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Sample records for heart rate performance

  1. Fighter pilots' heart rate, heart rate variation and performance during an instrument flight rules proficiency test.

    PubMed

    Mansikka, Heikki; Virtanen, Kai; Harris, Don; Simola, Petteri

    2016-09-01

    Increased task demand will increase the pilot mental workload (PMWL). When PMWL is increased, mental overload may occur resulting in degraded performance. During pilots' instrument flight rules (IFR) proficiency test, PMWL is typically not measured. Therefore, little is known about workload during the proficiency test and pilots' potential to cope with higher task demands than those experienced during the test. In this study, fighter pilots' performance and PMWL was measured during a real IFR proficiency test in an F/A-18 simulator. PMWL was measured using heart rate (HR) and heart rate variation (HRV). Performance was rated using Finnish Air Force's official rating scales. Results indicated that HR and HRV differentiate varying task demands in situations where variations in performance are insignificant. It was concluded that during a proficiency test, PMWL should be measured together with the task performance measurement. PMID:27109324

  2. Deceleration and acceleration capacities of heart rate associated with heart failure with high discriminating performance

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Jin, Xian; Zhang, Peng; Yu, Qiang; Yin, Guizhi; Lu, Yi; Xiao, Hongbing; Chen, Yueguang; Zhang, Dadong

    2016-01-01

    Accurate measurements of autonomic nerve regulation in heart failure (HF) were unresolved. The discriminating performance of deceleration and acceleration capacities of heart rate in HF was evaluated in 130 HF patients and 212 controls. Acceleration capacity and deceleration capacity were independent risk factors for HF in males, evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis, with odds ratios (ORs) of 5.94 and 0.13, respectively. Acceleration capacity was also an independent risk factor for HF in females, with an OR of 8.58. Deceleration capacity was the best cardiac electrophysiological index to classify HF in males, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.88. Deceleration capacity was the best classification factor of HF in females with an AUC of 0.97, significantly higher than even left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Acceleration capacity also showed high performance in classifying HF in males (0.84) and females (0.92). The cut-off values of deceleration capacity for HF classification in males and females were 4.55 ms and 4.85 ms, respectively. The cut-off values of acceleration capacity for HF classification in males and females were −6.15 ms and −5.75 ms, respectively. Our study illustrates the role of acceleration and deceleration capacity measurements in the neuro-pathophysiology of HF. PMID:27005970

  3. Comparison of body composition, heart rate variability, aerobic and anaerobic performance between competitive cyclists and triathletes

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Erşan; Aras, Dicle

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare the body composition, heart rate variability, and aerobic and anaerobic performance between competitive cyclists and triathletes. [Subjects] Six cyclists and eight triathletes with experience in competitions voluntarily participated in this study. [Methods] The subjects’ body composition was measured with an anthropometric tape and skinfold caliper. Maximal oxygen consumption and maximum heart rate were determined using the incremental treadmill test. Heart rate variability was measured by 7 min electrocardiographic recording. The Wingate test was conducted to determine anaerobic physical performance. [Results] There were significant differences in minimum power and relative minimum power between the triathletes and cyclists. Anthropometric characteristics and heart rate variability responses were similar among the triathletes and cyclists. However, triathletes had higher maximal oxygen consumption and lower resting heart rates. This study demonstrated that athletes in both sports have similar body composition and aerobic performance characteristics. PMID:27190476

  4. Cortisol release, heart rate and heart rate variability in the horse and its rider: different responses to training and performance.

    PubMed

    von Lewinski, Mareike; Biau, Sophie; Erber, Regina; Ille, Natascha; Aurich, Jörg; Faure, Jean-Michel; Möstl, Erich; Aurich, Christine

    2013-08-01

    Although some information exists on the stress response of horses in equestrian sports, the horse-rider team is much less well understood. In this study, salivary cortisol concentrations, heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV), SDRR (standard deviation of beat-to-beat interval) and RMSSD (root mean square of successive beat-to-beat intervals) were analysed in horses and their riders (n=6 each) at a public performance and an identical rehearsal that was not open to the public. Cortisol concentrations increased in both horses and riders (P<0.001) but did not differ between performance and rehearsal. HR in horses and riders increased during the rehearsal and the public performance (P<0.001) but the increase in HR was more pronounced (P<0.01) in riders than in their horses during the public performance (from 91 ± 10 to 150 ± 15 beats/min) compared to the rehearsal (from 94 ± 10 to 118 ± 12 beats/min). The SDRR decreased significantly during the equestrian tasks in riders (P<0.001), but not in their horses. The RMSSD decreased in horses and riders (P<0.001) during rehearsal and performance, indicating a decrease in parasympathetic tone. The decrease in RMSSD in the riders was more pronounced (P<0.05) during the performance (from 32.6 ± 6.6 to 3.8 ± 0.3 ms) than during the rehearsal (from 27.5 ± 4.2 to 6.6 ± 0.6 ms). The study has shown that the presence of spectators caused more pronounced changes in cardiac activity in the riders than it did in their horses. PMID:23380228

  5. Cognitive Performance and Heart Rate Variability: The Influence of Fitness Level

    PubMed Central

    Luque-Casado, Antonio; Zabala, Mikel; Morales, Esther; Mateo-March, Manuel; Sanabria, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the relation between cognitive performance and heart rate variability as a function of fitness level. We measured the effect of three cognitive tasks (the psychomotor vigilance task, a temporal orienting task, and a duration discrimination task) on the heart rate variability of two groups of participants: a high-fit group and a low-fit group. Two major novel findings emerged from this study. First, the lowest values of heart rate variability were found during performance of the duration discrimination task, compared to the other two tasks. Second, the results showed a decrement in heart rate variability as a function of the time on task, although only in the low-fit group. Moreover, the high-fit group showed overall faster reaction times than the low-fit group in the psychomotor vigilance task, while there were not significant differences in performance between the two groups of participants in the other two cognitive tasks. In sum, our results highlighted the influence of cognitive processing on heart rate variability. Importantly, both behavioral and physiological results suggested that the main benefit obtained as a result of fitness level appeared to be associated with processes involving sustained attention. PMID:23437276

  6. Heart rate performance curve during incremental cycle ergometer exercise in healthy young male subjects.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, P; Pokan, R; von Duvillard, S P; Seibert, F J; Zweiker, R; Schmid, P

    1997-06-01

    In 1992 Conconi et al. (20) presented an indirect and noninvasive method for the determination of anaerobic threshold (AnT) in an incremental field test for runners. This noninvasive method for the determination of anaerobic threshold is dependent on the occurrence of a deflection of the heart rate performance curve (HRPC). The aim of our study was to evaluate the degree and direction of the deflection of the HRPC and the relationship of the heart rate threshold (HRT) to the lactate turn point in a group of 227 healthy young subjects (age: 23 +/- 4 yr). The subjects were divided into three groups by means of second degree polynomial fitting (GI: regular deflection, kHR > 0.1; G II: no deflection, 0 < kHR < 0.1; G II: inverse deflection, k < -0.1). No significant differences between the groups were found in the anthropometric data or in the power output and the blood lactate concentration at both the first (LTP1) and second (LTP2) lactate turn points and at maximum performance (Pmax). Using the method of Conconi et al. (20), 85.9% of the subjects showed a "regular" deflection, 6.2% showed no deflection at all, and 7.9% showed even an inverted deflection of the HRPC. An HRT could be obtained in both G I and G III, and power output at HRT was not significantly different in comparison to that at the LTP2. No HRT could be assessed in G II. The heart rate at HRT and the LTP2 were significantly lower in G III compared with G I. The phenomenon of heart rate break point may be attractive in training regulation, but its application is limited because a heart rate deflection cannot be found even in young subjects in some cases. PMID:9219203

  7. Heart Rate Monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Under a NASA grant, Dr. Robert M. Davis and Dr. William M. Portnoy came up with a new type of electrocardiographic electrode that would enable long term use on astronauts. Their invention was an insulated capacitive electrode constructed of a thin dielectric film. NASA subsequently licensed the electrode technology to Richard Charnitski, inventor of the VersaClimber, who founded Heart Rate, Inc., to further develop and manufacture personal heart monitors and to produce exercise machines using the technology for the physical fitness, medical and home markets. Same technology is on both the Home and Institutional Model VersaClimbers. On the Home Model an infrared heart beat transmitter is worn under exercise clothing. Transmitted heart rate is used to control the work intensity on the VersaClimber using the heart rate as the speedometer of the exercise. This offers advantages to a full range of users from the cardiac rehab patient to the high level physical conditioning of elite athletes. The company manufactures and markets five models of the 1*2*3 HEART RATE monitors that are used wherever people exercise to accurately monitor their heart rate. Company is developing a talking heart rate monitor that works with portable headset radios. A version of the heart beat transmitter will be available to the manufacturers of other aerobic exercise machines.

  8. Heart rate turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is a baroreflex-mediated biphasic reaction of heart rate in response to premature ventricular beats. Heart rate turbulence is quantified by: turbulence onset (TO) reflecting the initial acceleration of heart rate following premature beat and turbulence slope (TS) describing subsequent deceleration of heart rate. Abnormal HRT identifies patients with autonomic dysfunction or impaired baroreflex sensitivity due to variety of disorders, but also may reflect changes in autonomic nervous system induced by different therapeutic modalities such as drugs, revascularization, or cardiac resynchronization therapy. More importantly, impaired HRT has been shown to identify patients at high risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death, particularly in postinfarction and congestive heart failure patients. It should be emphasized that abnormal HRT has a well-established role in stratification of postinfarction and heart failure patients with relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The ongoing clinical trials will document whether HRT can be used to guide implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators in this subset of patients, not covered yet by ICD guidelines. This review focuses on the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding clinical significance of HRT in detection of autonomic dysfunction and regarding the prognostic significance of this parameter in predicting all-cause mortality and sudden death. PMID:24215748

  9. Target Heart Rates

    MedlinePlus

    ... 60 - 100 beats per minute for well-trained athletes is 40 - 60 beats per minute. Hittin the Target Now youre ready to determine your target training heart rate. As you exercise, periodically: Take your pulse ...

  10. Heart Rate Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In the mid 70's, NASA saw a need for a long term electrocardiographic electrode suitable for use on astronauts. Heart Rate Inc.'s insulated capacitive electrode is constructed of thin dielectric film applied to stainless steel surface, originally developed under a grant by Texas Technical University. HRI, Inc. was awarded NASA license and continued development of heart rate monitor for use on exercise machines for physical fitness and medical markets.

  11. Relationships between heart rate and physiological parameters of performance in top-level water polo players.

    PubMed

    Galy, O; Ben Zoubir, S; Hambli, M; Chaouachi, A; Hue, O; Chamari, K

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the heart rate (HR) response of eight elite water polo players during the four 7-min quarters of the game and to check for relationships with the physiological parameters of performance ([Formula: see text]O2max, Th1vent, Th2vent). Each athlete performed a [Formula: see text]O2max treadmill test and played a water polo game wearing a heart rate monitor. The game fatigue index was calculated as the ratio of the fourth-quarter HR to the first-quarter HR: HR4/HR1. The results showed a slight decrease in fourth-quarter HR compared with the first quarter, with the mean four-quarter HR equal to 79.9±4.2% of HRmax. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed [Formula: see text]O2max to be the main explanatory factor of game intensity, i.e. game HR expressed in %HRreserve (R=0.88, P<0.01). We observed that higher aerobic capacity resulted in higher game intensity. We also observed a decrease in the playing intensity in the fourth quarter compared with the first, likely due to very high game involvement. We concluded that high aerobic capacity seems necessary to ensure high game intensity in water polo. This suggests that coaches should encourage their athletes to reach a minimum level of [Formula: see text]O2max and that HR monitoring could be of great interest in the control of water polo training sessions. PMID:24917687

  12. The Role of Shape and Heart Rate on the Performance of the Left Ventricle.

    PubMed

    Song, Zeying; Borazjani, Iman

    2015-11-01

    The left ventricle function is to pump the oxygenated blood through the circulatory system. Ejection fraction is the main noninvasive parameter for detecting heart disease (healthy >55%), and it is thought to be the main parameter affecting efficiency. However, the effects of other parameters on efficiency have yet to be investigated. We investigate the effect of heart rate and left ventricle shape by carrying out 3D numerical simulations of a left ventricle at different heart rates and perturbed geometries under constant, normal ejection fraction. The simulation using the immersed boundary method provide the 3D flow and pressure fields, which enable direct calculation of a new hemodynamic efficiency (H-efficiency) parameter, which does not depend on any reference pressure. The H-efficiency is defined as the ratio of flux of kinetic energy (useful power) to the total cardiac power into the left ventricle control volume. Our simulations show that H-efficiency is not that sensitive to heart rate but is maximized at around normal heart rate (72 bpm). Nevertheless, it is more sensitive to the shape of the left ventricle, which affects the H-efficiency by as much as 15% under constant ejection fraction. PMID:26312776

  13. Modelling heart rate kinetics.

    PubMed

    Zakynthinaki, Maria S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to formulate a simple and at the same time effective mathematical model of heart rate kinetics in response to movement (exercise). Based on an existing model, a system of two coupled differential equations which give the rate of change of heart rate and the rate of change of exercise intensity is used. The modifications introduced to the existing model are justified and discussed in detail, while models of blood lactate accumulation in respect to time and exercise intensity are also presented. The main modification is that the proposed model has now only one parameter which reflects the overall cardiovascular condition of the individual. The time elapsed after the beginning of the exercise, the intensity of the exercise, as well as blood lactate are also taken into account. Application of the model provides information regarding the individual's cardiovascular condition and is able to detect possible changes in it, across the data recording periods. To demonstrate examples of successful numerical fit of the model, constant intensity experimental heart rate data sets of two individuals have been selected and numerical optimization was implemented. In addition, numerical simulations provided predictions for various exercise intensities and various cardiovascular condition levels. The proposed model can serve as a powerful tool for a complete means of heart rate analysis, not only in exercise physiology (for efficiently designing training sessions for healthy subjects) but also in the areas of cardiovascular health and rehabilitation (including application in population groups for which direct heart rate recordings at intense exercises are not possible or not allowed, such as elderly or pregnant women). PMID:25876164

  14. Modelling Heart Rate Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Zakynthinaki, Maria S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to formulate a simple and at the same time effective mathematical model of heart rate kinetics in response to movement (exercise). Based on an existing model, a system of two coupled differential equations which give the rate of change of heart rate and the rate of change of exercise intensity is used. The modifications introduced to the existing model are justified and discussed in detail, while models of blood lactate accumulation in respect to time and exercise intensity are also presented. The main modification is that the proposed model has now only one parameter which reflects the overall cardiovascular condition of the individual. The time elapsed after the beginning of the exercise, the intensity of the exercise, as well as blood lactate are also taken into account. Application of the model provides information regarding the individual’s cardiovascular condition and is able to detect possible changes in it, across the data recording periods. To demonstrate examples of successful numerical fit of the model, constant intensity experimental heart rate data sets of two individuals have been selected and numerical optimization was implemented. In addition, numerical simulations provided predictions for various exercise intensities and various cardiovascular condition levels. The proposed model can serve as a powerful tool for a complete means of heart rate analysis, not only in exercise physiology (for efficiently designing training sessions for healthy subjects) but also in the areas of cardiovascular health and rehabilitation (including application in population groups for which direct heart rate recordings at intense exercises are not possible or not allowed, such as elderly or pregnant women). PMID:25876164

  15. The Effects of Guided Imagery on Heart Rate Variability in Simulated Spaceflight Emergency Tasks Performers

    PubMed Central

    Yijing, Zhang; Xiaoping, Du; Fang, Liu; Xiaolu, Jing; Bin, Wu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of guided imagery training on heart rate variability in individuals while performing spaceflight emergency tasks. Materials and Methods. Twenty-one student subjects were recruited for the experiment and randomly divided into two groups: imagery group (n = 11) and control group (n = 10). The imagery group received instructor-guided imagery (session 1) and self-guided imagery training (session 2) consecutively, while the control group only received conventional training. Electrocardiograms of the subjects were recorded during their performance of nine spaceflight emergency tasks after imagery training. Results. In both of the sessions, the root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), the standard deviation of all normal NN (SDNN), the proportion of NN50 divided by the total number of NNs (PNN50), the very low frequency (VLF), the low frequency (LF), the high frequency (HF), and the total power (TP) in the imagery group were significantly higher than those in the control group. Moreover, LF/HF of the subjects after instructor-guided imagery training was lower than that after self-guided imagery training. Conclusions. Guided imagery was an effective regulator for HRV indices and could be a potential stress countermeasure in performing spaceflight tasks. PMID:26137491

  16. High-Intensity Intermittent Exercise and its Effects on Heart Rate Variability and Subsequent Strength Performance

    PubMed Central

    Panissa, Valéria L. G.; Cal Abad, Cesar C.; Julio, Ursula F.; Andreato, Leonardo V.; Franchini, Emerson

    2016-01-01

    Prupose: To investigate the effects of a 5-km high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) on heart rate variability (HRV) and subsequent strength performance. Methods: Nine trained males performed a control session composed of a half-squat strength exercise (4 × 80% of one repetition maximum—1 RM) in isolation and 30-min, 1-, 4-, 8-, and 24-h after an HIIE (1-min at the velocity peak:1-min passive recovery). All experimental sessions were performed on different days. The maximum number of repetitions (MNR) and total weight lifted (TWL) during the strength exercise were registered in all conditions; in addition, prior to each session, HRV were assessed [beat-to-beat intervals (RR) and log-transformed of root means square of successive differences in the normal-to-normal intervals (lnRMSSD)]. Results: Performance in the strength exercise dropped at 30-min (31%) and 1-h (19%) post-HIIE concomitantly with lower values of RR (781 ± 79 ms; 799 ± 134 ms, respectively) in the same recovery intervals compared to the control (1015 ± 197 ms). Inferential analysis did not detect any effect of condition on lnRMSSD, however, values were lower after 30-min (3.5 ± 0.4 ms) and 1-h (3.3 ± 0.5 ms) with moderate and large effect sizes (0.9 and 1.2, respectively) compared with the control condition (3.9 ± 0.4 ms). Conclusion: Both RR and lnRMSSD seem to be associated with deleterious effects on strength performance, although further studies should be conducted to clarify this association. PMID:26973543

  17. Tympanic temperature and heart rate changes in firefighters during treadmill runs performed with different fireproof jackets.

    PubMed

    Ftaiti, F; Duflot, J C; Nicol, C; Grlot, L

    2001-04-15

    Six well-trained firefighters performed six treadmill runs at 70% of the velocity at VO2max (Maximal aerobic velocity MAV = 13.2+/-0.3 km h(-1)). A recovery time of 1 week was allowed between trials. The first session was performed by subjects wearing only shorts (i.e. no fire jacket, J0). A similar protocol was applied subsequently to test the physiological effects associated with the wearing of one of five different fire jackets: one leather (J1) and four textile-type jackets: VTN with membrane (J2), VTN without membrane (J3), Vidal with Kermel HTA (Haute Teneur en Aramide i.e. high density in Aramide) (J4); and Rolland with Kermel HTA (J5). All sessions were performed in a randomized order and in laboratory conditions. Exercise with the fireproof jackets resulted in higher tympanic temperature (Tty), heart rate (HR) and body mass loss (BML) changes compared to J0 (p<0.001). The magnitudes of these changes depended on the type of the jacket. Exercise in the leather jacket (J1) resulted in the highest Tty and HR, which differed significantly from values in all other conditions (p<0.001). The exercise-induced increases in Tty wearing jackets J3 and J5 were also significantly (p < 0.05) higher than those observed with jackets J2 and J4. In conclusion, textile jackets induced less HR and Tty stresses than the leather one. The magnitude of the physiological responses induced by textile jackets were correlated to jacket weight. J2 and J4 jackets were more effective in limiting hyperthermia and any potential detrimental effect on the exercise capacity. PMID:11345493

  18. Spectral analyses of systolic blood pressure and heart rate variability and their association with cognitive performance in elderly hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Santos, W B; Matoso, J M D; Maltez, M; Gonçalves, T; Casanova, M; Moreira, I F H; Lourenço, R A; Monteiro, W D; Farinatti, P T V; Soares, P P; Oigman, W; Neves, M F T; Correia, M L G

    2015-08-01

    Systolic hypertension is associated with cognitive decline in the elderly. Altered blood pressure (BP) variability is a possible mechanism of reduced cognitive performance in elderly hypertensives. We hypothesized that altered beat-to-beat systolic BP variability is associated with reduced global cognitive performance in elderly hypertensive subjects. In exploratory analyses, we also studied the correlation between diverse discrete cognitive domains and indices of systolic BP and heart rate variability. Disproving our initial hypothesis, we have shown that hypertension and low education, but not indices of systolic BP and heart rate variability, were independent predictors of lower global cognitive performance. However, exploratory analyses showed that the systolic BP variability in semi-upright position was an independent predictor of matrix reasoning (B = 0.08 ± .03, P-value = 0.005), whereas heart rate variability in semi-upright position was an independent predictor of the executive function score (B = -6.36 ± 2.55, P-value = 0.02). We conclude that myogenic vascular and sympathetic modulation of systolic BP do not contribute to reduced global cognitive performance in treated hypertensive subjects. Nevertheless, our results suggest that both systolic BP and heart rate variability might be associated with modulation of frontal lobe cognitive domains, such as executive function and matrix reasoning. PMID:25518896

  19. All about Heart Rate (Pulse)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More All About Heart Rate (Pulse) Updated:Apr 19,2016 ... are the Symptoms of High Blood Pressure? 4 All About Heart Rate (Pulse) 5 How to Eat ...

  20. Heart rate control during treadmill exercise.

    PubMed

    Su, S W; Wang, L; Celler, B G; Savkin, A

    2005-01-01

    A computer-controlled treadmill and related data collection and processing systems have been developed for the control of heart rate during treadmill exercise. Minimizing deviations of heart rate from a preset profile is achieved by controlling the speed and/or the gradient of the treadmill. A simple and practical heart rate measurement algorithm has been developed to robustly measure the variations of heart rate. Both conventional Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) control and fuzzy Proportional-Integral (PI) control approaches have been employed for the controller design. The fuzzy Proportional-Integral algorithm achieved better heart rate tracking performance. Finally, a heart rate based exercising protocol was successfully implemented on the newly designed exercise system. PMID:17282738

  1. Heart Rates of Elite Synchronized Swimmers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gemma, Karen Erickson; Wells, Christine L.

    1987-01-01

    Heart rates were recorded by radiotelemetry in ten elite and national-class synchronized swimmers as they performed competitive figures of high degrees of difficulty. The focus was on changes in heart rates and electrocardiogram patterns for each body position, especially those requiring facial immersion and breath-holding. (Author/MT)

  2. Measures of skin conductance and heart rate in alcoholic men and women during memory performance

    PubMed Central

    Poey, Alan; Ruiz, Susan Mosher; Marinkovic, Ksenija; Oscar-Berman, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    We examined abnormalities in physiological responses to emotional stimuli associated with long-term chronic alcoholism. Skin conductance responses (SCR) and heart rate (HR) responses were measured in 32 abstinent alcoholic (ALC) and 30 healthy nonalcoholic (NC) men and women undergoing an emotional memory task in an MRI scanner. The task required participants to remember the identity of two emotionally-valenced faces presented at the onset of each trial during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning. After viewing the faces, participants saw a distractor image (an alcoholic beverage, nonalcoholic beverage, or scrambled image) followed by a single probe face. The task was to decide whether the probe face matched one of the two encoded faces. Skin conductance measurements (before and after the encoded faces, distractor, and probe) were obtained from electrodes on the index and middle fingers on the left hand. HR measurements (beats per minute before and after the encoded faces, distractor, and probe) were obtained by a pulse oximeter placed on the little finger on the left hand. We expected that, relative to NC participants, the ALC participants would show reduced SCR and HR responses to the face stimuli, and that we would identify greater reactivity to the alcoholic beverage stimuli than to the distractor stimuli unrelated to alcohol. While the beverage type did not differentiate the groups, the ALC group did have reduced skin conductance and HR responses to elements of the task, as compared to the NC group. PMID:26020002

  3. Target Heart Rates

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  4. Effects of Ramadan Fasting on Body Composition, Aerobic Performance and Lactate, Heart Rate and Perceptual Responses in Young Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Güvenç, Alpay

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of Ramadan fasting on body composition, aerobic exercise performance and blood lactate, heart rate and perceived exertion in regularly trained young soccer players. Sixteen male soccer players participated in this study. Mean age, stature, body mass and training age of the players were 17.4±1.2 years, 175.4±3.6 cm, 69.6±4.3 kg and 5.1±1.3 years, respectively. During the Ramadan period, all subjects voluntarily chose to follow the fasting guidelines and abstained from eating and drinking from sunrise to sunset. Body composition, hydration status, dietary intake and sleep duration were assessed on four occasions: before Ramadan, at the beginning of Ramadan, at the end of Ramadan and 2 weeks after the end of Ramadan. On each occasion, aerobic exercise performance and blood lactate, heart rate and rating of perceived exertion responses of players were also determined during an incremental running test. Repeated measures of ANOVA revealed that body mass, percentage of body fat, fat-free mass, hydration status, daily sleeping time and daily energy and macronutrient intake of players did not vary significantly throughout the study period (p>0.05). However, players experienced a small but significant decrease in skinfold thicknesses over the course of the study (p<0.05). Although ratings of perceived exertion at submaximal workloads increased during Ramadan (p<0.05), blood lactate and heart rate responses had decreased by the end of Ramadan (p<0.05). In line with these changes, peak running performance and running velocity at anaerobic threshold also improved by the end of Ramadan (p<0.05). Improvements in aerobic exercise performance with time were probably due to the effects of pre-season training program that was performed after the break of the fast (Iftar) during the month of Ramadan. The results of the present study suggest that if regular training regimen, body fluid balance, daily energy intake and sleep duration are maintained as before Ramadan, Ramadan fasting does not have detrimental effects on aerobic exercise performance or body composition in young soccer players. PMID:23486092

  5. Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring during Labor

    MedlinePlus

    ... is fetal heart rate monitoring? Fetal heart rate monitoring is the process of checking the condition of your baby during labor and delivery by monitoring his or her heart rate with special equipment. ...

  6. Dimensional analysis of heart rate variability in heart transplant recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Zbilut, J.P.; Mayer-Kress, G.; Geist, K.

    1987-01-01

    We discuss periodicities in the heart rate in normal and transplanted hearts. We then consider the possibility of dimensional analysis of these periodicities in transplanted hearts and problems associated with the record.

  7. Assessment of gravitational stress on heart rate variability during maneuvers on high performance jet flights.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, Marco; Castiglioni, Paolo; Meriggi, Paolo; Rizzo, Francesco; Trivelloni, Pierandrea; Cacopardo, Salvatore; Guadagno, Anton Giulio

    2010-01-01

    The Push-Pull Effect (PPE) is a physiological phenomenon defined as a reduction of +Gz tolerance induced by a previous exposure to a -Gz acceleration, that may lead to loss of consciousness. Aim of this study was to evaluate, for the first time, the cardiac rhythm changes associated with PPE during real flights. Data were collected in 3 pilots during flights on the Aermacchi MB- 339-CD aircraft. In each flight, lasting about 60 minutes, ECG, respiration and 3D accelerations were recorded by a new smart garment (the MagIC System). The flight protocol included a maneuver eliciting a reference +5Gz acceleration for 15 seconds (Ref+5G), followed, after a while, by a push-pull maneuver with a profile characterized by a 5-s acceleration at -1Gz (PP-1G) and, with a 1G/s onset, by 15 seconds at +5Gz (PP+5G), so to induce the push-pull gravitational stress. From each ECG recording, a beat-by-beat RR Interval (RRI) series was derived. RRI mean, standard deviation (SDNN) and the RRI Root Mean Square of Successive Difference (RMSSD) were estimated in each pilot during the Ref+5G and the PP+5G maneuvers. As compared with Ref+5G, all pilots displayed significant reductions in RRI mean, SDNN and RMSSD during PP+5G. These findings are compatible with a PP-induced enhancement in the sympathetic drive to the heart -as shown by the reduction in RRI mean and SDNN- and a concomitant deactivation of the parasympathetic control as shown by the reduction in RMSSD. PMID:21097262

  8. The Effects of an Intervention Strategy on Children's Heart Rates and Skill Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ignico, Arlene; Corson, Arleen; Vidoni, Carla

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to examine the effectiveness of a fitness infusion instructional strategy (FI) on children's activity levels and skill performance scores. This strategy included aerobic activity within the skill practice tasks and game play. In other words, students performed short bouts of activity between the practice and…

  9. HEART RATE VARIABILITY AND 24-HOUR MINIMUM HEART RATE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heart rate variability (HRV) indices based on 24-hour electrocardiograph recordings have been used in clinical research studies to assess the aggregate activity of the autonomic nervous system. While 24-hour HRV is generally considered non-invasive, use in research protocols typically involves cons...

  10. Evaluating the Ability of Heart Rate and EEG to Control Alertness during Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Fred

    2002-01-01

    The major focus of the present proposal was to examine psychophysiological indices that show promise for invoking different modes of automation in an adaptive automation system. With the increased use of automation in today's work environment, people's roles in the work place are being redefined from that of active participant to one of passive monitor. Although the introduction of automated systems has a number of benefits, there are also a number of disadvantages regarding worker performance. Byrne and Parasuraman have argued for the use of psychophysiological measures in the development and the implementation of adaptive automation. While performance based, model based, and psychophysiologically based adaptive automation systems have been studied, the combined use of several psychophysiological measures has never been investigated. Such a combination provides the advantage of real time evaluation of the state of the subject in two relevant dimensions and offers a more realistic approach to the implementation of adaptive automation compared to the use of either dimension by itself.

  11. The contribution of coping-related variables and heart rate variability to visual search performance under pressure.

    PubMed

    Laborde, Sylvain; Lautenbach, Franziska; Allen, Mark S

    2015-02-01

    Visual search performance under pressure is explored within the predictions of the neurovisceral integration model. The experimental aims of this study were: 1) to investigate the contribution of coping-related variables to baseline, task, and reactivity (task-baseline) high-frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV), and 2) to investigate the contribution of coping-related variables and HF-HRV to visual search performance under pressure. Participants (n=96) completed self-report measures of coping-related variables (emotional intelligence, coping style, perceived stress intensity, perceived control of stress, coping effectiveness, challenge and threat, and attention strategy) and HF-HRV was measured during a visual search task under pressure. The data show that baseline HF-HRV was predicted by a trait coping-related variable, task HF-HRV was predicted by a combination of trait and state coping-related variables, and reactivity HF-HRV was predicted by a state coping-related variable. Visual search performance was predicted by coping-related variables but not by HF-HRV. PMID:25481358

  12. Effects of In-Water Passive Recovery on Sprint Swimming Performance and Heart Rate in Adolescent Swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Casuso, Rafael A.; Martínez-López, Emilio; Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Ruiz-Cazalilla, Irene; Cruz-Díaz, David; Martínez-Amat, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to test the hypothesis that sprint swimming performance is enhanced by in-water passive recovery (IN) after sprint swimming bouts in well-trained adolescent swimmers. Using a randomized crossover study design, twelve well-trained adolescent swimmers performed two tests at the swimming pool after preliminary testing. They performed 5 bouts of 100m all-out swimming separated by 5 minutes of passive rest. Their individual in- or out-of-water passive recovery condition was randomized on the first day. In their second visit to the swimming pool the opposite recovery condition was indicated. More than 60% of the subjects which rested in-water were faster in the 5th bout when compared to the OUT group. However, no significant differences were found in blood lactate when IN and OUT were compared. After the first bout peak heart rate (HR peak) was lower in subsequent bouts for IN recovery when compared with OUT (p < 0.001). Thus, coaches and researchers should take into account that IN passive recovery may decrease loss of performance and diminish HR peak during sprint swimming bouts. This is particularly important given the use that many coaches give to HR as a tool in daily training. Key points In-water passive recovery minimizes the loss of performance during high intensity swimming Maximal HR is significantly reduced by in-water recovery Coaches should take this information into account when using HR to control swimming intensity Future research should study long-term effects induced by in-water passive recovery PMID:25435791

  13. Effects of in-water passive recovery on sprint swimming performance and heart rate in adolescent swimmers.

    PubMed

    Casuso, Rafael A; Martínez-López, Emilio; Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Ruiz-Cazalilla, Irene; Cruz-Díaz, David; Martínez-Amat, Antonio

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to test the hypothesis that sprint swimming performance is enhanced by in-water passive recovery (IN) after sprint swimming bouts in well-trained adolescent swimmers. Using a randomized crossover study design, twelve well-trained adolescent swimmers performed two tests at the swimming pool after preliminary testing. They performed 5 bouts of 100m all-out swimming separated by 5 minutes of passive rest. Their individual in- or out-of-water passive recovery condition was randomized on the first day. In their second visit to the swimming pool the opposite recovery condition was indicated. More than 60% of the subjects which rested in-water were faster in the 5th bout when compared to the OUT group. However, no significant differences were found in blood lactate when IN and OUT were compared. After the first bout peak heart rate (HR peak) was lower in subsequent bouts for IN recovery when compared with OUT (p < 0.001). Thus, coaches and researchers should take into account that IN passive recovery may decrease loss of performance and diminish HR peak during sprint swimming bouts. This is particularly important given the use that many coaches give to HR as a tool in daily training. Key pointsIn-water passive recovery minimizes the loss of performance during high intensity swimmingMaximal HR is significantly reduced by in-water recoveryCoaches should take this information into account when using HR to control swimming intensityFuture research should study long-term effects induced by in-water passive recovery. PMID:25435791

  14. Resting Heart Rate and Auditory Evoked Potential

    PubMed Central

    Fiuza Regaçone, Simone; Baptista de Lima, Daiane Damaris; Engrácia Valenti, Vitor; Figueiredo Frizzo, Ana Cláudia

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between rest heart rate (HR) and the components of the auditory evoked-related potentials (ERPs) at rest in women. We investigated 21 healthy female university students between 18 and 24 years old. We performed complete audiological evaluation and measurement of heart rate for 10 minutes at rest (heart rate monitor Polar RS800CX) and performed ERPs analysis (discrepancy in frequency and duration). There was a moderate negative correlation of the N1 and P3a with rest HR and a strong positive correlation of the P2 and N2 components with rest HR. Larger components of the ERP are associated with higher rest HR. PMID:26504838

  15. Multifractality and heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassi, Roberto; Signorini, Maria Gabriella; Cerutti, Sergio

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we participate to the discussion set forth by the editor of Chaos for the controversy, "Is the normal heart rate chaotic?" Our objective was to debate the question, "Is there some more appropriate term to characterize the heart rate variability (HRV) fluctuations?" We focused on the ≈24 h RR series prepared for this topic and tried to verify with two different techniques, generalized structure functions and wavelet transform modulus maxima, if they might be described as being multifractal. For normal and congestive heart failure subjects, the hq exponents showed to be decreasing for increasing q with both methods, as it should be for multifractal signals. We then built 40 surrogate series to further verify such hypothesis. For most of the series (≈75%-80% of cases) multifractality stood the test of the surrogate data employed. On the other hand, series coming from patients in atrial fibrillation showed a small, if any, degree of multifractality. The population analyzed is too small for definite conclusions, but the study supports the use of multifractal series to model HRV. Also it suggests that the regulatory action of autonomous nervous system might play a role in the observed multifractality.

  16. Wearable sensor for heart rate detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Cong; Liu, Xiaohua; Kong, Lingqin; Wu, Jizhe; Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Hui, Mei; Zhao, Yuejin

    2015-08-01

    In recent years heart and blood vessel diseases kill more people than everything else combined. The daily test of heart rate for the prevention and treatment of the heart head blood-vessel disease has the vital significance. In order to adapt the transformation of medical model and solve the low accuracy problem of the traditional method of heart rate measuring, we present a new method to monitor heart rate in this paper. The heart rate detection is designed for daily heart rate detection .The heart rate signal is collected by the heart rate sensor. The signal through signal processing circuits converts into sine wave and square wave in turn. And then the signal is transmitted to the computer by data collection card. Finally, we use LABVIEW and MATLAB to show the heart rate wave and calculate the heart rate. By doing contrast experiment with medical heart rate product, experimental results show that the system can realize rapidly and accurately measure the heart rate value. A measurement can be completed within 10 seconds and the error is less than 3beat/min. And the result shows that the method in this paper has a strong anti-interference ability. It can effectively suppress the movement interference. Beyond that the result is insensitive to light.

  17. [Resting heart rate and cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Brito Díaz, Buenaventura; Alemán Sánchez, José Juan; Cabrera de León, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    Heart rate reflects autonomic nervous system activity. Numerous studies have demonstrated that an increased heart rate at rest is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as an independent risk factor. It has been shown a link between cardiac autonomic balance and inflammation. Thus, an elevated heart rate produces a micro-inflammatory response and is involved in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction. In turn, decrease in heart rate produces benefits in congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. Alteration of other heart rate-related parameters, such as their variability and recovery after exercise, is associated with risk of cardiovascular events. Drugs reducing the heart rate (beta-blockers, calcium antagonists and inhibitors of If channels) have the potential to reduce cardiovascular events. Although not recommended in healthy subjects, interventions for reducing heart rate constitute a reasonable therapeutic goal in certain pathologies. PMID:23937816

  18. Scale Invariant Properties in Heart Rate Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowiec, D.; Dudkowska, A.; Zwierz, M.; Galaska, R.; Rynkiewicz, A.

    2006-05-01

    The rate of heart beat is controlled by autonomic nervous system: accelerated by the sympathetic system and slowed by the parasympathetic system. Scaling properties in heart rate are usually related to the intrinsic dynamics of this physiological regulatory system. The two packages calculating local exponent spectra: Wavelet Transform Modulus Maxima and Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (accessible from Physionet home page http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/101/23/e215) are tested, and then used to investigate the spectrum of singularity exponents in series of heart rates obtained from patients suffering from reduced left ventricle systolic function. It occurs that this state of a heart could be connected to some perturbation in the regulatory system, because the heart rate appears to be less controlled than in a healthy human heart. The multifractality in the heart rate signal is weakened: the spectrum is narrower and moved to higher values what indicate the higher activity of the sympatethic nervous system.

  19. Heart rate, heart rate variability, and heartbeat detection with the method of constant stimuli: slow and steady wins the race.

    PubMed

    Knapp-Kline, Kelley; Kline, John P

    2005-07-01

    The literature on heartbeat detection is fraught with disagreement about appropriate methods. Some laboratories advocate the heartbeat counting method, whereas others advocate the method of constant (MCS) stimuli task. Advocates of the MCS task argue that the heartbeat counting task is confounded by expectancies of heart rate, whereas the MCS task has the virtue of assessing individual heartbeat sensations. In this paper, we present preliminary evidence that heart rate information may also influence performance on the MCS task. Heartbeat detection was predicted by decreased heart rate variability and decreased heart rate. The results suggest that the temporal patterning of heartbeats may influence performance on the MCS task. PMID:15925037

  20. Bluetooth Heart Rate Monitors For Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buxton, R. E.; West, M. R.; Kalogera, K. L.; Hanson, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate monitoring is required for crewmembers during exercise aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and will be for future exploration missions. The cardiovascular system must be sufficiently stressed throughout a mission to maintain the ability to perform nominal and contingency/emergency tasks. High quality heart rate data are required to accurately determine the intensity of exercise performed by the crewmembers and show maintenance of VO2max. The quality of the data collected on ISS is subject to multiple limitations and is insufficient to meet current requirements. PURPOSE: To evaluate the performance of commercially available Bluetooth heart rate monitors (BT_HRM) and their ability to provide high quality heart rate data to monitor crew health aboard the ISS and during future exploration missions. METHODS: Nineteen subjects completed 30 data collection sessions of various intensities on the treadmill and/or cycle. Subjects wore several BT_HRM technologies for each testing session. One electrode-based chest strap (CS) was worn, while one or more optical sensors (OS) were worn. Subjects were instrumented with a 12-lead ECG to compare the heart rate data from the Bluetooth sensors. Each BT_HRM data set was time matched to the ECG data and a +/-5bpm threshold was applied to the difference between the 2 data sets. Percent error was calculated based on the number of data points outside the threshold and the total number of data points. RESULTS: The electrode-based chest straps performed better than the optical sensors. The best performing CS was CS1 (1.6% error), followed by CS4 (3.3% error), CS3 (6.4% error), and CS2 (9.2% error). The OS resulted in 10.4% error for OS1 and 14.9% error for OS2. CONCLUSIONS: The highest quality data came from CS1, but unfortunately it has been discontinued by the manufacturer. The optical sensors have not been ruled out for use, but more investigation is needed to determine how to obtain the best quality data. CS2 will be used in an ISS Bluetooth validation study, because it simultaneously transmits magnetic pulse that is integrated with existing exercise hardware on ISS. The simultaneous data streams allow for beat-to-beat comparison between the current ISS standard and CS2. Upon Bluetooth validation aboard ISS, the research team will down select a new BT_HRM for operational use.

  1. Bluetooth Heart Rate Monitors for Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buxton, R. E.; West, M. R.; Kalogera, K. L.; Hanson, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate monitoring is required for crewmembers during exercise aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and will be for future exploration missions. The cardiovascular system must be sufficiently stressed throughout a mission to maintain the ability to perform nominal and contingency/emergency tasks. High quality heart rate data are required to accurately determine the intensity of exercise performed by the crewmembers and show maintenance of VO2max. The quality of the data collected on ISS is subject to multiple limitations and is insufficient to meet current requirements. PURPOSE: To evaluate the performance of commercially available Bluetooth heart rate monitors (BT HRM) and their ability to provide high quality heart rate data to monitor crew health aboard the ISS and during future exploration missions. METHODS: Nineteen subjects completed 30 data collection sessions of various intensities on the treadmill and/or cycle. Subjects wore several BT HRM technologies for each testing session. One electrode-based chest strap (CS) was worn, while one or more optical sensors (OS) were worn. Subjects were instrumented with a 12-lead ECG to compare the heart rate data from the Bluetooth sensors. Each BT HRM data set was time matched to the ECG data and a +/-5bpm threshold was applied to the difference between the 2 data sets. Percent error was calculated based on the number of data points outside the threshold and the total number of data points. RESULTS: The electrode-based chest straps performed better than the optical sensors. The best performing CS was CS1 (1.6% error), followed by CS4 (3.3% error), CS3 (6.4% error), and CS2 (9.2% error). The OS resulted in 10.4% error for OS1 and 14.9% error for OS2. CONCLUSIONS: The highest quality data came from CS1, but unfortunately it has been discontinued by the manufacturer. The optical sensors have not been ruled out for use, but more investigation is needed to determine how to obtain the best quality data. CS2 will be used in an ISS Bluetooth validation study, because it simultaneously transmits magnetic pulse that is integrated with existing exercise hardware on ISS. The simultaneous data streams allow for beat-to-beat comparison between the current ISS standard and CS2. Upon Bluetooth validation aboard ISS, the research team will down select a new BT HRM for operational use.

  2. Acoustically based fetal heart rate monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald A.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.

    1991-01-01

    The acoustically based fetal heart rate monitor permits an expectant mother to perform the fetal Non-Stress Test in her home. The potential market would include the one million U.S. pregnancies per year requiring this type of prenatal surveillance. The monitor uses polyvinylidene fluoride (PVF2) piezoelectric polymer film for the acoustic sensors, which are mounted in a seven-element array on a cummerbund. Evaluation of the sensor ouput signals utilizes a digital signal processor, which performs a linear prediction routine in real time. Clinical tests reveal that the acoustically based monitor provides Non-Stress Test records which are comparable to those obtained with a commercial ultrasonic transducer.

  3. Heart-Rate and Breath-Rate Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, T. G.

    1983-01-01

    Circuit requiring only four integrated circuits (IC's) measures both heart rate and breath rate. Phase-locked loops lock on heart-rate and respiration-rate input signals. Each loop IC contains two phase comparators. Positive-edge-triggered circuit used in making monitors insensitive to dutycycle variations.

  4. Heart Rate and Reinforcement Sensitivity in ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luman, Marjolein; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Hyde, Christopher; van Meel, Catharina S.; Sergeant, Joseph A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Both theoretical and clinical accounts of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) implicate a dysfunctional reinforcement system. This study investigated heart rate parameters in response to feedback associated with reward and response cost in ADHD children and controls aged 8 to 12. Methods: Heart rate responses (HRRs)

  5. Heart Rate and Reinforcement Sensitivity in ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luman, Marjolein; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Hyde, Christopher; van Meel, Catharina S.; Sergeant, Joseph A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Both theoretical and clinical accounts of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) implicate a dysfunctional reinforcement system. This study investigated heart rate parameters in response to feedback associated with reward and response cost in ADHD children and controls aged 8 to 12. Methods: Heart rate responses (HRRs)…

  6. Volitional control of the heart rate.

    PubMed

    Abukonna, Ahmed; Yu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Chong; Zhang, Jianbao

    2013-11-01

    The heart rate is largely under control of the autonomic nervous system. The aim of the present study is to investigate the interactions between the brain and heart underlying volitional control of the heart and to explore the effectiveness of volition as a strategy to control the heart rate without biofeedback. Twenty seven healthy male subjects voluntarily participated in the study and were instructed to decrease and increase their heart beats according to rhythmic, computer generated sound either 10% faster or slower than the subjects' measured heart rate. Sympathetic and parasympathetic activities were estimated with the heart rate variability (HRV) obtained by power spectral analysis of RR intervals. Functional coupling patterns of cerebral cortex with the heart were determined by Partial directed coherence (PDC). In HR(slow) task; HR and sympathetic activity significantly decreased. However parasympathetic activity and power spectral density of EEG in low Alpha (8-10.5 Hz) band significantly increased. Moreover information flow from parietal area (P3 and P4) to RR interval significantly increased. During HR(quick) task; HR, sympathetic activity and power spectral density of EEG in low Beta (14-24 Hz) band significantly increased. Parasympathetic activity significantly decreased. Information flow from FT8, CZ and T8 electrodes to RR interval significantly increased. Our findings suggested that the heart beat can be controlled by volition and is related to some special areas in the cortex. PMID:23810994

  7. Heart to Heart: Using Heart Rate Telemetry to Meet Physical Education Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Tami Benham; Deal, Laurence O.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a foundation for establishing measurable physical education outcomes, demonstrating how heart rate telemetry can help measure and achieve such outcomes. After explaining heart rate telemetry function, the article examines student and teacher outcomes that could be included in school physical education outcomes and achieved using heart

  8. FPGA Implementation of Heart Rate Monitoring System.

    PubMed

    Panigrahy, D; Rakshit, M; Sahu, P K

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a field programmable gate array (FPGA) implementation of a system that calculates the heart rate from Electrocardiogram (ECG) signal. After heart rate calculation, tachycardia, bradycardia or normal heart rate can easily be detected. ECG is a diagnosis tool routinely used to access the electrical activities and muscular function of the heart. Heart rate is calculated by detecting the R peaks from the ECG signal. To provide a portable and the continuous heart rate monitoring system for patients using ECG, needs a dedicated hardware. FPGA provides easy testability, allows faster implementation and verification option for implementing a new design. We have proposed a five-stage based methodology by using basic VHDL blocks like addition, multiplication and data conversion (real to the fixed point and vice-versa). Our proposed heart rate calculation (R-peak detection) method has been validated, using 48 first channel ECG records of the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. It shows an accuracy of 99.84%, the sensitivity of 99.94% and the positive predictive value of 99.89%. Our proposed method outperforms other well-known methods in case of pathological ECG signals and successfully implemented in FPGA. PMID:26643079

  9. Statistical analysis of heart rate and heart rate variability monitoring through the use of smart phone cameras.

    PubMed

    Bolkhovsky, Jeffrey B; Scully, Christopher G; Chon, Ki H

    2012-01-01

    Video recordings of finger tips made using a smartphone camera contain a pulsatile component caused by the cardiac pulse equivalent to that present in a photoplethysmographic signal. By performing peak detection on the pulsatile signal it is possible to extract a continuous heart rate signal. We performed direct comparisons between 5-lead electrocardiogram based heart rate variability measurements and those obtained from an iPhone 4s and Motorola Droid derived pulsatile signal to determine the accuracy of heart rate variability measurements obtained from the smart phones. Monitoring was performed in the supine and tilt positions for independent iPhone 4s (2 min recordings, n=9) and Droid (5 min recordings, n=13) experiments, and the following heart rate and heart rate variability parameters were estimated: heart rate, low frequency power, high frequency power, ratio of low to high frequency power, standard deviation of the RR intervals, and root mean square of successive RR-differences. Results demonstrate that accurate heart rate variability parameters can be obtained from smart phone based measurements. PMID:23366214

  10. Heart rate and the cardiometabolic risk.

    PubMed

    Palatini, Paolo

    2013-06-01

    Resting heart rate is a well recognized marker of autonomic nervous system tone, and in many population studies has been found to be a significant correlate of blood pressure, increased body mass index, and metabolic disturbances. This association is particularly striking in patients with hypertension or diabetes, and cardiovascular morbidity related to high heart rate in these conditions seems to depend mainly on the clustering of these risk factors. The prospective relationship between tachycardia and metabolic abnormalities found in longitudinal studies indicates that the adrenergic overdrive is the cause rather than the consequence of the insulin resistance state. Findings from observational studies and clinical trials have shown that heart rate measured during the follow-up provides prognostic information over and above heart rate measured at baseline, whereas the predictive value of heart rate measured out of the office is still debated. Antihypertensive drugs that decrease blood pressure and heart rate through a reduction of the sympathetic outflow may be more beneficial in clinical situations characterized by heightened sympathetic activity associated to insulin resistance. PMID:23645136

  11. Verification of the heart rate threshold.

    PubMed

    Bunc, V; Hofmann, P; Leitner, H; Gaisl, G

    1995-01-01

    Among the methods for determining anaerobic threshold (AT), the heart rate (HR) method seems to be the simplest. On the other hand, many conflicting results from comparing this method with others have been presented over the last 10 years. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the heart rate threshold (HRT) with the lactate turn point (LTP)-"second" break point of dependence of lactate (LA) to power output, ventilatory threshold (VT) and threshold determined by electromyography (EMGAT), all determined by the same exercise test and evaluated by the same computer algorithm. A group of 24 female students [mean age 20.5 (SD 1.6) years, maximal oxygen consumption 48.8 (SD 4.7) ml.kg-1.min-1] performed an incremental exercise test on a cycle ergometer (modified Conconi test) starting with an initial power output (PO) of 40 W with intensity increments of 10 W.min-1 until the subjects were exhausted. The HRT, LTP and EMGAT determination was done by computer-aided break-point regression analysis from dependence of functional measures on PO. The same computer algorithm was used for VT determination from the relationship between ventilation (V) and oxygen uptake (VO2) or carbon dioxide output (VCO2).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7607203

  12. Heart Rate Sensor for Freshwater Mussels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Just, C. L.; Vial, D. P.; Kruger, A.; Niemeier, J. J.; Lee, H. W.; Schroer, H. W.

    2014-12-01

    Researchers have long been interested the cardiac activity of mollusks. First, it is important as a basic measure of the animal's metabolism. Further, activities such as feeding and burrowing affect heart rate, as do environmental factors such as water salinity, water temperature, exposure, and predation. We have developed a small, noninvasive sensor for measuring freshwater mussel heart rate. Its working principle is as follows. An infrared (IR) light-emitting diode is placed in contact with the mussel shell. Some of the IR penetrates through the shell, reflects off internal organs, and traverses back. A photodetector detects this IR, and electronics condition the signal. The heartbeat of the animal modulates the IR, allowing one to measure the heart rate. The technique is widely-used in finger heart-rate monitors in humans. The sensors do not have to be positioned above the heart and several locations on the mussel shell work well. The sensor is small (8 mm × 10 mm) and consumes less than 1 mA, and has a simple one-wire interface that allows for easy integration into data acquisition hardware. We present heart rate measurements for the common pocketbook (lampsilis cardium) freshwater mussel.

  13. Accurate heart rate estimation from camera recording via MUSIC algorithm.

    PubMed

    Fouladi, Seyyed Hamed; Balasingham, Ilangko; Ramstad, Tor Audun; Kansanen, Kimmo

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm to extract heart rate frequency from video camera using the Multiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm. This leads to improved accuracy of the estimated heart rate frequency in cases the performance is limited by the number of samples and frame rate. Monitoring vital signs remotely can be exploited for both non-contact physiological and psychological diagnosis. The color variation recorded by ordinary cameras is used for heart rate monitoring. The orthogonality between signal space and noise space is used to find more accurate heart rate frequency in comparison with traditional methods. It is shown via experimental results that the limitation of previous methods can be overcome by using subspace methods. PMID:26738015

  14. Dynamic heart rate measurements from video sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yong-Poh; Raveendran, P.; Lim, Chern-Loon

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows how dynamic heart rate measurements that are typically obtained from sensors mounted near to the heart can also be obtained from video sequences. In this study, two experiments are carried out where a video camera captures the facial images of the seven subjects. The first experiment involves the measurement of subjects’ increasing heart rates (79 to 150 beats per minute (BPM)) while cycling whereas the second involves falling heart beats (153 to 88 BPM). In this study, independent component analysis (ICA) is combined with mutual information to ensure accuracy is not compromised in the use of short video duration. While both experiments are going on measures of heartbeat using the Polar heart rate monitor is also taken to compare with the findings of the proposed method. Overall experimental results show the proposed method can be used to measure dynamic heart rates where the root mean square error (RMSE) and the correlation coefficient are 1.88 BPM and 0.99 respectively. PMID:26203374

  15. Dynamic heart rate measurements from video sequences.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yong-Poh; Raveendran, P; Lim, Chern-Loon

    2015-07-01

    This paper shows how dynamic heart rate measurements that are typically obtained from sensors mounted near to the heart can also be obtained from video sequences. In this study, two experiments are carried out where a video camera captures the facial images of the seven subjects. The first experiment involves the measurement of subjects' increasing heart rates (79 to 150 beats per minute (BPM)) while cycling whereas the second involves falling heart beats (153 to 88 BPM). In this study, independent component analysis (ICA) is combined with mutual information to ensure accuracy is not compromised in the use of short video duration. While both experiments are going on measures of heartbeat using the Polar heart rate monitor is also taken to compare with the findings of the proposed method. Overall experimental results show the proposed method can be used to measure dynamic heart rates where the root mean square error (RMSE) and the correlation coefficient are 1.88 BPM and 0.99 respectively. PMID:26203374

  16. How Live Performance Moves the Human Heart.

    PubMed

    Shoda, Haruka; Adachi, Mayumi; Umeda, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how the audience member's physiological reactions differ as a function of listening context (i.e., live versus recorded music contexts). Thirty-seven audience members were assigned to one of seven pianists' performances and listened to his/her live performances of six pieces (fast and slow pieces by Bach, Schumann, and Debussy). Approximately 10 weeks after the live performance, each of the audience members returned to the same room and listened to the recorded performances of the same pianists' via speakers. We recorded the audience members' electrocardiograms in listening to the performances in both conditions, and analyzed their heart rates and the spectral features of the heart-rate variability (i.e., HF/TF, LF/HF). Results showed that the audience's heart rate was higher for the faster than the slower piece only in the live condition. As compared with the recorded condition, the audience's sympathovagal balance (LF/HF) was less while their vagal nervous system (HF/TF) was activated more in the live condition, which appears to suggest that sharing the ongoing musical moments with the pianist reduces the audience's physiological stress. The results are discussed in terms of the audience's superior attention and temporal entrainment to live performance. PMID:27104377

  17. How Live Performance Moves the Human Heart

    PubMed Central

    Shoda, Haruka; Adachi, Mayumi; Umeda, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how the audience member’s physiological reactions differ as a function of listening context (i.e., live versus recorded music contexts). Thirty-seven audience members were assigned to one of seven pianists’ performances and listened to his/her live performances of six pieces (fast and slow pieces by Bach, Schumann, and Debussy). Approximately 10 weeks after the live performance, each of the audience members returned to the same room and listened to the recorded performances of the same pianists’ via speakers. We recorded the audience members’ electrocardiograms in listening to the performances in both conditions, and analyzed their heart rates and the spectral features of the heart-rate variability (i.e., HF/TF, LF/HF). Results showed that the audience’s heart rate was higher for the faster than the slower piece only in the live condition. As compared with the recorded condition, the audience’s sympathovagal balance (LF/HF) was less while their vagal nervous system (HF/TF) was activated more in the live condition, which appears to suggest that sharing the ongoing musical moments with the pianist reduces the audience’s physiological stress. The results are discussed in terms of the audience’s superior attention and temporal entrainment to live performance. PMID:27104377

  18. [Hypoxaemia, peripheral chemoreceptors and fetal heart rate].

    PubMed

    Secourgeon, J-F

    2012-02-01

    The perinatal results of the widespread adoption of the continuous electronic fetal heart rate monitoring during labor remain rather disappointing. This is due in part to a lack of consistent interpretation of the fetal heart tracings. Despite efforts by referral agencies over the past decade the situation has not improved. In defense of practitioners the heterogeneity and complexity of definitions and classifications patterns especially morphological currently proposed should be noted. Whereas with the recent advances in the field of neuroscience, it is now possible to visualize the chain of pathophysiological events that lead from the hypoxemic stimulus of the glomus cell to changes in the morphology of the fetal heart rate tracing. Thus by taking some examples of real situations, we propose a method of analysis that dissects the fetal heart tracing and take into account the functional specifications of the chemoreceptor when exposed to a hypoxic environment. Furthermore we can identify tracings with a "threshold effect" and also "sensitization and desensitization effects" according to the intensity, duration and recurrence of hypoxaemic episodes. This new approach based upon specific research into the mechanism behind the fetal heart rate abnormalities may be useful to complement the morphological study of the fetal heart tracing, to provide a better idea of the fetal status and to better define the indications of fetal blood sampling procedures. PMID:21798673

  19. Heart-rate pulse-shift detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, M.

    1974-01-01

    Detector circuit accurately separates and counts phase-shift pulses over wide range of basic pulse-rate frequency, and also provides reasonable representation of full repetitive EKG waveform. Single telemeter implanted in small animal monitors not only body temperature but also animal movement and heart rate.

  20. Monofractality in RR Heart Rate by Multifractal Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowiec, D.; Dudkowska, A.; Gałąska, R.; Rynkiewicz, A.; Wdowczyk-Szulc, J.

    2009-05-01

    Multifractal formalism is tested if it can work as a robust estimator of monofractals when scaling intervals are fixed. Intervals for scaling are selected to be consistent with known frequency bands of power spectral analysis used in estimates of heart rate variability: low frequency (LF), very low frequency (VLF), and ultra low frequency (ULF). Tests on fractional Brownian motions and a binomial cascade are performed to validate popular multifractal methods: Wavelet Transform Modulus Maxima and Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis. Then the methods are applied to identify monofractal elements of control processes driving the heart rate. A transition is found in the dynamic organization of autonomic nervous system control of the heart rate related to the change in scaling intervals. The control over the diurnal heart rate is of a multifractal type when considered in LF and of a monofractal type when observed in ULF. Additionally, this transition affects on a switch in a relation between widths of diurnal and nocturnal multifractal spectra.

  1. Heart to Heart: Using Heart Rate Telemetry to Meet Physical Education Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Tami Benham; Deal, Laurence O.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a foundation for establishing measurable physical education outcomes, demonstrating how heart rate telemetry can help measure and achieve such outcomes. After explaining heart rate telemetry function, the article examines student and teacher outcomes that could be included in school physical education outcomes and achieved using heart…

  2. Heart Rate and Electrocardiography Monitoring in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ho, David; Zhao, Xin; Gao, Shumin; Hong, Chull; Vatner, Dorothy E.; Vatner, Stephen F.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of current cardiovascular research involves studies in genetically engineered mouse models. The measurement of heart rate is central to understanding cardiovascular control under normal conditions, with altered autonomic tone, superimposed stress or disease states, both in wild type mice as well as those with altered genes. Electrocardiography (ECG) is the “gold standard” using either hard wire or telemetry transmission. In addition, heart rate is measured or monitored from the frequency of the arterial pressure pulse or cardiac contraction, or by pulse oximetry. For each of these techniques, discussions of materials and methods, as well as advantages and limitations are covered. However, only the direct ECG monitoring will determine not only the precise heart rates but also whether the cardiac rhythm is normal or not. PMID:21743842

  3. Heart Rate Conditioning in Newborn Infants: Relationships Among Conditionability, Heart Rate Variability, and Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamps, Leighton E.; Porges, Stephen W.

    1975-01-01

    Trace conditioning was evaluated in newborn infants by measurements of heart rate responses to a conditioned stimulus in anticipation of or in absence of the unconditioned stimulus. Data suggest females have higher levels of heart rate variability than males, which parallels their greater conditionability. (GO)

  4. Effect of Short-Term Mobile Phone Base Station Exposure on Cognitive Performance, Body Temperature, Heart Rate and Blood Pressure of Malaysians.

    PubMed

    Malek, F; Rani, K A; Rahim, H A; Omar, M H

    2015-01-01

    Individuals who report their sensitivity to electromagnetic fields often undergo cognitive impairments that they believe are due to the exposure of mobile phone technology. The aim of this study is to clarify whether short-term exposure at 1 V/m to the typical Global System for Mobile Communication and Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) affects cognitive performance and physiological parameters (body temperature, blood pressure and heart rate). This study applies counterbalanced randomizing single blind tests to determine if sensitive individuals experience more negative health effects when they are exposed to base station signals compared with sham (control) individuals. The sample size is 200 subjects with 50.0% Idiopathic Environmental Intolerance attributed to electromagnetic fields (IEI-EMF) also known as sensitive and 50.0% (non-IEI-EMF). The computer-administered Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB eclipse(TM)) is used to examine cognitive performance. Four tests are chosen to evaluate Cognitive performance in CANTAB: Reaction Time (RTI), Rapid Visual Processing (RVP), Paired Associates Learning (PAL) and Spatial Span (SSP). Paired sample t-test on the other hand, is used to examine the physiological parameters. Generally, in both groups, there is no statistical significant difference between the exposure and sham exposure towards cognitive performance and physiological effects (P's > 0.05). PMID:26286015

  5. Effect of Short-Term Mobile Phone Base Station Exposure on Cognitive Performance, Body Temperature, Heart Rate and Blood Pressure of Malaysians

    PubMed Central

    Malek, F.; Rani, K. A.; Rahim, H. A.; Omar, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals who report their sensitivity to electromagnetic fields often undergo cognitive impairments that they believe are due to the exposure of mobile phone technology. The aim of this study is to clarify whether short-term exposure at 1 V/m to the typical Global System for Mobile Communication and Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) affects cognitive performance and physiological parameters (body temperature, blood pressure and heart rate). This study applies counterbalanced randomizing single blind tests to determine if sensitive individuals experience more negative health effects when they are exposed to base station signals compared with sham (control) individuals. The sample size is 200 subjects with 50.0% Idiopathic Environmental Intolerance attributed to electromagnetic fields (IEI-EMF) also known as sensitive and 50.0% (non-IEI-EMF). The computer-administered Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB eclipseTM) is used to examine cognitive performance. Four tests are chosen to evaluate Cognitive performance in CANTAB: Reaction Time (RTI), Rapid Visual Processing (RVP), Paired Associates Learning (PAL) and Spatial Span (SSP). Paired sample t-test on the other hand, is used to examine the physiological parameters. Generally, in both groups, there is no statistical significant difference between the exposure and sham exposure towards cognitive performance and physiological effects (P’s > 0.05). PMID:26286015

  6. Estimation of heart rate and heart rate variability from pulse oximeter recordings using localized model fitting.

    PubMed

    Wadehn, Federico; Carnal, David; Loeliger, Hans-Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Heart rate variability is one of the key parameters for assessing the health status of a subject's cardiovascular system. This paper presents a local model fitting algorithm used for finding single heart beats in photoplethysmogram recordings. The local fit of exponentially decaying cosines of frequencies within the physiological range is used to detect the presence of a heart beat. Using 42 subjects from the CapnoBase database, the average heart rate error was 0.16 BPM and the standard deviation of the absolute estimation error was 0.24 BPM. PMID:26737125

  7. Using photoplethysmography in heart rate monitoring of patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    van Andel, Judith; Ungureanu, Constantin; Aarts, Ronald; Leijten, Frans; Arends, Johan

    2015-04-01

    Heart rate is a useful neurophysiological sign when monitoring seizures in patients with epilepsy. In an ambulatory setting, heart rate is measured with ECG involving electrodes on the skin. This method is uncomfortable which is burdensome for patients and is sensitive to motion artifacts, which decrease the usability of measurements. In this study, green light photoplethysmography, an optical technique arising from the fitness industry, was evaluated for usefulness in a medical setting. Simultaneous overnight measurements of HR with a commercially available optical heart rate (OHR) sensor and with ECG (HRECG) were performed in 7 patients with epilepsy. Overall, there was no significant difference between OHR and HRECG in random 10-minute periods during wakefulness (p=0.69) and sleep (p=1.00). The Bland-Altman analysis showed negligible mean differences. Limits of agreement were higher during wakefulness and during the occurrence of two seizures possibly because of less reliable HRECG measurements due to motion artifacts. Optical heart rate seems less sensitive to these motion artifacts, and measurements are more user-friendly. The optical heart rate sensor may fill the gap of systems for ambulatory heart rate monitoring and can be especially useful in the context of seizure detection in patients with epilepsy. PMID:25812938

  8. Age differences in high frequency phasic heart rate variability and performance response to increased executive function load in three executive function tasks

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, Dana L.; Reuther, Erin T.; McNamara, Joseph P. H.; DeLucca, Teri L.; Berg, William K.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examines similarity or disparity of a frontally mediated physiological response of mental effort among multiple executive functioning tasks between children and adults. Task performance and phasic heart rate variability (HRV) were recorded in children (6 to 10 years old) and adults in an examination of age differences in executive functioning skills during periods of increased demand. Executive load levels were varied by increasing the difficulty levels of three executive functioning tasks: inhibition (IN), working memory (WM), and planning/problem solving (PL). Behavioral performance decreased in all tasks with increased executive demand in both children and adults. Adults’ phasic high frequency HRV was suppressed during the management of increased IN and WM load. Children’s phasic HRV was suppressed during the management of moderate WM load. HRV was not suppressed during either children’s or adults’ increasing load during the PL task. High frequency phasic HRV may be most sensitive to executive function tasks that have a time-response pressure, and simply requiring performance on a self-paced task requiring frontal lobe activation may not be enough to generate HRV responsitivity to increasing demand. PMID:25798113

  9. Heart Rate and Lactate Levels during Weight-Training Exercise in Trained and Untrained Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Michael H.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A study of effects of squatting exercise on heart rate and blood lactate levels in trained and untrained males indicated that trained subjects performed more work and had higher heart rates and lactate levels at exhaustion untrained subjects, though heart rate and lactate levels were lower for trained subjects at a given bar mass or submaximal…

  10. Lessons from the Heart: Individualizing Physical Education with Heart Rate Monitors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick, Beth; Birnbaum, Burton H.

    Learning about the relationship between heart rate and physical activity is an important aspect of fitness education. Use of a heart rate monitor (HRM) helps a student to understand how stretching and large muscle movements gradually increase the heart rate and blood flow, and enables students to measure their exercise heart rates and set goals…

  11. Gaussian Mixture Model of Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Tommaso; Boccignone, Giuseppe; Ferraro, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is an important measure of sympathetic and parasympathetic functions of the autonomic nervous system and a key indicator of cardiovascular condition. This paper proposes a novel method to investigate HRV, namely by modelling it as a linear combination of Gaussians. Results show that three Gaussians are enough to describe the stationary statistics of heart variability and to provide a straightforward interpretation of the HRV power spectrum. Comparisons have been made also with synthetic data generated from different physiologically based models showing the plausibility of the Gaussian mixture parameters. PMID:22666386

  12. Determination of Anaerobic Threshold by Heart Rate or Heart Rate Variability using Discontinuous Cycle Ergometry

    PubMed Central

    PARK, SUNG WOOK; BRENNEMAN, MICHAEL; COOKE, WILLIAM H.; CORDOVA, ALBERTO; FOGT, DONOVAN

    2014-01-01

    The purpose was to determine if heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) responses would reflect anaerobic threshold (AT) using a discontinuous, incremental, cycle test. AT was determined by ventilatory threshold (VT). Cyclists (30.6±5.9y; 7 males, 8 females) completed a discontinuous cycle test consisting of 7 stages (6 min each with 3 min of rest between). Three stages were performed at power outputs (W) below those corresponding to a previously established AT, one at W corresponding to AT, and 3 at W above those corresponding to AT. The W at the intersection of the trend lines was considered each metric’s “threshold”. The averaged stage data for Ve, HR, and time- and frequency-domain HRV metrics were plotted versus W. The W at the “threshold” for the metrics of interest were compared using correlation analysis and paired-sample t-test. In all, several heart rate-related parameters accurately reflected AT with significant correlations (p≤0.05) were observed between AT W and HR, mean RR interval (MRR), low and high frequency spectral energy (LF and HR, respectively), high frequency peak (fHF), and HFxfHF metrics’ threshold W (i.e., MRRTW, etc.). Differences in HR or HRV metric threshold W and AT for all subjects were less than 14 W. The steady state data from discontinuous protocols may allow for a true indication of steady-state physiologic stress responses and corresponding W at AT, compared to continuous protocols using 1–2 min exercise stages.

