Science.gov

Sample records for heat energy flow

  1. Heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ben

    The demand for clean and environmentally benign energy resources has been a great concern in the last two decades. To alleviate the associated environmental problems, reduction of the use of fossil fuels by developing more cost-effective renewable energy technologies becomes more and more significant. Among various types of renewable energy sources, solar energy and bioenergy take a great proportion. This dissertation focuses on the heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems, specifically for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) systems in Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants and open-channel algal culture raceways for biofuel production. The first part of this dissertation is the discussion about mathematical modeling, numerical simulation and experimental investigation of solar TES system. First of all, in order to accurately and efficiently simulate the conjugate heat transfer between Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) and filler material in four different solid-fluid TES configurations, formulas of an e?ective heat transfer coe?cient were theoretically developed and presented by extending the validity of Lumped Capacitance Method (LCM) to large Biot number, as well as verifications/validations to this simplified model. Secondly, to provide design guidelines for TES system in CSP plant using Phase Change Materials (PCM), a general storage tank volume sizing strategy and an energy storage startup strategy were proposed using the enthalpy-based 1D transient model. Then experimental investigations were conducted to explore a novel thermal storage material. The thermal storage performances were also compared between this novel storage material and concrete at a temperature range from 400 °C to 500 °C. It is recommended to apply this novel thermal storage material to replace concrete at high operating temperatures in sensible heat TES systems. The second part of this dissertation mainly focuses on the numerical and experimental study of an open-channel algae

  2. A Variable Refrigerant Flow Heat Pump Computer Model in EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect

    Raustad, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the variable refrigerant flow heat pump computer model included with the Department of Energy's EnergyPlusTM whole-building energy simulation software. The mathematical model for a variable refrigerant flow heat pump operating in cooling or heating mode, and a detailed model for the variable refrigerant flow direct-expansion (DX) cooling coil are described in detail.

  3. Inter-phase heat transfer and energy coupling in turbulent dispersed multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Y.; Balachandar, S.; Parmar, M.

    2016-03-01

    The present paper addresses important fundamental issues of inter-phase heat transfer and energy coupling in turbulent dispersed multiphase flows through scaling analysis. In typical point-particle or two-fluid approaches, the fluid motion and convective heat transfer at the particle scale are not resolved and the momentum and energy coupling between fluid and particles are provided by proper closure models. By examining the kinetic energy transfer due to the coupling forces from the macroscale to microscale fluid motion, closure models are obtained for the contributions of the coupling forces to the energy coupling. Due to the inviscid origin of the added-mass force, its contribution to the microscale kinetic energy does not contribute to dissipative transfer to fluid internal energy as was done by the quasi-steady force. Time scale analysis shows that when the particle is larger than a critical diameter, the diffusive-unsteady kernel decays at a time scale that is smaller than the Kolmogorov time scale. As a result, the computationally costly Basset-like integral form of diffusive-unsteady heat transfer can be simplified to a non-integral form. Conventionally, the fluid-to-particle volumetric heat capacity ratio is used to evaluate the relative importance of the unsteady heat transfer to the energy balance of the particles. Therefore, for gas-particle flows, where the fluid-to-particle volumetric heat capacity ratio is small, unsteady heat transfer is usually ignored. However, the present scaling analysis shows that for small fluid-to-particle volumetric heat capacity ratio, the importance of the unsteady heat transfer actually depends on the ratio between the particle size and the Kolmogorov scale. Furthermore, the particle mass loading multiplied by the heat capacity ratio is usually used to estimate the importance of the thermal two-way coupling effect. Through scaling argument, improved estimates are established for the energy coupling parameters of each

  4. Comparison of energy efficiency between variable refrigerant flow systems and ground source heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tainzhen; Liu, Xaiobing

    2009-11-01

    With the current movement toward net zero energy buildings, many technologies are promoted with emphasis on their superior energy efficiency. The variable refrigerant flow (VRF) and ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems are probably the most competitive technologies among these. However, there are few studies reporting the energy efficiency of VRF systems compared with GSHP systems. In this article, a preliminary comparison of energy efficiency between the air-source VRF and GSHP systems is presented. The computer simulation results show that GSHP system is more energy efficient than the air-source VRF system for conditioning a small office building in two selected US climates. In general, GSHP system is more energy efficient than the air-source VRV system, especially when the building has significant heating loads. For buildings with less heating loads, the GSHP system could still perform better than the air-source VRF system in terms of energy efficiency, but the resulting energy savings may be marginal.

  5. Radial flow heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Valenzuela, Javier

    2001-01-01

    A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

  6. Nanofluid heat transfer under mixed convection flow in a tube for solar thermal energy applications.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Y Raja; Sharma, K V; Kamal, Subhash

    2016-05-01

    The solar flat plate collector operating under different convective modes has low efficiency for energy conversion. The energy absorbed by the working fluid in the collector system and its heat transfer characteristics vary with solar insolation and mass flow rate. The performance of the system is improved by reducing the losses from the collector. Various passive methods have been devised to aid energy absorption by the working fluid. Also, working fluids are modified using nanoparticles to improve the thermal properties of the fluid. In the present work, simulation and experimental studies are undertaken for pipe flow at constant heat flux boundary condition in the mixed convection mode. The working fluid at low Reynolds number in the mixed laminar flow range is undertaken with water in thermosyphon mode for different inclination angles of the tube. Local and average coefficients are determined experimentally and compared with theoretical values for water-based Al2O3 nanofluids. The results show an enhancement in heat transfer in the experimental range with Rayleigh number at higher inclinations of the collector tube for water and nanofluids. PMID:26593731

  7. A heat flow calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, W. V.

    1973-01-01

    Reaction mechanism for nickel-cadmium cell is not known well enough to allow calculation of heat effects. Calorimeter can measure heat absorbed or evolved in cell, by determining amount of external heat that must be supplied to calorimeter to maintain constant flow isothermal heat sink.

  8. Impact of Groundwater Flow and Energy Load on Multiple Borehole Heat Exchangers.

    PubMed

    Dehkordi, S Emad; Schincariol, Robert A; Olofsson, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The effect of array configuration, that is, number, layout, and spacing, on the performance of multiple borehole heat exchangers (BHEs) is generally known under the assumption of fully conductive transport. The effect of groundwater flow on BHE performance is also well established, but most commonly for single BHEs. In multiple-BHE systems the effect of groundwater advection can be more complicated due to the induced thermal interference between the boreholes. To ascertain the influence of groundwater flow and borehole arrangement, this study investigates single- and multi-BHE systems of various configurations. Moreover, the influence of energy load balance is also examined. The results from corresponding cases with and without groundwater flow as well as balanced and unbalanced energy loads are cross-compared. The groundwater flux value, 10(-7) m/s, is chosen based on the findings of previous studies on groundwater flow interaction with BHEs and thermal response tests. It is observed that multi-BHE systems with balanced loads are less sensitive to array configuration attributes and groundwater flow, in the long-term. Conversely, multi-BHE systems with unbalanced loads are influenced by borehole array configuration as well as groundwater flow; these effects become more pronounced with time, unlike when the load is balanced. Groundwater flow has more influence on stabilizing loop temperatures, compared to array characteristics. Although borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) systems have a balanced energy load function, preliminary investigation on their efficiency shows a negative impact by groundwater which is due to their dependency on high temperature gradients between the boreholes and surroundings. PMID:25227154

  9. A Thermally-Regenerative Ammonia-Based Flow Battery for Electrical Energy Recovery from Waste Heat.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiuping; Rahimi, Mohammad; Gorski, Christopher A; Logan, Bruce

    2016-04-21

    Large amounts of low-grade waste heat (temperatures <130 °C) are released during many industrial, geothermal, and solar-based processes. Using thermally-regenerative ammonia solutions, low-grade thermal energy can be converted to electricity in battery systems. To improve reactor efficiency, a compact, ammonia-based flow battery (AFB) was developed and tested at different solution concentrations, flow rates, cell pairs, and circuit connections. The AFB achieved a maximum power density of 45 W m(-2) (15 kW m(-3) ) and an energy density of 1260 Wh manolyte (-3) , with a thermal energy efficiency of 0.7 % (5 % relative to the Carnot efficiency). The power and energy densities of the AFB were greater than those previously reported for thermoelectrochemical and salinity-gradient technologies, and the voltage or current could be increased using stacked cells. These results demonstrated that an ammonia-based flow battery is a promising technology to convert low-grade thermal energy to electricity. PMID:26990485

  10. Planetary heat flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Hagermann, Axel

    2005-12-15

    The year 2005 marks the 35th anniversary of the Apollo 13 mission, probably the most successful failure in the history of manned spaceflight. Naturally, Apollo 13's scientific payload is far less known than the spectacular accident and subsequent rescue of its crew. Among other instruments, it carried the first instrument designed to measure the flux of heat on a planetary body other than Earth. The year 2005 also should have marked the launch of the Japanese LUNAR-A mission, and ESA's Rosetta mission is slowly approaching comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Both missions carry penetrators to study the heat flow from their target bodies. What is so interesting about planetary heat flow? What can we learn from it and how do we measure it?Not only the Sun, but all planets in the Solar System are essentially heat engines. Various heat sources or heat reservoirs drive intrinsic and surface processes, causing 'dead balls of rock, ice or gas' to evolve dynamically over time, driving convection that powers tectonic processes and spawns magnetic fields. The heat flow constrains models of the thermal evolution of a planet and also its composition because it provides an upper limit for the bulk abundance of radioactive elements. On Earth, the global variation of heat flow also reflects the tectonic activity: heat flow increases towards the young ocean ridges, whereas it is rather low on the old continental shields. It is not surprising that surface heat flow measurements, or even estimates, where performed, contributed greatly to our understanding of what happens inside the planets. In this article, I will review the results and the methods used in past heat flow measurements and speculate on the targets and design of future experiments. PMID:16286290

  11. Heat and Mass Transfer in Unsteady Rotating Fluid Flow with Binary Chemical Reaction and Activation Energy

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Faiz G.; Motsa, Sandile; Khumalo, Melusi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the Spectral Relaxation Method (SRM) is used to solve the coupled highly nonlinear system of partial differential equations due to an unsteady flow over a stretching surface in an incompressible rotating viscous fluid in presence of binary chemical reaction and Arrhenius activation energy. The velocity, temperature and concentration distributions as well as the skin-friction, heat and mass transfer coefficients have been obtained and discussed for various physical parametric values. The numerical results obtained by (SRM) are then presented graphically and discussed to highlight the physical implications of the simulations. PMID:25250830

  12. A second-law investigation of heat exchanger wall-thickness on flow energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wold, S.K.; Maveety, J.G.; Peterson, E.; Olson, D.

    1996-03-01

    There has been a growing interest in enhancing the performance of space power systems, and quantifying the subsequent optimal operating conditions. In any thermal storage system, the thermodynamic irreversibilities decrease the net power (or exit flow energy) available to do work. Entropy production is closely related to the thermal efficiency of a thermal storage system, and isolating and reducing components of irreversibility will result in increased performance. This paper investigates second-law aspects of four single pass spiral heat exchangers in which helium is the working fluid. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Technical Subtopic 2.1: Modeling Variable Refrigerant Flow Heat Pump and Heat Recovery Equipment in EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect

    Raustad, Richard; Nigusse, Bereket; Domitrovic, Ron

    2013-09-30

    The University of Central Florida/Florida Solar Energy Center, in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute and several variable-refrigerant-flow heat pump (VRF HP) manufacturers, provided a detailed computer model for a VRF HP system in the United States Department of Energy's (U.S. DOE) EnergyPlus? building energy simulation tool. Detailed laboratory testing and field demonstrations were performed to measure equipment performance and compare this performance to both the manufacturer's data and that predicted by the use of this new model through computer simulation. The project goal was to investigate the complex interactions of VRF HP systems from an HVAC system perspective, and explore the operational characteristics of this HVAC system type within a laboratory and real world building environment. Detailed laboratory testing of this advanced HVAC system provided invaluable performance information which does not currently exist in the form required for proper analysis and modeling. This information will also be useful for developing and/or supporting test standards for VRF HP systems. Field testing VRF HP systems also provided performance and operational information pertaining to installation, system configuration, and operational controls. Information collected from both laboratory and field tests were then used to create and validate the VRF HP system computer model which, in turn, provides architects, engineers, and building owners the confidence necessary to accurately and reliably perform building energy simulations. This new VRF HP model is available in the current public release version of DOE?s EnergyPlus software and can be used to investigate building energy use in both new and existing building stock. The general laboratory testing did not use the AHRI Standard 1230 test procedure and instead used an approach designed to measure the field installed full-load operating performance. This projects test methodology used the air enthalpy method

  14. Modeling of dissociation and energy transfer in shock-heated nitrogen flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munafò, A.; Liu, Y.; Panesi, M.

    2015-12-01

    This work addresses the modeling of dissociation and energy transfer processes in shock heated nitrogen flows by means of the maximum entropy linear model and a newly proposed hybrid bin vibrational collisional model. Both models aim at overcoming two of the main limitations of the state of the art non-equilibrium models: (i) the assumption of equilibrium between rotational and translational energy modes of the molecules and (ii) the reliance on the quasi-steady-state distribution for the description of the population of the internal levels. The formulation of the coarse-grained models is based on grouping the energy levels into bins, where the population is assumed to follow a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution at its own temperature. Different grouping strategies are investigated. Following the maximum entropy principle, the governing equations are obtained by taking the zeroth and first-order moments of the rovibrational master equations. The accuracy of the proposed models is tested against the rovibrational master equation solution for both flow quantities and population distributions. Calculations performed for free-stream velocities ranging from 5 km/s to 10 km/s demonstrate that dissociation can be accurately predicted by using only 2-3 bins. It is also shown that a multi-temperature approach leads to an under-prediction of dissociation, due to the inability of the former to account for the faster excitation of high-lying vibrational states.

  15. Modeling of dissociation and energy transfer in shock-heated nitrogen flows

    SciTech Connect

    Munafò, A.; Liu, Y.; Panesi, M.

    2015-12-15

    This work addresses the modeling of dissociation and energy transfer processes in shock heated nitrogen flows by means of the maximum entropy linear model and a newly proposed hybrid bin vibrational collisional model. Both models aim at overcoming two of the main limitations of the state of the art non-equilibrium models: (i) the assumption of equilibrium between rotational and translational energy modes of the molecules and (ii) the reliance on the quasi-steady-state distribution for the description of the population of the internal levels. The formulation of the coarse-grained models is based on grouping the energy levels into bins, where the population is assumed to follow a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution at its own temperature. Different grouping strategies are investigated. Following the maximum entropy principle, the governing equations are obtained by taking the zeroth and first-order moments of the rovibrational master equations. The accuracy of the proposed models is tested against the rovibrational master equation solution for both flow quantities and population distributions. Calculations performed for free-stream velocities ranging from 5 km/s to 10 km/s demonstrate that dissociation can be accurately predicted by using only 2-3 bins. It is also shown that a multi-temperature approach leads to an under-prediction of dissociation, due to the inability of the former to account for the faster excitation of high-lying vibrational states.

  16. Pressure drop and heat transfer in turbulent non-Newtonian pipe flow of advanced energy transmission fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, U. S.; Liu, K. V.; Kasza, K. E.

    1988-03-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy, is making significant progress on the development of advanced energy transmission fluids for thermal systems, in particular district heating and cooling systems. ANL has identified two concepts for developing advanced energy transmission fluids. Tests have been conducted at ANL to prove these concepts. This paper presents experimental results and discusses the degradation behavior of linear polymer additives and the flow and heat transfer characteristics of non-melting slurry flows. The experimental data obtained in this study provide support for the use of friction reducing additives and slurries in thermal system applications.

  17. Study of Cold Heat Energy Release Characteristics of Flowing Ice Water Slurry in a Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Horibe, Akihiko; Ozaki, Koichi; Yokota, Maki

    This paper has dealt with melting heat transfer characteristics of ice water slurry in an inside tube of horizontal double tube heat exchanger in which a hot water circulated in an annular gap between the inside and outside tubes. Two kinds of heat exchangers were used; one is made of acrylic resin tube for flow visualization and the other is made of stainless steel tube for melting heat transfer measurement. The result of flow visualization revealed that ice particles flowed along the top of inside tube in the ranges of small ice packing factor and low ice water slurry velocity, while ice particles diffused into the whole of tube and flowed like a plug built up by ice particles for large ice packing factor and high velocity. Moreover, it was found that the flowing ice plug was separated into numbers of small ice clusters by melting phenomenon. Experiments of melting heat transfer were carried out under some parameters of ice packing factor, ice water slurry flow rate and hot water temperature. Consequently, the correlation equation of melting heat transfer was derived as a function of those experimental parameters.

  18. Enceladus' Enigmatic Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howett, C.; Spencer, J. R.; Spencer, D.; Verbiscer, A.; Hurford, T.; Segura, M.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of Enceladus' heat flow is important because it provides a vital constraint on Enceladus' tidal dissipation mechanisms, orbital evolution, and the physical processes that generate the plumes. In 2011 we published an estimate of the current heat flow from Enceladus' active south polar terrain: 15.8 +/- 3.1 GW (Howett et al., 2011). This value was calculated by first estimating by modeling, and then removing, the passive component from 17 to 1000 micron observations made of the entire south polar terrain by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS). The heat flow was then directly calculated from the residual, assumed endogenic, component. The derived heat flow of 15.8 GW was surprisingly high, about 10 times greater than that predicted by steady-state tidal heating (Meyer and Wisdom, 2007). CIRS has also returned high spatial resolution observations of Enceladus' active south polar terrain. Two separate observations are used: 9 to 16 micron observations taken over nearly the complete south polar terrain and a single 17 to 1000 micron scan over Damascus, Baghdad and Cairo. The shorter wavelength observations are only sensitive to high temperature emission (>70 K), and so longer wavelength observations are required (despite their limited spatial coverage) to estimate the low temperature emission from the stripes. Analysis of these higher resolution observations tells a different story of Enceladus' endogenic heat flow: the preliminary estimate of the heat flow from the active tiger stripes using these observations is 4.2 GW. An additional 0.5 GW must be added to this number to account for the latent heat release by the plumes (Ingersoll and Pankine 2009), giving a total preliminary estimate of 4.9 GW. The discrepancy in these two numbers is significant and we are currently investigating the cause. One possible reason is that there is significantly higher endogenic emission from the regions between the tiger stripes than we currently estimate

  19. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  20. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, James C.; Hardee, Harry C.; Striker, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  1. Lunar heat-flow experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langseth, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    The principal components of the experiment were probes, each with twelve thermometers of exceptional accuracy and stability, that recorded temperature variations at the surface and in the regolith down to 2.5 m. The Apollo 15 experiment and the Apollo 17 probes recorded lunar surface and subsurface temperatures. These data provided a unique and valuable history of the interaction of solar energy with lunar surface and the effects of heat flowing from the deep interior out through the surface of the moon. The interpretation of these data resulted in a clearer definition of the thermal and mechanical properties of the upper two meters of lunar regolith, direct measurements of the gradient in mean temperature due to heat flow from the interior and a determination of the heat flow at the Apollo 15 and Apollo 17 sites.

  2. Compare Energy Use in Variable Refrigerant Flow Heat Pumps Field Demonstration and Computer Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Chandan; Raustad, Richard

    2013-06-01

    Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) heat pumps are often regarded as energy efficient air-conditioning systems which offer electricity savings as well as reduction in peak electric demand while providing improved individual zone setpoint control. One of the key advantages of VRF systems is minimal duct losses which provide significant reduction in energy use and duct space. However, there is limited data available to show their actual performance in the field. Since VRF systems are increasingly gaining market share in the US, it is highly desirable to have more actual field performance data of these systems. An effort was made in this direction to monitor VRF system performance over an extended period of time in a US national lab test facility. Due to increasing demand by the energy modeling community, an empirical model to simulate VRF systems was implemented in the building simulation program EnergyPlus. This paper presents the comparison of energy consumption as measured in the national lab and as predicted by the program. For increased accuracy in the comparison, a customized weather file was created by using measured outdoor temperature and relative humidity at the test facility. Other inputs to the model included building construction, VRF system model based on lab measured performance, occupancy of the building, lighting/plug loads, and thermostat set-points etc. Infiltration model inputs were adjusted in the beginning to tune the computer model and then subsequent field measurements were compared to the simulation results. Differences between the computer model results and actual field measurements are discussed. The computer generated VRF performance closely resembled the field measurements.

  3. Heat transfer in energy problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushina, T.; Yang, W. J.

    Results of recent research are presented concerning heat transfer in energy problems, including high-temperature heat transfer, high-flux heat transfer, high-performance heat transfer, heat transfer in nonconventional energy (power and propulsion) systems, and novel heat transfer techniques. Topics discussed include studies of full-coverage film cooling, radiative properties of metals and alloys at high temperature, critical heat flux conditions in high-quality boiling systems, heat transfer characteristics of the evaporation of a liquid droplet on heated surfaces, high-performance surfaces for non-boiling heat transfer, and high performance heat transfer surfaces for boiling and condensation. Also examined are high flux heat transfer in gaseous solid suspension flow, nuclear process heat applications of high temperature heat exchange, heat transfer considerations in the use of new energy resources, and high performance mist-cooled condensers for geothermal binary cycle plants. No individual items are abstracted in this volume

  4. A stock-flow consistent input-output model with applications to energy price shocks, interest rates, and heat emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Matthew; Hartley, Brian; Richters, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    By synthesizing stock-flow consistent models, input-output models, and aspects of ecological macroeconomics, a method is developed to simultaneously model monetary flows through the financial system, flows of produced goods and services through the real economy, and flows of physical materials through the natural environment. This paper highlights the linkages between the physical environment and the economic system by emphasizing the role of the energy industry. A conceptual model is developed in general form with an arbitrary number of sectors, while emphasizing connections with the agent-based, econophysics, and complexity economics literature. First, we use the model to challenge claims that 0% interest rates are a necessary condition for a stationary economy and conduct a stability analysis within the parameter space of interest rates and consumption parameters of an economy in stock-flow equilibrium. Second, we analyze the role of energy price shocks in contributing to recessions, incorporating several propagation and amplification mechanisms. Third, implied heat emissions from energy conversion and the effect of anthropogenic heat flux on climate change are considered in light of a minimal single-layer atmosphere climate model, although the model is only implicitly, not explicitly, linked to the economic model.

  5. Map of Io's volcanic heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard; Veeder, Glenn J.; Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence V.

    2015-12-01

    We present a map of Io's volcanic heat flow. Io's high heat flow is a result of intense tidal heating, which generates widespread volcanic activity. The surface expression of ongoing volcanic activity constrains the location and magnitude of tidal dissipation within Io. Tidal heating models place heating either at relatively shallow (aesthenosphere) levels, or deep in the mantle. It was thought that actual tidal heating could be approximated using a combination of these end-member models. Io's volcanic heat flow has now been mapped in sufficient detail to compare with the models. Our maps show that the distribution of heat flow is not matched by current models of deep nor shallow tidal heating, nor by any combination of these two models. We find relatively low heat flow at sub-jovian (0°W) and anti-jovian (180°W) longitudes, at odds with the pure aesthenospheric heating model. Furthermore, there are large swaths of Io's surface where there is poor correlation between the number of hot spots in an area and the power emitted. We have previously accounted for ≈54% of Io's observed heat flow. We now show that Io's anomalously warm poles, possibly the result of heat flow from deep-mantle heating, would yield the "missing" energy (48 TW) if the polar surfaces are at temperatures of ∼90 K to ∼95 K and cover latitudes above ∼43° to ∼48° respectively. This possibility implies a ratio of deep to shallow heating of about 1:1. However, explaining regional variations in surface volcanic activity requires more detailed modeling of the location and magnitude of the internal tidal dissipation and the consequences of mantle convection and advection within Io. Future model predictions can be compared to our heat flow map.

  6. Heat Pipe Blocks Return Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eninger, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Metal-foil reed valve in conventional slab-wick heat pipe limits heat flow to one direction only. With sink warmer than source, reed is forced closed and fluid returns to source side through annular transfer wick. When this occurs, wick slab on sink side of valve dries out and heat pipe ceases to conduct heat.

  7. Magnetic heat pump flow director

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Frank S. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A fluid flow director is disclosed. The director comprises a handle body and combed-teeth extending from one side of the body. The body can be formed of a clear plastic such as acrylic. The director can be used with heat exchangers such as a magnetic heat pump and can minimize the undesired mixing of fluid flows. The types of heat exchangers can encompass both heat pumps and refrigerators. The director can adjust the fluid flow of liquid or gas along desired flow directions. A method of applying the flow director within a magnetic heat pump application is also disclosed where the comb-teeth portions of the director are inserted into the fluid flow paths of the heat pump.

  8. Cafeteria diet induce changes in blood flow that are more related with heat dissipation than energy accretion

    PubMed Central

    Sabater, David; Agnelli, Silvia; Arriarán, Sofía; Romero, María del Mar; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià

    2016-01-01

    Background. A “cafeteria” diet is a self-selected high-fat diet, providing an excess of energy, which can induce obesity. Excess of lipids in the diet hampers glucose utilization eliciting insulin resistance, which, further limits amino acid oxidation for energy. Methods. Male Wistar rats were exposed for a month to “cafeteria” diet. Rats were cannulated and fluorescent microspheres were used to determine blood flow. Results. Exposure to the cafeteria diet did not change cardiac output, but there was a marked shift in organ irrigation. Skin blood flow decreased to compensate increases in lungs and heart. Blood flow through adipose tissue tended to increase in relation to controls, but was considerably increased in brown adipose tissue (on a weight basis). Discussion. The results suggest that the cafeteria diet-induced changes were related to heat transfer and disposal. PMID:27547590

  9. Cafeteria diet induce changes in blood flow that are more related with heat dissipation than energy accretion.

    PubMed

    Sabater, David; Agnelli, Silvia; Arriarán, Sofía; Romero, María Del Mar; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià; Remesar, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Background. A "cafeteria" diet is a self-selected high-fat diet, providing an excess of energy, which can induce obesity. Excess of lipids in the diet hampers glucose utilization eliciting insulin resistance, which, further limits amino acid oxidation for energy. Methods. Male Wistar rats were exposed for a month to "cafeteria" diet. Rats were cannulated and fluorescent microspheres were used to determine blood flow. Results. Exposure to the cafeteria diet did not change cardiac output, but there was a marked shift in organ irrigation. Skin blood flow decreased to compensate increases in lungs and heart. Blood flow through adipose tissue tended to increase in relation to controls, but was considerably increased in brown adipose tissue (on a weight basis). Discussion. The results suggest that the cafeteria diet-induced changes were related to heat transfer and disposal. PMID:27547590

  10. Minnesota Heat Flow and Geothermal Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosnold, W. D.; Crowell, J.; Bubach, B.; Wahl, P.; Crowell, A. M.; Mcdonald, M. R.

    2011-12-01

    Radiogenic heat production, bedrock geology, gravity, magnetics, and heat flow were combined to study heat flow and geothermal energy potential in Minnesota. Heat production was determined from one-hundred 800 kg samples collected at outcrops and from drill cores by gamma ray spectrometry. Small splits of the samples were also analyzed by chemical methods for K, U, and Th. Heat production averaged 2.6 W m-1 K-1 ± 2.0 for 42 felsic samples and 0.9 W m-1 K-1 ± 0.6 for 58 mafic samples. Areal variation in heat production measured with a portable gamma ray spectrometer was compared to bedrock geology and gravity and magnetic anomaly patterns. Gravity lows and magnetic highs correlate with higher heat production and vice versa. Prior to this study heat flow was reported for only four borehole sites in Minnesota. Those sites were located in Keweenawan mafic rocks of the mid-continent rift and heat flow values averaged 39 ± 6 mW m-2. These low heat flows are consistent with a heat flow study conducted in Lake Superior that showed a trough of low heat flow (19.2 - 41.0 mW m-2) along the northern edge of the lake. Thirty-one new heat flow determinations in the mafic rocks obtained from borehole temperature measurements in mining holes average (34.1 mW m-2 ± 1.9 mW m-2). However, paleoclimate signals evident in the temperature vs. depth profiles indicate that the temperature gradients are at least 27 percent low and heat flow is likely 46.7 mW m-2. Based on a reduced heat flow of 32 mW m-2 and a depth parameter of 10 km, the heat flow heat production relation yields a heat flow value of 58 mW m-2 in the felsic regions in Minnesota. These heat flow values suggest that EGS with a binary power plant would be achievable in the felsic regions.

