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Sample records for heat generates oxidized

  1. Corner heating in rectangular solid oxide electrochemical cell generators

    DOEpatents

    Reichner, Philip

    1989-01-01

    Disclosed is an improvement in a solid oxide electrochemical cell generator 1 having a rectangular design with four sides that meet at corners, and containing multiplicity of electrically connected fuel cells 11, where a fuel gas is passed over one side of said cells and an oxygen containing gas is passed into said cells, and said fuel is burned to form heat, electricity, and an exhaust gas. The improvement comprises passing the exhaust gases over the multiplicity of cells 11 in such a way that more of the heat in said exhaust gases flows at the corners of the generator, such as through channels 19.

  2. HEAT GENERATION

    DOEpatents

    Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

    1963-12-01

    Heat is generated by the utilization of high energy neutrons produced as by nuclear reactions between hydrogen isotopes in a blanket zone containing lithium, a neutron moderator, and uranium and/or thorium effective to achieve multtplicatton of the high energy neutron. The rnultiplied and moderated neutrons produced react further with lithium-6 to produce tritium in the blanket. Thermal neutron fissionable materials are also produced and consumed in situ in the blanket zone. The heat produced by the aggregate of the various nuclear reactions is then withdrawn from the blanket zone to be used or otherwise disposed externally. (AEC)

  3. Nanostructured oxide materials and modules for high-temperature power generation from waste heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo Van, Nong; Pryds, Nini

    2013-06-01

    A large amount of thermal energy emitted from many industrial processes is available as waste heat. Thermoelectric (TE) power generators that convert heat directly into electricity can offer a very promising means of waste heat recovery. However, the requirements for this task place in the materials are not easily satisfied by conventional TE materials. Not only must they possess a sufficient TE performance, but they should also be stable at high temperatures, nontoxic and have low-cost comprising elements, and must be also able to be processed and shaped cheaply. Oxides are among the strongest candidate materials for this purpose. In this review, the progress in the development of two representative p- and n-type novel oxide materials based on Ca3Co4O9 and doped-ZnO is presented. TE modules built up from these oxides were fabricated, tested at high temperatures, and compared with other similar oxide modules reported in the literature. A maximum power density of 45.3 mW cm-2 was obtained for an oxide module comprising eight p-n couples at a temperature difference of 496 K, an encouraging result in the context of the present high-temperature oxide modules. Invited talk at the 6th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology IWAMSN2012, 30 October-2 November, 2012, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  4. The effect of coating on heat generation properties of Iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yuan

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted more and more attention for their potential application as heating agents in cancer hyperthermia. The effectiveness of cancer hyperthermia can be increased by using particles that have a higher heat generation rate, quantified by specific absorption rate (SAR), at a smaller applied field. In order to optimize the functionality of nanoparticles as heating agents, it is essential to have a comprehensive understanding of factors that may influence SAR including coating and aggregation. In all biomedical applications, the magnetic particles are coated with surfactants and polymers to enhance biocompatibility, prevent agglomeration and add functionality. Coatings may profoundly influence particles' clustering behavior and magnetic properties. Yet its effect on the heat generation rate of the nanoparticles has been scarcely investigated. In this context, a systematic investigation was carried out in this dissertation in order to understand the impact of the surface coating of magnetic nanoparticles on their heat generation rate. The study also includes investigation of normal nerve cell viability in presence of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles with and without exposure to magnetic heating. Commercially available suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles with a diameter of approximately 10 nm and different coatings relevant to biomedical applications such as aminosilane, carboxymethyl-dextran, protein A, biotin were extensively characterized. First of all, magnetic phase reduction of magnetite nanoparticles was examined by studying the discrepancy between the volume fraction of magnetic phase calculated from magnetization curve and the magnetic core concentration obtained from Tiron chelation test. The findings indicated that coatings might interact with the surface atoms of the magnetic core and form a magnetically disordered layer reducing the total amount of the magnetic phase. Secondly, the impact of coating and aggregation

  5. The effect of coating on heat generation properties of Iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yuan

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted more and more attention for their potential application as heating agents in cancer hyperthermia. The effectiveness of cancer hyperthermia can be increased by using particles that have a higher heat generation rate, quantified by specific absorption rate (SAR), at a smaller applied field. In order to optimize the functionality of nanoparticles as heating agents, it is essential to have a comprehensive understanding of factors that may influence SAR including coating and aggregation. In all biomedical applications, the magnetic particles are coated with surfactants and polymers to enhance biocompatibility, prevent agglomeration and add functionality. Coatings may profoundly influence particles' clustering behavior and magnetic properties. Yet its effect on the heat generation rate of the nanoparticles has been scarcely investigated. In this context, a systematic investigation was carried out in this dissertation in order to understand the impact of the surface coating of magnetic nanoparticles on their heat generation rate. The study also includes investigation of normal nerve cell viability in presence of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles with and without exposure to magnetic heating. Commercially available suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles with a diameter of approximately 10 nm and different coatings relevant to biomedical applications such as aminosilane, carboxymethyl-dextran, protein A, biotin were extensively characterized. First of all, magnetic phase reduction of magnetite nanoparticles was examined by studying the discrepancy between the volume fraction of magnetic phase calculated from magnetization curve and the magnetic core concentration obtained from Tiron chelation test. The findings indicated that coatings might interact with the surface atoms of the magnetic core and form a magnetically disordered layer reducing the total amount of the magnetic phase. Secondly, the impact of coating and aggregation

  6. Impact of magnetic field parameters and iron oxide nanoparticle properties on heat generation for use in magnetic hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Rhythm R.; Davis, Todd P.; Glover, Amanda L.; Nikles, David E.; Brazel, Christopher S.

    2015-08-01

    Heating of nanoparticles (NPs) using an AC magnetic field depends on several factors, and optimization of these parameters can improve the efficiency of heat generation for effective cancer therapy while administering a low NP treatment dose. This study investigated magnetic field strength and frequency, NP size, NP concentration, and solution viscosity as important parameters that impact the heating efficiency of iron oxide NPs with magnetite (Fe3O4) and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) crystal structures. Heating efficiencies were determined for each experimental setting, with specific absorption rates (SARs) ranging from 3.7 to 325.9 W/g Fe. Magnetic heating was conducted on iron oxide NPs synthesized in our laboratories (with average core sizes of 8, 11, 13, and 18 nm), as well as commercially-available iron oxides (with average core sizes of 8, 9, and 16 nm). The experimental magnetic coil system made it possible to isolate the effect of magnetic field parameters and independently study the effect on heat generation. The highest SAR values were found for the 18 nm synthesized particles and the maghemite nanopowder. Magnetic field strengths were applied in the range of 15.1-47.7 kA/m, with field frequencies ranging from 123 to 430 kHz. The best heating was observed for the highest field strengths and frequencies tested, with results following trends predicted by the Rosensweig equation. An increase in solution viscosity led to lower heating rates in nanoparticle solutions, which can have significant implications for the application of magnetic fluid hyperthermia in vivo.

  7. Impact of magnetic field parameters and iron oxide nanoparticle properties on heat generation for use in magnetic hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rhythm R.; Davis, Todd P.; Glover, Amanda L.; Nikles, David E.; Brazel, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Heating of nanoparticles (NPs) using an AC magnetic field depends on several factors, and optimization of these parameters can improve the efficiency of heat generation for effective cancer therapy while administering a low NP treatment dose. This study investigated magnetic field strength and frequency, NP size, NP concentration, and solution viscosity as important parameters that impact the heating efficiency of iron oxide NPs with magnetite (Fe3O4) and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) crystal structures. Heating efficiencies were determined for each experimental setting, with specific absorption rates (SARs) ranging from 3.7 to 325.9 W/g Fe. Magnetic heating was conducted on iron oxide NPs synthesized in our laboratories (with average core sizes of 8, 11, 13, and 18 nm), as well as commercially-available iron oxides (with average core sizes of 8, 9, and 16 nm). The experimental magnetic coil system made it possible to isolate the effect of magnetic field parameters and independently study the effect on heat generation. The highest SAR values were found for the 18 nm synthesized particles and the maghemite nanopowder. Magnetic field strengths were applied in the range of 15.1 to 47.7 kA/m, with field frequencies ranging from 123 to 430 kHz. The best heating was observed for the highest field strengths and frequencies tested, with results following trends predicted by the Rosensweig equation. An increase in solution viscosity led to lower heating rates in nanoparticle solutions, which can have significant implications for the application of magnetic fluid hyperthermia in vivo. PMID:25960599

  8. Combined solid oxide fuel cell and gas turbine systems for efficient power and heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palsson, Jens; Selimovic, Azra; Sjunnesson, Lars

    The Department of Heat and Power Engineering at Lund University in Sweden has been conducting theoretical studies of combined SOFC and gas turbine (SOFC/GT) cycles. The overall goal is an unbiased evaluation of performance prospects and operational behaviour of such systems. The project is part of a Swedish national program on high-temperature fuel cells. Results of continuous studies started earlier by authors are presented. Recent developments in modelling techniques has resulted in a more accurate fuel cell model giving an advantage over previous system studies based on simplified SOFC models. The fuel cell model has been improved by detailed representation of resistive cell losses, reaction kinetics for the reforming reaction and heat conduction through the solid part of the cell. This SOFC model has further been confirmed against the literature and integrated into simulation software, Aspen Plus™. Recent calculations have focused on a system with external pre-reforming and anode gas recirculation for the internal supply of steam. A reference system, sized at 500 kW, has also been analyzed in variants with gas turbine reheat and air compression intercooling. In addition, knowledge of stack and system behaviour has been gained from sensitivity studies. It is shown that the pressure ratio has a large impact on performance and that electrical efficiencies of more than 65% are possible at low pressure ratios.

  9. Aerodynamic heated steam generating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.

    1986-08-12

    An aerodynamic heated steam generating apparatus is described which consists of: an aerodynamic heat immersion coil steam generator adapted to be located on the leading edge of an airframe of a hypersonic aircraft and being responsive to aerodynamic heating of water by a compression shock airstream to produce steam pressure; an expansion shock air-cooled condensor adapted to be located in the airframe rearward of and operatively coupled to the aerodynamic heat immersion coil steam generator to receive and condense the steam pressure; and an aerodynamic heated steam injector manifold adapted to distribute heated steam into the airstream flowing through an exterior generating channel of an air-breathing, ducted power plant.

  10. Learning from Nature to Improve the Heat Generation of Iron-Oxide Nanoparticles for Magnetic Hyperthermia Applications

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Boubeta, Carlos; Simeonidis, Konstantinos; Makridis, Antonios; Angelakeris, Makis; Iglesias, Oscar; Guardia, Pablo; Cabot, Andreu; Yedra, Lluis; Estradé, Sonia; Peiró, Francesca; Saghi, Zineb; Midgley, Paul A.; Conde-Leborán, Iván; Serantes, David; Baldomir, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The performance of magnetic nanoparticles is intimately entwined with their structure, mean size and magnetic anisotropy. Besides, ensembles offer a unique way of engineering the magnetic response by modifying the strength of the dipolar interactions between particles. Here we report on an experimental and theoretical analysis of magnetic hyperthermia, a rapidly developing technique in medical research and oncology. Experimentally, we demonstrate that single-domain cubic iron oxide particles resembling bacterial magnetosomes have superior magnetic heating efficiency compared to spherical particles of similar sizes. Monte Carlo simulations at the atomic level corroborate the larger anisotropy of the cubic particles in comparison with the spherical ones, thus evidencing the beneficial role of surface anisotropy in the improved heating power. Moreover we establish a quantitative link between the particle assembling, the interactions and the heating properties. This knowledge opens new perspectives for improved hyperthermia, an alternative to conventional cancer therapies. PMID:23576006

  11. Learning from Nature to Improve the Heat Generation of Iron-Oxide Nanoparticles for Magnetic Hyperthermia Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Boubeta, Carlos; Simeonidis, Konstantinos; Makridis, Antonios; Angelakeris, Makis; Iglesias, Oscar; Guardia, Pablo; Cabot, Andreu; Yedra, Lluis; Estradé, Sonia; Peiró, Francesca; Saghi, Zineb; Midgley, Paul A.; Conde-Leborán, Iván; Serantes, David; Baldomir, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    The performance of magnetic nanoparticles is intimately entwined with their structure, mean size and magnetic anisotropy. Besides, ensembles offer a unique way of engineering the magnetic response by modifying the strength of the dipolar interactions between particles. Here we report on an experimental and theoretical analysis of magnetic hyperthermia, a rapidly developing technique in medical research and oncology. Experimentally, we demonstrate that single-domain cubic iron oxide particles resembling bacterial magnetosomes have superior magnetic heating efficiency compared to spherical particles of similar sizes. Monte Carlo simulations at the atomic level corroborate the larger anisotropy of the cubic particles in comparison with the spherical ones, thus evidencing the beneficial role of surface anisotropy in the improved heating power. Moreover we establish a quantitative link between the particle assembling, the interactions and the heating properties. This knowledge opens new perspectives for improved hyperthermia, an alternative to conventional cancer therapies.

  12. Micro thrust and heat generator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, E.J.

    1998-11-17

    A micro thrust and heat generator have a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator`s ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachining techniques (LIGA). 30 figs.

  13. Micro thrust and heat generator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    1998-01-01

    A micro thrust and heat generator has a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator's ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachining techniques (LIGA).

  14. Micro thrust and heat generator

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    The present invention relates generally to micromachines such as microengines or micromotors. More specifically, the invention is directed to a micro rocket which functions as a source of heat and thrust, and utilizes chemical energy to drive or power micromechanical apparatuses. The invention is adaptable to applications involving defense, bio-medical, manufacturing, consumer product, aviation, automotive, computer, inspection, and safety systems. A micro thrust and heat generator has a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator`s ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachine techniques (LIGA).

  15. Heat operated cryogenic electrical generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Saffren, M. M.; Elleman, D. D. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An electrical generator useful for providing electrical power in deep space, is disclosed. The electrical generator utilizes the unusual hydrodynamic property exhibited by liquid helium as it is converted to and from a superfluid state to cause opposite directions of rotary motion for a rotor cell thereof. The physical motion of the rotor cell was employed to move a magnetic field provided by a charged superconductive coil mounted on the exterior of the cell. An electrical conductor was placed in surrounding proximity to the cell to interact with the moving magnetic field provided by the superconductive coil and thereby generate electrical energy. A heat control arrangement was provided for the purpose of causing the liquid helium to be partially converted to and from a superfluid state by being cooled and heated, respectively.

  16. Heat generation in aircraft tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, S. K.; Dodge, R. N.

    1985-01-01

    A method was developed for calculating the internal temperature distribution in an aircraft tire while free rolling under load. The method uses an approximate stress analysis of each point in the tire as it rolls through the contact patch, and from this stress change the mechanical work done on each volume element may be obtained and converted into a heat release rate through a knowledge of material characteristics. The tire cross-section is then considered as a body with internal heat generation, and the diffusion equation is solved numerically with appropriate boundary conditions of the wheel and runway surface. Comparison with data obtained with buried thermocouples in tires shows good agreement.

  17. Generator configuration for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Reichner, Philip

    1989-01-01

    Disclosed are improvements in a solid oxide fuel cell generator 1 having a multiplicity of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells 2, where a fuel gas is passed over one side of said cells and an oxygen-containing gas is passed over the other side of said cells resulting in the generation of heat and electricity. The improvements comprise arranging the cells in the configuration of a circle, a spiral, or folded rows within a cylindrical generator, and modifying the flow rate, oxygen concentration, and/or temperature of the oxygen-containing gases that flow to those cells that are at the periphery of the generator relative to those cells that are at the center of the generator. In these ways, a more uniform temperature is obtained throughout the generator.

  18. Helicity Generation by Heat Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    1996-11-01

    In a large laboratory plasma (ne ~= 10^12 cm-3, k Te ~= 2 eV, B0 ~= 30 G, 1 m ⊥ B_0, 2.5 m allel B_0), the electrons are heated locally by a short intense current pulse (100 A, 0.2 μs) using a magnetic loop antenna or a biased electrode. The heat transport along the field establishes a flux tube with strong radial and weak axial temperature gradients. The time scale of temperature relaxation (Δ t ~= 50 μs) is much longer than that of the transient whistler wave pulse excited by the initial current pulse (Δ t < 2 μs). The temperature gradients drive linked field-aligned and diamagnetic currents which, due to their linkage, exhibit helicity and form a flux rope with J × B ~= 0.(R. L. Stenzel and J. M. Urrutia, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76), 1469 (1996). Alternatively, the helicity generation can be understood by the twisting of magnetic field lines which, in the parameter regime of electron MHD, are frozen into the electron fluid. The electron heating at one end of the flux tube causes a nonuniform diamagnetic rotation, hence the helicity. The heat transport by helical convection and conduction is investigated. The slowly time-varying magnetic field may excite Alfvénic perturbations.

  19. Disperse generation; use waste heat

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Utility manager and American Public Power Association (APPA) president William H. Corkran, Jr. answers questions about the Easton (Maryland) Utilities Commission, which currently has a capacity nearly double its peak load. Power sales through interconnections are made by day, and low-cost purchases are made by night from a variety of widespread sources using different fuels. Easton's fuel mix and conservation strategy is aimed at oil substitution and efficiency measures, such as waste-heat recovery from diesel engines. Wind, photovoltaics, solar water heating, cogeneration, and small nuclear units are also under study. Although he anticipates an OPEC move to discourage new technologies, dispersed technologies will still offer more potential for efficient and secure power generation and transmission. Utilities, he feels, should lead the decentralization more rather than resist it in order to expand their service capability into cable television. The APPA can help by motivating young people to pursue these opportunities. (DCK)

  20. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Draper, Robert; George, Raymond A.; Shockling, Larry A.

    1993-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a pair of spaced apart tubesheets in a housing. At least two intermediate barrier walls are between the tubesheets and define a generator chamber between two intermediate buffer chambers. An array of fuel cells have tubes with open ends engaging the tubesheets. Tubular, axially elongated electrochemical cells are supported on the tubes in the generator chamber. Fuel gas and oxidant gas are preheated in the intermediate chambers by the gases flowing on the other side of the tubes. Gas leakage around the tubes through the tubesheets is permitted. The buffer chambers reentrain the leaked fuel gas for reintroduction to the generator chamber.

  1. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Draper, R.; George, R.A.; Shockling, L.A.

    1993-04-06

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a pair of spaced apart tubesheets in a housing. At least two intermediate barrier walls are between the tubesheets and define a generator chamber between two intermediate buffer chambers. An array of fuel cells have tubes with open ends engaging the tubesheets. Tubular, axially elongated electrochemical cells are supported on the tubes in the generator chamber. Fuel gas and oxidant gas are preheated in the intermediate chambers by the gases flowing on the other side of the tubes. Gas leakage around the tubes through the tubesheets is permitted. The buffer chambers reentrain the leaked fuel gas for reintroduction to the generator chamber.

  2. Role of radiogenic heat generation in surface heat flow formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutorskoi, M. D.; Polyak, B. G.

    2016-03-01

    Heat generation due to decay of long-lived radioactive isotopes is considered in the Earth's crust of the Archean-Proterozoic and Paleozoic provinces of Eurasia and North America. The heat flow that forms in the mantle is calculated as the difference between the heat flow observed at the boundary of the solid Earth and radiogenic heat flow produced in the crust. The heat regime in regions with anomalously high radiogenic heat generation is discussed. The relationship between various heat flow components in the Precambrian and Phanerozoic provinces has been comparatively analyzed, and the role of erosion of the surfaceheat- generating layer has been estimated.

  3. Effect of Microwave Heating on Phytosterol Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Leal-Castañeda, Everth Jimena; Inchingolo, Raffaella; Cardenia, Vladimiro; Hernandez-Becerra, Josafat Alberto; Romani, Santina; Rodriguez-Estrada, María Teresa; Galindo, Hugo Sergio García

    2015-06-10

    The oxidative stability of phytosterols during microwave heating was evaluated. Two different model systems (a solid film made with a phytosterol mixture (PSF) and a liquid mixture of phytosterols and triolein (1:100, PS + TAG (triacylglycerol))) were heated for 1.5, 3, 6, 12, 20, and 30 min at 1000 W. PS degraded faster when they were microwaved alone than in the presence of TAG, following a first-order kinetic model. Up to 6 min, no phytosterol oxidation products (POPs) were generated in both systems. At 12 min of heating, the POP content reached a higher level in PSF (90.96 μg/mg of phytosterols) than in PS + TAG (22.66 μg/mg of phytosterols), but after 30 min of treatment, the opposite trend was observed. 7-Keto derivates were the most abundant POPs in both systems. The extent of phytosterol degradation depends on both the heating time and the surrounding medium, which can impact the quality and safety of the food product destined to microwave heating/cooking. PMID:25973984

  4. Oxidizer heat exchanger component test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanic, P. G.

    1988-01-01

    The RL10-IIB engine, is capable of multimode thrust operation. The engine operates at two low-thrust levels: tank head idle (THI), approximately 1 to 2 percent of full thrust; and pumped idle, 10 percent of full thrust. Operation at THI provides vehicle propellant settling thrust and efficient thermal conditioning; PI operation provides vehicle tank prepressurization and maneuver thrust for low-g deployment. Stable combustion of the RL10-IIB engine during the low-thrust operating modes can be accomplished by using a heat exchanger to supply gaseous oxygen to the propellant injector. The oxidized heat exchanger (OHE) vaporizes the liquid oxygen using hydrogen as the energy source. This report summarizes the test activity and post-test data analysis for two possible heat exchangers, each of which employs a completely different design philosophy. One design makes use of a low-heat transfer (PHT) approach in combination with a volume to attenuate pressure and flow oscillations. The test data showed that the LHT unit satisfied the oxygen exit quality of 0.95 or greater in both the THI and PI modes while maintaining stability. The HHT unit fulfilled all PI requirements; data for THI satisfactory operation is implied from experimental data that straddle the exact THI operating point.

  5. Heat engine generator control system

    DOEpatents

    Rajashekara, K.; Gorti, B.V.; McMullen, S.R.; Raibert, R.J.

    1998-05-12

    An electrical power generation system includes a heat engine having an output member operatively coupled to the rotor of a dynamoelectric machine. System output power is controlled by varying an electrical parameter of the dynamoelectric machine. A power request signal is related to an engine speed and the electrical parameter is varied in accordance with a speed control loop. Initially, the sense of change in the electrical parameter in response to a change in the power request signal is opposite that required to effectuate a steady state output power consistent with the power request signal. Thereafter, the electrical parameter is varied to converge the output member speed to the speed known to be associated with the desired electrical output power. 8 figs.

  6. Heat engine generator control system

    DOEpatents

    Rajashekara, Kaushik; Gorti, Bhanuprasad Venkata; McMullen, Steven Robert; Raibert, Robert Joseph

    1998-01-01

    An electrical power generation system includes a heat engine having an output member operatively coupled to the rotor of a dynamoelectric machine. System output power is controlled by varying an electrical parameter of the dynamoelectric machine. A power request signal is related to an engine speed and the electrical parameter is varied in accordance with a speed control loop. Initially, the sense of change in the electrical parameter in response to a change in the power request signal is opposite that required to effectuate a steady state output power consistent with the power request signal. Thereafter, the electrical parameter is varied to converge the output member speed to the speed known to be associated with the desired electrical output power.