  13. AUTONOMIC CONTROL OF HEART RATE AFTER EXERCISE IN TRAINED WRESTLERS

    PubMed Central

    Báez, San Martín E.; Von Oetinger, A.; Cañas, Jamett R.; Ramírez, Campillo R.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish differences in vagal reactivation, through heart rate recovery and heart rate variability post exercise, in Brazilian jiu-jitsu wrestlers (BJJW). A total of 18 male athletes were evaluated, ten highly trained (HT) and eight moderately trained (MT), who performed a maximum incremental test. At the end of the exercise, the R-R intervals were recorded during the first minute of recovery. We calculated heart rate recovery (HRR60s), and performed linear and non-linear (standard deviation of instantaneous beat-to-beat R-R interval variability – SD1) analysis of heart rate variability (HRV), using the tachogram of the first minute of recovery divided into four segments of 15 s each (0-15 s, 15-30 s, 30-45 s, 45-60 s). Between HT and MT individuals, there were statistically significant differences in HRR60s (p <0.05) and in the non linear analysis of HRV from SD130-45s (p <0.05) and SD145-60s (p <0.05). The results of this research suggest that heart rate kinetics during the first minute after exercise are related to training level and can be used as an index for autonomic cardiovascular control in BJJW. PMID:24744476

  14. Autonomic control of heart rate after exercise in trained wrestlers.

    PubMed

    Henríquez, Olguín C; Báez, San Martín E; Von Oetinger, A; Cañas, Jamett R; Ramírez, Campillo R

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to establish differences in vagal reactivation, through heart rate recovery and heart rate variability post exercise, in Brazilian jiu-jitsu wrestlers (BJJW). A total of 18 male athletes were evaluated, ten highly trained (HT) and eight moderately trained (MT), who performed a maximum incremental test. At the end of the exercise, the R-R intervals were recorded during the first minute of recovery. We calculated heart rate recovery (HRR60s), and performed linear and non-linear (standard deviation of instantaneous beat-to-beat R-R interval variability - SD1) analysis of heart rate variability (HRV), using the tachogram of the first minute of recovery divided into four segments of 15 s each (0-15 s, 15-30 s, 30-45 s, 45-60 s). Between HT and MT individuals, there were statistically significant differences in HRR60s (p <0.05) and in the non linear analysis of HRV from SD130-45s (p <0.05) and SD145-60s (p <0.05). The results of this research suggest that heart rate kinetics during the first minute after exercise are related to training level and can be used as an index for autonomic cardiovascular control in BJJW. PMID:24744476

  15. Influence of sickness condition on diurnal rhythms of heart rate and heart rate variability in cows.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masumi; Onda, Ken; Wada, Yasunori; Kuwahara, Masayoshi

    2015-03-01

    Parameters of heart rate variability would explain changes in heart rate during the disease status in cows and to evaluate whether such changes might provide a more sensitive and quantitative indicator of these conditions than crude indices. For this purpose, we recorded electrocardiograms for 24 hr using a Holter-type electrocardiograph and applied power spectral analysis of heart rate variability in both five clinically healthy and four hospitalized cows. The significant findings of the current investigation were that the diurnal variations of autonomic nervous function are abolished in cows that are sick. This abnormal rhythm was induced by predominant parasympathetic inhibition in these cows. Therefore, the heart rate variability may be a useful indicator of sickness condition in cows. PMID:25648088

  16. Investigation of determinism in heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, M. E. D.; Souza, A. V. P.; Guimarães, H. N.; Aguirre, L. A.

    2000-06-01

    The article searches for the possible presence of determinism in heart rate variability (HRV) signals by using a new approach based on NARMA (nonlinear autoregressive moving average) modeling and free-run prediction. Thirty-three 256-point HRV time series obtained from Wistar rats submitted to different autonomic blockade protocols are considered, and a collection of surrogate data sets are generated from each one of them. These surrogate sequences are assumed to be nondeterministic and therefore they may not be predictable. The original HRV time series and related surrogates are submitted to NARMA modeling and prediction. Special attention has been paid to the problem of stationarity. The results consistently show that the surrogate data sets cannot be predicted better than the trivial predictor—the mean—while most of the HRV control sequences are predictable to a certain degree. This suggests that the normal HRV signals have a deterministic signature. The HRV time series derived from the autonomic blockade segments of the experimental protocols do not show the same predictability performance, albeit the physiological interpretation is not obvious. These results have important implications to the methodology of HRV analysis, indicating that techniques from nonlinear dynamics and deterministic chaos may be applied to elicit more information about the autonomic modulation of the cardiovascular activity.

  17. Resting heart rate, heart rate variability and functional decline in old age

    PubMed Central

    Ogliari, Giulia; Mahinrad, Simin; Stott, David J.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Mooijaart, Simon P.; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Clark, Elaine N.; Kearney, Patricia M.; Westendorp, Rudi G.J.; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Sabayan, Behnam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Heart rate and heart rate variability, markers of cardiac autonomic function, have been linked with cardiovascular disease. We investigated whether heart rate and heart rate variability are associated with functional status in older adults, independent of cardiovascular disease. Methods: We obtained data from the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER). A total of 5042 participants were included in the present study, and mean follow-up was 3.2 years. Heart rate and heart rate variability were derived from baseline 10-second electrocardiograms. Heart rate variability was defined as the standard deviation of normal-to-normal RR intervals (SDNN). Functional status in basic (ADL) and instrumental (IADL) activities of daily living was measured using Barthel and Lawton scales, at baseline and during follow-up. Results: The mean age of the study population was 75.3 years. At baseline, higher heart rate was associated with worse ADL and IADL, and lower SDNN was related to worse IADL (all p values < 0.05). Participants in the highest tertile of heart rate (range 71–117 beats/min) had a 1.79-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.45–2.22) and 1.35-fold (95% CI 1.12–1.63) higher risk of decline in ADL and IADL, respectively (p for trend < 0.001 and 0.001, respectively). Participants in the lowest tertile of SDNN (range 1.70–13.30 ms) had 1.21-fold (95% CI 1.00–1.46) and 1.25-fold (95% CI 1.05–1.48) higher risk of decline in ADL and IADL, respectively (both p for trends < 0.05). All associations were independent of sex, medications, cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. Interpretation: Higher resting heart rate and lower heart rate variability were associated with worse functional status and with higher risk of future functional decline in older adults, independent of cardiovascular disease. This study provides insight into the role of cardiac autonomic function in the development of functional decline. PMID:26323697

  18. Heart Rate, Life Expectancy and the Cardiovascular System: Therapeutic Considerations.

    PubMed

    Boudoulas, Konstantinos Dean; Borer, Jeffrey S; Boudoulas, Harisios

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that life span is inversely related to resting heart rate in most organisms. This association between heart rate and survival has been attributed to the metabolic rate, which is greater in smaller animals and is directly associated with heart rate. Studies have shown that heart rate is related to survival in apparently healthy individuals and in patients with different underlying cardiovascular diseases. A decrease in heart rate due to therapeutic interventions may result in an increase in survival. However, there are many factors regulating heart rate, and it is quite plausible that these may independently affect life expectancy. Nonetheless, a fast heart rate itself affects the cardiovascular system in multiple ways (it increases ventricular work, myocardial oxygen consumption, endothelial stress, aortic/arterial stiffness, decreases myocardial oxygen supply, other) which, in turn, may affect survival. In this brief review, the effects of heart rate on the heart, arterial system and survival will be discussed. PMID:26305771

  19. Heart rate variability - a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Billman, George E

    2011-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the beat-to-beat variation in either heart rate or the duration of the R-R interval - the heart period, has become a popular clinical and investigational tool. The temporal fluctuations in heart rate exhibit a marked synchrony with respiration (increasing during inspiration and decreasing during expiration - the so called respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA) and are widely believed to reflect changes in cardiac autonomic regulation. Although the exact contributions of the parasympathetic and the sympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system to this variability are controversial and remain the subject of active investigation and debate, a number of time and frequency domain techniques have been developed to provide insight into cardiac autonomic regulation in both health and disease. It is the purpose of this essay to provide an historical overview of the evolution in the concept of HRV. Briefly, pulse rate was first measured by ancient Greek physicians and scientists. However, it was not until the invention of the "Physician's Pulse Watch" (a watch with a second hand that could be stopped) in 1707 that changes in pulse rate could be accurately assessed. The Rev. Stephen Hales (1733) was the first to note that pulse varied with respiration and in 1847 Carl Ludwig was the first to record RSA. With the measurement of the ECG (1895) and advent of digital signal processing techniques in the 1960s, investigation of HRV and its relationship to health and disease has exploded. This essay will conclude with a brief description of time domain, frequency domain, and non-linear dynamic analysis techniques (and their limitations) that are commonly used to measure HRV. PMID:22144961

  20. Heart Rate Variability – A Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Billman, George E.

    2011-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the beat-to-beat variation in either heart rate or the duration of the R–R interval – the heart period, has become a popular clinical and investigational tool. The temporal fluctuations in heart rate exhibit a marked synchrony with respiration (increasing during inspiration and decreasing during expiration – the so called respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA) and are widely believed to reflect changes in cardiac autonomic regulation. Although the exact contributions of the parasympathetic and the sympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system to this variability are controversial and remain the subject of active investigation and debate, a number of time and frequency domain techniques have been developed to provide insight into cardiac autonomic regulation in both health and disease. It is the purpose of this essay to provide an historical overview of the evolution in the concept of HRV. Briefly, pulse rate was first measured by ancient Greek physicians and scientists. However, it was not until the invention of the “Physician’s Pulse Watch” (a watch with a second hand that could be stopped) in 1707 that changes in pulse rate could be accurately assessed. The Rev. Stephen Hales (1733) was the first to note that pulse varied with respiration and in 1847 Carl Ludwig was the first to record RSA. With the measurement of the ECG (1895) and advent of digital signal processing techniques in the 1960s, investigation of HRV and its relationship to health and disease has exploded. This essay will conclude with a brief description of time domain, frequency domain, and non-linear dynamic analysis techniques (and their limitations) that are commonly used to measure HRV. PMID:22144961

  1. Neuroanatomical substrates for the volitional regulation of heart rate

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Catherine L.; Minati, Ludovico; Nagai, Yoko; Medford, Nick; Harrison, Neil A.; Gray, Marcus; Ward, Jamie; Critchley, Hugo D.

    2015-01-01

    The control of physiological arousal can assist in the regulation of emotional state. A subset cortical and subcortical brain regions are implicated in autonomic control of bodily arousal during emotional behaviors. Here, we combined human functional neuroimaging with autonomic monitoring to identify neural mechanisms that support the volitional regulation of heart rate, a process that may be assisted by visual feedback. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), 15 healthy adults performed an experimental task in which they were prompted voluntarily to increase or decrease cardiovascular arousal (heart rate) during true, false, or absent visual feedback. Participants achieved appropriate changes in heart rate, without significant modulation of respiratory rate, and were overall not influenced by the presence of visual feedback. Increased activity in right amygdala, striatum and brainstem occurred when participants attempted to increase heart rate. In contrast, activation of ventrolateral prefrontal and parietal cortices occurred when attempting to decrease heart rate. Biofeedback enhanced activity within occipito-temporal cortices, but there was no significant interaction with task conditions. Activity in regions including pregenual anterior cingulate and ventral striatum reflected the magnitude of successful task performance, which was negatively related to subclinical anxiety symptoms. Measured changes in respiration correlated with posterior insula activation and heart rate, at a more lenient threshold, change correlated with insula, caudate, and midbrain activity. Our findings highlight a set of brain regions, notably ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, supporting volitional control of cardiovascular arousal. These data are relevant to understanding neural substrates supporting interaction between intentional and interoceptive states related to anxiety, with implications for biofeedback interventions, e.g., real-time fMRI, that target emotional regulation. PMID:25992711

  2. Multiscale power analysis for heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Peng; Liu, Hongxing; Ni, Huangjing; Zhou, Jing; Xia, Lan; Ning, Xinbao

    2015-06-01

    We first introduce multiscale power (MSP) method to assess the power distribution of physiological signals on multiple time scales. Simulation on synthetic data and experiments on heart rate variability (HRV) are tested to support the approach. Results show that both physical and psychological changes influence power distribution significantly. A quantitative parameter, termed power difference (PD), is introduced to evaluate the degree of power distribution alteration. We find that dynamical correlation of HRV will be destroyed completely when PD>0.7.

  3. Modeling heart rate variability by stochastic feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amaral, L. A.; Goldberger, A. L.; Stanley, H. E.

    1999-01-01

    We consider the question of how the cardiac rhythm spontaneously self-regulates and propose a new mechanism as a possible answer. We model the neuroautonomic regulation of the heart rate as a stochastic feedback system and find that the model successfully accounts for key characteristics of cardiac variability, including the 1/f power spectrum, the functional form and scaling of the distribution of variations of the interbeat intervals, and the correlations in the Fourier phases which indicate nonlinear dynamics.

  4. Optimization of pharmacotherapy in chronic heart failure: is heart rate adequately addressed?

    PubMed

    Franke, Jennifer; Wolter, Jan Sebastian; Meme, Lillian; Keppler, Jeannette; Tschierschke, Ramon; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the use of beta-blockers in chronic heart failure (CHF) and the extent of heart rate reduction achieved in clinical practice and to determine differences in outcome of patients who fulfilled select inclusion criteria of the SHIFT study according to resting heart rate modulated by beta-blocker therapy. We evaluated an all-comer population of our dedicated CHF outpatient clinic between 2006 and 2010. For inclusion, individually optimized doses of guideline-recommended pharmacotherapy including beta-blockers had to be maintained for at least 3 months and routine follow-up performed at our outpatient CHF-clinic thereafter. Treatment dosages of beta-blockers, and demographic and clinical profiles including resting heart rate were assessed. The outcome of patients who fulfilled select inclusion criteria of the SHIFT study (left-ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤35 %, sinus rhythm, NYHA II-IV) and were followed-up for at least 1 year was stratified according to resting heart rates: ≥75 versus <75 bpm and ≥70 versus <70 bpm. The composite primary endpoint was defined as all-cause death or hospital admission for worsening heart failure during 12-month follow-up. In total, 3,181 patients were assessed in regard to treatment dosages of beta-blockers, and demographic and clinical profiles including resting heart rate. Of the overall studied population, 443 patients fulfilled all inclusion criteria and entered outcome analysis. Median observation time of survivors was 27.5 months with 1,039.7 observation-years in total. Up-titration to at least half the evidence-based target dose of beta-blockers was achieved in 69 % and full up-titration in 29 % of these patients. Patients with increased heart rates were younger, more often male, exhibited a higher NYHA functional class and lower LVEF. The primary endpoint occurred in 21 % of patients in the ≥70 bpm group versus 9 % of patients in the group with heart rates <70 bpm (p <0.01). Likewise, comparing the groups ≥75 and <75 bpm, the primary endpoint was significantly increased in the group of patients with heart rates ≥75 bpm 27 vs. 12.2 %; p < 0.01). 5-year event-free survival was significantly lower among patients with heart rates ≥70 bpm as compared to those with <70 bpm (log-rank test p < 0.05) and among patients in the ≥75 bpm group versus <75 bpm group (log-rank test p < 0.01). In conclusion, in clinical practice, 53 % of CHF patients have inadequate heart rate control (heart rates ≥75 bpm) despite concomitant beta-blocker therapy. In this non-randomized cohort, adequate heart rate control under individually optimized beta-blocker therapy was associated with improved mid- and long-term clinical outcome up to 5 years. As further up titration of beta-blockers is not achievable in many patients, the administration of a selective heart rate lowering agent, such as ivabradine adjuvant to beta-blockers may pose an opportunity to further modulate outcome. PMID:22760479

  5. Unobtrusive heart rate monitor based on a fiber specklegram sensor and a single-board computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benevides, Alessandro B.; Frizera, Anselmo; Cotrina, Anibal; Ribeiro, Moisés. R. N.; Segatto, Marcelo E. V.; Pontes, Maria José

    2015-09-01

    This paper proposes a portable and unobtrusive heart rate monitor based on fiber specklegram sensors. The proposed module uses the Raspberry Pi module to perform the image acquisition and the fiber specklegram sensor, which is based on multimode plastic optical fibers. The heart rate is obtained by welch power spectral density estimate and the heart beats are identified by means of a threshold analysis.

  6. Passive fetal heart rate monitoring apparatus and method with enhanced fetal heart beat discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahorian, Stephen A. (Inventor); Livingston, David L. (Inventor); Pretlow, III, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus for acquiring signals emitted by a fetus, identifying fetal heart beats and determining a fetal heart rate. Multiple sensor signals are outputted by a passive fetal heart rate monitoring sensor. Multiple parallel nonlinear filters filter these multiple sensor signals to identify fetal heart beats in the signal data. A processor determines a fetal heart rate based on these identified fetal heart beats. The processor includes the use of a figure of merit weighting of heart rate estimates based on the identified heart beats from each filter for each signal. The fetal heart rate thus determined is outputted to a display, storage, or communications channel. A method for enhanced fetal heart beat discrimination includes acquiring signals from a fetus, identifying fetal heart beats from the signals by multiple parallel nonlinear filtering, and determining a fetal heart rate based on the identified fetal heart beats. A figure of merit operation in this method provides for weighting a plurality of fetal heart rate estimates based on the identified fetal heart beats and selecting the highest ranking fetal heart rate estimate.

  7. Modelling and control for heart rate regulation during treadmill exercise.

    PubMed

    Su, Steven W; Wang, Lu; Celler, Branko G; Savkin, Andrey V; Guo, Ying

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel integrated approach for the identification and control of Hammerstein systems to achieve desired heart rate tracking performance for an automated treadmill system. The pseudo-random binary sequence input is employed to decouple the identification of dynamic linear part from static nonlinearity. The powerful e-insensitivity support vector regression is adopted to obtain sparse representations of the inversion of static nonlinearity in order to obtain an approximated linear model of the Hammerstein system. An H(infinity) controller is designed for the approximated linear model to achieve robust tracking performance. This new approach is applied to the design of a computer-controlled treadmill system for the regulation of heart rate during treadmill exercise. Minimizing deviations of heart rate from a preset profile is achieved by controlling the speed of the treadmill. Both conventional proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control and the proposed approaches have been employed for the controller design. The proposed algorithm achieves much better heart rate tracking performance. PMID:17946236

  8. Identification and control for heart rate regulation during treadmill exercise.

    PubMed

    Su, Steven W; Wang, Lu; Celler, Branko G; Savkin, Andrey V; Guo, Ying

    2007-07-01

    This paper proposes a novel integrated approach for the identification and control of Hammerstein systems to achieve desired heart rate profile tracking performance for an automated treadmill system. For the identification of Hammerstein systems, the pseudorandom binary sequence input is employed to decouple the identification of dynamic linear part from input nonlinearity. The powerful epsilon-insensitivity support vector regression method is adopted to obtain sparse representations of the inverse of static nonlinearity in order to obtain an approximate linear model of the Hammerstein system. An Hinfinity controller is designed for the approximated linear model to achieve robust tracking performance. This new approach is successfully applied to the design of a computer-controlled treadmill system for the regulation of heart rate during treadmill exercise. Minimizing deviations of heart rate from a preset profile is achieved by controlling the speed of the treadmill. Both conventional proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control and the proposed approaches have been employed for the controller design. The proposed algorithm achieves much better heart rate tracking performance. PMID:17605355

  9. The mitochondrial uniporter controls fight or flight heart rate increases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuejin; Rasmussen, Tyler P.; Koval, Olha M.; Joiner, Mei-ling A.; Hall, Duane D.; Chen, Biyi; Luczak, Elizabeth D.; Wang, Qiongling; Rokita, Adam G.; Wehrens, Xander H. T.; Song, Longsheng; Anderson, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate increases are a fundamental adaptation to physiological stress, while inappropriate heart rate increases are resistant to current therapies. However, the metabolic mechanisms driving heart rate acceleration in cardiac pacemaker cells remain incompletely understood. The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) facilitates calcium entry into the mitochondrial matrix to stimulate metabolism. We developed mice with myocardial MCU inhibition by transgenic expression of a dominant negative (DN) MCU. Here we show that DN-MCU mice had normal resting heart rates but were incapable of physiological fight or flight heart rate acceleration. We found MCU function was essential for rapidly increasing mitochondrial calcium in pacemaker cells and that MCU enhanced oxidative phoshorylation was required to accelerate reloading of an intracellular calcium compartment prior to each heartbeat. Our findings show the MCU is necessary for complete physiological heart rate acceleration and suggest MCU inhibition could reduce inappropriate heart rate increases without affecting resting heart rate. PMID:25603276

  10. The mitochondrial uniporter controls fight or flight heart rate increases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuejin; Rasmussen, Tyler P; Koval, Olha M; Joiner, Mei-Ling A; Hall, Duane D; Chen, Biyi; Luczak, Elizabeth D; Wang, Qiongling; Rokita, Adam G; Wehrens, Xander H T; Song, Long-Sheng; Anderson, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate increases are a fundamental adaptation to physiological stress, while inappropriate heart rate increases are resistant to current therapies. However, the metabolic mechanisms driving heart rate acceleration in cardiac pacemaker cells remain incompletely understood. The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) facilitates calcium entry into the mitochondrial matrix to stimulate metabolism. We developed mice with myocardial MCU inhibition by transgenic expression of a dominant-negative (DN) MCU. Here, we show that DN-MCU mice had normal resting heart rates but were incapable of physiological fight or flight heart rate acceleration. We found that MCU function was essential for rapidly increasing mitochondrial calcium in pacemaker cells and that MCU-enhanced oxidative phoshorylation was required to accelerate reloading of an intracellular calcium compartment before each heartbeat. Our findings show that MCU is necessary for complete physiological heart rate acceleration and suggest that MCU inhibition could reduce inappropriate heart rate increases without affecting resting heart rate. PMID:25603276

  11. BIOPHYSICAL CHARACTERISATION OF THE UNDER-APPRECIATED AND IMPORTANT RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HEART RATE VARIABILITY AND HEART RATE

    PubMed Central

    Monfredi, Oliver; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Johnsen, Anne-Berit; Inada, Shin; Schneider, Heiko; Wang, Ruoxi; Nirmalan, Mahesh; Wisloff, Ulrik; Maltsev, Victor A; Lakatta, Edward G; Zhang, Henggui; Boyett, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (beat-to-beat changes in the RR interval) has attracted considerable attention over the last 30+ years (PubMed currently lists >17,000 publications). Clinically, a decrease in heart rate variability is correlated to higher morbidity and mortality in diverse conditions, from heart disease to foetal distress. It is usually attributed to fluctuation in cardiac autonomic nerve activity. We calculated heart rate variability parameters from a variety of cardiac preparations (including humans, living animals, Langendorff-perfused heart and single sinoatrial nodal cell) in diverse species, combining this with data from previously published papers. We show that regardless of conditions, there is a universal exponential decay-like relationship between heart rate variability and heart rate. Using two biophysical models, we develop a theory for this, and confirm that heart rate variability is primarily dependent on heart rate and cannot be used in any simple way to assess autonomic nerve activity to the heart. We suggest that the correlation between a change in heart rate variability and altered morbidity and mortality is substantially attributable to the concurrent change in heart rate. This calls for re-evaluation of the findings from many papers that have not adjusted properly or at all for heart rate differences when comparing heart rate variability in multiple circumstances. PMID:25225208

  12. Resting and ambulatory heart rate variability in chronic anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Melanson, Edward Louis; Donahoo, William Troy; Krantz, Mori Jacob; Poirier, Paul; Mehler, Philip Sydney

    2004-11-01

    Heart rate variability was measured at rest and during ambulation in 6 women with anorexia nervosa. Compared with 10 nonanorexic women controls, resting and ambulatory measures of heart rate variability tended to be lower in patients, despite no differences in resting heart rate. PMID:15518630

  13. A healthy heart is not a metronome: an integrative review of the heart's anatomy and heart rate variability

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Fred; McCraty, Rollin; Zerr, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the change in the time intervals between adjacent heartbeats, is an emergent property of interdependent regulatory systems that operate on different time scales to adapt to challenges and achieve optimal performance. This article briefly reviews neural regulation of the heart, and its basic anatomy, the cardiac cycle, and the sinoatrial and atrioventricular pacemakers. The cardiovascular regulation center in the medulla integrates sensory information and input from higher brain centers, and afferent cardiovascular system inputs to adjust heart rate and blood pressure via sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent pathways. This article reviews sympathetic and parasympathetic influences on the heart, and examines the interpretation of HRV and the association between reduced HRV, risk of disease and mortality, and the loss of regulatory capacity. This article also discusses the intrinsic cardiac nervous system and the heart-brain connection, through which afferent information can influence activity in the subcortical and frontocortical areas, and motor cortex. It also considers new perspectives on the putative underlying physiological mechanisms and properties of the ultra-low-frequency (ULF), very-low-frequency (VLF), low-frequency (LF), and high-frequency (HF) bands. Additionally, it reviews the most common time and frequency domain measurements as well as standardized data collection protocols. In its final section, this article integrates Porges' polyvagal theory, Thayer and colleagues' neurovisceral integration model, Lehrer et al.'s resonance frequency model, and the Institute of HeartMath's coherence model. The authors conclude that a coherent heart is not a metronome because its rhythms are characterized by both complexity and stability over longer time scales. Future research should expand understanding of how the heart and its intrinsic nervous system influence the brain. PMID:25324790

  14. Interaction Between Heart Rate Variability and Heart Rate in Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Gąsior, Jakub S.; Sacha, Jerzy; Jeleń, Piotr J.; Pawłowski, Mariusz; Werner, Bożena; Dąbrowski, Marek J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Heart rate variability (HRV) is primarily heart rate (HR) dependent, and therefore, different HR may exert different impact on HRV. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the effect of HR on HRV in children and to determine whether HRV indices normalized to HR are sex- and age-related. Methods: Short-term ECG recordings were performed in 346 healthy children. Standard time and frequency domain HRV parameters and HR were analyzed in four age subgroups (6–7, 8–9, 10–11, and 12–13 years old). To investigate the HR impact on HRV, standard HRV parameters were normalized to prevailing HR. Results: Standard HRV measures did not differ between age subgroups, however, HR significantly decreased with subjects age and turned out to be the strongest determinant of HRV. The normalization of HRV to prevailing HR allowed to show that sex-related differences in standard HRV resulted from differences in HR between boys and girls. The normalized HRV significantly decreased with age—before the normalization this effect was masked by age-related HR alterations. Conclusions: HR significantly impacts HRV in pediatric population and turns out to be the strongest determinant of all standard HRV indices. The differences in standard HRV between boys and girls result from differences in their HR. The normalized HRV is decreasing with age in healthy children and it is accompanied by the reduction of HR—as a net result, the standard HRV is constant in children at different ages. This may reflect the maturation of the autonomic nervous system. PMID:26733878

  15. Adaptation of autonomic heart rate regulation in astronauts after spaceflight

    PubMed Central

    Vandeput, Steven; Widjaja, Devy; Aubert, Andre E.; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Background Spaceflight causes changes in the cardiovascular control system. The aim of this study was to evaluate postflight recovery of linear and nonlinear neural markers of heart rate modulation, with a special focus on day-night variations. Material/Methods Twenty-four-hour Holter ECG recordings were obtained in 8 astronauts participating in space missions aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Data recording was performed 1 month before launch, and 5 and 30 days after return to Earth from short- and long-term flights. Cardiovascular control was inferred from linear and nonlinear heart rate variability (HRV) parameters, separately during 2-hour day and 2-hour night recordings. Results No remarkable differences were found in the postflight recovery between astronauts from short- and long-duration spaceflights. Five days after return to Earth, vagal modulation was significantly decreased compared to the preflight condition (day: p=0.001; night: p=0.019), while the sympathovagal balance was strongly increased, but only at night (p=0.017). A few nonlinear parameters were reduced early postflight compared to preflight values, but these were not always statistically significant. No significant differences remained after 30 days of postflight recovery. Conclusions Our results show that 5 days after return from both short- and long-duration space missions, neural mechanisms of heart rate regulation are still disturbed. After 1 month, autonomic control of heart rate recovered almost completely. PMID:23291736

  16. Comparison of heart rate responses. Water walking versus treadmill walking.

    PubMed

    Whitley, J D; Schoene, L L

    1987-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare heart rate responses to water walking versus treadmill walking to determine whether the responses were of sufficient magnitude to elicit cardiorespiratory training effects. The heart rates of 12 healthy, female college students were measured immediately after walking in waist-deep water and on a treadmill at the same distance, durations, and speeds (2.55, 2.77, 3.02, and 3.31 km/hr). A significant increase in heart rate with increased speeds resulted from water walking (p less than .05); from rest to the fastest speed, it was 135% (96 bpm). For treadmill walking, the increase of 19% (13 bpm) was not significant. The heart rates for the water condition were significantly higher (p less than .05) at each speed. These findings indicate that water walking could serve as an effective exercise mode, for example, for cardiorespiratory fitness for individuals who are unable to perform such weight-bearing activities as jogging, fast walking, cycling, and dancing. PMID:3659133

  17. A Performance of the Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Joan; McCauley, Joyce; Grumble, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    How the heart works is found in "A Framework for K-12 Science Education" and connects to Life Sciences Core and Component Ideas, From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes (NRC 2012). By the end of grade 2, students should understand that all organisms have external parts, which they use in various ways to seek, find, and take

  18. A Performance of the Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Joan; McCauley, Joyce; Grumble, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    How the heart works is found in "A Framework for K-12 Science Education" and connects to Life Sciences Core and Component Ideas, From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes (NRC 2012). By the end of grade 2, students should understand that all organisms have external parts, which they use in various ways to seek, find, and take…

  19. Heart rate monitoring during training and competition in cyclists.

    PubMed

    Jeukendrup, A; VanDiemen, A

    1998-01-01

    To obtain optimal training effects and avoid overtraining, it is necessary to monitor the intensity of training. In cycling, speed is not an accurate indicator of exercise intensity, and therefore alternatives have to be found to monitor exercise intensity during training and competition. Power output may be the most direct indicator, but heart rate is easier to monitor and measure. There are, however, limitations that have to be taken into account when using a heart rate monitor. For example, the position on the bicycle may change heart rate at a given exercise intensity. More important, however, is the increase in heart rate over time, a phenomenon described as 'cardiac drift'. Cardiac drift can change the heart rate-power output relationship drastically, especially in hot environments or at altitude. It is important to determine whether one is interested in monitoring exercise intensity per se or measuring whole-body stress. Power output may be a better indicator of the former and heart rate may, under many conditions, be a better indicator of the latter. Heart rate can be used to evaluate a cyclist after training or competition, or to determine the exercise intensity during training. Heart rate monitoring is very useful in the detection of early overtraining, especially in combination with lactate curves and questionnaires. During overtraining, maximal heart rates as well as submaximal heart rates may be decreased, while resting and, in particular, sleeping - heart rates may be increased. PMID:22587722

  20. Children's Heart Rate Reactivity Responses to Three School Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharpley, Christopher F.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Investigated effects of 3 routine classroom arithmetic and reading tasks upon the heart rate reactivity of 30 fifth grade children. Results indicated that some children showed large increases in heart rates during the three tasks, and that these children should be considered at risk for coronary heart disease. (Author/TE)

  1. The heart rate VO2 relationship of aerobic dance: a comparison of target heart rate methods.

    PubMed

    Scharff-Olson, M; Williford, H N; Smith, F H

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between heart rate (HR) and oxygen consumption (VO2) for aerobic dance exercise. Therefore, eleven females completed 20 minutes of aerobic dance with continuous monitoring of HR and VO2. These physiological responses were analyzed with correlation/regression techniques. The results showed that for aerobic dance to produce a response in excess of 50% of VO2 max, the target HR must be approximately 80% of the age-predicted HR max or greater. In contrast, previously reported data for treadmill running shows that 50% of VO2 max is achieved at approximately 65% of age-predicted HR max in females. The maximum heart rate reserve (Karvonen) method was also found to underestimate the actual VO2 of AD. With the Karvonen method, the target heart rate must approximate 65% of maximum HR reserve in order to elicit a VO2 response which is representative of 50% of VO2 max. These data support recent research which illustrates that target heart rate prescriptions derived from treadmill testing may fail to accurately place AD participants in the recommended training zone. PMID:1293420

  2. Heart rate variability and sympathovagal balance: pharmacological validation

    PubMed Central

    Bootsma, M.; Swenne, C.A.; Janssen, M.J.A.; Cats, V. Manger; Schalij, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Rationale We validated heart rate (HR) and six time and six frequency domain measures of heart rate variability (HRV) as estimators of autonomic outflow in 44 young healthy male subjects. Gold standards for autonomic outflow were the Rosenblueth-Simeone factors m (sympathetic tone) and n (vagal tone), and the sympathovagal balance m·n, determined by two-stage complete autonomic blockade. Methods Rank correlations were computed between HR and the HRV measures obtained before autonomic blockade, and m, n and m·n. Also, the maximal mean performances (averaged sensitivity and specificity) for HR and HRV as discriminators between low and high values of m, n or m·n were computed. Results The spectral HRV measures showed less good correlations and performances than the time domain HRV measures. Correlations with sympathetic tone were all below 0.31. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia during 15 cycles/min metronome breathing was superior in estimating vagal tone and sympathovagal balance (correlations -0.71/-0.73; both performances 0.82), heart rate scored similarly for assessing the sympathovagal balance (correlation 0.71; performance 0.82). Conclusions It does not appear justified to evaluate HR or HRV in terms of sympathetic tone, vagal tone, or sympathovagal balance. HR and HRV are specifically weak in assessing sympathetic tone. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia during 15 cycles/min metronome breathing is superior in assessing vagal tone. Current HRV analysis techniques offer no advantages compared with HR in assessing the sympathovagal balance. PMID:25696224

  3. Heart rate detection from plantar bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Landaeta, Rafael; Casas, Oscar; Pallàs-Areny, Ramon

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, a novel technique for heart rate measurement on a standing subject is proposed that relies on electrical impedance variations detected by a plantar interface with booth feet, such as those in some bathroom weighting scales for body composition analysis. Heart-related impedance variations in the legs come from arterial blood circulation and are below 500 mOmega. To detect them, we have implemented a system with a gain in excess of 600, and whose fully differential AC input amplifier has a gain of 4.5 and a common-mode rejection ratio (CMRR) higher than 90 dB at 10 kHz. Differential coherent demodulation based on synchronous sampling yields a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of about 54 dB . The system sensitivity is 610 mV/Omega. The technique has been demonstrated on 18 volunteers, whose bioimpedance signal and ECG were simultaneously recorded. A Bland-Altman plot shows a mean bias of -0.2 ms between the RR time intervals obtained from these two signals, which is negligible. The technique is simple and user friendly and does not require any additional sensors or electrodes attached to the body, hence no conductive gel or skin preparation. PMID:18334409

  4. Music structure determines heart rate variability of singers.

    PubMed

    Vickhoff, Björn; Malmgren, Helge; Aström, Rickard; Nyberg, Gunnar; Ekström, Seth-Reino; Engwall, Mathias; Snygg, Johan; Nilsson, Michael; Jörnsten, Rebecka

    2013-01-01

    Choir singing is known to promote wellbeing. One reason for this may be that singing demands a slower than normal respiration, which may in turn affect heart activity. Coupling of heart rate variability (HRV) to respiration is called Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). This coupling has a subjective as well as a biologically soothing effect, and it is beneficial for cardiovascular function. RSA is seen to be more marked during slow-paced breathing and at lower respiration rates (0.1 Hz and below). In this study, we investigate how singing, which is a form of guided breathing, affects HRV and RSA. The study comprises a group of healthy 18 year olds of mixed gender. The subjects are asked to; (1) hum a single tone and breathe whenever they need to; (2) sing a hymn with free, unguided breathing; and (3) sing a slow mantra and breathe solely between phrases. Heart rate (HR) is measured continuously during the study. The study design makes it possible to compare above three levels of song structure. In a separate case study, we examine five individuals performing singing tasks (1-3). We collect data with more advanced equipment, simultaneously recording HR, respiration, skin conductance and finger temperature. We show how song structure, respiration and HR are connected. Unison singing of regular song structures makes the hearts of the singers accelerate and decelerate simultaneously. Implications concerning the effect on wellbeing and health are discussed as well as the question how this inner entrainment may affect perception and behavior. PMID:23847555

  5. Music structure determines heart rate variability of singers

    PubMed Central

    Vickhoff, Björn; Malmgren, Helge; Åström, Rickard; Nyberg, Gunnar; Ekström, Seth-Reino; Engwall, Mathias; Snygg, Johan; Nilsson, Michael; Jörnsten, Rebecka

    2013-01-01

    Choir singing is known to promote wellbeing. One reason for this may be that singing demands a slower than normal respiration, which may in turn affect heart activity. Coupling of heart rate variability (HRV) to respiration is called Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). This coupling has a subjective as well as a biologically soothing effect, and it is beneficial for cardiovascular function. RSA is seen to be more marked during slow-paced breathing and at lower respiration rates (0.1 Hz and below). In this study, we investigate how singing, which is a form of guided breathing, affects HRV and RSA. The study comprises a group of healthy 18 year olds of mixed gender. The subjects are asked to; (1) hum a single tone and breathe whenever they need to; (2) sing a hymn with free, unguided breathing; and (3) sing a slow mantra and breathe solely between phrases. Heart rate (HR) is measured continuously during the study. The study design makes it possible to compare above three levels of song structure. In a separate case study, we examine five individuals performing singing tasks (1–3). We collect data with more advanced equipment, simultaneously recording HR, respiration, skin conductance and finger temperature. We show how song structure, respiration and HR are connected. Unison singing of regular song structures makes the hearts of the singers accelerate and decelerate simultaneously. Implications concerning the effect on wellbeing and health are discussed as well as the question how this inner entrainment may affect perception and behavior. PMID:23847555

  6. Ordinal pattern statistics for the assessment of heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graff, G.; Graff, B.; Kaczkowska, A.; Makowiec, D.; Amigó, J. M.; Piskorski, J.; Narkiewicz, K.; Guzik, P.

    2013-06-01

    The recognition of all main features of a healthy heart rhythm (the so-called sinus rhythm) is still one of the biggest challenges in contemporary cardiology. Recently the interesting physiological phenomenon of heart rate asymmetry has been observed. This phenomenon is related to unbalanced contributions of heart rate decelerations and accelerations to heart rate variability. In this paper we apply methods based on the concept of ordinal pattern to the analysis of electrocardiograms (inter-peak intervals) of healthy subjects in the supine position. This way we observe new regularities of the heart rhythm related to the distribution of ordinal patterns of lengths 3 and 4.

  7. Classifying work rate from heart rate measurements using an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system.

    PubMed

    Kolus, Ahmet; Imbeau, Daniel; Dubé, Philippe-Antoine; Dubeau, Denise

    2016-05-01

    In a new approach based on adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS), field heart rate (HR) measurements were used to classify work rate into four categories: very light, light, moderate, and heavy. Inter-participant variability (physiological and physical differences) was considered. Twenty-eight participants performed Meyer and Flenghi's step-test and a maximal treadmill test, during which heart rate and oxygen consumption (V˙O2) were measured. Results indicated that heart rate monitoring (HR, HRmax, and HRrest) and body weight are significant variables for classifying work rate. The ANFIS classifier showed superior sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy compared to current practice using established work rate categories based on percent heart rate reserve (%HRR). The ANFIS classifier showed an overall 29.6% difference in classification accuracy and a good balance between sensitivity (90.7%) and specificity (95.2%) on average. With its ease of implementation and variable measurement, the ANFIS classifier shows potential for widespread use by practitioners for work rate assessment. PMID:26851475

  8. Bluetooth(Registered Trademark) Heart Rate Monitors for Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buxton, Roxanne E.; West, Michael R.; Kalogera, Kent L.; Hanson, Andrea M.

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate monitoring is required during exercise for crewmembers aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and will be for future exploration missions. The cardiovascular system must be sufficiently stressed throughout a mission to maintain the ability to perform nominal and contingency/emergency tasks. High quality heart rate data is required to accurately determine the intensity of exercise performed by the crewmembers and show maintenance of VO2max. The quality of the data collected on ISS is subject to multiple limitations and is insufficient to meet current requirements. PURPOSE: To evaluate the performance of commercially available Bluetooth® heart rate monitors (BT_HRM) and their ability to provide high quality heart rate data to monitor crew health on board ISS and during future exploration missions. METHODS: Nineteen subjects completed 30 data collection sessions of various intensities on the treadmill and/or cycle. Subjects wore several BT_HRM technologies for each testing session. One electrode-based chest strap (CS) was worn, while one or more optical sensors (OS) was worn. Subjects were instrumented with a 12-lead ECG to compare the heart rate data from the Bluetooth sensors. Each BT_RHM data set was time matched to the ECG data and a +/-5bpm threshold was applied to the difference between the two data sets. Percent error was calculated based on the number of data points outside the threshold and the total number of data points. REULTS: The electrode-based chest straps performed better than the optical sensors. The best performing CS was CS1 (1.6%error), followed by CS4 (3.3%error), CS3 (6.4%error), and CS2 (9.2%error). The OS resulted in 10.4% error for OS1 and 14.9% error for OS2. CONCLUSIONS: The highest quality data came from CS1, unfortunately it has been discontinued by the manufacturer. The optical sensors have not been ruled out for use, but more investigation is needed to determine how to get the best quality data. CS2 will be used in an ISS Bluetooth validation study, because it simultaneously transmits Magnetic Pulse which is integrated with existing exercise hardware on ISS. The simultaneous data streams allow for beat to beat comparison between the current ISS standard and CS2.Upon Bluetooth(Registered Trademark) validation aboard ISS, down select of a new BT_HRM for operational use will be made.

  9. Heart rate dynamics preceding hemorrhage in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Moss, Travis J; Clark, Matthew T; Lake, Douglas E; Moorman, J Randall; Calland, J Forrest

    2015-01-01

    Occult hemorrhage in surgical/trauma intensive care unit (STICU) patients is common and may lead to circulatory collapse. Continuous electrocardiography (ECG) monitoring may allow for early identification and treatment, and could improve outcomes. We studied 4,259 consecutive admissions to the STICU at the University of Virginia Health System. We collected ECG waveform data captured by bedside monitors and calculated linear and non-linear measures of the RR interbeat intervals. We tested the hypothesis that a transfusion requirement of 3 or more PRBC transfusions in a 24 hour period is preceded by dynamical changes in these heart rate measures and performed logistic regression modeling. We identified 308 hemorrhage events. A multivariate model including heart rate, standard deviation of the RR intervals, detrended fluctuation analysis, and local dynamics density had a C-statistic of 0.62. Earlier detection of hemorrhage might improve outcomes by allowing earlier resuscitation in STICU patients. PMID:26342251

  10. The precision and accuracy of a portable heart rate monitor.

    PubMed

    Seaward, B L; Sleamaker, R H; McAuliffe, T; Clapp, J F

    1990-01-01

    A device that would comfortably and accurately measure exercise heart rate during field performance could be valuable for athletes, fitness participants, and investigators in the field of exercise physiology. Such a device, a portable telemeterized microprocessor, was compared with direct EKG measurements in a laboratory setting under several conditions to assess its accuracy. Twenty-four subjects were studied at rest and during light-, moderate-, high-, and maximal-intensity endurance activities (walking, running, aerobic dancing, and Nordic Track simulated cross-country skiing. Differences between values obtained by the two measuring devices were not statistically significant, with correlation coefficient (r) values ranging from 0.998 to 0.999. The two methods proved equally reliable for measuring heart rate in a host of varied aerobic activities at varying intensities. PMID:2306564

  11. Heart rate variability in left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure: effects and implications of drug treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Tuininga, Y S; van Veldhuisen, D J; Brouwer, J; Haaksma, J; Crijns, H J; Man in't Veld, A J; Lie, K I

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To review the importance of heart rate variability analysis in left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure and to assess the effects of drug treatment. In patients with left ventricular dysfunction or heart failure, a low heart rate variability is a strong predictor of a low probability of survival. Because drug treatment in these patients has rapidly changed over the past two decades, the effect of these drugs on heart rate variability needs special attention. DESIGN--A study of published reports to give an overview of heart rate variability in patients with left ventricular dysfunction or heart failure and how it is affected by drug treatment. RESULTS--Analysis of heart rate variability provides an easily obtained early marker for progression of disease. It seems to be more closely related to the degree of neurohumoral activation than to haemodynamic variables. Cardiovascular drugs may either stimulate or inhibit the degree of neurohumoral activation, and the effects of pharmacological intervention can be closely monitored with this method. CONCLUSIONS--The analysis of heart rate variability, including spectral analysis, is a novel non-invasive way to obtain potentially useful clinical information in patients with reduced left ventricular function. The effects of drug treatment on heart rate variability are in general consistent with their long-term effects in left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure. PMID:7857731

  12. Unconstrained Evaluation System for Heart Rate Using Ultrasonic Vibrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamune, Kouki; Kobashi, Syoji; Kondo, Katsuya; Hata, Yutaka; Taniguchi, Kazuhiko; Sawayama, Toshiyuki

    2004-05-01

    Unconstrained health monitoring systems have received much considerable attention in medical applications, because such system can examine a subject without constraint. In this study, we propose a detection method based on a fuzzy logic for evaluating heart rate using our ultrasonic vibrograph. In the experiment for confirming heart rate, our method has been successfully used to detect the heart rates of four subjects, compared with a method using an electrocardiograph.

  13. A Bayesian classification of heart rate variability data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirhead, R. J.; Puff, R. D.

    2004-05-01

    We propose a simple Bayesian method for the classification of time series signals originating from mutually exclusive sources. In particular, the method is used to address the question of whether a 24-h recording of human heart rate data is produced by a normally functioning heart or by one exhibiting symptoms of congestive heart failure. Our method correctly classifies 18 of 18 normal heart data sets, and 38 of 44 congestive failure data sets.

  14. Critical Scale Invariance in a Healthy Human Heart Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyono, Ken; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Aoyagi, Naoko; Sakata, Seiichiro; Hayano, Junichiro; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2004-10-01

    We demonstrate the robust scale-invariance in the probability density function (PDF) of detrended healthy human heart rate increments, which is preserved not only in a quiescent condition, but also in a dynamic state where the mean level of the heart rate is dramatically changing. This scale-independent and fractal structure is markedly different from the scale-dependent PDF evolution observed in a turbulentlike, cascade heart rate model. These results strongly support the view that a healthy human heart rate is controlled to converge continually to a critical state.

  15. Continuous and online analysis of heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Chan, H L; Chou, W S; Chen, S W; Fang, S C; Liou, C S; Hwang, Y S

    2005-01-01

    Spectral analysis of heart rate variability provides a probe to assess the function of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. Time-frequency analysis of heart rate variability is useful for investigating autonomic nervous function in patients with syncope or non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, or in anaesthesia, etc. In this paper, we developed an algorithm for continuous and online analysis of heart rate variability. The algorithm was simulated and evaluated in MATLAB, and implemented on the digital signal processor. The electrocardiogram signals from MIT/BIH arrhythmia database and one patient with syncope demonstrate the capability of the proposed method in the continuous and online analysis of heart rate variability. PMID:16126583

  16. Ivabradine: Cardioprotection By and Beyond Heart Rate Reduction.

    PubMed

    Heusch, Gerd; Kleinbongard, Petra

    2016-05-01

    Ivabradine inhibits hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in the sinus node, thereby reducing heart rate, and heart rate reduction improves regional myocardial blood flow and contractile function in ischemic myocardium. Accordingly, ivabradine reduces anginal symptoms in patients with stable coronary artery disease but does not improve their clinical outcome. Heart rate reduction with ivabradine in patients with symptomatic heart failure reduces symptoms, attenuates remodeling, and improves clinical outcome. In pigs and mice, ivabradine reduces infarct size from myocardial ischemia/reperfusion, even when heart rate reduction is abrogated by atrial pacing. Improved viability is also observed in isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes subjected to simulated ischemia/reperfusion. These beneficial effects are attributed to reduced reactive oxygen species formation from the mitochondria. There is also evidence for a heart rate-independent benefit from ivabradine in the vasculature of mice and humans, and in left ventricular contractile function of pigs. Finally, in mice, ivabradine also has anti-aging potential. PMID:27041289

  17. Skeletal muscle electrical stimulation improves baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability in heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    Lazzarotto Rucatti, Ananda; Jaenisch, Rodrigo Boemo; Rossato, Douglas Dalcin; Poletto Bonetto, Jéssica Hellen; Ferreira, Janaína; Xavier, Leder Leal; Sonza, Anelise; Dal Lago, Pedro

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the current study was to evaluate the effects of electrical stimulation (ES) on the arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and cardiovascular autonomic control in rats with chronic heart failure (CHF). Male Wistar rats were designated to one of four groups: placebo sham (P-Sham, n=9), ES sham (ES-Sham, n=9), placebo CHF (P-CHF, n=9) or ES CHF (ES-CHF, n=9). The ES was adjusted at a low frequency (30 Hz), duration of 250 μs, with hold and rest time of 8s (4 weeks, 30 min/day, 5 times/week). It was applied on the gastrocnemius muscle with intensity to produce a visible muscle contraction. The rats assigned to the placebo groups performed the same procedures with the equipment turned off. The two-way ANOVA and the post hoc Student-Newman-Keuls tests (P<0.05) were used to data comparison. The BRS was higher in ES-Sham group compared to the P-Sham group and the ES-CHF group compared to the P-CHF group. ES was able to decrease heart rate sympatho-vagal modulation and peripheral sympathetic modulation in ES-CHF compared to P-CHF group. Interestingly, heart rate sympatho-vagal modulation was similar between ES-CHF and P-Sham groups. Thus, ES enhances heart rate parasympathetic modulation on heart failure (ES-CHF) compared to placebo (P-CHF), with consequent decrease of sympatho-vagal balance in the ES-CHF group compared to the P-CHF. The results show that a 4 week ES protocol in CHF rats enhances arterial BRS and cardiovascular autonomic control. PMID:26433753

  18. Drowsiness detection using heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Vicente, José; Laguna, Pablo; Bartra, Ariadna; Bailón, Raquel

    2016-06-01

    It is estimated that 10-30 % of road fatalities are related to drowsy driving. Driver's drowsiness detection based on biological and vehicle signals is being studied in preventive car safety. Autonomous nervous system activity, which can be measured noninvasively from the heart rate variability (HRV) signal obtained from surface electrocardiogram, presents alterations during stress, extreme fatigue and drowsiness episodes. We hypothesized that these alterations manifest on HRV and thus could be used to detect driver's drowsiness. We analyzed three driving databases in which drivers presented different sleep-deprivation levels, and in which each driving minute was annotated as drowsy or awake. We developed two different drowsiness detectors based on HRV. While the drowsiness episodes detector assessed each minute of driving as "awake" or "drowsy" with seven HRV derived features (positive predictive value 0.96, sensitivity 0.59, specificity 0.98 on 3475 min of driving), the sleep-deprivation detector discerned if a driver was suitable for driving or not, at driving onset, as function of his sleep-deprivation state. Sleep-deprivation state was estimated from the first three minutes of driving using only one HRV feature (positive predictive value 0.80, sensitivity 0.62, specificity 0.88 on 30 drivers). Incorporating drowsiness assessment based on HRV signal may add significant improvements to existing car safety systems. PMID:26780463

  19. Heart rate variability and suicidal behavior.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Scott T; Chesin, Megan; Fertuck, Eric; Keilp, John; Brodsky, Beth; Mann, J John; Sönmez, Cemile Ceren; Benjamin-Phillips, Christopher; Stanley, Barbara

    2016-06-30

    Identification of biological indicators of suicide risk is important given advantages of biomarker-based models. Decreased high frequency heart rate variability (HF HRV) may be a biomarker of suicide risk. The aim of this research was to determine whether HF HRV differs between suicide attempters and non-attempters. Using the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), we compared HF HRV between females with and without a history of suicide attempt, all with a lifetime diagnosis of a mood disorder. To investigate a potential mechanism explaining association between HF HRV and suicide, we examined the association between self-reported anger and HF HRV. Results of an Area under the Curve (AUC) analysis showed attempters had a lower cumulative HF HRV during the TSST than non-attempters. In addition, while there was no difference in self-reported anger at baseline, the increase in anger was greater in attempters, and negatively associated with HF HRV. Results suggest that suicide attempters have a reduced capacity to regulate their response to stress, and that reduced capacity to regulate anger may be a mechanism through which decreased HF HRV can lead to an increase in suicide risk. Our results have implications for the prevention of suicidal behavior in at-risk populations. PMID:27124209

  20. Double blind crossover comparison of the effects of dual chamber pacing (DDD) and ventricular rate adaptive (VVIR) pacing on neuroendocrine variables, exercise performance, and symptoms in complete heart block.

    PubMed Central

    Oldroyd, K G; Rae, A P; Carter, R; Wingate, C; Cobbe, S M

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare the effects of dual chamber pacing (DDD) and ventricular rate adaptive pacing (activity sensing) (VVIR) in patients with complete heart block. DESIGN--Double blind crossover comparison with one month in each pacing mode. PATIENTS--10 consecutive patients aged 23-74 presenting with complete anterograde atrioventricular block at rest and on exercise and with an intact atrial rate response received Synergyst I (Medtronic) pacemakers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Symptom scores, maximal exercise performance on a treadmill, and the plasma concentrations of atrial natriuretic peptide, adrenaline, and noradrenaline. RESULTS--No significant differences were identified between pacing modes in symptom scores for dyspnoea, fatigue, and mood disturbance; exercise time; and maximal oxygen consumption. One patient with intact ventriculoatrial conduction developed pacemaker syndrome during VVIR pacing. Resting plasma concentrations of atrial natriuretic peptide were raised in complete heart block and were restored to normal by DDD pacing but not by VVIR pacing. Resting plasma catecholamine concentrations were normal in complete heart block and in both pacing modes. During exercise the increase in the concentrations of all three hormones was similar in both pacing modes. CONCLUSIONS--In patients with complete anterograde and retrograde atrioventricular block, symptoms and maximal exercise performance were no better during DDD than during VVIR pacing. PMID:1827588

  1. [Study on the activity--heart rate prediction system for motion sensed rate responsive pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Guo, Ping; Sun, Weixin; Jin, Jie; Zhao, Qingping; Chen, Xiang; Kong, Shu; Huang, Yizhuo

    2011-09-01

    Focusing on the heart rate control mode of acceleration sensor based rate responsive pacemakers, this paper implemented the design of activity--heart rate prediction system. Bluetooth module was used as communication means in activity--heart rate prediction system, and the slave computer was used to complete the acceleration signal acquisition and processing, map from acceleration signal to the pacing rate signal, and achieve real-time transmission of acceleration signal and heart rate signal. The master computer fulfilled real-time display and recording of acceleration signal and heart rate signal, moreover, it achieved control function to the slave computer algorithm through classification of 6 parameters. The results of verification experiment showed that there was a significant relation between mapping heart rate and actual heart rate using linear mapping algorithm (R2 = 0.787, P < 0.001). PMID:22242376

  2. How to Take Your Heart Rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... beats per minute. - If you have difficulty with math, try doubling the number twice. 25 doubled is ... from going too high. If you are taking medicine for your heart or blood pressure, check with ...

  3. Assessing Heart Rate in Physical Education. Assessment Series: K-12 Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Marilyn M.

    This guide discusses the assessment of heart rate and, in particular, the assessment of heart rate using a heart monitor. Part 1, "Foundation for the Use of Heart Rate," reviews literature about heart rate assessment and heart rate monitors, offering an overview of national guidelines for physical activity. It focuses on the importance of physical…

  4. Effect of Age and Other Factors on Maximal Heart Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.; Moeschberger, Melvin L.

    1982-01-01

    To reduce confusion regarding reported effects of age on maximal exercise heart rate, a comprehensive review of the relevant English literature was conducted. Data on maximal heart rate after exercising with a bicycle, a treadmill, and after swimming were analyzed with regard to physical fitness and to age, sex, and racial differences. (Authors/PP)

  5. Using Target Heart-Rate Zones in Your Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Jennie A.

    2005-01-01

    Should teachers teach the calculation of target heart rate to students? And when is it appropriate to engage students in the attainment of these heart rates during physical education class activities? The answers to these questions are not easy. One might be tempted to state a simple yes or no and to identify a specific age to begin using training…

  6. Heart dimensions may influence the occurrence of the heart rate deflection point in highly trained cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Lucia, A.; Carvajal, A.; Boraita, A.; Serratosa, L.; Hoyos, J.; Chicharro, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether the heart rate (HR) response to exercise in 21 highly trained cyclists (mean (SD) age 25 (3) years) was related to their heart dimensions. METHODS: Before performing an incremental exercise test involving a ramp protocol with workload increases of 25 W/min, each subject underwent echocardiographic evaluation of the following variables: left ventricular end diastolic internal diameter (LVIDd), left ventricular posterior wall thickness at end diastole (LVPWTd), interventricular septal wall thickness at end diastole (IVSTd), left ventricular mass index (LVMI), left atrial dimension (LAD), longitudinal left atrial (LLAD) and right atrial (LRAD) dimensions, and the ratio of early to late (E/A) diastolic flow velocity. RESULTS: The HR response showed a deflection point (HRd) at about 85% VO2MAX in 66.7% of subjects (D group; n = 14) and was linear in 33.3% (NoD group; n = 7). Several echocardiographic variables (LVMI, LAD, LLAD, LRAD) indicative of heart dimensions were similar in each group. However, mean LPWTd (p<0.01) and IVSTd (p<0.05) values were significantly higher in the D group. Finally, no significant difference between groups was found with respect to the E/A. CONCLUSIONS: The HR response is curvilinear during incremental exercise in a considerable number of highly trained endurance athletes-that is, top level cyclists. The departure of HR increase from linearity may predominantly occur in athletes with thicker heart walls. 


 PMID:10597846

  7. Heart Rate Variability in Depressed Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Ripu D.; Vasko, Raymond C.; Jennings, J. Richard; Fasiczka, Amy L.; Thase, Michael E.; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The present study examines a measure of cardiac autonomic function, the heart rate variability (HRV), in a group of depressed elderly. Cardiac autonomic abnormalities have been implicated as a potential mediator of cardiovascular events and sudden death in depression. Because aging is associated with decreased cardiac vagal activity, it is possible that autonomic abnormalities are even more pronounced in the older depressed patients. Design Cross-sectional comparison between those with or without depression. The groups were compared using the Wilcoxon matched-pair sign-rank test. Setting Advanced Center for Interventions and Services Research for Late-Life Mood Disorders at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Participants Fifty-three patients with major depression (mean age: 73.3; SD: 7.4; range: 60–93) and an equal number of age and gender-matched subjects as a comparison group. Intervention None. Measurements Time domain and frequency domain measures of HRV. Results The groups did not differ in any of the time domain or frequency domain measures of HRV. As expected, subjects without depression displayed decreasing cardiac vagal function with aging (Spearman correlation coefficient rs = −0.33, p = 0.02). However, there was no significant change in vagal function with age in the depressed (r = 0.12, p = 0.38). Post-hoc analysis using Fisher’s zr transformation revealed that the relationship between age and cardiac vagal function was significantly different between the groups (z = 2.32, p = 0.02). Conclusions Our findings suggest that age has differential influence on vagal function in individuals with and without depression, a difference with implications for cardiovascular disease risk in depression. Prospective studies of cardiac vagal activity in depressed patients with or without preexisting cardiac disease in different age groups are needed to replicate and extend these findings. PMID:18978247

  8. Effects of Tai Chi exercise on heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Cole, Aimee R; Wijarnpreecha, Karn; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-05-01

    Tai Chi is a callisthenic exercise form that incorporates aerobic exercise with diaphragmatic breathing. These two aspects alone have been shown to enhance the heart rate variability, warranting research into the effects of Tai Chi on autonomic nervous system modulation and heart rate variability. A low heart rate variability has been shown to be indicative of compromised health. Any methods to enhance the heart rate variability, in particular, non-pharmacological methods, are therefore seen as beneficial to health and are sought after. The aim of this review was to comprehensively summarize the currently published studies regarding the effects of Tai Chi on heart rate variability. Both consistent and inconsistent findings are presented and discussed, and an overall conclusion attained which could benefit future clinical studies. PMID:27157960

  9. Effects of Vibration and G-Loading on Heart Rate, Breathing Rate, and Response Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godinez, Angelica; Ayzenberg, Ruthie; Liston, Dorian B.; Stone, Leland S.

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace and applied environments commonly expose pilots and astronauts to G-loading and vibration, alone and in combination, with well-known sensorimotor (Cohen, 1970) and performance consequences (Adelstein et al., 2008). Physiological variables such as heart rate (HR) and breathing rate (BR) have been shown to increase with G-loading (Yajima et al., 1994) and vibration (e.g. Guignard, 1965, 1985) alone. To examine the effects of G-loading and vibration, alone and in combination, we measured heart rate and breathing rate under aerospace-relevant conditions (G-loads of 1 Gx and 3.8 Gx; vibration of 0.5 gx at 8, 12, and 16 Hz).

  10. Heart rate variability biofeedback: how and why does it work?

    PubMed Central

    Lehrer, Paul M.; Gevirtz, Richard

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there has been substantial support for heart rate variability biofeedback (HRVB) as a treatment for a variety of disorders and for performance enhancement (Gevirtz, 2013). Since conditions as widely varied as asthma and depression seem to respond to this form of cardiorespiratory feedback training, the issue of possible mechanisms becomes more salient. The most supported possible mechanism is the strengthening of homeostasis in the baroreceptor (Vaschillo et al., 2002; Lehrer et al., 2003). Recently, the effect on the vagal afferent pathway to the frontal cortical areas has been proposed. In this article, we review these and other possible mechanisms that might explain the positive effects of HRVB. PMID:25101026

  11. Learning by Heart: Students Use Heart Rate Patterns To Identify Nervous System Imbalances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerly, Spafford C.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a science unit on heart rate variability (HVR) patterns. Uses spectral analysis to determine the effects of environmental stimulants such as music and emotional stress on heart rate. Observes relaxation techniques and their effects on the autonomous nervous system. (Contains 12 references.) (YDS)

  12. Respiratory modulation and baroreflex control of heart rate in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verheyden, Bart; Couckuyt, Kurt; Liu, Jiexin; Aubert, Andre

    During everyday life, gravity constantly stresses the human circulation by diminishing venous return in the upright position. This induces baroreflex-mediated cardiovascular adjustments that are aimed to prevent the blood pressure from falling. In weightlessness, gravitational pressure gradients do not arise in the circulation so that baroreflex function remains chronically unchallenged. This may contribute to the development of post spaceflight orthostatic intolerance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate respiratory modulation and baroreflex control of heart rate after a week of weightlessness in space. We tested the hypothesis that cardiovascular control in space will be similar to the baseline supine condition on Earth. We studied nine male cosmonauts during seven different space missions aboard the ISS (age 40 - 52 yrs, height 1.69 - 1.85 m, weight 67 - 90 kg). Data collection was performed between 30 and 45 days before launch in the standing and supine positions, and after 8 days in space. Cosmonauts were carefully trained to perform in-flight data collection by themselves. They were instructed to pace their breathing to a fixed rate of 12 breaths per minute (0.2 Hz) for a total duration of 3 minutes. The electrocardiogram and beat-by-beat finger arterial blood pressure were recorded at 1-kHz sample rate. Respiratory rate was evaluated using an abdominal pressure sensor. We used power spectral analysis to calculate respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) as well as the low-frequency (0.04 - 0.15 Hz) powers of spontaneous oscillations in heart rate and systolic blood pressure. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was estimated in the time domain using cross-correlation analysis. As expected, there was a rise in heart rate upon assuming the standing position before space- flight (59 ± 6 to 79 ± 11 beats per min; p ¡ 0.001). This was accompanied by an increase in mean arterial blood pressure (84 ± 6 to 93 ± 6 mmHg; p ¡ 0.001). Standing up further induced a marked increase in the low-frequency powers of systolic blood pressure oscillations (8 ± 7 to 17 ± 11 mmHg2; p = 0.018), whereas those in heart rate remained unchanged (445 ± 512 to 621 ± 799 ms2; p = 0.315). Alternatively, there was a reduction in RSA from 546 ± 167 ms2 to 158 ± 298 ms2 and in spontaneous BRS from 14 ± 5 ms/mmHg to 6 ± 2 ms/mmHg upon changing from supine to standing (both p ¡ 0.001). After a week of weightlessness in space, heart rate (61 ± 8 beats per min) and mean blood pressure (83 ± 6 mmHg) returned to the pre-flight supine values. This was also true for the low-frequency powers of systolic blood pressure (7 ± 4 mmHg2) and of heart rate (741 ± 716 ms2), as well as for RSA (465 ± 269 ms2) and spontaneous BRS (14 ± 4 ms/mmHg). It is concluded that cardiovascular control after one week in space corresponds to the pre-flight supine condition. This is characterized by a chronically increased vagal-cardiac outflow and suppressed sympathetic vasomotor modulation compared with the standing position on Earth. This kind of chronic baroreflex unloading is likely to contribute to post-spaceflight functional impairment of orthostatic blood pressure control.

  13. Effect of suprachiasmatic lesions on diurnal heart rate rhythm in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleh, M. A.; Winget, C. M.

    1977-01-01

    Heart rate and locomotor activity of rats kept under 12L/12D illumination regimen were recorded every six minutes for ten days using implantable radio transmitters. Some of the rats then received bilateral RF lesions into the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Control sham operations were performed on the rest of the animals. After recovery from surgery, recording of heart rate and locomotor activity was continued for ten days. SCN-lesioned rats showed no significant diurnal fluctuation in heart rate, while normal and sham-operated rats showed the normal diurnal rhythm in that function. The arrhythmic diurnal heart-rate pattern of SCN rats appeared to be correlated with their sporadic activity pattern. The integrity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus is therefore necessary for the generation and/or expression of diurnal rhythmicity in heart rate in the rat.

  14. Visual discrimination learning in dwarf goats and associated changes in heart rate and heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Langbein, Jan; Nrnberg, G; Manteuffel, G

    2004-09-30

    We studied visual discrimination learning in a group of Nigerian dwarf goats using a computer-based learning device which was integrated in the animals' home pen. We conducted three consecutive learning tasks (T1, T2 and T3), each of which lasted for 13 days. In each task, a different set of four visual stimuli was presented on a computer screen in a four-choice design. Predefined sequences of stimulus combinations were presented in a pseudorandom order. Animals were rewarded with drinking water when they chose the positive stimulus by pressing a button next to it. Noninvasive measurements of goats' heartbeat intervals were carried out on the first and the last 2 days of each learning task. We analysed heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) of resting animals to study sustained physiological effects related to general learning challenge rather than acute excitement during an actual learning session. The number of trials to reach the learning criterion was 1000 in T1, when visual stimuli were presented to the goats for the first time, but decreased to 210 in T2 and 240 in T3, respectively. A stable plateau of correct choices between 70% and 80% was reached on Day 10 in T1, on Day 8 in T2 and on Day 6 in T3. We found a significant influence of the task and of the interaction between task and day on learning success. Whereas HR increased throughout T1, this relationship was inverted in T2 and T3, indicating different effects on the HR depending on how familiar goats were with the learning task. We found a significant influence of the task and the interaction between task and time within the task on HRV parameters, indicating changes of vagal activity at the heart. The results suggest that changes in HR related to learning were predominantly caused by a withdrawal of vagal activity at the heart. With regard to nonlinear processes in heartbeat regulation, increased deterministic shares of HRV indicated that the animals did not really relax until the end of T3. Comparing changes of HR and HRV in T3 and in a subsequent postexperiment (PE), we assume a positive effect of such cognitive challenges once the task had been learned by the animals. PMID:15327907

  15. Dynamic heart rate estimation using principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yong-Poh; Raveendran, P; Lim, Chern-Loon; Kwan, Ban-Hoe

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, facial images from various video sequences are used to obtain a heart rate reading. In this study, a video camera is used to capture the facial images of eight subjects whose heart rates vary dynamically, between 81 and 153 BPM. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used to recover the blood volume pulses (BVP) which can be used for the heart rate estimation. An important consideration for accuracy of the dynamic heart rate estimation is to determine the shortest video duration that realizes it. This video duration is chosen when the six principal components (PC) are least correlated amongst them. When this is achieved, the first PC is used to obtain the heart rate. The results obtained from the proposed method are compared to the readings obtained from the Polar heart rate monitor. Experimental results show the proposed method is able to estimate the dynamic heart rate readings using less computational requirements when compared to the existing method. The mean absolute error and the standard deviation of the absolute errors between experimental readings and actual readings are 2.18 BPM and 1.71 BPM respectively. PMID:26601022

  16. Stochastic heart-rate model can reveal pathologic cardiac dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuusela, Tom

    2004-03-01

    A simple one-dimensional Langevin-type stochastic difference equation can simulate the heart-rate fluctuations in a time scale from minutes to hours. The model consists of a deterministic nonlinear part and a stochastic part typical of Gaussian noise, and both parts can be directly determined from measured heart-rate data. Data from healthy subjects typically exhibit the deterministic part with two or more stable fixed points. Studies of 15 congestive heart-failure subjects reveal that the deterministic part of pathologic heart dynamics has no clear stable fixed points. Direct simulations of the stochastic model for normal and pathologic cases can produce statistical parameters similar to those of real subjects. Results directly indicate that pathologic situations simplify the heart-rate control system.