  11. Heat exchanger with oscillating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Various heat exchange apparatuses are described in which an oscillating flow of primary coolant is used to dissipate an incident heat flux. The oscillating flow may be imparted by a reciprocating piston, a double action twin reciprocating piston, fluidic oscillators, or electromagnetic pumps. The oscillating fluid flows through at least one conduit in either an open loop or a closed loop. A secondary flow of coolant may be used to flow over the outer walls of at least one conduit to remove heat transferred from the primary coolant to the walls of the conduit.

  12. Heat exchanger with oscillating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Various heat exchange apparatuses are described in which an oscillating flow of primary coolant is used to dissipate an incident heat flux. The oscillating flow may be imparted by a reciprocating piston, a double action twin reciprocating piston, fluidic oscillators or electromagnetic pumps. The oscillating fluid flows through at least one conduit in either an open loop or a closed loop. A secondary flow of coolant may be used to flow over the outer walls of at least one conduit to remove heat transferred from the primary coolant to the walls of the conduit.

  13. Stress and heat flow

    SciTech Connect

    Lachenbrunch, A.H.; McGarr, A.

    1990-01-01

    As the Pacific plate slides northward past the North American plate along the San Andreas fault, the frictional stress that resists plate motion there is overcome to cause earthquakes. However, the frictional heating predicted for the process has never been detected. Thus, in spite of its importance to an understanding of both plate motion and earthquakes, the size of this frictional stress is still uncertain, even in order of magnitude.

  14. Temperature and energy deficit in the ground during operation and recovery phases of closed-loop ground source heat pump system: Effect of the groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erol, Selcuk; Francois, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    The advection/dispersion mechanism of the groundwater flow in the ground has a significant effect on a borehole heat exchanger (BHE) to enhance its thermal performance. However, the amount of energy extracted from the ground never disappears and only shifts with the magnitude of the effective thermal velocity in the infinite domain. In this work, we focus on the temperature and the energy balance of the ground in an advection/dispersion dominated heat transfer system during the operation period of a BHE and the subsequent recovery phase when the system is idle. The problem is treated with single BHE and multi-BHEs systems, for different representative geology and different groundwater flow velocity. In order to assess the thermal energy deficit due to heat extraction from the ground, we used the finite line source analytical model, developed recently (Erol et al., 2015) that provides the temperature distributions around the boreholes for discontinuous heat extraction. The model is developed based on the Green's function, which is the solution of heat conduction/advection/dispersion equation in porous media, for discontinuous heat extraction by analytically convoluting rectangular function or pulses in time domain. The results demonstrate the significant positive impact of the groundwater flow for the recovery in terms of temperature deficit at the location of the borehole. However, the total thermal energy deficit is not affected by the groundwater movement. The energy balance of the ground is the same no matter the prevailing heat transfer system, which can be only conduction or advection/dispersion. In addition, the energy balance of the ground is not based on either the duration of the production period operation or of the recovery phase, but depends on the total amount of heat that is extracted and on the bulk volumetric heat capacity of the ground.

  15. Coupled flow, thermal and structural analysis of aerodynamically heated panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Dechaumphai, Pramote

    1986-01-01

    A finite element approach to coupling flow, thermal and structural analyses of aerodynamically heated panels is presented. The Navier-Stokes equations for laminar compressible flow are solved together with the energy equation and quasi-static structural equations of the panel. Interactions between the flow, panel heat transfer and deformations are studied for thin stainless steel panels aerodynamically heated by Mach 6.6 flow.

  16. Heat flow in a pyroelectric converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, R. B.; Butler, W. F.; Drummond, J. E.; Bruno, D. A.; Briscoe, J. M.

    1985-12-01

    A simulated pyroelectric converter has been constructed. The heat flow and temperature profiles within the converter have been measured. Computer simulations of the heat flow compare well with the measurements and predict an efficiency of 12 percent of the Carnot limit for a real pyroelectric converter with the operating configuration of the simulation. These heat flow results are useful in considerations of heat engines using active materials other than pyroelectrics, such as Nitinol, when these engines utilize similar heat flow management.

  17. Polar Heat Flow on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D. L.; Johnson, T. V.; Davies, A. G.; Blaney, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, Galileo spacecraft data have revealed Io's polar regions to be much warmer than previously expected. This unexpected development came from Photo-Polarimeter Radiometer (PPR) data which show that the minimum night temperatures are in the range of 90-95 K virtually everywhere on Io. The minimum night temperatures show no dependence upon latitude and, when away from the sunset terminator, they show no dependence upon time of night. This is indeed bizarre behavior for surface units which generally had been assumed to be passive with respect to Io's pervasive volcanism. Night temperatures of 90-95 K at high, polar latitudes are particularly hard to explain. Even assuming infinite thermal inertia, at these latitudes there is insufficient sunlight to support these warm night temperatures. Thus, through the process of elimination of other possibilities, we come to the conclusion that these surfaces are volcanically heated. Taking previously passive units and turning them into new sources of heat flow is a radical departure from previous thermophysical model paradigms. However, the geological interpretation is straight forward. We are simply seeing the effect of old, cool lava flows which cover most of the surface of Io but yet have some heat to radiate. Under these new constraints, we have taken on the challenge of formulating a physical model which quantitatively reproduces all of the observations of Io's thermal emission. In the following we introduce a new parametric model which suffices to identify a previously unrecognized polar component of Io's heat flow.

  18. Role of radiogenic heat generation in surface heat flow formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutorskoi, M. D.; Polyak, B. G.

    2016-03-01

    Heat generation due to decay of long-lived radioactive isotopes is considered in the Earth's crust of the Archean-Proterozoic and Paleozoic provinces of Eurasia and North America. The heat flow that forms in the mantle is calculated as the difference between the heat flow observed at the boundary of the solid Earth and radiogenic heat flow produced in the crust. The heat regime in regions with anomalously high radiogenic heat generation is discussed. The relationship between various heat flow components in the Precambrian and Phanerozoic provinces has been comparatively analyzed, and the role of erosion of the surfaceheat- generating layer has been estimated.

  19. Entropy flow in quantum heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Mohammad; Nazarov, Yuli

    2015-03-01

    We evaluate Shannon and Renyi entropy flows from generic quantum heat engines (QHE) to a weakly-coupled probe environment kept in thermal equilibrium. We show the flows are determined by two quantities: heat flow and fictitious dissipation that manifest the quantum coherence in the engine. Our theory leads to novel physics in quantum heat engines.

  20. Solar Energy: Heat Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on heat transfer is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies. The…

  1. Solar Energy: Heat Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on heat storage is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies. The module…

  2. Solar Energy: Home Heating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on home heating is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies. The module…

  3. HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

  4. Heat flow structure in the Paleozoides of the Central Asian Fold Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutorskoy, M. D.; Lyapunov, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Heat generation produced by radioactive decay of long-lived isotopes in the Earth's crust (radiogenic heat flow) within the Paleozoic provinces of the Central Asian Fold Belt is considered. Heat flow from the mantle is calculated as the difference between the observed heat flow and the radiogenic flow. The major cause of this heat flow is the transition of potential energy of gravity differentiation into heat; in this respect, mantle heat flow is called gravigenic. Calculation shows that the fractions of radiogenic and gravigenic heat flows in the Paleozoides studied are nearly equal.

  5. Heat flow diagnostics for helicon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Berisford, Daniel F.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Raja, Laxminarayan L.; Cassady, Leonard D.; Chancery, William J.

    2008-10-15

    We present experimental studies of power balance in an argon helicon discharge. An infrared camera measures the heating of the dielectric tube containing a helicon discharge based on measurement of temperature profiles of the tube surface before and after a rf pulse. Using this diagnostic, we have measured surface heating trends at a variety of operating conditions on two helicon systems: the 10 kW VASIMR VX-50 experiment and the University of Texas at Austin 1 kW helicon experiment. Power losses downstream from the antenna are measured using thermocouples and probes. The heating of the dielectric tube increases with decreasing magnetic fields, higher gas flow rates, and higher molecular mass of the gas. These preliminary results suggest that cross-field particle diffusion contributes a significant proportion of the energy flux to the wall.

  6. Axial flow heat exchanger devices and methods for heat transfer using axial flow devices

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2016-02-16

    Systems and methods described herein are directed to rotary heat exchangers configured to transfer heat to a heat transfer medium flowing in substantially axial direction within the heat exchangers. Exemplary heat exchangers include a heat conducting structure which is configured to be in thermal contact with a thermal load or a thermal sink, and a heat transfer structure rotatably coupled to the heat conducting structure to form a gap region between the heat conducting structure and the heat transfer structure, the heat transfer structure being configured to rotate during operation of the device. In example devices heat may be transferred across the gap region from a heated axial flow of the heat transfer medium to a cool stationary heat conducting structure, or from a heated stationary conducting structure to a cool axial flow of the heat transfer medium.

  7. Double Stage Heat Transformer Controlled by Flow Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Sotelo, S.; Romero, R. J.; Rodríguez – Martínez, A.

    this paper shows the values of Flow ratio (FR) for control of an absorption double stage heat transformer. The main parameters for the heat pump system are defined as COP, FR and GTL. The control of the entire system is based in a new definition of FR. The heat balance of the Double Stage Heat Transformer (DSHT) is used for the control. The mass flow is calculated for a HPVEE program and a second program control the mass flow. The mass flow is controlled by gear pumps connected to LabView program. The results show an increment in the fraction of the recovery energy. An example of oil distillation is used for the calculation. The waste heat energy is added at the system at 70 °C. Water ™ - Carrol mixture is used in the DSHT. The recover energy is obtained in a second absorber at 128 °C with two scenarios.

  8. Subsurface heat flow in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Grant; Woodbury, Allan D.

    2004-02-01

    The subsurface temperature field beneath Winnipeg, Canada, is significantly different from that of the surrounding rural areas. Downward heat flow to depths as great as 130 m has been noted in some areas beneath the city and groundwater temperatures in a regional aquifer have risen by as much as 5°C in some areas. Numerical simulation of heat transport supports the conjecture that these temperature changes can be largely attributed to heat loss from buildings and the temperature at any given point is sensitive to the distance from and the age of any buildings. The effect is most noticable when buildings are closely spaced, which is typical of urban areas. Temperature measurements in areas more than a few hundred meters away from any heated structure were only a few tenths of a degree Celsius greater than those observed outside the city, suggesting that other reasons for increases in subsurface temperature, such as changes in surface cover or climate change, may be responsible for some of the some of the observed increase in temperatures. These sources of additional heat to the subsurface make it difficult to resolve information on past climates from temperatures measured in boreholes and monitoring wells. In some areas, the temperature increases may also have an impact on geothermal energy resources. This impact might be in the form of an increase in heat pump efficiency or in the case of the Winnipeg area, a decrease in the efficiency of direct use of groundwater for cooling.

  9. Exploring Geothermal Energy Potential in Ireland through 3-D Geophysical-Petrological Modelling of Surface Heat-Flow and Crustal and Upper-Mantle Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullea, J.; Muller, M. R.; Jones, A. G.

    2012-04-01

    Little is known of Ireland's deep, low-enthalpy geothermal resources and the potential for space heating and/or electricity generation based on geothermal energy to displace Ireland's significant reliance on carbon-based fuels. IRETHERM (www.iretherm.ie) is a four-and-a-half year, all-island, academic-government-industry collaborative project, initiated in 2011, with the overarching objective of developing a strategic and holistic understanding of Ireland's geothermal energy potential through integrated modelling of new and existing geophysical and geological data. One of the challenges in searching for deep geothermal resources in the relatively unexplored setting of Ireland lies in identifying those areas most likely to support significantly elevated temperatures at depth. Available borehole data, although sparse and clustered around areas of mineral and hydrocarbon interest, suggest a marked regional increase in surface heat-flow across Ireland, from ~40 mW/m2 in the south to >80 mW/m2 in the north. The origins of both the observed regional heat-flow trend and local temperature anomalies have not been investigated and are not currently understood. Although variations in the structure of the crust and lithosphere have been revealed by a number of active-source seismic and teleseismic experiments, their effects on surface heat-flow have not been modelled. Bulk 3-D variation in crustal heat-production across Ireland, which may contribute significantly to the observed regional and local temperature variations, has also not been determined. We investigate the origins of Ireland's regional heat-flow trend and regional and local temperature variations using the software package LitMod. This software combines petrological and geophysical modelling of the lithosphere and sub-lithospheric upper mantle within an internally consistent thermodynamic-geophysical framework, where all relevant properties are functions of temperature, pressure and chemical composition. The major

  10. Buoyancy driven flow in counter flow heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, C. O.

    2012-11-01

    The temperature distribution, the buoyancy head and the flow rate have been studied in a counter flow heat exchanger having buoyancy driven flow on at least one side. The assumptions made for heat flux distribution are varied and the resulting effects on the flow rate and fluid temperatures are studied. A network model is used to simulate the temperature distribution and oil flow rates in an oil-filled power transformer cooled by radiators. It is found that for operating conditions normally found for mineral oil the counter flow assumptions for heat flux distribution gives approximately the same results as assuming uniform heat flux. When a more viscous oil type is used or the radiators are placed lower than normal relative to the heat generating parts, the counter flow assumptions give more reliable results.

  11. A Critical Review of Thermodiffusion Models: Role and Significance of the Heat of Transport and the Activation Energy of Viscous Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslamian, Morteza; Saghir, M. Ziad

    2009-06-01

    In this paper thermodiffusion models developed to estimate the thermal diffusion factor in nonideal liquid mixtures are reviewed; the merits and shortcomings of each model are discussed in detail. Most of these models are multicomponent in principle; however our focus here is on binary mixtures. Two rather different groups of models are identified: models needing a matching parameter to be obtained usually from the outside of thermodynamics, and the self-contained or independent models. Derivation of the matching parameter models using linear non-equilibrium thermodynamics and the details of how to find the matching parameters are investigated. The physical meaning of parameters such as the net heat of transport and the activation energy of viscous flow is elucidated, as the literature is overwhelmed with confusing and misleading information. The so-called dynamic and static models and their relations to the matching and non-matching parameter models are also discussed. We conclude that modeling the net heat of transport by the activation energy of self-diffusion may provide better results than approximating it by the activation energy of viscous flow. Nonetheless, the matching parameter models, which use the activation energy of viscous flow, are more dynamic and predict the thermal diffusion factor better than the non-matching parameter or static models, such as those of Kempers and Haase.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTI-LOOP FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER FACILITY FOR ADVANCED NUCLEAR REACTOR THERMAL HYDRAULIC AND HYBRID ENERGY SYSTEM STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    James E. O'Brien; Piyush Sabharwall; SuJong Yoon

    2001-09-01

    A new high-temperature multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility for advanced nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory. The facility will include three flow loops: high-temperature helium, molten salt, and steam/water. Molten salts have been identified as excellent candidate heat transport fluids for primary or secondary coolant loops, supporting advanced high temperature and small modular reactors (SMRs). Details of some of the design aspects and challenges of this facility, which is currently in the conceptual design phase, are discussed. A preliminary design configuration will be presented, with the required characteristics of the various components. The loop will utilize advanced high-temperature compact printed-circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs) operating at prototypic intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) conditions. The initial configuration will include a high-temperature (750°C), high-pressure (7 MPa) helium loop thermally integrated with a molten fluoride salt (KF-ZrF4) flow loop operating at low pressure (0.2 MPa) at a temperature of ~450°C. Experiment design challenges include identification of suitable materials and components that will withstand the required loop operating conditions. Corrosion and high temperature creep behavior are major considerations. The facility will include a thermal energy storage capability designed to support scaled process heat delivery for a variety of hybrid energy systems and grid stabilization strategies. Experimental results obtained from this research will also provide important data for code ve

  13. Exhaust bypass flow control for exhaust heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Michael G.

    2015-09-22

    An exhaust system for an engine comprises an exhaust heat recovery apparatus configured to receive exhaust gas from the engine and comprises a first flow passage in fluid communication with the exhaust gas and a second flow passage in fluid communication with the exhaust gas. A heat exchanger/energy recovery unit is disposed in the second flow passage and has a working fluid circulating therethrough for exchange of heat from the exhaust gas to the working fluid. A control valve is disposed downstream of the first and the second flow passages in a low temperature region of the exhaust heat recovery apparatus to direct exhaust gas through the first flow passage or the second flow passage.

  14. New heat flow determination in northern Tarim Craton, northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaowen; Lei, Xiao; Wang, Liangshu

    2015-02-01

    Tarim Craton is a Precambrian block situated in northwest China, just north of the Tibetan Plateau, where a large sedimentary basin with abundant hydrocarbon potential has developed. Accurate heat flow data for Tarim is vital for understanding the lithospheric evolution and hydrocarbon generation in this area; however, there were unavailable until now, due to a lack of high quality steady-state temperature logging data. Here, we report 10 new heat flow values derived from steady-state temperature logging and measured thermal conductivity data. New heat flow values range from 40.1 to 49.4 mW m-2, with a mean of 43.1 ± 3.0 mW m-2. In addition, radiogenic heat production from the sediments accounts for 20 per cent of the observed surface heat flow, whilst the mantle heat flow is estimated to be as low as 6-15 mW m-2; this indicates a dominant contribution from crustal heat, to the observed heat flow. The average heat flow and crustal temperature in the Tarim Craton are markedly lower than those in the Tibetan Plateau, whilst the calculated rheological strength of the lithosphere, beneath Tarim, is sufficiently large to resist the elevation-induced gravitational potential energy difference between Tarim and Tibet. This inherited thermal and rheological contrast, between the craton and Plateau, can be traced back to before the India-Asia collision; this accounts for the differential active deformation pattern in the Tarim Craton and adjacent areas.

  15. A New U.S. Marine Heat Flow Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R. N.; Fisher, A. T.

    2009-12-01

    Marine heat flow observations provide critical information on physical, chemical and biological processes occurring near and below the seafloor. Renewed interest in the collection and application of marine heat flow data to a broad range of scientific purposes is indicated by a renaissance in heat flow studies and publications over the last 10-15 years, as documented by a recent NSF-sponsored workshop and report on the Future of Marine Heat Flow [Harris et al., 2007]. Fundamental questions of geodynamics, global mass and energy fluxes across the seafloor, marine hydrogeology, gas hydrates, marine microbiology, sedimentary processes and other topics are addressed in recent heat flow studies. To facilitate these measurements we are establishing a marine heat flow capability for use by U.S. academic researchers on standard UNOLS vessels in collaboration with the Oregon State University coring capability. This capability includes two main sets of instruments: 1) A multipenetration probe that allows multiple measurements of heat flow, the product of the thermal gradient and thermal conductivity, with a single instrument transit to the seafloor; and 2) an outrigger probe system that allows measurements at a single location when a gravity or piston core is collected. A thermal conductivity needle probe system for use on recovered core samples will complete the determination of heat flow using outrigger probes, and supplement in-situ measurements from the multipenetration probe. This capability is available to U.S. scientists for an initial five-year period through funding from the National Science Foundation. Researchers wishing to include measurements of marine heat flow as part of a field program can request access to equipment, software, and technical support through the UNOLS ship time request system, and should consult early in the cruise planning process with US heat flow capability personnel to determine specific needs and capabilities. More information is

  16. Heat Transfer Enhancement in Separated and Vortex Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Richard J. Goldstein

    2004-05-27

    This document summarizes the research performance done at the Heat Transfer Laboratory of the University of Minnesota on heat transfer and energy separation in separated and vortex flow supported by DOE in the period September 1, 1998--August 31, 2003. Unsteady and complicated flow structures in separated or vortex flows are the main reason for a poor understanding of heat transfer under such conditions. The research from the University of Minnesota focused on the following important aspects of understanding such flows: (1) Heat/mass transfer from a circular cylinder; (2) study of energy separation and heat transfer in free jet flows and shear layers; and (3) study of energy separation on the surface and in the wake of a cylinder in crossflow. The current study used three different experimental setups to accomplish these goals. A wind tunnel and a liquid tunnel using water and mixtures of ethylene glycol and water, is used for the study of prandtl number effect with uniform heat flux from the circular cylinder. A high velocity air jet is used to study energy separation in free jets. A high speed wind tunnel, same as used for the first part, is utilized for energy separation effects on the surface and in the wake of the circular cylinder. The final outcome of this study is a substantial advancement in this research area.

  17. The impact of separated flow on heat and mass transfer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.J.

    1998-08-01

    An investigation of the effect of flow separation on heat and mass transfer has been completed. This research provided enhanced understanding of fundamental mechanisms governing important heat and mass transfer flow processes. This report summarizes the work conducted under the project. This research has provided considerable new knowledge on flow and heat transfer situations of great interest in a number of energy conversion devices, including heat exchangers, gas turbines, solar energy systems and general heat transfer systems.

  18. Analysis of Heat Transfers inside Counterflow Plate Heat Exchanger Augmented by an Auxiliary Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Khaled, A.-R. A.

    2014-01-01

    Enhancement of heat transfers in counterflow plate heat exchanger due to presence of an intermediate auxiliary fluid flow is investigated. The intermediate auxiliary channel is supported by transverse conducting pins. The momentum and energy equations for the primary fluids are solved numerically and validated against a derived approximate analytical solution. A parametric study including the effect of the various plate heat exchanger, and auxiliary channel dimensionless parameters is conducted. Different enhancement performance indicators are computed. The various trends of parameters that can better enhance heat transfer rates above those for the conventional plate heat exchanger are identified. Large enhancement factors are obtained under fully developed flow conditions. The maximum enhancement factors can be increased by above 8.0- and 5.0-fold for the step and exponential distributions of the pins, respectively. Finally, counterflow plate heat exchangers with auxiliary fluid flows are recommended over the typical ones if these flows can be provided with the least cost. PMID:24719572

  19. Energy absorber for sodium-heated heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Essebaggers, J.

    1975-12-01

    A heat exchanger is described in which water-carrying tubes are heated by liquid sodium and in which the results of accidental contact between the water and the sodium caused by failure of one or more of the water tubes is minimized. An energy absorbing chamber contains a compressible gas and is connected to the body of flowing sodium by a channel so that, in the event of a sodium-water reaction, products of the reaction will partially fill the energy absorbing chamber to attenuate the rise in pressure within the heat exchanger.

  20. Heat flow in the postquasistatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Mueller, B.; Peralta, C.; Barreto, W.; Rosales, L.

    2010-08-15

    We apply the postquasistatic approximation to study the evolution of spherically symmetric fluid distributions undergoing dissipation in the form of radial heat flow. For a model that corresponds to an incompressible fluid departing from the static equilibrium, it is not possible to go far from the initial state after the emission of a small amount of energy. Initially collapsing distributions of matter are not permitted. Emission of energy can be considered as a mechanism to avoid the collapse. If the distribution collapses initially and emits one hundredth of the initial mass only the outermost layers evolve. For a model that corresponds to a highly compressed Fermi gas, only the outermost shell can evolve with a shorter hydrodynamic time scale.

  1. Heat flow from the Liberian precambrian shield

    SciTech Connect

    Sass, J.H.; Behrendt, J.C.

    1980-06-10

    Uncorrected heat flow in iron formation rocks from three areas within the Liberian part of the West African Shield ranges from 50 to more than 80 mW m/sup -2/. When corrections are applied for topography and refraction, the range of heat flow is narrowed to between 38 and 42 mW m/sup -2/. In comparison with heat flows from other parts of the West African Craton, these values are consistent with preliminary results from Ghana (42 +- 8 mW m/sup -2/) and Nigeria (38 +- 2 mW /sup -2/) but are somewhat higher than values from Niger (20 mW m/sup -2/) and neighboring Sierra Leone (26 mW m/sup -2/). The Liberian values are significantly lower than the heat flow offshore in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean (58 +- 8 mW m/sup -2/), suggesting large lateral temperature gradients within the lithosphere near the coast. Values of heat production from outcrops of crystalline basement rocks near the holes are between 2 and 2.3 ..mu..W m/sup -3/. A heat-flow/heat-production relation cannot be established because of the small range of values; however, assuming a 'characteristic depth' of 8 km (similar to the North American Craton) the reduced heat flow of from 20 to 25 mW m/sup -2/ is consistent with that from other Precambrian shields.

  2. New Map of Io's Volcanic Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A. G.; Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D.; Johnson, T. V.

    2014-12-01

    We have created a global map of Io's volcanic heat flow from 245 thermal sources indicative of ongoing or recent volcanic activity, and 8 additional outbursts [1,2]. We incorporate data from both spacecraft and ground-based instruments that have observed Io primarily at infrared wavelengths. This map provides a snapshot of Io's volcanic activity and distribution during the Galileo epoch. Io's volcanic activity, in terms of thermal emission from individual eruptive centres, spans nearly six orders of magnitude, from Surt in 2001 (78 TW) [3] to a faint hot spot in patera P197 (0.2 GW) [1]. We account for ≈54% of Io's yearly volcanic heat flow, which emanates from ≈2% of Io's surface [1]. Averaged heat flow from the non-active surface is 1 ± 0.2 W m2. This quantification of volcanic heat flow map provides constraints for modelling the magnitude and location of the internal heating of Io by tidal dissipation. The observed heat flow distribution is the result of interior heating and volcanic advection, the delivery of magma to the surface regardless of its depth of origin. As noted previously [1, 2] the distribution of heat flow is not uniform, which is not unexpected. The volcanic heat flow does not match the expected distributions from end-member models for both the deep-seated (mantle) heating model (which predicts enhanced polar heating) and the shallow (aesthenospheric) heating model, which predicts enhanced thermal emission at sub-jovian and anti-jovian longitudes. Intriguingly, heat flow curves using a bin size of 30 degrees show a longitudinal offset from the shallow heating model prediction of some tens of degrees [2], suggesting a more complex mixture of deep and shallow heating. Future work includes refinement of thermal emission by including temporal variability of thermal emission at individual volcanoes, and comparing the heat flow map with the Io Geological Map [4] and global topography [5]. We thank the NASA OPR Program for support. Part of this

  3. Pneumatic Proboscis Heat-Flow Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zacny, Kris; Hedlund, Magnus; Mumm, Eric; Shasho, Jeffrey; Chu, Philip; Kumar, Nishant

    2013-01-01

    Heat flow is a fundamental property of a planet, and provides significant constraints on the abundance of radiogenic isotopes, the thermal evolution and differentiation history, and the mechanical properties of the lithosphere. Heat-flow measurements are also essential in achieving at least four of the goals set out by the National Research Council for future lunar exploration. The heat-flow probe therefore directly addresses the goal of the Lunar Geophysical Network, which is to understand the interior structure and composition of the Moon. A key challenge for heat flow measurement is to install thermal sensors to the depths approximately equal to 3 m that are not influenced by the diurnal, annual, and longer-term fluctuations of the surface thermal environment. In addition, once deployed, the heat flow probe should cause little disturbance to the thermal regime of the surrounding regolith. A heat-flow probe system was developed that has two novel features: (1) it utilizes a pneumatic (gas) approach, excavates a hole by lofting the lunar soil out of the hole, and (2) deploys the heat flow probe, which utilizes a coiled up tape as a thermal probe to reach greater than 3-meter depth. The system is a game-changer for small lunar landers as it exhibits extremely low mass, volume, and simple deployment. The pneumatic system takes advantage of the helium gas used for pressurizing liquid propellant of the lander. Normally, helium is vented once the lander is on the surface, but it can be utilized for powering pneumatic systems. Should sufficient helium not be available, a simple gas delivery system may be taken specifically for the heat flow probe. Either way, the pneumatic heat flow probe system would be much lighter than other systems that entirely rely on the electrical power of the lander.

  4. Thermodynamics of Flow Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, F. J.

    2003-05-01

    Convective boiling in sub-cooled water flowing through a heated channel is essential in many engineering applications where high heat flux needs to be accommodated. It has been customary to represent the heat transfer by the boiling curve, which shows the heat flux versus the wall-minus-saturation temperature difference. However it is a rather complicated problem, and recent revisions of two-phase flow and heat transfer note that calculated values of boiling heat transfer coefficients present many uncertainties. Quite recently, the author has shown that the average thermal gap in the heated channel (the wall temperature minus the average temperature of the coolant) was tightly connected with the thermodynamic efficiency of a theoretical reversible engine placed in this thermal gap. In this work, whereas this correlation is checked again with data taken by General Electric (task III) for water at high pressure, a possible connection between this wall efficiency and the reversible-work theorem is explored.