  7. Oxidizer heat exchanger component testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kmiec, T.; Kanic, P.

    1986-01-01

    As part of the RL10 Rocket Engine Product Improvement Program, Oxidizer Heat Exchanger (OHE) stages 1, 2, and 3 were designed and fabricated during late 1983 and early 1984. The purpose of the OHE is to provide gaseous oxygen to the propellant injector for stable engine operation at tank head idle and pumped idle operating modes. This report summarizes the OHE stages 1 and 3 rig testing, and includes the separation of the stage 1-and-2 assembly and the remanifolding of stage 1. The OHE performance analysis and analytical model modifications for both stages are also presented. The flow tests were accomplished during the time period from 9 October 1984 to 12 November 1984.

  8. Staged heating by oxidation of carbonaceous material

    DOEpatents

    Knell, Everett W.; Green, Norman W.

    1978-01-31

    A carbonaceous material is pyrolyzed in the presence of a particulate source of heat obtained by the partial oxidation of a carbon containing solid residue of the carbonaceous material. The heat obtained from the oxidation of the carbon containing solid residue is maximized by preheating the carbon containing solid residue with a hot gas stream obtained by oxidizing the gaseous combustion products of the carbon containing solid residue.

  9. Control system for fluid heated steam generator

    DOEpatents

    Boland, James F.; Koenig, John F.

    1985-01-01

    A control system for controlling the location of the nucleate-boiling region in a fluid heated steam generator comprises means for measuring the temperature gradient (change in temperature per unit length) of the heating fluid along the steam generator; means for determining a control variable in accordance with a predetermined function of temperature gradients and for generating a control signal in response thereto; and means for adjusting the feedwater flow rate in accordance with the control signal.

  10. Control system for fluid heated steam generator

    DOEpatents

    Boland, J.F.; Koenig, J.F.

    1984-05-29

    A control system for controlling the location of the nucleate-boiling region in a fluid heated steam generator comprises means for measuring the temperature gradient (change in temperature per unit length) of the heating fluid along the steam generator; means for determining a control variable in accordance with a predetermined function of temperature gradients and for generating a control signal in response thereto; and means for adjusting the feedwater flow rate in accordance with the control signal.

  11. Waste heat generation: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Yeşiller, Nazli; Hanson, James L; Yee, Emma H

    2015-08-01

    A comprehensive review of heat generation in various types of wastes and of the thermal regime of waste containment facilities is provided in this paper. Municipal solid waste (MSW), MSW incineration ash, and mining wastes were included in the analysis. Spatial and temporal variations of waste temperatures, thermal gradients, thermal properties of wastes, average temperature differentials, and heat generation values are provided. Heat generation was influenced by climatic conditions, mean annual earth temperatures, waste temperatures at the time of placement, cover conditions, and inherent heat generation potential of the specific wastes. Time to onset of heat generation varied between months and years, whereas timelines for overall duration of heat generation varied between years and decades. For MSW, measured waste temperatures were as high as 60-90°C and as low as -6°C. MSW incinerator ash temperatures varied between 5 and 87°C. Mining waste temperatures were in the range of -25 to 65°C. In the wastes analyzed, upward heat flow toward the surface was more prominent than downward heat flow toward the subsurface. Thermal gradients generally were higher for MSW and incinerator ash and lower for mining waste. Based on thermal properties, MSW had insulative qualities (low thermal conductivity), while mining wastes typically were relatively conductive (high thermal conductivity) with ash having intermediate qualities. Heat generation values ranged from -8.6 to 83.1MJ/m(3) and from 0.6 to 72.6MJ/m(3) for MSW and mining waste, respectively and was 72.6MJ/m(3) for ash waste. Conductive thermal losses were determined to range from 13 to 1111MJ/m(3)yr. The data and analysis provided in this review paper can be used in the investigation of heat generation and thermal regime of a wide range of wastes and waste containment facilities located in different climatic regions. PMID:25962825

  12. Heat-generating nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, G.; Fajeau, M.; Labrousse, M.; Lerouge, B.; Minguet, J.

    1981-01-20

    A reactor vessel filled with coolant fluid is divided by a wall into an upper region and a lower region which contains the reactor core, part of the coolant fluid in the upper region being injected into the lower region. The injection flow rate is regulated as a function of the variations in pressure in the lower region by means of a baffle-plate container which communicates with a leak-tight chamber and with a storage reservoir, a flow of fluid from the chamber to the reservoir being established only at the time of a reduction in the rate of injection into the container. The reactor can be employed for the production of hot water which is passed through a heat exchanger and supplied to a heating installation.

  13. A fully coupled model for water-gas-heat reactive transport with methane oxidation in landfill covers.

    PubMed

    Ng, C W W; Feng, S; Liu, H W

    2015-03-01

    Methane oxidation in landfill covers is a complex process involving water, gas and heat transfer as well as microbial oxidation. The coupled phenomena of microbial oxidation, water, gas, and heat transfer are not fully understood. In this study, a new model is developed that incorporates water-gas-heat coupled reactive transport in unsaturated soil with methane oxidation. Effects of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat are included. The model is calibrated using published data from a laboratory soil column test. Moreover, a series of parametric studies are carried out to investigate the influence of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat, initial water content on methane oxidation efficiency. Computed and measured results of gas concentration and methane oxidation rate are consistent. It is found that the coupling effects between water-gas-heat transfer and methane oxidation are significant. Ignoring microbial oxidation-generated water and heat can result in a significant difference in methane oxidation efficiency by 100%. PMID:25489976

  14. Heat Management in Thermoelectric Power Generators.

    PubMed

    Zebarjadi, M

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric power generators are used to convert heat into electricity. Like any other heat engine, the performance of a thermoelectric generator increases as the temperature difference on the sides increases. It is generally assumed that as more heat is forced through the thermoelectric legs, their performance increases. Therefore, insulations are typically used to minimize the heat losses and to confine the heat transport through the thermoelectric legs. In this paper we show that to some extend it is beneficial to purposely open heat loss channels in order to establish a larger temperature gradient and therefore to increase the overall efficiency and achieve larger electric power output. We define a modified Biot number (Bi) as an indicator of requirements for sidewall insulation. We show cooling from sidewalls increases the efficiency for Bi values less than one, and decreases the efficiency for Bi values larger than one. PMID:27033717

  15. Heat Management in Thermoelectric Power Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebarjadi, M.

    2016-04-01

    Thermoelectric power generators are used to convert heat into electricity. Like any other heat engine, the performance of a thermoelectric generator increases as the temperature difference on the sides increases. It is generally assumed that as more heat is forced through the thermoelectric legs, their performance increases. Therefore, insulations are typically used to minimize the heat losses and to confine the heat transport through the thermoelectric legs. In this paper we show that to some extend it is beneficial to purposely open heat loss channels in order to establish a larger temperature gradient and therefore to increase the overall efficiency and achieve larger electric power output. We define a modified Biot number (Bi) as an indicator of requirements for sidewall insulation. We show cooling from sidewalls increases the efficiency for Bi values less than one, and decreases the efficiency for Bi values larger than one.

  16. Heat Management in Thermoelectric Power Generators

    PubMed Central

    Zebarjadi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric power generators are used to convert heat into electricity. Like any other heat engine, the performance of a thermoelectric generator increases as the temperature difference on the sides increases. It is generally assumed that as more heat is forced through the thermoelectric legs, their performance increases. Therefore, insulations are typically used to minimize the heat losses and to confine the heat transport through the thermoelectric legs. In this paper we show that to some extend it is beneficial to purposely open heat loss channels in order to establish a larger temperature gradient and therefore to increase the overall efficiency and achieve larger electric power output. We define a modified Biot number (Bi) as an indicator of requirements for sidewall insulation. We show cooling from sidewalls increases the efficiency for Bi values less than one, and decreases the efficiency for Bi values larger than one. PMID:27033717

  17. Heat generation and transport in the heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beek, Johannes H. G. M.

    1996-05-01

    During contraction of the heart, a large part of the energy in energy metabolism is converted to heat. The article presents the results of measurements of mechanical stresses in the myocardium and blood vessels, temperatures and rate of heat generation. Experimental data correlate well with the numerical solutions of the biothermal problem.

  18. OXIDE DISPERSION-STRENGTHENED HEAT EXCHANGER TUBING

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Mark A.

    2001-11-06

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys (e.g. the INCOLOY{reg_sign} MA956 alloy) are known for their excellent high temperature properties and are prime candidate materials for the construction of very high temperature heat exchangers that will be used in Vision 21 power plants. The main limitation of these materials is their poor weldability. Commercially available ODS tubing also tends to exhibit relatively poor circumferential creep strength due to current processing practices resulting in a fine grain size in the transverse direction. Thus far, these two characteristics of the ODS tubing have restricted its use to mostly non-pressure containing applications. The objectives of this program are to develop: (a) an MA956 tube with sufficient circumferential creep strength for long term use as heat exchanger tubing for very high temperatures; (b) a welding technique(s) for producing adequate joints between an MA956 tube and an MA956 tube, and an MA956 tube and an INCONEL 601 tube; (c) the bending strain limits, below which recrystallization will not occur in a MA956 tube during normal operation; and (d) the high temperature corrosion limits for the MA956 alloy with respect to working-fluid side and fireside environments. Also, this program seeks to generate data for use by heat exchanger designers and the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, and perform an analysis of the mechanical property, tube bending, and corrosion data in order to determine the implications on the design of a very high temperature heat exchanger (T>1093 C/2000 F). After one year, work is currently being conducted on increasing the circumferential strength of a MA956 tube, developing joining techniques for this material, determining the tube bending strain limits, and establishing the high temperature corrosion parameters for the MA956 alloy in environments expected to be present in Vision 21 power plants. Work in these areas will is continuing into the next fiscal year, with success

  19. Integrated Heat Switch/Oxide Sorption Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven

    1989-01-01

    Thermally-driven, nonmechanical compressor uses container filled with compressed praseodymium cerium oxide powder (PrCeOx) to provide high-pressure flow of oxygen gas for driving closed-cycle Joule-Thomson-expansion refrigeration unit. Integrated heat switch/oxide sorption compressor has no moving parts except check valves, which control flow of oxygen gas between compressor and closed-cycle Joule-Thomson refrigeration system. Oxygen expelled from sorbent at high pressure by evacuating heat-switch gap and turning on heater.

  20. Graphene oxide reduction by microwave heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Angela; Carotenuto, Gianfranco

    2016-05-01

    The possibility to prepare thermal reduced graphene oxide (Tr-GO) colloidal suspensions by microwave heating of graphene oxide (GO) suspensions in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) has been investigated. According to transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and absorption and emission spectroscopy characterization, such a type of thermal reduction does not lead to graphene quantum dots formation because only mono-functional oxygen-containing groups are removed.

  1. Heat flow and heat generation in greenstone belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drury, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Heat flow has been measured in Precambrian shields in both greenstone belts and crystalline terrains. Values are generally low, reflecting the great age and tectonic stability of the shields; they range typically between 30 and 50 mW/sq m, although extreme values of 18 and 79 mW/sq m have been reported. For large areas of the Earth's surface that are assumed to have been subjected to a common thermotectonic event, plots of heat flow against heat generation appear to be linear, although there may be considerable scatter in the data. The relationship is expressed as: Q = Q sub o + D A sub o in which Q is the observed heat flow, A sub o is the measured heat generation at the surface, Q sub o is the reduced heat flow from the lower crust and mantle, and D, which has the dimension of length, represents a scale depth for the distribution of radiogenic elements. Most authors have not used data from greenstone belts in attempting to define the relationship within shields, considering them unrepresentative and preferring to use data from relatively homogeneous crystalline rocks. A discussion follows.

  2. OXIDANT FORMATION IN THE GENERATION OF OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone samples generated by UV photolysis and silent electric discharge upon air or oxygen were examined to determine if other oxidants were formed. Chemical and physical methods (IR and UV spectroscopy) failed to show the presence of such oxidants. Absence of such oxidants was al...

  3. Solar steam generation by heat localization.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Hadi; Ni, George; Marconnet, Amy Marie; Loomis, James; Yerci, Selcuk; Miljkovic, Nenad; Chen, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Currently, steam generation using solar energy is based on heating bulk liquid to high temperatures. This approach requires either costly high optical concentrations leading to heat loss by the hot bulk liquid and heated surfaces or vacuum. New solar receiver concepts such as porous volumetric receivers or nanofluids have been proposed to decrease these losses. Here we report development of an approach and corresponding material structure for solar steam generation while maintaining low optical concentration and keeping the bulk liquid at low temperature with no vacuum. We achieve solar thermal efficiency up to 85% at only 10 kW m(-2). This high performance results from four structure characteristics: absorbing in the solar spectrum, thermally insulating, hydrophilic and interconnected pores. The structure concentrates thermal energy and fluid flow where needed for phase change and minimizes dissipated energy. This new structure provides a novel approach to harvesting solar energy for a broad range of phase-change applications. PMID:25043613

  4. Two Dimensional Polymer That Generates Nitric Oxide.

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F.; Koren, Amy B.

    2005-10-04

    A polymeric composition that generates nitric oxide and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate nonthrombogenic by applying a coating of the polymeric composition to the substrate are disclosed. The composition comprises: (1) a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, and (ii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups; and (2) a plurality of nitric oxide generating functional groups associated with the crosslinked chemical combination. Once exposed to a physiological environment, the coating generates nitric oxide thereby inhibiting platelet aggregation. In one embodiment, the nitric oxide generating functional groups are provided by a nitrated compound (e.g., nitrocellulose) imbedded in the polymeric composition. In another embodiment, the nitric oxide generating functional groups comprise N2O2- groups covalently bonded to amino groups on the polymer.

  5. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2005-07-29

    Electricity generated by distributed energy resources (DER) located close to end-use loads has the potential to meet consumer requirements more efficiently than the existing centralized grid. Installation of DER allows consumers to circumvent the costs associated with transmission congestion and other non-energy costs of electricity delivery and potentially to take advantage of market opportunities to purchase energy when attractive. On-site thermal power generation is typically less efficient than central station generation, but by avoiding non-fuel costs of grid power and utilizing combined heat and power (CHP) applications, i.e., recovering heat from small-scale on-site generation to displace fuel purchases, then DER can become attractive to a strictly cost-minimizing consumer. In previous efforts, the decisions facing typical commercial consumers have been addressed using a mixed-integer linear programme, the DER Customer Adoption Model(DER-CAM). Given the site s energy loads, utility tariff structure, and information (both technical and financial) on candidate DER technologies, DER-CAM minimizes the overall energy cost for a test year by selecting the units to install and determining their hourly operating schedules. In this paper, the capabilities of DER-CAM are enhanced by the inclusion of the option to store recovered low-grade heat. By being able to keep an inventory of heat for use in subsequent periods, sites are able to lower costs even further by reducing off-peak generation and relying on storage. This and other effects of storages are demonstrated by analysis of five typical commercial buildings in San Francisco, California, and an estimate of the cost per unit capacity of heat storage is calculated.

  6. Effect of heat treatments on oxidation kinetics in AZ91 and AM60 magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Barrena, M.I. Gomez de Salazar, J.M.; Matesanz, L.; Soria, A.

    2011-10-15

    The effect of heat treatments on a non protective atmosphere (air) on the morphology and composition of the oxide in AM60 and AZ91 alloys has been evaluated. With the aim of evaluating the loss of alloying elements during heat treatment, a study of these alloys has been carried out using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). In order to determine the nature of the oxides the reaction products generated were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Results show that the nature and morphology of the oxides generated are related to the temperature and the time of the heating conditions applied. - Highlights: {yields} The effect of heat treatments on the oxide growth in Mg-Al alloys has been evaluated. {yields} The nature and morphology of the oxides have been characterized. {yields} These oxides are associated to the time and the temperature conditions.

  7. ULF Generation by Modulated Ionospheric Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Labenski, J.; Wallace, T.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2013-12-01

    Modulated ionospheric heating experiments designed to generate ULF waves using the HAARP heater have been conducted since 2007. Artificial ULF waves in the Pc1 frequency range were observed from space and by ground induction magnetometers located in the vicinity of the heater as well as at long distances. Two distinct generation mechanisms of artificial ULF waves were identified. The first was electroject modulation under geomagnetically disturbed conditions. The second was pressure modulation in the E and F regions of the ionosphere under quiet conditions. Ground detections of ULF waves near the heater included both Shear Alfven waves and Magnetosonic waves generated by electrojet and/or pressure modulations. Distant ULF detections involved Magnetosonic wave propagation in the Alfvenic duct with pressure modulation as the most likely source. Summary of our observations and theoretical interpretations will be presented at the meeting. We would like to acknowledge the support provided by the staff at the HAARP facility during our ULF experiments.

  8. Nanoparticle heating: nanoscale to bulk effects of electromagnetically heated iron oxide and gold for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhenpeng; Etheridge, Michael; Bischof, John C.

    2011-03-01

    Biomedical applications of nanoparticle heating range in scale from molecular activation (i.e. molecular beacons, protein denaturation, lipid melting and drug release), cellular heating (i.e. nanophotolysis and membrane permeability control and rupture) to whole tumor heating (deep and superficial). This work will present a review on the heating of two classes of biologically compatible metallic nanoparticles: iron oxide and gold with particular focus on spatial and temporal scales of the heating event. The size range of nanoparticles under discussion will focus predominantly in the 10 - 200 nm diameter size range. Mechanisms of heating range from Néelian and Brownian relaxation due to magnetic susceptibility at 100s of kHz, optical absorption due to VIS and NIR lasers and "Joule" heating at higher frequency RF (13.56 MHz). The heat generation of individual nanoparticles and the thermal responses at nano-, micro-, and macroscales are presented. This review will also discuss how to estimate a specific absorption rate (SAR, W/g) based on individual nanoparticles heating in bulk samples. Experimental setups are designed to measure the SAR and the results are compared with theoretical predictions.

  9. Myeloperoxidase-generated oxidants and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Podrez, E A; Abu-Soud, H M; Hazen, S L

    2000-06-15

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory process where oxidative damage within the artery wall is implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. Mononuclear phagocytes, an inflammatory cell capable of generating a variety of oxidizing species, are early components of arterial lesions. Their normal functions include host defense and surveillance through regulated generation of diffusible radical species, reactive oxygen or nitrogen species, and HOCl (hypochlorous acid). However, under certain circumstances an excess of these oxidizing species can overwhelm local antioxidant defenses and lead to oxidant stress and oxidative tissue injury, processes implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. This review focuses on oxidation reactions catalyzed by myeloperoxidase (MPO), an abundant heme protein secreted from activated phagocytes which is present in human atherosclerotic lesions. Over the past several years, significant evidence has accrued demonstrating that MPO is one pathway for protein and lipoprotein oxidation during the evolution of cardiovascular disease. Multiple distinct products of MPO are enriched in human atherosclerotic lesions and LDL recovered from human atheroma. However, the biological consequences of these MPO-catalyzed reactions in vivo are still unclear. Here we discuss evidence for the occurrence of MPO-catalyzed oxidation reactions in vivo and the potential role MPO plays in both normal host defenses and inflammatory diseases like atherosclerosis. PMID:10946213

  10. Molybdenum oxide electrodes for thermoelectric generators

    DOEpatents

    Schmatz, Duane J.

    1989-01-01

    The invention is directed to a composite article suitable for use in thermoelectric generators. The article comprises a thin film comprising molybdenum oxide as an electrode deposited by physical deposition techniques onto solid electrolyte. The invention is also directed to the method of making same.

  11. Generator-absorber-heat exchange heat transfer apparatus and method and use thereof in a heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Zawacki, Thomas S.; Marsala, Joseph

    1994-11-29

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use the working solution of the absorption system for the heat transfer medium.

  12. Heat exchanger for power generation equipment

    DOEpatents

    Nirmalan, Nirm Velumylm; Bowman, Michael John

    2005-06-14

    A heat exchanger for a turbine is provided wherein the heat exchanger comprises a heat transfer cell comprising a sheet of material having two opposed ends and two opposed sides. In addition, a plurality of concavities are disposed on a surface portion of the sheet of material so as to cause hydrodynamic interactions and affect a heat transfer rate of the turbine between a fluid and the concavities when the fluid is disposed over the concavities.

  13. Heating subsurface formations by oxidizing fuel on a fuel carrier

    DOEpatents

    Costello, Michael; Vinegar, Harold J.

    2012-10-02

    A method of heating a portion of a subsurface formation includes drawing fuel on a fuel carrier through an opening formed in the formation. Oxidant is supplied to the fuel at one or more locations in the opening. The fuel is combusted with the oxidant to provide heat to the formation.

  14. Entropy and heat generation of lithium cells/batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Songrui, Wang

    2016-01-01

    The methods and techniques commonly used in investigating the change of entropy and heat generation in Li cells/batteries are introduced, as are the measurements, calculations and purposes. The changes of entropy and heat generation are concomitant with the use of Li cells/batteries. In order to improve the management and the application of Li cells/batteries, especially for large scale power batteries, the quantitative investigations of the change of entropy and heat generating are necessary.

  15. Generator-absorber-heat exchange heat transfer apparatus and method and use thereof in a heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Zawacki, Thomas S.

    1998-07-21

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use, as the heat transfer medium, the working fluid of the absorption system taken from the generator at a location where the working fluid has a rich liquor concentration.

  16. Generator-absorber-heat exchange heat transfer apparatus and method and use thereof in a heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, B.A.; Zawacki, T.S.

    1998-07-21

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use, as the heat transfer medium, the working fluid of the absorption system taken from the generator at a location where the working fluid has a rich liquor concentration. 5 figs.

  17. Generator-absorber-heat exchange heat transfer apparatus and method and use thereof in a heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Zawacki, Thomas S.

    1996-12-03

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use the working solution of the absorption system for the heat transfer medium. A combination of weak and rich liquor working solution is used as the heat transfer medium.

  18. SCALE ANALYSIS OF CONVECTIVE MELTING WITH INTERNAL HEAT GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    John Crepeau

    2011-03-01

    Using a scale analysis approach, we model phase change (melting) for pure materials which generate internal heat for small Stefan numbers (approximately one). The analysis considers conduction in the solid phase and natural convection, driven by internal heat generation, in the liquid regime. The model is applied for a constant surface temperature boundary condition where the melting temperature is greater than the surface temperature in a cylindrical geometry. We show the time scales in which conduction and convection heat transfer dominate.

  19. Heat-Pipe-Associated Localized Thermoelectric Power Generation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pan-Jo; Rhi, Seok-Ho; Lee, Kye-Bock; Hwang, Hyun-Chang; Lee, Ji-Su; Jang, Ju-Chan; Lee, Wook-Hyun; Lee, Ki-Woo

    2014-06-01

    The present study focused on how to improve the maximum power output of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) system and move heat to any suitable space using a TEG associated with a loop thermosyphon (loop-type heat pipe). An experimental study was carried out to investigate the power output, the temperature difference of the thermoelectric module (TEM), and the heat transfer performance associated with the characteristic of the researched heat pipe. Currently, internal combustion engines lose more than 35% of their fuel energy as recyclable heat in the exhaust gas, but it is not easy to recycle waste heat using TEGs because of the limited space in vehicles. There are various advantages to use of TEGs over other power sources, such as the absence of moving parts, a long lifetime, and a compact system configuration. The present study presents a novel TEG concept to transfer heat from the heat source to the sink. This technology can transfer waste heat to any location. This simple and novel design for a TEG can be applied to future hybrid cars. The present TEG system with a heat pipe can transfer heat and generate power of around 1.8 V with T TEM = 58°C. The heat transfer performance of a loop-type heat pipe with various working fluids was investigated, with water at high heat flux (90 W) and 0.05% TiO2 nanofluid at low heat flux (30 W to 70 W) showing the best performance in terms of power generation. The heat pipe can transfer the heat to any location where the TEM is installed.