  17. Phase Transition in a Healthy Human Heart Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyono, Ken; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Aoyagi, Naoko; Togo, Fumiharu; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2005-07-01

    A healthy human heart rate displays complex fluctuations which share characteristics of physical systems in a critical state. We demonstrate that the human heart rate in healthy individuals undergoes a dramatic breakdown of criticality characteristics, reminiscent of continuous second order phase transitions. By studying the germane determinants, we show that the hallmark of criticality—highly correlated fluctuations—is observed only during usual daily activity, and a breakdown of these characteristics occurs in prolonged, strenuous exercise and sleep. This finding is the first reported discovery of the dynamical phase transition phenomenon in a biological control system and will be a key to understanding the heart rate control system in health and disease.

  18. Scaling Behaviour and Memory in Heart Rate of Healthy Human

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Shi-Min; Peng, Hu; Yang, Hui-Jie; Zhou, Tao; Zhou, Pei-Ling; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2007-10-01

    We investigate a set of complex heart rate time series from healthy human in different behaviour states with the detrended fluctuation analysis and diffusion entropy (DE) method. It is proposed that the scaling properties are influenced by behaviour states. The memory detected by DE exhibits an approximately same pattern after a detrending procedure. Both of them demonstrate the long-range strong correlations in heart rate. These findings may be helpful to understand the underlying dynamical evolution process in the heart rate control system, as well as to model the cardiac dynamic process.

  19. Fetal heart rate monitoring: from Doppler to computerized analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ji Young

    2016-01-01

    The monitoring of fetal heart rate (FHR) status is an important method to check well-being of the baby during labor. Since the electronic FHR monitoring was introduced 40 years ago, it has been expected to be an innovative screening test to detect fetuses who are becoming hypoxic and who may benefit from cesarean delivery or operative vaginal delivery. However, several randomized controlled trials have failed to prove that electronic FHR monitoring had any benefit of reducing the perinatal mortality and morbidity. Also it is now clear that the FHR monitoring had high intra- and interobserver disagreements and increased the rate of cesarean delivery. Despite such limitations, the FHR monitoring is still one of the most important obstetric procedures in clinical practice, and the cardiotocogram is the most-used equipment. To supplement cardiotocogram, new methods of computerized FHR analysis and electrocardiogram have been developed, and several clinical researches have been currently performed. Computerized equipment makes us to analyze beat-to-beat variability and short term heart rate patterns. Furthermore, researches about multiparameters of FHR variability will be ongoing. PMID:27004196

  20. Real-time Continuous Assessment Method for Mental and Physiological Condition using Heart Rate Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Kiyoko; Ishii, Naohiro

    It is necessary to monitor the daily health condition for preventing stress syndrome. In this study, it was proposed the method assessing the mental and physiological condition, such as the work stress or the relaxation, using heart rate variability at real time and continuously. The instantanuous heart rate (HR), and the ratio of the number of extreme points (NEP) and the number of heart beats were calculated for assessing mental and physiological condition. In this method, 20 beats heart rate were used to calculate these indexes. These were calculated in one beat interval. Three conditions, which are sitting rest, performing mental arithmetic and watching relaxation movie, were assessed using our proposed algorithm. The assessment accuracies were 71.9% and 55.8%, when performing mental arithmetic and watching relaxation movie respectively. In this method, the mental and physiological condition was assessed using only 20 regressive heart beats, so this method is considered as the real time assessment method.

  1. Heart Rate at Hospital Discharge in Patients With Heart Failure Is Associated With Mortality and Rehospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Laskey, Warren K.; Alomari, Ihab; Cox, Margueritte; Schulte, Phillip J.; Zhao, Xin; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Heidenreich, Paul A.; Eapen, Zubin J.; Yancy, Clyde; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Fonarow, Gregg C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether heart rate upon discharge following hospitalization for heart failure is associated with long‐term adverse outcomes and whether this association differs between patients with sinus rhythm (SR) and atrial fibrillation (AF) have not been well studied. Methods and Results We conducted a retrospective cohort study from clinical registry data linked to Medicare claims for 46 217 patients participating in Get With The Guidelines®–Heart Failure. Cox proportional‐hazards models were used to estimate the association between discharge heart rate and all‐cause mortality, all‐cause readmission, and the composite outcome of mortality/readmission through 1 year. For SR and AF patients with heart rate ≥75, the association between heart rate and mortality (expressed as hazard ratio [HR] per 10 beats‐per‐minute increment) was significant at 0 to 30 days (SR: HR 1.30, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.39; AF: HR 1.23, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.29) and 31 to 365 days (SR: HR 1.15, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.20; AF: HR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.08). Similar associations between heart rate and all‐cause readmission and the composite outcome were obtained for SR and AF patients from 0 to 30 days but only in the composite outcome for SR patients over the longer term. The HR from 0 to 30 days exceeded that from 31 to 365 days for both SR and AF patients. At heart rates <75, an association was significant for mortality only for both SR and AF patients. Conclusions Among older patients hospitalized with heart failure, higher discharge heart rate was associated with increased risks of death and rehospitalization, with higher risk in the first 30 days and for SR compared with AF. PMID:25904590

  2. Deletion of neurturin impairs development of cholinergic nerves and heart rate control in postnatal mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Downs, Anthony M; Jalloh, Hawa B; Prater, Kayla J; Fregoso, Santiago P; Bond, Cherie E; Hampton, Thomas G; Hoover, Donald B

    2016-05-01

    The neurotrophic factor neurturin is required for normal cholinergic innervation of adult mouse heart and bradycardic responses to vagal stimulation. Our goals were to determine effects of neurturin deletion on development of cardiac chronotropic and dromotropic functions, vagal baroreflex response, and cholinergic nerve density in nodal regions of postnatal mice. Experiments were performed on postnatal C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and neurturin knockout (KO) mice. Serial electrocardiograms were recorded noninvasively from conscious pups using an ECGenie apparatus. Mice were treated with atenolol to evaluate and block sympathetic effects on heart rate (HR) and phenylephrine (PE) to stimulate the baroreflex. Immunohistochemistry was used to label cholinergic nerves in paraffin sections. WT and KO mice showed similar age-dependent increases in HR and decreases in PR interval between postnatal days (P) 2.5 and 21. Treatment with atenolol reduced HR significantly in WT and KO pups at P7.5. PE caused a reflex bradycardia that was significantly smaller in KO pups. Cholinergic nerve density was significantly less in nodal regions of P7.5 KO mice. We conclude that cholinergic nerves have minimal influence on developmental changes in HR and PR, QRS, and QTc intervals in mouse pups. However, cholinergic nerves mediate reflex bradycardia by 1 week postnatally. Deletion of neurturin impairs cholinergic innervation of the heart and the vagal efferent component of the baroreflex early during postnatal development. PMID:27162260

  3. Signal processing methodologies for an acoustic fetal heart rate monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pretlow, Robert A., III; Stoughton, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Research and development is presented of real time signal processing methodologies for the detection of fetal heart tones within a noise-contaminated signal from a passive acoustic sensor. A linear predictor algorithm is utilized for detection of the heart tone event and additional processing derives heart rate. The linear predictor is adaptively 'trained' in a least mean square error sense on generic fetal heart tones recorded from patients. A real time monitor system is described which outputs to a strip chart recorder for plotting the time history of the fetal heart rate. The system is validated in the context of the fetal nonstress test. Comparisons are made with ultrasonic nonstress tests on a series of patients. Comparative data provides favorable indications of the feasibility of the acoustic monitor for clinical use.

  4. Method of Discriminant Gravity Tolerance using Heart Rate Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Kiyoko; Takada, Hiroki; Iwase, Satoshi

    When returning on the earth by the space flight, the space deconditioning may be developed. As this countermeasure, the artificial gravity load device using the centrifuge is proposed in the space station. But the gravity load might cause the faint, and safe gravity load is uncertainty. We proposed that discriminate strength of gravity tolerance using heart rate variability time series. Step function was inputted to AR model estimated from heart rate variability time series during rest or under light gravity load, and strength of the gravity tolerance was discriminated by the step response function. On the result, discriminant accuracy was 87.5% by using heart rate variability time series when gravity load of 1.0 G was added to the human lying on the supine. Therefore, possibility of discriminant of gravity tolerance was obtained by using heart rate variability time series when sympathetic hyperactivity. Discriminant of the gravity tolerance is expected before countermeasure of space deconditioning is executed.

  5. Heart Rate Response and Lactic Acid Concentration in Squash Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudin, Paula; And Others

    1978-01-01

    It was concluded that playing squash is an activity that results in heart rate responses of sufficient intensity to elicit aerobic training effects without producing high lactic acid concentration in the blood. (MM)

  6. Heart rate measurement as a tool to quantify sedentary behavior.

    PubMed

    Åkerberg, Anna; Koshmak, Gregory; Johansson, Anders; Lindén, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Sedentary work is very common today. The aim of this pilot study was to attempt to differentiate between typical work situations and to investigate the possibility to break sedentary behavior, based on physiological measurement among office workers. Ten test persons used one heart rate based activity monitor (Linkura), one pulse oximeter device (Wrist) and one movement based activity wristband (Fitbit Flex), in different working situations. The results showed that both heart rate devices, Linkura and Wrist, were able to detect differences in heart rate between the different working situations (resting, sitting, standing, slow walk and medium fast walk). The movement based device, Fitbit Flex, was only able to separate differences in steps between slow walk and medium fast walk. It can be concluded that heart rate measurement is a promising tool for quantifying and separating different working situations, such as sitting, standing and walking. PMID:25980855

  7. Heart rate and estimated energy expenditure during ballroom dancing.

    PubMed

    Blanksby, B A; Reidy, P W

    1988-06-01

    Ten competitive ballroom dance couples performed simulated competitive sequences of Modern and Latin American dance. Heart rate was telemetered during the dance sequences and related to direct measures of oxygen uptake and heart rate obtained while walking on a treadmill. Linear regression was employed to estimate gross and net energy expenditures of the dance sequences. A multivariate analysis of variance with repeated measures on the dance factor was applied to the data to test for interaction and main effects on the sex and dance factors. Overall mean heart rate values for the Modern dance sequence were 170 beats.min-1 and 173 beats.min-1 for males and females respectively. During the Latin American sequence mean overall heart rate for males was 168 beats.min-1 and 177 beats.min-1 for females. Predicted mean gross values of oxygen consumption for the males were 42.8 +/- 5.7 ml.kg-1 min-1 and 42.8 +/- 6.9 ml.kg-1 min-1 for the Modern and Latin American sequences respectively. Corresponding gross estimates of oxygen consumption for the females were 34.7 +/- 3.8 ml.kg-1 min-1 and 36.1 +/- 4.1 ml.kg-1 min-1. Males were estimated to expand 54.1 +/- 8.1 kJ.min-1 of energy during the Modern sequence and 54.0 +/- 9.6 kJ.min-1 during the Latin American sequence, while predicted energy expenditure for females was 34.7 +/- 3.8 kJ.min-1 and 36.1 +/- 4.1 kJ.min-1 for Modern and Latin American dance respectively. The results suggested that both males and females were dancing at greater than 80% of their maximum oxygen consumption. A significant difference between males and females was observed for predicted gross and net values of oxygen consumption (in L.min-1 and ml.kg-1 min-1). PMID:3167503

  8. Assessment of anxiety using heart rate nonlinear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, Julian F.; Friedman, Bruce H.

    1993-11-01

    Various anxiety states have been linked with disorders of the autonomic nervous system. These autonomic disorders may be revealed by analysis of physiological time series such as the heart rate interbeat interval series. The present paper reports a general model of biological system functioning and related assessment indices based on recent nonlinear dynamical systems approaches. In particular, two experimental studies are reported which suggest the utility of heart rate nonlinear dynamics in the assessment of anxiety.

  9. Sympathetic reinnervation and heart rate variability after cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Lord, S. W.; Clayton, R. H.; Mitchell, L.; Dark, J. H.; Murray, A.; McComb, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart rate variability is thought to measure autonomic modulation, but the relation has never been demonstrated directly in humans. AIM: To test the hypothesis that increased low frequency heart rate variability reflects sympathetic reinnervation after cardiac transplantation. PATIENTS: 24 cardiac transplant recipients at the time of routine surveillance coronary angiography two or more years after cardiac transplantation, and 10 controls with normal coronary arteries undergoing angiography for investigation of chest pain. SETTING: Regional cardiothoracic centre. METHODS: Sympathetic effector function at the sinus node was assessed by measuring the fall in cycle length for two minutes after injection of tyramine to the artery supplying the sinus node. Heart rate variability was measured from three-minute RR interval sequences at rest, during metronomic respiration, and before and after atropine. RESULTS: The logarithm of the low frequency component of heart rate variability during metronomic respiration was linearly related to the logarithm of the change in cycle length after injection of tyramine (R2 = 0.28, P = 0.007). Absolute units more accurately reflected sympathetic effector function than did normalised units or the ratio of low frequency to high frequency. Atropine did not affect high frequency heart rate variability in transplant recipients. CONCLUSIONS: The low frequency component of heart rate variability is directly related to sympathetic reinnervation to the sinus node. PMID:9227297

  10. Human heart rate variability relation is unchanged during motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, T. J.; Berger, R. D.; Oman, C. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    In a study of 18 human subjects, we applied a new technique, estimation of the transfer function between instantaneous lung volume (ILV) and instantaneous heart rate (HR), to assess autonomic activity during motion sickness. Two control recordings of ILV and electrocardiogram (ECG) were made prior to the development of motion sickness. During the first, subjects were seated motionless, and during the second they were seated rotating sinusoidally about an earth vertical axis. Subjects then wore prism goggles that reverse the left-right visual field and performed manual tasks until they developed moderate motion sickness. Finally, ILV and ECG were recorded while subjects maintained a relatively constant level of sickness by intermittent eye closure during rotation with the goggles. Based on analyses of ILV to HR transfer functions from the three conditions, we were unable to demonstrate a change in autonomic control of heart rate due to rotation alone or due to motion sickness. These findings do not support the notion that moderate motion sickness is manifested as a generalized autonomic response.

  11. 1/f scaling in heart rate requires antagonistic autonomic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Hayano, Junichiro; Sakata, Seiichiro; Kwak, Shin; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2004-11-01

    We present systematic evidence for the origins of 1/f -type temporal scaling in human heart rate. The heart rate is regulated by the activity of two branches of the autonomic nervous system: the parasympathetic (PNS) and the sympathetic (SNS) nervous systems. We examine alterations in the scaling property when the balance between PNS and SNS activity is modified, and find that the relative PNS suppression by congestive heart failure results in a substantial increase in the Hurst exponent H towards random-walk scaling 1/f2 and a similar breakdown is observed with relative SNS suppression by primary autonomic failure. These results suggest that 1/f scaling in heart rate requires the intricate balance between the antagonistic activity of PNS and SNS.

  12. Gender- and age-related differences in heart rate dynamics: are women more complex than men?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, S. M.; Goldberger, A. L.; Pincus, S. M.; Mietus, J.; Lipsitz, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This study aimed to quantify the complex dynamics of beat-to-beat sinus rhythm heart rate fluctuations and to determine their differences as a function of gender and age. BACKGROUND. Recently, measures of heart rate variability and the nonlinear "complexity" of heart rate dynamics have been used as indicators of cardiovascular health. Because women have lower cardiovascular risk and greater longevity than men, we postulated that there are important gender-related differences in beat-to-beat heart rate dynamics. METHODS. We analyzed heart rate dynamics during 8-min segments of continuous electrocardiographic recording in healthy young (20 to 39 years old), middle-aged (40 to 64 years old) and elderly (65 to 90 years old) men (n = 40) and women (n = 27) while they performed spontaneous and metronomic (15 breaths/min) breathing. Relatively high (0.15 to 0.40 Hz) and low (0.01 to 0.15 Hz) frequency components of heart rate variability were computed using spectral analysis. The overall "complexity" of each heart rate time series was quantified by its approximate entropy, a measure of regularity derived from nonlinear dynamics ("chaos" theory). RESULTS. Mean heart rate did not differ between the age groups or genders. High frequency heart rate power and the high/low frequency power ratio decreased with age in both men and women (p < 0.05). The high/low frequency power ratio during spontaneous and metronomic breathing was greater in women than men (p < 0.05). Heart rate approximate entropy decreased with age and was higher in women than men (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS. High frequency heart rate spectral power (associated with parasympathetic activity) and the overall complexity of heart rate dynamics are higher in women than men. These complementary findings indicate the need to account for gender-as well as age-related differences in heart rate dynamics. Whether these gender differences are related to lower cardiovascular disease risk and greater longevity in women requires further study.

  13. Validity of a heart rate monitor during work in the laboratory and on the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, A. D. Jr; Lee, S. M.; Greenisen, M. C.; Bishop, P.

    1997-01-01

    Accurate heart rate measurement during work is required for many industrial hygiene and ergonomics situations. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the validity of heart rate measurements obtained by a simple, lightweight, commercially available wrist-worn heart rate monitor (HRM) during work (cycle exercise) sessions conducted in the laboratory and also during the particularly challenging work environment of space flight. Three different comparisons were made. The first compared HRM data to simultaneous electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings of varying heart rates that were generated by an ECG simulator. The second compared HRM data to ECG recordings collected during work sessions of 14 subjects in the laboratory. Finally, ECG downlink and HRM data were compared in four astronauts who performed cycle exercise during space flight. The data were analyzed using regression techniques. The results were that the HRM recorded virtually identical heart rates compared with ECG recordings for the data set generated by an ECG simulator. The regression equation for the relationship between ECG versus HRM heart rate data during work in the laboratory was: ECG HR = 0.99 x (HRM) + 0.82 (r2 = 0.99). Finally, the agreement between ECG downlink data and HRM data during space flight was also very high, with the regression equation being: Downlink ECG HR = 1.05 x (HRM) -5.71 (r2 = 0.99). The results of this study indicate that the HRM provides accurate data and may be used to reliably obtain valid data regarding heart rate responses during work.

  14. Heart rate response to taekwondo forms and technique combinations. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pieter, W; Taaffe, D; Heijmans, J

    1990-03-01

    The telemetered exercise and recovery heart rates of seven male recreational taekwondo students were recorded while they were performing two different beginner's forms (one with only arm techniques and one with both arm and leg techniques) and two sets of technique combinations, one set consisting of only kicks and the other of kicks and punches. No significant differences were found between the two forms or between the two sets of combinations. Significant differences were observed, however, between the forms on the one hand and the combinations on the other: the combinations elicited higher exercise heart rates than the forms. The exercise heart rate for both forms was 80% of the age-predicted maximal heart rate, while that of the combinations was between 90 and 91% of the age-predicted maximal heart rate. The recovery heart rates expressed as a percentage of the age-predicted maximal heart rate, yielded 64-67% for the forms and 73% for both combinations. PMID:2366544

  15. Nonlinear systems dynamics in cardiovascular physiology: The heart rate delay map and lower body negative pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, John C.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary study of the applicability of nonlinear dynamic systems analysis techniques to low body negative pressure (LBNP) studies. In particular, the applicability of the heart rate delay map is investigated. It is suggested that the heart rate delay map has potential as a supplemental tool in the assessment of subject performance in LBNP tests and possibly in the determination of susceptibility to cardiovascular deconditioning with spaceflight.

  16. Assessing positive emotional states in dogs using heart rate and heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Zupan, Manja; Buskas, Julia; Altimiras, Jordi; Keeling, Linda J

    2016-03-01

    Since most animal species have been recognized as sentient beings, emotional state may be a good indicator of welfare in animals. The goal of this study was to manipulate the environment of nine beagle research dogs to highlight physiological responses indicative of different emotional experiences. Stimuli were selected to be a more or a less positive food (meatball or food pellet) or social reward (familiar person or less familiar person). That all the stimuli were positive and of different reward value was confirmed in a runway motivation test. Dogs were tested individually while standing facing a display theatre where the different stimuli could be shown by lifting a shutter. The dogs approached and remained voluntarily in the test system. They were tested in four sessions (of 20s each) for each of the four stimuli. A test session consisted of four presentation phases (1st exposure to stimulus, post exposure, 2nd exposure, and access to reward). Heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) responses were recorded during testing in the experimental room and also when lying resting in a quiet familiar room. A new method of 'stitching' short periods of HRV data together was used in the analysis. When testing different stimuli, no significant differences were observed in HR and LF:HF ratio (relative power in low frequency (LF) and the high-frequency (HF) range), implying that the sympathetic tone was activated similarly for all the stimuli and may suggest that dogs were in a state of positive arousal. A decrease of HF was associated with the meatball stimulus compared to the food pellet and the reward phase (interacting with the person or eating the food) was associated with a decrease in HF and RMSSD (root mean square of successive differences of inter-beat intervals) compared to the preceding phase (looking at the person or food). This suggests that parasympathetic deactivation is associated with a more positive emotional state in the dog. A similar reduction in HF and RMSSD was found in the test situation compared to the resting situation. This is congruent with the expected autonomic effects related to postural shift i.e. sympathetic activation and parasympathetic withdrawal, during standing versus lying, but it cannot explain the parasympathetic deactivation in response to the more positive stimuli since the dogs were always standing in the test situation. We discuss the systematic pattern of responses, which support that increased HR and LF:HF ratio are associated with emotional arousal, but add the new proposal that a combined decrease in RMSSD and HF may reflect a more positively valenced emotional state even when an individual is already in a positive psychological state. PMID:26631546

  17. Heart Rate Variability Dynamics for the Prognosis of Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Villegas, Juan F.; Lam-Espinosa, Eric; Ramirez-Moreno, David F.; Calvo-Echeverry, Paulo C.; Agredo-Rodriguez, Wilfredo

    2011-01-01

    Statistical, spectral, multi-resolution and non-linear methods were applied to heart rate variability (HRV) series linked with classification schemes for the prognosis of cardiovascular risk. A total of 90 HRV records were analyzed: 45 from healthy subjects and 45 from cardiovascular risk patients. A total of 52 features from all the analysis methods were evaluated using standard two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (KS-test). The results of the statistical procedure provided input to multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural networks, radial basis function (RBF) neural networks and support vector machines (SVM) for data classification. These schemes showed high performances with both training and test sets and many combinations of features (with a maximum accuracy of 96.67%). Additionally, there was a strong consideration for breathing frequency as a relevant feature in the HRV analysis. PMID:21386966

  18. Automated Fetal Heart Rate Analysis in Labor: Decelerations and Overshoots

    SciTech Connect

    Georgieva, A. E.; Payne, S. J.; Moulden, M.; Redman, C. W. G.

    2010-10-25

    Electronic fetal heart rate (FHR) recording is a standard way of monitoring fetal health in labor. Decelerations and accelerations usually indicate fetal distress and normality respectively. But one type of acceleration may differ, namely an overshoot that may atypically reflect fetal stress. Here we describe a new method for detecting decelerations, accelerations and overshoots as part of a novel system for computerized FHR analysis (OxSyS). There was poor agreement between clinicians when identifying these FHR features visually, which precluded setting a gold standard of interpretation. We therefore introduced 'modified' Sensitivity (SE deg.) and 'modified' Positive Predictive Value (PPV deg.) as appropriate performance measures with which the algorithm was optimized. The relation between overshoots and fetal compromise in labor was studied in 15 cases and 15 controls. Overshoots showed promise as an indicator of fetal compromise. Unlike ordinary accelerations, overshoots cannot be considered to be reassuring features of fetal health.

  19. Breathing frequency bias in fractal analysis of heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Perakakis, Pandelis; Taylor, Michael; Martinez-Nieto, Eduardo; Revithi, Ioanna; Vila, Jaime

    2009-09-01

    Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) is an algorithm widely used to determine fractal long-range correlations in physiological signals. Its application to heart rate variability (HRV) has proven useful in distinguishing healthy subjects from patients with cardiovascular disease. In this study we examined the effect of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) on the performance of DFA applied to HRV. Predictions based on a mathematical model were compared with those obtained from a sample of 14 normal subjects at three breathing frequencies: 0.1Hz, 0.2Hz and 0.25Hz. Results revealed that: (1) the periodical properties of RSA produce a change of the correlation exponent in HRV at a scale corresponding to the respiratory period, (2) the short-term DFA exponent is significantly reduced when breathing frequency rises from 0.1Hz to 0.2Hz. These findings raise important methodological questions regarding the application of fractal measures to short-term HRV. PMID:19559748

  20. Automated Fetal Heart Rate Analysis in Labor: Decelerations and Overshoots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, A. E.; Payne, S. J.; Moulden, M.; Redman, C. W. G.

    2010-10-01

    Electronic fetal heart rate (FHR) recording is a standard way of monitoring fetal health in labor. Decelerations and accelerations usually indicate fetal distress and normality respectively. But one type of acceleration may differ, namely an overshoot that may atypically reflect fetal stress. Here we describe a new method for detecting decelerations, accelerations and overshoots as part of a novel system for computerized FHR analysis (OxSyS). There was poor agreement between clinicians when identifying these FHR features visually, which precluded setting a gold standard of interpretation. We therefore introduced `modified' Sensitivity (SE°) and `modified' Positive Predictive Value (PPV°) as appropriate performance measures with which the algorithm was optimized. The relation between overshoots and fetal compromise in labor was studied in 15 cases and 15 controls. Overshoots showed promise as an indicator of fetal compromise. Unlike ordinary accelerations, overshoots cannot be considered to be reassuring features of fetal health.

  1. Quantification of fetal heart rate regularity using symbolic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, P.; Cysarz, D.; Lange, S.; Geue, D.; Groenemeyer, D.

    2007-03-01

    Fetal heart rate complexity was examined on the basis of RR interval time series obtained in the second and third trimester of pregnancy. In each fetal RR interval time series, short term beat-to-beat heart rate changes were coded in 8bit binary sequences. Redundancies of the 28 different binary patterns were reduced by two different procedures. The complexity of these sequences was quantified using the approximate entropy (ApEn), resulting in discrete ApEn values which were used for classifying the sequences into 17 pattern sets. Also, the sequences were grouped into 20 pattern classes with respect to identity after rotation or inversion of the binary value. There was a specific, nonuniform distribution of the sequences in the pattern sets and this differed from the distribution found in surrogate data. In the course of gestation, the number of sequences increased in seven pattern sets, decreased in four and remained unchanged in six. Sequences that occurred less often over time, both regular and irregular, were characterized by patterns reflecting frequent beat-to-beat reversals in heart rate. They were also predominant in the surrogate data, suggesting that these patterns are associated with stochastic heart beat trains. Sequences that occurred more frequently over time were relatively rare in the surrogate data. Some of these sequences had a high degree of regularity and corresponded to prolonged heart rate accelerations or decelerations which may be associated with directed fetal activity or movement or baroreflex activity. Application of the pattern classes revealed that those sequences with a high degree of irregularity correspond to heart rate patterns resulting from complex physiological activity such as fetal breathing movements. The results suggest that the development of the autonomic nervous system and the emergence of fetal behavioral states lead to increases in not only irregular but also regular heart rate patterns. Using symbolic dynamics to examine the cardiovascular system may thus lead to new insight with respect to fetal development.

  2. What is the “normal” fetal heart rate?

    PubMed Central

    Pildner von Steinburg, Stephanie; Boulesteix, Anne-Laure; Lederer, Christian; Grunow, Stefani; Schiermeier, Sven; Hatzmann, Wolfgang; Schneider, Karl-Theodor M.

    2013-01-01

    Aim. There is no consensus about the normal fetal heart rate. Current international guidelines recommend for the normal fetal heart rate (FHR) baseline different ranges of 110 to 150 beats per minute (bpm) or 110 to 160 bpm. We started with a precise definition of “normality” and performed a retrospective computerized analysis of electronically recorded FHR tracings. Methods. We analyzed all recorded cardiotocography tracings of singleton pregnancies in three German medical centers from 2000 to 2007 and identified 78,852 tracings of sufficient quality. For each tracing, the baseline FHR was extracted by eliminating accelerations/decelerations and averaging based on the “delayed moving windows” algorithm. After analyzing 40% of the dataset as “training set” from one hospital generating a hypothetical normal baseline range, evaluation of external validity on the other 60% of the data was performed using data from later years in the same hospital and externally using data from the two other hospitals. Results. Based on the training data set, the “best” FHR range was 115 or 120 to 160 bpm. Validation in all three data sets identified 120 to 160 bpm as the correct symmetric “normal range”. FHR decreases slightly during gestation. Conclusions. Normal ranges for FHR are 120 to 160 bpm. Many international guidelines define ranges of 110 to 160 bpm which seem to be safe in daily practice. However, further studies should confirm that such asymmetric alarm limits are safe, with a particular focus on the lower bound, and should give insights about how to show and further improve the usefulness of the widely used practice of CTG monitoring. PMID:23761161

  3. Heart rate variability and target organ damage in hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We evaluated the association between linear standard Heart Rate Variability (HRV) measures and vascular, renal and cardiac target organ damage (TOD). Methods A retrospective analysis was performed including 200 patients registered in the Regione Campania network (aged 62.4 ± 12, male 64%). HRV analysis was performed by 24-h holter ECG. Renal damage was assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), vascular damage by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), and cardiac damage by left ventricular mass index. Results Significantly lower values of the ratio of low to high frequency power (LF/HF) were found in the patients with moderate or severe eGFR (p-value < 0.001). Similarly, depressed values of indexes of the overall autonomic modulation on heart were found in patients with plaque compared to those with a normal IMT (p-value <0.05). These associations remained significant after adjustment for other factors known to contribute to the development of target organ damage, such as age. Moreover, depressed LF/HF was found also in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy but this association was not significant after adjustment for other factors. Conclusions Depressed HRV appeared to be associated with vascular and renal TOD, suggesting the involvement of autonomic imbalance in the TOD. However, as the mechanisms by which abnormal autonomic balance may lead to TOD, and, particularly, to renal organ damage are not clearly known, further prospective studies with longitudinal design are needed to determine the association between HRV and the development of TOD. PMID:23153340

  4. Heart rate detection from an electronic weighing scale.

    PubMed

    González-Landaeta, R; Casas, O; Pallàs-Areny, R

    2007-01-01

    We propose a novel technique for heart rate detection on a subject that stands on a common electronic weighing scale. The detection relies on sensing force variations related to the blood acceleration in the aorta, works even if wearing footwear, and does not require any sensors attached to the body. We have applied our method to three different weighing scales, and estimated whether their sensitivity and frequency response suited heart rate detection. Scale sensitivities were from 490 nV/V/N to 1670 nV/V/N, all had an underdamped transient response and their dynamic gain error was below 19% at 10 Hz, which are acceptable values for heart rate estimation. We also designed a pulse detection system based on off-the-shelf integrated circuits, whose gain was about 70x10(3) and able to sense force variations about 240 mN. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the main peaks of the pulse signal detected was higher than 48 dB, which is large enough to estimate the heart rate by simple signal processing methods. To validate the method, the ECG and the force signal were simultaneously recorded on 12 volunteers. The maximal error obtained from heart rates determined from these two signals was +/-0.6 beats/minute. PMID:18003457

  5. Heart rate measurement based on face video sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fang; Zhou, Qin-Wu; Wu, Peng; Chen, Xing; Yang, Xiaofeng; Yan, Hong-jian

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes a new non-contact heart rate measurement method based on photoplethysmography (PPG) theory. With this method we can measure heart rate remotely with a camera and ambient light. We collected video sequences of subjects, and detected remote PPG signals through video sequences. Remote PPG signals were analyzed with two methods, Blind Source Separation Technology (BSST) and Cross Spectral Power Technology (CSPT). BSST is a commonly used method, and CSPT is used for the first time in the study of remote PPG signals in this paper. Both of the methods can acquire heart rate, but compared with BSST, CSPT has clearer physical meaning, and the computational complexity of CSPT is lower than that of BSST. Our work shows that heart rates detected by CSPT method have good consistency with the heart rates measured by a finger clip oximeter. With good accuracy and low computational complexity, the CSPT method has a good prospect for the application in the field of home medical devices and mobile health devices.

  6. Heart rate variability interventions for concussion and rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Conder, Robert L.; Conder, Alanna A.

    2014-01-01

    The study of heart rate variability (HRV) has emerged as an essential component of cardiovascular health, as well as a physiological mechanism by which one can increase the interactive communication between the cardiac and the neurocognitive systems (i.e., the body and the brain). It is well-established that lack of HRV implies cardiopathology, morbidity, reduced quality-of-life, and precipitous mortality. On the positive, optimal HRV has been associated with good cardiovascular health, autonomic nervous system (ANS) control, emotional regulation, and enhanced neurocognitive processing. In addition to health benefits, optimal HRV has been shown to improve neurocognitive performance by enhancing focus, visual acuity and readiness, and by promoting emotional regulation needed for peak performance. In concussed athletes and soldiers, concussions not only alter brain connectivity, but also alter cardiac functioning and impair cardiovascular performance upon exertion. Altered sympathetic and parasympathetic balance in the ANS has been postulated as a critical factor in refractory post concussive syndrome (PCS). This article will review both the pathological aspects of reduced HRV on athletic performance, as well as the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular components of concussion and PCS. Additionally, this article will review interventions with HRV biofeedback (HRV BFB) training as a promising and underutilized treatment for sports and military-related concussion. Finally, this article will review research and promising case studies pertaining to use of HRV BFB for enhancement of cognition and performance, with applicability to concussion rehabilitation. PMID:25165461

  7. The Use of Heart Rate Monitors in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Randall; Davis, Kathryn L.; McCord, Tim; Schmidt, Dave; Slezak, Alex M.

    2009-01-01

    The ever-rising rate of obesity and the need for increased physical activity for young children is well documented. Data suggests that today's youth are not participating in enough quality health-enhancing physical activity either in or outside of school. Heart rate monitors have been used by adult exercisers for many years to monitor and assess

  8. The Use of Heart Rate Monitors in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Randall; Davis, Kathryn L.; McCord, Tim; Schmidt, Dave; Slezak, Alex M.

    2009-01-01

    The ever-rising rate of obesity and the need for increased physical activity for young children is well documented. Data suggests that today's youth are not participating in enough quality health-enhancing physical activity either in or outside of school. Heart rate monitors have been used by adult exercisers for many years to monitor and assess…

  9. Heart rate and heart rate variability in pregnant dairy cows and their fetuses determined by fetomaternal electrocardiography.

    PubMed

    Trenk, Lisa; Kuhl, Juliane; Aurich, Jrg; Aurich, Christine; Nagel, Christina

    2015-11-01

    In this study, fetomaternal electrocardiograms were recorded once weekly in cattle during the last 14weeks of gestation. From the recorded beat-to-beat (RR) intervals, heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) variables standard deviation of the RR interval (SDRR) and root mean square of successive RR differences (RMSSD) were calculated. To differentiate between effects of lactation and gestation, pregnant lactating (PL) cows (n=7) and pregnant nonlactating (PNL) heifers (n=8) were included. We hypothesized that lactation is associated with stress detectable by HRV analysis. We also followed the hypothesis that heart rate and HRV are influenced by growth and maturation of the fetus toward term. Maternal heart rate changed over time in both groups, and in PL cows, it decreased with drying-off. During the last 5weeks of gestation, maternal heart rate increased in both groups but was lower in PL cows than in PNL heifers. Maternal HRV did not change over time, but SDRR was significantly higher in PL cows than in PNL heifers, and significant interactions of group time existed. On the basis of HRV, undisturbed pregnancies are thus no stressor for the dam in cattle. Fetal heart rate decreased from week 14 to week 1 before birth with no difference between groups. Gestational age thus determines heart rate in the bovine fetus. The HRV variables SDRR and RMSSD increased toward the end of gestation in fetuses carried by cows but not in those carried by heifers. The increase in HRV indicates maturation of fetal cardiac regulation which may be overrun by high sympathoadrenal activity in fetuses carried by heifers as suggested by their low HRV. PMID:26279313

  10. The Effect of Fetal Heart Rate on the Peak Systolic Velocity of the Fetal Middle Cerebral Artery: Does Heart Rate Matter?

    PubMed Central

    SWARTZ, Anthony E.; RUMA, Michael S.; KIM, Eunhee; HERRING, Amy H.; MENARD, M. Kathryn; MOISE, Kenneth J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To estimate the effect of an increase in the basal heart rate of the fetus on the middle cerebral artery-peak systolic velocity (MCA-PSV). Study Design Prospective longitudinal cohort. Patients between 14 and 36 weeks gestation were enrolled (N=66). Ultrasound examinations were performed monthly. MCA-PSV measurements were assessed at 0-degree angle of insonation at basal fetal heart rate and after application of vibroacoustic stimulation (VAS). Results A total of 514 MCA-PSV measurements were obtained in 66 fetuses. No difference in fetal heart rate pre- and post-VAS was noted prior to 27 weeks’ gestation. A significant increase in fetal heart rate post-VAS was detected from a mean gestational age of 27.1 ± 1.3 weeks onward. A significant decrease in the MCA-PSV was noted between pre- and post-VAS measurements for examinations 3,4, and 5 (p < 0.001, < 0.0001, < 0.0001, respectively). Conclusion Assessment of the MCA-PSV for the detection of fetal anemia, particularly in the third trimester, should be undertaken during a period of baseline fetal heart rate to avoid the potential of a false negative result. PMID:19461416

  11. Visualization of Heart Rate Variability of Long-Term Heart Transplant Patient by Transition Networks: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wdowczyk, Joanna; Makowiec, Danuta; Dorniak, Karolina; Gruchała, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    We present a heart transplant patient at his 17th year of uncomplicated follow-up. Within a frame of routine check out several tests were performed. With such a long and uneventful follow-up some degree of graft reinnervation could be anticipated. However, the patient's electrocardiogram and exercise parameters seemed largely inconclusive in this regard. The exercise heart rate dynamics were suggestive of only mild, if any parasympathetic reinnervation of the graft with persisting sympathetic activation. On the other hand, traditional heart rate variability (HRV) indices were inadequately high, due to erratic rhythm resulting from interference of the persisting recipient sinus node or non-conducted atrial parasystole. New tools, originated from network representation of time series, by visualization short-term dynamical patterns, provided a method to discern HRV increase due to reinnervation from other reasons. PMID:27014081

  12. Visualization of Heart Rate Variability of Long-Term Heart Transplant Patient by Transition Networks: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Wdowczyk, Joanna; Makowiec, Danuta; Dorniak, Karolina; Gruchała, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    We present a heart transplant patient at his 17th year of uncomplicated follow-up. Within a frame of routine check out several tests were performed. With such a long and uneventful follow-up some degree of graft reinnervation could be anticipated. However, the patient's electrocardiogram and exercise parameters seemed largely inconclusive in this regard. The exercise heart rate dynamics were suggestive of only mild, if any parasympathetic reinnervation of the graft with persisting sympathetic activation. On the other hand, traditional heart rate variability (HRV) indices were inadequately high, due to erratic rhythm resulting from interference of the persisting recipient sinus node or non-conducted atrial parasystole. New tools, originated from network representation of time series, by visualization short-term dynamical patterns, provided a method to discern HRV increase due to reinnervation from other reasons. PMID:27014081

  13. Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Control on Return from International Space Station (CCISS)- Heart Rate and Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughson, R. L.; Shoemaker, J. K.; Blaber, A. P.; Arbeille, Ph.; Zuj, K. A.; Greaves, D. K.

    2008-06-01

    CCISS is a project to study the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses of astronauts before, during and after long-duration (>60-day) stays on the International Space Station. The CCISS experiments consist of three phases that are designed to achieve an integrated examination of components responsible for return of blood to the heart, the pumping of blood from the heart and the distribution to the vascular territories including the brain. In this report the data are obtained from the 24-h monitoring of physical activity (Actiwatch on wrist and ankle) and of heart rate (Holter monitor). The data show clear patterns of change in physical activity from predominantly leg-based on Earth to relatively little activity of the ankles with maintained or increased activity of the wrists on ISS. Both on Earth and on ISS the largest changes in heart rate occur during the periods of leg activity. Average heart rate was changed little during the periods of minimal activity or of sleep in comparisons of Earth with in-flight recording both within the first two weeks of flight and the last two weeks. These data clearly show the importance of monitoring heart rate and physical activity simultaneously and show that attempts to derive indicators of autonomic activity from spectral analysis of heart rate variability should not be performed in the absence of knowledge of both variables.

  14. Exaggerated heart rate oscillations during two meditation techniques.

    PubMed

    Peng, C K; Mietus, J E; Liu, Y; Khalsa, G; Douglas, P S; Benson, H; Goldberger, A L

    1999-07-31

    We report extremely prominent heart rate oscillations associated with slow breathing during specific traditional forms of Chinese Chi and Kundalini Yoga meditation techniques in healthy young adults. We applied both spectral analysis and a novel analytic technique based on the Hilbert transform to quantify these heart rate dynamics. The amplitude of these oscillations during meditation was significantly greater than in the pre-meditation control state and also in three non-meditation control groups: i) elite athletes during sleep, ii) healthy young adults during metronomic breathing, and iii) healthy young adults during spontaneous nocturnal breathing. This finding, along with the marked variability of the beat-to-beat heart rate dynamics during such profound meditative states, challenges the notion of meditation as only an autonomically quiescent state. PMID:10454297

  15. Universal structures of normal and pathological heart rate variability

    PubMed Central

    Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M.; Fajardo-López, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The circulatory system of living organisms is an autonomous mechanical system softly tuned with the respiratory system, and both developed by evolution as a response to the complex oxygen demand patterns associated with motion. Circulatory health is rooted in adaptability, which entails an inherent variability. Here, we show that a generalized N-dimensional normalized graph representing heart rate variability reveals two universal arrhythmic patterns as specific signatures of health one reflects cardiac adaptability, and the other the cardiac-respiratory rate tuning. In addition, we identify at least three universal arrhythmic profiles whose presences raise in proportional detriment of the two healthy ones in pathological conditions (myocardial infarction; heart failure; and recovery from sudden death). The presence of the identified universal arrhythmic structures together with the position of the centre of mass of the heart rate variability graph provide a unique quantitative assessment of the health-pathology gradient. PMID:26912108

  16. Universal structures of normal and pathological heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M; Fajardo-López, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The circulatory system of living organisms is an autonomous mechanical system softly tuned with the respiratory system, and both developed by evolution as a response to the complex oxygen demand patterns associated with motion. Circulatory health is rooted in adaptability, which entails an inherent variability. Here, we show that a generalized N-dimensional normalized graph representing heart rate variability reveals two universal arrhythmic patterns as specific signatures of health one reflects cardiac adaptability, and the other the cardiac-respiratory rate tuning. In addition, we identify at least three universal arrhythmic profiles whose presences raise in proportional detriment of the two healthy ones in pathological conditions (myocardial infarction; heart failure; and recovery from sudden death). The presence of the identified universal arrhythmic structures together with the position of the centre of mass of the heart rate variability graph provide a unique quantitative assessment of the health-pathology gradient. PMID:26912108

  17. Matter Over Mind: A Randomised-Controlled Trial of Single-Session Biofeedback Training on Performance Anxiety and Heart Rate Variability in Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Ruth; Outhred, Tim; Heathers, James A. J.; Quintana, Daniel S.; Kemp, Andrew H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Musical performance is a skilled activity performed under intense pressure, thus is often a profound source of anxiety. In other contexts, anxiety and its concomitant symptoms of sympathetic nervous system arousal have been successfully ameliorated with HRV biofeedback (HRV BF), a technique involving slow breathing which augments autonomic and emotional regulatory capacity. Objective: This randomised-controlled study explored the impact of a single 30-minute session of HRV BF on anxiety in response to a highly stressful music performance. Methods A total of 46 trained musicians participated in this study and were randomly allocated to a slow breathing with or without biofeedback or no-treatment control group. A 3 Group×2 Time mixed experimental design was employed to compare the effect of group before and after intervention on performance anxiety (STAI-S) and frequency domain measures of HRV. Results Slow breathing groups (n = 30) showed significantly greater improvements in high frequency (HF) and LF/HF ratio measures of HRV relative to control (n = 15) during 5 minute recordings of performance anticipation following the intervention (effect size: η2 = 0.122 and η2 = 0.116, respectively). The addition of biofeedback to a slow breathing protocol did not produce differential results. While intervention groups did not exhibit an overall reduction in self-reported anxiety, participants with high baseline anxiety who received the intervention (n = 15) displayed greater reductions in self-reported state anxiety relative to those in the control condition (n = 7) (r = 0.379). Conclusions These findings indicate that a single session of slow breathing, regardless of biofeedback, is sufficient for controlling physiological arousal in anticipation of psychosocial stress associated with music performance and that slow breathing is particularly helpful for musicians with high levels of anxiety. Future research is needed to further examine the effects of HRV BF as a low-cost, non-pharmacological treatment for music performance anxiety. PMID:23056361

  18. Generalised heart rate statistics reveal neurally mediated homeostasis transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowiec, D.; Graff, B.; Miklaszewski, W.; Wejer, D.; Kaczkowska, A.; Budrejko, S.; Struzik, Z. R.

    2015-04-01

    Distributions of accelerations and decelerations, obtained from increments of heart rate recorded during a head-up tilt table (HUTT) test provide short-term characterization of the complex cardiovascular response to a rapid controlled dysregulation of homeostasis. A generalised statistic is proposed for evaluating the neural reflexes responsible for restoring the homeostatic dynamics. An evaluation of the effects on heart rate of the neural regulation involved in achieving homeostasis indicates a distinction between vasovagal patients and healthy subjects who are not susceptible to spontaneous fainting. A healthy cardiovascular response to the HUTT test is identified in the sympathetic tone appropriately punctuated by vagal activity.

  19. Robust efficient estimation of heart rate pulse from video

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuchang; Sun, Lingyun; Rohde, Gustavo Kunde

    2014-01-01

    We describe a simple but robust algorithm for estimating the heart rate pulse from video sequences containing human skin in real time. Based on a model of light interaction with human skin, we define the change of blood concentration due to arterial pulsation as a pixel quotient in log space, and successfully use the derived signal for computing the pulse heart rate. Various experiments with different cameras, different illumination condition, and different skin locations were conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed algorithm. Examples computed with normal illumination show the algorithm is comparable with pulse oximeter devices both in accuracy and sensitivity. PMID:24761294

  20. Effect of heart rate on the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves' prostheses (St. Jude Medical) in the aortic position and in the opening phase: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Jahandardoost, Mehdi; Fradet, Guy; Mohammadi, Hadi

    2016-03-01

    To date, to the best of the authors' knowledge, in almost all of the studies performed around the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves, a heart rate of 70-72 beats/min has been considered. In fact, the heart rate of ~72 beats/min does not represent the entire normal physiological conditions under which the aortic or prosthetic valves function. The heart rates of 120 or 50 beats/min may lead to hemodynamic complications, such as plaque formation and/or thromboembolism in patients. In this study, the hemodynamic performance of the bileaflet mechanical heart valves in a wide range of normal and physiological heart rates, that is, 60-150 beats/min, was studied in the opening phase. The model considered in this study was a St. Jude Medical bileaflet mechanical heart valve with the inner diameter of 27 mm in the aortic position. The hemodynamics of the native valve and the St. Jude Medical valve were studied in a variety of heart rates in the opening phase and the results were carefully compared. The results indicate that peak values of the velocity profile downstream of the valve increase as heart rate increases, as well as the location of the maximum velocity changes with heart rate in the St. Jude Medical valve model. Also, the maximum values of shear stress and wall shear stresses downstream of the valve are proportional to heart rate in both models. Interestingly, the maximum shear stress and wall shear stress values in both models are in the same range when heart rate is <90 beats/min; however, these values significantly increase in the St. Jude Medical valve model when heart rate is >90 beats/min (up to ~40% growth compared to that of the native valve). The findings of this study may be of importance in the hemodynamic performance of bileaflet mechanical heart valves. They may also play an important role in design improvement of conventional prosthetic heart valves and the design of the next generation of prosthetic valves, such as percutaneous valves. PMID:26786673

  1. Ambulatory heart rate range predicts mode-specific mortality and hospitalisation in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Cubbon, Richard M; Ruff, Naomi; Groves, David; Eleuteri, Antonio; Denby, Christine; Kearney, Lorraine; Ali, Noman; Walker, Andrew M N; Jamil, Haqeel; Gierula, John; Gale, Chris P; Batin, Phillip D; Nolan, James; Shah, Ajay M; Fox, Keith A A; Sapsford, Robert J; Witte, Klaus K; Kearney, Mark T

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to define the prognostic value of the heart rate range during a 24 h period in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Methods Prospective observational cohort study of 791 patients with CHF associated with left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Mode-specific mortality and hospitalisation were linked with ambulatory heart rate range (AHRR; calculated as maximum minus minimum heart rate using 24 h Holter monitor data, including paced and non-sinus complexes) in univariate and multivariate analyses. Findings were then corroborated in a validation cohort of 408 patients with CHF with preserved or reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. Results After a mean 4.1 years of follow-up, increasing AHRR was associated with reduced risk of all-cause, sudden, non-cardiovascular and progressive heart failure death in univariate analyses. After accounting for characteristics that differed between groups above and below median AHRR using multivariate analysis, AHRR remained strongly associated with all-cause mortality (HR 0.991/bpm increase in AHRR (95% CI 0.999 to 0.982); p=0.046). AHRR was not associated with the risk of any non-elective hospitalisation, but was associated with heart-failure-related hospitalisation. AHRR was modestly associated with the SD of normal-to-normal beats (R2=0.2; p<0.001) and with peak exercise-test heart rate (R2=0.33; p<0.001). Analysis of the validation cohort revealed AHRR to be associated with all-cause and mode-specific death as described in the derivation cohort. Conclusions AHRR is a novel and readily available prognosticator in patients with CHF, which may reflect autonomic tone and exercise capacity. PMID:26674986

  2. Heart Rate Detection During Sleep Using a Flexible RF Resonator and Injection-Locked PLL Sensor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Woo; Choi, Soo Beom; An, Yong-Jun; Kim, Byung-Hyun; Kim, Deok Won; Yook, Jong-Gwan

    2015-11-01

    Novel nonintrusive technologies for wrist pulse detection have been developed and proposed as systems for sleep monitoring using three types of radio frequency (RF) sensors. The three types of RF sensors for heart rate measurement on wrist are a flexible RF single resonator, array resonators, and an injection-locked PLL resonator sensor. To verify the performance of the new RF systems, we compared heart rates between presleep time and postsleep onset time. Heart rates of ten subjects were measured using the RF systems during sleep. All three RF devices detected heart rates at 0.2 to 1 mm distance from the skin of the wrist over clothes made of cotton fabric. The wrist pulse signals of a flexible RF single resonator were consistent with the signals obtained by a portable piezoelectric transducer as a reference. Then, we confirmed that the heart rate after sleep onset time significantly decreased compared to before sleep. In conclusion, the RF system can be utilized as a noncontact nonintrusive method for measuring heart rates during sleep. PMID:26057527

  3. [Changes in heart rate variability after myocardial infarction. Value of Poincareé's diagram].

    PubMed

    Copie, X; Le Heuzey, J Y; Iliou, M C; Pousset, F; Lavergne, T; Guize, L

    1995-11-01

    The variability of the heart rate is reduced after myocardial infarction. It then progressively increases, to return to near normal values after several months. However, these changes in heart rate variability occur at the same time as slowing of the heart rate which makes interpretation difficult. Poincaré's diagram is constructed from a Holter recording plotting each RR interval against the preceding RR interval. The authors have developed a geometric approach to this diagram to evaluate parasympathetic tone for a given heart rate. By measuring the dispersion in height of the Poincaré's diagram, the authors evaluate the shor-term variability for a given RR interval. Two 24 hr Holter recordings were performed in 52 patients at one and two weeks after a myocardial infarction. The dispersion in the height of the Poincaré's diagrams was measured at the 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th percentiles of the total dispersion. The authors have shown an increase in the short-term variability of the shortest RR intervals (1th, 25th and 50th percentiles) which is not observed in the longer RR intervals (75th and 90th percentiles). In conclusion, theres is an increase in the heart rate variability at the shortest RR intervals. This suggests that the recovery of parasympathic tone after myocardial infarction occurs mainly at the fastest heart rates. PMID:8745997

  4. Prediction of Heart Rates on a Ropes Course from Simple Physical Measures. Research Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priest, Simon; Montelpare, William

    1995-01-01

    This study identified the highest heart rates attained on a ropes course for a corporate population; examined relationships between highest heart rate and other physical measures (basal heart rate, blood pressure, height, weight, body girths, cholesterol, maximum number of pushups, and heart rate after brisk walk); and developed an equation for

  5. Remote Measurements of Heart and Respiration Rates for Telemedicine

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yi; Tsien, Joe Z.

    2013-01-01

    Non-contact and low-cost measurements of heart and respiration rates are highly desirable for telemedicine. Here, we describe a novel technique to extract blood volume pulse and respiratory wave from a single channel images captured by a video camera for both day and night conditions. The principle of our technique is to uncover the temporal dynamics of heart beat and breathing rate through delay-coordinate transformation and independent component analysis-based deconstruction of the single channel images. Our method further achieves robust elimination of false positives via applying ratio-variation probability distributions filtering approaches. Moreover, it enables a much needed low-cost means for preventing sudden infant death syndrome in new born infants and detecting stroke and heart attack in elderly population in home environments. This noncontact-based method can also be applied to a variety of animal model organisms for biomedical research. PMID:24115996

  6. Direct observation of homoclinic orbits in human heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żebrowski, J. J.; Baranowski, R.

    2003-05-01

    Homoclinic trajectories of the interbeat intervals between contractions of ventricles of the human heart are identified. The interbeat intervals are extracted from 24-h Holter ECG recordings. Three such recordings are discussed in detail. Mappings of the measured consecutive interbeat intervals are constructed. In the second and in some cases in the fourth iterate of the map of interbeat intervals homoclinic trajectories associated with a hyperbolic saddle are found. The homoclinic trajectories are often persistent for many interbeat intervals, sometimes spanning many thousands of heartbeats. Several features typical for homoclinic trajectories found in other systems were identified, including a signature of the gluing bifurcation. The homoclinic trajectories are present both in recordings of heart rate variability obtained from patients with an increased number of arrhythmias and in cases in which the sinus rhythm is dominant. The results presented are a strong indication of the importance of deterministic nonlinear instabilities in human heart rate variability.

  7. Remote measurements of heart and respiration rates for telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang; Li, Meng; Qian, Yi; Tsien, Joe Z

    2013-01-01

    Non-contact and low-cost measurements of heart and respiration rates are highly desirable for telemedicine. Here, we describe a novel technique to extract blood volume pulse and respiratory wave from a single channel images captured by a video camera for both day and night conditions. The principle of our technique is to uncover the temporal dynamics of heart beat and breathing rate through delay-coordinate transformation and independent component analysis-based deconstruction of the single channel images. Our method further achieves robust elimination of false positives via applying ratio-variation probability distributions filtering approaches. Moreover, it enables a much needed low-cost means for preventing sudden infant death syndrome in new born infants and detecting stroke and heart attack in elderly population in home environments. This noncontact-based method can also be applied to a variety of animal model organisms for biomedical research. PMID:24115996

  8. Feedback control of heart rate during robotics-assisted treadmill exercise.

    PubMed

    Schindelholz, Matthias; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2012-01-01

    Robotics-assisted treadmill exercise has potential for cardiovascular rehabilitation of patients with miscellaneous neurological deficits. A novel approach is presented here which suggests using heart rate to define and control exercise intensity during robotics-assisted treadmill exercise. The work delineates the design and provides technical validation of the new method. A feedback structure in conjunction with a human-in-the-loop feedback for volitional control of mechanical work rate is proposed which provides automatic regulation of heart rate. A controller computes the target mechanical work rate based on target and actual heart rates. An analytical model-based method was used to design the controller. The overall feedback design process is technically validated through a test series with different control tasks including square-wave tracking, disturbance rejection, ramp tracking and an open loop test. The feedback method and the heart rate control provide close to nominal performance for square-wave and ramp reference tracking tasks below and above the anaerobic threshold, which was estimated by the V-slope method. The controllers provide robust and stable performance as verified by calculation of the root mean square error of the tracked heart rate at different effort levels as well as with the disturbance test. Further work is required to evaluate the robustness of the approach across a group of subjects including neurological patients to show the potential for clinical implementation and to achieve a positive effect for the cardiovascular status of patients. PMID:22735733

  9. Inhalation of ultrafine carbon particles alters heart rate and heart rate variability in people with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes may confer an increased risk for the cardiovascular health effects of particulate air pollution, but few human clinical studies of air pollution have included people with diabetes. Ultrafine particles (UFP, ≤100 nm in diameter) have been hypothesized to be an important component of particulate air pollution with regard to cardiovascular health effects. Methods 17 never-smoker subjects 30–60 years of age, with stable type 2 diabetes but otherwise healthy, inhaled either filtered air (0–10 particles/cm3) or elemental carbon UFP (~107 particles/cm3, ~50 ug/m3, count median diameter 32 nm) by mouthpiece, for 2 hours at rest, in a double-blind, randomized, crossover study design. A digital 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) was recorded continuously for 48 hours, beginning 1 hour prior to exposure. Results Analysis of 5-minute segments of the ECG during quiet rest showed reduced high-frequency heart rate variability with UFP relative to air exposure (p = 0.014), paralleled by non-significant reductions in time-domain heart rate variability parameters. In the analysis of longer durations of the ECG, we found that UFP exposure increased the heart rate relative to air exposure. During the 21- to 45-hour interval after exposure, the average heart rate increased approximately 8 beats per minute with UFP, compared to 5 beats per minute with air (p = 0.045). There were no UFP effects on cardiac rhythm or repolarization. Conclusions Inhalation of elemental carbon ultrafine particles alters heart rate and heart rate variability in people with type 2 diabetes. Our findings suggest that effects may occur and persist hours after a single 2-hour exposure. PMID:25028096

  10. Low-dose coronary-CT angiography using step and shoot at any heart rate: comparison of image quality at systole for high heart rate and diastole for low heart rate with a 128-slice dual-source machine.

    PubMed

    Paul, Jean-François; Amato, Aude; Rohnean, Adela

    2013-03-01

    To compare image quality of coronary CT angiography in step-and-shoot mode at the diastolic phase at low heart rates (<70 bpm) and systolic phase at high heart rates (≥70 bpm). We prospectively included 96 consecutive patients then excluded 5 patients with arrhythmia. Coronary CT-angiography was performed using a dual-source 128-slice CT machine, at the diastolic phase in the 55 patients with heart rates <70 bpm (group D) and at the systolic phase in the 36 patients with heart rates ≥70 (group S). Image quality was scored on a 5 point-scale (1, not interpretable; 2, insufficient for diagnosis; 3, fair, sufficient for diagnosis; 4, good; 5, excellent). In addition, we compared the number of stair-step artifacts in the two groups. Mean image quality score was 4 (0.78) in group D and 4.1 (0.34) in group S (NS), with an unequal distribution (p = 0.01). Step artifacts were seen in 44 % of group D and 18 % of group S patients (p = 0.02). In 3 group D patients and no group S patients, the image score was <3 due to artifacts, requiring repeat CT-angiography. When performing dual-source 128-slice CT-angiography, step-and-shoot acquisition provides comparable mean image quality in systole, with less variability and fewer stair-step artifacts, compared to diastole. This method may be feasible at any heart rate in most patients in sinus rhythm, allowing low-dose prospective acquisition without beta-blocker premedication. PMID:22918571

  11. Circadian Variation of Heart Rate Variability Across Sleep Stages

    PubMed Central

    Boudreau, Philippe; Yeh, Wei-Hsien; Dumont, Guy A.; Boivin, Diane B.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Nocturnal cardiovascular events are more frequent at the beginning and end of the night. It was proposed that this pattern reflects the nocturnal distribution of sleep and sleep stages. Using heart rate variability (HRV), we recently showed an interaction between the circadian system and vigilance states on the regulation of cardiac rhythmicity. Here, we further investigate this interaction in order to clarify the specific effects of sleep stages on the regulation of the heart. Design: Participants underwent a 72-h ultradian sleep-wake cycle procedure in time isolation consisting of alternating 60-min wake episodes in dim light and 60-min nap opportunities in total darkness. Setting: Time isolation suite. Patients or participants: Fifteen healthy young participants; two were subsequently excluded. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: The current study revealed that sleep onset and progression to deeper sleep stages was associated with a shift toward greater parasympathetic modulation, whereas rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was associated with a shift toward greater sympathetic modulation. We found a circadian rhythm of heart rate (HR) and high-frequency power during wakefulness and all non-REM sleep stages. A significant circadian rhythm of HR and sympathovagal balance of the heart was also observed during REM sleep. During slow wave sleep, maximal parasympathetic modulation was observed at ∼02:00, whereas during REM sleep, maximal sympathetic modulation occurred in the early morning. Conclusion: The circadian and sleep stage-specific effects on heart rate variability are clinically relevant and contribute to the understanding of the degree of cardiovascular vulnerability during sleep. Citation: Boudreau P; Yeh WH; Dumont GA; Boivin DB. Circadian variation of heart rate variability across sleep stages. SLEEP 2013;36(12):1919-1928. PMID:24293767

  12. Effect of Selective Heart Rate Slowing in Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Nikhil; Sivaswamy, Nadiya; Mahmod, Masliza; Yavari, Arash; Rudd, Amelia; Singh, Satnam; Dawson, Dana K.; Francis, Jane M.; Dwight, Jeremy S.; Watkins, Hugh; Neubauer, Stefan; Frenneaux, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background— Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality but is currently refractory to therapy. Despite limited evidence, heart rate reduction has been advocated, on the basis of physiological considerations, as a therapeutic strategy in HFpEF. We tested the hypothesis that heart rate reduction improves exercise capacity in HFpEF. Methods and Results— We conducted a randomized, crossover study comparing selective heart rate reduction with the If blocker ivabradine at 7.5 mg twice daily versus placebo for 2 weeks each in 22 symptomatic patients with HFpEF who had objective evidence of exercise limitation (peak oxygen consumption at maximal exercise [o2 peak] <80% predicted for age and sex). The result was compared with 22 similarly treated matched asymptomatic hypertensive volunteers. The primary end point was the change in o2 peak. Secondary outcomes included tissue Doppler–derived E/e′ at echocardiography, plasma brain natriuretic peptide, and quality-of-life scores. Ivabradine significantly reduced peak heart rate compared with placebo in the HFpEF (107 versus 129 bpm; P<0.0001) and hypertensive (127 versus 145 bpm; P=0.003) cohorts. Ivabradine compared with placebo significantly worsened the change in o2 peak in the HFpEF cohort (-2.1 versus 0.9 mL·kg−1·min−1; P=0.003) and significantly reduced submaximal exercise capacity, as determined by the oxygen uptake efficiency slope. No significant effects on the secondary end points were discernable. Conclusion— Our observations bring into question the value of heart rate reduction with ivabradine for improving symptoms in a HFpEF population characterized by exercise limitation. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02354573. PMID:26338956

  13. Robust sensor fusion of unobtrusively measured heart rate.

    PubMed

    Wartzek, Tobias; Brüser, Christoph; Walter, Marian; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2014-03-01

    Contactless vital sign measurement technologies often have the drawback of severe motion artifacts and periods in which no signal is available. However, using several identical or physically different sensors, redundancy can be used to decrease the error in noncontact heart rate estimation, while increasing the time period during which reliable data are available. In this paper, we show for the first time two major results in case of contactless heart rate measurements deduced from a capacitive ECG and optical pulse signals. First, an artifact detection is an essential preprocessing step to allow a reliable fusion. Second, the robust but computationally efficient median already provides good results; however, using a Bayesian approach, and a short time estimation of the variance, best results in terms of difference to reference heart rate and temporal coverage can be achieved. In this paper, six sensor signals were used and coverage increased from 0-90% to 80-94%, while the difference between the estimated heart rate and the gold standard was less than ±2 BPM. PMID:24608065

  14. Heart Rate Variability and Drawing Impairment in Hypoxemic COPD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli; Corsonello, Andrea; Trojano, Luigi; Pedone, Claudio; Acanfora, Domenico; Spada, Aldo; D'Addio, Gianni; Maestri, Roberto; Rengo, Franco; Rengo, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    We studied 54 patients with hypoxemic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The Mini Mental State Examination and the Mental Deterioration Battery were used for neuropsychological assessment. Heart rate variability (HRV) was assessed based on 24-h Holter ECG recording. Mann-Whitney test was used to compare HRV parameters of patients

  15. Volitional Control of Heart Rate During Exercise Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeFevers, Victoria A.

    Thirty five volunteer college women were divided into three groups to determine if heart rate could be conditioned instrumentally and lowered during exercise stress on the treadmill. The three groups were a) experimental group I, 15 subjects who received instrumental conditioning with visual feedback; b) instrumental group II, 9 subjects who…

  16. An improved method of measuring heart rate using a webcam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Ouyang, Jianfei; Yan, Yonggang

    2014-09-01

    Measuring heart rate traditionally requires special equipment and physical contact with the subject. Reliable non-contact and low-cost measurements are highly desirable for convenient and comfortable physiological self-assessment. Previous work has shown that consumer-grade cameras can provide useful signals for remote heart rate measurements. In this paper a simple and robust method of measuring the heart rate using low-cost webcam is proposed. Blood volume pulse is extracted by proper Region of Interest (ROI) and color channel selection from image sequences of human faces without complex computation. Heart rate is subsequently quantified by spectrum analysis. The method is successfully applied under natural lighting conditions. Results of experiments show that it takes less time, is much simpler, and has similar accuracy to the previously published and widely used method of Independent Component Analysis (ICA). Benefitting from non-contact, convenience, and low-costs, it provides great promise for popularization of home healthcare and can further be applied to biomedical research.

  17. Hierarchical structure in healthy and diseased human heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, Emily S.; Lin, D. C.; Zhang, C.

    2004-05-01

    It is shown that the healthy and diseased human heart rate variability (HRV) possesses a hierarchical structure of the She-Leveque (SL) form. This structure, first found in measurements in turbulent fluid flows, implies further details in the HRV multifractal scaling. The potential of diagnosis is also discussed based on the characteristics derived from the SL hierarchy.

  18. Exploring the Relationship between Fetal Heart Rate and Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisilevsky, Barbara S.; Hains, Sylvia M. J.

    2010-01-01

    A relationship between fetal heart rate (HR) and cognition is explored within the context of infant, child and adult studies where the association is well established. Lack of direct access to the fetus and maturational changes limit research paradigms and response measures for fetal studies. Nevertheless, neural regulation of HR shows a number of…

  19. Fetal heart rate changes associated with general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Fedorkow, D M; Stewart, T J; Parboosingh, J

    1989-07-01

    Decreased fetal heart rate variability was noted 90 seconds after the induction of general anesthesia with sodium thiopentone and fentanyl in a patient undergoing basket extraction of a renal calculus at 30 weeks' gestation. The fetal sleep pattern lasted for 105 minutes after the anesthetic was discontinued, 45 minutes after the mother was fully awake. PMID:2730732

  20. Infant Heart Rate: A Review of Research and Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Von Bargen, Donna M.

    1983-01-01

    Reviews literature on children up to age one to determine whether heart rate (HR) is a reliable, stable, and valid measure. Considers factors influencing resting HR and the Law of Initial Values, discusses information about response to stimulation and infant perception and affect obtained by using HR measures, and describes HR use in risk…

  1. [The physiological problems of biofeedback control by the heart rate].

    PubMed

    Sidorov, Iu A; Vasilevskiĭ, N N

    1994-02-01

    The data on voluntary regulation of the heart rate in humans is given in respect to individual-typological differences of adaptive abilities, ecological specifics of ambient environment and labour, health condition (neuroses, vegetative-vascular dystonias etc.). A major role of training of the rhythmic regulatory processes for the biological feedback control, is corroborated. PMID:7522776

  2. Heart Rate Monitors Promote Physical Education for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Jan; Sander, Allan N.