  5. Flow and convective heat transfer in cylindrical reversed flow combustion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Kilic, M.

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents a computational study of the flow and convective heat transfer in cylindrical reversed flow combustion chambers. The computations are performed using an elliptic solver incorporates the {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model. Heat production by combustion is simulated by adding heat generation source terms in the energy equation. And it is assumed that heat generation occurs only a section of the furnace. A number of different inlet conditions with different geometries are considered, and the changes of flow structure, temperature distribution, convective heat flux rate are presented and compared. The results show that, in general, heat transfer in the reversed flow combustion chamber can be improved by properly chosen geometry for the required output.

  6. The Development of an INL Capability for High Temperature Flow, Heat Transfer, and Thermal Energy Storage with Applications in Advanced Small Modular Reactors, High Temperature Heat Exchangers, Hybrid Energy Systems, and Dynamic Grid Energy Storage C

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Kim, Inhun; O'Brien, James; Sabharwall, Piyush

    2014-10-01

    The overall goal of this project is to support Idaho National Laboratory in developing a new advanced high temperature multi fluid multi loop test facility that is aimed at investigating fluid flow and heat transfer, material corrosion, heat exchanger characteristics and instrumentation performance, among others, for nuclear applications. Specifically, preliminary research has been performed at The Ohio State University in the following areas: 1. A review of fluoride molten salts’ characteristics in thermal, corrosive, and compatibility performances. A recommendation for a salt selection is provided. Material candidates for both molten salt and helium flow loop have been identified. 2. A conceptual facility design that satisfies the multi loop (two coolant loops [i.e., fluoride molten salts and helium]) multi purpose (two operation modes [i.e., forced and natural circulation]) requirements. Schematic models are presented. The thermal hydraulic performances in a preliminary printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) design have been estimated. 3. An introduction of computational methods and models for pipe heat loss analysis and cases studies. Recommendations on insulation material selection have been provided. 4. An analysis of pipe pressure rating and sizing. Preliminary recommendations on pipe size selection have been provided. 5. A review of molten fluoride salt preparation and chemistry control. An introduction to the experience from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been provided. 6. A review of some instruments and components to be used in the facility. Flowmeters and Grayloc connectors have been included. This report primarily presents the conclusions drawn from the extensive review of literatures in material selections and the facility design progress at the current stage. It provides some useful guidelines in insulation material and pipe size selection, as well as an introductory review of facility process and components.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Flow Instability and Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Hua-Shu; Jiang, Gang

    2014-11-01

    This paper numerically investigates the physical mechanism of flow instability and heat transfer of natural convection in a cavity with thin fin(s). The left and the right walls of the cavity are differentially heated. The cavity is given an initial temperature, and the thin fin(s) is fixed on the hot wall in order to control the heat transfer. The finite volume method with the SIMPLE scheme is used to simulate the flow. Distributions of the temperature, the pressure, the velocity and the total pressure are achieved. Then, the energy gradient method is employed to study the physical mechanism of flow instability and the effect of the thin fin(s) on heat transfer. Based on the energy gradient method, the energy gradient function K represents the characteristic of flow instability. It is observed from the simulation results that the positions where instabilities take place in the temperature contours accord well with those of higher K value, which demonstrates that the energy gradient method reveals the physical mechanism of flow instability. Furthermore, the effect of the fin length, the fin position, the fin number, and Ra on heat transfer is also investigated. It is found that the effect of the fin length on heat transfer is negligible when Ra is relatively high. When there is only one fin, the most efficient heat transfer rate is achieved as the fin is fixed at the middle height of the cavity. The fin blocks heat transfer with a relatively small Ra, but the fin enhances heat transfer with a relatively large Ra. The fin(s) enhances heat transfer gradually with the increase of Ra under the influence of the thin fin(s). Finally, it is observed that both Kmax and Ra can reveal the physical mechanism of natural convection from different approaches.

  8. Motorcycle waste heat energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichting, Alexander D.; Anton, Steven R.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2008-03-01

    Environmental concerns coupled with the depletion of fuel sources has led to research on ethanol, fuel cells, and even generating electricity from vibrations. Much of the research in these areas is stalling due to expensive or environmentally contaminating processes, however recent breakthroughs in materials and production has created a surge in research on waste heat energy harvesting devices. The thermoelectric generators (TEGs) used in waste heat energy harvesting are governed by the Thermoelectric, or Seebeck, effect, generating electricity from a temperature gradient. Some research to date has featured platforms such as heavy duty diesel trucks, model airplanes, and automobiles, attempting to either eliminate heavy batteries or the alternator. A motorcycle is another platform that possesses some very promising characteristics for waste heat energy harvesting, mainly because the exhaust pipes are exposed to significant amounts of air flow. A 1995 Kawasaki Ninja 250R was used for these trials. The module used in these experiments, the Melcor HT3-12-30, produced an average of 0.4694 W from an average temperature gradient of 48.73 °C. The mathematical model created from the Thermoelectric effect equation and the mean Seebeck coefficient displayed by the module produced an average error from the experimental data of 1.75%. Although the module proved insufficient to practically eliminate the alternator on a standard motorcycle, the temperature data gathered as well as the examination of a simple, yet accurate, model represent significant steps in the process of creating a TEG capable of doing so.

  9. Heat flow from the West African shield

    SciTech Connect

    Brigaud, F.; Lucazeau, F.; Ly, S.; Sauvage, J.F.

    1985-09-01

    The heat flow over Precambrian shields is generally lower than over other continental provinces. Previous observations at 9 sites of the West African shield have shown that heat flow ranges from 20 mW m/sup -2/ in Niger to 38-42 mW m/sup -2/ in Liberia, Ghana and Nigeria. Since some of these values are lower than expected for Precambrian shields, it is important to find out whether or not they are representative of the entire shield before trying to derive its thermal structure. In this paper, we present new heat flow determinations from seven sites of the West African shield. These indicate that the surface heat flow is comparable with that of other Precambrian shields in the world.

  10. Flow and heat transfer enhancement in tube heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed Ahmed, Sayed Ahmed E.; Mesalhy, Osama M.; Abdelatief, Mohamed A.

    2015-11-01

    The performance of heat exchangers can be improved to perform a certain heat-transfer duty by heat transfer enhancement techniques. Enhancement techniques can be divided into two categories: passive and active. Active methods require external power, such as electric or acoustic field, mechanical devices, or surface vibration, whereas passive methods do not require external power but make use of a special surface geometry or fluid additive which cause heat transfer enhancement. The majority of commercially interesting enhancement techniques are passive ones. This paper presents a review of published works on the characteristics of heat transfer and flow in finned tube heat exchangers of the existing patterns. The review considers plain, louvered, slit, wavy, annular, longitudinal, and serrated fins. This review can be indicated by the status of the research in this area which is important. The comparison of finned tubes heat exchangers shows that those with slit, plain, and wavy finned tubes have the highest values of area goodness factor while the heat exchanger with annular fin shows the lowest. A better heat transfer coefficient ha is found for a heat exchanger with louvered finned and thus should be regarded as the most efficient one, at fixed pumping power per heat transfer area. This study points out that although numerous studies have been conducted on the characteristics of flow and heat transfer in round, elliptical, and flat tubes, studies on some types of streamlined-tubes shapes are limited, especially on wing-shaped tubes (Sayed Ahmed et al. in Heat Mass Transf 50: 1091-1102, 2014; in Heat Mass Transf 51: 1001-1016, 2015). It is recommended that further detailed studies via numerical simulations and/or experimental investigations should be carried out, in the future, to put further insight to these fin designs.

  11. Flow-Dependent Vascular Heat Transfer during Microwave Thermal Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Jason; Hynes, Kieran; Brace, Christopher L.

    2012-01-01

    Microwave tumor ablation is an attractive option for thermal ablation because of its inherent benefits over radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the treatment of solid tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Microwave energy heats tissue to higher temperatures and at a faster rate than RFA, creating larger, more homogenous ablation zones. In this study, we investigate microwave heating near large vasculature using coupled fluid-flow and thermal analysis. Low-flow conditions are predicted to be more likely to cause cytotoxic heating and, therefore, vessel thrombosis and endothelial damage of downstream tissues. Such conditions may be more prevalent in patient with severe cirrhosis or compromised blood flow. High-flow conditions create the more familiar heat-sink effect that can protect perivascular tissues from the intended thermal damage. These results may help guide placement and use of microwave ablation technologies in future studies. PMID:23367194

  12. Heat-flow mapping at the Geysers Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.P.

    1986-10-31

    Pertinent data were compiled for 187 temperature-gradient holes in the vicinity of The Geysers Geothermal field. Terrain-correction techniques were applied to most of the temperature-gradient data, and a temperature-gradient map was constructed. Cutting samples from 16, deep, production wells were analyzed for thermal conductivity. From these samples, the mean thermal conductivities were determined for serpentinized ultramafic rock, greenstone, and graywacke. Then, a heat flow map was made. The temperature-gradient and heat-flow maps show that The Geysers Geothermal field is part of a very large, northwesterly-trending, thermal anomaly; the commercially productive portion of the field may be 100 km/sup 2/ in area. The rate that heat energy flows through the surface by thermal conduction is estimated at 1.79 x 10/sup 9/MJ per year. The net heat energy loss from commercial production for 1983 is estimated at 180.14 x 10/sup 9/MJ.

  13. Cryogenic fluid flow instabilities in heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, R. B.; Staub, F. W.

    1969-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigation determines the nature of oscillations and instabilities that occur in the flow of two-phase cryogenic fluids at both subcritical and supercritical pressures in heat exchangers. Test results with varying system parameters suggest certain design approaches with regard to heat exchanger geometry.

  14. Earth tides, global heat flow, and tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, H.R.

    1970-01-01

    The power of a heat engine ignited by tidal energy can account for geologically reasonable rates of average magma production and sea floor spreading. These rates control similarity of heat flux over continents and oceans because of an inverse relationship between respective depth intervals for mass transfer and consequent distributions of radiogenic heat production.

  15. Heat Flow of the Norwegian Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, C.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial heat flow determination is of prime interest for oil industry because it impacts directly maturation histories and economic potential of oil fields. Published systematic heat flow determinations from major oil provinces are however seldom. Robust heat flow determinations in drillholes require logging of undisturbed temperatures and intensive sampling of core material for petrophysical measurements. Temperature logging in exploration drillholes is traditionally conducted during drill breaks or shortly after drilling, resulting in temperatures severely disturbed by mud circulation and coring is restricted to selected intervals. Alternatively, test temperatures, information from electric logs and lithological descriptions of drill cuttings can be used to overcome these limitations. The present contribution introduces new heat flow determinations based on 63 exploration drillholes from the Norwegian North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin and the Barents Shelf. Our analyses are based on released DST temperatures, precise lithological descriptions of drill cuttings, previously measured rock matrix thermal conductivities and established porosity laws. For the sake of comparison, we carefully review previous heat flow studies carried out both onshore and offshore Norway. Our results suggest median heat flow values of 64 mW/m2, 65 mW/m2 and 72 mW/m2 for the North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin (mainly the Trøndelag Platform) and the SW Barents Shelf respectively. In detail, heat flow increases by ~ 10 mW/m2 from the southern Norwegian North Sea towards the Mid Norway Margin. This result appears to be in very good agreement with seismic tomographic studies suggesting northward thinning of the underlying mantle lithosphere. Our results together with published marine heat flow data from the Mid Norway Margin suggest a gradual decrease in heat flow levels from both the North Sea and the Trøndelag Platform towards the centres of the deep Møre and Vøring basins. This latter

  16. Heat flow and heat generation in greenstone belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drury, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Heat flow has been measured in Precambrian shields in both greenstone belts and crystalline terrains. Values are generally low, reflecting the great age and tectonic stability of the shields; they range typically between 30 and 50 mW/sq m, although extreme values of 18 and 79 mW/sq m have been reported. For large areas of the Earth's surface that are assumed to have been subjected to a common thermotectonic event, plots of heat flow against heat generation appear to be linear, although there may be considerable scatter in the data. The relationship is expressed as: Q = Q sub o + D A sub o in which Q is the observed heat flow, A sub o is the measured heat generation at the surface, Q sub o is the reduced heat flow from the lower crust and mantle, and D, which has the dimension of length, represents a scale depth for the distribution of radiogenic elements. Most authors have not used data from greenstone belts in attempting to define the relationship within shields, considering them unrepresentative and preferring to use data from relatively homogeneous crystalline rocks. A discussion follows.

  17. Heat flow of the Norwegian continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial heat flow influences a large collection of geological processes. Its determination is a requirement to assess the economic potential of deep sedimentary basins. Published heat flow calculations from e.g. major oil provinces are however seldom. Robust heat flow determinations in drillholes require logging of undisturbed temperatures and intensive sampling of core material for petrophysical measurements. Temperature logging in exploration drillholes is traditionally conducted during drill breaks or shortly after drilling, resulting in temperatures severely disturbed by mud circulation and coring is restricted to selected intervals. Alternatively, test temperatures, information from electric logs and lithological descriptions of drill cuttings can be used to overcome these limitations. The present contribution introduces new heat flow determinations based on 63 exploration drillholes from the Norwegian North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin and the Barents Shelf. Our analyses are based on released DST temperatures, precise lithological descriptions of drill cuttings, previously measured rock matrix thermal conductivities and established porosity laws. Our results suggest median heat flow values of 64 mW/m2, 65 mW/m2 and 72 mW/m2 for the North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin (mainly the Trøndelag Platform) and the SW Barents Shelf respectively. The Barents Shelf shows significantly high heat flow, suggesting lateral transfer of heat from the mantle of the adjacent young ocean. In detail, heat flow increases by ~ 10 mW/m2 from the southern Norwegian North Sea towards the Mid Norway Margin. This result appears to be in very good agreement with seismic tomographic studies suggesting northward thinning of the underlying mantle lithosphere. Our results together with published marine heat flow data from the Mid Norway Margin suggest a gradual decrease in heat flow levels from both the North Sea and the Trøndelag Platform towards the centres of the deep Møre and V

  18. Comparisons of Earthward Poynting flux and the kinetic energy flux of up-flowing transversely heated ions from the Polar spacecraft on cusp magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, S.; Wygant, J. R.; Cattell, C. A.; Scudder, J. D.; Mozer, F.; Russell, C. T.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents estimates of the Poynting flux flowing along magnetic field lines in the Earth's cusp region over altitudes from 0.8 Re to 7 Re using measurements during several passes from the Polar spacecraft. The Poynting flux is calculated from measurements of electric fields from the University of California, Berkeley double probe electric field instrument, and from magnetic field measurements from the U.C.L.A. fluxgate magnetometer. The estimates of Poynting flux are of special interest because the high altitude mapping of the cusp magnetic flux tubes may connect to newly reconnected field lines and the low altitude mapping of these field lines is the scene of powerful acceleration processes, most notably transverse heating and outflow of ions. The data show that the Poynting flux is predominantly downward over the frequency range from 1 mHz to 1 Hz . This frequency range includes the Poynting flux due to steady state convection and field-aligned current systems, Alfven waves, and kinetic Alfven waves. Measurement of transversely heated ions over the energy ranges from 10 eV to several keV and their associated ion kinetic energy flux are presented from the University of Iowa Hydra instrument and compared to the values of the downward Poynting flux. Generally the downward Poynting flux exceeds the upward kinetic energy flux of the ions.

  19. Energy 101: Geothermal Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    An energy-efficient heating and cooling alternative, the geothermal heat pump system moves heat from the ground to a building (or from a building to the ground) through a series of flexible pipe "loops" containing water. This edition of Energy 101 explores the benefits Geothermal and the science behind how it all comes together.

  20. Energy 101: Geothermal Heat Pumps

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-29

    An energy-efficient heating and cooling alternative, the geothermal heat pump system moves heat from the ground to a building (or from a building to the ground) through a series of flexible pipe "loops" containing water. This edition of Energy 101 explores the benefits Geothermal and the science behind how it all comes together.

  1. Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. Subba

    1993-01-01

    Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic space vehicles is an important factor to be considered in their design. Therefore the designers of such vehicles need reliable heat transfer data in this respect for a successful design. Such data is usually produced by testing the models of hypersonic surfaces in wind tunnels. Most of the hypersonic test facilities at present are conventional blow-down tunnels whose run times are of the order of several seconds. The surface temperatures on such models are obtained using standard techniques such as thin-film resistance gages, thin-skin transient calorimeter gages and coaxial thermocouple or video acquisition systems such as phosphor thermography and infrared thermography. The data are usually reduced assuming that the model behaves like a semi-infinite solid (SIS) with constant properties and that heat transfer is by one-dimensional conduction only. This simplifying assumption may be valid in cases where models are thick, run-times short, and thermal diffusivities small. In many instances, however, when these conditions are not met, the assumption may lead to significant errors in the heat transfer results. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate this aspect. Specifically, the objectives are as follows: (1) to determine the limiting conditions under which a model can be considered a semi-infinite body; (2) to estimate the extent of errors involved in the reduction of the data if the models violate the assumption; and (3) to come up with correlation factors which when multiplied by the results obtained under the SIS assumption will provide the results under the actual conditions.

  2. Heat flow and efficiency in a microscopic engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, B.-Q.; Xie, H.-Z.; Wen, D.-H.; Liu, X.-M.; Liu, L.-G.

    2005-11-01

    We study the energetics of a thermal motor driven by temperature differences, which consists of a Brownian particle moving in a sawtooth potential with an external load where the viscous medium is periodically in contact with hot and cold heat reservoir along space coordinate. The motor can work as a heat engine or a refrigerator under different conditions. The heat flow via both potential and kinetic energy is considered. The former is reversible when the engine works quasistatically and the latter is always irreversible. The efficiency of the heat engine can never approach Carnot efficiency.

  3. Basic study of heat flow in fusion welding. Progress report to the US Department of Energy, October 1, 1980-October 1, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Szekely, J.; Eagar, T.W.

    1981-10-15

    Progress is reported in an investigation whose purpose is the development of a fundamental understanding of heat and fluid flow in fusion welding operations and of the role played by heat and fluid flow in determining the mechanical and structural properties of the welds produced. To date, a good quantitative description has been developed of the temperature profiles for electroslag welding systems and an understanding has been derived of factors that determine the size of the heat-affected zone (HAZ). Mathematical models of heat and fluid flow in the weld pool and of the temperature distribution in weldments using a moving heat source were developed. Experiments were performed to determine the effects of welding process parameters on the size and shape of the weld pool and of the HAZ. An unexpected finding was that the size of the HAZ was not markedly dependent on any of the welding process parameters. (LCL)

  4. Coupling of volatile transport and internal heat flow on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert H.; Kirk, Randolph L.

    1994-01-01

    Recently Brown et al. (1991) showed that Triton's internal heat source could amount to 5-20% of the absorbed insolation on Triton, thus significantly affecting volatile transport and atmospheric pressure. Subsequently, Kirk and Brown (1991a) used simple analytical models of the effect of internal heat on the distribution of volatiles on Triton's surface, confirming the speculation of Brown et al. that Triton's internal heat flow could strongly couple to the surface volatile distribution. To further explore this idea, we present numerical models of the permanent distribution of nitrogen ice on Triton that include the effects of sunlight, the two-dimensional distribution of internal heat flow, the coupling of internal heat flow to the surface distribution of nitrogen ice, and the finite viscosity of nitrogen ice. From these models we conclude that: (1) The strong vertical thermal gradient induced in Triton's polar caps by internal heat-flow facilitates viscous spreading to lower latitudes, thus opposing the poleward transport of volatiles by sunlight, and, for plausible viscosities and nitrogen inventories, producing permanent caps of considerable latitudinal extent; (2) It is probable that there is a strong coupling between the surface distribution of nitrogen ice on Triton and internal heat flow; (3) Asymmetries in the spatial distribution of Triton's heat flow, possibly driven by large-scale, volcanic activity or convection in Triton's interior, can result in permanent polar caps of unequal latitudinal extent, including the case of only one permanent polar cap; (4) Melting at the base of a permanent polar cap on Triton caused by internal heat flow can significantly enhance viscous spreading, and, as an alternative to the solid-state greenhouse mechanism proposed by Brown et al. (1990), could provide the necessary energy, fluids, and/or gases to drive Triton's geyser-like plumes; (5) The atmospheric collapse predicted to occur on Triton in the next 20 years

  5. The Flow of Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Znidarsic, F.; Robertson, G. A.

    In this paper, the flow of energy in materials is presented as mechanical waves with a distinct velocity or speed of transition. This speed of transition came about through the observations of cold fusion experiments, i.e., Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR) and superconductor gravity experiments, both assumed speculative by mainstream science. In consideration of superconductor junctions, the LENR experiments have a similar speed of transition, which seems to imply that the reactions in the LENR experiment are discrete quantized reactions (energy - burst vs. continuous). Here an attempt is made to quantify this new condition as it applies to electrons; toward the progression of quantized energy flows (discrete energy burst) as a new source of clean energy and force mechanisms (i.e, propulsion).

  6. Ionospheric Heating Rates Associated with Solar Wind Forcing: Ejecta flow, High Speed Flow and Slow Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipp, D. J.; Kasprzak, B.; Richardson, I.; Paige, T.; Evans, D.

    2001-12-01

    We present estimates of global ionospheric Joule and particle heating as a function of solar wind flow types over solar cycles 21, 22 and the first half of solar cycle 23. Richardson et al., [JGR, 2000] used a variety of techniques to categorize the solar wind flow as ejecta, high-speed stream or slow flow. Their work provides the basis for our catigorization of heating by flow type. The estimates of Joule heating are based on output of the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) procedure, and fits to the Polar Cap Index [Chun et al., GRL, 1999]. Estimates of particle heating are derived from polar orbiting satellites. Although ejecta only account for 19% of the solar wind flow, they account for 27% of the Joule heating. High-speed stream flow accounts for 47% of the flow occurrence and 44% of the Joule heating. We will show similar comparisons for particle heating. Our solar cycle statistics indicate that Joule heating produces a yearly average hemispheric heating rate of 53 GW while particles produce a hemispheric heating rate of 38 GW. Joule heating exhibits more variability than particle heating. During solar cycle maximum years Joule heating accounts for twice the heating associated with particles heating.

  7. Method for identifying anomalous terrestrial heat flows

    DOEpatents

    Del Grande, Nancy Kerr

    1977-01-25

    A method for locating and mapping the magnitude and extent of terrestrial heat-flow anomalies from 5 to 50 times average with a tenfold improved sensitivity over orthodox applications of aerial temperature-sensing surveys as used for geothermal reconnaissance. The method remotely senses surface temperature anomalies such as occur from geothermal resources or oxidizing ore bodies by: measuring the spectral, spatial, statistical, thermal, and temporal features characterizing infrared radiation emitted by natural terrestrial surfaces; deriving from these measurements the true surface temperature with uncertainties as small as 0.05 to 0.5 K; removing effects related to natural temperature variations of topographic, hydrologic, or meteoric origin, the surface composition, detector noise, and atmospheric conditions; factoring out the ambient normal-surface temperature for non-thermally enhanced areas surveyed under otherwise identical environmental conditions; distinguishing significant residual temperature enhancements characteristic of anomalous heat flows and mapping the extent and magnitude of anomalous heat flows where they occur.

  8. Azimuthal Stress and Heat Flux In Radiatively Inefficient Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devlen, Ebru

    2016-07-01

    Radiatively Inefficient Accretion Flows (RIAFs) have low radiative efficiencies and/or low accretion rates. The accreting gas may retain most of its binding energy in the form of heat. This lost energy for hot RIAFs is one of the problems heavily worked on in the literature. RIAF observations on the accretion to super massive black holes (e.g., Sagittarius A* in the center of our Galaxy) have shown that the observational data are not consistent with either advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) or Bondi models. For this reason, it is very important to theoretically comprehend the physical properties of RIAFs derived from observations with a new disk/flow model. One of the most probable candidates for definition of mass accretion and the source of excess heat energy in RIAFs is the gyroviscous modified magnetorotational instability (GvMRI). Dispersion relation is derived by using MHD equations containing heat flux term based on viscosity in the energy equation. Numerical solutions of the disk equations are done and the growth rates of the instability are calculated. This additional heat flux plays an important role in dissipation of energy. The rates of the angular momentum and heat flux which are obtained from numerical calculations of the turbulence brought about by the GVMRI are also discussed.

  9. Colorado Heat Flow Data from IHFC

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: The International Heat Flow Commission (IHFC) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado IHFC Data Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: Abstract: This layer contains the heat flow sites and data of the State of Colorado compiled from the International Heat Flow Commission (IHFC) of the International Association of Seismology and Physics of the Earth's Interior (IASPEI) global heat flow database (www.heatflow.und.edu/index2.html). The data include different items: Item number, descriptive code, name of site, latitude and longitude, elevation, depth interval, number of temperature data, temperature gradient, number of conductivity measurement, average conductivity, number of heat generation measurements, average heat production, heat flow, number of individual sites, references, and date of publication. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4522121.800672 m Left: 165356.134075 m Right: 621836.776246 m Bottom: 4097833.419676 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude Of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich

  10. Stirling Engine With Radial Flow Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitale, N.; Yarr, George

    1993-01-01

    Conflict between thermodynamical and structural requirements resolved. In Stirling engine of new cylindrical configuration, regenerator and acceptor and rejector heat exchangers channel flow of working gas in radial direction. Isotherms in regenerator ideally concentric cylinders, and gradient of temperature across regenerator radial rather than axial. Acceptor and rejector heat exchangers located radially inward and outward of regenerator, respectively. Enables substantial increase in power of engine without corresponding increase in diameter of pressure vessel.

  11. Temperature-gated thermal rectifier for active heat flow control.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia; Hippalgaonkar, Kedar; Shen, Sheng; Wang, Kevin; Abate, Yohannes; Lee, Sangwook; Wu, Junqiao; Yin, Xiaobo; Majumdar, Arun; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-08-13

    Active heat flow control is essential for broad applications of heating, cooling, and energy conversion. Like electronic devices developed for the control of electric power, it is very desirable to develop advanced all-thermal solid-state devices that actively control heat flow without consuming other forms of energy. Here we demonstrate temperature-gated thermal rectification using vanadium dioxide beams in which the environmental temperature actively modulates asymmetric heat flow. In this three terminal device, there are two switchable states, which can be regulated by global heating. In the "Rectifier" state, we observe up to 28% thermal rectification. In the "Resistor" state, the thermal rectification is significantly suppressed (<1%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of solid-state active-thermal devices with a large rectification in the Rectifier state. This temperature-gated rectifier can have substantial implications ranging from autonomous thermal management of heating and cooling systems to efficient thermal energy conversion and storage. PMID:25010206

  12. Heat transfer peculiarities in supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovoi, V. Ia.; Brazhko, V. N.; Maikapar, G. I.; Skuratov, A. S.; Struminskaia, I. V.

    1992-12-01

    A method of heat transfer and gas flow investigation based on the application of thermal sensitive coatings or thermocouple sensors and various visualization techniques is described. The thermal sensitive coatings and visualization reveal heat transfer peculiarities, and the complex nature of the method contributes to understanding the processes and generalization of quantitative results. Data concerning heat transfer on the leeward side of a blunt cone in the regions of the shock-wave boundary layer and bow wave interaction, in gaps and cavities of the orbiter's thermal insulation, and in the vicinity of them, are presented.

  13. Transient pipe flow derived by periodic heat release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Zun; Celik, Ismail

    The heat release resulting from chemical reactions in a combustor/tail pipe system usually induces an instability in the gas flow. This instability may lead to a stable periodic motion under certain combinations of combustion heat release and combustor geometry. This paper reports a numerical study of the unsteady (periodic) gas flow which is driven by a periodic heat release prescribed empirically. The one-dimensional transient equations of motion and energy are derived by integration from the more general two-dimensional equations. The combustion heat release is added to the energy equation as a source term. These equations are solved using the explicit, predictor-corrector method of MacCormack. Some predictions are compared with measurements. The effects of the wall friction, heat transfer, and the amplitude and frequency of combustion heat release on the velocity and pressure waves are investigated. The results indicate that pulsation amplitude is a strong function of the heat release rate and it shows a maximum near an equivalence ratio value of one, where the heat release is near its maximum; this is in conformity with the experimental data. A method for calculating the natural operation frequency of pulse combustor is suggested.