  20. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen Minh

    2002-03-31

    This report summarizes the work performed by Honeywell during the January 2002 to March 2002 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a turbogenerator. For this reporting period the following activities have been carried out: {lg_bullet} Conceptual system design trade studies were performed {lg_bullet} System-level performance model was created {lg_bullet} Dynamic control models are being developed {lg_bullet} Mechanical properties of candidate heat exchanger materials were investigated {lg_bullet} SOFC performance mapping as a function of flow rate and pressure was completed

  1. Heat resistant polymers of oxidized styrylphosphine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. J. L. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Homopolymers, copolymers and terpolymers of a styrene based monomer are prepared by polymerizing at least one oxidized styrylphosphine monomer or by polymerizing p-diphenylphosphinestyrene and then oxidizing the polymerized monomer with an organoazide. Copolymers can also be prepared by copolymerizing styrene with at least one oxidized styrylphosphine monomer. Flame resistant vinyl based polymers whose degradation products are non toxic and non corrosive are obtained.

  2. Low heat transfer oxidizer heat exchanger design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanic, P. G.; Kmiec, T. D.; Peckham, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    The RL10-IIB engine, a derivative of the RLIO, is capable of multi-mode thrust operation. This engine operates at two low thrust levels: tank head idle (THI), which is approximately 1 to 2 percent of full thrust, and pumped idle (PI), which is 10 percent of full thrust. Operation at THI provides vehicle propellant settling thrust and efficient engine thermal conditioning; PI operation provides vehicle tank pre-pressurization and maneuver thrust for log-g deployment. Stable combustion of the RL10-IIB engine at THI and PI thrust levels can be accomplished by providing gaseous oxygen at the propellant injector. Using gaseous hydrogen from the thrust chamber jacket as an energy source, a heat exchanger can be used to vaporize liquid oxygen without creating flow instability. This report summarizes the design and analysis of a United Aircraft Products (UAP) low-rate heat transfer heat exchanger concept for the RL10-IIB rocket engine. The design represents a second iteration of the RL10-IIB heat exchanger investigation program. The design and analysis of the first heat exchanger effort is presented in more detail in NASA CR-174857. Testing of the previous design is detailed in NASA CR-179487.

  3. Copper oxide aerosol: generation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Peoples, S M; McCarthy, J F; Chen, L C; Eppelsheimer, D; Amdur, M O

    1988-06-01

    Effluent gases from high temperature systems such as fossil fuel combustion and pyrometallurgical processes contain inorganic material which has the potential to interact with sulfur dioxide (SO2) on the surface of particles to form an irritant aerosol. The submicron fraction of this inorganic material is especially important as the fine particles may penetrate deep into the lung and cause serious health effects. A laboratory furnace was designed to produce a submicrometer copper oxide aerosol to stimulate emissions from copper smelters and other pyrometallurgical operations. The ultimate aim of this research is to investigate the interaction of SO2 and the copper oxide aerosol at different temperatures and humidities in order to determine the reaction products and their potential health effects upon inhalation. The initial work, as presented in this paper, was to reproducibly generate a submicrometer copper oxide aerosol and to characterize it in terms of size, morphology and composition. Two experimental regimes were set up. One admitted filtered air, without water vapor, into the furnace, and the other admitted filtered air and water vapor. The size and morphology of the aerosols were determined using an electrical aerosol analyzer and transmission electron microscopy. The particles appear as chain aggregates with a count median diameter of 0.026 micron when no water vapor was added and 0.031 micron when water vapor was added into the furnace. Composition of the aerosol was determined using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The aerosol, with or without water in the furnace, consists of a mixture of copper(I) oxide and copper(II) hydroxide. PMID:3400592

  4. Conceptual study of measures against heat generation for TRU fuel fabrication system

    SciTech Connect

    Kawaguchi, Koichi; Namekawa, Takashi

    2007-07-01

    To lower the reprocessing cost and the environmental burden, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has developed low decontamination TRU fuel fabrication system. TRU fuel contains MA of 1.2 to 5 wt% and its decay heat is estimated a few tens W/kg-HM. As the heat affects fuel quality through oxidation of fuel material and members, it is necessary to remove decay heat. In this work, authors designed concepts of the measures against heat generation at typical equipments using with the thermal hydraulics analysis technique. As a result, it is shown that it is possible to cool fuel materials with specific heat generation up to 20 W/kg-HM enough, though more detailed study is required for comprehensive equipments. (authors)

  5. Self-heating induced instability of oxide thin film transistors under dynamic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kise, Kahori; Fujii, Mami N.; Urakawa, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Haruka; Kawashima, Emi; Tomai, Shigekazu; Yano, Koki; Wang, Dapeng; Furuta, Mamoru; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Uraoka, Yukiharu

    2016-01-01

    Degradation caused by Joule heating of transparent amorphous oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors (TFTs) is an important issue for display technology. Deep understanding of the mechanism of self-heating degradation generated by driving pulse voltage will pave the way for the development of highly reliable flexible displays. In this work, by using a pseudo interval measurement method, we examined the relationship of the highest and the lowest heating temperature in pulse 1 cycle and frequency. These self-heating converged to a constant temperature under pulse voltage applied at 1 kHz. Moreover, the long-term reliability under positive-bias stress voltage at 1 kHz of low converged temperature condition was improved relative to that of the stress voltage at 10 Hz of dynamic temperature change condition. We discussed the degradation mechanism of oxide TFTs generated by pulse voltage, and clarified that the degradation was accelerated by thermionic emission which occurred at low frequency.

  6. Generator powered electrically heated diesel particulate filter

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore, Jr., Michael J

    2014-03-18

    A control circuit for a vehicle powertrain includes a switch that selectivity interrupts current flow between a first terminal and a second terminal. A first power source provides power to the first terminal and a second power source provides power to the second terminal and to a heater of a heated diesel particulate filter (DPF). The switch is opened during a DPF regeneration cycle to prevent the first power source from being loaded by the heater while the heater is energized.

  7. Method and apparatus for enhanced heat recovery from steam generators and water heaters

    DOEpatents

    Knight, Richard A.; Rabovitser, Iosif K.; Wang, Dexin

    2006-06-27

    A heating system having a steam generator or water heater, at least one economizer, at least one condenser and at least one oxidant heater arranged in a manner so as to reduce the temperature and humidity of the exhaust gas (flue gas) stream and recover a major portion of the associated sensible and latent heat. The recovered heat is returned to the steam generator or water heater so as to increase the quantity of steam generated or water heated per quantity of fuel consumed. In addition, a portion of the water vapor produced by combustion of fuel is reclaimed for use as feed water, thereby reducing the make-up water requirement for the system.

  8. Constructal design for a rectangular body with nonuniform heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Huijun; Chen, Lingen; Xie, Zhihui; Sun, Fengrui

    2016-08-01

    Nonuniform heat generation models with constant and variable cross-section high-conductivity channels (HCCs) are built in this paper. The minimum dimensionless peak temperature (DPT) is taken as the optimization objective. Different from the models with uniform heat generation and constant cross-section HCCs built by Bejan (1997) and Ledezma et al. (1997), the model with nonuniform heat generation and variable cross-section HCC is more practical and can help to improve the heat conduction performance of a thermal system. The results show that for the rectangular first-order assembly (RFOA) with nonuniform heat generation, there exist both the optimal shape of the RFOA and the optimal HCCs width ratio, which lead to the minimum DPT. They are different from those with uniform heat generation. When the heat is nonuniformly generated in the RFOA, the minimum DPT of the RFOA with variable cross-section HCC is reduced by 12.11% compared with that with constant cross-section HCC. Moreover, the numerical results are also verified by the analytical method.

  9. Method of forming oxide coatings. [for solar collector heating panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    This invention is concerned with an improved plating process for covering a substrate with a black metal oxide film. The invention is particularly directed to making a heating panel for a solar collector. A compound is electrodeposited from an aqueous solution containing cobalt metal salts onto a metal substrate. This compound is converted during plating into a black, highly absorbing oxide coating which contains hydrated oxides. This is achieved by the inclusion of an oxidizing agent in the plating bath. The inclusion of an oxidizing agent in the plating bath is contrary to standard electroplating practice. The hydrated oxides are converted to oxides by treatment in a hot bath, such as boiling water. An oxidizing agent may be added to the hot liquid treating bath.

  10. Denaturation and Oxidative Stability of Hemp Seed (Cannabis sativa L.) Protein Isolate as Affected by Heat Treatment.

    PubMed

    Raikos, Vassilios; Duthie, Garry; Ranawana, Viren

    2015-09-01

    The present study investigated the impact of heat treatments on the denaturation and oxidative stability of hemp seed protein during simulated gastrointestinal digestion (GID). Heat-denatured hemp protein isolate (HPI) solutions were prepared by heating HPI (2 mg/ml, pH 6.8) to 40, 60, 80 and 100 °C for 10 min. Heat-induced denaturation of the protein isolates was monitored by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Heating HPI at temperatures above 80 °C significantly reduced solubility and led to the formation of large protein aggregates. The isolates were then subjected to in vitro GID and the oxidative stability of the generated peptides was investigated. Heating did not significantly affect the formation of oxidation products during GID. The results suggest that heat treatments should ideally remain below 80 °C if heat stability and solubility of HPI are to be preserved. PMID:26142888

  11. Nitric oxide generating/releasing materials

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hongying; Nacharaju, Parimala; Friedman, Adam; Friedman, Joel M

    2015-01-01

    Harnessing the impressive therapeutic potential of nitric oxide (NO) remains an ongoing challenge. This paper describes several of the current strategies both with respect to the underlying chemistry and physics and to the applications where they have shown promise. Included in this overview are molecular systems such as NONOates that release NO through chemical reactions and delivery vehicles such as nanoparticles that can generate, store, transport and deliver NO and related bioactive forms of NO such as nitrosothiols. Although there has been much positive movement, it is clear that we are only at the early stages of knowing how to precisely produce, transport and deliver to targeted sites therapeutic levels of NO and related molecules. PMID:26855790

  12. MEMS CLOSED CHAMBER HEAT ENGINE AND ELECTRIC GENERATOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A heat engine, preferably combined with an electric generator, and advantageously implemented using micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) technologies as an array of one or more individual heat engine/generators. The heat engine is based on a closed chamber containing a motive medium, preferably a gas; means for alternately enabling and disabling transfer of thermal energy from a heat source to the motive medium; and at least one movable side of the chamber that moves in response to thermally-induced expansion and contraction of the motive medium, thereby converting thermal energy to oscillating movement. The electrical generator is combined with the heat engine to utilize movement of the movable side to convert mechanical work to electrical energy, preferably using electrostatic interaction in a generator capacitor. Preferably at least one heat transfer side of the chamber is placed alternately into and out of contact with the heat source by a motion capacitor, thereby alternately enabling and disabling conductive transfer of heat to the motive medium.

  13. Solid–Liquid Phase Change Driven by Internal Heat Generation

    SciTech Connect

    John Crepeau; Ali s. Siahpush

    2012-07-01

    This article presents results of solid-liquid phase change, the Stefan Problem, where melting is driven internal heat generation, in a cylindrical geometry. The comparison between a quasi-static analytical solution for Stefan numbers less than one and numerical solutions shows good agreement. The computational results of phase change with internal heat generation show how convection cells form in the liquid region. A scale analysis of the same problem shows four distinct regions of the melting process.

  14. Oxidation and emittance of superalloys in heat shield applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, K. E.; Clark, R. K.; Unnam, J.

    1986-01-01

    Recently developed superalloys that form alumina coatings have a high potential for heat shield applications for advanced aerospace vehicles at temperatures above 1095C. Both INCOLOY alloy MA 956 (of the Inco Alloys International, Inc.), an iron-base oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloy, and CABOT alloy No. 214 (of the Cabot Corporation), an alumina-forming nickel-chromium alloy, have good oxidation resistance and good elevated temperature strength. The oxidation resistance of both alloys has been attributed to the formation of a thin alumina layer (alpha-Al2O3) at the surface. Emittance and oxidation data were obtained for simulated Space Shuttle reentry conditions using a hypersonic arc-heated wind tunnel. The surface oxides and substrate alloys were characterized using X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy with an energy-dispersive X-ray analysis unit. The mass loss and emittance characteristics of the two alloys are discussed.

  15. Gas Generation from Actinide Oxide Materials

    SciTech Connect

    George Bailey; Elizabeth Bluhm; John Lyman; Richard Mason; Mark Paffett; Gary Polansky; G. D. Roberson; Martin Sherman; Kirk Veirs; Laura Worl

    2000-12-01

    This document captures relevant work performed in support of stabilization, packaging, and long term storage of plutonium metals and oxides. It concentrates on the issue of gas generation with specific emphasis on gas pressure and composition. Even more specifically, it summarizes the basis for asserting that materials loaded into a 3013 container according to the requirements of the 3013 Standard (DOE-STD-3013-2000) cannot exceed the container design pressure within the time frames or environmental conditions of either storage or transportation. Presently, materials stabilized and packaged according to the 3013 Standard are to be transported in certified packages (the certification process for the 9975 and the SAFKEG has yet to be completed) that do not rely on the containment capabilities of the 3013 container. Even though no reliance is placed on that container, this document shows that it is highly likely that the containment function will be maintained not only in storage but also during transportation, including hypothetical accident conditions. Further, this document, by summarizing materials-related data on gas generation, can point those involved in preparing Safety Analysis Reports for Packages (SARPs) to additional information needed to assess the ability of the primary containment vessel to contain the contents and any reaction products that might reasonably be produced by the contents.

  16. Choose the best heat-recovery method for thermal oxidizers

    SciTech Connect

    Klobucar, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    Thermal oxidation is current the most economically favorable add-on method of controlling hydrocarbon air emissions of moderate to low concentration (below 10,000 ppm). This concentration range covers emissions from a wide variety of chemical process industries (CPI) sources, including dryers, reactor vents, tank vents, and coaters. Thermal oxidizer systems consist of three basic sub-systems--burner, combustion chamber, and primary heat recovery. Selecting the type of primary heat recovery is probably the most important decision in the design of a thermal oxidizer, and requires consideration of a wide range of factors. The two most widely used types of primary heat recovery--recuperative and regenerative--each have distinct advantages and disadvantages. In general, recuperative oxidizers are simpler and less costly to purchase, whereas regenerative oxidizers offer substantially lower operating costs. Selecting between recuperative and regenerative heat recovery requires balancing a number of factors, such as capital and operating costs, exhaust gas composition and temperature, and secondary heat demand. This article provides guidance on when, where, and how to use each.

  17. Feasibility analysis of a vortex generator for absorption heat pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Fineblum, S.S.

    1996-12-31

    Significant thermal resources in the form of low temperature industrial waste heat, between 211 to 528 trillion kJ (200 and 500 trillion BTU`s) per annum, have the potential to drive absorption heat pumps. The proposed vortex generator permits a practical heat pump to operate efficiently with as much as 20 to 30 C below the boiling temperature of water (70--80 C (158--176 F)). Energy flows and auxiliary power requirements are computed. The system is shown to operate with relatively low temperature waste heat with higher specific capacity than conventional systems.

  18. [Study on catalytic oxidation of benzene by microwave heating].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-cai; Bo, Long-li; Wang, Xiao-hui; Liu, Hai-nan; Zhang, Hao

    2012-08-01

    The performance in catalytic oxidation of benzene was investigated in two different heating modes, microwave heating and conventional electric furnace heating. The effects of copper (Cu)-manganese (Mn) mass ratio, doping dose of cerium (Ce) and calcination temperature on the catalytic activity of Cu-Mn-Ce/molecular sieve catalyst were also checked in catalytic oxidation of benzene with microwave heating, and the catalysts were subsequently characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the catalyst had better catalytic activity for the oxidation of benzene under microwave heating than electric furnace heating, and high oxidation efficiency for benzene was reached due to the "local hot spots" and dipole polarization effect of microwave and stable bed reaction temperature. Under the conditions of Cu, Mn and Ce mass ratio 1:1:0.33 and calcination temperature 500 degrees C, the catalyst had the optimal catalytic activity for benzene oxidation, and its light-off temperature and complete combustion temperature were 165 degrees C and 230 degrees C, respectively. It was indicated by characteristics of XRD and SEM that the presence of copper and manganese oxides and Cu1.5Mn1.5O4 with spinel crystal improved the catalytic activity of the catalyst, and the doping of Ce promoted the dispersion and regularization of active components. High calcination temperature led to the sintering of the catalyst surface and agglomeration of active components, which decreased the catalytic activity of the catalyst in the catalytic oxidation PMID:23213902

  19. INDUCTION HEATING OF CARBON-FIBER COMPOSITES: THERMAL GENERATION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A theory of local and global mechanisms of heat generation and distribution in carbon-fiber-based composites subjected to an alternating magnetic field has been proposed. A model that predicts the strength and distribution of thermal generation through the thickness of carbon-fib...

  20. Finned Tube With Vortex Generators For A Heat Exchanger.

    DOEpatents

    Sohal, Monohar S.; O'Brien, James E.

    2004-09-14

    A system for and method of manufacturing a finned tube for a heat exchanger is disclosed herein. A continuous fin strip is provided with at least one pair of vortex generators. A tube is rotated and linearly displaced while the continuous fin strip with vortex generators is spirally wrapped around the tube.

  1. Finned Tube With Vortex Generators For A Heat Exchanger.

    DOEpatents

    Sohal, Manohar S.; O'Brien, James E.

    2005-12-20

    A system for and method of manufacturing a finned tube for a heat exchanger is disclosed herein. A continuous fin strip is provided with at one pair of vortex generators. A tube is rotated and linearly displaced while the continuous fin strip with vortex generators is spirally wrapped around the tube.

  2. SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL HYBRID SYSTEM FOR DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

    2003-07-01

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC during the January 2003 to June 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. This report summarizes the results obtained to date on: System performance analysis and model optimization; Reliability and cost model development; System control including dynamic model development; Heat exchanger material tests and life analysis; Pressurized SOFC evaluation; and Pre-baseline system definition for coal gasification fuel cell system concept.

  3. Heat- And Oxidation-Resistant Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Alloys coated with electrically conductive ceramics used to make strong, oxidation-resistant electrodes for electrochemical cells operating at temperatures of 1,000 to 1,300 degrees C. Fe3Al or Ni3Al coated with strontium-doped lanthanum manganite more resistant to chemical attack than all-metal electrode, less brittle than all-ceramic electrode, and less costly than either alternative.

  4. Numerical and Experimental Investigation for Heat Transfer Enhancement by Dimpled Surface Heat Exchanger in Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiping; Li, Shuai; Yang, Xue; Deng, Yadong; Su, Chuqi

    2016-03-01

    For vehicle thermoelectric exhaust energy recovery, the temperature difference between the heat exchanger and the coolant has a strong influence on the electric power generation, and ribs are often employed to enhance the heat transfer of the heat exchanger. However, the introduction of ribs will result in a large unwanted pressure drop in the exhaust system which is unfavorable for the engine's efficiency. Therefore, how to enhance the heat transfer and control the pressure drop in the exhaust system is quite important for thermoelectric generators (TEG). In the current study, a symmetrical arrangement of dimpled surfaces staggered in the upper and lower surfaces of the heat exchanger was proposed to augment heat transfer rates with minimal pressure drop penalties. The turbulent flow characteristics and heat transfer performance of turbulent flow over the dimpled surface in a flat heat exchanger was investigated by numerical simulation and temperature measurements. The heat transfer capacity in terms of Nusselt number and the pressure loss in terms of Fanning friction factors of the exchanger were compared with those of the flat plate. The pressure loss and heat transfer characteristics of dimples with a depth-to-diameter ratio ( h/D) at 0.2 were investigated. Finally, a quite good heat transfer performance with minimal pressure drop heat exchanger in a vehicle TEG was obtained. And based on the area-averaged surface temperature of the heat exchanger and the Seeback effect, the power generation can be improved by about 15% at Re = 25,000 compared to a heat exchanger with a flat surface.

  5. Anodic Oxidative Modification of Egg White for Heat Treatment.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masahito; Handa, Akihiro; Yamaguchi, Yusuke; Kodama, Risa; Chiba, Kazuhiro

    2016-08-31

    A new functionalization of egg white was achieved by an electrochemical reaction. The method involves electron transfer from thiol groups of egg white protein to form disulfide bonds. The oxidized egg white produced less hydrogen sulfide during heat treatment; with sufficient application of electricity, almost no hydrogen sulfide was produced. In addition, gels formed by heating electrochemically oxidized egg white exhibited unique properties, such as a lower gelation temperature and a softened texture, presumably due to protein aggregation and electrochemically mediated intramolecular disulfide bond formation. PMID:27518910

  6. Radiogenic heat generation in the Darling Range, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Mike F.

    2013-07-01

    New heat generation measurements for radiogenic granites were made for thirteen localities in the Darling Range, Western Australia. These are integrated with published data to estimate temperatures at depth within radiogenic-granite bodies for this region of the south-western Yilgarn Craton. The heat generation in the radiogenic granites is calculated from the concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium measured in the field. A reliable relationship between total counts from a commercial portable spectrometer and Geiger Müller counter was found for the various granites measured. The relationship Ao = 0.34 + 2.16 CU, with a correlation coefficient of 0.98, was found between uranium (CU in ppm) content and heat generation (Ao in units of µW/m3) for those radiogenic granites measured in the Darling Range, and also for two granites in the Pilbara Craton. Measured heat generation in the Darling Range was found to vary between 4 and 10μW/m3, the maximum of which is higher than previously known heat generation in granites for the Yilgarn Craton. Based on these new data, temperatures between depths of 3000 and 4000 m are modelled to fall between 60 and 110°C, depending on the thickness of the granitic bodies. These results are encouraging for potential low-temperature geothermal developments in this region, which is adjacent to the Perth metropolitan area.

  7. Effect on Non-Uniform Heat Generation on Thermionic Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    2012-01-19

    The penalty resulting from non-uniform heat generation in a thermionic reactor is examined. Operation at sub-optimum cesium pressure is shown to reduce this penalty, but at the risk of a condition analogous to burnout. For high pressure diodes, a simple empirical correlation between current, voltage and heat flux is developed and used to analyze the performance penalty associated with two different heat flux profiles, for series-and parallel-connected converters. The results demonstrate that series-connected converters require much finer power flattening than parallel converters. For example, a ±10% variation in heat generation across a series array can result in a 25 to 50% power penalty.

  8. Niobium alloy heat pipes for use in oxidizing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, C. C.

    Nb-alloy heat pipes employing oxidation-protection silicide coatings in conjunction with P/M techniques for the production of porous wicks have been shown capable of comfortably operating in flame temperatures in excess of 3000 K. Attention is presently given to Li corrosion tests conducted with Nb-10Hf-1Ti alloy heat pipes at up to 1477 K, in conjunction with the thermal performance data derived for specific heat-pipe designs. An Hf-rich reaction was detected after 200 hrs of exposure.

  9. Modeling of non-uniform heat generation in LDMOS transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, J.; Flores, D.; Urresti, J.; Hidalgo, S.; Rebollo, J.