    2004-01-01

    National health and fitness data suggests that a significant percentage of children are not on a pathway to leading healthy, physically active lifestyles. Many children are leading sedentary lifestyles due to a lack of opportunity, success, or self-motivation in physical activity. Programs that highlight the use of heart rate monitors offer a…

  3. Heart Rate and Stress in a College Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elwess, Nancy L.; Vogt, F. Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Conditions producing stress are present in all colleges and universities. In this paper we report on an investigation utilizing heart rate as an indicator of stress in students when participating in activities encountered in a college classroom or laboratory. The activities included presenting an oral report, taking an exam, and participating in a…

  4. Heart Rate Variability and Drawing Impairment in Hypoxemic COPD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli; Corsonello, Andrea; Trojano, Luigi; Pedone, Claudio; Acanfora, Domenico; Spada, Aldo; D'Addio, Gianni; Maestri, Roberto; Rengo, Franco; Rengo, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    We studied 54 patients with hypoxemic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The Mini Mental State Examination and the Mental Deterioration Battery were used for neuropsychological assessment. Heart rate variability (HRV) was assessed based on 24-h Holter ECG recording. Mann-Whitney test was used to compare HRV parameters of patients…

  5. Transfer entropy analysis of maternal and fetal heart rate coupling.

    PubMed

    Marzbanrad, Faezeh; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Endo, Miyuki; Palaniswami, Marimuthu; Khandoker, Ahsan H

    2015-08-01

    Although evidence of the short term relationship between maternal and fetal heart rates has been found in previous model-based studies, knowledge about the mechanism and patterns of the coupling during gestation is still limited. In this study, a model-free method based on Transfer Entropy (TE) was applied to quantify the maternal-fetal heart rate couplings in both directions. Furthermore, analysis of the lag at which TE was maximum and its changes throughout gestation, provided more information about the mechanism of coupling and its latency. Experimental results based on fetal electrocardiograms (fECGs) and maternal ECG showed the evidence of coupling for 62 out of 65 healthy mothers and fetuses in each direction, by statistically validating against the surrogate pairs. The fetuses were divided into three gestational age groups: early (16-25 weeks), mid (26-31 weeks) and late (32-41 weeks) gestation. The maximum TE from maternal to fetal heart rate significantly increased from early to mid gestation, while the coupling delay on both directions decreased significantly from mid to late gestation. These changes occur concomitant with the maturation of the fetal sensory and autonomic nervous systems with advancing gestational age. In conclusion, the application of TE with delays revealed detailed information about the changes in fetal-maternal heart rate coupling strength and latency throughout gestation, which could provide novel clinical markers of fetal development and well-being. PMID:26738115

  6. Heart Rate Variability During Early Adaptation to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toscano, W. B.; Cowings, P. S.

    1994-01-01

    A recent report hypothesized that episodes of space motion sickness (SMS) were reliably associated with low frequency oscillations (less than 0.03 to less than 0.01 Hz) in heart rate variability. This paper archives a large data set for review of investigators in this field which may facilitate the evaluation of this hypothesis. Continuous recording of Electro-cardiography (ECG) and other measures were made for 6 to 12 hours per day (waking hours) of six Shuttle crewmembers for the first 3 mission days of two separate Shuttle flights. Spectral analyses of heart rate variability during approximately 200 hours of inflight is presented. In addition, nearly 200 hours of data collected on these same individuals during ground tests prior to the mission are presented. The Purpose of this Publication is to document the incidence of low frequency oscillations of heart rate in 4 people exposed to microgravity over a period of five days. In addition, this report contains spectral analyses of heart rate data collected on these same individuals during ground-based mission simulations. By archiving these data in this manner, it is our intention to make this information available to other investigators interested in studying this phenomena.

  7. Relationship between Exercise Heart Rate and Music Tempo Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karageorghis, Costas I.; Jones, Leighton; Low, Daniel C.

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined the predicted positive and linear relationship (Iwanaga, 1995a, 1995b) between exercise heart rate and music tempo preference. Initially, 128 undergraduate students (M age = 20.0 years, SD = 0.9) were surveyed to establish their three favorite music artists. A separate experimental group of 29 undergraduates (M age =…

  8. Heart Rate Variability: Effect of Exercise Intensity on Postexercise Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David V. B.; Munson, Steven C.; Maldonado-Martin, Sara; De Ste Croix, Mark B. A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of two exercise intensities (moderate and severe) on heart rate variability (HRV) response in 16 runners 1 hr prior to (-1 hr) and at +1 hr, +24 hr, +48 hr, and +72 hr following each exercise session. Time domain indexes and a high frequency component showed a significant decrease…

  9. Developmental and Gender Differences in the Relationship of Behavior Pattern to Heart Rate Reactivity between Two Teenage Samples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharpley, Christopher F.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Assessed Type A behavior pattern for 122 teenagers who had heart rate measured during rest and presentation of mental arithmetic stressor under timed and competitive conditions. Examined whether sex, age, task performance, and behavior pattern predicted heart rate reactivitiy. Found no significant main effects for behavior pattern, sex, or age;…

  10. Heart rate never lies: interventional cardiologist and Braude's quote revised

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Stéphane; Stauffer, Jean-Christophe; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Graf, Denis; Puricel, Serban; Frobert, Aurélien; Muller, Olivier; Togni, Mario; Arroyo, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Background Interventional cardiologists may be immune to stress, allowing them to perform complex percutaneous interventions under pressure. Objectives To assess heart rate (HR) variations as a surrogate marker of stress of interventional cardiologists during percutaneous cardiac procedures and in every-day life. Design This is a single-centre observational study including a total of six male interventional cardiologists performing coronary interventions and pacemaker implantations. Participants were asked to record their HR with the Apple Watch Device during procedures, every-day life and control activities such as outpatient consultations, sport, marital conflicts and sexual intercourse. Results Average daily HR was 88±17 bpm. During work days, HR increased significantly during procedures (90±17 bpm) compared with days outside the cathlab (87±17 bpm, p=0.02). The average HR was higher during a regular week working (88±16 bpm) compared with weekends off (84±18 bpm, p=0.002). Complex cardiac procedures were associated with higher HR up to 122 bpm. Peak HR were higher during physical exertion. Of note, participants complained of hypersexuality and mania after night shifts. Conclusions Work and especially percutaneous cardiac procedures increase HR independently of physical exertion suggesting that interventional cardiologists experience mental stress and emotions. PMID:26835145

  11. Lack of reliability in Conconi's heart rate deflection point.

    PubMed

    Jones, A M; Doust, J H

    1995-11-01

    Conconi et al. (1982) reported the development of noninvasive field test for anaerobic threshold (AT) based upon an observed deviation from the linear heart rate (HR)--running velocity (RV) relationship at high RV (HRdev). While the validity of the Conconi test has been debated (Heck and Hollmann 1992; Tokmakidis and Leger 1992), the reliability of the Conconi test has never been independently assessed in athletes performing the protocol outlined by Conconi. This study evaluated the reliability of the Conconi test in 15 well-trained male distance runners (22.5 +/- 3.3 yrs, 67.7 +/- 4.8 kg, VO2 peak 66.4 +/- 4.8 ml.kg-1.min-1) who performed a treadmill simulation of the Conconi test protocol twice within a 4-8 day period. The results were as follows: 6 subjects demonstrated HRdev in both Conconi tests, 5 subjects demonstrated HRdev in only one test, and in 4 subjects HRdev could not be discerned in either test. It was concluded that failure to determine a reproducible HRdev by subjective assessment in 9 of 15 subjects makes the Conconi test unsuitable for reliable evaluation of AT. PMID:8776209

  12. Heart rate slowing versus other pharmacological antianginal strategies.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Ariel; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2006-01-01

    Relieving the symptoms of angina and improving the quality of life and functional status are important objectives in the management of patients with chronic stable angina. A high heart rate induces or exacerbates myocardial ischemia and angina because it both increases oxygen demand and decreases myocardial perfusion. Beta-Blockers are effective at reducing anginal symptoms largely by decreasing heart rate. Physician use and patient compliance may be limited by the side effects of Beta-blockers which include fatigue, depression and sexual dysfunction. Heart rate reduction can also be obtained by the calcium antagonists verapamil and diltiazem and by the new selective heart-rate-reducing agent ivabradine. Ivabradine (Procoralan) is a selective and specific I(f) inhibitor that acts on one of the most important ionic currents for the regulation of the pacemaker activity of sinoatrial node cells. Ivabradine has demonstrated dosedependent anti-ischemic and antianginal effects in a placebo-controlled study. The INITIATIVE trial is a large multicenter trial in which 939 patients with stable angina were randomized to ivabradine or atenolol. The noninferiority of ivabradine was shown in the INITIATIVE trial at all doses and for all criteria including time to limiting angina. The number of angina attacks per week was decreased by two thirds with both ivabradine and atenolol. In another trial of 1,195 patients, time to 1mm ST segment depression was increased by 45 s with ivabradine 7.5 mg b.i.d. and by 40 s with amlodipine 10 mg daily. Unlike beta-blockers, ivabradine is devoid of intrinsic negative inotropic effects and does not affect coronary vasomotion. A whole range of patients with angina may benefit from exclusive heart rate reduction with ivabradine, including those with contraindications or intolerance to the use of beta-blockers and patients that are insufficiently controlled by beta-blockers or calcium channel blockers. PMID:16936473

  13. What is the optimal increase in resting heart rate with low dose isoproterenol infusion for tilt-induced vasovagal response?

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, Masataka; Abe, Haruhiko; Mineda, Yoriaki; Tokano, Takashi; Yasuda, Masayuki; Nakazato, Kaoru; Nakazato, Yuji; Nakata, Yasuro; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2003-12-01

    Isoproterenol is widely used as a provocative medium for vasovagal responses during tilt testing. Dose of isoproterenol infusion is generally titrated empirically by increase in resting heart rate before tilt up. To determine the optimal increase in resting heart rate with isoproterenol for tilt-induced vasovagal responses, we studied 97 consecutive patients with unexplained syncope. After the end of a negative baseline tilt (80 degrees for 30 min), the isoproterenol tilt was performed using one of two protocols: two-stage isoproterenol-tilt protocol, with doses of 0.01 and 0.02 microg/kg per min for 10 min each, or one-stage isoproterenol-tilt protocol, with a dose of 1 or 2 microg/min for 10 min. The resting heart rate increase was defined as a percentage increase in the resting heart rate after isoproterenol infusion, compared to the baseline heart rate before the tilt test. In 117 tilt procedures, 28 (93%) of the 30 positive responses occurred with a resting heart rate increase of > or = 21%. With the resting heart rate increase of 60 and 100%, 18 (60%) and 27 (90%) positive responses were observed, respectively. In conclusion, the minimum resting heart rate increase of > or = 21% was required to provoke a vasovagal response during subsequent isoproterenol-tilt (80 degrees for 10 min). Preferably, heart rate should be increased to 60-100% by isoproterenol titration before tilting. PMID:14871023

  14. Nonlinear Control of Heart Rate Variability in Human Infants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugihara, George; Allan, Walter; Sobel, Daniel; Allan, Kenneth D.

    1996-03-01

    Nonlinear analyses of infant heart rhythms reveal a marked rise in the complexity of the electrocardiogram with maturation. We find that normal mature infants (gestation >= 35 weeks) have complex and distinctly nonlinear heart rhythms (consistent with recent reports for healthy adults) but that such nonlinearity is lacking in preterm infants (gestation <= 27 weeks) where parasympathetic-sympathetic interaction and function are presumed to be less well developed. Our study further shows that infants with clinical brain death and those treated with atropine exhibit a similar lack of nonlinear feedback control. These three lines of evidence support the hypothesis championed by Goldberger et al. [Goldberger, A. L., Rigney, D. R. & West, B. J. (1990) Sci. Am. 262, 43-49] that autonomic nervous system control underlies the nonlinearity and possible chaos of normal heart rhythms. This report demonstrates the acquisition of nonlinear heart rate dynamics and possible chaos in developing human infants and its loss in brain death and with the administration of atropine. It parallels earlier work documenting changes in the variability of heart rhythms in each of these cases and suggests that nonlinearity may provide additional power in characterizing physiological states.

  15. Nonlinear control of heart rate variability in human infants.

    PubMed Central

    Sugihara, G; Allan, W; Sobel, D; Allan, K D

    1996-01-01

    Nonlinear analyses of infant heart rhythms reveal a marked rise in the complexity of the electrocardiogram with maturation. We find that normal mature infants (gestation greater than or equal to 35 weeks) have complex and distinctly nonlinear heart rhythms (consistent with recent reports for healthy adults) but that such nonlinearity is lacking in preterm infants (gestation > or = to 27 weeks) where parasympathetic-sympathetic interaction and function are presumed to be less well developed. Our study further shows that infants with clinical brain death and those treated with atropine exhibit a similar lack of nonlinear feedback control. These three lines of evidence support the hypothesis championed by Goldberger et al. [Goldberger, A.L., Rigney, D.R. & West, B.J. (1990) Sci. Am. 262, 43-49] that autonomic nervous system control underlies the nonlinearity and possible chaos of normal heart rhythms. This report demonstrates the acquisition of nonlinear heart rate dynamics and possible chaos in developing human infants and its loss in brain death and with the administration of atropine. It parallels earlier work documenting changes in the variability of heart rhythms in each of these cases and suggests that nonlinearity may provide additional power in characterizing physiological states. PMID:8637921

  16. A handle electrode system for measuring heart rate while riding a bicycle.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masutaka; Tsukamoto, Sosuke; Hoshino, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a handle-electrode system is proposed for obtaining the heart rate of a user while riding a bicycle. The system was designed to measure the user's heart rate by only gripping the handle of a bicycle. Three electrodes made from conductive cloth were adhered to the handle. A method detecting heart-rate from the obtained electrocardiogram was also proposed. To assess the applicability of the proposed system, a simple experiment was performed. The experiment was performed in four conditions of road surfaces; lawn, asphalt, a tiled, and an uneven road. Experimental result suggests that the proposed system can be useful for obtaining R waves while riding a bicycle. PMID:19162713

  17. Pulse transducer with artifact signal attenuator. [heart rate sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, W. H., Jr.; Polhemus, J. T. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An artifact signal attenuator for a pulse rate sensor is described. The circuit for attenuating background noise signals is connected with a pulse rate transducer which has a light source and a detector for light reflected from blood vessels of a living body. The heart signal provided consists of a modulated dc signal voltage indicative of pulse rate. The artifact signal resulting from light reflected from the skin of the body comprises both a constant dc signal voltage and a modulated dc signal voltage. The amplitude of the artifact signal is greater and the frequency less than that of the heart signal. The signal attenuator circuit includes an operational amplifier for canceling the artifact signal from the output signal of the transducer and has the capability of meeting packaging requirements for wrist-watch-size packages.

  18. Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability in Dairy Cows with Different Temperament and Behavioural Reactivity to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Tőzsér, János; Szenci, Ottó; Póti, Péter; Pajor, Ferenc

    2015-01-01

    From the 1990s, extensive research was started on the physiological aspects of individual traits in animals. Previous research has established two extreme (proactive and reactive) coping styles in several animal species, but the means of reactivity with the autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity has not yet been investigated in cattle. The aim of this study was the characterization of cardiac autonomic activity under different conditions in cows with different individual characteristics. For this purpose, we investigated heart rate and ANS-related heart rate variability (HRV) parameters of dairy cows (N = 282) on smaller- and larger-scale farms grouped by (1) temperament and (2) behavioural reactivity to humans (BRH). Animals with high BRH scores were defined as impulsive, while animals with low BRH scores were defined as reserved. Cardiac parameters were calculated for undisturbed lying (baseline) and for milking bouts, the latter with the presence of an unfamiliar person (stressful situation). Sympathetic tone was higher, while vagal activity was lower in temperamental cows than in calm animals during rest both on smaller- and larger-scale farms. During milking, HRV parameters were indicative of a higher sympathetic and a lower vagal activity of temperamental cows as compared to calm ones in farms of both sizes. Basal heart rate did not differ between BRH groups either on smaller- or larger-scale farms. Differences between basal ANS activity of impulsive and reserved cows reflected a higher resting vagal and lower sympathetic activity of reserved animals compared to impulsive ones both on smaller- and larger-scale farms. There was no difference either in heart rate or in HRV parameters between groups during milking neither in smaller- nor in larger-scale farms. These two groupings allowed to draw possible parallels between personality and cardiac autonomic activity during both rest and milking in dairy cows. Heart rate and HRV seem to be useful for characterisation of physiological differences related to temperament and BRH. PMID:26291979

  19. Impaired signaling intrinsic to sinoatrial node pacemaker cells affects heart rate variability during cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Yaniv, Yael; Lyashkov, Alexey E.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    The normal heart beat intervals are neither strictly stationary nor completely random, and continuously shift from one period to another. Decoding the ECG identifies this “hidden” information that imparts inherent complexity to the heart-beating interval time series. Loss of this complexity in cardiovascular disease is manifested as a reduction in heart rate variability (HRV) and this reduction correlates with an increase in both morbidity and mortality. Because HRV measurements are noninvasive and easy to perform, they have emerged as an important tool in cardiology. However, the identities of specific mechanisms that underline the changes in HRV that occur in cardiovascular diseases remain largely unknown. Changes in HRV have mainly been interpreted on a neural basis, ie due to changes in autonomic impulses to the heart: sympathetic activity decreases both the average heart beat interval and HRV, and parasympathetic activity increases both. It has now become clear, however, that the heart rate and HRV are also determined by intrinsic properties of the pacemaker cells that comprise the sinoatrial node, and the responses of these properties to autonomic receptor stimulation. Here we review how changes in the properties of coupled-clock mechanisms intrinsic to pacemaker cells that comprise the sinoatrial node and their impaired response to autonomic receptor stimulation are implicated in the changes of HRV observed in heart diseases. PMID:26251764

  20. Heart Rate Changes in Electroacupuncture Treated Polycystic Ovary in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ramadoss, Mukilan; Subbiah, Angelie Jessica; Natrajan, Chidambaranathan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is a common metabolic disorder, it affects both humans and animals. It may induce coronary heart disease, obesity and hyperandrogenism. Previous studies show that Low frequency Electroacupuncture (EA) have an effect on PCOS, however the exact pathway is unclear. Aim To find the effect of EA on autonomic activity of the heart in Estradiol Valerate (EV) induced PCOS rats. Materials and Methods Heart rate variability (HRV) was assessed in 3 groups: 1) Control; 2) PCOS rats; and 3) PCOS rats after EA treatment (n=8 in each group). From the time domain analysis and frequency domain analysis (linear measures) HRV analysis was done. EA stimulation was given at low frequency of 2Hz for 15 min on alternate days for 4-5 weeks. Collected data were statistically analysed using One-Way Analysis of Variance with the application of multiple comparisons of Tukey test. Results EA treatment group shows significant reduction in Heart Rate (HR) and low frequency, high frequency ratio (LF/HF); and increase in RR interval, Total Power (TP) when compared to PCOS group. Conclusion The study concludes that EA treatment has a significant effect on reducing sympathetic tone and decreasing HR in PCOS. PMID:27134868

  1. General anesthesia suppresses normal heart rate variability in humans.

    PubMed

    Matchett, Gerald; Wood, Philip

    2014-06-01

    The human heart normally exhibits robust beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV). The loss of this variability is associated with pathology, including disease states such as congestive heart failure (CHF). The effect of general anesthesia on intrinsic HRV is unknown. In this prospective, observational study we enrolled 100 human subjects having elective major surgical procedures under general anesthesia. We recorded continuous heart rate data via continuous electrocardiogram before, during, and after anesthesia, and we assessed HRV of the R-R intervals. We assessed HRV using several common metrics including Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), Multifractal Analysis, and Multiscale Entropy Analysis. Each of these analyses was done in each of the four clinical phases for each study subject over the course of 24 h: Before anesthesia, during anesthesia, early recovery, and late recovery. On average, we observed a loss of variability on the aforementioned metrics that appeared to correspond to the state of general anesthesia. Following the conclusion of anesthesia, most study subjects appeared to regain their normal HRV, although this did not occur immediately. The resumption of normal HRV was especially delayed on DFA. Qualitatively, the reduction in HRV under anesthesia appears similar to the reduction in HRV observed in CHF. These observations will need to be validated in future studies, and the broader clinical implications of these observations, if any, are unknown. PMID:24985443

  2. General anesthesia suppresses normal heart rate variability in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matchett, Gerald; Wood, Philip

    2014-06-01

    The human heart normally exhibits robust beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV). The loss of this variability is associated with pathology, including disease states such as congestive heart failure (CHF). The effect of general anesthesia on intrinsic HRV is unknown. In this prospective, observational study we enrolled 100 human subjects having elective major surgical procedures under general anesthesia. We recorded continuous heart rate data via continuous electrocardiogram before, during, and after anesthesia, and we assessed HRV of the R-R intervals. We assessed HRV using several common metrics including Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), Multifractal Analysis, and Multiscale Entropy Analysis. Each of these analyses was done in each of the four clinical phases for each study subject over the course of 24 h: Before anesthesia, during anesthesia, early recovery, and late recovery. On average, we observed a loss of variability on the aforementioned metrics that appeared to correspond to the state of general anesthesia. Following the conclusion of anesthesia, most study subjects appeared to regain their normal HRV, although this did not occur immediately. The resumption of normal HRV was especially delayed on DFA. Qualitatively, the reduction in HRV under anesthesia appears similar to the reduction in HRV observed in CHF. These observations will need to be validated in future studies, and the broader clinical implications of these observations, if any, are unknown.

  3. Extraction of Heart Rate Variability from Smartphone Photoplethysmograms

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Rong-Chao; Zhou, Xiao-Lin; Lin, Wan-Hua; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is a useful clinical tool for autonomic function assessment and cardiovascular diseases diagnosis. It is traditionally calculated from a dedicated medical electrocardiograph (ECG). In this paper, we demonstrate that HRV can also be extracted from photoplethysmograms (PPG) obtained by the camera of a smartphone. Sixteen HRV parameters, including time-domain, frequency-domain, and nonlinear parameters, were calculated from PPG captured by a smartphone for 30 healthy subjects and were compared with those derived from ECG. The statistical results showed that 14 parameters (AVNN, SDNN, CV, RMSSD, SDSD, TP, VLF, LF, HF, LF/HF, nLF, nHF, SD1, and SD2) from PPG were highly correlated (r > 0.7, P < 0.001) with those from ECG, and 7 parameters (AVNN, TP, VLF, LF, HF, nLF, and nHF) from PPG were in good agreement with those from ECG within the acceptable limits. In addition, five different algorithms to detect the characteristic points of PPG wave were also investigated: peak point (PP), valley point (VP), maximum first derivative (M1D), maximum second derivative (M2D), and tangent intersection (TI). The results showed that M2D and TI algorithms had the best performance. These results suggest that the smartphone might be used for HRV measurement. PMID:25685174

  4. The role of heart rate variability in sports physiology

    PubMed Central

    DONG, JIN-GUO

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is a relevant marker reflecting cardiac modulation by sympathetic and vagal components of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Although the clinical application of HRV is mainly associated with the prediction of sudden cardiac death and assessing cardiovascular and metabolic illness progression, recent observations have suggested its applicability to physical exercise training. HRV is becoming one of the most useful tools for tracking the time course of training adaptation/maladaptation of athletes and in setting the optimal training loads leading to improved performances. However, little is known regarding the role of HRV and the internal effects of physical exercise on an athlete, which may be useful in designing fitness programs ensuring sufficient training load that may correspond with the specific ability of the athlete. In this review, we offer a comprehensive assessment of investigations concerning the interrelation between HRV and ANS, and examine how the application of HRV to physical exercise may play a role in sports physiology. PMID:27168768

  5. Ivabradine reduces heart rate while preserving metabolic fluxes and energy status of healthy normoxic working hearts

    PubMed Central

    Lauzier, Benjamin; Vaillant, Fanny; Gélinas, Roselle; Bouchard, Bertrand; Brownsey, Roger; Thorin, Eric; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Rosiers, Christine Des

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate reduction (HRR) is an important target in the management of patients with chronic stable angina. Most available drugs for HRR, such as β-blockers, have adverse effects, including on cardiac energy substrate metabolism, a well-recognized determinant of cardiac homeostasis. This study aimed at 1) testing whether HRR by ivabradine (IVA) alters substrate metabolism in the healthy normoxic working heart and 2) comparing the effect of IVA with that of the β-blocker metoprolol (METO). This was assessed using our well-established model of ex vivo mouse heart perfusion in the working mode, which enables concomitant evaluation of myocardial contractility and metabolic fluxes using 13C-labeled substrates. Hearts were perfused in the absence (controls; n = 10) or presence of IVA (n = 10, 3 μM) with or without atrial pacing to abolish HRR in the IVA group. IVA significantly reduced HR (35 ± 5%) and increased stroke volume (39 ± 9%) while maintaining similar cardiac output, contractility, power, and efficiency. Effects of IVA on HR and stroke volume were reversed by atrial pacing. At the metabolic level, IVA did not impact on substrate selection to citrate formation, rates of glycolysis, or tissue levels of high-energy phosphates. In contrast, METO, at concentrations up to 40 μM, decreased markedly cardiac function (flow: 25 ± 6%; stroke volume: 30 ± 10%; contractility: 31 ± 9%) as well as glycolysis (2.9-fold) but marginally affected HR. Collectively, these results demonstrate that IVA selectively reduces HR while preserving energy substrate metabolism of normoxic healthy working mouse hearts perfused ex vivo, a model that mimics to some extent the denervated transplanted heart. Our results provide the impetus for testing selective HRR by IVA on cardiac substrate metabolism in pathological models. PMID:21257916

  6. Ivabradine reduces heart rate while preserving metabolic fluxes and energy status of healthy normoxic working hearts.

    PubMed

    Lauzier, Benjamin; Vaillant, Fanny; Gélinas, Roselle; Bouchard, Bertrand; Brownsey, Roger; Thorin, Eric; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Des Rosiers, Christine

    2011-03-01

    Heart rate reduction (HRR) is an important target in the management of patients with chronic stable angina. Most available drugs for HRR, such as β-blockers, have adverse effects, including on cardiac energy substrate metabolism, a well-recognized determinant of cardiac homeostasis. This study aimed at 1) testing whether HRR by ivabradine (IVA) alters substrate metabolism in the healthy normoxic working heart and 2) comparing the effect of IVA with that of the β-blocker metoprolol (METO). This was assessed using our well-established model of ex vivo mouse heart perfusion in the working mode, which enables concomitant evaluation of myocardial contractility and metabolic fluxes using (13)C-labeled substrates. Hearts were perfused in the absence (controls; n = 10) or presence of IVA (n = 10, 3 μM) with or without atrial pacing to abolish HRR in the IVA group. IVA significantly reduced HR (35 ± 5%) and increased stroke volume (39 ± 9%) while maintaining similar cardiac output, contractility, power, and efficiency. Effects of IVA on HR and stroke volume were reversed by atrial pacing. At the metabolic level, IVA did not impact on substrate selection to citrate formation, rates of glycolysis, or tissue levels of high-energy phosphates. In contrast, METO, at concentrations up to 40 μM, decreased markedly cardiac function (flow: 25 ± 6%; stroke volume: 30 ± 10%; contractility: 31 ± 9%) as well as glycolysis (2.9-fold) but marginally affected HR. Collectively, these results demonstrate that IVA selectively reduces HR while preserving energy substrate metabolism of normoxic healthy working mouse hearts perfused ex vivo, a model that mimics to some extent the denervated transplanted heart. Our results provide the impetus for testing selective HRR by IVA on cardiac substrate metabolism in pathological models. PMID:21257916

  7. Multifractal heart rate dynamics in human cardiovascular model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotani, Kiyoshi; Takamasu, Kiyoshi; Safonov, Leonid; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2003-05-01

    Human cardiovascular and/or cardio-respiratory systems are shown to exhibit both multifractal and synchronous dynamics, and we recently developed a nonlinear, physiologically plausible model for the synchronization between heartbeat and respiration (Kotani, et al. Phys. Rev. E 65: 051923, 2002). By using the same model, we now show the multifractality in the heart rate dynamics. We find that beat-to-beat monofractal noise (fractional Brownian motion) added to the brain stem cardiovascular areas results in significantly broader singularity spectra for heart rate through interactions between sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. We conclude that the model proposed here would be useful in studying the complex cardiovascular and/or cardio- respiratory dynamics in humans.

  8. Characterizing atypical patterns of Heart Rate before Paroxysmal Ventricular Tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, E; Jimnez, J; Moleiro, F; Rodrguez, A

    2010-12-01

    Results of a comparative analysis between Heart Rate (HR) patterns occurring before the onset of Paroxysmal Ventricular Tachycardia (PVT) and from healthy subjects are shown. Two study groups were made after electrocardiographic dynamical monitoring (Holter) of volunteers. The first group includes 100h from 27 healthy control subjects, and the second group consists of 88h, ending with self-terminating episodes of PVT from 55 patients. Patterns are defined as sequences of consecutive RR intervals, while atypical patterns are defined as corresponding to unlikely behavior of Heart Rate in healthy subjects. We investigated spatial and temporal distributions of these patterns in order to find early signs of PVT. We found that they can be grouped on a reduced number of clusters, and the number of atypical patterns increases as we approach the onset of the episode. PMID:20869900

  9. The effects of hypnosis on heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Ramazan; Ozcan, Osman; Dane, Senol

    2013-01-01

    Uslu et al. (2012 ) suggested that hypnotic status can modulate cerebral blood flow. The authors investigated the effects of hypnosis on heart rate variability (HRV). In women, HRV decreased during hypnosis. Posthypnotic values were higher compared to prehypnotic and hypnotic values. Women had highest HRV parameters in the posthypnotic condition. It appears that hypnosis can produce cardiac and cognitive activations. Hypnotherapy may be useful in some cardiac clinical conditions characterized by an autonomic imbalance or some cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:23427840

  10. Ivabradine in chronic stable angina: Effects by and beyond heart rate reduction.

    PubMed

    Camici, Paolo G; Gloekler, Steffen; Levy, Bernard I; Skalidis, Emmanouil; Tagliamonte, Ercole; Vardas, Panos; Heusch, Gerd

    2016-07-15

    Heart rate plays a major role in myocardial ischemia. A high heart rate increases myocardial performance and oxygen demand and reduces diastolic time. Ivabradine reduces heart rate by inhibiting the If current of sinoatrial-node cells. In contrast to beta-blockers, ivabradine has no negative inotropic and lusitropic effect for a comparable heart rate reduction. Consequently, diastolic duration is increased with ivabradine compared to beta-blockers. This has potential consequences on coronary blood flow since compression of the vasculature by the surrounding myocardium during systole impedes flow and coronary blood flow is mainly diastolic. Moreover, ivabradine does not unmask alpha-adrenergic vasoconstriction and, unlike beta-blockers, maintains coronary dilation during exercise. In comparison with beta-blockers, ivabradine increases coronary flow reserve and collateral perfusion promoting the development of coronary collaterals. Ivabradine attenuates myocardial ischemia and its consequences even in the absence of heart rate reduction, possibly through reduced formation of reactive oxygen species. In conclusion, ivabradine differs from other anti-anginal agents by improving coronary blood flow and by additional pleiotropic effects. These properties make ivabradine an effective anti-anginal and anti-ischemic agent for the treatment of patients with coronary artery disease. PMID:27104917

  11. Analysis of long term heart rate variability: methods, 1/f scaling and implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saul, J. P.; Albrecht, P.; Berger, R. D.; Cohen, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    The use of spectral techniques to quantify short term heart rate fluctuations on the order of seconds to minutes has helped define the autonomic contributions to beat-to-beat control of heart rate. We used similar techniques to quantify the entire spectrum (0.00003-1.0 Hz) of heart rate variability during 24 hour ambulatory ECG monitoring. The ECG from standard Holter monitor recordings from normal subjects was sampled with the use of a phase locked loop, and a heart rate time series was constructed at 3 Hz. Frequency analysis of the heart rate signal was performed after a nonlinear filtering algorithm was used to eliminate artifacts. A power spectrum of the entire 24 hour record revealed power that was inversely proportional to frequency, 1/f, over 4 decades from 0.00003 to 0.1 Hz (period approximately 10 hours to 10 seconds). Displaying consecutive spectra calculated at 5 minute intervals revealed marked variability in the peaks at all frequencies throughout the 24 hours, probably accounting for the lack of distinct peaks in the spectra of the entire records.

  12. Monitoring of Heart and Breathing Rates Using Dual Cameras on a Smartphone

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Yunyoung; Kong, Youngsun; Reyes, Bersain; Reljin, Natasa; Chon, Ki H.

    2016-01-01

    Some smartphones have the capability to process video streams from both the front- and rear-facing cameras simultaneously. This paper proposes a new monitoring method for simultaneous estimation of heart and breathing rates using dual cameras of a smartphone. The proposed approach estimates heart rates using a rear-facing camera, while at the same time breathing rates are estimated using a non-contact front-facing camera. For heart rate estimation, a simple application protocol is used to analyze the varying color signals of a fingertip placed in contact with the rear camera. The breathing rate is estimated from non-contact video recordings from both chest and abdominal motions. Reference breathing rates were measured by a respiration belt placed around the chest and abdomen of a subject; reference heart rates (HR) were determined using the standard electrocardiogram. An automated selection of either the chest or abdominal video signal was determined by choosing the signal with a greater autocorrelation value. The breathing rate was then determined by selecting the dominant peak in the power spectrum. To evaluate the performance of the proposed methods, data were collected from 11 healthy subjects. The breathing ranges spanned both low and high frequencies (6–60 breaths/min), and the results show that the average median errors from the reflectance imaging on the chest and the abdominal walls based on choosing the maximum spectral peak were 1.43% and 1.62%, respectively. Similarly, HR estimates were also found to be accurate. PMID:26963390

  13. Monitoring of Heart and Breathing Rates Using Dual Cameras on a Smartphone.

    PubMed

    Nam, Yunyoung; Kong, Youngsun; Reyes, Bersain; Reljin, Natasa; Chon, Ki H

    2016-01-01

    Some smartphones have the capability to process video streams from both the front- and rear-facing cameras simultaneously. This paper proposes a new monitoring method for simultaneous estimation of heart and breathing rates using dual cameras of a smartphone. The proposed approach estimates heart rates using a rear-facing camera, while at the same time breathing rates are estimated using a non-contact front-facing camera. For heart rate estimation, a simple application protocol is used to analyze the varying color signals of a fingertip placed in contact with the rear camera. The breathing rate is estimated from non-contact video recordings from both chest and abdominal motions. Reference breathing rates were measured by a respiration belt placed around the chest and abdomen of a subject; reference heart rates (HR) were determined using the standard electrocardiogram. An automated selection of either the chest or abdominal video signal was determined by choosing the signal with a greater autocorrelation value. The breathing rate was then determined by selecting the dominant peak in the power spectrum. To evaluate the performance of the proposed methods, data were collected from 11 healthy subjects. The breathing ranges spanned both low and high frequencies (6-60 breaths/min), and the results show that the average median errors from the reflectance imaging on the chest and the abdominal walls based on choosing the maximum spectral peak were 1.43% and 1.62%, respectively. Similarly, HR estimates were also found to be accurate. PMID:26963390

  14. Modeling heart rate variability including the effect of sleep stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliński, Mateusz; Gierałtowski, Jan; Żebrowski, Jan

    2016-02-01

    We propose a model for heart rate variability (HRV) of a healthy individual during sleep with the assumption that the heart rate variability is predominantly a random process. Autonomic nervous system activity has different properties during different sleep stages, and this affects many physiological systems including the cardiovascular system. Different properties of HRV can be observed during each particular sleep stage. We believe that taking into account the sleep architecture is crucial for modeling the human nighttime HRV. The stochastic model of HRV introduced by Kantelhardt et al. was used as the initial starting point. We studied the statistical properties of sleep in healthy adults, analyzing 30 polysomnographic recordings, which provided realistic information about sleep architecture. Next, we generated synthetic hypnograms and included them in the modeling of nighttime RR interval series. The results of standard HRV linear analysis and of nonlinear analysis (Shannon entropy, Poincaré plots, and multiscale multifractal analysis) show that—in comparison with real data—the HRV signals obtained from our model have very similar properties, in particular including the multifractal characteristics at different time scales. The model described in this paper is discussed in the context of normal sleep. However, its construction is such that it should allow to model heart rate variability in sleep disorders. This possibility is briefly discussed.

  15. [Nonlinear dynamics in regulation of heart rate in healthy infants].

    PubMed

    Mrowka, R; Unbehaun, A; Schubert, E; Patzak, A

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate qualitatively and quantitatively non-linear and linear characteristics of heart rate identifying their connection to sleep states during the first 6 months of life. 16 newborns were examined polygraphically in a longitudinal study (first day, first and sixth month). After R-peak detection of a limb lead ECG and R-R interval calculation, time series of the instantaneous heart rate (IHR) were constructed. They were analyzed qualitatively with regard to the structure of the Poincaré maps and the occurrence of bifurcations as well as quantitatively by calculating the correlation dimension (D2) and the Lyapunov exponent (LLE). In some cases, bifurcations in the IHR time series occurred. The Poincaré maps showed mainly clear structures in the shape of limited point clusters. D2 was in the range of 1.5 to 2.5 and was larger in quiet than in active sleep. LLE was always positive, although higher values in active sleep than in quiet sleep were exhibited in the first month of life only. D2 and LLE values during active sleep were age-dependent. The results of the study indicate a non-linear component in the heart rate control of healthy newborns. The change in D2 and LLE in connection with postnatal age and sleep states expresses a modulation of these system components during the postnatal maturation and during vegetative sleep organisation. PMID:9012165

  16. Modeling heart rate variability including the effect of sleep stages.

    PubMed

    Soliński, Mateusz; Gierałtowski, Jan; Żebrowski, Jan

    2016-02-01

    We propose a model for heart rate variability (HRV) of a healthy individual during sleep with the assumption that the heart rate variability is predominantly a random process. Autonomic nervous system activity has different properties during different sleep stages, and this affects many physiological systems including the cardiovascular system. Different properties of HRV can be observed during each particular sleep stage. We believe that taking into account the sleep architecture is crucial for modeling the human nighttime HRV. The stochastic model of HRV introduced by Kantelhardt et al. was used as the initial starting point. We studied the statistical properties of sleep in healthy adults, analyzing 30 polysomnographic recordings, which provided realistic information about sleep architecture. Next, we generated synthetic hypnograms and included them in the modeling of nighttime RR interval series. The results of standard HRV linear analysis and of nonlinear analysis (Shannon entropy, Poincaré plots, and multiscale multifractal analysis) show that-in comparison with real data-the HRV signals obtained from our model have very similar properties, in particular including the multifractal characteristics at different time scales. The model described in this paper is discussed in the context of normal sleep. However, its construction is such that it should allow to model heart rate variability in sleep disorders. This possibility is briefly discussed. PMID:26931582

  17. Development and preliminary evaluation of an Android based heart rate variability biofeedback system.

    PubMed

    Abtahi, F; Berndtsson, A; Abtahi, S; Seoane, F; Lindecrantz, K

    2014-01-01

    The reduced Heart Rate Variability (HRV) is believed to be associated with several diseases such as congestive heart failure, diabetes and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). In these cases, HRV biofeedback may be a potential intervention method to increase HRV which in turn is beneficial to these patients. In this work, a real-time Android biofeedback application based on a Bluetooth enabled ECG and thoracic electrical bioimpedance (respiration) measurement device has been developed. The system performance and usability have been evaluated in a brief study with eight healthy volunteers. The result demonstrates real-time performance of system and positive effects of biofeedback training session by increased HRV and reduced heart rate. Further development of the application and training protocol is ongoing to investigate duration of training session to find an optimum length and interval of biofeedback sessions to use in potential interventions. PMID:25570716

  18. Estimating mental fatigue based on electroencephalogram and heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chong; Yu, Xiaolin

    2010-01-01

    The effects of long term mental arithmetic task on psychology are investigated by subjective self-reporting measures and action performance test. Based on electroencephalogram (EEG) and heart rate variability (HRV), the impacts of prolonged cognitive activity on central nervous system and autonomic nervous system are observed and analyzed. Wavelet packet parameters of EEG and power spectral indices of HRV are combined to estimate the change of mental fatigue. Then wavelet packet parameters of EEG which change significantly are extracted as the features of brain activity in different mental fatigue state, support vector machine (SVM) algorithm is applied to differentiate two mental fatigue states. The experimental results show that long term mental arithmetic task induces the mental fatigue. The wavelet packet parameters of EEG and power spectral indices of HRV are strongly correlated with mental fatigue. The predominant activity of autonomic nervous system of subjects turns to the sympathetic activity from parasympathetic activity after the task. Moreover, the slow waves of EEG increase, the fast waves of EEG and the degree of disorder of brain decrease compared with the pre-task. The SVM algorithm can effectively differentiate two mental fatigue states, which achieves the maximum classification accuracy (91%). The SVM algorithm could be a promising tool for the evaluation of mental fatigue. Fatigue, especially mental fatigue, is a common phenomenon in modern life, is a persistent occupational hazard for professional. Mental fatigue is usually accompanied with a sense of weariness, reduced alertness, and reduced mental performance, which would lead the accidents in life, decrease productivity in workplace and harm the health. Therefore, the evaluation of mental fatigue is important for the occupational risk protection, productivity, and occupational health.

  19. Heart rate variability (HRV): an indicator of stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Balvinder; Durek, Joseph J.; O'Kane, Barbara L.; Tran, Nhien; Moses, Sophia; Luthra, Megha; Ikonomidou, Vasiliki N.

    2014-05-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) can be an important indicator of several conditions that affect the autonomic nervous system, including traumatic brain injury, post-traumatic stress disorder and peripheral neuropathy [3], [4], [10] & [11]. Recent work has shown that some of the HRV features can potentially be used for distinguishing a subject's normal mental state from a stressed one [4], [13] & [14]. In all of these past works, although processing is done in both frequency and time domains, few classification algorithms have been explored for classifying normal from stressed RRintervals. In this paper we used 30 s intervals from the Electrocardiogram (ECG) time series collected during normal and stressed conditions, produced by means of a modified version of the Trier social stress test, to compute HRV-driven features and subsequently applied a set of classification algorithms to distinguish stressed from normal conditions. To classify RR-intervals, we explored classification algorithms that are commonly used for medical applications, namely 1) logistic regression (LR) [16] and 2) linear discriminant analysis (LDA) [6]. Classification performance for various levels of stress over the entire test was quantified using precision, accuracy, sensitivity and specificity measures. Results from both classifiers were then compared to find an optimal classifier and HRV features for stress detection. This work, performed under an IRB-approved protocol, not only provides a method for developing models and classifiers based on human data, but also provides a foundation for a stress indicator tool based on HRV. Further, these classification tools will not only benefit many civilian applications for detecting stress, but also security and military applications for screening such as: border patrol, stress detection for deception [3],[17], and wounded-warrior triage [12].

  20. The effects of strenuous exercises on resting heart rate, blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake.

    PubMed

    Oh, Deuk-Ja; Hong, Hyeon-Ok; Lee, Bo-Ae

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of strenuous exercises on resting heart rate, blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake. To achieve the purpose of the study, a total of 30 subjects were selected, including 15 people who performed continued regular exercises and 15 people as the control group. With regard to data processing, the IBM SPSS Statistics ver. 21.0 was used to calculate the mean and standard deviation. The difference of mean change between groups was verified through an independent t-test. As a result, there were significant differences in resting heart rate, maximal heart rate, maximal systolic blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake. However, the maximal systolic blood pressure was found to be an exercise-induced high blood pressure. Thus, it is thought that a risk diagnosis for it through a regular exercise stress test is necessary. PMID:26933659

  1. The effects of strenuous exercises on resting heart rate, blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Deuk-Ja; Hong, Hyeon-Ok; Lee, Bo-Ae

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of strenuous exercises on resting heart rate, blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake. To achieve the purpose of the study, a total of 30 subjects were selected, including 15 people who performed continued regular exercises and 15 people as the control group. With regard to data processing, the IBM SPSS Statistics ver. 21.0 was used to calculate the mean and standard deviation. The difference of mean change between groups was verified through an independent t-test. As a result, there were significant differences in resting heart rate, maximal heart rate, maximal systolic blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake. However, the maximal systolic blood pressure was found to be an exercise-induced high blood pressure. Thus, it is thought that a risk diagnosis for it through a regular exercise stress test is necessary. PMID:26933659

  2. Electroencephalogram and Heart Rate Measures of Working Memory at 5 and 10 Months of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuevas, Kimberly; Bell, Martha Ann; Marcovitch, Stuart; Calkins, Susan D.

    2012-01-01

    We recorded electroencephalogram (EEG; 6-9 Hz) and heart rate (HR) from infants at 5 and 10 months of age during baseline and performance on the looking A-not-B task of infant working memory (WM). Longitudinal baseline-to-task comparisons revealed WM-related increases in EEG power (all electrodes) and EEG coherence (medial frontal-occipital

  3. The Effects of Smokeless Tobacco on Heart Rate and Neuromuscular Reactivity in Athletes and Nonathletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Steven W; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A study of 25 male college students (both athletes and nonathletes) who where either regular smokeless tobacco users or nonusers as they performed perceptual-motor tasks revealed significant differences in favor of athletes over nonathletes in terms of reaction time. Tobacco-using subjects showed significant increases in heart rate. (Author/CB)

  4. Electroencephalogram and Heart Rate Measures of Working Memory at 5 and 10 Months of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuevas, Kimberly; Bell, Martha Ann; Marcovitch, Stuart; Calkins, Susan D.

    2012-01-01

    We recorded electroencephalogram (EEG; 6-9 Hz) and heart rate (HR) from infants at 5 and 10 months of age during baseline and performance on the looking A-not-B task of infant working memory (WM). Longitudinal baseline-to-task comparisons revealed WM-related increases in EEG power (all electrodes) and EEG coherence (medial frontal-occipital…

  5. Association of heart rate and heart-rate variability with scores on the emotion profile index in patients with acute coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Catipović-Veselica, K; Amidzić, V; Durijancek, J; Kozmar, D; Sram, M; Glavas, B; Catipović, B

    1999-04-01

    We investigated the link between the eight basic emotions named by Plutchik and heart rate, heart-rate variability in the 114 patients, 86 men and 28 women (M = 53.8 yr., SD = 8.0) with acute coronary heart disease during the initial 24-hr. stay in the coronary care unit and again at hospital discharge. Variability in heart rate was significantly positively associated with scores on Trust (the emotional state acceptance) at hospital admission and discharge in the patients with unstable angina and non-Q-wave infarction, on Aggression in the patients with unstable angina at hospital discharge and at hospital admission in the patients with non-Q-wave infarction. There was inverse relation on Timid (the emotional state fear) and Gregarious (joy) at hospital admission and on Distrust (disgust or rejection), Depressed (sadness), and Dyscontrol (impulsiveness) at hospital discharge in the patient with non-Q-wave infarction. There was no significant association between heart-rate variability and the scores on the Emotion Profile Index in the patients with anterior and posterior myocardial infarction. There was no statistically significant association between heart rate and scores on the Emotion Profile Index in the patients with acute coronary disease at hospital admission and discharge. Our results suggest psychological interventions that enhance emotional states represented by the Trust and Aggression scales and minimize those represented by Depressed, Dyscontrol, Timid, and Distrust scales could have a beneficial effect on cardiovascular function in the patients with unstable angina and non-Q-wave infarction in a hospital setting. PMID:10335058

  6. Predominance of Intrinsic Mechanism of Resting Heart Rate Control and Preserved Baroreflex Sensitivity in Professional Cyclists after Competitive Training.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Luciene Ferreira; Perlingeiro, Patricia; Hachul, Denise Tessariol; Gomes-Santos, Igor Lucas; Tsutsui, Jeane Mike; Negrao, Carlos Eduardo; De Matos, Luciana D N J

    2016-01-01

    Different season trainings may influence autonomic and non-autonomic cardiac control of heart rate and provokes specific adaptations on heart's structure in athletes. We investigated the influence of transition training (TT) and competitive training (CT) on resting heart rate, its mechanisms of control, spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and relationships between heart rate mechanisms and cardiac structure in professional cyclists (N = 10). Heart rate (ECG) and arterial blood pressure (Pulse Tonometry) were recorded continuously. Autonomic blockade was performed (atropine-0.04 mg.kg-1; esmolol-500 μg.kg-1 = 0.5 mg). Vagal effect, intrinsic heart rate, parasympathetic (n) and sympathetic (m) modulations, autonomic influence, autonomic balance and BRS were calculated. Plasma norepinephrine (high-pressure liquid chromatography) and cardiac structure (echocardiography) were evaluated. Resting heart rate was similar in TT and CT. However, vagal effect, intrinsic heart rate, autonomic influence and parasympathetic modulation (higher n value) decreased in CT (P≤0.05). Sympathetic modulation was similar in both trainings. The autonomic balance increased in CT but still showed parasympathetic predominance. Cardiac diameter, septum and posterior wall thickness and left ventricular mass also increased in CT (P<0.05) as well as diastolic function. We observed an inverse correlation between left ventricular diastolic diameter, septum and posterior wall thickness and left ventricular mass with intrinsic heart rate. Blood pressure and BRS were similar in both trainings. Intrinsic heart rate mechanism is predominant over vagal effect during CT, despite similar resting heart rate. Preserved blood pressure levels and BRS during CT are probably due to similar sympathetic modulation in both trainings. PMID:26812615

  7. [Heart rate variability in chronic cardiac failure insufficiency. Effect of severity and etiology].

    PubMed

    Gibelin, P; Dadoun-Dybal, M; Morand, P

    1994-09-01

    The variability of the heart rate is a sign of the activation of the autonomic nervous system. This parameter was studied in 21 control subjects and 72 patients with chronic cardiac failure (20 stage II, 37 stage III and 15 stage IV of the NYHA) due to ischaemic heart disease in 48 cases and idiopathic in 24 cases. Spectral and non-spectral analysis of the variability of the heart rate recorded during 24 hour Holter monitoring was performed with the Marquette Electronics 8000 software. Plasma noradrenaline was measured in whole blood by HPLC. The left ventricular ejection fraction was measured by echocardiography. There was a superior to 40% decrease in non-spectral and over 50% decrease in spectral parameters in patients with cardiac failure. This was more pronounced when the cardiac failure was in an advanced stage. The decrease in sinus rhythm variability was proportional to the functional class (SDANN stage II: 96 +/- 34 ms; stage III: 63 +/- 34 ms; stage IV: 54 +/- 33 ms). Moreover, the non-spectral parameters were correlated to the ejection fraction and plasma noradrenaline levels (p < 0.01). In addition, with the same NYHA stage, plasma noradrenaline concentration, ejection fraction and heart rate, the SDNN and the pNN50 were over 50% lower in idiopathic cardiomyopathy than in ischaemic cardiomyopathy. In conclusion, the variability of the heart rate is reduced in chronic cardiac failure in relation with the severity and aetiology of the underlying disease. PMID:7646235

  8. Identifying Genetic Variants for Heart Rate Variability in the Acetylcholine Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Riese, Harriëtte; Muñoz, Loretto M.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Ding, Xiuhua; Su, Shaoyong; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; van Roon, Arie M.; van der Most, Peter J.; Lefrandt, Joop; Gansevoort, Ron T.; van der Harst, Pim; Verweij, Niek; Licht, Carmilla M. M.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Willemsen, Gonneke; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Nolte, Ilja M.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Wang, Xiaoling; Snieder, Harold

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. The acetylcholine pathway plays a key role in explaining heart rate variability in humans. We assessed whether 443 genotyped and imputed common genetic variants in eight key genes (CHAT, SLC18A3, SLC5A7, CHRNB4, CHRNA3, CHRNA, CHRM2 and ACHE) of the acetylcholine pathway were associated with variation in an established measure of heart rate variability reflecting parasympathetic control of the heart rhythm, the root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD) of normal RR intervals. The association was studied in a two stage design in individuals of European descent. First, analyses were performed in a discovery sample of four cohorts (n = 3429, discovery stage). Second, findings were replicated in three independent cohorts (n = 3311, replication stage), and finally the two stages were combined in a meta-analysis (n = 6740). RMSSD data were obtained under resting conditions. After correction for multiple testing, none of the SNPs showed an association with RMSSD. In conclusion, no common genetic variants for heart rate variability were identified in the largest and most comprehensive candidate gene study on the acetylcholine pathway to date. Future gene finding efforts for RMSSD may want to focus on hypothesis free approaches such as the genome-wide association study. PMID:25384021

  9. Method of investigation of the accuracy of four digitally-displaying heart rate meters suitable for use in the exercising horse.

    PubMed

    Evans, D L; Rose, R J

    1986-03-01

    The measurement of heart rate during exercise in the horse has been recommended as a means of prescribing work effort, monitoring the changes in aerobic capacity during training and as part of the clinical examination of the performance horse. The accuracy of four heart rate meters (PEH 100, PU 10, HR 14 and HRM-7) was assessed by comparison with heart rate determined by simultaneous telemetry electrocardiography (ECG) using a rapid incremental exercise test on a treadmill. Heart rate displayed by all four meters showed significant correlations with the ECG heart rate, but only two meters (PEH 100 and HRM-7) had correlation coefficients of 0.98 or greater. PMID:3698951

  10. Blood parameter and heart rate response to training in Andalusian horses.

    PubMed

    Agüera, E I; Rubio, M D; Vivo, R; Santisteban, R; Muñoz, A; Castejón, F

    1995-06-01

    A study was performed on Andalusian horses in order to assess the response of heart rate and various blood parameters to training. Two tests were performed, at two and four months of training respectively. Exercise schedules were of increasing intensity, over a distance of 1000 meters. Speed was progressively increased, from 4 m/s to 8.5 m/s, over four exercise stages. In both tests, a recovery period of 5 min followed each stage. Sample collection (by puncture of the external jugular vein) was performed with the animals at rest, within the first minute after each exercise stage, and at 10, 15, 20 and 30 min of final recovery. Samples for analysis contained plasma for measurement of lactate, glucose, ion and creatinine levels. Heart rate was measured using the Polar Sport tester. The most important parameters in both tests proved to be glucose level, heart rate and lactate concentration. Variations in electrolyte and creatinine levels were transitory, normal resting values being regained after 30 minutes' recovery. Response to daily training was most clearly reflected in altered lactate levels and heart rate; recovery improved with increased training which enhanced aerobic capacity and decreased metabolic acidosis. PMID:8532951

  11. Characterizing heart rate variability by scale-dependent Lyapunov exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jing; Gao, Jianbo; Tung, Wen-wen

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies on heart rate variability (HRV) using chaos theory, fractal scaling analysis, and many other methods, while fruitful in many aspects, have produced much confusion in the literature. Especially the issue of whether normal HRV is chaotic or stochastic remains highly controversial. Here, we employ a new multiscale complexity measure, the scale-dependent Lyapunov exponent (SDLE), to characterize HRV. SDLE has been shown to readily characterize major models of complex time series including deterministic chaos, noisy chaos, stochastic oscillations, random 1/f processes, random Levy processes, and complex time series with multiple scaling behaviors. Here we use SDLE to characterize the relative importance of nonlinear, chaotic, and stochastic dynamics in HRV of healthy, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation subjects. We show that while HRV data of all these three types are mostly stochastic, the stochasticity is different among the three groups.

  12. Reading multifractal spectra: Aging by multifractal analysis of heart rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowiec, D.; Rynkiewicz, A.; Gałaska, R.; Wdowczyk-Szulc, J.; Żarczyńska-Buchowiecka, M.

    2011-06-01

    The method of effective reading of multifractal properties is proposed. The method consists in the analysis of a given signal together with the analysis of an integrated signal. A practical way to separate monofractal-type signals from other signals is given. The method is applied to 24-hour ECG recordings of RR-interbeat intervals to assess the effect of aging on autonomic regulation of the heart in healthy adults. Heart rate variability is evaluated by multifractal analysis in the VLF band. A switch from mono- to multifractality is observed between diurnal and nocturnal parts of series in the group of young adults. With aging the multifractal structure of nocturnal signals declines. The observed changes can be related to the circadian alternation in the central mechanisms controlling the cardiovascular system which becomes impaired with advance in age in human. Indices for age impairment of autonomic regulation are proposed.

  13. Failure of target heart rate to accurately monitor intensity during aerobic dance.

    PubMed

    Parker, S B; Hurley, B F; Hanlon, D P; Vaccaro, P

    1989-04-01

    Fourteen untrained females (age 19 +/- 1, range 18-21) were studied to examine the heart rate-VO2 relationship during a single aerobic dance training session. These findings were used to help explain the changes in VO2max resulting from an aerobic dance training program. VO2max and body composition were determined before and after an 8 wk training period. In addition, the heart rate-VO2 responses to an aerobic dance training session were monitored and compared to the heart rate responses of treadmill jogging performed at the same VO2. The aerobic dance session elicited a significantly lower oxygen pulse than did treadmill exercise (7.2 +/- 0.3 vs 8.1 +/- 0.8 ml.beat-1; P less than 0.01). There were no significant changes in percent body fat, whereas VO2max increased by 11% (34.4 +/- 0.9 vs 38.1 +/- 0.8 ml.kg-1.min-1; P less than 0.05). No significant changes in any of the parameters tested were observed in 10 untrained controls. These findings indicate that the heart rate elicited from aerobic dance represents a lower relative exercise intensity (VO2) than that of running. Therefore, the assumption that aerobic dance training produces the same cardiovascular adaptations as running training when performed at the same target rate may be unwarranted. PMID:2709986

  14. Cardiorespiratory fitness and heart rate recovery in obese premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Carroll, S; Marshall, P; Ingle, L; Borkoles, E

    2012-12-01

    Post-exercise heart rate recovery (HRR) has been proposed as a measure of cardiac autonomic dysfunction in apparently healthy adults. We aimed to determine the effects of a lifestyle intervention on HRR among clinically obese premenopausal women. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to investigate the effects of a 3-month non-dieting lifestyle intervention program on cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and HRR among healthy clinically obese premenopausal women. Thirty-one were randomly assigned to 3-month intensive lifestyle intervention and 31 served as controls. Sixty-one participants performed a maximal treadmill walking test with metabolic gas exchange. Baseline anthropometric measures were closely related to HRR at 1 min, which may indicate reduced parasympathetic reactivation. Post-exercise HRR at 60 s (HRR60) increased from 21.3 ± 6.2 to 27.8 ± 10.2 bpm in the intervention group compared with a smaller reduction (26.8 ± 12.3 to 24.5 ± 9.9 bpm) in controls (test for interaction P = 0.0001). HRR120 showed a significant effect of time (P = 0.0002) with no significant interaction with lifestyle intervention. A significant increase in VO2 peak was evident in the lifestyle group (21.6 to 23.6 mL/kg/min) compared with a modest reduction in the controls (22.6 to 21.6 mL/kg/min; test for interaction, P = 0.001). Clinically obese healthy premenopausal women achieved significant improvements in HRR60 and VO peak following a 3-month intensive lifestyle intervention. PMID:22998554

  15. Heart Rates in Hospitalized Children by Age and Body Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Bonafide, Christopher P.; Brady, Patrick W.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Heart rate (HR) is frequently used by clinicians in the hospital to assess a patient’s severity of illness and make treatment decisions. We sought to develop percentiles that characterize the relationship of expected HR by age and body temperature in hospitalized children and to compare these percentiles with published references in both primary care and emergency department (ED) settings. METHODS: Vital sign data were extracted from electronic health records of inpatients <18 years of age at 2 large freestanding children’s hospitals from July 2011 to June 2012. We selected up to 10 HR-temperature measurement pairs from each admission. Measurements from 60% of patients were used to derive the percentile curves, with the remainder used for validation. We compared our upper percentiles with published references in primary care and ED settings. RESULTS: We used 60 863 observations to derive the percentiles. Overall, an increase in body temperature of 1°C was associated with an increase of ∼10 beats per minute in HR, although there were variations across age and temperature ranges. For infants and young children, our upper percentiles were lower than in primary care and ED settings. For school-age children, our upper percentiles were higher. CONCLUSIONS: We characterized expected HR by age and body temperature in hospitalized children. These percentiles differed from references in primary care and ED settings. Additional research is needed to evaluate the performance of these percentiles for the identification of children who would benefit from further evaluation or intervention for tachycardia. PMID:25917984

  16. Terminology and Methodology Related to the Use of Heart Rate Responsivity in Infancy Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodcock, James M.

    1971-01-01

    Methodological problems in measuring and interpreting infantile heart rate reactivity in research are discussed. Various ways of describing cardiac activity are listed. Attention is given to the relationship between resting state and heart rate responsivity. (Author/WY)

  17. Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation Program on Heart Rate Recovery in Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi Anari, Leila; Ghanbari-Firoozabadi, Mahdieh; Ansari, Zahra; Emami, Mahmoud; Vafaii Nasab, Mohammadreza; Nemaiande, Mahdieh; Boostany, Fatemeh; Neishaboury, Mohamadreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that the autonomic system function and the metabolic syndrome can significantly affect patients' survival. The aim of the current study was to investigate the impact of the cardiac rehabilitation program on the autonomic system balance in patients with coronary artery disease. Methods: Patients with a previous diagnosis of coronary artery disease who were referred to the Cardiovascular Rehabilitation Center of Afshar Hospital (Yazd, Iran) between March and November 2011 were enrolled. All the patients participated in rehabilitation sessions 3 times a week for 12 weeks. Heart rate recovery (HRR) was measured as an indicator of the autonomic system balance. In order to calculate HRR, the maximum heart rate during the exercise test was recorded. At the end of the exercise test, the patients were asked to sit down without having a cooldown period and their heart rate was recorded again after 1 minute. The difference between these 2 measurements was considered as HRR. Results: A total of 108 patients, including 86 (79.6%) men and 22 (20.4%) women, completed the rehabilitation course. The mean age of the study participants was 58.25 ± 9.83 years. A statistically significant improvement was observed in HRR (p value = 0.040). Significant declines were also observed in the patients' waist circumference (p value < 0.001) and systolic and diastolic blood pressures (p value = 0.018 and 0.003, respectively). A decreasing trend was observed in the patients' body mass index, but it failed to reach statistical significance (p value = 0.063). No statistically meaningful changes were noted in fasting blood glucose (p value = 0.171), high-density lipoprotein (p value = 0.070), or triglyceride concentrations (p value = 0.149). Conclusion: The cardiac rehabilitation program may help to improve HRR and several components of the metabolic syndrome in patients with coronary heart disease. PMID:26985205

  18. Heart rate responses to autonomic challenges in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Macey, Paul M; Kumar, Rajesh; Woo, Mary A; Yan-Go, Frisca L; Harper, Ronald M

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is accompanied by structural alterations and dysfunction in central autonomic regulatory regions, which may impair dynamic and static cardiovascular regulation, and contribute to other syndrome pathologies. Characterizing cardiovascular responses to autonomic challenges may provide insights into central nervous system impairments, including contributions by sex, since structural alterations are enhanced in OSA females over males. The objective was to assess heart rate responses in OSA versus healthy control subjects to autonomic challenges, and, separately, characterize female and male patterns. We studied 94 subjects, including 37 newly-diagnosed, untreated OSA patients (6 female, age mean ± std: 52.1 ± 8.1 years; 31 male aged 54.3 ± 8.4 years), and 57 healthy control subjects (20 female, 50.5 ± 8.1 years; 37 male, 45.6 ± 9.2 years). We measured instantaneous heart rate with pulse oximetry during cold pressor, hand grip, and Valsalva maneuver challenges. All challenges elicited significant heart rate differences between OSA and control groups during and after challenges (repeated measures ANOVA, p<0.05). In post-hoc analyses, OSA females showed greater impairments than OSA males, which included: for cold pressor, lower initial increase (OSA vs. control: 9.5 vs. 7.3 bpm in females, 7.6 vs. 3.7 bpm in males), OSA delay to initial peak (2.5 s females/0.9 s males), slower mid-challenge rate-of-increase (OSA vs. control: -0.11 vs. 0.09 bpm/s in females, 0.03 vs. 0.06 bpm/s in males); for hand grip, lower initial peak (OSA vs. control: 2.6 vs. 4.6 bpm in females, 5.3 vs. 6.0 bpm in males); for Valsalva maneuver, lower Valsalva ratio (OSA vs. control: 1.14 vs. 1.30 in females, 1.29 vs. 1.34 in males), and OSA delay during phase II (0.68 s females/1.31 s males). Heart rate responses showed lower amplitude, delayed onset, and slower rate changes in OSA patients over healthy controls, and impairments may be more pronounced in females. The dysfunctions may reflect central injury in the syndrome, and suggest autonomic deficiencies that may contribute to further tissue and functional pathologies. PMID:24194842

  19. The loss of circadian heart rate variations in patients undergoing mitral valve replacement and Corridor procedure--comparison to heart transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Velimirovic, D B; Pavlovic, S U; Petrovic, P; Neskovic, A; Zivkovic, M; Bojic, M

    2001-02-01

    We have presently demonstrated that when added to mitral valve replacement (MVR) the corridor procedure is 75% efficient in restoring and maintaining sinus rhythm in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation (AF), caused by rheumatic mitral valve disease, (follow up 13.9months). In the same patient population, we observed that the typical day-night cycle heart rate (HR) variations were lost and our present study concentrates on this subject. Heart rate variability analysis based on 24-h Holter ECG recording (StrataScan 563 DelMar Avionics) or hospital discharge (12th-14th postoperative days) was performed in 3 patient groups: Group I: Patients with a Corridor procedure added to MVR (12pts, m/f 10/2, mean age 47.3+/-7.5yr); Group II (control): with patients MVR performed through the left atrial approach, without additional antiarrhythmic procedures (10pts, m/f 3/7 mean age 51.5+/-6.7yr), and Group III: heart transplant recipients (5pts, mean age 46.4+/-11.22yr). We analyzed the hourly heart rate over 24-h period divided into three 8-h segments (07-14h; 15-22h and 23-06h). Statistical comparison of mean hourly heart rate values was made between the three time periods of Holter monitoring. The Corridor procedure performed with mitral valve replacement resulted in conversion of sinus rhythm in 75% of patients (Group I), but postoperative heart rate variability analyses based on Holter monitoring disclosed that the mean heart rate was not statistically significantly difficult between the three 8-h segments of the day-night (P>0.05). The same results were found in the group of patients after heart transplant (P>0.05). The same results were found in the group of patients after heart transplant (P>0.05). In the second group (classical MVR), statistically significant differences in mean HR variation existed between the three 8-h intervals (P<0.05), and although atrial fibrillation occurred postoperatively physiologic circadian heart rate variations were preserved. With the Corridor procedure, both atria were surgically and electrically isolated and chronotropic function of the ventricles was restored by creating a small strip of atrial tissue with isolated sinus node and atrio-ventricular node, connected to the ventricles. This technique produced heart denervation nervous system influence, producing the loss of circadian HR variations, similar to the transplanted heart. PMID:11137811

  20. Depression and Heart Rate Variability in Patients With Stable Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gehi, Anil; Mangano, Dennis; Pipkin, Sharon; Browner, Warren S.; Whooley, Mary A.