  14. Microgravity Two-phase Flow and Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Kamiel

    2006-12-01

    Multiphase thermal systems (involving more than one phase or one component) have numerous applications in aerospace, heat-exchanger, transport of contaminants in environmental systems, and energy transport and energy conversion systems. Advances in understanding the behaviour of multiphase thermal systems could lead to higher efficiency energy production systems, improved heat-exchanger design, and safer and enhanced treatment of hazardous waste. But such advances have been greatly hindered by the strong effect of gravitational acceleration on the flow. Depending on the flow orientation and the phase velocities, gravitational forces could significantly alter the flow regime, and hence the pressure-drop and heat-transfer coefficients associated with the flow. A reduced gravity environment (or "microgravity"), provides an excellent tool to study the flow without the masking effects of gravity. This book presents for the first time a comprehensive coverage of all aspects of two-phase flow behaviour in the virtual absence of gravity. Link: http://www.springer.com/east/home?SGWID=5-102-22-173662745-0&changeHeader=true

  15. Notes on heat flow at Ririwai, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukwueke, C.

    Heat flow measurements carried out in the Ririwai ring complexes gave an average temperature gradient of 16.0 ± 0.5°C km -1 and thermal conductivity of the granites measured in the laboratory varied from 3.007 to 3.672 W/m°C. The laboratory results conforms with the estimated thermal conductivities from mineralogical compositions: modal analysis 3.13 W/m°C, C.I.P.W. norm 3.06 W/m°C and the content of oxides SiO 2 3.17 W/m°C. The calculated average heat flow is 50.72 ± 2.54 mWm -2 which is higher than those from the West African Craton: 20 mWm -2 in Niger, (Chapman and Pollack, 1974), 26 mWm -2 in Ghana (Beck and Mustonen, 1972) and 38.5 ± 1.7 mWm -2 from the same complex (Verheijen and Ajakaiye, 1979). The heat flow value of 50.72 ± 2.54 mWm -2 is considered normal for post PreCambrian orogenic provinces and also in agreement with the relation between heat flow and age.

  16. Numberical Solution to Transient Heat Flow Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobiske, Ronald A.; Hock, Jeffrey L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the reduction of the one- and three-dimensional diffusion equation to the difference equation and its stability, convergence, and heat-flow applications under different boundary conditions. Indicates the usefulness of this presentation for beginning students of physics and engineering as well as college teachers. (CC)

  17. Heat flow-heat production relationship not found: what drives heat flow variability of the Western Canadian foreland basin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majorowicz, Jacek A.

    2016-06-01

    Heat flow high -80 ± 10 mW/m2 in the northern western parts of the Western Canadian foreland basin is in large contrast to low heat flow to the south and east (50 ± 7 mW/m2) of the same basin with the same old 2E09 year's Precambrian basement and some 200-km-thick lithosphere. Over-thrusted and flat-laying sedimentary units are heated from below by heat flow from the old craton' crust and low 15 ± 5 mW/m2 mantle contribution. The heat flow vs. radiogenic heat production statistical relationship is not found for this area. To account for this large heat flow contrast and to have 200-km-thick lithosphere, we would need to assume that high heat production layer of the upper crust varies in thickness as much as factor of 2 and/or that the measured heat production at top of Precambrian basement is not representative for deeper rocks. The other explanation proposed before that heat in the basin is redistributed by the regional fluid flow systems driven from high hydraulic head areas close to the foothills of the Rocky Mountains toward low elevation areas to the east and north cannot be explained by observed low Darcy fluid velocities and the geometry of the basin.

  18. Rényi entropy flows from quantum heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Mohammad H.; Nazarov, Yuli V.

    2015-03-01

    We evaluate Rényi entropy flows from generic quantum heat engines (QHE) to a weakly coupled probe environment kept in thermal equilibrium. We show that the flows are determined not only by heat flow but also by a quantum coherent flow that can be separately measured in experiment apart from the heat flow measurement. The same pertains to Shannon entropy flow. This appeals for a revision of the concept of entropy flows in quantum nonequlibrium thermodynamics.

  19. Regional heat flow variations in the northern Michigan and Lake Superior region determined using the silica heat flow estimator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vugrinovich, R.

    1987-01-01

    Conventional heat flow data are sparse for northern Michigan. The groundwater silica heat flow estimator expands the database sufficiently to allow regional variations in heat flow to be examined. Heat flow shows a pattern of alternating highs and lows trending ESE across the Upper Peninsula and Lake Superior. The informal names given to these features, their characteristic heat flow and inferred causes are listed: {A table is presented} The results suggest that, for the study area, regional variations in heat flow cannot be interpreted solely in terms of regional variations of the heat generation rate of basement rocks. ?? 1987.

  20. Heat flow in the Keweenawan rift system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, C.; Mareschal, J.; Jaupart, C. P.

    2012-12-01

    The emplacement of large volumes of mafic volcanic rocks during the Keweenawan rifting has modified the average crustal composition and affects the present steady state heat flux in the region. We have combined new heat flux measurements in the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield and previously published data to characterize the heat flux field around the Keweenawan rift system. For the Nipigon embayment, North of lake Superior in Ontario, mafic intrusions associated with the Keweenawan rifting have resulted in an increase in the volume of mafic rocks in the crust and caused a very small <3mW m-2 decrease in the mean heat flux. There is a very marked decrease in the heat flux (Δ Q ≈ 20mW m-2) beneath the western half of Lake Superior and to the west. The very low values of the surface heat flux (≈ 22mW m-2 correlate with the maximum Bouguer gravity anomaly. The heat flux at the base of the crust in the Canadian Shield has been determined from surface heat flux, heat production, and crustal stucture to be ≈ 15 mW m-2. In the Keweenawan rift, the surface heat flux is only a few mW m-2 higher than the mantle heat flux, which implies that the contribution of the entire crustal column to the surface heat flux is small and that the crust is exclusively made up of depleted mafic volcanic rocks. In the eastern part and northeast of Lake Superior, there is a marked increase in heat flux that correlates with a lower Bouguer anomaly. Local high heat flux anomalies due to intrusions by felsic rocks are superposed with a long wavelength trend of higher heat flow suggesting a more felsic crustal composition in the eastern part of the Keweenawan rift. Simple models suggest that such a thick dense volcanic pile as accumulated in the Keweenawan rift is almost invariably unstable and that very particular conditions were required for it to stabilize in the crust.

  1. Turbulent Heat Transfer in Ribbed Pipe Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Changwoo; Yang, Kyung-Soo

    2012-11-01

    From the view point of heat transfer control, surface roughness is one of the popular ways adopted for enhancing heat transfer in turbulent pipe flow. Such a surface roughness is often modeled with a rib. In the current investigation, Large Eddy Simulation has been performed for turbulent flow in a pipe with periodically-mounted ribs at Reτ=700, Pr=0.71, and p / k =2, 4, and 8. Here, p and k represent the pitch and rib height, respectively. The rib height is fixed as one tenth of the pipe radius. The profiles of mean velocity components, mean temperature, root-mean-squares (rms) of temperature fluctuation are presented at the selected streamwise locations. In comparison with the smooth-pipe case at the same Re and Pr, the effects of the ribs are clearly identified, leading to overall enhancement of turbulent heat transfer in terms of Nu. The budget of temperature variance is presented in the form of contours. The results of an Octant analysis are also given to elucidate the dominant events. Our LES results shed light on a complete understanding of the heat-transfer mechanisms in turbulent ribbed-pipe flow which has numerous applications in engineering. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MEST) (No. 2012013019).

  2. Natural convection flow in porous enclosure with localized heating from below with heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiki, Md. Noor-A.-Alam; Molla, Md. Mamun; Saha, Suvash C.

    2016-07-01

    Unsteady natural convection flow in a two dimensional fluid saturated porous enclosure with localized heating from below with heat flux, symmetrical cooling from the sides and the insulated top wall has been investigated numerically. The governing equations are the Darcy's law for the porous media and the energy equation for the temperature field has been considered. The non-dimensional Darcy's law in terms of the stream function is solved by finite difference method using the successive over-relaxation (SOR) scheme and the energy equation is solved by Alternative Direction Alternative (ADI) scheme. The uniform heat flux source is located centrally at the bottom wall. The numerical results are presented in terms of the streamlines and isotherms, as well as the local and average rate of heat transfer for the wide range of the Darcy's Rayleigh number and the length of the heat flux source at the bottom wall.

  3. Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Hardee, Harry C.; Reynolds, Gerald D.; Steinfort, Terry D.

    1992-01-01

    A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers arranged in a vertical string. The transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings.

  4. Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, C.R.; Hardee, H.C.; Reynolds, G.D.; Steinfort, T.D.

    1990-01-01

    A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings. 6 figs.

  5. Heat flow and energetics of the San Andreas fault zone.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lachenbruch, A.H.; Sass, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Approximately 100 heat flow measurements in the San Andreas fault zone indicate 1) there is no evidence for local frictional heating of the main fault trace at any latitude over a 1000-km length from Cape Mendocino to San Bernardino, 2) average heat flow is high (ca.2 HFU, ca.80 mW m-2) throughout the 550-km segment of the Coast Ranges that encloses the San Andreas fault zone in central California; this broad anomaly falls off rapidly toward the Great Valley to the east, and over a 200-km distance toward the Mendocino Triple Junction to the northwest. As others have pointed out, a local conductive heat flow anomaly would be detectable unless the frictional resistance allocated to heat production on the main trace were less than 100 bars. Frictional work allocated to surface energy of new fractures is probably unimportant, and hydrologic convection is not likely to invalidate the conduction assumption, since the heat discharge by thermal springs near the fault is negligible. -Authors

  6. Fluid flow and heat convection studies for actively cooled airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, A. F.

    1992-01-01

    The work done during the progress report period from May-October 1992 is summarized. The effect of wall thermal boundary conditions on flows over a step or rib when repeated rib roughness is used for heating augmentation is examined. In numerical investigations of various such laminar and turbulent flows, the local heat transfer coefficients on a forward-facing step or on a rib were found to be very sensitive to the wall thermal boundary condition. For the computation of constant property laminar flow, the wall thermal boundary conditions were either a uniform heat flux or a uniform temperature. Results (Nusselt number and isotherms) of the studies are included. The second part of the work consisted of using PHOENICS to solve the conjugate heat transfer problem of flow over a rib in channel. Finally, the algebraic stress model in the TEAM (Turbulent Elliptic Algorithm-Manchester) code was tested for jet impingement flow, but there needs to be an addition of the energy equation to the code.

  7. Critical heat flux in subcooled flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, David Douglas

    The critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon was investigated for water flow in tubes with particular emphasis on the development of methods for predicting CHF in the subcooled flow boiling regime. The Purdue University Boiling and Two-Phase Flow Laboratory (PU-BTPFL) CHF database for water flow in a uniformly heated tube was compiled from the world literature dating back to 1949 and represents the largest CHF database ever assembled with 32,544 data points from over 100 sources. The superiority of this database was proven via a detailed examination of previous databases. The PU-BTPFL CHF database is an invaluable tool for the development of CHF correlations and mechanistic models that are superior to existing ones developed with smaller, less comprehensive CHF databases. In response to the many inaccurate and inordinately complex correlations, two nondimensional, subcooled CHF correlations were formulated, containing only five adjustable constants and whose unique functional forms were determined without using a statistical analysis but rather using the parametric trends observed in less than 10% of the subcooled CHF data. The correlation based on inlet conditions (diameter, heated length, mass velocity, pressure, inlet quality) was by far the most accurate of all known subcooled CHF correlations, having mean absolute and root-mean-square (RMS) errors of 10.3% and 14.3%, respectively. The outlet (local) conditions correlation was the most accurate correlation based on local CHF conditions (diameter, mass velocity, pressure, outlet quality) and may be used with a nonuniform axial heat flux. Both correlations proved more accurate than a recent CHF look-up table commonly employed in nuclear reactor thermal hydraulic computer codes. An interfacial lift-off, subcooled CHF model was developed from a consideration of the instability of the vapor-liquid interface and the fraction of heat required for liquid-vapor conversion as opposed to that for bulk liquid heating. Severe

  8. Behaviour: Seeing heat saves energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steg, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Household energy conservation can help to significantly lower energy consumption. Visual cues provided by thermal imaging of heat loss in buildings are now shown to increase energy conserving behaviours and implementations among homeowners more effectively than just performing carbon footprint audits.

  9. Visualization of working fluid flow in gravity assisted heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, Milan

    2015-05-01

    Heat pipe is device working with phase changes of working fluid inside hermetically closed pipe at specific pressure. The phase changes of working fluid from fluid to vapor and vice versa help heat pipe to transport high heat flux. The article deal about construction and processes casing in heat pipe during operation. Experiment visualization of working fluid flow is performed with glass heat pipe filed with ethanol. The visualization of working fluid flow explains the phenomena as working fluid boiling, nucleation of bubbles, vapor flow, vapor condensation on the wall, vapor and condensate flow interaction, flow down condensate film thickness on the wall, occurred during the heat pipe operation.

  10. Flow-induced vibration of component cooling water heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Y.S.; Chen, S.S. . Nuclear Engineering Dept.; Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of flow-induced vibration problems of component cooling water heat exchangers in one of Taipower's nuclear power stations. Specifically, it describes flow-induced vibration phenomena, tests to identify the excitation mechanisms, measurement of response characteristics, analyses to predict tube response and wear, various design alterations, and modifications of the original design. Several unique features associated with the heat exchangers are demonstrated, including energy-trapping modes, existence of tube-support-plate (TSP)-inactive modes, and fluidelastic instability of TSP-active and -inactive modes. On the basis of this evaluation, the difficulties and future research needs for the evaluation of heat exchangers are identified. 11 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Flow characteristics and heat transfer in wavy walled channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Zachary; Shah, Tapan; Monts, Vontravis; Warey, Alok; Balestrino, Sandro; Alexeev, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    Using lattice Boltzmann simulations, we investigated the effects of wavy channel geometry on the flow and heat transfer within a parallel plate heat exchanger. We observed three distinct flow regimes that include steady flow with and without recirculation and unsteady time-periodic flow. We determined the critical Reynolds numbers at which the flow transitions between different flow regimes. To validate our computational results, we compared the simulated flow structures with the structures observed in a flowing soap film. Furthermore, we examine the effects of the wavy channel geometry on the heat transfer. We find that the unsteady flow regime drastically enhances the rate of heat transfer and show that heat exchangers with wavy walls outperform currently used heat exchangers with similar volume and power characteristics. Results from our study point to a simple and efficient method for increasing performance in compact heat exchangers.

  12. US energy flow, 1981

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, C. K.; Borg, I. Y.

    1982-10-01

    Flow diagrams to describe the US energy situation are given. In 1981 the energy consumption was 73 quads (or 73 times 10 to the 15th power Btu). Use was down from 75 quads in 1980. Oil continues to dominate the picture as it comprises 45% of the total energy used. Net oil use (exclusive of oil purchased for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and Exports) fell 8%; oil imports declined 14%. In contrast to oil, use of natural gas and coal remained at 1980 levels. Decreased use of residual oils, principally for electric power generating, account for much of the drop in oil use. Increased use of coal and nuclear energy for power generation almost compensated for the decrease in use of oil in that end use. Transmitted power remained at 1980 levels. The remainder of the drop in energy usage is attributed to price driven conservation, increased efficiencies in end use and the recession that prevailed during most of the year. The share of the energy drop attributable to the recession is estimated by various analysts to be on the order of 40 to 50%.

  13. Io's heat flow from infrared radiometry: 1983-1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, Glenn J.; Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Blaney, Diana L.; Goguen, Jay D.

    1994-01-01

    We report the following results from a decade of infrared radiometry of Io: (1) The average global heat flow is more than approx. 2.5 W/sq.m, (2) large warm (less than or equal to 200 K) volcanic regions dominate the global heat flow, (3) smal high-temperature (greater than or = 300 K) 'hotspots' contribute little to the average heat flow, (4) thermal anomalies on the leading hemisphere contribute about half of the heat flow, (5) a substantial amount of heat is radiated during Io's night, (6) high-temperature (greater than or = 600 K) 'outbursts' occurred during approx. 4% of the nights we observed, (7) 'Loki' is the brightest, persistent, infrared emission feature, and (8) some excess emission is always present at the longitude of Loki, but its intensity and other characteristics change between apparitions. Observations of Io at M(4.8 micrometer), 8.7 micrometer, N(10 micrometer), and Q(20 micrometer) with the Infrared Telescope Facility presented here were collected during nine apparitions between 1983 and 1993. These measurements provide full longitudinal coveraged as well as an eclipse observation and the detection of two outbursts. Reflected sunlight, passive thermal emission, and radiation from thermal anomalies all contribute to the observed flux densities. We find that a new thermophysical model is required to match all the data. Two key elements of this model are (1) a 'thermal reservoir' unit which lowers daytime temperatures, and (2) the 'thermal pedestal effect' which shifts to shorter wavelengths the spectral emission due to the reradiation of solar energy absorbed by the thermal anomalies. The thermal anomalies are modeled with a total of 10 source components at five locations. Io's heat flow is the sum of the power from these components.

  14. Calibrated Heat Flow Model for Determining the Heat Conduction Losses in Laser Cutting of CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, P.; Weber, R.; Speker, N.; Berger, P.; Sommer, B.; Graf, T.

    Laser machining has great potential regarding automation in fabrication of CFRP (carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics) parts, due to the nearly force and tool-wear free processing at high process speeds. The high vaporization temperatures and the large heat conductivity of the carbon fibers lead to a large heat transport into the sample. This causes the formation of a heat-affected zone and a decrease of the process speed. In the present paper,an analytical heat flow model was adapted in order to understand and investigate the heat conduction losses. Thermal sensors were embedded in samples at different distances from the kerf to fit the calculated to the measured temperatures. Heat conduction losses of up to 30% of the laser power were determined. Furthermore, the energy not absorbed by the sample, the energy for sublimating the composite material in the kerf, the energy for the formation of the HAZ, and the residual heat in the sample are compared in an energy balance.

  15. Geomechanical Fracturing with Flow and Heat

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-01-01

    The GeoFracFH model is a particle-based discrete element model (DEM) that has been coupled with fluid flow and heat conduction/convection. In this model, the rock matrix material is represented by a network of DEM particles connected by mechanical bonds (elastic beams in this case, see Figure 1, gray particles connected by beams). During the simulation process, the mechanical bonds that have been stretched or bent beyond a critical strain (both tensile and shear failures aremore » simulated) are broken and removed from the network in a progressive manner. Bonds can be removed from the network with rates or probabilities that depend on their stress or strain, or the properties of the discrete elements and bonds can be varied continuously to represent phenomena such as creep, strain hardening, and chemical degradation. The coupling of a DEM geomechanical model with models for Darcy flow and heat transport is also illustrated in Figure 1. Darcy flow and heat transport equations are solved on an underlying fixed finite difference grid with evolving porosity and permeability for each grid cell that depends on the local structure of the discrete element network (such as the DEM particle density). The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which then deforms and fractures the rock matrix. The deformation/fracturing in turn changes the permeability which again changes the evolution of fluid pressure, coupling the two phenomena. The intimate coupling between fracturing, fluid flow, and thermal transport makes the GeoFracFH model, rather than conventional continuum mechanical models, necessary for coupled hydro-thermal-mechanical problems in the subsurface.« less

  16. The impact of separated flow on heat and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.J.; Jabbari, M.Y.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of flow separation on heat (or mass) transfer is underway. This research, sponsored by the Department of Energy (Contract No. FG02-87ER13800), is planned to enhance our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms governing the process. This report summarizes previous accomplishments and briefly describes works done during period May 1, 1989 through April 30, 1990. Future plans and studies under preparation are also mentioned. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  17. A coupled heat and water flow apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.M.O.; Caporouscio, F.; Yong, R.N. ); Cheung, C.H. ); Kjartanson, B.H. )

    1993-03-01

    Safe and permanent disposal of radioactive waste requires isolation of a number of diverse chemical elements form the environment. The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is assessing the concept of disposing of waste in a vault excavated at a depth of 500 to 1000 m below the ground surface in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The temperatures and hydraulic potential in the buffer and back fill material were investigated. To study the performance of a compacted buffer material under thermal and isothermal conditions, a coupled heat and water flow apparatus is designed and presented. In the preliminary design, a one-dimensional flow of heat and water was not achieved. however, control of temperature gradient, existence of one-dimensional flow, and uniformity of temperature and volumetric water content distributions at any cross section within the specimen are achieved in the modified design. Experimental results have shown that the temperature stabilizes very rapidly after a period of approximately 0. 107 days. The moisture moves away from the hot end along the longitudinal direction of the specimen due to imposed thermal gradient. The time required for moisture to stabilize is in order of days. 17 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. 2-Phase Fluid Flow & Heat Transport

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-03-13

    GEOTHER is a three-dimensional, geothermal reservoir simulation code. The model describes heat transport and flow of a single component, two-phase fluid in porous media. It is based on the continuity equations for steam and water, which are reduced to two nonlinear partial differential equations in which the dependent variables are fluid pressure and enthalpy. GEOTHER can be used to simulate the fluid-thermal interaction in rock that can be approximated by a porous media representation. Itmore » can simulate heat transport and the flow of compressed water, two-phase mixtures, and superheated steam in porous media over a temperature range of 10 to 300 degrees C. In addition, it can treat the conversion from single to two-phase flow, and vice versa. It can be used for evaluation of a near repository spatial scale and a time scale of a few years to thousands of years. The model can be used to investigate temperature and fluid pressure changes in response to thermal loading by waste materials.« less

  19. Flow of superfluid helium in tubes with heated walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, H. A.; Mord, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    The equations for superfluid helium flowing through a straight tube with heated walls are integrated. The model equations are based on those of Landau as modified for superfluid turbulence by Gorter and Mellink (1949). The model is implemented by the program SUPERFLOW which runs on a personal computer. The effect of the heating level on the mass flux, the energy flux, and the pressure and temperature profiles is investigated. The four types of profiles which occur without sidewall heating are also found with heated walls. The progression through these four types is shown to depend primarily on the dimensionless parameter, defined previously to characterize the unheated profiles, and a dimensionless ratio of heat fluxes. The pressure and temperature maxima which rise well above the boundary values increase significantly with sidewall heating. Approximate design equations for estimating the mass flux and the profiles are presented. The physical basis of the results is discussed. These results are useful in the design of optimal cooling loops and other superfluid flow systems.

  20. Revised lunar heat-flow values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langseth, M. G.; Keihm, S. J.; Peters, K.

    1976-01-01

    The 3.5- and 2-year subsurface temperature histories at the Apollo 15 and 17 heat-flow sites have been analyzed, and the results yield significantly lower thermal conductivity determinations than the results of previous short-term experiments. The thermal conductivity determined by probes at a depth of about 150 cm and 250 cm lies in the range 0.9-1.3 times 10 to the -4th W/cm K. On the basis of measurements of variations of surface thorium abundance and inferred crustal thicknesses, the average global heat flux is estimated to be about 1.8 microwatts/sq cm. This requires a uranium concentration of 46 ppb.

  1. Underworld and multi-basin heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quenette, S. M.; O'Neill, C.; Moresi, L. N.; Danis, C. R.; Mansour, J.

    2011-12-01

    We present an over arching method for non-linear heat flow assessments of large, multi-basin systems. Our example is the Sydney-, Gunnedah-, Bowen basins (Danis et al 2011), which covers an area of 800kms by 1900kms and depth of 5kms, on the east coast of Australia. It is used as a baseline towards further fluid and structural geodynamics oriented analysis. In contrast to reservoir scale geothermal models - basin, multi-basin and towards lithosphere scale models exhibit their own challenges in terms of physical/rheological behaviour and computational tractability. For instance we model a non-linear heat flow by means of temperature dependent conductivity, as indicated by Clauser and Huenges (1995), which allows crystalline basement rocks, such as granites, to show for example a significant decrease in conductivity from ambient temperature up to around 400C, dropping from around 3 mK**(units) to around 2. For this modelling, a specialisation of the geodynamics code 'Underworld' (Moresi et al 2007) called Underworld-GT is used. A toolbox is added to the otherwise un-touched Underworld code adding geothermal workflow and context to Underworld. A particular novel feature is the ability to load stratigraphic layers, and/or GoCAD or GeoModeller voxel sets as the constraining geological geometry, whilst allowing the heat assessment models to scale from 1 process to 1000s. Another is the ability to prescribe synthetic drill holes, and its use in stochastic-oriented assessments of model parameters. Following the Underworld platform's approach and its simple PDE abstraction layer, these model configurations from a baseline for further additions to the governing equations such as fluid flow and structure, enabling a bridge between reservoir and continental scale dynamics, albeit with their own computational challenges.

  2. Borehole Heat Exchangers: heat transfer simulation in the presence of a groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelotti, A.; Alberti, L.; La Licata, I.; Antelmi, M.

    2014-04-01

    The correct design of the Borehole Heat Exchanger is crucial for the operation and the energy performance of a Ground Source Heat Pump. Most design methods and tools are based on the assumption that the ground is a solid medium where conduction is the only heat transfer mechanism. In turn in regions rich in groundwater the groundwater flow influence has to be assessed, by including the convection effects. In this paper a numerical model of a 100 m U-pipe in a saturated porous medium is presented. The model is created adopting MT3DMS coupled to MODFLOW. A Darcy flow is imposed across the medium. The typical operation of a Borehole Heat Exchanger operating both in winter and in summer is simulated for two years, under different groundwater velocities. The energy injected to and extracted from the ground is derived as a function of the Darcy velocity and compared with the purely conductive case. Temperature fields in the ground at key moments are shown and discussed. From both the energy and the aquifer temperature field points of view, the velocity ranges for respectively negligible and relevant influence of the groundwater flow are identified.

  3. Extracting energy from natural flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delionback, L. M.; Wilhold, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    Three concepts for extracting energy from wind, waterflow, and tides utilize flow instability to generate usable energy. Proposed converters respond to vortex excitation motion, galloping or plunging motion, and flutter. Fluid-flow instability is more efficient in developing lift than is direct flow.

  4. New and classical applications of heat flow studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauser, C.

    2005-12-01

    become widely recognized as a valuable supplement to established climate proxies. In contrast to these, GST is directly linked to climate-related temperature variations. It is based in a straightforward manner on heat transport and thermal physics and, in contrast to climate proxies, does not require transfer functions for relating temperature-sensitive phenomena to temperature.The second new application makes use of the signature of heat advection to identify and quantify flow in the deep subsurface. Based on high-quality data of sufficient number and distribution, the method's detection limit is far below that of any other technique. These are but two examples where, under a new perspective, noise has turned into signal. Last but not least, the potential of geothermal energy to supply low-pollution, low-carbon-dioxide electric power and heat has been recognized and exploited for more than 100 years, primarily in tectonically active regions with natural steam reservoirs. However, the ever-increasing price of fossil fuels and their exhaust of greenhouse gases have turned geothermal energy into an attractive option, even in geothermally less favourable regions. In this more demanding situation, understanding different heat transport processes requires more refined techniques for data correction, parameter identification and numerical simulation. This special issue comprises a selection of 11 papers which emerged from this meeting. Corresponding to the scope of the meeting, four papers address paleoclimatic topics, four papers deal with topics related to subsurface flow, and five papers discuss various aspects related directly or indirectly to geothermal energy. Thus, this special issue reflects exciting trends in current geothermal research. It illustrates that today geothermal research comprises new and challenging fields, with applications in environmental sciences, reservoir engineering, and climate and energy research.

  5. The effect of asymmetric heating on flow stability and heat transfer for flow in a vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Tappan, C.H.

    1987-11-01

    This study presents experimental results of combined free and forced convection heat transfer in a vertical tube with a circumferentially nonuniform constant wall heat flux. The effect of an asymmetric wall heat flux on flow stability and on the rate of heat transfer for water flowing downward in a vertical tube was investigated. Experimental results were used to develop two stability maps which identify various flow regimes, corresponding to different thermal and hydraulic conditions. Heat transfer coefficients were also determined. Experimental results in the present investigation were compared to those with uniform heating in horizontal and vertical tube flow situations discussed in the literature. 23 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Thaw flow control for liquid heat transport systems

    DOEpatents

    Kirpich, Aaron S.