    2005-01-01

    This work is devoted to the heat dissipation analysis in LDMOS transistors operating at high current conditions. Hence, a new expression for the Joule heat generated by electron current is provided to simplify the LDMOS electro-thermal modeling, thus giving physical insight and predicting hot spots. The model is based on the semiconductor physics and the required input data are the device geometrical and technological parameters as well as the applied bias.

  10. Heat transfer simulation in a helically coiled tube steam generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh, Bazargan; Keshavarz, Ali; Ebrahimi, Masood

    2014-01-01

    A symmetric helically coiled tube steam generator that operates by methane has been simulated analytically and numerically. In the analytical method, the furnace has been divided into five zones. The numerical method computes the total heat absorbed in the furnace, while the existing analytical methods compute only the radiation heat transfer. In addition, according to the numerical results, a correlation is proposed for the Nusselt number in the furnace.

  11. Heat Pipe-Assisted Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology for Waste Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Ju-Chan; Chi, Ri-Guang; Rhi, Seok-Ho; Lee, Kye-Bock; Hwang, Hyun-Chang; Lee, Ji-Su; Lee, Wook-Hyun

    2015-06-01

    Currently, large amounts of thermal energy dissipated from automobiles are emitted through hot exhaust pipes. This has resulted in the need for a new efficient recycling method to recover energy from waste hot exhaust gas. The present experimental study investigated how to improve the power output of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) system assisted by a wickless loop heat pipe (loop thermosyphon) under the limited space of the exhaust gas pipeline. The present study shows a novel loop-type heat pipe-assisted TEG concept to be applied to hybrid vehicles. The operating temperature of a TEG's hot side surface should be as high as possible to maximize the Seebeck effect. The present study shows a novel TEG concept of transferring heat from the source to the sink. This technology can transfer waste heat to any local place with a loop-type heat pipe. The present TEG system with a heat pipe can transfer heat and generate an electromotive force power of around 1.3 V in the case of 170°C hot exhaust gas. Two thermoelectric modules (TEMs) for a conductive block model and four Bi2Te3 TEMs with a heat pipe-assisted model were installed in the condenser section. Heat flows to the condenser section from the evaporator section connected to the exhaust pipe. This novel TEG system with a heat pipe can be placed in any location on an automobile.

  12. Light bulb heat exchanger for magnetohydrodynamic generator applications - Preliminary evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.; Hwang, C. C.; Seikel, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    The light-bulb heat-exchanger concept is investigated as a possible means of using a combustion heat source to supply energy to an inert gas MHD power generator system. In this concept, combustion gases flow through a central passage which consists of a duct with transparent walls through which heat is transferred by radiation to a radiation receiver which in turn heats the inert gas by convection. The effects of combustion-gas emissivity, transparent-wall-transmissivity, radiation-receiver emissivity, and the use of fins in the inert gas coolant passage are studied. The results indicate that inert gas outlet temperatures of 2500 K are possible for combustion temperatures of 3200 K and that sufficient energy can be transferred from the combustion gas to reduce its temperature to approximately 2000 K. At this temperature more conventional heat exchangers can be used.

  13. Generation of singlet oxygen on the surface of metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, V. M.; Kislyakov, I. M.; Burchinov, A. N.

    2016-04-01

    Generation of singlet oxygen on the surface of metal oxides is studied. It is shown that, under conditions of heterogeneous photo-catalysis, along with the conventional mechanism of singlet oxygen formation due to the formation of electron-hole pairs in the oxide structure, there is an additional and more efficient mechanism involving direct optical excitation of molecular oxygen adsorbed on the oxide surface. The excited adsorbate molecule then interacts with the surface or with other adsorbate molecules. It is shown that, with respect to singlet oxygen generation, yttrium oxide is more than an order of magnitude more efficient than other oxides, including titanium dioxide.

  14. Heat generation during overcharge of Ni/H2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, Hari; Kelly, W. H.; Earl, M. W.

    1992-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form on the heat generation during overcharge of nickel hydrogen cells. The heat dissipated during various rates of charge and overcharge was measured, using a radiative type calorimeter. Measurements made during the charging of the cell indicated that the total heat was greatest for C/10 charge, compared with C/2 or C/4. The endothermic to exothermic transition occurred at 1.43 V for C/10 charge, and increased to 1.467 V at C/2 charge. The magnitude of the endothermic heat was only 3.7 percent of the total heat generated during charging. Experimentally measured values were compared against those calculated using a thermoneutral potential of 1.51 V. Although there was general agreement between the calculated and measured values, a significant difference existed in the instantaneous heat values for the initial stages of cell discharge. Heat dissipated during self-discharge appears to depend on the charge rate preceding open circuit stand.

  15. Heat resistant polymers of oxidized styrylphosphine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. J. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A flame resistant, nontoxic polymer which may be used safely in confined locations where there is inadequate ventilation is prepared either by polymerizing compounds having the formula R-N=P(C6H5)2(C6H4)CH=CH2 where R is an organic moeity selected from the group of (C6H5)2P(O)-, (C6H5O)2P(O)-, (C6H5)2 C3N3-, or their mixtures, or by reacting a polymer with an organic azide such as diphenylphosphinylazide, diphenyl-phosphorylazide, 2-azido-4,6-diphenly-5-triazine, 2,4-diazido-6-phenyl-s-triazine, trimethylsilyoazide, triphenylsilylazine, and phenylazine. The reaction of the styrylphosphine with the organozaide results in the oxidation of the trivalent phosphorus atom to the pentavalent state in the form of an unsaturated P=N linkage known as a phosphazene group.

  16. New geothermal heat extraction process to deliver clean power generation

    ScienceCinema

    Pete McGrail

    2012-12-31

    A new method for capturing significantly more heat from low-temperature geothermal resources holds promise for generating virtually pollution-free electrical energy. Scientists at the Department of Energys Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will determine if their innovative approach can safely and economically extract and convert heat from vast untapped geothermal resources. The goal is to enable power generation from low-temperature geothermal resources at an economical cost. In addition to being a clean energy source without any greenhouse gas emissions, geothermal is also a steady and dependable source of power.

  17. Characterization of oxides on Bruce A NGS liner tubes and steam generator tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.G.; Burrill, K.A.

    1998-12-31

    Oxide deposits on end-fitting liner tubes and steam generator tubes from the Bruce A Nuclear Generating Station (NGS) were characterized in advance of the decontamination of the heat transport system (HTS) of Bruce Unit 2. Oxide loadings, and Co-60 surface activities and specific activities were determined for the oxides on inlet and outlet end-fitting liner tubes from Bruce Unit l, Bruce Unit 2 and Bruce Unit 4. Oxides on the inner surfaces of steam generator tubes from Bruce NGS Units 1 and 2 were also characterized. The consistency in the deposit characteristics on the inlet liner tubes and steam generator tubes from Bruce A, along with the absence of magnetite on the outlet liner tubes has led to the development of a model for iron transport in the HTS of pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs). The activity transport/fouling mechanism involves flow-accelerated corrosion of the outlet feeder pipes, followed by deposition of iron in the steam generators, along the inlet feeder pipes, on the inlet end fittings, on the inlet fuel bundles and on the inlet region of the pressure tube. The results of loop experiments using decontamination solutions indicated that the oxide was rapidly removed from inlet liner tubes. However, removal of the Cr-rich oxide from the outlet liner tubes was less efficient, requiring the Alkaline Permangante (AP) oxidizing pre-treatment that is typically used in light water reactors (LWRs). The steam generator tubes were effectively decontaminated.

  18. Heat-Transfer Enhancement by Artificially Generated Streamwise Vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanem, Akram; Habchi, Charbel; Lemenand, Thierry; Della Valle, Dominique; Peerhossaini, Hassan

    2012-11-01

    Vortex-induced heat transfer enhancement exploits longitudinal and transverse pressure-driven vortices through the deliberate artificial generation of large-scale vortical flow structures. Thermal-hydraulic performance, Nusselt number and friction factor are experimentally investigated in a HEV (high-efficiency vortex) mixer, which is a tubular heat exchanger and static mixer equipped with trapezoidal vortex generators. Pressure gradients are generated on the trapezoidal tab initiating a streamwise swirling motion in the form of two longitudinal counter-rotating vortex pairs (CVP). Due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, the shear layer generated at the tab edges, which is a production site of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), becomes unstable further downstream from the tabs and gives rise to periodic hairpin vortices. The aim of the study is to quantify the effects of hydrodynamics on the heat- and masstransfer phenomena accompanying such flows for comparison with the results of numerical studies and validate the high efficiency of the intensification process implementing such vortex generators. The experimental results reflect the enhancement expected from the numerical studies and confirm the high status of the HEV heat exchanger and static mixer.

  19. Waste-heat steam generation is economically viable in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    McMann, F.C.; Marshall, R.W.

    1984-03-01

    Generation of electric power by turbine-driven generators serviced by waste heat boilers is not a blue sky dream. It is time-proven technology, employing time-proven equipment-equipment that is expected to run uninterrupted in fouryear cycles. This equipment and its control are made right here in the U.S. The equipment is very simple to operate and maintain. This article describes the applications of ceramics in this industry.

  20. Modeling Joule Heating Effect on Lunar O2 Generation via Electrolytic Reduction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominquez, Jesus; Poizeau, Sophie; Sibille, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center is leading research work on lunar O2 generation via electrolytic reduction of regolith; the metal oxide present in the regolith is dissociated in oxygen anions and metal cations leading to the generation of gaseous oxygen at the anode and liquid metal at the cathode. Electrical resistance of molten regolith is high, leading to heating of the melt when electrical current is applied between the electrodes (Joule heating). The authors have developed a 3D model using a rigorous approach for two coupled physics (thermal and electrical potential) to not only study the effect of Joule heating on temperature distribution throughout the molten regolith but also to evaluate and optimize the design of the electrolytic cells. This paper presents the results of the thermal analysis performed on the model and used to validate the design of the electrolytic cell.

  1. Heat generated during seating of dental implant fixtures.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Dennis

    2014-04-01

    Frictional heat can be generated during seating of dental implants into a drill-prepared osteotomy. This in vitro study tested the heat generated by implant seating in dense bovine mandible ramus. A thermocouple was placed approximately 0.5 mm from the rim of the osteotomy during seating of each dental implant. Four diameters of implants were tested. The average temperature increases were 0.075°C for the 5.7-mm-diameter implant, 0.97°C for the 4.7-mm-diameter implant, 1.4°C for the 3.7-mm-diameter implant, and 8.6°C for the 2.5-mm-diameter implant. The results showed that heat was indeed generated and a small temperature rise occurred, apparently by the friction of the implant surface against the fresh-cut bone surface. Bone is a poor thermal conductor. The titanium of the implant and the steel of the handpiece are much better heat conductors. Titanium may be 70 times more heat conductive than bone. The larger diameter and displacement implant may act as a heat sink to draw away any heat produced from the friction of seating the implant at the bone-implant interface. The peak temperature duration was momentary, and not measured, but this was approximately less than 1 second. Except for the 2.5-mm-diameter implants, the temperature rises and durations were found to be below those previously deemed to be detrimental, so no clinically significant osseous damage would be expected during dental implant fixture seating of standard and large-diameter-sized implants. A 2.5-mm implant may generate detrimental heat during seating in nonvital bone, but this may be clinically insignificant in vital bone. The surface area and thermal conductivity are important factors in removing generated heat transfer at the bone-implant interface. The F value as determined by analysis of variance was 69.22, and the P value was less than .0001, demonstrating significant differences between the groups considered as a whole. PMID:24400840

  2. Modeling a Thermoelectric Generator Applied to Diesel Automotive Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, N.; Lazard, M.; Aixala, L.; Scherrer, H.

    2010-09-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are outstanding devices for automotive waste heat recovery. Their packaging, lack of moving parts, and direct heat to electrical conversion are the main benefits. Usually, TEGs are modeled with a constant hot-source temperature. However, energy in exhaust gases is limited, thus leading to a temperature decrease as heat is recovered. Therefore thermoelectric properties change along the TEG, affecting performance. A thermoelectric generator composed of Mg2Si/Zn4Sb3 for high temperatures followed by Bi2Te3 for low temperatures has been modeled using engineering equation solver (EES) software. The model uses the finite-difference method with a strip-fins convective heat transfer coefficient. It has been validated on a commercial module with well-known properties. The thermoelectric connection and the number of thermoelements have been addressed as well as the optimum proportion of high-temperature material for a given thermoelectric heat exchanger. TEG output power has been estimated for a typical commercial vehicle at 90°C coolant temperature.

  3. Niobium alloy heat pipes for use in oxidizing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig Wojcik, C.

    1991-01-01

    Niobium alloys have been used for many years in rocket propulsion systems and afterburner sections of gas turbine engines. In these applications, adequate oxidation resistance is provided by protective silicide coatings. By utilizing these coatings and niobium powder metallurgy to produce porous wicks, it has been demonstrated that niobium alloy heat pipes can comfortably operate in flame temperatures exceeding 3000 K. Results of lithium corrosion tests on C-103 (Nb-10%Hf-1%Ti) up to 1477 K will be presented along with thermal performance data for specific heat pipe designs.

  4. Heat generation in aircraft tires under free rolling conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, S. K.; Dodge, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    A method was developed for calculating the internal temperature distribution in an aircraft tire while free rolling under load. The method uses an approximate stress analysis of each point in the tire as it rolls through the contact patch, and from this stress change the mechanical work done on each volume element may be obtained and converted into a heat release rate through a knowledge of material characteristics. The tire cross-section is then considered as a body with internal heat generation, and the diffusion equation is solved numerically with appropriate boundary conditions of the wheel and runway surface. Comparison with data obtained with buried thermocouples in tires shows good agreement.

  5. Parametric Optimization of Thermoelectric Generators for Waste Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shouyuan; Xu, Xianfan

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a methodology for design optimization of thermoelectric-based waste heat recovery systems called thermoelectric generators (TEGs). The aim is to maximize the power output from thermoelectrics which are used as add-on modules to an existing gas-phase heat exchanger, without negative impacts, e.g., maintaining a minimum heat dissipation rate from the hot side. A numerical model is proposed for TEG coupled heat transfer and electrical power output. This finite-volume-based model simulates different types of heat exchangers, i.e., counter-flow and cross-flow, for TEGs. Multiple-filled skutterudites and bismuth-telluride-based thermoelectric modules (TEMs) are applied, respectively, in higher and lower temperature regions. The response surface methodology is implemented to determine the optimized TEG size along and across the flow direction and the height of thermoelectric couple legs, and to analyze their covariance and relative sensitivity. A genetic algorithm is employed to verify the globality of the optimum. The presented method will be generally useful for optimizing heat-exchanger-based TEG performance.

  6. Increased use of reject heat from electric generation

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, R.W.; Piraino, M.

    1994-02-01

    This study aims to determine existing barriers to greater use of reject heat by electric power producers, including utilities and cogenerators. It includes analytical studies of the technical and economic issues and a survey of several electric power producers. The core analytic findings of the study are that although electric utility- based, cogenerated district heating is sometimes cost competitive with currently common furnaces and boilers, it is not clearly less expensive, and is often more expensive. Since market penetration by a new technology depends on strong perceived advantages, district heating will remain at a disadvantage unless its benefits, such as lowered emissions and decreased reliance on foreign oil, are given overt financial form through subsidies or tax incentives. The central finding from the survey was that electric utilities have arrived at the same conclusion by their own routes; we present a substantial list of their reasons for not engaging in district heating or for not pursuing it more vigorously, and many of them can be summarized as the lack of a clear cost advantage for district heat. We also note that small-scale district heating systems, based on diesel generators and located near the thermal load center, show very clear cost advantages over individual furnaces. This cost advantage is consistent with the explosive growth currently observed in private cogeneration systems.

  7. Improved heat dissipation in gallium nitride light-emitting diodes with embedded graphene oxide pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Nam; Viet Cuong, Tran; Han, Min; Deul Ryu, Beo; Chandramohan, S.; Bae Park, Jong; Hye Kang, Ji; Park, Young-Jae; Bok Ko, Kang; Yun Kim, Hee; Kyu Kim, Hyun; Hyoung Ryu, Jae; Katharria, Y. S.; Choi, Chel-Jong; Hong, Chang-Hee

    2013-02-01

    The future of solid-state lighting relies on how the performance parameters will be improved further for developing high-brightness light-emitting diodes. Eventually, heat removal is becoming a crucial issue because the requirement of high brightness necessitates high-operating current densities that would trigger more joule heating. Here we demonstrate that the embedded graphene oxide in a gallium nitride light-emitting diode alleviates the self-heating issues by virtue of its heat-spreading ability and reducing the thermal boundary resistance. The fabrication process involves the generation of scalable graphene oxide microscale patterns on a sapphire substrate, followed by its thermal reduction and epitaxial lateral overgrowth of gallium nitride in a metal-organic chemical vapour deposition system under one-step process. The device with embedded graphene oxide outperforms its conventional counterpart by emitting bright light with relatively low-junction temperature and thermal resistance. This facile strategy may enable integration of large-scale graphene into practical devices for effective heat removal.

  8. Flexible transparent heaters with heating films made of indium tin oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Im, Kiju; Chol, Kyoungah; Kwak, Kiyeol; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Sangsig

    2013-05-01

    In this study, flexible transparent heaters with heating films made of indium tin oxide (ITO) are fabricated on plastic substrates. The optical transmittance of a representative flexible heater is above 90% in the visible and near infrared regions. The steady-state temperature is determined by the bias voltage and reaches about 180 degrees C at a bias voltage of 50 V. The heat-generating properties are nearly the same before and after the application of tensile strain. Furthermore, the defrosting ability is demonstrated using a block of dry-ice. PMID:23858892

  9. Design with constructal theory: Steam generators, turbines and heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong Sung

    This dissertation shows that the architecture of steam generators, steam turbines and heat exchangers for power plants can be predicted on the basis of the constructal law. According to constructal theory, the flow architecture emerges such that it provides progressively greater access to its currents. Each chapter shows how constructal theory guides the generation of designs in pursuit of higher performance. Chapter two shows the tube diameters, the number of riser tubes, the water circulation rate and the rate of steam production are determined by maximizing the heat transfer rate from hot gases to riser tubes and minimizing the global flow resistance under the fixed volume constraint. Chapter three shows how the optimal spacing between adjacent tubes, the number of tubes for the downcomer and the riser and the location of the flow reversal for the continuous steam generator are determined by the intersection of asymptotes method, and by minimizing the flow resistance under the fixed volume constraints. Chapter four shows that the mass inventory for steam turbines can be distributed between high pressure and low pressure turbines such that the global performance of the power plant is maximal under the total mass constraint. Chapter five presents the more general configuration of a two-stream heat exchanger with forced convection of the hot side and natural circulation on the cold side. Chapter six demonstrates that segmenting a tube with condensation on the outer surface leads to a smaller thermal resistance, and generates design criteria for the performance of multi-tube designs.

  10. Assessment of next generation nuclear plant intermediate heat exchanger design.

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Moisseytsev, A.; Natesan, K.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-10-17

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is an advanced high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) concept with emphasis on production of both electricity and hydrogen, involves helium as the coolant and a closed-cycle gas turbine for power generation with a core outlet/gas turbine inlet temperature of 900-1000 C. In the indirect cycle system, an intermediate heat exchanger is used to transfer the heat from primary helium from the core to the secondary fluid, which can be helium, nitrogen/helium mixture, or a molten salt. The system concept for the vary high temperature reactor (VHTR) can be a reactor based on the prismatic block of the GT-MHR developed by a consortium led by General Atomics in the U.S. or based on the PBMR design developed by ESKOM of South Africa and British Nuclear Fuels of U.K. This report has made an assessment on the issues pertaining to the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP. A detailed thermal hydraulic analysis, using models developed at ANL, was performed to calculate heat transfer, temperature distribution, and pressure drop. Two IHX designs namely, shell and straight tube and compact heat exchangers were considered in an earlier assessment. Helical coil heat exchangers were analyzed in the current report and the results were compared with the performance features of designs from industry. In addition, a comparative analysis is presented between the shell and straight tube, helical, and printed circuit heat exchangers from the standpoint of heat exchanger volume, primary and secondary sides pressure drop, and number of tubes. The IHX being a high temperature component, probably needs to be designed using ASME Code Section III, Subsection NH, assuming that the IHX will be classified as a class 1 component. With input from thermal hydraulic calculations performed at ANL, thermal conduction and stress analyses were performed for the helical heat exchanger design and the results were compared with earlier-developed results on

  11. Heat Priming Induces Trans-generational Tolerance to High Temperature Stress in Wheat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Xin, Caiyun; Cai, Jian; Zhou, Qin; Dai, Tingbo; Cao, Weixing; Jiang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Wheat plants are very sensitive to high temperature stress during grain filling. Effects of heat priming applied to the first generation on tolerance of the successive generation to post-anthesis high temperature stress were investigated. Compared with the progeny of non-heat primed plants (NH), the progeny of heat-primed plants (PH) possessed higher grain yield, leaf photosynthesis and activities of antioxidant enzymes and lower cell membrane damage under high temperature stress. In the transcriptome profile, 1430 probes showed obvious difference in expression between PH and NH. These genes were related to signal transduction, transcription, energy, defense, and protein destination and storage, respectively. The gene encoding the lysine-specific histone demethylase 1 (LSD1) which was involved in histone demethylation related to epigenetic modification was up-regulated in the PH compared with NH. The proteome analysis indicated that the proteins involved in photosynthesis, energy production and protein destination and storage were up-regulated in the PH compared with NH. In short, thermos-tolerance was induced through heritable epigenetic alternation and signaling transduction, both processes further triggered prompt modifications of defense related responses in anti-oxidation, transcription, energy production, and protein destination and storage in the progeny of the primed plants under high temperature stress. It was concluded that trans-generation thermo-tolerance was induced by heat priming in the first generation, and this might be an effective measure to cope with severe high-temperature stresses during key growth stages in wheat production. PMID:27148324

  12. Heat Priming Induces Trans-generational Tolerance to High Temperature Stress in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Xin, Caiyun; Cai, Jian; Zhou, Qin; Dai, Tingbo; Cao, Weixing; Jiang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Wheat plants are very sensitive to high temperature stress during grain filling. Effects of heat priming applied to the first generation on tolerance of the successive generation to post-anthesis high temperature stress were investigated. Compared with the progeny of non-heat primed plants (NH), the progeny of heat-primed plants (PH) possessed higher grain yield, leaf photosynthesis and activities of antioxidant enzymes and lower cell membrane damage under high temperature stress. In the transcriptome profile, 1430 probes showed obvious difference in expression between PH and NH. These genes were related to signal transduction, transcription, energy, defense, and protein destination and storage, respectively. The gene encoding the lysine-specific histone demethylase 1 (LSD1) which was involved in histone demethylation related to epigenetic modification was up-regulated in the PH compared with NH. The proteome analysis indicated that the proteins involved in photosynthesis, energy production and protein destination and storage were up-regulated in the PH compared with NH. In short, thermos-tolerance was induced through heritable epigenetic alternation and signaling transduction, both processes further triggered prompt modifications of defense related responses in anti-oxidation, transcription, energy production, and protein destination and storage in the progeny of the primed plants under high temperature stress. It was concluded that trans-generation thermo-tolerance was induced by heat priming in the first generation, and this might be an effective measure to cope with severe high-temperature stresses during key growth stages in wheat production. PMID:27148324

  13. Infrared nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of stainless steel: micro iron-oxide zones generation.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Morales, M; Frausto-Reyes, C; Soto-Bernal, J J; Acosta-Ortiz, S E; Gonzalez-Mota, R; Rosales-Candelas, I

    2014-07-15

    Nanosecond-pulsed, infrared (1064 nm) laser irradiation was used to create periodic metal oxide coatings on the surface of two samples of commercial stainless steel at ambient conditions. A pattern of four different metal oxide zones was created using a galvanometer scanning head and a focused laser beam over each sample. This pattern is related to traverse direction of the laser beam scanning. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to find the elemental composition and Raman spectroscopy to characterize each oxide zone. Pulsed laser irradiation modified the composition of the stainless steel samples, affecting the concentration of the main components within each heat affected zone. The Raman spectra of the generated oxides have different intensity profiles, which suggest different oxide phases such as magnetite and maghemite. In addition, these oxides are not sensible to the laser power of the Raman system, as are the iron oxide powders reported in the literature. These experiments show that it is possible to generate periodic patterns of various iron oxide zones by laser irradiation, of stainless steel at ambient conditions, and that Raman spectroscopy is a useful punctual technique for the analysis and inspection of small oxide areas. PMID:24699286

  14. Infrared nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of stainless steel: Micro iron-oxide zones generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Morales, M.; Frausto-Reyes, C.; Soto-Bernal, J. J.; Acosta-Ortiz, S. E.; Gonzalez-Mota, R.; Rosales-Candelas, I.

