Science.gov

Sample records for heat energy flow

  1. Heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ben

    The demand for clean and environmentally benign energy resources has been a great concern in the last two decades. To alleviate the associated environmental problems, reduction of the use of fossil fuels by developing more cost-effective renewable energy technologies becomes more and more significant. Among various types of renewable energy sources, solar energy and bioenergy take a great proportion. This dissertation focuses on the heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems, specifically for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) systems in Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants and open-channel algal culture raceways for biofuel production. The first part of this dissertation is the discussion about mathematical modeling, numerical simulation and experimental investigation of solar TES system. First of all, in order to accurately and efficiently simulate the conjugate heat transfer between Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) and filler material in four different solid-fluid TES configurations, formulas of an e?ective heat transfer coe?cient were theoretically developed and presented by extending the validity of Lumped Capacitance Method (LCM) to large Biot number, as well as verifications/validations to this simplified model. Secondly, to provide design guidelines for TES system in CSP plant using Phase Change Materials (PCM), a general storage tank volume sizing strategy and an energy storage startup strategy were proposed using the enthalpy-based 1D transient model. Then experimental investigations were conducted to explore a novel thermal storage material. The thermal storage performances were also compared between this novel storage material and concrete at a temperature range from 400 °C to 500 °C. It is recommended to apply this novel thermal storage material to replace concrete at high operating temperatures in sensible heat TES systems. The second part of this dissertation mainly focuses on the numerical and experimental study of an open-channel algae

  2. A Variable Refrigerant Flow Heat Pump Computer Model in EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect

    Raustad, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the variable refrigerant flow heat pump computer model included with the Department of Energy's EnergyPlusTM whole-building energy simulation software. The mathematical model for a variable refrigerant flow heat pump operating in cooling or heating mode, and a detailed model for the variable refrigerant flow direct-expansion (DX) cooling coil are described in detail.

  3. Inter-phase heat transfer and energy coupling in turbulent dispersed multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Y.; Balachandar, S.; Parmar, M.

    2016-03-01

    The present paper addresses important fundamental issues of inter-phase heat transfer and energy coupling in turbulent dispersed multiphase flows through scaling analysis. In typical point-particle or two-fluid approaches, the fluid motion and convective heat transfer at the particle scale are not resolved and the momentum and energy coupling between fluid and particles are provided by proper closure models. By examining the kinetic energy transfer due to the coupling forces from the macroscale to microscale fluid motion, closure models are obtained for the contributions of the coupling forces to the energy coupling. Due to the inviscid origin of the added-mass force, its contribution to the microscale kinetic energy does not contribute to dissipative transfer to fluid internal energy as was done by the quasi-steady force. Time scale analysis shows that when the particle is larger than a critical diameter, the diffusive-unsteady kernel decays at a time scale that is smaller than the Kolmogorov time scale. As a result, the computationally costly Basset-like integral form of diffusive-unsteady heat transfer can be simplified to a non-integral form. Conventionally, the fluid-to-particle volumetric heat capacity ratio is used to evaluate the relative importance of the unsteady heat transfer to the energy balance of the particles. Therefore, for gas-particle flows, where the fluid-to-particle volumetric heat capacity ratio is small, unsteady heat transfer is usually ignored. However, the present scaling analysis shows that for small fluid-to-particle volumetric heat capacity ratio, the importance of the unsteady heat transfer actually depends on the ratio between the particle size and the Kolmogorov scale. Furthermore, the particle mass loading multiplied by the heat capacity ratio is usually used to estimate the importance of the thermal two-way coupling effect. Through scaling argument, improved estimates are established for the energy coupling parameters of each

  4. Comparison of energy efficiency between variable refrigerant flow systems and ground source heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tainzhen; Liu, Xaiobing

    2009-11-01

    With the current movement toward net zero energy buildings, many technologies are promoted with emphasis on their superior energy efficiency. The variable refrigerant flow (VRF) and ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems are probably the most competitive technologies among these. However, there are few studies reporting the energy efficiency of VRF systems compared with GSHP systems. In this article, a preliminary comparison of energy efficiency between the air-source VRF and GSHP systems is presented. The computer simulation results show that GSHP system is more energy efficient than the air-source VRF system for conditioning a small office building in two selected US climates. In general, GSHP system is more energy efficient than the air-source VRV system, especially when the building has significant heating loads. For buildings with less heating loads, the GSHP system could still perform better than the air-source VRF system in terms of energy efficiency, but the resulting energy savings may be marginal.

  5. Radial flow heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Valenzuela, Javier

    2001-01-01

    A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

  6. Nanofluid heat transfer under mixed convection flow in a tube for solar thermal energy applications.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Y Raja; Sharma, K V; Kamal, Subhash

    2016-05-01

    The solar flat plate collector operating under different convective modes has low efficiency for energy conversion. The energy absorbed by the working fluid in the collector system and its heat transfer characteristics vary with solar insolation and mass flow rate. The performance of the system is improved by reducing the losses from the collector. Various passive methods have been devised to aid energy absorption by the working fluid. Also, working fluids are modified using nanoparticles to improve the thermal properties of the fluid. In the present work, simulation and experimental studies are undertaken for pipe flow at constant heat flux boundary condition in the mixed convection mode. The working fluid at low Reynolds number in the mixed laminar flow range is undertaken with water in thermosyphon mode for different inclination angles of the tube. Local and average coefficients are determined experimentally and compared with theoretical values for water-based Al2O3 nanofluids. The results show an enhancement in heat transfer in the experimental range with Rayleigh number at higher inclinations of the collector tube for water and nanofluids. PMID:26593731

  7. A heat flow calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, W. V.

    1973-01-01

    Reaction mechanism for nickel-cadmium cell is not known well enough to allow calculation of heat effects. Calorimeter can measure heat absorbed or evolved in cell, by determining amount of external heat that must be supplied to calorimeter to maintain constant flow isothermal heat sink.

  8. Impact of Groundwater Flow and Energy Load on Multiple Borehole Heat Exchangers.

    PubMed

    Dehkordi, S Emad; Schincariol, Robert A; Olofsson, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The effect of array configuration, that is, number, layout, and spacing, on the performance of multiple borehole heat exchangers (BHEs) is generally known under the assumption of fully conductive transport. The effect of groundwater flow on BHE performance is also well established, but most commonly for single BHEs. In multiple-BHE systems the effect of groundwater advection can be more complicated due to the induced thermal interference between the boreholes. To ascertain the influence of groundwater flow and borehole arrangement, this study investigates single- and multi-BHE systems of various configurations. Moreover, the influence of energy load balance is also examined. The results from corresponding cases with and without groundwater flow as well as balanced and unbalanced energy loads are cross-compared. The groundwater flux value, 10(-7) m/s, is chosen based on the findings of previous studies on groundwater flow interaction with BHEs and thermal response tests. It is observed that multi-BHE systems with balanced loads are less sensitive to array configuration attributes and groundwater flow, in the long-term. Conversely, multi-BHE systems with unbalanced loads are influenced by borehole array configuration as well as groundwater flow; these effects become more pronounced with time, unlike when the load is balanced. Groundwater flow has more influence on stabilizing loop temperatures, compared to array characteristics. Although borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) systems have a balanced energy load function, preliminary investigation on their efficiency shows a negative impact by groundwater which is due to their dependency on high temperature gradients between the boreholes and surroundings. PMID:25227154

  9. A Thermally-Regenerative Ammonia-Based Flow Battery for Electrical Energy Recovery from Waste Heat.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiuping; Rahimi, Mohammad; Gorski, Christopher A; Logan, Bruce

    2016-04-21

    Large amounts of low-grade waste heat (temperatures <130 °C) are released during many industrial, geothermal, and solar-based processes. Using thermally-regenerative ammonia solutions, low-grade thermal energy can be converted to electricity in battery systems. To improve reactor efficiency, a compact, ammonia-based flow battery (AFB) was developed and tested at different solution concentrations, flow rates, cell pairs, and circuit connections. The AFB achieved a maximum power density of 45 W m(-2) (15 kW m(-3) ) and an energy density of 1260 Wh manolyte (-3) , with a thermal energy efficiency of 0.7 % (5 % relative to the Carnot efficiency). The power and energy densities of the AFB were greater than those previously reported for thermoelectrochemical and salinity-gradient technologies, and the voltage or current could be increased using stacked cells. These results demonstrated that an ammonia-based flow battery is a promising technology to convert low-grade thermal energy to electricity. PMID:26990485

  10. Heat and Mass Transfer in Unsteady Rotating Fluid Flow with Binary Chemical Reaction and Activation Energy

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Faiz G.; Motsa, Sandile; Khumalo, Melusi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the Spectral Relaxation Method (SRM) is used to solve the coupled highly nonlinear system of partial differential equations due to an unsteady flow over a stretching surface in an incompressible rotating viscous fluid in presence of binary chemical reaction and Arrhenius activation energy. The velocity, temperature and concentration distributions as well as the skin-friction, heat and mass transfer coefficients have been obtained and discussed for various physical parametric values. The numerical results obtained by (SRM) are then presented graphically and discussed to highlight the physical implications of the simulations. PMID:25250830

  11. A second-law investigation of heat exchanger wall-thickness on flow energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wold, S.K.; Maveety, J.G.; Peterson, E.; Olson, D.

    1996-03-01

    There has been a growing interest in enhancing the performance of space power systems, and quantifying the subsequent optimal operating conditions. In any thermal storage system, the thermodynamic irreversibilities decrease the net power (or exit flow energy) available to do work. Entropy production is closely related to the thermal efficiency of a thermal storage system, and isolating and reducing components of irreversibility will result in increased performance. This paper investigates second-law aspects of four single pass spiral heat exchangers in which helium is the working fluid. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Technical Subtopic 2.1: Modeling Variable Refrigerant Flow Heat Pump and Heat Recovery Equipment in EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect

    Raustad, Richard; Nigusse, Bereket; Domitrovic, Ron

    2013-09-30

    The University of Central Florida/Florida Solar Energy Center, in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute and several variable-refrigerant-flow heat pump (VRF HP) manufacturers, provided a detailed computer model for a VRF HP system in the United States Department of Energy's (U.S. DOE) EnergyPlus? building energy simulation tool. Detailed laboratory testing and field demonstrations were performed to measure equipment performance and compare this performance to both the manufacturer's data and that predicted by the use of this new model through computer simulation. The project goal was to investigate the complex interactions of VRF HP systems from an HVAC system perspective, and explore the operational characteristics of this HVAC system type within a laboratory and real world building environment. Detailed laboratory testing of this advanced HVAC system provided invaluable performance information which does not currently exist in the form required for proper analysis and modeling. This information will also be useful for developing and/or supporting test standards for VRF HP systems. Field testing VRF HP systems also provided performance and operational information pertaining to installation, system configuration, and operational controls. Information collected from both laboratory and field tests were then used to create and validate the VRF HP system computer model which, in turn, provides architects, engineers, and building owners the confidence necessary to accurately and reliably perform building energy simulations. This new VRF HP model is available in the current public release version of DOE?s EnergyPlus software and can be used to investigate building energy use in both new and existing building stock. The general laboratory testing did not use the AHRI Standard 1230 test procedure and instead used an approach designed to measure the field installed full-load operating performance. This projects test methodology used the air enthalpy method

  13. Planetary heat flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Hagermann, Axel

    2005-12-15

    The year 2005 marks the 35th anniversary of the Apollo 13 mission, probably the most successful failure in the history of manned spaceflight. Naturally, Apollo 13's scientific payload is far less known than the spectacular accident and subsequent rescue of its crew. Among other instruments, it carried the first instrument designed to measure the flux of heat on a planetary body other than Earth. The year 2005 also should have marked the launch of the Japanese LUNAR-A mission, and ESA's Rosetta mission is slowly approaching comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Both missions carry penetrators to study the heat flow from their target bodies. What is so interesting about planetary heat flow? What can we learn from it and how do we measure it?Not only the Sun, but all planets in the Solar System are essentially heat engines. Various heat sources or heat reservoirs drive intrinsic and surface processes, causing 'dead balls of rock, ice or gas' to evolve dynamically over time, driving convection that powers tectonic processes and spawns magnetic fields. The heat flow constrains models of the thermal evolution of a planet and also its composition because it provides an upper limit for the bulk abundance of radioactive elements. On Earth, the global variation of heat flow also reflects the tectonic activity: heat flow increases towards the young ocean ridges, whereas it is rather low on the old continental shields. It is not surprising that surface heat flow measurements, or even estimates, where performed, contributed greatly to our understanding of what happens inside the planets. In this article, I will review the results and the methods used in past heat flow measurements and speculate on the targets and design of future experiments. PMID:16286290

  14. Modeling of dissociation and energy transfer in shock-heated nitrogen flows

    SciTech Connect

    Munafò, A.; Liu, Y.; Panesi, M.

    2015-12-15

    This work addresses the modeling of dissociation and energy transfer processes in shock heated nitrogen flows by means of the maximum entropy linear model and a newly proposed hybrid bin vibrational collisional model. Both models aim at overcoming two of the main limitations of the state of the art non-equilibrium models: (i) the assumption of equilibrium between rotational and translational energy modes of the molecules and (ii) the reliance on the quasi-steady-state distribution for the description of the population of the internal levels. The formulation of the coarse-grained models is based on grouping the energy levels into bins, where the population is assumed to follow a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution at its own temperature. Different grouping strategies are investigated. Following the maximum entropy principle, the governing equations are obtained by taking the zeroth and first-order moments of the rovibrational master equations. The accuracy of the proposed models is tested against the rovibrational master equation solution for both flow quantities and population distributions. Calculations performed for free-stream velocities ranging from 5 km/s to 10 km/s demonstrate that dissociation can be accurately predicted by using only 2-3 bins. It is also shown that a multi-temperature approach leads to an under-prediction of dissociation, due to the inability of the former to account for the faster excitation of high-lying vibrational states.

  15. Modeling of dissociation and energy transfer in shock-heated nitrogen flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munafò, A.; Liu, Y.; Panesi, M.

    2015-12-01

    This work addresses the modeling of dissociation and energy transfer processes in shock heated nitrogen flows by means of the maximum entropy linear model and a newly proposed hybrid bin vibrational collisional model. Both models aim at overcoming two of the main limitations of the state of the art non-equilibrium models: (i) the assumption of equilibrium between rotational and translational energy modes of the molecules and (ii) the reliance on the quasi-steady-state distribution for the description of the population of the internal levels. The formulation of the coarse-grained models is based on grouping the energy levels into bins, where the population is assumed to follow a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution at its own temperature. Different grouping strategies are investigated. Following the maximum entropy principle, the governing equations are obtained by taking the zeroth and first-order moments of the rovibrational master equations. The accuracy of the proposed models is tested against the rovibrational master equation solution for both flow quantities and population distributions. Calculations performed for free-stream velocities ranging from 5 km/s to 10 km/s demonstrate that dissociation can be accurately predicted by using only 2-3 bins. It is also shown that a multi-temperature approach leads to an under-prediction of dissociation, due to the inability of the former to account for the faster excitation of high-lying vibrational states.

  16. Pressure drop and heat transfer in turbulent non-Newtonian pipe flow of advanced energy transmission fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, U. S.; Liu, K. V.; Kasza, K. E.

    1988-03-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy, is making significant progress on the development of advanced energy transmission fluids for thermal systems, in particular district heating and cooling systems. ANL has identified two concepts for developing advanced energy transmission fluids. Tests have been conducted at ANL to prove these concepts. This paper presents experimental results and discusses the degradation behavior of linear polymer additives and the flow and heat transfer characteristics of non-melting slurry flows. The experimental data obtained in this study provide support for the use of friction reducing additives and slurries in thermal system applications.

  17. Study of Cold Heat Energy Release Characteristics of Flowing Ice Water Slurry in a Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Horibe, Akihiko; Ozaki, Koichi; Yokota, Maki

    This paper has dealt with melting heat transfer characteristics of ice water slurry in an inside tube of horizontal double tube heat exchanger in which a hot water circulated in an annular gap between the inside and outside tubes. Two kinds of heat exchangers were used; one is made of acrylic resin tube for flow visualization and the other is made of stainless steel tube for melting heat transfer measurement. The result of flow visualization revealed that ice particles flowed along the top of inside tube in the ranges of small ice packing factor and low ice water slurry velocity, while ice particles diffused into the whole of tube and flowed like a plug built up by ice particles for large ice packing factor and high velocity. Moreover, it was found that the flowing ice plug was separated into numbers of small ice clusters by melting phenomenon. Experiments of melting heat transfer were carried out under some parameters of ice packing factor, ice water slurry flow rate and hot water temperature. Consequently, the correlation equation of melting heat transfer was derived as a function of those experimental parameters.

  18. Enceladus' Enigmatic Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howett, C.; Spencer, J. R.; Spencer, D.; Verbiscer, A.; Hurford, T.; Segura, M.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of Enceladus' heat flow is important because it provides a vital constraint on Enceladus' tidal dissipation mechanisms, orbital evolution, and the physical processes that generate the plumes. In 2011 we published an estimate of the current heat flow from Enceladus' active south polar terrain: 15.8 +/- 3.1 GW (Howett et al., 2011). This value was calculated by first estimating by modeling, and then removing, the passive component from 17 to 1000 micron observations made of the entire south polar terrain by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS). The heat flow was then directly calculated from the residual, assumed endogenic, component. The derived heat flow of 15.8 GW was surprisingly high, about 10 times greater than that predicted by steady-state tidal heating (Meyer and Wisdom, 2007). CIRS has also returned high spatial resolution observations of Enceladus' active south polar terrain. Two separate observations are used: 9 to 16 micron observations taken over nearly the complete south polar terrain and a single 17 to 1000 micron scan over Damascus, Baghdad and Cairo. The shorter wavelength observations are only sensitive to high temperature emission (>70 K), and so longer wavelength observations are required (despite their limited spatial coverage) to estimate the low temperature emission from the stripes. Analysis of these higher resolution observations tells a different story of Enceladus' endogenic heat flow: the preliminary estimate of the heat flow from the active tiger stripes using these observations is 4.2 GW. An additional 0.5 GW must be added to this number to account for the latent heat release by the plumes (Ingersoll and Pankine 2009), giving a total preliminary estimate of 4.9 GW. The discrepancy in these two numbers is significant and we are currently investigating the cause. One possible reason is that there is significantly higher endogenic emission from the regions between the tiger stripes than we currently estimate

  19. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  20. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, James C.; Hardee, Harry C.; Striker, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  1. Compare Energy Use in Variable Refrigerant Flow Heat Pumps Field Demonstration and Computer Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Chandan; Raustad, Richard

    2013-06-01

    Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) heat pumps are often regarded as energy efficient air-conditioning systems which offer electricity savings as well as reduction in peak electric demand while providing improved individual zone setpoint control. One of the key advantages of VRF systems is minimal duct losses which provide significant reduction in energy use and duct space. However, there is limited data available to show their actual performance in the field. Since VRF systems are increasingly gaining market share in the US, it is highly desirable to have more actual field performance data of these systems. An effort was made in this direction to monitor VRF system performance over an extended period of time in a US national lab test facility. Due to increasing demand by the energy modeling community, an empirical model to simulate VRF systems was implemented in the building simulation program EnergyPlus. This paper presents the comparison of energy consumption as measured in the national lab and as predicted by the program. For increased accuracy in the comparison, a customized weather file was created by using measured outdoor temperature and relative humidity at the test facility. Other inputs to the model included building construction, VRF system model based on lab measured performance, occupancy of the building, lighting/plug loads, and thermostat set-points etc. Infiltration model inputs were adjusted in the beginning to tune the computer model and then subsequent field measurements were compared to the simulation results. Differences between the computer model results and actual field measurements are discussed. The computer generated VRF performance closely resembled the field measurements.

  2. Lunar heat-flow experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langseth, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    The principal components of the experiment were probes, each with twelve thermometers of exceptional accuracy and stability, that recorded temperature variations at the surface and in the regolith down to 2.5 m. The Apollo 15 experiment and the Apollo 17 probes recorded lunar surface and subsurface temperatures. These data provided a unique and valuable history of the interaction of solar energy with lunar surface and the effects of heat flowing from the deep interior out through the surface of the moon. The interpretation of these data resulted in a clearer definition of the thermal and mechanical properties of the upper two meters of lunar regolith, direct measurements of the gradient in mean temperature due to heat flow from the interior and a determination of the heat flow at the Apollo 15 and Apollo 17 sites.

  3. Heat transfer in energy problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushina, T.; Yang, W. J.

    Results of recent research are presented concerning heat transfer in energy problems, including high-temperature heat transfer, high-flux heat transfer, high-performance heat transfer, heat transfer in nonconventional energy (power and propulsion) systems, and novel heat transfer techniques. Topics discussed include studies of full-coverage film cooling, radiative properties of metals and alloys at high temperature, critical heat flux conditions in high-quality boiling systems, heat transfer characteristics of the evaporation of a liquid droplet on heated surfaces, high-performance surfaces for non-boiling heat transfer, and high performance heat transfer surfaces for boiling and condensation. Also examined are high flux heat transfer in gaseous solid suspension flow, nuclear process heat applications of high temperature heat exchange, heat transfer considerations in the use of new energy resources, and high performance mist-cooled condensers for geothermal binary cycle plants. No individual items are abstracted in this volume

  4. A stock-flow consistent input-output model with applications to energy price shocks, interest rates, and heat emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Matthew; Hartley, Brian; Richters, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    By synthesizing stock-flow consistent models, input-output models, and aspects of ecological macroeconomics, a method is developed to simultaneously model monetary flows through the financial system, flows of produced goods and services through the real economy, and flows of physical materials through the natural environment. This paper highlights the linkages between the physical environment and the economic system by emphasizing the role of the energy industry. A conceptual model is developed in general form with an arbitrary number of sectors, while emphasizing connections with the agent-based, econophysics, and complexity economics literature. First, we use the model to challenge claims that 0% interest rates are a necessary condition for a stationary economy and conduct a stability analysis within the parameter space of interest rates and consumption parameters of an economy in stock-flow equilibrium. Second, we analyze the role of energy price shocks in contributing to recessions, incorporating several propagation and amplification mechanisms. Third, implied heat emissions from energy conversion and the effect of anthropogenic heat flux on climate change are considered in light of a minimal single-layer atmosphere climate model, although the model is only implicitly, not explicitly, linked to the economic model.

  5. Cafeteria diet induce changes in blood flow that are more related with heat dissipation than energy accretion

    PubMed Central

    Sabater, David; Agnelli, Silvia; Arriarán, Sofía; Romero, María del Mar; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià

    2016-01-01

    Background. A “cafeteria” diet is a self-selected high-fat diet, providing an excess of energy, which can induce obesity. Excess of lipids in the diet hampers glucose utilization eliciting insulin resistance, which, further limits amino acid oxidation for energy. Methods. Male Wistar rats were exposed for a month to “cafeteria” diet. Rats were cannulated and fluorescent microspheres were used to determine blood flow. Results. Exposure to the cafeteria diet did not change cardiac output, but there was a marked shift in organ irrigation. Skin blood flow decreased to compensate increases in lungs and heart. Blood flow through adipose tissue tended to increase in relation to controls, but was considerably increased in brown adipose tissue (on a weight basis). Discussion. The results suggest that the cafeteria diet-induced changes were related to heat transfer and disposal. PMID:27547590

  6. Cafeteria diet induce changes in blood flow that are more related with heat dissipation than energy accretion.

    PubMed

    Sabater, David; Agnelli, Silvia; Arriarán, Sofía; Romero, María Del Mar; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià; Remesar, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Background. A "cafeteria" diet is a self-selected high-fat diet, providing an excess of energy, which can induce obesity. Excess of lipids in the diet hampers glucose utilization eliciting insulin resistance, which, further limits amino acid oxidation for energy. Methods. Male Wistar rats were exposed for a month to "cafeteria" diet. Rats were cannulated and fluorescent microspheres were used to determine blood flow. Results. Exposure to the cafeteria diet did not change cardiac output, but there was a marked shift in organ irrigation. Skin blood flow decreased to compensate increases in lungs and heart. Blood flow through adipose tissue tended to increase in relation to controls, but was considerably increased in brown adipose tissue (on a weight basis). Discussion. The results suggest that the cafeteria diet-induced changes were related to heat transfer and disposal. PMID:27547590

  7. Map of Io's volcanic heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard; Veeder, Glenn J.; Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence V.

    2015-12-01

    We present a map of Io's volcanic heat flow. Io's high heat flow is a result of intense tidal heating, which generates widespread volcanic activity. The surface expression of ongoing volcanic activity constrains the location and magnitude of tidal dissipation within Io. Tidal heating models place heating either at relatively shallow (aesthenosphere) levels, or deep in the mantle. It was thought that actual tidal heating could be approximated using a combination of these end-member models. Io's volcanic heat flow has now been mapped in sufficient detail to compare with the models. Our maps show that the distribution of heat flow is not matched by current models of deep nor shallow tidal heating, nor by any combination of these two models. We find relatively low heat flow at sub-jovian (0°W) and anti-jovian (180°W) longitudes, at odds with the pure aesthenospheric heating model. Furthermore, there are large swaths of Io's surface where there is poor correlation between the number of hot spots in an area and the power emitted. We have previously accounted for ≈54% of Io's observed heat flow. We now show that Io's anomalously warm poles, possibly the result of heat flow from deep-mantle heating, would yield the "missing" energy (48 TW) if the polar surfaces are at temperatures of ∼90 K to ∼95 K and cover latitudes above ∼43° to ∼48° respectively. This possibility implies a ratio of deep to shallow heating of about 1:1. However, explaining regional variations in surface volcanic activity requires more detailed modeling of the location and magnitude of the internal tidal dissipation and the consequences of mantle convection and advection within Io. Future model predictions can be compared to our heat flow map.

  8. Heat Pipe Blocks Return Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eninger, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Metal-foil reed valve in conventional slab-wick heat pipe limits heat flow to one direction only. With sink warmer than source, reed is forced closed and fluid returns to source side through annular transfer wick. When this occurs, wick slab on sink side of valve dries out and heat pipe ceases to conduct heat.

  9. Magnetic heat pump flow director

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Frank S. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A fluid flow director is disclosed. The director comprises a handle body and combed-teeth extending from one side of the body. The body can be formed of a clear plastic such as acrylic. The director can be used with heat exchangers such as a magnetic heat pump and can minimize the undesired mixing of fluid flows. The types of heat exchangers can encompass both heat pumps and refrigerators. The director can adjust the fluid flow of liquid or gas along desired flow directions. A method of applying the flow director within a magnetic heat pump application is also disclosed where the comb-teeth portions of the director are inserted into the fluid flow paths of the heat pump.

  10. Minnesota Heat Flow and Geothermal Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosnold, W. D.; Crowell, J.; Bubach, B.; Wahl, P.; Crowell, A. M.; Mcdonald, M. R.

    2011-12-01

    Radiogenic heat production, bedrock geology, gravity, magnetics, and heat flow were combined to study heat flow and geothermal energy potential in Minnesota. Heat production was determined from one-hundred 800 kg samples collected at outcrops and from drill cores by gamma ray spectrometry. Small splits of the samples were also analyzed by chemical methods for K, U, and Th. Heat production averaged 2.6 W m-1 K-1 ± 2.0 for 42 felsic samples and 0.9 W m-1 K-1 ± 0.6 for 58 mafic samples. Areal variation in heat production measured with a portable gamma ray spectrometer was compared to bedrock geology and gravity and magnetic anomaly patterns. Gravity lows and magnetic highs correlate with higher heat production and vice versa. Prior to this study heat flow was reported for only four borehole sites in Minnesota. Those sites were located in Keweenawan mafic rocks of the mid-continent rift and heat flow values averaged 39 ± 6 mW m-2. These low heat flows are consistent with a heat flow study conducted in Lake Superior that showed a trough of low heat flow (19.2 - 41.0 mW m-2) along the northern edge of the lake. Thirty-one new heat flow determinations in the mafic rocks obtained from borehole temperature measurements in mining holes average (34.1 mW m-2 ± 1.9 mW m-2). However, paleoclimate signals evident in the temperature vs. depth profiles indicate that the temperature gradients are at least 27 percent low and heat flow is likely 46.7 mW m-2. Based on a reduced heat flow of 32 mW m-2 and a depth parameter of 10 km, the heat flow heat production relation yields a heat flow value of 58 mW m-2 in the felsic regions in Minnesota. These heat flow values suggest that EGS with a binary power plant would be achievable in the felsic regions.

  11. Heat exchanger with oscillating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Various heat exchange apparatuses are described in which an oscillating flow of primary coolant is used to dissipate an incident heat flux. The oscillating flow may be imparted by a reciprocating piston, a double action twin reciprocating piston, fluidic oscillators, or electromagnetic pumps. The oscillating fluid flows through at least one conduit in either an open loop or a closed loop. A secondary flow of coolant may be used to flow over the outer walls of at least one conduit to remove heat transferred from the primary coolant to the walls of the conduit.

  12. Heat exchanger with oscillating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Various heat exchange apparatuses are described in which an oscillating flow of primary coolant is used to dissipate an incident heat flux. The oscillating flow may be imparted by a reciprocating piston, a double action twin reciprocating piston, fluidic oscillators or electromagnetic pumps. The oscillating fluid flows through at least one conduit in either an open loop or a closed loop. A secondary flow of coolant may be used to flow over the outer walls of at least one conduit to remove heat transferred from the primary coolant to the walls of the conduit.

  13. Stress and heat flow

    SciTech Connect

    Lachenbrunch, A.H.; McGarr, A.

    1990-01-01

    As the Pacific plate slides northward past the North American plate along the San Andreas fault, the frictional stress that resists plate motion there is overcome to cause earthquakes. However, the frictional heating predicted for the process has never been detected. Thus, in spite of its importance to an understanding of both plate motion and earthquakes, the size of this frictional stress is still uncertain, even in order of magnitude.

  14. Temperature and energy deficit in the ground during operation and recovery phases of closed-loop ground source heat pump system: Effect of the groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erol, Selcuk; Francois, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    The advection/dispersion mechanism of the groundwater flow in the ground has a significant effect on a borehole heat exchanger (BHE) to enhance its thermal performance. However, the amount of energy extracted from the ground never disappears and only shifts with the magnitude of the effective thermal velocity in the infinite domain. In this work, we focus on the temperature and the energy balance of the ground in an advection/dispersion dominated heat transfer system during the operation period of a BHE and the subsequent recovery phase when the system is idle. The problem is treated with single BHE and multi-BHEs systems, for different representative geology and different groundwater flow velocity. In order to assess the thermal energy deficit due to heat extraction from the ground, we used the finite line source analytical model, developed recently (Erol et al., 2015) that provides the temperature distributions around the boreholes for discontinuous heat extraction. The model is developed based on the Green's function, which is the solution of heat conduction/advection/dispersion equation in porous media, for discontinuous heat extraction by analytically convoluting rectangular function or pulses in time domain. The results demonstrate the significant positive impact of the groundwater flow for the recovery in terms of temperature deficit at the location of the borehole. However, the total thermal energy deficit is not affected by the groundwater movement. The energy balance of the ground is the same no matter the prevailing heat transfer system, which can be only conduction or advection/dispersion. In addition, the energy balance of the ground is not based on either the duration of the production period operation or of the recovery phase, but depends on the total amount of heat that is extracted and on the bulk volumetric heat capacity of the ground.

  15. Coupled flow, thermal and structural analysis of aerodynamically heated panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Dechaumphai, Pramote

    1986-01-01

    A finite element approach to coupling flow, thermal and structural analyses of aerodynamically heated panels is presented. The Navier-Stokes equations for laminar compressible flow are solved together with the energy equation and quasi-static structural equations of the panel. Interactions between the flow, panel heat transfer and deformations are studied for thin stainless steel panels aerodynamically heated by Mach 6.6 flow.

  16. Heat flow in a pyroelectric converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, R. B.; Butler, W. F.; Drummond, J. E.; Bruno, D. A.; Briscoe, J. M.

    1985-12-01

    A simulated pyroelectric converter has been constructed. The heat flow and temperature profiles within the converter have been measured. Computer simulations of the heat flow compare well with the measurements and predict an efficiency of 12 percent of the Carnot limit for a real pyroelectric converter with the operating configuration of the simulation. These heat flow results are useful in considerations of heat engines using active materials other than pyroelectrics, such as Nitinol, when these engines utilize similar heat flow management.

  17. Polar Heat Flow on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D. L.; Johnson, T. V.; Davies, A. G.; Blaney, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, Galileo spacecraft data have revealed Io's polar regions to be much warmer than previously expected. This unexpected development came from Photo-Polarimeter Radiometer (PPR) data which show that the minimum night temperatures are in the range of 90-95 K virtually everywhere on Io. The minimum night temperatures show no dependence upon latitude and, when away from the sunset terminator, they show no dependence upon time of night. This is indeed bizarre behavior for surface units which generally had been assumed to be passive with respect to Io's pervasive volcanism. Night temperatures of 90-95 K at high, polar latitudes are particularly hard to explain. Even assuming infinite thermal inertia, at these latitudes there is insufficient sunlight to support these warm night temperatures. Thus, through the process of elimination of other possibilities, we come to the conclusion that these surfaces are volcanically heated. Taking previously passive units and turning them into new sources of heat flow is a radical departure from previous thermophysical model paradigms. However, the geological interpretation is straight forward. We are simply seeing the effect of old, cool lava flows which cover most of the surface of Io but yet have some heat to radiate. Under these new constraints, we have taken on the challenge of formulating a physical model which quantitatively reproduces all of the observations of Io's thermal emission. In the following we introduce a new parametric model which suffices to identify a previously unrecognized polar component of Io's heat flow.

  18. Role of radiogenic heat generation in surface heat flow formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutorskoi, M. D.; Polyak, B. G.

    2016-03-01

    Heat generation due to decay of long-lived radioactive isotopes is considered in the Earth's crust of the Archean-Proterozoic and Paleozoic provinces of Eurasia and North America. The heat flow that forms in the mantle is calculated as the difference between the heat flow observed at the boundary of the solid Earth and radiogenic heat flow produced in the crust. The heat regime in regions with anomalously high radiogenic heat generation is discussed. The relationship between various heat flow components in the Precambrian and Phanerozoic provinces has been comparatively analyzed, and the role of erosion of the surfaceheat- generating layer has been estimated.

  19. Solar Energy: Heat Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on heat transfer is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies. The…

  20. Solar Energy: Heat Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on heat storage is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies. The module…

  1. Solar Energy: Home Heating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on home heating is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies. The module…

  2. HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

  3. Entropy flow in quantum heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Mohammad; Nazarov, Yuli

    2015-03-01

    We evaluate Shannon and Renyi entropy flows from generic quantum heat engines (QHE) to a weakly-coupled probe environment kept in thermal equilibrium. We show the flows are determined by two quantities: heat flow and fictitious dissipation that manifest the quantum coherence in the engine. Our theory leads to novel physics in quantum heat engines.

  4. Heat flow structure in the Paleozoides of the Central Asian Fold Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutorskoy, M. D.; Lyapunov, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Heat generation produced by radioactive decay of long-lived isotopes in the Earth's crust (radiogenic heat flow) within the Paleozoic provinces of the Central Asian Fold Belt is considered. Heat flow from the mantle is calculated as the difference between the observed heat flow and the radiogenic flow. The major cause of this heat flow is the transition of potential energy of gravity differentiation into heat; in this respect, mantle heat flow is called gravigenic. Calculation shows that the fractions of radiogenic and gravigenic heat flows in the Paleozoides studied are nearly equal.

  5. Heat flow diagnostics for helicon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Berisford, Daniel F.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Raja, Laxminarayan L.; Cassady, Leonard D.; Chancery, William J.

    2008-10-15

    We present experimental studies of power balance in an argon helicon discharge. An infrared camera measures the heating of the dielectric tube containing a helicon discharge based on measurement of temperature profiles of the tube surface before and after a rf pulse. Using this diagnostic, we have measured surface heating trends at a variety of operating conditions on two helicon systems: the 10 kW VASIMR VX-50 experiment and the University of Texas at Austin 1 kW helicon experiment. Power losses downstream from the antenna are measured using thermocouples and probes. The heating of the dielectric tube increases with decreasing magnetic fields, higher gas flow rates, and higher molecular mass of the gas. These preliminary results suggest that cross-field particle diffusion contributes a significant proportion of the energy flux to the wall.

  6. Axial flow heat exchanger devices and methods for heat transfer using axial flow devices

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2016-02-16

    Systems and methods described herein are directed to rotary heat exchangers configured to transfer heat to a heat transfer medium flowing in substantially axial direction within the heat exchangers. Exemplary heat exchangers include a heat conducting structure which is configured to be in thermal contact with a thermal load or a thermal sink, and a heat transfer structure rotatably coupled to the heat conducting structure to form a gap region between the heat conducting structure and the heat transfer structure, the heat transfer structure being configured to rotate during operation of the device. In example devices heat may be transferred across the gap region from a heated axial flow of the heat transfer medium to a cool stationary heat conducting structure, or from a heated stationary conducting structure to a cool axial flow of the heat transfer medium.

  7. Exploring Geothermal Energy Potential in Ireland through 3-D Geophysical-Petrological Modelling of Surface Heat-Flow and Crustal and Upper-Mantle Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullea, J.; Muller, M. R.; Jones, A. G.

    2012-04-01

    Little is known of Ireland's deep, low-enthalpy geothermal resources and the potential for space heating and/or electricity generation based on geothermal energy to displace Ireland's significant reliance on carbon-based fuels. IRETHERM (www.iretherm.ie) is a four-and-a-half year, all-island, academic-government-industry collaborative project, initiated in 2011, with the overarching objective of developing a strategic and holistic understanding of Ireland's geothermal energy potential through integrated modelling of new and existing geophysical and geological data. One of the challenges in searching for deep geothermal resources in the relatively unexplored setting of Ireland lies in identifying those areas most likely to support significantly elevated temperatures at depth. Available borehole data, although sparse and clustered around areas of mineral and hydrocarbon interest, suggest a marked regional increase in surface heat-flow across Ireland, from ~40 mW/m2 in the south to >80 mW/m2 in the north. The origins of both the observed regional heat-flow trend and local temperature anomalies have not been investigated and are not currently understood. Although variations in the structure of the crust and lithosphere have been revealed by a number of active-source seismic and teleseismic experiments, their effects on surface heat-flow have not been modelled. Bulk 3-D variation in crustal heat-production across Ireland, which may contribute significantly to the observed regional and local temperature variations, has also not been determined. We investigate the origins of Ireland's regional heat-flow trend and regional and local temperature variations using the software package LitMod. This software combines petrological and geophysical modelling of the lithosphere and sub-lithospheric upper mantle within an internally consistent thermodynamic-geophysical framework, where all relevant properties are functions of temperature, pressure and chemical composition. The major

  8. Double Stage Heat Transformer Controlled by Flow Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Sotelo, S.; Romero, R. J.; Rodríguez – Martínez, A.

    this paper shows the values of Flow ratio (FR) for control of an absorption double stage heat transformer. The main parameters for the heat pump system are defined as COP, FR and GTL. The control of the entire system is based in a new definition of FR. The heat balance of the Double Stage Heat Transformer (DSHT) is used for the control. The mass flow is calculated for a HPVEE program and a second program control the mass flow. The mass flow is controlled by gear pumps connected to LabView program. The results show an increment in the fraction of the recovery energy. An example of oil distillation is used for the calculation. The waste heat energy is added at the system at 70 °C. Water ™ - Carrol mixture is used in the DSHT. The recover energy is obtained in a second absorber at 128 °C with two scenarios.

  9. Subsurface heat flow in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Grant; Woodbury, Allan D.

    2004-02-01

    The subsurface temperature field beneath Winnipeg, Canada, is significantly different from that of the surrounding rural areas. Downward heat flow to depths as great as 130 m has been noted in some areas beneath the city and groundwater temperatures in a regional aquifer have risen by as much as 5°C in some areas. Numerical simulation of heat transport supports the conjecture that these temperature changes can be largely attributed to heat loss from buildings and the temperature at any given point is sensitive to the distance from and the age of any buildings. The effect is most noticable when buildings are closely spaced, which is typical of urban areas. Temperature measurements in areas more than a few hundred meters away from any heated structure were only a few tenths of a degree Celsius greater than those observed outside the city, suggesting that other reasons for increases in subsurface temperature, such as changes in surface cover or climate change, may be responsible for some of the some of the observed increase in temperatures. These sources of additional heat to the subsurface make it difficult to resolve information on past climates from temperatures measured in boreholes and monitoring wells. In some areas, the temperature increases may also have an impact on geothermal energy resources. This impact might be in the form of an increase in heat pump efficiency or in the case of the Winnipeg area, a decrease in the efficiency of direct use of groundwater for cooling.

  10. A Critical Review of Thermodiffusion Models: Role and Significance of the Heat of Transport and the Activation Energy of Viscous Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslamian, Morteza; Saghir, M. Ziad

    2009-06-01

    In this paper thermodiffusion models developed to estimate the thermal diffusion factor in nonideal liquid mixtures are reviewed; the merits and shortcomings of each model are discussed in detail. Most of these models are multicomponent in principle; however our focus here is on binary mixtures. Two rather different groups of models are identified: models needing a matching parameter to be obtained usually from the outside of thermodynamics, and the self-contained or independent models. Derivation of the matching parameter models using linear non-equilibrium thermodynamics and the details of how to find the matching parameters are investigated. The physical meaning of parameters such as the net heat of transport and the activation energy of viscous flow is elucidated, as the literature is overwhelmed with confusing and misleading information. The so-called dynamic and static models and their relations to the matching and non-matching parameter models are also discussed. We conclude that modeling the net heat of transport by the activation energy of self-diffusion may provide better results than approximating it by the activation energy of viscous flow. Nonetheless, the matching parameter models, which use the activation energy of viscous flow, are more dynamic and predict the thermal diffusion factor better than the non-matching parameter or static models, such as those of Kempers and Haase.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTI-LOOP FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER FACILITY FOR ADVANCED NUCLEAR REACTOR THERMAL HYDRAULIC AND HYBRID ENERGY SYSTEM STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    James E. O'Brien; Piyush Sabharwall; SuJong Yoon

    2001-09-01

    A new high-temperature multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility for advanced nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory. The facility will include three flow loops: high-temperature helium, molten salt, and steam/water. Molten salts have been identified as excellent candidate heat transport fluids for primary or secondary coolant loops, supporting advanced high temperature and small modular reactors (SMRs). Details of some of the design aspects and challenges of this facility, which is currently in the conceptual design phase, are discussed. A preliminary design configuration will be presented, with the required characteristics of the various components. The loop will utilize advanced high-temperature compact printed-circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs) operating at prototypic intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) conditions. The initial configuration will include a high-temperature (750°C), high-pressure (7 MPa) helium loop thermally integrated with a molten fluoride salt (KF-ZrF4) flow loop operating at low pressure (0.2 MPa) at a temperature of ~450°C. Experiment design challenges include identification of suitable materials and components that will withstand the required loop operating conditions. Corrosion and high temperature creep behavior are major considerations. The facility will include a thermal energy storage capability designed to support scaled process heat delivery for a variety of hybrid energy systems and grid stabilization strategies. Experimental results obtained from this research will also provide important data for code ve

  12. Buoyancy driven flow in counter flow heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, C. O.

    2012-11-01

    The temperature distribution, the buoyancy head and the flow rate have been studied in a counter flow heat exchanger having buoyancy driven flow on at least one side. The assumptions made for heat flux distribution are varied and the resulting effects on the flow rate and fluid temperatures are studied. A network model is used to simulate the temperature distribution and oil flow rates in an oil-filled power transformer cooled by radiators. It is found that for operating conditions normally found for mineral oil the counter flow assumptions for heat flux distribution gives approximately the same results as assuming uniform heat flux. When a more viscous oil type is used or the radiators are placed lower than normal relative to the heat generating parts, the counter flow assumptions give more reliable results.

  13. Exhaust bypass flow control for exhaust heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Michael G.

    2015-09-22

    An exhaust system for an engine comprises an exhaust heat recovery apparatus configured to receive exhaust gas from the engine and comprises a first flow passage in fluid communication with the exhaust gas and a second flow passage in fluid communication with the exhaust gas. A heat exchanger/energy recovery unit is disposed in the second flow passage and has a working fluid circulating therethrough for exchange of heat from the exhaust gas to the working fluid. A control valve is disposed downstream of the first and the second flow passages in a low temperature region of the exhaust heat recovery apparatus to direct exhaust gas through the first flow passage or the second flow passage.

  14. New heat flow determination in northern Tarim Craton, northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaowen; Lei, Xiao; Wang, Liangshu

    2015-02-01

    Tarim Craton is a Precambrian block situated in northwest China, just north of the Tibetan Plateau, where a large sedimentary basin with abundant hydrocarbon potential has developed. Accurate heat flow data for Tarim is vital for understanding the lithospheric evolution and hydrocarbon generation in this area; however, there were unavailable until now, due to a lack of high quality steady-state temperature logging data. Here, we report 10 new heat flow values derived from steady-state temperature logging and measured thermal conductivity data. New heat flow values range from 40.1 to 49.4 mW m-2, with a mean of 43.1 ± 3.0 mW m-2. In addition, radiogenic heat production from the sediments accounts for 20 per cent of the observed surface heat flow, whilst the mantle heat flow is estimated to be as low as 6-15 mW m-2; this indicates a dominant contribution from crustal heat, to the observed heat flow. The average heat flow and crustal temperature in the Tarim Craton are markedly lower than those in the Tibetan Plateau, whilst the calculated rheological strength of the lithosphere, beneath Tarim, is sufficiently large to resist the elevation-induced gravitational potential energy difference between Tarim and Tibet. This inherited thermal and rheological contrast, between the craton and Plateau, can be traced back to before the India-Asia collision; this accounts for the differential active deformation pattern in the Tarim Craton and adjacent areas.

  15. Energy absorber for sodium-heated heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Essebaggers, J.

    1975-12-01

    A heat exchanger is described in which water-carrying tubes are heated by liquid sodium and in which the results of accidental contact between the water and the sodium caused by failure of one or more of the water tubes is minimized. An energy absorbing chamber contains a compressible gas and is connected to the body of flowing sodium by a channel so that, in the event of a sodium-water reaction, products of the reaction will partially fill the energy absorbing chamber to attenuate the rise in pressure within the heat exchanger.

  16. A New U.S. Marine Heat Flow Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R. N.; Fisher, A. T.

    2009-12-01

    Marine heat flow observations provide critical information on physical, chemical and biological processes occurring near and below the seafloor. Renewed interest in the collection and application of marine heat flow data to a broad range of scientific purposes is indicated by a renaissance in heat flow studies and publications over the last 10-15 years, as documented by a recent NSF-sponsored workshop and report on the Future of Marine Heat Flow [Harris et al., 2007]. Fundamental questions of geodynamics, global mass and energy fluxes across the seafloor, marine hydrogeology, gas hydrates, marine microbiology, sedimentary processes and other topics are addressed in recent heat flow studies. To facilitate these measurements we are establishing a marine heat flow capability for use by U.S. academic researchers on standard UNOLS vessels in collaboration with the Oregon State University coring capability. This capability includes two main sets of instruments: 1) A multipenetration probe that allows multiple measurements of heat flow, the product of the thermal gradient and thermal conductivity, with a single instrument transit to the seafloor; and 2) an outrigger probe system that allows measurements at a single location when a gravity or piston core is collected. A thermal conductivity needle probe system for use on recovered core samples will complete the determination of heat flow using outrigger probes, and supplement in-situ measurements from the multipenetration probe. This capability is available to U.S. scientists for an initial five-year period through funding from the National Science Foundation. Researchers wishing to include measurements of marine heat flow as part of a field program can request access to equipment, software, and technical support through the UNOLS ship time request system, and should consult early in the cruise planning process with US heat flow capability personnel to determine specific needs and capabilities. More information is

  17. Heat Transfer Enhancement in Separated and Vortex Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Richard J. Goldstein

    2004-05-27

    This document summarizes the research performance done at the Heat Transfer Laboratory of the University of Minnesota on heat transfer and energy separation in separated and vortex flow supported by DOE in the period September 1, 1998--August 31, 2003. Unsteady and complicated flow structures in separated or vortex flows are the main reason for a poor understanding of heat transfer under such conditions. The research from the University of Minnesota focused on the following important aspects of understanding such flows: (1) Heat/mass transfer from a circular cylinder; (2) study of energy separation and heat transfer in free jet flows and shear layers; and (3) study of energy separation on the surface and in the wake of a cylinder in crossflow. The current study used three different experimental setups to accomplish these goals. A wind tunnel and a liquid tunnel using water and mixtures of ethylene glycol and water, is used for the study of prandtl number effect with uniform heat flux from the circular cylinder. A high velocity air jet is used to study energy separation in free jets. A high speed wind tunnel, same as used for the first part, is utilized for energy separation effects on the surface and in the wake of the circular cylinder. The final outcome of this study is a substantial advancement in this research area.

  18. The impact of separated flow on heat and mass transfer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.J.

    1998-08-01

    An investigation of the effect of flow separation on heat and mass transfer has been completed. This research provided enhanced understanding of fundamental mechanisms governing important heat and mass transfer flow processes. This report summarizes the work conducted under the project. This research has provided considerable new knowledge on flow and heat transfer situations of great interest in a number of energy conversion devices, including heat exchangers, gas turbines, solar energy systems and general heat transfer systems.

  19. Analysis of Heat Transfers inside Counterflow Plate Heat Exchanger Augmented by an Auxiliary Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Khaled, A.-R. A.

    2014-01-01

    Enhancement of heat transfers in counterflow plate heat exchanger due to presence of an intermediate auxiliary fluid flow is investigated. The intermediate auxiliary channel is supported by transverse conducting pins. The momentum and energy equations for the primary fluids are solved numerically and validated against a derived approximate analytical solution. A parametric study including the effect of the various plate heat exchanger, and auxiliary channel dimensionless parameters is conducted. Different enhancement performance indicators are computed. The various trends of parameters that can better enhance heat transfer rates above those for the conventional plate heat exchanger are identified. Large enhancement factors are obtained under fully developed flow conditions. The maximum enhancement factors can be increased by above 8.0- and 5.0-fold for the step and exponential distributions of the pins, respectively. Finally, counterflow plate heat exchangers with auxiliary fluid flows are recommended over the typical ones if these flows can be provided with the least cost. PMID:24719572

  20. Heat flow in the postquasistatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Mueller, B.; Peralta, C.; Barreto, W.; Rosales, L.

    2010-08-15

    We apply the postquasistatic approximation to study the evolution of spherically symmetric fluid distributions undergoing dissipation in the form of radial heat flow. For a model that corresponds to an incompressible fluid departing from the static equilibrium, it is not possible to go far from the initial state after the emission of a small amount of energy. Initially collapsing distributions of matter are not permitted. Emission of energy can be considered as a mechanism to avoid the collapse. If the distribution collapses initially and emits one hundredth of the initial mass only the outermost layers evolve. For a model that corresponds to a highly compressed Fermi gas, only the outermost shell can evolve with a shorter hydrodynamic time scale.

  1. Heat flow from the Liberian precambrian shield

    SciTech Connect

    Sass, J.H.; Behrendt, J.C.

    1980-06-10

    Uncorrected heat flow in iron formation rocks from three areas within the Liberian part of the West African Shield ranges from 50 to more than 80 mW m/sup -2/. When corrections are applied for topography and refraction, the range of heat flow is narrowed to between 38 and 42 mW m/sup -2/. In comparison with heat flows from other parts of the West African Craton, these values are consistent with preliminary results from Ghana (42 +- 8 mW m/sup -2/) and Nigeria (38 +- 2 mW /sup -2/) but are somewhat higher than values from Niger (20 mW m/sup -2/) and neighboring Sierra Leone (26 mW m/sup -2/). The Liberian values are significantly lower than the heat flow offshore in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean (58 +- 8 mW m/sup -2/), suggesting large lateral temperature gradients within the lithosphere near the coast. Values of heat production from outcrops of crystalline basement rocks near the holes are between 2 and 2.3 ..mu..W m/sup -3/. A heat-flow/heat-production relation cannot be established because of the small range of values; however, assuming a 'characteristic depth' of 8 km (similar to the North American Craton) the reduced heat flow of from 20 to 25 mW m/sup -2/ is consistent with that from other Precambrian shields.

  2. New Map of Io's Volcanic Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A. G.; Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D.; Johnson, T. V.

    2014-12-01

    We have created a global map of Io's volcanic heat flow from 245 thermal sources indicative of ongoing or recent volcanic activity, and 8 additional outbursts [1,2]. We incorporate data from both spacecraft and ground-based instruments that have observed Io primarily at infrared wavelengths. This map provides a snapshot of Io's volcanic activity and distribution during the Galileo epoch. Io's volcanic activity, in terms of thermal emission from individual eruptive centres, spans nearly six orders of magnitude, from Surt in 2001 (78 TW) [3] to a faint hot spot in patera P197 (0.2 GW) [1]. We account for ≈54% of Io's yearly volcanic heat flow, which emanates from ≈2% of Io's surface [1]. Averaged heat flow from the non-active surface is 1 ± 0.2 W m2. This quantification of volcanic heat flow map provides constraints for modelling the magnitude and location of the internal heating of Io by tidal dissipation. The observed heat flow distribution is the result of interior heating and volcanic advection, the delivery of magma to the surface regardless of its depth of origin. As noted previously [1, 2] the distribution of heat flow is not uniform, which is not unexpected. The volcanic heat flow does not match the expected distributions from end-member models for both the deep-seated (mantle) heating model (which predicts enhanced polar heating) and the shallow (aesthenospheric) heating model, which predicts enhanced thermal emission at sub-jovian and anti-jovian longitudes. Intriguingly, heat flow curves using a bin size of 30 degrees show a longitudinal offset from the shallow heating model prediction of some tens of degrees [2], suggesting a more complex mixture of deep and shallow heating. Future work includes refinement of thermal emission by including temporal variability of thermal emission at individual volcanoes, and comparing the heat flow map with the Io Geological Map [4] and global topography [5]. We thank the NASA OPR Program for support. Part of this

  3. Motorcycle waste heat energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichting, Alexander D.; Anton, Steven R.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2008-03-01

    Environmental concerns coupled with the depletion of fuel sources has led to research on ethanol, fuel cells, and even generating electricity from vibrations. Much of the research in these areas is stalling due to expensive or environmentally contaminating processes, however recent breakthroughs in materials and production has created a surge in research on waste heat energy harvesting devices. The thermoelectric generators (TEGs) used in waste heat energy harvesting are governed by the Thermoelectric, or Seebeck, effect, generating electricity from a temperature gradient. Some research to date has featured platforms such as heavy duty diesel trucks, model airplanes, and automobiles, attempting to either eliminate heavy batteries or the alternator. A motorcycle is another platform that possesses some very promising characteristics for waste heat energy harvesting, mainly because the exhaust pipes are exposed to significant amounts of air flow. A 1995 Kawasaki Ninja 250R was used for these trials. The module used in these experiments, the Melcor HT3-12-30, produced an average of 0.4694 W from an average temperature gradient of 48.73 °C. The mathematical model created from the Thermoelectric effect equation and the mean Seebeck coefficient displayed by the module produced an average error from the experimental data of 1.75%. Although the module proved insufficient to practically eliminate the alternator on a standard motorcycle, the temperature data gathered as well as the examination of a simple, yet accurate, model represent significant steps in the process of creating a TEG capable of doing so.

  4. Pneumatic Proboscis Heat-Flow Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zacny, Kris; Hedlund, Magnus; Mumm, Eric; Shasho, Jeffrey; Chu, Philip; Kumar, Nishant

    2013-01-01

    Heat flow is a fundamental property of a planet, and provides significant constraints on the abundance of radiogenic isotopes, the thermal evolution and differentiation history, and the mechanical properties of the lithosphere. Heat-flow measurements are also essential in achieving at least four of the goals set out by the National Research Council for future lunar exploration. The heat-flow probe therefore directly addresses the goal of the Lunar Geophysical Network, which is to understand the interior structure and composition of the Moon. A key challenge for heat flow measurement is to install thermal sensors to the depths approximately equal to 3 m that are not influenced by the diurnal, annual, and longer-term fluctuations of the surface thermal environment. In addition, once deployed, the heat flow probe should cause little disturbance to the thermal regime of the surrounding regolith. A heat-flow probe system was developed that has two novel features: (1) it utilizes a pneumatic (gas) approach, excavates a hole by lofting the lunar soil out of the hole, and (2) deploys the heat flow probe, which utilizes a coiled up tape as a thermal probe to reach greater than 3-meter depth. The system is a game-changer for small lunar landers as it exhibits extremely low mass, volume, and simple deployment. The pneumatic system takes advantage of the helium gas used for pressurizing liquid propellant of the lander. Normally, helium is vented once the lander is on the surface, but it can be utilized for powering pneumatic systems. Should sufficient helium not be available, a simple gas delivery system may be taken specifically for the heat flow probe. Either way, the pneumatic heat flow probe system would be much lighter than other systems that entirely rely on the electrical power of the lander.

  5. The Development of an INL Capability for High Temperature Flow, Heat Transfer, and Thermal Energy Storage with Applications in Advanced Small Modular Reactors, High Temperature Heat Exchangers, Hybrid Energy Systems, and Dynamic Grid Energy Storage C

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Kim, Inhun; O'Brien, James; Sabharwall, Piyush

    2014-10-01

    The overall goal of this project is to support Idaho National Laboratory in developing a new advanced high temperature multi fluid multi loop test facility that is aimed at investigating fluid flow and heat transfer, material corrosion, heat exchanger characteristics and instrumentation performance, among others, for nuclear applications. Specifically, preliminary research has been performed at The Ohio State University in the following areas: 1. A review of fluoride molten salts’ characteristics in thermal, corrosive, and compatibility performances. A recommendation for a salt selection is provided. Material candidates for both molten salt and helium flow loop have been identified. 2. A conceptual facility design that satisfies the multi loop (two coolant loops [i.e., fluoride molten salts and helium]) multi purpose (two operation modes [i.e., forced and natural circulation]) requirements. Schematic models are presented. The thermal hydraulic performances in a preliminary printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) design have been estimated. 3. An introduction of computational methods and models for pipe heat loss analysis and cases studies. Recommendations on insulation material selection have been provided. 4. An analysis of pipe pressure rating and sizing. Preliminary recommendations on pipe size selection have been provided. 5. A review of molten fluoride salt preparation and chemistry control. An introduction to the experience from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been provided. 6. A review of some instruments and components to be used in the facility. Flowmeters and Grayloc connectors have been included. This report primarily presents the conclusions drawn from the extensive review of literatures in material selections and the facility design progress at the current stage. It provides some useful guidelines in insulation material and pipe size selection, as well as an introductory review of facility process and components.

  6. Thermodynamics of Flow Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, F. J.

    2003-05-01

    Convective boiling in sub-cooled water flowing through a heated channel is essential in many engineering applications where high heat flux needs to be accommodated. It has been customary to represent the heat transfer by the boiling curve, which shows the heat flux versus the wall-minus-saturation temperature difference. However it is a rather complicated problem, and recent revisions of two-phase flow and heat transfer note that calculated values of boiling heat transfer coefficients present many uncertainties. Quite recently, the author has shown that the average thermal gap in the heated channel (the wall temperature minus the average temperature of the coolant) was tightly connected with the thermodynamic efficiency of a theoretical reversible engine placed in this thermal gap. In this work, whereas this correlation is checked again with data taken by General Electric (task III) for water at high pressure, a possible connection between this wall efficiency and the reversible-work theorem is explored.

  7. Flow and convective heat transfer in cylindrical reversed flow combustion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Kilic, M.