    2009-01-01

    Context Depression is associated with low heart rate variability (HRV) in patients following myocardial infarction, suggesting that alterations in the autonomic nervous system may contribute to the adverse cardiac outcomes associated with depression. Whether depression is associated with low HRV in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD) is not known. Objective To examine the association between major depression and 24-hour HRV in patients with stable CHD. Design, Setting, and Participants Cross-sectional study of 873 outpatients with stable CHD recruited from outpatient clinics in the San Francisco Bay Area, California. Main Outcome Measures Major depression was assessed using the Computerized National Institute of Mental Health Diagnostic Interview Schedule. Heart rate variability was measured by 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiography. Results A total of 195 participants (22%) had major depression. Overall, we observed no association between depression and HRV as measured by time domain or frequency domain variables. Mean HRV was similar in participants with and without depression (all P values >.10), and participants with depression were no more likely than those without depression to have low HRV (all P values >.10). Conclusions We found no evidence of an association between depression and HRV in 873 outpatients with stable CHD. These findings raise questions about the potential role of HRV in the association between depression and cardiovascular disease. PMID:15939843

  1. Identification of heart rateassociated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders

    PubMed Central

    den Hoed, Marcel; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Esko, Tnu; Brundel, Bianca J J M; Peal, David S; Evans, David M; Nolte, Ilja M; Segr, Ayellet V; Holm, Hilma; Handsaker, Robert E; Westra, Harm-Jan; Johnson, Toby; Isaacs, Aaron; Yang, Jian; Lundby, Alicia; Zhao, Jing Hua; Kim, Young Jin; Go, Min Jin; Almgren, Peter; Bochud, Murielle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Hadley, David; Van Der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; Heijer, Martin Den; Igl, Wilmar; Jackson, Anne U; Kutalik, Zoltn; Luan, Jianan; Kemp, John P; Kristiansson, Kati; Ladenvall, Claes; Lorentzon, Mattias; Montasser, May E; Njajou, Omer T; OReilly, Paul F; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pourcain, Beate St.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Salo, Perttu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Timpson, Nicholas J; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Weihua; Draisma, Harmen H M; Feitosa, Mary F; Kerr, Kathleen F; Lind, Penelope A; Mihailov, Evelin; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Song, Ci; Weedon, Michael N; Xie, Weijia; Yengo, Loic; Absher, Devin; Albert, Christine M; Alonso, Alvaro; Arking, Dan E; de Bakker, Paul I W; Balkau, Beverley; Barlassina, Cristina; Benaglio, Paola; Bis, Joshua C; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Brage, Sren; Chanock, Stephen J; Chines, Peter S; Chung, Mina; Darbar, Dawood; Dina, Christian; Drr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Felix, Stephan B; Fischer, Krista; Fuchsberger, Christian; de Geus, Eco J C; Goyette, Philippe; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Hartikainen, Anna-liisa; Havulinna, Aki S; Heckbert, Susan R; Hicks, Andrew A; Hofman, Albert; Holewijn, Suzanne; Hoogstra-Berends, Femke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jensen, Majken K; Johansson, sa; Junttila, Juhani; Kb, Stefan; Kanon, Bart; Ketkar, Shamika; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W; Kooner, Angrad S; Kors, Jan A; Kumari, Meena; Milani, Lili; Laiho, Pivi; Lakatta, Edward G; Langenberg, Claudia; Leusink, Maarten; Liu, Yongmei; Luben, Robert N; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Lynch, Stacey N; Markus, Marcello R P; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Leach, Irene Mateo; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarroll, Steven A; Medland, Sarah E; Miller, Kathryn A; Montgomery, Grant W; Morrison, Alanna C; Mller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Pau; Nelis, Mari; OConnell, Jeffrey R; ODonnell, Christopher J; Ong, Ken K; Newman, Anne B; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P; Psaty, Bruce M; Rao, Dabeeru C; Ring, Susan M; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Rudan, Diana; Sanna, Serena; Scott, Robert A; Sehmi, Jaban S; Sharp, Stephen; Shin, Jordan T; Singleton, Andrew B; Smith, Albert V; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D; Stewart, Chip; Stringham, Heather M; Tarasov, Kirill V; Uitterlinden, Andr G; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Whitfield, John B; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Andrew; Wong, Quenna; Jamshidi, Yalda; Zitting, Paavo; Boer, Jolanda M A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Ekelund, Ulf; Forouhi, Nita G; Froguel, Philippe; Hingorani, Aroon; Ingelsson, Erik; Kivimaki, Mika; Kronmal, Richard A; Kuh, Diana; Lind, Lars; Martin, Nicholas G; Oostra, Ben A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Quertermous, Thomas; Rotter, Jerome I; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Verschuren, W M Monique; Walker, Mark; Albanes, Demetrius; Arnar, David O; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Boehnke, Michael; de Boer, Rudolf A; Bouchard, Claude; Caulfield, W L Mark; Chambers, John C; Curhan, Gary; Cusi, Daniele; Eriksson, Johan; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Gilst, Wiek H; Glorioso, Nicola; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Groop, Leif; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Hu, Frank B; Huikuri, Heikki V; Hunter, David J; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Khnen, Mika; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kraft, Peter; Iacoviello, Licia; Lehtimki, Terho; Lokki, Marja-Liisa L; Mitchell, Braxton D; Navis, Gerjan; Nieminen, Markku S; Ohlsson, Claes; Poulter, Neil R; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rimm, Eric B; Rioux, John D; Rizzi, Federica; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Sever, Peter S; Shields, Denis C; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sinisalo, Juha; Stanton, Alice V; Stolk, Ronald P; Strachan, David P; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tuomilehto, Jaako; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Viikari, Jorma; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Grard; Widen, Elisabeth; Cho, Yoon Shin; Olsen, Jesper V; Visscher, Peter M; Willer, Cristen; Franke, Lude; Erdmann, Jeanette; Thompson, John R; Pfeufer, Arne; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Ellinor, Patrick T; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Metspalu, Andres; Perola, Markus; Beckmann, Jacques S; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Wareham, Nicholas J; Munroe, Patricia B; Sibon, Ody C M; Milan, David J; Snieder, Harold; Samani, Nilesh J; Loos, Ruth J F

    2013-01-01

    Elevated resting heart rate is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. In a 2-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in up to 181,171 individuals, we identified 14 new loci associated with heart rate and confirmed associations with all 7 previously established loci. Experimental downregulation of gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio identified 20 genes at 11 loci that are relevant for heart rate regulation and highlight a role for genes involved in signal transmission, embryonic cardiac development and the pathophysiology of dilated cardiomyopathy, congenital heart failure and/or sudden cardiac death. In addition, genetic susceptibility to increased heart rate is associated with altered cardiac conduction and reduced risk of sick sinus syndrome, and both heart rateincreasing and heart ratedecreasing variants associate with risk of atrial fibrillation. Our findings provide fresh insights into the mechanisms regulating heart rate and identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:23583979

  2. Optimum Heart Rate to Minimize Pulsatile External Cardiac Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlevan, Niema; Gharib, Morteza

    2011-11-01

    The workload on the left ventricle is composed of steady and pulsatile components. Clinical investigations have confirmed that an abnormal pulsatile load plays an important role in the pathogenesis of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and progression of LVH to congestive heart failure (CHF). The pulsatile load is the result of the complex dynamics of wave propagation and reflection in the compliant arterial vasculature. We hypothesize that aortic waves can be optimized to reduce the left ventricular (LV) pulsatile load. We used an in-vitro experimental approach to investigate our hypothesis. A unique hydraulic model was used for in-vitro experiments. This model has physical and dynamical properties similar to the heart-aorta system. Different compliant models of the artificial aorta were used to test the hypothesis under various aortic rigidities. Our results indicate that: i) there is an optimum heart rate that minimizes LV pulsatile power (this is in agreement with our previous computational study); ii) introducing an extra reflection site at the specific location along the aorta creates constructive wave conditions that reduce the LV pulsatile power.

  3. Predominance of Intrinsic Mechanism of Resting Heart Rate Control and Preserved Baroreflex Sensitivity in Professional Cyclists after Competitive Training

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Luciene Ferreira; Perlingeiro, Patricia; Hachul, Denise Tessariol; Gomes-Santos, Igor Lucas; Tsutsui, Jeane Mike; Negrao, Carlos Eduardo; De Matos, Luciana D. N. J.

    2016-01-01

    Different season trainings may influence autonomic and non-autonomic cardiac control of heart rate and provokes specific adaptations on heart’s structure in athletes. We investigated the influence of transition training (TT) and competitive training (CT) on resting heart rate, its mechanisms of control, spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and relationships between heart rate mechanisms and cardiac structure in professional cyclists (N = 10). Heart rate (ECG) and arterial blood pressure (Pulse Tonometry) were recorded continuously. Autonomic blockade was performed (atropine—0.04 mg.kg-1; esmolol—500 μg.kg-1 = 0.5 mg). Vagal effect, intrinsic heart rate, parasympathetic (n) and sympathetic (m) modulations, autonomic influence, autonomic balance and BRS were calculated. Plasma norepinephrine (high-pressure liquid chromatography) and cardiac structure (echocardiography) were evaluated. Resting heart rate was similar in TT and CT. However, vagal effect, intrinsic heart rate, autonomic influence and parasympathetic modulation (higher n value) decreased in CT (P≤0.05). Sympathetic modulation was similar in both trainings. The autonomic balance increased in CT but still showed parasympathetic predominance. Cardiac diameter, septum and posterior wall thickness and left ventricular mass also increased in CT (P<0.05) as well as diastolic function. We observed an inverse correlation between left ventricular diastolic diameter, septum and posterior wall thickness and left ventricular mass with intrinsic heart rate. Blood pressure and BRS were similar in both trainings. Intrinsic heart rate mechanism is predominant over vagal effect during CT, despite similar resting heart rate. Preserved blood pressure levels and BRS during CT are probably due to similar sympathetic modulation in both trainings. PMID:26812615

  4. Spectral Heart Rate Variability analysis using the heart timing signal for the screening of the Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Estevez, Diego; Moret-Bonillo, Vicente

    2016-04-01

    Some approaches have been published in the past using Heart Rate Variability (HRV) spectral features for the screening of Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome (SAHS) patients. However there is a big variability among these methods regarding the selection of the source signal and the specific spectral components relevant to the analysis. In this study we investigate the use of the Heart Timing (HT) as the source signal in comparison to the classical approaches of Heart Rate (HR) and Heart Period (HP). This signal has the theoretical advantage of being optimal under the Integral Pulse Frequency Modulation (IPFM) model assumption. Only spectral bands defined as standard for the study of HRV are considered, and for each method the so-called LF/HF and VLFn features are derived. A comparative statistical analysis between the different resulting methods is performed, and subject classification is investigated by means of ROC analysis and a Naïve-Bayes classifier. The standard Apnea-ECG database is used for validation purposes. Our results show statistical differences between SAHS patients and controls for all the derived features. In the subject classification task the best performance in the testing set was obtained using the LF/HF ratio derived from the HR signal (Area under ROC curve=0.88). Only slight differences are obtained due to the effect of changing the source signal. The impact of using the HT signal in this domain is therefore limited, and has not shown relevant differences with respect to the use of the classical approaches of HR or HP. PMID:26866445

  5. Problem Behavior and Heart Rate Reactivity in Adopted Adolescents: Longitudinal and Concurrent Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bimmel, Nicole; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Juffer, Femmie; De Geus, Eco J. C.

    2008-01-01

    The present longitudinal study examined resting heart rate and heart rate variability and reactivity to a stressful gambling task in adopted adolescents with aggressive, delinquent, or internalizing behavior problems and adopted adolescents without behavior problems (total N=151). Early-onset delinquent adolescents showed heart rate

  6. Heart rates and diving behavior of leatherback sea turtles in the eastern pacific ocean

    PubMed

    Southwood; Andrews; Lutcavage; Paladino; West; George; Jones

    1999-05-01

    Heart rates and diving behavior of leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) were monitored at sea during the internesting interval. Instruments that recorded the electrocardiogram and the depth and duration of dives were deployed on six female leatherback turtles as they laid eggs at Playa Grande, Costa Rica. Turtles dived continually for the majority of the internesting interval and spent 57-68 % of the time at sea submerged. Mean dive depth was 19+/-1 m (mean +/- s.d.) and the mean dive duration was 7.4+/-0.6 min. Heart rate declined immediately upon submergence and continued to fall during descent. All turtles showed an increase in heart rate before surfacing. The mean heart rate during dives of 17.4+/-0.9 beats min-1 (mean +/- s.d.) was significantly lower than the mean heart rate at the surface of 24.9+/-1.3 beats min-1 (P<0.05). Instantaneous heart rates as low as 1.05 beats min-1 were recorded during a 34 min dive. The mean heart rate over the entire dive cycle (dive + succeeding surface interval; 19.4+/-1.3 beats min-1) was more similar to the heart rate during diving than to the heart rate at the surface. Although dive and surface heart rates were significantly different from each other, heart rates during diving were 70 % of heart rates at the surface, showing that leatherback turtles do not experience a dramatic bradycardia during routine diving. PMID:10101109

  7. Dynamic analysis of heart rate may predict subsequent ventricular tachycardia after myocardial infarction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makikallio, T. H.; Seppanen, T.; Airaksinen, K. E.; Koistinen, J.; Tulppo, M. P.; Peng, C. K.; Goldberger, A. L.; Huikuri, H. V.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamics analysis of RR interval behavior and traditional measures of heart rate variability were compared between postinfarction patients with and without vulnerability to ventricular tachyarrhythmias in a case-control study. Short-term fractal correlation of heart rate dynamics was better than traditional measures of heart rate variability in differentiating patients with and without life-threatening arrhythmias.

  8. Comparison of Traditional and Alternative Fitness Teaching Formats on Heart Rate Intensity and Perceived Enjoyment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ha, Amy Sau-ching; Heung-Sang Wong, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Compared a traditional and an alternative (skill-fitness- music) fitness teaching format to determine whether there would be differences on Hong Kong middle school students' heart rate intensity and perceived enjoyment. Data from heart rate monitors and student surveys indicated that the two formats did not produce differences in heart rates.…

  9. The Relationship between Heart Rate Reserve and Oxygen Uptake Reserve in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hui, Stanley Sai-chuen; Chan, Janus Wan-sze

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between oxygen uptake (VO[subscript 2]) and heart rate (HR) responses during rest and exercise in Chinese children and youth and to evaluate the relationships between maximal heart rate (%HRmax), heart rate reserve (%HRR), peak oxygen uptake (%VO[subscript 2]peak), and oxygen uptake…

  10. Making the Most of the "Daphnia" Heart Rate Lab: Optimizing the Use of Ethanol, Nicotine & Caffeine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corotto, Frank; Ceballos, Darrel; Lee, Adam; Vinson, Lindsey

    2010-01-01

    Students commonly test the effects of chemical agents on the heart rate of the crustacean "Daphnia" magna, but the procedure has never been optimized. We determined the effects of three concentrations of ethanol, nicotine, and caffeine and of a control solution on heart rate in "Daphnia." Ethanol at 5% and 10% (v/v) reduced mean heart rate to

  11. Heart Rates of High School Physical Education Students during Team Sports, Individual Sports, and Fitness Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurson, Kelly R.; Brown, Dale D.; Cullen, Robert W.; Dennis, Karen K.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined how activity type influenced heart rates and time spent in target heart rate zones of high school students participating in physical education classes. Significantly higher average heart rates existed for fitness (142 plus or minus 24 beats per minute [bpm]) compared to team (118 plus or minus 24 bpm) or individual (114 plus or…

  12. Making the Most of the "Daphnia" Heart Rate Lab: Optimizing the Use of Ethanol, Nicotine & Caffeine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corotto, Frank; Ceballos, Darrel; Lee, Adam; Vinson, Lindsey

    2010-01-01

    Students commonly test the effects of chemical agents on the heart rate of the crustacean "Daphnia" magna, but the procedure has never been optimized. We determined the effects of three concentrations of ethanol, nicotine, and caffeine and of a control solution on heart rate in "Daphnia." Ethanol at 5% and 10% (v/v) reduced mean heart rate to…

  13. Heart rate dynamics in iNOS knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Mani, Ali R; Ollosson, Richard; Mani, Yasaman; Ippolito, Silvia; Moore, Kevin P

    2006-09-20

    Nitric oxide has both an inhibitory and excitatory role in the regulation of pre-ganglionic sympathetic neurons, involving the iNOS and nNOS systems respectively. The aim of the present study was to examine cardiovascular autonomic activity in iNOS knockout mice using spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV), and to determine the role of iNOS in altered HRV in endotoxaemia. Electrocardiograms were recorded in anaesthetised mice, and the R-R intervals digitized for spectral analysis of HRV and cardiac rhythm regularity using sample entropy analysis. The basal heart rate was higher in iNOS knockout mice compared with controls (465+/-8 vs 415+/-13 beat/min P<0.05), with a significant increase in the low frequency power of HRV spectra in iNOS knockout mice compared with controls (49.4+/-4.3 vs 33.8+/-5.6 normalized units, P<0.05), consistent with increased cardiac sympathetic activity. Endotoxaemia is known to decrease HRV, but the role of iNOS is unknown. LPS (20 mg/kg i.p) increased basal heart rate in both wild type and iNOS knockout mice, but caused a depression of HRV and sample entropy in both groups. Studies in isolated beating atria showed that the changes of HRV under basal or post-LPS conditions disappeared in vitro, suggesting that the autonomic system is responsible for altered HRV. We conclude that disruption of iNOS gene leads to an increase in the low frequency power of HRV consistent with increased cardiac sympathetic activity. These data also demonstrate that LPS-induced decrease of HRV is independent of iNOS. PMID:16790251

  14. Classification tree for risk assessment in patients suffering from congestive heart failure via long-term heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Melillo, Paolo; De Luca, Nicola; Bracale, Marcello; Pecchia, Leandro

    2013-05-01

    This study aims to develop an automatic classifier for risk assessment in patients suffering from congestive heart failure (CHF). The proposed classifier separates lower risk patients from higher risk ones, using standard long-term heart rate variability (HRV) measures. Patients are labeled as lower or higher risk according to the New York Heart Association classification (NYHA). A retrospective analysis on two public Holter databases was performed, analyzing the data of 12 patients suffering from mild CHF (NYHA I and II), labeled as lower risk, and 32 suffering from severe CHF (NYHA III and IV), labeled as higher risk. Only patients with a fraction of total heartbeats intervals (RR) classified as normal-to-normal (NN) intervals (NN/RR) higher than 80% were selected as eligible in order to have a satisfactory signal quality. Classification and regression tree (CART) was employed to develop the classifiers. A total of 30 higher risk and 11 lower risk patients were included in the analysis. The proposed classification trees achieved a sensitivity and a specificity rate of 93.3% and 63.6%, respectively, in identifying higher risk patients. Finally, the rules obtained by CART are comprehensible and consistent with the consensus showed by previous studies that depressed HRV is a useful tool for risk assessment in patients suffering from CHF. PMID:24592473

  15. Heart rate variability helps tracking time more accurately.

    PubMed

    Cellini, Nicola; Mioni, Giovanna; Levorato, Ilenia; Grondin, Simon; Stablum, Franca; Sarlo, Michela

    2015-12-01

    Adequate temporal abilities are crucial for adaptive behavior. In time processing, variations in the rate of pulses' emission by the pacemaker are often reported to be an important cause of temporal errors. These variations are often associated with physiological changes, and recently it has also been proposed that physiological changes may not just vary the pulses' emission, but they can work as a timekeeper themselves. In the present study we further explore the relationship between temporal abilities with autonomic activity and interoceptive awareness in a group of thirty healthy young adults (mean age 24.18 years; SD=2.1). Using electrocardiogram, impedance cardiography and skin conductance measures, we assessed the relationship between the autonomic profile at rest and temporal abilities in two temporal tasks (time bisection and finger tapping tasks). Results showed that heart rate variability affects time perception. We observed that increased heart rate variability (HRV) was associated with higher temporal accuracy. More specifically, we found that higher vagal control was associated with lower error in producing 1-s tempo, whereas higher overall HRV was related with lower error (measured by the constant error) in the time bisection task. Our results support the idea that bodily signals may shape our perception of time. PMID:26507899

  16. Alternate Nostril Breathing at Different Rates and its Influence on Heart Rate Variability in Non Practitioners of Yoga

    PubMed Central

    P.R, Devaki; P., Saikumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Heart rate variability is a measure of modulation in autonomic input to the heart and is one of the markers of autonomic functions. Though there are many studies on the long term influence of breathing on HRV (heart rate variability) there are only a few studies on the immediate effect of breathing especially alternate nostril breathing on HRV. This study focuses on the immediate effects of alternate nostril breathing and the influence of different breathing rates on HRV. Materials and Methods The study was done on 25 subjects in the age group of 17-35 years. ECG and respiration were recorded before intervention and immediately after the subjects were asked to perform alternate nostril breathing for five minutes. Results Low frequency (LF) which is a marker of sympathetic activity increased, high frequency (HF) which is a marker of parasympathetic activity decreased and their ratio LF/HF which is a marker of sympatho/vagal balance increased immediately after 6 and 12 minutes in comparison to baseline values whereas there was no significant difference in the means of these components when both 6 and 12 minutes were compared. Conclusion Immediate effects of alternate nostril breathing on HRV in non practitioners of yogic breathing are very different from the long term influence of yogic breathing on HRV which show a predominant parasympathetic influence on the heart. PMID:26894062

  17. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition with pyridostigmine improves heart rate recovery after maximal exercise in patients with chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Androne, A S; Hryniewicz, K; Goldsmith, R; Arwady, A; Katz, S D

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To characterise the effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibition with pyridostigmine on parasympathetic tone in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Design: Prospective randomised, double blind crossover trial. Setting: University hospital outpatient heart failure clinic. Patients: 20 ambulatory subjects with stable CHF (mean age 55 years, mean ejection fraction 24%). Interventions: Oral administration of a single dose of pyridostigmine 30 mg and matching placebo on separate days. Main outcome measures: Heart rate recovery at one minute and three minutes after completion of maximal exercise. Results: Heart rate recovery at one minute after exercise was significantly greater after administration of pyridostigmine than after administration of placebo (mean (SEM) 27.4 (3.2) beats/min v 22.4 (2.4) beats/min, p < 0.01). Heart rate recovery at three minutes after exercise did not differ after administration of pyridostigmine and placebo (mean (SEM) 44.4 (3.9) beats/min v 41.8 (3.6) beats/min, NS). Peak heart rate, peak oxygen uptake, peak respiratory exchange ratio, plasma noradrenaline (norepinephrine) concentrations, and plasma brain natriuretic peptide concentrations did not differ after administration of pyridostigmine and placebo. Conclusions: Acetylcholinesterase inhibition with pyridostigmine increased heart rate recovery at one minute but not at three minutes after exercise. A specific effect of pyridostigmine on heart rate one minute after exercise suggests that pyridostigmine augments parasympathetic tone in patients with CHF. PMID:12860856

  18. Beta-adrenergic stimulation modulation of heart rate via synchronization of ryanodine receptor Ca2+ release.

    PubMed

    Lakatta, Edward G; Vinogradova, Tatiana M; Bogdanov, Konstantin Y

    2002-01-01

    A robust "fight or flight response", largely mediated via acute beta-adrenergic receptor (beta-AR) stimulation to the heart to increase its beating rate and contractile performance, is an essential component of the vertebrate survival instinct. While it has long been recognized that activation of beta-AR increases the spontaneous beating rate of sinoatrial nodal cells (SANC), specific links between stimulation of beta-ARs and the resultant increase in firing rate have not been evaluated. Our recent studies employed imaging of subcellular Ca2+ release coupled with recording of membrane potential or current in single, isolated cardiac SANC, to seek novel links between beta-AR stimulation and ryanodine receptor Ca2+ release and heart rate. An overview of these recent results, which provides novel insights into mechanisms of cardiac reserve that underlie the "fight or flight instinct, is presented here. PMID:12630548

  19. Prognostic significance of heart rate turbulence parameters in patients with chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study is aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of heart rate turbulence (HRT) parameters in predicting the prognosis in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Methods From June 2011 to December 2012, a total of 104 CHF patients and 30 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. We obtained a 24-hour Holter ECG recording to assess the HRT parameters, included turbulence onset (TO), turbulence slope (TS), standard deviation of N-N intervals (SDNN), and resting heart rate (RHR). The relationships between HRT parameters and the prognosis of CHF patients were determined. Results The assessment follow-up period lasted until January 31, 2013. The overall mortality of CHF patients was 9.6% (10/104). Our results revealed that CHF patients had higher levels of TO than those of healthy subjects, but the TS levels of CHF patients were lower than that of the control group. CHF patients with NYHA grade IV had higher HRT1/2 rate than those with NYHA grade II/III. There were statistical differences in TS, LVEF, SDNN and RHR between the non-deteriorating group and the non-survivor group. Significant differences in TS among the three groups were also found. Furthermore, CHF patients in the non-survivor group had lower levels of TS than those in the deteriorating group. Correlation analyses indicated that TO negatively correlate with SDNN, while TS positively correlated with SDNN and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). We also observed negative correlations between TS and left ventricular end-diastolic cavity dimension (LVEDD), RHR, homocysteine (Hcy) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Multivariate Cox regression analysis further confirmed that LVEF (≤30%), HRT2, SDNN and RHR were independent risk factors which can indicate poor prognosis in CHF patients. Conclusions Our findings indicate that HRT may have good clinical predictive value in patients with CHF. Thus, quantifying HRT parameters could be a useful tool for predicting mortality in CHF patients. PMID:24725657

  20. Combined use of autogenic therapy and biofeedback in training effective control of heart rate by humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were performed on 24 men and women (aged 20-27 yr) in three equal groups who were taught to control their own heart rates by autogenic training and biofeedback under dark and sound-isolated conditions. Group I was parasympathetic dominant, group II was sympathetic dominant, and group III consisted of parasympathetic-dominant subjects and controls who received only biofeedback of their own heart rates. The results corroborate three hypotheses: (1) subjects with para-sympathetic-dominant autonomic profiles perform in a way that is both qualitatively and quantitatively different from subjects with sympathetic-dominant autonomic profiles; (2) tests of interindividual variability yield data relevant to individual performance in visceral learning tasks; and (3) the combined use of autogenic training, biofeedback, and verbal feedback is suitable for conditioning large stable autonomic responses in humans.

  1. Motion-compensated non-contact detection of heart rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Yuejin; Liu, Xiaohua

    2015-12-01

    A new non-contact heart rate detection method based on the dual-wavelength technique is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. It is a well-known fact that the differences in the circuits of two detection modules result in different responses of two modules for motion artifacts. This poses a great challenge to compensate the motion artifacts during measurements. In order to circumvent this problem, we have proposed the amplitude spectrum and phase spectrum adaptive filter. Comparing with the time-domain adaptive filter and independent component analysis, the amplitude spectrum and phase spectrum adaptive filter can suppress the interference caused by the two circuit differences and effectively compensate the motion artifacts. To make the device is much compact and portable, a photoelectric probe is designed. The measurement distance is from several centimeters up to several meters. Moreover, the data obtained by using this non-contact detection system is compared with those of the conventional finger blood volume pulse (BVP) sensor by simultaneously measuring the heart rate of the subject. The data obtained from the proposed non-contact system are consistent and comparable with that of the BVP sensor.

  2. Heart rate variability (HRV) during virtual reality immersion.

    PubMed

    Malińska, Marzena; Zużewicz, Krystyna; Bugajska, Joanna; Grabowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study was assessment of the hour-long training involving handling virtual environment (sVR) and watching a stereoscopic 3D movie on the mechanisms of autonomic heart rate (HR) regulation among the subjects who were not predisposed to motion sickness. In order to exclude predispositions to motion sickness, all the participants (n=19) underwent a Coriolis test. During an exposure to 3D and sVR the ECG signal was continuously recorded using the Holter method. For the twelve consecutive 5-min epochs of ECG signal, the analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) in time and frequency domains was conducted. After 30 min from the beginning of the training in handling the virtual workstation a significant increase in LF spectral power was noted. The values of the sympathovagal LF/HF index while sVR indicated a significant increase in sympathetic predominance in four time intervals, namely between the 5th and the 10th minute, between the 15th and the 20th minute, between the 35th and 40th minute and between the 55th and the 60th minute of exposure. PMID:26327262

  3. Effect of Methamphetamine Dependence on Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Brook L.; Minassian, Arpi; Perry, William

    2010-01-01

    Background Methamphetamine (METH) is an increasing popular and highly addictive stimulant associated with autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction, cardiovascular pathology, and neurotoxicity. Heart rate variability (HRV) has been used to assess autonomic function and predict mortality in cardiac disorders and drug intoxication, but has not been characterized in METH use. We recorded HRV in a sample of currently abstinent individuals with a history of METH dependence compared to age- and gender-matched drug-free comparison subjects. Method HRV was assessed using time domain, frequency domain, and nonlinear entropic analyses in 17 previously METH-dependent and 21 drug-free comparison individuals during a 5 minute rest period. Results The METH-dependent group demonstrated significant reduction in HRV, reduced parasympathetic activity, and diminished heartbeat complexity relative to comparison participants. More recent METH use was associated with increased sympathetic tone. Conclusion Chronic METH exposure may be associated with decreased HRV, impaired vagal function, and reduction in heart rate complexity as assessed by multiple methods of analysis. We discuss and review evidence that impaired HRV may be related to the cardiotoxic or neurotoxic effects of prolonged METH use. PMID:21182570

  4. Online heart rate estimation in unstable ballistocardiographic records.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Eduardo C; Postolache, Octavian A; Girão, Pedro S

    2010-01-01

    When recording the pressure oscillations of a seated subject two distinct effects are assessed, ample vibrations due to the person's movement, and periodic oscillations of small amplitude due to cardiopulmonary activity, expressed by the ballistocardiogram (BCG). Embedding a pressure sensor in a chair's back or seat allows unobtrusive monitoring of the BCG. However, inconspicuously acquired signals are affected by numerous artifacts, often generated by the subject's forgetfulness, and posture changes due to lack of constrains. Moreover, the signal changes considerably its shape from person to person, and when the seating posture, or conversely, sensor position, is different. For real-time continuous monitoring, it is still to be found a method which, without introducing significant delays, can deal with such volatility. Thus, tailored calibration of peak detectors and other algorithms is recurrent, and even so, the neighboring samples of artifacts are possibly untreatable. This work evaluates the advantages of Empirical Mode Decomposition, as well as a coarser demodulation approach of the BCG signal, as dependable methods to allow real-time heart rate estimation on unstable BCG records. An analysis of the Fourier transform of the demodulated signals is the method used to provide and compare robustness of heart rate estimates. PMID:21096778

  5. Heart rate variability (HRV) during virtual reality immersion

    PubMed Central

    Malińska, Marzena; Zużewicz, Krystyna; Bugajska, Joanna; Grabowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study was assessment of the hour-long training involving handling virtual environment (sVR) and watching a stereoscopic 3D movie on the mechanisms of autonomic heart rate (HR) regulation among the subjects who were not predisposed to motion sickness. In order to exclude predispositions to motion sickness, all the participants (n=19) underwent a Coriolis test. During an exposure to 3D and sVR the ECG signal was continuously recorded using the Holter method. For the twelve consecutive 5-min epochs of ECG signal, the analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) in time and frequency domains was conducted. After 30 min from the beginning of the training in handling the virtual workstation a significant increase in LF spectral power was noted. The values of the sympathovagal LF/HF index while sVR indicated a significant increase in sympathetic predominance in four time intervals, namely between the 5th and the 10th minute, between the 15th and the 20th minute, between the 35th and 40th minute and between the 55th and the 60th minute of exposure. PMID:26327262

  6. Heart rate variability in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Gardim, Camila Balsamo; de Oliveira, Bruno Affonso P.; Bernardo, Aline Fernanda B.; Gomes, Rayana Loch; Pacagnelli, Francis Lopes; Lorençoni, Roselene Modolo R.; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To gather current information about the effects of type 1 diabetes mellitus on children's cardiac autonomic behavior. DATA SOURCES: The search of articles was conducted on PubMed, Ibecs, Medline, Cochrane, Lilacs, SciELO and PEDro databases using the MeSH terms: "autonomic nervous system", "diabetes mellitus", "child", "type 1 diabetes mellitus", "sympathetic nervous system" and "parasympathetic nervous system", and their respective versions in Portuguese (DeCS). Articles published from January 2003 to February 2013 that enrolled children with 9-12 years old with type 1 diabetes mellitus were included in the review. DATA SYNTHESIS: The electronic search resulted in four articles that approached the heart rate variability in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus, showing that, in general, these children present decreased global heart rate variability and vagal activity. The practice of physical activity promoted benefits for these individuals. CONCLUSIONS: Children with type 1 diabetes mellitus present changes on autonomic modulation, indicating the need for early attention to avoid future complications in this group. PMID:25119762

  7. Conditioned tolerance to the heart rate effects of smoking.

    PubMed

    Epstein, L H; Caggiula, A R; Perkins, K A; McKenzie, S J; Smith, J A

    1991-05-01

    This study extended our findings that behavioral tolerance to nicotine in animals can be influenced by conditioning to cardiovascular tolerance in humans. Subjects smoked one-half a cigarette during each of five trials. In the ten-minute intersmoking interval the contexts that preceded smoking were varied. Smokers in the Changing group attended to a different five-minute segment of a Sherlock Holmes radio mystery before each trial, while those in the Repeated group listened to the same segment of the tape. Presmoking heart rates were stable across the groups from trials 1 to 5. As predicted, heart rate for subjects who smoked in the same context showed tolerance to smoking from trials 1 to 5 (84.5 to 78 bpm), while subjects who smoked in in the same context showed tolerance to 83.9 bpm). COa levels increased equally for both groups over the five trials. The results of this study suggest tolerance to smoking can be influenced by learning. PMID:1924497

  8. [Development of Digital Subtraction Angiography Method for Pediatric Cardiac Angiography Using Subtraction Technique with Heart Rate].

    PubMed

    Niki, Ayumi; Honmoto, Tsuyoshi; Sanada, Shigeru; Hayashi, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) has been used in head and abdomen. However, in recent years, the use of cardiac DSA has been reported. In this report, we discuss the development of a DSA method with heart rate to clearly visualize blood vessels of pediatric patients. The patients included five children who underwent pulmonary artery angioplasty. We used a process to resize the original images and performed two kinds of subtraction methods as well as visually evaluated the images and performed comparisons between pairs of images using the Scheffe's method. Subtraction techniques were used to eliminate motion artifacts of the heart, thoracic vertebra, ribs, and diaphragm. Visualization of the image of blood vessels of pulmonary arteries using the subtraction technique with heart rate was superior to the visualization of the conventional DSA images of peripheral blood vessels of the lung and pulmonary arteries. Use of subtraction technique with heart rate makes it possible to obtain more detailed information on pediatric cardiac angiography images noninvasively. PMID:26796932

  9. Heart rate effects of intraosseous injections using slow and fast rates of anesthetic solution deposition.

    PubMed

    Susi, Louis; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike; Weaver, Joel; Drum, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    The authors, using a crossover design, randomly administered, in a single-blind manner, 3 primary intraosseous injections to 61 subjects using: the Wand local anesthetic system at a deposition rate of 45 seconds (fast injection); the Wand local anesthetic system at a deposition rate of 4 minutes and 45 seconds (slow injection); a conventional syringe injection at a deposition rate of 4 minutes and 45 seconds (slow injection), in 3 separate appointments spaced at least 3 weeks apart. A pulse oximeter measured heart rate (pulse). The results demonstrated the mean maximum heart rate was statistically higher with the fast intraosseous injection (average 21 to 28 beats/min increase) than either of the 2 slow intraosseous injections (average 10 to 12 beats/min increase). There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 slow injections. We concluded that an intraosseous injection of 1.4 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine with the Wand at a 45-second rate of anesthetic deposition resulted in a significantly higher heart rate when compared with a 4-minute and 45-second anesthetic solution deposition using either the Wand or traditional syringe. PMID:18327970

  10. Heart Rate, Stress, and Occupational Noise Exposure among Electronic Waste Recycling Workers.

    PubMed

    Burns, Katrina N; Sun, Kan; Fobil, Julius N; Neitzel, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Electronic waste (e-waste) is a growing occupational and environmental health issue around the globe. E-waste recycling is a green industry of emerging importance, especially in low-and middle-income countries where much of this recycling work is performed, and where many people's livelihoods depend on this work. The occupational health hazards of e-waste recycling have not been adequately explored. We performed a cross-sectional study of noise exposures, heart rate, and perceived stress among e-waste recycling workers at a large e-waste site in Accra, Ghana. We interviewed 57 workers and continuously monitored their individual noise exposures and heart rates for up to 24 h. More than 40% of workers had noise exposures that exceeded recommended occupational (85 dBA) and community (70 dBA) noise exposure limits, and self-reported hearing difficulties were common. Workers also had moderate to high levels of perceived stress as measured via Cohen's Perceived Stress Scale, and reported a variety of symptoms that could indicate cardiovascular disease. Noise exposures were moderately and significantly correlated with heart rate (Spearman's ρ 0.46, p < 0.001). A mixed effects linear regression model indicated that a 1 dB increase in noise exposure was associated with a 0.17 increase in heart rate (p-value = 0.01) even after controlling for work activities, age, smoking, perceived stress, and unfavorable physical working conditions. These findings suggest that occupational and non-occupational noise exposure is associated with elevations in average heart rate, which may in turn predict potential cardiovascular damage. PMID:26797626

  11. Heart Rate, Stress, and Occupational Noise Exposure among Electronic Waste Recycling Workers

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Katrina N.; Sun, Kan; Fobil, Julius N.; Neitzel, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Electronic waste (e-waste) is a growing occupational and environmental health issue around the globe. E-waste recycling is a green industry of emerging importance, especially in low-and middle-income countries where much of this recycling work is performed, and where many people’s livelihoods depend on this work. The occupational health hazards of e-waste recycling have not been adequately explored. We performed a cross-sectional study of noise exposures, heart rate, and perceived stress among e-waste recycling workers at a large e-waste site in Accra, Ghana. We interviewed 57 workers and continuously monitored their individual noise exposures and heart rates for up to 24 h. More than 40% of workers had noise exposures that exceeded recommended occupational (85 dBA) and community (70 dBA) noise exposure limits, and self-reported hearing difficulties were common. Workers also had moderate to high levels of perceived stress as measured via Cohen’s Perceived Stress Scale, and reported a variety of symptoms that could indicate cardiovascular disease. Noise exposures were moderately and significantly correlated with heart rate (Spearman’s ρ 0.46, p < 0.001). A mixed effects linear regression model indicated that a 1 dB increase in noise exposure was associated with a 0.17 increase in heart rate (p-value = 0.01) even after controlling for work activities, age, smoking, perceived stress, and unfavorable physical working conditions. These findings suggest that occupational and non-occupational noise exposure is associated with elevations in average heart rate, which may in turn predict potential cardiovascular damage. PMID:26797626

  12. Scientific Comparison of Different Online Heart Rate Monitoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Schönfelder, Martin; Hinterseher, Georg; Peter, Philipp; Spitzenpfeil, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Recent technical development focused on real-time heart rate monitoring instead of postexercise evaluation of recorded data. There are several systems on the market that allow direct and real-time monitoring of several individuals at the same time. The present study compared the systems of Polar, Acentas, Activio, and Suunto in a field test with twelve subjects regarding failure quota, operating distance, and ECG validity. Moreover, the installation and use of software and hardware were evaluated with a quality rating system. Chest belts were evaluated with a questionnaire, too. Overall the system of Acentas reached the best mark of all systems, but detailed results showed that every system has its advantages and disadvantages depending on using purpose, location, and weather. So this evaluation cannot recommend a single system but rather shows strength and weakness of all systems and additionally can be used for further system improvements. PMID:21760780

  13. Contact-free heart rate measurement using multiple video data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Pang-Chan; Lee, Kual-Zheng; Tsai, Luo-Wei

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a contact-free heart rate measurement method by analyzing sequential images of multiple video data. In the proposed method, skin-like pixels are firstly detected from multiple video data for extracting the color features. These color features are synchronized and analyzed by independent component analysis. A representative component is finally selected among these independent component candidates to measure the HR, which achieves under 2% deviation on average compared with a pulse oximeter in the controllable environment. The advantages of the proposed method include: 1) it uses low cost and high accessibility camera device; 2) it eases users' discomfort by utilizing contact-free measurement; and 3) it achieves the low error rate and the high stability by integrating multiple video data.

  14. Deterioration of Heart Rate Recovery Index in Patients with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)

    PubMed Central

    Ozveren, Olcay; Dogdu, Orhan; Sengul, Cihan; Cinar, Veysel; Eroglu, Elif; Kucukdurmaz, Zekeriya; Degertekin, Muzaffer

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been considered as a benign disease often associated with central obesity and insulin resistance and, in general, with factors of the metabolic syndrome. Heart rate recovery after exercise is a function of vagal reactivation, and its impairment is an independent prognostic indicator for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. The aim of our study was to evaluate the heart rate recovery index in patients with NAFLD. Material/Methods The study population included 59 patients with NAFLD (mean age=42.39.3 years) and 22 healthy subjects as controls (mean age=40.76.5 years). Basal electrocardiography, echocardiography, and treadmill exercise testing were performed on all patients and controls. The heart rate recovery index was defined as the reduction in the heart rate from the rate at peak exercise to the rate at the 1st minute (HRR1), 2nd minute (HRR2), 3rd minute (HRR3), and 5th minute (HRR5) after stopping exercise stress testing. Results There were significant differences in HRR1 and HRR2 indices between patients with ED and the control group (19.98.2 vs. 34.19.6; p<0.001 and 24.35.4 vs. 40.59.1; p=0.006, respectively). Similarly, HRR indices after the 3rd and 5th minutes of the recovery period were significantly lower in patients with NAFLD compared with those indices in the control group (32.38.5 vs. 58.46.5; p=0.001 and 5818.2 vs. 75.115.8; p<0.001). Effort capacity was markedly lower (111.9 vs. 12.51.5 METs; p=0.001) among the patients with NAFLD. Conclusions The heart rate recovery index is deteriorated in patients with NAFLD. When the prognostic significance of the heart rate recovery index is considered, these results may help explain the increased occurrence of cardiac death. It points to the importance of the heart rate recovery index in the identification of high-risk patients. PMID:25168159

  15. Resting heart rate: risk indicator and emerging risk factor in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Michael; Reil, Jan-Christian; Deedwania, Prakash; Kim, Jae B; Borer, Jeffrey S

    2015-03-01

    Resting heart rate is central to cardiac output and is influenced by changes occurring in numerous diseases. It predicts longevity and cardiovascular diseases, and current evidence suggests that it is also an important marker of outcome in cardiovascular disease, including heart failure. Beta-blockers improve outcomes in heart failure; however, they have effects outside reducing heart rate. Ivabradine has demonstrated efficacy in reducing rehospitalizations and mortality in heart failure and in improving exercise tolerance and reducing angina attacks in patients with coronary artery disease, whereas selective heart rate reduction may also prove to be beneficial in therapeutic areas outside those in which ivabradine has already demonstrated clinical efficacy. This review provides an update on the associations between heart rate and cardiovascular outcomes in various conditions, the experimental effects of heart rate reduction with ivabradine, and the potential new indications in cardiovascular disease. PMID:25447617

  16. Heart Rate Response During Underwater Treadmill Training in Adults with Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Don W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Walking on a submerged treadmill can improve mobility in persons displaying lower limb muscle weakness and balance deficits. Little is known, however, regarding the effect of water treadmill exercise on cardiac performance in persons with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). Objective: To assess heart rate response during underwater treadmill training (UTT) in adults with iSCI. Methods: Seven males and 4 females with iSCI (age = 48 ± 13 years; 5 ± 8 years after injury) completed 8 weeks of UTT (3 sessions per week; 3 walks per session) incorporating individually determined walking speeds, personalized levels of body weight unloading, and gradual, alternating increases in speed and duration. Heart rate was monitored during the last 15 seconds of the final 2 minutes of each walk. Results: Over the course of 3 biweekly periods in which walking speed remained constant, heart rate fell by 7% (7 ± 1 b•min-1; P < .001) in weeks 2 and 3, 14% (17 ± 6 b•min-1; P < .001) in weeks 4 and 5, and 17% (21 ± 11 b•min-1; P < .001) in weeks 6 and 7. Conclusion: In adults with iSCI, progressively greater absolute and relative reductions in submaximal exercise heart rate occurred after 2 months of UTT featuring a systematic increase in training volume. PMID:25762859

  17. Effect of muscle mass and intensity of isometric contraction on heart rate.

    PubMed

    Glvez, J M; Alonso, J P; Sangrador, L A; Navarro, G

    2000-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of muscle mass and the level of force on the contraction-induced rise in heart rate. We conducted an experimental study in a sample of 28 healthy men between 20 and 30 yr of age (power: 95%, alpha: 5%). Smokers, obese subjects, and those who performed regular physical activity over a certain amount of energetic expenditure were excluded from the study. The participants exerted two types of isometric contractions: handgrip and turning a 40-cm-diameter wheel. Both were sustained to exhaustion at 20 and 50% of maximal force. Twenty-five subjects finished the experiment. Heart rate increased a mean of 15.1 beats/min [95% confidence interval (CI): 5.5-24.6] from 20 to 50% handgrip contractions, and 20.7 beats/min (95% CI: 11.9-29.5) from 20 to 50% wheel-turn contractions. Heart rate also increased a mean of 13.3 beats/min (95% CI: 10.4-16.1) from handgrip to wheel-turn contractions at 20% maximal force, and 18.9 beats/min (95% CI: 9. 8-28.0) from handgrip to wheel-turn contractions at 50% maximal force. We conclude that the magnitude of the heart rate increase during isometric exercise is related to the intensity of the contraction and the mass of the contracted muscle. PMID:10658015

  18. Heart rates increase after hatching in two species of natricine snakes

    PubMed Central

    Aubret, Fabien

    2013-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown heart rates to decrease from embryo to hatchling stage in turtles, remain steady in skinks, and increase in birds. However, no snake species has been studied in this regard. I recorded heart rate evolution trajectories from embryo to juvenile stage in 78 eggs from two species of European Natricine snakes. Unexpectedly, snakes behaved more like birds than turtles or lizards: heart rates increased after hatching in both N. maura and N. natrix, respectively by 43.92 ± 22.84% and 35.92 ± 24.52%. Heart rate shift was not related to an abrupt elevation of metabolism per se (snakes that increased their heart rates the most sharply grew the least after birth), but rather due to a number of smaller eggs that experienced lower than normal heart rates throughout the incubation and recovered a normal heart rate post-birth. This finding is discussed in the light of hatching synchrony benefits. PMID:24287712

  19. Electrocardiogram, heart movement and heart rate in the awake gecko (Hemidactylus mabouia).

    PubMed

    Germer, Carina M; Tomaz, Juliana M; Carvalho, Ana F; Bassani, Rosana A; Bassani, José W M

    2015-01-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) is the simplest and most effective non-invasive method to assess the electrical activity of the heart and to obtain information on the heart rate (HR) and rhythm. Because information on the HR of very small reptiles (body mass <10 g) is still scarce in the literature, in the present work we describe a procedure for recording the ECG in non-anesthetized geckos (Hemidactylus mabouia, Moreau de Jonnès, 1818) under different conditions, namely manual restraint (MR), spontaneous tonic immobility (TI), and in the non-restrained condition (NR). In the gecko ECG, the P, QRS and T waves were clearly distinguishable. The HR was 2.83 ± 0.02 Hz under MR, which was significantly greater (p < 0.001) than the HR under the TI (1.65 ± 0.09 Hz) and NR (1.60 ± 0.10 Hz) conditions. Spontaneously beating isolated gecko hearts contracted at 0.84 ± 0.03 Hz. The in vitro beating rate was affected in a concentration-dependent fashion by adrenoceptor stimulation with noradrenaline, as well as by the muscarinic cholinergic agonist carbachol, which produced significant positive and negative chronotropic effects, respectively (p < 0.001). To our knowledge, this is the first report on the ECG morphology and HR values in geckos, particularly under TI. The methodology and instrumentation developed here are useful for non-invasive in vivo physiological and pharmacological studies in small reptiles without the need of physical restraint or anesthesia. PMID:25395252

  20. Problem Behavior and Heart Rate Reactivity in Adopted Adolescents: Longitudinal and Concurrent Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bimmel, Nicole; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Juffer, Femmie; De Geus, Eco J. C.

    2008-01-01

    The present longitudinal study examined resting heart rate and heart rate variability and reactivity to a stressful gambling task in adopted adolescents with aggressive, delinquent, or internalizing behavior problems and adopted adolescents without behavior problems (total N=151). Early-onset delinquent adolescents showed heart rate…

  1. Hierarchical Structure of Heart Rate Variability in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X. Z.; Ching, E. S. C.; Lin, D. C.

    2004-03-01

    We show a hierarchical structure (HS) of the She-Leveque form in the beat-to-beat RR intervals of heart rate variability (HRV) in humans. This structure, first found as an empirical law in turbulent fluid flows, implies further details in the HRV multifractal scaling. We tested HS using daytime RRi data from healthy subjects and heart diseased patients with congestive heart failure and found a universal law C(b) where b characterizes the multifractality of HRV and C is related to a co-dimension parameter of the most violent events in the fluctuation. The potential of diagnosis is discussed based on the characteristics of this finding. To model the HRV phenomenology, we propose a local-feedback-global-cascade (LFGC) model based on the She-Waymire (SW) cascade solution to the HS in fluid turbulence. This model extends from the previous work in that it integrates additive law multiplicatively into the cascade structure. It is an attempt to relate to the cardiovascular physiology which consists of numerous feedback controls that function primarily on the principle of additive law. In particular, the model is based on the same philosophy as the SW cascade that its multifractal dynamics consists of a singular and a modulating component. In the LFGC model, we introduce local feedback to model the dynamics of the modulating effect. The novelty of our model is to incorporate the cascade structure in the scheduling for the feedback control. This model also represents an alternative solution to the HS. We will present the simulation results by the LFGC model and discuss its implication in physiology terms.

  2. Heart rate and heart-rate variability responses to acute and chronic stress in a wild-caught passerine bird.

    PubMed

    Cyr, Nicole E; Dickens, Molly J; Romero, L Michael

    2009-01-01

    The cardiovascular-stress response has been studied extensively in laboratory animals but has been poorly studied in naturally selected species. We determined the relative roles of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) in regulating stress-induced changes in heart rate (HR) in wild-caught European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). In both heart-rate variability (HRV) analysis and receptor blockade (atropine and propranolol) experiments, baseline HR was controlled predominantly by the PNS, whereas the increase in HR resulting from acute restraint stress was controlled predominantly by the SNS. These results indicate similar cardiac control of baseline and acute-stress-induced HR in wild-caught starlings and mammals. We further investigated HR responses during chronic stress. Driven primarily by changes in PNS regulation, baseline HR increased during the day but decreased at night. In addition, elevated HRs during acute restraint stress were attenuated throughout chronic stress and were accompanied by decreased HRV. This suggested that increased SNS drive elevated HR, but the attenuated HR response combined with resistance to the SNS blocker propranolol suggested that the sympathetic signal was less effective during chronic stress. Overall, chronic stress in wild-caught starlings elicited profound changes in cardiac function that were primarily regulated by changes in the PNS. PMID:19115847

  3. Welfare implication of measuring heart rate and heart rate variability in dairy cattle: literature review and conclusions for future research.

    PubMed

    Kovács, L; Jurkovich, V; Bakony, M; Szenci, O; Póti, P; Tőzsér, J

    2014-02-01

    Heart rate (HR) measurements have been used to determine stress in livestock species since the beginning of the 1970s. However, according to the latest studies in veterinary and behaviour-physiological sciences, heart rate variability (HRV) proved to be more precise for studying the activity of the autonomic nervous system. In dairy cattle, HR and HRV indices have been used to detect stress caused by routine management practices, pain or milking. This review provides the significance of HR and HRV measurements in dairy cattle by summarising current knowledge and research results in this area. First, the biological background and the interrelation of the autonomic regulation of cardiovascular function, stress, HR and HRV are discussed. Equipment and methodological approaches developed to measure interbeat intervals and estimate HRV in dairy cattle are described. The methods of HRV analysis in time, frequency and non-linear domains are also explained in detail emphasising their physiological background. Finally, the most important scientific results and potential possibilities for future research are presented. PMID:24308850

  4. Heart rate variability in risk stratification of cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Huikuri, Heikki V; Stein, Phyllis K

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) variability has been extensively studied in cardiac patients, especially in patients surviving an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and also in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) or left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. The majority of studies have shown that patients with reduced or abnormal HR variability have an increased risk of mortality within a few years after an AMI or after a diagnosis of CHF/LV dysfunction. Various measures of HR dynamics, such as time-domain, spectral, and non-linear measures of HR variability have been used in risk stratification. The prognostic power of various measures, except of those reflecting rapid R-R interval oscillations, has been almost identical, albeit some non-linear HR variability measures, such as short-term fractal scaling exponent have provided somewhat better prognostic information than the others. Abnormal HR variability predicts both sudden and non-sudden cardiac death. Because of remodeling of the arrhythmia substrate after AMI, early measurement of HR variability to identify those at high risk should likely be repeated later in order to assess the risk of fatal arrhythmia events. Future randomized trials using HR variability/turbulence as one of the pre-defined inclusion criteria will show whether routine measurement of HR variability/turbulence will become a routine clinical tool for risk stratification of cardiac patients. PMID:24215747

  5. Exercise Training Improves Heart Rate Variability after Methamphetamine Dependency

    PubMed Central

    Dolezal, Brett A.; Chudzynski, Joy; Dickerson, Daniel; Mooney, Larissa; Rawson, Richard A.; Garfinkel, Alan; Cooper, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects a healthy autonomic nervous system and is increased with physical training. Methamphetamine dependence (MD) causes autonomic dysfunction and diminished HRV. We compared recently abstinent MD participants with age-matched, drug free controls (DF) and also investigated whether HRV can be improved with exercise training in the MD participants. Methods In 50 participants (MD=28; DF=22) resting heart rate (R-R intervals) was recorded over 5 min while seated using a monitor affixed to a chest strap. Previously reported time-domain (SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50) and frequency-domain (LFnu, HFnu, LF/HF) parameters of HRV were calculated with customized software. MD were randomized to thrice weekly exercise training (ME=14) or equal attention without training (MC=14) over 8 weeks. Groups were compared using paired and unpaired t-tests. Statistical significance was set at P≤0.05. Results Participant characteristics were matched between groups: age 33±6 years; body mass 82.7±12 kg, BMI 26.8±4.1 kg•min−2, mean±SD. Compared with DF, the MD group had significantly higher resting heart rate (P<0.05), LFnu, and LF/HF (P<0.001) as well as lower SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50 and HFnu (all P<0.001). At randomization, HRV indices were similar between ME and MC groups. However, after training, the ME group significantly (all P<0.001) increased SDNN (+14.7±2.0 ms, +34%), RMSSD (+19.6±4.2 ms, +63%), pNN50 (+22.6±2.7%, +173%), HFnu (+14.2±1.9, +60%) and decreased HR (−5.2±1.1 beats·min−1, −7%), LFnu (−9.6±1.5, −16%) and LF/HF (−0.7±0.3, −19%). These measures did not change from baseline in the MC group. Conclusion HRV, based on several conventional indices, was diminished in recently abstinent, methamphetamine dependent individuals. Moreover, physical training yielded a marked increase of HRV representing increased vagal modulation or improved autonomic balance. PMID:24162556

  6. Decreasing Congestive Heart Failure Readmission Rates Within 30 Days at the Tampa VA.

    PubMed

    Messina, William

    2016-01-01

    High hospital readmission rates contribute to the problem of escalating costs and fragmented quality in the US health care system. This article describes the implementation of a home telehealth (HT) performance improvement project with subsequent cost-avoidance savings. The HT project was designed to potentiate communication between and among patients, clinicians, and administrative staff, in addition to reducing readmissions for patients with congestive heart failure at the James A. Haley Veterans Hospital in Tampa, Florida. Pre- and post-HT implementation comparisons were made of readmission rates, costs, and veteran satisfaction from the same 4-month periods in 2012 and 2013. The application of telehealth and phone care initiatives reduced the congestive heart failure hospital readmission rate by 5%, decreased costs, and improved veteran satisfaction with overall care experience. PMID:26938187

  7. Evaluation of a strapless heart rate monitor during simulated flight tasks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Fu, Shan

    2016-03-01

    Pilots are under high task demands during flight. Monitoring pilot's physiological status is very important in the evaluation of pilot's workload and flight safety. Recently, physiological status monitor (PSM) has been embedded into a watch that can be used without a conventional chest strap. This makes it possible to unobtrusively monitor, log and transmit pilot's physiological measurements such as heart rate (HR) during flight tasks. The purpose of this study is to validate HR recorded by a strapless heart rate watch against criterion ECG-derived HR. Ten commercial pilots (mean ± SD : age: 39.1 ± 7.8 years; total flight hours 7173.2 ± 5270.9 hr) performed three routinely trained flight tasks in a full flight simulator: wind shear go-around (WG), takeoff and climb (TC), and hydraulic failure (HF). For all tasks combined (overall) and for each task, differences between the heart rate watch measurements and the criterion data were small (mean difference [95% CI]: overall: -0.71 beats/min [-0.85, -0.57]; WG: -0.90 beats/min [-1.15, -0.65]; TC: -0.69 beats/min [-0.98, -0.40]; HF: -0.61 beats/min [-0.80, -0.42]). There were high correlations between the heart rate watch measurements and the ECG-derived HR for all tasks (r ≥ 0.97, SEE < 3). Bland-Altman plots also show high agreements between the watch measurements and the criterion HR. These results suggest that the strapless heart rate watch provides valid measurements of HR during simulated flight tasks and could be a useful tool for pilot workload evaluation. PMID:26554432

  8. Heart Rate and Initial Presentation of Cardiovascular Diseases (Caliber)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-17

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Coronary Heart Disease NOS; Unheralded Coronary Death; Intracerebral Haemorrhage; Heart Failure; Ischemic Stroke; Myocardial Infarction; Stroke; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Stable Angina Pectoris; Subarachnoid Haemorrhage; Transient Ischemic Attack; Unstable Angina; Cardiac Arrest, Sudden Cardiac Death

  9. [Dynamic analysis of heart rate variability based on wavelet transform].

    PubMed

    Lu, Shan; Yang, Hao; Xiao, Dongping; Huang, Ying

    2006-10-01

    The analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) has become a tool for noninvasively detecting the cardiovascular modulation of autonomic nervous system. Traditional analysis in frequency domain mainly includes calculating the power and detecting the peak frequency of each physiological frequency band. Whether employing the classical method or AR model to estimate the spectrum, the approximate stationarity of HRV is presupposed. Only in short term analysis can data meet this condition, while in long term the nonstationarity of HRV notably appears. A dynamic analysis method based on wavelet transform was proposed in this paper, which not only can obtain the traditional indices in frequency domain, but can compute their dynamic values varying with time, called short-time power and short-time LF/HF ratio. The latter can dynamically evaluate the activity of autonomic nervous. Finally the method was applied to trace the balance of autonomic nervous in Atropin drag experiment. PMID:17121332

  10. Wearable depression monitoring system with heart-rate variability.

    PubMed

    Roh, Taehwan; Hong, Sunjoo; Yoo, Hoi-Jun

    2014-01-01

    A wearable depression monitoring system is proposed with an application-specific system-on-chip (SoC) solution. The SoC is designed to accelerate the filtering and feature extraction of heart-rate variability (HRV) from the electrocardiogram (ECG). Thanks to the SoC solution and planar-fashionable circuit board (P-FCB), the monitoring system becomes a low-power wearable system. Its dimension is 14cm × 7cm with 5mm thickness covering the chest band for convenient usage. In addition, with 3.7V 500mAh battery, its lifetime is at least 10 hours. For user's convenience, the system is interfacing to smart phones through Bluetooth communication. With the features of the HRV and Beck depression inventory (BDI), the smart phone application trains and classifies the user's depression scale with 71% of accuracy. PMID:25570021

  11. Emergence of dynamical complexity related to human heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Mei-Chu; Peng, C.-K.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2014-12-01

    We apply the refined composite multiscale entropy (MSE) method to a one-dimensional directed small-world network composed of nodes whose states are binary and whose dynamics obey the majority rule. We find that the resulting fluctuating signal becomes dynamically complex. This dynamical complexity is caused (i) by the presence of both short-range connections and long-range shortcuts and (ii) by how well the system can adapt to the noisy environment. By tuning the adaptability of the environment and the long-range shortcuts we can increase or decrease the dynamical complexity, thereby modeling trends found in the MSE of a healthy human heart rate in different physiological states. When the shortcut and adaptability values increase, the complexity in the system dynamics becomes uncorrelated.

  12. Correlated and uncorrelated heart rate fluctuations during relaxing visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papasimakis, N.; Pallikari, F.

    2010-05-01

    The heart rate variability (HRV) of healthy subjects practicing relaxing visualization is studied by use of three multiscale analysis techniques: the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), the entropy in natural time (ENT) and the average wavelet (AWC) coefficient. The scaling exponent of normal interbeat interval increments exhibits characteristics of the presence of long-range correlations. During relaxing visualization the HRV dynamics change in the sense that two new features emerge independent of each other: a respiration-induced periodicity that often dominates the HRV at short scales (<40 interbeat intervals) and the decrease of the scaling exponent at longer scales (40-512 interbeat intervals). In certain cases, the scaling exponent during relaxing visualization indicates the breakdown of long-range correlations. These characteristics have been previously seen in the HRV dynamics during non-REM sleep.

  13. Robust estimation of fetal heart rate variability using Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Kumari L; Mathews, V John; Varner, Michael W; Clark, Edward B

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents a new measure of heart rate variability (HRV) that can be estimated using Doppler ultrasound techniques and is robust to variations in the angle of incidence of the ultrasound beam and the measurement noise. This measure employs the multiple signal characterization (MUSIC) algorithm which is a high-resolution method for estimating the frequencies of sinusoidal signals embedded in white noise from short-duration measurements. We show that the product of the square-root of the estimated signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the mean-square error of the frequency estimates is independent of the noise level in the signal. Since varying angles of incidence effectively changes the input SNR, this measure of HRV is robust to the input noise as well as the angle of incidence. This paper includes the results of analyzing synthetic and real Doppler ultrasound data that demonstrates the usefulness of the new measure in HRV analysis. PMID:12892322

  14. Heart rate and salivary cortisol concentrations in foals at birth.

    PubMed

    Nagel, C; Erber, R; Ille, N; Wulf, M; Aurich, J; Mstl, E; Aurich, C

    2015-02-01

    Heart rate (HR), HR variability (HRV) and salivary cortisol concentrations were determined in foals (n?=?13) during the perinatal phase and until 5 months of age. In the fetus, HR decreased from 77??3 beats/min at 120?min before birth to 60??1 beats/min at 5?min before birth (P?<0.01). Within 30?min of birth, HR increased to 160??9 beats/min (P?<0.01). Salivary cortisol concentrations immediately after birth were 11.9??3.6?ng/mL and within 2?h increased to a maximum of 52.5??12.3?ng/mL (P?<0.01). In conclusion, increases in HR and salivary cortisol concentrations in foals are not induced during parturition, but occur immediately after birth. PMID:25582796

  15. Heart rate, startle response, and intrusive trauma memories

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chia-Ying; Marca, Roberto La; Steptoe, Andrew; Brewin, Chris R

    2014-01-01

    The current study adopted the trauma film paradigm to examine potential moderators affecting heart rate (HR) as an indicator of peritraumatic psychological states and as a predictor of intrusive memories. We replicated previous findings that perifilm HR decreases predicted the development of intrusive images and further showed this effect to be specific to images rather than thoughts, and to detail rather than gist recognition memory. Moreover, a group of individuals showing both an atypical sudden reduction in HR after a startle stimulus and higher trait dissociation was identified. Only among these individuals was lower perifilm HR found to indicate higher state dissociation, fear, and anxiety, along with reduced vividness of intrusions. The current findings emphasize how peritraumatic physiological responses relate to emotional reactions and intrusive memory. The moderating role of individual difference in stress defense style was highlighted. PMID:24397333

  16. Pain/analgesia evaluation using heart rate variability analysis.

    PubMed

    Logier, R; Jeanne, M; Tavernier, B; De Jonckheere, J

    2006-01-01

    The optimization of analgesic drugs delivery during general anesthesia requires to evaluate the pain/analgesia balance. Heart rate variability analysis has been shown in several studies to measure the autonomic nervous system tone, which is strongly influenced by anesthetic drugs. Recording RR series during general anesthesia enabled us to observe that the respiratory sinus arrhythmia pattern changed when a surgical stimulation was painful, even though the patient was not conscious. We developed a pain/analgesia evaluation algorithm based on the magnitude analysis of the respiratory patterns on the RR series. The parameters computed from this algorithm were recorded in thirty nine patients during general anesthesia. We retrospectively compared our parameters at different levels of analgesia during surgical stimulation, and found that they were related to pain/analgesia and relatively independent from other anesthesia related events like hypnosis and haemodynamic conditions. PMID:17946620

  17. Modes of heart rate compensations during exercise ECG test.

    PubMed

    Viik, Jari

    2005-12-01

    Heart rate (HR) compensation of electrocardiographic (ECG) parameters is not an unique concept. However, in the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) ST-segment plotted as a function HR has been studied extensively during the last 20 years. In clinical practice quantitative methods are evolved for the exercise phase of the exercise test and post-exercise recovery phase has not been studied as extensively. Quantitative parameters, as ST/HR hysteresis, which represents the average difference in ST depressions between the exercise and recovery phases at an identical HR up to three minutes of recovery, has been shown to improve the detection of CAD. Furthermore, the ST/HR parameters have been demonstrated to be very competent in a prediction of mortality. PMID:16330399

  18. Heart Rate Recovery in Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vimal; Critoph, Christopher H.; Finlay, Malcolm C.; Mist, Bryan; Lambiase, Pier D.; Elliott, Perry M.