    2014-07-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed, infrared (1064 nm) laser irradiation was used to create periodic metal oxide coatings on the surface of two samples of commercial stainless steel at ambient conditions. A pattern of four different metal oxide zones was created using a galvanometer scanning head and a focused laser beam over each sample. This pattern is related to traverse direction of the laser beam scanning. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to find the elemental composition and Raman spectroscopy to characterize each oxide zone. Pulsed laser irradiation modified the composition of the stainless steel samples, affecting the concentration of the main components within each heat affected zone. The Raman spectra of the generated oxides have different intensity profiles, which suggest different oxide phases such as magnetite and maghemite. In addition, these oxides are not sensible to the laser power of the Raman system, as are the iron oxide powders reported in the literature. These experiments show that it is possible to generate periodic patterns of various iron oxide zones by laser irradiation, of stainless steel at ambient conditions, and that Raman spectroscopy is a useful punctual technique for the analysis and inspection of small oxide areas.

  15. Micro- and Nanoscale Energetic Materials as Effective Heat Energy Sources for Enhanced Gas Generators.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Beom; Kim, Kyung Ju; Cho, Myung Hoon; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Kyung Tae; Kim, Soo Hyung

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we systematically investigated the effect of micro- and nanoscale energetic materials in formulations of aluminum microparticles (Al MPs; heat source)/aluminum nanoparticles (Al NPs; heat source)/copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs; oxidizer) on the combustion and gas-generating properties of sodium azide microparticles (NaN3 MPs; gas-generating agent) for potential applications in gas generators. The burn rate of the NaN3 MP/CuO NP composite powder was only ∼0.3 m/s. However, the addition of Al MPs and Al NPs to the NaN3 MP/CuO NP matrix caused the rates to reach ∼1.5 and ∼5.3 m/s, respectively. In addition, the N2 gas volume flow rate generated by the ignition of the NaN3 MP/CuO NP composite powder was only ∼0.6 L/s, which was significantly increased to ∼1.4 and ∼3.9 L/s by adding Al MPs and Al NPs, respectively, to the NaN3 MP/CuO NP composite powder. This suggested that the highly reactive Al MPs and NPs, with the assistance of CuO NPs, were effective heat-generating sources enabling the complete thermal decomposition of NaN3 MPs upon ignition. Al NPs were more effective than Al MPs in the gas generators because of the increased reactivity induced by the reduced particle size. Finally, we successfully demonstrated that a homemade airbag with a specific volume of ∼140 mL could be rapidly and fully inflated by the thermal activation of nanoscale energetic material-added gas-generating agents (i.e., NaN3 MP/Al NP/CuO NP composites) within the standard time of ∼50 ms for airbag inflation. PMID:27007287

  16. Induction heating to trigger the nickel surface modification by in situ generated 4-carboxybenzene diazonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrotin, Bastien; Jacques, Amory; Devillers, Sébastien; Delhalle, Joseph; Mekhalif, Zineb

    2016-05-01

    Nickel is commonly used in numerous applications and is one of the few materials that present strong ferromagnetic properties. These make it a suitable material for induction heating which can be used to activate the grafting of organic species such as diazonium salts onto the material. Diazonium compounds are often used for the modification of metals and alloys thanks to their easy chemical reduction onto the substrates and the possibility to apply a one-step in situ generation process of the diazonium species. This work focuses on the grafting of 4-aminocarboxybenzene on nickel substrates in the context of a spontaneous grafting conducted either at room temperature or by thermal assistance through conventional heating and induction heating. These modifications are also carried out with the goal of maintaining the oxides layer as much as possible unaffected. The benefits of using induction heating with respect to conventional heating are an increase of the grafting rate, a better control of the reaction and a slighter impact on the oxides layer.

  17. Energy harvesting thermoelectric generators manufactured using the complementary metal oxide semiconductor process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming-Zhi; Wu, Chyan-Chyi; Dai, Ching-Liang; Tsai, Wen-Jung

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of energy harvesting thermoelectric micro generators using the commercial complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The micro generator consists of 33 thermocouples in series. Thermocouple materials are p-type and n-type polysilicon since they have a large Seebeck coefficient difference. The output power of the micro generator depends on the temperature difference in the hot and cold parts of the thermocouples. In order to increase this temperature difference, the hot part of the thermocouples is suspended to reduce heat-sinking. The micro generator needs a post-CMOS process to release the suspended structures of hot part, which the post-process includes an anisotropic dry etching to etch the sacrificial oxide layer and an isotropic dry etching to remove the silicon substrate. Experiments show that the output power of the micro generator is 9.4 mW at a temperature difference of 15 K. PMID:23396193

  18. Car companies look to generate power from waste heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirber, Michael

    2008-04-01

    You might think that the steam engine is an outdated technology that had its heyday centuries ago, but in fact steam is once again a hot topic with vehicle manufacturers. Indeed, the next generation of hybrid cars and trucks may incorporate some form of steam power. Honda, for example, has just released details of a new prototype hybrid car that recharges its battery using a steam engine that exploits waste heat from the exhaust pipe.

  19. Microwave heating for the rapid generation of glycosylhydrazides.

    PubMed

    Mallevre, F; Roget, A; Minon, T; Kervella, Y; Ropartz, D; Ralet, M C; Canut, H; Livache, T

    2013-07-17

    Conditions for simple derivatization of reducing carbohydrates via adipic acid dihydrazide microwave-assisted condensation are described. We demonstrate with a diverse set of oligo- and polysaccharides how to improve a restrictive and labor intensive conventional conjugation protocol by using microwave-assisted chemistry. We show that 5 min of microwave heating in basic or acidic conditions are adequate to generate, in increased yields, intact and functional glycosylhydrazides, whereas hours to days and acidic conditions are generally required under conventional methods. PMID:23731134

  20. Sound generated by vortex ring impingement on a heated wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsari, E. Giannos; Howe, M. S.

    2009-11-01

    An analysis is made of the sound generated when a vortex ring impinges normally on a heated section of a plane wall. The unsteady convective diffusion occurring when the vortex is close to the wall causes a rapid increase in heat transfer and the emission of sound of monopole type. The approximate dependence on vortex Reynolds number of the enhancement of heat transfer is deduced from recent experiments reported by Arévalo et al. [Vortex ring head-on collision with a heated vertical plate, Physics of Fluids 19 (2007) 083603-1-083603-9], and is used to derive a scaling law for the acoustic pressure. The sound pressure signature is dominated by a large amplitude pulse associated with an explosive, but brief increase in the rate of heat transfer at the start of the vortex-wall interaction. The quadrupole sound pressure also produced during impingement on the wall is found to be smaller than the thermally induced sound by a factor proportional to M2T0/(Tw-T0) where M, Tw, T0 respectively denote the Mach number of the vortex motion, the mean wall temperature and the fluid temperature at large distances from the wall.

  1. Thermoelectric Generation Using Waste Heat in Steel Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroki, Takashi; Kabeya, Kazuhisa; Makino, Kazuya; Kajihara, Takeshi; Kaibe, Hiromasa; Hachiuma, Hirokuni; Matsuno, Hidetoshi; Fujibayashi, Akio

    2014-06-01

    The steelmaking industry in Japan has significantly reduced its energy use for the past several decades and has kept the highest energy efficiency in the world. However, the steelmaking industry is strongly required to develop new technologies for further energy conservation in view of energy security, high and volatile energy prices, and climate change. One of the key technologies to achieve the requirement is waste heat recovery. This paper describes the thermoelectric generation (TEG) system using the waste heat in the steelmaking process. In this system, the TEG unit, which consists of 16 thermoelectric modules made of Bi-Te thermoelectric materials, generates the electrical power directly by converting the radiant heat released from hot steel products. Each thermoelectric module, whose size is 50 mm × 50 mm × 4.2 mm, generates 18 W when the hot-side temperature is 523 K and the cold-side is 303 K. Therefore, the output of the TEG unit is over 250 W. The performance and the durability of the system have been investigated under various operating conditions in steel works. The results of the verification tests in the JFE steel Corporation's continuous casting line will be discussed.

  2. Heat Transfer Enhancement for Finned-Tube Heat Exchangers with Vortex Generators: Experimental and Numerical Results

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh; Huff, George Albert

    2002-08-01

    A combined experimental and numerical investigation is under way to investigate heat transfer enhancement techniques that may be applicable to large-scale air-cooled condensers such as those used in geothermal power applications. The research is focused on whether air-side heat transfer can be improved through the use of finsurface vortex generators (winglets,) while maintaining low heat exchanger pressure drop. A transient heat transfer visualization and measurement technique has been employed in order to obtain detailed distributions of local heat transfer coefficients on model fin surfaces. Pressure drop measurements have also been acquired in a separate multiple-tube row apparatus. In addition, numerical modeling techniques have been developed to allow prediction of local and average heat transfer for these low-Reynolds-number flows with and without winglets. Representative experimental and numerical results presented in this paper reveal quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer in the vicinity of a circular tube with a single delta winglet pair downstream of the cylinder. The winglets were triangular (delta) with a 1:2 height/length aspect ratio and a height equal to 90% of the channel height. Overall mean fin-surface Nusselt-number results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement (average enhancement ratio 35%) associated with the deployment of the winglets with oval tubes. Pressure drop measurements have also been obtained for a variety of tube and winglet configurations using a single-channel flow apparatus that includes four tube rows in a staggered array. Comparisons of heat transfer and pressure drop results for the elliptical tube versus a circular tube with and without winglets are provided. Heat transfer and pressure-drop results have been obtained for flow Reynolds numbers based on channel height and mean flow velocity ranging from 700 to 6500.

  3. Heat capacity, enthalpy and entropy of ternary bismuth tantalum oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, J.; Jakes, V.; Sofer, Z.; Sedmidubsky, D.; Ruzicka, K.; Svoboda, P.

    2011-02-15

    Heat capacity and enthalpy increments of ternary bismuth tantalum oxides Bi{sub 4}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 11}, Bi{sub 7}Ta{sub 3}O{sub 18} and Bi{sub 3}TaO{sub 7} were measured by the relaxation time method (2-280 K), DSC (265-353 K) and drop calorimetry (622-1322 K). Temperature dependencies of the molar heat capacity in the form C{sub pm}=445.8+0.005451T-7.489x10{sup 6}/T{sup 2} J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1}, C{sub pm}=699.0+0.05276T-9.956x10{sup 6}/T{sup 2} J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1} and C{sub pm}=251.6+0.06705T-3.237x10{sup 6}/T{sup 2} J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1} for Bi{sub 3}TaO{sub 7}, Bi{sub 4}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 11} and for Bi{sub 7}Ta{sub 3}O{sub 18}, respectively, were derived by the least-squares method from the experimental data. The molar entropies at 298.15 K, S{sup o}{sub m}(298.15 K)=449.6{+-}2.3 J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1} for Bi{sub 4}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 11}, S{sup o}{sub m}(298.15 K)=743.0{+-}3.8 J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1} for Bi{sub 7}Ta{sub 3}O{sub 18} and S{sup o}{sub m}(298.15 K)=304.3{+-}1.6 J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1} for Bi{sub 3}TaO{sub 7}, were evaluated from the low-temperature heat capacity measurements. -- Graphical Abstract: Temperature dependence of {Delta}{sub ox}C{sub pm} for bismuth tantalum mixed oxides. Display Omitted Research highlights: > Heat capacity, enthalpy and entropy of ternary bismuth tantalum oxides Bi{sub 4}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 11}, Bi{sub 7}Ta{sub 3}O{sub 18} and Bi{sub 3}TaO{sub 7}. > Heat capacity by DSC calorimetry and heat-pulsed calorimetry. > Enthalpy increments by drop calorimetry. > Einstein-Debye model for low-temperature dependence of the heat capacity. > Application of Neumann-Kopp rule.

  4. Oxidant generation and toxicity enhancement of aged-diesel exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qianfeng; Wyatt, Anna; Kamens, Richard M.

    Diesel exhaust related airborne Particulate Matter (PM) has been linked to a myriad of adverse health outcomes, ranging from cancer to cardiopulmonary disease. The underlying toxicological mechanisms are of great scientific interest. A hypothesis under investigation is that many of the adverse health effects may derive from oxidative stress, initiated by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within affected cells. In this study, the main objective was to determine whether aged-diesel exhaust PM has a higher oxidant generation and toxicity than fresh diesel exhaust PM. The diesel exhaust PM was generated from a 1980 Mercedes-Benz model 300SD, and a dual 270 m 3 Teflon film chamber was utilized to generate two test atmospheres. One side of the chamber is used to produce ozone-diesel exhaust PM system, and another side of the chamber was used to produce diesel exhaust PM only system. A newly optimized dithiothreitol (DTT) method was used to assess their oxidant generation and toxicity. The results of this study showed: (1) both fresh and aged-diesel exhaust PM had high oxidant generation and toxicity; (2) ozone-diesel exhaust PM had a higher toxicity response than diesel exhaust PM only; (3) the diesel exhaust PM toxicity increased with time; (4) the optimized DTT method could be used as a good quantitative chemical assay for oxidant generation and toxicity measurement.

  5. Second-harmonic generation in metal oxide/ormosils nanocomposites derived from sol-gel processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chih-Hsing; Xu, Yuhuan; Mackenzie, John D.; Chee, Joseph K.; Liu, Jia-ming

    1992-12-01

    Nanocomposites of Ormosis containing metal oxides, such as niobates, titanates and zirconates, were prepared by sol-gel processing. The materials were hydrolyzed partially and were dried in air atmosphere for appropriate periods. Afterwards, the materials were heat- treated between 200 degree(s) and 450 degree(s)C for 2 days in pure oxygen. The final bulk samples are transparent in infrared and visible ranges. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that these samples did not have any crystalline phases after heating up to 200 degree(s)C. Using a Nd:YAG laser of 1.064 micrometers wavelength, second harmonic generation, of green light (0.532 micrometers ), was observed in these metal oxides/Ormosils nanocomposites. The refractive index and other optical properties of the metal oxides/Ormosils were also measured. The microstructures of these samples were examined by transmission electron microscopy.

  6. Cellular level loading and heating of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kalambur, Venkat S; Longmire, Ellen K; Bischof, John C

    2007-11-20

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) hold promise for a variety of biomedical applications due to their properties of visualization using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), heating with radio frequency (rf), and movement in an external magnetic field. In this study, the cellular loading (uptake) mechanism of dextran- and surfactant-coated iron oxide NPs by malignant prostate tumor cells (LNCaP-Pro5) has been studied, and the feasibility of traditional rf treatment and a new laser heating method was evaluated. The kinetics of cell loading was quantified using magnetophoresis and a colorimetric assay. The results showed that loading of surfactant-coated iron oxide NPs with LNCaP-Pro5 was saturable with time (at 24 h) and extracellular concentration (11 pg Fe/cell at 0.5 mg Fe/mL), indicating that the particles are taken up by an "adsorptive endocytosis" pathway. Dextran-coated NPs, however, were taken up less efficiently (1 pg Fe/cell at 0.5 mg Fe/mL). Loading did not saturate with concentration suggesting uptake by fluid-phase endocytosis. Magnetophoresis suggests that NP-loaded cells can be held using external magnetic fields in microcirculatory flow velocities in vivo or in an appropriately designed extracorporeal circuit. Loaded cells were heated using traditional rf (260A, 357 kHz) and a new laser method (532 nm, 7 ns pulse duration, 0.03 J/pulse, 20 pulse/s). Iron oxide in water was found to absorb sufficiently strongly at 532 nm such that heating of individual NPs and thus loaded cells (1 pg Fe/cell) was effective (<10% cell survival) after 30 s of laser exposure. Radio frequency treatment required higher loading (>10 pg Fe/cell) and longer duration (30 min) when compared to laser to accomplish cell destruction (50% viability at 10 pg Fe/cell). Scaling calculations show that the pulsed laser method can lead to single-cell (loaded with NPs) treatments (200 degrees C temperature change at the surface of an individual NP) unlike traditional rf heating

  7. SOFCo mobile planar solid oxide generator

    SciTech Connect

    Khandkar, A.C.; Privette, R.M.

    1995-08-01

    This paper presents results from the first phase of a three phase, four-year program with the objective of designing and demonstrating a 10 kW mobile electric power generator operating on logistic fuel. Objectives of the first phase include: the development of a preliminary system design, an assessment of technologies critical to system performance, and the fabrication of three multi-stack test units.

  8. Safe radioisotope thermoelectric generators and heat sources for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, R. C.; Ambrosi, R. M.; Bannister, N. P.; Howe, S. D.; Atkinson, H. V.

    2008-07-01

    Several isotopes are examined as alternatives to 238Pu that is traditionally used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and heating units (RHUs). The radioisotopes discussed include 241Am, 208Po, 210Po, and 90Sr. The aim of this study is to facilitate the design of an RTG with a minimal radiation dose rate and mass including any required shielding. Applications of interest are primarily space and planetary exploration. In order to evaluate the properties of the alternative radioisotopes a Monte Carlo model was developed to examine the radiation protection aspect of the study. The thermodynamics of the power generation process is examined and possible materials for the housing and encapsulation of the radioisotopes are proposed. In this study we also present a historical review of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and the thermoelectric conversion mechanism in order to provide a direct comparison with the performance of our proposed alternative isotope systems.

  9. Microstructural evolution of char under oxidation induced by uneven heating

    SciTech Connect

    Kantorovich, I.I.; Bar-Ziv, E. |

    1996-04-01

    Single spherical char particles were intentionally irradiated nonuniformly in an electrodynamic chamber, in the temperature range 600--1,000 K. The char particles were irradiated from one side (bottom) and consequently heated unevenly. Nonuniform shrinkage of an initially spherical char particle has been observed during oxidation. The features of nonuniform shrinkage are rather peculiar: (1) up to 40%--60% conversion, the particle shrank uniformly. Then spatial preferential consumption initiated, indicating the threshold nature of the phenomenon; (2) preferential consumption, in most experiments, was observed to start from the top of the particle; (3) above the threshold conversion, a disk structure became clear; (4) at very high conversion the particle became like a center-hole doughnut. A model was developed to explain these features by nonuniform transformation of the micropore structure due to oxidation of the unevenly heated particle. The threshold nature of the phenomenon was also explained in terms of the dynamic stability of a particle. The threshold of nonuniform shrinkage corresponds to the transition of the particle to a stable position. After initiation of nonuniform shrinkage, the macroporosity distribution inside the particle becomes nonuniform. Macroporosity was shown to increase near the particle`s center; this eventually creates a hole at high conversion. The good agreement of modeling results with experimental observation confirms the notion that nonuniform shrinkage in regime 1 (kinetically controlled) is an indication of the fundamental microstructural transformations in the course of oxidation.

  10. Probing and controlling photothermal heat generation in plasmonic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Coppens, Zachary J; Li, Wei; Walker, D Greg; Valentine, Jason G

    2013-03-13

    In the emerging field of thermoplasmonics, Joule heating associated with optically resonant plasmonic structures is exploited to generate nanoscale thermal hotspots. In the present study, new methods for designing and thermally probing thermoplasmonic structures are reported. A general design rationale, based on Babinet's principle, is developed for understanding how the complementary version of ideal electromagnetic antennae can yield efficient nanoscale heat sources with maximized current density. Using this methodology, we show that the diabolo antenna is more suitable for heat generation compared with its more well-known complementary structure, the bow-tie antenna. We also demonstrate that highly localized and enhanced thermal hot spots can be realized by incorporating the diabolo antenna into a plasmonic lens. Using a newly developed thermal microscopy method based on the temperature-dependent photoluminescence lifetime of thin-film thermographic phosphors, we experimentally characterize the thermal response of various antenna and superstructure designs. Data from FDTD simulations and the experimental temperature measurements confirm the validity of the design rationale. The thermal microscopy technique, with its robust sensing method, could overcome some of the drawbacks of current micro/nanoscale temperature measurement schemes. PMID:23437919

  11. Vortex generator induced heat transfer augmentation past a rib in a heated duct air flow

    SciTech Connect

    Myrum, T.A.; Acharya, S.; Inamdar, S.; Mehrotra, A. )

    1992-02-01

    The present investigation represents the initial phase of a comprehensive experimental program designed to study the potential for increasing the heat transfer per unit pressure drop in a ribbed duct by positioning vortex generators at key locations in the flow. In particular, the present investigation consists of a rib positioned at the inlet to a rectangular test section with uniform heating at its bottom wall. Local and average Nusselt number results are obtained for a circular rod positioned either immediately above or just downstream of the rib.

  12. Design and optimization of geothermal power generation, heating, and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanoglu, Mehmet

    Most of the world's geothermal power plants have been built in 1970s and 1980s following 1973 oil crisis. Urgency to generate electricity from alternative energy sources and the fact that geothermal energy was essentially free adversely affected careful designs of plants which would maximize their performance for a given geothermal resource. There are, however, tremendous potentials to improve performance of many existing geothermal power plants by retrofitting, optimizing the operating conditions, re-selecting the most appropriate binary fluid in binary plants, and considering cogeneration such as a district heating and/or cooling system or a system to preheat water entering boilers in industrial facilities. In this dissertation, some representative geothermal resources and existing geothermal power plants in Nevada are investigated to show these potentials. Economic analysis of a typical geothermal resource shows that geothermal heating and cooling may generate up to 3 times as much revenue as power generation alone. A district heating/cooling system is designed for its incorporation into an existing 27 MW air-cooled binary geothermal power plant. The system as designed has the capability to meet the entire heating needs of an industrial park as well as 40% of its cooling needs, generating potential revenues of $14,040,000 per year. A study of the power plant shows that evaporative cooling can increase the power output by up to 29% in summer by decreasing the condenser temperature. The power output of the plant can be increased by 2.8 percent by optimizing the maximum pressure in the cycle. Also, replacing the existing working fluid isobutane by butane, R-114, isopentane, and pentane can increase the power output by up to 2.5 percent. Investigation of some well-known geothermal power generation technologies as alternatives to an existing 12.8 MW single-flash geothermal power plant shows that double-flash, binary, and combined flash/binary designs can increase the

  13. High heat transfer oxidizer heat exchanger design and analysis. [RL10-2B engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kmiec, Thomas D.; Kanic, Paul G.; Peckham, Richard J.