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents a computational study of the flow and convective heat transfer in cylindrical reversed flow combustion chambers. The computations are performed using an elliptic solver incorporates the {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model. Heat production by combustion is simulated by adding heat generation source terms in the energy equation. And it is assumed that heat generation occurs only a section of the furnace. A number of different inlet conditions with different geometries are considered, and the changes of flow structure, temperature distribution, convective heat flux rate are presented and compared. The results show that, in general, heat transfer in the reversed flow combustion chamber can be improved by properly chosen geometry for the required output.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Flow Instability and Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Hua-Shu; Jiang, Gang

    2014-11-01

    This paper numerically investigates the physical mechanism of flow instability and heat transfer of natural convection in a cavity with thin fin(s). The left and the right walls of the cavity are differentially heated. The cavity is given an initial temperature, and the thin fin(s) is fixed on the hot wall in order to control the heat transfer. The finite volume method with the SIMPLE scheme is used to simulate the flow. Distributions of the temperature, the pressure, the velocity and the total pressure are achieved. Then, the energy gradient method is employed to study the physical mechanism of flow instability and the effect of the thin fin(s) on heat transfer. Based on the energy gradient method, the energy gradient function K represents the characteristic of flow instability. It is observed from the simulation results that the positions where instabilities take place in the temperature contours accord well with those of higher K value, which demonstrates that the energy gradient method reveals the physical mechanism of flow instability. Furthermore, the effect of the fin length, the fin position, the fin number, and Ra on heat transfer is also investigated. It is found that the effect of the fin length on heat transfer is negligible when Ra is relatively high. When there is only one fin, the most efficient heat transfer rate is achieved as the fin is fixed at the middle height of the cavity. The fin blocks heat transfer with a relatively small Ra, but the fin enhances heat transfer with a relatively large Ra. The fin(s) enhances heat transfer gradually with the increase of Ra under the influence of the thin fin(s). Finally, it is observed that both Kmax and Ra can reveal the physical mechanism of natural convection from different approaches.

  9. Heat flow from the West African shield

    SciTech Connect

    Brigaud, F.; Lucazeau, F.; Ly, S.; Sauvage, J.F.

    1985-09-01

    The heat flow over Precambrian shields is generally lower than over other continental provinces. Previous observations at 9 sites of the West African shield have shown that heat flow ranges from 20 mW m/sup -2/ in Niger to 38-42 mW m/sup -2/ in Liberia, Ghana and Nigeria. Since some of these values are lower than expected for Precambrian shields, it is important to find out whether or not they are representative of the entire shield before trying to derive its thermal structure. In this paper, we present new heat flow determinations from seven sites of the West African shield. These indicate that the surface heat flow is comparable with that of other Precambrian shields in the world.

  10. Flow and heat transfer enhancement in tube heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed Ahmed, Sayed Ahmed E.; Mesalhy, Osama M.; Abdelatief, Mohamed A.

    2015-11-01

    The performance of heat exchangers can be improved to perform a certain heat-transfer duty by heat transfer enhancement techniques. Enhancement techniques can be divided into two categories: passive and active. Active methods require external power, such as electric or acoustic field, mechanical devices, or surface vibration, whereas passive methods do not require external power but make use of a special surface geometry or fluid additive which cause heat transfer enhancement. The majority of commercially interesting enhancement techniques are passive ones. This paper presents a review of published works on the characteristics of heat transfer and flow in finned tube heat exchangers of the existing patterns. The review considers plain, louvered, slit, wavy, annular, longitudinal, and serrated fins. This review can be indicated by the status of the research in this area which is important. The comparison of finned tubes heat exchangers shows that those with slit, plain, and wavy finned tubes have the highest values of area goodness factor while the heat exchanger with annular fin shows the lowest. A better heat transfer coefficient ha is found for a heat exchanger with louvered finned and thus should be regarded as the most efficient one, at fixed pumping power per heat transfer area. This study points out that although numerous studies have been conducted on the characteristics of flow and heat transfer in round, elliptical, and flat tubes, studies on some types of streamlined-tubes shapes are limited, especially on wing-shaped tubes (Sayed Ahmed et al. in Heat Mass Transf 50: 1091-1102, 2014; in Heat Mass Transf 51: 1001-1016, 2015). It is recommended that further detailed studies via numerical simulations and/or experimental investigations should be carried out, in the future, to put further insight to these fin designs.

  11. Flow-Dependent Vascular Heat Transfer during Microwave Thermal Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Jason; Hynes, Kieran; Brace, Christopher L.

    2012-01-01

    Microwave tumor ablation is an attractive option for thermal ablation because of its inherent benefits over radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the treatment of solid tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Microwave energy heats tissue to higher temperatures and at a faster rate than RFA, creating larger, more homogenous ablation zones. In this study, we investigate microwave heating near large vasculature using coupled fluid-flow and thermal analysis. Low-flow conditions are predicted to be more likely to cause cytotoxic heating and, therefore, vessel thrombosis and endothelial damage of downstream tissues. Such conditions may be more prevalent in patient with severe cirrhosis or compromised blood flow. High-flow conditions create the more familiar heat-sink effect that can protect perivascular tissues from the intended thermal damage. These results may help guide placement and use of microwave ablation technologies in future studies. PMID:23367194

  12. Heat-flow mapping at the Geysers Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.P.

    1986-10-31

    Pertinent data were compiled for 187 temperature-gradient holes in the vicinity of The Geysers Geothermal field. Terrain-correction techniques were applied to most of the temperature-gradient data, and a temperature-gradient map was constructed. Cutting samples from 16, deep, production wells were analyzed for thermal conductivity. From these samples, the mean thermal conductivities were determined for serpentinized ultramafic rock, greenstone, and graywacke. Then, a heat flow map was made. The temperature-gradient and heat-flow maps show that The Geysers Geothermal field is part of a very large, northwesterly-trending, thermal anomaly; the commercially productive portion of the field may be 100 km/sup 2/ in area. The rate that heat energy flows through the surface by thermal conduction is estimated at 1.79 x 10/sup 9/MJ per year. The net heat energy loss from commercial production for 1983 is estimated at 180.14 x 10/sup 9/MJ.

  13. Energy 101: Geothermal Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    An energy-efficient heating and cooling alternative, the geothermal heat pump system moves heat from the ground to a building (or from a building to the ground) through a series of flexible pipe "loops" containing water. This edition of Energy 101 explores the benefits Geothermal and the science behind how it all comes together.

  14. Energy 101: Geothermal Heat Pumps

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-29

    An energy-efficient heating and cooling alternative, the geothermal heat pump system moves heat from the ground to a building (or from a building to the ground) through a series of flexible pipe "loops" containing water. This edition of Energy 101 explores the benefits Geothermal and the science behind how it all comes together.

  15. Comparisons of Earthward Poynting flux and the kinetic energy flux of up-flowing transversely heated ions from the Polar spacecraft on cusp magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, S.; Wygant, J. R.; Cattell, C. A.; Scudder, J. D.; Mozer, F.; Russell, C. T.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents estimates of the Poynting flux flowing along magnetic field lines in the Earth's cusp region over altitudes from 0.8 Re to 7 Re using measurements during several passes from the Polar spacecraft. The Poynting flux is calculated from measurements of electric fields from the University of California, Berkeley double probe electric field instrument, and from magnetic field measurements from the U.C.L.A. fluxgate magnetometer. The estimates of Poynting flux are of special interest because the high altitude mapping of the cusp magnetic flux tubes may connect to newly reconnected field lines and the low altitude mapping of these field lines is the scene of powerful acceleration processes, most notably transverse heating and outflow of ions. The data show that the Poynting flux is predominantly downward over the frequency range from 1 mHz to 1 Hz . This frequency range includes the Poynting flux due to steady state convection and field-aligned current systems, Alfven waves, and kinetic Alfven waves. Measurement of transversely heated ions over the energy ranges from 10 eV to several keV and their associated ion kinetic energy flux are presented from the University of Iowa Hydra instrument and compared to the values of the downward Poynting flux. Generally the downward Poynting flux exceeds the upward kinetic energy flux of the ions.

  16. Earth tides, global heat flow, and tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, H.R.

    1970-01-01

    The power of a heat engine ignited by tidal energy can account for geologically reasonable rates of average magma production and sea floor spreading. These rates control similarity of heat flux over continents and oceans because of an inverse relationship between respective depth intervals for mass transfer and consequent distributions of radiogenic heat production.

  17. Cryogenic fluid flow instabilities in heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, R. B.; Staub, F. W.

    1969-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigation determines the nature of oscillations and instabilities that occur in the flow of two-phase cryogenic fluids at both subcritical and supercritical pressures in heat exchangers. Test results with varying system parameters suggest certain design approaches with regard to heat exchanger geometry.

  18. Heat Flow of the Norwegian Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, C.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial heat flow determination is of prime interest for oil industry because it impacts directly maturation histories and economic potential of oil fields. Published systematic heat flow determinations from major oil provinces are however seldom. Robust heat flow determinations in drillholes require logging of undisturbed temperatures and intensive sampling of core material for petrophysical measurements. Temperature logging in exploration drillholes is traditionally conducted during drill breaks or shortly after drilling, resulting in temperatures severely disturbed by mud circulation and coring is restricted to selected intervals. Alternatively, test temperatures, information from electric logs and lithological descriptions of drill cuttings can be used to overcome these limitations. The present contribution introduces new heat flow determinations based on 63 exploration drillholes from the Norwegian North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin and the Barents Shelf. Our analyses are based on released DST temperatures, precise lithological descriptions of drill cuttings, previously measured rock matrix thermal conductivities and established porosity laws. For the sake of comparison, we carefully review previous heat flow studies carried out both onshore and offshore Norway. Our results suggest median heat flow values of 64 mW/m2, 65 mW/m2 and 72 mW/m2 for the North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin (mainly the Trøndelag Platform) and the SW Barents Shelf respectively. In detail, heat flow increases by ~ 10 mW/m2 from the southern Norwegian North Sea towards the Mid Norway Margin. This result appears to be in very good agreement with seismic tomographic studies suggesting northward thinning of the underlying mantle lithosphere. Our results together with published marine heat flow data from the Mid Norway Margin suggest a gradual decrease in heat flow levels from both the North Sea and the Trøndelag Platform towards the centres of the deep Møre and Vøring basins. This latter

  19. Heat flow and heat generation in greenstone belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drury, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Heat flow has been measured in Precambrian shields in both greenstone belts and crystalline terrains. Values are generally low, reflecting the great age and tectonic stability of the shields; they range typically between 30 and 50 mW/sq m, although extreme values of 18 and 79 mW/sq m have been reported. For large areas of the Earth's surface that are assumed to have been subjected to a common thermotectonic event, plots of heat flow against heat generation appear to be linear, although there may be considerable scatter in the data. The relationship is expressed as: Q = Q sub o + D A sub o in which Q is the observed heat flow, A sub o is the measured heat generation at the surface, Q sub o is the reduced heat flow from the lower crust and mantle, and D, which has the dimension of length, represents a scale depth for the distribution of radiogenic elements. Most authors have not used data from greenstone belts in attempting to define the relationship within shields, considering them unrepresentative and preferring to use data from relatively homogeneous crystalline rocks. A discussion follows.

  20. Heat flow of the Norwegian continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial heat flow influences a large collection of geological processes. Its determination is a requirement to assess the economic potential of deep sedimentary basins. Published heat flow calculations from e.g. major oil provinces are however seldom. Robust heat flow determinations in drillholes require logging of undisturbed temperatures and intensive sampling of core material for petrophysical measurements. Temperature logging in exploration drillholes is traditionally conducted during drill breaks or shortly after drilling, resulting in temperatures severely disturbed by mud circulation and coring is restricted to selected intervals. Alternatively, test temperatures, information from electric logs and lithological descriptions of drill cuttings can be used to overcome these limitations. The present contribution introduces new heat flow determinations based on 63 exploration drillholes from the Norwegian North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin and the Barents Shelf. Our analyses are based on released DST temperatures, precise lithological descriptions of drill cuttings, previously measured rock matrix thermal conductivities and established porosity laws. Our results suggest median heat flow values of 64 mW/m2, 65 mW/m2 and 72 mW/m2 for the North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin (mainly the Trøndelag Platform) and the SW Barents Shelf respectively. The Barents Shelf shows significantly high heat flow, suggesting lateral transfer of heat from the mantle of the adjacent young ocean. In detail, heat flow increases by ~ 10 mW/m2 from the southern Norwegian North Sea towards the Mid Norway Margin. This result appears to be in very good agreement with seismic tomographic studies suggesting northward thinning of the underlying mantle lithosphere. Our results together with published marine heat flow data from the Mid Norway Margin suggest a gradual decrease in heat flow levels from both the North Sea and the Trøndelag Platform towards the centres of the deep Møre and V

  1. Basic study of heat flow in fusion welding. Progress report to the US Department of Energy, October 1, 1980-October 1, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Szekely, J.; Eagar, T.W.

    1981-10-15

    Progress is reported in an investigation whose purpose is the development of a fundamental understanding of heat and fluid flow in fusion welding operations and of the role played by heat and fluid flow in determining the mechanical and structural properties of the welds produced. To date, a good quantitative description has been developed of the temperature profiles for electroslag welding systems and an understanding has been derived of factors that determine the size of the heat-affected zone (HAZ). Mathematical models of heat and fluid flow in the weld pool and of the temperature distribution in weldments using a moving heat source were developed. Experiments were performed to determine the effects of welding process parameters on the size and shape of the weld pool and of the HAZ. An unexpected finding was that the size of the HAZ was not markedly dependent on any of the welding process parameters. (LCL)

  2. The Flow of Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Znidarsic, F.; Robertson, G. A.

    In this paper, the flow of energy in materials is presented as mechanical waves with a distinct velocity or speed of transition. This speed of transition came about through the observations of cold fusion experiments, i.e., Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR) and superconductor gravity experiments, both assumed speculative by mainstream science. In consideration of superconductor junctions, the LENR experiments have a similar speed of transition, which seems to imply that the reactions in the LENR experiment are discrete quantized reactions (energy - burst vs. continuous). Here an attempt is made to quantify this new condition as it applies to electrons; toward the progression of quantized energy flows (discrete energy burst) as a new source of clean energy and force mechanisms (i.e, propulsion).

  3. Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. Subba

    1993-01-01

    Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic space vehicles is an important factor to be considered in their design. Therefore the designers of such vehicles need reliable heat transfer data in this respect for a successful design. Such data is usually produced by testing the models of hypersonic surfaces in wind tunnels. Most of the hypersonic test facilities at present are conventional blow-down tunnels whose run times are of the order of several seconds. The surface temperatures on such models are obtained using standard techniques such as thin-film resistance gages, thin-skin transient calorimeter gages and coaxial thermocouple or video acquisition systems such as phosphor thermography and infrared thermography. The data are usually reduced assuming that the model behaves like a semi-infinite solid (SIS) with constant properties and that heat transfer is by one-dimensional conduction only. This simplifying assumption may be valid in cases where models are thick, run-times short, and thermal diffusivities small. In many instances, however, when these conditions are not met, the assumption may lead to significant errors in the heat transfer results. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate this aspect. Specifically, the objectives are as follows: (1) to determine the limiting conditions under which a model can be considered a semi-infinite body; (2) to estimate the extent of errors involved in the reduction of the data if the models violate the assumption; and (3) to come up with correlation factors which when multiplied by the results obtained under the SIS assumption will provide the results under the actual conditions.

  4. Heat flow and efficiency in a microscopic engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, B.-Q.; Xie, H.-Z.; Wen, D.-H.; Liu, X.-M.; Liu, L.-G.

    2005-11-01

    We study the energetics of a thermal motor driven by temperature differences, which consists of a Brownian particle moving in a sawtooth potential with an external load where the viscous medium is periodically in contact with hot and cold heat reservoir along space coordinate. The motor can work as a heat engine or a refrigerator under different conditions. The heat flow via both potential and kinetic energy is considered. The former is reversible when the engine works quasistatically and the latter is always irreversible. The efficiency of the heat engine can never approach Carnot efficiency.

  5. Coupling of volatile transport and internal heat flow on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert H.; Kirk, Randolph L.

    1994-01-01

    Recently Brown et al. (1991) showed that Triton's internal heat source could amount to 5-20% of the absorbed insolation on Triton, thus significantly affecting volatile transport and atmospheric pressure. Subsequently, Kirk and Brown (1991a) used simple analytical models of the effect of internal heat on the distribution of volatiles on Triton's surface, confirming the speculation of Brown et al. that Triton's internal heat flow could strongly couple to the surface volatile distribution. To further explore this idea, we present numerical models of the permanent distribution of nitrogen ice on Triton that include the effects of sunlight, the two-dimensional distribution of internal heat flow, the coupling of internal heat flow to the surface distribution of nitrogen ice, and the finite viscosity of nitrogen ice. From these models we conclude that: (1) The strong vertical thermal gradient induced in Triton's polar caps by internal heat-flow facilitates viscous spreading to lower latitudes, thus opposing the poleward transport of volatiles by sunlight, and, for plausible viscosities and nitrogen inventories, producing permanent caps of considerable latitudinal extent; (2) It is probable that there is a strong coupling between the surface distribution of nitrogen ice on Triton and internal heat flow; (3) Asymmetries in the spatial distribution of Triton's heat flow, possibly driven by large-scale, volcanic activity or convection in Triton's interior, can result in permanent polar caps of unequal latitudinal extent, including the case of only one permanent polar cap; (4) Melting at the base of a permanent polar cap on Triton caused by internal heat flow can significantly enhance viscous spreading, and, as an alternative to the solid-state greenhouse mechanism proposed by Brown et al. (1990), could provide the necessary energy, fluids, and/or gases to drive Triton's geyser-like plumes; (5) The atmospheric collapse predicted to occur on Triton in the next 20 years

  6. Ionospheric Heating Rates Associated with Solar Wind Forcing: Ejecta flow, High Speed Flow and Slow Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipp, D. J.; Kasprzak, B.; Richardson, I.; Paige, T.; Evans, D.

    2001-12-01

    We present estimates of global ionospheric Joule and particle heating as a function of solar wind flow types over solar cycles 21, 22 and the first half of solar cycle 23. Richardson et al., [JGR, 2000] used a variety of techniques to categorize the solar wind flow as ejecta, high-speed stream or slow flow. Their work provides the basis for our catigorization of heating by flow type. The estimates of Joule heating are based on output of the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) procedure, and fits to the Polar Cap Index [Chun et al., GRL, 1999]. Estimates of particle heating are derived from polar orbiting satellites. Although ejecta only account for 19% of the solar wind flow, they account for 27% of the Joule heating. High-speed stream flow accounts for 47% of the flow occurrence and 44% of the Joule heating. We will show similar comparisons for particle heating. Our solar cycle statistics indicate that Joule heating produces a yearly average hemispheric heating rate of 53 GW while particles produce a hemispheric heating rate of 38 GW. Joule heating exhibits more variability than particle heating. During solar cycle maximum years Joule heating accounts for twice the heating associated with particles heating.

  7. Azimuthal Stress and Heat Flux In Radiatively Inefficient Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devlen, Ebru

    2016-07-01

    Radiatively Inefficient Accretion Flows (RIAFs) have low radiative efficiencies and/or low accretion rates. The accreting gas may retain most of its binding energy in the form of heat. This lost energy for hot RIAFs is one of the problems heavily worked on in the literature. RIAF observations on the accretion to super massive black holes (e.g., Sagittarius A* in the center of our Galaxy) have shown that the observational data are not consistent with either advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) or Bondi models. For this reason, it is very important to theoretically comprehend the physical properties of RIAFs derived from observations with a new disk/flow model. One of the most probable candidates for definition of mass accretion and the source of excess heat energy in RIAFs is the gyroviscous modified magnetorotational instability (GvMRI). Dispersion relation is derived by using MHD equations containing heat flux term based on viscosity in the energy equation. Numerical solutions of the disk equations are done and the growth rates of the instability are calculated. This additional heat flux plays an important role in dissipation of energy. The rates of the angular momentum and heat flux which are obtained from numerical calculations of the turbulence brought about by the GVMRI are also discussed.

  8. Method for identifying anomalous terrestrial heat flows

    DOEpatents

    Del Grande, Nancy Kerr

    1977-01-25

    A method for locating and mapping the magnitude and extent of terrestrial heat-flow anomalies from 5 to 50 times average with a tenfold improved sensitivity over orthodox applications of aerial temperature-sensing surveys as used for geothermal reconnaissance. The method remotely senses surface temperature anomalies such as occur from geothermal resources or oxidizing ore bodies by: measuring the spectral, spatial, statistical, thermal, and temporal features characterizing infrared radiation emitted by natural terrestrial surfaces; deriving from these measurements the true surface temperature with uncertainties as small as 0.05 to 0.5 K; removing effects related to natural temperature variations of topographic, hydrologic, or meteoric origin, the surface composition, detector noise, and atmospheric conditions; factoring out the ambient normal-surface temperature for non-thermally enhanced areas surveyed under otherwise identical environmental conditions; distinguishing significant residual temperature enhancements characteristic of anomalous heat flows and mapping the extent and magnitude of anomalous heat flows where they occur.

  9. Colorado Heat Flow Data from IHFC

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: The International Heat Flow Commission (IHFC) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado IHFC Data Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: Abstract: This layer contains the heat flow sites and data of the State of Colorado compiled from the International Heat Flow Commission (IHFC) of the International Association of Seismology and Physics of the Earth's Interior (IASPEI) global heat flow database (www.heatflow.und.edu/index2.html). The data include different items: Item number, descriptive code, name of site, latitude and longitude, elevation, depth interval, number of temperature data, temperature gradient, number of conductivity measurement, average conductivity, number of heat generation measurements, average heat production, heat flow, number of individual sites, references, and date of publication. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4522121.800672 m Left: 165356.134075 m Right: 621836.776246 m Bottom: 4097833.419676 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude Of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich

  10. Stirling Engine With Radial Flow Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitale, N.; Yarr, George

    1993-01-01

    Conflict between thermodynamical and structural requirements resolved. In Stirling engine of new cylindrical configuration, regenerator and acceptor and rejector heat exchangers channel flow of working gas in radial direction. Isotherms in regenerator ideally concentric cylinders, and gradient of temperature across regenerator radial rather than axial. Acceptor and rejector heat exchangers located radially inward and outward of regenerator, respectively. Enables substantial increase in power of engine without corresponding increase in diameter of pressure vessel.

  11. Temperature-gated thermal rectifier for active heat flow control.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia; Hippalgaonkar, Kedar; Shen, Sheng; Wang, Kevin; Abate, Yohannes; Lee, Sangwook; Wu, Junqiao; Yin, Xiaobo; Majumdar, Arun; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-08-13

    Active heat flow control is essential for broad applications of heating, cooling, and energy conversion. Like electronic devices developed for the control of electric power, it is very desirable to develop advanced all-thermal solid-state devices that actively control heat flow without consuming other forms of energy. Here we demonstrate temperature-gated thermal rectification using vanadium dioxide beams in which the environmental temperature actively modulates asymmetric heat flow. In this three terminal device, there are two switchable states, which can be regulated by global heating. In the "Rectifier" state, we observe up to 28% thermal rectification. In the "Resistor" state, the thermal rectification is significantly suppressed (<1%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of solid-state active-thermal devices with a large rectification in the Rectifier state. This temperature-gated rectifier can have substantial implications ranging from autonomous thermal management of heating and cooling systems to efficient thermal energy conversion and storage. PMID:25010206

  12. Heat transfer peculiarities in supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovoi, V. Ia.; Brazhko, V. N.; Maikapar, G. I.; Skuratov, A. S.; Struminskaia, I. V.

    1992-12-01

    A method of heat transfer and gas flow investigation based on the application of thermal sensitive coatings or thermocouple sensors and various visualization techniques is described. The thermal sensitive coatings and visualization reveal heat transfer peculiarities, and the complex nature of the method contributes to understanding the processes and generalization of quantitative results. Data concerning heat transfer on the leeward side of a blunt cone in the regions of the shock-wave boundary layer and bow wave interaction, in gaps and cavities of the orbiter's thermal insulation, and in the vicinity of them, are presented.

  13. Transient pipe flow derived by periodic heat release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Zun; Celik, Ismail

    The heat release resulting from chemical reactions in a combustor/tail pipe system usually induces an instability in the gas flow. This instability may lead to a stable periodic motion under certain combinations of combustion heat release and combustor geometry. This paper reports a numerical study of the unsteady (periodic) gas flow which is driven by a periodic heat release prescribed empirically. The one-dimensional transient equations of motion and energy are derived by integration from the more general two-dimensional equations. The combustion heat release is added to the energy equation as a source term. These equations are solved using the explicit, predictor-corrector method of MacCormack. Some predictions are compared with measurements. The effects of the wall friction, heat transfer, and the amplitude and frequency of combustion heat release on the velocity and pressure waves are investigated. The results indicate that pulsation amplitude is a strong function of the heat release rate and it shows a maximum near an equivalence ratio value of one, where the heat release is near its maximum; this is in conformity with the experimental data. A method for calculating the natural operation frequency of pulse combustor is suggested.

  14. Microgravity Two-phase Flow and Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Kamiel

    2006-12-01

    Multiphase thermal systems (involving more than one phase or one component) have numerous applications in aerospace, heat-exchanger, transport of contaminants in environmental systems, and energy transport and energy conversion systems. Advances in understanding the behaviour of multiphase thermal systems could lead to higher efficiency energy production systems, improved heat-exchanger design, and safer and enhanced treatment of hazardous waste. But such advances have been greatly hindered by the strong effect of gravitational acceleration on the flow. Depending on the flow orientation and the phase velocities, gravitational forces could significantly alter the flow regime, and hence the pressure-drop and heat-transfer coefficients associated with the flow. A reduced gravity environment (or "microgravity"), provides an excellent tool to study the flow without the masking effects of gravity. This book presents for the first time a comprehensive coverage of all aspects of two-phase flow behaviour in the virtual absence of gravity. Link: http://www.springer.com/east/home?SGWID=5-102-22-173662745-0&changeHeader=true

  15. Numberical Solution to Transient Heat Flow Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobiske, Ronald A.; Hock, Jeffrey L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the reduction of the one- and three-dimensional diffusion equation to the difference equation and its stability, convergence, and heat-flow applications under different boundary conditions. Indicates the usefulness of this presentation for beginning students of physics and engineering as well as college teachers. (CC)

  16. Notes on heat flow at Ririwai, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukwueke, C.

    Heat flow measurements carried out in the Ririwai ring complexes gave an average temperature gradient of 16.0 ± 0.5°C km -1 and thermal conductivity of the granites measured in the laboratory varied from 3.007 to 3.672 W/m°C. The laboratory results conforms with the estimated thermal conductivities from mineralogical compositions: modal analysis 3.13 W/m°C, C.I.P.W. norm 3.06 W/m°C and the content of oxides SiO 2 3.17 W/m°C. The calculated average heat flow is 50.72 ± 2.54 mWm -2 which is higher than those from the West African Craton: 20 mWm -2 in Niger, (Chapman and Pollack, 1974), 26 mWm -2 in Ghana (Beck and Mustonen, 1972) and 38.5 ± 1.7 mWm -2 from the same complex (Verheijen and Ajakaiye, 1979). The heat flow value of 50.72 ± 2.54 mWm -2 is considered normal for post PreCambrian orogenic provinces and also in agreement with the relation between heat flow and age.

  17. Heat flow-heat production relationship not found: what drives heat flow variability of the Western Canadian foreland basin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majorowicz, Jacek A.

    2016-06-01

    Heat flow high -80 ± 10 mW/m2 in the northern western parts of the Western Canadian foreland basin is in large contrast to low heat flow to the south and east (50 ± 7 mW/m2) of the same basin with the same old 2E09 year's Precambrian basement and some 200-km-thick lithosphere. Over-thrusted and flat-laying sedimentary units are heated from below by heat flow from the old craton' crust and low 15 ± 5 mW/m2 mantle contribution. The heat flow vs. radiogenic heat production statistical relationship is not found for this area. To account for this large heat flow contrast and to have 200-km-thick lithosphere, we would need to assume that high heat production layer of the upper crust varies in thickness as much as factor of 2 and/or that the measured heat production at top of Precambrian basement is not representative for deeper rocks. The other explanation proposed before that heat in the basin is redistributed by the regional fluid flow systems driven from high hydraulic head areas close to the foothills of the Rocky Mountains toward low elevation areas to the east and north cannot be explained by observed low Darcy fluid velocities and the geometry of the basin.

  18. Rényi entropy flows from quantum heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Mohammad H.; Nazarov, Yuli V.

    2015-03-01

    We evaluate Rényi entropy flows from generic quantum heat engines (QHE) to a weakly coupled probe environment kept in thermal equilibrium. We show that the flows are determined not only by heat flow but also by a quantum coherent flow that can be separately measured in experiment apart from the heat flow measurement. The same pertains to Shannon entropy flow. This appeals for a revision of the concept of entropy flows in quantum nonequlibrium thermodynamics.

  19. Regional heat flow variations in the northern Michigan and Lake Superior region determined using the silica heat flow estimator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vugrinovich, R.

    1987-01-01

    Conventional heat flow data are sparse for northern Michigan. The groundwater silica heat flow estimator expands the database sufficiently to allow regional variations in heat flow to be examined. Heat flow shows a pattern of alternating highs and lows trending ESE across the Upper Peninsula and Lake Superior. The informal names given to these features, their characteristic heat flow and inferred causes are listed: {A table is presented} The results suggest that, for the study area, regional variations in heat flow cannot be interpreted solely in terms of regional variations of the heat generation rate of basement rocks. ?? 1987.

  20. Heat flow in the Keweenawan rift system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, C.; Mareschal, J.; Jaupart, C. P.

    2012-12-01

    The emplacement of large volumes of mafic volcanic rocks during the Keweenawan rifting has modified the average crustal composition and affects the present steady state heat flux in the region. We have combined new heat flux measurements in the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield and previously published data to characterize the heat flux field around the Keweenawan rift system. For the Nipigon embayment, North of lake Superior in Ontario, mafic intrusions associated with the Keweenawan rifting have resulted in an increase in the volume of mafic rocks in the crust and caused a very small <3mW m-2 decrease in the mean heat flux. There is a very marked decrease in the heat flux (Δ Q ≈ 20mW m-2) beneath the western half of Lake Superior and to the west. The very low values of the surface heat flux (≈ 22mW m-2 correlate with the maximum Bouguer gravity anomaly. The heat flux at the base of the crust in the Canadian Shield has been determined from surface heat flux, heat production, and crustal stucture to be ≈ 15 mW m-2. In the Keweenawan rift, the surface heat flux is only a few mW m-2 higher than the mantle heat flux, which implies that the contribution of the entire crustal column to the surface heat flux is small and that the crust is exclusively made up of depleted mafic volcanic rocks. In the eastern part and northeast of Lake Superior, there is a marked increase in heat flux that correlates with a lower Bouguer anomaly. Local high heat flux anomalies due to intrusions by felsic rocks are superposed with a long wavelength trend of higher heat flow suggesting a more felsic crustal composition in the eastern part of the Keweenawan rift. Simple models suggest that such a thick dense volcanic pile as accumulated in the Keweenawan rift is almost invariably unstable and that very particular conditions were required for it to stabilize in the crust.

  1. Turbulent Heat Transfer in Ribbed Pipe Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Changwoo; Yang, Kyung-Soo

    2012-11-01

    From the view point of heat transfer control, surface roughness is one of the popular ways adopted for enhancing heat transfer in turbulent pipe flow. Such a surface roughness is often modeled with a rib. In the current investigation, Large Eddy Simulation has been performed for turbulent flow in a pipe with periodically-mounted ribs at Reτ=700, Pr=0.71, and p / k =2, 4, and 8. Here, p and k represent the pitch and rib height, respectively. The rib height is fixed as one tenth of the pipe radius. The profiles of mean velocity components, mean temperature, root-mean-squares (rms) of temperature fluctuation are presented at the selected streamwise locations. In comparison with the smooth-pipe case at the same Re and Pr, the effects of the ribs are clearly identified, leading to overall enhancement of turbulent heat transfer in terms of Nu. The budget of temperature variance is presented in the form of contours. The results of an Octant analysis are also given to elucidate the dominant events. Our LES results shed light on a complete understanding of the heat-transfer mechanisms in turbulent ribbed-pipe flow which has numerous applications in engineering. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MEST) (No. 2012013019).

  2. Behaviour: Seeing heat saves energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steg, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Household energy conservation can help to significantly lower energy consumption. Visual cues provided by thermal imaging of heat loss in buildings are now shown to increase energy conserving behaviours and implementations among homeowners more effectively than just performing carbon footprint audits.

  3. Natural convection flow in porous enclosure with localized heating from below with heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiki, Md. Noor-A.-Alam; Molla, Md. Mamun; Saha, Suvash C.

    2016-07-01

    Unsteady natural convection flow in a two dimensional fluid saturated porous enclosure with localized heating from below with heat flux, symmetrical cooling from the sides and the insulated top wall has been investigated numerically. The governing equations are the Darcy's law for the porous media and the energy equation for the temperature field has been considered. The non-dimensional Darcy's law in terms of the stream function is solved by finite difference method using the successive over-relaxation (SOR) scheme and the energy equation is solved by Alternative Direction Alternative (ADI) scheme. The uniform heat flux source is located centrally at the bottom wall. The numerical results are presented in terms of the streamlines and isotherms, as well as the local and average rate of heat transfer for the wide range of the Darcy's Rayleigh number and the length of the heat flux source at the bottom wall.

  4. Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Hardee, Harry C.; Reynolds, Gerald D.; Steinfort, Terry D.

    1992-01-01

    A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers arranged in a vertical string. The transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings.

  5. Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, C.R.; Hardee, H.C.; Reynolds, G.D.; Steinfort, T.D.

    1990-01-01

    A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings. 6 figs.

  6. Heat flow and energetics of the San Andreas fault zone.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lachenbruch, A.H.; Sass, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Approximately 100 heat flow measurements in the San Andreas fault zone indicate 1) there is no evidence for local frictional heating of the main fault trace at any latitude over a 1000-km length from Cape Mendocino to San Bernardino, 2) average heat flow is high (ca.2 HFU, ca.80 mW m-2) throughout the 550-km segment of the Coast Ranges that encloses the San Andreas fault zone in central California; this broad anomaly falls off rapidly toward the Great Valley to the east, and over a 200-km distance toward the Mendocino Triple Junction to the northwest. As others have pointed out, a local conductive heat flow anomaly would be detectable unless the frictional resistance allocated to heat production on the main trace were less than 100 bars. Frictional work allocated to surface energy of new fractures is probably unimportant, and hydrologic convection is not likely to invalidate the conduction assumption, since the heat discharge by thermal springs near the fault is negligible. -Authors

  7. Fluid flow and heat convection studies for actively cooled airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, A. F.

    1992-01-01

    The work done during the progress report period from May-October 1992 is summarized. The effect of wall thermal boundary conditions on flows over a step or rib when repeated rib roughness is used for heating augmentation is examined. In numerical investigations of various such laminar and turbulent flows, the local heat transfer coefficients on a forward-facing step or on a rib were found to be very sensitive to the wall thermal boundary condition. For the computation of constant property laminar flow, the wall thermal boundary conditions were either a uniform heat flux or a uniform temperature. Results (Nusselt number and isotherms) of the studies are included. The second part of the work consisted of using PHOENICS to solve the conjugate heat transfer problem of flow over a rib in channel. Finally, the algebraic stress model in the TEAM (Turbulent Elliptic Algorithm-Manchester) code was tested for jet impingement flow, but there needs to be an addition of the energy equation to the code.

  8. US energy flow, 1981

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, C. K.; Borg, I. Y.

    1982-10-01

    Flow diagrams to describe the US energy situation are given. In 1981 the energy consumption was 73 quads (or 73 times 10 to the 15th power Btu). Use was down from 75 quads in 1980. Oil continues to dominate the picture as it comprises 45% of the total energy used. Net oil use (exclusive of oil purchased for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and Exports) fell 8%; oil imports declined 14%. In contrast to oil, use of natural gas and coal remained at 1980 levels. Decreased use of residual oils, principally for electric power generating, account for much of the drop in oil use. Increased use of coal and nuclear energy for power generation almost compensated for the decrease in use of oil in that end use. Transmitted power remained at 1980 levels. The remainder of the drop in energy usage is attributed to price driven conservation, increased efficiencies in end use and the recession that prevailed during most of the year. The share of the energy drop attributable to the recession is estimated by various analysts to be on the order of 40 to 50%.

  9. Critical heat flux in subcooled flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, David Douglas

    The critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon was investigated for water flow in tubes with particular emphasis on the development of methods for predicting CHF in the subcooled flow boiling regime. The Purdue University Boiling and Two-Phase Flow Laboratory (PU-BTPFL) CHF database for water flow in a uniformly heated tube was compiled from the world literature dating back to 1949 and represents the largest CHF database ever assembled with 32,544 data points from over 100 sources. The superiority of this database was proven via a detailed examination of previous databases. The PU-BTPFL CHF database is an invaluable tool for the development of CHF correlations and mechanistic models that are superior to existing ones developed with smaller, less comprehensive CHF databases. In response to the many inaccurate and inordinately complex correlations, two nondimensional, subcooled CHF correlations were formulated, containing only five adjustable constants and whose unique functional forms were determined without using a statistical analysis but rather using the parametric trends observed in less than 10% of the subcooled CHF data. The correlation based on inlet conditions (diameter, heated length, mass velocity, pressure, inlet quality) was by far the most accurate of all known subcooled CHF correlations, having mean absolute and root-mean-square (RMS) errors of 10.3% and 14.3%, respectively. The outlet (local) conditions correlation was the most accurate correlation based on local CHF conditions (diameter, mass velocity, pressure, outlet quality) and may be used with a nonuniform axial heat flux. Both correlations proved more accurate than a recent CHF look-up table commonly employed in nuclear reactor thermal hydraulic computer codes. An interfacial lift-off, subcooled CHF model was developed from a consideration of the instability of the vapor-liquid interface and the fraction of heat required for liquid-vapor conversion as opposed to that for bulk liquid heating. Severe

  10. Flow-induced vibration of component cooling water heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Y.S.; Chen, S.S. . Nuclear Engineering Dept.; Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of flow-induced vibration problems of component cooling water heat exchangers in one of Taipower's nuclear power stations. Specifically, it describes flow-induced vibration phenomena, tests to identify the excitation mechanisms, measurement of response characteristics, analyses to predict tube response and wear, various design alterations, and modifications of the original design. Several unique features associated with the heat exchangers are demonstrated, including energy-trapping modes, existence of tube-support-plate (TSP)-inactive modes, and fluidelastic instability of TSP-active and -inactive modes. On the basis of this evaluation, the difficulties and future research needs for the evaluation of heat exchangers are identified. 11 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Visualization of working fluid flow in gravity assisted heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, Milan

    2015-05-01

    Heat pipe is device working with phase changes of working fluid inside hermetically closed pipe at specific pressure. The phase changes of working fluid from fluid to vapor and vice versa help heat pipe to transport high heat flux. The article deal about construction and processes casing in heat pipe during operation. Experiment visualization of working fluid flow is performed with glass heat pipe filed with ethanol. The visualization of working fluid flow explains the phenomena as working fluid boiling, nucleation of bubbles, vapor flow, vapor condensation on the wall, vapor and condensate flow interaction, flow down condensate film thickness on the wall, occurred during the heat pipe operation.

  12. Flow characteristics and heat transfer in wavy walled channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Zachary; Shah, Tapan; Monts, Vontravis; Warey, Alok; Balestrino, Sandro; Alexeev, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    Using lattice Boltzmann simulations, we investigated the effects of wavy channel geometry on the flow and heat transfer within a parallel plate heat exchanger. We observed three distinct flow regimes that include steady flow with and without recirculation and unsteady time-periodic flow. We determined the critical Reynolds numbers at which the flow transitions between different flow regimes. To validate our computational results, we compared the simulated flow structures with the structures observed in a flowing soap film. Furthermore, we examine the effects of the wavy channel geometry on the heat transfer. We find that the unsteady flow regime drastically enhances the rate of heat transfer and show that heat exchangers with wavy walls outperform currently used heat exchangers with similar volume and power characteristics. Results from our study point to a simple and efficient method for increasing performance in compact heat exchangers.

  13. Io's heat flow from infrared radiometry: 1983-1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, Glenn J.; Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Blaney, Diana L.; Goguen, Jay D.

    1994-01-01

    We report the following results from a decade of infrared radiometry of Io: (1) The average global heat flow is more than approx. 2.5 W/sq.m, (2) large warm (less than or equal to 200 K) volcanic regions dominate the global heat flow, (3) smal high-temperature (greater than or = 300 K) 'hotspots' contribute little to the average heat flow, (4) thermal anomalies on the leading hemisphere contribute about half of the heat flow, (5) a substantial amount of heat is radiated during Io's night, (6) high-temperature (greater than or = 600 K) 'outbursts' occurred during approx. 4% of the nights we observed, (7) 'Loki' is the brightest, persistent, infrared emission feature, and (8) some excess emission is always present at the longitude of Loki, but its intensity and other characteristics change between apparitions. Observations of Io at M(4.8 micrometer), 8.7 micrometer, N(10 micrometer), and Q(20 micrometer) with the Infrared Telescope Facility presented here were collected during nine apparitions between 1983 and 1993. These measurements provide full longitudinal coveraged as well as an eclipse observation and the detection of two outbursts. Reflected sunlight, passive thermal emission, and radiation from thermal anomalies all contribute to the observed flux densities. We find that a new thermophysical model is required to match all the data. Two key elements of this model are (1) a 'thermal reservoir' unit which lowers daytime temperatures, and (2) the 'thermal pedestal effect' which shifts to shorter wavelengths the spectral emission due to the reradiation of solar energy absorbed by the thermal anomalies. The thermal anomalies are modeled with a total of 10 source components at five locations. Io's heat flow is the sum of the power from these components.

  14. Calibrated Heat Flow Model for Determining the Heat Conduction Losses in Laser Cutting of CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, P.; Weber, R.; Speker, N.; Berger, P.; Sommer, B.; Graf, T.

    Laser machining has great potential regarding automation in fabrication of CFRP (carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics) parts, due to the nearly force and tool-wear free processing at high process speeds. The high vaporization temperatures and the large heat conductivity of the carbon fibers lead to a large heat transport into the sample. This causes the formation of a heat-affected zone and a decrease of the process speed. In the present paper,an analytical heat flow model was adapted in order to understand and investigate the heat conduction losses. Thermal sensors were embedded in samples at different distances from the kerf to fit the calculated to the measured temperatures. Heat conduction losses of up to 30% of the laser power were determined. Furthermore, the energy not absorbed by the sample, the energy for sublimating the composite material in the kerf, the energy for the formation of the HAZ, and the residual heat in the sample are compared in an energy balance.

  15. Geomechanical Fracturing with Flow and Heat

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-01-01

    The GeoFracFH model is a particle-based discrete element model (DEM) that has been coupled with fluid flow and heat conduction/convection. In this model, the rock matrix material is represented by a network of DEM particles connected by mechanical bonds (elastic beams in this case, see Figure 1, gray particles connected by beams). During the simulation process, the mechanical bonds that have been stretched or bent beyond a critical strain (both tensile and shear failures aremore » simulated) are broken and removed from the network in a progressive manner. Bonds can be removed from the network with rates or probabilities that depend on their stress or strain, or the properties of the discrete elements and bonds can be varied continuously to represent phenomena such as creep, strain hardening, and chemical degradation. The coupling of a DEM geomechanical model with models for Darcy flow and heat transport is also illustrated in Figure 1. Darcy flow and heat transport equations are solved on an underlying fixed finite difference grid with evolving porosity and permeability for each grid cell that depends on the local structure of the discrete element network (such as the DEM particle density). The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which then deforms and fractures the rock matrix. The deformation/fracturing in turn changes the permeability which again changes the evolution of fluid pressure, coupling the two phenomena. The intimate coupling between fracturing, fluid flow, and thermal transport makes the GeoFracFH model, rather than conventional continuum mechanical models, necessary for coupled hydro-thermal-mechanical problems in the subsurface.« less

  16. Extracting energy from natural flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delionback, L. M.; Wilhold, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    Three concepts for extracting energy from wind, waterflow, and tides utilize flow instability to generate usable energy. Proposed converters respond to vortex excitation motion, galloping or plunging motion, and flutter. Fluid-flow instability is more efficient in developing lift than is direct flow.

  17. The impact of separated flow on heat and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.J.; Jabbari, M.Y.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of flow separation on heat (or mass) transfer is underway. This research, sponsored by the Department of Energy (Contract No. FG02-87ER13800), is planned to enhance our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms governing the process. This report summarizes previous accomplishments and briefly describes works done during period May 1, 1989 through April 30, 1990. Future plans and studies under preparation are also mentioned. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  18. A coupled heat and water flow apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.M.O.; Caporouscio, F.; Yong, R.N. ); Cheung, C.H. ); Kjartanson, B.H. )

    1993-03-01

    Safe and permanent disposal of radioactive waste requires isolation of a number of diverse chemical elements form the environment. The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is assessing the concept of disposing of waste in a vault excavated at a depth of 500 to 1000 m below the ground surface in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The temperatures and hydraulic potential in the buffer and back fill material were investigated. To study the performance of a compacted buffer material under thermal and isothermal conditions, a coupled heat and water flow apparatus is designed and presented. In the preliminary design, a one-dimensional flow of heat and water was not achieved. however, control of temperature gradient, existence of one-dimensional flow, and uniformity of temperature and volumetric water content distributions at any cross section within the specimen are achieved in the modified design. Experimental results have shown that the temperature stabilizes very rapidly after a period of approximately 0. 107 days. The moisture moves away from the hot end along the longitudinal direction of the specimen due to imposed thermal gradient. The time required for moisture to stabilize is in order of days. 17 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. 2-Phase Fluid Flow & Heat Transport

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-03-13

    GEOTHER is a three-dimensional, geothermal reservoir simulation code. The model describes heat transport and flow of a single component, two-phase fluid in porous media. It is based on the continuity equations for steam and water, which are reduced to two nonlinear partial differential equations in which the dependent variables are fluid pressure and enthalpy. GEOTHER can be used to simulate the fluid-thermal interaction in rock that can be approximated by a porous media representation. Itmore » can simulate heat transport and the flow of compressed water, two-phase mixtures, and superheated steam in porous media over a temperature range of 10 to 300 degrees C. In addition, it can treat the conversion from single to two-phase flow, and vice versa. It can be used for evaluation of a near repository spatial scale and a time scale of a few years to thousands of years. The model can be used to investigate temperature and fluid pressure changes in response to thermal loading by waste materials.« less

  20. Flow of superfluid helium in tubes with heated walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, H. A.; Mord, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    The equations for superfluid helium flowing through a straight tube with heated walls are integrated. The model equations are based on those of Landau as modified for superfluid turbulence by Gorter and Mellink (1949). The model is implemented by the program SUPERFLOW which runs on a personal computer. The effect of the heating level on the mass flux, the energy flux, and the pressure and temperature profiles is investigated. The four types of profiles which occur without sidewall heating are also found with heated walls. The progression through these four types is shown to depend primarily on the dimensionless parameter, defined previously to characterize the unheated profiles, and a dimensionless ratio of heat fluxes. The pressure and temperature maxima which rise well above the boundary values increase significantly with sidewall heating. Approximate design equations for estimating the mass flux and the profiles are presented. The physical basis of the results is discussed. These results are useful in the design of optimal cooling loops and other superfluid flow systems.

  1. Revised lunar heat-flow values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langseth, M. G.; Keihm, S. J.; Peters, K.

    1976-01-01

    The 3.5- and 2-year subsurface temperature histories at the Apollo 15 and 17 heat-flow sites have been analyzed, and the results yield significantly lower thermal conductivity determinations than the results of previous short-term experiments. The thermal conductivity determined by probes at a depth of about 150 cm and 250 cm lies in the range 0.9-1.3 times 10 to the -4th W/cm K. On the basis of measurements of variations of surface thorium abundance and inferred crustal thicknesses, the average global heat flux is estimated to be about 1.8 microwatts/sq cm. This requires a uranium concentration of 46 ppb.

  2. Borehole Heat Exchangers: heat transfer simulation in the presence of a groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelotti, A.; Alberti, L.; La Licata, I.; Antelmi, M.

    2014-04-01

    The correct design of the Borehole Heat Exchanger is crucial for the operation and the energy performance of a Ground Source Heat Pump. Most design methods and tools are based on the assumption that the ground is a solid medium where conduction is the only heat transfer mechanism. In turn in regions rich in groundwater the groundwater flow influence has to be assessed, by including the convection effects. In this paper a numerical model of a 100 m U-pipe in a saturated porous medium is presented. The model is created adopting MT3DMS coupled to MODFLOW. A Darcy flow is imposed across the medium. The typical operation of a Borehole Heat Exchanger operating both in winter and in summer is simulated for two years, under different groundwater velocities. The energy injected to and extracted from the ground is derived as a function of the Darcy velocity and compared with the purely conductive case. Temperature fields in the ground at key moments are shown and discussed. From both the energy and the aquifer temperature field points of view, the velocity ranges for respectively negligible and relevant influence of the groundwater flow are identified.

  3. Underworld and multi-basin heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quenette, S. M.; O'Neill, C.; Moresi, L. N.; Danis, C. R.; Mansour, J.

    2011-12-01

    We present an over arching method for non-linear heat flow assessments of large, multi-basin systems. Our example is the Sydney-, Gunnedah-, Bowen basins (Danis et al 2011), which covers an area of 800kms by 1900kms and depth of 5kms, on the east coast of Australia. It is used as a baseline towards further fluid and structural geodynamics oriented analysis. In contrast to reservoir scale geothermal models - basin, multi-basin and towards lithosphere scale models exhibit their own challenges in terms of physical/rheological behaviour and computational tractability. For instance we model a non-linear heat flow by means of temperature dependent conductivity, as indicated by Clauser and Huenges (1995), which allows crystalline basement rocks, such as granites, to show for example a significant decrease in conductivity from ambient temperature up to around 400C, dropping from around 3 mK**(units) to around 2. For this modelling, a specialisation of the geodynamics code 'Underworld' (Moresi et al 2007) called Underworld-GT is used. A toolbox is added to the otherwise un-touched Underworld code adding geothermal workflow and context to Underworld. A particular novel feature is the ability to load stratigraphic layers, and/or GoCAD or GeoModeller voxel sets as the constraining geological geometry, whilst allowing the heat assessment models to scale from 1 process to 1000s. Another is the ability to prescribe synthetic drill holes, and its use in stochastic-oriented assessments of model parameters. Following the Underworld platform's approach and its simple PDE abstraction layer, these model configurations from a baseline for further additions to the governing equations such as fluid flow and structure, enabling a bridge between reservoir and continental scale dynamics, albeit with their own computational challenges.

  4. New and classical applications of heat flow studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauser, C.

    2005-12-01

    become widely recognized as a valuable supplement to established climate proxies. In contrast to these, GST is directly linked to climate-related temperature variations. It is based in a straightforward manner on heat transport and thermal physics and, in contrast to climate proxies, does not require transfer functions for relating temperature-sensitive phenomena to temperature.The second new application makes use of the signature of heat advection to identify and quantify flow in the deep subsurface. Based on high-quality data of sufficient number and distribution, the method's detection limit is far below that of any other technique. These are but two examples where, under a new perspective, noise has turned into signal. Last but not least, the potential of geothermal energy to supply low-pollution, low-carbon-dioxide electric power and heat has been recognized and exploited for more than 100 years, primarily in tectonically active regions with natural steam reservoirs. However, the ever-increasing price of fossil fuels and their exhaust of greenhouse gases have turned geothermal energy into an attractive option, even in geothermally less favourable regions. In this more demanding situation, understanding different heat transport processes requires more refined techniques for data correction, parameter identification and numerical simulation. This special issue comprises a selection of 11 papers which emerged from this meeting. Corresponding to the scope of the meeting, four papers address paleoclimatic topics, four papers deal with topics related to subsurface flow, and five papers discuss various aspects related directly or indirectly to geothermal energy. Thus, this special issue reflects exciting trends in current geothermal research. It illustrates that today geothermal research comprises new and challenging fields, with applications in environmental sciences, reservoir engineering, and climate and energy research.

  5. The effect of asymmetric heating on flow stability and heat transfer for flow in a vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Tappan, C.H.

    1987-11-01

    This study presents experimental results of combined free and forced convection heat transfer in a vertical tube with a circumferentially nonuniform constant wall heat flux. The effect of an asymmetric wall heat flux on flow stability and on the rate of heat transfer for water flowing downward in a vertical tube was investigated. Experimental results were used to develop two stability maps which identify various flow regimes, corresponding to different thermal and hydraulic conditions. Heat transfer coefficients were also determined. Experimental results in the present investigation were compared to those with uniform heating in horizontal and vertical tube flow situations discussed in the literature. 23 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Thaw flow control for liquid heat transport systems

    DOEpatents

    Kirpich, Aaron S.

    1989-01-01

    In a liquid metal heat transport system including a source of thaw heat for use in a space reactor power system, the thaw flow throttle or control comprises a fluid passage having forward and reverse flow sections and a partition having a plurality of bleed holes therein to enable fluid flow between the forward and reverse sections. The flow throttle is positioned in the system relatively far from the source of thaw heat.

  7. Thermoelectric and heat flow phenomena in mesoscopic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Jason E.

    Low-dimensional electronic systems, systems that are restricted to single energy levels in at least one of the three spatial dimensions, have attracted considerable interest in the field of thermoelectric materials. At these scales, the ability to manipulate electronic energy levels offers a great deal of control over a device's thermopower, that is, its ability to generate a voltage due to a thermal gradient. In addition, low-dimensional devices offer increased control over phononic heat flow. Mesoscale geometry can also have a large impact on both electron and phonon dynamics. Effects such as ballistic transport in a two-dimensional electron gas structure can lead to the enhancement or attenuation of electron transmission probabilities in multi-terminal junctions. The first half of this dissertation investigates the transverse thermoelectric properties of a four-terminal ballistic junction containing a central symmetry-breaking scatterer. It is believed that the combined symmetry of the scatterer and junction is the key component to understanding non-linear and thermoelectric transport in these junctions. To this end, experimental investigations on this type of junction were carried out to demonstrate its ability to generate a transverse thermovoltage. To aid in interpreting the results, a multi-terminal scattering-matrix theory was developed that relates the junction's non-linear electronic properties to its thermoelectric properties. The possibility of a transverse thermoelectric device also motivated the first derivation of the transverse thermoelectric efficiency. This second half of this dissertation focuses on heat flow phenomena in InAs/InP heterostructure nanowires. In thermoelectric research, a phononic heat flow between thermal reservoirs is considered parasitic due to its minimal contribution to the electrical output. Recent experiments involving heterostructure nanowires have shown an unexpectedly large heat flow, which is attributed in this

  8. Laminar-transitional micropipe flows: energy and exergy mechanisms based on Reynolds number, pipe diameter, surface roughness and wall heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozalp, A. Alper

    2012-01-01

    Energy and exergy mechanisms of laminar-transitional micropipe flows are computationally investigated by solving the variable fluid property continuity, Navier-Stokes and energy equations. Analyses are carried for wide ranges of Reynolds number ( Re = 10-2,000), micropipe diameter (d = 0.50-1.00 mm), non-dimensional surface roughness (ɛ* = 0.001-0.01) and wall heat flux ( {{q}}^' ' } = 1,000-2,000 W/m2) conditions. Computations revealed that friction coefficient (Cf) elevates with higher ɛ* and Re and with lower d, where the rise of ɛ* from 0.001 to 0.01 induced the Cf to increase by 0.7 → 0.9% (d = 1.00 → 0.50 mm), 3.4 → 4.2%, 6.6 → 8.1%, 9.6 → 11.9% and 12.4 → 15.2% for Re = 100, 500, 1,000, 1,500 and 2,000, respectively. Earlier transition exposed with stronger micro-structure and surface roughness at the descriptive transitional Reynolds numbers of Re tra = 1,656 → 769 (ɛ* = 0.001 → 0.01), 1,491 → 699 and 1,272 → 611 at d = 1.00, 0.75 and 0.50 mm; the corresponding shape factor (H) and intermittency (γ) data appear in the narrow ranges of H = 3.135-3.142 and γ = 0.132-0.135. At higher Re and lower d, ɛ* is determined to become more influential on the heat transfer rates, such that the Nuɛ*=0.01/Nuɛ*=0.001 ratio attains the values of 1.002 → 1.023 (d = 1.00 → 0.50 mm), 1.012 → 1.039, 1.025 → 1.056 and 1.046 → 1.082 at Re = 100, 500, 1,000 and 2,000. As ɛ* comes out to cause minor variations in the cross-sectional thermal entropy generation rates ( {{{S}}_{{Updelta {{T}}}}^' } } ) , {{q}}^' ' } is confirmed to augment {{S}}_{{Updelta {{T}}}}^' } , where the impact becomes more pronounced at higher Re and d. Frictional entropy generation values ( {{{S}}_{{Updelta {{P}}}}^' } } ) are found to be motivated by lower d, higher Re and ɛ*, such that the {{S}}_{{Updelta {{P}}_{{{{d}} = 0.50{{mm}}}} }}^' } /{{S}}_{{Updelta {{P}}_{{{{d}} = 1.00{{mm}}}} }}^' } ratio is computed as 4.0011 → 4.0014 (ɛ* = 0.001 → 0.01), 4.002 → 4

  9. Couette flow regimes with heat transfer in rarefied gas

    SciTech Connect

    Abramov, A. A. Butkovskii, A. V.

    2013-06-15

    Based on numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation by direct statistic simulation, the Couette flow with heat transfer is studied in a broad range of ratios of plate temperatures and Mach numbers of a moving plate. Flow regime classification by the form of the dependences of the energy flux and friction stress on the Knudsen number Kn is proposed. These dependences can be simultaneously monotonic and nonmonotonic and have maxima. Situations are possible in which the dependence of the energy flux transferred to a plate on Kn has a minimum, while the dependence of the friction stress is monotonic or even has a maximum. Also, regimes exist in which the dependence of the energy flux on Kn has a maximum, while the dependence of the friction stress is monotonic, and vice versa.

  10. Electroosmotic flow and Joule heating in preparative continuous annular electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, René; Bart, Hans-Jörg

    2015-09-01

    An openFOAM "computational fluid dynamic" simulation model was developed for the description of local interaction of hydrodynamics and Joule heating in annular electrochromatography. A local decline of electrical conductivity of the background eluent is caused by an electrokinetic migration of ions resulting in higher Joule heat generation. The model equations consider the Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible fluids, the energy equation for stationary temperature fields, and the mass transfer equation for the electrokinetic flow. The simulations were embedded in commercial ANSYS Fluent software and in open-source environment openFOAM. The annular gap (1 mm width) contained an inorganic C8 reverse-phase monolith as stationary phase prepared by an in situ sol-gel process. The process temperature generated by Joule heating was determined by thermal camera system. The local hydrodynamics in the prototype was detected by a gravimetric contact-free measurement method and experimental and simulated values matched quite well. PMID:25997390

  11. Flow and heat transfer characteristics of orthogonally rotating channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Hiroshi

    1991-12-01

    Numerical analysis was conducted to predict the centripetal buoyant effect on flow and heat transfer characteristics in a channel rotating about a perpendicular axis. The conditions were assumed to be laminar, fully developed, and uniform heat flux. Calculation were conducted both for radially outward flow from the rotating axis and radially inward flow. The calculated results indicated that for radially outward flow buoyancy decreases the suction side friction and heat transfer while increasing pressure side friction and heat transfer. This trends were reversed for radially inward flow.

  12. One dimensional lunar ash flow with and without heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, S. I.; Hsieh, T.

    1971-01-01

    The characteristics of lunar ash flow are discussed in terms of the two phase flow theory of a mixture of a gas and small solid particles. A model is developed to present the fundamental equations and boundary conditions. Numerical solutions for special ash flow with and without heat transfer are presented. In the case of lunar ash flow with small initial velocity, the effect of the heat transfer makes the whole layer of ash flow more compacted together than the corresponding isothermal case.

  13. Evaluation of heat flow and its geological implications on Mt. St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, T.; Adams, E.; Brown, R.L.; Sato, A.

    1982-04-01

    A study to determine the heat flux pattern in the vicinity of Mt. St. Helens was undertaken as part of a program to evaluate the effects of the eruption on future snowpack conditions in the area. Subsurface temperature and low energy refraction seismic studies were made during the early spring in 1981 to determine both the heat flux in the area of pyroclastic deposition and its potential source. In addition, samples were collected for later laboratory determination of thermal conductivity and diffusivity. Results indicate that the heat flow values in the area of pyroclastic deposition are as large as forty times greater than the heat flow values measured on Mt. Adams and Mt. Hood during the same period. The highest heat flow values appear to coincide with a pumice flow unit on the north side of the mountain.. Comparison with work done on the eruption of Mt. Komagatake indicates that the large heat flow values continue for several years.