    1989-01-01

    In a liquid metal heat transport system including a source of thaw heat for use in a space reactor power system, the thaw flow throttle or control comprises a fluid passage having forward and reverse flow sections and a partition having a plurality of bleed holes therein to enable fluid flow between the forward and reverse sections. The flow throttle is positioned in the system relatively far from the source of thaw heat.

  7. Thermoelectric and heat flow phenomena in mesoscopic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Jason E.

    Low-dimensional electronic systems, systems that are restricted to single energy levels in at least one of the three spatial dimensions, have attracted considerable interest in the field of thermoelectric materials. At these scales, the ability to manipulate electronic energy levels offers a great deal of control over a device's thermopower, that is, its ability to generate a voltage due to a thermal gradient. In addition, low-dimensional devices offer increased control over phononic heat flow. Mesoscale geometry can also have a large impact on both electron and phonon dynamics. Effects such as ballistic transport in a two-dimensional electron gas structure can lead to the enhancement or attenuation of electron transmission probabilities in multi-terminal junctions. The first half of this dissertation investigates the transverse thermoelectric properties of a four-terminal ballistic junction containing a central symmetry-breaking scatterer. It is believed that the combined symmetry of the scatterer and junction is the key component to understanding non-linear and thermoelectric transport in these junctions. To this end, experimental investigations on this type of junction were carried out to demonstrate its ability to generate a transverse thermovoltage. To aid in interpreting the results, a multi-terminal scattering-matrix theory was developed that relates the junction's non-linear electronic properties to its thermoelectric properties. The possibility of a transverse thermoelectric device also motivated the first derivation of the transverse thermoelectric efficiency. This second half of this dissertation focuses on heat flow phenomena in InAs/InP heterostructure nanowires. In thermoelectric research, a phononic heat flow between thermal reservoirs is considered parasitic due to its minimal contribution to the electrical output. Recent experiments involving heterostructure nanowires have shown an unexpectedly large heat flow, which is attributed in this

  8. Couette flow regimes with heat transfer in rarefied gas

    SciTech Connect

    Abramov, A. A. Butkovskii, A. V.

    2013-06-15

    Based on numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation by direct statistic simulation, the Couette flow with heat transfer is studied in a broad range of ratios of plate temperatures and Mach numbers of a moving plate. Flow regime classification by the form of the dependences of the energy flux and friction stress on the Knudsen number Kn is proposed. These dependences can be simultaneously monotonic and nonmonotonic and have maxima. Situations are possible in which the dependence of the energy flux transferred to a plate on Kn has a minimum, while the dependence of the friction stress is monotonic or even has a maximum. Also, regimes exist in which the dependence of the energy flux on Kn has a maximum, while the dependence of the friction stress is monotonic, and vice versa.

  9. Flow and heat transfer characteristics of orthogonally rotating channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Hiroshi

    1991-12-01

    Numerical analysis was conducted to predict the centripetal buoyant effect on flow and heat transfer characteristics in a channel rotating about a perpendicular axis. The conditions were assumed to be laminar, fully developed, and uniform heat flux. Calculation were conducted both for radially outward flow from the rotating axis and radially inward flow. The calculated results indicated that for radially outward flow buoyancy decreases the suction side friction and heat transfer while increasing pressure side friction and heat transfer. This trends were reversed for radially inward flow.

  10. Electroosmotic flow and Joule heating in preparative continuous annular electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, René; Bart, Hans-Jörg

    2015-09-01

    An openFOAM "computational fluid dynamic" simulation model was developed for the description of local interaction of hydrodynamics and Joule heating in annular electrochromatography. A local decline of electrical conductivity of the background eluent is caused by an electrokinetic migration of ions resulting in higher Joule heat generation. The model equations consider the Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible fluids, the energy equation for stationary temperature fields, and the mass transfer equation for the electrokinetic flow. The simulations were embedded in commercial ANSYS Fluent software and in open-source environment openFOAM. The annular gap (1 mm width) contained an inorganic C8 reverse-phase monolith as stationary phase prepared by an in situ sol-gel process. The process temperature generated by Joule heating was determined by thermal camera system. The local hydrodynamics in the prototype was detected by a gravimetric contact-free measurement method and experimental and simulated values matched quite well. PMID:25997390

  11. One dimensional lunar ash flow with and without heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, S. I.; Hsieh, T.

    1971-01-01

    The characteristics of lunar ash flow are discussed in terms of the two phase flow theory of a mixture of a gas and small solid particles. A model is developed to present the fundamental equations and boundary conditions. Numerical solutions for special ash flow with and without heat transfer are presented. In the case of lunar ash flow with small initial velocity, the effect of the heat transfer makes the whole layer of ash flow more compacted together than the corresponding isothermal case.

  12. Laminar-transitional micropipe flows: energy and exergy mechanisms based on Reynolds number, pipe diameter, surface roughness and wall heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozalp, A. Alper

    2012-01-01

    Energy and exergy mechanisms of laminar-transitional micropipe flows are computationally investigated by solving the variable fluid property continuity, Navier-Stokes and energy equations. Analyses are carried for wide ranges of Reynolds number ( Re = 10-2,000), micropipe diameter (d = 0.50-1.00 mm), non-dimensional surface roughness (ɛ* = 0.001-0.01) and wall heat flux ( {{q}}^' ' } = 1,000-2,000 W/m2) conditions. Computations revealed that friction coefficient (Cf) elevates with higher ɛ* and Re and with lower d, where the rise of ɛ* from 0.001 to 0.01 induced the Cf to increase by 0.7 → 0.9% (d = 1.00 → 0.50 mm), 3.4 → 4.2%, 6.6 → 8.1%, 9.6 → 11.9% and 12.4 → 15.2% for Re = 100, 500, 1,000, 1,500 and 2,000, respectively. Earlier transition exposed with stronger micro-structure and surface roughness at the descriptive transitional Reynolds numbers of Re tra = 1,656 → 769 (ɛ* = 0.001 → 0.01), 1,491 → 699 and 1,272 → 611 at d = 1.00, 0.75 and 0.50 mm; the corresponding shape factor (H) and intermittency (γ) data appear in the narrow ranges of H = 3.135-3.142 and γ = 0.132-0.135. At higher Re and lower d, ɛ* is determined to become more influential on the heat transfer rates, such that the Nuɛ*=0.01/Nuɛ*=0.001 ratio attains the values of 1.002 → 1.023 (d = 1.00 → 0.50 mm), 1.012 → 1.039, 1.025 → 1.056 and 1.046 → 1.082 at Re = 100, 500, 1,000 and 2,000. As ɛ* comes out to cause minor variations in the cross-sectional thermal entropy generation rates ( {{{S}}_{{Updelta {{T}}}}^' } } ) , {{q}}^' ' } is confirmed to augment {{S}}_{{Updelta {{T}}}}^' } , where the impact becomes more pronounced at higher Re and d. Frictional entropy generation values ( {{{S}}_{{Updelta {{P}}}}^' } } ) are found to be motivated by lower d, higher Re and ɛ*, such that the {{S}}_{{Updelta {{P}}_{{{{d}} = 0.50{{mm}}}} }}^' } /{{S}}_{{Updelta {{P}}_{{{{d}} = 1.00{{mm}}}} }}^' } ratio is computed as 4.0011 → 4.0014 (ɛ* = 0.001 → 0.01), 4.002 → 4

  13. Evaluation of heat flow and its geological implications on Mt. St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, T.; Adams, E.; Brown, R.L.; Sato, A.

    1982-04-01

    A study to determine the heat flux pattern in the vicinity of Mt. St. Helens was undertaken as part of a program to evaluate the effects of the eruption on future snowpack conditions in the area. Subsurface temperature and low energy refraction seismic studies were made during the early spring in 1981 to determine both the heat flux in the area of pyroclastic deposition and its potential source. In addition, samples were collected for later laboratory determination of thermal conductivity and diffusivity. Results indicate that the heat flow values in the area of pyroclastic deposition are as large as forty times greater than the heat flow values measured on Mt. Adams and Mt. Hood during the same period. The highest heat flow values appear to coincide with a pumice flow unit on the north side of the mountain.. Comparison with work done on the eruption of Mt. Komagatake indicates that the large heat flow values continue for several years.

  14. Heat transfer in serpentine flow passages with rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, S.; Takamura, J.; Yamawaki, S.; Yang, Wen-Jei

    1992-06-01

    Results are reported of an experimental study tracing heat transfer performance in a rotating serpentine flow passage of a square cross section. The test section is preceded by a hydrodynamic calming region. The test model is a blow-up (by seven times) of actual winding flow passages in rotor blades. It is concluded that the flow in the 180-deg bends exhibits strong 3D structure. The heat transfer coefficient in the bend is substantially higher than in the straight flow passages. The average heat transfer characteristics over the entire flow passage is greatly affected by flow at the 180-deg bends. Due to secondary flow induced by the Coriolis force, the heat transfer coefficient in the radially outward flow passages diminish on the leading surface, but increase on the trailing surface, with an increase in rotational speed. The trend is reversed in the radially inward flow passages.

  15. Meteorological insights from planetary heat flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2015-04-01

    Planetary heat flow measurements are made with a series of high-precision temperature sensors deployed in a column of regolith to determine the geothermal gradient. Such sensors may, however, be susceptible to other influences, especially on worlds with atmospheres. First, pressure fluctuations at the surface may pump air in and out of pore space leading to observable, and otherwise unexpected, temperature fluctuations at depth. Such pumping is important in subsurface radon and methane transport on Earth: evidence of such pumping may inform understanding of methane or water vapor transport on Mars. Second, the subsurface profile contains a muted record of surface temperature history, and such measurements on other worlds may help constrain the extent to which Earth's Little Ice Age was directly solar-forced, versus volcanic-driven and/or amplified by climate feedbacks.

  16. Flow and heat simultaneously induced by two stretchable rotating disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkyilmazoglu, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    An exact solution for the steady state Navier-Stokes equations in cylindrical coordinates is presented in this work. It serves to investigate the fluid flow and heat transfer occurring between two stretchable disks rotating co-axially at constant distance apart. The governing equations of motion and energy are first transformed into a set of nonlinear differential equation system by the use of von Karman similarity transformations, which are later solved numerically. The small Reynolds number case allows us to extract closed-form solutions for the physical phenomenon. The effects of the same or opposite direction rotation, as well as the stretching parameter and the Reynolds number, are discussed on the flow and heat characteristics. The main physical implication of the results is that stretching action of a disk surface alters considerably the classical flow behavior occurring between two disks and the physically interesting quantities like the torque and heat transfer are elucidated in the presence of a new physical mechanism; that is the surface stretching in the current research.

  17. Analysis of the transient compressible vapor flow in heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Jong Hoon; Faghri, Amir; Chang, Won Soon

    1989-01-01

    The transient compressible one-dimensional vapor flow dynamics in a heat pipe is modeled. The numerical results are obtained by using the implicit non-iterative Beam-Warming finite difference method. The model is tested for simulated heat pipe vapor flow and actual flow in cylindrical heat pipes. A good comparison of the present transient results for the simulated heat pipe vapor flow with the previous results of a two-dimensional numerical model is achieved and the steady state results are in agreement with the existing experimental data. The transient behavior of the vapor flow under subsonic, sonic, and supersonic speeds and high mass flow rates are successfully predicted. The one-dimensional model also describes the vapor flow dynamics in cylindrical heat pipes at high temperatures.

  18. 2007 Estimated International Energy Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

    2011-03-10

    An energy flow chart or 'atlas' for 136 countries has been constructed from data maintained by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and estimates of energy use patterns for the year 2007. Approximately 490 exajoules (460 quadrillion BTU) of primary energy are used in aggregate by these countries each year. While the basic structure of the energy system is consistent from country to country, patterns of resource use and consumption vary. Energy can be visualized as it flows from resources (i.e. coal, petroleum, natural gas) through transformations such as electricity generation to end uses (i.e. residential, commercial, industrial, transportation). These flow patterns are visualized in this atlas of 136 country-level energy flow charts.

  19. Heat transfer coefficients for drying in pulsating flows

    SciTech Connect

    Fraenkel, S.L.

    1998-05-01

    Pulsating flows generated by a Rijke type combustor are studied for drying of grains and food particles. It is assumed that the velocity fluctuations are the main factor in the enhancement of the drying process. The heat transfer coefficients for drying in vibrating beds are utilized to estimate the heat transfer coefficients of fixed beds in pulsating and permeating flows and are compared to the steady flow heat transfer coefficients obtained for solid porous bodies, after perturbing the main flow. The cases considered are compared to the convective heat transfer coefficients employed in non-pulsating drying.

  20. Heat-flow reconnaissance of the Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; Shannon, S.S. Jr.

    1982-04-01

    Most of the 46 new values of heat flow determined for the Gulf Coastal Plain are in the low to normal range, but heat-flow values averaging 1.8 heat-flow unit (HFU) were obtained in Claiborne, Ouachita, and Union parishes, Louisiana. Moreover, a zone of relatively high heat-flow values and steep thermal gradients (35 to 46/sup 0/C/km) extends from northern Louisiana into southwestern Mississippi. Also near Pensacola, Florida, temperatures of 50/sup 0/C at 1-km depth have been extrapolated from thermal gradients. Future development of low-grade geothermal resources may be warranted in these areas.

  1. Nanofluid flow and forced convection heat transfer over a stretching surface considering heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour, M.; Valipour, P.; Shambooli, M.; Ayani, M.; Mirparizi, M.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, magnetic field effects on the forced convection flow of a nanofluid over a stretching surface in the presence of heat generation/absorption are studied. The equations of continuity, momentum and energy are transformed into ordinary differential equations and solved numerically using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration scheme featuring the shooting technique. Different types of nanoparticles as copper (Cu), silver (Ag), alumina (Al2O3) and titania (TiO2) with water as their base fluid has been considered. The influence of significant parameters, such as magnetic parameter, volume fraction of the nanoparticles, heat generation/absorption parameter, velocity ratio parameter and temperature index parameter on the flow and heat transfer characteristics are discussed. The results show that the values of temperature profiles increase with increasing heat generation/absorption and volume fraction of the nanoparticles but they decrease with increasing velocity ratio parameter and temperature index parameter. Also, it can be found that selecting silver as nanoparticle leads to the highest heat transfer enhancement.

  2. Energy dissipation in sheared granular flows

    SciTech Connect

    Karion, A.; Hunt, M.L.

    1999-11-01

    Granular material flows describe flows of solid particles in which the interstitial fluid plays a negligible role in the flow mechanics. Examples include the transport of coal, food products, detergents, pharmaceutical tablets, and toner particles in high-speed printers. Using a two-dimensional discrete element computer simulation of a bounded, gravity-free Couette flow of particles, the heat dissipation rate per unit area is calculated as a function of position in the flow as well as overall solid fraction. The computation results compare favorably with the kinetic theory analysis for rough disks. The heat dissipation rate is also measured for binary mixtures of particles for different small to large solid fraction ratios, and for diameter ratios of ten, five, and two. The dissipation rates increase significantly with overall solid fraction as well as local strain rates and granular temperatures. The thermal energy equation is solved for a Couette flow with one adiabatic wall and one at constant temperature. Solutions use the simulation measurements of the heat dissipation rate, solid fraction, and granular temperature to show that the thermodynamic temperature increases with solid fraction and decreases with particle conductivity. In mixtures, both the dissipation rate and the thermodynamic temperature increase with size ratio and with decreasing ratio of small to large particles.

  3. Terrestrial heat flow in east and southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyblade, Andrew A.; Pollack, Henry N.; Jones, D. L.; Podmore, Francis; Mushayandebvu, Martin

    1990-10-01

    We report 26 new heat flow and 13 radiogenic heat production measurements from Zimbabwe, Zambia and Tanzania, together with details and some revisions of 18 previous heat flow measurements by other investigators from Kenya and Tanzania. These measurements come from Archean cratons, Proterozoic mobile belts, and Mesozoic and Cenozoic rifts. Heat flow data from eight new sites in the Archean Zimbabwe Craton are consistent with previous measurements in the Archean Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe Craton and Limpopo Belt (Kalahari Craton) and do not change the mean heat flow of 47±2 mW m-2 (standard error of the mean) in the Kalahari Craton based on 53 previous measurements. Eight new sites in the Archean Tanzania Craton give a mean heat flow of 34±4 mW m-2. The mean heat flow from nine sites in the Proterozoic Mozambique Belt to the east of the Tanzania Craton in Kenya and Tanzania is 47±4 mW m-2. Twelve measurements in the Mesozoic rifted continental margin in east Africa give a mean heat flow of 68±4 mW m-2; four measurements in the Mesozoic Luangwa and Zambezi Rifts range from 44 to 110 mW m-2 with a mean of 76±14 mW m-2. In comparing heat flow in east and southern Africa, we observe a common heat flow pattern of increasing heat flow away from the centers of the Archean cratons. This pattern suggests a fundamental difference in lithospheric thermal structure between the Archean cratons and the Proterozoic and early Paleozoic mobile belts which surround them. Superimposed on this common pattern are two regional variations in heat flow. Heat flow in the Tanzania Craton is lower by about 13 mW m-2 than in the Kalahari Craton, and in the Mozambique Belt in east Africa heat flow is somewhat lower than in the southern African mobile belts at similar distances from the Archean cratonic margin. The two regional variations can be explained in several ways, none of which can as yet be elevated to a preferred status: (1) by variations in crustal heat production, (2) by thin

  4. Metallurgical technologies, energy conversion, and magnetohydrodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branover, Herman; Unger, Yeshajahu

    The present volume discusses metallurgical applications of MHD, R&D on MHD devices employing liquid working medium for process applications, electromagnetic (EM) modulation of molten metal flow, EM pump performance of superconducting MHD devices, induction EM alkali-metal pumps, a physical model for EM-driven flow in channel-induction furnaces, grain refinement in Al alloys via EM vibrational method, dendrite growth of solidifying metal in dc magnetic field, MHD for mass and heat transfer in single-crystal melt growth, inverse EM shaping, and liquid-metal MHD development in Israel. Also discussed are the embrittlement of steel by lead, an open cycle MHD disk generator, the acceleration of gas-liquid piston flows for molten-metal MHD generators, MHD flow around a cylinder, new MHD drag coefficients, liquid-metal MHD two-phase flow, and two-phase liquid gas mixers for MHD energy conversion. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  5. Heat transfer research on supercritical water flow upward in tube

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H. B.; Yang, J.; Gu, H. Y.; Zhao, M.; Lu, D. H.; Zhang, J. M.; Wang, F.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-07-01

    The experimental research of heat transfer on supercritical water has been carried out on the supercritical water multipurpose test loop with a 7.6 mm upright tube. The experimental data of heat transfer is obtained. The experimental results of thermal-hydraulic parameters on flow and heat transfer of supercritical water show that: Heat transfer enhancement occurs when the fluid temperature reaches pseudo-critical point with low mass flow velocity, and peters out when the mass flow velocity increases. The heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number decrease with the heat flux or system pressure increases, and increase with the increasing of mass flow velocity. The wall temperature increases when the mass flow velocity decreases or the system pressure increases. (authors)

  6. Effects of secondary flow on heat transfer in rotating passages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Joan G.; Moore, John

    1990-02-01

    Secondary flow in rotating cooling passages of jet engine turbine rotors is considered. A Navier-Stokes calculation procedure for turbulent flow is used to compute flow development in a radially outward flow channel, round a sharp 180 degree bend, and in the radially inward flow channel downstream. Areas of high and low heat transfer are explained by secondary flow development and quantitative results show regions of design interest.

  7. Working fluid flow visualization in gravity heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, Milan

    2016-03-01

    Heat pipe is device working with phase changes of working fluid inside hermetically closed pipe at specific pressure. The phase changes of working fluid from fluid to vapour and vice versa help heat pipe to transport high heat flux. The article deal about gravity heat pipe construction and processes casing inside during heat pipe operation. Experiment working fluid flow visualization is performed with two glass heat pipes with different inner diameter (13 mm and 22 mm) and filled with water. The working fluid flow visualization explains the phenomena as a working fluid boiling, nucleation of bubbles, and vapour condensation on the wall, vapour and condensate flow interaction, flow down condensate film thickness on the wall occurred during the heat pipe operation.

  8. Large deviations in stochastic heat-conduction processes provide a gradient-flow structure for heat conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Peletier, Mark A.; Redig, Frank; Vafayi, Kiamars

    2014-09-01

    We consider three one-dimensional continuous-time Markov processes on a lattice, each of which models the conduction of heat: the family of Brownian Energy Processes with parameter m (BEP(m)), a Generalized Brownian Energy Process, and the Kipnis-Marchioro-Presutti (KMP) process. The hydrodynamic limit of each of these three processes is a parabolic equation, the linear heat equation in the case of the BEP(m) and the KMP, and a nonlinear heat equation for the Generalized Brownian Energy Process with parameter a (GBEP(a)). We prove the hydrodynamic limit rigorously for the BEP(m), and give a formal derivation for the GBEP(a). We then formally derive the pathwise large-deviation rate functional for the empirical measure of the three processes. These rate functionals imply gradient-flow structures for the limiting linear and nonlinear heat equations. We contrast these gradient-flow structures with those for processes describing the diffusion of mass, most importantly the class of Wasserstein gradient-flow systems. The linear and nonlinear heat-equation gradient-flow structures are each driven by entropy terms of the form -log ρ; they involve dissipation or mobility terms of order ρ² for the linear heat equation, and a nonlinear function of ρ for the nonlinear heat equation.

  9. A New Determination of Io's Heat Flow Using Diurnal Heat Balance Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. R.; Rathbun, J. A.; McEwen, A. S.; Pearl, J. C.; Bastos, A.; Andrade, J.; Correia, M.; Barros, S.

    2002-01-01

    We use heat balance arguments to obtain a new estimate of Io's heat flow that does not depend on assumptions about the temperatures of its thermal anomalies. Our estimated heat flow is somewhat less than 2.2 +/- 0.9 W/sq m. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Heat flow and temperature-depth curves throughout Alaska: finding regions for future geothermal exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batir, Joseph F.; Blackwell, David D.; Richards, Maria C.

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this research is to contribute to the understanding of the thermal regime of Alaska and its relationship to geology, regional tectonics, and to suggest potential sites for future geothermal energy production. New heat flow data were collected and are combined with existing published and unpublished data, although large sections of Alaska still lack data. Fault traces were implemented into the heat flow contouring as an additional gridding constraint, to incorporate both heat flow measurements and geology. New heat flow data supported the use of geologic trends in the heat flow mapping procedure, and a heat flow map of Alaska was produced with this added constraint. The multi-input contouring strategy allows production of a map with a regional interpretation of heat flow, in addition to site-specific heat flow and thermal model interpretations in areas with sufficient data density. Utilizing the new heat flow map, temperature-at-depth curves were created for example areas. Temperature-at-depth curves are calculated to 10 km depth for the areas of Anchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, the Alaska Peninsula, Bristol Bay, and the Copper River Basin. The temperatures-at-depth predicted near the population centers of Anchorage and Juneau are relatively low, limiting the geothermal resource potential. The Fairbanks area temperature estimates are near conventional power production temperatures (150 °C) between 3.5 and 4 km. All data areas, except at Juneau, have temperatures sufficient for low temperature geothermal applications (40 °C) by 2 km. A high heat flow region exists within the Aleutian Volcanic Arc, although new data show heat flow variations from 59 to 120 mW m‑2, so individual geothermal resources within the arc will be irregularly located.

  11. Computer code for predicting coolant flow and heat transfer in turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, Peter L.

    1990-01-01

    A computer code was developed to analyze any turbomachinery coolant flow path geometry that consist of a single flow passage with a unique inlet and exit. Flow can be bled off for tip-cap impingement cooling, and a flow bypass can be specified in which coolant flow is taken off at one point in the flow channel and reintroduced at a point farther downstream in the same channel. The user may either choose the coolant flow rate or let the program determine the flow rate from specified inlet and exit conditions. The computer code integrates the 1-D momentum and energy equations along a defined flow path and calculates the coolant's flow rate, temperature, pressure, and velocity and the heat transfer coefficients along the passage. The equations account for area change, mass addition or subtraction, pumping, friction, and heat transfer.

  12. Heat flow calorimeter. [measures output of Ni-Cd batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, J. C.; Johnston, W. V. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Heat flow calorimeter devices are used to measure heat liberated from or absorbed by an object. This device is capable of measuring the thermal output of sealed nickel-cadmium batteries or cells during charge-discharge cycles. An elongated metal heat conducting rod is coupled between the calorimeter vessel and a heat sink, thus providing the only heat exchange path from the calorimeter vessel itself.

  13. Flow instability and flow reversal in heated annular multichannels with initial downward flow

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H.N.; Hart, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented regarding the stability of initial downward flow of single phase water in parallel annular channels of the Savannah River Site (SRS) fuel assembly. The test was performed on an electrically heated prototypic mockup of a Mark-22 fuel assembly. The test conditions consisted of mass fluxes, from 98--294 kg/m[sup 2]-sec, and inlet water temperatures of 25[degrees]C and 40[degrees]C. With increased power to the heaters, flow instability was detected, characterized by flow fluctuations and flow redistribution among subchannels of the outer flow channel. With increased power, a condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increased, a critical heat flux condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increases, a critical heat flux condition was reached in the outer channel.

  14. Flow instability and flow reversal in heated annular multichannels with initial downward flow

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H.N.; Hart, C.M.

    1992-12-31

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented regarding the stability of initial downward flow of single phase water in parallel annular channels of the Savannah River Site (SRS) fuel assembly. The test was performed on an electrically heated prototypic mockup of a Mark-22 fuel assembly. The test conditions consisted of mass fluxes, from 98--294 kg/m{sup 2}-sec, and inlet water temperatures of 25{degrees}C and 40{degrees}C. With increased power to the heaters, flow instability was detected, characterized by flow fluctuations and flow redistribution among subchannels of the outer flow channel. With increased power, a condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increased, a critical heat flux condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increases, a critical heat flux condition was reached in the outer channel.

  15. Boiling heat transfer of refrigerant R-21 in upward flow in plate-fin heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. V.; Shamirzaev, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    The article presents the results of experimental investigation of boiling heat transfer of refrigerant R-21 in upward flow in a vertical plate-fin heat exchanger with transverse size of the channels that is smaller than the capillary constant. The heat transfer coefficients obtained in ranges of small mass velocities and low heat fluxes, which are typical of the industry, have been poorly studied yet. The characteristic patterns of the upward liquid-vapor flow in the heat exchanger channels and the regions of their existence are detected. The obtained data show a weak dependence of heat transfer coefficient on equilibrium vapor quality, mass flow rate, and heat flux density and do not correspond to calculations by the known heat transfer models. A possible reason for this behavior is a decisive influence of evaporation of thin liquid films on the heat transfer at low heat flux.

  16. In situ determination of heat flow in unconsolidated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Kennelly, J.P.; Wendt, W.E.; Moses, T.H.; Ziagos, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    Subsurface thermal measurements are the most effective, least ambiguous tools for identifying and delineating possible geothernml resources. Measurements of thermal gradient in the upper few tens of meters generally are sufficient to outline the major anomalies, but it is always desirable to combine these gradients with reliable estimates of thermal conductivity to provide data on the energy flux and to constrain models for the heat sources responsible for the observed, near-surface thermal anomalies. The major problems associated with heat-flow measurements in the geothermal exploration mode are concerned with the economics of casing and/or grouting holes, the repeated site visits necessary to obtain equilibrium temperature values, the possible legal liability associated with the disturbance of underground aquifers, the surface hazards presented by pipes protruding from the ground, and the security problems associated with leaving cased holes open for periods of weeks to months. We have developed a technique which provides reliable 'real-time' determinations of temperature, thermal conductivity, and hence, of heat flow during the drilling operation in unconsolidated sediments. A combined temperature, gradient, and thermal conductivity experiment can be carried out, by driving a thin probe through the bit about 1.5 meters into the formation in the time that would otherwise be required for a coring trip. Two or three such experiments over the depth range of, say, 50 to 150 meters provide a high-quality heat-flow determination at costs comparable to those associated with a standard cased 'gradient hole' to comparable depths. The hole can be backfilled and abandoned upon cessation of drilling, thereby eliminating the need for casing, grouting, or repeated site visits.