    1987-01-01

    The RL10-2B engine, a derivative of the RL10, is capable of multimode thrust operation. This engine operates at two low thrust levels: tank head idle (THI), which is approximately 1 to 2% of full thrust, and pumped idle (PI), which is 10% of full thrust. Operation at THI provides vehicle propellant settling thrust and efficient engine thermal conditioning; PI operation provides vehicle tank pre-pressurization and maneuver thrust for low-g deployment. Stable combustion of the RL10-2B engine during the low thrust operating modes can be accomplished by using a heat exchanger to supply gaseous oxygen to the propellant injector. The oxidizer heat exchanger (OHE) vaporizes the liquid oxygen using hydrogen as the energy source. The design, concept verification testing and analysis for such a heat exchanger is discussed. The design presented uses a high efficiency compact core to vaporize the oxygen, and in the self-contained unit, attenuates any pressure and flow oscillations which result from unstable boiling in the core. This approach is referred to as the high heat transfer design. An alternative approach which prevents unstable boiling of the oxygen by limiting the heat transfer is referred to as the low heat transfer design and is reported in Pratt & Whitney report FR-19135-2.

  14. Mechanism of heat generation from loading gaseous hydrogen isotopes into palladium nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriyeva, Olga

    I have carried out the study of hydrogen isotope reactions in the presence of palladium nanoparticles impregnated into oxide powder. My goal was to explain the mechanisms of heat generation in those systems as a result of exposure to deuterium gas. Some researchers have associated this heating with a nuclear reaction in the Pd lattice. While some earlier experiments showed a correlation between the generation of excess heat and helium production as possible evidence of a nuclear reaction, the results of that research have not been replicated by the other groups and the search for radiation was unsuccessful. Therefore, the unknown origin of the excess heat produced by these systems is of great interest. I synthesized different types of Pd and Pt-impregnated oxide samples similar to those used by other research groups. I used different characterization techniques to confirm that the fabrication method I used is capable of producing Pd nanoparticles on the surface of alumina support. I used a custom built gas-loading system to pressurize the material with hydrogen and deuterium gas while measuring heat output as a result of these pressurizations. My initial study confirmed the excess heat generation in the presence of deuterium. However, the in-situ radiometry and alpha-particle measurements did not show any abnormal increase in counts above the background level. In the absence of nuclear reaction products, I decided to look for a conventional chemical process that could account for the excess heat generation. It was earlier suggested that Pd in its nanoparticle form catalyzes hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions in the material. To prove the chemical nature of the observed phenomena I demonstrated that the reaction can be either exo- or endothermic based on the water isotope trapped in the material and the type of gas provided to the system. The H/D exchange was confirmed by RGA, NMR and FTIR analysis. I quantified the amount of energy that can be released due

  15. Modelling hot electron generation in short pulse target heating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircombe, N. J.; Hughes, S. J.

    2013-11-01

    Target heating experiments planned for the Orion laser facility, and electron beam driven fast ignition schemes, rely on the interaction of a short pulse high intensity laser with dense material to generate a flux of energetic electrons. It is essential that the characteristics of this electron source are well known in order to inform transport models in radiation hydrodynamics codes and allow effective evaluation of experimental results and forward modelling of future campaigns. We present results obtained with the particle in cell (PIC) code EPOCH for realistic target and laser parameters, including first and second harmonic light. The hot electron distributions are characterised and their implications for onward transport and target heating are considered with the aid of the Monte-Carlo transport code THOR.

  16. Thermoelectric generators as self-oscillating heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alicki, Robert

    2016-02-01

    In a previous paper [1] a model of a solar cell was proposed in which the non-periodic source of energy—photon flux—drives the collective periodic motion of electrons in a form of plasma oscillation. Subsequently, plasma oscillations are rectified by the p-n junction diode into dc (work). This approach makes a solar cell similar to standard macroscopic heat motors or turbines which always contain two heat baths, the working medium and the periodically moving piston or rotor. Here, a very similar model is proposed in order to describe the operation principles of thermoelectric generators based either on bimetallic or semiconductor p-n junctions. Again plasma oscillation corresponds to a piston and sunlight is replaced by a hot bath. The mathematical formalism is based on the Markovian master equations which can be derived in a rigorous way from the underlying Hamiltonian models and are consistent with the laws of thermodynamics.

  17. Acoustic Optimization of Automotive Exhaust Heat Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C. Q.; Ye, B. Q.; Guo, X.; Hui, P.

    2012-06-01

    The potential for thermoelectric exhaust heat recovery in vehicles has been increasing with recent advances in the efficiency of thermoelectric generators (TEGs). This study analyzes the acoustic attenuation performance of exhaust-based TEGs. The acoustic characteristics of two different thermal designs of exhaust gas heat exchanger in TEGs are discussed in terms of transmission loss and acoustic insertion loss. GT-Power simulations and bench tests on a dynamometer with a high-performance production engine are carried out. Results indicate that the acoustic attenuation of TEGs could be determined and optimized. In addition, the feasibility of integration of exhaust-based TEGs and engine mufflers into the exhaust line is tested, which can help to reduce space and improve vehicle integration.

  18. Heat generation in aircraft tires under braked rolling conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, S. K.; Dodge, R. N.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical model was developed to approximate the internal temperature distribution in an aircraft tire operating under conditions of unyawed braked rolling. The model employs an array of elements to represent the tire cross section and considers the heat generated within the tire to be caused by the change in strain energy associated with cyclic tire deflection. The additional heating due to tire slip and stresses induced by braking are superimposed on the previously developed free rolling model. An extensive experimental program was conducted to verify temperatures predicted from the analytical model. Data from these tests were compared with calculations over a range of operating conditions. The model results were in reasonably good agreement with measured values.

  19. COMMIX analysis of the sodium heated helical coil steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Kakarala, C.R.; Burge, S.W.; Sha, W.T.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the COMMIX-HCSG computer program and compares predictions to data obtained from performance tests on a 76 MWt Helical Coil Steam Generator (HCSG) test unit. COMMIX-HCSG is a multi-dimensional thermal/hydraulic code that models both steady state and transient operation of an HCSG. The code solves a system of Navier-Stokes continuum equations that have been modified with a combination of volume and directional surface porosities and distributed resistances. This formulation properly accounts for the presence of tube bundle, supports, and baffles on the shell side of the steam generator. Turbulence models and heat transfer and pressure drop equations are used as applicable for the different regions including the upper plenum, the tube bundle, and the lower plenum of the HCSG. The data was obtained from performance tests conducted in early 1987 on the 76 MWt HCSG test unit at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC). The test unit contains over 700 instruments. HCSG development and tests are carried out as part of the Department of Energy program to develop reliable and economical liquid metal heated steam generators.

  20. Heating characteristics of ferromagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Eiji; Hashimoto, Shinji; Kayano, Takeru; Minagawa, Makoto; Yanagihara, Hideto; Kishimoto, Mikio; Yamada, Keiichi; Oda, Tatsuya; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Kanamori, Toshiyuki; Ikehata, Yoshio; Nagano, Isamu

    2010-05-01

    Heating characteristics of Fe oxide nanoparticles designed for hyperthermia were examined. Samples with coercive forces from 50 to 280 Oe(codoped magnetite) were produced with a coprecipitation technique following by hydrothermal reaction. The maximum specific loss powers (SLPs) of 420 W/g was obtained at 117 kHz (640 Oe) for a dispersant sample with coercive force of 280 Oe (ATH9D). SLPs measured on dry powder samples at 17 kHz and measured at 117 kHz on dispersant samples were compared. The measured SLP amplitudes are lower for 17 kHz and higher for 117 kHz than those expected from ferromagnetic dc minor loops. For the 117 kHz case, friction of particles in a carrier fluid (similar mechanism to Brown relaxation in superparamagnetic dispersant samples) is considered to contribute to the heating mechanism.

  1. Mixed-oxide fuel decay heat analysis for BWR LOCA safety evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, R. T.

    2013-07-01

    The mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel decay heat behavior is analyzed for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) safety evaluation. The physical reasoning on why the decay heat power fractions of MOX fuel fission product (FP) are significantly lower than the corresponding decay heat power fractions of uranium-oxide (UOX) fuel FP is illustrated. This is primarily due to the following physical phenomena. -The recoverable energies per fission of plutonium (Pu)-239 and Pu-241 are significantly higher than those of uranium (U)-235 and U-238. Consequently, the fission rate required to produce the same amount of power in MOX fuel is significantly lower than that in UOX fuel, which leads to lower subsequent FP generation rate and associated decay heat power in MOX fuel than those in UOX fuel. - The effective FP decay energy per fission of Pu-239 is significantly lower than the corresponding effective FP decay energy per fission of U-235, e.g., Pu-239's 10.63 Mega-electron-Volt (MeV) vs. U-235's 12.81 MeV at the cooling time 0.2 second. This also leads to lower decay heat power in MOX fuel than that in UOX fuel. The FP decay heat is shown to account for more than 90% of the total decay heat immediately after shutdown. The FP decay heat results based on the American National Standard Institute (ANSI)/American Nuclear Society (ANS)-5.1-1979 standard method are shown very close to the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-2005 standard method. The FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 simplified method are shown very close to but mostly slightly lower than the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1971 method. The FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 simplified method or the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1971 method are shown significantly larger than the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 standard method or the ANSI/ANS-5.1-2005 standard method. (authors)

  2. Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste.

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, Christi D.; Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from United

  3. Cloud-generated radiative heating and its generation of available potential energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhlmann, R.; Smith, G. L.

    1989-01-01

    The generation of zonal available potential energy (APE) by cloud radiative heating is discussed. The APE concept was mathematically formulated by Lorenz (1955) as a measure of the maximum amount of total potential energy that is available for conversion by adiabatic processes to kinetic energy. The rate of change of APE is the rate of the generation of APE minus the rate of conversion between potential and kinetic energy. By radiative transfer calculations, a mean cloud-generated radiative heating for a well defined set of cloud classes is derived as a function of cloud optical thickness. The formulation is suitable for using a general cloud parameter data set and has the advantage of taking into account nonlinearities between the microphysical and macrophysical cloud properties and the related radiation field.

  4. Dynamic stability experiments in sodium-heated steam generators. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    France, D.M.; Roy, R.; Carlson, R.D.; Chiang, T.

    1984-01-01

    Seventy-two dynamic stability tests were performed in the sodium-heated boiling-water test facility at Argonne National Laboratory. A full-scale LMFBR steam generator tube was employed as the test section operating over the water parameter ranges of 6.9 to 15.9 MPa pressure and 170 to 800 kg/m/sup 2/.s mass flux. The stability thresholds from the test compared well to the predictions of a modified version of a correlation equation recently published by other investigators. Typical experimental data and the modified correlation equation are presented.

  5. Effects of Temperature Gradients and Heat Fluxes on High-Temperature Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.

    2008-04-01

    The effects of a temperature gradient and heat flux on point defect diffusion in protective oxide scales were examined. Irreversible thermodynamics were used to expand Fick’s first law of diffusion to include a heat-flux term—a Soret effect. Oxidation kinetics were developed for the oxidation of cobalt and of nickel doped with chromium. Research is described to verify the effects of a heat flux by oxidizing pure cobalt in a temperature gradient at 900 °C, and comparing the kinetics to isothermal oxidation. No evidence of a heat flux effect was found.

  6. Ballistic heat transport in laser generated nano-bubbles.

    PubMed

    Lombard, Julien; Biben, Thierry; Merabia, Samy

    2016-08-01

    Nanobubbles generated by laser heated plasmonic nanoparticles are of interest for biomedical and energy harvesting applications. Of utmost importance is the maximal size of these transient bubbles. Here, we report hydrodynamic phase field simulations of the dynamics of laser induced nanobubbles, with the aim to understand which physical processes govern their maximal size. We show that the nanobubble maximal size and lifetime are to a large extent controlled by the ballistic thermal flux which is present inside the bubble. Taking into account this thermal flux, we can reproduce the fluence dependence of the maximal nanobubble radius as reported experimentally. We also discuss the influence of the laser pulse duration on the number of nanobubbles generated and their maximal size. These studies represent a significant step toward the optimization of the nanobubble size, which is of crucial importance for photothermal cancer therapy applications. PMID:27461058

  7. Ballistic heat transport in laser generated nano-bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombard, Julien; Biben, Thierry; Merabia, Samy

    2016-08-01

    Nanobubbles generated by laser heated plasmonic nanoparticles are of interest for biomedical and energy harvesting applications. Of utmost importance is the maximal size of these transient bubbles. Here, we report hydrodynamic phase field simulations of the dynamics of laser induced nanobubbles, with the aim to understand which physical processes govern their maximal size. We show that the nanobubble maximal size and lifetime are to a large extent controlled by the ballistic thermal flux which is present inside the bubble. Taking into account this thermal flux, we can reproduce the fluence dependence of the maximal nanobubble radius as reported experimentally. We also discuss the influence of the laser pulse duration on the number of nanobubbles generated and their maximal size. These studies represent a significant step toward the optimization of the nanobubble size, which is of crucial importance for photothermal cancer therapy applications.Nanobubbles generated by laser heated plasmonic nanoparticles are of interest for biomedical and energy harvesting applications. Of utmost importance is the maximal size of these transient bubbles. Here, we report hydrodynamic phase field simulations of the dynamics of laser induced nanobubbles, with the aim to understand which physical processes govern their maximal size. We show that the nanobubble maximal size and lifetime are to a large extent controlled by the ballistic thermal flux which is present inside the bubble. Taking into account this thermal flux, we can reproduce the fluence dependence of the maximal nanobubble radius as reported experimentally. We also discuss the influence of the laser pulse duration on the number of nanobubbles generated and their maximal size. These studies represent a significant step toward the optimization of the nanobubble size, which is of crucial importance for photothermal cancer therapy applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C6NR02144A

  8. The Next Generation Heated Halo for Blackbody Emissivity Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gero, P.; Taylor, J. K.; Best, F. A.; Revercomb, H. E.; Knuteson, R. O.; Tobin, D. C.; Adler, D. P.; Ciganovich, N. N.; Dutcher, S. T.; Garcia, R. K.

    2011-12-01

    The accuracy of radiance measurements from space-based infrared spectrometers is contingent on the quality of the calibration subsystem, as well as knowledge of its uncertainty. Future climate benchmarking missions call for measurement uncertainties better than 0.1 K (k=3) in radiance temperature for the detection of spectral climate signatures. Blackbody cavities impart the most accurate calibration for spaceborne infrared sensors, provided that their temperature and emissivity is traceably determined on-orbit. The On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard (OARS) has been developed at the University of Wisconsin to meet the stringent requirements of the next generation of infrared remote sensing instruments. It provides on-orbit determination of both traceable temperature and emissivity for calibration blackbodies. The Heated Halo is the component of the OARS that provides a robust and compact method to measure the spectral emissivity of a blackbody in situ. A carefully baffled thermal source is placed in front of a blackbody in an infrared spectrometer system, and the combined radiance of the blackbody and Heated Halo reflection is observed. Knowledge of key temperatures and the viewing geometry allow the blackbody cavity spectral emissivity to be calculated. We present the results from the Heated Halo methodology implemented with a new Absolute Radiance Interferometer (ARI), which is a prototype space-based infrared spectrometer designed for climate benchmarking that was developed under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). We compare our findings to models and other experimental methods of emissivity determination.

  9. Exfoliation Propensity of Oxide Scale in Heat Exchangers Used for Supercritical CO2 Power Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Shingledecker, John P.; Kung, Steve; Wright, Ian G.; Nash, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Supercritical CO2 (sCO2) Brayton cycle systems offer the possibility of improved efficiency in future fossil energy power generation plants operating at temperatures of 650 C and above. As there are few data on the oxidation/corrosion behavior of structural alloys in sCO2 at these temperatures, modeling to predict the propensity for oxide exfoliation is not well developed, thus hindering materials selection for these novel cycles. The ultimate goal of this effort is to provide needed data on scale exfoliation behavior in sCO2 for confident alloy selection. To date, a model developed by ORNL and EPRI for the exfoliation of oxide scales formed on boiler tubes in high-temperature, high-pressure steam has proven useful for managing exfoliation in conventional steam plants. A major input provided by the model is the ability to predict the likelihood of scale failure and loss based on understanding of the evolution of the oxide morphologies and the conditions that result in susceptibility to exfoliation. This paper describes initial steps taken to extend the existing model for exfoliation of steam-side oxide scales to sCO2 conditions. The main differences between high-temperature, high-pressure steam and sCO2 that impact the model involve (i) significant geometrical differences in the heat exchangers, ranging from standard pressurized tubes seen typically in steam-producing boilers to designs for sCO2 that employ variously-curved thin walls to create shaped flow paths for extended heat transfer area and small channel cross-sections to promote thermal convection and support pressure loads; (ii) changed operating characteristics with sCO2 due to the differences in physical and thermal properties compared to steam; and (iii) possible modification of the scale morphologies, hence properties that influence exfoliation behavior, due to reaction with carbon species from sCO2. The numerical simulations conducted were based on an assumed sCO2 operating schedule and several

  10. HeatWave: the next generation of thermography devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman; Vidas, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    Energy sustainability is a major challenge of the 21st century. To reduce environmental impact, changes are required not only on the supply side of the energy chain by introducing renewable energy sources, but also on the demand side by reducing energy usage and improving energy efficiency. Currently, 2D thermal imaging is used for energy auditing, which measures the thermal radiation from the surfaces of objects and represents it as a set of color-mapped images that can be analysed for the purpose of energy efficiency monitoring. A limitation of such a method for energy auditing is that it lacks information on the geometry and location of objects with reference to each other, particularly across separate images. Such a limitation prevents any quantitative analysis to be done, for example, detecting any energy performance changes before and after retrofitting. To address these limitations, we have developed a next generation thermography device called Heat Wave. Heat Wave is a hand-held 3D thermography device that consists of a thermal camera, a range sensor and color camera, and can be used to generate precise 3D model of objects with augmented temperature and visible information. As an operator holding the device smoothly waves it around the objects of interest, Heat Wave can continuously track its own pose in space and integrate new information from the range and thermal and color cameras into a single, and precise 3D multi-modal model. Information from multiple viewpoints can be incorporated together to improve the accuracy, reliability and robustness of the global model. The approach also makes it possible to reduce any systematic errors associated with the estimation of surface temperature from the thermal images.

  11. Generation and Sustainment of Plasma Rotation by ICRF Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, F. W.

    2000-10-01

    When tokamak plasmas are heated by the fundamental minority ion-cyclotron process, they are observed to rotate toroidally, even though this heating process introduces negligable angular momentum. This work proposes and evaluates a physics mechanism which resolves this apparent conflict. The argument has two elements. First, it is assumed that angular momentum transport is governed by a diffusion equation with a v_tor = 0 boundary condition at the plasma surface and a torque-density source. When the source consists of separated regions of positive and negative torque density, a finite central rotation velocity results, even though the volume integrated torque density - the angular momentum input - vanishes. Secondly, ions energized by the ICRF process can generate separated regions of positive and negative torque density. Heating increases their banana widths which leads to radial energetic-particle transport that must be balanced by neutralizing radial currents and a j_rB_pR torque density in the bulk plasma. Additional, comparable torque density results from collisional transfer of mechanical angular momentum from energetic particles to the bulk plasma and particle loss through banana particles impacting the wall. Monte-Carlo calculations utilizing the ORBIT code evaluate all sources of torque density and rigorously assure that no net angular momentum is introduced. Two models of ICRF heating, diffusive and instantaneous, give similar results. When the resonance location is on the LFS, the calculated rotation has the magnitude, profile, and co-current sense of Alcator C-Mod observations. For HFS resonance locations, the model predicts counter-current rotation. Scans of rotational profiles vs. resonance location, initial energy, particle loss, pitch, and qm will be presented as will the location of the velocity shear layer its scaling to a reactor.

  12. Microwave torch as a plasmachemical generator of nitric oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Knyazev, V. Yu.; Kossyi, I. A.; Popov, N. A.

    2006-06-15

    The possibility of using a microwave coaxial plasmatron (a microwave torch) as an efficient plasmachemical generator of nitric oxides in an air jet has been studied experimentally. A plasmachemical model of the generator is developed. Results of calculations by this model do not contradict experimental results. A conclusion about the mechanisms governing NO{sub x} production in a plasma torch is drawn by comparing the experimental and calculated results.

  13. Downhole steam generator having a downhole oxidant compressor

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Ronald L.

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus and method for generation of steam in a borehole for penetration into an earth formation wherein a downhole oxidant compressor is used to compress relatively low pressure (atmospheric) oxidant, such as air, to a relatively high pressure prior to mixing with fuel for combustion. The multi-stage compressor receives motive power through a shaft driven by a gas turbine powered by the hot expanding combustion gases. The main flow of compressed oxidant passes through a velocity increasing nozzle formed by a reduced central section of the compressor housing. An oxidant bypass feedpipe leading to peripheral oxidant injection nozzles of the combustion chamber are also provided. The downhole compressor allows effective steam generation in deep wells without need for high pressure surface compressors. Feedback preheater means are provided for preheating fuel in a preheat chamber. Preheating of the water occurs in both a water feed line running from aboveground and in a countercurrent water flow channel surrounding the combustor assembly. The countercurrent water flow channels advantageously serve to cool the combustion chamber wall. The water is injected through slotted inlets along the combustion chamber wall to provide an unstable boundary layer and stripping of the water from the wall for efficient steam generation. Pressure responsive doors are provided at the steam outlet for closing and sealing the combustion chamber from entry of reservoir fluids in the event of a flameout.

  14. Downhole steam generator having a downhole oxidant compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, R.L.

    1983-04-19

    Apparatus and method for generation of steam in a borehole for penetration into an earth formation wherein a downhole oxidant compressor is used to compress relatively low pressure (Atmospheric) oxidant, such as air, to a relatively high pressure prior to mixing with fuel for combustion. The multi-stage compressor receives motive power through a shaft driven by a gas turbine powered by the hot expanding combustion gases. The main flow of compressed oxidant passes through a velocity increasing nozzle formed by a reduced central section of the compressor housing. An oxidant bypass feedpipe leading to peripheral oxidant injection nozzles of the combustion chamber are also provided. The downhole compressor allows effective steam generation in deep wells without need for high pressure surface compressors. Feedback preheater means are provided for preheating fuel in a preheat chamber. Preheating of the water occurs in both a water feed line running from aboveground and in a countercurrent water flow channel surrounding the combustor assembly. The countercurrent water flow channels advantageously serve to cool the combustion chamber wall. The water is injected through slotted inlets along the combustion chamber wall to provide an unstable boundary layer and stripping of the water from the wall for efficient steam generation. Pressure responsive doors are provided at the steam outlet for closing and sealing the combustion chamber from entry of reservoir fluids in the event of a flameout.

  15. Generating Apparatus for Gas Heat Pump System using Sensorless-Controlled Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toba, Akio; Fujita, Kouetsu; Maeda, Toshihiro; Kato, Tomohiko

    A unique generating system for Gas heat pump system (GHP) is presented. The GHP is an air-conditioning system, in which the compressors are driven by a gas engine. The proposed system is applied to the outside unit of GHP to feed the electrical equipments inside. The system utilizes a permanent magnet synchronous generator, which is connected to the gas engine, to realize high-efficiency and small-size. The generator is controlled by a converter with sensorless control technology to eliminate the position sensor. Another major topic is the “free-run startup" technique to start the converter when the generator is rotating. The system configuration and principles of the techniques are set forth, followed by experimental results which show that the system works properly and successfully.