  14. 2007 Estimated International Energy Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

    2011-03-10

    An energy flow chart or 'atlas' for 136 countries has been constructed from data maintained by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and estimates of energy use patterns for the year 2007. Approximately 490 exajoules (460 quadrillion BTU) of primary energy are used in aggregate by these countries each year. While the basic structure of the energy system is consistent from country to country, patterns of resource use and consumption vary. Energy can be visualized as it flows from resources (i.e. coal, petroleum, natural gas) through transformations such as electricity generation to end uses (i.e. residential, commercial, industrial, transportation). These flow patterns are visualized in this atlas of 136 country-level energy flow charts.

  15. Meteorological insights from planetary heat flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2015-04-01

    Planetary heat flow measurements are made with a series of high-precision temperature sensors deployed in a column of regolith to determine the geothermal gradient. Such sensors may, however, be susceptible to other influences, especially on worlds with atmospheres. First, pressure fluctuations at the surface may pump air in and out of pore space leading to observable, and otherwise unexpected, temperature fluctuations at depth. Such pumping is important in subsurface radon and methane transport on Earth: evidence of such pumping may inform understanding of methane or water vapor transport on Mars. Second, the subsurface profile contains a muted record of surface temperature history, and such measurements on other worlds may help constrain the extent to which Earth's Little Ice Age was directly solar-forced, versus volcanic-driven and/or amplified by climate feedbacks.

  16. Heat transfer in serpentine flow passages with rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, S.; Takamura, J.; Yamawaki, S.; Yang, Wen-Jei

    1992-06-01

    Results are reported of an experimental study tracing heat transfer performance in a rotating serpentine flow passage of a square cross section. The test section is preceded by a hydrodynamic calming region. The test model is a blow-up (by seven times) of actual winding flow passages in rotor blades. It is concluded that the flow in the 180-deg bends exhibits strong 3D structure. The heat transfer coefficient in the bend is substantially higher than in the straight flow passages. The average heat transfer characteristics over the entire flow passage is greatly affected by flow at the 180-deg bends. Due to secondary flow induced by the Coriolis force, the heat transfer coefficient in the radially outward flow passages diminish on the leading surface, but increase on the trailing surface, with an increase in rotational speed. The trend is reversed in the radially inward flow passages.

  17. Energy dissipation in sheared granular flows

    SciTech Connect

    Karion, A.; Hunt, M.L.

    1999-11-01

    Granular material flows describe flows of solid particles in which the interstitial fluid plays a negligible role in the flow mechanics. Examples include the transport of coal, food products, detergents, pharmaceutical tablets, and toner particles in high-speed printers. Using a two-dimensional discrete element computer simulation of a bounded, gravity-free Couette flow of particles, the heat dissipation rate per unit area is calculated as a function of position in the flow as well as overall solid fraction. The computation results compare favorably with the kinetic theory analysis for rough disks. The heat dissipation rate is also measured for binary mixtures of particles for different small to large solid fraction ratios, and for diameter ratios of ten, five, and two. The dissipation rates increase significantly with overall solid fraction as well as local strain rates and granular temperatures. The thermal energy equation is solved for a Couette flow with one adiabatic wall and one at constant temperature. Solutions use the simulation measurements of the heat dissipation rate, solid fraction, and granular temperature to show that the thermodynamic temperature increases with solid fraction and decreases with particle conductivity. In mixtures, both the dissipation rate and the thermodynamic temperature increase with size ratio and with decreasing ratio of small to large particles.

  18. Flow and heat simultaneously induced by two stretchable rotating disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkyilmazoglu, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    An exact solution for the steady state Navier-Stokes equations in cylindrical coordinates is presented in this work. It serves to investigate the fluid flow and heat transfer occurring between two stretchable disks rotating co-axially at constant distance apart. The governing equations of motion and energy are first transformed into a set of nonlinear differential equation system by the use of von Karman similarity transformations, which are later solved numerically. The small Reynolds number case allows us to extract closed-form solutions for the physical phenomenon. The effects of the same or opposite direction rotation, as well as the stretching parameter and the Reynolds number, are discussed on the flow and heat characteristics. The main physical implication of the results is that stretching action of a disk surface alters considerably the classical flow behavior occurring between two disks and the physically interesting quantities like the torque and heat transfer are elucidated in the presence of a new physical mechanism; that is the surface stretching in the current research.

  19. Analysis of the transient compressible vapor flow in heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Jong Hoon; Faghri, Amir; Chang, Won Soon

    1989-01-01

    The transient compressible one-dimensional vapor flow dynamics in a heat pipe is modeled. The numerical results are obtained by using the implicit non-iterative Beam-Warming finite difference method. The model is tested for simulated heat pipe vapor flow and actual flow in cylindrical heat pipes. A good comparison of the present transient results for the simulated heat pipe vapor flow with the previous results of a two-dimensional numerical model is achieved and the steady state results are in agreement with the existing experimental data. The transient behavior of the vapor flow under subsonic, sonic, and supersonic speeds and high mass flow rates are successfully predicted. The one-dimensional model also describes the vapor flow dynamics in cylindrical heat pipes at high temperatures.

  20. Metallurgical technologies, energy conversion, and magnetohydrodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branover, Herman; Unger, Yeshajahu

    The present volume discusses metallurgical applications of MHD, R&D on MHD devices employing liquid working medium for process applications, electromagnetic (EM) modulation of molten metal flow, EM pump performance of superconducting MHD devices, induction EM alkali-metal pumps, a physical model for EM-driven flow in channel-induction furnaces, grain refinement in Al alloys via EM vibrational method, dendrite growth of solidifying metal in dc magnetic field, MHD for mass and heat transfer in single-crystal melt growth, inverse EM shaping, and liquid-metal MHD development in Israel. Also discussed are the embrittlement of steel by lead, an open cycle MHD disk generator, the acceleration of gas-liquid piston flows for molten-metal MHD generators, MHD flow around a cylinder, new MHD drag coefficients, liquid-metal MHD two-phase flow, and two-phase liquid gas mixers for MHD energy conversion. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  1. Heat-flow reconnaissance of the Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; Shannon, S.S. Jr.

    1982-04-01

    Most of the 46 new values of heat flow determined for the Gulf Coastal Plain are in the low to normal range, but heat-flow values averaging 1.8 heat-flow unit (HFU) were obtained in Claiborne, Ouachita, and Union parishes, Louisiana. Moreover, a zone of relatively high heat-flow values and steep thermal gradients (35 to 46/sup 0/C/km) extends from northern Louisiana into southwestern Mississippi. Also near Pensacola, Florida, temperatures of 50/sup 0/C at 1-km depth have been extrapolated from thermal gradients. Future development of low-grade geothermal resources may be warranted in these areas.

  2. Heat transfer coefficients for drying in pulsating flows

    SciTech Connect

    Fraenkel, S.L.

    1998-05-01

    Pulsating flows generated by a Rijke type combustor are studied for drying of grains and food particles. It is assumed that the velocity fluctuations are the main factor in the enhancement of the drying process. The heat transfer coefficients for drying in vibrating beds are utilized to estimate the heat transfer coefficients of fixed beds in pulsating and permeating flows and are compared to the steady flow heat transfer coefficients obtained for solid porous bodies, after perturbing the main flow. The cases considered are compared to the convective heat transfer coefficients employed in non-pulsating drying.

  3. Nanofluid flow and forced convection heat transfer over a stretching surface considering heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour, M.; Valipour, P.; Shambooli, M.; Ayani, M.; Mirparizi, M.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, magnetic field effects on the forced convection flow of a nanofluid over a stretching surface in the presence of heat generation/absorption are studied. The equations of continuity, momentum and energy are transformed into ordinary differential equations and solved numerically using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration scheme featuring the shooting technique. Different types of nanoparticles as copper (Cu), silver (Ag), alumina (Al2O3) and titania (TiO2) with water as their base fluid has been considered. The influence of significant parameters, such as magnetic parameter, volume fraction of the nanoparticles, heat generation/absorption parameter, velocity ratio parameter and temperature index parameter on the flow and heat transfer characteristics are discussed. The results show that the values of temperature profiles increase with increasing heat generation/absorption and volume fraction of the nanoparticles but they decrease with increasing velocity ratio parameter and temperature index parameter. Also, it can be found that selecting silver as nanoparticle leads to the highest heat transfer enhancement.

  4. Terrestrial heat flow in east and southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyblade, Andrew A.; Pollack, Henry N.; Jones, D. L.; Podmore, Francis; Mushayandebvu, Martin

    1990-10-01

    We report 26 new heat flow and 13 radiogenic heat production measurements from Zimbabwe, Zambia and Tanzania, together with details and some revisions of 18 previous heat flow measurements by other investigators from Kenya and Tanzania. These measurements come from Archean cratons, Proterozoic mobile belts, and Mesozoic and Cenozoic rifts. Heat flow data from eight new sites in the Archean Zimbabwe Craton are consistent with previous measurements in the Archean Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe Craton and Limpopo Belt (Kalahari Craton) and do not change the mean heat flow of 47±2 mW m-2 (standard error of the mean) in the Kalahari Craton based on 53 previous measurements. Eight new sites in the Archean Tanzania Craton give a mean heat flow of 34±4 mW m-2. The mean heat flow from nine sites in the Proterozoic Mozambique Belt to the east of the Tanzania Craton in Kenya and Tanzania is 47±4 mW m-2. Twelve measurements in the Mesozoic rifted continental margin in east Africa give a mean heat flow of 68±4 mW m-2; four measurements in the Mesozoic Luangwa and Zambezi Rifts range from 44 to 110 mW m-2 with a mean of 76±14 mW m-2. In comparing heat flow in east and southern Africa, we observe a common heat flow pattern of increasing heat flow away from the centers of the Archean cratons. This pattern suggests a fundamental difference in lithospheric thermal structure between the Archean cratons and the Proterozoic and early Paleozoic mobile belts which surround them. Superimposed on this common pattern are two regional variations in heat flow. Heat flow in the Tanzania Craton is lower by about 13 mW m-2 than in the Kalahari Craton, and in the Mozambique Belt in east Africa heat flow is somewhat lower than in the southern African mobile belts at similar distances from the Archean cratonic margin. The two regional variations can be explained in several ways, none of which can as yet be elevated to a preferred status: (1) by variations in crustal heat production, (2) by thin

  5. Large deviations in stochastic heat-conduction processes provide a gradient-flow structure for heat conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Peletier, Mark A.; Redig, Frank; Vafayi, Kiamars

    2014-09-01

    We consider three one-dimensional continuous-time Markov processes on a lattice, each of which models the conduction of heat: the family of Brownian Energy Processes with parameter m (BEP(m)), a Generalized Brownian Energy Process, and the Kipnis-Marchioro-Presutti (KMP) process. The hydrodynamic limit of each of these three processes is a parabolic equation, the linear heat equation in the case of the BEP(m) and the KMP, and a nonlinear heat equation for the Generalized Brownian Energy Process with parameter a (GBEP(a)). We prove the hydrodynamic limit rigorously for the BEP(m), and give a formal derivation for the GBEP(a). We then formally derive the pathwise large-deviation rate functional for the empirical measure of the three processes. These rate functionals imply gradient-flow structures for the limiting linear and nonlinear heat equations. We contrast these gradient-flow structures with those for processes describing the diffusion of mass, most importantly the class of Wasserstein gradient-flow systems. The linear and nonlinear heat-equation gradient-flow structures are each driven by entropy terms of the form -log ρ; they involve dissipation or mobility terms of order ρ² for the linear heat equation, and a nonlinear function of ρ for the nonlinear heat equation.

  6. Heat transfer research on supercritical water flow upward in tube

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H. B.; Yang, J.; Gu, H. Y.; Zhao, M.; Lu, D. H.; Zhang, J. M.; Wang, F.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-07-01

    The experimental research of heat transfer on supercritical water has been carried out on the supercritical water multipurpose test loop with a 7.6 mm upright tube. The experimental data of heat transfer is obtained. The experimental results of thermal-hydraulic parameters on flow and heat transfer of supercritical water show that: Heat transfer enhancement occurs when the fluid temperature reaches pseudo-critical point with low mass flow velocity, and peters out when the mass flow velocity increases. The heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number decrease with the heat flux or system pressure increases, and increase with the increasing of mass flow velocity. The wall temperature increases when the mass flow velocity decreases or the system pressure increases. (authors)

  7. Effects of secondary flow on heat transfer in rotating passages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Joan G.; Moore, John

    1990-02-01

    Secondary flow in rotating cooling passages of jet engine turbine rotors is considered. A Navier-Stokes calculation procedure for turbulent flow is used to compute flow development in a radially outward flow channel, round a sharp 180 degree bend, and in the radially inward flow channel downstream. Areas of high and low heat transfer are explained by secondary flow development and quantitative results show regions of design interest.

  8. Working fluid flow visualization in gravity heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, Milan

    2016-03-01

    Heat pipe is device working with phase changes of working fluid inside hermetically closed pipe at specific pressure. The phase changes of working fluid from fluid to vapour and vice versa help heat pipe to transport high heat flux. The article deal about gravity heat pipe construction and processes casing inside during heat pipe operation. Experiment working fluid flow visualization is performed with two glass heat pipes with different inner diameter (13 mm and 22 mm) and filled with water. The working fluid flow visualization explains the phenomena as a working fluid boiling, nucleation of bubbles, and vapour condensation on the wall, vapour and condensate flow interaction, flow down condensate film thickness on the wall occurred during the heat pipe operation.

  9. A New Determination of Io's Heat Flow Using Diurnal Heat Balance Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. R.; Rathbun, J. A.; McEwen, A. S.; Pearl, J. C.; Bastos, A.; Andrade, J.; Correia, M.; Barros, S.

    2002-01-01

    We use heat balance arguments to obtain a new estimate of Io's heat flow that does not depend on assumptions about the temperatures of its thermal anomalies. Our estimated heat flow is somewhat less than 2.2 +/- 0.9 W/sq m. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Heat flow and temperature-depth curves throughout Alaska: finding regions for future geothermal exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batir, Joseph F.; Blackwell, David D.; Richards, Maria C.

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this research is to contribute to the understanding of the thermal regime of Alaska and its relationship to geology, regional tectonics, and to suggest potential sites for future geothermal energy production. New heat flow data were collected and are combined with existing published and unpublished data, although large sections of Alaska still lack data. Fault traces were implemented into the heat flow contouring as an additional gridding constraint, to incorporate both heat flow measurements and geology. New heat flow data supported the use of geologic trends in the heat flow mapping procedure, and a heat flow map of Alaska was produced with this added constraint. The multi-input contouring strategy allows production of a map with a regional interpretation of heat flow, in addition to site-specific heat flow and thermal model interpretations in areas with sufficient data density. Utilizing the new heat flow map, temperature-at-depth curves were created for example areas. Temperature-at-depth curves are calculated to 10 km depth for the areas of Anchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, the Alaska Peninsula, Bristol Bay, and the Copper River Basin. The temperatures-at-depth predicted near the population centers of Anchorage and Juneau are relatively low, limiting the geothermal resource potential. The Fairbanks area temperature estimates are near conventional power production temperatures (150 °C) between 3.5 and 4 km. All data areas, except at Juneau, have temperatures sufficient for low temperature geothermal applications (40 °C) by 2 km. A high heat flow region exists within the Aleutian Volcanic Arc, although new data show heat flow variations from 59 to 120 mW m‑2, so individual geothermal resources within the arc will be irregularly located.

  11. Computer code for predicting coolant flow and heat transfer in turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, Peter L.

    1990-01-01

    A computer code was developed to analyze any turbomachinery coolant flow path geometry that consist of a single flow passage with a unique inlet and exit. Flow can be bled off for tip-cap impingement cooling, and a flow bypass can be specified in which coolant flow is taken off at one point in the flow channel and reintroduced at a point farther downstream in the same channel. The user may either choose the coolant flow rate or let the program determine the flow rate from specified inlet and exit conditions. The computer code integrates the 1-D momentum and energy equations along a defined flow path and calculates the coolant's flow rate, temperature, pressure, and velocity and the heat transfer coefficients along the passage. The equations account for area change, mass addition or subtraction, pumping, friction, and heat transfer.

  12. Heat flow calorimeter. [measures output of Ni-Cd batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, J. C.; Johnston, W. V. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Heat flow calorimeter devices are used to measure heat liberated from or absorbed by an object. This device is capable of measuring the thermal output of sealed nickel-cadmium batteries or cells during charge-discharge cycles. An elongated metal heat conducting rod is coupled between the calorimeter vessel and a heat sink, thus providing the only heat exchange path from the calorimeter vessel itself.

  13. Boiling heat transfer of refrigerant R-21 in upward flow in plate-fin heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. V.; Shamirzaev, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    The article presents the results of experimental investigation of boiling heat transfer of refrigerant R-21 in upward flow in a vertical plate-fin heat exchanger with transverse size of the channels that is smaller than the capillary constant. The heat transfer coefficients obtained in ranges of small mass velocities and low heat fluxes, which are typical of the industry, have been poorly studied yet. The characteristic patterns of the upward liquid-vapor flow in the heat exchanger channels and the regions of their existence are detected. The obtained data show a weak dependence of heat transfer coefficient on equilibrium vapor quality, mass flow rate, and heat flux density and do not correspond to calculations by the known heat transfer models. A possible reason for this behavior is a decisive influence of evaporation of thin liquid films on the heat transfer at low heat flux.

  14. Flow instability and flow reversal in heated annular multichannels with initial downward flow

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H.N.; Hart, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented regarding the stability of initial downward flow of single phase water in parallel annular channels of the Savannah River Site (SRS) fuel assembly. The test was performed on an electrically heated prototypic mockup of a Mark-22 fuel assembly. The test conditions consisted of mass fluxes, from 98--294 kg/m[sup 2]-sec, and inlet water temperatures of 25[degrees]C and 40[degrees]C. With increased power to the heaters, flow instability was detected, characterized by flow fluctuations and flow redistribution among subchannels of the outer flow channel. With increased power, a condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increased, a critical heat flux condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increases, a critical heat flux condition was reached in the outer channel.

  15. Flow instability and flow reversal in heated annular multichannels with initial downward flow

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H.N.; Hart, C.M.

    1992-12-31

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented regarding the stability of initial downward flow of single phase water in parallel annular channels of the Savannah River Site (SRS) fuel assembly. The test was performed on an electrically heated prototypic mockup of a Mark-22 fuel assembly. The test conditions consisted of mass fluxes, from 98--294 kg/m{sup 2}-sec, and inlet water temperatures of 25{degrees}C and 40{degrees}C. With increased power to the heaters, flow instability was detected, characterized by flow fluctuations and flow redistribution among subchannels of the outer flow channel. With increased power, a condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increased, a critical heat flux condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increases, a critical heat flux condition was reached in the outer channel.

  16. Energy and material flows of megacities

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Christopher A.; Stewart, Iain; Facchini, Angelo; Cersosimo, Igor; Mele, Renata; Chen, Bin; Uda, Mariko; Kansal, Arun; Chiu, Anthony; Kim, Kwi-gon; Dubeux, Carolina; Lebre La Rovere, Emilio; Cunha, Bruno; Pincetl, Stephanie; Keirstead, James; Barles, Sabine; Pusaka, Semerdanta; Gunawan, Juniati; Adegbile, Michael; Nazariha, Mehrdad; Hoque, Shamsul; Marcotullio, Peter J.; González Otharán, Florencia; Genena, Tarek; Ibrahim, Nadine; Farooqui, Rizwan; Cervantes, Gemma; Sahin, Ahmet Duran

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the drivers of energy and material flows of cities is important for addressing global environmental challenges. Accessing, sharing, and managing energy and material resources is particularly critical for megacities, which face enormous social stresses because of their sheer size and complexity. Here we quantify the energy and material flows through the world’s 27 megacities with populations greater than 10 million people as of 2010. Collectively the resource flows through megacities are largely consistent with scaling laws established in the emerging science of cities. Correlations are established for electricity consumption, heating and industrial fuel use, ground transportation energy use, water consumption, waste generation, and steel production in terms of heating-degree-days, urban form, economic activity, and population growth. The results help identify megacities exhibiting high and low levels of consumption and those making efficient use of resources. The correlation between per capita electricity use and urbanized area per capita is shown to be a consequence of gross building floor area per capita, which is found to increase for lower-density cities. Many of the megacities are growing rapidly in population but are growing even faster in terms of gross domestic product (GDP) and energy use. In the decade from 2001–2011, electricity use and ground transportation fuel use in megacities grew at approximately half the rate of GDP growth. PMID:25918371

  17. Energy and material flows of megacities.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Christopher A; Stewart, Iain; Facchini, Angelo; Cersosimo, Igor; Mele, Renata; Chen, Bin; Uda, Mariko; Kansal, Arun; Chiu, Anthony; Kim, Kwi-Gon; Dubeux, Carolina; Lebre La Rovere, Emilio; Cunha, Bruno; Pincetl, Stephanie; Keirstead, James; Barles, Sabine; Pusaka, Semerdanta; Gunawan, Juniati; Adegbile, Michael; Nazariha, Mehrdad; Hoque, Shamsul; Marcotullio, Peter J; González Otharán, Florencia; Genena, Tarek; Ibrahim, Nadine; Farooqui, Rizwan; Cervantes, Gemma; Sahin, Ahmet Duran

    2015-05-12

    Understanding the drivers of energy and material flows of cities is important for addressing global environmental challenges. Accessing, sharing, and managing energy and material resources is particularly critical for megacities, which face enormous social stresses because of their sheer size and complexity. Here we quantify the energy and material flows through the world's 27 megacities with populations greater than 10 million people as of 2010. Collectively the resource flows through megacities are largely consistent with scaling laws established in the emerging science of cities. Correlations are established for electricity consumption, heating and industrial fuel use, ground transportation energy use, water consumption, waste generation, and steel production in terms of heating-degree-days, urban form, economic activity, and population growth. The results help identify megacities exhibiting high and low levels of consumption and those making efficient use of resources. The correlation between per capita electricity use and urbanized area per capita is shown to be a consequence of gross building floor area per capita, which is found to increase for lower-density cities. Many of the megacities are growing rapidly in population but are growing even faster in terms of gross domestic product (GDP) and energy use. In the decade from 2001-2011, electricity use and ground transportation fuel use in megacities grew at approximately half the rate of GDP growth. PMID:25918371

  18. In situ determination of heat flow in unconsolidated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Kennelly, J.P.; Wendt, W.E.; Moses, T.H.; Ziagos, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    Subsurface thermal measurements are the most effective, least ambiguous tools for identifying and delineating possible geothernml resources. Measurements of thermal gradient in the upper few tens of meters generally are sufficient to outline the major anomalies, but it is always desirable to combine these gradients with reliable estimates of thermal conductivity to provide data on the energy flux and to constrain models for the heat sources responsible for the observed, near-surface thermal anomalies. The major problems associated with heat-flow measurements in the geothermal exploration mode are concerned with the economics of casing and/or grouting holes, the repeated site visits necessary to obtain equilibrium temperature values, the possible legal liability associated with the disturbance of underground aquifers, the surface hazards presented by pipes protruding from the ground, and the security problems associated with leaving cased holes open for periods of weeks to months. We have developed a technique which provides reliable 'real-time' determinations of temperature, thermal conductivity, and hence, of heat flow during the drilling operation in unconsolidated sediments. A combined temperature, gradient, and thermal conductivity experiment can be carried out, by driving a thin probe through the bit about 1.5 meters into the formation in the time that would otherwise be required for a coring trip. Two or three such experiments over the depth range of, say, 50 to 150 meters provide a high-quality heat-flow determination at costs comparable to those associated with a standard cased 'gradient hole' to comparable depths. The hole can be backfilled and abandoned upon cessation of drilling, thereby eliminating the need for casing, grouting, or repeated site visits.

  19. Snow distribution and heat flow in the taiga

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, M. )

    1992-05-01

    The trees of the taiga intercept falling snow and cause it to become distributed in an uneven fashion. Around aspen and birch, cone-shaped accumulations form. Beneath large spruce trees, the snow cover is depleted, forming a bowl-shaped depression called a tree well. Small spruce trees become covered with snow, creating cavities that funnel cold air to the snow/ground interface. The depletion of snow under large spruce trees results in greater heat loss from the ground. A finite difference model suggests that heat flow from tree wells can be more than twice that of undisturbed snow. In forested watersheds, this increase can be a significant percentage of the total winter energy exchange.

  20. Carbon Energy Flows Belowground

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants use photosynthesis to convert carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and energy from sunlight into energy-containing, carbon-based foodstuffs (i.e. carbohydrates such as sugars and starches) that provide the building blocks for all life on Earth. Without photosynthesis, sunlight would not be a goo...

  1. US energy flow, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, I.Y.; Briggs, C.K.

    1991-06-01

    Energy consumption in the US changed only slightly in 1990. Transportation used was close to 1988 and 1989 levels. Improvements in automobile efficiency were compensated by an increase in the number of miles driven. A larger energy use in the industrial sector was offset by decreases in the residential/commercial sector. Energy use in the latter sector was influenced by a relatively mild, nation-wide summer and winter. All end-use sectors were affected by the high fuel prices related to the Kuwait-Iraq war in the last half of the year and by an attendant economic downturn. Electrical use rose slightly and thus deviated from the 3-4% annual increases recorded in the previous decade. Nuclear energy's contribution to electrical generation increased to almost 21%, and capacity factors reached 66%, an all time high in the US. Renewable sources of energy apart from hydroelectric power showed negligible growth. Domestic natural gas and coal production rose, and oil production continued its steady decline. As oil constitutes 41% of US energy consumption, failing domestic production has been augmented by imports. Collectively energy imports constituted two-thirds of the US trade deficit in 1990. The ratio between energy consumption and GNP declined slightly in 1990 as it has for almost every year since 1972. The Services'' component of the GNP increased in 1990 and the Goods'' and Structures'' components declined in keeping with an even longer trend. 29 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. A Prototype Flux-Plate Heat-Flow Sensor for Venus Surface Heat-Flow Determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Paul; Reyes, Celso; Smrekar, Suzanne E.

    2005-01-01

    Venus is the most Earth-like planet in the Solar System in terms of size, and the densities of the two planets are almost identical when selfcompression of the two planets is taken into account. Venus is the closest planet to Earth, and the simplest interpretation of their similar densities is that their bulk compositions are almost identical. Models of the thermal evolution of Venus predict interior temperatures very similar to those indicated for the regions of Earth subject to solid-state convection, but even global analyses of the coarse Pioneer Venus elevation data suggest Venus does not lose heat by the same primary heat loss mechanism as Earth, i.e., seafloor spreading. The comparative paucity of impact craters on Venus has been interpreted as evidence for relatively recent resurfacing of the planet associated with widespread volcanic and tectonic activity. The difference in the gross tectonic styles of Venus and Earth, and the origins of some of the enigmatic volcano-tectonic features on Venus, such as the coronae, appear to be intrinsically related to Venus heat loss mechanism(s). An important parameter in understanding Venus geological evolution, therefore, is its present surface heat flow. Before the complications of survival in the hostile Venus surface environment were tackled, a prototype fluxplate heat-flow sensor was built and tested for use under synthetic stable terrestrial surface conditions. The design parameters for this prototype were that it should operate on a conforming (sand) surface, with a small, self-contained power and recording system, capable of operating without servicing for at least several days. The precision and accuracy of the system should be < 5 mW/sq m. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  3. Optimization of Transient Heat Exchanger Performance for Improved Energy Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bran Anleu, Gabriela; Kavehpour, Pirouz; Lavine, Adrienne; Wirz, Richard

    2014-11-01

    Heat exchangers are used in a multitude of applications within systems for energy generation, energy conversion, or energy storage. Many of these systems (e.g. solar power plants) function under transient conditions, but the design of the heat exchangers is typically optimized assuming steady state conditions. There is a potential for significant energy savings if the transient behavior of the heat exchanger is taken into account in designing the heat exchanger by optimizing its operating conditions in relation to the transient behavior of the overall system. The physics of the transient behavior of a heat exchanger needs to be understood to provide design parameters for transient heat exchangers to deliver energy savings. A numerical model was used to determine the optimized mass flow rates thermal properties for a thermal energy storage system. The transient behavior is strongly linked to the dimensionless parameters relating fluid properties, the mass flow rates, and the temperature of the fluids at the inlet of each stream. Smart metals, or advanced heat exchanger surface geometries and methods of construction will be used to meet the three goals mentioned before: 1) energy and cost reduction, 2) size reduction, and 3) optimal performance for all modes of operation.

  4. Heat flow, crustal differentiation and lithospheric strength in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, C.; Mareschal, J.; Jaupart, C.

    2008-12-01

    In stable North America, thermal models based on heat flow and heat production measurements suggest that the mechanical resistance of the lithosphere on a regional scale is greater in provinces of elevated heat flow. This is contrary to the general belief that higher surface heat flow means less stable lithosphere. We show that crustal differentiation is equally important to determine lithospheric strength. The degree of crustal radiogenic differentiation may be described using the average surface and crustal heat flows, and is quantified through the differentiation index. This index is obtained as the ratio between regional average values of heat production at the surface and in the bulk crust. The differentiation index is calculated with the bulk average heat production, suggesting that crustal differentiation processes are largely driven by internal radiogenic heat. We show that the most stable of lithospheres may be characterized by relatively high surface heat flow, simply a result of the distribution of heat sources through the crust. This may have important implications for the thermo-mechanical evolution of stable continental interiors, and for the vertical distribution of crustal heat sources through time.

  5. Inductive heating with magnetic materials inside flow reactors.

    PubMed

    Ceylan, Sascha; Coutable, Ludovic; Wegner, Jens; Kirschning, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles coated with silica gel or alternatively steel beads are new fixed-bed materials for flow reactors that efficiently heat reaction mixtures in an inductive field under flow conditions. The scope and limitations of these novel heating materials are investigated in comparison with conventional and microwave heating. The results suggest that inductive heating can be compared to microwave heating with respect to rate acceleration. It is also demonstrated that a very large diversity of different reactions can be performed under flow conditions by using inductively heated flow reactors. These include transfer hydrogenations, heterocyclic condensations, pericyclic reactions, organometallic reactions, multicomponent reactions, reductive cyclizations, homogeneous and heterogeneous transition-metal catalysis. Silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are stable under many chemical conditions and the silica shell could be utilized for further functionalization with Pd nanoparticles, rendering catalytically active heatable iron oxide particles. PMID:21274939

  6. Heat recovery reduces process energy losses

    SciTech Connect

    Anon

    1981-09-01

    After evaluation of process and plant operation losses, a pharmaceutical plant found heat recovery a viable means of reducing energy losses. One of the first applications of air-to-air heat recovery was in a recirculation/dehumidification process. Heat exchangers were used to recover heat from the air used to generate or dry the dehumidification material.

  7. Air-side flow and heat transfer in compact heat exchangers: A discussion of enhancement mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobi, A.M.; Shah, R.K.

    1998-10-01

    The behavior of air flows in complex heat exchanger passages is reviewed with a focus on the heat transfer effects of boundary-layer development, turbulence, spanwise and streamwise vortices, and wake management. Each of these flow features is discussed for the plain, wavy, and interrupted passages found in contemporary compact heat exchanger designs. Results from the literature are used to help explain the role of these mechanisms in heat transfer enhancement strategies.

  8. Computation of flow and heat transfer in rotating cavities with peripheral flow of cooling air.

    PubMed

    Kiliç, M

    2001-05-01

    Numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations have been used to model the flow and the heat transfer that occurs in the internal cooling-air systems of gas turbines. Computations are performed to study the effect of gap ratio, Reynolds number and the mass flow rate on the flow and the heat transfer structure inside isothermal and heated rotating cavities with peripheral flow of cooling air. Computations are compared with some of the recent experimental work on flow and heat transfer in rotating-cavities. The agreement between the computed and the available experimental data is reasonably good. PMID:11460668

  9. Heat Flow, Climate Change and Advective Heat Transfer Beneath Winnipeg, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, G. A.; Woodbury, A. D.

    2002-12-01

    appear to have the greatest impacts in an industrial area in eastern Winnipeg and in an area with several large apartment buildings in western Winnipeg where the largest volumes of warm water are injected. Temperature profiles in areas where anomalous advective heat flow is prevalent are characterized by elevated temperatures occurring over discrete intervals, indicating transport through fractures and paleokarst features in the Upper Carbonate Aquifer. The presence of elevated temperatures beneath Winnipeg indicate that the current practices of using groundwater for cooling may not be sustainable due to the current injections of warm water and basement construction. However, the increases in heat flow beneath Winnipeg make the use of geothermal energy by heat pumps an attractive alternative for space heating.

  10. Cryogenic Heat Exchanger with Turbulent Flows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrit, Jay; Douay, Christelle; Dubois, Francis; Defresne, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    An evaporator-type cryogenic heat exchanger is designed and built for introducing fluid-solid heat exchange phenomena to undergraduates in a practical and efficient way. The heat exchanger functions at liquid nitrogen temperature and enables cooling of N[subscript 2] and He gases from room temperatures. We present first the experimental results of…

  11. Solar Energy for Space Heating & Hot Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Energy Research and Development Administration, Washington, DC. Div. of Solar Energy.

    This pamphlet reviews the direct transfer of solar energy into heat, particularly for the purpose of providing space and hot water heating needs. Owners of buildings and homes are provided with a basic understanding of solar heating and hot water systems: what they are, how they perform, the energy savings possible, and the cost factors involved.…

  12. Unsteady Flow in a Supersonic Turbine with Variable Specific Heats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Daniel J.; Griffin, Lisa W.; Huber, Frank; Sondak, Douglas L.; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Modern high-work turbines can be compact, transonic, supersonic, counter-rotating, or use a dense drive gas. The vast majority of modern rocket turbine designs fall into these Categories. These turbines usually have large temperature variations across a given stage, and are characterized by large amounts of flow unsteadiness. The flow unsteadiness can have a major impact on the turbine performance and durability. For example, the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) fuel turbine, a high work, transonic design, was found to have an unsteady inter-row shock which reduced efficiency by 2 points and increased dynamic loading by 24 percent. The Revolutionary Reusable Technology Turbopump (RRTT), which uses full flow oxygen for its drive gas, was found to shed vortices with such energy as to raise serious blade durability concerns. In both cases, the sources of the problems were uncovered (before turbopump testing) with the application of validated, unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to the designs. In the case of the RRTT and the Alternate Turbopump Development (ATD) turbines, the unsteady CFD codes have been used not just to identify problems, but to guide designs which mitigate problems due to unsteadiness. Using unsteady flow analyses as a part of the design process has led to turbine designs with higher performance (which affects temperature and mass flow rate) and fewer dynamics problems. One of the many assumptions made during the design and analysis of supersonic turbine stages is that the values of the specific heats are constant. In some analyses the value is based on an average of the expected upstream and downstream temperatures. In stages where the temperature can vary by 300 to 500 K, however, the assumption of constant fluid properties may lead to erroneous performance and durability predictions. In this study the suitability of assuming constant specific heats has been investigated by performing three-dimensional unsteady Navier

  13. 3D topographic correction of the BSR heat flow and detection of focused fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tao; Li, Hong-Lin; Zou, Chang-Chun

    2014-06-01

    The bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) is a seismic indicator of the bottom of a gas hydrate stability zone. Its depth can be used to calculate the seafloor surface heat flow. The calculated BSR heat flow variations include disturbances from two important factors: (1) seafloor topography, which focuses the heat flow over regions of concave topography and defocuses it over regions of convex topography, and (2) the focused warm fluid flow within the accretionary prism coming from depths deeper than BSR. The focused fluid flow can be detected if the contribution of the topography to the BSR heat flow is removed. However, the analytical equation cannot solve the topographic effect at complex seafloor regions. We prove that 3D finite element method can model the topographic effect on the regional background heat flow with high accuracy, which can then be used to correct the topographic effect and obtain the BSR heat flow under the condition of perfectly flat topography. By comparing the corrected BSR heat flow with the regional background heat flow, focused fluid flow regions can be detected that are originally too small and cannot be detected using present-day equipment. This method was successfully applied to the midslope region of northern Cascadia subducting margin. The results suggest that the Cucumber Ridge and its neighboring area are positive heat flow anomalies, about 10%-20% higher than the background heat flow after 3D topographic correction. Moreover, the seismic imaging associated the positive heat flow anomaly areas with seabed fracture-cavity systems. This suggests flow of warm gas-carrying fluids along these high-permeability pathways, which could result in higher gas hydrate concentrations.

  14. Study on the heat-flow controllable heat exchanger (2nd report): Dehumidification in the greenhouse by the ventilation type dehumidifier with heat-flow controllable heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Yanadori, Michio; Hamano, Masayoshi )

    1994-07-01

    A novel ventilation type dehumidifier with heat-flow controllable heat exchanger was installed on the wall of a greenhouse. Dehumidification and heat recovery experiments were conducted. The construction of the novel dehumidifier is simpler than that of the conventional dehumidifier with a compressor. It was found that the required input for the ventilation type dehumidifier was less than that of a conventional dehumidifier with compressor.

  15. Dryout of an inductively heated bed of steel particles with subcooled flow from beneath the bed

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, F.P.; Catton, I.; Dhir, V.K.; Jakobsson, J.

    1984-04-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted of dryout heat flux in an inductively heated bed of metal particles with forced flow from beneath the bed. The mass flux varied from 0 to 3.11 kg/m/sup 2/.s. Freon113 was used as coolant. Particle sizes were 1588, 3175, and 4763 /rho/m in diameter. The dryout heat flux was found to increase as mass flux increases. When the mass flux is large enough, the dryout heat flux asymptotically approaches the total evaporation energy of the inlet flow.

  16. Heat Transfer of Viscoelastic Fluid Flow due to Nonlinear Stretching Sheet with Internal Heat Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandeppanavar, M. M.; Siddalingappa, M. N.; Jyoti, H.

    2013-08-01

    In the present paper, a viscoelastic boundary layer flow and heat transfer over an exponentially stretching continuous sheet in the presence of a heat source/sink has been examined. Loss of energy due to viscous dissipation of the non-Newtonian fluid has been taken into account in this study. Approximate analytical local similar solutions of the highly non-linear momentum equation are obtained for velocity distribution by transforming the equation into Riccati-type and then solving this sequentially. Accuracy of the zero-order analytical solutions for the stream function and velocity are verified by numerical solutions obtained by employing the Runge-Kutta fourth order method involving shooting. Similarity solutions of the temperature equation for non-isothermal boundary conditions are obtained in the form of confluent hypergeometric functions. The effect of various physical parameters on the local skin-friction coefficient and heat transfer characteristics are discussed in detail. It is seen that the rate of heat transfer from the stretching sheet to the fluid can be controlled by suitably choosing the values of the Prandtl number Pr and local Eckert number E, local viscioelastic parameter k*1 and local heat source/ sink parameter β*

  17. Hot Topics! Heat Pumps and Geothermal Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2009-01-01

    The recent rapid rises in the cost of energy has significantly increased interest in alternative energy sources. The author discusses the underlying principles of heat pumps and geothermal energy. Related activities for technology education students are included.

  18. Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Closed-Type Two-Phase Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Saito, Yuji; Fujimoto, Hiromitsu

    A closed-loop two-phase thermosyphon can transport a large amount of thermal energy with small temperature differences without any external power supply. A fundamental investigation of flow and heat transfer characteristics was performed experimentally and theoretically using water, ethanol and R113 as the working liquids. Heat transfer coefficients in an evaporator and a condenser, and circulation flow rates were measured experimentally. The effects of liquid fill charge, rotation angle, pressure in the loop and heat flux on the heat transfer coefficients were examined. The heat transfer coefficients in the evaporator and the condenser were correlated by the expressions for pool boiling and film condensation respectively. As a result, the heat transfer coefficients in the evaporator were correlated by the Stephan-Abdelsalam equations within a±40% error. Theoretically, the circulation flow rate was predicted by calculating pressure, temperature, quality and void fraction along the loop. And, the comparison between the calculated and experimental results was made.

  19. Heat Transfer and Flow Structure Evaluation of a Synthetic Jet Emanating from a Planar Heat Sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Paul; Persoons, Tim; Murray, Darina

    2014-07-01

    Direct impinging synthetic jets are a proven method for heat transfer enhancement, and have been subject to extensive research. However, despite the vast amount of research into direct synthetic jet impingement, there has been little research investigating the effects of a synthetic jet emanating from a heated surface, this forms the basis of the current research investigation. Both single and multiple orifices are integrated into a planar heat sink forming a synthetic jet, thus allowing the heat transfer enhancement and flow structures to be assessed. The heat transfer analysis highlighted that the multiple orifice synthetic jet resulted in the greatest heat transfer enhancements. The flow structures responsible for these enhancements were identified using a combination of flow visualisation, thermal imaging and thermal boundary layer analysis. The flow structure analysis identified that the synthetic jets decreased the thermal boundary layer thickness resulting in a more effective convective heat transfer process. Flow visualisation revealed entrainment of local air adjacent to the heated surface; this occurred from vortex roll-up at the surface of the heat sink and from the highly sheared jet flow. Furthermore, a secondary entrainment was identified which created a surface impingement effect. It is proposed that all three flow features enhance the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  20. Nonsteady flow of a vapor-drop flow in a heated channel

    SciTech Connect

    Kroshilin, V.E.; Khodzhaev, Y.D.

    1992-06-01

    Flow of a vapor-drop mixture in a heated channel is studied under steady and non-steady conditions using a model which considers direct thermal interaction of drops with the heating surface. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Flow and heat transfer in a curved channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinich, P. F.; Graham, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Flow and heat transfer in a curved channel of aspect ratio 6 and inner- to outer-wall radius ratio 0.96 were studied. Secondary currents and large longitudinal vortices were found. The heat-transfer rates of the outer and inner walls were independently controlled to maintain a constant wall temperature. Heating the inner wall increased the pressure drop along the channel length, whereas heating the outer wall had little effect. Outer-wall heat transfer was as much as 40 percent greater than the straight-channel correlation, and inner-wall heat transfer was 22 percent greater than the straight-channel correlation.

  2. On the global variations of terrestrial heat-flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, W.H.K.

    1969-01-01

    Over 3 500 measurements of surface heat-flux have been catalogued and analyzed to study the large-scale variations of terrestrial heat-flow. It was found that heat-flow values are correlated with major geologic provinces: higher averages and scattered values in active tectonic regions, and lower averages and more uniform values in stable areas. Analyzing the data in the light of new global tectonics shows that the variations of heat-flow are consistent with the hypotheses of sea-floor spreading and plate tectonics. The observed heat-flow across the mid-oceanic ridges can be accounted for by a simple model of a spreading sea floor. ?? 1970.

  3. Heat transfer and flow characteristics on a gas turbine shroud.

    PubMed

    Obata, M; Kumada, M; Ijichi, N

    2001-05-01

    The work described in this paper is an experimental investigation of the heat transfer from the main flow to a turbine shroud surface, which may be applicable to ceramic gas turbines. Three kinds of turbine shrouds are considered with a flat surface, a taper surface and a spiral groove surface opposite to the blades in an axial flow turbine of actual turbo-charger. Heat transfer measurements were performed for the experimental conditions of a uniform heat flux or a uniform wall temperature. The effects of the inlet flow angle, rotational speed, and tip clearance on the heat transfer coefficient were clarified under on- and off-design flow conditions. The mean heat transfer coefficient was correlated to the blade Reynolds number and tip clearance, and compared with an experimental correlation and measurements of a flat surface. A comparison was also made for the measurement of static pressure distributions. PMID:11460639

  4. Numerical prediction of turbulent oscillating flow and associated heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, W. J.; Patankar, S. V.; Ibele, W. E.

    1991-08-01

    A crucial point for further development of engines is the optimization of its heat exchangers which operate under oscillatory flow conditions. It has been found that the most important thermodynamic uncertainties in the Stirling engine designs for space power are in the heat transfer between gas and metal in all engine components and in the pressure drop across the heat exchanger components. So far, performance codes cannot predict the power output of a Stirling engine reasonably enough if used for a wide variety of engines. Thus, there is a strong need for better performance codes. However, a performance code is not concerned with the details of the flow. This information must be provided externally. While analytical relationships exist for laminar oscillating flow, there has been hardly any information about transitional and turbulent oscillating flow, which could be introduced into the performance codes. In 1986, a survey by Seume and Simon revealed that most Stirling engine heat exchangers operate in the transitional and turbulent regime. Consequently, research has since focused on the unresolved issue of transitional and turbulent oscillating flow and heat transfer. Since 1988, the University of Minnesota oscillating flow facility has obtained experimental data about transitional and turbulent oscillating flow. However, since the experiments in this field are extremely difficult, lengthy, and expensive, it is advantageous to numerically simulate the flow and heat transfer accurately from first principles. Work done at the University of Minnesota on the development of such a numerical simulation is summarized.

  5. Numerical prediction of turbulent oscillating flow and associated heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehler, W. J.; Patankar, S. V.; Ibele, W. E.

    1991-01-01

    A crucial point for further development of engines is the optimization of its heat exchangers which operate under oscillatory flow conditions. It has been found that the most important thermodynamic uncertainties in the Stirling engine designs for space power are in the heat transfer between gas and metal in all engine components and in the pressure drop across the heat exchanger components. So far, performance codes cannot predict the power output of a Stirling engine reasonably enough if used for a wide variety of engines. Thus, there is a strong need for better performance codes. However, a performance code is not concerned with the details of the flow. This information must be provided externally. While analytical relationships exist for laminar oscillating flow, there has been hardly any information about transitional and turbulent oscillating flow, which could be introduced into the performance codes. In 1986, a survey by Seume and Simon revealed that most Stirling engine heat exchangers operate in the transitional and turbulent regime. Consequently, research has since focused on the unresolved issue of transitional and turbulent oscillating flow and heat transfer. Since 1988, the University of Minnesota oscillating flow facility has obtained experimental data about transitional and turbulent oscillating flow. However, since the experiments in this field are extremely difficult, lengthy, and expensive, it is advantageous to numerically simulate the flow and heat transfer accurately from first principles. Work done at the University of Minnesota on the development of such a numerical simulation is summarized.

  6. Three-phase flow? Consider helical-coil heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Haraburda, S.S.

    1995-07-01

    In recent years, chemical process plants are increasingly encountering processes that require heat exchange in three-phase fluids. A typical application, for example, is heating liquids containing solid catalyst particles and non-condensable gases. Heat exchangers designed for three-phase flow generally have tubes with large diameters (typically greater than two inches), because solids can build-up inside the tube and lead to plugging. At the same time, in order to keep heat-transfer coefficients high, the velocity of the process fluid within the tube should also be high. As a result, heat exchangers for three-phase flow may require less than five tubes -- each having a required linear length that could exceed several hundred feet. Given these limitations, it is obvious that a basic shell-and-tube heat exchanger is not the most practical solution for this purpose. An alternative for three-phase flow is a helical-coil heat exchanger. The helical-coil units offer a number of advantages, including perpendicular, counter-current flow and flexible overall dimensions for the exchanger itself. The paper presents equations for: calculating the tube-side heat-transfer coefficient; calculating the shell-side heat-transfer coefficient; calculating the heat-exchanger size; calculating the tube-side pressure drop; and calculating shell-side pressure-drop.

  7. Estimation of respiratory heat flows in prediction of heat strain among Taiwanese steel workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wang-Yi; Juang, Yow-Jer; Hsieh, Jung-Yu; Tsai, Perng-Jy; Chen, Chen-Peng

    2016-06-01

    International Organization for Standardization 7933 standard provides evaluation of required sweat rate (RSR) and predicted heat strain (PHS). This study examined and validated the approximations in these models estimating respiratory heat flows (RHFs) via convection (C res) and evaporation (E res) for application to Taiwanese foundry workers. The influence of change in RHF approximation to the validity of heat strain prediction in these models was also evaluated. The metabolic energy consumption and physiological quantities of these workers performing at different workloads under elevated wet-bulb globe temperature (30.3 ± 2.5 °C) were measured on-site and used in the calculation of RHFs and indices of heat strain. As the results show, the RSR model overestimated the C res for Taiwanese workers by approximately 3 % and underestimated the E res by 8 %. The C res approximation in the PHS model closely predicted the convective RHF, while the E res approximation over-predicted by 11 %. Linear regressions provided better fit in C res approximation (R 2 = 0.96) than in E res approximation (R 2 ≤ 0.85) in both models. The predicted C res deviated increasingly from the observed value when the WBGT reached 35 °C. The deviations of RHFs observed for the workers from those predicted using the RSR or PHS models did not significantly alter the heat loss via the skin, as the RHFs were in general of a level less than 5 % of the metabolic heat consumption. Validation of these approximations considering thermo-physiological responses of local workers is necessary for application in scenarios of significant heat exposure.

  8. Transport of heat and momentum in oscillatory wall-bounded flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebadi, Alireza; Biles, Drummond; White, Christopher; Pond, Ian; Dubief, Yves; UNH Team; UVM Team

    2015-11-01

    The balance of the leading order terms in the mean momentum and energy equations and their thrice integrated forms are investigated in oscillatory wall-bounded flow using both DNS and experimental data. The integrated forms of the equations are used to investigate the dynamical contributions to the phase-averaged wall shear stress and wall heat flux. Preliminary results indicate that phases corresponding to flow acceleration are dynamically similar to oscillatory laminar flow and phases corresponding to flow deceleration are dynamically similar to fully developed turbulent flow. Moreover, the flow becomes more turbulent-like with increasing period of oscillation.

  9. Spherical harmonic analysis of earth's conductive heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, V. M.; Cardoso, R. R.; Ponte Neto, C. F.

    2008-04-01

    A reappraisal of the international heat flow database has been carried out and the corrected data set was employed in spherical harmonic analysis of the conductive component of global heat flow. Procedures used prior to harmonic analysis include analysis of the heat flow data and determination of representative mean values for a set of discretized area elements of the surface of the earth. Estimated heat flow values were assigned to area elements for which experimental data are not available. However, no corrections were made to account for the hypothetical effects of regional-scale convection heat transfer in areas of oceanic crust. New sets of coefficients for 12° spherical harmonic expansion were calculated on the basis of the revised and homogenized data set. Maps derived on the basis of these coefficients reveal several new features in the global heat flow distribution. The magnitudes of heat flow anomalies of the ocean ridge segments are found to have mean values of less than 150 mW/m2. Also, the mean global heat flow values for the raw and binned data are found to fall in the range of 56-67 mW/m2, down by nearly 25% compared to the previous estimate of 1993, but similar to earlier assessments based on raw data alone. To improve the spatial resolution of the heat flow anomalies, the spherical harmonic expansions have been extended to higher degrees. Maps derived using coefficients for 36° harmonic expansion have allowed identification of new features in regional heat flow fields of several oceanic and continental segments. For example, lateral extensions of heat flow anomalies of active spreading centers have been outlined with better resolution than was possible in earlier studies. Also, the characteristics of heat flow variations in oceanic crust away from ridge systems are found to be typical of conductive cooling of the lithosphere, there being little need to invoke the hypothesis of unconfined hydrothermal circulation on regional scales. Calculations

  10. Heat flow in the north-central Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodell, John Michael; Chapman, David S.

    1982-04-01

    We report new heat flow measurements at 25 evenly distributed sites in the north-central Colorado Plateau. Heat flow values computed for these new sites and one previously published site range from 43 to 116 mW m-2 but fall into the following distinct subsets related to physiographic and tectonic elements within the Plateau: (1) heat flow of 51 mW m-2 (12 sites; s.d. 6) in the San Rafael Swell and Green River Desert which constitute the core of the Colorado Plateau at this latitude, (2) heat flows of 69 mW m-2 (5 sites; s.d. 10) and 88 mW m-2 (4 sites; s.d. 19) in successive parallel north-south bands approaching the Wasatch Plateau to the west but still 80 km east of the Basin and Range physiographic boundary, (3) heat flow of 64 mW m-2 (5 sites; s.d. 2) along the Salt Anticline trend which strikes northwest in the region of Moab, Utah. Heat flow results for the entire Colorado Plateau have been reexamined in view of our new results, and the overall pattern supports the concept of a low heat flow `thermal interior' for the plateau surrounded by a periphery some 100 km wide having substantially higher heat flow. Average heat flow in the thermal interior is about 60 mW m-2 compared to 80-90 mW m-2 in the periphery. This regional heat flow pattern supports a model of Tertiary lithospheric thinning under the Colorado Plateau whereby the plateau is still in transient thermal response and a 15-20 m.y. lag between uplift and corresponding surface heat flow anomaly is to be expected. The position of the heat flow transition between our interior and peripheral regions in the northwest plateau is roughly consistent with lateral warming and weakening of the Colorado Plateau lithosphere initiated at the Basin and Range boundary some 20 m.y. ago.

  11. Investigation on critical heat flux of flow in pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Senyuan

    1990-08-01

    This paper experimentally and theoretically investigates the critical heat flux of flow in pipes. From the analysis of the boiling mechanism and processing by means of the analogy principle of two-phase flow, a criterion equation to express critical heat flux has been derived. Correlated with six different coolants, 355 experimental data, the constant A and exponents K, m, and n are obtained. With a dimensionless correction term to calculate the effect on the varying slotted height of the cooling jacket, the previous equation will be a general equation to calculate the critical heat flux of flow in pipes.

  12. In-situ measurements of lunar heat flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langseth, M. G.; Keihm, S. J.

    1974-01-01

    During the Apollo program two successful heat flow measurements were made in situ on the lunar surface. At the Apollo 15 site a value of 0.0000031 watts/sqcm was measured and at the Apollo 17 site a value of 0.0000022 watts/sqcm was determined. Both measurements have uncertainty limits of + or - 20% and have been corrected for perturbing topographic effects. The apparent difference between the observations may correlate with observed variations in the surface abundance of thorium. Comparison with earlier determinations of heat flow, using the microwave emission spectrum from the moon, gives support to the high gradients and heat flows observed in situ.

  13. Turbulent flow and heat transfer in rotating channels and tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitiakov, V. Y.; Petropavlovskii, R. R.; Ris, V. V.; Smirnov, E. M.; Smirnov, S. A.

    This document is a reduction of the author's experimental results on turbulent flow characteristics and heat transfer in rotating channels whose axes are parallel to the plane of rotation. Substantial dissimilarities of longitudinal velocity field profile and pulsational characteristics are caused by effects of stabilization and destabilization and secondary flow production. Local heat transfer coefficients vary over the perimeter of the tube section connecting detected flow peculiarities. It is shown that the increase in rotational intensity caused an increase in the relative dissimilarity of the local heat transfer coefficients and increased their mean value.

  14. In-situ measurements of lunar heat flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langseth, M. B.; Keihm, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    During the Apollo program two successful heat flow measurements were made in situ on the lunar surface. At the Apollo 15 site a value of .0000031 W/sq cm was measured, and at the Apollo 17 site a value of .0000022 W/sq cm was determined. Both measurements have uncertainty limits of + or - 20 percent and have been corrected for perturbing topographic effects. The apparent difference between the observations may correlate with observed variations in the surface abundance of thorium. Comparison with earlier determinations of heat flow, using the microwave emission spectrum from the moon, gives support to the high gradients and heat flows observed in situ.

  15. Coupled Groundwater and Heat Flow in the Tahoe Basin Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trask, J. C.

    2002-12-01

    We propose that recent developments in available temperature probe technology and improvements in appropriate modeling software, together with the advent of desktop high-speed computing, have enabled the thermal analysis approach to be an inexpensive, robust, and practical way to constrain groundwater flow fields in a wide variety of environments. We present field measurements and numerical models of coupled heat and groundwater flow in the Tahoe Basin region. In montane regions such as the Tahoe Basin, steep topography provides a driving force for deep groundwater flow. Deep groundwater flow re-routes subsurface heat flow, impacting temperature gradients to depth, including the shallow subsurface (<100m depth). In the Tahoe Basin region, the magnitude of deep groundwater flow on the areal or regional scale has been largely unknown. We present examples of borehole temperature profiles that constrain possible areal groundwater flow patterns, including the magnitude of flow beneath the bottom of boreholes probed.

  16. Application of heat flow models to SOI current mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Feixia; Cheng, Ming-C.

    2004-11-01

    An analytical heat flow model for SOI circuits is presented. The model is able to account for heat exchanges among devices and heat loss from the silicon film and interconnects to the substrate through the buried oxide. The developed model can accurately and efficiently predict the temperature distribution in the interconnect/poly-lines and SOI devices. The model is applied to SOI current mirrors to study heat flow in different layout designs. The results from the developed model are verified with those from Raphael, a 3D numerical simulator that can provide the detailed 3D temperature distribution in interconnect/poly-lines.

  17. Laminar flow heat transfer downstream from U-bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie Nassif

    1987-05-01

    The laminar flow heat transfer downstream from the unheated, vertical bends in horizontal U-tubes with electrically heated straight tube sections was investigated. For each test section, local axial and peripheral wall temperatures were measured and the local peripheral heat transfer coefficients at the various locations were calculated. The investigation permitted a better understanding of the interaction of the primary, secondary and tertiary flow patterns, i.e., the combination of forced and natural convection with the centrifugal effects. Also, a correlation was developed, which predicts the heat transfer coefficient downstream from an unheated U-bend, and which can be extended to straight tubes.

  18. Improved Heat-of-Fusion Energy Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K. H.; Manvi, R.

    1982-01-01

    Alkali metal/alkali-halide mixtures proposed for preventing solid buildup during energy recovery. When mixture melts (by absorption of heat of fusion), it forms two immiscible liquids. Salt-rich phase is heavier and has higher melting/recrysallization temperature; so during energy recovery salt crystallizes in this phase first. Since heat exchanger for energy recovery is in lighter metal-rich phase, solids do not form and there is no reduction of heat-recovery efficiency.

  19. Gas flow environment and heat transfer nonrotating 3D program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A complete set of benchmark quality data for the flow and heat transfer within a large rectangular turning duct is provided. These data are to be used to evaluate, and verify, three-dimensional internal viscous flow models and computational codes. The analytical contract objective is to select a computational code and define the capabilities of this code to predict the experimental results obtained. Details of the proper code operation will be defined and improvements to the code modeling capabilities will be formulated. Internal flow in a large rectangular cross-sectioned 90 deg. bend turning duct was studied. The duct construction was designed to allow detailed measurements to be made for the following three duct wall conditions: (1) an isothermal wall with isothermal flow; (2) an adiabatic wall with convective heat transfer by mixing between an unheated surrounding flow; and (3) an isothermal wall with heat transfer from a uniformly hot inlet flow.

  20. Correlations for heat transfer and flow friction characteristics of compact plate-type heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinaut, F. V.; Melgar, A.; Rahman Ali, A. A.

    1992-07-01

    Correlations for heat transfer and flow friction coefficients are provided for plane parallel plates and offset strip-fin plates over the ranges used in compact heat exchangers. Closed form expressions have been used to present these correlations. The proposed correlations allow one to adequately predict experimental data available for the heat exchanged and pressure losses in compact plate-type heat exchangers. The correlation cover continuously the full range from laminar to turbulent flow, for both short and long pipes. Suggestions to extend the correlations to other flow conditions are provided.

  1. High heat flux burnout in subcooled flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celata, G. P.; Cumo, M.; Mariani, A.

    1995-09-01

    The paper reports the results of an experimental research carried out at the Heat Transfer Division of the Energy Department, C.R. Casaccia, on the thermal hydraulic characterization of subcooled flow boiling CHF under typical conditions of thermonuclear fusion reactors, i.e. high liquid velocity and subcooling. The experiment was carried out exploring the following parameters: channel diameter (from 2.5 to 8.0 mm), heated length (10 and 15 cm), liquid velocity (from 2 to 40 m/s), exit pressure (from atmospheric to 5.0 MPa), inlet temperature (from 30 to 80 °C), channel orientation (vertical and horizontal). A maximum CHF value of 60.6 MW/m2 has been obtained under the following conditions: T in=30°, p=2.5 MPa, u=40 m/s, D=2.5 mm (smooth channel) Turbulence promoters (helically coiled wires) have been employed to further enhance the CHF attainable with subcooled flow boiling. Helically coiled wires allow an increase of 50% of the maximum CHF obtained with smooth channels.