    2014-01-01

    Recovery in heart rate (HR) after exercise is a measure of autonomic function and a prognostic indicator in cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to characterize heart rate recovery (HRR) and to determine its relation to cardiac function and morphology in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). We studied 18 healthy volunteers and 41 individuals with HC. All patients underwent clinical assessment and transthoracic echocardiography. Continuous beat-by-beat assessment of HR was obtained during and after cardiopulmonary exercise testing using finger plethysmography. HRR and power spectral densities were calculated on 3minutes of continuous RR recordings. Absolute HRR was lower in patients than that in controls at 1, 2, and 3minutes (25.7 8.4 vs 35.3 11.0 beats/min, p <0.001; 36.8 9.4 vs 53.6 13.2 beats/min, p <0.001; 41.2 12.2 vs 62.1 14.5 beats/min, p <0.001, respectively). HRR remained lower in patients at 2 and 3minutes after normalization to peak HR. After normalization to the difference in HR between peak exercise and rest, HRR was significantly impaired in individuals with obstructive HC at 3minutes compared with controls. HR at 3minutes correlated with peak left ventricular outflow tract gradient (B 0.154 beats/min/mm Hg, confidence interval 0.010 to 0.299, p= 0.037) and remained a significant predictor of HRR after multivariable analysis. Spectral analysis showed a trend toward an increased low-frequency to high-frequency ratio in patients (p= 0.08) suggesting sympathetic predominance. In conclusion, HRR is impaired in HC and correlates with the severity of left ventricular outflow tract gradient. Prospective studies of the prognostic implications of impaired HRR in HC are warranted. PMID:24461767

  19. Heart Rate Variability in Porcine Progressive Peritonitis-Induced Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Jarkovska, Dagmar; Valesova, Lenka; Chvojka, Jiri; Benes, Jan; Sviglerova, Jitka; Florova, Blanka; Nalos, Lukas; Matejovic, Martin; Stengl, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that heart rate variability (HRV) alterations could serve as an indicator of sepsis progression and outcome, however, the relationships of HRV and major pathophysiological processes of sepsis remain unclear. Therefore, in this experimental study HRV was investigated in a clinically relevant long-term porcine model of severe sepsis/septic shock. HRV was analyzed by several methods and the parameters were correlated with pathophysiological processes of sepsis. In 16 anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, and instrumented domestic pigs of either gender, sepsis was induced by fecal peritonitis. Experimental subjects were screened up to the refractory shock development or death. ECG was continuously recorded throughout the experiment, afterwards RR intervals were detected and HRV parameters computed automatically using custom made measurement and analysis MATLAB routines. In all septic animals, progressive hyperdynamic septic shock developed. The statistical measures of HRV, geometrical measures of HRV and Poincaré plot analysis revealed a pronounced reduction of HRV that developed quickly upon the onset of sepsis and was maintained throughout the experiment. The frequency domain analysis demonstrated a decrease in the high frequency component and increase in the low frequency component together with an increase of the low/high frequency component ratio. The reduction of HRV parameters preceded sepsis-associated hemodynamic changes including heart rate increase or shock progression. In a clinically relevant porcine model of peritonitis-induced progressive septic shock, reduction of HRV parameters heralded sepsis development. HRV reduction was associated with a pronounced parasympathetic inhibition and a shift of sympathovagal balance. Early reduction of HRV may serve as a non-invasive and sensitive marker of systemic inflammatory syndrome, thereby widening the therapeutic window for early interventions. PMID:26779039

  20. Relationship between Arousal Intensity and Heart Rate Response to Arousal

    PubMed Central

    Azarbarzin, Ali; Ostrowski, Michele; Hanly, Patrick; Younes, Magdy

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: The visual appearance of cortical arousals varies considerably, from barely meeting scoring criteria to very intense arousals. Arousal from sleep is associated with an increase in heart rate (HR). Our objective was to quantify the intensity of arousals in an objective manner using the time and frequency characteristics of the electroencephalogram (EEG) and to determine whether HR response to arousal correlates with arousal intensity so determined. Design: Post hoc analysis of 20 preexisting polysomnography (PSG) files. Setting: Research and Development Laboratory (YRT Limited). Participants: N/A. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Arousals were scored using the American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria. The EEG signals' time and frequency characteristics were determined using wavelet analysis. An automatic algorithm was developed to scale arousal intensity based on the change in wavelet features and data from a training set obtained from 271 arousals visually scaled between zero and nine (most intense). There were 2,695 arousals in 20 PSGs that were scaled. HR response (?HR) was defined as the difference between the highest HR in the interval [arousal-onset to (arousal-end +8 sec)] and the highest HR between 2 and 12 sec preceding arousal onset. There was a strong correlation between arousal scale and ?HR within each subject (average r: 0.95 0.04). The slope of the relationship varied among subjects (0.7-2.4 min-1/unit scale). Conclusions: Arousal intensity, quantified by wavelet transform, is strongly associated with arousal-related tachycardia, and the gain of the relationship varies among subjects. Quantifying arousal intensity in PSGs provides additional information that may be clinically relevant. Citation: Azarbarzin A; Ostrowski M; Hanly P; Younes M. Relationship between arousal intensity and heart rate response to arousal. SLEEP 2014;37(4):645-653. PMID:24899756

  1. Predicted maximal heart rate for upper body exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Hill, M; Talbot, C; Price, M

    2016-03-01

    Age-predicted maximal heart rate (HRMAX ) equations are commonly used for the purpose of prescribing exercise regimens, as criteria for achieving maximal exertion and for diagnostic exercise testing. Despite the growing popularity of upper body exercise in both healthy and clinical settings, no recommendations are available for exercise modes using the smaller upper body muscle mass. The purpose of this study was to determine how well commonly used age-adjusted prediction equations for HRMAX estimate actual HRMAX for upper body exercise in healthy young and older adults. A total of 30 young (age: 20 ± 2 years, height: 171·9 ± 32·8 cm, mass: 77·7 ± 12·6 kg) and 20 elderly adults (age: 66 ± 6 years, height: 162 ± 8·1 cm, mass: 65·3 ± 12·3 kg) undertook maximal incremental exercise tests on a conventional arm crank ergometer. Age-adjusted maximal heart rate was calculated using prediction equations based on leg exercise and compared with measured HRMAX data for the arms. Maximal HR for arm exercise was significantly overpredicted compared with age-adjusted prediction equations in both young and older adults. Subtracting 10-20 beats min(-1) from conventional prediction equations provides a reasonable estimate of HRMAX for upper body exercise in healthy older and younger adults. PMID:25319169

  2. Heart Rate and Motion Analysis by GPS in Beach Soccer

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Julen; Casamichana, David

    2010-01-01

    Although beach soccer has become increasingly popular in recent years very little scientific research has been conducted into the sport. A pilot study was carried out with the aim of examining the physiological (heart rate) and physical (motion analysis) responses of beach soccer players during competitive matches. Ten players (age 25.5 ± 0.5 years; height 1.80 ± 0.08 m; weight 78.2 ± 5.6 kg.) were studied over five beach soccer matches. The physiological demands were analysed by measuring heart rate (HR) using telemetric devices, while the physical profile was evaluated by recording motion and speed by means of GPS devices. During competitive matches, players obtained a HRmean of 165.2 bpm (86.5% HRmax), with 59.3% of the time participating (TP) corresponding to values above 90% of the HRmax. The distance covered per minute of participation was 97.7 m, with 9.5% of this distance corresponding to high-intensity running and 2.5% to sprint; the work:rest ratio was 1.4:1 and the maximum speed 21.7 km·h-1. These results showed that beach soccer is an intermittent physical activity of greater intensity than other team games. It requires a major contribution from the anaerobic system as emphasis is placed on players making quick bursts of high-intensity activity separated by brief rest periods. Key points The distance covered per minute of play is around 100 m. Beach soccer is an intermittent sport with a work:rest ratio of 1.4:1. The playing surface in beach soccer is an important handicap to obtain maximum speeds. Beach soccer has a high physiological intensity, with more than half of the game is spent at intensities above 90 % of the HRmax. PMID:24149392

  3. The benefits of ivabradine are independent of resting heart rate.

    PubMed

    Riccioni, Graziano

    2013-05-01

    Evaluation of: Tardif JC, Ponikowski P, Kahan T; on behalf of the ASSOCIATE investigators. Effects of ivabradine in patients with stable angina receiving beta-blockers according to baseline heart rate: an analysis of the ASSOCIATE study. Int. J. Cardiol. pii:S0167-5273(12)01385-X (2012). Chronic stable angina pectoris is the most common manifestation of coronary artery disease. A large body of evidence points to high resting heart rate (HR) as a risk factor for mortality in various populations, including patients with cardiovascular disease. Elevated HR is an important pathophysiological variable that increases myocardial oxygen demand and also limits tissue perfusion by reducing the duration of diastole, during which most myocardial perfusion occurs. Large epidemiological trials have established that elevated resting HR is a prognostic factor for cardiovascular events and mortality in healthy individuals and in patients with myocardial infarction, stable coronary artery disease and heart failure. The classical treatments for HR reduction show such negative aspects. β-blocker therapy exerts negative effects on regional myocardial blood flow and function when HR reduction is eliminated by atrial pacing. Calcium channel antagonists functionally antagonize coronary vasoconstriction mediated through α-adrenoreceptors and are thus devoid of this undesired effect, but the compounds are nevertheless negative inotrope. Ivabradine (IVA), a pure HR-lowering drug, reduces the myocardial oxygen demand of exercise and contributes to the restoration of oxygen balance, which has demonstrated a benefit in chronic cardiovascular disease. No relevant negative effects are evidenced on cardiac conduction, contractility, relaxation or repolarization, or blood pressure. In this post-hoc analysis, the authors show that IVA treatment, compared with the placebo group, had no significant impact on systolic or diastolic blood pressure at rest or during exercise and reduces HR in all stages of physical exercise and during the treatment period. These benefits are independent of baseline HR, both at rest and during physical exercise, confirming that HR reduction with IVA is beneficial in all patients, even with β-blocker therapy, if their resting HR is above 60 bpm. PMID:23668736

  4. [Heart rate and outcome in patients with acute and chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Oliva, Fabrizio; Ammirati, Enrico; Campana, Carlo; Carubelli, Valentina; Cirò, Antonio; Di Tano, Giuseppe; Mortara, Andrea; Senni, Michele; Morandi, Fabrizio; Metra, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Heart rate (HR) is not only a physical sign but also a biomarker. High HR in several cardiac disorders is associated with increased mortality. In heart failure (HF), HR represents an important therapeutic target, both in the acute and chronic phase. Beta-blockers are a milestone of recommended treatments in HF patients with reduced ejection fraction. However, hemodynamic profile or intolerance may limit the use or the optimization of beta-blocker treatment, both during hospitalization and outpatient follow-up. More recently, ivabradine has become available, a drug that lowers HR by blocking the I f current in the pacemaker cells at the sinoatrial node level. In the SHIFT trial, ivabradine was shown to improve the outcome of patients with chronic HF, in sinus rhythm, with HR >70 b/min while on beta-blockers. Preliminary data have shown that this drug has a good safety profile and lowers effectively HR even during hospitalization due to worsening HF. However, further studies are warranted to understand if an earlier administration of ivabradine can lead to a better prognosis beyond symptom control and improved hemodynamics. In patients with atrial fibrillation and HF, the target is the restoration of sinus rhythm, alternatively rate control should be pursued with beta-blockers, amiodarone or digitalis, even if there is no clear evidence of an association between ventricular rate response in patients with atrial fibrillation at discharge after an HF hospitalization and major cardiovascular events. In this review, the studies that point to a role of HR both as a biomarker and a therapeutic target in patients with acute and chronic HF are described. In addition, the proportions of patients who do not reach target HR values at discharge after an acute decompensated HF episode or in the chronic phase are evaluated based on the Italian registries. PMID:27030005

  5. The Effect of Maternal Relaxation Training on Reactivity of Non-Stress Test, Basal Fetal Heart Rate, and Number of Fetal Heart Accelerations: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzade, Marzieh; Rafiee, Bahare; Asadi, Nasrin; Zare, Najaf

    2015-01-01

    Background: Relaxation-training, as an anxiety-reducer intervention, plays an important role in fetal health. The present study aimed to analyze the effect of maternal relaxation on stress test (NST), basal fetal heart rate, and number of fetal heart accelerations. Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 84 pregnant women were randomly divided into two groups of teaching relaxation and control groups in 2012. In the intervention group, 60-90 minute classes were held every week lasting for 4 weeks. Besides, home practice charts were given to the mothers and researchers controlled the home practices by phone calls every week. The control group received routine prenatal care. In the 4th week, NST was performed in the intervention group 30 minutes before and after the 4th session. In the control group, NST was done in the 4th week. The quantitative variables in the two groups were compared through ANOVA and Chi-square test. Results: The results of paired t-test showed that relaxation could improve the NST results (P=0.01). Mean and standard deviation of basal fetal heart rate was 138.95±8.18 before the intervention and 133.07±6.9 after the intervention. Paired t-test also showed that relaxation reduced the basal fetal heart rate (P=0.001). Mean and standard deviation of the number of fetal heart accelerations was 1.5±0.8 before the intervention and 2.2±0.9 after it. The results of paired t-test also showed that relaxation increased the number of fetal heart accelerations (P=0.001). Conclusions: Relaxation could improve the NST results, reduce the basal fetal heart rate, and increase the number of fetal heart accelerations. Therefore, relaxation is recommended during pregnancy. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2012072810418N1 PMID:25553334

  6. Designing heart performance by gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jennifer; Westfall, Margaret V; Townsend, Dewayne; Blankinship, Michael; Herron, Todd J; Guerrero-Serna, Guadalupe; Wang, Wang; Devaney, Eric; Metzger, Joseph M

    2008-10-01

    The birth of molecular cardiology can be traced to the development and implementation of high-fidelity genetic approaches for manipulating the heart. Recombinant viral vector-based technology offers a highly effective approach to genetically engineer cardiac muscle in vitro and in vivo. This review highlights discoveries made in cardiac muscle physiology through the use of targeted viral-mediated genetic modification. Here the history of cardiac gene transfer technology and the strengths and limitations of viral and nonviral vectors for gene delivery are reviewed. A comprehensive account is given of the application of gene transfer technology for studying key cardiac muscle targets including Ca(2+) handling, the sarcomere, the cytoskeleton, and signaling molecules and their posttranslational modifications. The primary objective of this review is to provide a thorough analysis of gene transfer studies for understanding cardiac physiology in health and disease. By comparing results obtained from gene transfer with those obtained from transgenesis and biophysical and biochemical methodologies, this review provides a global view of cardiac structure-function with an eye towards future areas of research. The data presented here serve as a basis for discovery of new therapeutic targets for remediation of acquired and inherited cardiac diseases. PMID:18923190

  7. Behavioral correlates of heart rates of free-living Greater White-fronted Geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ely, C.R.; Ward, D.H.; Bollinger, K.S.

    1999-01-01

    We simultaneously monitored the heart rate and behavior of nine free-living Greater White-fronted Geese (Anser albifrons) on their wintering grounds in northern California. Heart rates of wild geese were monitored via abdominally-implanted radio transmitters with electrodes that received electrical impulses of the heart and emitted a radio signal with each ventricular contraction. Post-operative birds appeared to behave normally, readily rejoining flocks and flying up to 15 km daily from night-time roost sites to feed in surrounding agricultural fields. Heart rates varied significantly among individuals and among behaviors, and ranged from less than 100 beats per minute (BPM) during resting, to over 400 BPM during flight. Heart rates varied from 80 to 140 BPM during non-strenuous activities such as walking, feeding, and maintenance activities, to about 180 BPM when birds became alert, and over 400 BPM when birds were startled, even if they did not take flight. Postflight heart rate recovery time averaged < 10 sec. During agonistic encounters, heart rate exceeded 400 BPM; heart rates during social interactions were not predictable solely from postures, as heart rates were context-dependent, and were highest in initial encounters among individuals. Instantaneous measures of physiological parameters, such as heart rate, are often better indicators of the degree of response to external stimuli than visual observations and can be used to improve estimates of energy expenditure based solely on activity data.

  8. Executive function moderates the relationship between depressive symptoms and resting heart rate variability in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gathright, Emily C; Walter, Fawn A; Hawkins, Misty A W; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Hughes, Joel W; Gunstad, John

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with high rates of depression. In turn, depression is associated with reduced heart rate variability (HRV), a marker of parasympathetic dysfunction and poorer cardiac outcomes. Cognitive impairment-especially executive dysfunction-is also highly prevalent in HF, but it is unknown whether executive function (EF) impacts the depression-HRV relationship. The primary objective of this paper is to examine whether EF moderates the relationship between depression and HRV in HF. Participants were 109 HF patients. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Beck Depression Inventory-II. EF was assessed using a composite of age-adjusted T scores on the Frontal Assessment Battery, Trail Making Test B, and Stroop Color Word subtest. Parasympathetic function was assessed using resting high frequency HRV (HF-HRV). Multiple hierarchical regression was used to conduct BDI × EF moderation analyses. BDI scores were associated with reduced resting HF-HRV (p < .05). No main effects were detected between EF and resting HF-HRV (p > .05). However, EF moderated the relationship between BDI scores and resting HF-HRV (β = 0.59, p < .01). Simple slope analyses revealed that among participants with poorer EF, higher BDI scores were associated with lower resting HF-HRV (p < .001). Structural brain changes common in HF may contribute to lower EF, increased depression, and poorer autonomic functioning. Alternatively, the results may indicate that individuals with intact EF engage in self-care strategies that negate the detrimental impact of depression on autonomic function. Additional work is needed to clarify these possibilities and the potential benefits of treating depression in HF patients with different cognitive abilities. PMID:26410167

  9. Heart rate variability in the dog: is it too variable?

    PubMed Central

    Minors, S L; O'Grady, M R

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate resting heart rate variability (HRV) as a simple noninvasive screening test for early autonomic derangement, heralding the development of occult dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Time and frequency domain HRV parameters were evaluated in 32 healthy Doberman pinschers, as potential predictors of the development of occult DCM within the following year and correlated with plasma catecholamines, markers of sympathoexcitation. Ten Dobermans with occult DCM and 8 Dobermans with congestive heart failure (CHF) were positive controls. Seven of the 32 "healthy" dogs developed occult DCM over the course of the study. None of the HRV parameters were associated with the development of occcult DCM based on univariate logistic regression. In dogs who developed occult DCM, plasma norepinephrine (NE) was inversely correlated with % fractal power (r = -0.81, P = 0.05). In dogs with occult DCM (positive controls), plasma NE was inversely correlated with fractal power (r = -0.81, r = 0.03), total power (r = -0.08, P = 0.03), high frequency power (r = -0.75, P = 0.05) and the standard deviation of the RR (r = -0.83, P = 0.02). The great inherent variability of the test may have limited our ability to discriminate between physiologic and pathophysiologic data, rendering this methodology inadequate as a screening test for early occult DCM. However, the negative correlations of NE with various forms of spectral power in dogs with occult DCM suggests that early in the natural history of DCM, there is parasympathetic withdrawal. A reduction in the nonharmonic, fractal component may be the first recognizable abnormality in the power spectrum of dogs who will develop DCM. PMID:9114965

  10. A New Method to Derive Fetal Heart Rate from Maternal Abdominal Electrocardiogram: Monitoring Fetal Heart Rate during Cesarean Section

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Huei-Ming; Chang, Yi-Chung; Lin, Chen; Yeh, Chien-Hung; Lee, Chien-Nan; Shyu, Ming-Kwang; Hung, Ming-Hui; Hsiao, Po-Ni; Wang, Yung-Hung; Tseng, Yu-Hsin; Tsao, Jenho; Lai, Ling-Ping; Lin, Lian-Yu; Lo, Men-Tzung

    2015-01-01

    Background Monitoring of fetal heart rate (FHR) is important during labor since it is a sensitive marker to obtain significant information about fetal condition. To take immediate response during cesarean section (CS), we noninvasively derive FHR from maternal abdominal ECG. Methods We recruited 17 pregnant women delivered by elective cesarean section, with abdominal ECG obtained before and during the entire CS. First, a QRS-template is created by averaging all the maternal ECG heart beats. Then, Hilbert transform was applied to QRS-template to generate the other basis which is orthogonal to the QRS-template. Second, maternal QRS, P and T waves were adaptively subtracted from the composited ECG. Third, Gabor transformation was applied to obtain time-frequency spectrogram of FHR. Heart rate variability (HRV) parameters including standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN), 0V, 1V, 2V derived from symbolic dynamics of HRV and SD1, SD2 derived from Poincareé plot. Three emphasized stages includes: (1) before anesthesia, (2) 5 minutes after anesthesia and (3) 5 minutes before CS delivery. Results FHRs were successfully derived from all maternal abdominal ECGs. FHR increased 5 minutes after anesthesia and 5 minutes before delivery. As for HRV parameters, SDNN increased both 5 minutes after anesthesia and 5 minutes before delivery (21.30±9.05 vs. 13.01±6.89, P < 0.001 and 22.88±12.01 vs. 13.01±6.89, P < 0.05). SD1 did not change during anesthesia, while SD2 increased significantly 5 minutes after anesthesia (27.92±12.28 vs. 16.18±10.01, P < 0.001) and both SD2 and 0V percentage increased significantly 5 minutes before delivery (30.54±15.88 vs. 16.18±10.01, P < 0.05; 0.39±0.14 vs. 0.30±0.13, P < 0.05). Conclusions We developed a novel method to automatically derive FHR from maternal abdominal ECGs and proved that it is feasible during CS. PMID:25680192

  11. Heart rate analysis by sparse representation for acute pain detection.

    PubMed

    Tejman-Yarden, Shai; Levi, Ofer; Beizerov, Alex; Parmet, Yisrael; Nguyen, Tu; Saunders, Michael; Rudich, Zvia; Perry, James C; Baker, Dewleen G; Moeller-Bertram, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    Objective pain assessment methods pose an advantage over the currently used subjective pain rating tools. Advanced signal processing methodologies, including the wavelet transform (WT) and the orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm (OMP), were developed in the past two decades. The aim of this study was to apply and compare these time-specific methods to heart rate samples of healthy subjects for acute pain detection. Fifteen adult volunteers participated in a study conducted in the pain clinic at a single center. Each subject's heart rate was sampled for 5-min baseline, followed by a cold pressor test (CPT). Analysis was done by the WT and the OMP algorithm with a Fourier/Wavelet dictionary separately. Data from 11 subjects were analyzed. Compared to baseline, The WT analysis showed a significant coefficients' density increase during the pain incline period (p < 0.01) and the entire CPT (p < 0.01), with significantly higher coefficient amplitudes. The OMP analysis showed a significant wavelet coefficients' density increase during pain incline and decline periods (p < 0.01, p < 0.05) and the entire CPT (p < 0.001), with suggestive higher amplitudes. Comparison of both methods showed that during the baseline there was a significant reduction in wavelet coefficient density using the OMP algorithm (p < 0.001). Analysis by the two-way ANOVA with repeated measures showed a significant proportional increase in wavelet coefficients during the incline period and the entire CPT using the OMP algorithm (p < 0.01). Both methods provided accurate and non-delayed detection of pain events. Statistical analysis proved the OMP to be by far more specific allowing the Fourier coefficients to represent the signal's basic harmonics and the wavelet coefficients to focus on the time-specific painful event. This is an initial study using OMP for pain detection; further studies need to prove the efficiency of this system in different settings. PMID:26264057

  12. Heart rates of elementary physical education students during the dancing classrooms program.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Larry; Evans, Melissa; Guess, Wendy; Morris, Mary; Olson, Terry; Buckwalter, John

    2011-06-01

    We examined how different types of dance activities, along with their duration, influenced heart rate responses among fifth-grade physical education students (N = 96) who participated in the Dancing Classrooms program. Results indicated that the overall Dancing Classrooms program elicits a moderate cardiovascular heart rate response (M = 124.4 bpm), in which 47% of class time was spent above a 60% maximal heart rate threshold. The swing dance in particular (M = 143.4 bpm) stimulated a much higher heart rate level than all other dances in the program, with a mean heart rate change of 52.6 bpm. Girls (127.3 bpm) achieved marginally higher heart rates (p = .059) than boys (121.1 bpm). PMID:21699105

  13. Generalized discriminant analysis for congestive heart failure risk assessment based on long-term heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Fatemeh; Asl, Babak Mohammadzadeh

    2015-11-01

    The aims of this study are summarized in the following items: first, to investigate the class discrimination power of long-term heart rate variability (HRV) features for risk assessment in patients suffering from congestive heart failure (CHF); second, to introduce the most discriminative features of HRV to discriminate low risk patients (LRPs) and high risk patients (HRPs), and third, to examine the influence of feature dimension reduction in order to achieve desired accuracy of the classification. We analyzed two public Holter databases: 12 data of patients suffering from mild CHF (NYHA class I and II), labeled as LRPs and 32 data of patients suffering from severe CHF (NYHA class III and IV), labeled as HRPs. A K-nearest neighbor classifier was used to evaluate the performance of feature set in the classification. Moreover, to reduce the number of features as well as the overlap of the samples of two classes in feature space, we used generalized discriminant analysis (GDA) as a feature extraction method. By applying GDA to the discriminative nonlinear features, we achieved sensitivity and specificity of 100% having the least number of features. Finally, the results were compared with other similar conducted studies regarding the performance of feature selection procedure and classifier besides the number of features used in training. PMID:26344584

  14. Fetal hepatic hemangioma representing non-reassuring pattern in fetal heart rate monitoring.

    PubMed

    Morimura, Yutaka; Fujimori, Keiya; Ishida, Tomohiko; Ito, Akiko; Nomura, Yasuhisa; Sato, Akira

    2003-10-01

    To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a non-reassuring fetal pattern caused by a hepatic hemangioma that was found during fetal heart rate monitoring. A 37 weeks' gestation, a 32-year-old-woman was referred to our hospital for evaluation of a rapidly growing fetal abdominal tumor. Fetal heart rate monitoring revealed a non-reassuring pattern, and a cesarean section was performed as a result. Examination of the 2820 g female infant suggested a hepatic hemangioma accompanying an intratumor hemorrhage and coagulopathy. The infant died 2 days after birth. The autopsy confirmed that the cause of death was a result of a hepatic hemangioma. Frequent monitoring of fetuses and ultrasound examinations are necessary for determining the timing of delivery and for a favorable prognosis. PMID:14641708

  15. Fast tracking of a given heart rate profile in treadmill exercise.

    PubMed

    Weng, Kaili; Turk, Basil; Dolores, Louis; Nguyen, Tuan N; Celler, Branko; Su, Steven; Nguyen, Hung T

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the application of a multi-loop PID controller in an automated treadmill exercise machine. The approach is to design a computer-controlled treadmill control system for the regulation of heart rate (HR) during treadmill exercise. A single-input and multiple-output (SIMO) controller was implemented to fast track a given heart rate profile in treadmill exercise. Two separate single-input and single-output (SISO) PID control systems are initially implemented to modify either the treadmill speed or its angle of inclination in order to achieve a desired HR. The purpose of this paper is to apply a SIMO control system by implementing a control algorithm which includes the two PID controllers working simultaneously to track the desired HR profile. The performance of the SIMO and SISO control systems are compared through the closed loop responses recorded during experimentation. This would also help future development of safe treadmill exercise system. PMID:21096172

  16. Towards an objective measurement of emotional stress: Preliminary analysis based on heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Arza, A; Garzon, J M; Hemando, A; Aguilo, J; Bailon, R

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a study performed in 25 young healthy subjects measuring the evolution of heart rate variability (HRV) indices during emotional stress. Acute emotional stress was generated with a modified version of Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). The TSST comprises several tasks which include a memory test, anticipation of stress, public exposition, and an arithmetic task. Each task has different demanding conditions, carrying subjects' emotional stress to different states. An autogenic relaxation was done before TSST. Significant differences in HRV indices were observed in the arithmetic and memory task with respect to the relaxation stage. In particular during the arithmetic task, mean heart rate increased 22% (p-value <;0.00001) the power in the very low frequency band increased 47% (p-value <;0.00001 and normalized power in the low frequency (LF) band increased 19% (p-value <;0.04). These results support a sympathetic activation during these tasks. PMID:26737005

  17. Heart Rate Variability for Quantification of Autonomic Dysfunction in Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jin Ho; Hong, Seok Hyun; Lee, Chang Hyun; Choi, Byoong Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify autonomic dysfunction in fibromyalgia patients compared to healthy controls using heart rate variability (HRV). Methods Sixteen patients with fibromyalgia and 16 healthy controls were recruited in this case control study. HRV was measured using the time-domain method incorporating the following parameters: total heartbeats, the mean of intervals between consecutive heartbeats (R-R intervals), the standard deviation of normal to normal R-R intervals (SDNN), the square root of the mean squared differences of successive R-R intervals (RMSSD), ratio of SDNN to RMSSD (SDNN/RMSSD), and difference between the longest and shortest R-R interval under different three conditions including normal quiet breathing, rate controlled breathing, and Valsalva maneuver. The severity of autonomic symptoms in the group of patients with fibromyalgia was measured by Composite Autonomic Symptom Scale 31 (COMPASS 31). Then we analyzed the difference between the fibromyalgia and control groups and the correlation between the COMPASS 31 and aforementioned HRV parameters in the study groups. Results Patients with fibromyalgia had significantly higher SDNN/RMSSD values under both normal quiet breathing and rate controlled breathing compared to controls. Differences between the longest and shortest R-R interval under Valsalva maneuver were also significantly lower in patients with fibromyalgia than in controls. COMPASS 31 score was negatively correlated with SDNN/RMSSD values under rate controlled breathing. Conclusion SDNN/RMSSD is a valuable parameter for autonomic nervous system function and can be used to quantify subjective autonomic symptoms in patients with fibromyalgia. PMID:27152281

  18. A comparison between computer-controlled and set work rate exercise based on target heart rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, Wanda M.; Siconolfi, Steven F.; Webster, Laurie; Hayes, Judith C.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.; Harris, Bernard A., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Two methods are compared for observing the heart rate (HR), metabolic equivalents, and time in target HR zone (defined as the target HR + or - 5 bpm) during 20 min of exercise at a prescribed intensity of the maximum working capacity. In one method, called set-work rate exercise, the information from a graded exercise test is used to select a target HR and to calculate a corresponding constant work rate that should induce the desired HR. In the other method, the work rate is controlled by a computer algorithm to achieve and maintain a prescribed target HR. It is shown that computer-controlled exercise is an effective alternative to the traditional set work rate exercise, particularly when tight control of cardiovascular responses is necessary.

  19. Rhythmic variation in heart rate and respiration rate during space flight - Apollo 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    As part of the operational biomedical monitoring for Apollo manned missions, ECG and respiration rate are telemetered at selected intervals to mission control. The data were collected as part of this monitoring program. These data were evaluated for circadian and ultradian rhythmicity because of their uniqueness. The ability to detect and quantitate biorhythms in living systems during space flight is an important aspect of evaluating hypotheses concerning the underlying mechanisms of these phenomena. Circadian variation in heart rate during space flight is demonstrated here. In analyzing generated time series data it has been found that period discrimination is much better than the theoretical limit.

  20. The heart rate method for estimating metabolic rate: review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Green, Jonathan A

    2011-03-01

    Under most circumstances heart rate (f(H)) is correlated with the rate of oxygen consumption (VO(2)) and hence the rate of energy expenditure or metabolic rate (MR). For over 60 years this simple principle has underpinned the use of heart rate to estimate metabolic rate in a range of animal species and to answer questions about their physiology, behaviour and ecology. The heart rate method can be applied both quantitatively and qualitatively. The quantitative approach is a two-stage process where firstly f(H) and MR are measured simultaneously under controlled conditions and a predictive calibration relationship derived. Secondly, measurements of heart rate are made and converted to estimates of MR using the calibration relationship. The qualitative approach jumps directly to the second stage, comparing estimates of f(H) under different circumstances and drawing conclusions about MR under the assumption that a relationship exists. This review describes the range of studies which have adopted either the quantitative or qualitative approach to estimating the MR of birds, mammals and reptiles. Studies have tended to focus on species, states and questions which are hard to measure, control or define using other techniques. For example, species studied include large, wide-ranging species such as ungulates, marine predators, and domestic livestock while research questions have concerned behaviours such as flight, diving and the effects of stress. In particular, the qualitative approach has applied to circumstances and/or species where it may be hard or impossible to derive a calibration relationship for practical reasons. The calibration process itself can be complex and a number of factors such as body mass, activity state and stress levels can affect the relationship between f(H) and VO(2). I recommend that a quantitative approach be adopted wherever possible but that this may entail deriving a calibration relationship which is practical and applicable, rather than the most accurate possible. I conclude with a series of recommendations for the application and development of this method. PMID:20869457

  1. State Anxiety and Nonlinear Dynamics of Heart Rate Variability in Students

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriev, Aleksey D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Clinical and experimental research studies have demonstrated that the emotional experience of anxiety impairs heart rate variability (HRV) in humans. The present study investigated whether changes in state anxiety (SA) can also modulate nonlinear dynamics of heart rate. Methods A group of 96 students volunteered to participate in the study. For each student, two 5-minute recordings of beat intervals (RR) were performed: one during a rest period and one just before a university examination, which was assumed to be a real-life stressor. Nonlinear analysis of HRV was performed. The Spielberger’s State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was used to assess the level of SA. Results Before adjusting for heart rate, a Wilcoxon matched pairs test showed significant decreases in Poincaré plot measures, entropy, largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE), and pointwise correlation dimension (PD2), and an increase in the short-term fractal-like scaling exponent of detrended fluctuation analysis (α1) during the exam session, compared with the rest period. A Pearson analysis indicated significant negative correlations between the dynamics of SA and Poincaré plot axes ratio (SD1/SD2), and between changes in SA and changes in entropy measures. A strong negative correlation was found between the dynamics of SA and LLE. A significant positive correlation was found between the dynamics of SA and α1. The decreases in Poincaré plot measures (SD1, complex correlation measure), entropy measures, and LLE were still significant after adjusting for heart rate. Corrected α1 was increased during the exam session. As before, the dynamics of adjusted LLE was significantly correlated with the dynamics of SA. Conclusions The qualitative increase in SA during academic examination was related to the decrease in the complexity and size of the Poincaré plot through a reduction of both the interbeat interval and its variation. PMID:26807793

  2. [Design of Oxygen Saturation, Heart Rate, Respiration Rate Detection System Based on Smartphone of Android Operating System].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingshan; Zeng, Bixin

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we designed an oxygen saturation, heart rate, respiration rate monitoring system based on smartphone of android operating system, physiological signal acquired by MSP430 microcontroller and transmitted by Bluetooth module. PMID:26524782

  3. Fish Consumption, Sleep, Daily Functioning, and Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Anita L.; Dahl, Lisbeth; Olson, Gina; Thornton, David; Graff, Ingvild E.; Frøyland, Livar; Thayer, Julian F.; Pallesen, Staale

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: This study investigated the effects of fatty fish on sleep, daily functioning and biomarkers such as heart rate variability (HRV), vitamin D status (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) in red blood cells. Moreover the relationship among sleep, daily functioning, HRV, vitamin D status, and levels of EPA+DHA was investigated. Methods: Ninety-five male forensic patients from a secure forensic inpatient facility in the USA were randomly assigned into a Fish or a Control group. The Fish group received Atlantic salmon three times per week from September to February, and the Control group was provided an alternative meal (e.g., chicken, pork, beef), but with the same nutritional value as their habitual diet, three times per week during the same period. Sleep (sleep latency, sleep efficiency, actual sleep time, and actual wake time), self-perceived sleep quality and daily functioning, as well as vitamin D status, EPA+DHA, and HRV, were assessed pre- and post-intervention period. Results: There was a significant increase in sleep latency from pre- to post-test in the Control group. The Fish group reported better daily functioning than the Control group during post-test. Fish consumption throughout the wintertime had also an effect on resting HRV and EPA+DHA, but not on vitamin D status. However, at post-test, the vitamin D status in the Fish group was still closer to the level regarded as optimal compared to the Control group. Vitamin D status correlated negatively with actual wake time and positively with sleep efficiency during pre-test, as well as positively with daily functioning and sleep quality during post-test. Finally, HRV correlated negatively with sleep latency and positively with daily functioning. Conclusions: Fish consumption seemed to have a positive impact on sleep in general and also on daily functioning, which may be related to vitamin D status and HRV. Citation: Hansen AL, Dahl L, Olson G, Thornton D, Graff IE, Frøyland L, Thayer JF, Pallesen S. Fish consumption, sleep, daily functioning, and heart rate variability. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(5):567-575. PMID:24812543

  4. Lightweight wrist photoplethysmography for heavy exercise: motion robust heart rate monitoring algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Insoo

    2015-01-01

    The challenge of heart rate monitoring based on wrist photoplethysmography (PPG) during heavy exercise is addressed. PPG is susceptible to motion artefacts, which have to be mitigated for accurate heart rate estimation. Motion artefacts are particularly apparent for wrist devices, for example, a smart watch, because of the high mobility of the arms. Proposed is a low complexity highly accurate heart rate estimation method for continuous heart rate monitoring using wrist PPG. The proposed method achieved 2.57% mean absolute error in a test data set where subjects ran for a maximum speed of 17 km/h. PMID:26609397

  5. Lightweight wrist photoplethysmography for heavy exercise: motion robust heart rate monitoring algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lai, Po-Hsiang; Kim, Insoo

    2015-02-01

    The challenge of heart rate monitoring based on wrist photoplethysmography (PPG) during heavy exercise is addressed. PPG is susceptible to motion artefacts, which have to be mitigated for accurate heart rate estimation. Motion artefacts are particularly apparent for wrist devices, for example, a smart watch, because of the high mobility of the arms. Proposed is a low complexity highly accurate heart rate estimation method for continuous heart rate monitoring using wrist PPG. The proposed method achieved 2.57% mean absolute error in a test data set where subjects ran for a maximum speed of 17 km/h. PMID:26609397

  6. Are novel objects perceived as stressful? The effect of novelty on heart rate.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Clare Parker; Franco, Leor A; Romero, L Michael

    2016-07-01

    Neophobia, or the fear of novel objects, is a behavior that is often found in wild animals. Neophobia appears to be related to the physiological stress response because individuals with higher glucocorticoid responses to stress often are more neophobic. The relationship between the heart rate response and novelty, however, has not been tested in a wild species. We implanted heart rate transmitters in captive European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) to measure increases in heart rate as an index of the adrenomedullary stress response. Specifically, we measured heart rate in animals encountering novel objects on or near their food dishes using a system to display the novel objects while the experimenters remained outside the room, thereby minimizing the confounding effects of experimenter presence on heart rate. We analyzed three conditions: the period of adjustment to the experimental setup before any exposure to novelty, novel object trials, and no object controls (presented in a random order after 0-5 novel objects). Birds approached their food dishes faster during the adjustment period than during novel object trials. Although they demonstrated a behavioral aversion to novelty, the effect on heart rate was unexpected. Heart rate increased sharply when the food dishes were displayed. The duration of the startle response was longer during no object controls than during novel object exposure, the opposite of the anticipated result. There were no correlations between behavior and metrics of the heart rate response. Novel object exposure does not cause an increase in heart rate. PMID:27072510

  7. Ivabradine: a new rate-limiting therapy for coronary artery disease and heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Rushworth, Gordon F.; Lambrakis, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Ivabradine is a new bradycardic agent acting on the If channels of sinoatrial nodal cells to decrease the rate of diastolic depolarization and thus heart rate. The benefit of ivabradine over other negatively chronotropic agents is its absence of negative inotropy. Effective management of coronary artery disease, in terms of reducing morbidity and mortality, is reliant on controlling heart rate. Ivabradine has been shown to safely and effectively reduce heart rate without compromising cardiac function in patients with coronary artery disease and more recently in patients with heart failure and raised heart rate. Furthermore, ivabradine has been shown to have a favourable side-effect profile compared with alternative bradycardic agents. This article reviews the evidence for ivabradine in coronary artery disease and heart failure and compares its safety with alternative bradycardic agents for these conditions. PMID:25083199

  8. Effects of Exercise Training on Heart Rate Variability in Chagas Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Bruno Ramos; Lima, Márcia Maria Oliveira; Nunes, Maria do Carmo Pereira; de Alencar, Maria Clara Noman; Costa, Henrique Silveira; Pinto Filho, Marcelo Martins; Cota, Vitor Emanuel Serafim; Rocha, Manoel Otávio da Costa; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz Pinho

    2014-01-01

    Background: Heart rate variability (HRV) is a marker of autonomic dysfunction severity. The effects of physical training on HRV indexes in Chagas heart disease (CHD) are not well established. Objective: To evaluate the changes in HRV indexes in response to physical training in CHD. Methods: Patients with CHD and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, physically inactive, were randomized either to the intervention (IG, N = 18) or control group (CG, N = 19). The IG participated in a 12-week exercise program consisting of 3 sessions/week. Results: Mean age was 49.5 ± 8 years, 59% males, mean LVEF was 36.3 ± 7.8%. Baseline HRV indexes were similar between groups. From baseline to follow-up, total power (TP): 1653 (IQ 625 - 3418) to 2794 (1617 - 4452) ms, p = 0.02) and very low frequency power: 586 (290 - 1565) to 815 (610 - 1425) ms, p = 0.047) increased in the IG, but not in the CG. The delta (post - pre) HRV indexes were similar: SDNN 11.5 ± 30.0 vs. 3.7 ± 25.1 ms. p = 0.10; rMSSD 2 (6 - 17) vs. 1 (21 - 9) ms. p = 0.43; TP 943 (731 - 3130) vs. 1780 (921 - 2743) Hz. p = 0.46; low frequency power (LFP) 1.0 (150 - 197) vs. 60 (111 - 146) Hz. p = 0.85; except for high frequency power, which tended to increase in the IG: 42 (133 - 92) vs. 79 (61 - 328) Hz. p = 0.08). Conclusion: In the studied population, the variation of HRV indexes was similar between the active and inactive groups. Clinical improvement with physical activity seems to be independent from autonomic dysfunction markers in CHD. PMID:25098373

  9. Resting heart rate in patients with ischemic heart disease in Saudi Arabia and Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Kinsara, Abdulhalim J.; Najm, Hani K.; Anazi, Menwar Al; Tamim, Hani

    2011-01-01

    Aim To assess the level of resting heart rate (RHR) in an outpatient population presenting with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) as well as to measure its association with current therapeutic management strategies for cardiovascular events. Materials and methods A multi-center cross-sectional survey was carried out in Saudi Arabia and Egypt over a three month period (between January 2007 and April 2007). 2049 patients with CAD without clinical heart failure (HF) were included in this study through “cluster sampling”. RHR was measured by manual palpitation. Results Mean age of CAD patients was 56.7 ± 10.4 and the mean RHR was 78.9 ± 13.9 b/m. 1686 patients (83.1%) were on β-blockers for whom the RHR was 78.5 ± 14.0 b/m (95.5% had RHR ⩾ 60 b/m, which is higher than recommended by the guidelines). 1094 (73.5%) of patients on β-blockers were on a lower dose, probably to avoid the complications associated with such a class. Among those not on β-blockers (16.9%), RHR was 80.9 ± 13.0 b/m. Moreover, 98 patients (4.8%) were on calcium channel blocker (diltiazem or verapamil) but not on β-blockers, for whom the RHR was 80.9 ± 12.0 b/m. Finally, 163 patients (8.0%) were on both β-blockers and the calcium channel blocker, and their RHR was 79.0 ± 14.4 b/m. Conclusion Optimal target RHR has not been achieved in a significant number of screened patients. Achievements of such targets are known to decrease mortality and to improve survival. PMID:23960653

  10. Effect of heart rate correction on pre- and post-exercise heart rate variability to predict risk of mortalityan experimental study on the FINCAVAS cohort

    PubMed Central

    Pradhapan, Paruthi; Tarvainen, Mika P.; Nieminen, Tuomo; Lehtinen, Rami; Nikus, Kjell; Lehtimki, Terho; Khnen, Mika; Viik, Jari

    2014-01-01

    The non-linear inverse relationship between RR-intervals and heart rate (HR) contributes significantly to the heart rate variability (HRV) parameters and their performance in mortality prediction. To determine the level of influence HR exerts over HRV parameters' prognostic power, we studied the predictive performance for different HR levels by applying eight correction procedures, multiplying or dividing HRV parameters by the mean RR-interval (RRavg) to the power 0.516. Data collected from 1288 patients in The Finnish Cardiovascular Study (FINCAVAS), who satisfied the inclusion criteria, was used for the analyses. HRV parameters (RMSSD, VLF Power and LF Power) were calculated from 2-min segment in the rest phase before exercise and 2-min recovery period immediately after peak exercise. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to determine the predictive performance for each parameter with and without HR corrections in rest and recovery phases. The division of HRV parameters by segment's RRavg to the power 2 (HRVDIV-2) showed the highest predictive performance under the rest phase (RMSSD: 0.67/0.66; VLF Power: 0.70/0.62; LF Power: 0.79/0.65; cardiac mortality/non-cardiac mortality) with minimum correlation to HR (r = ?0.15 to 0.15). In the recovery phase, Kaplan-Meier (KM) survival analysis revealed good risk stratification capacity at HRVDIV-2 in both groups (cardiac and non-cardiac mortality). Although higher powers of correction (HRVDIV-4and HRVDIV-8) improved predictive performance during recovery, they induced an increased positive correlation to HR. Thus, we inferred that predictive capacity of HRV during rest and recovery is augmented when its dependence on HR is weakened by applying appropriate correction procedures. PMID:24917825

  11. Effect of heart rate correction on pre- and post-exercise heart rate variability to predict risk of mortality-an experimental study on the FINCAVAS cohort.

    PubMed

    Pradhapan, Paruthi; Tarvainen, Mika P; Nieminen, Tuomo; Lehtinen, Rami; Nikus, Kjell; Lehtimki, Terho; Khnen, Mika; Viik, Jari

    2014-01-01

    The non-linear inverse relationship between RR-intervals and heart rate (HR) contributes significantly to the heart rate variability (HRV) parameters and their performance in mortality prediction. To determine the level of influence HR exerts over HRV parameters' prognostic power, we studied the predictive performance for different HR levels by applying eight correction procedures, multiplying or dividing HRV parameters by the mean RR-interval (RRavg) to the power 0.5-16. Data collected from 1288 patients in The Finnish Cardiovascular Study (FINCAVAS), who satisfied the inclusion criteria, was used for the analyses. HRV parameters (RMSSD, VLF Power and LF Power) were calculated from 2-min segment in the rest phase before exercise and 2-min recovery period immediately after peak exercise. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to determine the predictive performance for each parameter with and without HR corrections in rest and recovery phases. The division of HRV parameters by segment's RRavg to the power 2 (HRVDIV-2) showed the highest predictive performance under the rest phase (RMSSD: 0.67/0.66; VLF Power: 0.70/0.62; LF Power: 0.79/0.65; cardiac mortality/non-cardiac mortality) with minimum correlation to HR (r = -0.15 to 0.15). In the recovery phase, Kaplan-Meier (KM) survival analysis revealed good risk stratification capacity at HRVDIV-2 in both groups (cardiac and non-cardiac mortality). Although higher powers of correction (HRVDIV-4and HRVDIV-8) improved predictive performance during recovery, they induced an increased positive correlation to HR. Thus, we inferred that predictive capacity of HRV during rest and recovery is augmented when its dependence on HR is weakened by applying appropriate correction procedures. PMID:24917825

  12. Knowledge Workers' Perceptions of Performance Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Alan D.; Rupp, William T.

    2004-01-01

    One major purpose of performance appraisals is to determine individual merit, especially where pay for performance systems are employed. Based upon expectancy theory, high performance ratings should entail high merit increases while low performance ratings result in low merit increases. However, it appears that decoupling performance ratings and…

  13. Knowledge Workers' Perceptions of Performance Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Alan D.; Rupp, William T.

    2004-01-01

    One major purpose of performance appraisals is to determine individual merit, especially where pay for performance systems are employed. Based upon expectancy theory, high performance ratings should entail high merit increases while low performance ratings result in low merit increases. However, it appears that decoupling performance ratings and

  14. A systematic review on heart rate variability in Bulimia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Peschel, Stephanie K V; Feeling, Nicole R; Vögele, Claus; Kaess, Michael; Thayer, Julian F; Koenig, Julian

    2016-04-01

    Eating disorders are associated with alterations of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Among other indices, heart rate variability (HRV) provides a readily available index of ANS function. While ANS dysfunction indexed by HRV in Anorexia Nervosa has been addressed in previous reviews, here we aimed to review the current evidence on HRV in Bulimia Nervosa (BN). A systematic literature search in Web of Science, PsycInfo, Scopus, and PubMed identified 17 studies reporting HRV in patients with BN. Studies described (i) differences in resting state HRV in patients compared to controls, (ii) alterations in the stress response in BN indexed by HRV, and (iii) treatment effects on HRV in patients with BN. Despite a number of conflicting results, we conclude that BN is characterized by increased resting state vagally-mediated HRV and an impaired stress-response. Intervention-studies suggest that altered ANS-activity in BN is at least partially reversible. Future studies on the complex relation between BN and HRV should investigate the effect of comorbid disorders, subtypes of BN, and mechanisms affecting treatment outcome. PMID:26828568

  15. Heart-rate monitoring by air pressure and causal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Naoki; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Hata, Yutaka

    2011-06-01

    Among lots of vital signals, heart-rate (HR) is an important index for diagnose human's health condition. For instance, HR provides an early stage of cardiac disease, autonomic nerve behavior, and so forth. However, currently, HR is measured only in medical checkups and clinical diagnosis during the rested state by using electrocardiograph (ECG). Thus, some serious cardiac events in daily life could be lost. Therefore, a continuous HR monitoring during 24 hours is desired. Considering the use in daily life, the monitoring should be noninvasive and low intrusive. Thus, in this paper, an HR monitoring in sleep by using air pressure sensors is proposed. The HR monitoring is realized by employing the causal analysis among air pressure and HR. The causality is described by employing fuzzy logic. According to the experiment on 7 males at age 22-25 (23 on average), the correlation coefficient against ECG is 0.73-0.97 (0.85 on average). In addition, the cause-effect structure for HR monitoring is arranged by employing causal decomposition, and the arranged causality is applied to HR monitoring in a setting posture. According to the additional experiment on 6 males, the correlation coefficient is 0.66-0.86 (0.76 on average). Therefore, the proposed method is suggested to have enough accuracy and robustness for some daily use cases.

  16. Estimation of human core temperature from sequential heart rate observations.

    PubMed

    Buller, Mark J; Tharion, William J; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Montain, Scott J; Kenefick, Robert W; Castellani, John; Latzka, William A; Roberts, Warren S; Richter, Mark; Jenkins, Odest Chadwicke; Hoyt, Reed W

    2013-07-01

    Core temperature (CT) in combination with heart rate (HR) can be a good indicator of impending heat exhaustion for occupations involving exposure to heat, heavy workloads, and wearing protective clothing. However, continuously measuring CT in an ambulatory environment is difficult. To address this problem we developed a model to estimate the time course of CT using a series of HR measurements as a leading indicator using a Kalman filter. The model was trained using data from 17 volunteers engaged in a 24 h military field exercise (air temperatures 24-36 °C, and 42%-97% relative humidity and CTs ranging from 36.0-40.0 °C). Validation data from laboratory and field studies (N = 83) encompassing various combinations of temperature, hydration, clothing, and acclimation state were examined using the Bland-Altman limits of agreement (LoA) method. We found our model had an overall bias of -0.03 ± 0.32 °C and that 95% of all CT estimates fall within ±0.63 °C (>52 000 total observations). While the model for estimating CT is not a replacement for direct measurement of CT (literature comparisons of esophageal and rectal methods average LoAs of ±0.58 °C) our results suggest it is accurate enough to provide practical indication of thermal work strain for use in the work place. PMID:23780514

  17. Does Baseline Heart Rate Variability Reflect Stable Positive Emotionality?

    PubMed

    Silvia, Paul J; Jackson, Bryonna A; Sopko, Rachel S

    2014-11-01

    Several recent studies have found significant correlations, medium in effect size, between baseline heart rate variability (HRV) and measures of positive functioning, such as extraversion, agreeableness, and trait positive affectivity. Other research, however, has suggested an optimal level of HRV and found nonlinear effects. In the present study, a diverse sample of 239 young adults completed a wide range of measures that reflect positive psychological functioning, including personality traits, an array of positive emotions (measured with the Dispositional Positive Emotions Scale), and depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms (measured with the DASS and CESD). HRV was measured with a 6-minute baseline period and quantified using many common HRV metrics (e.g., respiratory sinus arrhythmia, root mean square of successive differences, and others), and potentially confounding behavioral and lifestyle variables (e.g., BMI, caffeine and nicotine use, sleep quality) were assessed. Neither linear nor non-linear effects were found, and the effect sizes were small and near zero. The findings suggest that the cross-sectional relationship between HRV and positive experience deserves more attention and meta-analytic synthesis. PMID:25147421

  18. Stochastic time series analysis of fetal heart-rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariati, M. A.; Dripps, J. H.

    1990-06-01

    Fetal Heart Rate(FHR) is one of the important features of fetal biophysical activity and its long term monitoring is used for the antepartum(period of pregnancy before labour) assessment of fetal well being. But as yet no successful method has been proposed to quantitatively represent variety of random non-white patterns seen in FHR. Objective of this paper is to address this issue. In this study the Box-Jenkins method of model identification and diagnostic checking was used on phonocardiographic derived FHR(averaged) time series. Models remained exclusively autoregressive(AR). Kalman filtering in conjunction with maximum likelihood estimation technique forms the parametric estimator. Diagnosrics perfonned on the residuals indicated that a second order model may be adequate in capturing type of variability observed in 1 up to 2 mm data windows of FHR. The scheme may be viewed as a means of data reduction of a highly redundant information source. This allows a much more efficient transmission of FHR information from remote locations to places with facilities and expertise for doser analysis. The extracted parameters is aimed to reflect numerically the important FHR features. These are normally picked up visually by experts for their assessments. As a result long term FHR recorded during antepartum period could then be screened quantitatively for detection of patterns considered normal or abnonnal. 1.

  19. Dynamics of heart rate response to sympathetic nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mokrane, A; Nadeau, R

    1998-09-01

    Electrical stimulation of the right cardiac sympathetic nerve was used to achieve a step increase of norepinephrine concentration at the sinus node. The heart rate (HR) response to sympathetic stimulation was characterized by a first-order process with a time delay. For moderate to high intensities of stimulation the mean delay and time constant were 0.7 and 2.1 s, respectively, and for low intensities of stimulation they were 0.4 and 1.1 s, respectively. From the analysis of the HR response to different patterns of nerve stimulation, in vivo neurotransmitter kinetics were estimated. The time constant of norepinephrine dissipation averaged approximately 9 s. These results combined with computer simulations revealed two facets of sympathetic neural control of HR: 1) negligible role of the sympathetic system in beat-to-beat regulation of HR under stationary conditions and 2) ability of HR to react relatively quickly (within a few seconds) to sharp increases in sympathetic nerve traffic. PMID:9724305

  20. Heart rate variability as a biomarker of fibromyalgia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Staud, Roland

    2009-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by widespread mechanical tenderness, fatigue, nonrefreshing sleep and depressed mood. Several biological abnormalities have been described in FM patients, including elevated substance P in the cerebrospinal fluid, increased CNS sensitivity to painful and nonpainful stimuli and pervasive dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Such ANS abnormalities include, but are not limited to: tachycardia, postural intolerance, Raynaud’s phenomenon, and diarrhea or constipation. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis of FM patients can be used to assess ANS dysfunction, specifically related to sympathovagal balance, which has provided evidence for nonabating sympathetic hyperactivity in this chronic pain population. Although not specific for FM, ANS dysfunction can be readily determined by HRV analysis requiring only computer analysis of electrocardiogram recordings by commercially available software. HRV has been shown to correlate with FM pain and is sensitive to change; in particular, pain related to physical and mental stressors. Thus, ANS dysfunction as assessed by HRV analysis may serve as a useful biomarker, and may become part of future FM diagnostic criteria and serve as a surrogate end point in clinical trials. PMID:19890437

  1. Heart rate variability: a tool to explore the sleeping brain?

    PubMed

    Chouchou, Florian; Desseilles, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is divided into two main sleep stages: (1) non-rapid eye movement sleep (non-REMS), characterized among others by reduced global brain activity; and (2) rapid eye movement sleep (REMS), characterized by global brain activity similar to that of wakefulness. Results of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis, which is widely used to explore autonomic modulation, have revealed higher parasympathetic tone during normal non-REMS and a shift toward sympathetic predominance during normal REMS. Moreover, HRV analysis combined with brain imaging has identified close connectivity between autonomic cardiac modulation and activity in brain areas such as the amygdala and insular cortex during REMS, but no connectivity between brain and cardiac activity during non-REMS. There is also some evidence for an association between HRV and dream intensity and emotionality. Following some technical considerations, this review addresses how brain activity during sleep contributes to changes in autonomic cardiac activity, organized into three parts: (1) the knowledge on autonomic cardiac control, (2) differences in brain and autonomic activity between non-REMS and REMS, and (3) the potential of HRV analysis to explore the sleeping brain, and the implications for psychiatric disorders. PMID:25565936

  2. Nicotine Acutely Inhibits Erectile Tumescence by Altering Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Harte, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine potential mechanisms underlying nicotines effects on male sexual arousal by exploring the mediating role of heart rate variability (HRV). Methods The sample comprised 22 healthy, nicotine-nave men (Mage = 20.91 years; SD = 2.43). Data were taken from a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial previously completed and published elsewhere. During each laboratory visit, time-domain parameters of HRV (standard deviation of normal-to-normal [NN] intervals [SDNN], square root of the mean squared difference of successive NN intervals [RMSSD], percent of NN intervals for which successive heartbeat intervals differed by at least 50 ms [pNN50]) were assessed, as well as objective (via penile plethysmography) and subjective indices of sexual arousal. Results Acute nicotine ingestion (compared to placebo) was associated with dysregulated sympathovagal balance, which in turn was related to relatively reduced erectile tumescence. HRV did not mediate relations between nicotine intake and self-reported indices of sexual arousal. Conclusions HRV mediated the association between nicotine ingestion and erectile capacity. Findings suggest that dysfunctional cardiac autonomic tone may be an underlying mechanism by which nicotine exerts its deleterious effects on erectile health. PMID:24642073

  3. Factors affecting the heart rate during self-paced walking.

    PubMed

    Bassey, E J; Macdonald, I A; Patrick, J M

    1982-01-01

    The results of 277 self-paced walking tests have been analysed for the effects of body composition, sex and age using step-up multiple regression analysis. Equations are given for the influence of the significant factors on chosen walking speeds and on heart rate (fc) (standardised at 4.8 km . h-1 by interpolation from points recorded at three walking speeds). The basic equations are: Normal speed (km . h-1) = 1.72 + 2.13 stature (m) - 0.008 age (years) Fast speed (km . h-1) = 0.54 + 3.69 stature (m) - 0.016 age (years) For men: fc4.8 (beat . min-1) = 161 - 50.7 stature (m) + 0.223 body weight (kg) For women: fc4.8 (beat . min-1) = 161 - 50.7 stature (m) + 0.223 body weight (kg) + 4.43 The significant factors affecting freely chosen walking speeds are stature and age. When estimates of body composition are available, percentage fat is found to be the most influential single factor affecting fc, while sex no longer has a significant effect, and age now has a negative influence. When allowance is made for these factors the effects of customary physical activity can be seen more clearly. PMID:7199445

  4. Autonomic dysfunction and heart rate variability in depression.

    PubMed

    Sgoifo, Andrea; Carnevali, Luca; Alfonso, Maria de los Angeles Pico; Amore, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Depression occurs in people of all ages across all world regions; it is the second leading cause of disability and its global burden increased by 37.5% between 1990 and 2010. Autonomic changes are often found in altered mood states and appear to be a central biological substrate linking depression to a number of physical dysfunctions. Alterations of autonomic nervous system functioning that promotes vagal withdrawal are reflected in reductions of heart rate variability (HRV) indexes. Reduced HRV characterizes emotional dysregulation, decreased psychological flexibility and defective social engagement, which in turn are linked to prefrontal cortex hypoactivity. Altogether, these pieces of evidence support the idea that HRV might represent a useful endophenotype for psychological/physical comorbidities, and its routine application should be advised to assess the efficacy of prevention/intervention therapies in a number of psychosomatic and psychiatric dysfunctions. Further research, also making use of appropriate animal models, could provide a significant support to this point of view and possibly help to identify appropriate antidepressant therapies that do not interefere with physical health. PMID:26004818

  5. Using minute ventilation for ambulatory estimation of additional heart rate.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, F H; Roth, W T

    1998-09-01

    Both physical activity and emotion produce physiological activation. The emotional component of heart rate (HR) can be estimated as the additional HR (aHR) above that predicted by O2 consumption. Our innovation was to substitute minute ventilation (V) for O2 consumption, calculating aHR from individual relations between V and HR during an exercise test. We physiologically monitored 28 flight phobics and 15 non-anxious controls while walking (leaving the hospital, entering a plane), and during a commercial flight. Raw HR did not differ between phobics and controls when leaving the hospital (118/114 bpm) or entering the plane (117/110 bpm). However, although aHR was not different when leaving the hospital (7.0/8.6 bpm), it was significantly greater when entering the plane (17.5/9.9 bpm), accurately reflecting the increased subjective anxiety of the phobics. V was not higher in phobics than controls during any condition, suggesting an absence of hyperventilation in the phobics. The results demonstrate the utility of our method for analyzing HR in people whose stress occurs when they are physically active. PMID:9792490

  6. Detection of changes in the fractal scaling of heart rate and speed in a marathon race

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billat, Véronique L.; Mille-Hamard, Laurence; Meyer, Yves; Wesfreid, Eva

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to detect changes in the fractal scaling behavior of heart rate and speed fluctuations when the average runner’s speed decreased with fatigue. Scaling analysis in heart rate (HR) and speed (S) dynamics of marathon runners was performed using the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and the wavelet based structure function. We considered both: the short-range ( α1) and the long-range ( α2) scaling exponents for the DFA method separated by a change-point, n0=64=5.3 min (box length), the same for all the races. The variability of HR and S decreased in the second part of the marathon race, while the cardiac cost time series (i.e. the number of cardiac beats per meter) increased due to the decreasing speed behavior. The scaling exponents α1 and α2 of HR and α1 of S, increased during the race ( p<0.01) as did the HR wavelet scaling exponent ( τ). These findings provide evidence of the significant effect of fatigue induced by long exercise on the heart rate and speed variability.

  7. Large-scale dimension densities for heart rate variability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, Corinna; Wessel, Niels; Schirdewan, Alexander; Kurths, Jürgen

    2006-04-01

    In this work, we reanalyze the heart rate variability (HRV) data from the 2002 Computers in Cardiology (CiC) Challenge using the concept of large-scale dimension densities and additionally apply this technique to data of healthy persons and of patients with cardiac diseases. The large-scale dimension density (LASDID) is estimated from the time series using a normalized Grassberger-Procaccia algorithm, which leads to a suitable correction of systematic errors produced by boundary effects in the rather large scales of a system. This way, it is possible to analyze rather short, nonstationary, and unfiltered data, such as HRV. Moreover, this method allows us to analyze short parts of the data and to look for differences between day and night. The circadian changes in the dimension density enable us to distinguish almost completely between real data and computer-generated data from the CiC 2002 challenge using only one parameter. In the second part we analyzed the data of 15 patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), 15 patients with congestive heart failure (CHF), 15 elderly healthy subjects (EH), as well as 18 young and healthy persons (YH). With our method we are able to separate completely the AF (ρlsμ=0.97±0.02) group from the others and, especially during daytime, the CHF patients show significant differences from the young and elderly healthy volunteers (CHF, 0.65±0.13 ; EH, 0.54±0.05 ; YH, 0.57±0.05 ; p<0.05 for both comparisons). Moreover, for the CHF patients we find no circadian changes in ρlsμ (day, 0.65±0.13 ; night, 0.66±0.12 ; n.s.) in contrast to healthy controls (day, 0.54±0.05 ; night, 0.61±0.05 ; p=0.002 ). Correlation analysis showed no statistical significant relation between standard HRV and circadian LASDID, demonstrating a possibly independent application of our method for clinical risk stratification.

  8. Changing Geomagnetic Field and Heart Rates Variability in Healthy Volunteers: A Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanova, Malina; Zenchenko, Tatiana; Poskotinova, Lilia; Medvedeva, Anna; Uzunov, Todor; Alenikova, Alexandra

    Space Climate is an interdisciplinary science that deals with the long-term change in the Sun, and its effects in the near-Earth environment, including possible effects on human health. This paper will present the first results from simultaneous experiments performed at 3 different locations - Sofia, Bulgaria 42° 40' N 23° 20' E; Moscow, Russia 55° 45' N 37° 36‘ E and Arkhangelsk, Russia 64° 34' N / 40° 32' E. Subjects are 5 healthy volunteers, women, mean age 39,4 years. The experiments are part of the project “Heliobiology” (2011 - 2015) that reflects the intense interest towards the influence of solar activity and meteorology on the human health. The aim of the experiments is to study the degree of conjugation of the heart rate variability and the variations of the geomagnetic field. To minimize the experimental bias one and the same hard- and software were applied during the testing. ECG signals were recorder via "KARDI-2", the software package is "Ecosan-2007", both developed by "Medical Computer Systems", Zelenograd, Russia. The duration of the observations ranged from 60 to 120 minutes. A comparison of the dynamics of the minute variations of the heart rate with the horizontal components of the geomagnetic field vector revealed a synchronization of some of the research parameters as well as specific individual differences. Despite of the small sample size (5 subjects per 8 measures), in over 70% of the experimental data a similar patterns of variation of geophysical and heart rate variability were recorded. The experiments discussed involved healthy volunteers, i.e. people that have good adaptation reserves, and the response to variation of geomagnetic field will not push them beyond the physiological norms. The observed effect of synchronization of heart rate fluctuations of healthy subjects with fluctuations of geomagnetic field may give an effective tool to address further one especially interesting problems - the mechanism of geomagnetic sensitivity.

  9. Heart rate break point may coincide with the anaerobic and not the aerobic threshold.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, J P; Fielding, R A; Hughes, V; Black, A; Bochese, M A; Knuttgen, H G

    1985-08-01

    Recently, Conconi et al. (4) proposed that the point where heart rate departs from linearity in an incremental exercise test is a good predictor of the aerobic threshold (AeT, i.e., the exercise intensity at which blood lactate concentration increases systematically above resting levels). We hypothesized that this heart rate break point (BrP) is a better predictor of the anaerobic threshold (AnT, i.e., the exercise intensity at which blood lactate concentration shows a rapid rise during an incremental test). To test this hypothesis, 11 subjects with different levels of conditioning were tested on a cycle ergometer using a progressive incremental exercise protocol. Heart rate from EKG tracings and blood samples for lactate determination were taken every minute. The results showed the following significant correlation coefficients when the variables were expressed in watts: AeT and AnT = 0.92; AeT and BrP = 0.89; AnT and BrP = 0.97. The AeT was significantly lower than the BrP (166.4 +/- 52.6 W and 234.5 +/- 69.5 W). There was no significant difference between the AnT and BrP (240.0 +/- 67.1 W and 234.5 +/- 69.5 W). Another group consisting of 16 subjects performed two tests to evaluate the reproducibility of the BrP. Although a ventilatory AnT (defined as a consistent decrease in the fraction of expired CO2) was noted in all the tests, eight subjects failed to demonstrate a BrP in at least one of the evaluations, even though post-exercise blood lactate levels and peak heart rates were consistent with a maximal effort.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4044107

  10. [Maximal effort, maximal heart rate and serum lactic acid in exercise electrocardiography. A comparative study].

    PubMed

    Alabouvette, G; Bertholon, M; Helfre, G; Chatard, J C; Geyssant, A; Lacour, J R

    1984-11-01

    In exercise stress testing the quantification of effort on which the value and significance of the test depend is based on two simple and practical criteria: theoretical maximal heart rate for age (MHR) and serum lactic acid levels 3 minutes after exercise. Usually only MHR is used, 85% of MHR being the common cut-off point between "interpretable" maximal or "inframaximal" effort and useless effort. Our study was based on 1 000 exercise stress tests performed over a two year period with the same protocol and equipment. Initially, we determined our values of MHR and serum lactic acid in undoubted maximal effort stress tests, as shown by a levelling out of the heart rate during the last load increments, the last stage of exercise being sustained for at least 1.5 minute. The application of both criteria to all the investigations showed significant differences in the evaluation of the exercise obtained when the maximal measured heart rate was between 85 and 95% of MHR. This was also true, to a lesser extent, in patients over 60 years of age or under 30 years of age with maximal measured heart rate of 85% or less than MHR. A discussion of the theoretical basis of the two criteria helps explain this divergence, attributing it to the inaccuracy and unreliability of the MHR. The only obstacle to the use of serum lactate as the preferential indicator of maximal effort is the need for laboratory facilities and the delay in obtaining the result.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6439155

  11. Bombesin-like receptor 3 regulates blood pressure and heart rate via a central sympathetic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lateef, Dalya M; Xiao, Cuiying; Brychta, Robert J; Diedrich, André; Schnermann, Jurgen; Reitman, Marc L

    2016-04-01

    Bombesin-like receptor 3 (BRS-3) is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor that regulates energy expenditure, food intake, and body weight. We examined the effects of BRS-3 deletion and activation on blood pressure and heart rate. In free-living, telemeteredBrs3null mice the resting heart rate was 10% lower than wild-type controls, while the resting mean arterial pressure was unchanged. During physical activity, the heart rate and blood pressure increased more inBrs3null mice, reaching a similar heart rate and higher mean arterial pressure than control mice. When sympathetic input was blocked with propranolol, the heart rate ofBrs3null mice was unchanged, while the heart rate in control mice was reduced to the level of the null mice. The intrinsic heart rate, measured after both sympathetic and parasympathetic blockade, was similar inBrs3null and control mice. Intravenous infusion of the BRS-3 agonist MK-5046 increased mean arterial pressure and heart rate in wild-type but not inBrs3null mice, and this increase was blocked by pretreatment with clonidine, a sympatholytic, centrally acting α2-adrenergic agonist. In anesthetized mice, hypothalamic infusion of MK-5046 also increased both mean arterial pressure and heart rate. Taken together, these data demonstrate that BRS-3 contributes to resting cardiac sympathetic tone, but is not required for activity-induced increases in heart rate and blood pressure. The data suggest that BRS-3 activation increases heart rate and blood pressure via a central sympathetic mechanism. PMID:26801314

  12. Higher Precision of Heart Rate Compared with VO2 to Predict Exercise Intensity in Endurance-Trained Runners

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Victor M.; den Tillaar, Roland Van; Marques, Mario C.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the precision of oxygen uptake with heart rate regression during track running in highly-trained runners. Twelve national and international level male long-distance road runners (age 30.7 ± 5.5 yrs, height 1.71 ± 0.04 m and mass 61.2 ± 5.8 kg) with a personal best on the half marathon of 62 min 37 s ± 1 min 22 s participated in the study. Each participant performed, in an all-weather synthetic track five, six min bouts at constant velocity with each bout at an increased running velocity. The starting velocity was 3.33 m·s-1 with a 0.56 m·s-1 increase on each subsequent bout. VO2 and heart rate were measured during the runs and blood lactate was assessed immediately after each run. Mean peak VO2 and mean peak heart rate were, respectively, 76.2 ± 9.7 mL·kg-1·min-1 and 181 ± 13 beats·min-1. The linearity of the regressions between heart rate, running velocity and VO2 were all very high (r > 0.99) with small standard errors of regression (i.e. Sy.x < 5% at the velocity associated with the 2 and 4 mmol·L-1 lactate thresholds). The strong relationships between heart rate, running velocity and VO2 found in this study show that, in highly trained runners, it is possible to have heart rate as an accurate indicator of energy demand and of the running speed. Therefore, in this subject cohort it may be unnecessary to use VO2 to track changes in the subjects’ running economy during training periods. Key points Heart rate is used in the control of exercise intensity in endurance sports. However, few studies have quantified the precision of its relationship with oxygen uptake in highly trained runners. We evaluated twelve elite half-marathon runners during track running at various intensities and established three regressions: oxygen uptake / heart rate; heart rate / running velocity and oxygen uptake / running velocity. The three regressions presented, respectively, imprecision of 4,2%, 2,75% and 4,5% at the velocity associated with the 4 mmol·L-1 threshold. The results of the present study show that, in highly trained runners, it is possible to use heart rate as an accurate index of the external work rate during sub maximal running speeds. PMID:24149310

  13. Development of a piezopolymer pressure sensor for a portable fetal heart rate monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Pretlow, R. A.; Stoughton, J. W.; Baker, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    A piezopolymer pressure sensor has been developed for service in a portable fetal heart rate monitor, which will permit an expectant mother to perform the fetal nonstress test, a standard predelivery test, in her home. Several sensors are mounted in an array on a belt worn by the mother. The sensor design conforms to the distinctive features of the fetal heart tone, namely, the acoustic signature, frequency spectrum, signal amplitude, and localization. The components of a sensor serve to fulfill five functions: signal detection, acceleration cancellation, acoustical isolation, electrical shielding, and electrical isolation of the mother. A theoretical analysis of the sensor response yields a numerical value for the sensor sensitivity, which is compared to experiment in an in vitro sensor calibration. Finally, an in vivo test on patients within the last six weeks of term reveals that nonstress test recordings from the acoustic monitor compare well with those obtained from conventional ultrasound.