  16. Heat flow and heat generation estimates for the Churchill basement of the Western Canadian Basin in Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.D.W.; Jones, F.W.; Majorowicz, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Heat flow through the sediments and temperatures of the Churchill province basement under the sedimentary cover are determined for 24 locations in the central part of the Prairies basin in Alberta where the vertical heat flux is approximately constant from the base of the sediments to the surface. The contribution to heat flow from heat generation in the sediments is also considered. The average heat flow through the sediments is found to be 71 mWm/sup -2/ +- 12mWm/sup -2/ which is about 30 mWm/sup -2/ higher than in the neighbouring shield area of the Churchill province, and the contribution from heat generation in the sediments to the surface heat flow is only approximately 2.5 mWm/sup -2/. The relationship between basement heat generation and heat flow is investigated, and it is found that the platform heat flow/heat generation values are in general higher than those from the Churchill province of the shield found by Drury (1985). Although for the platform and shield data, the reduced heat flow is about 40 mWm/sup -2/ and the slope is about 8km, it is apparent that the platform data alone are not good enough to establish a precise relationship.

  17. Molybdenum-platinum-oxide electrodes for thermoelectric generators

    DOEpatents

    Schmatz, Duane J.

    1990-01-01

    The invention is directed to a composite article suitable for use in thermoelectric generators. The article comprises a solid electrolyte carrying a thin film comprising molybdenum-platinum-oxide as an electrode deposited by physical deposition techniques. The invention is also directed to the method of making same.

  18. Studies on Effective Utilization of SOFC Exhaust Heat Using Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terayama, Takeshi; Nagata, Susumu; Tanaka, Yohei; Momma, Akihiko; Kato, Tohru; Kunii, Masaru; Yamamoto, Atsushi

    2013-07-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are being researched around the world. In Japan, a compact SOFC system with rated alternative current (AC) power of 700 W has become available on the market, since the base load electricity demand for a standard home is said to be less than 700 W AC. To improve the generating efficiency of SOFC systems in the 700-W class, we focused on thermoelectric generation (TEG) technology, since there are a lot of temperature gradients in the system. Analysis based on simulations indicated the possibility of introducing thermoelectric generation at the air preheater, steam generator, and exhaust outlet. Among these options, incorporating a TEG heat exchanger comprising multiple CoSb3/SiGe-based TEG modules into the air preheater had potential to produce additional output of 37.5 W and an improvement in generating efficiency from 46% to 48.5%. Furthermore, by introducing thermoelectric generation at the other two locations, an increase in maximum output of more than 50 W and generating efficiency of 50% can be anticipated.

  19. Method for heat treating and sintering metal oxides with microwave radiation

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.; Meek, Thomas T.

    1989-01-01

    A method for microwave sintering materials, primarily metal oxides, is described. Metal oxides do not normally absorb microwave radiation at temperatures ranging from about room temperature to several hundred degrees centrigrade are sintered with microwave radiation without the use of the heretofore required sintering aids. This sintering is achieved by enclosing a compact of the oxide material in a housing or capsule formed of a oxide which has microwave coupling properties at room temprature up to at least the microwave coupling temperature of the oxide material forming the compact. The heating of the housing effects the initial heating of the oxide material forming the compact by heat transference and then functions as a thermal insulator for the encased oxide material after the oxide material reaches a sufficient temperature to adequately absorb or couple with microwave radiation for heating thereof to sintering temperature.

  20. Blood flow, substrate utilization and heat generation in tissues drained by the azygos vein in man.

    PubMed

    Brundin, T; Hagenfeldt, L; Söderberg, R; Wahren, J

    1987-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the blood flow, heat generation and substrate utilization in tissues drained by the azygos vein in healthy subjects. Catheters were inserted percutaneously into the azygos vein and the pulmonary artery in 10 healthy male subjects in the basal, post-absorptive state. Blood flow in the azygos vein was measured by thermodilution technique, blood temperature was recorded in both the azygos vein and the pulmonary artery and blood samples for the determination of oxygen content and substrate concentrations were collected from both vessels repeatedly at timed intervals. Free fatty acid (FFA) exchange was evaluated following the intravenous infusion of 14-C labelled oleic acid. The average azygos vein blood flow was 94 +/- 10 ml/min. The coefficient of variation for the flow determination was 3.6%. The blood temperature in the azygos vein was consistently higher than that in the pulmonary artery, indicating an average calculated net heat production in the tissues of 0.5 W. The oxygen uptake to the tissues drained by the azygos vein amounted to 6 +/- 1 ml/min. Significant amounts of glucose, FFA and ketone bodies were taken up in the azygos area, while both glycerol and FFA were released. The FFA uptake could, if oxidized, account for about half of the oxygen uptake. In conclusion, the findings indicate that, in the basal state, the tissues drained by the azygos vein utilize both glucose and FFA. Heat is generated within the area but the rate of generation is low and can largely be explained by the oxidative metabolism. The findings do not support an important role for brown adipose tissue metabolism in the interscapular region in man. PMID:3427881

  1. Heat transport by phonons and the generation of heat by fast phonon processes in ferroelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, X.; Salje, E. K. H.

    2015-05-01

    Thermal conductivity of ferroelastic device materials can be reversibly controlled by strain. The nucleation and growth of twin boundaries reduces thermal conductivity if the heat flow is perpendicular to the twin wall. The twin walls act as phonon barriers whereby the thermal conductivity decreases linearly with the number of such phonon barriers. Ferroelastic materials also show elasto-caloric properties with a high frequency dynamics. The upper frequency limit is determined by heat generation on a time scale, which is some 5 orders of magnitude below the typical bulk phonon times. Some of these nano-structural processes are irreversible under stress release (but remain reversible under temperature cycling), in particular the annihilation of needle domains that are a key indicator for ferroelastic behaviour in multiferroic materials.

  2. A study on post blast generation of nitrogen oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, L.D.

    1996-12-31

    Certain blasting applications are more prone to the generation of significant levels of nitrogen dioxide post blast fumes, more commonly referred to as after blast smoke, generally ranging in color from dark yellow to bright red. This paper reviews basic background chemistry defining the observed fumes and attempts to correlate geology, blast design, and explosive composition effects on the level of nitrogen dioxide that can be observed in various blasting conditions. Additionally, a test setting for evaluating the generation of post blast fumes is presented with pertinent test data detailing generic explosive formulation modifications which effect the overall level of post detonation generation of nitrogen dioxide. Scaled up field trials were completed to evaluate the results obtained using data generated from the test model. Specifically, deep, wet blasting applications in softer geologies with reduced confinement appear to promote the generation of nitric oxide from the explosive composition within the borehole due to partial reaction of the nitrates contained in commercial explosives. As the nitric oxide is released from the muck pile following the detonation of the blast pattern, the gas is readily oxidized to form the colorful after blast fumes of nitrogen dioxide. Using the experimental testing procedure it has been determined that variations to the explosive composition which affect detonation velocity and explosion temperature seem to have a significant effect on the level of nitric oxide formed during a less than ideal detonation. Additional chemical additives to reduce the level of nitric oxide which results from a less than ideal detonation front have been evaluated using the proposed test procedure.

  3. Generation of mirage effect by heated carbon nanotube thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, L. H.; Lim, C. W.; Li, Y. C.; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Quoc Bui, Tinh

    2014-06-01

    Mirage effect, a common phenomenon in nature, is a naturally occurring optical phenomenon in which lights are bent due to the gradient variation of refraction in the temperature gradient medium. The theoretical analysis of mirage effect generated by heated carbon nanotube thin film is presented both for gas and liquid. Excellent agreement is demonstrated through comparing the theoretical prediction with published experimental results. It is concluded from the theoretical prediction and experimental observation that the mirage effect is more likely to happen in liquid. The phase of deflected optical beam is also discussed and the method for measurement of thermal diffusivity of medium is theoretically verified. Furthermore, a method for measuring the refractive index of gas by detecting optical beam deflection is also presented in this paper.

  4. Some aspects of materials development for sodium heated steam generators

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, P.; Spalaris, C.N.

    1980-10-01

    A development program was undertaken to support the materials selection for steam generator piping and IHX which are to be used in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR). Four major topics were reviewed, describing the results obtained as well as the direction of future tests. These topics are: carbon transport in sodium, effect of carbon loss/gain upon materials in the reactor Intermediate Heat Transport System (IHTS), corrosion fatigue and aqueous corrosion. The results support the initial assumptions made in specifying the use of 2-1/4Cr-1Mo as the construction material for the evaporator and superheater and Type 316 piping of the IHT system. Future direction of the experimental programs is to further verify the materials choice and to also obtain information which will be essential during the plant installation, operation and reliability of the components.

  5. Heat generation in Aircraft tires under yawed rolling conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, Richard N.; Clark, Samuel K.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical model was developed for approximating the internal temperature distribution in an aircraft tire operating under conditions of yawed rolling. The model employs an assembly of elements to represent the tire cross section and treats the heat generated within the tire as a function of the change in strain energy associated with predicted tire flexure. Special contact scrubbing terms are superimposed on the symmetrical free rolling model to account for the slip during yawed rolling. An extensive experimental program was conducted to verify temperatures predicted from the analytical model. Data from this program were compared with calculation over a range of operating conditions, namely, vertical deflection, inflation pressure, yaw angle, and direction of yaw. Generally the analytical model predicted overall trends well and correlated reasonably well with individual measurements at locations throughout the cross section.

  6. Generation of mirage effect by heated carbon nanotube thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, L. H.; Lim, C. W.; Li, Y. C.; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Quoc Bui, Tinh

    2014-06-28

    Mirage effect, a common phenomenon in nature, is a naturally occurring optical phenomenon in which lights are bent due to the gradient variation of refraction in the temperature gradient medium. The theoretical analysis of mirage effect generated by heated carbon nanotube thin film is presented both for gas and liquid. Excellent agreement is demonstrated through comparing the theoretical prediction with published experimental results. It is concluded from the theoretical prediction and experimental observation that the mirage effect is more likely to happen in liquid. The phase of deflected optical beam is also discussed and the method for measurement of thermal diffusivity of medium is theoretically verified. Furthermore, a method for measuring the refractive index of gas by detecting optical beam deflection is also presented in this paper.

  7. Dynamic conversion of solar generated heat to electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. C.; Fourakis, E.; Hammer, J. M.; Smith, G. A.; Grosskreutz, J. C.; Mcbride, E.

    1974-01-01

    The effort undertaken during this program led to the selection of the water-superheated steam (850 psig/900 F) crescent central receiver as the preferred concept from among 11 candidate systems across the technological spectrum of the dynamic conversion of solar generated heat to electricity. The solar power plant designs were investigated in the range of plant capacities from 100 to 1000 Mw(e). The investigations considered the impacts of plant size, collector design, feed-water temperature ratio, heat rejection equipment, ground cover, and location on solar power technical and economic feasibility. For the distributed receiver systems, the optimization studies showed that plant capacities less than 100 Mw(e) may be best. Although the size of central receiver concepts was not parametrically investigated, all indications are that the optimal plant capacity for central receiver systems will be in the range from 50 to 200 Mw(e). Solar thermal power plant site selection criteria and methodology were also established and used to evaluate potentially suitable sites. The result of this effort was to identify a site south of Inyokern, California, as typically suitable for a solar thermal power plant. The criteria used in the selection process included insolation and climatological characteristics, topography, and seismic history as well as water availability.

  8. Role of heat generation and thermal diffusion during frontal photopolymerization.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, Matthew G; Vitale, Alessandra; Cabral, João T; Matar, Omar K

    2015-08-01

    Frontal photopolymerization (FPP) is a rapid and versatile solidification process that can be used to fabricate complex three-dimensional structures by selectively exposing a photosensitive monomer-rich bath to light. A characteristic feature of FPP is the appearance of a sharp polymerization front that propagates into the bath as a planar traveling wave. In this paper, we introduce a theoretical model to determine how heat generation during photopolymerization influences the kinetics of wave propagation as well as the monomer-to-polymer conversion profile, both of which are relevant for FPP applications and experimentally measurable. When thermal diffusion is sufficiently fast relative to the rate of polymerization, the system evolves as if it were isothermal. However, when thermal diffusion is slow, a thermal wavefront develops and propagates at the same rate as the polymerization front. This leads to an accumulation of heat behind the polymerization front which can result in a significant sharpening of the conversion profile and acceleration of the growth of the solid. Our results also suggest that a novel way to tailor the dynamics of FPP is by imposing a temperature gradient along the growth direction. PMID:26382412

  9. Role of heat generation and thermal diffusion during frontal photopolymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, Matthew G.; Vitale, Alessandra; Cabral, João T.; Matar, Omar K.

    2015-08-01

    Frontal photopolymerization (FPP) is a rapid and versatile solidification process that can be used to fabricate complex three-dimensional structures by selectively exposing a photosensitive monomer-rich bath to light. A characteristic feature of FPP is the appearance of a sharp polymerization front that propagates into the bath as a planar traveling wave. In this paper, we introduce a theoretical model to determine how heat generation during photopolymerization influences the kinetics of wave propagation as well as the monomer-to-polymer conversion profile, both of which are relevant for FPP applications and experimentally measurable. When thermal diffusion is sufficiently fast relative to the rate of polymerization, the system evolves as if it were isothermal. However, when thermal diffusion is slow, a thermal wavefront develops and propagates at the same rate as the polymerization front. This leads to an accumulation of heat behind the polymerization front which can result in a significant sharpening of the conversion profile and acceleration of the growth of the solid. Our results also suggest that a novel way to tailor the dynamics of FPP is by imposing a temperature gradient along the growth direction.

  10. Resistively Heated SiC Nozzle for Generating Molecular Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagiano, Steven; Abell, Robert; Patrick, Edward; Bendt, Miri; Gundersen, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    An improved nozzle has been developed to replace nozzles used previously in an apparatus that generates a substantially unidirectional beam of molecules passing through a vacuum at speeds of several kilometers per second. The basic principle of operation of the apparatus is the same for both the previous and the present nozzle designs. The main working part of the nozzle is essentially a cylinder that is closed except that there is an inlet for a pressurized gas and, at one end, the cylinder is closed by a disk that contains a narrow central hole that serves as an outlet. The cylinder is heated to increase the thermal speeds of the gas molecules into the desired high-speed range. Heated, pressurized gas escapes through the outlet into a portion of the vacuum chamber that is separated, by a wall, from the rest of the vacuum chamber. In this portion of the vacuum chamber, the gas undergoes a free jet expansion. Most of the expanded gas is evacuated and thus does not become part of the molecular beam. A small fraction of the expanded beam passes through a narrow central orifice in the wall and thereby becomes a needle- thin molecular beam in the portion of the vacuum on the downstream side of the wall.

  11. Modeling of heat generation in ammonia-treated solid rocket propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Raun, R.L.; Isom, K.B.

    1995-06-01

    With the end of the Cold War, safe, environmentally sound separation, recycling, and disposal of ingredients in solid rocket propellants and munitions has become a national priority. One approach to demilitarize solid rocket propellants is treatment with ammonia. Ammonia extracts the oxidizers ammonium perchlorate and HMX, yielding a solid reside that is more suitable for incineration and less sensitive to impact and other modes of accidental initiation. Ammonia treatment of nitroglycerin-containing propellants is complicated by an exothermic reaction between ammonia and nitroglycerin. If not removed, the heat generated by this reaction can cause propellant ignition. To help design safe treatment processes, a model for the ammonia-propellant reaction was developed, which integrates transient energy and species conservation equations to simulate ammonia diffusion, heat generation, and heat flow in a propellant and in the solid residue resulting from ammonia treatment. It was calibrated using residue thickness and thermocouple data for one propellant. The calibrated model was used to predict conditions leading to ignition of thin propellant strips. The results agree well with experimental observations.

  12. Model of Heat Exchangers for Waste Heat Recovery from Diesel Engine Exhaust for Thermoelectric Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Chad; Vuppuluri, Prem; Shi, Li; Hall, Matthew

    2012-06-01

    The performance and operating characteristics of a hypothetical thermoelectric generator system designed to extract waste heat from the exhaust of a medium-duty turbocharged diesel engine were modeled. The finite-difference model consisted of two integrated submodels: a heat exchanger model and a thermoelectric device model. The heat exchanger model specified a rectangular cross-sectional geometry with liquid coolant on the cold side, and accounted for the difference between the heat transfer rate from the exhaust and that to the coolant. With the spatial variation of the thermoelectric properties accounted for, the thermoelectric device model calculated the hot-side and cold-side heat flux for the temperature boundary conditions given for the thermoelectric elements, iterating until temperature and heat flux boundary conditions satisfied the convection conditions for both exhaust and coolant, and heat transfer in the thermoelectric device. A downhill simplex method was used to optimize the parameters that affected the electrical power output, including the thermoelectric leg height, thermoelectric n-type to p-type leg area ratio, thermoelectric leg area to void area ratio, load electrical resistance, exhaust duct height, coolant duct height, fin spacing in the exhaust duct, location in the engine exhaust system, and number of flow paths within the constrained package volume. The calculation results showed that the configuration with 32 straight fins was optimal across the 30-cm-wide duct for the case of a single duct with total height of 5.5 cm. In addition, three counterflow parallel ducts or flow paths were found to be an optimum number for the given size constraint of 5.5 cm total height, and parallel ducts with counterflow were a better configuration than serpentine flow. Based on the reported thermoelectric properties of MnSi1.75 and Mg2Si0.5Sn0.5, the maximum net electrical power achieved for the three parallel flow paths in a counterflow arrangement was 1

  13. Influence of heat generation and heat flux on peristaltic flow with interacting nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Raza, M.; Ellahi, R.

    2014-08-01

    In the current study, we have examined the peristaltic flow of three different nanoparticles with water as base fluid under the influence of slip boundary conditions through a vertical asymmetric porous channel in the presence of MHD. The selected nanoparticles are titanium dioxide ( TiO2 , copper oxide (CuO) and silicon dioxide ( SiO2 . The Brownian motion shows that the effective conductivity increases to result in a lower temperature gradient for a given heat flux. To examine these transport phenomena thoroughly, we also consider the thermal conductivity model of Brownian motion for nanofluids, this increases the effect of the particle size, particle volume fraction and temperature dependence. The mathematical formulation is presented. Exact solutions are obtained from the resulting equations. The obtained expressions for pressure gradient, temperature and velocity profile are described through graphs for the various relevant parameters. The streamlines are drawn for some physical quantities to discuss the trapping phenomenon.

  14. Effect of reactor heat transfer limitations on CO preferential oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, X.; Besser, R. S.

    Our recent studies of CO preferential oxidation (PrOx) identified systematic differences between the characteristic curves of CO conversion for a microchannel reactor with thin-film wall catalyst and conventional mini packed-bed lab reactors (m-PBR's). Strong evidence has suggested that the reverse water-gas-shift (r-WGS) side reaction activated by temperature gradients in m-PBR's is the source of these differences. In the present work, a quasi-3D tubular non-isothermal reactor model based on the finite difference method was constructed to quantitatively study the effect of heat transport resistance on PrOx reaction behavior. First, the kinetic expressions for the three principal reactions involved were formed based on the combination of experimental data and literature reports and their parameters were evaluated with a non-linear regression method. Based on the resulting kinetic model and an energy balance derived for PrOx, the finite difference method was then adopted for the quasi-3D model. This model was then used to simulate both the microreactor and m-PBR's and to gain insights into their different conversion behavior. Simulation showed that the temperature gradients in m-PBR's favor the reverse water-gas-shift (r-WGS) reaction, thus causing a much narrower range of permissible operating temperature compared to the microreactor. Accordingly, the extremely efficient heat removal of the microchannel/thin-film catalyst system eliminates temperature gradients and efficiently prevents the onset of the r-WGS reaction.

  15. Effect of patchouli alcohol on the regulation of heat shock-induced oxidative stress in IEC-6 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Jiang, Linshu; Liu, Fenghua; Chen, Yuping; Xu, Lei; Li, Deyin; Ma, Yunfei; Li, Huanrong; Xu, Jianqin

    2016-08-01

    Purpose Patchouli alcohol (PA) is used to treat gastrointestinal dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the function of PA in the regulated process of oxidative stress in rat intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6). Materials and methods Oxidative stress was stimulated by exposing IEC-6 cells to heat shock (42 °C for 3 h). IEC-6 cells in treatment groups were pretreated with various concentrations of PA (10, 40, and 80 ng/mL) for 3 h before heat shock. Results Heat shock caused damage to the morphology of IEC-6 cells, and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Moreover, mRNA and protein expression by target genes related to oxidative stress in heat shock were also altered. Specifically, the mRNA expression by HSP70, HSP90, GSH-px, NRF2 nd HO-1were all increased, and Nrf2 and Keap1 protein expression were increased after heat shock. However, pretreatment with PA weakened the level of damage to the cellular morphology, and decreased the MDA content caused by heat shock, indicating PA had cytoprotective activities. Pretreatment with PA at high dose significantly increased generation of intracellular ROS. Compared with the heat shock group alone, PA pretreatment significantly decreased the mRNA expression by HSP70, HSP90, SOD, CAT, GSH-px, KEAP1 and HO-1. Furthermore, the high dose of PA significantly increased Nrf2 protein expression, while both the intermediate and high dose of PA significantly increased HO-1 protein expression. Conclusion Heat-shock-induced oxidative stress in IEC-6 cells, and PA could alleviate the Nrf2-Keap1 cellular oxidative stress responses. PMID:27056378

  16. Three-zonal engineering method of heat calculation for fluidized bed furnaces based on data on commercial investigations of heat generation distribution during biomass combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litun, D. S.; Ryabov, G. A.

    2016-02-01

    A three-zonal method of heat calculation of furnaces for combustion of biomass and low-caloric fuel in the fluidized bed is described. The method is based on equations of thermal and material balances that account for heat generation by fuel in the zone, heat-and-mass transfer heat exchange between the furnace media and surfaces that bound the zone, and heat-and-mass transfer between furnace zones. The calculation procedure for heat generation by fuel in the fluidized bed (FB) using the heat generation portion by the fuel is proposed. Based on commercial investigations, the main factors that affect the average temperature in the FB and the portion of fuel heat that is released in the FB are determined. Results of commercial investigations showed that the airflow coefficient in the FB should be recognized as the main operation parameter that affects the average temperature in the FB and, consequently, heat generation in the FB. The gas flow rate in the FB can be marked out as the second factor that affects the consumption degree of oxidizer supplied in the FB. Commercial investigations revealed that mixing is affected by the gas flow rate in the FB and the bed material particle size, which may be changed during the boiler operation because of the agglomeration of particles of sand and ash. The calculation processing of commercial investigations on a KM-75-40M boiler of a CHP-3 of an Arkhangelsk Pulp and Paper Mill (APPM), which was carried out using the inverse problem procedure by means of a developed computer program, determined the range of the fuel heat release share in the FB, which was 0.26-0.45 at an excess air factor of 0.59-0.93 in the bed, and the heat release share in the maximum temperature zone in the total heat release in the superbed space. The heat release share in the bed is determined as an approximating function of the excess air factor in the bed and the fluidization number. The research results can be used during designing boilers with the

  17. Synthesis and heating effect of iron/iron oxide composite and iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Q.; Baker, I.; Loudis, J. A.; Liao, Y.F.; Hoopes, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Fe/Fe oxide nanoparticles, in which the core consists of metallic Fe and the shell is composed of Fe oxides, were obtained by reduction of an aqueous solution of FeCl3 within a NaBH4 solution, or, using a water-in-oil micro-emulsion with CTAB as the surfactant. The reduction was performed either in an inert atmosphere or in air, and passivation with air was performed to produce the Fe/Fe3O4 core/shell composite. Phase identification and particle size were determined by X-ray diffraction and TEM. Thermal analysis was performed using a differential scanning calorimeter. The quasistatic magnetic properties were measured using a VSM, and the specific absorption rates (SARs) of both Fe oxide and Fe/Fe3O4 composite nanoparticles either dispersed in methanol or in an epoxy resin were measured by Luxtron fiber temperature sensors in an alternating magnetic field of 150 Oe at 250 kHz. It was found that the preparation conditions, including the concentrations of solutions, the mixing procedure and the heat treatment, influence the particle size, the crystal structure and consequently the magnetic properties of the particles. Compared with Fe oxides, the saturation magnetization (MS) of Fe/Fe3O4 particles (100–190 emu/g) can be twice as high, and the coercivity (HC) can be tunable from several Oe to several hundred Oe. Hence, the SAR of Fe/Fe3O4 composite nanoparticles can be much higher than that of Fe oxides, with a maximum SAR of 345 W/g. The heating behavior is related to the magnetic behavior of the nanoparticles. PMID:25301983

  18. Synthesis and heating effect of iron/iron oxide composite and iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Q.; Baker, I.; Loudis, J. A.; Liao, Y. F.; Hoopes, P. J.