  2. Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Two-Phase Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Takeshita, Kazuhiro; Horie, Yoshiatsu; Noda, Ken-Ichi

    A two-phase loop thermosyphon transports thermal energy from a heat source to a heat sink by natural convective circulation under a body force field without any external power supply such as a pump. It is, therefore, thought that this could be applied to an energy-saving heat transportation system, and so forth. In practical use, an evaporator has several heated tubes and also the heat supplied to each of the heated tubes is not always equal. Therefore, the present study was performed both experimentally and theoretically on the flow and heat transfer characteristics in the two-phase loop thermosyphon installed with the evaporator with three heated tubes as a comparatively simple multi-tube evaporator in the lower part of the loop. The circulation mass flow rate, pressure and temperature distributions along the loop, as well as the heat transfer coefficients in the heated tubes were measured using water, ethanol and benzene, on which the effects of subcooling at the evaporator inlet and a heat input ratio of the three heated tubes were examined, and the experimental data were compared with the theoretically calculated results.

  3. Conjugate Compressible Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, M. F.

    2011-01-01

    A computational approach to modeling transient, compressible fluid flow with heat transfer in long, narrow ducts is presented. The primary application of the model is for analyzing fluid flow and heat transfer in solid propellant rocket motor nozzle joints during motor start-up, but the approach is relevant to a wide range of analyses involving rapid pressurization and filling of ducts. Fluid flow is modeled through solution of the spatially one-dimensional, transient Euler equations. Source terms are included in the governing equations to account for the effects of wall friction and heat transfer. The equation solver is fully-implicit, thus providing greater flexibility than an explicit solver. This approach allows for resolution of pressure wave effects on the flow as well as for fast calculation of the steady-state solution when a quasi-steady approach is sufficient. Solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations with source terms significantly reduces computational run times compared to general purpose computational fluid dynamics packages solving the Navier-Stokes equations with resolved boundary layers. In addition, conjugate heat transfer is more readily implemented using the approach described in this paper than with most general purpose computational fluid dynamics packages. The compressible flow code has been integrated with a transient heat transfer solver to analyze heat transfer between the fluid and surrounding structure. Conjugate fluid flow and heat transfer solutions are presented. The author is unaware of any previous work available in the open literature which uses the same approach described in this paper.

  4. Buoyant instabilities in downward flow in a symmetrically heated vertical channel

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, G.; Greif, R.

    1996-07-01

    This study of the downward flow of nitrogen in a tall, partially heated vertical channel (upstream isothermal at T{sub in}*, heated region isothermal at T{sub s}* downstream adiabatic) shows the strong effects of buoyancy even for small temperature differences. Time-dependent oscillations including periodic flow reversals occur along the channel walls. Although the flow and heat transfer are asymmetric, the temperature and axial component of velocity show symmetric reflections at two times that are half a period apart and the lateral component of velocity shows antisymmetric reflections at the two times. There is strong interaction between the downward flow in the central region of the channel and the upward flow along the heated channel walls. At the top of the heated region, the upward buoyant flow turns toward the center of the channel and is incorporated into the downward flow. Along the channel centerline there are nonmonotonic variations of the axial component of velocity and temperature and a large lateral component of velocity that reverses direction periodically. Results are presented for Re = 219.7 and Gr/Re{sup 2} = 1.83, 8.0, and 13.7. The heat transfer and the frequency of the oscillations increases and the flow and temperature fields become more complex as Gr/Re{sup 2} increases. The results have applications to fiber drying, food processing, crystal growth, solar energy collection, cooling of electronic circuits, ventilation, etc.

  5. Critical heat flux of subcooled flow boiling with water for high heat flux application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inasaka, Fujio; Nariai, Hideki

    1993-11-01

    Subcooled flow boiling in water is thought to be advantageous in removing high heat load of more than 10 MW/m2. Characteristics of the critical heat flux (CHF), which determines the upper limit of heat removal, are very important for the design of cooling systems. In this paper, studies on subcooled flow boiling CHF, which have been conducted by the authors, are reported. Experiments were conducted using direct current heating of stainless steel tube. For uniform heating conditions, CHF increment in small diameter tubes (1 - 3 mm inside diameter) and the CHF characteristics in tubes with internal twisted tapes were investigated, and also the existing CHF correlations for ordinary tubes (more than 3 mm inside diameter) were evaluated. For peripherally non-uniform heating conditions using the tube, whose wall thickness was partly reduced, the CHF for swirl flow was higher than the CHF under uniform heating conditions with an increase of the non-uniformity factor.

  6. Pressure and flow, temperature and heat, and properties of water. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The three sections in this volume cover pressure and flow (units of measurement, properties of substances, mass, volume, density, pressure, units of pressure, how pressure is measured, what causes flow, how flow is measured), temperature and heat (forms of energy, potential and kinetic energy, internal and P-V energy, temperature, work and heat in power plants, energy equivalence), and properties of water (what is water; ice - the solid phase of H/sub 2/O; water - the liquid phase of H/sub 2/O; steam - the gas phase of H/sub 2/O; change of phase of H/sub 2/O; specific heat of water; effect of pressure; density of water; important properties of steam).

  7. U.S. Energy Flow - 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiper, G V

    2001-03-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has prepared similar flow charts of U.S. energy consumption since 1972. The chart follows the flow of individual fuels and compares these on the basis of a common energy unit of quadrillion British thermal units (Btu). A quadrillion, or ''quad,'' is 10{sup 15}. One Btu is the quantity of heat needed to raise the temperature of 1 pound of water by 1 F at or near 39.2 F. The width of each colored line across this chart is in proportion to the amount of quads conveyed. (Exception: lines showing extremely small amounts have been made wide enough to be clearly visible.) In most cases, the numbers used in this chart have been rounded to the nearest tenth of a quad, although the original data was published in hundredths or thousandths of a quad. As a consequence of independent rounding, some of the summary numbers may not appear to be a precise total of their various components. The first chart in this document uses quadrillion Btu's to conform with data from the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA). However, the second chart is expressed in exajoules. A joule is the metric unit for heat. One Btu equals 1,055.06 joules; and one quadrillion Btu's equals 1.055 exajoules (an exajoule is 10{sup 18} joules).

  8. Approximate convective heating equations for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoby, E. V.; Moss, J. N.; Sutton, K.

    1979-01-01

    Laminar and turbulent heating-rate equations appropriate for engineering predictions of the convective heating rates about blunt reentry spacecraft at hypersonic conditions are developed. The approximate methods are applicable to both nonreacting and reacting gas mixtures for either constant or variable-entropy edge conditions. A procedure which accounts for variable-entropy effects and is not based on mass balancing is presented. Results of the approximate heating methods are in good agreement with existing experimental results as well as boundary-layer and viscous-shock-layer solutions.

  9. Constraints on hydrothermal heat flux through the oceanic lithosphere from global heat flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Carol A.; Stein, Seth

    1994-01-01

    A significant discrepancy exists between the heat flow measured at the seafloor and the higher values predicted by thermal models of the cooling lithosphere. This discrepancy is generally interpreted as indicating that the upper oceanic crust is cooled significantly by hydrothermal circulation. The magnitude of this heat flow discrepancy is the primary datum used to estimate the volume of hydrothermal flow, and the variation in the discrepancy with lithospheric age is the primary constraint on how the hydrothermal flux is divided between near-ridge and off-ridge environments. The resulting estimates are important for investigation of both the thermal structure of the lithosphere and the chemistry of the oceans. We reevaluate the magnitude and age variation of the discrepancy using a global heat flow data set substantially larger than in earlier studies, and the GDHI (Global Depth and Heat Flow) model that better predicts the heat flow. We estimate that of the predicted global oceanic heat flux of 32 x 10(exp 12) W, 34% (11 x 10(exp 12) W) occurs by hydrothermal flow. Approximately 30% of the hydrothermal heat flux occurs in crust younger than 1 Ma, so the majority of this flux is off-ridge. These hydrothermal heat flux estimates are upper bounds, because heat flow measurements require sediment at the site and so are made preferentially at topographic lows, where heat flow may be depressed. Because the water temperature for the near-ridge flow exceeds that for the off-ridge flow, the near-ridge water flow will be even a smaller fraction of the total water flow. As a result, in estimating fluxes from geochemical data, use of the high water temperatures appropriate for the ridge axis may significantly overestimate the heat flux for an assumed water flux or underestimate the water flux for an assumed heat flux. Our data also permit improved estimates of the 'sealing' age, defined as the age where the observed heat flow approximately equals that predicted, suggesting

  10. Optimal operation of a concurrent-flow corn dryer with a drying heat pump using superheated steam

    SciTech Connect

    Moraitis, C.S.; Akritidis, C.B.

    1998-07-01

    A numerical model of a concurrent-flow dryer of corn using superheated steam as drying medium is solved applying a shooting technique, so as to satisfy boundary conditions imposed by the optimal design of a drying heat pump. The drying heat pump is based on the theory of minimum energy cycles. The solution of the model proves the applicability of the heat pump to a concurrent-flow dryer, achieving a Specific Energy Consumption as low as 1080 kJ/kg.

  11. Heat-Energy Analysis for Solar Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    Heat-energy analysis program (HEAP) solves general heat-transfer problems, with some specific features that are "custom made" for analyzing solar receivers. Can be utilized not only to predict receiver performance under varying solar flux, ambient temperature and local heat-transfer rates but also to detect locations of hotspots and metallurgical difficulties and to predict performance sensitivity of neighboring component parameters.

  12. Changes in the structure and substructure of tungsten during irradiation by hydrogen plasma flows at the specific energy close to the heat loads on the ITER surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garkusha, I. E.; Malykhin, S. V.; Makhlai, V. A.; Pugachev, A. T.; Bazdyrieva, S. V.; Aksenov, N. N.

    2014-11-01

    The changes in the structure, the substructure, and the state of stress in the surface layers of tungsten targets and the cracking processes in them are studied in model experiments on irradiation by a hydrogen plasma in a quasi-stationary plasma accelerator QSPA Kh-50, which adequately reproduces the energy density and the edge localized mode (ELM) time in ITER. The plasma heat load is up to 1 MJ m-2, the pulse duration is 0.25 ms, and the maximum number of irradiating pulses of 150. The development of residual macrostresses from compression to tension is analyzed by X-ray diffraction, and their relation to cracking is shown. Irradiation is found to increase the lattice parameter of tungsten in the undeformable section from a 0 ≈ 0.31642 ± 0.00001 (initial state) to 0.31645 ± 0.00001 nm. The changes in the coherent scattering region and microstrains are estimated. The role of point defects and their complexes in the irradiation-assisted processes is established. A qualitative model is proposed to explain these changes.

  13. Frictional strength and heat flow of southern San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, P. P.

    2016-01-01

    Frictional strength and heat flow of faults are two related subjects in geophysics and seismology. To date, the investigation on regional frictional strength and heat flow still stays at the stage of qualitative estimation. This paper is concentrated on the regional frictional strength and heat flow of the southern San Andreas Fault (SAF). Based on the in situ borehole measured stress data, using the method of 3D dynamic faulting analysis, we quantitatively determine the regional normal stress, shear stress, and friction coefficient at various seismogenic depths. These new data indicate that the southern SAF is a weak fault within the depth of 15 km. As depth increases, all the regional normal and shear stresses and friction coefficient increase. The former two increase faster than the latter. Regional shear stress increment per kilometer equals 5.75 ± 0.05 MPa/km for depth ≤15 km; regional normal stress increment per kilometer is equal to 25.3 ± 0.1 MPa/km for depth ≤15 km. As depth increases, regional friction coefficient increment per kilometer decreases rapidly from 0.08 to 0.01/km at depths less than ~3 km. As depth increases from ~3 to ~5 km, it is 0.01/km and then from ~5 to 15 km, and it is 0.002/km. Previously, frictional strength could be qualitatively determined by heat flow measurements. It is difficult to obtain the quantitative heat flow data for the SAF because the measured heat flow data exhibit large scatter. However, our quantitative results of frictional strength can be employed to investigate the heat flow in the southern SAF. We use a physical quantity P f to describe heat flow. It represents the dissipative friction heat power per unit area generated by the relative motion of two tectonic plates accommodated by off-fault deformation. P f is called "fault friction heat." On the basis of our determined frictional strength data, utilizing the method of 3D dynamic faulting analysis, we quantitatively determine the regional long-term fault

  14. Flows through sequential orifices with heated spacer reservoirs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Stetz, T. T.

    1982-01-01

    Flow rates and pressure thermal profiles for two phase choked flows of fluid nitrogen were studied theoretically and experimentally in a four sequential orifice configuration. Both theory and experimental evidence demonstrate that heat addition in the first spacer-reservoir adjacent to the inlet orifice is most effective in reducing the flow rate and that heat addition in the last spacer-reservoir is least effective. The flows are choked at the exit orifice for large spacings and at the inlet orifice for small spacings. The moderate addition of heat available for this experiment did not materially alter this result for large spacings; however, significant heat addition for the small spacings tended to shift the choke point to the exit orifice. Nitrogen is used as the working fluid over a range of states from liquid to gas with a reduced inlet stagnation pressure range to P sub r, o = 2.

  15. Heat flow from eastern Panama and northwestern Colombia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Munroe, R.J.; Moses, T.H., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Heat flows were determined at 12 sites in four distinct areas between longitude 77?? and 80??W in eastern Panama and northwestern Colombia. Evidently, most of the region is underlain by mafic oceanic crust so that the crustal radiogenic component of heat flow is very small (??? 0.1 ??cal cm-2 sec-1). Low heat-flow values (??? 0.7 ??cal cm-2 sec-1) in northwestern Colombia may reflect thermal transients associated with shallow subduction. The normal values (??? 1) at about 78??W are consistent with the mean heat flow from the western Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico. At 80??W, a fairly high value of 1.8 may define the easterly limit of thermal transients due to Cenozoic volcanic activity in Central America. ?? 1974.

  16. Heat flow measurements on the southeast coast of Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hyndman, R.D.; Jaeger, J.C.; Sass, J.H.

    1969-01-01

    Three boreholes have been drilled for the Australian National University near the southeast coast of New South Wales, Australia. The heat flows found are 1.1, 1.0, and 1.3 ??cal/cm2sec. The errors resulting from the proximity of the sea and a lake, surface temperature change, conductivity structure and water flow have been examined. The radioactive heat production in some of the intrusive rocks of the area have also been measured. The heat flows are much lower than the values of about 2.0 found elsewhere in south eastern Australia. The lower values appear to be part of a distinct heat flow province in eastern Australia. ?? 1969.

  17. Forced flow heat transfer of supercritical hydrogen for superconductor cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotsu, M.; Shirai, Y.; Tatsumoto, H.; Hata, K.; Kobayashi, H.; Naruo, Y.; Inatani, H.

    2014-01-01

    Heat transfer from inner side of a vertical tube to forced flow of hydrogen was measured at the pressure of 1.5 MPa. The test tubes were made of stainless steel 316L with the inner diameters from 3 mm to 9 mm and lengths from 100 mm to 250 mm. Heat transfer curves were obtained by gradually increasing the heating current to the test tube and raising the surface temperature up to around 200 K. Inlet fluid temperature and flow velocity were varied from 21 to 30 K and 0.5 to 12 m/s, respectively. Effects of inlet temperature, flow velocity and tube dimension were clearly observed. The heat transfer curve for each flow velocity consists of a lower temperature region with a higher gradient and higher temperature region with a lower gradient. The experimental results were compared with the authors' correlation presented formerly. It was confirmed that this correlation can describe the experimental results obtained here.

  18. Oregon Cascades Play Fairway Analysis: Faults and Heat Flow maps

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    This submission includes a fault map of the Oregon Cascades and backarc, a probability map of heat flow, and a fault density probability layer. More extensive metadata can be found within each zip file.

  19. Constraints on rift thermal processes from heat flow and uplift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.

    1983-01-01

    The implications of heat flow data available from five major Cenozoic continental rift systems for the processes of continental rifting are discussed, and simple thermal models of lithospheric thinning which predict uplift are used to further constrain the thermal processes in the lithosphere during rifting. Compilations of the heat flow data are summarized and the salient results of these compilations are briefly discussed. The uplift predictions of the slow and rapid thinning models, in which thinning is assumed to occur at a respectively slower and faster rate than heat can be conducted into the lithosphere, are presented. Comparison of uplift rates with model results indicates that the lithosphere is in a state between the two models. While uplift is predicted to continue after thinning has ceased due to thermal relaxation of the lithosphere, the rapid thinning model is always predicted to apply to surface heat flow, and an anomaly in this flow is not predicted to develop until after thinning has stopped.

  20. Effect of flow twisting on hydraulic resistance and heat exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslov, V. Ya.; Makarov, N. A.

    1989-02-01

    On the basis of dimensional analysis through a differentiated approach to the dimensions of length we have obtained formulas for the effect of flow twisting in a circular tube on the hydraulic resistance and exchange of heat.

  1. Modeling Io's Heat Flow: Constraints from Galileo PPR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathbun, J. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Tamppari, L. K.

    2000-01-01

    We attempt to improve on previous Io heat flow estimates by using higher resolution data from Galileo Photopolarimeter Radiometer (PPR) and improved thermophysical models of the surface, including finite thermal inertia, the pedestal effect, and disk-resolved radiance.

  2. Fluid flow nozzle energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Winn, Tyler; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Colonius, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Power generation schemes that could be used downhole in an oil well to produce about 1 Watt average power with long-life (decades) are actively being developed. A variety of proposed energy harvesting schemes could be used to extract energy from this environment but each of these has their own limitations that limit their practical use. Since vibrating piezoelectric structures are solid state and can be driven below their fatigue limit, harvesters based on these structures are capable of operating for very long lifetimes (decades); thereby, possibly overcoming a principle limitation of existing technology based on rotating turbo-machinery. An initial survey [1] identified that spline nozzle configurations can be used to excite a vibrating piezoelectric structure in such a way as to convert the abundant flow energy into useful amounts of electrical power. This paper presents current flow energy harvesting designs and experimental results of specific spline nozzle/ bimorph design configurations which have generated suitable power per nozzle at or above well production analogous flow rates. Theoretical models for non-dimensional analysis and constitutive electromechanical model are also presented in this paper to optimize the flow harvesting system.

  3. Enhanced two phase flow in heat transfer systems

    DOEpatents

    Tegrotenhuis, Ward E; Humble, Paul H; Lavender, Curt A; Caldwell, Dustin D

    2013-12-03

    A family of structures and designs for use in devices such as heat exchangers so as to allow for enhanced performance in heat exchangers smaller and lighter weight than other existing devices. These structures provide flow paths for liquid and vapor and are generally open. In some embodiments of the invention, these structures can also provide secondary heat transfer as well. In an evaporate heat exchanger, the inclusion of these structures and devices enhance the heat transfer coefficient of the evaporation phase change process with comparable or lower pressure drop.

  4. Heat flow and near-surface radioactivity in the Australian continental crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Jaeger, J.C.; Munroe, Robert J.

    1976-01-01

    be related to thermal transients associated with Late Tertiary and younger volcanic and tectonic activity, even though the relation between heat-flow values and the age of volcanism is not a simple one. Parts of the high heat-flow area in the southeast might be exploitable for geothermal energy.

  5. Mercurian megaregolith layer and surface heat flows constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egea-Gonzalez, Isabel; Ruiz, Javier

    2013-04-01

    Mercury is covered by a thermally insulating megaregolith layer. Despite the fact that it is known that this poor conducting layer has important influences on surface heat flows, most thermal modeling studies have overlooked it. Mercurian megaregolith is not very well known, but data provided by MESSENGER suggest that mercurian megaregolith is less insulating than its lunar counterpart. This information together with brittle-ductile transition (BDT) depths, estimated from the analysis of fault geometries associated with lobate scarps, allow us to constrain the surface heat flow on Mercury at the time of scarps formation. In this work, we have solved the heat conduction equation in order to constrain surface heat flows. Firstly, we obtain an upper limit in surface heat flows by using published values of the BDT depth and by neglecting the megaregolith layer. Then, we calculate a lower limit by including in the heat equation a top layer with thermal properties representative of the lunar megaregolith. In our calculations we have taken into account volumetric heat production rates obtained from the surface abundances of radioactive elements provided by MESSENGER. Heat equation solutions constrain surface heat flows to a range of 6 - 29 mWm-2. These results suggest the possibility that surface heat flows could be lower than those calculated in previous works, which is in agreement with the small amount of radial contraction detected on Mercury. Furthermore, the procedure followed in this article can be easily applied to other planets and satellites, which will improve our knowledge about the thermal evolution of these bodies.

  6. Prediction of heat transfer to a thin liquid film in plane and radially spreading flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Faghri, A.; Hankey, W. L.; Swanson, T. D.

    1990-01-01

    The energy equation is incorporated in the solution algorithm of Rahman et al. (1990) to compute the heat transfer to a thin film in the presence or absence of gravity. For a plane flow under zero gravity, it is found that, for both isothermal and uniformly heated walls, the heat transfer coefficient gradually decreases downstream, with Nu-asterisk (the Nusselt number in terms of film height) remaining approximately constant except for regions very close to the entrance. In the case of radial flow under zero gravity, Nu-asterisk is found to decrease monotonically when the plane is uniformly heated. Two different flow regimes are identified in the presence of gravity for both plane and radial flows. The results of the study may be applicable to the design of space-based cooling systems.

  7. Heat flow vs. atmospheric greenhouse on early Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanale, F. P.; Postawko, S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers derived a quantitative relationship between the effectiveness of an atmospheric greenhouse and internal heat flow in producing the morphological differences between earlier and later Martian terrains. The derivation is based on relationships previously derived by other researchers. The reasoning may be stated as follows: the CO2 mean residence time in the Martian atmosphere is almost certainly much shorter than the total time span over which early climate differences are thought to have been sustained. Therefore, recycling of previously degassed CO2 quickly becomes more important than the ongoing supply of juvenile CO2. If so, then the atmospheric CO2 pressure, and thereby the surface temperature, may be approximated mathematically as a function of the total degassed CO2 in the atmosphere plus buried material and the ratio of the atmospheric and regolith mean residence times. The latter ratio can also be expressed as a function of heat flow. Hence, it follows that the surface temperature may be expressed as a function of heat flow and the total amount of available CO2. However, the depth to the water table can simultaneously be expressed as a function of heat flow and the surface temperature (the boundary condition). Therefore, for any given values of total available CO2 and regolith conductivity, there exist coupled independent equations which relate heat flow, surface temperature, and the depth to the water table. This means we can now derive simultaneous values of surface temperature and the depth of the water table for any value of the heat flow. The derived relationship is used to evaluate the relative importance of the atmospheric greenhouse effect and the internal regolith thermal gradient in producing morphological changes for any value of the heat flow, and to assess the absolute importance of each of the values of the heat flow which are thought to be reasonable on independent geophysical grounds.

  8. Nitrogen Flow in a Nanonozzle with Heat Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averkin, Sergey; Zhang, Zetian; Gatsonis, Nikolaos

    2012-11-01

    The nitrogen flow in conical nanonozzles at atmospheric pressures are investigated using a three-dimensional unstructured direct simulation Monte Carlo (U3DSMC) method. The DSMC simulations are performed in computational domains that feature the plenum, the nanonozzle region and the external plume expansion region. The inlet and outlet boundaries are modeled by the Kinetic-Moment (KM) boundary conditions method. This methodology is based on the local one dimensional inviscid (LODI) formulation used in compressible (continuous) flow computations. The cross section for elastic collisions is based on the variable hard sphere (VHS) model. The Larsen-Borgnakke (L-B) model is used to simulate the exchange of the internal energy in the collision pair. Solid surfaces are modeled as being either diffuse or specularly reflecting. The effects of Knudsen number, aspect ratio, and nanonozzle scale on the heat transfer are investigating by ranging the throat diameters from 100-500 nm, exit diameter from 100-1000 nm, stagnation pressure from 1-10atm, and wall temperature from 300K-500K. Finite backpressure and vacuum conditions are considered. Macroscopic flow variables are obtained and compared with continuum predictions in order to elucidate the impacts of nanoscale.

  9. The Energy Impacts of Solar Heating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whipple, Chris

    1980-01-01

    The energy required to build and install solar space- and water-heating equipment is compared to the energy saved under two solar growth paths corresponding to high and low rates of solar technology implementation. (Author/RE)

  10. The energy impacts of solar heating.

    PubMed

    Whipple, C

    1980-04-18

    The energy required to build and install solar space- and water-heating equipment is compared to the energy it saves under two solar growth paths corresponding to high and low rates of implementation projected by the Domestic Policy Review of Solar Energy. For the rapid growth case, the cumulative energy invested to the year 2000 is calculated to be (1/2) to 1(1/2) times the amount saved. An impact of rapid solar heating implementation is to shift energy demand from premium heating fuels (natural gas and oil) to coal and nuclear power use in the industries that provide materials for solar equipment. PMID:17820033

  11. New computer program solves wide variety of heat flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almond, J. C.

    1966-01-01

    Boeing Engineering Thermal Analyzer /BETA/ computer program uses numerical methods to provide accurate heat transfer solutions to a wide variety of heat flow problems. The program solves steady-state and transient problems in almost any situation that can be represented by a resistance-capacitance network.

  12. High Energy Antimatter Telescope (HEAT) Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    This grant supported our work on the High Energy Antimatter Telescope(HEAT) balloon experiment. The HEAT payload is designed to perform a series of experiments focusing on the cosmic ray positron, electron, and antiprotons. Thus far two flights of the HEAT -e+/- configuration have taken place. During the period of this grant major accomplishments included the following: (1) Publication of the first results of the 1994 HEAT-e+/- flight in Physical Review Letters; (2) Successful reflight of the HEAT-e+/- payload from Lynn Lake in August 1995; (3) Repair and refurbishment of the elements of the HEAT payload damaged during the landing following the 1995 flight; and (4) Upgrade of the ground support equipment for future flights of the HEAT payload.

  13. Study on the Heat-Flow Controllable Heat Exchanger-3rd report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Osamu; Hamano, Masayoshi; Yanadori, Michio

    The heat-flow controllable heat exchanger for the purpose of heat recovery through the waste hot water at the bathroom and the washing room has been developed. The system is especially available at the house of cold area and the recovery heat is used to warm the suction air conducted from ventilation device. As the result of field test, it is clarified that the heat recovery rate by the system is very large. Also, the exchanger is possible to control the amount of recorery heat. Therefore, it is considered that the exchanger is applicable in the ventilation systems used the waste hot water.

  14. Solar energy for industrial process heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, R. H.; Pivirotto, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Findings of study of potential use for solar energy utilization by California dairy industry, prove that applicable solar energy system furnish much of heat needed for milk processing with large savings in expenditures for oil and gas and ensurance of adequate readily available sources of process heat.

  15. Utilizing thermal isostasy to estimate sub-lithospheric heat flow and anomalous crustal radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasterok, D.; Gard, M.

    2016-09-01

    While surface heat flow relates to the heat loss through the lithosphere, it can be difficult to quantify and separate the heat produced internally through radiogenic decay from the heat transferred across the base of the lithosphere by mantle convection. In this study, we apply a thermo-isostatic analysis to Australia and estimate the sub-lithospheric and radiogenic heat flow components by employing a simple 1-D conservation of energy model. We estimate an anomalous radiogenic heat production across much of eastern Australia generally accounting for >50 mW m-2, while western Australia appears to have high crustal compositionally corrected elevation, possibly related to chemical buoyancy of the mantle lithosphere. A moderately high sub-lithospheric heat flow (∼40 mW m-2) along the eastern and southeastern coast, including Tasmania, is coincident with locations of Cenozoic volcanism and supports an edge-driven convection hypothesis. However, the pattern of sub-lithospheric heat flow along the margin does not support the existence of hotspot tracks. Thermo-isostatic models such as these improve our ability to identify and quantify crustal from mantle sources of heat loss and add valuable constraints on tectonic and geodynamic models of the continental lithosphere's physical state and evolution.

  16. Study on heat transfer of heat exchangers in the Stirling engine - Heat transfer in a heated tube under the periodically reversing flow condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzaka, Mitsuo; Iwabuchi, Makio

    1992-11-01

    Heat transfer characteristics in heated tubes under periodically reversing flow conditions have been experimentally investigated, using a test apparatus that simulates heat exchangers for an actual Stirling engine. It is shown that the heat transfer characteristics under these conditions are greatly affected by the piston phase difference that generates the reversing flow of working fluid, and this phenomenon is peculiar to heat transfer under periodically reversing flow. The experimental correlation for the heat transfer coefficient under these conditions is obtained through the use of the working gas velocity evaluated from the Schmidt cycle model, which is one of the ideal Stirling cycles concerning the influence of the piston phase difference.

  17. A heat-flow reconnaissance of southeastern Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Lawver, L.A.; Munroe, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Heat flow was measured at nine sites in crystalline and sedimentary rocks of SE Alaska. Seven of the sites, located between 115 and 155 km landward of the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather transform fault, have heat flows significantly higher than the mean in the coastal provinces between Cape Mendocino and the Queen Charlotte Islands, and lower than the mean for 81 values within 100 km of the San Andreas transform fault, even further S. There is no evidence for heat sources that might be associated with late Cainozoic thermal events.-P.Br.

  18. Topographically driven groundwater flow and the San Andreas heat flow paradox revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.; Hickman, S.

    2003-01-01

    Evidence for a weak San Andreas Fault includes (1) borehole heat flow measurements that show no evidence for a frictionally generated heat flow anomaly and (2) the inferred orientation of ??1 nearly perpendicular to the fault trace. Interpretations of the stress orientation data remain controversial, at least in close proximity to the fault, leading some researchers to hypothesize that the San Andreas Fault is, in fact, strong and that its thermal signature may be removed or redistributed by topographically driven groundwater flow in areas of rugged topography, such as typify the San Andreas Fault system. To evaluate this scenario, we use a steady state, two-dimensional model of coupled heat and fluid flow within cross sections oriented perpendicular to the fault and to the primary regional topography. Our results show that existing heat flow data near Parkfield, California, do not readily discriminate between the expected thermal signature of a strong fault and that of a weak fault. In contrast, for a wide range of groundwater flow scenarios in the Mojave Desert, models that include frictional heat generation along a strong fault are inconsistent with existing heat flow data, suggesting that the San Andreas Fault at this location is indeed weak. In both areas, comparison of modeling results and heat flow data suggest that advective redistribution of heat is minimal. The robust results for the Mojave region demonstrate that topographically driven groundwater flow, at least in two dimensions, is inadequate to obscure the frictionally generated heat flow anomaly from a strong fault. However, our results do not preclude the possibility of transient advective heat transport associated with earthquakes.

  19. Oscillating flow loss test results in Stirling engine heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, G.; Howell, S.; Wood, G.; Miller, E.; Gedeon, D.

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented for a test program designed to generate a database of oscillating flow loss information that is applicable to Stirling engine heat exchangers. The tests were performed on heater/cooler tubes of various lengths and entrance/exit configurations, on stacked and sintered screen regenerators of various wire diameters and on Brunswick and Metex random fiber regenerators. The test results were performed over a range of oscillating flow parameters consistent with Stirling engine heat exchanger experience. The tests were performed on the Sunpower oscillating flow loss rig which is based on a variable stroke and variable frequency linear drive motor. In general, the results are presented by comparing the measured oscillating flow losses to the calculated flow losses. The calculated losses are based on the cycle integration of steady flow friction factors and entrance/exit loss coefficients.

  20. Effect on the flow and heat transfer characteristics for sinusoidal pulsating laminar flow in a heated square cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiu-Yang; Lin, Wei; Zheng, Xiao-Tao

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulation is performed to understand the effect of flow pulsation on the flow and heat transfer from a heated square cylinder at Re = 100. Numerical calculations are carried out by using a finite volume method based on the pressure-implicit with splitting of operators algorithm in a collocated grid. The effects of flow pulsation amplitude (0.2 ≤ A ≤ 0.8) and frequency (0 ≤ f p ≤ 20 Hz) on the detailed kinematics of flow (streamlines, vorticity patterns), the macroscopic parameters (drag coefficient, vortex shedding frequency) and heat transfer enhancement are presented in detail. The Strouhal number of vortices shedding, drag coefficient for non-pulsating flow are compared with the previously published data, and good agreement is found. The lock-on phenomenon is observed for a square cylinder in the present flow pulsation. When the pulsating frequency is within the lock-on regime, time averaged drag coefficient and heat transfer from the square cylinder is substantially augmented, and when the pulsating frequency in about the natural vortex shedding frequency, the heat transfer is also substantially enhanced. In addition, the influence of the pulsating amplitude on the time averaged drag coefficient, heat transfer enhancement and lock-on occurrence is discussed in detail.

  1. Heat flow map of the western Mediterranean basins

    SciTech Connect

    Foucher, J.P.; Burrus, J.; Vedova, B.D.

    1988-08-01

    More than 400 terrestrial heat flow determinations have been carried our in the western Mediterranean basins. These include results of detailed surveys in the Ligurian Sea and in the Gulf of Lions and Tyrrhenian basins, as well as sparse measurements in the Gulf of Valencia and the Algerian basin. Most of the measurements are surficial, obtained from the temperatures sensed by outrigged thermistors mounted on weight-driven probes penetrating the sediment to 3 to 10 m. Thermal conductivity was measured either on cores or in situ. The authors present a heat flow map of the western Mediterranean basins based on the available geothermal results. Mean regional heat flow values range from 55 to 105 mW m/sup /minus/2/ in the Lugiran and Gulf of Lions basin and from 50 to 200 m mW m/sup /minus/2/ in the Tyrrhenian Sea. In the latter basin, high heat flow characterizes areas of recent intensive thinning of the continental crust and associated incipient oceanic crust formation. In the former basins, heat flow tends to increase from the Provencal coast of France to the Corsican and Sardinian margins, which may reflect on increasing heat contribution from the mantle.

  2. Numerical simulation of transitional flows with heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kožíšek, Martin; Příhoda, Jaromír; Fürst, Jiří; Straka, Petr

    2016-06-01

    The contribution deals with simulation of internal flows with the laminar/turbulent transition and heat transfer. The numerical modeling of incompressible flow on a heated flat plate was carried out partly by the k-kL-ω model of Walters and Cokljat [1] and partly by the algebraic transition model of Straka and Příhoda [2] connected with the EARSM turbulence model of Hellsten [3]. Transition models were tested by means of the skin friction and the Stanton number distribution. Used models of turbulent heat transfer were compared with the simplest model based on the constant turbulent Prandtl number. The k-kL-ω model is applied for the simulation of compressible flow through the VKI turbine blade cascade with heat transfer.

  3. Fundamental Study for the Solution of Thermoacoustic Phenomenon Using Numerical Calculation: Relationship between the Stack Installation Position and Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Kentaro; Sakamoto, Shin-ichi; Shibata, Kenji; Nakano, Yosuke; Tsuchiya, Takao; Watanabe, Yoshiaki

    2012-07-01

    Thermoacoustic systems have several advantages owing to their simple structure driven by heat energy such as waste heat and solar heat. However, because their energy conversion efficiency is low, they have not been developed for practical use. Therefore, to improve energy conversion efficiency, a method of system design development is examined in this report using numerical calculations. First, calculation results obtained using the transfer-matrix methods are compared with experimentally obtained results, which confirms their good agreement. Secondly, calculated results of each heat flow element in the stack show that heat flow proportional to the temperature gradient QD, which decreases the performance of the system, is dominant. Finally, the installation position of the stack is changed to reduce the ratio that QD occupies in the heat flow. Results show a decrease in the ratio obtained by moving the stack installation position closer to the center of the tube. Energy conversion efficiency was increased eight times.

  4. Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Two-Phase Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Saito, Yuji; Katsumata, Yoshikazu

    A two-phase loop thermosyphon transports thermal energy by natural convective circulation without any external power supply. Therefore, it has been paid attention as a heat transfer equipment for saving energy. A basic investigation of flow and heat transfer characteristics in the thermosyphon was performed both experimentally and theoretically. The circulation flow rate, pressure and temperature distributions along the loop, and heat transfer coefficients in the heated section were measured using water, ethanol and Freon 113 as the working liquids. And, the effects of the heat input and liquid physical properties on the flow and heat transfer characteristics were examined. In the theoretical study, the circulation flow rate was calculated from the force balance between the driving force arising from density differences and the pressure drop in the loop. The comparison of the calculated with experimental results was made concerning the circulation flow rate and pressure and temperature distributions. For water and ethanol, the comparison presented the considerably close agreement. But, for Freon 113, the agreement was insufficient and further detailed investigation is needed.

  5. Lunar heat flow: Regional prospective of the Apollo landing sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegler, M. A.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2014-01-01

    reexamine the Apollo Heat Flow Experiment in light of new orbital data. Using three-dimensional thermal conduction models, we examine effects of crustal thickness, density, and radiogenic abundance on measured heat flow values at the Apollo 15 and 17 sites. These models show the importance of regional context on heat flux measurements. We find that measured heat flux can be greatly altered by deep subsurface radiogenic content and crustal density. However, total crustal thickness and the presence of a near-surface radiogenic-rich ejecta provide less leverage, representing only minor (<1.5 mW m-2) perturbations on surface heat flux. Using models of the crust implied by Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory results, we found that a roughly 9-13 mW m-2 mantle heat flux best approximate the observed heat flux. This equates to a total mantle heat production of 2.8-4.1 × 1011 W. These heat flow values could imply that the lunar interior is slightly less radiogenic than the Earth's mantle, perhaps implying that a considerable fraction of terrestrial mantle material was incorporated at the time of formation. These results may also imply that heat flux at the crust-mantle boundary beneath the Procellarum potassium, rare earth element, and phosphorus (KREEP) Terrane (PKT) is anomalously elevated compared to the rest of the Moon. These results also suggest that a limited KREEP-rich layer exists beneath the PKT crust. If a subcrustal KREEP-rich layer extends below the Apollo 17 landing site, required mantle heat flux can drop to roughly 7 mW m-2, underlining the need for future heat flux measurements outside of the radiogenic-rich PKT region.

  6. A survey of oscillating flow in Stirling engine heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Terrence W.; Seume, Jorge R.

    1988-01-01

    Similarity parameters for characterizing the effect of flow oscillation on wall shear stress, viscous dissipation, pressure drop and heat transfer rates are proposed. They are based on physical agruments and are derived by normalizing the governing equations. The literature on oscillating duct flows, regenerator and porous media flows is surveyed. The operating characteristics of the heat exchanger of eleven Stirling engines are discribed in terms of the similarity parameters. Previous experimental and analytical results are discussed in terms of these parameters and used to estimate the nature of the oscillating flow under engine operating conditions. The operating points for many of the modern Stirling engines are in or near the laminar to turbulent transition region. In several engines, working fluid does not pass entirely through heat exchangers during a cycle. Questions that need to be addressed by further research are identified.

  7. Flow and heat transfer of petal shaped double tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakouchi, Toshihiko; Kawashima, Yuki; Tsujimoto, Koichi; Ando, Toshitake

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the flow and heat transfer characteristics of petal-shaped double tube with 6 petals are examined experimentally for a compact heat exchanger. As results, the heat transfer rate, Q, of the 6 petal shaped double tube (6-p tube) is much larger than that, Qp, of conventional circular double tube in all Reynolds number Rein,h (where, the reference length is hydraulic diameter) ranges. For example, at Rein,h =(0.5~1.0)× 104 it is about 4 times of Qp. The heat transfer enhancement of 6-p tube is by the increase of heat transfer area, wetting perimeter, and a highly fluctuating flow, and Q of the 6-p tube can be expressed by Q [kW/m] = 0.54Rein,h + 2245.

  8. Instability of flow of liquid film over a heated surface

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, W.T.; Soo, S.L.

    1994-08-01

    Fundamental concepts and basic equations of a flowing thin liquid film cooling a heated surfaced by its vaporization and the effect of dry patches were treated. Stable film flow prior to the appearance of dry patches on the heated surface is maintained by a balance of various forces due to surface tension, shear stress, heat and mass transfer, and gravity. Film splitting at a critical film thickness produces dry patches due to perturbation by waves on a perfect surface, and often by surface imperfection and uneven heating. This work is primarily motivated by the design of next-generation nuclear reactors, which employ many novel passive heat-removal systems via natural circulation. These systems are design to prevent damage to the reactor core and containment without action by the reactor operators during or after a design basis accident such as a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) or a main steam-line break (MSLB) accident.

  9. Relations between heat flow, topography and Moho depth for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin; Majorowicz, Jacek; Grad, Marek

    2013-04-01

    The relation between heat flow, topography and Moho depth for recent maps of Europe is presented. New heat flow map of Europe (Majorowicz and Wybraniec, 2010) is based on updated database of uncorrected heat flow values to which paleoclimatic correction is applied across the continental Europe. Correction is depth dependent due to a diffusive thermal transfer of the surface temperature forcing of which glacial-interglacial history has the largest impact. This explains some very low uncorrected heat flow values 20-30 mW/m2 in the shields, shallow basin areas of the cratons, and in other areas including orogenic belts were heat flow was likely underestimated. New integrated map of the European Moho depth (Grad et al., 2009) is the first high resolution digital map for European plate understand as an area from Ural Mountains in the east to mid-Atlantic ridge in the west, and Mediterranean Sea in the south to Spitsbergen and Barents Sea in Arctic in the north. For correlation we used: onshore heat flow density data with palaeoclimatic correction (5318 locations), topography map (30 x 30 arc seconds; Danielson and Gesch, 2011) and Moho map (longitude, latitude and Moho depth, each 0.1 degree). Analysis was done in areas where data from all three datasets were available. Continental Europe area could be divided into two large domains related with Precambrian East European craton and Palaeozoic Platform. Next two smaller areas correspond to Scandinavian Caledonides and Anatolia. Presented results show different correlations between Moho depth, elevation and heat flow for all discussed regions. For each region more detailed analysis of these relation in different elevation ranges is presented. In general it is observed that Moho depth is more significant to HF then elevation. Depending on region and elevation range HF value in mW/m2 is up to two times larger than Moho depth in km, while HF relation to elevation varies much more.

  10. Heat flow anomalies in oil- and gas-bearing structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sergiyenko, S.I.

    1988-02-01

    The main features of the distribution of heat flow values in oil, gas and gas-condensate fields on the continents have been discussed by Makarenko and Sergiyenko. The method of analysis used made it possible to establish that the presence of hydrocarbons in formations leads to high heat-flow, regardless of the age of folding of the potentially oil- and gas-bearing zones. Only in regions adjacent to marginal Cenozoic folded mountain structures and in zones of Cenozoic volcanism is the world average higher, by 2.5 to 10%, than in the oil- and gas-bearing structures in those regions. The earlier analysis of the distribution of heat flow values in oil and gas structures was based on 403 measurements. The author now has nearly doubled the sample population, enabling him substantially to revise the ideas on the distribution of heat flow values and the development of the thermal regime of local oil and gas structures. He notes that the method previously used, comparing heat flow values on young continental platforms with values in local oil and gas structures, makes it possible to estimate the thermal effect of the presence of oil and gas. This conclusion stems from the fact that the overwhelming majority of heat flow measurements were made on various kinds of positive structural forms, and distortions of the thermal field caused by thermal anisotropy phenomena are equally characteristic of both productive and nonproductive structures. As a result, for the first time a continuous time series of heat flow measurements over oil and gas structures in various tectonic regions, with ages of consolidation ranging from the Precambrian to the Cenozoic, was established. 26 references.

  11. Capture of Heat Energy from Diesel Engine Exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Chuen-Sen Lin

    2008-12-31

    Diesel generators produce waste heat as well as electrical power. About one-third of the fuel energy is released from the exhaust manifolds of the diesel engines and normally is not captured for useful applications. This project studied different waste heat applications that may effectively use the heat released from exhaust of Alaskan village diesel generators, selected the most desirable application, designed and fabricated a prototype for performance measurements, and evaluated the feasibility and economic impact of the selected application. Exhaust flow rate, composition, and temperature may affect the heat recovery system design and the amount of heat that is recoverable. In comparison with the other two parameters, the effect of exhaust composition may be less important due to the large air/fuel ratio for diesel engines. This project also compared heat content and qualities (i.e., temperatures) of exhaust for three types of fuel: conventional diesel, a synthetic diesel, and conventional diesel with a small amount of hydrogen. Another task of this project was the development of a computer-aided design tool for the economic analysis of selected exhaust heat recovery applications to any Alaskan village diesel generator set. The exhaust heat recovery application selected from this study was for heating. An exhaust heat recovery system was fabricated, and 350 hours of testing was conducted. Based on testing data, the exhaust heat recovery heating system showed insignificant effects on engine performance and maintenance requirements. From measurements, it was determined that the amount of heat recovered from the system was about 50% of the heat energy contained in the exhaust (heat contained in exhaust was evaluated based on environment temperature). The estimated payback time for 100% use of recovered heat would be less than 3 years at a fuel price of $3.50 per gallon, an interest rate of 10%, and an engine operation of 8 hours per day. Based on experimental data

  12. A novel compact heat exchanger using gap flow mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, J. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, D. Z.; Luo, T. P.; Ren, T. Q.

    2015-02-01

    A novel, compact gap-flow heat exchanger (GFHE) using heat-transfer fluid (HTF) was developed in this paper. The detail design of the GFHE coaxial structure which forms the annular gap passage for HTF is presented. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were introduced into the design to determine the impacts of the gap width and the HTF flow rate on the GFHE performance. A comparative study on the GFHE heating rate, with the gap widths ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 mm and the HTF flow rates ranged from 100 to 500 ml/min, was carried out. Results show that a narrower gap passage and a higher HTF flow rate can yield a higher average heating rate in GFHE. However, considering the compromise between the GFHE heating rate and the HTF pressure drop along the gap, a 0.4 mm gap width is preferred. A testing loop was also set up to experimentally evaluate the GFHE capability. The testing results show that, by using 0.4 mm gap width and 500 ml/min HTF flow rate, the maximum heating rate in the working chamber of the as-made GFHE can reach 18 °C/min, and the average temperature change rates in the heating and cooling processes of the thermal cycle test were recorded as 6.5 and 5.4 °C/min, respectively. These temperature change rates can well satisfy the standard of IEC 60068-2-14:2009 and show that the GFHE developed in this work has sufficient heat exchange capacity and can be used as an ideal compact heat exchanger in small volume desktop thermal fatigue test apparatus.

  13. A novel compact heat exchanger using gap flow mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liang, J S; Zhang, Y; Wang, D Z; Luo, T P; Ren, T Q

    2015-02-01

    A novel, compact gap-flow heat exchanger (GFHE) using heat-transfer fluid (HTF) was developed in this paper. The detail design of the GFHE coaxial structure which forms the annular gap passage for HTF is presented. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were introduced into the design to determine the impacts of the gap width and the HTF flow rate on the GFHE performance. A comparative study on the GFHE heating rate, with the gap widths ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 mm and the HTF flow rates ranged from 100 to 500 ml/min, was carried out. Results show that a narrower gap passage and a higher HTF flow rate can yield a higher average heating rate in GFHE. However, considering the compromise between the GFHE heating rate and the HTF pressure drop along the gap, a 0.4 mm gap width is preferred. A testing loop was also set up to experimentally evaluate the GFHE capability. The testing results show that, by using 0.4 mm gap width and 500 ml/min HTF flow rate, the maximum heating rate in the working chamber of the as-made GFHE can reach 18 °C/min, and the average temperature change rates in the heating and cooling processes of the thermal cycle test were recorded as 6.5 and 5.4 °C/min, respectively. These temperature change rates can well satisfy the standard of IEC 60068-2-14:2009 and show that the GFHE developed in this work has sufficient heat exchange capacity and can be used as an ideal compact heat exchanger in small volume desktop thermal fatigue test apparatus. PMID:25725874

  14. Program for Heat Flow in Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Graham, M.

    1986-01-01

    Program contains numerical model of temperature distribution in vicinity of weld. Weld model used to produce estimated welding power requirements, welding-power-loss analysis, heat-affected-zone temperature history, and weld-puddle cross-section plots. Applied to gas/tungsten-arc, plasma-arc, electron-beam, and laser-beam welds on wide plates under steady conditions. User predicts power requirements and temperature distributions. Weld model written in BASIC.

  15. Heat Transfer in Regions of Separated and Reattached Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Davis H; Rumsey, Charles B

    1957-01-01

    Past experimental work has indicated that separated flow can greatly increase the heat transfer to a surface; whereas, some theoretical studies have indicated a possible decrease. Recent investigations have helped to clarify the effects of separation on heat transfer and have indicated a method of reducing separation. This paper considers the results of some of these investigations and shows the heat transfer in regions of separation and reattachment for a few specific shapes. These results show that the heat transfer in a separated region is strongly affected by the extent of separation, the location of the reattachment point, and the location of transition along the separated boundary.

  16. On the relation between coronal heating, flux tube divergence, and the solar wind proton flux and flow speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandbaek, Onulf; Leer, Egil; Hansteen, Viggo H.

    1994-01-01

    A one-fluid solar wind model is used to investigate some relations between coronal heating, the flux tube divergence near the Sun, and the solar wind proton flux and flow speed. The effects of energy addition to the supersonic region of the flow are also studied. We allow for a mechanical energy flux that heats the corona, and an Alfven wave energy flux that adds energy, mainly to the supersonic flow, both as momentum and as heat. We find that the mechanical energy flux determines the solar wind mass flux, and in order to keep an almost constant proton flux at the orbit of Earth with changing flow geometry, that the mechanical energy flux must vary linearly with the magnetic field in the inner corona. This thermally driven wind generally has a low asymptotic flow speed. When Alfven waves are added to the thermally driven flow, the asymptotic flow speed is increased and is determined by the ratio of the Alfven wave and the mechanical energy fluxes at the coronal base. Flow speeds characteristic of recurrent high-speed solar wind streams can be obtained only when the Alfven wave energy flux, deposited in the supersonic flow, is larger than the mechanical energy flux heating the corona.

  17. Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics of the Staggered Slotted Semi Cylinders in a Cross Flow Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yayla, Sedat; Beyin, Seyfettin; Oztekin, Alparslan

    2012-11-01

    Transient 3-D dimensional turbulent flow simulations are conducted to examine flow and heat transfer characteristics in inline and staggered slotted semi-cylinders placed in a rectangular cross sectioned fin tube heat exchanger. Both Reynolds averaged Navier's equation and Large Eddy simulations model are employed to conduct simulations using Fluent-ANSYS. Predictions of transient simulations are compared against the results of the PIV flow visualization observations at Reynolds number 1500 and 4000. Measured and predicted velocity and the vorticity field in the wake of cylinders agree well with each other at both Reynolds number. The effect of the angle between the slotted semi cylinders and the flow direction is investigated for various values of Reynolds number in both laminar and turbulent flow regimes. Transient nature of the three dimensional flow structures with flow separation, reattachment and vortices are characterized. The effects of the flow structure on the heat transfer characteristics are determined by calculating the heat transfer coefficient along the surface of the semi cylinders.

  18. Measurement of energy distribution in flowing hydrogen microwave plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R.; Morin, T.; Finzel, M.; Hawley, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    An electrothermal propulsion concept utilizing a microwave plasma system as the mechanism to convert electromagnetic energy into kinetic energy of a flowing gas is investigated. A calorimetry system enclosing a microwave plasma system has been developed to accurately measure the energy inputs and outputs of the microwave plasma system. The rate of energy transferred to the gas can be determined to within + or - 1.8 W from an energy balance around the microwave plasma system. The percentage of the power absorbed by the microwave plasma system transferred to the hydrogen gas as it flows through the system is found to increase with the increasing flow rate, to decrease with the increasing pressure, and to be independent of the absorbed power. An upper bound for the hydrogen gas temperature is estimated from the energy content, heat capacity, and flow rate of the gas stream. A lower bound for an overall heat-transfer coefficient is then calculated, characterizing the energy loss from the hydrogen gas stream to the air cooling of the plasma discharge tube wall. The heat-transfer coefficient is found to increase with the increasing flow rate and pressure and to be independent of the absorbed power. This result indicates that a convective-type mechanism is responsible for the energy transfer.

  19. Heat transfer in vertically aligned phase change energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    El-Dessouky, H.T.; Bouhamra, W.S.; Ettouney, H.M.; Akbar, M.

    1999-05-01

    Convection effects on heat transfer are analyzed in low temperature and vertically aligned phase change energy storage systems. This is performed by detailed temperature measurements in the phase change material (PCM) in eighteen locations forming a grid of six radial and three axial positions. The system constitutes a double pipe configuration, where commercial grade paraffin wax is stored in the annular space between the two pipes and water flows inside the inner pipe. Vertical alignment of the system allowed for reverse of the flow direction of the heat transfer fluid (HTF), which is water. Therefore, the PCM is heated from the bottom for HTF flow from bottom to top and from the top as the HTF flow direction is reversed. For the former case, natural convection affects the melting process. Collected data are used to study variations in the transient temperature distribution at axial and radial positions as well as for the two-dimensional temperature field. The data are used to calculate the PCM heat transfer coefficient and to develop correlations for the melting Fourier number. Results indicate that the PCM heat transfer coefficient is higher for the case of PCM heating from bottom to top. Nusselt number correlations are developed as a function of Rayleigh, Stefan, and Fourier numbers for the HTF flow from bottom to top and as a function of Stefan and Fourier numbers for HTF flow from top to bottom. The enhancement ratio for heat transfer caused by natural convection increases and then levels off as the inlet temperature of the HTF is increased.

  20. Brine flow in heated geologic salt.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

    2013-03-01

    This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

  1. Joule Heating Effects on Electrokinetic Flow Instabilities in Ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumme, Christian; Shaw, Ryan; Zhou, Yilong; Prabhakaran, Rama; Xuan, Xiangchun

    We have demonstrated in our earlier work that the application of a tangential electric field can draw fluid instabilities at the interface of a ferrofluid/water co-flow. These electrokinetic flow instabilities are produced primarily by the mismatch of electric conductivities of the two fluids. We demonstrate in this talk that the Joule heating induced fluid temperature rises and gradients can significantly suppress the electrokinetic flow instabilities. We also develop a two-dimensional depth-averaged numerical model to predict the fluid temperature, flow and concentration fields in the two-fluid system with the goal to understand the Joule heating effects on electric field-driven ferrofluid flow instabilities. This work was supported by the Honors and Creative Inquiry programs at Clemson University.

  2. Nanofluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Channel Entrance Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Joseph T. C.; Puliti, Gianluca

    2014-11-01

    The present work uses the continuum description of nanofluid flow to study the flow, heat and mass transfer in the entrance and developing region of channels or tubes, where the viscous and heat conduction layers are thin and the heat transfer is much more intense than fully developed flow. Instead of supplementing the formulation with thermodynamic properties based on mixture calculations, use is made of recent molecular dynamical computations of such properties, specifically, the density and heat capacity of gold-water nanofluids. The more general formulation results, within the Rayleigh-Stokes (plug flow) approximation and perturbation for small volume fraction, show that the nanofluid density-heat capacity has an enormous effect in the inertia mechanism in causing the nanofluid temperature profile to steepen. The nanofluid thermal conductivity though has an explicit enhancement of the surface heat transfer rate has the almost hidden effect of stretching the nanofluid temperature profile thus giving the opposite effect of enhancement. Quantitative results for Gold-Water nanofluid is presented.

  3. Basic data for some recent Australian heat-flow measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munroe, Robert J.; Sass, J.H.; Milburn, G.T.; Jaeger, J.C.; Tammemagi, H.Y.

    1975-01-01

    This report has been compiled to provide background information and detailed temperature and thermal conductivity data for the heat-flow values reported in Sass, Jaeger, and Munroe (in press). The data were collected as part of a joint heat-flow study by the Australian National University (ANU) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) under the direction of J. C. Jaeger (ANU) and J. H. Sass (USGS). The format is similar to that used for basic data from United States heat-flow determinations (Sass and Munroe, 1974). Each section contains a state map showing the geographic distribution of heat-flow data followed by tables which list individual temperatures, thermal conductivities, and radiogenic heat production values. A companion volume (Bunker and others, 1975) gives details of the heat-production measurements together with individual radioelement concentrations. Localities are arranged in alphabetical order within each state. The methods and techniques of measurements have been described by Sass and others (1971a, b). Unusual methods or procedures which differ markedly from these techniques are noted and described in the comments sections of the tables.

  4. Percussive and Proboscis Based Lunar Heat Flow Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumm, E.; Zacny, K.; Kumar, N.

    2009-12-01

    The subsurface temperature of the Moon is strongly influenced by the diurnal, annual, and precession fluctuations of the insolation. Therefore, to measure the heat flow, the probe has to be inserted to a depth of at least 3m. There are a number of ways the heat flow probe can be deployed. These methods differ in many ways such as simplicity and mass of the deployment system, power required to deploy it, extent of thermal isolation between temperature sensors and between sensors themselves and surface system (deployment system, lander, electronics box etc), thermal sensor placement within the hole (radiative as opposed to conducive coupling), and methods of deployment. The percussive based heat flow probe utilizes a percussive approach to drive a small diameter (20mm) cone penetrometer to >3 meter depths, deploying ring-like thermal sensors every 30 cm. It leaves only small sensors in the borehole, maximizing measurement sensitivity by minimizing thermal coupling from the lander to the electrical tether. The proboscis based heat flow probe utilizes a pneumatic (gas) approach to lower the heat flow probe, a lenticular tape, to 3 meters. The system offers extremely low mass, volume, and simple deployment.

  5. Heat flow through the sea bottom around the Yucatan Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Khutorskoy, M.D.; Kononov, V.I.; Polyak, B.G. ); Fernandez, R. ); Matveev, V.G.; Rot, A.A. )

    1990-02-10

    Heat flow studies were conducted in January-February 1987, off the Atlantic Coast of Mexico on board the R/V Akademik Nikolai Strakhov. Two areas were surveyed, one transecting the Salt Dome Province and the Campeche Canyon, in the Gulf of Mexico, and the other, on the eastern flank of the Yucatan Peninsula. Conductive heat flow through the bottom sediments was determined as the product of vertical temperature gradient and in situ thermal conductivity, measured with a thermal probe using a multithermistor array and real-time processing capabilities. Forward two-dimensional modeling allows one to estimate heat flow variations at both sites from local disturbances and to obtain average heat flow values of 51 mW/m{sup 2} for the transect within the Gulf of Mexico and 38 and 69 mW/m{sup 2} for two basins within the Yucatan area. Sea bottom relief has a predominant effect over other environmental factors in the scatter of heat flow determination in the Gulf of Mexico.

  6. Modeling heat flow in a thermos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karls, Michael A.; Scherschel, James E.

    2003-07-01

    One of the first mathematical models that students encounter is that of the cooling of a cup of coffee. A related, but more complicated, problem is how the temperature in a thermos full of ice-cold water changes as a function of both time and position in the thermos. We use the approach developed by Fourier for the heating of an insulated rod to establish a model for a thermos. We verify the model by comparing it to data recorded with a calculator-based laboratory.

  7. Particle-based simulation of hydraulic fracture and fluid/heat flow in geothermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Peter; Wang, Yucang; Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando

    2013-06-01

    Realizing the potential of geothermal energy as a cheap, green, sustainable resource to provide for the planet's future energy demands that a key geophysical problem be solved first: how to develop and maintain a network of multiple fluid flow pathways for the time required to deplete the heat within a given region. We present the key components for micro-scale particle-based numerical modeling of hydraulic fracture, and fluid and heat flow in geothermal reservoirs. They are based on the latest developments of ESyS-Particle - the coupling of the Lattice Solid Model (LSM) to simulate the nonlinear dynamics of complex solids with the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) applied to the nonlinear dynamics of coupled fluid and heat flow in the complex solid-fluid system. The coupled LSM/LBM can be used to simulate development of fracture systems in discontinuous media, elastic stress release, fluid injection and the consequent slip at joint surfaces, and hydraulic fracturing; heat exchange between hot rocks and water within flow pathways created through hydraulic fracturing; and fluid flow through complex, narrow, compact and gouge-or powder-filled fracture and joint systems. We demonstrate the coupled LSM/LBM to simulate the fundamental processes listed above, which are all components for the generation and sustainability of the hot-fractured rock geothermal energy fracture systems required to exploit this new green-energy resource.

  8. Heat energy of various ignition sparks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silsbee, F B; Loeb, L B; Fonseca, E L

    1920-01-01

    This report describes a method developed at the Bureau of Standards for measuring the total energy liberated as heat in a spark gap by an ignition system. Since this heat energy is obtained from the electromagnetic energy stored in the windings of the magneto or coil, it is a measure of the effectiveness of the device as an electric generator. Part 2 gives the results of measurements in absolute units of the total heat supplied to a spark gap by ignition systems of different types operating at various speeds, under conditions substantially equivalent to those in the cylinder of a high-compression aviation engine.