  17. Snow distribution and heat flow in the taiga

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, M. )

    1992-05-01

    The trees of the taiga intercept falling snow and cause it to become distributed in an uneven fashion. Around aspen and birch, cone-shaped accumulations form. Beneath large spruce trees, the snow cover is depleted, forming a bowl-shaped depression called a tree well. Small spruce trees become covered with snow, creating cavities that funnel cold air to the snow/ground interface. The depletion of snow under large spruce trees results in greater heat loss from the ground. A finite difference model suggests that heat flow from tree wells can be more than twice that of undisturbed snow. In forested watersheds, this increase can be a significant percentage of the total winter energy exchange.

  18. A Prototype Flux-Plate Heat-Flow Sensor for Venus Surface Heat-Flow Determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Paul; Reyes, Celso; Smrekar, Suzanne E.

    2005-01-01

    Venus is the most Earth-like planet in the Solar System in terms of size, and the densities of the two planets are almost identical when selfcompression of the two planets is taken into account. Venus is the closest planet to Earth, and the simplest interpretation of their similar densities is that their bulk compositions are almost identical. Models of the thermal evolution of Venus predict interior temperatures very similar to those indicated for the regions of Earth subject to solid-state convection, but even global analyses of the coarse Pioneer Venus elevation data suggest Venus does not lose heat by the same primary heat loss mechanism as Earth, i.e., seafloor spreading. The comparative paucity of impact craters on Venus has been interpreted as evidence for relatively recent resurfacing of the planet associated with widespread volcanic and tectonic activity. The difference in the gross tectonic styles of Venus and Earth, and the origins of some of the enigmatic volcano-tectonic features on Venus, such as the coronae, appear to be intrinsically related to Venus heat loss mechanism(s). An important parameter in understanding Venus geological evolution, therefore, is its present surface heat flow. Before the complications of survival in the hostile Venus surface environment were tackled, a prototype fluxplate heat-flow sensor was built and tested for use under synthetic stable terrestrial surface conditions. The design parameters for this prototype were that it should operate on a conforming (sand) surface, with a small, self-contained power and recording system, capable of operating without servicing for at least several days. The precision and accuracy of the system should be < 5 mW/sq m. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  19. Heat flow, crustal differentiation and lithospheric strength in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, C.; Mareschal, J.; Jaupart, C.

    2008-12-01

    In stable North America, thermal models based on heat flow and heat production measurements suggest that the mechanical resistance of the lithosphere on a regional scale is greater in provinces of elevated heat flow. This is contrary to the general belief that higher surface heat flow means less stable lithosphere. We show that crustal differentiation is equally important to determine lithospheric strength. The degree of crustal radiogenic differentiation may be described using the average surface and crustal heat flows, and is quantified through the differentiation index. This index is obtained as the ratio between regional average values of heat production at the surface and in the bulk crust. The differentiation index is calculated with the bulk average heat production, suggesting that crustal differentiation processes are largely driven by internal radiogenic heat. We show that the most stable of lithospheres may be characterized by relatively high surface heat flow, simply a result of the distribution of heat sources through the crust. This may have important implications for the thermo-mechanical evolution of stable continental interiors, and for the vertical distribution of crustal heat sources through time.

  20. Inductive heating with magnetic materials inside flow reactors.

    PubMed

    Ceylan, Sascha; Coutable, Ludovic; Wegner, Jens; Kirschning, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles coated with silica gel or alternatively steel beads are new fixed-bed materials for flow reactors that efficiently heat reaction mixtures in an inductive field under flow conditions. The scope and limitations of these novel heating materials are investigated in comparison with conventional and microwave heating. The results suggest that inductive heating can be compared to microwave heating with respect to rate acceleration. It is also demonstrated that a very large diversity of different reactions can be performed under flow conditions by using inductively heated flow reactors. These include transfer hydrogenations, heterocyclic condensations, pericyclic reactions, organometallic reactions, multicomponent reactions, reductive cyclizations, homogeneous and heterogeneous transition-metal catalysis. Silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are stable under many chemical conditions and the silica shell could be utilized for further functionalization with Pd nanoparticles, rendering catalytically active heatable iron oxide particles. PMID:21274939

  1. Air-side flow and heat transfer in compact heat exchangers: A discussion of enhancement mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobi, A.M.; Shah, R.K.

    1998-10-01

    The behavior of air flows in complex heat exchanger passages is reviewed with a focus on the heat transfer effects of boundary-layer development, turbulence, spanwise and streamwise vortices, and wake management. Each of these flow features is discussed for the plain, wavy, and interrupted passages found in contemporary compact heat exchanger designs. Results from the literature are used to help explain the role of these mechanisms in heat transfer enhancement strategies.

  2. Computation of flow and heat transfer in rotating cavities with peripheral flow of cooling air.

    PubMed

    Kiliç, M

    2001-05-01

    Numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations have been used to model the flow and the heat transfer that occurs in the internal cooling-air systems of gas turbines. Computations are performed to study the effect of gap ratio, Reynolds number and the mass flow rate on the flow and the heat transfer structure inside isothermal and heated rotating cavities with peripheral flow of cooling air. Computations are compared with some of the recent experimental work on flow and heat transfer in rotating-cavities. The agreement between the computed and the available experimental data is reasonably good. PMID:11460668

  3. Energy and material flows of megacities

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Christopher A.; Stewart, Iain; Facchini, Angelo; Cersosimo, Igor; Mele, Renata; Chen, Bin; Uda, Mariko; Kansal, Arun; Chiu, Anthony; Kim, Kwi-gon; Dubeux, Carolina; Lebre La Rovere, Emilio; Cunha, Bruno; Pincetl, Stephanie; Keirstead, James; Barles, Sabine; Pusaka, Semerdanta; Gunawan, Juniati; Adegbile, Michael; Nazariha, Mehrdad; Hoque, Shamsul; Marcotullio, Peter J.; González Otharán, Florencia; Genena, Tarek; Ibrahim, Nadine; Farooqui, Rizwan; Cervantes, Gemma; Sahin, Ahmet Duran

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the drivers of energy and material flows of cities is important for addressing global environmental challenges. Accessing, sharing, and managing energy and material resources is particularly critical for megacities, which face enormous social stresses because of their sheer size and complexity. Here we quantify the energy and material flows through the world’s 27 megacities with populations greater than 10 million people as of 2010. Collectively the resource flows through megacities are largely consistent with scaling laws established in the emerging science of cities. Correlations are established for electricity consumption, heating and industrial fuel use, ground transportation energy use, water consumption, waste generation, and steel production in terms of heating-degree-days, urban form, economic activity, and population growth. The results help identify megacities exhibiting high and low levels of consumption and those making efficient use of resources. The correlation between per capita electricity use and urbanized area per capita is shown to be a consequence of gross building floor area per capita, which is found to increase for lower-density cities. Many of the megacities are growing rapidly in population but are growing even faster in terms of gross domestic product (GDP) and energy use. In the decade from 2001–2011, electricity use and ground transportation fuel use in megacities grew at approximately half the rate of GDP growth. PMID:25918371

  4. Energy and material flows of megacities.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Christopher A; Stewart, Iain; Facchini, Angelo; Cersosimo, Igor; Mele, Renata; Chen, Bin; Uda, Mariko; Kansal, Arun; Chiu, Anthony; Kim, Kwi-Gon; Dubeux, Carolina; Lebre La Rovere, Emilio; Cunha, Bruno; Pincetl, Stephanie; Keirstead, James; Barles, Sabine; Pusaka, Semerdanta; Gunawan, Juniati; Adegbile, Michael; Nazariha, Mehrdad; Hoque, Shamsul; Marcotullio, Peter J; González Otharán, Florencia; Genena, Tarek; Ibrahim, Nadine; Farooqui, Rizwan; Cervantes, Gemma; Sahin, Ahmet Duran

    2015-05-12

    Understanding the drivers of energy and material flows of cities is important for addressing global environmental challenges. Accessing, sharing, and managing energy and material resources is particularly critical for megacities, which face enormous social stresses because of their sheer size and complexity. Here we quantify the energy and material flows through the world's 27 megacities with populations greater than 10 million people as of 2010. Collectively the resource flows through megacities are largely consistent with scaling laws established in the emerging science of cities. Correlations are established for electricity consumption, heating and industrial fuel use, ground transportation energy use, water consumption, waste generation, and steel production in terms of heating-degree-days, urban form, economic activity, and population growth. The results help identify megacities exhibiting high and low levels of consumption and those making efficient use of resources. The correlation between per capita electricity use and urbanized area per capita is shown to be a consequence of gross building floor area per capita, which is found to increase for lower-density cities. Many of the megacities are growing rapidly in population but are growing even faster in terms of gross domestic product (GDP) and energy use. In the decade from 2001-2011, electricity use and ground transportation fuel use in megacities grew at approximately half the rate of GDP growth. PMID:25918371

  5. Heat Flow, Climate Change and Advective Heat Transfer Beneath Winnipeg, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, G. A.; Woodbury, A. D.

    2002-12-01

    appear to have the greatest impacts in an industrial area in eastern Winnipeg and in an area with several large apartment buildings in western Winnipeg where the largest volumes of warm water are injected. Temperature profiles in areas where anomalous advective heat flow is prevalent are characterized by elevated temperatures occurring over discrete intervals, indicating transport through fractures and paleokarst features in the Upper Carbonate Aquifer. The presence of elevated temperatures beneath Winnipeg indicate that the current practices of using groundwater for cooling may not be sustainable due to the current injections of warm water and basement construction. However, the increases in heat flow beneath Winnipeg make the use of geothermal energy by heat pumps an attractive alternative for space heating.

  6. Cryogenic Heat Exchanger with Turbulent Flows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrit, Jay; Douay, Christelle; Dubois, Francis; Defresne, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    An evaporator-type cryogenic heat exchanger is designed and built for introducing fluid-solid heat exchange phenomena to undergraduates in a practical and efficient way. The heat exchanger functions at liquid nitrogen temperature and enables cooling of N[subscript 2] and He gases from room temperatures. We present first the experimental results of…

  7. Unsteady Flow in a Supersonic Turbine with Variable Specific Heats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Daniel J.; Griffin, Lisa W.; Huber, Frank; Sondak, Douglas L.; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Modern high-work turbines can be compact, transonic, supersonic, counter-rotating, or use a dense drive gas. The vast majority of modern rocket turbine designs fall into these Categories. These turbines usually have large temperature variations across a given stage, and are characterized by large amounts of flow unsteadiness. The flow unsteadiness can have a major impact on the turbine performance and durability. For example, the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) fuel turbine, a high work, transonic design, was found to have an unsteady inter-row shock which reduced efficiency by 2 points and increased dynamic loading by 24 percent. The Revolutionary Reusable Technology Turbopump (RRTT), which uses full flow oxygen for its drive gas, was found to shed vortices with such energy as to raise serious blade durability concerns. In both cases, the sources of the problems were uncovered (before turbopump testing) with the application of validated, unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to the designs. In the case of the RRTT and the Alternate Turbopump Development (ATD) turbines, the unsteady CFD codes have been used not just to identify problems, but to guide designs which mitigate problems due to unsteadiness. Using unsteady flow analyses as a part of the design process has led to turbine designs with higher performance (which affects temperature and mass flow rate) and fewer dynamics problems. One of the many assumptions made during the design and analysis of supersonic turbine stages is that the values of the specific heats are constant. In some analyses the value is based on an average of the expected upstream and downstream temperatures. In stages where the temperature can vary by 300 to 500 K, however, the assumption of constant fluid properties may lead to erroneous performance and durability predictions. In this study the suitability of assuming constant specific heats has been investigated by performing three-dimensional unsteady Navier

  8. 3D topographic correction of the BSR heat flow and detection of focused fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tao; Li, Hong-Lin; Zou, Chang-Chun

    2014-06-01

    The bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) is a seismic indicator of the bottom of a gas hydrate stability zone. Its depth can be used to calculate the seafloor surface heat flow. The calculated BSR heat flow variations include disturbances from two important factors: (1) seafloor topography, which focuses the heat flow over regions of concave topography and defocuses it over regions of convex topography, and (2) the focused warm fluid flow within the accretionary prism coming from depths deeper than BSR. The focused fluid flow can be detected if the contribution of the topography to the BSR heat flow is removed. However, the analytical equation cannot solve the topographic effect at complex seafloor regions. We prove that 3D finite element method can model the topographic effect on the regional background heat flow with high accuracy, which can then be used to correct the topographic effect and obtain the BSR heat flow under the condition of perfectly flat topography. By comparing the corrected BSR heat flow with the regional background heat flow, focused fluid flow regions can be detected that are originally too small and cannot be detected using present-day equipment. This method was successfully applied to the midslope region of northern Cascadia subducting margin. The results suggest that the Cucumber Ridge and its neighboring area are positive heat flow anomalies, about 10%-20% higher than the background heat flow after 3D topographic correction. Moreover, the seismic imaging associated the positive heat flow anomaly areas with seabed fracture-cavity systems. This suggests flow of warm gas-carrying fluids along these high-permeability pathways, which could result in higher gas hydrate concentrations.

  9. Study on the heat-flow controllable heat exchanger (2nd report): Dehumidification in the greenhouse by the ventilation type dehumidifier with heat-flow controllable heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Yanadori, Michio; Hamano, Masayoshi )

    1994-07-01

    A novel ventilation type dehumidifier with heat-flow controllable heat exchanger was installed on the wall of a greenhouse. Dehumidification and heat recovery experiments were conducted. The construction of the novel dehumidifier is simpler than that of the conventional dehumidifier with a compressor. It was found that the required input for the ventilation type dehumidifier was less than that of a conventional dehumidifier with compressor.

  10. Optimization of Transient Heat Exchanger Performance for Improved Energy Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bran Anleu, Gabriela; Kavehpour, Pirouz; Lavine, Adrienne; Wirz, Richard

    2014-11-01

    Heat exchangers are used in a multitude of applications within systems for energy generation, energy conversion, or energy storage. Many of these systems (e.g. solar power plants) function under transient conditions, but the design of the heat exchangers is typically optimized assuming steady state conditions. There is a potential for significant energy savings if the transient behavior of the heat exchanger is taken into account in designing the heat exchanger by optimizing its operating conditions in relation to the transient behavior of the overall system. The physics of the transient behavior of a heat exchanger needs to be understood to provide design parameters for transient heat exchangers to deliver energy savings. A numerical model was used to determine the optimized mass flow rates thermal properties for a thermal energy storage system. The transient behavior is strongly linked to the dimensionless parameters relating fluid properties, the mass flow rates, and the temperature of the fluids at the inlet of each stream. Smart metals, or advanced heat exchanger surface geometries and methods of construction will be used to meet the three goals mentioned before: 1) energy and cost reduction, 2) size reduction, and 3) optimal performance for all modes of operation.

  11. Carbon Energy Flows Belowground

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants use photosynthesis to convert carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and energy from sunlight into energy-containing, carbon-based foodstuffs (i.e. carbohydrates such as sugars and starches) that provide the building blocks for all life on Earth. Without photosynthesis, sunlight would not be a goo...

  12. US energy flow, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, I.Y.; Briggs, C.K.

    1991-06-01

    Energy consumption in the US changed only slightly in 1990. Transportation used was close to 1988 and 1989 levels. Improvements in automobile efficiency were compensated by an increase in the number of miles driven. A larger energy use in the industrial sector was offset by decreases in the residential/commercial sector. Energy use in the latter sector was influenced by a relatively mild, nation-wide summer and winter. All end-use sectors were affected by the high fuel prices related to the Kuwait-Iraq war in the last half of the year and by an attendant economic downturn. Electrical use rose slightly and thus deviated from the 3-4% annual increases recorded in the previous decade. Nuclear energy's contribution to electrical generation increased to almost 21%, and capacity factors reached 66%, an all time high in the US. Renewable sources of energy apart from hydroelectric power showed negligible growth. Domestic natural gas and coal production rose, and oil production continued its steady decline. As oil constitutes 41% of US energy consumption, failing domestic production has been augmented by imports. Collectively energy imports constituted two-thirds of the US trade deficit in 1990. The ratio between energy consumption and GNP declined slightly in 1990 as it has for almost every year since 1972. The Services'' component of the GNP increased in 1990 and the Goods'' and Structures'' components declined in keeping with an even longer trend. 29 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Dryout of an inductively heated bed of steel particles with subcooled flow from beneath the bed

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, F.P.; Catton, I.; Dhir, V.K.; Jakobsson, J.

    1984-04-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted of dryout heat flux in an inductively heated bed of metal particles with forced flow from beneath the bed. The mass flux varied from 0 to 3.11 kg/m/sup 2/.s. Freon113 was used as coolant. Particle sizes were 1588, 3175, and 4763 /rho/m in diameter. The dryout heat flux was found to increase as mass flux increases. When the mass flux is large enough, the dryout heat flux asymptotically approaches the total evaporation energy of the inlet flow.

  14. Heat recovery reduces process energy losses

    SciTech Connect

    Anon

    1981-09-01

    After evaluation of process and plant operation losses, a pharmaceutical plant found heat recovery a viable means of reducing energy losses. One of the first applications of air-to-air heat recovery was in a recirculation/dehumidification process. Heat exchangers were used to recover heat from the air used to generate or dry the dehumidification material.

  15. Heat Transfer of Viscoelastic Fluid Flow due to Nonlinear Stretching Sheet with Internal Heat Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandeppanavar, M. M.; Siddalingappa, M. N.; Jyoti, H.

    2013-08-01

    In the present paper, a viscoelastic boundary layer flow and heat transfer over an exponentially stretching continuous sheet in the presence of a heat source/sink has been examined. Loss of energy due to viscous dissipation of the non-Newtonian fluid has been taken into account in this study. Approximate analytical local similar solutions of the highly non-linear momentum equation are obtained for velocity distribution by transforming the equation into Riccati-type and then solving this sequentially. Accuracy of the zero-order analytical solutions for the stream function and velocity are verified by numerical solutions obtained by employing the Runge-Kutta fourth order method involving shooting. Similarity solutions of the temperature equation for non-isothermal boundary conditions are obtained in the form of confluent hypergeometric functions. The effect of various physical parameters on the local skin-friction coefficient and heat transfer characteristics are discussed in detail. It is seen that the rate of heat transfer from the stretching sheet to the fluid can be controlled by suitably choosing the values of the Prandtl number Pr and local Eckert number E, local viscioelastic parameter k*1 and local heat source/ sink parameter β*

  16. Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Closed-Type Two-Phase Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Saito, Yuji; Fujimoto, Hiromitsu

    A closed-loop two-phase thermosyphon can transport a large amount of thermal energy with small temperature differences without any external power supply. A fundamental investigation of flow and heat transfer characteristics was performed experimentally and theoretically using water, ethanol and R113 as the working liquids. Heat transfer coefficients in an evaporator and a condenser, and circulation flow rates were measured experimentally. The effects of liquid fill charge, rotation angle, pressure in the loop and heat flux on the heat transfer coefficients were examined. The heat transfer coefficients in the evaporator and the condenser were correlated by the expressions for pool boiling and film condensation respectively. As a result, the heat transfer coefficients in the evaporator were correlated by the Stephan-Abdelsalam equations within a±40% error. Theoretically, the circulation flow rate was predicted by calculating pressure, temperature, quality and void fraction along the loop. And, the comparison between the calculated and experimental results was made.

  17. Heat Transfer and Flow Structure Evaluation of a Synthetic Jet Emanating from a Planar Heat Sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Paul; Persoons, Tim; Murray, Darina

    2014-07-01

    Direct impinging synthetic jets are a proven method for heat transfer enhancement, and have been subject to extensive research. However, despite the vast amount of research into direct synthetic jet impingement, there has been little research investigating the effects of a synthetic jet emanating from a heated surface, this forms the basis of the current research investigation. Both single and multiple orifices are integrated into a planar heat sink forming a synthetic jet, thus allowing the heat transfer enhancement and flow structures to be assessed. The heat transfer analysis highlighted that the multiple orifice synthetic jet resulted in the greatest heat transfer enhancements. The flow structures responsible for these enhancements were identified using a combination of flow visualisation, thermal imaging and thermal boundary layer analysis. The flow structure analysis identified that the synthetic jets decreased the thermal boundary layer thickness resulting in a more effective convective heat transfer process. Flow visualisation revealed entrainment of local air adjacent to the heated surface; this occurred from vortex roll-up at the surface of the heat sink and from the highly sheared jet flow. Furthermore, a secondary entrainment was identified which created a surface impingement effect. It is proposed that all three flow features enhance the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  18. Nonsteady flow of a vapor-drop flow in a heated channel

    SciTech Connect

    Kroshilin, V.E.; Khodzhaev, Y.D.

    1992-06-01

    Flow of a vapor-drop mixture in a heated channel is studied under steady and non-steady conditions using a model which considers direct thermal interaction of drops with the heating surface. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Flow and heat transfer in a curved channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinich, P. F.; Graham, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Flow and heat transfer in a curved channel of aspect ratio 6 and inner- to outer-wall radius ratio 0.96 were studied. Secondary currents and large longitudinal vortices were found. The heat-transfer rates of the outer and inner walls were independently controlled to maintain a constant wall temperature. Heating the inner wall increased the pressure drop along the channel length, whereas heating the outer wall had little effect. Outer-wall heat transfer was as much as 40 percent greater than the straight-channel correlation, and inner-wall heat transfer was 22 percent greater than the straight-channel correlation.

  20. Heat transfer and flow characteristics on a gas turbine shroud.

    PubMed

    Obata, M; Kumada, M; Ijichi, N

    2001-05-01

    The work described in this paper is an experimental investigation of the heat transfer from the main flow to a turbine shroud surface, which may be applicable to ceramic gas turbines. Three kinds of turbine shrouds are considered with a flat surface, a taper surface and a spiral groove surface opposite to the blades in an axial flow turbine of actual turbo-charger. Heat transfer measurements were performed for the experimental conditions of a uniform heat flux or a uniform wall temperature. The effects of the inlet flow angle, rotational speed, and tip clearance on the heat transfer coefficient were clarified under on- and off-design flow conditions. The mean heat transfer coefficient was correlated to the blade Reynolds number and tip clearance, and compared with an experimental correlation and measurements of a flat surface. A comparison was also made for the measurement of static pressure distributions. PMID:11460639

  1. On the global variations of terrestrial heat-flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, W.H.K.

    1969-01-01

    Over 3 500 measurements of surface heat-flux have been catalogued and analyzed to study the large-scale variations of terrestrial heat-flow. It was found that heat-flow values are correlated with major geologic provinces: higher averages and scattered values in active tectonic regions, and lower averages and more uniform values in stable areas. Analyzing the data in the light of new global tectonics shows that the variations of heat-flow are consistent with the hypotheses of sea-floor spreading and plate tectonics. The observed heat-flow across the mid-oceanic ridges can be accounted for by a simple model of a spreading sea floor. ?? 1970.

  2. Solar Energy for Space Heating & Hot Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Energy Research and Development Administration, Washington, DC. Div. of Solar Energy.

    This pamphlet reviews the direct transfer of solar energy into heat, particularly for the purpose of providing space and hot water heating needs. Owners of buildings and homes are provided with a basic understanding of solar heating and hot water systems: what they are, how they perform, the energy savings possible, and the cost factors involved.…

  3. Numerical prediction of turbulent oscillating flow and associated heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehler, W. J.; Patankar, S. V.; Ibele, W. E.

    1991-01-01

    A crucial point for further development of engines is the optimization of its heat exchangers which operate under oscillatory flow conditions. It has been found that the most important thermodynamic uncertainties in the Stirling engine designs for space power are in the heat transfer between gas and metal in all engine components and in the pressure drop across the heat exchanger components. So far, performance codes cannot predict the power output of a Stirling engine reasonably enough if used for a wide variety of engines. Thus, there is a strong need for better performance codes. However, a performance code is not concerned with the details of the flow. This information must be provided externally. While analytical relationships exist for laminar oscillating flow, there has been hardly any information about transitional and turbulent oscillating flow, which could be introduced into the performance codes. In 1986, a survey by Seume and Simon revealed that most Stirling engine heat exchangers operate in the transitional and turbulent regime. Consequently, research has since focused on the unresolved issue of transitional and turbulent oscillating flow and heat transfer. Since 1988, the University of Minnesota oscillating flow facility has obtained experimental data about transitional and turbulent oscillating flow. However, since the experiments in this field are extremely difficult, lengthy, and expensive, it is advantageous to numerically simulate the flow and heat transfer accurately from first principles. Work done at the University of Minnesota on the development of such a numerical simulation is summarized.

  4. Numerical prediction of turbulent oscillating flow and associated heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, W. J.; Patankar, S. V.; Ibele, W. E.

    1991-08-01

    A crucial point for further development of engines is the optimization of its heat exchangers which operate under oscillatory flow conditions. It has been found that the most important thermodynamic uncertainties in the Stirling engine designs for space power are in the heat transfer between gas and metal in all engine components and in the pressure drop across the heat exchanger components. So far, performance codes cannot predict the power output of a Stirling engine reasonably enough if used for a wide variety of engines. Thus, there is a strong need for better performance codes. However, a performance code is not concerned with the details of the flow. This information must be provided externally. While analytical relationships exist for laminar oscillating flow, there has been hardly any information about transitional and turbulent oscillating flow, which could be introduced into the performance codes. In 1986, a survey by Seume and Simon revealed that most Stirling engine heat exchangers operate in the transitional and turbulent regime. Consequently, research has since focused on the unresolved issue of transitional and turbulent oscillating flow and heat transfer. Since 1988, the University of Minnesota oscillating flow facility has obtained experimental data about transitional and turbulent oscillating flow. However, since the experiments in this field are extremely difficult, lengthy, and expensive, it is advantageous to numerically simulate the flow and heat transfer accurately from first principles. Work done at the University of Minnesota on the development of such a numerical simulation is summarized.

  5. Three-phase flow? Consider helical-coil heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Haraburda, S.S.

    1995-07-01

    In recent years, chemical process plants are increasingly encountering processes that require heat exchange in three-phase fluids. A typical application, for example, is heating liquids containing solid catalyst particles and non-condensable gases. Heat exchangers designed for three-phase flow generally have tubes with large diameters (typically greater than two inches), because solids can build-up inside the tube and lead to plugging. At the same time, in order to keep heat-transfer coefficients high, the velocity of the process fluid within the tube should also be high. As a result, heat exchangers for three-phase flow may require less than five tubes -- each having a required linear length that could exceed several hundred feet. Given these limitations, it is obvious that a basic shell-and-tube heat exchanger is not the most practical solution for this purpose. An alternative for three-phase flow is a helical-coil heat exchanger. The helical-coil units offer a number of advantages, including perpendicular, counter-current flow and flexible overall dimensions for the exchanger itself. The paper presents equations for: calculating the tube-side heat-transfer coefficient; calculating the shell-side heat-transfer coefficient; calculating the heat-exchanger size; calculating the tube-side pressure drop; and calculating shell-side pressure-drop.

  6. Estimation of respiratory heat flows in prediction of heat strain among Taiwanese steel workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wang-Yi; Juang, Yow-Jer; Hsieh, Jung-Yu; Tsai, Perng-Jy; Chen, Chen-Peng

    2016-06-01

    International Organization for Standardization 7933 standard provides evaluation of required sweat rate (RSR) and predicted heat strain (PHS). This study examined and validated the approximations in these models estimating respiratory heat flows (RHFs) via convection (C res) and evaporation (E res) for application to Taiwanese foundry workers. The influence of change in RHF approximation to the validity of heat strain prediction in these models was also evaluated. The metabolic energy consumption and physiological quantities of these workers performing at different workloads under elevated wet-bulb globe temperature (30.3 ± 2.5 °C) were measured on-site and used in the calculation of RHFs and indices of heat strain. As the results show, the RSR model overestimated the C res for Taiwanese workers by approximately 3 % and underestimated the E res by 8 %. The C res approximation in the PHS model closely predicted the convective RHF, while the E res approximation over-predicted by 11 %. Linear regressions provided better fit in C res approximation (R 2 = 0.96) than in E res approximation (R 2 ≤ 0.85) in both models. The predicted C res deviated increasingly from the observed value when the WBGT reached 35 °C. The deviations of RHFs observed for the workers from those predicted using the RSR or PHS models did not significantly alter the heat loss via the skin, as the RHFs were in general of a level less than 5 % of the metabolic heat consumption. Validation of these approximations considering thermo-physiological responses of local workers is necessary for application in scenarios of significant heat exposure.