  14. On the open/close performance of prosthetic heart valves at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltran, A.; Zenit, R.

    2013-11-01

    We report experimental observations of the performance of mechanical and biological prosthetic heart valves. The valves are mounted in a test circular channel conected to a flow system that emulates accelerated human-like conditions. The flow is generated by a high frequencie pulsative pump (in the range of 7 to 18 Hz). The objective of the investigation is to find the treshold conditions for which the open/close performance fails. Preliminary results show that for the mechanical valve the failure starts at 436 pulses/min, while for the biological valve, it starts a failing performance is observed for frequencies higher that 462 pulses/min. Even though these values are far from the heart rate in the human body, we use these measurements to further understand the structure-fluid interaction mechanics of the flow through heart valves.

  15. Relationship between obesity, negative affect and basal heart rate in predicting heart rate reactivity to psychological stress among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Park, Andres E; Huynh, Pauline; Schell, Anne M; Baker, Laura A

    2015-08-01

    Reduced cardiovascular responses to psychological stressors have been found to be associated with both obesity and negative affect in adults, but have been less well studied in children and adolescent populations. These findings have most often been interpreted as reflecting reduced sympathetic nervous system response, perhaps associated with heightened baseline sympathetic activation among the obese and those manifesting negative affect. However, obesity and negative affect may themselves be correlated, raising the question of whether they both independently affect cardiovascular reactivity. The present study thus examined the separate effects of obesity and negative affect on both cardiovascular and skin conductance responses to stress (e.g., during a serial subtraction math task) in adolescents, while controlling for baseline levels of autonomic activity during rest. Both obesity and negative affect had independent and negative associations with cardiovascular reactivity, such that reduced stress responses were apparent for obese adolescents and those with high levels of negative affect. In contrast, neither obesity nor negative affect was related to skin conductance responses to stress, implicating specifically noradrenergic mechanisms rather than sympathetic mechanisms generally as being deficient. Moreover, baseline heart rate was unrelated to obesity in this sample, which suggests that heightened baseline of sympathetic activity is not necessary for the reduced cardiovascular reactivity to stress. PMID:26049136

  16. Is target dose of beta-blocker more important than achieved heart rate or heart rate change in patients with systolic chronic heart failure?

    PubMed

    Porapakkham, Pornwalee; Porapakkham, Pramote; Krum, Henry

    2010-04-01

    Beta-blockers (BBs) are mandatory therapy for patients with systolic chronic heart failure (CHF). However, it is uncertain whether target dose of these agents is more important than the achievement of target heart rate (HR) in maximizing the benefits of these agents. To test this, we obtained ECG absolute HR from patients with systolic CHF, together with consecutive left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) measures at least 3 months apart. Patients were divided into those who achieved target dose for beta-blocker and/or target absolute HR of < or = 60 beats per minute (bpm) and target change in HR (>10 bpm reduction) with increasing dose. Baseline ejection fraction (EF) was similar across all groups. Patients with absolute or change in HR at target achieved a greater change in EF than those not at target (P= 0.027 and P= 0.012, respectively). In contrast, those who achieved target dose did not achieve a significantly greater improvement in EF than those not at target dose (P= 0.81). Similarly for absolute EF, patients at target HR or target change in HR achieved a greater EF increase than those achieving target dose. Based on these data, target HR or change in HR appears to be more critical to improvement in EF than target dose in CHF patients. Therefore, achieving an absolute HR or change in HR with BBs may be more important than target dose in maximizing benefits of BBs in this setting. PMID:20398098

  17. Heart Rate and Treatment Effect in Children with Disruptive Behavior Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stadler, Christina; Grasmann, Dorte; Fegert, Jorg M.; Holtmann, Martin; Poustka, Fritz; Schmeck, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether children with disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs; hyperkinetic conduct disorder, conduct disorder, hyperkinetic disorder) characterized by low heart rate profit less from an intensive cognitive behavioral intervention aimed at reducing impulsive, oppositional and aggressive behavior problems. Method: Basal heart rate

  18. Electroencephalogram and Heart Rate Regulation to Familiar and Unfamiliar People in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hecke, Amy Vaughan; Lebow, Jocelyn; Bal, Elgiz; Lamb, Damon; Harden, Emily; Kramer, Alexis; Denver, John; Bazhenova, Olga; Porges, Stephen W.

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have examined whether familiarity of partner affects social responses in children with autism. This study investigated heart rate regulation (respiratory sinus arrhythmia [RSA]: The myelinated vagus nerve's regulation of heart rate) and temporal-parietal electroencephalogram (EEG) activity while nineteen 8- to 12-year-old children with…

  19. The Influence of Motor Impairment on Autonomic Heart Rate Modulation among Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamuner, Antonio Roberto; Cunha, Andrea Baraldi; da Silva, Ester; Negri, Ana Paola; Tudella, Eloisa; Moreno, Marlene Aparecida

    2011-01-01

    The study of heart rate variability is an important tool for a noninvasive evaluation of the neurocardiac integrity. The present study aims to evaluate the autonomic heart rate modulation in supine and standing positions in 12 children diagnosed with cerebral palsy and 16 children with typical motor development (control group), as well as to

  20. SKIPPING BREAKFAST: GENDER EFFECTS ON RESTING HEART RATE MEASURES IN PREADOLESCENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cardiovascular response in children to morning nutrition has received little attention, and associated gender-related effects are virtually uninvestigated. This study evaluated resting heart-rate (HR) and heart-rate variability (HRV) in preadolescents after overnight fasting and again after eati...

  1. Electroencephalogram and Heart Rate Regulation to Familiar and Unfamiliar People in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hecke, Amy Vaughan; Lebow, Jocelyn; Bal, Elgiz; Lamb, Damon; Harden, Emily; Kramer, Alexis; Denver, John; Bazhenova, Olga; Porges, Stephen W.

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have examined whether familiarity of partner affects social responses in children with autism. This study investigated heart rate regulation (respiratory sinus arrhythmia [RSA]: The myelinated vagus nerve's regulation of heart rate) and temporal-parietal electroencephalogram (EEG) activity while nineteen 8- to 12-year-old children with

  2. Heart Rate Level and Antisocial Behavior in Children and Adolescents: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Jame; Raine, Adrian

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether antisocial children are characterized by low heart rate. Method: A meta-analysis was conducted on 45 independent effect sizes of the resting heart rate-antisocial behavior relationship obtained from 40 studies meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria. Studies were conducted between 1971 to 2002 using a total of 5,868…

  3. Middle School Student's Heart Rates during Different Curricular Activities in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Zan; Hannon, James C.; Carson, Russell L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if students' heart rate outcomes in physical education varied as a function of activity and grade. A total of 146 sixth to eighth graders participated in different activities (i.e., walking/jogging, line dancing, soccer, and catch ball). Their average heart rate (AHR) and percentage of time in and above…

  4. The Influence of Motor Impairment on Autonomic Heart Rate Modulation among Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamuner, Antonio Roberto; Cunha, Andrea Baraldi; da Silva, Ester; Negri, Ana Paola; Tudella, Eloisa; Moreno, Marlene Aparecida

    2011-01-01

    The study of heart rate variability is an important tool for a noninvasive evaluation of the neurocardiac integrity. The present study aims to evaluate the autonomic heart rate modulation in supine and standing positions in 12 children diagnosed with cerebral palsy and 16 children with typical motor development (control group), as well as to…

  5. Heart Rates of Elementary Physical Education Students during the Dancing Classrooms Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Larry; Evans, Melissa; Guess, Wendy; Morris, Mary; Olson, Terry; Buckwalter, John

    2011-01-01

    We examined how different types of dance activities, along with their duration, influenced heart rate responses among fifth-grade physical education students (N = 96) who participated in the Dancing Classrooms program. Results indicated that the overall Dancing Classrooms program elicits a moderate cardiovascular heart rate response (M = 124.4…

  6. Film-type transducer materials PVDF and EMFi in the measurement of heart and respiration rates.

    PubMed

    Kärki, Satu; Lekkala, Jukka

    2008-01-01

    Film-type transducer materials polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF) and ElectroMechanical Film (EMFi) were used in the measurement of heart and respiration rates on the chest wall at rest. The aim here was to evaluate if the both materials are capable to measure the heart and respiration rates correctly and also to found out if there are differences between the results of PVDF and EMFi. The movements provided by the pulsation of heart and respiration were converted into an electrical signal by the sensors. The signals were amplified and transmitted to a computer. The data was analyzed with Matlab software. The signals were filtered to reveal the heart pulsation and respiration components. Power spectral density (PSD) spectrum was computed to determine the heart and respiration rates. ECG was used as a reference signal for the heart rate and a thermistor for the respiration rate. Both transducer materials provided good results and no differences between PVDF and EMFi were found. The heart rates measured with PVDF and EMFi sensors corresponded to the values calculated from the ECG signal. Also the respiration rates correlated with the values determined with the thermistor. To conclude, both materials provided reliable results in the measurements of heart and respiration rates. PMID:19162710

  7. Using Heart Rate Monitors in Research on Fitness Levels of Children in Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strand, Brad; Reeder, Steve

    1993-01-01

    Demonstrates the use of heart rate monitors (HRMs) in fitness research and examines heart rate intensity levels of middle school students while they participated in a variety of physical education activities throughout a school year. Research shows the HRM has considerable potential in assessing fitness achievements in school-age children. (GLR)

  8. Effects of head-down bed rest on complex heart rate variability: Response to LBNP testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberger, Ary L.; Mietus, Joseph E.; Rigney, David R.; Wood, Margie L.; Fortney, Suzanne M.

    1994-01-01

    Head-down bed rest is used to model physiological changes during spaceflight. We postulated that bed rest would decrease the degree of complex physiological heart rate variability. We analyzed continuous heart rate data from digitized Holter recordings in eight healthy female volunteers (age 28-34 yr) who underwent a 13-day 6 deg head-down bed rest study with serial lower body negative pressure (LBNP) trials. Heart rate variability was measured on a 4-min data sets using conventional time and frequency domain measures as well as with a new measure of signal 'complexity' (approximate entropy). Data were obtained pre-bed rest (control), during bed rest (day 4 and day 9 or 11), and 2 days post-bed rest (recovery). Tolerance to LBNP was significantly reduced on both bed rest days vs. pre-bed rest. Heart rate variability was assessed at peak LBNP. Heart rate approximate entropy was significantly decreased at day 4 and day 9 or 11, returning toward normal during recovery. Heart rate standard deviation and the ratio of high- to low-power frequency did not change significantly. We conclude that short-term bed rest is associated with a decrease in the complex variability of heart rate during LBNP testing in healthy young adult women. Measurement of heart rate complexity, using a method derived from nonlinear dynamics ('chaos theory'), may provide a sensitive marker of this loss of physiological variability, complementing conventional time and frequency domain statistical measures.

  9. [Energy index of heart rate spectral analysis for the assessment of autonomic nerve activities].

    PubMed

    Naito, T

    1991-02-01

    Heart rate spectral analysis was performed in 17 male healthy volunteers by changing their positions (supine or standing) and respiratory rates (8, 10, 12, 15 and 20 bpm). Furthermore, analysis was made by a multiple regression method on parameters such as R-R interval, tidal volume, respiratory time and positions of the subjects which may contribute to the peak power values of high frequency components (HFC, synchronous with respiratory patterns and of low frequency components (LFC, about 0.1Hz). HFC power was found to be significantly dependent on R-R interval and respiratory time, but not on tidal volume or position. Following equation was obtained. HFCP = 11.3 X RTX (RR-0.246) HFCP: HFC power value (msec) RT: respiratory time (sec) RR: R-R interval (sec) Therefore, HFCP or area under the curve (AUC) of HFC is not appropriate for the assessment of autonomic nerve activities, especially when respiratory rate or heart rate is changing. The intensity of physical wave is in proportion to (amplitude X frequency). Consequently, in a case where frequency is changeable, (amplitude X frequency) is a good index of the oscillatory energy. Therefore, sigma (power X frequency) is proposed as a suitable index for a certain component of power-spectrum. Parasympathetic activity should be assessed by the following index induced from the previously mentioned equation. RR adjusted HFEI (high frequency energy index) = sigma (power X frequency)/(RR-0.246) (0.15Hz less than frequency less than 0.4Hz). Similarly, low frequency components which reflect the sympathetic activity should be assessed by the following equation. LFEI (low frequency energy index) = sigma (power X frequency) (0.05Hz less than frequency less than 0.15Hz). The assessment of autonomic nerve activities becomes more appropriate by using these indices especially when heart rate and respiratory rate are changing. PMID:2020102

  10. Evaluation of heart rate changes: electrocardiographic versus photoplethysmographic methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.; Zimmerman, I. R.; O'Brien, P. C.

    1997-01-01

    The heart rate (HR) variation to forced deep breathing (HRDB) and to the Valsalva maneuver (Valsalva ratio; VR) are the two most widely used tests of cardiovagal function in human subjects. The HR is derived from a continuously running electrocardiographic (ECG) recording. Recently, HR derived from the arterial waveform became available on the Finapres device (FinapHR), but its ability to detect rapid changes in HR remains uncertain. We therefore evaluated HRDB and VR derived from FinapHR using ECG-derived HR (ECGHR) recordings as the standard. We also compared the averaged HR on Finapres (Finapav) with beat-to-beat Finapres (FinapBB) values. Studies were undertaken in 12 subjects with large HR variations: age, 34.5 +/- 9.3 (SD) years; six males and six females. FinapBB values were superimposable upon ECGHR for both HRDB and VR. In contrast, Finapav failed to follow ECGHR for HRDB and followed HRECG with a lag for the VR. To evaluate statistically how closely FinapHR approximated ECGHR, we undertook regression analysis, using mean values for each subject. To compare the two methods, we evaluated the significance of the difference between test and standard values. For HRDB, FinapBB reproducibly recorded HR (R2 = 0.998), and was significantly (p = 0.001) better than Finapav (R2 = 0.616; p < 0.001). For VR, HRBB generated a VR that was not significantly different from the correct values, while HRav generated a value that was slightly but consistently lower than the correct values (p < 0.001). We conclude that FinapHR reliably records HR variations in the beat-to-beat mode for cardiovascular HR tests.

  11. Heart rate variability in normal and pathological sleep

    PubMed Central

    Tobaldini, Eleonora; Nobili, Lino; Strada, Silvia; Casali, Karina R.; Braghiroli, Alberto; Montano, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Sleep is a physiological process involving different biological systems, from molecular to organ level; its integrity is essential for maintaining health and homeostasis in human beings. Although in the past sleep has been considered a state of quiet, experimental and clinical evidences suggest a noteworthy activation of different biological systems during sleep. A key role is played by the autonomic nervous system (ANS), whose modulation regulates cardiovascular functions during sleep onset and different sleep stages. Therefore, an interest on the evaluation of autonomic cardiovascular control in health and disease is growing by means of linear and non-linear heart rate variability (HRV) analyses. The application of classical tools for ANS analysis, such as HRV during physiological sleep, showed that the rapid eye movement (REM) stage is characterized by a likely sympathetic predominance associated with a vagal withdrawal, while the opposite trend is observed during non-REM sleep. More recently, the use of non-linear tools, such as entropy-derived indices, have provided new insight on the cardiac autonomic regulation, revealing for instance changes in the cardiovascular complexity during REM sleep, supporting the hypothesis of a reduced capability of the cardiovascular system to deal with stress challenges. Interestingly, different HRV tools have been applied to characterize autonomic cardiac control in different pathological conditions, from neurological sleep disorders to sleep disordered breathing (SDB). In summary, linear and non-linear analysis of HRV are reliable approaches to assess changes of autonomic cardiac modulation during sleep both in health and diseases. The use of these tools could provide important information of clinical and prognostic relevance. PMID:24137133

  12. Does the Aging Process Significantly Modify the Mean Heart Rate?

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Marcos Antonio Almeida; Sousa, Antonio Carlos Sobral; Reis, Francisco Prado; Santos, Thayná Ramos; Lima, Sonia Oliveira; Barreto-Filho, José Augusto

    2013-01-01

    Background The Mean Heart Rate (MHR) tends to decrease with age. When adjusted for gender and diseases, the magnitude of this effect is unclear. Objective To analyze the MHR in a stratified sample of active and functionally independent individuals. Methods A total of 1,172 patients aged ≥ 40 years underwent Holter monitoring and were stratified by age group: 1 = 40-49, 2 = 50-59, 3 = 60-69, 4 = 70-79, 5 = ≥ 80 years. The MHR was evaluated according to age and gender, adjusted for Hypertension (SAH), dyslipidemia and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Several models of ANOVA, correlation and linear regression were employed. A two-tailed p value <0.05 was considered significant (95% CI). Results The MHR tended to decrease with the age range: 1 = 77.20 ± 7.10; 2 = 76.66 ± 7.07; 3 = 74.02 ± 7.46; 4 = 72.93 ± 7.35; 5 = 73.41 ± 7.98 (p < 0.001). Women showed a correlation with higher MHR (p <0.001). In the ANOVA and regression models, age and gender were predictors (p < 0.001). However, R2 and ETA2 < 0.10, as well as discrete standardized beta coefficients indicated reduced effect. Dyslipidemia, hypertension and DM did not influence the findings. Conclusion The MHR decreased with age. Women had higher values of MHR, regardless of the age group. Correlations between MHR and age or gender, albeit significant, showed the effect magnitude had little statistical relevance. The prevalence of SAH, dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus did not influence the results. PMID:24029962

  13. Heart Rate Variability and Autonomic Modulations in Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Shaza M.; Adam, Ishag; Lutfi, Mohamed F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the exact pathophysiology of preeclampsia is not well understood, autonomic nervous system imbalance is suggested as one of the main factors. Aims To investigate heart rate variability (HRV) and autonomic modulations in Sudanese pregnant women with preeclampsia. Subjects and Methods A case-control study (60 women in each arm) was conducted at Omdurman Maternity Hospital—Sudan, during the period from June to August, 2014. Cases were women presented with preeclampsia and healthy pregnant women were the controls. Studied groups were matched for important determinants of HRV. Natural logarithm (Ln) of total power (TP), high frequency (HF), low frequency (LF) and very low frequency (VLF) were used to determine HRV. Normalized low and high frequencies (LF Norm and HF Norm) were used to evaluate sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic modulations respectively. Results Patients with preeclampsia achieved significantly higher LF Norm [49.80 (16.25) vs. 44.55 (19.15), P = 0.044] and LnLF/HF [0.04 (0.68) vs. -0.28 (0.91), P = 0.023] readings, but lower HF Norm [49.08 (15.29) vs. 55.87 (19.56), P = 0.012], compared with healthy pregnant women. Although all other HRV measurements were higher in the patients with preeclampsia compared with the controls, only LnVLF [4.50 (1.19) vs. 4.01 (1.06), P = 0.017] and LnLF [4.01 (1.58) vs. 3.49 (1.23), P = 0.040] reached statistical significance. Conclusion The study adds further evidence for the dominant cardiac sympathetic modulations on patients with preeclampsia, probably secondary to parasympathetic withdrawal in this group. However, the higher LnVLF and LnLF readings achieved by preeclamptic women compared with the controls are unexpected in the view that augmented sympathetic modulations usually depresses all HRV parameters including these two measures. PMID:27043306

  14. Changes in extracellular muscle volume affect heart rate and blood pressure responses to static exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, K.; Essfeld, D.; Stegemann, J.

    To investigate the effect of μg-induced peripheral extracellular fluid reductions on heart rate and blood pressure during isometric exercise, six healthy male subjects performed three calf ergometer test with different extracellular volumes of working muscles. In all tests, body positions during exercise were identical (supine with the knee joint flexed to 900). After a pre-exercise period of 25 min, during which calf volumes were manipulated, subjects had to counteract an external force of 180 N for 5 min. During the pre-exercise period three different protocols were applied. Test A: Subjects rested in the exercise position; test B: Body position was the same as in A but calf volume was increased by venous congestion (cuffs inflated to 80 mm Hg); test C: Calf volumes were decreased by a negative hydrostatic pressure (calves about 40 cm above heart level with the subjects supine). To clamp the changed calf volumes in tests B and C, cuffs were inflated to 300 mm Hg 5 min before the onset of exercise. This occlusion was maintained until termination of exercise. Compared to tests A and B, the reduced volume of test C led to significant increases in heart rate and blood pressure during exercise. Oxygen uptake did not exceed resting levels in B and C until cuffs were deflated, indicating that exclusively calf muscles contributed to the neurogenic peripheral drive. It is concluded that changes in extracellular muscle volume have to be taken into account when comparing heart rate and blood pressure during lg- and μg- exercise.

  15. Optogenetic stimulation of Drosophila heart rate at different temperatures and Ca2+ concentrations.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yue C; Uradu, Henry; Majeed, Zana R; Cooper, Robin L

    2016-02-01

    Optogenetics is a revolutionary technique that enables noninvasive activation of electrically excitable cells. In mammals, heart rate has traditionally been modulated with pharmacological agents or direct stimulation of cardiac tissue with electrodes. However, implanted wires have been known to cause physical damage and damage from electrical currents. Here, we describe a proof of concept to optically drive cardiac function in a model organism, Drosophila melanogaster. We expressed the light sensitive channelrhodopsin protein ChR2.XXL in larval Drosophila hearts and examined light-induced activation of cardiac tissue. After demonstrating optical stimulation of larval heart rate, the approach was tested at low temperature and low calcium levels to simulate mammalian heart transplant conditions. Optical activation of ChR2.XXL substantially increased heart rate in all conditions. We have developed a system that can be instrumental in characterizing the physiology of optogenetically controlled cardiac function with an intact heart. PMID:26834237

  16. Natriuretic Peptides as Cardiovascular Safety Biomarkers in Rats: Comparison With Blood Pressure, Heart Rate, and Heart Weight.

    PubMed

    Engle, Steven K; Watson, David E

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) toxicity is an important cause of failure during drug development. Blood-based biomarkers can be used to detect CV toxicity during preclinical development and prioritize compounds at lower risk of causing such toxicities. Evidence of myocardial degeneration can be detected by measuring concentrations of biomarkers such as cardiac troponin I and creatine kinase in blood; however, detection of functional changes in the CV system, such as blood pressure, generally requires studies in animals with surgically implanted pressure transducers. This is a significant limitation because sustained changes in blood pressure are often accompanied by changes in heart rate and together can lead to cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial degeneration in animals, and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in humans. Increased concentrations of NPs in blood correlate with higher risk of cardiac mortality, all-cause mortality, and MACE in humans. Their utility as biomarkers of CV function and toxicity in rodents was investigated by exploring the relationships between plasma concentrations of NTproANP and NTproBNP, blood pressure, heart rate, and heart weight in Sprague Dawley rats administered compounds that caused hypotension or hypertension, including nifedipine, fluprostenol, minoxidil, L-NAME, L-thyroxine, or sunitinib for 1-2 weeks. Changes in NTproANP and/or NTproBNP concentrations were inversely correlated with changes in blood pressure. NTproANP and NTproBNP concentrations were inconsistently correlated with relative heart weights. In addition, increased heart rate was associated with increased heart weights. These studies support the use of natriuretic peptides and heart rate to detect changes in blood pressure and cardiac hypertrophy in short-duration rat studies. PMID:26609138

  17. Smartphone-enabled pulse rate variability: an alternative methodology for the collection of heart rate variability in psychophysiological research.

    PubMed

    Heathers, James A J

    2013-09-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is widely used to assess autonomic nervous system (ANS) function. It is traditionally collected from a dedicated laboratory electrocardiograph (ECG). This presents a barrier to collecting the large samples necessary to maintain the statistical power of between-subject psychophysiological comparisons. An alternative to ECG involves an optical pulse sensor or photoplethysmograph run from a smartphone or similar portable device: smartphone pulse rate variability (SPRV). Experiment 1 determined the simultaneous accuracy between ECG and SPRV systems in n = 10 participants at rest. Raw SPRV values showed a consistent positive bias, which was successfully attenuated with correction. Experiment 2 tested an additional n = 10 participants at rest, during attentional load, and during mild stress (exercise). Accuracy was maintained, but slightly attenuated during exercise. The best correction method maintained an accuracy of +/-2% for low-frequency spectral power, and +/-5% for high-frequency spectral power over all points. Thus, the SPRV system records a pulse-to-pulse approximation of an ECG-derived heart rate series that is sufficiently accurate to perform time- and frequency-domain analysis of its variability, as well as accurately reflecting change in autonomic output provided by typical psychophysiological stimuli. This represents a novel method by which an accurate approximation of HRV may be collected for large-sample or naturalistic cardiac psychophysiological research. PMID:23751411

  18. Heart rate deflection point relates to second ventilatory threshold in a tennis test.

    PubMed

    Baiget, Ernest; Fernández-Fernández, Jaime; Iglesias, Xavier; Rodríguez, Ferran A

    2015-03-01

    The relationship between heart rate deflection point (HRDP) and the second ventilatory threshold (VT2) has been studied in continuous sports, but never in a tennis-specific test. The aim of the study was to assess the relationships between HRDP and the VT2, and between the maximal test performance and the maximal oxygen uptake ((Equation is included in full-text article.)) in an on-court specific endurance tennis test. Thirty-five high-level tennis players performed a progressive tennis-specific field test to exhaustion to determine HRDP, VT2, and (Equation is included in full-text article.). Ventilatory gas exchange parameters were continuously recorded by a portable telemetric breath-by-breath gas exchange measurement system. Heart rate deflection point was identified at the point at which the slope values of the linear portion of the time/heart rate (HR) relationship began to decline and was successfully determined in 91.4% of the players. High correlations (r = 0.79-0.96; p < 0.001) between physiological (HR and oxygen uptake [(Equation is included in full-text article.)]) and performance (Time, Stage, and Frequency of balls [Ballf]) variables corresponding to HRDP and VT2 were observed. Frequency of balls at the HRDP (BallfHRDP) was detected at 19.8 ± 1.7 shots per minute. Paired t-test showed no significant differences in HR (178.9 ± 8.5 vs. 177.9 ± 8.7 b·min for HRDP vs. HRVT2, respectively) at intensities corresponding to HRDP and VT2. Maximal test performance and (Equation is included in full-text article.)were moderately correlated (r = 0.56; p < 0.001). Heart rate deflection point obtained from this specific tennis test can be used to determine the VT2, and the BallfHRDP can be used as a practical performance variable to prescribe on-court specific aerobic training at or near VT2. PMID:25162649

  19. Reducing sojourn points from recurrence plots to improve transition detection: Application to fetal heart rate transitions.

    PubMed

    Zaylaa, Amira; Charara, Jamal; Girault, Jean-Marc

    2015-08-01

    The analysis of biomedical signals demonstrating complexity through recurrence plots is challenging. Quantification of recurrences is often biased by sojourn points that hide dynamic transitions. To overcome this problem, time series have previously been embedded at high dimensions. However, no one has quantified the elimination of sojourn points and rate of detection, nor the enhancement of transition detection has been investigated. This paper reports our on-going efforts to improve the detection of dynamic transitions from logistic maps and fetal hearts by reducing sojourn points. Three signal-based recurrence plots were developed, i.e. embedded with specific settings, derivative-based and m-time pattern. Determinism, cross-determinism and percentage of reduced sojourn points were computed to detect transitions. For logistic maps, an increase of 50% and 34.3% in sensitivity of detection over alternatives was achieved by m-time pattern and embedded recurrence plots with specific settings, respectively, and with a 100% specificity. For fetal heart rates, embedded recurrence plots with specific settings provided the best performance, followed by derivative-based recurrence plot, then unembedded recurrence plot using the determinism parameter. The relative errors between healthy and distressed fetuses were 153%, 95% and 91%. More than 50% of sojourn points were eliminated, allowing better detection of heart transitions triggered by gaseous exchange factors. This could be significant in improving the diagnosis of fetal state. PMID:25308517

  20. [Body composition and heart rate variability in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease pulmonary rehabilitation candidates].

    PubMed

    Curilem Gatica, Cristian; Almagi Flores, Atilio; Yuing Faras, Tuillang; Rodrguez Rodrguez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Body composition is a non-invasive method, which gives us information about the distribution of tissues in the body structure, it is also an indicator of the risk of mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The heart rate variability is a technique that gives us information of autonomic physiological condition, being recognized as an indicator which is decreased in a number of diseases. The purpose of this study was to assess body composition and heart rate variability. The methodology used is that of Debora Kerr (1988) endorsed by the International Society for advances in Cineantropometra for body composition and heart rate variability of the guidelines described by the American Heart Association (1996). Roscraff equipment, caliper Slimguide and watch Polar RS 800CX was used. , BMI 26.7 3.9 kg / m; Muscle Mass 26.1 6.3 kg ; Bone Mass 1.3 kg 8.1 76 9.9 years Age : 14 candidates for pulmonary rehabilitation patients were evaluated , Adipose mass 16.4 3.6 kg ; FEV1 54 14%. Increased waist circumference and waist hip ratio was associated with a lower overall heart rate variability. The bone component was positively related to the variability of heart rate and patients with higher forced expiratory volume in one second had lower high frequency component in heart rate variability. In these patients, the heart rate variability is reduced globally and is associated with cardiovascular risk parameters. PMID:25137278

  1. Conventional heart rate variability analysis of ambulatory electrocardiographic recordings fails to predict imminent ventricular fibrillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vybiral, T.; Glaeser, D. H.; Goldberger, A. L.; Rigney, D. R.; Hess, K. R.; Mietus, J.; Skinner, J. E.; Francis, M.; Pratt, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this report was to study heart rate variability in Holter recordings of patients who experienced ventricular fibrillation during the recording. BACKGROUND. Decreased heart rate variability is recognized as a long-term predictor of overall and arrhythmic death after myocardial infarction. It was therefore postulated that heart rate variability would be lowest when measured immediately before ventricular fibrillation. METHODS. Conventional indexes of heart rate variability were calculated from Holter recordings of 24 patients with structural heart disease who had ventricular fibrillation during monitoring. The control group consisted of 19 patients with coronary artery disease, of comparable age and left ventricular ejection fraction, who had nonsustained ventricular tachycardia but no ventricular fibrillation. RESULTS. Heart rate variability did not differ between the two groups, and no consistent trends in heart rate variability were observed before ventricular fibrillation occurred. CONCLUSIONS. Although conventional heart rate variability is an independent long-term predictor of adverse outcome after myocardial infarction, its clinical utility as a short-term predictor of life-threatening arrhythmias remains to be elucidated.

  2. Introduction to Controversial Topics in Nonlinear Science: Is the Normal Heart Rate Chaotic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, Leon

    2009-06-01

    In June 2008, the editors of Chaos decided to institute a new section to appear from time to time that addresses timely and controversial topics related to nonlinear science. The first of these deals with the dynamical characterization of human heart rate variability. We asked authors to respond to the following questions: Is the normal heart rate chaotic? If the normal heart rate is not chaotic, is there some more appropriate term to characterize the fluctuations (e.g., scaling, fractal, multifractal)? How does the analysis of heart rate variability elucidate the underlying mechanisms controlling the heart rate? Do any analyses of heart rate variability provide clinical information that can be useful in medical assessment (e.g., in helping to assess the risk of sudden cardiac death)? If so, please indicate what additional clinical studies would be useful for measures of heart rate variability to be more broadly accepted by the medical community. In addition, as a challenge for analysis methods, PhysioNet [A. L. Goldberger et al., "PhysioBank, PhysioToolkit, and PhysioNet: Components of a new research resource for complex physiologic signals," Circulation 101, e215-e220 (2000)] provided data sets from 15 patients of whom five were normal, five had heart failure, and five had atrial fibrillation (http://www.physionet.org/challenge/chaos/). This introductory essay summarizes the main issues and introduces the essays that respond to these questions.

  3. Non-contact estimation of heart rate and oxygen saturation using ambient light.

    PubMed

    Bal, Ufuk

    2015-01-01

    We propose a robust method for automated computation of heart rate (HR) from digital color video recordings of the human face. In order to extract photoplethysmographic signals, two orthogonal vectors of RGB color space are used. We used a dual tree complex wavelet transform based denoising algorithm to reduce artifacts (e.g. artificial lighting, movement, etc.). Most of the previous work on skin color based HR estimation performed experiments with healthy volunteers and focused to solve motion artifacts. In addition to healthy volunteers we performed experiments with child patients in pediatric intensive care units. In order to investigate the possible factors that affect the non-contact HR monitoring in a clinical environment, we studied the relation between hemoglobin levels and HR estimation errors. Low hemoglobin causes underestimation of HR. Nevertheless, we conclude that our method can provide acceptable accuracy to estimate mean HR of patients in a clinical environment, where the measurements can be performed remotely. In addition to mean heart rate estimation, we performed experiments to estimate oxygen saturation. We observed strong correlations between our SpO2 estimations and the commercial oximeter readings. PMID:25657877

  4. Simultaneous measurement of breathing rate and heart rate using a microbend multimode fiber optic sensor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhihao; Lau, Doreen; Teo, Ju Teng; Ng, Soon Huat; Yang, Xiufeng; Kei, Pin Lin

    2014-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate the feasibility of using a highly sensitive microbend multimode fiber optic sensor for simultaneous measurement of breathing rate (BR) and heart rate (HR). The sensing system consists of a transceiver, microbend multimode fiber, and a computer. The transceiver is comprised of an optical transmitter, an optical receiver, and circuits for data communication with the computer via Bluetooth. Comparative experiments conducted between the sensor and predicate commercial physiologic devices showed an accuracy of ±2 bpm for both BR and HR measurement. Our preliminary study of simultaneous measurement of BR and HR in a clinical trial conducted on 11 healthy subjects during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also showed very good agreement with measurements obtained from conventional MR-compatible devices. PMID:24788372

  5. Simultaneous measurement of breathing rate and heart rate using a microbend multimode fiber optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhihao; Lau, Doreen; Teo, Ju Teng; Ng, Soon Huat; Yang, Xiufeng; Kei, Pin Lin

    2014-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate the feasibility of using a highly sensitive microbend multimode fiber optic sensor for simultaneous measurement of breathing rate (BR) and heart rate (HR). The sensing system consists of a transceiver, microbend multimode fiber, and a computer. The transceiver is comprised of an optical transmitter, an optical receiver, and circuits for data communication with the computer via Bluetooth. Comparative experiments conducted between the sensor and predicate commercial physiologic devices showed an accuracy of ±2 bpm for both BR and HR measurement. Our preliminary study of simultaneous measurement of BR and HR in a clinical trial conducted on 11 healthy subjects during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also showed very good agreement with measurements obtained from conventional MR-compatible devices.

  6. Assessment of heart rate variability based on mobile device for planning physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirin, I. S.; Epishina, E. V.; Voronin, V. V.; Semenishchev, E. A.; Solodova, E. N.; Nabilskaya, N. V.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we present a method for the functional analysis of human heart based on electrocardiography (ECG) signals. The approach using the apparatus of analytical and differential geometry and correlation and regression analysis. ECG contains information on the current condition of the cardiovascular system as well as on the pathological changes in the heart. Mathematical processing of the heart rate variability allows to obtain a great set of mathematical and statistical characteristics. These characteristics of the heart rate are used when solving research problems to study physiological changes that determine functional changes of an individual. The proposed method implemented for up-to-date mobile Android and iOS based devices.

  7. Heart rate and respiratory rhythm dynamics on ascent to high altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipsitz, L. A.; Hashimoto, F.; Lubowsky, L. P.; Mietus, J.; Moody, G. B.; Appenzeller, O.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the alterations in autonomic control of heart rate at high altitude and to test the hypothesis that hypoxaemic stress during exposure to high altitude induces non-linear, periodic heart rate oscillations, similar to those seen in heart failure and the sleep apnoea syndrome. SUBJECTS--11 healthy subjects aged 24-64. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--24 hour ambulatory electrocardiogram records obtained at baseline (1524 m) and at 4700 m. Simultaneous heart rate and respiratory dynamics during 2.5 hours of sleep by fast Fourier transform analysis of beat to beat heart rate and of an electrocardiographically derived respiration signal. RESULTS--All subjects had resting hypoxaemia at high altitude, with an average oxyhaemoglobin saturation of 81% (5%). There was no significant change in mean heart rate, but low frequency (0.01-0.05 Hz) spectral power was increased (P < 0.01) at high altitude. Time series analysis showed a complex range of non-linear sinus rhythm dynamics. Striking low frequency (0.04-0.06 Hz) heart rate oscillations were observed during sleep in eight subjects at high altitude. Analysis of the electrocardiographically derived respiration signal indicated that these heart rate oscillations correlated with low frequency respiratory oscillations. CONCLUSIONS--These data suggest (a) that increased low frequency power during high altitude exposure is not simply attributable to increased sympathetic modulation of heart rate, but relates to distinctive cardiopulmonary oscillations at approximately 0.05 Hz and (b) that the emergence of periodic heart rate oscillations at high altitude is consistent with an unstable cardiopulmonary control system that may develop on acute exposure to hypoxaemic stress.

  8. Rate Control Management of Atrial Fibrillation: May a Mathematical Model Suggest an Ideal Heart Rate?

    PubMed Central

    Anselmino, Matteo; Scarsoglio, Stefania; Camporeale, Carlo; Saglietto, Andrea; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the routine prescription of rate control therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF), clinical evidence demonstrating a heart rate target is lacking. Aim of the present study was to run a mathematical model simulating AF episodes with a different heart rate (HR) to predict hemodynamic parameters for each situation. Methods The lumped model, representing the pumping heart together with systemic and pulmonary circuits, was run to simulate AF with HR of 50, 70, 90, 110 and 130 bpm, respectively. Results Left ventricular pressure increased by 57%, from 33.92±37.56 mmHg to 53.15±47.56 mmHg, and mean systemic arterial pressure increased by 27%, from 82.66±14.04 mmHg to 105.3±7.6 mmHg, at the 50 and 130 bpm simulations, respectively. Stroke volume (from 77.45±8.50 to 39.09±8.08 mL), ejection fraction (from 61.10±4.40 to 39.32±5.42%) and stroke work (SW, from 0.88±0.04 to 0.58±0.09 J) decreased by 50, 36 and 34%, at the 50 and 130 bpm simulations, respectively. In addition, oxygen consumption indexes (rate pressure product – RPP, tension time index per minute – TTI/min, and pressure volume area per minute – PVA/min) increased from the 50 to the 130 bpm simulation, respectively, by 186% (from 5598±1939 to 15995±3219 mmHg/min), 56% (from 2094±265 to 3257±301 mmHg s/min) and 102% (from 57.99±17.90 to 117.4±26.0 J/min). In fact, left ventricular efficiency (SW/PVA) decreased from 80.91±2.91% at 50 bpm to 66.43±3.72% at the 130 bpm HR simulation. Conclusion Awaiting compulsory direct clinical evidences, the present mathematical model suggests that lower HRs during permanent AF relates to improved hemodynamic parameters, cardiac efficiency, and lower oxygen consumption. PMID:25764321

  9. [Development of a wrist wearing and remote heart rate alarm apparatus].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ruibin; Meng, Yanjun; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yanru; Zhang, Jingjing; Fan, Zhenzhong

    2013-04-01

    We have developed a new wrist wearing heart rate monitoring alarm apparatus, which can detect the patients' real-time pulse waves. When the abnormal heart rate appears or pulse disappears, the monitoring alarm will sound and dial the remote telephone for help simultaneously. This apparatus uses the switch circuit to control the keyboard of mobile phone, and dials remote telephone in the help of mature technology and communication platform of mobile phones. The intelligent program can distinguish digital pulse signal, pick out the correct cycle of heartbeat intelligently. The new wrist wearing heart rate monitoring alarm apparatus will calculate an average heart rate when it captures consecutively five correct electrocardiograph waveforms. It really provides a simple, inexpensive and effective way for the patients with heart disease. PMID:23858750

  10. Validation of heart rate extraction through an iPhone accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sungjun; Lee, Jeongsu; Chung, Gih Sung; Park, Kwang Suk

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitous medical technology may provide advanced utility for evaluating the status of the patient beyond the clinical environment. The iPhone provides the capacity to measure the heart rate, as the iPhone consists of a 3-axis accelerometer that is sufficiently sensitive to perceive tiny body movements caused by heart pumping. In this preliminary study, an iPhone was tested and evaluated as the reliable heart rate extractor to use for medical purpose by comparing with reference electrocardiogram. By comparing the extracted heart rate from acquired acceleration data with the extracted one from ECG reference signal, iPhone functioning as the reliable heart rate extractor has demonstrated sufficient accuracy and consistency. PMID:22255524

  11. Heart rate estimation from FBG sensors using cepstrum analysis and sensor fusion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongwei; Fook, Victor Foo Siang; Jianzhong, Emily Hao; Maniyeri, Jayachandran; Guan, Cuntai; Zhang, Haihong; Jiliang, Eugene Phua; Biswas, Jit

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a method of estimating heart rate from arrays of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors embedded in a mat. A cepstral domain signal analysis technique is proposed to characterize Ballistocardiogram (BCG) signals. With this technique, the average heart beat intervals can be estimated by detecting the dominant peaks in the cepstrum, and the signals of multiple sensors can be fused together to obtain higher signal to noise ratio than each individual sensor. Experiments were conducted with 10 human subjects lying on 2 different postures on a bed. The estimated heart rate from BCG was compared with heart rate ground truth from ECG, and the mean error of estimation obtained is below 1 beat per minute (BPM). The results show that the proposed fusion method can achieve promising heart rate measurement accuracy and robustness against various sensor contact conditions. PMID:25571206

  12. Robust heart rate estimation using wrist-based PPG signals in the presence of intense physical activities.

    PubMed

    Chengzhi Zong; Jafari, Roozbeh

    2015-08-01

    Heart rate tracking from a wrist-type photoplethysmogram (PPG) signal during intensive physical activities is a challenge that is attracting more attention thanks to the introduction of wrist-worn wearable computers. Commonly-used motion artifact rejection methods coupled with simple periodicity-based heart rate estimation techniques are incapable of achieving satisfactory heart rate tracking performance during intense activities. In this paper, we propose a two-stage solution. Firstly, we introduce an improved spectral subtraction method to reject the spectral components of motion artifacts. Secondly, instead of using heuristic mechanisms, we formalize the spectral peaks selection process as the shortest path search problem and validate its effectiveness. Analysis on the experimental results based on a published database shows that: (1) Our proposed method outperforms three other comparable methods with regards to heart rate estimation error. (2) The proposed method is a promising candidate for both offline cardiac health analysis and online heart rate tracking in daily life, even during intensive physical motions. PMID:26738168

  13. Persistent effects after trigeminal nerve proprioceptive stimulation by mandibular extension on rat blood pressure, heart rate and pial microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Lapi, D; Colantuoni, A; Del Seppia, C; Ghione, S; Tonlorenzi, D; Brunelli, M; Scuri, R

    2013-03-01

    The trigemino-cardiac reflex is a brainstem reflex known to lead to a decrement in heart rate and blood pressure, whereas few data have been collected about its effects on the cerebral hemodynamic. In this study we assess the in vivo effects of trigeminal nerve peripheral stimulation by mandibular extension on pial microcirculation and systemic arterial blood pressure in rats. Experiments were performed in male Wistar rats subjected to mandibular extension obtained inserting an ad hoc developed retractor between the dental arches. Mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate were recorded and the pial arterioles were visualized by fluorescence microscopy to measure the vessel diameters before (15 minutes) during (5-15 minutes) and after (80 minutes) mandibular extension. While in control rats (sham-operated rats) and in rats subjected to the dissection of the trigeminal peripheral branches mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate and pial microcirculation did not change during the whole observation period (110 minutes), in rats submitted to mandibular extension, mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate and arteriolar diameter significantly decreased during stimulation. Afterward mean arterial blood pressure remained reduced as well as heart rate, while arteriolar diameter significantly increased evidencing a vasodilatation persisting for the whole remaining observation time. Therefore, trigeminal nerve proprioceptive stimulation appears to trigger specific mechanisms regulating systemic arterial blood pressure and pial microcirculation. PMID:23807620

  14. Effects of Three Months Fingolimod Therapy on Heart Rate.

    PubMed

    Simula, Sakari; Laitinen, Tomi; Laitinen, Tiina M; Tarkiainen, Tuula; Hartikainen, Juha E K; Hartikainen, Päivi

    2015-12-01

    Fingolimod is a novel disease-modifying drug for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Fingolimod initiation associates with a decrease in heart rate (HR). However, the long-term effects of fingolimod on HR are not known. The aim of this study was prospectively investigate the effect of 3-month fingolimod therapy on HR. Twenty-seven RRMS patients underwent 24-h ambulatory electrocardiogram recording 20 ± 16 days before (baseline) and at the day of fingolimod initiation (1 day). Twenty-four patients completed 3 months follow-up (3 months). The average HR over 24-h and the average HR for daytime and nighttime were assessed at baseline, 1 day and 3 months. Fingolimod initiation resulted in slowing of HR from 82 ± 11 1/min at baseline to 63 ± 9.5 1/min at 5 h after the initiation of the therapy. The average HR during 24-h was lower at 1d (66 ± 7.8 1/min;p < 0.001) and also at 3 months (69 ± 8.3 1/min;p < 0.001) as compared to baseline (74 ± 10 1/min). The average daytime HR at 1 day (68 ± 8.4 1/min) was lower as compared to baseline (78 ± 11 1/min, p < 0.001), whereas no difference was found between the average daytime HR at baseline and at 3 months (79 ± 10 1/min). The average nighttime HR at 1 day (59 ± 8.8 1/min;p < 0.001) and at 3 months (60 ± 9.2 1/min;p < 0.05) both were lower than at baseline (64 ± 9.9 1/min). In conclusion, fingolimod resulted in HR decrease reaching the nadir at 5 h after the first dose. HR remained lower after 3 months fingolimod treatment as compared to baseline. Particularly, HR at daytime recovered whereas the nighttime HR showed not recovery as compared to the day of fingolimod initiation. PMID:26092537

  15. 5 CFR 430.308 - Rating performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rating performance. 430.308 Section 430.308 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Managing Senior Executive Performance § 430.308 Rating performance. (a) Initial summary...

  16. 5 CFR 430.308 - Rating performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rating performance. 430.308 Section 430.308 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Managing Senior Executive Performance § 430.308 Rating performance. (a) Initial summary...

  17. 5 CFR 430.308 - Rating performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rating performance. 430.308 Section 430.308 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Managing Senior Executive Performance § 430.308 Rating performance. (a) Initial summary...

  18. 5 CFR 430.308 - Rating performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rating performance. 430.308 Section 430.308 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Managing Senior Executive Performance § 430.308 Rating performance. (a) Initial summary...

  19. 5 CFR 430.308 - Rating performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rating performance. 430.308 Section 430.308 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Managing Senior Executive Performance § 430.308 Rating performance. (a) Initial summary...

  20. Opportunity for information search and the effect of false heart rate feedback.

    PubMed

    Barefoot, John C; Straub, Ronald B

    2005-01-01

    The role of information search in the attribution of physiological states was investigated by manipulating the subject's opportunity for information search following the presentation of false information about his heart-rate reactions to photographs of female nudes. Consistent with the self-persuasion hypothesis proposed by Valins, the rated attractiveness of the slides was not affected by the false heart-rate feedback for those subjects who were prevented from visually searching the slides. Those subjects who had ample opportunity to view the slides rated those slides accompanied by false information of a heart-rate change as more attractive than those slides which were not paired with a change in heart rate. PMID:17477208

  1. Influence of microwaves on the beating rate of isolated rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, K.C.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that microwave exposure can decrease the beating rate of isolated rat hearts. These experiments were conducted at room temperature and with the hearts exposed to air. We observed arrhythmia frequently at room temperature, and the variation of heart beat was so large that it makes the results difficult to reproduce. Therefore, we employed a double-circulating system to provide perfusion through the coronary artery and around the outside of the heart to maintain the rat hearts at 37.7 degrees C. No arrhythmias were observed in our experiments, and the hearts were beating for at least 1 h. The effects of 16-Hz modulated 2,450-MHz pulsed microwaves (10 microseconds, 100 pps) on the beating rate of 50 isolated rat hearts were studied. Results showed no statistically significant changes of heart rate in exposed groups at SARs of 2 and 10 W/kg compared with the control group. The effect seen at 200 W/kg was shown to be similar to that resulting from heating the heart.

  2. Glutamate transporter type 3 knockout leads to decreased heart rate possibly via parasympathetic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jiao; Li, Jiejie; Li, Liaoliao; Feng, Chenzhuo; Xiong, Lize; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2013-08-01

    Parasympathetic tone is a dominant neural regulator for basal heart rate. Glutamate transporters (EAAT) via their glutamate uptake functions regulate glutamate neurotransmission in the central nervous system. We showed that EAAT type 3 (EAAT3) knockout mice had a slower heart rate than wild-type mice when they were anesthetized. We design this study to determine whether non-anesthetized EAAT3 knockout mice have a slower heart rate and, if so, what may be the mechanism for this effect. Young adult EAAT3 knockout mice had slower heart rates than those of their littermate wild-type mice no matter whether they were awake or anesthetized. This difference was abolished by atropine, a parasympatholytic drug. Carbamylcholine chloride, a parasympathomimetic drug, equally effectively reduced the heart rates of wild-type and EAAT3 knockout mice. Positive immunostaining for EAAT3 was found in the area of nuclei deriving fibers for vagus nerve. There was no positive staining for the EAATs in the sinoatrial node. These results suggest that EAAT3 knockout mice have a slower heart rate at rest. This effect may be caused by an increased parasympathetic tone possibly due to increased glutamate neurotransmission in the central nervous system. These findings indicate that regulation of heart rate, a vital sign, is one of the EAAT biological functions. PMID:23361868

  3. Minimal changes in heart rate of incubating American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) in response to human activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borneman, Tracy E.; Rose, Eli T.; Simons, Theodore R.

    2014-01-01

    An organism's heart rate is commonly used as an indicator of physiological stress due to environmental stimuli. We used heart rate to monitor the physiological response of American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) to human activity in their nesting environment. We placed artificial eggs with embedded microphones in 42 oystercatcher nests to record the heart rate of incubating oystercatchers continuously for up to 27 days. We used continuous video and audio recordings collected simultaneously at the nests to relate physiological response of birds (heart rate) to various types of human activity. We observed military and civilian aircraft, off-road vehicles, and pedestrians around nests. With the exception of high-speed, low-altitude military overflights, we found little evidence that oystercatcher heart rates were influenced by most types of human activity. The low-altitude flights were the only human activity to significantly increase average heart rates of incubating oystercatchers (12% above baseline). Although statistically significant, we do not consider the increase in heart rate during high-speed, low-altitude military overflights to be of biological significance. This noninvasive technique may be appropriate for other studies of stress in nesting birds.

  4. A novel recursive Fourier transform for nonuniform sampled signals: application to heart rate variability spectrum estimation.

    PubMed

    Holland, Alexander; Aboy, Mateo

    2009-07-01

    We present a novel method to iteratively calculate discrete Fourier transforms for discrete time signals with sample time intervals that may be widely nonuniform. The proposed recursive Fourier transform (RFT) does not require interpolation of the samples to uniform time intervals, and each iterative transform update of N frequencies has computational order N. Because of the inherent non-uniformity in the time between successive heart beats, an application particularly well suited for this transform is power spectral density (PSD) estimation for heart rate variability. We compare RFT based spectrum estimation with Lomb-Scargle Transform (LST) based estimation. PSD estimation based on the LST also does not require uniform time samples, but the LST has a computational order greater than Nlog(N). We conducted an assessment study involving the analysis of quasi-stationary signals with various levels of randomly missing heart beats. Our results indicate that the RFT leads to comparable estimation performance to the LST with significantly less computational overhead and complexity for applications requiring iterative spectrum estimations. PMID:19247700

  5. Impact of endo- and exogenous estrogens on heart rate variability in women: a review.

    PubMed

    von Holzen, J J; Capaldo, G; Wilhelm, M; Stute, P

    2016-06-01

    Measurement of heart rate variability (HRV) is an established method to assess the activity of the autonomic nervous system. The aim of this review was to examine the link between HRV, reproductive life stages and menopausal hormone therapy. A literature review was performed using the Medline database. Based on title and abstract, 45 studies were extracted out of 261 citations screened. Due to different study designs and evaluation methods, HRV indices were not directly comparable. Qualitative comparisons in between the vast majority of studies, however, demonstrated a decrease of the vagal dominance on the heart from the follicular to the luteal cycle phase, although some studies asserted no change. The intake of oral contraceptives appeared not to alter the vagal modulation of the heart. All investigations agreed on a decline of HRV towards higher sympathetic control after menopause. Different menopausal hormone therapy approaches showed a supporting impact of estrogen on HRV in most studies. A combined therapy of estrogen and progestogens revoked this benefit. Further research is needed to demonstrate how this process might be attenuated by different menopausal hormone therapies. PMID:26872538

  6. NK1‐receptor‐expressing paraventricular nucleus neurones modulate daily variation in heart rate and stress‐induced changes in heart rate variability

    PubMed Central

    Feetham, Claire H.; Barrett‐Jolley, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) is an established center of cardiovascular control, receiving projections from other nuclei of the hypothalamus such as the dorsomedial hypothalamus and the suprachiasmatic nucleus. The PVN contains a population of “pre‐autonomic neurones” which project to the intermediolateralis of the spinal cord and increase sympathetic activity, blood pressure, and heart rate. These spinally projecting neurones express a number of membrane receptors including GABA and substance P NK1 receptors. Activation of NK1‐expressing neurones increases heart rate, blood pressure, and sympathetic activity. However, their role in the pattern of overall cardiovascular control remains unknown. In this work, we use specific saporin lesion of NK1‐expressing PVN rat neurones with SSP‐SAP and telemetrically measure resting heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) parameters in response to mild psychological stress. The HRV parameter “low frequency/high frequency ratio” is often used as an indicator of sympathetic activity and is significantly increased with psychological stress in control rats (0.84 ± 0.14 to 2.02 ± 0.15; P < 0.001; n = 3). We find the stress‐induced increase in this parameter to be blunted in the SSP‐SAP‐lesioned rats (0.83 ± 0.09 to 0.93 ± 0.21; P > 0.05; n = 3). We also find a shift in daily variation of heart rate rhythm and conclude that NK1‐expressing PVN neurones are involved with coupling of the cardiovascular system to daily heart rate variation and the sympathetic response to psychological stress. PMID:25472606

  7. NK1-receptor-expressing paraventricular nucleus neurones modulate daily variation in heart rate and stress-induced changes in heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Feetham, Claire H; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2014-12-01

    The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) is an established center of cardiovascular control, receiving projections from other nuclei of the hypothalamus such as the dorsomedial hypothalamus and the suprachiasmatic nucleus. The PVN contains a population of "pre-autonomic neurones" which project to the intermediolateralis of the spinal cord and increase sympathetic activity, blood pressure, and heart rate. These spinally projecting neurones express a number of membrane receptors including GABA and substance P NK1 receptors. Activation of NK1-expressing neurones increases heart rate, blood pressure, and sympathetic activity. However, their role in the pattern of overall cardiovascular control remains unknown. In this work, we use specific saporin lesion of NK1-expressing PVN rat neurones with SSP-SAP and telemetrically measure resting heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) parameters in response to mild psychological stress. The HRV parameter "low frequency/high frequency ratio" is often used as an indicator of sympathetic activity and is significantly increased with psychological stress in control rats (0.84 ± 0.14 to 2.02 ± 0.15; P < 0.001; n = 3). We find the stress-induced increase in this parameter to be blunted in the SSP-SAP-lesioned rats (0.83 ± 0.09 to 0.93 ± 0.21; P > 0.05; n = 3). We also find a shift in daily variation of heart rate rhythm and conclude that NK1-expressing PVN neurones are involved with coupling of the cardiovascular system to daily heart rate variation and the sympathetic response to psychological stress. PMID:25472606

  8. Increased Non-Gaussianity of Heart Rate Variability Predicts Cardiac Mortality after an Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Hayano, Junichiro; Kiyono, Ken; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Watanabe, Eiichi; Stein, Phyllis K.; Watkins, Lana L.; Blumenthal, James A.; Carney, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Non-Gaussianity index (λ) is a new index of heart rate variability (HRV) that characterizes increased probability of the large heart rate deviations from its trend. A previous study has reported that increased λ is an independent mortality predictor among patients with chronic heart failure. The present study examined predictive value of λ in patients after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Among 670 post-AMI patients, we performed 24-h Holter monitoring to assess λ and other HRV predictors, including SD of normal-to-normal interval, very-low frequency power, scaling exponent α1 of detrended fluctuation analysis, deceleration capacity, and heart rate turbulence (HRT). At baseline, λ was not correlated substantially with other HRV indices (|r| < 0.4 with either indices) and was decreased in patients taking β-blockers (P = 0.04). During a median follow-up period of 25 months, 45 (6.7%) patients died (32 cardiac and 13 non-cardiac) and 39 recurrent non-fatal AMI occurred among survivors. While all of these HRV indices but λ were significant predictors of both cardiac and non-cardiac deaths, increased λ predicted exclusively cardiac death (RR [95% CI], 1.6 [1.3–2.0] per 1 SD increment, P < 0.0001). The predictive power of increased λ was significant even after adjustments for clinical risk factors, such as age, diabetes, left ventricular function, renal function, prior AMI, heart failure, and stroke, Killip class, and treatment ([95% CI], 1.4 [1.1–2.0] per 1 SD increment, P = 0.01). The prognostic power of increased λfor cardiac death was also independent of all other HRV indices and the combination of increased λ and abnormal HRT provided the best predictive model for cardiac death. Neither λ nor other HRV indices was an independent predictor of AMI recurrence. Among post-AMI patients, increased λ is associated exclusively with increased cardiac mortality risk and its predictive power is independent of clinical risk factors and of other HRV predictors. PMID:21994495

  9. Discrete Scale Invariance in the Cascade Heart Rate Variability of Healthy Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, D. C.

    Evidence of discrete scale invariance (DSI) in daytime healthy heart rate variability (HRV) is presented based on the log-periodic power law scaling of the heart beat interval increment. Our analysis suggests multiple DSI groups and a dynamic cascading process. A cascade model is presented to simulate such a property.

  10. Heart Rate and Treatment Effect in Children with Disruptive Behavior Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stadler, Christina; Grasmann, Dorte; Fegert, Jorg M.; Holtmann, Martin; Poustka, Fritz; Schmeck, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether children with disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs; hyperkinetic conduct disorder, conduct disorder, hyperkinetic disorder) characterized by low heart rate profit less from an intensive cognitive behavioral intervention aimed at reducing impulsive, oppositional and aggressive behavior problems. Method: Basal heart rate…

  11. Smart pillow for heart-rate monitoring using a fiber optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhihao; Teo, Ju Teng; Ng, Soon Huat; Yim, Huiqing

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a new method to monitor heart rate using fiber optic microbending based sensor for in-bed non-intrusive monitoring. The sensing system consists of transmitter, receiver, sensor mat, National Instrument (NI) data acquisition (DAQ) card and a computer for signal processing. The sensor mat is embedded inside a commercial pillow. The heart rate measurement system shows an accuracy of +/-2 beats, which has been successfully demonstrated in a field trial. The key technological advantage of our system is its ability to measure heart rate with no preparation and minimal compliance by the patient.

  12. Alteration of the Fetal Heart Rate Pattern Induced by the Use Of Clozapine during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Guyon, Laurie; Auffret, Marine; Coussemacq, Marion; Béné, Johana; Deruelle, Philippe; Gautier, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Patients treated with clozapine show autonomic dysregulation and cardiac repolarisation changes. As clozapine crosses the placenta, it could have an impact on the fetus heart rate. We reported a case of reduction of the fetal heart rate variability in a patient treated with clozapine during her pregnancy. This anomaly disappeared with fetal maturation and it did not jeopardize the fetal well-being. This side effect had already been described and pharmacologists and obstetricians should be aware that clozapine may be responsible for these fetal heart rate alterations. PMID:25534520

  13. Voluntary control of breathing does not alter vagal modulation of heart rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patwardhan, A. R.; Evans, J. M.; Bruce, E. N.; Eckberg, D. L.; Knapp, C. F.

    1995-01-01

    Variations in respiratory pattern influence the heart rate spectrum. It has been suggested, hence, that metronomic respiration should be used to correctly assess vagal modulation of heart rate by using spectral analysis. On the other hand, breathing to a metronome has been reported to increase heart rate spectral power in the high- or respiratory frequency region; this finding has led to the suggestion that metronomic respiration enhances vagal tone or alters vagal modulation of heart rate. To investigate whether metronomic breathing complicates the interpretation of heart rate spectra by altering vagal modulation, we recorded the electrocardiogram and respiration from eight volunteers during three breathing trials of 10 min each: 1) spontaneous breathing (mean rate of 14.4 breaths/min); 2) breathing to a metronome at the rate of 15, 18, and 21 breaths/min for 2, 6, and 2 min, respectively; and 3) breathing to a metronome at the rate of 18 breaths/min for 10 min. Data were also collected from eight volunteers who breathed spontaneously for 20 min and breathed metronomically at each subject's mean spontaneous breathing frequency for 20 min. Results from the three 10-min breathing trials showed that heart rate power in the respiratory frequency region was smaller during metronomic breathing than during spontaneous breathing. This decrease could be explained fully by the higher breathing frequencies used during trials 2 and 3 of metronomic breathing. When the subjects breathed metronomically at each subject's mean breathing frequency, the heart rate powers during metronomic breathing were similar to those during spontaneous breathing. Our results suggest that vagal modulation of heart rate is not altered and vagal tone is not enhanced during metronomic breathing.

  14. Spectral analysis of time series of events: effect of respiration on heart rate in neonates.

    PubMed

    van Drongelen, Wim; Williams, Amber L; Lasky, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    Certain types of biomedical processes such as the heart rate generator can be considered as signals that are sampled by the occurring events, i.e. QRS complexes. This sampling property generates problems for the evaluation of spectral parameters of such signals. First, the irregular occurrence of heart beats creates an unevenly sampled data set which must either be pre-processed (e.g. by using trace binning or interpolation) prior to spectral analysis, or analyzed with specialized methods (e.g. Lomb's algorithm). Second, the average occurrence of events determines the Nyquist limit for the sampled time series. Here we evaluate different types of spectral analysis of recordings of neonatal heart rate. Coupling between respiration and heart rate and the detection of heart rate itself are emphasized. We examine both standard and data adaptive frequency bands of heart rate signals generated by models of coupled oscillators and recorded data sets from neonates. We find that an important spectral artifact occurs due to a mirror effect around the Nyquist limit of half the average heart rate. Further we conclude that the presence of respiratory coupling can only be detected under low noise conditions and if a data-adaptive respiratory band is used. PMID:19075368

  15. Automated detection of perinatal hypoxia using time-frequency-based heart rate variability features.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shiying; Boashash, Boualem; Azemi, Ghasem; Lingwood, Barbara E; Colditz, Paul B

    2014-02-01

    Perinatal hypoxia is a cause of cerebral injury in foetuses and neonates. Detection of foetal hypoxia during labour based on the pattern recognition of heart rate signals suffers from high observer variability and low specificity. We describe a new automated hypoxia detection method using time-frequency analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) signals. This approach uses features extracted from the instantaneous frequency and instantaneous amplitude of HRV signal components as well as features based on matrix decomposition of the signals' time-frequency distributions using singular value decomposition and non-negative matrix factorization. The classification between hypoxia and non-hypoxia data is performed using a support vector machine classifier. The proposed method is tested on a dataset obtained from a newborn piglet model with a controlled hypoxic insult. The chosen HRV features show strong performance compared to conventional spectral features and other existing methods of hypoxia detection with a sensitivity 93.3 %, specificity 98.3 % and accuracy 95.8 %. The high predictive value of this approach to detecting hypoxia is a substantial step towards developing a more accurate and reliable hypoxia detection method for use in human foetal monitoring. PMID:24272142

  16. The Influence of a Crosshair Visual Aid on Observer Detection of Simulated Fetal Heart Rate Signals

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Rebecca A.; Scerbo, Mark W.; Anderson-Montoya, Brittany L.; Belfore, Lee A.; Abuhamad, Alfred Z.; Davis, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether a visual aid overlaid on fetal heart rate (FHR) tracings increases detection of critical signals relative to images with no visual aid. Study Design In an experimental study, 21 undergraduate students viewed 240 images of simulated FHR tracings twice, once with the visual aids and once without aids. Performance was examined for images containing three different types of FHR signals (early deceleration, late deceleration, and acceleration) and four different FHR signal-to-noise ratios corresponding to FHR variability types (absent, minimal, moderate, and marked) identified by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (2008). Performance was analyzed using repeated-measures analyses of variance. Results The presence of the visual aid significantly improved correct detections of signals overall and decreased false alarms for the marked variability condition. Conclusion The results of the study provide evidence that the presence of a visual aid was useful in helping novices identify FHR signals in simulated maternal-fetal heart rate images. Further, the visual aid was most useful for conditions in which the signal is most difficult to detect (when FHR variability is highest). PMID:26989564

  17. Estimating oxygen consumption from heart rate using adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system and analytical approaches.