  9. Heat transfer intensification by increasing vapor flow rate in flat heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprinceana, Silviu; Mihai, Ioan; Beniuga, Marius; Suciu, Cornel

    2015-02-01

    Flat heat pipes have various technical applications, one of the most important being the cooling of electronic components[9]. Their continuous development is due to the fact that these devices permit heat transfer without external energetic contribution. The practical exploitation of flat heat pipes however is limited by the fact that dissipated power can only reach a few hundred watts. The present paper aims to advance a new method for the intensification of convective heat transfer. A centrifugal mini impeller, driven by a turntable which incorporates four permanent magnets was designed. These magnets are put in motion by another rotor, which in its turn includes two permanent magnets and is driven by a mini electrical motor. Rotation of the centrifugal blades generates speed and pressure increase of the cooling agent brought to vapor state within the flat micro heat pipe. It's well known that the liquid suffers biphasic transformations during heat transfer inside the heat pipe. Over the hotspot (the heat source being the electronic component) generated at one end of the heat pipe, convective heat transfer occurs, leading to sudden vaporization of the liquid. Pressures generated by newly formed vapors push them towards the opposite end of the flat heat pipe, where a finned mini heat sink is usually placed. The mini-heat exchanger is air-cooled, thus creating a cold spot, where vapors condensate. The proposed method contributes to vapor flow intensification by increasing their transport speed and thus leading to more intense cooling of the heat pipe.

  10. Can differences in heat flow between east and southern Africa be easily interpreted?: Implications for understanding regional variability in continental heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyblade, Andrew A.; Pollack, Henry N.

    1993-03-01

    We address the extent to which regional variations in continental heat flow can be interpreted, making use of a heat flow data set from east and southern Africa. The first-order observation deriving from these heat flow measurements is a common pattern characterized in both regions by low heat flow in Archean cratons and higher heat flow in younger mobile belts. Two regional differences between east and southern Africa are superimposed on this common heat flow pattern: (1) heat flow in the Tanzania Craton is about 13 mW m -2 lower than in the Kalahari Craton, and (2) heat flow in the Mozambique Belt in east Africa is about 9 mW m -2 lower than in the southern African mobile belts, within about 250 km of the respective Archean cratons. The differences in heat flow between east and southern Africa suggest that the thermal structure of the lithosphere beneath these regions differs somewhat, and we attempt to resolve these differences in lithospheric thermal structure by examining four explanations that could account for the heat flow observations: (1) diminished heat flow in shallow boreholes in east Africa; (2) less crustal heat production in the regions of lower heat flow; (3) thicker lithosphere beneath the regions of lower heat flow; (4) cooler mantle beneath the areas of lower heat flow. We find it difficult to interpret uniquely the heat flow differences between east and southern Africa because available constraints on crustal heat production, crustal structure, lithospheric thickness and mantle temperatures are insufficient to discriminate among the possible explanations. Hence, extracting significant information about lithospheric thermal structure from regional heat flow variations requires more ancillary geochemical and geophysical information than Africa presently offers.

  11. Heat Flow and Segregation in Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, A. F.

    1985-01-01

    This research is composed of three major components: (1) development of interface morphology control for automated Bridgman growth of semiconductor systems; (2) comparative analysis of segregation during crystal growth in a reduced gravity environment and in the presence of magnetic fields; and (3) consequences of seeding by meltback in Bridgman growth under reduced gravity conditions. In attempts to optimize furnace design for crystal growth in a reduced gravity environment, an analytical approach to heat transfer was developed. It was thus found that charge confining crucibles diminish the ability to control the growth interface morphology through its position within the gradient zone. A heat pipe hot zone system for Bridgman growth, in reduced gravity environment, of crystal with diameters up to 16 mm was developed. For growth of Ga-doped germanium in the multipurpose (ASTP) furnace, it was found that the application of transverse magnetic fields (up to 36 kg) does not substantially increase the effective distribution coefficient; i.e., diffusion-controlled segregation observed in reduced gravity environment cannot be reached nor approached by magnetic field induced melt stabilization.

  12. Heat transfer analysis for peripheral blood flow measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Koji; Hattori, Hideharu; Sato, Nobuhiko; Ichige, Yukiko; Kiguchi, Masashi

    2009-06-01

    Some disorders such as circulatory disease and metabolic abnormality cause many problems to peripheral blood flow condition. Therefore, frequent measurement of the blood flow condition is bound to contribute to precaution against those disorders and to control of conditions of the diseases. We propose a convenient means of blood flow volume measurement at peripheral part, such as fingertips. Principle of this measurement is based on heat transfer characteristics of peripheral part containing the blood flow. Transition response analysis of skin surface temperature has provided measurement model of the peripheral blood flow volume. We developed the blood flow measurement system based on that model and evaluated it by using artificial finger under various temperature conditions of ambience and internal fluid. The evaluation results indicated that proposed method could estimate the volume of the fluid regardless of temperature condition of them. Finally we applied our system to real finger testing and have obtained results correlated well with laser Doppler blood flow meter values.

  13. Effects of steady flow heating by arc discharge upstream of non-slender bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schülein, E.; Zheltovodov, A.

    2011-08-01

    The influence of steady energy addition into the flow by a low-voltage DC-arc discharge located upstream of conically nosed and spherically blunted bodies was investigated experimentally in the Ludwieg-Tube Facility at Mach 5. The results include drag force measurements and shadowgraph flow visualizations. The flow-field structure, arising due to the bow-shock/heated-wake interaction, as well as the bow-shock intensity and heating power effects on the drag reduction is analyzed in this paper. The results demonstrate the existence of an optimum heating rate, providing a maximum effectiveness of energy addition and showing distinct drag reductions up to 70% dependent on test conditions and model geometries.

  14. Heat production in an Archean crustal profile and implications for heat flow and mobilization of heat-producing elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashwal, L. D.; Morgan, P.; Kelley, S. A.; Percival, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    Concentrations of heat producing elements (Th, U, and K) in 58 samples representative of the main lithologies in a 100-km transect of the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield have been obtained. The relatively large variation in heat production found among the silicic plutonic rocks is shown to correlate with modal abundances of accessory minerals, and these variations are interpreted as premetamorphic. The present data suggest fundamental differences in crustal radioactivity distributions between granitic and more mafic terrains, and indicate that a previously determined apparently linear heat flow-heat production relationship for the Kapuskasing area does not relate to the distribution of heat production with depth.

  15. Heat treatment of organic polymers in a flow of a gaseous heat carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravskii, G. I.; Vinogradov, L. M.; Greben'kov, A. Zh.; Drozdov, V. N.; Egorov, N. N.

    1996-11-01

    Processes of heat and mass transfer are studied during heat treatment of organic polymers in a superheated-steam flow. Promising environmentally safe engineering processes of treatment of plant biomass, plastics, and rubber wastes that contain petroleum products of sludges and soils are described.

  16. A Model of Solar Radiation and Joule Heating in Flow of Third Grade Nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Tariq; Hayat, Tasawar; Shehzad, Sabir Ali; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Chen, Bin

    2015-03-01

    The flow problem resulting from the stretching of a surface with convective conditions in a magnetohydrodynamic nanofluid with solar radiation is examined. Both heat and nanoparticle mass transfer convective conditions are employed. An incompressible third grade fluid which exhibits shear thinning and shear thickening characteristics is used as a base fluid. Concept of convective nanoparticle mass condition is introduced. Effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis on magnetohydrodynamic flow of nanofluid are accounted in the presence of thermal radiation. Energy equation incorporates the features of Joule heating. The impact of physical parameters on the temperature and nanoparticle concentration has been pointed out. Numerical values of skin-friction coefficient are presented and analysed. It is hoped that this present investigation serves as a stimulus for the next generation of solar film collectors, heat exchangers technology, material processing, geothermal energy storage, and all those processes which are highly affected by the heat enhancement concept.

  17. Terrestrial heat flow in the North Island of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Om Prakash

    1981-07-01

    Large variations in terrestrial heat flow from 21 to 209 mW/m 2 have been observed over the North Island, New Zealand. This is generally in good agreement with the pattern of existing geological and geophysical observations. A high heat flow zone with a value of 92 ±3 mW/m 2, which corresponds to melting temperatures near the base of the crust, is delineated in the northern part of the Taranaki Basin. In the rest of the island, heat flow appears to be low to normal, but some isolated high values are also found. Observed results are interpreted in terms of crust and mantle structure in a region of plate subduction.

  18. Relativistic Pulsar Winds with Pressure Anisotropy and Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenbarge, Jason; Hazeltine, Richard; Mahajan, Swadesh

    2008-11-01

    A newly developed covariant fluid model for magnetized plasmas, incorporating anisotropy in both temperature and heat flow, is used to study equatorial radial profiles of density, velocity, magnetic field, pressure, and heat flow in the hot, strongly magnetized wind region beyond the light cylinder of pulsar magnetospheres. Radiative losses are assumed to have isotropized the wind region plasma so that PP. Fluid velocities are taken as mildly relativistic, while temperatures are ultra-relativistic. This study of pulsar magnetospheres extends the work by Tsikarishvili et al. to a more general fluid closure including heat flow. The general covariant fluid model in spherical geometry and equations of state for arbitrary temperature will also be presented for more general applicability. J. M. TenBarge, R. D. Hazeltine, and S. M. Mahajan, Phys. Plasmas 15, 062112 (2008)., E. G. Tsikarishvili, A. D. Rogava, and D. G. Tsiklauri, Ap. J. 439, 822 (1995).

  19. Geothermal Heat Pump Profitability in Energy Services

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    If geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) are to make a significant mark in the market, we believe that it will be through energy service pricing contracts offered by retailcos. The benefits of GHPs are ideally suited to energy service pricing (ESP) contractual arrangements; however, few retailcos are thoroughly familiar with the benefits of GHPs. Many of the same barriers that have prevented GHPs from reaching their full potential in the current market environment remain in place for retailcos. A lack of awareness, concerns over the actual efficiencies of GHPs, perceptions of extremely high first costs, unknown records for maintenance costs, etc. have all contributed to limited adoption of GHP technology. These same factors are of concern to retailcos as they contemplate long term customer contracts. The central focus of this project was the creation of models, using actual GHP operating data and the experience of seasoned professionals, to simulate the financial performance of GHPs in long-term ESP contracts versus the outcome using alternative equipment. We have chosen two case studies, which may be most indicative of target markets in the competitive marketplace: A new 37,000 square foot office building in Toronto, Ontario; we also modeled a similar building under the weather conditions of Orlando, Florida. An aggregated residential energy services project using the mass conversion of over 4,000 residential units at Ft. Polk, Louisiana. Our method of analyses involved estimating equipment and energy costs for both the base case and the GHP buildings. These costs are input in to a cash flow analysis financial model which calculates an after-tax cost for the base and GHP case. For each case study customers were assumed to receive a 5% savings over their base case utility bill. A sensitivity analysis was then conducted to determine how key variables affect the attractiveness of a GHP investment.

  20. Energy efficient continuous flow ash lockhopper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr. (Inventor); Suitor, Jerry W. (Inventor); Dubis, David (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to an energy efficient continuous flow ash lockhopper, or other lockhopper for reactor product or byproduct. The invention includes an ash hopper at the outlet of a high temperature, high pressure reactor vessel containing heated high pressure gas, a fluidics control chamber having an input port connected to the ash hopper's output port and an output port connected to the input port of a pressure letdown means, and a control fluid supply for regulating the pressure in the control chamber to be equal to or greater than the internal gas pressure of the reactor vessel, whereby the reactor gas is contained while ash is permitted to continuously flow from the ash hopper's output port, impelled by gravity. The main novelty resides in the use of a control chamber to so control pressure under the lockhopper that gases will not exit from the reactor vessel, and to also regulate the ash flow rate. There is also novelty in the design of the ash lockhopper shown in two figures. The novelty there is the use of annular passages of progressively greater diameter, and rotating the center parts on a shaft, with the center part of each slightly offset from adjacent ones to better assure ash flow through the opening.

  1. Heat transfer from cylinders in subsonic slip flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagabushana, K. A.; Stainback, P. C.

    1992-01-01

    The heat transfer in heated wires was measured using a constant temperature anemometer over a Mach number range from 0.05 to 0.4 and pressures from 0.5 to 8.0 atmospheres. The total temperature ranged from 80 to 120 F and the wire diameters were 0.00015, 0.00032, and 0.00050 inch. The heat transfer data is presented in the form of a corrected Nusselt number. Based on suggested criteria, much of the data was obtained in the slip flow regime. Therefore, the data is compared with data having comparable flow conditions. The possible application of the heat transfer data to hot wire anemometry is discussed. To this end, the sensitivity of the wires to velocity, density, and total temperature is computed and compared using two different types of correlations.

  2. Heat transfer in oscillatory flow. Progress report, January 1983-December 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Telionis, D.P.; Diller, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    Progress is reported in work with a water tunnel facility and wind tunnel facilities used to study heat transfer in oscillatory flow. Work on both facilities include construction and modifications of the facilities themselves, instrumentation and data acquisition, and experimental measurements. A computer code was developed for the calculation of steady and unsteady heat transfer over the attached portion of the boundary layer. The equations of momentum and energy were recast in their finite-difference form. (LEW)

  3. Flow patterns and heat convection in a rectangular water bolus for use in superficial hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Birkelund, Yngve; Jacobsen, Svein; Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo; Stauffer, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates both numerically and experimentally the spatio-temporal effects of water flow in a custom made water bolus used for superficial hyperthermia generated by a 915-MHz, 4 × 3 microwave applicator array. Similar hyperthermia models referenced in the literature use a constant water temperature and uniform heat flux to describe conduction and convection energy exchange within the heating apparatus available to cool the tissue surface. The results presented in this paper show that the spatially varying flow pattern and rate are vital factors for the overall heat control applicability of the 5 mm thick bolus under study. Regions with low flow rates and low heat convection clearly put restrictions on the maximum microwave energy possible within the limits of skin temperature rise under the bolus. Our analysis is illustrated by experimental flow front studies using a contrast liquid setup monitored by high definition video and complemented by numerical analysis of liquid flow and heat exchange within the rectangular water bolus loaded by malignant tissue. Important factors for improvement of future bolus designs are also discussed in terms of diameter and configuration of the water input and output tubing network. PMID:19494426

  4. Heat Recovery and Energy Conservation in Petroleum Refining.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, William Gale

    1990-01-01

    The focus of the analysis presented here is improved recovery (and use) of waste heat at existing petroleum refineries. The major energy-conservation opportunities associated with waste heat are systematically examined both physically and in terms of cost. The opportunities at the Study Refinery are systematically examined in detail. The presentation begins with an overview of the processes carried out in contemporary petroleum refineries including discussion of typical energy use. There follows a brief thermodynamic description of refinery energy flows with an emphasis on heat and on energy-efficiency analysis. The heart of the thesis is Chapters 3-5 describing heat recovery opportunities involving, respectively: extraction and use of heat from combustion gases being discharged through stacks, the exchange of heat between product streams, and uses for low-temperature waste heat. In Chapter 6, a unifying economic concept is introduced (with details in the Appendix): a "supply curve" for saved energy. This describes the potential rate of energy savings in barrels of oil-equivalent per year (in analogy with production capacity of oil or gas fields), as a function of the cost of saved energy in dollars per barrel (in analogy with the production cost of energy). The nature of the distribution is, of course, for the cost of saved energy to increase with increasing energy savings. In this chapter, estimates are presented for the energy conservation opportunities other than waste heat at the Study Refinery. All the opportunities are then summarized in a single supply curve. The extraordinary result in a cost-effective opportunity to reduce refinery energy use by some 26% at 1984 prices. This translates into roughly a 1 energy-cost reduction per 42-gallon barrel of petroleum input. Of course, investments are required; the net benefit would be about 1.5 cents per gallon of product. This would be a major benefit in relation to typical refinery earnings. The concluding

  5. Flow pattern and heat transfer behavior of boiling two-phase flow in inclined pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dezhang; Ning, Ouyang

    1992-09-01

    Movable Electrical Conducting Probe (MECP), a kind of simple and reliable measuring transducer, used for predicting full-flow-path flow pattern in a boiling vapor/liquid two-phase flow is introduced in this paper. When the test pipe is set at different inclination angles, several kinds of flow patterns, such as bubble, slug, churn, intermittent, and annular flows, may be observed in accordance with the locations of MECP. By means of flow pattern analysis, flow field numerical calculations have been carried out, and heat transfer coefficient correlations along full-flow-path derived. The results show that heat transfer performance of boiling two-phase flow could be significantly augmented as expected in some flow pattern zones. The results of the investigation, measuring techniques and conclusions contained in this paper would be a useful reference in foundational research for prediction of flow pattern and heat transfer behavior in boiling two-phase flow, as well as for turbine vane liquid-cooling design.

  6. Numerical and Experimental Approaches Toward Understanding Lava Flow Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpf, M.; Fagents, S. A.; Hamilton, C.; Crawford, I. A.

    2013-12-01

    We have performed numerical modeling and experimental studies to quantify the heat transfer from a lava flow into an underlying particulate substrate. This project was initially motivated by a desire to understand the transfer of heat from a lava flow into the lunar regolith. Ancient regolith deposits that have been protected by a lava flow may contain ancient solar wind, solar flare, and galactic cosmic ray products that can give insight into the history of our solar system, provided the records were not heated and destroyed by the overlying lava flow. In addition, lava-substrate interaction is an important aspect of lava fluid dynamics that requires consideration in lava emplacement models Our numerical model determines the depth to which the heat pulse will penetrate beneath a lava flow into the underlying substrate. Rigorous treatment of the temperature dependence of lava and substrate thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity, density, and latent heat release are imperative to an accurate model. Experiments were conducted to verify the numerical model. Experimental containers with interior dimensions of 20 x 20 x 25 cm were constructed from 1 inch thick calcium silicate sheeting. For initial experiments, boxes were packed with lunar regolith simulant (GSC-1) to a depth of 15 cm with thermocouples embedded at regular intervals. Basalt collected at Kilauea Volcano, HI, was melted in a gas forge and poured directly onto the simulant. Initial lava temperatures ranged from ~1200 to 1300 °C. The system was allowed to cool while internal temperatures were monitored by a thermocouple array and external temperatures were monitored by a Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) video camera. Numerical simulations of the experiments elucidate the details of lava latent heat release and constrain the temperature-dependence of the thermal conductivity of the particulate substrate. The temperature-dependence of thermal conductivity of particulate material is not well known

  7. Modeling of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Nanotube and Nanowire Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Bundles of nanotubes, also known as nanotube forests, are under consideration for applications such as chip cooling and pre-concentrators for biodetection. Scaling law analysis shows that the air flow through these forests at atmospheric pressure is in the free-molecular flow regime. Based on the linearized free-molecular flow equations, a model is presented for the pressure drop and heat transfer in these systems. The momentum and energy equations are coupled, requiring that they be solved simultaneously. Results show large pressure drops, and a non-linear pressure distribution, similar to that seen in rarefied micro-channel flows.

  8. Measurements of pressure drop and heat transfer in turbulent pipe flows of particulate slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K. V.; Choi, U. S.; Kasza, K. E.

    1988-05-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), under sponsorhip of DOE, Office of Buildings and Community Systems, has been conducting a comprehensive, long-range program to develop high-performance advanced energy transmission fluids for use in district heating and cooling (DHC) systems. The current study focuses on the development of phase-change slurries as advanced energy transmission fluids. The objectives are: (1) to establish proof-of-concept of enhanced heat transfer by a slurry, with and without phase change, relative to heat transfer in a pure carrier liquid; (2) to investigate the effect of particle volumetric loading, size, and flow rate on the slurry pressure drip and heat transfer behavior with and without friction-reducing additives; and (3) to generate pressure drop and heat transfer data needed for the development and design of improved DHC systems. Two types of phase-change materials were used in the experiments: ice slush for cooling, and cross-linked, high- density polyethylene (X-HDPE) particles with diameters of 1/8 and 1/20 in. (3.2 and 1.3 mm) for heating. The friction-reducing additive used in the tests was Separan AP-272 at 65 wppm. This report describes the test facility, discusses the experimental procedures, and presents significant experimental results on flow and heat transfer characteristics of the non-melting slurry flows.

  9. Steady-state heat transfer in transversely heated porous media with application to focused solar energy collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, L. D.

    1976-01-01

    A fluid flowing in a porous medium heated transversely to the fluid flow is considered. This configuration is applicable to a focused solar energy collector for use in an electric power generating system. A fluidized bed can be regarded as a porous medium with special properties. The solutions presented are valid for describing the effectiveness of such a fluidized bed for collecting concentrated solar energy to heat the working fluid of a heat engine. Results indicate the advantage of high thermal conductivity in the transverse direction and high operating temperature of the porous medium.

  10. The Detectability of Heat Flow Signatures on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paige, D. A.; Hayne, P. O.; Spencer, J. R.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Bennett, K. A.; Mellon, M. T.; Bandfield, J. L.; Aharonson, O.

    2014-12-01

    Europa is planetary body with a young, tectonically active ice shell and a subsurface liquid water ocean. These characteristics make it one of the most promising places in the solar system to search for extant life beyond Earth. Conventional wisdom dictates that temperatures at the surface of Europa's ice shell are not expected to exceed 130K, which is well below the stability temperature of liquid water or brines. However, the regional or local-scale surface temperatures on Europa could be elevated due to regional or local scale heat flow anomalies as manifested by regional variations in tidal heating, recent cracks in the ice shell, or episodic eruptive plumes. Using a sophisticated ray-tracing thermal model developed for the moon and Mercury, we have explored the potential detectability of a range of heat flow anomalies on Europa from remote sensing measurements of the thermal emission and solar reflection from the Europa's surface. We find that the thermal emission signatures of potential heat flow anomalies can be differentiated from those caused by topography, roughness, exposed ice blocks and Jupiter shine. We further quantify the requirements for accuracy and signal-to-noise, as well as the requirements, for spatial, spectral and diurnal coverage, and conclude that heat flow signatures from sites of recent plume activity should be readily detectable, even if they are not currently active.

  11. Pressure Gradient Effects on Hypersonic Cavity Flow Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Merski, N. Ronald; Wood, William A.; Prabhu, Ramdas K.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of a pressure gradient on the local heating disturbance of rectangular cavities tested at hypersonic freestream conditions has been globally assessed using the two-color phosphor thermography method. These experiments were conducted in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel and were initiated in support of the Space Shuttle Return-To-Flight Program. Two blunted-nose test surface geometries were developed, including an expansion plate test surface with nearly constant negative pressure gradient and a flat plate surface with nearly zero pressure gradient. The test surface designs and flow characterizations were performed using two-dimensional laminar computational methods, while the experimental boundary layer state conditions were inferred using the measured heating distributions. Three-dimensional computational predictions of the entire model geometry were used as a check on the design process. Both open-flow and closed-flow cavities were tested on each test surface. The cavity design parameters and the test condition matrix were established using the computational predictions. Preliminary conclusions based on an analysis of only the cavity centerline data indicate that the presence of the pressure gradient did not alter the open cavity heating for laminar-entry/laminar-exit flows, but did raise the average floor heating for closed cavities. The results of these risk-reduction studies will be used to formulate a heating assessment of potential damage scenarios occurring during future Space Shuttle flights.

  12. Pressure Gradient Effects on Hypersonic Cavity Flow Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Merski, N. Ronald; Wood, William A.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of a pressure gradient on the local heating disturbance of rectangular cavities tested at hypersonic freestream conditions has been globally assessed using the two-color phosphor thermography method. These experiments were conducted in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel and were initiated in support of the Space Shuttle Return-To-Flight Program. Two blunted-nose test surface geometries were developed, including an expansion plate test surface with nearly constant negative pressure gradient and a flat plate surface with nearly zero pressure gradient. The test surface designs and flow characterizations were performed using two-dimensional laminar computational methods, while the experimental boundary layer state conditions were inferred using the measured heating distributions. Three-dimensional computational predictions of the entire model geometry were used as a check on the design process. Both open-flow and closed-flow cavities were tested on each test surface. The cavity design parameters and the test condition matrix were established using the computational predictions. Preliminary conclusions based on an analysis of only the cavity centerline data indicate that the presence of the pressure gradient did not alter the open cavity heating for laminar-entry/laminar-exit flows, but did raise the average floor heating for closed cavities. The results of these risk-reduction studies will be used to formulate a heating assessment of potential damage scenarios occurring during future Space Shuttle flights.

  13. Prediction of strongly-heated internal gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, D.M. ||; Shehata, A.M.; Kunugi, Tomoaki |

    1997-12-31

    The purposes of the present article are to remind practitioners why the usual textbook approaches may not be appropriate for treating gas flows heated from the surface with large heat fluxes and to review the successes of some recent applications of turbulence models to this case. Simulations from various turbulence models have been assessed by comparison to the measurements of internal mean velocity and temperature distributions by Shehata for turbulent, laminarizing and intermediate flows with significant gas property variation. Of about fifteen models considered, five were judged to provide adequate predictions.

  14. Heat flow and geothermal studies in the state of Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, D.D.; Steele, J.L.; Kelley, S.A.

    1985-08-01

    Existing geothermal gradient and heat flow data for the state of Washington are summarized. In addition, information on mean-annual ground surface temperatures is included. The data consist of accurate, detailed temperature-depth measurements in selected available holes throughout the state of Washington made between 1979 and 1982. Measurements of thermal conductivity on selected rock samples from these drill holes and ancillary information required to assess the significance of the data and calculate heat flow values were obtained as well. Information is presented on the mean-annual ground-surface temperatures throughout the state of Washington. 32 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Heat transfer enhancement and vortex flow structure over a heated cylinder oscillating in the crossflow direction

    SciTech Connect

    Gau, C.; Wu, J.M.; Liang, C.Y.

    1999-11-01

    Experiments are performed to study the flow structure and heat transfer over a heated oscillating cylinder. Both flow visualization using a smoke wire and local heat transfer measurements around the cylinder were made. The excitation frequencies of the cylinder are selected at F{sub e}/F{sub n} = 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, and 3. These include excitations at harmonic, subharmonic, superharmonic, and non harmonic frequencies. Synchronization of vortex shedding with the cylinder excitation occurs not only at F{sub e}/F{sub n} = 1 but also at F{sub e}/F{sub n} = 3, which can greatly enhance the heat transfer. The simultaneous enhancement of heat transfer at the stagnation point, its downstream region, and the wake region of the flow suggests that different modes of instabilities occurring in the shear layer of the near wake are actually initiated and amplified far upstream in the stagnation point, which were suppressed in the accelerated flow region and re-amplified in the decelerated flow region. As long as the dominant mode of the instability is amplified by the excitation of cylinder, enhancement of heat transfer can be obtained. During the experiments, the Reynolds numbers vary from 1,600 to 4,800, the ratios of oscillation amplitude to diameter of the cylinder from 0.064 to 0.016.

  16. Incorporation of Condensation Heat Transfer in a Flow Network Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, Miranda; Majumdar, Alok; McConnaughey, Paul K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we have investigated the condensation of water vapor in a short tube. A numerical model of condensation heat transfer was incorporated in a flow network code. The flow network code that we have used in this paper is Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). GFSSP is a finite volume based flow network code. Four different condensation models were presented in the paper. Soliman's correlation has been found to be the most stable in low flow rates which is of particular interest in this application. Another highlight of this investigation is conjugate or coupled heat transfer between solid or fluid. This work was done in support of NASA's International Space Station program.

  17. Marangoni mixed convection flow with Joule heating and nonlinear radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hayat, Tasawar; Shaheen, Uzma; Shafiq, Anum; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Asghar, Saleem

    2015-07-15

    Marangoni mixed convective flow of Casson fluid in a thermally stratified medium is addressed. Flow analysis has been carried out in presence of inclined magnetic field. Heat transfer analysis is discussed in the presence of viscous dissipation, Joule heating and nonlinear thermal radiation. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are first converted into ordinary differential systems and then developed the convergent series solutions. Flow pattern with the influence of pertinent parameters namely the magnetic parameter, Casson fluid parameter, temperature ratio parameter, stratification parameter, Prandtl number, Eckert number and radiation parameter is investigated. Expression of local Nusselt number is computed and analyzed. It is found that the Nusselt number decreases by increasing magnetic parameter, temperature ratio parameter, angle of inclination and stratification parameter. Moreover the effect of buoyancy parameter on the velocity distribution is opposite in both the opposing and assisting flow phenomena. Thermal field and associated layer thickness are enhanced for larger radiation parameter.

  18. Experimental investigation of flow and heating in a resonance tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarohia, V.; Back, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to determine the basic mechanism of heating in resonance tubes of square section with constant area excited by underexpanded jet flows. The jet flow between the nozzle exit and the tube inlet plays a key role in the performance of a resonance tube. A detailed and systematic investigation of the unsteady complex shock structure in this part of the flow region has led to a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms associated with the gas heating in such tubes. A study of the effects of tube location in relation to free-jet shock location (without the presence of the resonance tube) has shed further light on the underlying mechanism of sustained oscillations of the flow in a resonance tube.

  19. District Heating Systems Performance Analyses. Heat Energy Tariff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemele, Jelena; Vigants, Girts; Vitolins, Valdis; Blumberga, Dagnija; Veidenbergs, Ivars

    2014-12-01

    The paper addresses an important element of the European energy sector: the evaluation of district heating (DH) system operations from the standpoint of increasing energy efficiency and increasing the use of renewable energy resources. This has been done by developing a new methodology for the evaluation of the heat tariff. The paper presents an algorithm of this methodology, which includes not only a data base and calculation equation systems, but also an integrated multi-criteria analysis module using MADM/MCDM (Multi-Attribute Decision Making / Multi-Criteria Decision Making) based on TOPSIS (Technique for Order Performance by Similarity to Ideal Solution). The results of the multi-criteria analysis are used to set the tariff benchmarks. The evaluation methodology has been tested for Latvian heat tariffs, and the obtained results show that only half of heating companies reach a benchmark value equal to 0.5 for the efficiency closeness to the ideal solution indicator. This means that the proposed evaluation methodology would not only allow companies to determine how they perform with regard to the proposed benchmark, but also to identify their need to restructure so that they may reach the level of a low-carbon business.

  20. Controlling the sonic boom from a thin body by means of local heating of the incoming flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapkin, A. V.; Moskvichev, D. Yu.

    2013-11-01

    The problem of reduction of the sonic boom level by heating the flow in front of the body is solved numerically. A combined method of “phantom bodies” is used for calculations. The sonic boom generated by an axisymmetric thin body for the flight Mach number of 2 with different levels of energy supply to the incoming flow is calculated. The calculation results show that the sonic boom can be reduced by means of local heat supply to a supersonic gas flow. Reduction of the sonic boom level is provided by specific gas-dynamic features of the flow behind the heat supply zone.

  1. Understanding heat and fluid flow in linear GTA welds

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1992-12-31

    A transient heat flow and fluid flow model was used to predict the development of gas tungsten arc (GTA) weld pools in 1.5 mm thick AISI 304 SS. The welding parameters were chosen so as to correspond to an earlier experimental study which produced high-resolution surface temperature maps. The motivation of the present study was to verify the predictive capability of the computational model. Comparison of the numerical predictions and experimental observations indicate good agreement.

  2. Understanding heat and fluid flow in linear GTA welds

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    A transient heat flow and fluid flow model was used to predict the development of gas tungsten arc (GTA) weld pools in 1.5 mm thick AISI 304 SS. The welding parameters were chosen so as to correspond to an earlier experimental study which produced high-resolution surface temperature maps. The motivation of the present study was to verify the predictive capability of the computational model. Comparison of the numerical predictions and experimental observations indicate good agreement.

  3. Gas flow environmental and heat transfer nonrotating 3D program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geil, T.; Steinhoff, J.

    1983-01-01

    A complete set of benchmark quality data for the flow and heat transfer within a large rectangular turning duct is being compiled. These data will be used to evaluate and verify three dimensional internal viscous flow models and computational codes. The analytical objective is to select such a computational code and define the capabilities of this code to predict the experimental results. Details of the proper code operation will be defined and improvements to the code modeling capabilities will be formulated.

  4. Proceedings of heat transfer and flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Somerton, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    The topic of heat transfer and flow in porous media continues to be the focus of considerable research efforts. Certainly, this is partly due to the wide application of porous materials in engineering systems as well as the novel application of a porous media model to a variety of engineering problems. The work presented in this volume deals with such applications as papermaking, insulation materials, heat pipes, buried heating systems, tumor treatment, and cooling of microelectronics. This volume contains a nice mixture of experimental and computational approaches to problems and should provide the reader with a sense of the current state-of-the-art in porous media research.

  5. Oscillatory/Chaotic Thermocapillary Flow Induced by Radiant Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth J.

    1998-01-01

    There is a continuing need to understand the fluid physics occurring under low gravity conditions in processes such as crystal growth, materials processing, and the movement of bubbles or droplets. The fluid flow in such situations is often caused by a gradient in interfacial tension. If a temperature gradient is created due to a heat source, the resulting flow is called thermocapillary flow, a special case of Marangoni Convection. In this study, an experimental investigation was conducted using silicone oil in cylindrical containers with a laser heat source at the free surface. It was desired to determine the conditions under which steady, axisymmetrical thermocapillary flow becomes unstable and oscillatory three-dimensional flow states develop. The critical Marangoni number for each observed oscillatory state was measured as a function of the container aspect ratio and the dynamic Bond number, a measure of buoyant force versus ii thermocapillary force. Various oscillatory modes were observed during three- dimensional convection, and chaotic flow was reached in one test condition. The critical Marangoni numbers are compared with those measured in previous studies, and the power spectra and phase trajectories of the instantaneous surface temperature distributions are used to characterize the routes of transitions to the chaotic flow state. Results show that only superharmonic modes appear in the routes to chaos while infinite number of subharmonic modes occur in flow transitions for pure Rayleigh convection.

  6. Heat Transfer to Longitudinal Laminar Flow Between Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, Ephraim M.; Loeffler, Albert L. Jr.; Hubbard, H. A.

    1960-01-01

    Consideration is given to the fully developed heat transfer characteristics for longitudinal laminar flow between cylinders arranged in an equilateral triangular array. The analysis is carried out for the condition of uniform heat transfer per unit length. Solutions are obtained for the temperature distribution, and from these, Nusselt numbers are derived for a wide range of spacing-to-diameter ratios. It is found that as the spacing ratio increases, so also does the wall-to-bulk temperature difference for a fixed heat transfer per unit length. Corresponding to a uniform surface temperature around the circumference of a cylinder, the circumferential variation of the local heat flux is computed. For spacing ratios of 1.5 - 2.0 and greater, uniform peripheral wall temperature and uniform peripheral heat flux are simultaneously achieved. A simplified analysis which neglects circumferential variations is also carried out, and the results are compared with those from the more exact formulation.

  7. Influence of two-phase flow characteristic on critical heat flux in low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Akira; Lee, Sangryoul

    1996-08-01

    Estimation of the critical heat flux (CHF) in a boiling two-phase flow is one of the important subjects for the safety of water-cooled reactors and other energy systems. In the case of a boiling two-phase flow at low pressure, flow pattern and void fraction are easy to change by the power input and the flow becomes more complex due to low density of gas phase. The CHF is affected by the flow pattern. In this study, the CHFs were measured over wide quality range from the subcooled boiling to the annular-mist flow. By using Pyrex glass tube as a test channel, the two-phase flow situation was observed. Graphite rod or stainless steel tube was used as a heater rod and installed at the center of the glass tube. Two-phase flow was formed by steam injection to circulating water at an upstream region of the test section. The flow pattern was kept nearly constant over the length of test section due to the low input power density into the fluid. Then, the characteristics of CHF could be investigated at each flow patterns of bubbly, slug, annular and annular-mist flow. In the subcooled boiling region of bubbly flow, the CHF decreased with increase of quality and was less sensitive to flow rate. In the slug flow region, the CHF showed a minimum value. With more increase of quality in the annular flow, the CHF increased and reached a peak value at a certain quality depending on a flow rate. The peak of CHF occurred almost at a constant vapor mass velocity. In the annular-mist flow region, the CHF decreased with increase of quality. In the region, the effect of heated length on the CHF was systematically measured and validity of an analytical model considering dryout of liquid film based on formation of a dry patch was investigated.

  8. New heat flow measurements in Oman in the Arabian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolandone, F.; Lucazeau, F.; Jaupart, C.; Leroy, S.; Bache, F.; Amerjeed, M.; Lally, J.

    2009-04-01

    Precambrian shields are viewed as low heat flow provinces but detailed studies in Canada, South Africa and India shields demonstrate that large heat flow differences exist between them and within a single province, related to differences of crustal structures. Very few heat flow measurements are available on the Arabian shield and its thermal structure is poorly constrained. Heat flow reported for the Arabian Shield and its immediate platform (36-88 mWm-2) is broad. Thermal regime has a control on rheology and on deformation and the Arabian shield is of particular interest because it was affected by geodynamic processes such as the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden riftings starting around 30 Ma ago and the formation of the Dead Sea Transform fault starting at about 20 Ma. In December 2006, a marine heat-flow survey in the Gulf of Aden provided 169 new heat-flow measurements along multi-channel seismic profiles. One of the main results is that the high heat-flow (~120 mWm-2), characteristic of oceanic domains, extends into the deep continental margin and switches abruptly in the proximal margin to a low value (~40 mWm-2) typical of stable Precambrian domain. These low values have been confirmed by estimates derived from oil exploration data in few locations south of Oman. These data indicate a strong contrast of thermal regimes within the continental margin. Recent tomography studies on Arabia in Oman show that the lithosphere is significantly affected within Arabia in the vicinity of the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden. This pattern is apparently different from the observed heat-flow pattern, which needs to be confirmed and extended into the Arabian platform. The survey we conducted in October 2008 was to evaluate the thermal regime in the onshore domains of Oman. We measured the temperature gradient in 9 water wells in Dhofar south of Oman and in 8 mining wells in northern Oman in the ophiolite belt. The goal is to investigate the thermal structure of the Arabian plate and

  9. Distributed energy storage: Time-dependent tree flow design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, A.; Ziaei, S.; Lorente, S.

    2016-05-01

    This article proposes "distributed energy storage" as a basic design problem of distributing energy storage material on an area. The energy flows by fluid flow from a concentrated source to points (users) distributed equidistantly on the area. The flow is time-dependent. Several scenarios are analyzed: sensible-heat storage, latent-heat storage, exergy storage vs energy storage, and the distribution of a finite supply of heat transfer surface between the source fluid and the distributed storage material. The chief conclusion is that the finite amount of storage material should be distributed proportionally with the distribution of the flow rate of heating agent arriving on the area. The total time needed by the source stream to "invade" the area is cumulative (the sum of the storage times required at each storage site) and depends on the energy distribution paths and the sequence in which the users are served by the source stream. Directions for future designs of distributed storage and retrieval are outlined in the concluding section.

  10. Anisotropic energy flow and allosteric ligand binding in albumin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guifeng; Magana, Donny; Dyer, R. Brian

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric interactions in proteins generally involve propagation of local structural changes through the protein to a remote site. Anisotropic energy transport is thought to couple the remote sites, but the nature of this process is poorly understood. Here, we report the relationship between energy flow through the structure of bovine serum albumin and allosteric interactions between remote ligand binding sites of the protein. Ultrafast infrared spectroscopy is used to probe the flow of energy through the protein backbone following excitation of a heater dye, a metalloporphyrin or malachite green, bound to different binding sites in the protein. We observe ballistic and anisotropic energy flow through the protein structure following input of thermal energy into the flexible ligand binding sites, without local heating of the rigid helix bundles that connect these sites. This efficient energy transport mechanism enables the allosteric propagation of binding energy through the connecting helix structures. PMID:24445265

  11. The Lorenz energy cycle in simulated rotating annulus flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, R. M. B.

    2014-05-01

    Lorenz energy cycles are presented for a series of simulated differentially heated rotating annulus flows, in the axisymmetric, steady, amplitude vacillating, and structurally vacillating flow regimes. The simulation allows contributions to the energy diagnostics to be identified in parts of the fluid that cannot be measured in experiments. These energy diagnostics are compared with laboratory experiments studying amplitude vacillation, and agree well with experimental time series of kinetic and potential energy, as well as conversions between them. Two of the three major energy transfer paradigms of the Lorenz energy cycle are identified—a Hadley-cell overturning circulation, and baroclinic instability. The third, barotropic instability, was never dominant, but increased in strength as rotation rate increased. For structurally vacillating flow, which matches the Earth's thermal Rossby number well, the ratio between energy conversions associated with baroclinic and barotropic instabilities was similar to the measured ratio in the Earth's mid-latitudes.

  12. Anisotropic energy flow and allosteric ligand binding in albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guifeng; Magana, Donny; Dyer, R. Brian

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric interactions in proteins generally involve propagation of local structural changes through the protein to a remote site. Anisotropic energy transport is thought to couple the remote sites, but the nature of this process is poorly understood. Here, we report the relationship between energy flow through the structure of bovine serum albumin and allosteric interactions between remote ligand binding sites of the protein. Ultrafast infrared spectroscopy is used to probe the flow of energy through the protein backbone following excitation of a heater dye, a metalloporphyrin or malachite green, bound to different binding sites in the protein. We observe ballistic and anisotropic energy flow through the protein structure following input of thermal energy into the flexible ligand binding sites, without local heating of the rigid helix bundles that connect these sites. This efficient energy transport mechanism enables the allosteric propagation of binding energy through the connecting helix structures.

  13. Enhanced Phase Synchronization of Blood Flow Oscillations between Heated and Adjacent Non-heated Sacral Skin

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fuyuan; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2012-01-01

    The study of skin microcirculation may be used to assess risk for pressure ulcers. It is observed that local heating not only causes an increase in blood flow of the heated skin but also in the adjacent non-heated skin. The underlying physiological mechanism of this indirect vasodilation of the non-heated skin remains unclear. We hypothesized that blood flow oscillations (BFO) in the adjacent non-heated skin area synchronize with BFO in the heated skin, thus inducing a vasodilatory response. We investigated BFO in the heated and adjacent non-heated skin (12.1±1.2 cm distance) on the sacrum in 12 healthy participants. The ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) was used to decompose blood flow signals into a set of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs), and the IMFs with power spectra over the frequency range of 0.0095–0.02 Hz, 0.02–0.05 Hz, and 0.05–0.15 Hz were chosen as the characteristic components corresponding to metabolic, neurogenic, and myogenic regulations, respectively. Then, the instantaneous phase of the characteristic components was calculated using the Hilbert transform. From the time series of phase difference between a pair of characteristic components, the epochs of phase synchronization were detected. The results showed that myogenic and neurogenic BFO exhibit self-phase synchronization during the slower vasodilation of the heated skin. In the non-heated skin, the degree of synchronization of BFO is associated with the changes in blood flow. PMID:22936012

  14. Local Heat Transfer and CHF for Subcooled Flow Boiling - Annual Report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ronald D. Boyd

    2000-07-01

    The Thermal Science Research Center (TSRC) at Prairie View A&M University is involved in an international fusion reactor technology development program aimed at demonstrating the technical feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. This report highlights: (1) Recent accomplishments and pinpoints thermal hydraulic problem areas of immediate concern to the development of plasma-facing components, and (2) Next generation thermal hydraulic problems which must be addressed to insure safety and reliability in component operation. More specifically, the near-term thermal hydraulic problem entails: (1) generating an appropriate data base to insure the development of single-side heat flux correlations, and (2) evaluating previously developed single-side/uniform heated transformations and correlations to determine which can be used to relate the vast two-phase heat transfer and critical heat flux (CHF) technical literature for uniformly heated flow channels to single-side heated channels.

  15. The developing heat transfer and fluid flow in micro-channel heat sink with viscous heating effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelea, Dorin; Cioabla, Adrian Eugen

    2011-07-01

    The numerical modeling of the conjugate heat transfer and fluid flow through the micro-heat sink was presented in the paper, considering the viscous dissipation effect. Three different fluids with temperature dependent fluid viscosity are considered: water, dielectric fluid HFE-7600 and isopropanol. The square shape of the cross-section is considered with D h = 50 μm with a channel length L = 50 mm. As most of the reported researches dealt with fully developed fluid flow and constant fluid properties in this paper the thermal and hydro-dynamic developing laminar fluid flow is analyzed. Two different heat transfer conditions are considered: heating and cooling at various Br. The influence of the viscous heating on local Nu and Po is analyzed. It was shown that for a given geometry the local Po and Nu numbers are strongly affected by the viscous heating. Moreover the Po number attains the fully developed value as the external heating is equal with the internal viscous heating.

  16. Heat pump system and heat pump device using a constant flow reverse stirling cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Fineblum, S.S.

    1993-08-31

    A constant flow reverse Stirling cycle heat pump system is described comprising: a constant flow isothermal compression means for compressing a working gas, the compression means including a drive means, an inlet, and an outlet, and further including a cooling means to remove heat of compression from the working gas; a constant flow isothermal expansion means for expanding the working gas, the expansion means including an inlet, an outlet, and a heat source means to provide isothermal expansion of the working gas while removing heat from said heat source means; and a constant volume regenerative heat exchange means for transferring heat from compressed working gas to expanded working gas, the constant volume regenerative heat exchange means comprising: an enclosure, the enclosure containing a high pressure portion with an inlet receiving compressed working gas from the compression means outlet and with an outlet discharging cooled working gas to the expansion means inlet, a low pressure portion with an inlet receiving expanded working gas from the expansion means outlet and with an outlet discharging heated working gas to the compression means inlet, a slotted rotor in a central portion of the enclosure, the rotor containing a plurality of radially extending slots, and a plurality of radially sliding vanes mounted in the slots and extending to seal against a wall of the enclosure, wherein a first portion of the wall having a constant first radial distance from the rotor cooperates with the vanes to form a first constant volume channel defining the high pressure portion and a second portion of the wall having a constant second radial distance from the rotor cooperates with the vanes to form a second constant volume channel defining the low pressure portion; and heat transfer means in thermal contact with the high pressure portion and the low pressure portion for transferring heat from the compressed working gas to the expanded working gas.

  17. Small scale changes of geochemistry and flow field due to transient heat storage in aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S.; Boockmeyer, A.; Li, D.; Beyer, C.

    2013-12-01

    Heat exchangers in the subsurface are increasingly installed for transient heat storage due to the need of heating or cooling of buildings as well as the interim storage of heat to compensate for the temporally fluctuating energy production by wind or solar energy. For heat storage to be efficient, high temperatures must be achieved in the subsurface. Significant temporal changes of the soil and groundwater temperatures however effect both the local flow field by temperature dependent fluid parameters as well as reactive mass transport through temperature dependent diffusion coefficients, geochemical reaction rates and mineral equilibria. As the use of heat storage will be concentrated in urban areas, the use of the subsurface for (drinking) water supply and heat storage will typically coincide and a reliable prognosis of the processes occurring is needed. In the present work, the effects of a temporal variation of the groundwater temperature, as induced by a local heat exchanger introduced into a groundwater aquifer, are studied. For this purpose, the coupled non-isothermal groundwater flow, heat transport and reactive mass transport is simulated in the near filed of such a heat exchanger. By explicitly discretizing and incorporating the borehole, the borehole cementation and the heat exchanger tubes, a realistic geometrical and process representation is obtained. The numerical simulation code OpenGeoSys is used in this work, which incorporates the required processes of coupled groundwater flow, heat and mass transport as well as temperature dependent geochemistry. Due to the use of a Finite Element Method, a close representation of the geometric effects can be achieved. Synthetic scenario simulations for typical settings of salt water formations in northern Germany are used to investigate the geochemical effects arising from a high temperature heat storage by quantifying changes in groundwater chemistry and overall reaction rates. This work presents the

  18. Oscillatory/chaotic thermocapillary flow induced by radiant heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Kwang-Chung; Thompson, Robert L.; Vanzandt, David; Dewitt, Kenneth; Nash, Jon

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to conduct ground-based experiments to measure the onset conditions of oscillatory Marangoni flow in laser-heated silicone oil in a cylindrical container. For a single fluid, experimental data are presented using the aspect ratio and the dynamic Bond number. It is found that for a fixed aspect ratio, there seems to be an asymptotic limit of the dynamic Bond number beyond which no onset of flow oscillation could occur. Experimental results also suggested that there could be a lower limit of the aspect ratio below which there is no onset of oscillatory flow.

  19. Periodically developed flow and heat transfer in a ribbed duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, S.; Dutta, S.; Myrum, T. A.; Baker, R. S.

    1993-05-01

    Periodic fully developed flow and heat transfer results for a ribbed duct were obtained experimentally and numerically, using the nonlinear and standard k-epsilon turbulence models. Predicted recirculation lengths and maximum Nusselt number locations agreed well with the measured values. Both models performed poorly in the separated region just behind the ribs, where the Reynolds stresses were grossly underpredicted, the flow temperatures were overpredicted, and the mean velocity magnitudes were generally underpredicted. The local Nusselt numbers were underpredicted by both models. The nonlinear model predicted more realistic Reynolds stresses in the core flow region immediately above the ribs than the standard k-epsilon model.

  20. The Effect of Subcooling on the Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Two-Phase Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Takeshita, Kazuhiro; Doi, Kyoji; Noda, Ken-Ichi

    A two-phase loop thermosyphon is used as a heat transfer device in an energy-saving heat transportation system and so forth, because it transports thermal energy without any external power supply such as a pump under a body force field. We previously performed a fundamental study on the flow and heat transfer characteristics in a two-phase loop thermosyphon installed with a single heated tube evaporator both experimentally and theoretically which was made under the condition of near saturation temperature of liquid in a reservoir. In the present study, the effects of liquid subcooling and the heat input on the circulation mass flow rates, pressure and temperature distributions, and heat transfer coefficients in the evaporator were examined experimentally using water, ethanol, benzene and Freon 113 as the working fluids. On the other hand, the circulation mass flow rates, pressure and temperature distributions were theoretically calculated and compared with the experimental results.

  1. Terrestrial heat flow and its role in petroleum geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipova, E. N.; Ivanov, I. V.; Smirnov, V. A.; Abramova, R. N.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes an overview of mineral resources exploration survey by geothermal method based on the studies of terrestrial heat flow, anomalies varying in strike, in depth, physical behavior and in time. Applying geothermometry in oil-gas deposit exploration, based on paleotemperature modeling of sedimentation sequences was illustrated.

  2. Computational heat transfer analysis for oscillatory channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Kannapareddy, Mohan

    1993-01-01

    An accurate finite-difference scheme has been utilized to investigate oscillatory, laminar and incompressible flow between two-parallel-plates and in circular tubes. The two-parallel-plates simulate the regenerator of a free-piston Stirling engine (foil type regenerator) and the channel wall was included in the analysis (conjugate heat transfer problem). The circular tubes simulate the cooler and heater of the engine with an isothermal wall. The study conducted covered a wide range for the maximum Reynolds number (from 75 to 60,000), Valensi number (from 2.5 to 700), and relative amplitude of fluid displacement (0.714 and 1.34). The computational results indicate a complex nature of the heat flux distribution with time and axial location in the channel. At the channel mid-plane we observed two thermal cycles (out of phase with the flow) per each flow cycle. At this axial location the wall heat flux mean value, amplitude and phase shift with the flow are dependent upon the maximum Reynolds number, Valensi number and relative amplitude of fluid displacement. At other axial locations, the wall heat flux distribution is more complex.

  3. Phlegethon flow: A proposed origin for spicules and coronal heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.; Mayr, Hans G.

    1986-01-01

    A model was develped for the mass, energy, and magnetic field transport into the corona. The focus is on the flow below the photosphere which allows the energy to pass into, and be dissipated within, the solar atmosphere. The high flow velocities observed in spicules are explained. A treatment following the work of Bailyn et al. (1985) is examined. It was concluded that within the framework of the model, energy may dissipate at a temperature comparable to the temperature where the waves originated, allowing for an equipartition solution of atmospheric flow, departing the sun at velocities approaching the maximum Alfven speed.

  4. Heat transfer in thin, compact heat exchangers with circular, rectangular, or pin-fin flow passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    Heat transfer and pressure drop have been measured of three thin, compact heat exchangers in helium gas at 3.5 MPa and higher, with Reynolds numbers of 450 to 36,000. The flow geometries for the three heat exchanger specimens were: circular tube, rectangular channel, and staggered pin fin with tapered pins. The specimens were heated radiatively at heat fluxes up to 77 W/sq cm. Correlations were developed for the isothermal friction factor as a function of Reynolds number, and for the Nusselt number as a function of Reynolds number and the ratio of wall temperature to fluid temperature. The specimen with the pin fin internal geometry had significantly better heat transfer than the other specimens, but it also had higher pressure drop. For certain conditions of helium flow and heating, the temperature more than doubled from the inlet to the outlet of the specimens, producing large changes in gas velocity, density, viscosity, and thermal conductivity. These changes in properties did not affect the correlations for friction factor and Nusselt number in turbulent flow.

  5. A review of the heat flow data of NE Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiozzi, Paolo; Barkaoui, Alae-Eddine; Rimi, Abdelkrim; Verdoya, Massimo; Zarhloule, Yassine

    2016-04-01

    The Atlas chain is characterised by a SW-NE trending volcanic belt roughly extending from the Atlantic to the Mediterranean Sea and showing activity that spans in age mainly from Middle Miocene to Quaternary (14.6-0.3 Ma). The geochemical features of volcanism are mostly intraplate and alkaline with the exception of the northeastern termination of the belt where calc-alkaline series crop out. Lithospheric thermal and density models so far proposed, constrained by heat flow, gravity anomalies, geoid, and topography data, show that the Atlas chain is not supported isostatically by a thickened crust and a thin, hot and low-density lithosphere explains the high topography. One of the possible explanations for lithospheric mantle thinning, possibly in relation with the observed alkaline volcanism, is thermal erosion produced by either small-scale convection or activation of a small mantle plume, forming part of a hot and deep mantle reservoir system extending from the Canary Islands. This paper focuses on the several geothermal data available in the northeastern sector of the volcanic belt. The occurrence of an extensive, often artesian, carbonatic reservoir hosting moderately hot groundwater might boost the temperature gradient in the overlying impermeable cover, and consequently mask the deep thermal regime. We therefore revised the available dataset and investigated the contribution of advection. Temperature data available from water and oil wells were reprocessed and analysed in combination with thermal conductivity measurements on a wide set of lithotypes. Data were filtered according to rigid selection criteria, and, in the deeper boreholes, the heat flow was inferred by taking into account the porosity variation with depth and the temperature effect on the matrix and pore-filling fluid conductivity. Moreover, the possible effect of advection was evaluated with simple analytical models which envisage the carbonatic layers as confined aquifers heated by the

  6. Heat transfer and flow visualization of swirling impinging jets

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    The heat transfer performance of swirling impinging jets was experimentally investigated, and the flow fields were visualized for a jet diameter, d{sub j} = 12.7 mm and swirl angles, {theta} = 15{degree}, 30{degree}, and 45{degree}. Other experimental parameters included Reynolds number, Re = 3,620--17,600, vertical jet spacing, h = 12.7--76.2 mm, and radial distance from the stagnation point, r = 0--65 mm. The results showed significant enhancement in the heat transfer coefficient, both with respect to radial uniformity and local values, compared to a circular straight impinging jet of the same dimensions at the same test conditions. The flow field visualizations confirmed the measured enhancement in the heat transfer coefficient for the swirling jets as well as the radial distribution of local Nusselt number.

  7. Energy Integrated Lighting-Heating-Cooling System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meckler, Gershon; And Others

    1964-01-01

    Energy balance problems in the design of office buildings are analyzed. Through the use of integrated systems utilizing dual purpose products, a controlled environment with minimum expenditure of energy, equipment and space can be provided. Contents include--(1) office building occupancy loads, (2) office building heating load analysis, (3) office…

  8. A Temperature-Profile Method for Estimating Flow Processes in Geologic Heat Pipes

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2005-01-21

    Above-boiling temperature conditions, as encountered, for example, in geothermal reservoirs and in geologic repositories for the storage of heat-producing nuclear wastes, may give rise to strongly altered liquid and gas flow processes in porous subsurface environments. The magnitude of such flow perturbation is extremely hard to measure in the field. We therefore propose a simple temperature-profile method that uses high-resolution temperature data for deriving such information. The energy that is transmitted with the vapor and water flow creates a nearly isothermal zone maintained at about the boiling temperature, referred to as a heat pipe. Characteristic features of measured temperature profiles, such as the differences in the gradients inside and outside of the heat pipe regions, are used to derive the approximate magnitude of the liquid and gas fluxes in the subsurface, for both steady-state and transient conditions.

  9. Modelling of fluid flow and heat transfer in a reciprocating compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuhovcak, J.; Hejcik, J.; Jicha, M.

    2015-08-01

    Efficiency of reciprocating compressor is strongly dependent on several parameters. The most important are valve behaviour and heat transfer. Valves affect the flow through the suction and discharge line. Heat flow from the walls to working fluid increases the work of the cycle. Understanding of these phenomena inside the compressor is a necessary step in the development process. Commercial CFD tools offer wide range of opportunities how to simulate the flow inside the reciprocating compressor nowadays, however they are too demanding in terms of computational time and mesh creation. Several approaches using various correlation equation exist to describe the heat transfer inside the cylinder, however none of them was validated by measurements due to the complicated settings. The goal of this paper is to show a comparison between these correlations using in-house code based on energy balance through the cycle.

  10. A temperature-profile method for estimating flow in geologic heat pipes.

    PubMed

    Birkholzer, Jens T

    2006-05-30

    Above-boiling temperature conditions, as encountered, for example, in geothermal reservoirs and in geologic repositories for the storage of heat-producing radioactive wastes, may induce strong liquid and gas flow processes in porous subsurface environments. The magnitude of these flow processes is extremely hard to measure in the field. We therefore propose a simple temperature-profile method that uses high-resolution temperature data for deriving such information. The energy that is transmitted with the vapor and water flow creates a nearly isothermal zone maintained at about the boiling temperature, referred to as a heat pipe. Characteristic features of measured temperature profiles, such as the differences in the gradients inside and outside of the heat-pipe regions, are used to derive the approximate magnitude of the liquid and gas fluxes in the subsurface. PMID:16516337

  11. Additions to compact heat exchanger technology: Jet impingement cooling & flow & heat transfer in metal foam-fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onstad, Andrew J.

    Compact heat exchangers have been designed following the same basic methodology for over fifty years. However, with the present emphasis on energy efficiency and light weight of prime movers there is increasing demand for completely new heat exchangers. Moreover, new materials and mesoscale fabrication technologies offer the possibility of significantly improving heat exchanger performance over conventional designs. This work involves fundamental flow and heat transfer experimentation to explore two new heat exchange systems: in Part I, large arrays of impinging jets with local extraction and in Part II, metal foams used as fins. Jet impingement cooling is widely used in applications ranging from paper manufacturing to the cooling of gas turbine blades because of the very high local heat transfer coefficients that are possible. While the use of single jet impingement results in non-uniform cooling, increased and more uniform mean heat transfer coefficients may be attained by dividing the total cooling flow among an array of smaller jets. Unfortunately, when the spent fluid from the array's central jets interact with the outer jets, the overall mean heat transfer coefficient is reduced. This problem can be alleviated by locally extracting the spent fluid before it is able to interact with the surrounding jets. An experimental investigation was carried out on a compact impingement array (Xn/Djet = 2.34) utilizing local extraction of the spent fluid (Aspent/Ajet = 2.23) from the jet exit plane. Spatially resolved measurements of the mean velocity field within the array were carried out at jet Reynolds numbers of 2300 and 5300 by magnetic resonance velocimetry, MRV. The geometry provided for a smooth transition from the jet to the target surface and out through the extraction holes without obvious flow recirculation. Mean Nusselt number measurements were also carried out for a Reynolds number range of 2000 to 10,000. The Nusselt number was found to increase with the

  12. Modeling Heat Flow In a Calorimeter Equipped With a Textured Solar Collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Allen, Bradley J.

    2001-01-01

    Heat engines are being considered for generating electric power for minisatellite applications, particularly for those missions in high radiation threat orbits. To achieve this objective, solar energy must be collected and transported to the hot side of the heat engine. A solar collector is needed having the combined properties of high solar absorptance, low infrared emittance, and high thermal conductivity. To test candidate solar collector concepts, a simple calorimeter was designed, manufactured, and installed in a bench top vacuum chamber to measure heat flow. In addition, a finite element analysis model of the collector/calorimeter combination was made to model this heat flow. The model was tuned based on observations from the as-manufactured collector/calorimeter combination. In addition, the model was exercised to examine other collector concepts, properties, and scale up issues.