  7. Transport of heat and momentum in oscillatory wall-bounded flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebadi, Alireza; Biles, Drummond; White, Christopher; Pond, Ian; Dubief, Yves; UNH Team; UVM Team

    2015-11-01

    The balance of the leading order terms in the mean momentum and energy equations and their thrice integrated forms are investigated in oscillatory wall-bounded flow using both DNS and experimental data. The integrated forms of the equations are used to investigate the dynamical contributions to the phase-averaged wall shear stress and wall heat flux. Preliminary results indicate that phases corresponding to flow acceleration are dynamically similar to oscillatory laminar flow and phases corresponding to flow deceleration are dynamically similar to fully developed turbulent flow. Moreover, the flow becomes more turbulent-like with increasing period of oscillation.

  8. Spherical harmonic analysis of earth's conductive heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, V. M.; Cardoso, R. R.; Ponte Neto, C. F.

    2008-04-01

    A reappraisal of the international heat flow database has been carried out and the corrected data set was employed in spherical harmonic analysis of the conductive component of global heat flow. Procedures used prior to harmonic analysis include analysis of the heat flow data and determination of representative mean values for a set of discretized area elements of the surface of the earth. Estimated heat flow values were assigned to area elements for which experimental data are not available. However, no corrections were made to account for the hypothetical effects of regional-scale convection heat transfer in areas of oceanic crust. New sets of coefficients for 12° spherical harmonic expansion were calculated on the basis of the revised and homogenized data set. Maps derived on the basis of these coefficients reveal several new features in the global heat flow distribution. The magnitudes of heat flow anomalies of the ocean ridge segments are found to have mean values of less than 150 mW/m2. Also, the mean global heat flow values for the raw and binned data are found to fall in the range of 56-67 mW/m2, down by nearly 25% compared to the previous estimate of 1993, but similar to earlier assessments based on raw data alone. To improve the spatial resolution of the heat flow anomalies, the spherical harmonic expansions have been extended to higher degrees. Maps derived using coefficients for 36° harmonic expansion have allowed identification of new features in regional heat flow fields of several oceanic and continental segments. For example, lateral extensions of heat flow anomalies of active spreading centers have been outlined with better resolution than was possible in earlier studies. Also, the characteristics of heat flow variations in oceanic crust away from ridge systems are found to be typical of conductive cooling of the lithosphere, there being little need to invoke the hypothesis of unconfined hydrothermal circulation on regional scales. Calculations

  9. In-situ measurements of lunar heat flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langseth, M. B.; Keihm, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    During the Apollo program two successful heat flow measurements were made in situ on the lunar surface. At the Apollo 15 site a value of .0000031 W/sq cm was measured, and at the Apollo 17 site a value of .0000022 W/sq cm was determined. Both measurements have uncertainty limits of + or - 20 percent and have been corrected for perturbing topographic effects. The apparent difference between the observations may correlate with observed variations in the surface abundance of thorium. Comparison with earlier determinations of heat flow, using the microwave emission spectrum from the moon, gives support to the high gradients and heat flows observed in situ.

  10. Heat flow in the north-central Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodell, John Michael; Chapman, David S.

    1982-04-01

    We report new heat flow measurements at 25 evenly distributed sites in the north-central Colorado Plateau. Heat flow values computed for these new sites and one previously published site range from 43 to 116 mW m-2 but fall into the following distinct subsets related to physiographic and tectonic elements within the Plateau: (1) heat flow of 51 mW m-2 (12 sites; s.d. 6) in the San Rafael Swell and Green River Desert which constitute the core of the Colorado Plateau at this latitude, (2) heat flows of 69 mW m-2 (5 sites; s.d. 10) and 88 mW m-2 (4 sites; s.d. 19) in successive parallel north-south bands approaching the Wasatch Plateau to the west but still 80 km east of the Basin and Range physiographic boundary, (3) heat flow of 64 mW m-2 (5 sites; s.d. 2) along the Salt Anticline trend which strikes northwest in the region of Moab, Utah. Heat flow results for the entire Colorado Plateau have been reexamined in view of our new results, and the overall pattern supports the concept of a low heat flow `thermal interior' for the plateau surrounded by a periphery some 100 km wide having substantially higher heat flow. Average heat flow in the thermal interior is about 60 mW m-2 compared to 80-90 mW m-2 in the periphery. This regional heat flow pattern supports a model of Tertiary lithospheric thinning under the Colorado Plateau whereby the plateau is still in transient thermal response and a 15-20 m.y. lag between uplift and corresponding surface heat flow anomaly is to be expected. The position of the heat flow transition between our interior and peripheral regions in the northwest plateau is roughly consistent with lateral warming and weakening of the Colorado Plateau lithosphere initiated at the Basin and Range boundary some 20 m.y. ago.

  11. Investigation on critical heat flux of flow in pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Senyuan

    1990-08-01

    This paper experimentally and theoretically investigates the critical heat flux of flow in pipes. From the analysis of the boiling mechanism and processing by means of the analogy principle of two-phase flow, a criterion equation to express critical heat flux has been derived. Correlated with six different coolants, 355 experimental data, the constant A and exponents K, m, and n are obtained. With a dimensionless correction term to calculate the effect on the varying slotted height of the cooling jacket, the previous equation will be a general equation to calculate the critical heat flux of flow in pipes.

  12. Turbulent flow and heat transfer in rotating channels and tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitiakov, V. Y.; Petropavlovskii, R. R.; Ris, V. V.; Smirnov, E. M.; Smirnov, S. A.

    This document is a reduction of the author's experimental results on turbulent flow characteristics and heat transfer in rotating channels whose axes are parallel to the plane of rotation. Substantial dissimilarities of longitudinal velocity field profile and pulsational characteristics are caused by effects of stabilization and destabilization and secondary flow production. Local heat transfer coefficients vary over the perimeter of the tube section connecting detected flow peculiarities. It is shown that the increase in rotational intensity caused an increase in the relative dissimilarity of the local heat transfer coefficients and increased their mean value.

  13. In-situ measurements of lunar heat flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langseth, M. G.; Keihm, S. J.

    1974-01-01

    During the Apollo program two successful heat flow measurements were made in situ on the lunar surface. At the Apollo 15 site a value of 0.0000031 watts/sqcm was measured and at the Apollo 17 site a value of 0.0000022 watts/sqcm was determined. Both measurements have uncertainty limits of + or - 20% and have been corrected for perturbing topographic effects. The apparent difference between the observations may correlate with observed variations in the surface abundance of thorium. Comparison with earlier determinations of heat flow, using the microwave emission spectrum from the moon, gives support to the high gradients and heat flows observed in situ.

  14. Coupled Groundwater and Heat Flow in the Tahoe Basin Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trask, J. C.

    2002-12-01

    We propose that recent developments in available temperature probe technology and improvements in appropriate modeling software, together with the advent of desktop high-speed computing, have enabled the thermal analysis approach to be an inexpensive, robust, and practical way to constrain groundwater flow fields in a wide variety of environments. We present field measurements and numerical models of coupled heat and groundwater flow in the Tahoe Basin region. In montane regions such as the Tahoe Basin, steep topography provides a driving force for deep groundwater flow. Deep groundwater flow re-routes subsurface heat flow, impacting temperature gradients to depth, including the shallow subsurface (<100m depth). In the Tahoe Basin region, the magnitude of deep groundwater flow on the areal or regional scale has been largely unknown. We present examples of borehole temperature profiles that constrain possible areal groundwater flow patterns, including the magnitude of flow beneath the bottom of boreholes probed.

  15. Application of heat flow models to SOI current mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Feixia; Cheng, Ming-C.

    2004-11-01

    An analytical heat flow model for SOI circuits is presented. The model is able to account for heat exchanges among devices and heat loss from the silicon film and interconnects to the substrate through the buried oxide. The developed model can accurately and efficiently predict the temperature distribution in the interconnect/poly-lines and SOI devices. The model is applied to SOI current mirrors to study heat flow in different layout designs. The results from the developed model are verified with those from Raphael, a 3D numerical simulator that can provide the detailed 3D temperature distribution in interconnect/poly-lines.

  16. Laminar flow heat transfer downstream from U-bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie Nassif

    1987-05-01

    The laminar flow heat transfer downstream from the unheated, vertical bends in horizontal U-tubes with electrically heated straight tube sections was investigated. For each test section, local axial and peripheral wall temperatures were measured and the local peripheral heat transfer coefficients at the various locations were calculated. The investigation permitted a better understanding of the interaction of the primary, secondary and tertiary flow patterns, i.e., the combination of forced and natural convection with the centrifugal effects. Also, a correlation was developed, which predicts the heat transfer coefficient downstream from an unheated U-bend, and which can be extended to straight tubes.

  17. Gas flow environment and heat transfer nonrotating 3D program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A complete set of benchmark quality data for the flow and heat transfer within a large rectangular turning duct is provided. These data are to be used to evaluate, and verify, three-dimensional internal viscous flow models and computational codes. The analytical contract objective is to select a computational code and define the capabilities of this code to predict the experimental results obtained. Details of the proper code operation will be defined and improvements to the code modeling capabilities will be formulated. Internal flow in a large rectangular cross-sectioned 90 deg. bend turning duct was studied. The duct construction was designed to allow detailed measurements to be made for the following three duct wall conditions: (1) an isothermal wall with isothermal flow; (2) an adiabatic wall with convective heat transfer by mixing between an unheated surrounding flow; and (3) an isothermal wall with heat transfer from a uniformly hot inlet flow.

  18. Hot Topics! Heat Pumps and Geothermal Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2009-01-01

    The recent rapid rises in the cost of energy has significantly increased interest in alternative energy sources. The author discusses the underlying principles of heat pumps and geothermal energy. Related activities for technology education students are included.

  19. Correlations for heat transfer and flow friction characteristics of compact plate-type heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinaut, F. V.; Melgar, A.; Rahman Ali, A. A.

    1992-07-01

    Correlations for heat transfer and flow friction coefficients are provided for plane parallel plates and offset strip-fin plates over the ranges used in compact heat exchangers. Closed form expressions have been used to present these correlations. The proposed correlations allow one to adequately predict experimental data available for the heat exchanged and pressure losses in compact plate-type heat exchangers. The correlation cover continuously the full range from laminar to turbulent flow, for both short and long pipes. Suggestions to extend the correlations to other flow conditions are provided.

  20. High heat flux burnout in subcooled flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celata, G. P.; Cumo, M.; Mariani, A.

    1995-09-01

    The paper reports the results of an experimental research carried out at the Heat Transfer Division of the Energy Department, C.R. Casaccia, on the thermal hydraulic characterization of subcooled flow boiling CHF under typical conditions of thermonuclear fusion reactors, i.e. high liquid velocity and subcooling. The experiment was carried out exploring the following parameters: channel diameter (from 2.5 to 8.0 mm), heated length (10 and 15 cm), liquid velocity (from 2 to 40 m/s), exit pressure (from atmospheric to 5.0 MPa), inlet temperature (from 30 to 80 °C), channel orientation (vertical and horizontal). A maximum CHF value of 60.6 MW/m2 has been obtained under the following conditions: T in=30°, p=2.5 MPa, u=40 m/s, D=2.5 mm (smooth channel) Turbulence promoters (helically coiled wires) have been employed to further enhance the CHF attainable with subcooled flow boiling. Helically coiled wires allow an increase of 50% of the maximum CHF obtained with smooth channels.

  1. Conjugate Compressible Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, M. F.

    2011-01-01

    A computational approach to modeling transient, compressible fluid flow with heat transfer in long, narrow ducts is presented. The primary application of the model is for analyzing fluid flow and heat transfer in solid propellant rocket motor nozzle joints during motor start-up, but the approach is relevant to a wide range of analyses involving rapid pressurization and filling of ducts. Fluid flow is modeled through solution of the spatially one-dimensional, transient Euler equations. Source terms are included in the governing equations to account for the effects of wall friction and heat transfer. The equation solver is fully-implicit, thus providing greater flexibility than an explicit solver. This approach allows for resolution of pressure wave effects on the flow as well as for fast calculation of the steady-state solution when a quasi-steady approach is sufficient. Solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations with source terms significantly reduces computational run times compared to general purpose computational fluid dynamics packages solving the Navier-Stokes equations with resolved boundary layers. In addition, conjugate heat transfer is more readily implemented using the approach described in this paper than with most general purpose computational fluid dynamics packages. The compressible flow code has been integrated with a transient heat transfer solver to analyze heat transfer between the fluid and surrounding structure. Conjugate fluid flow and heat transfer solutions are presented. The author is unaware of any previous work available in the open literature which uses the same approach described in this paper.

  2. Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Two-Phase Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Takeshita, Kazuhiro; Horie, Yoshiatsu; Noda, Ken-Ichi

    A two-phase loop thermosyphon transports thermal energy from a heat source to a heat sink by natural convective circulation under a body force field without any external power supply such as a pump. It is, therefore, thought that this could be applied to an energy-saving heat transportation system, and so forth. In practical use, an evaporator has several heated tubes and also the heat supplied to each of the heated tubes is not always equal. Therefore, the present study was performed both experimentally and theoretically on the flow and heat transfer characteristics in the two-phase loop thermosyphon installed with the evaporator with three heated tubes as a comparatively simple multi-tube evaporator in the lower part of the loop. The circulation mass flow rate, pressure and temperature distributions along the loop, as well as the heat transfer coefficients in the heated tubes were measured using water, ethanol and benzene, on which the effects of subcooling at the evaporator inlet and a heat input ratio of the three heated tubes were examined, and the experimental data were compared with the theoretically calculated results.

  3. Buoyant instabilities in downward flow in a symmetrically heated vertical channel

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, G.; Greif, R.

    1996-07-01

    This study of the downward flow of nitrogen in a tall, partially heated vertical channel (upstream isothermal at T{sub in}*, heated region isothermal at T{sub s}* downstream adiabatic) shows the strong effects of buoyancy even for small temperature differences. Time-dependent oscillations including periodic flow reversals occur along the channel walls. Although the flow and heat transfer are asymmetric, the temperature and axial component of velocity show symmetric reflections at two times that are half a period apart and the lateral component of velocity shows antisymmetric reflections at the two times. There is strong interaction between the downward flow in the central region of the channel and the upward flow along the heated channel walls. At the top of the heated region, the upward buoyant flow turns toward the center of the channel and is incorporated into the downward flow. Along the channel centerline there are nonmonotonic variations of the axial component of velocity and temperature and a large lateral component of velocity that reverses direction periodically. Results are presented for Re = 219.7 and Gr/Re{sup 2} = 1.83, 8.0, and 13.7. The heat transfer and the frequency of the oscillations increases and the flow and temperature fields become more complex as Gr/Re{sup 2} increases. The results have applications to fiber drying, food processing, crystal growth, solar energy collection, cooling of electronic circuits, ventilation, etc.

  4. Critical heat flux of subcooled flow boiling with water for high heat flux application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inasaka, Fujio; Nariai, Hideki

    1993-11-01

    Subcooled flow boiling in water is thought to be advantageous in removing high heat load of more than 10 MW/m2. Characteristics of the critical heat flux (CHF), which determines the upper limit of heat removal, are very important for the design of cooling systems. In this paper, studies on subcooled flow boiling CHF, which have been conducted by the authors, are reported. Experiments were conducted using direct current heating of stainless steel tube. For uniform heating conditions, CHF increment in small diameter tubes (1 - 3 mm inside diameter) and the CHF characteristics in tubes with internal twisted tapes were investigated, and also the existing CHF correlations for ordinary tubes (more than 3 mm inside diameter) were evaluated. For peripherally non-uniform heating conditions using the tube, whose wall thickness was partly reduced, the CHF for swirl flow was higher than the CHF under uniform heating conditions with an increase of the non-uniformity factor.

  5. Approximate convective heating equations for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoby, E. V.; Moss, J. N.; Sutton, K.

    1979-01-01

    Laminar and turbulent heating-rate equations appropriate for engineering predictions of the convective heating rates about blunt reentry spacecraft at hypersonic conditions are developed. The approximate methods are applicable to both nonreacting and reacting gas mixtures for either constant or variable-entropy edge conditions. A procedure which accounts for variable-entropy effects and is not based on mass balancing is presented. Results of the approximate heating methods are in good agreement with existing experimental results as well as boundary-layer and viscous-shock-layer solutions.

  6. Pressure and flow, temperature and heat, and properties of water. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The three sections in this volume cover pressure and flow (units of measurement, properties of substances, mass, volume, density, pressure, units of pressure, how pressure is measured, what causes flow, how flow is measured), temperature and heat (forms of energy, potential and kinetic energy, internal and P-V energy, temperature, work and heat in power plants, energy equivalence), and properties of water (what is water; ice - the solid phase of H/sub 2/O; water - the liquid phase of H/sub 2/O; steam - the gas phase of H/sub 2/O; change of phase of H/sub 2/O; specific heat of water; effect of pressure; density of water; important properties of steam).

  7. Constraints on hydrothermal heat flux through the oceanic lithosphere from global heat flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Carol A.; Stein, Seth

    1994-01-01

    A significant discrepancy exists between the heat flow measured at the seafloor and the higher values predicted by thermal models of the cooling lithosphere. This discrepancy is generally interpreted as indicating that the upper oceanic crust is cooled significantly by hydrothermal circulation. The magnitude of this heat flow discrepancy is the primary datum used to estimate the volume of hydrothermal flow, and the variation in the discrepancy with lithospheric age is the primary constraint on how the hydrothermal flux is divided between near-ridge and off-ridge environments. The resulting estimates are important for investigation of both the thermal structure of the lithosphere and the chemistry of the oceans. We reevaluate the magnitude and age variation of the discrepancy using a global heat flow data set substantially larger than in earlier studies, and the GDHI (Global Depth and Heat Flow) model that better predicts the heat flow. We estimate that of the predicted global oceanic heat flux of 32 x 10(exp 12) W, 34% (11 x 10(exp 12) W) occurs by hydrothermal flow. Approximately 30% of the hydrothermal heat flux occurs in crust younger than 1 Ma, so the majority of this flux is off-ridge. These hydrothermal heat flux estimates are upper bounds, because heat flow measurements require sediment at the site and so are made preferentially at topographic lows, where heat flow may be depressed. Because the water temperature for the near-ridge flow exceeds that for the off-ridge flow, the near-ridge water flow will be even a smaller fraction of the total water flow. As a result, in estimating fluxes from geochemical data, use of the high water temperatures appropriate for the ridge axis may significantly overestimate the heat flux for an assumed water flux or underestimate the water flux for an assumed heat flux. Our data also permit improved estimates of the 'sealing' age, defined as the age where the observed heat flow approximately equals that predicted, suggesting

  8. Optimal operation of a concurrent-flow corn dryer with a drying heat pump using superheated steam

    SciTech Connect

    Moraitis, C.S.; Akritidis, C.B.

    1998-07-01

    A numerical model of a concurrent-flow dryer of corn using superheated steam as drying medium is solved applying a shooting technique, so as to satisfy boundary conditions imposed by the optimal design of a drying heat pump. The drying heat pump is based on the theory of minimum energy cycles. The solution of the model proves the applicability of the heat pump to a concurrent-flow dryer, achieving a Specific Energy Consumption as low as 1080 kJ/kg.

  9. Frictional strength and heat flow of southern San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, P. P.

    2016-01-01

    Frictional strength and heat flow of faults are two related subjects in geophysics and seismology. To date, the investigation on regional frictional strength and heat flow still stays at the stage of qualitative estimation. This paper is concentrated on the regional frictional strength and heat flow of the southern San Andreas Fault (SAF). Based on the in situ borehole measured stress data, using the method of 3D dynamic faulting analysis, we quantitatively determine the regional normal stress, shear stress, and friction coefficient at various seismogenic depths. These new data indicate that the southern SAF is a weak fault within the depth of 15 km. As depth increases, all the regional normal and shear stresses and friction coefficient increase. The former two increase faster than the latter. Regional shear stress increment per kilometer equals 5.75 ± 0.05 MPa/km for depth ≤15 km; regional normal stress increment per kilometer is equal to 25.3 ± 0.1 MPa/km for depth ≤15 km. As depth increases, regional friction coefficient increment per kilometer decreases rapidly from 0.08 to 0.01/km at depths less than ~3 km. As depth increases from ~3 to ~5 km, it is 0.01/km and then from ~5 to 15 km, and it is 0.002/km. Previously, frictional strength could be qualitatively determined by heat flow measurements. It is difficult to obtain the quantitative heat flow data for the SAF because the measured heat flow data exhibit large scatter. However, our quantitative results of frictional strength can be employed to investigate the heat flow in the southern SAF. We use a physical quantity P f to describe heat flow. It represents the dissipative friction heat power per unit area generated by the relative motion of two tectonic plates accommodated by off-fault deformation. P f is called "fault friction heat." On the basis of our determined frictional strength data, utilizing the method of 3D dynamic faulting analysis, we quantitatively determine the regional long-term fault

  10. Constraints on rift thermal processes from heat flow and uplift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.

    1983-01-01

    The implications of heat flow data available from five major Cenozoic continental rift systems for the processes of continental rifting are discussed, and simple thermal models of lithospheric thinning which predict uplift are used to further constrain the thermal processes in the lithosphere during rifting. Compilations of the heat flow data are summarized and the salient results of these compilations are briefly discussed. The uplift predictions of the slow and rapid thinning models, in which thinning is assumed to occur at a respectively slower and faster rate than heat can be conducted into the lithosphere, are presented. Comparison of uplift rates with model results indicates that the lithosphere is in a state between the two models. While uplift is predicted to continue after thinning has ceased due to thermal relaxation of the lithosphere, the rapid thinning model is always predicted to apply to surface heat flow, and an anomaly in this flow is not predicted to develop until after thinning has stopped.

  11. Effect of flow twisting on hydraulic resistance and heat exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslov, V. Ya.; Makarov, N. A.

    1989-02-01

    On the basis of dimensional analysis through a differentiated approach to the dimensions of length we have obtained formulas for the effect of flow twisting in a circular tube on the hydraulic resistance and exchange of heat.

  12. Heat flow measurements on the southeast coast of Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hyndman, R.D.; Jaeger, J.C.; Sass, J.H.

    1969-01-01

    Three boreholes have been drilled for the Australian National University near the southeast coast of New South Wales, Australia. The heat flows found are 1.1, 1.0, and 1.3 ??cal/cm2sec. The errors resulting from the proximity of the sea and a lake, surface temperature change, conductivity structure and water flow have been examined. The radioactive heat production in some of the intrusive rocks of the area have also been measured. The heat flows are much lower than the values of about 2.0 found elsewhere in south eastern Australia. The lower values appear to be part of a distinct heat flow province in eastern Australia. ?? 1969.

  13. Flows through sequential orifices with heated spacer reservoirs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Stetz, T. T.

    1982-01-01

    Flow rates and pressure thermal profiles for two phase choked flows of fluid nitrogen were studied theoretically and experimentally in a four sequential orifice configuration. Both theory and experimental evidence demonstrate that heat addition in the first spacer-reservoir adjacent to the inlet orifice is most effective in reducing the flow rate and that heat addition in the last spacer-reservoir is least effective. The flows are choked at the exit orifice for large spacings and at the inlet orifice for small spacings. The moderate addition of heat available for this experiment did not materially alter this result for large spacings; however, significant heat addition for the small spacings tended to shift the choke point to the exit orifice. Nitrogen is used as the working fluid over a range of states from liquid to gas with a reduced inlet stagnation pressure range to P sub r, o = 2.

  14. Heat flow from eastern Panama and northwestern Colombia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Munroe, R.J.; Moses, T.H., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Heat flows were determined at 12 sites in four distinct areas between longitude 77?? and 80??W in eastern Panama and northwestern Colombia. Evidently, most of the region is underlain by mafic oceanic crust so that the crustal radiogenic component of heat flow is very small (??? 0.1 ??cal cm-2 sec-1). Low heat-flow values (??? 0.7 ??cal cm-2 sec-1) in northwestern Colombia may reflect thermal transients associated with shallow subduction. The normal values (??? 1) at about 78??W are consistent with the mean heat flow from the western Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico. At 80??W, a fairly high value of 1.8 may define the easterly limit of thermal transients due to Cenozoic volcanic activity in Central America. ?? 1974.

  15. Forced flow heat transfer of supercritical hydrogen for superconductor cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotsu, M.; Shirai, Y.; Tatsumoto, H.; Hata, K.; Kobayashi, H.; Naruo, Y.; Inatani, H.

    2014-01-01

    Heat transfer from inner side of a vertical tube to forced flow of hydrogen was measured at the pressure of 1.5 MPa. The test tubes were made of stainless steel 316L with the inner diameters from 3 mm to 9 mm and lengths from 100 mm to 250 mm. Heat transfer curves were obtained by gradually increasing the heating current to the test tube and raising the surface temperature up to around 200 K. Inlet fluid temperature and flow velocity were varied from 21 to 30 K and 0.5 to 12 m/s, respectively. Effects of inlet temperature, flow velocity and tube dimension were clearly observed. The heat transfer curve for each flow velocity consists of a lower temperature region with a higher gradient and higher temperature region with a lower gradient. The experimental results were compared with the authors' correlation presented formerly. It was confirmed that this correlation can describe the experimental results obtained here.

  16. Oregon Cascades Play Fairway Analysis: Faults and Heat Flow maps

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    This submission includes a fault map of the Oregon Cascades and backarc, a probability map of heat flow, and a fault density probability layer. More extensive metadata can be found within each zip file.

  17. Modeling Io's Heat Flow: Constraints from Galileo PPR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathbun, J. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Tamppari, L. K.

    2000-01-01

    We attempt to improve on previous Io heat flow estimates by using higher resolution data from Galileo Photopolarimeter Radiometer (PPR) and improved thermophysical models of the surface, including finite thermal inertia, the pedestal effect, and disk-resolved radiance.

  18. Enhanced two phase flow in heat transfer systems

    DOEpatents

    Tegrotenhuis, Ward E; Humble, Paul H; Lavender, Curt A; Caldwell, Dustin D

    2013-12-03

    A family of structures and designs for use in devices such as heat exchangers so as to allow for enhanced performance in heat exchangers smaller and lighter weight than other existing devices. These structures provide flow paths for liquid and vapor and are generally open. In some embodiments of the invention, these structures can also provide secondary heat transfer as well. In an evaporate heat exchanger, the inclusion of these structures and devices enhance the heat transfer coefficient of the evaporation phase change process with comparable or lower pressure drop.

  19. Heat flow and near-surface radioactivity in the Australian continental crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Jaeger, J.C.; Munroe, Robert J.

    1976-01-01

    be related to thermal transients associated with Late Tertiary and younger volcanic and tectonic activity, even though the relation between heat-flow values and the age of volcanism is not a simple one. Parts of the high heat-flow area in the southeast might be exploitable for geothermal energy.

  20. Improved Heat-of-Fusion Energy Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K. H.; Manvi, R.

    1982-01-01

    Alkali metal/alkali-halide mixtures proposed for preventing solid buildup during energy recovery. When mixture melts (by absorption of heat of fusion), it forms two immiscible liquids. Salt-rich phase is heavier and has higher melting/recrysallization temperature; so during energy recovery salt crystallizes in this phase first. Since heat exchanger for energy recovery is in lighter metal-rich phase, solids do not form and there is no reduction of heat-recovery efficiency.

  1. Mercurian megaregolith layer and surface heat flows constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egea-Gonzalez, Isabel; Ruiz, Javier

    2013-04-01

    Mercury is covered by a thermally insulating megaregolith layer. Despite the fact that it is known that this poor conducting layer has important influences on surface heat flows, most thermal modeling studies have overlooked it. Mercurian megaregolith is not very well known, but data provided by MESSENGER suggest that mercurian megaregolith is less insulating than its lunar counterpart. This information together with brittle-ductile transition (BDT) depths, estimated from the analysis of fault geometries associated with lobate scarps, allow us to constrain the surface heat flow on Mercury at the time of scarps formation. In this work, we have solved the heat conduction equation in order to constrain surface heat flows. Firstly, we obtain an upper limit in surface heat flows by using published values of the BDT depth and by neglecting the megaregolith layer. Then, we calculate a lower limit by including in the heat equation a top layer with thermal properties representative of the lunar megaregolith. In our calculations we have taken into account volumetric heat production rates obtained from the surface abundances of radioactive elements provided by MESSENGER. Heat equation solutions constrain surface heat flows to a range of 6 - 29 mWm-2. These results suggest the possibility that surface heat flows could be lower than those calculated in previous works, which is in agreement with the small amount of radial contraction detected on Mercury. Furthermore, the procedure followed in this article can be easily applied to other planets and satellites, which will improve our knowledge about the thermal evolution of these bodies.