    PubMed

    Kolus, Ahmet; Dubé, Philippe-Antoine; Imbeau, Daniel; Labib, Richard; Dubeau, Denise

    2014-11-01

    In new approaches based on adaptive neuro-fuzzy systems (ANFIS) and analytical method, heart rate (HR) measurements were used to estimate oxygen consumption (VO2). Thirty-five participants performed Meyer and Flenghi's step-test (eight of which performed regeneration release work), during which heart rate and oxygen consumption were measured. Two individualized models and a General ANFIS model that does not require individual calibration were developed. Results indicated the superior precision achieved with individualized ANFIS modelling (RMSE = 1.0 and 2.8 ml/kg min in laboratory and field, respectively). The analytical model outperformed the traditional linear calibration and Flex-HR methods with field data. The General ANFIS model's estimates of VO2 were not significantly different from actual field VO2 measurements (RMSE = 3.5 ml/kg min). With its ease of use and low implementation cost, the General ANFIS model shows potential to replace any of the traditional individualized methods for VO2 estimation from HR data collected in the field. PMID:24793823

  18. The effect of vibroacoustic stimulation on fetal heart rate parameters utilizing computer analysis.

    PubMed

    Barton, J R; Hiett, A K

    1997-04-01

    We examined the effect of vibroacoustic stimulation on periodic and nonperiodic fetal heart rate (FHR) parameters in fetuses not meeting Dawes-Redman criteria utilizing computerized analysis. Antepartum FHR analysis was performed using the Oxford Sonicaid System 8000 package (Oxford Sonicaid Ltd., Chichester, UK). Patients not meeting Dawes-Redman criteria for reactivity after 20 min of monitoring were recruited for the study. A 3-sec vibroacoustic stimulation (VAS) to the maternal abdomen was then performed over the fetal head. Each patient was again monitored using the System 8000. FHR parameters were compared before and after fetal VAS using the paired Student's t-test. Twenty patients met the study criteria. The average gestational age at testing was 36 weeks. Following fetal VAS, significant increases were observed in the number of fetal movements, number of accelerations, baseline FHR, overall variation, and short-term variation. No significant changes occurred in the number of decelerations. Dawes-Redman criteria were met in 16 patients after fetal VAS. In fetuses not initially meeting Dawes-Redman criteria, VAS is associated with increased long-term periodic changes in FHR, but not with changes in the number of fetal heart rate decelerations. Furthermore, by computerized analysis, VAS is also associated with increased overall and short-term FHR variability. PMID:9259933

  19. Validity of the heart rate deflection point as a predictor of lactate threshold concepts during cycling.

    PubMed

    Bourgois, Jan; Coorevits, Pascal; Danneels, Lieven; Witvrouw, Erik; Cambier, Dirk; Vrijens, Jacques

    2004-08-01

    This paper examines the validity of the heart rate deflection point (HRDP) obtained with the "updated" Conconi test. Eleven male road cyclists performed 2 progressive incremental cycling tests and a 30-minute prolonged exercise test (PET). From the data obtained, comparisons were made and correlation coefficients were calculated between HRDP, the lactate threshold (LT), and the 3 mmol.L(-1) threshold (AT3). The PET at HRDP demonstrated whether or not a steady state in blood lactate concentration (BLaSS) could be maintained. Significantly lower values for power output (p < 0.01) and heart rate (HR) (p < 0.01) were found at LT compared with HRDP. No differences were found between HRDP and AT3. Only a moderate correlation for power output between HRDP and AT3 (rs = 0.69; p < 0.05) could be observed. During the PET, only 6 out of 11 cyclists reached the target time of 30 minutes, and only 4 cyclists maintained a BLaSS. We conclude that the updated Conconi test is not a valid method for assessing LT or AT3. Therefore, this method seems not suitable to evaluate endurance performance and prescribe exercise intensities in road cycling. PMID:15320666

  20. Acute physical activity on cognitive function: a heart rate variability examination.

    PubMed

    Murray, Nicholas P; Russoniello, Carmen

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of physical activity and cognitive function (as determined by reaction time and the trail-making test) in active versus non-active participants. Participants were divided into one of four groups: active experimental, active control, non-active experimental and non-active control. All groups completed a complex cognitive task (the trail-making test) as well as a set of reaction time tasks both before and after the experimental session. The experimental groups completed a 30-min exercise session while the control groups monitored the physical activity of the experimental group. In addition to the measures of cognitive function, heart rate variability was recorded during the pre- and post-tests. There was significant cognitive performance improvement in tasks with a higher cognitive and perceptual component. Heart rate variability data indicated that a moderate level of arousal based on sympathetic nervous system activity post exercise was associated with an increase in cognitive performance. The findings are discussed in light of the inverted-U hypothesis. PMID:22543813

  1. Reducing heart rate reactivity to stress with feedback. Generalization across task and time.

    PubMed

    Larkin, K T; Zayfert, C; Abel, J L; Veltum, L G

    1992-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) reactions to two behavioral stressors (videogame and mental arithmetic) were measured in 8 experimental subjects who received biofeedback training and 8 matched control subjects during three assessment periods: pretraining, posttraining, and one-week follow-up. Experimental subjects exhibited significant reductions in HR following a training session in which they received ongoing HR feedback while playing a videogame. Control subjects, who played the same number of videogames without HR feedback, showed smaller HR reductions. During the training session, all subjects were instructed to reduce HR while maximizing game performance. In comparison to controls, experimental subjects (a) maintained lower HRs during videogame presentations after a one-week period and (b) generalized these HR reductions to the mental arithmetic challenge at follow-up. Performance on the videogame declined from posttraining to follow-up for experimental subjects but not for control subjects. No group difference in mental arithmetic performance was observed. PMID:1540120

  2. Leptin decreases heart rate associated with increased ventricular repolarization via its receptor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Chang; Huang, Jianying; Hileman, Stan; Martin, Karen H; Hull, Robert; Davis, Mary; Yu, Han-Gang

    2015-11-15

    Leptin has been proposed to modulate cardiac electrical properties via β-adrenergic receptor activation. The presence of leptin receptors and adipocytes in myocardium raised a question as to whether leptin can directly modulate cardiac electrical properties such as heart rate and QT interval via its receptor. In this work, the role of local direct actions of leptin on heart rate and ventricular repolarization was investigated. We identified the protein expression of leptin receptors at cell surface of sinus node, atrial, and ventricular myocytes isolated from rat heart. Leptin at low doses (0.1-30 μg/kg) decreased resting heart rate; at high doses (150-300 μg/kg), leptin induced a biphasic effect (decrease and then increase) on heart rate. In the presence of high-dose propranolol (30 mg/kg), high-dose leptin only reduced heart rate and sometimes caused sinus pauses and ventricular tachycardia. The leptin-induced inhibition of resting heart rate was fully reversed by leptin antagonist. Leptin also increased heart rate-corrected QT interval (QTc), and leptin antagonist did not. In isolated ventricular myocytes, leptin (0.03-0.3 μg/ml) reversibly increased the action potential duration. These results supported our hypothesis that in addition to indirect pathway via sympathetic tone, leptin can directly decrease heart rate and increase QT interval via its receptor independent of β-adrenergic receptor stimulation. During inhibition of β-adrenergic receptor activity, high concentration of leptin in myocardium can cause deep bradycardia, prolonged QT interval, and ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:26408544

  3. In-ear heart rate monitoring using a micro-optic reflective sensor.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Stefan; Hülsbusch, Markus; Starke, Dietmar; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are among the most common causes of death in western industrial nations. It is of great interest of both physician and patient to determine the cardiovascular risk factors early in order to take preventive measures. To assist the recognition of irregularities in a subject's cardiovascular system, we develop an optic 24/7 inear monitoring system (IN-MONIT). The central component is a micro-optic remission/reflection sensor (MORES), which is placed inside the auditory canal. There the pulsation of blood within the capillaries is measured by means of optical absorption. From the resulting photoplethysmographic curves (pulse plethysmogram, PPG), the heart rate, oxygen saturation (SpO2), respiratory rate and higher order moments can be derived. The optical absorption data are processed locally using a microcontroller and the results are transferred wirelessly to a personal digital assistant (PDA) or PC for sophisticated classification. This paper introduces the IN-MONIT system and two algorithms for heart rate determination from ECG or PPG data. The performance of these algorithms was tested using annotated ECG data from the "MIT-BIH Normal Sinus Rhythm Database", synchronously recorded ECG and pulse oximeter data, and data acquired by the MORES sensor. PMID:18002220

  4. Real time heart rate variability assessment from Android smartphone camera photoplethysmography: Postural and device influences.

    PubMed

    Guede-Fernandez, F; Ferrer-Mileo, V; Ramos-Castro, J; Fernandez-Chimeno, M; Garcia-Gonzalez, M A

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a smartphone based system for real-time pulse-to-pulse (PP) interval time series acquisition by frame-to-frame camera image processing. The developed smartphone application acquires image frames from built-in rear-camera at the maximum available rate (30 Hz) and the smartphone GPU has been used by Renderscript API for high performance frame-by-frame image acquisition and computing in order to obtain PPG signal and PP interval time series. The relative error of mean heart rate is negligible. In addition, measurement posture and the employed smartphone model influences on the beat-to-beat error measurement of heart rate and HRV indices have been analyzed. Then, the standard deviation of the beat-to-beat error (SDE) was 7.81 ± 3.81 ms in the worst case. Furthermore, in supine measurement posture, significant device influence on the SDE has been found and the SDE is lower with Samsung S5 than Motorola X. This study can be applied to analyze the reliability of different smartphone models for HRV assessment from real-time Android camera frames processing. PMID:26737985

  5. Music close to one's heart: heart rate variability with music, diagnostic with e-bra and smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, Shantala; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Rai, Pratyush; Mathur, Gyanesh N.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2012-04-01

    Music is a powerful elicitor of emotions. Emotions evoked by music, through autonomic correlates have been shown to cause significant modulation of parameters like heart rate and blood pressure. Consequently, Heart Rate Variability (HRV) analysis can be a powerful tool to explore evidence based therapeutic functions of music and conduct empirical studies on effect of musical emotion on heart function. However, there are limitations with current studies. HRV analysis has produced variable results to different emotions evoked via music, owing to variability in the methodology and the nature of music chosen. Therefore, a pragmatic understanding of HRV correlates of musical emotion in individuals listening to specifically chosen music whilst carrying out day to day routine activities is needed. In the present study, we aim to study HRV as a single case study, using an e-bra with nano-sensors to record heart rate in real time. The e-bra developed previously, has several salient features that make it conducive for this study- fully integrated garment, dry electrodes for easy use and unrestricted mobility. The study considers two experimental conditions:- First, HRV will be recorded when there is no music in the background and second, when music chosen by the researcher and by the subject is playing in the background.

  6. Predicting heart rate response to various metabolic rates, environments, and clothing.

    PubMed

    Moran, D; Epstein, Y; Laor, A; Vitalis, A; Shapiro, Y

    1995-01-01

    A mathematical model that describes heart rate (HR) responses to different combinations of metabolic levels, climatic conditions, and clothing ensembles was developed. The database that served to construct the model consisted of 48 variations representing a wide range of environmental conditions, clothing ensembles, and metabolic rates. The model, which correlates highly with the observed values (r = 0.88, P < 0.0001), is based on physiological and environmental parameters: HR = 57.1 + 0.6HRi + [0.07M - 19.06 - 0.011(Emax - Ereq)] log t, where HRi is initial HR in beats per minute (at rest before the exposure), t is the time of exposure in minutes, M is the metabolic rate in watts, Ereq is the required sweat evaporation for thermal equilibrium in watts, and Emax is the maximal evaporative capacity of the environment in watts. The model's validity was tested by using two independent databases representing wide ranges of conditions; the correlation between measured and predicted values was found to be highly significant (r = 0.83, P < 0.001 and r = 0.77, P < 0.001, respectively). In summary, the present study suggests a valid predictive model for HR that overcomes some of the difficulties observed in other models. PMID:7713832

  7. Influence of exercise modality on agreement between gas exchange and heart rate variability thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, F.A.; Montenegro, R.A.; Midgley, A.W.; Vasconcellos, F.; Soares, P.P.; Farinatti, P.

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the level of agreement between the gas exchange threshold (GET) and heart rate variability threshold (HRVT) during maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) using three different exercise modalities. A further aim was to establish whether there was a 1:1 relationship between the percentage heart rate reserve (%HRR) and percentage oxygen uptake reserve (%V˙O2 R) at intensities corresponding to GET and HRVT. Sixteen apparently healthy men 17 to 28 years of age performed three maximal CPETs (cycling, walking, and running). Mean heart rate and V˙O2 at GET and HRVT were 16 bpm (P<0.001) and 5.2 mL·kg-1·min-1 (P=0.001) higher in running than cycling, but no significant differences were observed between running and walking, or cycling and walking (P>0.05). There was a strong relationship between GET and HRVT, with R2 ranging from 0.69 to 0.90. A 1:1 relationship between %HRR and %V˙O2 R was not observed at GET and HRVT. The %HRR was higher during cycling (GET mean difference=7%; HRVT mean difference=11%; both P<0.001), walking (GET mean difference=13%; HRVT mean difference=13%; both P<0.001), or running (GET mean difference=11%; HRVT mean difference=10%; both P<0.001). Therefore, using HRVT to prescribe aerobic exercise intensity appears to be valid. However, to assume a 1:1 relationship between %HRR and %V˙O2 R at HRVT would probably result in overestimation of the energy expenditure during the bout of exercise. PMID:25003546

  8. Heart rate variability derived from exercise ECG in the detection of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Matti; Kähönen, Mika; Nieminen, Tuomo; Karjalainen, Pasi; Tarvainen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lehtinen, Rami; Nikus, Kjell; Kööbi, Tiit; Niemi, Mari; Niemelä, Kari; Turjanmaa, Väinö; Malmivuo, Jaakko; Viik, Jari

    2007-10-01

    The diagnostic performance of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis from exercise ECG in the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) is unknown. Bicycle exercise ECG recordings from The Finnish Cardiovascular Study (FINCAVAS) of angiography-proofed CAD patients (n = 112) and a patient group with a low likelihood of CAD (n = 114) were analyzed. HRV parameters (SDNN, RMSSD, Poincaré SD1 and SD2) were calculated from 1 min segments before exercise, during exercise and after exercise. All the parameters were in addition calculated from heart rate (HR)-corrected RR-interval segments. The ST-segment depressions in each stage were also determined. The diagnostic performance of the parameters was evaluated with the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve method. The uncorrected HRV parameters showed the best diagnostic performance in the recovery segments but the correlation with HR was also high (SDNN: 0.758/-0.64, RMSSD: 0.747/-0.60; area under the ROC/correlation coefficient). The HR correction decreased the correlation and the diagnostic performance in recovery segments (SDNN: 0.515/-0.12, RMSSD: 0.609/0.20). The diagnostic performance of ST-level at its best was higher than any of HRV parameters (ST-level: 0.795/0.36). According to the results, the HR correction decreased the diagnostic performance of the recovery phase. The HRV parameters calculated from 1 min segments of exercise test ECG were not as capable as traditional ST-segment analysis. In conclusion, the HRV analysis from exercise or recovery phase seems to be inadequate in the detection of CAD. PMID:17906387

  9. Effects of heart rate on myocardial thallium-201 uptake and clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Nordrehaug, J.E.; Danielsen, R.; Vik-Mo, H. )

    1989-12-01

    The effects of heart rate on the myocardial uptake and clearance of {sup 201}Tl were studied prospectively in seven healthy men, mean age 43 +/- 7 (s.d.) yr. Initial and delayed (3 hr) thallium images were obtained in three views after three bicycle exercise tests: to maximal, 80% and 60% of predicted maximal heart rate. The mean of three views initial myocardial {sup 201}Tl uptake was higher at maximal than at both 80% and 60% of predicted maximal heart rate, being 81% (p less than 0.01) and 60% (p less than 0.01) of maximal activity, respectively. The myocardial activity in the delayed images was identical. There was a linear relationship between heart rate and the initial myocardial activity, r = 0.86 (p less than 0.001). The mean (range) {sup 201}Tl clearance was 58% (51-65), 47% (34-56), and 34% (22-49) (all differences p less than 0.01), respectively. Concordance among the three individual views in estimating clearance was best for the highest exercise level. There was a linear relationship between heart rate and clearance, r = 0.80 (p less than 0.001). Clearance was altered by only 1.67 x 10%/heart bpm (0.024 hr/heart beat). Clearance in the liver, spleen and lungs increased at submaximal exercise levels. Thus, a linear relationship between heart rate and clearance is the result of changes in the initial exercise myocardial {sup 201}Tl activity. Submaximal exercise may reduce reproducibility of clearance estimation, and the change of myocardial clearance with heart rate seems less than previously suggested.

  10. Increased Efferent Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Defective Intrinsic Heart Rate Regulation in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Thaung, H P Aye; Baldi, J Chris; Wang, Heng-Yu; Hughes, Gillian; Cook, Rosalind F; Bussey, Carol T; Sheard, Phil W; Bahn, Andrew; Jones, Peter P; Schwenke, Daryl O; Lamberts, Regis R

    2015-08-01

    Elevated sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) coupled with dysregulated β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) signaling is postulated as a major driving force for cardiac dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes; however, cardiac SNA has never been assessed directly in diabetes. Our aim was to measure the sympathetic input to and the β-AR responsiveness of the heart in the type 2 diabetic heart. In vivo recording of SNA of the left efferent cardiac sympathetic branch of the stellate ganglion in Zucker diabetic fatty rats revealed an elevated resting cardiac SNA and doubled firing rate compared with nondiabetic rats. Ex vivo, in isolated denervated hearts, the intrinsic heart rate was markedly reduced. Contractile and relaxation responses to β-AR stimulation with dobutamine were compromised in externally paced diabetic hearts, but not in diabetic hearts allowed to regulate their own heart rate. Protein levels of left ventricular β1-AR and Gs (guanine nucleotide binding protein stimulatory) were reduced, whereas left ventricular and right atrial β2-AR and Gi (guanine nucleotide binding protein inhibitory regulatory) levels were increased. The elevated resting cardiac SNA in type 2 diabetes, combined with the reduced cardiac β-AR responsiveness, suggests that the maintenance of normal cardiovascular function requires elevated cardiac sympathetic input to compensate for changes in the intrinsic properties of the diabetic heart. PMID:25784543

  11. The modulatory effects of noradrenaline on vagal control of heart rate in the dogfish, Squalus acanthias.

    PubMed

    Agnisola, Claudio; Randall, David J; Taylor, Edwin W

    2003-01-01

    The possible interactions between inhibitory vagal control of the heart and circulating levels of catecholamines in dogfish (Squalus acanthias) were studied using an in situ preparation of the heart, which retained intact its innervation from centrally cut vagus nerves. The response to peripheral vagal stimulation typically consisted of an initial cardiac arrest, followed by an escape beat, leading to renewed beating at a mean heart rate lower than the prestimulation rate (partial recovery). Cessation of vagal stimulation led to a transient increase in heart rate, above the prestimulation rate. This whole response was completely abolished by 10(-4) M atropine (a muscarinic cholinergic antagonist). The degree of vagal inhibition was evaluated in terms of both the initial, maximal cardiac interval and the mean heart rate during partial recovery, both expressed as a percentage of the prestimulation heart rate. The mean prestimulation heart rate of this preparation (36+/-4 beats min(-1)) was not affected by noradrenaline but was significantly reduced by 10(-4) M nadolol (a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist), suggesting the existence of a resting adrenergic tone arising from endogenous catecholamines. The degree of vagal inhibition of heart rate varied with the rate of stimulation and was increased by the presence of 10(-8) M noradrenaline (the normal in vivo level in routinely active fish), while 10(-7) M noradrenaline (the in vivo level measured in disturbed or deeply hypoxic fish) reduced the cardiac response to vagal stimulation. In the presence of 10(-7) M noradrenaline, 10(-4) M nadolol further reduced the vagal response, while 10(-4) M nadolol + 10(-4) M phentolamine had no effect, indicating a complex interaction between adrenoreceptors, possibly involving presynaptic modulation of vagal inhibition. PMID:12905117

  12. Slow Heart Rate Doesn't Mean Early Death Risk: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Slow Heart Rate Doesn't Mean Early Death Risk: Study But, there's some concern for those ... calcium channel blockers had an increased risk of death, the study found. But, the study wasn't ...

  13. [A Heart Rate Variability Analysis System for Short-term Applications].

    PubMed

    Shi, Bo; Chen, Fasheng; Zhang, Genxuan; Cao, Mingna; Tsau, Young

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a heart rate variability analysis system is presented for short-term (5 min) applications, which is composed of an electrocardiogram signal acquisition unit and a heart rate variability analysis unit. The electrocardiogram signal acquisition unit adopts various digital technologies, including the low-gain amplifier, the high-resolution analog-digital converter, the real-time digital filter and wireless transmission etc. Meanwhile, it has the advantages of strong anti-interference capacity, small size, light weight, and good portability. The heart rate variability analysis unit is used to complete the R-wave detection and the analyses of time domain, frequency domain and nonlinear indexes, based on the Matlab Toolbox. The preliminary experiments demonstrated that the system was reliable, and could be applied to the heart rate variability analysis at resting, motion states etc. PMID:26710447

  14. Development and validation of an improved smartphone heart rate acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karapetyan, G.; Barseghyan, R.; Sarukhanyan, H.; Agaian, S.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we propose a robust system for touchless heart rate (HR) acquisition on mobile devices. The application allows monitor heart rate signal during usual mobile device usage such as video watching, games playing, article reading etc. The system is based on algorithm of acquiring heart rate via recording of skin color variations with built-in cameras of mobile device. The signal is acquired from different ROIs of human face, which make it more clear and the amplification of the signal improve the robustness in low lightening conditions. The effectiveness and robustness of the developed system has been demonstrated under different distances from camera source and illumination conditions. The experiments have been done with different mobile devices HRs were collected from 10 subjects, ages 22 to 65, by using the 3 devices. Moreover, we compared the developed method with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved sensors and related commercial applications of remote heart rate measurements on mobile devices.

  15. Ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate during shuttle flight, entry and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W.; Moore, T. P.; Uri, J.

    1993-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressures (BP) and heart rates (HR) were recorded on a series of early Shuttle flights during preflight and pre-entry, entry, landing and egress. There were no significant differences between flight and preflight values during routine activity. Systolic blood pressure was slightly elevated in the deorbit period and systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rates were all elevated with onset of gravitoinertial loads and remained so through egress. Two of seven subjects had orthostatic problems in egress but their data did not show significant differences from others except in heart rate. Comparison of this data to that from recent studies show even larger increase in HR/BP values during current deorbit and entry phases which is consistent with increased heat and weight loads imposed by added survival gear. Both value and limitations of ambulatory heart rate/blood pressure data in this situation are demonstrated.

  16. Facial electromyogram and heart-rate correlates of a paradoxical attitude change to antinuclear war information

    SciTech Connect

    Vigne, J.J.; Dale, J.A.; Klions, H.L.

    1988-12-01

    The effects of film images versus film descriptions of the effects of nuclear explosions (versus a no-film control) on corrugator muscle tension, heart rate, attitude and mood were investigated. The last 5 min. of the images were associated with more corrugator tension for that condition when compared to the last 5 min. of the description condition. The groups did not differ in heart rate but women in both groups showed an increase in heart rate whereas men in both groups showed a decrease in heart rate. Film groups did not differ in their significant increases in anxiety, hostility, and depression on the Multiple Adjective Affect Checklist. On the pretest there was no significant correlation between scores on Betts' Questionnaire Upon Mental Imagery and scores on Goldenring and Doctor's index of concern for nuclear war. The vivid-image film group showed a decrease in concern for nuclear war when compared to the descriptive film group and the no-film control.

  17. PARTICULATE MATTER AND HEART RATE VARIABILITY AMONG ELDERLY RETIREES: THE BALTIMORE 1998 PM STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigates the reported relationship between ambient fine particle pollution and impaired cardiac autonomic control in the elderly. Heart rate variability (HRV) among 56 elderly (mean age 82) nonsmoking residents of a retirement center in Baltimore County, Maryland,...

  18. Aerobic Requirements for and Heart Rate Responses to Variations in Rope Jumping Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solis, Ken; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Highly skilled ropejumpers can maintain their exercise intensity by varying their jumping technique. Research on heart rate responses and aerobic requirements of different jumping techniques is discussed. Methodology and data are reported. (Author/JL)

  19. Screening of obstructive sleep apnoea: heart rate spectral analysis of nocturnal pulse oximetric recording.

    PubMed

    Zamarrón, C; Romero, P V; Gude, F; Amaro, A; Rodriguez, J R

    2001-09-01

    Using heart rate spectral analysis of nocturnal pulse oximetry, we prospectively evaluated the utility of this methodology in patients clinically suspected of having obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). A hundred and ninety-seven outpatients referred with symptoms compatible with the diagnosis of OSA were studied. All participants had nocturnal pulse oximetry performed simultaneously with conventional polysomnography. Power density of heart rate obtained by nocturnal pulse oximetry was analysed using fast Fourier transformation of a Hamming-windowed signal. Recording test results were classified as abnormal (suspicion of OSA) in the presence of a peak in the periodogram between period boundaries 30-70 sec. A normal test result was defined as the absence of the 30-70 sec peak in the periodogram. The total area of the periodogram (S(TOT)), the area enclosed in the periodogram between the period boundaries 30-70 sec (S(30-70)), the area enclosed in the period boundaries 30-70 sec with respect to the total area of the periodogram (S) and the peak amplitude 30-70 sec (PA) were measured. The presence of a peak in the periodogram has a sensitivity of 81.3%, a specificity of 91.5% a positive predictive value of 89.1% and a negative predictive value of 85.1% for OSA diagnosis. The OSA patients were found to have higher values of S(TOT), S(30-70), S and PA than the non OSA patients. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve was constructed at different thresholds of S(TOT), S(30-70) S and PA. For a PA threshold of 10(%)2, heart rate spectra analysis sensitivity for OSA was 58% and specificity was 92%. Furthermore, the positive and negative predictive values for diagnosis of OSA were 87 and 72% respectively. Apnoea hypopnea index (AHI) correlated significantly with S(TOT) (r=0.44; P<0.001), S(30-70) (r=0.59: P<0.001), S (r=0.58; P<0.001) and PA (r=0.58; P<0.001). According to our results, heart rate spectral analys s obtained by nocturnal pulse oximetry and identification of peak in the periodogram between period boundaries 30-70 sec could be useful as a diagnostic technique for OSA patients. PMID:11575898

  20. Using complexity metrics with R-R intervals and BPM heart rate measures

    PubMed Central

    Wallot, Sebastian; Fusaroli, Riccardo; Tylén, Kristian; Jegindø, Else-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Lately, growing attention in the health sciences has been paid to the dynamics of heart rate as indicator of impending failures and for prognoses. Likewise, in social and cognitive sciences, heart rate is increasingly employed as a measure of arousal, emotional engagement and as a marker of interpersonal coordination. However, there is no consensus about which measurements and analytical tools are most appropriate in mapping the temporal dynamics of heart rate and quite different metrics are reported in the literature. As complexity metrics of heart rate variability depend critically on variability of the data, different choices regarding the kind of measures can have a substantial impact on the results. In this article we compare linear and non-linear statistics on two prominent types of heart beat data, beat-to-beat intervals (R-R interval) and beats-per-min (BPM). As a proof-of-concept, we employ a simple rest-exercise-rest task and show that non-linear statistics—fractal (DFA) and recurrence (RQA) analyses—reveal information about heart beat activity above and beyond the simple level of heart rate. Non-linear statistics unveil sustained post-exercise effects on heart rate dynamics, but their power to do so critically depends on the type data that is employed: While R-R intervals are very susceptible to non-linear analyses, the success of non-linear methods for BPM data critically depends on their construction. Generally, “oversampled” BPM time-series can be recommended as they retain most of the information about non-linear aspects of heart beat dynamics. PMID:23964244

  1. Treadmill performance and cardiac function in selected patients with coronary heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    McKirnan, M.D.; Sullivan, M.; Jensen, D.; Froelicher, V.F.

    1984-02-01

    To investigate the cardiac determinants of treadmill performance in patients able to exercise to volitional fatigue, 88 patients with coronary heart disease free of angina pectoris were tested. The exercise tests included supine bicycle radionuclide ventriculography, thallium scintigraphy and treadmill testing with expired gas analysis. The number of abnormal Q wave locations, ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, cardiac output, exercise-induced ST segment depression and thallium scar and ischemia scores were the cardiac variables considered. Rest and exercise ejection fractions were highly correlated to thallium scar score (r . -0.72 to -0.75, p less than 0.001), but not to maximal oxygen consumption (r . 0.19 to 0.25, p less than 0.05). Fifty-five percent of the variability in predicting treadmill time or estimated maximal oxygen consumption was explained by treadmill test-induced change in heart rate (39%), thallium ischemia score (12%) and cardiac output at rest (4%). The change in heart rate induced by the treadmill test explained only 27% of the variability in measured maximal oxygen consumption. Myocardial damage predicted ejection fraction at rest and the ability to increase heart rate with treadmill exercise appeared as an essential component of exercise capacity. Exercise capacity was only minimally affected by asymptomatic ischemia and was relatively independent of ventricular function.

  2. Heart Disease Death Rates in Low Versus High Land Elevation Counties in the U.S

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on land elevation and cancer death rates in the U.S. revealed lower cancer death rates in higher elevations. The present study further tests the possible effect of land elevation on a diffident health outcome, namely, heart disease death rates. U.S. counties not overlapping in their land elevations according to their lowest and highest elevation points were identified. Using an ecological design, heart disease death rates for two races (black and white) corresponding to lower elevation counties were compared to heart disease death rates in higher land elevation counties using the two-sample t-test and effect size statistics. Death rates in higher land elevation counties for both races were lower compared to the death rates in lower land elevation counties (p < 0.001) with large effect sizes (of > 0.70). Since this is an observational study, no causal inference is claimed, and further research is indicated to verify these findings. PMID:26674102

  3. Association between the Rating Perceived Exertion, Heart Rate and Blood Lactate in Successive Judo Fights (Randori)

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Braulio H.M.; Massuça, Luis M.; Andreato, Leonardo V.; Marinho, Bruno F.; Miarka, Bianca; Monteiro, Luis; Franchini, Emerson

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to investigate the association between the rating of perceived exertion (RPE), heart rate (HR) and the blood lactate concentration ([La]) in successive judo fight simulations (randori). Methods Ten athletes participated in the study (age: 25.6±2.1 years; stature: 1.75±0.07 m; body mass: 75.6±14.9kg; %BF: 11.5±7.8%; practice: 14.5±6.2 years) and completed 4 judo fight simulations (T1 to T4) with duration of 5 min separated by 5 min passive recovery periods. Before each randori, [La] and HR were collected, and after each randori, the same measures and the RPE (CR-10 scale) were collected. Results Significant correlations were observed between: (1) CR-10 and HR (T2: r =0.70; T3: r =0.64; both, P<0.05); (2) ΔCR-10 and Δ[La] (T1-T2: r = .71, P< 0.05; T2-T3: r =0.92, P<0.01; T3-T4: r =0.73, P<0.05). Moreover, significant differences were noted in the behavior of the HR between the 2nd (T2) and 3rd (T3) judo fight simulations (P<0.05). Conclusion The use of CR-10 in the evaluation process, as well as in deciding the load of training in judo, should be done with caution. PMID:23802054

  4. Heart Rate Variability and the Efficacy of Biofeedback in Heroin Users with Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Lin, I-Mei; Ko, Jiun-Min; Fan, Sheng-Yu; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Objective Low heart rate variability (HRV) has been confirmed in heroin users, but the effects of heart-rate-variability–biofeedback in heroin users remain unknown. This study examined (1) correlations between depression and HRV indices; (2) group differences in HRV indices among a heroin-user group, a group with major depressive disorder but no heroin use, and healthy controls; and (3) the effects of heart-rate-variability–biofeedback on depressive symptoms, HRV indices, and respiratory rates within the heroin group. Methods All participants completed a depression questionnaire and underwent electrocardiogram measurements, and group differences in baseline HRV indices were examined. The heroin group underwent electrocardiogram and respiration rate measurements at baseline, during a depressive condition, and during a happiness condition, before and after which they took part in the heart-rate-variability–biofeedback program. The effects of heart-rate-variability–biofeedback on depressive symptoms, HRV indices, and respiration rates were examined. Results There was a negative correlation between depression and high frequency of HRV, and a positive correlation between depression and low frequency to high frequency ratio of HRV. The heroin group had a lower overall and high frequency of HRV, and a higher low frequency/high frequency ratio than healthy controls. The heart-rate-variability–biofeedback intervention increased HRV indices and decreased respiratory rates from pre-intervention to post-intervention. Conclusion Reduced parasympathetic and increased sympathetic activations were found in heroin users. Heart-rate-variability–biofeedback was an effective non-pharmacological intervention to restore autonomic balance. PMID:27121428

  5. A Heart and A Mind: Self-distancing Facilitates the Association Between Heart Rate Variability, and Wise Reasoning

    PubMed Central

    Grossmann, Igor; Sahdra, Baljinder K.; Ciarrochi, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac vagal tone (indexed via resting heart rate variability [HRV]) has been previously associated with superior executive functioning. Is HRV related to wiser reasoning and less biased judgments? Here we hypothesize that this will be the case when adopting a self-distanced (as opposed to a self-immersed) perspective, with self-distancing enabling individuals with higher HRV to overcome bias-promoting egocentric impulses and to reason wisely. However, higher HRV may not be associated with greater wisdom when adopting a self-immersed perspective. Participants were randomly assigned to reflect on societal issues from a self-distanced- or self-immersed perspective, with responses coded for reasoning quality. In a separate task, participants read about and evaluated a person performing morally ambiguous actions, with responses coded for dispositional vs. situational attributions. We simultaneously assessed resting cardiac recordings, obtaining six HRV indicators. As hypothesized, in the self-distanced condition, each HRV indicator was positively related to prevalence of wisdom-related reasoning (e.g., prevalence of recognition of limits of one’s knowledge, recognition that the world is in flux/change, consideration of others’ opinions and search for an integration of these opinions) and to balanced vs. biased attributions (recognition of situational and dispositional factors vs. focus on dispositional factors alone). In contrast, there was no relationship between these variables in the self-immersed condition. We discuss implications for research on psychophysiology, cognition, and wisdom. PMID:27092066

  6. Neighborhood Blight, Stress, and Health: A Walking Trial of Urban Greening and Ambulatory Heart Rate

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Michelle C.; Cheney, Rose A.; Branas, Charles C.

    2015-01-01

    We measured dynamic stress responses using ambulatory heart rate monitoring as participants in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania walked past vacant lots before and after a greening remediation treatment of randomly selected lots. Being in view of a greened vacant lot decreased heart rate significantly more than did being in view of a nongreened vacant lot or not in view of any vacant lot. Remediating neighborhood blight may reduce stress and improve health. PMID:25790382

  7. Resting heart rate and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in the general population: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongfeng; Shen, Xiaoli; Qi, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Data on resting heart rate and risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality are inconsistent; the magnitude of associations between resting heart rate and risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality varies across studies. We performed a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to quantitatively evaluate the associations in the general population. Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase and MEDLINE from inception to Jan. 1, 2015. We used a random-effects model to combine study-specific relative risks and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We used restricted cubic spline functions to assess the dose–response relation. Results: A total of 46 studies were included in the meta-analysis, involving 1 246 203 patients and 78 349 deaths for all-cause mortality, and 848 320 patients and 25 800 deaths for cardiovascular mortality. The relative risk with 10 beats/min increment of resting heart rate was 1.09 (95% CI 1.07–1.12) for all-cause mortality and 1.08 (95% CI 1.06–1.10) for cardiovascular mortality. Compared with the lowest category, patients with a resting heart rate of 60–80 beats/min had a relative risk of 1.12 (95% CI 1.07–1.17) for all-cause mortality and 1.08 (95% CI 0.99–1.17) for cardiovascular mortality, and those with a resting heart rate of greater than 80 beats/min had a relative risk of 1.45 (95% CI 1.34–1.57) for all-cause mortality and 1.33 (95% CI 1.19–1.47) for cardiovascular mortality. Overall, the results did not differ after adjustment for traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Compared with 45 beats/min, the risk of all-cause mortality increased significantly with increasing resting heart rate in a linear relation, but a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular mortality was observed at 90 beats/min. Substantial heterogeneity and publication bias were detected. Interpretation: Higher resting heart rate was independently associated with increased risks of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. This indicates that resting heart rate is a predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in the general population. PMID:26598376

  8. Intrapartum fetal heart rate classification from trajectory in Sparse SVM feature space.

    PubMed

    Spilka, J; Frecon, J; Leonarduzzi, R; Pustelnik, N; Abry, P; Doret, M

    2015-08-01

    Intrapartum fetal heart rate (FHR) constitutes a prominent source of information for the assessment of fetal reactions to stress events during delivery. Yet, early detection of fetal acidosis remains a challenging signal processing task. The originality of the present contribution are three-fold: multiscale representations and wavelet leader based multifractal analysis are used to quantify FHR variability ; Supervised classification is achieved by means of Sparse-SVM that aim jointly to achieve optimal detection performance and to select relevant features in a multivariate setting ; Trajectories in the feature space accounting for the evolution along time of features while labor progresses are involved in the construction of indices quantifying fetal health. The classification performance permitted by this combination of tools are quantified on a intrapartum FHR large database (≃ 1250 subjects) collected at a French academic public hospital. PMID:26736761

  9. Ventilatory and heart rate responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, M; Miyamoto, K; Suzuki, A; Yamamoto, H; Tsuji, M; Kishi, F; Kawakami, Y

    1989-01-01

    The ventilatory response to isocapnic progressive hypoxia and hyperoxic progressive hypercapnia in 24 diabetic patients were compared with those of sex and age matched normal control subjects. The heart rate response to hypoxia was also measured in both groups. In diabetic patients the ventilatory and heart rate responses to hypoxia were significantly lower than those in the control group (0.10 v 0.24 l/min/% fall/m2 and 0.5 l v 1.27 beats/min/% fall respectively). The ventilatory response to hypercapnia was significantly higher (1.09 v 0.76 l/min/mm Hg/m2) in the diabetic patients. There was a significant correlation between the hypoxic ventilatory response and the heart rate response in diabetic patients (r = 0.56), but not in the control group (r = 0.28). In addition, both the ventilatory and the heart rate responses to hypoxia in diabetic patients had weak but significant correlations with the heart rate variation during deep breathing. It is concluded that the ventilatory and heart rate responses to hypoxia in diabetic patients are impaired, whereas the ventilatory response to hypercapnia is well preserved. PMID:2763226

  10. Relationship between self-reported activity levels and actual heart rates in teenagers

    SciTech Connect

    Terblanche, A.P.S.; Ozkaynak, H.; Spengler, J.D.; Butler, D.A. )

    1991-08-01

    A study was designed to explore the relationship between self-reported activity levels and actual heart rate (HR) as measured by a portable heart rate monitor. Twenty-two teenagers (8 boys, 14 girls, median age of 16) from Watertown High School, Massachusetts participated in this pilot study which involved continuous monitoring of HR during normal daily activities and simultaneous completion of a time-activity diary. There were 31 successful monitoring sessions ranging from 1.9 to 17 hours with a median monitoring time of 12.6 hours. Four unsuccessful monitoring sessions were experienced due to equipment failure. Apart from participant cooperation, the single most important factor affecting the feasibility of continuous heart rate monitoring was found to be equipment design. Th overall average heart rate observed was 88.4 bpm (SD = 24.3). An individual's correlation coefficient for perceived activity level (documented in half-hour intervals) and heart rate (averaged over the half-hour intervals) varied from 0.24 to 0.89. More than half of the correlation coefficients were below 0.40. There was a significant difference between average heart rate for time spent indoors (90 bpm) versus outdoors (103 bpm) even after correcting for sleeping time. It is concluded that continuous HR monitoring with simultaneous completion of a time/activity dairy is feasible and is a promising source of information for studies on exposure to air pollutants.

  11. Genetic mapping of a new heart rate QTL on chromosome 8 of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Gustavo JJ; Pereira, Alexandre C; Krieger, Eduardo M; Krieger, José E

    2007-01-01

    Background Tachycardia is commonly observed in hypertensive patients, predominantly mediated by regulatory mechanisms integrated within the autonomic nervous system. The genetic loci and genes associated with increased heart rate in hypertension, however, have not yet been identified. Methods An F2 intercross of Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR) × Brown Norway (BN) linkage analysis of quantitative trait loci mapping was utilized to identify candidate genes associated with an increased heart rate in arterial hypertension. Results Basal heart rate in SHR was higher compared to that of normotensive BN rats (365 ± 3 vs. 314 ± 6 bpm, p < 0.05 for SHR and BN, respectively). A total genome scan identified one quantitative trait locus in a 6.78 cM interval on rat chromosome 8 (8q22–q24) that was responsible for elevated heart rate. This interval contained 241 genes, of which 65 are known genes. Conclusion Our data suggest that an influential genetic region located on the rat chromosome 8 contributes to the regulation of heart rate. Candidate genes that have previously been associated with tachycardia and/or hypertension were found within this QTL, strengthening our hypothesis that these genes are, potentially, associated with the increase in heart rate in a hypertension rat model. PMID:17419875

  12. The effect of competition on heart rate during kart driving: A field study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Both the act of competing, which can create a kind of mental stress, and participation in motor sports, which induces physical stress from intense g-forces, are known to increase heart rate dramatically. However, little is known about the specific effect of competition on heart rate during motor sports, particularly during four-wheel car driving. The goal of this preliminary study, therefore, was to investigate whether competition increases heart rate under such situations. Findings The participants drove an entry-level formula kart during two competitive races and during solo driving against the clock while heart rate and g-forces were measured. Analyses showed that heart rate values during the races (168.8 beats/min) were significantly higher than those during solo driving (140.9 beats/min) and rest (75.1 beats/min). Conclusions The results of this preliminary study indicate that competition heightens heart rate during four-wheel car driving. Kart drivers should be concerned about maintaining good health and developing physical strength. PMID:21906298

  13. The nonstress test. Criteria for the duration of fetal heart rate acceleration.

    PubMed

    Willis, D C; Blanco, J D; Hamblen, K A; Stovall, D W

    1990-09-01

    Although the most common definition of a reactive nonstress test is an acceleration in the fetal heart rate of 15 beats per minute (bpm) for 15 seconds, some investigators require that the fetal heart rate acceleration be maintained at 15 bpm above the baseline for the entire 15 seconds (long criterion), and others require simply that the acceleration be 15 seconds from the beginning until the return to the baseline (short criterion). In 1,241 nonstress tests (NSTs) there was a statistically significant difference in the number of reactive tests between the short and long criteria (1,108 [89%] vs. 985 [79%], P less than .001). This difference in percentage of reactivity may be important when comparing studies performed by various investigators. In comparing cesarean section deliveries for fetal distress we were unable to find a difference in the ability to predict a poor outcome between use of the short and long criteria. However, a type II error is possible since the number of poor outcomes was small. We now use the short criterion for NST interpretation. PMID:2231567

  14. Toward the improvement in fetal monitoring during labor with the inclusion of maternal heart rate analysis.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Hernâni; Pinto, Paula; Silva, Manuela; Ayres-de-Campos, Diogo; Bernardes, João

    2016-04-01

    Fetal heart rate (FHR) monitoring is used routinely in labor, but conventional methods have a limited capacity to detect fetal hypoxia/acidosis. An exploratory study was performed on the simultaneous assessment of maternal heart rate (MHR) and FHR variability, to evaluate their evolution during labor and their capacity to detect newborn acidemia. MHR and FHR were simultaneously recorded in 51 singleton term pregnancies during the last two hours of labor and compared with newborn umbilical artery blood (UAB) pH. Linear/nonlinear indices were computed separately for MHR and FHR. Interaction between MHR and FHR was quantified through the same indices on FHR-MHR and through their correlation and cross-entropy. Univariate and bivariate statistical analysis included nonparametric confidence intervals and statistical tests, receiver operating characteristic curves and linear discriminant analysis. Progression of labor was associated with a significant increase in most MHR and FHR linear indices, whereas entropy indices decreased. FHR alone and in combination with MHR as FHR-MHR evidenced the highest auROC values for prediction of fetal acidemia, with 0.76 and 0.88 for the UAB pH thresholds 7.20 and 7.15, respectively. The inclusion of MHR on bivariate analysis achieved sensitivity and specificity values of nearly 100 and 89.1 %, respectively. These results suggest that simultaneous analysis of MHR and FHR may improve the identification of fetal acidemia compared with FHR alone, namely during the last hour of labor. PMID:26219610

  15. High-resolution motion-compensated imaging photoplethysmography for remote heart rate monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Audrey; Wang, Xiao Yu; Amelard, Robert; Scharfenberger, Christian; Leong, Joanne; Kulinski, Jan; Wong, Alexander; Clausi, David A.

    2015-03-01

    We present a novel non-contact photoplethysmographic (PPG) imaging system based on high-resolution video recordings of ambient reflectance of human bodies that compensates for body motion and takes advantage of skin erythema fluctuations to improve measurement reliability for the purpose of remote heart rate monitoring. A single measurement location for recording the ambient reflectance is automatically identified on an individual, and the motion for the location is determined over time via measurement location tracking. Based on the determined motion information motion-compensated reflectance measurements at different wavelengths for the measurement location can be acquired, thus providing more reliable measurements for the same location on the human over time. The reflectance measurement is used to determine skin erythema fluctuations over time, resulting in the capture of a PPG signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio. To test the efficacy of the proposed system, a set of experiments involving human motion in a front-facing position were performed under natural ambient light. The experimental results demonstrated that skin erythema fluctuations can achieve noticeably improved average accuracy in heart rate measurement when compared to previously proposed non-contact PPG imaging systems.

  16. Heart rate variability to assess ventilatory threshold in ski-mountaineering.

    PubMed

    Cassirame, Johan; Tordi, Nicolas; Fabre, Nicolas; Duc, Sébastien; Durand, Fabienne; Mourot, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The capacity to predict the heart rate (HR) and speed at the first (VT1) and second (VT2) ventilatory thresholds was evaluated during an incremental ski-mountaineering test using heart rate variability (HRV). Nine skiers performed a field test to exhaustion on an alpine skiing track. VT1 and VT2 were individually determined by visual analysis from gas exchanges (VT1V and VT2V) and time-varying spectral HRV analysis (VT1fH, VT2fH and VT2H). VT1 could not be determined with the HRV methods used. On the contrary, the VT2 was determined in all skiers. No significant difference between HR and speed at VT2H and VT2V was observed (174.3 ± 5.6 vs. 174.3 ± 5.3 bpm, and 6.3 ± 0.9 and 6.3 ± 0.9 km h(-1), respectively). Strong correlations were obtained for HR (r = 0.91) and speed (r = 0.92) at VT2H and VT2V with small limits of agreement (±3.6 bpm for HR). Our results indicated that HRV enables determination of HR and speed at VT2 during a specific ski-mountaineering incremental test. These findings provide practical applications for skiers in order to evaluate and control specific training loads, at least when referring to VT2. PMID:25228474

  17. Study of Heart Rate Variability in Bipolar Disorder: Linear and Non-Linear Parameters during Sleep.

    PubMed

    Migliorini, Matteo; Mendez, Martin O; Bianchi, Anna M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study is to define physiological parameters and vital signs that may be related to the mood and mental status in patients affected by bipolar disorder. In particular we explored the autonomic nervous system through the analysis of the heart rate variability. Many different parameters, in the time and in the frequency domain, linear and non-linear were evaluated during the sleep in a group of normal subject and in one patient in four different conditions. The recording of the signals was performed through a wearable sensorized T-shirt. Heart rate variability (HRV) signal and movement analysis allowed also obtaining sleep staging and the estimation of REM sleep percentage over the total sleep time. A group of eight normal females constituted the control group, on which normality ranges were estimated. The pathologic subject was recorded during four different nights, at time intervals of at least 1?week, and during different phases of the disturbance. Some of the examined parameters (MEANNN, SDNN, RMSSD) confirmed reduced HRV in depression and bipolar disorder. REM sleep percentage was found to be increased. Lempel-Ziv complexity and sample entropy, on the other hand, seem to correlate with the depression level. Even if the number of examined subjects is still small, and the results need further validation, the proposed methodology and the calculated parameters seem promising tools for the monitoring of mood changes in psychiatric disorders. PMID:22291638

  18. Heart rate variability during carbachol-induced REM sleep and cataplexy.

    PubMed

    Torterolo, Pablo; Castro-Zaballa, Santiago; Cavelli, Matías; Velasquez, Noelia; Brando, Victoria; Falconi, Atilio; Chase, Michael H; Migliaro, Eduardo R

    2015-09-15

    The nucleus pontis oralis (NPO) exerts an executive control over REM sleep. Cholinergic input to the NPO is critical for REM sleep generation. In the cat, a single microinjection of carbachol (a cholinergic agonist) into the NPO produces either REM sleep (REMc) or wakefulness with muscle atonia (cataplexy, CA). In order to study the central control of the heart rate variability (HRV) during sleep, we conducted polysomnographic and electrocardiogram recordings from chronically prepared cats during REMc, CA as well as during sleep and wakefulness. Subsequently, we performed statistical and spectral analyses of the HRV. The heart rate was greater during CA compared to REMc, NREM or REM sleep. Spectral analysis revealed that the low frequency band (LF) power was significantly higher during REM sleep in comparison to REMc and CA. Furthermore, we found that during CA there was a decrease in coupling between the RR intervals plot (tachogram) and respiratory activity. In contrast, compared to natural behavioral states, during REMc and CA there were no significant differences in the HRV based upon the standard deviation of normal RR intervals (SDNN) and the mean squared difference of successive intervals (rMSSD). In conclusion, there were differences in the HRV during naturally-occurring REM sleep compared to REMc. In addition, in spite of the same muscle atonia, the HRV was different during REMc and CA. Therefore, the neuronal network that controls the HRV during REM sleep can be dissociated from the one that generates the muscle atonia during this state. PMID:25997581

  19. Fetal heart rate extraction from abdominal electrocardiograms through multivariate empirical mode decomposition.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Praveen; Sharma, K K; Joshi, S D

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of fetal heart rate (FHR) and fetal heart rate variability (fHRV) reveals important information about fetal well-being, specifically in high risk pregnancies. Abdominal electrocardiogram (abdECG) recording is a non-invasive method to capture fetal electrocardiograms. In this paper, we propose a methodology to extract FHR (fetal RR time series) from the abdECG recordings using the recently introduced multivariate empirical mode decomposition (MEMD) technique. MEMD breaks a signal into a finite set of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs). First, elimination of the noisier abdECG channels, based on comparison of similar indexed IMFs that were obtained through the MEMD technique, is conducted. Thereafter, denoising of the remaining abdECG channels is performed by eliminating certain similar indexed IMFs. The unwanted mother QRS complexes are removed from these noise-free abdECG channels, and the candidate fetal R-peaks are detected through a wavelet based approach. The proposed methodology is validated using an open source real-life clinical database. The proposed technique resulted in a high value (0.983) of cross correlation between the detected and true FHR signals. PMID:26649764

  20. VO2 Reserve vs. Heart Rate Reserve During Moderate Intensity Treadmill Exercise

    PubMed Central

    SOLHEIM, TANNER J.; KELLER, BRAD G.; FOUNTAINE, CHARLES J.

    2014-01-01

    VO2 and heart rate (HR) are widely used when determining appropriate training intensities for clinical, healthy, and athletic populations. It has been shown that if the % reserve (%R) is used, rather than % of max, HR and VO2 can be used interchangeably to accurately prescribe exercise intensities. Thus, heart rate reserve (HRR) can be prescribed if VO2 reserve (VO2R) is known. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare VO2 R and HRR during moderate intensity exercise (50%R). Physically active college students performed a maximal treadmill test to exhaustion. During which VO2 and HR were monitored to determine max values. Upon completion of the maximal test, calculations were made to determine the % grade expected to yield approximately 50% of the subjects VO2R. Subjects then returned to complete the submaximal test (50%R) at least two days later. The %VO2R and %HRR were calculated and compared to the predicted value as well as to each other. Statistical analysis revealed that VO2 at 50%R was significantly greater than the actual VO2 achieved, p < .001. Conversely, the mean predicted HR at 50%R was significantly less than the actual HR achieved, p < .001. In conclusion, this study indicated that VO2 could be more accurately predicted than HR during moderate intensity exercise. The weak correlation between VO2R and HRR indicates that caution should be used when relying on a HR to determine VO2.

  1. Large deviations estimates for the multiscale analysis of heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiseau, Patrick; Médigue, Claire; Gonçalves, Paulo; Attia, Najmeddine; Seuret, Stéphane; Cottin, François; Chemla, Denis; Sorine, Michel; Barral, Julien

    2012-11-01

    In the realm of multiscale signal analysis, multifractal analysis provides a natural and rich framework to measure the roughness of a time series. As such, it has drawn special attention of both mathematicians and practitioners, and led them to characterize relevant physiological factors impacting the heart rate variability. Notwithstanding these considerable progresses, multifractal analysis almost exclusively developed around the concept of Legendre singularity spectrum, for which efficient and elaborate estimators exist, but which are structurally blind to subtle features like non-concavity or, to a certain extent, non scaling of the distributions. Large deviations theory allows bypassing these limitations but it is only very recently that performing estimators were proposed to reliably compute the corresponding large deviations singularity spectrum. In this article, we illustrate the relevance of this approach, on both theoretical objects and on human heart rate signals from the Physionet public database. As conjectured, we verify that large deviations principles reveal significant information that otherwise remains hidden with classical approaches, and which can be reminiscent of some physiological characteristics. In particular we quantify the presence/absence of scale invariance of RR signals.

  2. Heart rate and blood pressure responses to tobacco smoking among African-American adolescents.

    PubMed Central

    Moolchan, Eric T.; Hudson, Darrell L.; Schroeder, Jennifer R.; Sehnert, Shelley S.

    2004-01-01

    Ethnic differences in both physiological response to and health consequences of tobacco smoking-some of which have been attributed to ethnic preferences for menthol cigarettes-have been described in the literature. We compared acute physiological responses to smoking in African-American and European-American adolescent menthol cigarette smokers seeking smoking cessation treatment. One-hundred- twenty-eight adolescents (32% African-American, 71% female; mean age 15.16 +/- 1.32 years, mean Fagerström Test of Nicotine Dependence (FTND) score 6.73 +/- 1.53, cigarettes per day (CPD) 16.9 +/- 2.64) participated in an experimental session during which they smoked one menthol cigarette of their usual brand. Blood pressure, heart rate, and exhaled carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations were measured before and after smoking; mean puff volume (mL), puff duration (sec) and maximal puff velocity (mL/sec) during smoking were also determined. Two sample t-tests were performed to assess ethnic differences in smoking topography; analysis of covariance was used to determine whether heart rate and blood pressure after smoking one menthol cigarette varied by ethnicity, after controlling for baseline physiological measures. No significant ethnic differences were observed in either smoking topography or acute cardiovascular response to smoking. These preliminary findings warrant extension to a broader group of nontreatment-seeking adolescent smokers of both ethnicities. PMID:15233486

  3. Aerobic Exercise during Pregnancy and Presence of Fetal-Maternal Heart Rate Synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Van Leeuwen, Peter; Gustafson, Kathleen M.; Cysarz, Dirk; Geue, Daniel; May, Linda E.; Grönemeyer, Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that short-term direct interaction between maternal and fetal heart rates may take place and that this interaction is affected by the rate of maternal respiration. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of maternal aerobic exercise during pregnancy on the occurrence of fetal-maternal heart rate synchronization. Methods In 40 pregnant women at the 36th week of gestation, 21 of whom exercised regularly, we acquired 18 min. RR interval time series obtained simultaneously in the mothers and their fetuses from magnetocardiographic recordings. The time series of the two groups were examined with respect to their heart rate variability, the maternal respiratory rate and the presence of synchronization epochs as determined on the basis of synchrograms. Surrogate data were used to assess whether the occurrence of synchronization was due to chance. Results In the original data, we found synchronization occurred less often in pregnancies in which the mothers had exercised regularly. These subjects also displayed higher combined fetal-maternal heart rate variability and lower maternal respiratory rates. Analysis of the surrogate data showed shorter epochs of synchronization and a lack of the phase coordination found between maternal and fetal beat timing in the original data. Conclusion The results suggest that fetal-maternal heart rate coupling is present but generally weak. Maternal exercise has a damping effect on its occurrence, most likely due to an increase in beat-to-beat differences, higher vagal tone and slower breathing rates. PMID:25162592

  4. Combined effects of hypertension and heart rate on the risk of stroke and coronary heart disease: a population-based prospective cohort study among Inner Mongolians in China.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chongke; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Xu, Tian; Peng, Hao; Li, Hongmei; Zhang, Mingzhi; Wang, Aili; Xu, Tan; Sun, Yingxian; Zhang, Yonghong

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the combined effects of hypertension and heart rate on the risk of stroke and coronary heart disease (CHD) among Inner Mongolians. Based a cross-sectional survey in 2002-2003, a prospective cohort study was conducted among 2530 Mongolian people. We categorized the participants into four subgroups according to blood pressure and heart rate. Cox proportional hazards models and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to evaluate the association between hypertension, heart rate, and stroke and CHD incidence. During the follow-up period, a total of 120 stroke and 75 CHD patients were observed. Compared with normotensives with a heart rate <80 b.p.m., in a multivariate-adjusted model, the hazard ratios (HRs; 95% confidence intervals (CIs)) of stroke for hypertensives with a heart rate <80 b.p.m. and hypertensives with heart rate ⩾80 b.p.m. were 3.21 (1.80-5.70) and 3.59 (1.95-6.62), respectively (all P<0.05); the HRs (95% CI) of CHD for hypertensives with a heart rate <80 b.p.m. and hypertensives with a heart rate ⩾80 b.p.m. were 2.09 (1.07-4.07) and 2.76 (1.43-5.36), respectively (all P<0.05). For both stroke and CHD incidence, the area under ROC curve for a model containing hypertension and a heart rate ⩾80 b.p.m. along with other conventional factors was significantly larger than the one containing only other conventional factors (all P<0.05). Hypertensives with a high heart rate had the highest risk of stroke and CHD among the Inner Mongolians. These results indicate that the coexistence of hypertension and high heart rate may be a valuable predictor of stroke and CHD incidence. PMID:26289782

  5. The Development of Functional Overreaching Is Associated with a Faster Heart Rate Recovery in Endurance Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Aubry, Anaël; Hausswirth, Christophe; Louis, Julien; Coutts, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to investigate whether heart rate recovery (HRR) may represent an effective marker of functional overreaching (f-OR) in endurance athletes. Methods and Results Thirty-one experienced male triathletes were tested (10 control and 21 overload subjects) before (Pre), and immediately after an overload training period (Mid) and after a 2-week taper (Post). Physiological responses were assessed during an incremental cycling protocol to exhaustion, including heart rate, catecholamine release and blood lactate concentration. Ten participants from the overload group developed signs of f-OR at Mid (i.e. -2.1 ± 0.8% change in performance associated with concomitant high perceived fatigue). Additionally, only the f-OR group demonstrated a 99% chance of increase in HRR during the overload period (+8 ± 5 bpm, large effect size). Concomitantly, this group also revealed a >80% chance of decreasing blood lactate (-11 ± 14%, large), plasma norepinephrine (-12 ± 37%, small) and plasma epinephrine peak concentrations (-51 ± 22%, moderate). These blood measures returned to baseline levels at Post. HRR change was negatively correlated to changes in performance, peak HR and peak blood metabolites concentrations. Conclusion These findings suggest that i) a faster HRR is not systematically associated with improved physical performance, ii) changes in HRR should be interpreted in the context of the specific training phase, the athletes perceived level of fatigue and the performance response; and, iii) the faster HRR associated with f-OR may be induced by a decreased central command and by a lower chemoreflex activity. PMID:26488766

  6. Gender Bias in Managerial Performance Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Patrick A.; Saal, Frank E.

    As more women enter the managerial ranks, organizations are finding it necessary to address the possibility of gender bias in managerial performance ratings. To investigate the existence of gender bias in managerial performance ratings as they relate to problem-solving strategies, 197 college students (46 percent female) and 127 managers (of those…

  7. Heart rate and rate of oxygen consumption of exercising macaroni penguins.

    PubMed

    Green, J A; Butler, P J; Woakes, A J; Boyd, I L; Holder, R L

    2001-02-01

    Twenty-four macaroni penguins (Eudyptes chrysolophus) from three groups, breeding males (N=9), breeding females (N=9) and moulting females (N=6), were exercised on a variable-speed treadmill. Heart rate (fH) and mass-specific rate of oxygen consumption (sVO2) were recorded from the animals, and both fh and sVO2 were found to increase linearly with increasing treadmill speed. A linear regression equation described the relationship between fh and sVO2 for each individual. There were no significant differences in these regressions between breeding and moulting females. There were significant differences in these relationships between all females and breeding males. fH and s VO2 were recorded from five of these animals for a total of 24 h. When fh was used to predict sVO2 for the 24 h period using the derived regressions, the estimate was not significantly different from the measured values, with an average error of -2.1 %. When fh was used to predict sVO2 for the 5 min intervals used for the calibration in all 24 birds, the estimate was not significantly different from the observed values, and the average error was only +0.47 %. Since the fH/sVO2 relationship was the same during periods of the annual cycle when the animals were inactive/fasting and active/foraging, it seems reasonable that, as long as sex differences are taken into account, fh can be used to predict the metabolic rates of free-ranging macaroni penguins all year round. PMID:11171349

  8. Estimating the rate of oxygen consumption during submersion from the heart rate of diving animals.

    PubMed

    Green, J A; Halsey, L G; Butler, P J; Holder, R L

    2007-05-01

    How animals manage their oxygen stores during diving and other breath-hold activities has been a topic of debate among physiologists for decades. Specifically, while the behavior of free-ranging diving animals suggests that metabolism during submersion must be primarily aerobic in nature, no studies have been able to determine their rate of oxygen consumption during submersion (Vo(2)d) and hence prove that this is the case. In the present study, we combine two previously used techniques and develop a new model to estimate Vo(2)d accurately and plausibly in a free-ranging animal and apply it to data for macaroni penguins (Eudyptes chrysolophus) as an example. For macaroni penguins at least, Vo(2)d can be predicted by measuring heart rate during the dive cycle and the subsequent surface interval duration. Including maximum depth of the dive improves the accuracy of these predictions. This suggests that energetically demanding locomotion events within the dive combine with the differing buoyancy and locomotion costs associated with traveling to depth to influence its cost in terms of oxygen use. This will in turn effect the duration of the dive and the duration of the subsequent recovery period. In the present study, Vo(2)d ranged from 4 to 28 ml.min(-1).kg(-1), indicating that, at least as far as aerobic metabolism was concerned, macaroni penguins were often hypometabolic, with rates of oxygen consumption usually below that for this species resting in water (25.6 ml.min(-1).kg(-1)) and occasionally lower than that while resting in air (10.3 ml.min(-1).kg(-1)). PMID:17218442

  9. Building trust: Heart rate synchrony and arousal during joint action increased by public goods game.

    PubMed

    Mitkidis, Panagiotis; McGraw, John J; Roepstorff, Andreas; Wallot, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    The physiological processes underlying trust are subject of intense interest in the behavioral sciences. However, very little is known about how trust modulates the affective link between individuals. We show here that trust has an effect on heart rate arousal and synchrony, a result consistent with research on joint action and experimental economics. We engaged participants in a series of joint action tasks which, for one group of participants, was interleaved with a PGG, and measured their heart synchrony and arousal. We found that the introduction of the economic game shifted participants' attention to the dynamics of the interaction. This was followed by increased arousal and synchrony of heart rate profiles. Also, the degree of heart rate synchrony was predictive of participants' expectations regarding their partners in the economic game. We conclude that the above changes in physiology and behavior are shaped by the valuation of other people's social behavior, and ultimately indicate trust building process. PMID:26037635

  10. Bradycardia in perspective-not all reductions in heart rate need immediate intervention.

    PubMed

    Mason, Keira P; Lönnqvist, Per-Arne

    2015-01-01

    According to Wikipedia, the word 'bradycardia' stems from the Greek βραδύς, bradys, 'slow', and καρδία, kardia, 'heart'. Thus, the meaning of bradycardia is slow heart rate but not necessarily too slow heart rate. If looking at top endurance athletes they may have a resting heart rate in the very low thirties without needing emergent intervention with anticholinergics, isoprenaline, epinephrine, chest compressions or the insertion of an emergency pacemaker (Figure 1). In fact, they withstand these episodes without incident, accommodating with a compensatory increase in stroke volume to preserve and maintain cardiac output. With this in mind, it is difficult for the authors to fully understand and agree with the general sentiment amongst many pediatric anesthesiologists that all isolated bradycardia portends impending doom and must be immediately treated with resuscitative measures. PMID:25410284

  11. Effect of varying heart rate on intra-ventricular filling fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhanakrishnan, Arvind; Okafor, Ikechukwu; Angirish, Yagna; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2013-11-01

    Impaired exercise tolerance is used to delineate asymptomatic patients during the clinical diagnosis of diastolic left heart failure. Examining the effects of varying heart rate on intra-ventricular filling can provide a physical understanding of the specific flow characteristics that are impacted during exercise. In this study, diastolic filling was investigated with an anatomical left ventricle (LV) physical model under normal heart rate of 70 bpm, and varying exercise conditions of 100 bpm and 120 bpm. The LV model was incorporated into a flow loop and tuned for physiological inflow rates and outflow pressures. 2D PIV measurements were conducted along 3 parallel longitudinal planes. The systemic pressure was maintained the same across all test conditions. The E/A ratio was maintained within 1.0-1.2 across all heart rates. The strength of the mitral vortex ring formed during E-wave, as well as the peak incoming jet velocity, decreased with increasing heart rate. During peak flow of the A-wave, the vortex ring propagated farther into the LV for 120 bpm as compared to 70 bpm. The results point to the heightened role of the atrial kick for optimal LV filling during exercise conditions. This study was funded by a grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (RO1HL70262).

  12. A non-contact method based on multiple signal classification algorithm to reduce the measurement time for accurately heart rate detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechet, P.; Mitran, R.; Munteanu, M.

    2013-08-01

    Non-contact methods for the assessment of vital signs are of great interest for specialists due to the benefits obtained in both medical and special applications, such as those for surveillance, monitoring, and search and rescue. This paper investigates the possibility of implementing a digital processing algorithm based on the MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification) parametric spectral estimation in order to reduce the observation time needed to accurately measure the heart rate. It demonstrates that, by proper dimensioning the signal subspace, the MUSIC algorithm can be optimized in order to accurately assess the heart rate during an 8-28 s time interval. The validation of the processing algorithm performance was achieved by minimizing the mean error of the heart rate after performing simultaneous comparative measurements on several subjects. In order to calculate the error the reference value of heart rate was measured using a classic measurement system through direct contact.

  13. A non-contact method based on multiple signal classification algorithm to reduce the measurement time for accurately heart rate detection.

    PubMed

    Bechet, P; Mitran, R; Munteanu, M

    2013-08-01

    Non-contact methods for the assessment of vital signs are of great interest for specialists due to the benefits obtained in both medical and special applications, such as those for surveillance, monitoring, and search and rescue. This paper investigates the possibility of implementing a digital processing algorithm based on the MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification) parametric spectral estimation in order to reduce the observation time needed to accurately measure the heart rate. It demonstrates that, by proper dimensioning the signal subspace, the MUSIC algorithm can be optimized in order to accurately assess the heart rate during an 8-28 s time interval. The validation of the processing algorithm performance was achieved by minimizing the mean error of the heart rate after performing simultaneous comparative measurements on several subjects. In order to calculate the error the reference value of heart rate was measured using a classic measurement system through direct contact. PMID:24007088

  14. Caffeine Consumption and Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Response to Regadenoson

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Abbas; Mastouri, Ronald; Kreutz, Rolf P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Current guidelines recommend that caffeinated products should be avoided for at least 12 hours prior to regadenoson administration. We intended to examine the effect of caffeine consumption and of timing of last dose on hemodynamic effects after regadenoson administration for cardiac stress testing. Methods 332 subjects undergoing regadenoson stress testing were enrolled. Baseline characteristics, habits of coffee/caffeine exposure, baseline vital signs and change in heart rate, blood pressure, percent of maximal predicted heart rate, and percent change in heart rate were prospectively collected. Results Non-coffee drinkers (group 1) (73 subjects) and subjects who last drank coffee >24 hours (group 3) (139 subjects) prior to regadenoson did not demonstrate any difference in systolic blood pressure, heart rate change, maximal predicted heart rate and percent change in heart rate. Systolic blood pressure change (15.2±17.1 vs. 7.2±10.2 mmHg, p = 0.001), heart rate change (32.2±14 vs. 27.3±9.6 bpm, p = 0.038) and maximal predicted heart rate (65.5±15.6 vs. 60.7±8.6%, p = 0.038) were significantly higher in non-coffee drinkers (group 1) compared to those who drank coffee 12–24 hours prior (group 2) (108 subjects). Subjects who drank coffee >24 hours prior (group 3) exhibited higher systolic blood pressure change (13±15.8 vs. 7±10.2, p = 0.007), and heart rate change (32.1±15.3 vs. 27.3±9.6, p = 0.017) as compared to those who drank coffee 12–24 hours prior to testing (group 2). Conclusions Caffeine exposure 12–24 hours prior to regadenoson administration attenuates the vasoactive effects of regadenoson, as evidenced by a blunted rise in heart rate and systolic blood pressure. These results suggest that caffeine exposure within 24 hours may reduce the effects of regadenoson administered for vasodilatory cardiac stress testing. PMID:26098883

  15. Combining electroencephalographic activity and instantaneous heart rate for assessing brain-heart dynamics during visual emotional elicitation in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Valenza, G; Greco, A; Gentili, C; Lanata, A; Sebastiani, L; Menicucci, D; Gemignani, A; Scilingo, E P

    2016-05-13

    Emotion perception, occurring in brain areas such as the prefrontal cortex and amygdala, involves autonomic responses affecting cardiovascular dynamics. However, how such brain-heart dynamics is further modulated by emotional valence (pleasantness/unpleasantness), also considering different arousing levels (the intensity of the emotional stimuli), is still unknown. To this extent, we combined electroencephalographic (EEG) dynamics and instantaneous heart rate estimates to study emotional processing in healthy subjects. Twenty-two healthy volunteers were elicited through affective pictures gathered from the International Affective Picture System. The experimental protocol foresaw 110 pictures, each of which lasted 10 s, associated to 25 different combinations of arousal and valence levels, including neutral elicitations. EEG data were processed using short-time Fourier transforms to obtain time-varying maps of cortical activation, whereas the associated instantaneous cardiovascular dynamics was estimated in the time and frequency domains through inhomogeneous point-process models. Brain-heart linear and nonlinear coupling was estimated through the maximal information coefficient (MIC). Considering EEG oscillations in theθband (4-8 Hz), MIC highlighted significant arousal-dependent changes between positive and negative stimuli, especially occurring at intermediate arousing levels through the prefrontal cortex interplay. Moreover, high arousing elicitations seem to mitigate changes in brain-heart dynamics in response to pleasant/unpleasant visual elicitation. PMID:27044990

  16. Proposal Intensity Adequacy of Expiratory Effort and Heart Rate Behavior During the Valsalva Maneuver in Preadolescents

    PubMed Central

    Paschoal, Mario Augusto; Donato, Bruno de Sousa; Neves, Flvia Baroni

    2014-01-01

    Background When performing the Valsalva maneuver (VM), adults and preadolescents produce the same expiratory resistance values. Objective To analyze heart rate (HR) in preadolescents performing VM, and propose a new method for selecting expiratory resistance. Method The maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) was measured in 45 sedentary children aged 9-12 years who subsequently performed VM for 20 s using an expiratory pressure of 60%, 70%, or 80% of MEP. HR was