  13. Global Crustal Heat Flow Using Random Decision Forest Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. J.; Wood, W. T.; Martin, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    We have applied supervised learning with random decision forests (RDF) to estimate, or predict, a global, densely spaced grid of crustal heat flow. The results are similar to global heat flow predictions that have been previously published but are more accurate and offer higher resolution. The training inputs are measurement values and uncertainties of existing sparsely sampled, (~8,000 locations), geographically biased, yet globally extensive, datasets of crustal heat flow. The RDF estimate is a highly non-linear empirical relationship between crustal heat flow and dozens of other parameters (attributes) that we have densely sampled, global, estimates of (e.g., crustal age, water depth, crustal thickness, seismic sound speed, seafloor temperature, sediment thickness, and sediment grain type). Synthetic attributes were key to obtaining good results using the RDF method. We created synthetic attributes by applying physical intuition and statistical analyses to the fundamental attributes. Statistics include median, kurtosis, and dozens of other functions, all calculated at every node and averaged over a variety of ranges from 5 to 500km. Other synthetic attributes are simply plausible, (e.g., distance from volcanoes, seafloor porosity, mean grain size). More than 600 densely sampled attributes are used in our prediction, and for each we estimated their relative importance. The important attributes included all those expected from geophysics, (e.g., inverse square root of age, gradient of depth, crustal thickness, crustal density, sediment thickness, distance from trenches), and some unexpected but plausible attributes, (e.g., seafloor temperature), but none that were unphysical. The simplicity of the RDF technique may also be of great interest beyond the discipline of crustal heat flow as it allows for more geologically intelligent predictions, decreasing the effect of sampling bias, and improving predictions in regions with little or no data, while rigorously

  14. Convection flows driven by laser heating of a liquid layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivière, David; Selva, Bertrand; Chraibi, Hamza; Delabre, Ulysse; Delville, Jean-Pierre

    2016-02-01

    When a fluid is heated by the absorption of a continuous laser wave, the fluid density decreases in the heated area. This induces a pressure gradient that generates internal motion of the fluid. Due to mass conservation, convection eddies emerge in the sample. To investigate these laser-driven bulk flows at the microscopic scale, we built a setup to perform temperature measurements with a fluorescent-sensitive dye on the one hand, and measured the flow pattern at different beam powers, using a particle image velocimetry technique on the other hand. Temperature measurements were also used in numerical simulations in order to compare predictions to the experimental velocity profiles. The combination of our numerical and experimental approaches allows a detailed description of the convection flows induced by the absorption of light, which reveals a transition between a thin and a thick liquid layer regime. This supports the basis of optothermal approaches for microfluidic applications.

  15. Spacecraft heat transfer by two-phase flow method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hye, A.

    1985-01-01

    A refrigerator/freezer has been designed with an oil-free compressor to provide an economical two-phase flow system for heat transfer. A computer simulation has been done for the condenser and evaporator to determine the design parameters, such as length, diameter, and flow regimes, for different refrigerants and load requirements. A large Reynolds number was considered to ensure annular flow (in order to maximize heat transfer coefficients) and large Froude number. The simulation was correlated with the test data of a vapor compression refrigerator/freezer flown on STS-4 (which provided information on vapor compression in a zero-gravity environment). The two-phase system will be used for the Spacelab mission SLS-1 and can be used in future spacecraft and high-speed aircraft, where weight, volume, and power requirements are critical.

  16. Modeling of fluid and heat flow in fractured geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1988-08-01

    In most geothermal reservoirs large-scale permeability is dominated by fractures, while most of the heat and fluid reserves are stored in the rock matrix. Early-time fluid production comes mostly from the readily accessible fracture volume, while reservoir behavior at later time depends upon the ease with which fluid and heat can be transferred from the rock matrix to the fractures. Methods for modeling flow in fractured porous media must be able to deal with this matrix-fracture exchange, the so-called interporosity flow. This paper reviews recent work at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory on numerical modeling of nonisothermal multiphase flow in fractured porous media. We also give a brief summary of simulation applications to problems in geothermal production and reinjection. 29 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Modelling of Radiation Heat Transfer in Reacting Hot Gas Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thellmann, A.; Mundt, C.

    2009-01-01

    In this work the interaction between a turbulent flow including chemical reactions and radiation transport is investigated. As a first step, the state-of-the art radiation models P1 based on the moment method and Discrete Transfer Model (DTM) based on the discrete ordinate method are used in conjunction with the CFD code ANSYS CFX. The absorbing and emitting medium (water vapor) is modeled by Weighted Sum of Gray Gases. For the chemical reactions the standard Eddy dissipation model combined with the two equation turbulence model k-epsilon is employed. A demonstration experiment is identified which delivers temperature distribution, species concentration and radiative intensity distribution in the investigated combustion enclosure. The simulation results are compared with the experiment and reveals that the P1 model predicts the location of the maximal radiation intensity unphysically. On the other hand the DTM model does better but over predicts the maximum value of the radiation intensity. This radiation sensitivity study is a first step on the way to identify a suitable radiation transport and spectral model in order to implement both in an existing 3D Navier-Stokes Code. Including radiation heat transfer we intend to investigate the influence on the overall energy balance in a hydrogen/oxygen rocket combustion chamber.

  18. Radiant energy receiver having improved coolant flow control means

    DOEpatents

    Hinterberger, H.

    1980-10-29

    An improved coolant flow control for use in radiant energy receivers of the type having parallel flow paths is disclosed. A coolant performs as a temperature dependent valve means, increasing flow in the warmer flow paths of the receiver, and impeding flow in the cooler paths of the receiver. The coolant has a negative temperature coefficient of viscosity which is high enough such that only an insignificant flow through the receiver is experienced at the minimum operating temperature of the receiver, and such that a maximum flow is experienced at the maximum operating temperature of the receiver. The valving is accomplished by changes in viscosity of the coolant in response to the coolant being heated and cooled. No remotely operated valves, comparators or the like are needed.

  19. A laser-induced heat flux technique for convective heat transfer measurements in high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. R.; Keith, T. G., Jr.; Hingst, W. R.

    1991-01-01

    A technique is developed to measure the local convective heat transfer coefficient on a model surface in a supersonic flow field. The technique uses a laser to apply a discrete local heat flux at the model test surface, and an infrared camera system determines the local temperature distribution due to the heating. From this temperature distribution and an analysis of the heating process, a local convective heat transfer coefficient is determined. The technique was used to measure the local surface convective heat transfer coefficient distribution on a flat plate at nominal Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0. The flat plate boundary layer initially was laminar and became transitional in the measurement region. The experimentally determined convective heat transfer coefficients were generally higher than the theoretical predictions for flat plate laminar boundary layers. However, the results indicate that this nonintrusive optical measurement technique has the potential to measure surface convective heat transfer coefficients in high speed flow fields.

  20. Cycle of waste heat energy transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, H.; Voneynatten, C.; Krause, R.; Rudolph, W.; Gneuss, G.; Groesche, F.

    1983-08-01

    Transformation of industrial waste heat with temperatures up to 300 C into mechanical or electrical energy using organic Rankine cycles technique is considered. Behavior of working fluid was studied and plant components were optimized. A pilot plant (generated power 30 kW) was installed under industrial operating conditions. The working fluid is a fluorochlorohydrocarbon; the expansion machine is a piston type steam engine. The results of the pilot plant were used for the planning and building of a prototype plant (120 kW) with an additional power heat coupling for preheating the boiler heat water. The waste heat source is a calciner process. The predicted results are obtained although full working load is not reached due to reduced available waste heat of the calciner process.

  1. CERES Detects Earth's Heat and Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System, CERES, monitors solar energy reflected from the Earth and heat energy emitted from the Earth. In this image, heat energy radiated from the earth is shown in varying shades of yellow, red, blue and white. The brightest yellow areas, such as the Sahara Desert and Arabian Peninsula, are emitting the most energy out to space, while the dark blue polar regions and bright white clouds are the coldest areas on Earth, and are emitting the least energy. The animation (1.5MB) (high-res (4MB)) shows roughly a week of CERES data. For more information: CERES images through Visible Earth. CERES web site Image courtesy of the CERES instrument team

  2. An experimental study of the flow and heat transfer between enhanced heat transfer plates for PHEs

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiao-wei; Meng, Ji-an; Li, Zhi-xin

    2010-11-15

    The flow and heat transfer between inclined discrete rib plates for plate heat exchangers have been experimentally studied. Dye injection method is used to visualize the flow structures. The visualization results show that front vortex, rear vortex and main vortex are formed between the plates. The rib parameter influence is also studied using visualization method. The pressure drop and heat transfer between the inclined discrete rib plates as well as that between inclined continuous rib plates and smooth plates are also measured. The measured results show that the inclined discrete rib plate can enhanced heat transfer 20-25% at the same pumping power compared with the commonly used inclined continuous rib plates. (author)

  3. Heat conduction boundary layers of condensed clumps in cooling flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehringer, H.; Fabian, A. C.

    1989-04-01

    The structure of heat conduction boundary layers of gaseous condensations embedded in the hot intergalactic gas in clusters of galaxies is investigated by means of steady, one-dimensional, hydrodynamic models. It is assumed that heat conduction is effective only on scales much smaller than the total region of the cooling flow. Models are calculated for an arbitrary scaling factor, accounting for the reduction in heat conduction efficiency compared to the classical Spitzer case. The results imply a lower limit to the size spectrum of the condensations. The enhancement of cooling in the ambient medium due to heat conduction losses is calculated for a range of clump parameters. The luminosity of several observable emission lines, the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray emission spectrum, and the column density of some important ions are determined for the model boundary layers and compared with observations.

  4. An Engineering Aerodynamic Heating Method for Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.; DeJarnette, Fred R.

    1992-01-01

    A capability to calculate surface heating rates has been incorporated in an approximate three-dimensional inviscid technique. Surface streamlines are calculated from the inviscid solution, and the axisymmetric analog is then used along with a set of approximate convective-heating equations to compute the surface heat transfer. The method is applied to blunted axisymmetric and three-dimensional ellipsoidal cones at angle of attack for the laminar flow of a perfect gas. The method is also applicable to turbulent and equilibrium-air conditions. The present technique predicts surface heating rates that compare favorably with experimental (ground-test and flight) data and numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes (NS) and viscous shock-layer (VSL) equations. The new technique represents a significant improvement over current engineering aerothermal methods with only a modest increase in computational effort.

  5. Heat flow in Jane Basin, northwest Weddell Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawver, Lawrence A.; Della Vedova, Bruno; von Herzen, Richard P.

    1991-02-01

    The Jane Basin is a marginal basin situated immediately to the east of the South Orkney microcontinent in the Northwest section of the Weddell Sea. Thirty-five heat flow measurements made in the Jane Basin ranged in value from 67.5±4.3 to 92.1±3.0 mW/m2. Excluding values that were corrected for tilting or were on the very edge of the basin, the remaining 28 values range between 75.0±8.0 and 84.6±9.1 mW/m2. Magnetostratigraphy on the recovered core from Ocean Drilling Program hole 697, which was drilled in Jane Basin to a depth of 322 m, allowed sedimentation rates to be calculated back to 4.5 Ma. Single-channel seismic reflection data from RSS Shackleton allowed estimations of total sediment thickness for the Jane Basin to be made. We calculate that the measured heat flow is only 86-89% of the actual heat flow as a result of sedimentation. Heat generation in the sediments contributes 1.5-1.9 mW/m2to the total heat flow. The corrected heat flow gives an age for the Jane Basin of between 25 and 32 Ma from age-versus-heat flow comparisons, similar to the age determined from basement depth. The Scotia Sea, located to the north of Jane Basin and the South Orkney microcontinent, has been dated as anomaly 10 (30 Ma) and younger. Our calculated age for the Jane Basin would indicate that it may have been created prior to the initiation of seafloor spreading in the Scotia Sea. Evidence from major plate motions indicate that Antarctica began to rotate clockwise away from South America at about 65 Ma. Such motion may have triggered subduction along the southeast side of Jane Bank and the opening of Jane Basin as a back arc basin. Subduction at Jane Bank ended at anomaly 6A time (22 Ma) as evidenced by the age of the identified magnetic anomalies on the Antarctic plate found immediately to the east of Jane Bank. We conclude that Jane Basin opened prior to the opening of the Scotia Sea and that the spreading center that opened Jane Basin may have jumped to the Scotia Sea and

  6. Heat transfer coefficient for flow boiling in an annular mini gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hożejowska, Sylwia; Musiał, Tomasz; Piasecka, Magdalena

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper was to present the concept of mathematical models of heat transfer in flow boiling in an annular mini gap between the metal pipe with enhanced exterior surface and the external glass pipe. The one- and two-dimensional mathematical models were proposed to describe stationary heat transfer in the gap. A set of experimental data governed both the form of energy equations in cylindrical coordinates and the boundary conditions. The models were formulated to minimize the number of experimentally determined constants. Known temperature distributions in the enhanced surface and in the fluid helped to determine, from the Robin condition, the local heat transfer coefficients at the enhanced surface - fluid contact. The Trefftz method was used to find two-dimensional temperature distributions for the thermal conductive filler layer, enhanced surface and flowing fluid. The method of temperature calculation depended on whether the area of single-phase convection ended with boiling incipience in the gap or the two-phase flow region prevailed, with either fully developed bubbly flow or bubbly-slug flow. In the two-phase flow, the fluid temperature was calculated by Trefftz method. Trefftz functions for the Laplace equation and for the energy equation were used in the calculations.

  7. Three dimensional simulation of flow and heat transfer in an F shell heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Prithiviraj, M.; Andrews, M.J.

    1998-12-31

    Shell-and-tube heat exchangers are the most commonly used design in process and petrochemical industries. Over the last four years, a three-dimensional numerical model has been developed at Texas A and M University to model flow and heat transfer within shell-and-tube heat exchangers. This model is based on the distributed resistance concept of Patankar and Spalding (1974). Sub-models used for pressure drop, heat transfer and turbulence generation are briefly described. Leakage flow through the baffle-tube and baffle-shell clearances are modeled using a Bernoulli type approach. The discretized governing equations are solved using a SIMPLE type finite volume method on a colocated grid. The numerical model was previously used to perform E shell simulations. Here the 3D model is used to analyze flow through an F shell heat exchanger. Velocity vector plots for the shellside fluid and temperature contours for the shellside and tubeside fluids are used to study the flow structure. The performance of the 3D model is compared with the Bell Method (1981) for the prediction of overall pressure drop. Good agreement is obtained between the computed overall pressure drop and the pressure drop predicted by the Bell method.

  8. Investigation into flow boiling heat transfer in a minichannel with enhanced heating surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecka, Magdalena

    2012-04-01

    The paper presents results of flow boiling in a minichannel of 1.0 mm depth. The heating element for the working fluid (FC-72) that flows along the minichannel is a single-sided enhanced alloy foil made from Haynes-230. Microrecesses were formed on the selected area of the heating foil by laser technology. The observations of the flow structure were carried out through a piece of glass. Simultaneously, owing to the liquid crystal layer placed on the opposite side of the enhanced foil surface, it was possible to measure temperature distribution on the heating wall through another piece of glass. The experimental research has been focused on the transition from single phase forced convection to nucleate boiling, i.e. the zone of boiling incipience and further development of boiling. The objective of the paper is determining of the void fraction for some cross-sections of selected images for increasing heat fluxes supplied to the heating surface. The flow structure photos were processed in Corel graphics software and binarized. The analysis of phase volumes was developed in Techystem Globe software.

  9. Plasma Heating and Flow in an Auroral Arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Pollock, C. J.; Reasoner, D. L.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Austin, B.; Kintner, P. M.; Bonnell, J.

    1996-01-01

    We report direct observations of the three-dimensional velocity distribution of selected topside ionospheric ion species in an auroral context between 500 and 550 km altitude. We find heating transverse to the local magnetic field in the core plasma, with significant heating of 0(+), He(+), and H(+), as well as tail heating events that occur independently of the core heating. The 0(+) velocity distribution departs from bi-Maxwellian, at one point exhibiting an apparent ring-like shape. However, these observations are shown to be aliased within the auroral arc by temporal variations that arc not well-resolved by the core plasma instrument. The dc electric field measurements reveal superthermal plasma drifts that are consistent with passage of the payload through a series of vortex structures or a larger scale circularly polarized hydromagnetic wave structure within the auroral arc. The dc electric field also shows that impulsive solitary structures, with a frequency spectrum in the ion cyclotron frequency range, occur in close correlation with the tail heating events. The drift and core heating observations lend support to the idea that core ion heating is driven at low altitudes by rapid convective motions imposed by the magnetosphere. Plasma wave emissions at ion frequencies and parallel heating of the low-energy electron plasma are observed in conjunction with this auroral form; however, the conditions are much more complex than those typically invoked in previous theoretical treatments of superthermal frictional heating. The observed ion heating within the arc clearly exceeds that expected from frictional heating for the light ion species H(+) and He(+), and the core distributions also contain hot transverse tails, indicating an anomalous transverse heat source.

  10. Heat flow and continental breakup: The Gulf of Elat (Aqaba)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Avraham, Z.; Vonherzen, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    Heat flow measurements were made in the major basins of the Gulf of Elat (Aqaba), northern Red Sea. The gulf is located at the southern portion of the Dead Sea rift which is a transform plate boundary. Gradient measurements at each site were made with a probe which allows multiple penetration of the bottom during a single deployment of the instrument. Thermal conductivity was determined by needle probe measurements on sedimentary cores. The mean heat flux, about 80 mWm(-2), is significantly above the continental mean, and probably also above that from the adjacent Sinai and Arabian continental blocks. The heat flow appears to increase from north to south. Such an increase may be related to the more advanced rifting stage of the Red Sea immediately to the south, which presently includes creation of an oceanic crust. This trend also corresponds to the general trend of the deep crustal structure in the gulf. Evidence from various geophysical fields suggest a gradual thinning of the crust towards the direction of the Red Sea where a normal oceanic crust exists. The heat flow data, together with other geophysical data, indicate a propagation of mature rifting activity from the Red Sea into the Gulf of Elat. This process is acting simultaneously with the transform motion along the Dead Sea rift.

  11. California energy flow in 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, I.Y.; Mui, N.

    1996-09-01

    California energy consumption increased in 1994 in keeping with a recovery from the previous mild recession years. Although unemployment remained above the national average, other indicators pointed to improved economic health. Increased energy use was registered principally in the residential/commercial and transportation end-use sectors. A cooler-than-usual winter and spring was reflected in increased consumption of natural gas, the principal space-heating fuel in the state. Because of low water levels behind state dams, utilities turned to natural gas for electrical generation and to increased imports from out-of- state sources to meet demand. Other factors, such as smaller output from geothermal, biomass, and cogenerators, contributed to the need for the large increase in electrical supply from these two sources. Nonetheless, petroleum dominated the supply side of the energy equation of the state in which transportation requirements comprise more than one-third of total energy demand. About half of the oil consumed derived from California production. Onshore production has been in slow decline; however, in 1994 the decrease was compensated for by increases from federal offshore fields. Until 1994 production had been limited by regulatory restrictions relating to the movement of the crude oil to onshore refineries. State natural gas production remained at 1993 levels. The increased demand was met by larger imports from Canada through the recent expansion of Pacific Transmission Company`s 804 mile pipeline. Deregulation of the state`s utilities moved ahead in 1994 when the California Public Utilities Commission issued its proposal on how to restructure the industry. Public hearings were conducted in which the chief issues were recovery of the utilities` capital investments, conflicts with the Public Utilities Policies Act, management of power transactions between new suppliers and former utility customers, and preservation of energy conservation programs

  12. Heat transfer and forces on concave surfaces in free molecule flow.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, C.

    1971-01-01

    A Monte Carlo modeling technique is described for mathematically simulating free molecular flows over a concave spherical surface and a concave cylindrical surface of finite length. The half-angle of the surfaces may vary from 0 to 90 degrees, and the incident flow may have an arbitrary speed ratio and an arbitrary angle of attack. Partial diffuse reflection and imperfect energy accommodation for molecules colliding with the surfaces are also considered. Results of heat transfer, drag and lift coefficients are presented for a variety of flow conditions. The present Monte Carlo results are shown to be in very good agreement with certain available theoretical solutions.

  13. Comparative study of heat transfer and pressure drop during flow boiling and flow condensation in minichannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikielewicz, Dariusz; Andrzejczyk, Rafał; Jakubowska, Blanka; Mikielewicz, Jarosław

    2014-09-01

    In the paper a method developed earlier by authors is applied to calculations of pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient for flow boiling and also flow condensation for some recent data collected from literature for such fluids as R404a, R600a, R290, R32,R134a, R1234yf and other. The modification of interface shear stresses between flow boiling and flow condensation in annular flow structure are considered through incorporation of the so called blowing parameter. The shear stress between vapor phase and liquid phase is generally a function of nonisothermal effects. The mechanism of modification of shear stresses at the vapor-liquid interface has been presented in detail. In case of annular flow it contributes to thickening and thinning of the liquid film, which corresponds to condensation and boiling respectively. There is also a different influence of heat flux on the modification of shear stress in the bubbly flow structure, where it affects bubble nucleation. In that case the effect of applied heat flux is considered. As a result a modified form of the two-phase flow multiplier is obtained, in which the nonadiabatic effect is clearly pronounced.

  14. Laminar-flow heat transfer downstream from U-bends

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelmessih, A.N

    1987-01-01

    The laminar-flow heat transfer downstream from the unheated, vertical bends in horizontal U-tubes with electrically heated straight tube sections was investigated. Four U-tubes with curvature ratios of 4.84, 7.66, 12.35, and 25.36 were studied. Distilled water and almost-pure ethylene glycol solutions (water content 1 to 5%) were the test fluids. For each test section, local axial and peripheral wall temperatures were measured, and the local peripheral heat-transfer coefficients at the various locations were calculated. The experiments covered the local bulk Reynolds number range of 120 to 2500. The local bulk Prandtl number varied between 4 and 110, while the Grashof number ranged from 2500 to 1,130,000. The uniform wall heat flux ranged from 900 to 4230 Btu/hr.sq.ft (3.12 to 13.33 KW/sq.m.). This investigation permitted a better understanding of the interaction of the primary, secondary, and tertiary flow patterns. Also, a correlation was developed that predicts the heat-transfer coefficient downstream from an unheated U-bend and that can be extended to straight tubes.

  15. California energy flow in 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, I.Y.; Briggs, C.K.

    1994-04-01

    For the past 16 years energy flow diagrams for the State of California have been prepared from available data by members of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. They have proven to be useful tools in graphically expressing energy supply and use in the State as well as illustrating the difference between particular years and between the State and the US as a whole. As far as is possible, similar data sources have been used to prepare the diagrams from year to year and identical assumptions{sup la-le} concerning conversion efficiencies have been made in order to minimize inconsistencies in the data and analyses. Sources of data used in this report are given in Appendix B and C; unavoidably the sources used over the 1976--1993 period have varied as some data bases are no longer available. In addition, we continue to see differences in specific data reported by different agencies for a given year. In particular, reported data on supply and usage in industrial/commercial/residential end-use categories have shown variability amongst the data gathering agencies, which bars detailed comparisons from year to year. Nonetheless, taken overall, valid generalizations can be made concerning gross trends and changes.

  16. Local Heat Transfer and CHF for Subcooled Flow Boiling - Annual Report 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ronald D. Boyd

    2000-07-01

    Subcooled flow boiling in heated coolant channels is an important heat transfer enhancement technique in the development of fusion reactor components, where high heat fluxes must be accommodated. As energy fluxes increase in magnitude, additional emphasis must be devoted to enhancing techniques such as sub cooling and enhanced surfaces. In addition to subcooling, other high heat flux alternatives such as high velocity helium and liquid metal cooling have been considered as serious contenders. Each technique has its advantages and disadvantages [1], which must be weighed as to reliability and reduced cost of fusion reactor components. Previous studies [2] have set the stage for the present work, which will concentrate on fundamental thermal hydraulic issues associated with the h-international Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Engineering Design Activity (EDA). This proposed work is intended to increase our understanding of high heat flux removal alternatives as well as our present capabilities by: (1) including single-side heating effects in models for local predictions of heat transfer and critical heat flux; (2) inspection of the US, Japanese, and other possible data sources for single-side heating, with the aim of exploring possible correlations for both CHF and local heat transfer; and (3) assessing the viability of various high heat flux removal techniques. The latter task includes: (a) sub-cooled water flow boiling with enhancements such as twisted tapes, and hypervapotrons, (b) high velocity helium cooling, and (c) other potential techniques such as liquid metal cooling. This assessment will increase our understanding of: (1) hypervapotron heat transfer via fins, flow recirculation, and flow oscillation, and (2) swirl flow. This progress report contains selective examples of ongoing work. Section II contains an extended abstract, which is part of and evolving technical paper on single-side f heating. Section III describes additional details

  17. Terrestrial heat flow in the tertiary basin of central Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva Carvalho, Humberto; Purwoko; Siswoyo; Thamrin, M.; Vacquier, Victor

    1980-10-01

    Heat flow at 170 locations in the Central Tertiary basin of Sumatra was determined from thermal gradients obtained from the extrapolated oil well bottom hole formation temperature and the assumed temperature of 80°F at the surface. The effective thermal conductivity of the whole rock column, by which the gradient is multiplied to get the heat flow was calculated from measurements on 273 specimens of the geologic section and inspection of 92 well logs. For the whole basin the gradient averaged 3.71 ± 1.04°F/ 100 ft (67.6°C/km) the conductivity 4.83 ± 0.31 mcal °C -1 cm -1 sec -1, giving an average heat flow of 3.27 ± 0.93 10-6 cal cm -2 sec -1 which is about twice the world average. The gradient and the heat flow vary inversely with the depth of the wells most of which bottom in the pre-Tertiary basement. This may result from the basement rocks being several times more conductive than the sediments. Mocel calculations on a narrow heat-flow anomaly which rises from a base level of 3.2 HFU to 8.8 HFU suggest that it can be caused by the intrusion less than 55,000 years ago of an igneous plug or laccolith no deeper than 3 km and 2.2 to 4.6 km wide. Using the gradients from the SEAPEX Geothermal Gradient Map and assuming a conductivity of 5 mcal cm -1 °C -1 sec -1, the heat flow in the North Sumatra basin, the South Sumatra Basin, Sunda Strait and West Java is 2.5 HFU, while in Java east of 110°E longitude it drops to 1.9 HFU. Since subduction off Sumatra dates back at least to the Cretaceous, compression of the Asian plate against the Benioff zone is preventing the opening of a back-arc basin. This does not preclude the possibility of occasional periods of crustal tension corresponding perhaps to episodes of transgression which allow magma to rise into the rocks underlying the basin.

  18. Measuring Heat Flow on the Moon and Mars- The Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package HP-cubed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spohn, T.; Grott, M.; Ho, T.; van Zoest, T.; Kargl, G.; Smrekar, S. E.; Hudson, T. L.

    2010-12-01

    With only two successful heat flow measurements performed on the surface of the Moon to date, the thermal state of the Moon remains poorly constrained. Furthermore, measurements were taken close to the boundary of the Procellarum KREEP terraine, and the obtained values may not be representative for the bulk of the planet. For Mars, no heat flow measurement is yet available. Here we will present the Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package HP-cubed a self-penetrating, robotic heat flow probe. The instrument consists of electrical and temperature sensors that will be emplaced into the lunar subsurface by means of an electro-mechanical hammering mechanism. The instruement is foreseen to penetrate 3-5 m into the planet’s soil and will perform depth resolved measurements, from which the surface planetary heat flow can be directly deduced. The instrument has been pre-developed in two ESA funded precursor studies and has been further developed in the framework of ESA’s ExoMars mission. The current readiness level of the instrument is TRL 5.62 (ESA PDR Apr. 2009) which has been achieved with several Breadboards developed and tested between 2004 and 2009. As no drilling is required to achieve soil penetration, HP-cubed is a relatively lightweight heat flow probe, weighting less than 1800 g. It has been further studied as parts of the discovery proposals Lunette and GEMS and for the proposed Japanese lunar mission SELENE 2 The instrument consists of an electro-mechanic mole, a pay-load compartment, and a tether equipped with temperature sensors. The latter can be actively heated for thermal conductivity measurements. A tiltmeter and acceleraometer will help to track the path of the mole. The payload compartment has room for sensors such as a permittivity probe, a bore-hole camera, and/or a masspectrometer. Following deployment of the instrument, instrument operations will be split into two phases: During the penetration phase soil intrusion is achieved by means of the

  19. A high performance cocurrent-flow heat pipe for heat recovery applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.; Hartl, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    By the introduction of a plate-and-tube separator assembly into a heat pipe vapor core, it has been demonstrated that axial transport capacity in reflux mode can be improved by up to a factor of 10. This improvement is largely the result of eliminating the countercurrent shear that commonly limits reflux heat pipe axial capacity. With benzene, axial heat fluxes up to 1800 W/sq cm were obtained in the temperature range 40 to 80 C, while heat flux densities up to 3000 W/sq cm were obtained with R-11 over the temperature range 40 to 80 C. These very high axial capacities compare favorably with liquid metal limits; the sonic limit for liquid sodium, for example, is 3000 W/sq cm at 657 C. Computational models developed for these cocurrent flow heat pipes agreed with experimental data within + or - 25%.

  20. Two-phase flow and heat transfer under low gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, W.

    1981-11-01

    Spacelab experiment to investigate two-phase flow patterns under gravity uses a water-air mixture experiment. Air and water are circulated through the system. The quality or the mixture or air-water is controlled. Photographs of the test section are made and at the same time pressure drop across the test section is measured. The data establishes a flow regime map under reduced gravity conditions with corresponding pressure drop correlations. The test section is also equipped with an electrical resistance heater in order to allow a flow boiling experiment to be carried out using Freon II. High-speed photographs of the test section are used to determine flow patterns. The temperature gradient and pressure drop along the duct can be measured. Thus, quality change can be measured, and heat transfer calculated.

  1. Two-phase flow and heat transfer under low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.

    1981-01-01

    Spacelab experiment to investigate two-phase flow patterns under gravity uses a water-air mixture experiment. Air and water are circulated through the system. The quality or the mixture or air-water is controlled. Photographs of the test section are made and at the same time pressure drop across the test section is measured. The data establishes a flow regime map under reduced gravity conditions with corresponding pressure drop correlations. The test section is also equipped with an electrical resistance heater in order to allow a flow boiling experiment to be carried out using Freon II. High-speed photographs of the test section are used to determine flow patterns. The temperature gradient and pressure drop along the duct can be measured. Thus, quality change can be measured, and heat transfer calculated.

  2. Heat Transfer Over the Circumference of a Heated Cylinder in Transverse Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Ernst; Wenner, Karl

    1943-01-01

    A method for recording the local heat-transfer coefficients on bodies in flow was developed. The cylinder surface was kept at constant temperature by the condensation of vapor except for a narrow strip which is heated separately to the same temperature by electricity. The heat-transfer coefficient at each point was determined from the electric heat output and the temperature increase. The distribution of the heat transfer along the circumference of cylinders was recorded over a range of Reynolds numbers of from 5000 to 426,000. The pressure distribution was measured at the same time. At Reynolds numbers up to around 100,000 high maximums of the heat transfer occurred in the forward stagnation point at and on the rear side at 180C, while at around 80 the heat-transfer coefficient on both sides of the cylinder behind the forward stagnation point manifested distinct minimums. Two other maximums occurred at around 115 C behind the forward stagnation point between 170,000 and 426,000. At 426,000 the heat transfer at the location of those maximums was almost twice as great as in the forward stagnation point, and the rear half of the cylinder diffused about 60 percent of the entire heat, The tests are compared with the results of other experimental and theoretical investigations.

  3. Heat transfer and pressure drop of supercritical carbon dioxide flowing in several printed circuit heat exchanger channel patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, M.; Kruizenga, A.; Anderson, M.; Corradini, M.

    2012-07-01

    Closed-loop Brayton cycles using supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO{sub 2}) show potential for use in high-temperature power generation applications including High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) and Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR). Compared to Rankine cycles SCO{sub 2} Brayton cycles offer similar or improved efficiency and the potential for decreased capital costs due to a reduction in equipment size and complexity. Compact printed-circuit heat exchangers (PCHE) are being considered as part of several SCO{sub 2} Brayton designs to further reduce equipment size with increased energy density. Several designs plan to use a gas cooler operating near the pseudo-critical point of carbon dioxide to benefit from large variations in thermophysical properties, but further work is needed to validate correlations for heat transfer and pressure-drop characteristics of SCO{sub 2} flows in candidate PCHE channel designs for a variety of operating conditions. This paper presents work on experimental measurements of the heat transfer and pressure drop behavior of miniature channels using carbon dioxide at supercritical pressure. Results from several plate geometries tested in horizontal cooling-mode flow are presented, including a straight semi-circular channel, zigzag channel with a bend angle of 80 degrees, and a channel with a staggered array of extruded airfoil pillars modeled after a NACA 0020 airfoil with an 8.1 mm chord length facing into the flow. Heat transfer coefficients and bulk temperatures are calculated from measured local wall temperatures and local heat fluxes. The experimental results are compared to several methods for estimating the friction factor and Nusselt number of cooling-mode flows at supercritical pressures in millimeter-scale channels. (authors)

  4. A New Model for Heat Flow in Extensional Basins: Estimating Radiogenic Heat Production

    SciTech Connect

    Waples, Douglas W.

    2002-06-15

    Radiogenic heat production (RHP) represents a significant fraction of surface heat flow, both on cratons and in sedimentary basins. RHP within continental crust-especially the upper crust-is high. RHP at any depth within the crust can be estimated as a function of crustal age. Mantle RHP, in contrast, is always low, contributing at most 1 to 2 mW/m{sup 2} to total heat flow. Radiogenic heat from any noncrystalline basement that may be present also contributes to total heat flow. RHP from metamorphic rocks is similar to or slightly lower than that from their precursor sedimentary rocks. When extension of the lithosphere occurs-as for example during rifting-the radiogenic contribution of each layer of the lithosphere and noncrystalline basement diminishes in direct proportion to the degree of extension of that layer. Lithospheric RHP today is somewhat less than in the distant past, as a result of radioactive decay. In modeling, RHP can be varied through time by considering the half lives of uranium, thorium, and potassium, and the proportional contribution of each of those elements to total RHP from basement. RHP from sedimentary rocks ranges from low for most evaporites to high for some shales, especially those rich in organic matter. The contribution to total heat flow of radiogenic heat from sediments depends strongly on total sediment thickness, and thus differs through time as subsidence and basin filling occur. RHP can be high for thick clastic sections. RHP in sediments can be calculated using ordinary or spectral gamma-ray logs, or it can be estimated from the lithology.

  5. Heat and mass transfer in magnetohydrodynamic flow of micropolar fluid on a circular cylinder with uniform heat and mass flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, M. A.; El-Hakiem, M. A.; El Kabeir, S. M.

    2000-10-01

    Steady laminar boundary layer analysis of heat and mass transfer characteristics in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of a micropolar fluid on a circular cylinder maintained at uniform heat and mass flux has been conducted. The solution of the energy equation inside the boundary layer is obtained as a power series of the distance measured along the surface from the front stagnation point of the cylinder. The results of dimensionless temperature, Nusselt number, wall shear stress, wall couple stress and Sherwood number have been presented graphically for various values of the material parameters. The results indicate that the micropolar fluids display a reduction in drag as well as heat transfer rate when compared with Newtonian fluids.

  6. Acoustically excited heated jets. 3: Mean flow data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.; Salikuddin, M.; Morris, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    This is Part 3 of a report on the excitability of heated jets under the influence of acoustic excitation. The effects of upstream internal acoustic excitation on jet mixing were described in Part 1. Part 2 described the effects of external excitation on flow mixing. Part 3 contains quantitative results from the measurements of mean Mach number and temperature and consists of radial profiles and centerline distributions measured at selected jet operating conditions for internally excited and unexcited jets. The mean flow data are presented in both graphical and tabulated forms. For the sake of completeness, this part contains temperature probe calibration curves also.

  7. Measuring fluid flow and heat output in seafloor hydrothermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germanovich, Leonid N.; Hurt, Robert S.; Smith, Joshua E.; Genc, Gence; Lowell, Robert P.

    2015-12-01

    We review techniques for measuring fluid flow and advective heat output from seafloor hydrothermal systems and describe new anemometer and turbine flowmeter devices we have designed, built, calibrated, and tested. These devices allow measuring fluid velocity at high- and low-temperature focused and diffuse discharge sites at oceanic spreading centers. The devices perform at ocean floor depths and black smoker temperatures and can be used to measure flow rates ranging over 2 orders of magnitude. Flow velocity is determined from the rotation rate of the rotor blades or paddle assembly. These devices have an open bearing design that eliminates clogging by particles or chemical precipitates as the fluid passes by the rotors. The devices are compact and lightweight enough for deployment from either an occupied or remotely operated submersible. The measured flow rates can be used in conjunction with vent temperature or geochemical measurements to obtain heat outputs or geochemical fluxes from both vent chimneys and diffuse flow regions. The devices have been tested on 30 Alvin dives on the Juan de Fuca Ridge and 3 Jason dives on the East Pacific Rise (EPR). We measured an anomalously low entrainment coefficient (0.064) and report 104 new measurements over a wide range of discharge temperatures (5°-363°C), velocities (2-199 cm/s), and depths (1517-2511 m). These include the first advective heat output measurements at the High Rise vent field and the first direct fluid flow measurement at Middle Valley. Our data suggest that black smoker heat output at the Main Endeavour vent field may have declined since 1994 and that after the 2005-2006 eruption, the high-temperature advective flow at the EPR 9°50'N field may have become more channelized, predominately discharging through the Bio 9 structure. We also report 16 measurements on 10 Alvin dives and 2 Jason dives with flow meters that predate devices described in this work and were used in the process of their development

  8. LavaSIM: the effect of heat transfer in 3D on lava flow characteristics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, E.

    2013-12-01

    Characteristics of lava flow are governed by many parameters like lava viscosity, effusion rate, ground topography, etc. The accuracy and applicability of lava flow simulation code is evaluated whether the numerical simulation can reproduce these features quantitatively, which is important from both strategic and scientific points of views. Many lava flow simulation codes are so far proposed, and they are classified into two categories, i.e., the deterministic and the probabilistic models. LavaSIM is one of the former category models, and has a disadvantage of time consuming. But LavaSIM can solves the equations of continuity, motion, energy by step and has an advantage in the calculation of three-dimensional analysis with solid-liquid two phase flow, including the heat transfer between lava, solidified crust, air, water and ground, and three-dimensional convection in liquid lava. In other word, we can check the detailed structure of lava flow by LavaSIM. Therefore, this code can produce both channeled and fan-dispersive flows. The margin of the flow is solidified by cooling and these solidified crusts control the behavior of successive lava flow. In case of a channel flow, the solidified margin supports the stable central main flow and elongates the lava flow distance. The cross section of lava flow shows that the liquid lava flows between solidified crusts. As for the lava extrusion flow rate, LavaSIM can include the time function as well as the location of the vents. In some cases, some parts of the solidified wall may be broken by the pressure of successive flow and/or re-melting. These mechanisms could characterize complex features of the observed lava flows at many volcanoes in the world. To apply LavaSIM to the benchmark tests organized by V-hub is important to improve the lava flow evaluation technique.

  9. Two-phase Flow Ejector as Water Refrigerant by Using Waste Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, H.; Nakagawa, M.

    2013-04-01

    Energy saving and the use of clean energy sources have recently become significant issues. It is expected that clean energy sources such as solar panels and fuel cells will be installed in many private dwellings. However, when electrical power is generated, exhaust heat is simultaneously produced. Especially for the summer season, the development of refrigeration systems that can use this waste heat is highly desirable. One approach is an ejector that can reduce the mechanical compression work required in a normal refrigeration cycle. We focus on the use of water as a refrigerant, since this can be safely implemented in private dwellings. Although the energy conversion efficiency is low, it is promising because it can use heat that would otherwise be discarded. However, a steam ejector refrigeration cycle requires a large amount of energy to change saturated water into vapour. Thus, we propose a more efficient two-phase flow ejector cycle. Experiments were carried out in which the quality of the two-phase flow from a tank was varied, and the efficiency of the ejector and nozzle was determined. The results show that a vacuum state can be achieved and suction exerted with a two-phase flow state at the ejector nozzle inlet.

  10. Thermoelectricity without absorbing energy from the heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Robert S.; Sánchez, Rafael; Haupt, Federica; Splettstoesser, Janine

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the power output of a quantum dot machine coupled to two electronic reservoirs via thermoelectric contacts, and to two thermal reservoirs - one hot and one cold. This machine is a nanoscale analogue of a conventional thermocouple heat-engine, in which the active region being heated is unavoidably also exchanging heat with its cold environment. Heat exchange between the dot and the thermal reservoirs is treated as a capacitive coupling to electronic fluctuations in localized levels, modeled as two additional quantum dots. The resulting multiple-dot setup is described using a master equation approach. We observe an "exotic" power generation, which remains finite even when the heat absorbed from the thermal reservoirs is zero (in other words the heat coming from the hot reservoir all escapes into the cold environment). This effect can be understood in terms of a non-local effect in which the heat flow from heat source to the cold environment generates power via a mechanism which we refer to as Coulomb heat drag. It relies on the fact that there is no relaxation in the quantum dot system, so electrons within it have a non-thermal energy distribution. More poetically, one can say that we find a spatial separation of the first-law of thermodynamics (heat to work conversion) from the second-law of thermodynamics (generation of entropy). We present circumstances in which this non-thermal system can generate more power than any conventional macroscopic thermocouple (with local thermalization), even when the latter works with Carnot efficiency.

  11. Reprint of : Thermoelectricity without absorbing energy from the heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Robert S.; Sánchez, Rafael; Haupt, Federica; Splettstoesser, Janine

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the power output of a quantum dot machine coupled to two electronic reservoirs via thermoelectric contacts, and to two thermal reservoirs - one hot and one cold. This machine is a nanoscale analogue of a conventional thermocouple heat-engine, in which the active region being heated is unavoidably also exchanging heat with its cold environment. Heat exchange between the dot and the thermal reservoirs is treated as a capacitive coupling to electronic fluctuations in localized levels, modeled as two additional quantum dots. The resulting multiple-dot setup is described using a master equation approach. We observe an "exotic" power generation, which remains finite even when the heat absorbed from the thermal reservoirs is zero (in other words the heat coming from the hot reservoir all escapes into the cold environment). This effect can be understood in terms of a non-local effect in which the heat flow from heat source to the cold environment generates power via a mechanism which we refer to as Coulomb heat drag. It relies on the fact that there is no relaxation in the quantum dot system, so electrons within it have a non-thermal energy distribution. More poetically, one can say that we find a spatial separation of the first-law of thermodynamics (heat to work conversion) from the second-law of thermodynamics (generation of entropy). We present circumstances in which this non-thermal system can generate more power than any conventional macroscopic thermocouple (with local thermalization), even when the latter works with Carnot efficiency.

  12. Analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in a channel with intermittent heated porous blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikh, S.; Boumedien, A.; Bouhadef, K.; Lauriat, G.

    A numerical study of forced convection enhancement in a channel intermittently heated is presented in this work. The use of porous blocks mounted on the heated parts of the channel to improve thermal performance is investigated. In order to account for the inertia, drag and boundary effects, the Brinkman-Forchheimer-extended Darcy model is adopted for the flow inside the porous regions. The effects of several parameters such as Darcy number, the block dimensions, the number of blocks and the thermal conductivity ratio are documented. The results show that the blocks may alter substantially the flow pattern depending on the permeability of the porous medium, and may improve the heat transfer and reduce the wall temperature under certain circumstances.

  13. Heat flow control and segregation in directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, A. F.; Rohsenow, W. M.; Houpt, P. K.

    1982-01-01

    Optimization of the vertical Bridgman technique for growth of electronic materials in single crystal form was investigated. The limitations of the crystal growth configuration were experimentally determined and heat transfer related deficiencies identified. Design of an alternate system was based on the use of heat pipes separated by a gradient region. Heat transfer analyses based on one and two dimensional models indicated the necessity of a flexible gradient zone configuration. Directional melting of binary systems as encountered during seeding in melt growth was analysed for concurrent compositional changes at the crystal-metal interface, and the theoretical treatment numerically applied to HgCdTe and Ga doped germanium. A theoretical and experimental study of the thermal effects associated with current flow was conducted. It was found that experimental measurements of dc induced growth during crystal pulling can be used for the precise determination of the Peltier coefficient.

  14. Heat transfer characteristics of pulsated turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, M. A.; Said, S. A. M.; Al-Farayedhi, A. A.; Al-Dini, S. A.; Asghar, A.; Gbadebo, S. A.

    Heat Transfer characteristics of pulsated turbulent pipe flow under different conditions of pulsation frequency, amplitude and Reynolds number were experimentally investigated. The pipe wall was kept at uniform heat flux. Reynolds number was varied from 5000 to 29 000 while frequency of pulsation ranged from 1 to 8 Hz. The results show an enhancement in the local Nusselt number at the entrance region. The rate of enhancement decreased as Re increased. Reduction of heat transfer coefficient was observed at higher frequencies and the effect of pulsation is found to be significant at high Reynolds number. It can be concluded that the effect of pulsation on the mean Nusselt numbers is insignificant at low values of Reynolds number.

  15. A laser-induced heat flux technique for convective heat transfer measurements in high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. R.; Keith, T. G., Jr.; Hingst, W. R.

    1991-01-01

    A technique is developed to measure the local convective heat transfer coefficient on a model surface in a supersonic flow field. The technique uses a laser to apply a discrete local heat flux at the model test surface, and an infrared camera system determines the local temperature distribution due to the heating. From this temperature distribution and an analysis of the heating process, a local convective heat transfer coefficient is determined. The technique was used to measure the local surface convective heat transfer coefficient distribution on a flat plate at nominal Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0. The flat plate boundary layer initially was laminar and became transitional in the measurement region. The experimentally determined convective heat transfer coefficients were generally higher than the theoretical predictions for flat plate laminar boundary layers. However, the results indicate that this nonintrusive optical measurement technique has the potential to measure surface convective heat transfer coefficients in high-speed flowfields.

  16. Fundamental flow and heat transfer results relevant to oscillating flow regenerators

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, R.A.; Ross, B.A.

    1987-08-01

    Complete understanding of the operation of Stirling and other heat engine regenerators has evaded engineers working on engine development because making measurements in or near such a regenerator is so difficult. Some illumination of the physics that may be involved, however, can be found by studying fundamental experimental results in the literature, results that were examined for other applications in addition to Stirling. Preliminary reviews of literature on the subjects of oscillating flows, periodic flows and porous media have brought to light interesting papers presenting a number of phenomena that may be of importance in heat engine regenerators. Some are also relevant to flows in other Stirling heat exchangers. These topics include heat transfer during compression and expansion, enhanced conduction in oscillating laminar flows, approaches to analysis of nonuniform porous media, and heat transfer enhancement mechanisms in porous media. Each topic is briefly described and discussed in this paper, and a summary of physical phenomena that may affect regenerator performance is presented. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Restoration of the Apollo Heat Flow Experiments Metadata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagihara, S.; Stephens, M. K.; Taylor, P. T.; Williams, D. R.; Hills, H. K.; Nakamura, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Geothermal heat flow probes were deployed on the Apollo 15 and 17 missions as part of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP). At each landing site, the astronauts drilled 2 holes, 10-m apart, and installed a probe in each. The holes were 1- and 1.5-m deep at the Apollo 15 site and 2.5-m deep at the Apollo 17 sites. The probes monitored surface temperature and subsurface temperatures at different depths. At the Apollo 15 site, the monitoring continued from July 1971 to January 1977. At the Apollo 17 site, it did from December 1972 to September 1977. Based on the observations made through December 1974, Marcus Langseth, the principal investigator of the heat flow experiments (HFE), determined the thermal conductivity of the lunar regolith by mathematically modeling how the seasonal temperature fluctuation propagated down through the regolith. He also determined the temperature unaffected by diurnal and seasonal thermal waves of the regolith at different depths, which yielded the geothermal gradient. By multiplying the thermal gradient and the thermal conductivity, Langseth obtained the endogenic heat flow of the Moon as 21 mW/m(exp 2) at Site 15 and 16 mW/m(exp 2) at Site 17.

  18. Nonclassical Symmetry Analysis of Heated Two-Dimensional Flow Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, Imran; Naz, Rehana; Khan, Muhammad Danish

    2015-12-01

    This article analyses the nonclassical symmetries and group invariant solution of boundary layer equations for two-dimensional heated flows. First, we derive the nonclassical symmetry determining equations with the aid of the computer package SADE. We solve these equations directly to obtain nonclassical symmetries. We follow standard procedure of computing nonclassical symmetries and consider two different scenarios, ξ1≠0 and ξ1=0, ξ2≠0. Several nonclassical symmetries are reported for both scenarios. Furthermore, numerous group invariant solutions for nonclassical symmetries are derived. The similarity variables associated with each nonclassical symmetry are computed. The similarity variables reduce the system of partial differential equations (PDEs) to a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) in terms of similarity variables. The reduced system of ODEs are solved to obtain group invariant solution for governing boundary layer equations for two-dimensional heated flow problems. We successfully formulate a physical problem of heat transfer analysis for fluid flow over a linearly stretching porous plat and, with suitable boundary conditions, we solve this problem.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Wall Heat Load in Combustor Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panara, D.; Hase, M.; Krebs, W.; Noll, B.

    2007-09-01

    Due to the major mechanism of NOx generation, there is generally a temperature trade off between improved cycle efficiency, material constraints and low NOx emission. The cycle efficiency is proportional to the highest cycle temperature, but unfortunately also the NOx production increases with increasing combustion temperature. For this reason, the modern combustion chamber design has been oriented towards lean premixed combustion system and more and more attention must be focused on the cooling air management. The challenge is to ensure sufficiently low temperature of the combustion liner with very low amount of film or effusion cooling air. Correct numerical prediction of temperature fields and wall heat load are therefore of critical interest in the modern combustion chamber design. Moreover, lean combustion technology has shown the appearance of thermo-acoustic instabilities which have to be taken into account in the simulation and, more in general, in the design of reliable combustion systems. In this framework, the present investigation addresses the capability of a commercial multiphysics code (ANSYS CFX) to correctly predict the wall heat load and the core flow temperature field in a scaled power generation combustion chamber with a simplified ceramic liner. Comparison are made with the experimental results from the ITS test rig at the University of Karlsruhe [1] and with a previous numerical campaign from [2]. In addition the effect of flow unsteadyness on the wall heat load is discussed showing some limitations of the traditional steady state flow thermal design.

  20. Biomass recycling heat technology and energy products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakaev, R. B.; Gergelizhiu, P. S.; Kazakov, A. V.; Zavorin, A. S.

    2014-10-01

    Relevance is determined by necessity of utilizing of local low-grade fuels by energy equpment. Most widespread Tomsk oblast (Russian Federation region) low-grade fuels are described and listed. Capability of utilizing is analysed. Mass balances of heat-technology conversion materials and derived products are described. As a result, recycling capability of low-grade fuels in briquette fuel is appraised.

  1. Heat flow and heat generation estimates for the Churchill basement of the Western Canadian Basin in Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.D.W.; Jones, F.W.; Majorowicz, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Heat flow through the sediments and temperatures of the Churchill province basement under the sedimentary cover are determined for 24 locations in the central part of the Prairies basin in Alberta where the vertical heat flux is approximately constant from the base of the sediments to the surface. The contribution to heat flow from heat generation in the sediments is also considered. The average heat flow through the sediments is found to be 71 mWm/sup -2/ +- 12mWm/sup -2/ which is about 30 mWm/sup -2/ higher than in the neighbouring shield area of the Churchill province, and the contribution from heat generation in the sediments to the surface heat flow is only approximately 2.5 mWm/sup -2/. The relationship between basement heat generation and heat flow is investigated, and it is found that the platform heat flow/heat generation values are in general higher than those from the Churchill province of the shield found by Drury (1985). Although for the platform and shield data, the reduced heat flow is about 40 mWm/sup -2/ and the slope is about 8km, it is apparent that the platform data alone are not good enough to establish a precise relationship.

  2. Unsteady Flow of Radiating and Chemically Reacting MHD Micropolar Fluid in Slip-Flow Regime with Heat Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abo-Dahab, S. M.; Mohamed, R. A.

    2013-11-01

    An analytical study of the problem of unsteady free convection with thermal radiation and heat generation on MHD micropolar fluid flow through a porous medium bounded by a semi-infinite vertical plate in a slip-flow regime has been presented. The Rosseland diffusion approximation is used to describe the radiation heat flux in the energy equation. The homogeneous chemical reaction of first order is accounted for in the mass diffusion equation. A uniform magnetic field acts perpendicular on the porous surface absorbing micropolar fluid with a suction velocity varying with time. A perturbation technique is applied to obtain the expressions for the velocity, microrotation, temperature, and concentration distributions. Expressions for the skin-friction, Nusselt number, and Sherwood number are also obtained. The results are discussed graphically for different values of the parameters entered into the equations of the problem.

  3. Two dimensional heat transfer problem in flow boiling in a rectangular minichannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hożejowska, Sylwia; Piasecka, Magdalena; Hożejowski, Leszek

    2015-05-01

    The paper presents mathematical modelling of flow boiling heat transfer in a rectangular minichannel asymmetrically heated by a thin and one-sided enhanced foil. Both surfaces are available for observations due to the openings covered with glass sheets. Thus, changes in the colour of the plain foil surface can be registered and then processed. Plain side of the heating foil is covered with a base coat and liquid crystal paint. Observation of the opposite, enhanced surface of the minichannel allows for identification of the gas-liquid two-phase flow patterns and vapour quality. A two-dimensional mathematical model of heat transfer in three subsequent layers (sheet glass, heating foil, liquid) was proposed. Heat transfer in all these layers was described with the respective equations: Laplace equation, Poisson equation and energy equation, subject to boundary conditions corresponding to the observed physical process. The solutions (temperature distributions) in all three layers were obtained by Trefftz method. Additionally, the temperature of the boiling liquid was obtained by homotopy perturbation method (HPM) combined with Trefftz method. The heat transfer coefficient, derived from Robin boundary condition, was estimated in both approaches. In comparison, the results by both methods show very good agreement especially when restricted to the thermal sublayer.

  4. Flow and heat transfer for gas flowing in microchannels: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostami, A. A.; Mujumdar, A. S.; Saniei, N.

    Microchannels are currently being used in many areas and have high potential for applications in many other areas, which are considered realistic by experts. The application areas include medicine, biotechnology, avionics, consumer electronics, telecommunications, metrology, computer technology, office equipment and home appliances, safety technology, process engineering, robotics, automotive engineering and environmental protection. A number of these applications are introduced in this paper, followed by a critical review of the works on the flow and heat transfer for gas flowing in microchannels. The results show that the flow and heat transfer characteristics of a gas flowing in microchannels can not be adequately predicted by the theories and correlations developed for conventional sized channels. The results of theoretical and experimental works are discussed and summarized along with suggestions for future research directions.

  5. Magnetic energy flow in the solar wind.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modisette, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the effect of rotation (tangential flow) of the solar wind on the conclusions of Whang (1971) suggesting an increase in the solar wind velocity due to the conversion of magnetic energy to kinetic energy. It is shown that the effect of the rotation of the sun on the magnetic energy flow results in most of the magnetic energy being transported by magnetic shear stress near the sun.

  6. Allosteric Ligand Binding and Anisotropic Energy Flow in Albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Brian

    2014-03-01

    Protein allostery usually involves propagation of local structural changes through the protein to a remote site. Coupling of structural changes at remote sites is thought to occur through anisotropic energy transport, but the nature of this process is poorly understood. We have studied the relationship between allosteric interactions of remote ligand binding sites of the protein and energy flow through the structure of bovine serum albumin (BSA). We applied ultrafast infrared spectroscopy to probe the flow of energy through the protein backbone following excitation of a heater dye, a metalloporphyrin or malachite green, bound to different binding sites in the protein. We observe ballistic flow through the protein structure following input of thermal energy into the flexible ligand binding sites. We also observe anisotropic heat flow through the structure, without local heating of the rigid helix bundles that connect these sites. We will discuss the implications of this efficient energy transport mechanism with regard to the allosteric propagation of binding energy through the connecting helix structures.

  7. Sub-basement sensible heat storage for solar energy

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F.D.

    1982-03-30

    A sensible heat storage method for use in conventional buildings with basements is disclosed that permits the long term storage of solar energy at reasonable efficiency in amounts appropriate for home heating. An exchanger consisting of a plurality of closely spaced, small diameter parallel or serpentine tubes with suitable manifolds is constructed on the central portion of the basement floor. The exchanger is covered with a layer of fine gravel, followed with a layer of waterproof insulation. Finally a second floor is supported on studs resting edgewise on the original basement floor. Horizontal conduction heat losses are reduced by allowing a peripheral margin, insulated from above, about the exchanger and by using a flow reversing system that maintains a horizontal temperature gradient within the exchanger.

  8. The stability of Taylor-Couette flow with radial heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mohamed El-Sayed

    The stability of circular Couette flow with radial heating across vertically oriented coaxial cylinders is investigated using linearized stability theory. The physical problem is governed by five parameters: the Taylor number Ta, the Groshof number G, the Prandtl number Pr, the cylinder aspect ration A, and the radius ratio eta. In the model infinite aspect ratio is assumed and critical stability boundaries are calculated for a conduction regime base flow. A rational analysis is made to derive the full governing perturbation equations and test flow stability subject to both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric disturbances. The flow may be driven to instability by competition between centrifugal, buoyancy, and shear force mechanisms. In spite of this complexity, the existence of solution symmetries of the perturbation equations with respect to the sense of radial heating and the sense of cylinder rotation are proven. The linear boundary-value problem defined by 16 first-order differential equations is solved using the software package SUPORT in combination with the nonlinear equation solver SNSQE. Critical stability boundaries at fixed Pr and eta were determined by searching for the minimum value of either Ta or G over all wavelengths K and mode numbers n.

  9. Preliminary investigation of heat transfer to water flowing in an electrically heated Inconel tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Samuel J; Isely, Francis D

    1950-01-01

    A heat-transfer investigation was conducted with water flowing in an electrically heated Inconel tube with an inside diameter of 0.204 inch and a length-diameter ratio of 50 for ranges of Reynolds number up to 100,000 and of entrance pressure up to 200 inches of mercury gage. Correlation of average heat-transfer coefficients was obtained by use of the familiar Nusselt relation, wherein the physical properties of water were evaluated at an average bulk temperature. For conditions in which no boiling occurred, the data gave a good correlation. Runs made in the nucleate-boiling region, however, gave higher values of heat-transfer coefficient than would be predicted by the Nusselt relation.

  10. The effects of orbital and climatic variations on Martian surface heat flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellon, Michael T.; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    1992-01-01

    We have examined the effects of climate changes, induced by orbital oscillations, on Martian surface heat flow. It was found that the climatological component of the surface heat flow can be larger than the expected internal geothermal heat flow. We suggest that measurements of surface heat flow be targeted for equatorial and south polar regions to avoid climatic effects and that care be taken in interpreting measurements in mid-latitude and north polar regions.

  11. Melting of nanoparticle-enhanced phase change material inside an enclosure heated by laminar heat transfer fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbahjaoui, Radouane; El Qarnia, Hamid; El Ganaoui, Mohammed

    2016-05-01

    The proposed work presents a numerical investigation of the melting of a phase change material (PCM: Paraffin wax P116) dispersed with nanoparticles (Al2O3) in a latent heat storage unit (LHSU). The latter is composed of a number of vertical and identical slabs of nano-enhanced phase change material (NEPCM) separated by rectangular channels through which passes heat transfer fluid (HTF: water). A mathematical model based on the conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy has been developed. The resulting equations are discretized using the finite volume approach. The numerical model has been validated by experimental and numerical results published in literature. Numerical investigations have been conducted to evaluate the effects of the volumetric fraction of nanoparticles, HTF mass flow rate and inlet temperature on the latent heat storage unit's thermal behaviour and performance. Modelling results show that the volumetric fraction, HTF mass flow rate and inlet temperature need to be designed to achieve a significant improvement in thermal performance. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy Harvesting, Conversion and Storage (ICOME 2015) - Elected submissions", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  12. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Air Flow, Heat Transfer and Thermal Comfort in Buildings with Different Heating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabanskis, A.; Virbulis, J.