  2. Heat flow vs. atmospheric greenhouse on early Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanale, F. P.; Postawko, S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers derived a quantitative relationship between the effectiveness of an atmospheric greenhouse and internal heat flow in producing the morphological differences between earlier and later Martian terrains. The derivation is based on relationships previously derived by other researchers. The reasoning may be stated as follows: the CO2 mean residence time in the Martian atmosphere is almost certainly much shorter than the total time span over which early climate differences are thought to have been sustained. Therefore, recycling of previously degassed CO2 quickly becomes more important than the ongoing supply of juvenile CO2. If so, then the atmospheric CO2 pressure, and thereby the surface temperature, may be approximated mathematically as a function of the total degassed CO2 in the atmosphere plus buried material and the ratio of the atmospheric and regolith mean residence times. The latter ratio can also be expressed as a function of heat flow. Hence, it follows that the surface temperature may be expressed as a function of heat flow and the total amount of available CO2. However, the depth to the water table can simultaneously be expressed as a function of heat flow and the surface temperature (the boundary condition). Therefore, for any given values of total available CO2 and regolith conductivity, there exist coupled independent equations which relate heat flow, surface temperature, and the depth to the water table. This means we can now derive simultaneous values of surface temperature and the depth of the water table for any value of the heat flow. The derived relationship is used to evaluate the relative importance of the atmospheric greenhouse effect and the internal regolith thermal gradient in producing morphological changes for any value of the heat flow, and to assess the absolute importance of each of the values of the heat flow which are thought to be reasonable on independent geophysical grounds.

  3. Prediction of heat transfer to a thin liquid film in plane and radially spreading flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Faghri, A.; Hankey, W. L.; Swanson, T. D.

    1990-01-01

    The energy equation is incorporated in the solution algorithm of Rahman et al. (1990) to compute the heat transfer to a thin film in the presence or absence of gravity. For a plane flow under zero gravity, it is found that, for both isothermal and uniformly heated walls, the heat transfer coefficient gradually decreases downstream, with Nu-asterisk (the Nusselt number in terms of film height) remaining approximately constant except for regions very close to the entrance. In the case of radial flow under zero gravity, Nu-asterisk is found to decrease monotonically when the plane is uniformly heated. Two different flow regimes are identified in the presence of gravity for both plane and radial flows. The results of the study may be applicable to the design of space-based cooling systems.

  4. Nitrogen Flow in a Nanonozzle with Heat Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averkin, Sergey; Zhang, Zetian; Gatsonis, Nikolaos

    2012-11-01

    The nitrogen flow in conical nanonozzles at atmospheric pressures are investigated using a three-dimensional unstructured direct simulation Monte Carlo (U3DSMC) method. The DSMC simulations are performed in computational domains that feature the plenum, the nanonozzle region and the external plume expansion region. The inlet and outlet boundaries are modeled by the Kinetic-Moment (KM) boundary conditions method. This methodology is based on the local one dimensional inviscid (LODI) formulation used in compressible (continuous) flow computations. The cross section for elastic collisions is based on the variable hard sphere (VHS) model. The Larsen-Borgnakke (L-B) model is used to simulate the exchange of the internal energy in the collision pair. Solid surfaces are modeled as being either diffuse or specularly reflecting. The effects of Knudsen number, aspect ratio, and nanonozzle scale on the heat transfer are investigating by ranging the throat diameters from 100-500 nm, exit diameter from 100-1000 nm, stagnation pressure from 1-10atm, and wall temperature from 300K-500K. Finite backpressure and vacuum conditions are considered. Macroscopic flow variables are obtained and compared with continuum predictions in order to elucidate the impacts of nanoscale.

  5. New computer program solves wide variety of heat flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almond, J. C.

    1966-01-01

    Boeing Engineering Thermal Analyzer /BETA/ computer program uses numerical methods to provide accurate heat transfer solutions to a wide variety of heat flow problems. The program solves steady-state and transient problems in almost any situation that can be represented by a resistance-capacitance network.

  6. U.S. Energy Flow - 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiper, G V

    2001-03-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has prepared similar flow charts of U.S. energy consumption since 1972. The chart follows the flow of individual fuels and compares these on the basis of a common energy unit of quadrillion British thermal units (Btu). A quadrillion, or ''quad,'' is 10{sup 15}. One Btu is the quantity of heat needed to raise the temperature of 1 pound of water by 1 F at or near 39.2 F. The width of each colored line across this chart is in proportion to the amount of quads conveyed. (Exception: lines showing extremely small amounts have been made wide enough to be clearly visible.) In most cases, the numbers used in this chart have been rounded to the nearest tenth of a quad, although the original data was published in hundredths or thousandths of a quad. As a consequence of independent rounding, some of the summary numbers may not appear to be a precise total of their various components. The first chart in this document uses quadrillion Btu's to conform with data from the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA). However, the second chart is expressed in exajoules. A joule is the metric unit for heat. One Btu equals 1,055.06 joules; and one quadrillion Btu's equals 1.055 exajoules (an exajoule is 10{sup 18} joules).

  7. Changes in the structure and substructure of tungsten during irradiation by hydrogen plasma flows at the specific energy close to the heat loads on the ITER surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garkusha, I. E.; Malykhin, S. V.; Makhlai, V. A.; Pugachev, A. T.; Bazdyrieva, S. V.; Aksenov, N. N.

    2014-11-01

    The changes in the structure, the substructure, and the state of stress in the surface layers of tungsten targets and the cracking processes in them are studied in model experiments on irradiation by a hydrogen plasma in a quasi-stationary plasma accelerator QSPA Kh-50, which adequately reproduces the energy density and the edge localized mode (ELM) time in ITER. The plasma heat load is up to 1 MJ m-2, the pulse duration is 0.25 ms, and the maximum number of irradiating pulses of 150. The development of residual macrostresses from compression to tension is analyzed by X-ray diffraction, and their relation to cracking is shown. Irradiation is found to increase the lattice parameter of tungsten in the undeformable section from a 0 ≈ 0.31642 ± 0.00001 (initial state) to 0.31645 ± 0.00001 nm. The changes in the coherent scattering region and microstrains are estimated. The role of point defects and their complexes in the irradiation-assisted processes is established. A qualitative model is proposed to explain these changes.

  8. Study on the Heat-Flow Controllable Heat Exchanger-3rd report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Osamu; Hamano, Masayoshi; Yanadori, Michio

    The heat-flow controllable heat exchanger for the purpose of heat recovery through the waste hot water at the bathroom and the washing room has been developed. The system is especially available at the house of cold area and the recovery heat is used to warm the suction air conducted from ventilation device. As the result of field test, it is clarified that the heat recovery rate by the system is very large. Also, the exchanger is possible to control the amount of recorery heat. Therefore, it is considered that the exchanger is applicable in the ventilation systems used the waste hot water.

  9. Utilizing thermal isostasy to estimate sub-lithospheric heat flow and anomalous crustal radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasterok, D.; Gard, M.

    2016-09-01

    While surface heat flow relates to the heat loss through the lithosphere, it can be difficult to quantify and separate the heat produced internally through radiogenic decay from the heat transferred across the base of the lithosphere by mantle convection. In this study, we apply a thermo-isostatic analysis to Australia and estimate the sub-lithospheric and radiogenic heat flow components by employing a simple 1-D conservation of energy model. We estimate an anomalous radiogenic heat production across much of eastern Australia generally accounting for >50 mW m-2, while western Australia appears to have high crustal compositionally corrected elevation, possibly related to chemical buoyancy of the mantle lithosphere. A moderately high sub-lithospheric heat flow (∼40 mW m-2) along the eastern and southeastern coast, including Tasmania, is coincident with locations of Cenozoic volcanism and supports an edge-driven convection hypothesis. However, the pattern of sub-lithospheric heat flow along the margin does not support the existence of hotspot tracks. Thermo-isostatic models such as these improve our ability to identify and quantify crustal from mantle sources of heat loss and add valuable constraints on tectonic and geodynamic models of the continental lithosphere's physical state and evolution.

  10. Heat-Energy Analysis for Solar Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    Heat-energy analysis program (HEAP) solves general heat-transfer problems, with some specific features that are "custom made" for analyzing solar receivers. Can be utilized not only to predict receiver performance under varying solar flux, ambient temperature and local heat-transfer rates but also to detect locations of hotspots and metallurgical difficulties and to predict performance sensitivity of neighboring component parameters.

  11. Fluid flow nozzle energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Winn, Tyler; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Colonius, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Power generation schemes that could be used downhole in an oil well to produce about 1 Watt average power with long-life (decades) are actively being developed. A variety of proposed energy harvesting schemes could be used to extract energy from this environment but each of these has their own limitations that limit their practical use. Since vibrating piezoelectric structures are solid state and can be driven below their fatigue limit, harvesters based on these structures are capable of operating for very long lifetimes (decades); thereby, possibly overcoming a principle limitation of existing technology based on rotating turbo-machinery. An initial survey [1] identified that spline nozzle configurations can be used to excite a vibrating piezoelectric structure in such a way as to convert the abundant flow energy into useful amounts of electrical power. This paper presents current flow energy harvesting designs and experimental results of specific spline nozzle/ bimorph design configurations which have generated suitable power per nozzle at or above well production analogous flow rates. Theoretical models for non-dimensional analysis and constitutive electromechanical model are also presented in this paper to optimize the flow harvesting system.

  12. Study on heat transfer of heat exchangers in the Stirling engine - Heat transfer in a heated tube under the periodically reversing flow condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzaka, Mitsuo; Iwabuchi, Makio

    1992-11-01

    Heat transfer characteristics in heated tubes under periodically reversing flow conditions have been experimentally investigated, using a test apparatus that simulates heat exchangers for an actual Stirling engine. It is shown that the heat transfer characteristics under these conditions are greatly affected by the piston phase difference that generates the reversing flow of working fluid, and this phenomenon is peculiar to heat transfer under periodically reversing flow. The experimental correlation for the heat transfer coefficient under these conditions is obtained through the use of the working gas velocity evaluated from the Schmidt cycle model, which is one of the ideal Stirling cycles concerning the influence of the piston phase difference.

  13. Topographically driven groundwater flow and the San Andreas heat flow paradox revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.; Hickman, S.

    2003-01-01

    Evidence for a weak San Andreas Fault includes (1) borehole heat flow measurements that show no evidence for a frictionally generated heat flow anomaly and (2) the inferred orientation of ??1 nearly perpendicular to the fault trace. Interpretations of the stress orientation data remain controversial, at least in close proximity to the fault, leading some researchers to hypothesize that the San Andreas Fault is, in fact, strong and that its thermal signature may be removed or redistributed by topographically driven groundwater flow in areas of rugged topography, such as typify the San Andreas Fault system. To evaluate this scenario, we use a steady state, two-dimensional model of coupled heat and fluid flow within cross sections oriented perpendicular to the fault and to the primary regional topography. Our results show that existing heat flow data near Parkfield, California, do not readily discriminate between the expected thermal signature of a strong fault and that of a weak fault. In contrast, for a wide range of groundwater flow scenarios in the Mojave Desert, models that include frictional heat generation along a strong fault are inconsistent with existing heat flow data, suggesting that the San Andreas Fault at this location is indeed weak. In both areas, comparison of modeling results and heat flow data suggest that advective redistribution of heat is minimal. The robust results for the Mojave region demonstrate that topographically driven groundwater flow, at least in two dimensions, is inadequate to obscure the frictionally generated heat flow anomaly from a strong fault. However, our results do not preclude the possibility of transient advective heat transport associated with earthquakes.

  14. A heat-flow reconnaissance of southeastern Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Lawver, L.A.; Munroe, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Heat flow was measured at nine sites in crystalline and sedimentary rocks of SE Alaska. Seven of the sites, located between 115 and 155 km landward of the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather transform fault, have heat flows significantly higher than the mean in the coastal provinces between Cape Mendocino and the Queen Charlotte Islands, and lower than the mean for 81 values within 100 km of the San Andreas transform fault, even further S. There is no evidence for heat sources that might be associated with late Cainozoic thermal events.-P.Br.

  15. Oscillating flow loss test results in Stirling engine heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, G.; Howell, S.; Wood, G.; Miller, E.; Gedeon, D.

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented for a test program designed to generate a database of oscillating flow loss information that is applicable to Stirling engine heat exchangers. The tests were performed on heater/cooler tubes of various lengths and entrance/exit configurations, on stacked and sintered screen regenerators of various wire diameters and on Brunswick and Metex random fiber regenerators. The test results were performed over a range of oscillating flow parameters consistent with Stirling engine heat exchanger experience. The tests were performed on the Sunpower oscillating flow loss rig which is based on a variable stroke and variable frequency linear drive motor. In general, the results are presented by comparing the measured oscillating flow losses to the calculated flow losses. The calculated losses are based on the cycle integration of steady flow friction factors and entrance/exit loss coefficients.

  16. Effect on the flow and heat transfer characteristics for sinusoidal pulsating laminar flow in a heated square cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiu-Yang; Lin, Wei; Zheng, Xiao-Tao

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulation is performed to understand the effect of flow pulsation on the flow and heat transfer from a heated square cylinder at Re = 100. Numerical calculations are carried out by using a finite volume method based on the pressure-implicit with splitting of operators algorithm in a collocated grid. The effects of flow pulsation amplitude (0.2 ≤ A ≤ 0.8) and frequency (0 ≤ f p ≤ 20 Hz) on the detailed kinematics of flow (streamlines, vorticity patterns), the macroscopic parameters (drag coefficient, vortex shedding frequency) and heat transfer enhancement are presented in detail. The Strouhal number of vortices shedding, drag coefficient for non-pulsating flow are compared with the previously published data, and good agreement is found. The lock-on phenomenon is observed for a square cylinder in the present flow pulsation. When the pulsating frequency is within the lock-on regime, time averaged drag coefficient and heat transfer from the square cylinder is substantially augmented, and when the pulsating frequency in about the natural vortex shedding frequency, the heat transfer is also substantially enhanced. In addition, the influence of the pulsating amplitude on the time averaged drag coefficient, heat transfer enhancement and lock-on occurrence is discussed in detail.

  17. Heat flow map of the western Mediterranean basins

    SciTech Connect

    Foucher, J.P.; Burrus, J.; Vedova, B.D.

    1988-08-01

    More than 400 terrestrial heat flow determinations have been carried our in the western Mediterranean basins. These include results of detailed surveys in the Ligurian Sea and in the Gulf of Lions and Tyrrhenian basins, as well as sparse measurements in the Gulf of Valencia and the Algerian basin. Most of the measurements are surficial, obtained from the temperatures sensed by outrigged thermistors mounted on weight-driven probes penetrating the sediment to 3 to 10 m. Thermal conductivity was measured either on cores or in situ. The authors present a heat flow map of the western Mediterranean basins based on the available geothermal results. Mean regional heat flow values range from 55 to 105 mW m/sup /minus/2/ in the Lugiran and Gulf of Lions basin and from 50 to 200 m mW m/sup /minus/2/ in the Tyrrhenian Sea. In the latter basin, high heat flow characterizes areas of recent intensive thinning of the continental crust and associated incipient oceanic crust formation. In the former basins, heat flow tends to increase from the Provencal coast of France to the Corsican and Sardinian margins, which may reflect on increasing heat contribution from the mantle.

  18. The Energy Impacts of Solar Heating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whipple, Chris

    1980-01-01

    The energy required to build and install solar space- and water-heating equipment is compared to the energy saved under two solar growth paths corresponding to high and low rates of solar technology implementation. (Author/RE)

  19. The energy impacts of solar heating.

    PubMed

    Whipple, C

    1980-04-18

    The energy required to build and install solar space- and water-heating equipment is compared to the energy it saves under two solar growth paths corresponding to high and low rates of implementation projected by the Domestic Policy Review of Solar Energy. For the rapid growth case, the cumulative energy invested to the year 2000 is calculated to be (1/2) to 1(1/2) times the amount saved. An impact of rapid solar heating implementation is to shift energy demand from premium heating fuels (natural gas and oil) to coal and nuclear power use in the industries that provide materials for solar equipment. PMID:17820033

  20. Numerical simulation of transitional flows with heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kožíšek, Martin; Příhoda, Jaromír; Fürst, Jiří; Straka, Petr

    2016-06-01

    The contribution deals with simulation of internal flows with the laminar/turbulent transition and heat transfer. The numerical modeling of incompressible flow on a heated flat plate was carried out partly by the k-kL-ω model of Walters and Cokljat [1] and partly by the algebraic transition model of Straka and Příhoda [2] connected with the EARSM turbulence model of Hellsten [3]. Transition models were tested by means of the skin friction and the Stanton number distribution. Used models of turbulent heat transfer were compared with the simplest model based on the constant turbulent Prandtl number. The k-kL-ω model is applied for the simulation of compressible flow through the VKI turbine blade cascade with heat transfer.

  1. High Energy Antimatter Telescope (HEAT) Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    This grant supported our work on the High Energy Antimatter Telescope(HEAT) balloon experiment. The HEAT payload is designed to perform a series of experiments focusing on the cosmic ray positron, electron, and antiprotons. Thus far two flights of the HEAT -e+/- configuration have taken place. During the period of this grant major accomplishments included the following: (1) Publication of the first results of the 1994 HEAT-e+/- flight in Physical Review Letters; (2) Successful reflight of the HEAT-e+/- payload from Lynn Lake in August 1995; (3) Repair and refurbishment of the elements of the HEAT payload damaged during the landing following the 1995 flight; and (4) Upgrade of the ground support equipment for future flights of the HEAT payload.

  2. Lunar heat flow: Regional prospective of the Apollo landing sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegler, M. A.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2014-01-01

    reexamine the Apollo Heat Flow Experiment in light of new orbital data. Using three-dimensional thermal conduction models, we examine effects of crustal thickness, density, and radiogenic abundance on measured heat flow values at the Apollo 15 and 17 sites. These models show the importance of regional context on heat flux measurements. We find that measured heat flux can be greatly altered by deep subsurface radiogenic content and crustal density. However, total crustal thickness and the presence of a near-surface radiogenic-rich ejecta provide less leverage, representing only minor (<1.5 mW m-2) perturbations on surface heat flux. Using models of the crust implied by Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory results, we found that a roughly 9-13 mW m-2 mantle heat flux best approximate the observed heat flux. This equates to a total mantle heat production of 2.8-4.1 × 1011 W. These heat flow values could imply that the lunar interior is slightly less radiogenic than the Earth's mantle, perhaps implying that a considerable fraction of terrestrial mantle material was incorporated at the time of formation. These results may also imply that heat flux at the crust-mantle boundary beneath the Procellarum potassium, rare earth element, and phosphorus (KREEP) Terrane (PKT) is anomalously elevated compared to the rest of the Moon. These results also suggest that a limited KREEP-rich layer exists beneath the PKT crust. If a subcrustal KREEP-rich layer extends below the Apollo 17 landing site, required mantle heat flux can drop to roughly 7 mW m-2, underlining the need for future heat flux measurements outside of the radiogenic-rich PKT region.

  3. A survey of oscillating flow in Stirling engine heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Terrence W.; Seume, Jorge R.

    1988-01-01

    Similarity parameters for characterizing the effect of flow oscillation on wall shear stress, viscous dissipation, pressure drop and heat transfer rates are proposed. They are based on physical agruments and are derived by normalizing the governing equations. The literature on oscillating duct flows, regenerator and porous media flows is surveyed. The operating characteristics of the heat exchanger of eleven Stirling engines are discribed in terms of the similarity parameters. Previous experimental and analytical results are discussed in terms of these parameters and used to estimate the nature of the oscillating flow under engine operating conditions. The operating points for many of the modern Stirling engines are in or near the laminar to turbulent transition region. In several engines, working fluid does not pass entirely through heat exchangers during a cycle. Questions that need to be addressed by further research are identified.

  4. Fundamental Study for the Solution of Thermoacoustic Phenomenon Using Numerical Calculation: Relationship between the Stack Installation Position and Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Kentaro; Sakamoto, Shin-ichi; Shibata, Kenji; Nakano, Yosuke; Tsuchiya, Takao; Watanabe, Yoshiaki

    2012-07-01

    Thermoacoustic systems have several advantages owing to their simple structure driven by heat energy such as waste heat and solar heat. However, because their energy conversion efficiency is low, they have not been developed for practical use. Therefore, to improve energy conversion efficiency, a method of system design development is examined in this report using numerical calculations. First, calculation results obtained using the transfer-matrix methods are compared with experimentally obtained results, which confirms their good agreement. Secondly, calculated results of each heat flow element in the stack show that heat flow proportional to the temperature gradient QD, which decreases the performance of the system, is dominant. Finally, the installation position of the stack is changed to reduce the ratio that QD occupies in the heat flow. Results show a decrease in the ratio obtained by moving the stack installation position closer to the center of the tube. Energy conversion efficiency was increased eight times.

  5. Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Two-Phase Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Saito, Yuji; Katsumata, Yoshikazu

    A two-phase loop thermosyphon transports thermal energy by natural convective circulation without any external power supply. Therefore, it has been paid attention as a heat transfer equipment for saving energy. A basic investigation of flow and heat transfer characteristics in the thermosyphon was performed both experimentally and theoretically. The circulation flow rate, pressure and temperature distributions along the loop, and heat transfer coefficients in the heated section were measured using water, ethanol and Freon 113 as the working liquids. And, the effects of the heat input and liquid physical properties on the flow and heat transfer characteristics were examined. In the theoretical study, the circulation flow rate was calculated from the force balance between the driving force arising from density differences and the pressure drop in the loop. The comparison of the calculated with experimental results was made concerning the circulation flow rate and pressure and temperature distributions. For water and ethanol, the comparison presented the considerably close agreement. But, for Freon 113, the agreement was insufficient and further detailed investigation is needed.

  6. Heat flow anomalies in oil- and gas-bearing structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sergiyenko, S.I.

    1988-02-01

    The main features of the distribution of heat flow values in oil, gas and gas-condensate fields on the continents have been discussed by Makarenko and Sergiyenko. The method of analysis used made it possible to establish that the presence of hydrocarbons in formations leads to high heat-flow, regardless of the age of folding of the potentially oil- and gas-bearing zones. Only in regions adjacent to marginal Cenozoic folded mountain structures and in zones of Cenozoic volcanism is the world average higher, by 2.5 to 10%, than in the oil- and gas-bearing structures in those regions. The earlier analysis of the distribution of heat flow values in oil and gas structures was based on 403 measurements. The author now has nearly doubled the sample population, enabling him substantially to revise the ideas on the distribution of heat flow values and the development of the thermal regime of local oil and gas structures. He notes that the method previously used, comparing heat flow values on young continental platforms with values in local oil and gas structures, makes it possible to estimate the thermal effect of the presence of oil and gas. This conclusion stems from the fact that the overwhelming majority of heat flow measurements were made on various kinds of positive structural forms, and distortions of the thermal field caused by thermal anisotropy phenomena are equally characteristic of both productive and nonproductive structures. As a result, for the first time a continuous time series of heat flow measurements over oil and gas structures in various tectonic regions, with ages of consolidation ranging from the Precambrian to the Cenozoic, was established. 26 references.

  7. Relations between heat flow, topography and Moho depth for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin; Majorowicz, Jacek; Grad, Marek

    2013-04-01

    The relation between heat flow, topography and Moho depth for recent maps of Europe is presented. New heat flow map of Europe (Majorowicz and Wybraniec, 2010) is based on updated database of uncorrected heat flow values to which paleoclimatic correction is applied across the continental Europe. Correction is depth dependent due to a diffusive thermal transfer of the surface temperature forcing of which glacial-interglacial history has the largest impact. This explains some very low uncorrected heat flow values 20-30 mW/m2 in the shields, shallow basin areas of the cratons, and in other areas including orogenic belts were heat flow was likely underestimated. New integrated map of the European Moho depth (Grad et al., 2009) is the first high resolution digital map for European plate understand as an area from Ural Mountains in the east to mid-Atlantic ridge in the west, and Mediterranean Sea in the south to Spitsbergen and Barents Sea in Arctic in the north. For correlation we used: onshore heat flow density data with palaeoclimatic correction (5318 locations), topography map (30 x 30 arc seconds; Danielson and Gesch, 2011) and Moho map (longitude, latitude and Moho depth, each 0.1 degree). Analysis was done in areas where data from all three datasets were available. Continental Europe area could be divided into two large domains related with Precambrian East European craton and Palaeozoic Platform. Next two smaller areas correspond to Scandinavian Caledonides and Anatolia. Presented results show different correlations between Moho depth, elevation and heat flow for all discussed regions. For each region more detailed analysis of these relation in different elevation ranges is presented. In general it is observed that Moho depth is more significant to HF then elevation. Depending on region and elevation range HF value in mW/m2 is up to two times larger than Moho depth in km, while HF relation to elevation varies much more.

  8. Flow and heat transfer of petal shaped double tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakouchi, Toshihiko; Kawashima, Yuki; Tsujimoto, Koichi; Ando, Toshitake

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the flow and heat transfer characteristics of petal-shaped double tube with 6 petals are examined experimentally for a compact heat exchanger. As results, the heat transfer rate, Q, of the 6 petal shaped double tube (6-p tube) is much larger than that, Qp, of conventional circular double tube in all Reynolds number Rein,h (where, the reference length is hydraulic diameter) ranges. For example, at Rein,h =(0.5~1.0)× 104 it is about 4 times of Qp. The heat transfer enhancement of 6-p tube is by the increase of heat transfer area, wetting perimeter, and a highly fluctuating flow, and Q of the 6-p tube can be expressed by Q [kW/m] = 0.54Rein,h + 2245.

  9. Instability of flow of liquid film over a heated surface

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, W.T.; Soo, S.L.

    1994-08-01

    Fundamental concepts and basic equations of a flowing thin liquid film cooling a heated surfaced by its vaporization and the effect of dry patches were treated. Stable film flow prior to the appearance of dry patches on the heated surface is maintained by a balance of various forces due to surface tension, shear stress, heat and mass transfer, and gravity. Film splitting at a critical film thickness produces dry patches due to perturbation by waves on a perfect surface, and often by surface imperfection and uneven heating. This work is primarily motivated by the design of next-generation nuclear reactors, which employ many novel passive heat-removal systems via natural circulation. These systems are design to prevent damage to the reactor core and containment without action by the reactor operators during or after a design basis accident such as a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) or a main steam-line break (MSLB) accident.

  10. A novel compact heat exchanger using gap flow mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, J. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, D. Z.; Luo, T. P.; Ren, T. Q.

    2015-02-01

    A novel, compact gap-flow heat exchanger (GFHE) using heat-transfer fluid (HTF) was developed in this paper. The detail design of the GFHE coaxial structure which forms the annular gap passage for HTF is presented. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were introduced into the design to determine the impacts of the gap width and the HTF flow rate on the GFHE performance. A comparative study on the GFHE heating rate, with the gap widths ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 mm and the HTF flow rates ranged from 100 to 500 ml/min, was carried out. Results show that a narrower gap passage and a higher HTF flow rate can yield a higher average heating rate in GFHE. However, considering the compromise between the GFHE heating rate and the HTF pressure drop along the gap, a 0.4 mm gap width is preferred. A testing loop was also set up to experimentally evaluate the GFHE capability. The testing results show that, by using 0.4 mm gap width and 500 ml/min HTF flow rate, the maximum heating rate in the working chamber of the as-made GFHE can reach 18 °C/min, and the average temperature change rates in the heating and cooling processes of the thermal cycle test were recorded as 6.5 and 5.4 °C/min, respectively. These temperature change rates can well satisfy the standard of IEC 60068-2-14:2009 and show that the GFHE developed in this work has sufficient heat exchange capacity and can be used as an ideal compact heat exchanger in small volume desktop thermal fatigue test apparatus.