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of temperature, humidity and air flow velocity is performed in 5 experimental buildings with the inner size of 3×3×3 m3 located in Riga, Latvia. The buildings are equipped with different heating systems, such as an air-air heat pump, air-water heat pump, capillary heating mat on the ceiling and electric heater. Numerical simulation of air flow and heat transfer by convection, conduction and radiation is carried out using OpenFOAM software and compared with experimental data. Results are analysed regarding the temperature and air flow distribution as well as thermal comfort.

  13. Visualization of heat transfer for impinging swirl flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bakirci, K.; Bilen, K.

    2007-10-15

    The objective of the experimental study was to visualize the temperature distribution and evaluate heat transfer rate on the impingement surface kept at a constant wall temperature boundary condition for the swirling (SIJ), multi-channel (MCIJ) and conventional impinging jet (CIJ) using liquid crystal technique. The swirling jet assembly consisted of a housing tube and a solid swirl generator insert which had four narrow slots machined on its surface. The swirl angle, {theta}, was set as 0 , 22.5 , 41 , 50 to change the direction and strength of the swirl in the air flow exiting the housing tube. The local Nusselt numbers of the MCIJ ({theta} = 0 ) were generally much higher than those of CIJ and SIJs. As the swirl angle increased, the radial uniformity of the heat transfer was seen compared to MCIJ and SIJ; the best results were for {theta} = 50 and the jet-to-surface distance of H/D = 14. The location of the distance of the maximum heat transfer for the swirl angles of {theta} = 41 and 50 was shifted away from the stagnation point in a radial distance of nearly r/D = 2.5. Increasing Reynolds number for same swirler angle increased the heat transfer rate on the entire surface, and increased saddle shape heat transfer distribution on the surface, but had no significant effect on the position of the individual impingement regions, but increased saddle shape heat transfer distribution on the surface. The lower Reynolds number (Re = 10 000) and the highest H/D = 14 gave much more uniform local and average heat transfer distribution on the surface, but decreased their values on the entire surface. (author)

  14. Modeling Heat Flow for a Distributed Moving Heat Source in Micro-Laser Welding of Plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grewell, David; Benatar, Avraham

    2004-06-01

    Polymer use in micro-devices, especially in the medical industry has been rapidly increasing. During assembly of micro-devices it is desirable to produce weld joints that are about 100 μm in width. This paper reviews the modeling of heat flow during through transmission infrared micro-welding of plastic using fiber coupled laser diodes. Two models were used to predict the temperature distributions within welded samples. Both models were based on a moving heat source and moving coordinate system. For the simpler model a moving point heat source was used and for the more complex model a Gaussian distributed heat source was used. It was found that the distributed model can accurately predict temperature fields in plastic laser welds for all ranges of the parameters evaluated. However, the point heat source model was only able to accurately predict temperature fields with a relatively small laser focal spot (25 μm). In addition it was found that for micro-welding of plastics, when the dimensionless distribution parameter is less than two, a point heat source model predicts similar widths to those predicted by a distributed heat source model.

  15. Flow and heat transfer of ferrofluids over a flat plate with uniform heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, W. A.; Khan, Z. H.; Haq, R. U.

    2015-04-01

    The present work is dedicated to analyze the flow and heat transport of ferrofluids along a flat plate subjected to uniform heat flux and slip velocity. A magnetic field is applied in the transverse direction to the plate. Moreover, three different kinds of magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4, CoFe2O4, Mn-ZnFe2O4 are incorporated within the base fluid. We have considered two different kinds of base fluids (kerosene and water) having poor thermal conductivity as compared to solid magnetic nanoparticles. Self-similar solutions are obtained and are compared with the available data for special cases. A simulation is performed for each ferrofluid mixture by considering the dominant effects of slip and uniform heat flux. It is found that the present results are in an excellent agreement with the existing literature. The variation of skin friction and heat transfer is also performed at the surface of the plate and then the better heat transfer and of each mixture is analyzed. Kerosene-based magnetite Fe3O4 provides the higher heat transfer rate at the wall as compared to the kerosene-based cobalt ferrite and Mn-Zn ferrite. It is also concluded that the primary effect of the magnetic field is to accelerate the dimensionless velocity and to reduce the dimensionless surface temperature as compared to the hydrodynamic case, thereby increasing the skin friction and the heat transfer rate of ferrofluids.

  16. Thermal energy scavenger (flow control)

    SciTech Connect

    Hochstein, P.A.; Milton, H.W.; Pringle, W.L.

    1981-12-22

    A thermal energy scavenger assembly is described including a plurality of temperature-sensitive wires made of material which exhibits shape memory due to a thermoelastic, martensitic phase transformation. The wires are placed in tension between fixed and movable plates which are, in turn, supported by a pair of wheels which are rotatably supported by a housing for rotation about a central axis. A pair of upper and lower cams are fixed to the housing and cam followers react with the respective cams. Each cam transmits forces through a pair of hydraulic pistons. One of the pistons is connected to a movable plate to which one end of the wires are connected whereby a stress is applied to the wires to strain the wires during a first phase and whereby the cam responds to the unstraining of the wires during a second phase. A housing defines fluid compartments through which hot and cold fluid passes and flows radially through the wires whereby the wires become unstrained and shorten in length when subjected to the hot fluid for causing a reaction between the cam followers and the cams to effect rotation of the wheels about the central axis of the assembly, which rotation of the wheels is extracted through beveled gearing. The wires are grouped into a plurality of independent modules with each module having a movable plate, a fixed plate and the associated hydraulic pistons and cam follower. The hydraulic pistons and cam follower of a module are disposed at ends of the wires opposite from the ends of the wires at which the same components of the next adjacent modules are disposed so that the cam followers of alternate modules react with one of the cams and the remaining cam followers of the remaining modules react with the other cam. There is also including stress limiting means in the form of coil springs associated with alternate ends of the wires for limiting the stress or strain in the wires.

  17. Paleo-heat flows, radioactive heat generation, and the cooling and deformation history of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Javier; López, Valle; Egea-González, Isabel

    2013-07-01

    Estimates of lithospheric strength for Mercury, based on the depth of thrust faults associated with large lobate scarps (which were most probably formed previously to ˜3 Ga) or on the effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere supporting a broad rise in the northern smooth plains (whose formation is poorly constrained, but posterior to 3.8 Ga), serve as a basis for the calculation of paleo-heat flows, referred to the time when these structures were formed. The so-obtained paleo-heat flows can give information on the Urey ratio (Ur), the ratio between the total radioactive heat production and the total surface heat loss. By imposing the condition Ur < 1 (corresponding to a cooling Mercury, consistent with the observed widespread contraction), we obtain an upper limit of 0.4 times the average surface value for the abundance of heat-producing elements in the outer solid shell of Mercury. We also find that if the formation of the northern rise occurred in a time posterior to ˜3 Ga, then in that time the Urey ratio was lower, and the cooling more intense, than when most of large lobate scarps were formed. Thus, because largest lobate scarps deform older terrains (suggesting more intense contraction early in the mercurian history), we conclude that the northern rise was formed previously to 3 Ga. If the age of other smooth plains large wavelength deformations is similar, then tectonic activity in Mercury would have been limited in the last 3 billion of years.

  18. Geothermal Well and Heat Flow Data for the United States (Southern Methodist University (SMU) Geothermal Laboratory)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Blackwell, D.D. and others

    Southern Methodist University makes two databases and several detailed maps available. The Regional Heat Flow Database for the United States contains information on primarily regional or background wells that determine the heat flow for the United States; temperature gradients and conductivity are used to generate heat flow measurements. Information on geology of the location, porosity, thermal conductivity, water table depth, etc. are also included when known. There are usually three data files for each state or region. The first files were generated in 1989 for the data base creating the Decade of North America Geology (DNAG) Geothermal Map. The second set is from 1996 when the data base was officially updated for the Department of Energy. The third set is from 1999 when the Western U.S. High Temperature Geothermal data base was completed. As new data is received, the files continue to be updated. The second major resource is the Western Geothermal Areas Database, a database of over 5000 wells in primarily high temperature geothermal areas from the Rockies to the Pacific Ocean. The majority of the data are from company documents, well logs, and publications with drilling dates ranging from 1960 to 2000. Many of the wells were not previously accessible to the public. Users will need to register, but will then have free, open access to the databases. The contents of each database can be viewed and downloaded as Excel spreadsheets. See also the heat flow maps at http://www.smu.edu/geothermal/heatflow/heatflow.htm

  19. Instantaneous/Simultaneous Flow Field and Endwall Heat Transfer in Turbulent Juncture Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praisner, Thomas; Smith, Charles

    1998-11-01

    A study of the instantaneous and time-mean flow topology along with the associated endwall heat transfer is presented for a turbulent juncture flow formed with an airfoil body. An experimental technique has been employed which allows the recording of simultaneous and instantaneous high-density PIV and thermochromic liquid-crystal based endwall heat transfer data. Data collected on the symmetry, 60o, 90o, and 90o+0.5D planes reveal the existence of a dominant horseshoe vortex, along with a counter-rotating secondary vortex, a co-rotating tertiary vortex, and a small corner vortex on the symmetry plane. Both instantaneous and time mean endwall heat transfer distributions are characterized by two bands of high heat transfer which circumscribe the base of the bluff body. The region upstream of the horseshoe vortex is characterized by a bimodal switching of the near-wall reverse flow which results in quasi-periodic eruptions of the secondary vortex. A physical model for the unsteady interaction process which gives rise to the high levels of endwall heat transfer is presented and discussed.

  20. Pluto's Polygonal Terrain Places Lower Limit on Planetary Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowbridge, A.; Steckloff, J. K.; Melosh, H., IV; Freed, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    During its recent flyby of Pluto, New Horizons imaged an icy plains region (Sputnik Planum) whose surface is divided into polygonal blocks, ca. 20-30 km across, bordered by what appear to be shallow troughs. The lack of craters within these plains suggests they are relatively young, implying that the underlying material is recently active. The scale of these features argues against an origin by cooling and contraction. Here we investigate the alternative scenario that they are the surface manifestation of shallow convection in a thick layer of nitrogen ice. Typical Rayleigh-Bernard convective cells are approximately three times wider than the depth of the convecting layer, implying a layer depth of ca. 7-10 km. Our convection hypothesis requires that the Rayleigh number exceed a minimum of about 1000 in the nitrogen ice layer. We coupled a parameterized convection model with a temperature dependent rheology of nitrogen ice (Yamashita, 2008), finding a Rayleigh number 1500 to 7500 times critical for a plausible range of heat flows for Pluto's interior. The computed range of heat flow (3.5-5.2 mW/m2) is consistent with the radiogenic heat generated by a carbonaceous chondrite (CC) core implied by Pluto's bulk density. The minimum heat flow at the critical Rayleigh number is 0.13 mW/m2. Our model implies a core temperature of 44 K in the interior of the convecting layer. This is very close to the exothermic β-α phase transition in nitrogen ice at 35.6 K (for pure N2 ice; dissolved CO can increase this, depending on its concentration), suggesting that the warm cores of the rising convective cells may be β phase, whereas the cooler sinking limbs may be α phase. This transition may thus be observable due to the large difference in their spectral signature. Further applying our model to Pluto's putative water ice mantle, the heat flow from CC is consistent with convection in Pluto's mantle and the activity observed on its surface.

  1. Vortex generator induced heat transfer augmentation past a rib in a heated duct air flow

    SciTech Connect

    Myrum, T.A.; Acharya, S.; Inamdar, S.; Mehrotra, A. )

    1992-02-01

    The present investigation represents the initial phase of a comprehensive experimental program designed to study the potential for increasing the heat transfer per unit pressure drop in a ribbed duct by positioning vortex generators at key locations in the flow. In particular, the present investigation consists of a rib positioned at the inlet to a rectangular test section with uniform heating at its bottom wall. Local and average Nusselt number results are obtained for a circular rod positioned either immediately above or just downstream of the rib.

  2. Megastructures: Heating/cooling/saving energy

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, H.L.

    1982-11-01

    Examined are methods to reduce the energy costs of modifying outdoor air brought into an office building's HVAC system. Minimizing the amount of outdoor air brought into the building or, as an alternative, using an economizer cycle is discussed. Cautions that care must be taken when specifying a VAV (variable air-volume) system to ensure that adequate airflow, air changes and fresh air are supplied at low-load conditions. Describes water-to-water heat pumps that can reject heat from the building's interior to a cooling tower, use it to help warm domestic water, or transfer it to perimeter circuits when it is needed. Suggests that high heat-load office equipment (e.g. computers) should have their own separate cooling systems. Gives the Tower of the Dubai International Trade Center (Arabian Gulf) as an example of air conditioning systems.

  3. Decay heat studies for nuclear energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algora, A.; Jordan, D.; Taín, J. L.; Rubio, B.; Agramunt, J.; Caballero, L.; Nácher, E.; Perez-Cerdan, A. B.; Molina, F.; Estevez, E.; Valencia, E.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Hunyadi, M. D.; Gulyás, J.; Vitéz, A.; Csatlós, M.; Csige, L.; Eronen, T.; Rissanen, J.; Saastamoinen, A.; Moore, I. D.; Penttilä, H.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Burkard, K.; Hüller, W.; Batist, L.; Gelletly, W.; Nichols, A. L.; Yoshida, T.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Peräjärvi, K.

    2014-01-01

    The energy associated with the decay of fission products plays an important role in the estimation of the amount of heat released by nuclear fuel in reactors. In this article we present results of the study of the beta decay of some refractory isotopes that were considered important contributors to the decay heat in reactors. The measurements were performed at the IGISOL facility of the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. In these studies we have combined for the first time a Penning trap (JYFLTRAP), which was used as a high resolution isobaric separator, with a total absorption spectrometer. The results of the measurements as well as their consequences for decay heat summation calculations are discussed.

  4. Use of a turboexpander in steam power units for heat energy recovery in heat supply systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadykov, R. A.; Daminov, A. Z.; Solomin, I. N.; Futin, V. A.

    2016-05-01

    A method for raising the efficiency of a boiler plant by installing a unit operating by the organic Rankine cycle is presented. Such units allow one to generate electricity to cover the auxiliaries of a heat source at a heat-transfer fluid temperature of no more than 130°C. The results of commissioning tests of boilers revealed that their efficiency is maximized under a load that is close or corresponds to the nominal one. If this load is maintained constantly, excess heat energy is produced. This excess may be used to generate electric energy in a steam power unit with a turboexpander. A way to insert this unit into the flow diagram of a boiler plant is proposed. The results of analysis of turbine types (turboexpanders included) with various capacities are presented, and the optimum type for the proposed flow diagram is chosen. The methodology for the design of turboexpanders and compressors used in the oil and gas industry and their operational data were applied in the analysis of a turboexpander. The results of the thermogasdynamic analysis of a turboexpander and the engineered shape of an axial-radial impeller are presented. Halocarbon R245fa is chosen as the working medium based on its calorimetric properties.

  5. Testing of SLA-561V in NASA-Ames' Turbulent Flow Duct with Augmented Radiative Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepka, Steven A.; Kornienko, Robert S.; Radbourne, Chris A.

    2010-01-01

    As part of Mars Science Laboratory s (MSL) heatshield development program, SLA-561 was tested in NASA Ames Turbulent Flow Duct (TFD) Facility. For these tests, the TFD facility was modified to include a ceramic plate located in the wall opposite to the test model. Normally the TFD wall opposite to the test model is water-cooled steel. Installing a noncooled ceramic plate allows the ceramic to absorb convective heating and radiate the energy back to the test model as the plate heats up. This work was an effort to increase the severity of TFD test conditions. Presented here are the results from these tests.

  6. Groundwater flow and heat flow in an area of mineral springs

    SciTech Connect

    Vasseur, G. )

    1991-01-01

    As part of the project Geologie Profonde de la France, two boreholes have been drilled in the active hydrothermal area of Chassole, an area of metamorphic Variscan basement characterized by the occurrence of sodium-bicarbonate waters that have undergone high temperatures during their underground cycle. The underground water flow system, as revealed from various hydraulic and chemical observations, appears very complex: it is characterized by the simultaneous presence of meteoric water flowing downwards and mineralized water of deep origin flowing upwards. Geothermal measurements performed in the borehole are presented in detail and a semi-quantitative interpretation is given. A vertical profile of heat flow down to 1400 m depth indicates important variations, which are interpreted as the result of upward vertical movement of water. The quantitative interpretation of the data is based on simple models of steady state and transient temperature disturbances associated with water flow.

  7. Strong ocean tidal flow and heating on moons of the outer planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Robert H.

    2008-12-01

    Data from recent space missions have added strong support for the idea that there are liquid oceans on several moons of the outer planets, with Jupiter's moon Europa having received the most attention. But given the extremely cold surface temperatures and meagre radiogenic heat sources of these moons, it is still unclear how these oceans remain liquid. The prevailing conjecture is that these oceans are heated by tidal forces that flex the solid moon (rock plus ice) during its eccentric orbit, and that this heat entering the ocean does not rapidly escape because of the insulating layer of ice over the ocean surface. Here, however, I describe strong tidal dissipation (and heating) in the liquid oceans; I show that a subdominant and previously unconsidered tidal force due to obliquity (axial tilt of the moon with respect to its orbital plane) has the right form and frequency to resonantly excite large-amplitude Rossby waves in these oceans. In the specific case of Europa, the minimum kinetic energy of the flow associated with this resonance (7.3×1018J) is two thousand times larger than that of the flow excited by the dominant tidal forces, and dissipation of this energy seems large enough to be a primary ocean heat source.

  8. Direct numerical simulation of particulate flows with heat transfer in a rotating cylindrical cavity.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robin; Nikrityuk, Petr A

    2011-06-28

    The purpose of this work was the direct numerical simulation of heat and fluid flow by granular mixing in a horizontal rotating kiln. To model particle behaviour and the heat and fluid flow in the drum, we solve the mass conservation, momentum and energy conservation equations directly on a fixed Eulerian grid for the whole domain including particles. At the same time the particle dynamics and their collisions are solved on a Lagrangian grid for each particle. To calculate the heat transfer inside the particles we use two models: the first is the direct solution of the energy conservation equation in the Lagrangian and Eulerian space, and the second is our so-called linear model that assumes homogeneous distribution of the temperature inside each particle. Numerical simulations showed that, if the thermal diffusivity of the gas phase significantly exceeds the same parameter of the particles, the linear model overpredicts the heating rate of the particles. The influence of the particle size and the angular velocity of the drum on the heating rates of particles is studied and discussed. PMID:21576173

  9. Channelized fluid flow in oceanic crust reconciles heat-flow and permeability data

    PubMed

    Fisher; Becker

    2000-01-01

    Hydrothermal fluid circulation within the sea floor profoundly influences the physical, chemical and biological state of the crust and the oceans. Circulation within ridge flanks (in crust more than 1 Myr old) results in greater heat loss and fluid flux than that at ridge crests and persists for millions of years, thereby altering the composition of the crust and overlying ocean. Fluid flow in oceanic crust is, however, limited by the extent and nature of the rock's permeability. Here we demonstrate that the global data set of borehole permeability measurements in uppermost oceanic crust defines a trend with age that is consistent with changes in seismic velocity. This trend-which indicates that fluid flow should be greatly reduced in crust older than a few million years-would appear to be inconsistent with heat-flow observations, which on average indicate significant advective heat loss in crust up to 65 Myr old. But our calculations, based on a lateral flow model, suggest that regional-scale permeabilities are much higher than have been measured in boreholes. These results can be reconciled if most of the fluid flow in the upper crust is channelized through a small volume of rock, influencing the geometry of convection and the nature of fluid-rock interaction. PMID:10638753

  10. Time decay rates for the equations of the compressible heat-conductive flow through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qing; Tan, Zhong; Wu, Guochun

    2015-11-01

    We consider the time decay rates of smooth solutions to the Cauchy problem for the equations of the compressible heat-conductive flow through porous media. We prove the global existence and uniqueness of the solutions by the standard energy method. Moreover, we establish the optimal decay rates of the solution as well as its higher-order spatial derivatives. And the damping effect on the time decay rates of the solution is studied in detail.

  11. Determination of forced convective heat transfer coefficients for subsonic flows over heated asymmetric NANA 4412 airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dag, Yusuf

    Forced convection over traditional surfaces such as flat plate, cylinder and sphere have been well researched and documented. Data on forced convection over airfoil surfaces, however, remain very scanty in literature. High altitude vehicles that employ airfoils as lifting surfaces often suffer leading edge ice accretions which have tremendous negative consequences on the lifting capabilities and stability of the vehicle. One of the ways of mitigating the effect of ice accretion involves judicious leading edge convective cooling technique which in turn depends on the accuracy of convective heat transfer coefficient used in the analysis. In this study empirical investigation of convective heat transfer measurements on asymmetric airfoil is presented at different angle of attacks ranging from 0° to 20° under subsonic flow regime. The top and bottom surface temperatures are measured at given points using Senflex hot film sensors (Tao System Inc.) and used to determine heat transfer characteristics of the airfoils. The model surfaces are subjected to constant heat fluxes using KP Kapton flexible heating pads. The monitored temperature data are then utilized to determine the heat convection coefficients modelled empirically as the Nusselt Number on the surface of the airfoil. The experimental work is conducted in an open circuit-Eiffel type wind tunnel, powered by a 37 kW electrical motor that is able to generate subsonic air velocities up to around 41 m/s in the 24 square-inch test section. The heat transfer experiments have been carried out under constant heat flux supply to the asymmetric airfoil. The convective heat transfer coefficients are determined from measured surface temperature and free stream temperature and investigated in the form of Nusselt number. The variation of Nusselt number is shown with Reynolds number at various angles of attacks. It is concluded that Nusselt number increases with increasing Reynolds number and increase in angle of attack from 0

  12. One-dimensional analysis of unsteady flows due to supercritical heat addition in high speed condensing steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, N. A.; Hasini, H.; Yusoff, M. Z.

    2013-06-01

    Unsteadiness in supersonic flow in nozzles can be generated by the release of heat due to spontaneous condensation. The heat released is termed "supercritical" and may be responsible for turbine blades failure in turbine cascade as it causes a supersonic flow to decelerate. When the Mach number is reduced to unity, the flow can no longer sustain the additional heat and becomes unstable. This paper aims to numerically investigate the unsteadiness caused by supercritical heat addition in one-dimensional condensing flows. The governing equations for mass, momentum and energy, coupled with the equations describing the wetness fraction and droplet growth are integrated and solved iteratively to reveal the final solution. Comparison is made with well-established experimental and numerical solution done by previous researchers that shows similar phenomena.

  13. Improving surface energy balance closure by reducing errors in soil heat flux measurement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The flux plate method is the most commonly employed method for measuring soil heat flux (G) in surface energy balance studies. Although relatively simple to use, the flux plate method is susceptible to significant errors. Two of the most common errors are heat flow divergence around the plate and fa...

  14. Cryogenic two-phase flow during chilldown: Flow transition and nucleate boiling heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jelliffe Kevin

    The recent interest in space exploration has placed a renewed focus on rocket propulsion technology. Cryogenic propellants are the preferred fuel for rocket propulsion since they are more energetic and environmentally friendly compared with other storable fuels. Voracious evaporation occurs while transferring these fluids through a pipeline that is initially in thermal equilibrium with the environment. This phenomenon is referred to as line chilldown. Large temperature differences, rapid transients, pressure fluctuations and the transition from the film boiling to the nucleate boiling regime characterize the chilldown process. Although the existence of the chilldown phenomenon has been known for decades, the process is not well understood. Attempts have been made to model the chilldown process; however the results have been fair at best. A major shortcoming of these models is the use of correlations that were developed for steady, non-cryogenic flows. The development of reliable correlations for cryogenic chilldown has been hindered by the lack of experimental data. An experimental facility was constructed that allows the flow structure, the temperature history and the pressure history to be recorded during the line chilldown process. The temperature history is then utilized in conjunction with an inverse heat conduction procedure that was developed, which allows the unsteady heat transfer coefficient on the interior of the pipe wall to be extracted. This database is used to evaluate present predictive models and correlations for flow regime transition and nucleate boiling heat transfer. It is found that by calibrating the transition between the stratified-wavy and the intermittent/annular regimes of the Taitel and Dukler flow regime map, satisfactory predictions are obtained. It is also found that by utilizing a simple model that includes the effect of flow structure and incorporating the enhancement provided by the local heat flux, significant improvement in the

  15. Flow Visualization within the Evaporator of Planar Loop Heat Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Junwoo; Cytrynowicz, Debra; Medis, Praveen; Gerner, Frank M.; Henderson, H. Thurman

    2005-02-01

    A planar micro loop heat pipe (LHP) with coherent porous silicon (CPS) wick in the evaporator is a two-phase heat transfer device that utilizes evaporation and condensation to transfer heat. This CPS wick has thousands of pores, which are 2 micrometer in diameter, contained over an area of one square centimeter. As heat is applied to the evaporator, liquid is vaporized and evaporator chamber's pressure is increased. A meniscus formed at the liquid/vapor interface inside the pore of the CPS wick is supported by capillary forces even though pressure force pushes it down. Vapor flows through the vapor line to the condenser and condenses. Liquid is transported back to the evaporator due to pressure difference. The internal thermodynamics and fluid dynamics are poorly understood due to the difficulty of taking internal measurements and the complexity of two-phase phenomena. To understand this thermal device, the clear evaporator machined from Pyrex glass was utilized to monitor the complex phenomena which occur in the evaporator. These phenomena include vapor formation, nucleate boiling, evaporation, depriming, and pressure oscillation. DI-water was utilized as the working fluid.

  16. Compression and Cavitation of Externally Applied Magnetic Field on a Hohlraum due to Non-Local Heat Flow Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, Archis; Thomas, Alec; Ridgers, Chris; Kingham, Rob

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we present full-scale 2D kinetic modeling of externally imposed magnetic fields on hohlraums with laser heating. We observe magnetic field cavitation and compression due to thermal energy transport. Self-consistent modeling of the electron momentum equation allows for a complete treatment of the heat flow equation and Ohm's Law. A complete Ohm's Law contains magnetic field advection through the Nernst mechanism that arises due to the heat flow. Magnetic field amplification by a factor of 3 occurs due to magnetic flux pile-up from Nernst convection. The magnetic field cavitates towards the hohlraum axis over a 0.5 ns time scale due to Nernst convection. This results in significantly different magnetic field profiles and slower cavitation than can be expected due to the plasma bulk flow. Non-local electrons contribute to the heat flow down the density gradient resulting in an augmented Nernst convection mechanism that is included self-consistently through kinetic modeling. In addition to showing the prevalence of non-local heat flows, we show effects such as anomalous heat flow up the density gradient induced by inverse bremsstrahlung heating. This research was supported by the DOE through Grant No. DE SC0010621 and in part through computational resources and services provided by Advanced Research Computing at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

  17. Investigation of turbulent juncture flow endwall heat transfer and flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praisner, Thomas James

    A study of the instantaneous and time-mean flow topology in a turbulent juncture flow, and the associated endwall heat transfer is presented. A new experimental technique was developed for this work which allows the recording of simultaneous and instantaneous high-density Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and thermochromic Liquid-Crystal (LC) based endwall heat transfer data. Endwall heat transfer and simultaneous PIV data in the symmetry, 60sp°, 90sp°, and 90sp° + 0.5D planes were recorded for juncture flows with ResbD\\ ≅ 2.4 × 10sp5. The results illustrate the existence (in an instantaneous and time-mean sense) of a dominant horseshoe vortex, a counter-rotating secondary vortex, a co-rotating tertiary vortex, and a small corner vortex. The corner vortex is a steady feature of the corner region, while the secondary vortex develops sporadically immediately upstream of the horseshoe vortex. The tertiary vortex appears intermittently upstream of the secondary vortex. The region upstream of the horseshoe vortex is characterized by a bimodal switching of the near-wall reverse flow which results in quasi-periodic eruptions of the secondary vortex. The bimodal switching of the reverse flow is shown to be a result of sporadic bursting of the down-wash fluid on the face of the bluff body. Both instantaneous and time mean endwall heat transfer distributions are characterized by two bands of high heat transfer which circumscribe the base of the bluff body. The primary band of high heat transfer (near x/D = 0.05) is a result of the outer-region fluid which impinges on the endwall in the corner region after advecting down the face of the bluff body. The inrush of cool outer-region fluid following the eruptive events upstream of the horseshoe vortex gives rise to the secondary band of high heat transfer near x/D = 0.27. A physical model for the complete interaction process on the symmetry plane is presented along with the associated trends in endwall surface heat transfer

  18. Flow regimes and heat transfer in vertical narrow annuli

    SciTech Connect

    Ulke, A.; Goldberg, I.

    1993-11-01

    In shell side boiling heat exchangers narrow crevices that are formed between the tubes and the tube support structure provide areas for local thermal-hydraulic conditions which differ significantly from bulk fluid conditions. Understanding of the processes of boiling and dryout in flow restricted crevices can help in designing of tube support geometries to minimize the likelihood of tube support plate and tube corrosion observed in commercial power plant steam generators. This paper describes a one dimensional thermal-hydraulic model of a vertical crevice between a tube and a support plate with cylindrical holes. The annulus formed by the support plate hole and an eccentrically located tube has been represented by vertical strips. The formation, growth and collapse of a steam bubble in each strip has been determined. Based on the bubble history, and flow regimes characterized by ``isolated`` bubbles, ``coalesced`` bubbles and liquid deficient regions have been defined.

  19. Heat transport in laminar flow of erythrocyte suspensions.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, A S

    1975-07-01

    Measurements of thermal conductivity were made in laminar flow of dog and turkey erythrocyte suspensions in a stainless stell tube of about 1 mm ID. These measurements were independent of the shear rate, showing that the red cell motion relative to plasma in flowing blood had no effect on the heat transfer. Measurements of thermal conductivity were further made in suspensions of polystyrene spheres of 100 mum and were found to be dependent upon the shear rate. The Graetz solution corresponding to uniform wall temperature was used for determining the value of thermal conductivity in an apparatus calibrated with tap water. The overall accuracy of the results is within 10%. A model based on the particle rotation with the entrained fluid is proposed. It is pointed out that the diffusion of platelets, red cells, and possibly plasma proteins (such as fibrinogen) will be augmented if they happen to be in the hydrodynamic field of rotating erythrocytes. PMID:1150598

  20. Heating surface material’s effect on subcooled flow boiling heat transfer of R134a

    SciTech Connect

    Ling Zou; Barclay G. Jones

    2012-11-01

    In this study, subcooled flow boiling of R134a on copper (Cu) and stainless steel (SS) heating surfaces was experimentally investigated from both macroscopic and microscopic points of view. By utilizing a high-speed digital camera, bubble growth rate, bubble departure size, and nucleation site density, were able to be observed and analyzed from the microscopic point of view. Macroscopic characteristics of the subcooled flow boiling, such as heat transfer coefficient, were able to be measured as well. Experimental results showed that there are no obvious difference between the copper and the stainless surface with respect to bubble dynamics, such as contact angle, growth rate and departure size. On the contrary, the results clearly showed a trend that the copper surface had a better performance than the stainless steel surface in terms of heat transfer coefficient. It was also observed that wall heat fluxes on both surfaces were found highly correlated with nucleation site density, as bubble hydrodynamics are similar on these two surfaces. The difference between these two surfaces was concluded as results of different surface thermal conductivities.

  1. Pressure Drop and Heat Transfer of Water Flowing Shell-Side of Multitube Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Yukio; Hashizume, Kenichi

    Experimental studies on heat transfer augmentation in water-flowing shell sides of counter flow multitube exchangers are presented. Various kinds of augmented tube bundles have been examined to obtain the characteristics of pressure drop and heat transfer. Data for a smooth tube bundle were a little different from those for the tube side. The pressure drop in the shell side depended on Re-0.4 and deviated from the tube side pressure drop to within +30%, while the shell side heat transfer coefficient depended on Re0.8 but about 35%. larger than that of the tube side. Furthermore the augmented tube bundles have been evaluated and compared using 21 evaluation criteria. Enhanced tube bundles, low-finned tube bundles and those with twisted tapes inserted had especially good performances. The ratios of increase in heat transfer were larger than those in pressure drop. In case of low-finned tube bundles, there seem to exist an optimum fin-pitch and an optimum relation between the fin-pitch and the pitch of twisted tapes inserted.

  2. Seismic b-Values, Bouguer Gravity and Heat Flow Data Beneath Eastern Anatolia, Turkey: Tectonic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maden, Nafiz; Öztürk, Serkan

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we analyze the relationships between the seismic b-values, Bouguer gravity and heat flow data in the Eastern Anatolia region of Turkey. For this purpose, spatial distributions of b-value, Bouguer gravity and heat flow have been presented for different depths and locations. In distinction to previous studies which have used only two parameters (gravity and seismic b-value or heat flow and seismic b-value), we have combined seismic b-values, Bouguer gravity and heat flow data to determine the new results on the active tectonics of the Eastern Anatolia region. Our analysis shows that there are significant and robust correlations amidst the heat flow data, Bouguer gravity anomaly and seismic b-values. The crustal structure is thick in areas where the large negative gravity anomalies and low b-values are observed. On the contrary, the regions with positive gravity anomalies and high b-values are likely to be associated with magma chambers or crustal low-velocity zones. We also provide some evidence suggesting that high b-values and high heat flow values can be related to the magmatic activities beneath the volcanic chain in the Eastern Pontide orogenic belt. Consequently, we have reached some conclusions for the Eastern Anatolia region: (1) The Moho to surface is rather thick and earthquakes are relatively smaller beneath the volcanic chain where the high heat flow values are observed, (2) a southward subduction model could have existed for the development of the Pontides during the late Mesozoic-Cenozoic era, (3) hot and unstable mantle lid zones or a lithosphere deprived of mantle under the study region is much more plausible, (4) a southward movement of the subduction plate and a northward extension of the Black Sea increase the state of stress along the trench axis and decrease the b-value, and (5) these movements may load the stress energy to the fault zones, thereby causing the catastrophic earthquakes in the Eastern Anatolia region.

  3. Reattachment heating upstream of short compression ramps in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estruch-Samper, David

    2016-05-01

    Hypersonic shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions with separation induce unsteady thermal loads of particularly high intensity in flow reattachment regions. Building on earlier semi-empirical correlations, the maximum heat transfer rates upstream of short compression ramp obstacles of angles 15° ⩽ θ ⩽ 135° are here discretised based on time-dependent experimental measurements to develop insight into their transient nature (Me = 8.2-12.3, Re_h= 0.17× 105-0.47× 105). Interactions with an incoming laminar boundary layer experience transition at separation, with heat transfer oscillating between laminar and turbulent levels exceeding slightly those in fully turbulent interactions. Peak heat transfer rates are strongly influenced by the stagnation of the flow upon reattachment close ahead of obstacles and increase with ramp angle all the way up to θ =135°, whereby rates well over two orders of magnitude above the undisturbed laminar levels are intermittently measured (q'_max>10^2q_{u,L}). Bearing in mind the varying degrees of strength in the competing effect between the inviscid and viscous terms—namely the square of the hypersonic similarity parameter (Mθ )^2 for strong interactions and the viscous interaction parameter bar{χ } (primarily a function of Re and M)—the two physical factors that appear to most globally encompass the effects of peak heating for blunt ramps (θ ⩾ 45°) are deflection angle and stagnation heat transfer, so that this may be fundamentally expressed as q'_max∝ {q_{o,2D}} θ ^2 with further parameters in turn influencing the interaction to a lesser extent. The dominant effect of deflection angle is restricted to short obstacle heights, where the rapid expansion at the top edge of the obstacle influences the relaxation region just downstream of reattachment and leads to an upstream displacement of the separation front. The extreme heating rates result from the strengthening of the reattaching shear layer with the increase in

  4. Heat flow and thermal history of the Anadarko basin, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, L.S.; Kelley, S.A.; Blackwell, D.D.; Naeser, N.D.

    1998-01-01

    New heat-flow values for seven sites in the Anadarko basin, Oklahoma, were determined using high-precision temperature logs and thermal conductivity measurements from nearly 300 core plugs. Three of the sites are on the northern shelf, three sites are in the deep basin, and one site is in the frontal fault zone of the northern Wichita Mountains. The heat flow decreased from 55 to 64 mW/m2 in the north, and from 39 to 54 mW/m2 in the south, due to a decrease in heat generation in the underlying basement rock toward the south. Lateral lithologic changes in the basin, combined with the change in heat flow across the basin, resulted in an unusual pattern of thermal maturity. The vitrinite reflectance values of the Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian Woodford formation are highest 30-40 km north-northwest of the deepest part of the basin. The offset in highest reflectance values is due to the contrast in thermal conductivity between the Pennsylvanian "granite wash" section adjacent to the Wichita uplift and the Pennsylvanian shale section to the north. The geothermal gradient in the low-conductivity shale section is elevated relative to the geothermal gradient in the high-conductivity "granite wash" section, thus displacing the highest temperatures to the north of the deepest part of the basin. Apatite fission-track, vitrinite reflectance, and heat-flow data were used to constrain regional aspects of the burial history of the Anadarko basin. By combining these data sets, we infer that at least 1.5 km of denudation has occurred at two sites in the deep Anadarko basin since the early to middle Cenozoic (40 ?? 10 m.y.). The timing of the onset of denudation in the southern Anadarko basin coincides with the period of late Eocene erosion observed in the southern Rocky Mountains and in the northern Great Plains. Burial history models for two wells from the deep Anadarko basin predict that shales of the Woodford formation passed through the hydrocarbon maturity window by the

  5. Volcanic eruptions on Io: Heat flow, resurfacing, and lava composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaney, Diana L.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Matson, Dennis L.; Veeder, Glenn J.

    1995-01-01

    We model an infrared outburst on Io as being due to a large, erupting lava flow which increased its area at a rate of 1.5 x 10(exp 5)/sq m and cooled from 1225 to 555 K over the 2.583-hr period of observation. The inferred effusion rate of 3 x 10(exp 5) cu m/sec for this eruption is very high, but is not unprece- dented on the Earth and is similar to the high eruption rates suggested for early lunar volcanism. Eruptions occur approxi- mately 6% of the time on Io. These eruptions provide ample resurfacing to explain Io's lack of impact craters. We suggest that the large total radiometric heat flow, 10(exp 14) W, and the size and temperature distribution of the thermal anomalies (McEwen et al. 1992; Veeder et al. 1994) can be accounted for by a series of silicate lava flows in various stages of cooling. We propose that the whole suite of Io's currently observed thermal anomalies was produced by multiple, high-eruptive-rate silicate flows within the past century.

  6. Collisionless inter-species energy transfer and turbulent heating in drift wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L.; Diamond, P. H.

    2012-08-15

    We reconsider the classic problems of calculating 'turbulent heating' and collisionless inter-species transfer of energy in drift wave turbulence. These issues are of interest for low collisionality, electron heated plasmas, such as ITER, where collisionless energy transfer from electrons to ions is likely to be significant. From the wave Poynting theorem at steady state, a volume integral over an annulus r{sub 1}heating as {integral}{sub r{sub 1}} {sup r{sub 2}} dr=-S{sub r}|{sub r{sub 1}{sup r{sub 2}}}{ne}0. Here S{sub r} is the wave energy density flux in the radial direction. Thus, a wave energy flux differential across an annular region indeed gives rise to a net heating, in contrast to previous predictions. This heating is related to the Reynolds work by the zonal flow, since S{sub r} is directly linked to the zonal flow drive. In addition to net heating, there is inter-species heat transfer. For collisionless electron drift waves, the total turbulent energy source for collisionless heat transfer is due to quasilinear electron cooling. Subsequent quasilinear ion heating occurs through linear ion Landau damping. In addition, perpendicular heating via ion polarization currents contributes to ion heating. Since at steady state, Reynolds work of the turbulence on the zonal flow must balance zonal flow frictional damping ({approx}{nu}{sub ii}{sup 2}{approx}|(e{phi}(tilde sign)/T)|{sup 4}), it is no surprise that zonal flow friction appears as an important channel for ion heating. This process of energy transfer via zonal flow has not previously been accounted for in analyses of energy transfer. As an application, we compare the rate of turbulent energy transfer in a low collisionality plasma with the rate of the energy transfer by collisions. The result shows that the collisionless turbulent energy transfer is a significant energy coupling process for ITER plasma.

  7. Recent trends in energy flows through the Arctic climate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Michael; Haimberger, Leo

    2016-04-01

    While Arctic climate change can be diagnosed in many parameters, a comprehensive assessment of long-term changes and low frequency variability in the coupled Arctic energy budget still remains challenging due to the complex physical processes involved and the lack of observations. Here we draw on strongly improved observational capabilities of the past 15 years and employ observed radiative fluxes from CERES along with state-of-the-art atmospheric as well as coupled ocean-ice reanalyses to explore recent changes in energy flows through the Arctic climate system. Various estimates of ice volume and ocean heat content trends imply that the energy imbalance of the Arctic climate system was >1 Wm-2 during the 2000-2015 period, where most of the extra heat warmed the ocean and a comparatively small fraction was used to melt sea ice. The energy imbalance was partly fed by enhanced oceanic heat transports into the Arctic, especially in the mid 2000s. Seasonal trends of net radiation show a very clear signal of the ice-albedo feedback. Stronger radiative energy input during summer means increased seasonal oceanic heat uptake and accelerated sea ice melt. In return, lower minimum sea ice extent and higher SSTs lead to enhanced heat release from the ocean during fall season. These results are consistent with modeling studies finding an enhancement of the annual cycle of surface energy exchanges in a warming Arctic. Moreover, stronger heat fluxes from the ocean to the atmosphere in fall tend to warm the arctic boundary layer and reduce meridional temperature gradients, thereby reducing atmospheric energy transports into the polar cap. Although the observed results are a robust finding, extended high-quality datasets are needed to reliably separate trends from low frequency variability.

  8. Heat Transfer Within a Fluid Filled Deformable Permeable Spherical Shell in Slow Viscous Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohais, R.

    2006-12-01

    Forced convective heat transfer is studied in a system of a fluid filled hollow permeable spherical shell set within a slow viscous flow of small Reynolds number, Re. The free fluid regions within and outside of the shell obey Stokesian flow theory while the fluid filled permeable region is governed by Darcy's law. The external surface of the shell is made deformable so that solutions can also be obtained for systems whose surfaces approach real bodies not possessing a spherical external surface. The well-known Beavers-Joseph slip boundary conditions are applied both to the internal and external surfaces of the shell to determine the analytical solutions for the fluid flow within the three regions. The further application of the energy equation to the system and the use of inhomogeneous mixed thermal boundary conditions on the two surfaces allow for analytic expressions to be obtained for the heat transfer up to O(PrRe), for small Re and Prandtl number, Pr of O(1). This study allows for the investigation of geothermal transport systems such as exists in certain ignimbrite terrains where ground water of meteoric origin is trapped and becomes superheated in underground systems. This water travels via cracks and faults to neighboring permeable structures with deformable surface layers and filters to a hollow core. Heat is transported not only by thermal conduction but by the convecting liquid as well. Analytic solutions such as the one presented here attest to the enhancement of heat transfer by permeable bodies.

  9. Flow and heat transfer predictions for film cooling.

    PubMed

    Acharya, S; Tyagi, M; Hoda, A

    2001-05-01

    Film cooling flows are characterized by a row of jets injected at an angle from the blade surface or endwalls into the heated crossflow. The resulting flowfield is quite complex, and accurate predictions of the flow and heat transfer have been difficult to obtain, particularly in the near field of the injected jet. The flowfield is characterized by a spectrum of vortical structures including the dominant kidney vortex, the horse-shoe vortex, the wake vortices and the shear layer vortices. These anisotropic and unsteady structures are not well represented by empirical or ad-hoc turbulence models, and lead to inaccurate predictions in the near field of the jet. In this paper, a variety of modeling approaches have been reviewed, and the limitations of these approaches are identified. Recent emergence of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) tools allow the resolution of the coherent structure dynamics, and it is shown in this paper, that such approaches provide improved predictions over that obtained with turbulence models. PMID:11460622

  10. Heat Flow in the Salton Trough Revisited and Implications for Regional Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C.; DeAngelo, J.; Galanis, P.

    2012-12-01

    As part of research into the geothermal energy resources of the Salton Trough, we have assembled a database of 1060 temperature-gradient and heat-flow measurements acquired by the geothermal industry, universities, national labs, and the US Geological Survey (USGS) throughout the region from the early 1970s to the present. In addition to using the data to examine the nature and occurrence of hydrothermal systems, we have estimated the total heat flux through the Trough and investigated relationships between subsurface thermal conditions and the character of faulting and seismicity. Our analysis for the Imperial Valley and other portions of the Salton Trough physiographic province gives an average heat flow of ~160 mW/m2 compared to the 140 mW/m2 average determined by Lachenbruch and others in the last regional study (JGR, v.90, n. B8, 1986). The higher average reflects a larger contribution to the total heat flux from hydrothermal systems that was not recognized in earlier studies due to incomplete spatial coverage. Most of these hydrothermal systems are associated with step-overs and other structural complexities in the fault zones that pass through the region, and the dense coverage of the new heat flow database allows for a detailed examination of the degree to which variations of convective and conductive heat transfer in this region influence, and are influenced by, active tectonic processes. We compared estimated subsurface temperatures from a conductive heat transfer model with the observed depth variation of the upper and lower boundaries of the seismogenic zone along active faults both within and along the margins of the Imperial Valley, and for those areas characterized by average heat flow less than or equal to 150 mW/m2, the base of the seismogenic zone is near the estimated depth of the 400 °C isotherm, a result that is consistent with observations in other seismically active regions. The base of seismicity continues to shallow where heat flow

  11. Transfer of heat by self-induced flow in a rotating tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilham, S.; Ivey, P. C.; Owen, J. M.

    1994-04-01

    This paper provides a review of recently published research on self-induced flow and heat transfer in a rotating tube, together with additional theoretical work on heat transfer to the cylindrical wall of the tube. Earlier work has shown that self-induced flow can occur when a tube, with one end open and the other sealed, is rotated about its axis: Fluid flows along the axis toward the sealed end and returns in an annular layer on the cylindrical wall. The flow and heat transfer on the end wall are similar to those associated with the so-called free disk, and measured velocity distributions in the tube and Nusselt numbers for the end wall are in good agreement with those computed from numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes and energy equations. The Reynolds analogy is used in this paper to provide a correlation for the computed Nusselt numbers for the cylindrical wall, and design correlations are provided to enable the results to be applied to anti-icing systems for the nose bullets of aero-engines.

  12. Vibrational energy flow in substituted benzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pein, Brandt C.

    Using ultrafast infrared (IR) Raman spectroscopy, vibrational energy flow was monitored in several liquid-state substituted benzenes at ambient temperature. In a series of mono-halogenated benzenes, X-C6H 5 (X = F, Cl, Br, I), a similar CH-stretch at 3068 cm-1 was excited using picosecond IR pulses and the resulting vibrational relaxation and overall vibrational cooling processes were monitored with anti-Stokes spectroscopy. In the molecules with a heavier halide substituent the CH-stretch decayed slower while midrange vibrations decayed faster. This result was logical if the density of states (DOS) in the first few tiers, which is the DOS composed of vibrations with smaller quantum number, is what primarily determines energy flow. For tiers 1-4, the DOS was nearly identical in the CH-stretch region while it increased in the midrange region for heavier halide mass. Excitation spectroscopy, an extension of 3D IR-Raman spectroscopy, was developed and used to selectively pump vibrations localized to the substituent or the phenyl group in nitrobenzene (NB), o-fluoronitrobenzene (OFNB) and o-nitrotoluene (ONT) and in the alkylbenzene series toluene, isopropylbenzene (IPB), and t-butylbenzene (TBB). Using quantum chemical calculations, each Raman active vibration was sorted, according to their atomic displacements, into three classifications: substituent, phenyl, or global. Using IR pump wavenumbers that initially excited substituent or phenyl vibrations, IR-Raman spectroscopy was used to monitor energy flowing from the substituent to phenyl vibrations and vice versa. In NB nitro-to-phenyl and nitro-to-global energy flow was almost nonexistent while phenyl-to-nitro and phenyl-to-global was weak. When ortho substituents (-CH3, -F) were introduced, energy flow from nitro-to-phenyl and nitro-to-global was activated. In ONT, phenyl-to-nitro energy flow ceased possibly due to the added methyl group diverting energy from entering the nitro vibrations. Energy flow is therefore

  13. Theoretical analysis of electrokinetic flow and heat transfer in a microchannel under asymmetric boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Soong, C Y; Wang, S H

    2003-09-01

    The main theme of the present work is to investigate the electrokinetic effects on liquid flow and heat transfer in a flat microchannel of two parallel plates under asymmetric boundary conditions including wall-sliding motion, unequal zeta potentials, and unequal heat fluxes on two walls. Based on the Debye-Huckel approximation, an electrical potential solution to the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation is obtained and employed in the analysis. The analytic solutions of the electrical potential, velocity distributions, streaming potential, friction coefficient, temperature distribution, and heat transfer rate are obtained, and thereby the effects of electrokinetic separation distance (K), zeta-potential level (zeta;(1)), ratio of two zeta potentials (r(zeta) identical with zeta;(2)/zeta;(1)), wall-sliding velocity (u(w)), and heat flux ratio (r(q) identical with q"(2)/q"(1)) are investigated. The present results reveal the effects of wall-sliding and zeta-potential ratio on the hydrodynamic nature of microchannel flow, and they are used to provide physical interpretations for the resultant electrokinetic effects and the underlying electro-hydrodynamic interaction mechanisms. In the final part the results of potential and velocity fields are applied in solving the energy equation. The temperature distributions and heat transfer characteristics under the asymmetrical kinematic, electric, and thermal boundary conditions considered presently are dealt with. PMID:12927184

  14. An improved algorithm for the modeling of vapor flow in heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tower, Leonard K.; Hainley, Donald C.

    1989-01-01

    A heat pipe vapor flow algorithm suitable for use in codes on microcomputers is presented. The incompressible heat pipe vapor flow studies of Busse are extended to incorporate compressibility effects. The Busse velocity profile factor is treated as a function of temperature and pressure. The assumption of a uniform saturated vapor temperature determined by the local pressure at each cross section of the pipe is not made. Instead, a mean vapor temperature, defined by an energy integral, is determined in the course of the solution in addition to the pressure, saturation temperature at the wall, and the Busse velocity profile factor. For alkali metal working fluids, local species equilibrium is assumed. Temperature and pressure profiles are presented for several cases involving sodium heat pipes. An example for a heat pipe with an adiabatic section and two evaporators in sequence illustrates the ability to handle axially varying heat input. A sonic limit plot for a short evaporator falls between curves for the Busse and Levy inviscid sonic limits.

  15. Scaling heat and mass flow through porous media during pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Julien; Muggeridge, Ann H.; Jackson, Matthew D.; Quintard, Michel; Lapene, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    The modelling of heat and mass flow through porous media in the presence of pyrolysis is complex because various physical and chemical phenomena need to be represented. In addition to the transport of heat by conduction and convection, and the change of properties with varying pressure and temperature, these processes involve transport of mass by convection, evaporation, condensation and pyrolysis chemical reactions. Examples of such processes include pyrolysis of wood, thermal decomposition of polymer composite and in situ upgrading of heavy oil and oil shale. The behaviours of these systems are difficult to predict as relatively small changes in the material composition can significantly change the thermophysical properties. Scaling reduces the number of parameters in the problem statement and quantifies the relative importance of the various dimensional parameters such as permeability, thermal conduction and reaction constants. This paper uses inspectional analysis to determine the minimum number of dimensionless scaling groups that describe the decomposition of a solid porous material into a gas in one dimension. Experimental design is then used to rank these scaling groups in terms of their importance in describing the outcome of two example processes: the thermal decomposition of heat shields formed from polymer composites and the in situ upgrading of heavy oils and oil shales. A sensitivity analysis is used to divide these groups into three sets (primary, secondary and insignificant), thus identifying the combinations of solid and fluid properties that have the most impact on the performance of the different processes.

  16. Flow of Supercritical Hydrogen in a Uniformly Heated Circular Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youn, B.; Mills, A. F.

    1993-01-01

    Turbulent flow of supercritical hydrogen through a uniformly heated circular tube has been investigated using numerical methods, for the range of 4 x 10(exp 5) less than Re less than 3 x 10(exp 6), 5 less than or equal to q(sub W) less than or equal to 10 MW/sq m, 30 less than or equal to T(sub in) less than or equal to 90 K, and 5 less than or equal to P(sub in) less than or equal to 15 MPa. The purpose is to validate a turbulence model and calculation method for the design of active cooling systems of hydrogen-fueled hypersonic aircraft, where the hydrogen fuel a used as coolant. The PHOENICS software package was used for the computations, which required special provision for evaluation of the thermophysical properties of the supercritical hydrogen, and a low Reynolds number form of the k-epsilon turbulence model. Pressure drop and heat transfer data were compared with experiment and existing correlations and good agreement was demonstrated. For the pressure range considered here a "thermal spike" was observed and shown to be due to the secondary peak in specific heat, rather than the primary peak.

  17. Development of Compact, Modular Lunar Heat Flow Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagihara, S.; Zacny, K.; Hedlund, M.; Taylor, P. T.

    2014-01-01

    Geothermal heat flow measurements are a high priority for the future lunar geophysical network missions recommended by the latest Decadal Survey and previously the International Lunar Network. Because the lander for such a mission will be relatively small, the heat flow instrumentation must be a low-mass and low-power system. The instrument needs to measure both thermal gradient and thermal conductivity of the regolith penetrated. It also needs to be capable of excavating a deep enough hole (approx. 3 m) to avoid the effect of potential long-term changes of the surface thermal environment. The recently developed pneumatic excavation system can largely meet the low-power, low-mass, and the depth requirements. The system utilizes a stem which winds out of a pneumatically driven reel and pushes its conical tip into the regolith. Simultaneously, gas jets, emitted from the cone tip, loosen and blow away the soil. The thermal sensors consist of resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) embedded on the stem and an insitu thermal conductivity probe attached to the cone tip. The thermal conductivity probe consists of a short 'needle' (2.4-mm diam. and 15- to 20-mm length) that contains a platinum RTD wrapped in a coil of heater wire. During a deployment, when the penetrating cone reaches a desired depth, it stops blowing gas, and the stem pushes the needle into the yet-to-be excavated, undisturbed bottom soil. Then, it begins heating and monitors the temperature. Thermal conductivity of the soil can determined from the rate of temperature increase with time. When the measurement is complete, the system resumes excavation until it reaches the next targeted depth.

  18. Mixed convection laminar flow and heat transfer of liquids in horizontal internally finned tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Shome, B.

    1998-01-01

    Energy and material savings, as well as economic incentives, have led to concentrated efforts over the past several decades in the field of heat transfer enhancement to produce more efficient and compact heat exchangers. Internally finned tubes are widely used for heat transfer enhancement, particularly in chemical process and petroleum industries. A finned tube heat exchanger with optimum geometry could offer 35--40% increase in heat duty for equal pumping power and size over a smooth tube heat exchanger or a comparable decrease in the heat exchanger size for a given heat duty. Developing mixed convection flow in internally finned tubes with variable viscosity was numerically investigated for a fin geometry range of 8 {le} N {le} 24, 0.1 {le} H {le} 0.3 and an operating condition range of 50 {le} Pr{sub in} {le} 1,250, 0 {le} Ra{sub in} {le} 10{sup 7}, and 0 {le} q{sub w}d/k{sub in} {le} 2,000. The numerical model was validated by comparison with existing numerical and experimental data. Internal finning was found to produce a complex two-cell, buoyancy-induced vortex structure. The results show that coring (retarded velocity in the interfin region) leads to poor heat transfer performance of tubes with large numbers of fins or with tall fins. The overall results indicated that large enhancement in the heat transfer can be obtained in the entrance region. Furthermore, variable viscosity effects are seen to have a pronounced effect on the friction factor and Nusselt number predictions.

  19. Flow and heat transfer model for a rotating cryogenic motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykhuizen, R. C.; Baca, R. G.; Bickel, T. C.

    1993-08-01

    Development of a high-temperature, superconducting, synchronous motor for large applications (greater than 1000 HP) could offer significant electrical power savings for industrial users. Presently 60% of all electric power generated in the United States is converted by electric motors. A large part of this power is utilized by motors 1000 HP or larger. The use of high-temperature superconducting materials with critical temperatures above that of liquid nitrogen (77 K) in the field winding would reduce the losses in these motors significantly, and therefore, would have a definite impact on the electrical power usage in the U.S. These motors will be 1/3 to 1/2 the size of conventional motors of similar power and, thus, offer potential savings in materials and floor space. The cooling of the superconducting materials in the field windings of the rotor presents a unique application of cryogenic engineering. The rotational velocity results in significant radial pressure gradients that affect the flow distribution of the cryogen. The internal pressure fields can result in significant nonuniformities in the two-phase flow of the coolant. Due to the variable speed design, the flow distribution has the potential to change during operation. A multiphase-flow computer model of the cryogenic cooling is developed to calculate the boiling heat transfer and phase distribution of the nitrogen coolant in the motor. The model accounts for unequal phase velocities and nonuniform cooling requirements of the rotor. The unequal radial pressure gradients in the inlet and outlet headers result in a larger driving force for flow in the outer cooling channels. The effect of this must be accounted for in the design of the motor. Continuing improvements of the model will allow the investigation of the transient thermal issues associated with localized quenching of the superconducting components of the motor.

  20. Flow and heat transfer model for a rotating cryogenic motor

    SciTech Connect

    Dykhuizen, R.C.; Baca, R.G.; Bickel, T.C.

    1993-08-01

    Development of a high-temperature, superconducting, synchronous motor for large applications (>1000 HP) could offer significant electrical power savings for industrial users. Presently 60% of all electric power generated in the United States is converted by electric motors. A large part of two power is utilized by motors 1000 HP or larger. The use of high-temperature superconducting materials with critical temperatures above that of liquid nitrogen (77 K) in the field winding would reduce the losses in these motors significantly, and therefore, would have a definite impact on the electrical power usage in the US. These motors will be 1/3 to 1/2 the size of conventional motors of similar power and, thus, offer potential savings in materials and floor space. The cooling of the superconducting materials in the field windings of the rotor presents a unique application of cryogenic engineering. The rotational velocity results in significant radial pressure gradients that affect the flow distribution of the cryogen. The internal pressure fields can result in significant nonuniformities in the two-phase flow of the coolant. Due to the variable speed design, the flow distribution has the potential to change during operation. A multiphase-flow computer model of the cryogenic cooling is developed to calculate the boiling heat transfer and phase distribution of the nitrogen coolant in the motor. The model accounts for unequal phase velocities and nonuniform cooling requirements of the rotor. The unequal radial pressure gradients in the inlet and outlet headers result in a larger driving force for flow in the outer cooling channels. The effect of this must be accounted for in the design of the motor. Continuing improvements of the model will allow the investigation of the transient thermal issues associated with localized quenching of the superconducting components of the motor.

  1. Radiation effect on viscous flow of a nanofluid and heat transfer over a nonlinearly stretching sheet

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we study the flow and heat transfer characteristics of a viscous nanofluid over a nonlinearly stretching sheet in the presence of thermal radiation, included in the energy equation, and variable wall temperature. A similarity transformation was used to transform the governing partial differential equations to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. An efficient numerical shooting technique with a fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme was used to obtain the solution of the boundary value problem. The variations of dimensionless surface temperature, as well as flow and heat-transfer characteristics with the governing dimensionless parameters of the problem, which include the nanoparticle volume fraction ϕ, the nonlinearly stretching sheet parameter n, the thermal radiation parameter NR, and the viscous dissipation parameter Ec, were graphed and tabulated. Excellent validation of the present numerical results has been achieved with the earlier nonlinearly stretching sheet problem of Cortell for local Nusselt number without taking the effect of nanoparticles. PMID:22520273

  2. Visualization techniques to experimentally model flow and heat transfer in turbine and aircraft flow passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Louis M.; Hippensteele, Steven A.

    1991-01-01

    Increased attention to fuel economy and increased thrust requirements have increased the demand for higher aircraft gas turbine engine efficiency through the use of higher turbine inlet temperatures. These higher temperatures increase the importance of understanding the heat transfer patterns which occur throughout the turbine passages. It is often necessary to use a special coating or some form of cooling to maintain metal temperatures at a level which the metal can withstand for long periods of time. Effective cooling schemes can result in significant fuel savings through higher allowable turbine inlet temperatures and can increase engine life. Before proceeding with the development of any new turbine it is economically desirable to create both mathematical and experimental models to study and predict flow characteristics and temperature distributions. Some of the methods are described used to physically model heat transfer patterns, cooling schemes, and other complex flow patterns associated with turbine and aircraft passages.

  3. Neutron Radiography of Fluid Flow for Geothermal Energy Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, P.; Polsky, Y.; Anovitz, L.; Carmichael, J.; Bilheux, H.; Jacobsen, D.; Hussey, D.

    Enhanced geothermal systems seek to expand the potential for geothermal energy by engineering heat exchange systems within the earth. A neutron radiography imaging method has been developed for the study of fluid flow through rock under environmental conditions found in enhanced geothermal energy systems. For this method, a pressure vessel suitable for neutron radiography was designed and fabricated, modifications to imaging instrument setups were tested, multiple contrast agents were tested, and algorithms developed for tracking of flow. The method has shown success for tracking of single phase flow through a manufactured crack in a 3.81 cm (1.5 inch) diameter core within a pressure vessel capable of confinement up to 69 MPa (10,000 psi) using a particle tracking approach with bubbles of fluorocarbon-based fluid as the "particles" and imaging with 10 ms exposures.

  4. Neutron radigoraphy of fluid flow for geothermal energy research

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, Philip R.; Polsky, Yarom; Anovitz, L.; Carmichael, Justin R.; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Jacobson, David; Hussey, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced geothermal systems seek to expand the potential for geothermal energy by engineering heat exchange systems within the earth. A neutron radiography imaging method has been developed for the study of fluid flow through rock under environmental conditions found in enhanced geothermal energy systems. For this method, a pressure vessel suitable for neutron radiography was designed and fabricated, modifications to imaging instrument setups were tested, multiple contrast agents were tested, and algorithms developed for tracking of flow. The method has shown success for tracking of single phase flow through a manufactured crack in a 3.81 cm (1.5 inch) diameter core within a pressure vessel capable of confinement up to 69 MPa (10,000 psi) using a particle tracking approach with bubbles of fluorocarbon-based fluid as the “particles” and imaging with 10 ms exposures.

  5. Numerical study of self-sustained oscillatory flows and heat transfer in channels with a tandem of transverse vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia, Alvaro

    A numerical investigation was conducted into channel flows with a tandem of transverse vortex generators in the form of rectangular cylinders. The oscillatory behavior of the flow is studied. Data for heat transfer and flow losses are presented for 100<=Re<=400 and cylinder separation distances 1<=S/H<=4. The results are obtained by numerical solution of the full Navier-Stokes equations and the energy equation. Self-sustained flow oscillations are found for Re>100. Alternate and dynamic shedding of large vortex structures from the cylinders is observed by visualization of the numerically determined flow field. A heat transfer enhancement up to a factor 1.78 compared to plane channel flow is observed.

  6. Heat to electricity conversion by cold carrier emissive energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strandberg, Rune

    2015-12-01

    This paper suggests a method to convert heat to electricity by the use of devices called cold carrier emissive energy harvesters (cold carrier EEHs). The working principle of such converters is explained and theoretical power densities and efficiencies are calculated for ideal devices. Cold carrier EEHs are based on the same device structure as hot carrier solar cells, but works in an opposite way. Whereas a hot carrier solar cell receives net radiation from the sun and converts some of this radiative heat flow into electricity, a cold carrier EEH sustains a net outflux of radiation to the surroundings while converting some of the energy supplied to it into electricity. It is shown that the most basic type of cold carrier EEHs have the same theoretical efficiency as the ideal emissive energy harvesters described earlier by Byrnes et al. In the present work, it is also shown that if the emission from the cold carrier EEH originates from electron transitions across an energy gap where a difference in the chemical potential of the electrons above and below the energy gap is sustained, power densities slightly higher than those given by Byrnes et al. can be achieved.

  7. Heat to electricity conversion by cold carrier emissive energy harvesters

    SciTech Connect

    Strandberg, Rune

    2015-12-07

    This paper suggests a method to convert heat to electricity by the use of devices called cold carrier emissive energy harvesters (cold carrier EEHs). The working principle of such converters is explained and theoretical power densities and efficiencies are calculated for ideal devices. Cold carrier EEHs are based on the same device structure as hot carrier solar cells, but works in an opposite way. Whereas a hot carrier solar cell receives net radiation from the sun and converts some of this radiative heat flow into electricity, a cold carrier EEH sustains a net outflux of radiation to the surroundings while converting some of the energy supplied to it into electricity. It is shown that the most basic type of cold carrier EEHs have the same theoretical efficiency as the ideal emissive energy harvesters described earlier by Byrnes et al. In the present work, it is also shown that if the emission from the cold carrier EEH originates from electron transitions across an energy gap where a difference in the chemical potential of the electrons above and below the energy gap is sustained, power densities slightly higher than those given by Byrnes et al. can be achieved.

  8. Interpretation of lunar heat flow data. [for estimating bulk uranium abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, J. E.; Morton, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Lunar heat flow observations at the Apollo 15 and 17 sites can be interpreted to imply bulk U concentrations for the moon of 5 to 8 times those of normal chondrites and 2 to 4 times terrestrial values inferred from the earth's heat flow and the assumption of thermal steady state between surface heat flow and heat production. A simple model of nearsurface structure that takes into account the large difference in (highly insulating) regolith thickness between mare and highland provinces is considered. This model predicts atypically high local values of heat flow near the margins of mare regions - possibly a factor of 10 or so higher than the global average. A test of the proposed model using multifrequency microwave techniques appears possible wherein heat flow traverse measurements are made across mare-highland contacts. The theoretical considerations discussed here urge caution in attributing global significance to point heat-flow measurements on the moon.

  9. Vibrational Energy Transfer of Diatomic Gases in Hypersonic Expanding Flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffin, Stephen Merrick

    In high temperature flows related to vehicles at hypersonic speeds significant excitation of the vibrational energy modes of the gas can occur. Accurate predictions of the vibrational state of the gas and the rates of vibrational energy transfer are essential to achieve optimum engine performance, for design of heat shields, and for studies of ground based hypersonic test facilities. The Landau -Teller relaxation model is widely used because it has been shown to give accurate predictions in vibrationally heating flows such as behind forebody shocks. However, a number of experiments in nozzles have indicated that it fails to accurately predict the rate of energy transfer in expanding, or cooling, flow regions and fails to predict the distribution of energy in the vibrational quantum levels. The present study examines the range of applicability of the Landau -Teller model in expanding flows and develops techniques which provide accurate predictions in expanding flows. In the present study, detailed calculations of the vibrational relaxation process of N_2 and CO in cooling flows are conducted. A coupled set of vibrational transition rate equations and quasi one-dimensional fluid dynamic equations is solved. Rapid anharmonic Vibration-Translation transition rates and Vibration -Vibration exchange collisions are found to be responsible for vibrational relaxation acceleration in situations of high vibrational temperature and low translational temperature. The predictions of the detailed master equation solver are in excellent agreement with experimental results. The exact degree of acceleration is cataloged in this study for N_2 and is found to be a function of both the translational temperature (T) and the ratio of vibrational to translational temperatures (T_{vib}/T). Non-Boltzmann population distributions are observed for values of T _{vib}/T as low as 2.0. The local energy transfer rate is shown to be an order of magnitude or more faster than the Landau-Teller model

  10. Forced flow supercritical helium in a closed heat transfer loop subjected to pulsed heat loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoa, Christine; Bonnay, Patrick; Bon-Mardion, Michel; Charvin, Philippe; Cheynel, Jean-Noel; Girard, Alain; Lagier, Benjamin; Michel, Frederic; Monteiro, Lionel; Poncet, Jean-Marc; Roussel, Pascal; Rousset, Bernard; Vallcorba-Carbonell, Roser

    2012-06-01

    The superconducting magnets of the tokamak JT-60SA are cooled by means of forced flows of supercritical helium at 4.4 K and 0.5 MPa. The closed loops transfer heat from the magnets to the refrigerator through heat exchangers immersed into a saturated liquid helium bath. An experimental loop was designed to represent a 1/20 scaled down mock-up of JT-60SA central solenoid cooling circuits. This design for keeping the same transit times in the helium circuits, aims at observing the thermally induced transients in the closed loop. Indeed, heated section simulates the variable loads coming from the magnet circuits. A series of experiments was performed with pulsed loads in an isochoric configuration of the loop. The cold circulator has been characterized under pulsed operation and its performances are addressed. Mass flow regulations at the interface of the refrigerator were tested to smooth the pulsed loads with the saturated liquid bath acting as a thermal buffer. Knowledge of the pulsed loads effects on the cryogenic components is important in view of a safe operation of the cryogenic system.

  11. Heat Transfer Effects on Laminar Velocity Profiles in Pipe Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Robert; Jenkins, Thomas

    1998-11-01

    Heat Transfer Effects on Laminar Velocity Profiles in Pipe Flow. Robert L. Powell, Thomas P. Jenkins Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science University of California, Davis, CA 95616 Using laser Doppler velocimetry, we have measured the axial velocity profiles for steady, pressure driven, laminar flow of water in a circular tube. The flow was established in a one inch diameter seamless glass tube. The entry length prior to the measuring section was over one hundred diameters. Reynolds numbers in the range 500-2000 were used. Under conditions where the temperature difference between the fluid and the surroundings differed by as little as 0.2C, we found significant asymmetries in the velocity profiles. This asymmetry was most pronounced in the vertical plane. Varying the temperature difference moved the velocity maximum either above or below the centerline depending upon whether the fluid was warmer or cooler than the room. These results compare well to existing calculations. Using the available theory and our experiments it is possible to identify parameter ranges where non-ideal conditions(not parabolic velocity profiles) will be found. Supported by the EMSP Program of DOE.

  12. Effect of variable magnetic field on nanofluid flow and heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoughi, Mohammadkazem; Sheikholeslami, Mohsen; Shariatmadar, Hamed

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, Control Volume based Finite Element Method is applied to simulate nanofluid flow and heat transfer in presence of variable magnetic field. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations are coupled with the energy equation due to the heat transfer by means of the Boussinessq approximation. Then, the 2D non-dimensional full MHD equations in terms of stream function, temperature, magnetic field and vorticity are solved by using CVFEM. The calculations were performed for different governing parameters namely; the Rayleigh number, nanoparticle volume fraction and Hartmann number arising from MHD. Results show that Nusselt number has direct relationship with Rayleigh number, nanoparticle volume fraction while it has reverse relationship with Hartmann number. Also it can be found that enhancement in heat.

  13. Laminar natural convection heat transfer and air flow in three-dimensional cubic enclosures with a partially heated wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellah, S.; Ben-Cheikh, N.; Ben-Beya, B.; Lili, T.

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, a finite volume computational procedure and a full multigrid technique are used to investigate laminar natural convection in partially heated cubic enclosures. Effects of heated strip disposition in the enclosure on the heat transfer rate are studied. Results are presented in the form of flow lines, isotherms plots, average Nusselt numbers, and average temperature on the heat source surface. Statistical distributions of temperature and average velocity fields and their root-mean-square values are presented and discussed.

  14. A note on drillhole depths required for reliable heat flow determinations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, D.S.; Howell, J.; Sass, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    In general, there is a limiting depth in a drillhole above which the reliability of a single determination of heat flow decreases rapidly with decreasing depth and below which the statistical uncertainty of a heat flow determination does not change perceptibly with increasing depth. This feature has been established empirically for a test case comprising a group of twelve heat flow sites in the Republic of Zambia. The technique consists of constructing heat flow versus depth curves for individual sites by progressively discarding data from the lower part of the hole and recomputing heat flow from the remaining data. For the Zambian test case, the curves converge towards a uniform value of 67 ?? 3 mW m-2 when all available data are used, but values of heat flow calculated for shallow(< 100 m) parts of the same holes range from 45 to 95 mW m-2. The heat flow versus depth curves are enclosed by a perturbation envelope which has an amplitude of 40 mW m-2 at the surface and decreases linearly to the noise level at 190 m. For the test region of Zambia a depth of 170 m is needed to guarantee a heat flow measurement within ?? 10% of the background regional value. It is reasonable to expect that this depth will be shallower in some regions and deeper in others. Features of heat flow perturbation envelopes can be used as quantitative reliability indices for heat flow studies. ?? 1984.

  15. Low temperature latent heat thermal energy storage - Heat storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhat, A.

    1983-01-01

    Heat-of-fusion storage materials for low temperature latent heat storage in the temperature range 0-120 C are reviewed. Organic and inorganic heat storage materials classified as paraffins, fatty acids, inorganic salt hydrates and eutectic compounds are considered. The melting and freezing behavior of the various substances is investigated using the techniques of Thermal Analysis and Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The importance of thermal cycling tests for establishing the long-term stability of the storage materials is discussed. Finally, some data pertaining to the corrosion compatibility of heat-of-fusion substances with conventional materials of construction is presented.

  16. Characterization of a flow-through microcalorimeter for measuring the heat production of cardiac trabeculae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taberner, A. J.; Hunter, I. W.; Kirton, R. S.; Nielsen, P. M. F.; Loiselle, D. S.

    2005-10-01

    The energy consumption of isolated cardiac trabeculae can be inferred from measurements of their heat production. Once excised from the heart, to remain viable, trabeculae require continuous superfusion with an oxygen- and nutrient-rich solution. Flow-through calorimeters enable trabeculae to be maintained in a stable and controlled environment for many hours at a time. In this paper we describe and characterize a flow-through microcalorimeter, with sensitivity in the 1μW range, for measuring the heat output of 10μg cardiac trabeculae. The device uses infrared-sensitive, thin-film thermopile sensors to provide a noncontact method for measuring temperature differences. The sensors are capable of resolving 5μK temperature differences within the superfusing fluid. The microcalorimeter has a sensitivity of 2.56V/W at a flow rate of 1μl/s, with a time constant of approximately 3.5 s. The sensitivity and time constant are strongly dependent upon the flow rate. Predictions of a finite-element model of the calorimeter's characteristics compare favorably with measured data over a wide range of flow rates.

  17. Experimental and numerical simulations of flow and heat transfer in heat exchanger elements using liquid crystal thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasiek, Jan; Ciofalo, Michele; Wierzbowski, Maciej

    2004-05-01

    Experimental and numerical investigation of heat transfer and fluid flow were conducted for classic heat exchanger elements (flat plate with fin-tubes in-line, staggered and with vortex generators) and corrugated-undulated ducts under transitional and weakly turbulent conditions. The dependence of average heat transfer and pressure drop on Reynolds number and geometrical parameters was investigated. Distributions of local heat transfer coefficient were obtained by using liquid crystal thermography and surface-averaged values were computed. Three-dimensional numerical simulations were conducted by a finite-volume method using a low-Reynolds number k-ɛ model under the assumption of fully developed flow. Computed flow fields provided otherwise inaccessible information on the flow patterns and the mechanisms of heat transfer enhancement.

  18. Crater Relaxation and Heat Flow on Dione and Tethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, O. L.; Schenk, P.

    2012-12-01

    Crater relaxation magnitudes on Saturn's mid-sized icy satellites can provide a record of the history of heat flow across their surfaces [Schenk, 1989]. Precise characterization of the morphologies of these craters is therefore a priority, and Cassini's orbital tour of the Saturnian system [Matson et al., 2004] has provided near-global stereo coverage for each of the satellites at resolutions better than 1.5 km/px. We have used customized ISIS software developed at LPI to create and process digital elevation models (DEMs) of all of Saturn's mid-sized icy satellites using Cassini stereo images and photoclinometry. We have so far used these DEMs to obtain depth/diameter plots for a wide range of crater diameters on Rhea and Iapetus, from which we have been able to assess the state of crater relaxation on these satellites [White et al., in preparation]. We are currently in the process of obtaining crater measurements for Dione and Tethys, two satellites that show a more complex crater relaxation history than either Rhea or Iapetus [Jaumann et al., 2009]. Depth/diameter plots for all four satellites are shown in Fig. 1. Relaxation for all crater sizes appears to be negligible on Iapetus, and on Rhea only affects craters above ~100 km diameter, regardless of location on the satellite [White and Schenk, 2011]. On Dione and Tethys, relaxation is less size-dependent and appears to be controlled by location on the satellites, indicating a history of differential heat flow across their surfaces. On Tethys, relaxation and heat flow decreased prior to ~1 Gyr, but continued on Dione for a longer time and with greater intensity [Moore and Schenk, 2007]. We intend to update our measurements for Dione and Tethys with higher quality DEMs obtained from data from recent Cassini flybys. We intend to present depth/diameter plots for Dione and Tethys that are of completeness comparable to our Rhea and Iapetus plots. We will also map relaxation magnitudes of large basins across Dione and

  19. Energy flows, metabolism and translation

    PubMed Central

    Pascal, Robert; Boiteau, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Thermodynamics provides an essential approach to understanding how living organisms survive in an organized state despite the second law. Exchanges with the environment constantly produce large amounts of entropy compensating for their own organized state. In addition to this constraint on self-organization, the free energy delivered to the system, in terms of potential, is essential to understand how a complex chemistry based on carbon has emerged. Accordingly, the amount of free energy brought about through discrete events must reach the strength needed to induce chemical changes in which covalent bonds are reorganized. The consequence of this constraint was scrutinized in relation to both the development of a carbon metabolism and that of translation. Amino acyl adenylates involved as aminoacylation intermediates of the latter process reach one of the higher free energy levels found in biochemistry, which may be informative on the range in which energy was exchanged in essential early biochemical processes. The consistency of this range with the amount of energy needed to weaken covalent bonds involving carbon may not be accidental but the consequence of the abovementioned thermodynamic constraints. This could be useful in building scenarios for the emergence and early development of translation. PMID:21930587

  20. Energy storage: Redox flow batteries go organic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Sprenkle, Vince

    2016-03-01

    The use of renewable resources as providers to the electrical grid is hampered by the intermittent and irregular nature in which they generate energy. Electrical energy storage technology could provide a solution and now, by using an iterative design process, a promising anolyte for use in redox flow batteries has been developed.

  1. Flow and heat transfer in rotating-disc systems. Volume I - Rotor-stator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, J. M.; Roger, R. H.

    The rotating flows occurring inside turbomachinery are discussed. Laminar and turbulent flow over a single disk and heat transfer from a single disk are addressed. Rotor-stator systems with and without superposed flow, heat transfer in rotor-stator systems, and the ingress problem of sealing rotor-stator systems are examined.

  2. Similarity flow in interaction of a shock wave with an inclined heated channel

    SciTech Connect

    Artemiev, V.I.; Medvedyuk, S.A.; Rybakov, V.A.

    1993-11-01

    A study is made of gasdynamic flow that initiates when a shock wave propagates along a thin heated channel. Analytical conditions of the onset of an unsteady flow precursor are obtained. The flow similarity is proved experimentally; precursor characteristics vs shock wave and heated channel parameters are analyzed.

  3. Heat exchange model in absorption chamber of water-direct-absorption-typed laser energy meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng Wei, Ji; Qun Sun, Li; Zhang, Kai; Hu, XiaoYang; Zhou, Shan

    2015-04-01

    The interaction between laser and water flow is very complicated in the absorption chamber of a high energy laser (HEL) energy meter which directly uses water as an absorbing medium. Therefore, the heat exchange model cannot be studied through traditional methods, but it is the most important factor to improve heat exchange efficiency in the absorption chamber. After the exchanges of heat and mass were deeply analyzed, experimental study and numerical fitting were brought out. The original testing data of laser power and water flow temperature at one moment were utilized to calculate those at the next moment, and then the calculated temperature curve was compared with the measured one. If the two curves matched well, the corresponding coefficient was obtained. Meanwhile, numerous experiments were performed to study the effects of laser power, duration, focal spot scale, and water flow rate on heat exchange coefficient. In addition, the relationship between water phase change and heat exchange was analyzed. The heat exchange coefficient was increased by optimizing the construction of the absorption chamber or increasing water flow rate. The results provide the reference for design of water-direct-absorption-typed HEL energy meters, as well as for analysis of the interaction between other similar lasers and water flow.

  4. Collection of low-grade waste heat for enhanced energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dede, Ercan M.; Schmalenberg, Paul; Wang, Chi-Ming; Zhou, Feng; Nomura, Tsuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Enhanced energy harvesting through the collection of low-grade waste heat is experimentally demonstrated. A structural optimization technique is exploited in the design of a thermal-composite substrate to guide and gather the heat emanating from multiple sources to a predetermined location. A thermoelectric generator is then applied at the selected focusing region to convert the resulting low-grade waste heat to electrical power. The thermal characteristics of the device are experimentally verified by direct temperature measurements of the system and numerically validated via heat conduction simulations. Electrical performance under natural and forced convection is measured, and in both cases, the device with optimized heat flow control plus energy harvesting demonstrates increased power generation when compared with a baseline waste heat recovery system. Electronics applications include energy scavenging for autonomously powered sensor networks or self-actuated devices.

  5. Energy production from waste heat by means of elastomers or memory metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljung, L.

    1980-05-01

    Calculation of the energy of an ideal heat engine for a flow between waste water and cooling water was made. Also the Brayton, Carnot and Rankine cycles were computed as well as the processes with nitinol or elastomers as converters. It was shown that half the energy can be recovered by a nitinol heat engine which is comparable to or has better efficiency than the Rankine cycle. The memory metal makes better use of the temperature difference than the Rankine cycle. Elastomers or Gadolinium may be used to utilize energy at low waste heat temperatures.

  6. Field Flows of Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Cahn, Robert N.; de Putter, Roland; Linder, Eric V.

    2008-07-08

    Scalar field dark energy evolving from a long radiation- or matter-dominated epoch has characteristic dynamics. While slow-roll approximations are invalid, a well defined field expansion captures the key aspects of the dark energy evolution during much of the matter-dominated epoch. Since this behavior is determined, it is not faithfully represented if priors for dynamical quantities are chosen at random. We demonstrate these features for both thawing and freezing fields, and for some modified gravity models, and unify several special cases in the literature.

  7. A Conceptual Change Model for Teaching Heat Energy, Heat Transfer and Insulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, C. K.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the existing knowledge that pre-service elementary teachers (PSETs) have regarding heat energy, heat transfer and insulation. The PSETs' knowledge of heat energy was initially assessed by using an activity: determining which container would be best to keep hot water warm for the longest period of time. Results showed that…

  8. Laminar and turbulent incompressible fluid flow analysis with heat transfer by the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the finite element method applied to two-dimensional incompressible fluid flow analysis with heat transfer is performed using a mixed Galerkin finite element method with the primitive variable form of the model equations. Four biquadratic, quadrilateral elements are compared in this study--the serendipity biquadratic element with bilinear continuous pressure interpolation (Q2(8)-Q1) and the Lagrangian biquadratic element with bilinear continuous pressure interpolation (Q2-Q1) of the Taylor-Hood form. A modified form of the Q2-Q1 element is also studied. The pressure interpolation is augmented by a discontinuous constant shape function for pressure (Q2-Q1+). The discontinuous pressure element formulation makes use of biquadratic shape functions and a discontinuous linear interpolation of the pressure (Q2-P1(3)). Laminar flow solutions, with heat transfer, are compared to analytical and computational benchmarks for flat channel, backward-facing step and buoyancy driven flow in a square cavity. It is shown that the discontinuous pressure elements provide superior solution characteristics over the continuous pressure elements. Highly accurate heat transfer solutions are obtained and the Q2-P1(3) element is chosen for extension to turbulent flow simulations. Turbulent flow solutions are presented for both low turbulence Reynolds number and high Reynolds number formulations of two-equation turbulence models. The following three forms of the length scale transport equation are studied; the turbulence energy dissipation rate ([var epsilon]), the turbulence frequency ([omega]) and the turbulence time scale (tau). It is shown that the low turbulence Reynolds number model consisting of the K - [tau] transport equations, coupled with the damping functions of Shih and Hsu, provides an optimal combination of numerical stability and solution accuracy for the flat channel flow.

  9. Flow dynamics and heat transfer of wavy condensate film

    SciTech Connect

    Miyara, Akio

    1999-07-01

    Wave evolution and heat transfer behavior of a wavy condensate film down a vertical wall have been investigated by a finite different method, in which the algorithm is based on the HSMAC method, and a staggered grid fixed on a physical space is employed. For the moving interface, newly proposed methods are used. A random perturbation of the film thickness is generated near the leading edge. The perturbation quickly diminishes once and small-amplitude long waves are propagated downstream. Then the amplitude of the wave increases rapidly at a certain position, and the wave shape changes from a sinusoidal wave to a pulse-like solitary wave which is composed of a large-amplitude wave and capillary waves. Figure A-1 shows an instantaneous stream line of the pulse-like solitary waves. The stream line is obtained for moving coordinates with the wave velocity. A circulation flow occurs in the large waves, and it disappears in the interacting wave at downstream. In the capillary waves, no circulation flow generates. The circulation flow affects the temperature field. Temperature contour lines are deformed by the convection effect of the circulation flow. On the other hand, the temperature contour is dense in the wave toughs and substrates because of the film thinning effect. These facets imply that the heat transfer is enhanced by two kinds of effects: the convection and the local film thinning. Figure A-3 shows the comparison of the present simulation results with the Chun-Seban equation for wavy film and the Nusselt equation for laminar film with smooth surface. Nu of the present results departs from Nusselt equation because of the wave generation. The pint of the departure depends on Prandtl number. Lower Prandtl number departs at higher Reynolds number. In the fully developed wave region, the simulation result of Pr = 5 reasonably agrees to the Chun-Seban equation. For Pr = 10, however, the simulation result is fairly higher. Because of limitation of calculation scheme

  10. Distribution Pattern of Terrestrial Heat Flow in Bohai Bay Basin, North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Gong, Y.; Liu, S.; Li, C.; Li, H.

    2004-12-01

    New temperature data from wells in Bohai bay basin increasing associated with the enhancement of oil and gas exploration there provides more reliable information about studying on Terrestrial heat flow pattern. Based on the data from 88 systematic continuous temperature logging curves and more than 1000 well test temperature data, along with the corresponding thermo-physical parameters of rock samples, here we determined 53 heat flow data and estimated other 172 according to thermal resistance method, then the distribution Pattern of heat flow in Bohai Bay basin is presented. Heat flow in Bohai bay basin is relatively large than those in the surrounding mountain areas. For instance, heat flow of Yanshan, north of the basin, is only low as 25 ~ 54 mW/m2, and less than 50 mW/m2 for Taihang mountain to the west, the average heat flow of Luxi Uplift is about 54 mW/m2. Crustal thickness of regions outside the basin to the west and north approximating to 36~44km, apparently is larger than that of basin, which maybe accounts for the high heat flow in Bohai bay basin. Those regions of relatively thin crust within the basin are of middle-high heat flow. Heat flow in such depressions as the Lower Liaohe, Bozhong, Jiyang and Yongqing area northeast of Jizhong Depression, together with Bohai offshore, for example, are all larger than 64 mW/m2, and even high as 70 mW/m2 for some regions with mantle upwelling. Low heat flow appears in those areas with relatively thick crust. For instance, heat flow in Linqing Depression, southwest margin of Jizhong Depression and southern Huanghua Depression, are all less than 64 mW/m2, even less than 60 mW/m2 for those areas with mantle downwelling. Heat flow pattern in Bohai Bay basin is negative correlation with crustal thickness, for those regions with relatively crustal thinning, heat derived from the deep earth is more due to the large lithospheric extension, resulting in the high heat flow; while for those with crustal thickening, heat

  11. Global map of heat flow on a 2 degree grid - digitally available

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. Huw

    2014-05-01

    surface heat flow, Geochemistry, Geophysics and Geosystems, 14, 4608-4622, doi 10.1002/ggge.20271. Davies JH & Davies DR, (2010) Earth's surface heat flux, Solid Earth, 1, 5-24, www.solid-earth.net/1/5/2010/. Jaupart C, Labrosse S, Mareschal J-C, (2007) Temperatures, heat and energy in the mantle of the Earth, in Treatise on Geophysics, v7 Mantle Convection, ed D. Bercovici, 253-303, Elsevier, Amsterdam

  12. Heat flow, deep formation temperature and thermal structure of the Tarim Basin, northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaowen; Lei, Xiao; Feng, Changge; Li, Xianglan

    2016-04-01

    depth are the favorable conditions for hydrocarbon generation and preservation. As far as heat budget of the Tarim Basin is concerned, the radiogenic heat from the sedimentary cover accounts only for 20 percent of the surface heat flow (~9 mW/m2), while the mantle heat flow is estimated to be low as 6~15 mW/m2; this indicates the dominant contribution of crustal radiogenic heat to the observed heat flow. Any variations in surface heat flow for the Tarim Basin can be due only to changes in crustal heat production. Thermal contrast between the Tarim Basin and Tibet Plateau, represented by a difference in surface heat flow and deep crustal temperature, is remarkable. This inherited thermal contrast can be traced as far as before the India-Asia collision. Moreover, the lithosphere beneath the Tarim Basin is sufficiently strong to resist the gravitational potential energy difference and tectonic forces from Tibet. The observed thermal and rheological contrast accounts for the differential Cenozoic deformation in the Tarim Basin and adjacent areas.

  13. Study on transient local entropy generation in pulsating fully developed laminar flow through an externally heated pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapıcı, Hüseyin; Kayataş, Nesrin; Baştürk, Gamze; Kahraman, Nafiz

    2006-11-01

    This study presents the investigation of transient local entropy generation rate in pulsating fully developed laminar flow through an externally heated pipe. The flow inlet to the pipe is considered as pulsating at a constant period and amplitude (only the velocity oscillates). The simulations are extended to include different pulsating flow cases (sinusoidal flow, step flow, and saw-down flow). To determine the effects of the mean velocity, the period and the amplitude of the pulsating flow on the entropy generation rate, the pulsating flow is examined for various cases of these parameters. Two-dimensional flow and temperature fields are computed numerically with the help of the fluent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. In addition to this CFD code, a computer program has been developed to calculate numerically the entropy generation and other thermodynamic parameters by using the results of the calculations performed for the flow and temperature fields. In all investigated cases, the irreversibility due to the heat transfer dominates. The step flow constitutes the highest temperature (about 919 K) and generates the highest total entropy rate (about 0.033 W/K) within the pipe. The results of this study indicate that in the considered situations, the inverse of square of temperature (1/ T 2) is more dominant on the entropy generation than the temperature gradients, and that the increase of the mean velocity of the pulsating flow has an adverse effect on the ratio of the useful energy transfer rate to irreversibility rate.

  14. Pore-Scale Simulations Of Flow And Heat Transport In Saturated Permeable Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zegers, G. R., Sr.; Herrera, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The study of heat transport in porous media is important for applications such as the use of temperature as environmental tracer, geothermal energy, fuel cells, etc. In recent years, there have been several advances in computational techniques that have allowed to investigate different processes in porous media at the pore-scale through detailed numerical simulations that considered synthetic porous media formed by regular grains and pore bodies arranged in different geometrical configurations. The main objective of this research is to investigate the influence of pore configurations on flow velocity and heat transport in 2D saturated porous media. We use OpenFOAM to solve flow and heat transport equations at the pore-scale. We performed detailed pore-scale numerical simulations in synthetic 2D porous media generated from regularly placed and randomly distributed circular solid grains. For each geometrical configuration we performed numerical simulations to compute the flow field in order to calculate properties such as as tortuosity, mean velocity and hydraulic conductivity, and to identify Lagrangian coherent structures to charaterize the velocity fields. We then perform heat transport simulations to relate the properties of the velocity fields and the main heat transport mechanisms. The analysis of the simulations results showed that in all the simulated configurations effective flow properties become valid at scales of 10 to 15 pore bodies. For the same porosity and boundary conditions we obtained that as expected tortuosity in the random structure is higher than in the regular configurations, while hydraulic conductivity is smaller for the random case. The results of heat transport simulations show significant differences in temperature distribution for the regular and random pore structures. For the simulated boundary and initial conditions, heat transport is more efficient in the random structure than in the regular geometry. This result indicates that the

  15. A sensitive flow-through microcalorimeter for measuring the heat production of cardiac trabeculae.

    PubMed

    Taberner, A; Kirton, R; F Nielsen, P; Loiselle, D; Hunter, I

    2004-01-01

    Measurement of the energy consumption of isolated cardiac muscle requires a flow-through microcalorimeter with sensitivity in the microW range. In this paper we describe and characterize a sensitive flow-through microcalorimeter, designed and constructed for measuring the heat output of cardiac trabeculae. The device exploits a non-contact, temperature-sensing technique utilizing infra-red-sensitive, thin-film thermopile sensors. The microcalorimeter achieves a sensitivity of 1.8-1.9 V/W at a flow rate of 1 microl/s, with a time constant of approximately 3.5 s. The typical power signal-to-noise ratio is better than 200. Predictions of a finite element model of the calorimeter's characteristics compare favourably with measured data. PMID:17272117

  16. Study of energy flows in Pantanal - Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santanna, F. B.; Arruda, P. H. Z. D.; Pinto-Jr, O. B.

    2014-12-01

    The main goal of this work was to estimate fluxes using the eddy covariance method in a wetland area, basically with herb-shrub physiognomy, sparse woody vegetation and approximately 4m height. The geographical position of the Pantanal, altitude, latitude, longitude, climate and weather conditions are determined by the dynamics of the atmosphere that affects the whole South America and consequently influence the ecological framework of ecosystems. The results shown by the components considered in the energy balance were more significant during the day, which the atmospheric boundary layer extends from the ground to about 50 or 100 meters height, showing greater instability and turbulence (u* > 0.2 m / s), and this turbulence is what justifies the use of the eddy covariance method to estimate the sensible and latent heat flux. The Pantanal presents seasonal difference between the densities estimates of sensible (H) and latent (LE) heat flux. During the rainy season the sensible heat flux (H) was 30% and the latent heat flux (LE) 58%. During the dry season the sensible heat flux (H) was 46% and the latent heat flux (LE) 40% of the energy budget.

  17. Experimental investigation on the heat transfer characteristics and flow pattern in vertical narrow channels heated from one side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lihao; Li, Gang; Tao, Leren

    2016-07-01

    Experimental investigation for the flow boiling of water in a vertical rectangular channel was conducted to reveal the boiling heat transfer mechanism and flow patterns map aspects. The onset of nucleate boiling went upward with the increasing of the working fluid mass flow rate or the decreasing of the inlet working fluid temperature. As the vapour quality was increased, the local heat transfer coefficient increased first, then decreased, followed by various flow patterns. The test data from other researchers had a similar pattern transition for the bubble-slug flow and the slug-annular flow. Flow pattern transition model analysis was performed to make the comparison with current test data. The slug-annular and churn-annular transition models showed a close trend with current data except that the vapor phase superficial velocity of flow pattern transition was much higher than that of experimental data.

  18. Modeling fluid flow and heat transfer at Basin and Range faults: preliminary results for Leach hot springs, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    López, Dina L.; Smith, Leslie; Storey, Michael L.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrothermal systems of the Basin and Range Province are often located at or near major range bounding normal faults. The flow of fluid and energy at these faults is affected by the advective transfer of heat and fluid from an to the adjacent mountain ranges and valleys, This paper addresses the effect of the exchange of fluid and energy between the country rock, the valley fill sediments, and the fault zone, on the fluid and heat flow regimes at the fault plane. For comparative purposes, the conditions simulated are patterned on Leach Hot Springs in southern Grass Valley, Nevada. Our simulations indicated that convection can exist at the fault plane even when the fault is exchanging significant heat and fluid with the surrounding country rock and valley fill sediments. The temperature at the base of the fault decreased with increasing permeability of the country rock. Higher groundwater discharge from the fault and lower temperatures at the base of the fault are favored by high country rock permabilities and fault transmissivities. Preliminary results suggest that basal temperatures and flow rates for Leach Hot Springs can not be simulated with a fault 3 km deep and an average regional heat flow of 150 mW/m2 because the basal temperature and mass discharge rates are too low. A fault permeable to greater depths or a higher regional heat flow may be indicated for these springs.

  19. 3D numerical simulation on fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics in multistage heat exchanger with slit fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, W. Q.; Cheng, Y. P.; Lee, T. S.

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, a numerical investigation is performed for three-stage heat exchangers with plain plate fins and slit fins respectively, with a three-dimensional laminar conjugated model. The tubes are arranged in a staggered way, and heat conduction in fins is considered. In order to save the computer resource and speed up the numerical simulation, the numerical modeling is carried out stage by stage. In order to avoid the large pressure drop penalty in enhancing heat transfer, a slit fin is presented with the strip arrangement of “front coarse and rear dense” along the flow direction. The numerical simulation shows that, compared to the plain plate fin heat exchanger, the increase in the heat transfer in the slit fin heat exchanger is higher than that of the pressure drop, which proves the excellent performance of this slit fin. The fluid flow and heat transfer performance along the stages is also provided.

  20. California energy flow in 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, I.Y.; Briggs, C.K.

    1993-04-01

    Energy consumption in California fell in 1991 for the first time in five years. The State`s economy was especially hard hit by a continuing national recession. The construction industry for the second year experienced a dramatic downturn. Energy use in the industrial sector showed a modest increase, but consumption in other end-use categories declined. The decrease in energy used in transportation can be traced to a substantial fall in the sales of both highway diesel fuels and vessel bunkering fuels at California ports, the latter reflecting a mid-year increase in taxes. Gasoline sales by contrast increased as did the number of miles traveled and the number of automobiles in the State. Production in California`s oil and gas fields was at 1990 levels thus arresting a steady decline in output. Due to enlarged steam flooding operations, production at several fields reached record levels. Also countering the decline in many of California fields was new production from the Port Arguello offshore field. California natural gas production, despite a modest 1991 increase, will not fill the use within the State. Petroleum comprised more than half of the State`s energy supply principally for transportation. Natural gas use showed a small increase. Oil products play virtually no role in electrical production. The largest single source of electricity to the State is imports from the Pacific Northwest and from coal-fired plants in the Southwest. Combined contributions to transmitted electricity from renewable and alternate sources declined as hydropower was constrained by a prolonged drought and as geothermal power from the largest and oldest field at The Geysers fell. Windpower grew slightly; however solar power remained at 1990 levels and made no substantial contribution to total power generation.

  1. California energy flow in 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, I.Y.; Briggs, C.K.

    1995-04-01

    Energy consumption in the state of California decreased about 3% in 1993 reflecting continuation of the recession that was manifest in a moribund construction industry and a high state unemployment that ran counter to national recovery trends. Residential/commercial use decreased slightly reflecting a mild winter in the populous southern portion of the state, a decrease that was offset to some extent by an increase in the state population. Industrial consumption of purchased energy declined substantially as did production of self-generated electricity for in-house use. Consumption in the transportation sector decreased slightly. The amount of power transmitted by the utilities was at 1992 levels; however a smaller proportion was produced by the utilities themselves. Generation of electricity by nonutilities, primarily cogenerators and small power producers, was the largest of any state in the US. The growth in the number of private power producers combined with increased amounts of electricity sold to the public utilities set the stage for the sweeping proposals before the California Public Utility Commission to permit direct sales from the nonutilities to retail customers. California production of both oil and natural gas declined; however, to meet demand only the imports of natural gas increased. A break in the decade-long drought during the 1992--1993 season resulted in a substantial increase in the amount of hydroelectricity generated during the year. Geothermal energy`s contribution increased substantially because of the development of new resources by small power producers. Decline in steam production continued at The Geysers, the state`s largest field, principally owned and managed by a public utility. Increases in windpower constituted 1--1/2% of the total electric supply--up slightly from 1992. Several solar photo voltaic demonstration plants were in operation, but their contribution remained small.

  2. ELECTRON HEATING BY THE ION CYCLOTRON INSTABILITY IN COLLISIONLESS ACCRETION FLOWS. II. ELECTRON HEATING EFFICIENCY AS A FUNCTION OF FLOW CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sironi, Lorenzo

    2015-02-20

    In the innermost regions of low-luminosity accretion flows, including Sgr A* at the center of our Galaxy, the frequency of Coulomb collisions is so low that the plasma has two temperatures, with the ions substantially hotter than the electrons. This paradigm assumes that Coulomb collisions are the only channel for transferring the ion energy to the electrons. In this work, the second of a series, we assess the efficiency of electron heating by ion velocity-space instabilities in collisionless accretion flows. The instabilities are seeded by the pressure anisotropy induced by magnetic field amplification, coupled to the adiabatic invariance of the particle magnetic moments. Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we showed in Paper I that if the electron-to-ion temperature ratio is T {sub 0e}/T {sub 0i} ≲ 0.2, the ion cyclotron instability is the dominant mode for ion betas β{sub 0i} ∼ 5-30 (here, β{sub 0i} is the ratio of ion thermal pressure to magnetic pressure), as appropriate for the midplane of low-luminosity accretion flows. In this work, we employ analytical theory and one-dimensional PIC simulations (with the box aligned with the fastest-growing wave vector of the ion cyclotron mode) to fully characterize how the electron heating efficiency during the growth of the ion cyclotron instability depends on the electron-to-proton temperature ratio, the plasma beta, the Alfvén speed, the amplification rate of the mean field (in units of the ion Larmor frequency), and the proton-to-electron mass ratio. Our findings can be incorporated as a physically grounded subgrid model into global fluid simulations of low-luminosity accretion flows, thus helping to assess the validity of the two-temperature assumption.

  3. Analytical and numerical study on cooling flow field designs performance of PEM fuel cell with variable heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshari, Ebrahim; Ziaei-Rad, Masoud; Jahantigh, Nabi

    2016-06-01

    In PEM fuel cells, during electrochemical generation of electricity more than half of the chemical energy of hydrogen is converted to heat. This heat of reactions, if not exhausted properly, would impair the performance and durability of the cell. In general, large scale PEM fuel cells are cooled by liquid water that circulates through coolant flow channels formed in bipolar plates or in dedicated cooling plates. In this paper, a numerical method has been presented to study cooling and temperature distribution of a polymer membrane fuel cell stack. The heat flux on the cooling plate is variable. A three-dimensional model of fluid flow and heat transfer in cooling plates with 15 cm × 15 cm square area is considered and the performances of four different coolant flow field designs, parallel field and serpentine fields are compared in terms of maximum surface temperature, temperature uniformity and pressure drop characteristics. By comparing the results in two cases, the constant and variable heat flux, it is observed that applying constant heat flux instead of variable heat flux which is actually occurring in the fuel cells is not an accurate assumption. The numerical results indicated that the straight flow field model has temperature uniformity index and almost the same temperature difference with the serpentine models, while its pressure drop is less than all of the serpentine models. Another important advantage of this model is the much easier design and building than the spiral models.

  4. High energy density redox flow device

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, W. Craig; Ho, Bryan Y; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2014-05-13

    Redox flow devices are described in which at least one of the positive electrode or negative electrode-active materials is a semi-solid or is a condensed ion-storing electroactive material, and in which at least one of the electrode-active materials is transported to and from an assembly at which the electrochemical reaction occurs, producing electrical energy. The electronic conductivity of the semi-solid is increased by the addition of conductive particles to suspensions and/or via the surface modification of the solid in semi-solids (e.g., by coating the solid with a more electron conductive coating material to increase the power of the device). High energy density and high power redox flow devices are disclosed. The redox flow devices described herein can also include one or more inventive design features. In addition, inventive chemistries for use in redox flow devices are also described.

  5. Gas Flow, Particle Acceleration, and Heat Transfer in Cold Spray: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shuo; Meyer, Morten; Li, Wenya; Liao, Hanlin; Lupoi, Rocco

    2016-06-01

    Cold spraying is increasingly attracting attentions from both scientific and industrial communities due to its unique `low-temperature' coating build-up process and its potential applications in the additive manufacturing across a variety of industries. The existing studies mainly focused on the following subjects: particle acceleration and heating, coating build-up, coating formation mechanism, coating properties, and coating applications, among which particle acceleration and heating can be regarded as the premise of the other subjects because it directly determines whether particles have sufficient energy to deposit and form the coating. Investigations on particle acceleration and heating behavior in cold spraying have been widely conducted both numerically and experimentally over decades, where many valuable conclusions were drawn. However, existing literature on this topic is vast; a systematical summery and review work is still lack so far. Besides, some curtail issues involved in modeling and experiments are still not quite clear, which needs to be further clarified. Hence, a comprehensive summary and review of the literature are very necessary. In this paper, the gas flow, particle acceleration, and heat transfer behavior in the cold spray process are systematically reviewed. Firstly, a brief introduction is given to introduce the early analytical models for predicting the gas flow and particle velocity in cold spraying. Subsequently, special attention is directed towards the application of computational fluid dynamics technique for cold spray modeling. Finally, the experimental observations and measurements in cold spraying are summarized.

  6. Gas Flow, Particle Acceleration, and Heat Transfer in Cold Spray: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shuo; Meyer, Morten; Li, Wenya; Liao, Hanlin; Lupoi, Rocco

    2016-04-01

    Cold spraying is increasingly attracting attentions from both scientific and industrial communities due to its unique `low-temperature' coating build-up process and its potential applications in the additive manufacturing across a variety of industries. The existing studies mainly focused on the following subjects: particle acceleration and heating, coating build-up, coating formation mechanism, coating properties, and coating applications, among which particle acceleration and heating can be regarded as the premise of the other subjects because it directly determines whether particles have sufficient energy to deposit and form the coating. Investigations on particle acceleration and heating behavior in cold spraying have been widely conducted both numerically and experimentally over decades, where many valuable conclusions were drawn. However, existing literature on this topic is vast; a systematical summery and review work is still lack so far. Besides, some curtail issues involved in modeling and experiments are still not quite clear, which needs to be further clarified. Hence, a comprehensive summary and review of the literature are very necessary. In this paper, the gas flow, particle acceleration, and heat transfer behavior in the cold spray process are systematically reviewed. Firstly, a brief introduction is given to introduce the early analytical models for predicting the gas flow and particle velocity in cold spraying. Subsequently, special attention is directed towards the application of computational fluid dynamics technique for cold spray modeling. Finally, the experimental observations and measurements in cold spraying are summarized.

  7. A CFD technique to investigate the chocked flow and heat transfer characteristic in a micro-channel heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azari, Ahmad; Bahraini, Abdorrasoul; Marhamati, Saeideh

    2015-04-01

    In this research, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technique was used to investigate the effect of choking on the flow and heat transfer characteristics of a typical micro-channel heat sink. Numerical simulations have been carried out using Spalart-Allmaras model. Comparison of the numerical results for the heat transfer rate, mass flow rate and Stanton number with the experimental data were conducted. Relatively good agreement was achieved with maximum relative error 16%, and 8% for heat transfer and mass flow rate, respectively. Also, average relative error 9.2% was obtained for the Stanton number in comparison with the experimental values. Although, the results show that the majority of heat was transferred in the entrance region of the channel, but the heat transfer in micro-channels can also be affected by choking at channel exit. Moreover, the results clearly show that, the location where the flow is choked (at the vicinity of the channel exit) is especially important in determining the heat transfer phenomena. It was found that Spalart-Allmaras model is capable to capture the main features of the choked flow. Also, the effects of choking on the main characteristics of the flow was presented and discussed.

  8. Heat transfer measurements on biconics at incidence in hypersonic high enthalpy air and nitrogen flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gai, S. L.; Cain, T.; Joe, W. S.; Sandeman, R. J.; Miller, C. G.

    1988-01-01

    Heat transfer rate measurements have been obtained at 0, 5, 15, and 21 deg angles-of-attack for a straight biconic scale model of an aeroassisted orbital vehicle proposed for planetary probe missions. Heat-transfer distributions were measured using palladium thin-film resistance gauges deposited on a glass-ceramic substrate. The windward heat transfer correlations were based on equilibrium flow in the shock layer of the model, although the flow may depart from equilibrium in the flow-field.

  9. California energy flow in 1993

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, I. Y.; Briggs, C. K.

    1995-04-01

    Energy consumption in the state of California decreased about 3% in 1993 reflecting continuation of the recession that was manifest in a moribund construction industry and a high state unemployment that ran counter to national recovery trends. Residential/commercial use decreased slightly reflecting a mild winter in the populous southern portion of the state, a decrease that was offset to some extent by an increase in the state population. Industrial consumption of purchased energy declined substantially as did production of self-generated electricity for in-house use. Consumption in the transportation sector decreased slightly. The amount of power transmitted by the utilities was at 1992 levels; however a smaller proportion was produced by the utilities themselves. Generation of electricity by nonutilities, primarily cogenerators and small power producers, was the largest of any state in the US. The growth in the number of private power producers combined with increased amounts of electricity sold to the public utilities set the stage for the sweeping proposals before the California Public Utility Commission to permit direct sales from the nonutilities to retail customers. California production of both oil and natural gas declined; however, to meet demand only the imports of natural gas increased. A break in the decade-long drought during the 1992-1993 season resulted in a substantial increase in the amount of hydroelectricity generated during the year. Geothermal energy's contribution increased substantially because of the development of new resources by small power producers. Decline in steam production continued at The Geysers, the state's largest field, principally owned and managed by a public utility. Increases in windpower constituted 1-1/2% of the total electric supply, up slightly from 1992. Several solar photovoltaic demonstration plants were in operation, but their contribution remained small.

  10. Revised conceptualization of the North China Basin groundwater flow system: Groundwater age, heat and flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Guoliang; Han, Dongmei; Currell, Matthew J.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2016-09-01

    Groundwater flow in deep sedimentary basins results from complex evolution processes on geological timescales. Groundwater flow systems conceptualized according to topography and/or groundwater table configuration generally assume a near-equilibrium state with the modern landscape. However, the time to reach such a steady state, and more generally the timescales of groundwater flow system evolution are key considerations for large sedimentary basins. This is true in the North China Basin (NCB), which has been studied for many years due to its importance as a groundwater supply. Despite many years of study, there remain contradictions between the generally accepted conceptual model of regional flow, and environmental tracer data. We seek to reconcile these contractions by conducting simulations of groundwater flow, age and heat transport in a three dimensional model, using an alternative conceptual model, based on geological, thermal, isotope and historical data. We infer flow patterns under modern hydraulic conditions using this new model and present the theoretical maximum groundwater ages under such a flow regime. The model results show that in contrast to previously accepted conceptualizations, most groundwater is discharged in the vicinity of the break-in-slope of topography at the boundary between the piedmont and central plain. Groundwater discharge to the ocean is in contrast small, and in general there are low rates of active flow in the eastern parts of the basin below the central and coastal plain. This conceptualization is more compatible with geochemical and geothermal data than the previous model. Simulated maximum groundwater ages of ∼1 Myrs below the central and coastal plain indicate that residual groundwater may be retained in the deep parts of the basin since being recharged during the last glacial period or earlier. The groundwater flow system has therefore probably not reached a new equilibrium state with modern-day hydraulic conditions. The

  11. Snowmass 2001: Jet energy flow project

    SciTech Connect

    C. F. Berger et al.

    2002-12-05

    Conventional cone jet algorithms arose from heuristic considerations of LO hard scattering coupled to independent showering. These algorithms implicitly assume that the final states of individual events can be mapped onto a unique set of jets that are in turn associated with a unique set of underlying hard scattering partons. Thus each final state hadron is assigned to a unique underlying parton. The Jet Energy Flow (JEF) analysis described here does not make such assumptions. The final states of individual events are instead described in terms of flow distributions of hadronic energy. Quantities of physical interest are constructed from the energy flow distribution summed over all events. The resulting analysis is less sensitive to higher order perturbative corrections and the impact of showering and hadronization than the standard cone algorithms.

  12. Convective heat and mass transfer during the evaporation of a liquid into a gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiarshinov, B. F.; Volchkov, E. P.; Terekhov, V. I.

    1985-10-01

    Heat and mass transfer processes associated with liquid evaporation are analyzed for adiabatic and nonadiabatic conditions. Experimental data are then presented on heat and mass transfer during the evaporation of water and ethyl alcohol from a porous surface. It is shown that heat and mass transfer under conditions of evaporation can be described by using expressions for flow past a 'dry' wall. A diagram is presented for determining the magnitudes of additional heat sources in the case of nonadiabatic evaporation. Finally, the effect of various factors, such as temperature, flow humidity, and liquid type, on heat and mass transfer during evaporation is analyzed for laminar and turbulent flows.

  13. Constraints on lithospheric thermal structure for the Indian Ocean from depth and heat flow data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoberg, Tom; Stein, Carol A.; Stein, Seth

    1993-01-01

    Models for the thermal evolution of oceanic lithosphere are primarily constrained by variations in seafloor depth and heat flow with age. These models have been largely based on data from the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean basins. We construct seafloor age relations for the Indian Ocean which we combine with bathymetric, sediment isopach and heat flow data to derive curves for depth and heat flow versus age. Comparison of these curves with predictions from three thermal models shows that they are better fit by the shallower depths and higher heat flow for the GDH1 model, which is characterized by a thinner and hotter lithosphere than previous models.

  14. Aero-Heating of Shallow Cavities in Hypersonic Freestream Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Berger, Karen T.; Merski, N. R., Jr.; Woods, William A.; Hollingsworth, Kevin E.; Hyatt, Andrew; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of these experiments and analysis was to augment the heating database and tools used for assessment of impact-induced shallow-cavity damage to the thermal protection system of the Space Shuttle Orbiter. The effect of length and depth on the local heating disturbance of rectangular cavities tested at hypersonic freestream conditions has been globally assessed using the two-color phosphor thermography method. These rapid-response experiments were conducted in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel and were initiated immediately prior to the launch of STS-114, the initial flight in the Space Shuttle Return-To-Flight Program, and continued during the first week of the mission. Previously-designed and numerically-characterized blunted-nose baseline flat plates were used as the test surfaces. Three-dimensional computational predictions of the entire model geometry were used as a check on the design process and the two-dimensional flow assumptions used for the data analysis. The experimental boundary layer state conditions were inferred using the measured heating distributions on a no-cavity test article. Two test plates were developed, each containing 4 equally-spaced spanwise-distributed cavities. The first test plate contained cavities with a constant length-to-depth ratio of 8 with design point depth-to-boundary-layer-thickness ratios of 0.1, 0.2, 0.35, and 0.5. The second test plate contained cavities with a constant design point depth-to-boundary-layer-thickness ratio of 0.35 with length-to-depth ratios of 8, 12, 16, and 20. Cavity design parameters and the test condition matrix were established using the computational predictions. Preliminary results indicate that the floor-averaged Bump Factor (local heating rate nondimensionalized by upstream reference) at the tested conditions is approximately 0.3 with a standard deviation of 0.04 for laminar-in/laminar-out conditions when the cavity length-to-boundary-layer thickness is between 2.5 and 10 and for

  15. Numerical simulation of heat transfer and flow structure in 3-D turbulent boundary layer with imbedded longitudinal vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, J.Y.; Ryou, H.S.

    1997-03-01

    Heat transfer characteristics and flow structure in turbulent flows through a flat plate three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer containing built-in vortex generators have been analyzed by means of the space marching Crank-Nicolson finite difference method. The method solves the slender flow approximation of the steady three-dimensional Navier-Stokes and energy equations. This study used the eddy diffusivity model and standard {kappa}-{epsilon} model to predict heat transfer and flow field in the turbulent flow with imbedded longitudinal vortex. The results show boundary layer distortion due to vortices, such as strong spanwise flow divergence and boundary layer thinning. The heat transfer and skin friction show relatively good results in comparison with experimental data. The vortex core moves slightly away from the wall and grows slowly; consequently, the vortex influences the flow over a very long distance downstream. The enhancement of the heat transfer in the vicinity of the wall is due to the increasing spanwise separation of the vortices as they develop in the streamwise direction.

  16. An Integrated Approach on Groundwater Flow and Heat/Solute Transport for Sustainable Groundwater Source Heat Pump (GWHP) System Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, D. K.; Bae, G. O.; Joun, W.; Park, B. H.; Park, J.; Park, I.; Lee, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    The GWHP system uses a stable temperature of groundwater for cooling and heating in buildings and thus has been known as one of the most energy-saving and cost-efficient renewable energy techniques. A GWHP facility was installed at an island located at the confluence of North Han and South Han rivers, Korea. Because of well-developed alluvium, the aquifer is suitable for application of this system, extracting and injecting a large amount of groundwater. However, the numerical experiments under various operational conditions showed that it could be vulnerable to thermal interference due to the highly permeable gravel layer, as a preferential path of thermal plume migration, and limited space for well installation. Thus, regional groundwater flow must be an important factor of consideration for the efficient operation under these conditions but was found to be not simple in this site. While the groundwater level in this site totally depends on the river stage control of Paldang dam, the direction and velocity of the regional groundwater flow, observed using the colloidal borescope, have been changed hour by hour with the combined flows of both the rivers. During the pumping and injection tests, the water discharges in Cheongpyeong dam affected their respective results. Moreover, the measured NO3-N concentrations might imply the effect of agricultural activities around the facility on the groundwater quality along the regional flow. It is obvious that the extraction and injection of groundwater during the facility operation will affect the fate of the agricultural contaminants. Particularly, the gravel layer must also be a main path for contaminant migration. The simulations for contaminant transport during the facility operation showed that the operation strategy for only thermal efficiency could be unsafe and unstable in respect of groundwater quality. All these results concluded that the integrated approach on groundwater flow and heat/solute transport is necessary

  17. Measurements of energy distribution and wall temperature in flowing hydrogen microwave plasma systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R.; Finzel, M.; Hawley, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    An electrothermal propulsion concept utilizing a microwave plasma system as the mechanism to convert electromagnetic energy into translational energy of the flowing gas is being investigated. A calorimetric experimental system has been designed and built enclosing the microwave plasma system to accurately determine the net energy transferred to the flowing gas. For a flow rate of 8900 micromoles/sec, a pressure of 7.4 torr, and an absorbed power level of 80 W, an energy transfer efficiency of 50 percent has been measured. A heat transfer model that characterizes the energy transfer processes in the plasma is developed. A wall temperature for the plasma system is calculated.

  18. Diurnal fluctuations of water and heat flows in a bare soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelde, K.; Thomsen, A.; Heidmann, T.; SchjøNning, P.; Jansson, P.-E.

    1998-11-01

    The complexity of coupled transport of heat and moisture at the soil surface necessitates a combination of field and numerical experiments to evaluate the interactions between liquid and vapor phase flow. The near-surface moisture and temperature conditions of a bare soil were investigated experimentally and by using the SOIL model to assess the importance of water vapor flow. During a 1-month period in early fall, intensive measurements of water content, water tension, and temperature were made in a bare soil plot. Soil thermal conductivity, measured on soil cores extracted for laboratory analysis, was found to agree with estimates based on the Kersten equation. Simulated water content and soil temperature agreed well with observations. Modeled soil vapor flow was significant compared to liquid flow only during the initial dry days when the inclusion of vapor flow improved the predicted diurnal variation in water tension. Model predictions were sensitive to an accurate representation of the soil surface energy balance, including the consideration of steep gradients in tension near the soil surface, and to the enhancement of vapor flow.

  19. Reducing residential energy growth with more efficient space heating equipment

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neal, D.L.; Hirst, E.A.

    1980-01-01

    Several energy-saving designs changes in residential space heating systems were examined to determine their energy conservation potential and cost effectiveness. Changes in conventional and advanced systems (such as gas heat pumps) were considered. Energy savings as large as 26, 20, and 57% were estimated for design changes in conventional gas, oil, and electric space heating systems, respectively. These changes increased capital cost of the three systems by 27, 16, and 26%. For advanced gas and electric systems, energy savings up to 45 and 67%, respectively, were calculated. The design changes needed to produce these energy savings increased capital costs 80 and 35%. The energy use and cost relationships developed for the space heating systems were used as input to the ORNL residential energy use simulation model to evaluate the effect of space heating improvements on national energy use to the year 2000. With no efficiency improvements in equipment, space heating energy grew at 2.5% per year. When improved conventional and advanced systems were introduced in the market, heating energy growth was cut to 1.8% and 1.6% per year, respectively. In addition, if consumers were to minimize life cycle costs in pruchasing space heating equipment, space heating energy growth was projected to grow at 1.1% per year.

  20. Vapor Flow Patterns During a Start-Up Transient in Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Issacci, F.; Ghoniem, N, M.; Catton, I.

    1996-01-01

    The vapor flow patterns in heat pipes are examined during the start-up transient phase. The vapor core is modelled as a channel flow using a two dimensional compressible flow model. A nonlinear filtering technique is used as a post process to eliminate the non-physical oscillations of the flow variables. For high-input heat flux, multiple shock reflections are observed in the evaporation region. The reflections cause a reverse flow in the evaporation and circulations in the adiabatic region. Furthermore, each shock reflection causes a significant increase in the local pressure and a large pressure drop along the heat pipe.