    2007-02-01

    Fe/Fe oxide nanoparticles, in which the core consists of metallic Fe and the shell is composed of Fe oxides, were obtained by reduction of an aqueous solution of FeCl 3 within a NaBH 4 solution, or, using a water-in-oil micro-emulsion with CTAB as the surfactant. The reduction was performed either in an inert atmosphere or in air, and passivation with air was performed to produce the Fe/Fe 3O 4 core/shell composite. Phase identification and particle size were determined by X-ray diffraction and TEM. Thermal analysis was performed using a differential scanning calorimeter. The quasistatic magnetic properties were measured using a VSM, and the specific absorption rates (SARs) of both Fe oxide and Fe/Fe 3O 4 composite nanoparticles either dispersed in methanol or in an epoxy resin were measured by Luxtron fiber temperature sensors in an alternating magnetic field of 150 Oe at 250 kHz. It was found that the preparation conditions, including the concentrations of solutions, the mixing procedure and the heat treatment, influence the particle size, the crystal structure and consequently the magnetic properties of the particles. Compared with Fe oxides, the saturation magnetization (MS) of Fe/Fe 3O 4 particles (100-190 emu/g) can be twice as high, and the coercivity (H C) can be tunable from several Oe to several hundred Oe. Hence, the SAR of Fe/Fe 3O 4 composite nanoparticles can be much higher than that of Fe oxides, with a maximum SAR of 345 W/g. The heating behavior is related to the magnetic behavior of the nanoparticles.

  19. The chemical transformation of copper in aluminium oxide during heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yu-Ling; Wang, Hsi-Chih; Yang, Yaw-Wen; Lee, Jyh-Fu

    2004-08-01

    Thermal treatment has recently been emerging as a promising environmental technology to stabilize heavy metal-containing industrial sludge. This study used x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to identify the species of copper contaminant contained in aluminium oxide that is one of the main compositions of sludge and soil. Results indicate that the originally loaded copper nitrate was transformed into Cu(OH)2 after its dissolution in the aluminium oxide slurry. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) fitting indicates that the main copper species in the 105 °C dried Cu(NO3)2-loaded aluminium oxide is Cu(OH)2 which accounts for ca. 75% of the loaded copper. After thermal treatment at 500 °C for 1 h, both x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and EXAFS fitting results show that CuO became the prevailing copper species (about 85%); the rest of the copper consisted of {\\sim }15{%} Cu(OH)2 and a negligible amount of Cu(NO3)2. It was found that most Cu(OH)2 and Cu(NO3)2 decomposed into CuO at 500 °C. Further increase of the heating temperature from 500 to 900 °C resulted in more decomposition of Cu(OH)2 and Cu(NO3)2; therefore CuO remained as the main copper species. However, it was suggested that about 15% of the loaded copper formed CuAl2O4 through the chemical reaction between CuO and Al2O3 at 900 °C.

  20. Heat of combustion of tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composites

    SciTech Connect

    Cervantes, Octavio G.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Gash, Alexander E.; Munir, Zuhair A.

    2010-12-15

    The heat of combustion of two distinctly synthesized stoichiometric tantalum-tungsten oxide energetic composites was investigated by bomb calorimetry. One composite was synthesized using a sol-gel (SG) derived method in which micrometric-scale tantalum is immobilized in a tungsten oxide three-dimensional nanostructured network structure. The second energetic composite was made from the mixing of micrometric-scale tantalum and commercially available (CA) nanometric tungsten oxide powders. The energetic composites were consolidated using the spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique under a 300 MPa pressure and at temperatures of 25, 400, and 500 C. For samples consolidated at 25 C, the density of the CA composite is 61.65 {+-} 1.07% in comparison to 56.41 {+-} 1.19% for the SG derived composite. In contrast, the resulting densities of the SG composite are higher than the CA composite for samples consolidated at 400 and 500 C. The theoretical maximum density for the SG composite consolidated to 400 and 500 C are 81.30 {+-} 0.58% and 84.42 {+-} 0.62%, respectively. The theoretical maximum density of the CA composite consolidated to 400 and 500 C are 74.54 {+-} 0.80% and 77.90 {+-} 0.79%, respectively. X-ray diffraction analyses showed an increase of pre-reaction of the constituents with an increase in the consolidation temperature. The increase in pre-reaction results in lower stored energy content for samples consolidated to 400 and 500 C in comparison to samples consolidated at 25 C. (author)

  1. Residential Solar Combined Heat and Power Generation using Solar Thermoelectric Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, B.; Wagner, M.; Kunkle, C.; Watson, P.; Williams, R.; Donohoe, R.; Ugarte, K.; Wilmoth, R.; Chong, M. Zachary; Lee, H.

    2015-06-01

    Recent reports on improved efficiencies of solar thermoelectric generation (STEG) systems have generated interest in STEGs as a competitive power generation system. In this paper, the design of a combined cooling and power utilizing concentrated solar power is discussed. Solar radiation is concentrated into a receiver connected to thermoelectric modules, which are used as a topping cycle to generate power and high grade heat necessary to run an absorption chiller. Modeling of the overall system is discussed with experimental data to validate modeling results. A numerical modeling approach is presented which considers temperature variation of the source and sink temperatures and is used to maximize combined efficiency. A system is built with a demonstrated combined efficiency of 32% in actual working conditions with power generation of 3.1 W. Modeling results fell within 3% of the experimental results verifying the approach. An optimization study is performed on the mirror concentration ration and number of modules for thermal load matching and is shown to improve power generation to 26.8 W.

  2. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    David Deangelis; Rich Depuy; Debashis Dey; Georgia Karvountzi; Nguyen Minh; Max Peter; Faress Rahman; Pavel Sokolov; Deliang Yang

    2004-09-30

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the April to October 2004 reporting period in Task 2.3 (SOFC Scaleup for Hybrid and Fuel Cell Systems) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. This study analyzes the performance and economics of power generation systems for central power generation application based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology and fueled by natural gas. The main objective of this task is to develop credible scale up strategies for large solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine systems. System concepts that integrate a SOFC with a gas turbine were developed and analyzed for plant sizes in excess of 20 MW. A 25 MW plant configuration was selected with projected system efficiency of over 65% and a factory cost of under $400/kW. The plant design is modular and can be scaled to both higher and lower plant power ratings. Technology gaps and required engineering development efforts were identified and evaluated.

  3. CHALLENGES IN GENERATING HYDROGEN BY HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS USING SOLID OXIDE CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; M. G. McKellar; J. S. Herring; E. A. Harvego

    2008-03-01

    Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) high temperature electrolysis research to generate hydrogen using solid oxide electrolysis cells is presented in this paper. The research results reported here have been obtained in a laboratory-scale apparatus. These results and common scale-up issues also indicate that for the technology to be successful in a large industrial setting, several technical, economical, and manufacturing issues have to be resolved. Some of the issues related to solid oxide cells are stack design and performance optimization, identification and evaluation of cell performance degradation parameters and processes, integrity and reliability of the solid oxide electrolysis (SOEC) stacks, life-time prediction and extension of the SOEC stack, and cost reduction and economic manufacturing of the SOEC stacks. Besides the solid oxide cells, balance of the hydrogen generating plant also needs significant development. These issues are process and ohmic heat source needed for maintaining the reaction temperature (~830°C), high temperature heat exchangers and recuperators, equal distribution of the reactants into each cell, system analysis of hydrogen and associated energy generating plant, and cost optimization. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. These issues need interdisciplinary research effort of federal laboratories, solid oxide cell manufacturers, hydrogen consumers, and other such stakeholders. This paper discusses research and development accomplished by INL on such issues and highlights associated challenges that need to

  4. Gas Generation Testing of Neptunium Oxide at Elevated Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, JM

    2004-01-30

    Elevated temperature gas generation tests have been conducted using neptunium dioxide produced on a laboratory scale using the HB-Line Phase II flowsheet. These tests were performed to determine what effect elevated temperatures would have on the neptunium dioxide in comparison to neptunium dioxide tested at ambient temperature. The headspace gas compositions following storage at elevated temperatures associated with normal conditions of transport (NCT) have been measured. These test results show an increase in hydrogen generation rate at elevated temperature and significant removal of oxygen from the headspace gas. The elevated temperature gas generation tests described in this report involved heating small test vessels containing neptunium dioxide and measuring the headspace gas pressure and composition at the end of the test period. Four samples were used in these tests to evaluate the impact of process variables on the gas generation rate. Two samples were calcined to 600 degrees Celsius and two were calcined to 650 degrees Celsius. Each test vessel contained approximately 9.5 g of neptunium dioxide. Following exposure to 75 per cent relative humidity (RH) for five days, these samples were loaded in air and then heated to between 105 and 115 degrees Celsius for about one month. At the conclusion of the test period, the headspace gas of each container was analyzed using a micro-gas chromatograph installed in the glovebox where the experiments were conducted. The pressure, volume, and composition data for the headspace gas samples were used to calculate average H2 generation rates.

  5. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

    2004-01-04

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the July 2003 to December 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

  6. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen Minh

    2004-07-04

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the January to June 2004 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

  7. Detailed study of heat generation in porous LiCoO2 electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heubner, C.; Schneider, M.; Michaelis, A.

    2016-03-01

    In this work the heat generation in porous LiCoO2 based electrodes for lithium ion batteries is studied in detail. Irreversible heat generation rates due to ohmic resistance, charge transfer and mass transport limitations as well as the reversible heat of the electrode reaction are determined from electrochemical measurements as a function of the C-rate, the temperature and the lithium concentration in the active material. The results show that all the individual heat sources contribute significantly to the total heat generation in the electrode. The heat sources are functions of the C-rate and the temperature as well as the lithium concentration in the active material. The reversible heat contribution was found to be most significant at higher temperatures und lower C-rates, which tend to reduce kinetic limitations and irreversible heats, respectively. The heat generation rate due to mass transport limitations is most influential among the irreversible heats, whereas the ohmic contribution shows a minor impact. The total heat generation was found to increase with increasing C-rate and decreasing temperature. Furthermore, the heat generation is significantly reduced for charging compared to discharging due to the intrinsic asymmetry of the reversible heat and larger kinetic limitations for lithiation compared to delithiation of LiCoO2.

  8. Effects of Heat Generation on Nuclear Waste Disposal in Salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, D. J.

    2008-12-01

    Disposal of nuclear waste in salt is an established technology, as evidenced by the successful operations of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) since 1999. The WIPP is located in bedded salt in southeastern New Mexico and is a deep underground facility for transuranic (TRU) nuclear waste disposal. There are many advantages for placing radioactive wastes in a geologic bedded-salt environment. One desirable mechanical characteristic of salt is that it flows plastically with time ("creeps"). The rate of salt creep is a strong function of temperature and stress differences. Higher temperatures and deviatoric stresses increase the creep rate. As the salt creeps, induced fractures may be closed and eventually healed, which then effectively seals the waste in place. With a backfill of crushed salt emplaced around the waste, the salt creep can cause the crushed salt to reconsolidate and heal to a state similar to intact salt, serving as an efficient seal. Experiments in the WIPP were conducted to investigate the effects of heat generation on the important phenomena and processes in and around the repository (Munson et al. 1987; 1990; 1992a; 1992b). Brine migration towards the heaters was induced from the thermal gradient, while salt creep rates showed an exponential dependence on temperature. The project "Backfill and Material Behavior in Underground Salt Repositories, Phase II" (BAMBUS II) studied the crushed salt backfill and material behavior with heat generation at the Asse mine located near Remlingen, Germany (Bechthold et al. 2004). Increased salt creep rates and significant reconsolidation of the crushed salt were observed at the termination of the experiment. Using the data provided from both projects, exploratory modeling of the thermal-mechanical response of salt has been conducted with varying thermal loading and waste spacing. Increased thermal loading and decreased waste spacing drive the system to higher temperatures, while both factors are desired to

  9. Dynamic modeling and evaluation of solid oxide fuel cell - combined heat and power system operating strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanaeda, Kimihiro; Mueller, Fabian; Brouwer, Jacob; Samuelsen, Scott

    Operating strategies of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) combined heat and power (CHP) systems are developed and evaluated from a utility, and end-user perspective using a fully integrated SOFC-CHP system dynamic model that resolves the physical states, thermal integration and overall efficiency of the system. The model can be modified for any SOFC-CHP system, but the present analysis is applied to a hotel in southern California based on measured electric and heating loads. Analysis indicates that combined heat and power systems can be operated to benefit both the end-users and the utility, providing more efficient electric generation as well as grid ancillary services, namely dispatchable urban power. Design and operating strategies considered in the paper include optimal sizing of the fuel cell, thermal energy storage to dispatch heat, and operating the fuel cell to provide flexible grid power. Analysis results indicate that with a 13.1% average increase in price-of-electricity (POE), the system can provide the grid with a 50% operating range of dispatchable urban power at an overall thermal efficiency of 80%. This grid-support operating mode increases the operational flexibility of the SOFC-CHP system, which may make the technology an important utility asset for accommodating the increased penetration of intermittent renewable power.

  10. Heat generation and stability of a plasmonic nanogold system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yuan; Kan, Caixia; Gao, Qi; Wei, Jingjing; Xu, Haiying; Wang, Changshun

    2016-02-01

    The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of Au nanostructures can be precisely tuned in the visible to near-infrared (vis-NIR) region with the size and morphology. The photothermal effect induced by the SPR can raise the temperature of Au nanostructures and the surrounding matrix under external illumination. In this work, hollow Au nanostructures such as nanoboxes and nanorings with a tunable SPR in the region of 650-1100 nm were obtained by a replacement reaction between HAuCl4 and the as-prepared Ag nanostructures as the sacrificed templates. Compared with the solid Au nanorods, studies on the photothermal conversion and stability of hollow Au nanostructures were systematically carried out with the assistance of the near-infrared (NIR) lasers available. Under NIR laser irradiation, the temperatures of the colloidal Au nanostructures increased rapidly from ~30 °C to ~65 °C. Combining the experimental results with a finite-different time-domain (FDTD) numerical simulation, the heat generation of different Au nanostructures was investigated. With the consideration of the concentration of the Au nanostructures, it is indicated that hollow Au nanostructures are superior to solid Au nanorods in photothermal conversion. On increasing the NIR laser power (3 W), Au nanorods undergo a shape deformation from nanorods to spherical nanoparticles, while the SPR and morphology of hollow Au nanoboxes and nanorings maintain high stability, promising to be candidates for nanoheaters. This work provides a standard to design optimized plasmonic nanoheaters.

  11. Localizing heat-generating defects using fluorescent microthermal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tangyunyong, P.; Liang, A.Y.; Righter, A.W.; Barton, D.L.; Soden, J.M.

    1996-10-01

    Fluorescent microthermal imaging (FMI) involves coating a sample surface with a thin fluorescent film that, upon exposure to UV light source, emits temperature-dependent fluorescence. The principle behind FMI was thoroughly reviewed at the ISTFA in 1994. In two recent publications, we identified several factors in film preparation and data processing that dramatically improved the thermal resolution and sensitivity of FMI. These factors include signal averaging, the use of base mixture films, film stabilization and film curing. These findings significantly enhance the capability of FMI as a failure analysis tool. In this paper, we show several examples that use FMI to quickly localize heat-generating defects (``hot spots``). When used with other failure analysis techniques such as focused ion beam (FIB) cross sectioning and scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging, we demonstrate that FMI is a powerful tool to efficiently identify the root cause of failures in complex ICs. In addition to defect localization, we use a failing IC to I determine the sensitivity of FMI (i.e., the lowest power that can be detected) in an ideal situation where the defects are very localized and near the surface.

  12. Mass production of two-dimensional oxides by rapid heating of hydrous chlorides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunsong; Zhang, Haitian; Si, Wenjie; Wu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanoscale oxides have attracted research interest owing to their electronic, magnetic optical and catalytic properties. If they could be manufactured on a large scale, 2D oxides would be attractive for applications ranging from electronics to energy conversion and storage. Herein, we report facile fabrication of oxide nanosheets by rapid thermal annealing of corresponding hydrous-chloride compounds. By heating CrCl3·6H2O, ZrOCl2·8H2O, AlCl3·6H2O and YCl3·6H2O crystals as precursors, we immediately collect large quantities of ultrathin Cr2O3, ZrO2, Al2O3 and Y2O3 nanosheets, respectively. The formation of layered nanosheets relies on exfoliation driven by rapid evaporation of water and/or other gas molecules generated under annealing. Our route allows simple, efficient and inexpensive production of 2D oxides. As a demonstration, we evaluate Cr2O3 nanosheets prepared by our method as anodes in lithium-ion batteries and find superior performance in comparison with their microcrystalline counterparts. PMID:27610589

  13. Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator for Electrical Power Generation from Automotive Waste Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisner, Gregory

    2012-02-01

    Filled skutterudites are state-of-the- art thermoelectric (TE) materials for electrical power generation from waste heat. They have suitable intrinsic transport properties as measured by the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT = S^2σT/κ (S = Seebeck coefficient, σ = electrical conductivity, T = temperature, and κ = thermal conductivity) and good mechanical strength for operation at vehicle exhaust gas temperatures of >550 C. We have demonstrated TE electrical power generation on a production test vehicle equipped with a fully functional prototype TE generator (TEG). It was assembled with TE modules fabricated from filled skutterudites synthesized at GM. Our results and analysis show that improvement in total power generated can be achieved by enhanced thermal and electrical interfaces and contacts. A substantial T decrease along the exhaust gas flow results in a large variation of voltage, current, and power output for each TE module depending on its position in the module array. Total TEG output power depends directly on the position-dependent T profile via the temperature dependence of both ZT and Carnot efficiency. Total TEG power output also depends on how the modules are connected in parallel or series combinations because mismatch in output voltage and/or internal resistance among the modules degrades the performance of the entire array. Uniform T profiles and consistent TE module internal resistances improve overall TEG performance.

  14. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Wei; Liu, Fu-Chao; Wang, Yu-Ren; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system. PMID:26637174

  15. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Ren; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system. PMID:26637174

  16. Enhancement of nitric oxide generation by low frequency electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa; Tanigawa; Tanigawa; Imai; Hongo; Kondo

    2000-07-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the intracellular signal transduction pathways for nitric oxide synthase (NOS) induction. The electromagnetic field (EMF) is believed to increase the free radical lifespan [S. Roy, Y. Noda, V. Eckert, M.G. Traber, A. Mori, R. Liburdy, L. Packer, The phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced oxidative burst in rat peritoneal neutrophils is increased by a 0.1 mT (60 Hz) magnetic field, FEBS Lett. 376 (1995) 164-6; F.S. Prato, M. Kavaliers, J.J. Carson, Behavioural evidence that magnetic field effects in the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis, might not depend on magnetite or induced electric currents, Bioelectromagnetics 17 (1996) 123-30; A.L. Hulbert, J. Metcalfe, R. Hesketh, Biological response to electromagnetic fields, FASEB 12 (1998) 395-420]. We tested the effects of EMF on endotoxin induced nitric oxide (NO) generation in vivo. Male BALB/C mice were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intraperitoneously (i.p.), followed by the exposure to EMF (0.1 mT, 60 Hz). Five hours and 30 min after the LPS administration, mice were administered with a NO spin trap, ferrous N-methyl-D-glucaminedithiocarbamate (MGD-Fe). Thirty minutes later, mice were sacrificed, and their livers were removed. The results were compared to three control groups: group A (LPS (-) EMF(-)); group B (LPS(-) EMF(+)); group C (LPS(+) EMF(-)). The ESR spectra of obtained livers were examined at room temperature. Three-line spectra of NO adducts were observed in the livers of all groups. In groups A and B very weak signals were observed, but in groups C and D strong spectra were observed. The signal intensity of the NO adducts in Group D was also significantly stronger than that in Group C. EMF itself did not induce NO generation, however, it enhanced LPS induced NO generation in vivo. PMID:10927193

  17. Interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism, the generation of oxidative stress and the mitigative oxidative stress response.

    PubMed

    Busch, Andrea W U; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2015-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles are involved in light harvesting and light perception, electron-transfer reactions, and as co-factors for key enzymes and sensory proteins. Under conditions in which cells exhibit stress-induced imbalances of photosynthetic reactions, or light absorption exceeds the ability of the cell to use photoexcitation energy in synthesis reactions, redox imbalance can occur in photosynthetic cells. Such conditions can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with alterations in tetrapyrrole homeostasis. ROS accumulation can result in cellular damage and detrimental effects on organismal fitness, or ROS molecules can serve as signals to induce a protective or damage-mitigating oxidative stress signaling response in cells. Induced oxidative stress responses include tetrapyrrole-dependent and -independent mechanisms for mitigating ROS generation and/or accumulation. Thus, tetrapyrroles can be contributors to oxidative stress, but are also essential in the oxidative stress response to protect cells by contributing to detoxification of ROS. In this review, we highlight the interconnection and interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism with the occurrence of oxidative stress and protective oxidative stress signaling responses in photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25618582

  18. Interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism, the generation of oxidative stress and the mitigative oxidative stress response

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Andrea W.U.; Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2015-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles are involved in light harvesting and light perception, electron-transfer reactions, and as co-factors for key enzymes and sensory proteins. Under conditions in which cells exhibit stress-induced imbalances of photosynthetic reactions, or light absorption exceeds the ability of the cell to use photoexcitation energy in synthesis reactions, redox imbalance can occur in photosynthetic cells. Such conditions can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with alterations in tetrapyrrole homeostasis. ROS accumulation can result in cellular damage and detrimental effects on organismal fitness, or ROS molecules can serve as signals to induce a protective or damage-mitigating oxidative stress signaling response in cells. Induced oxidative stress responses include tetrapyrrole-dependent and -independent mechanisms for mitigating ROS generation and/or accumulation. Thus, tetrapyrroles can be contributors to oxidative stress, but are also essential in the oxidative stress response to protect cells by contributing to detoxification of ROS. In this review, we highlight the interconnection and interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism with the occurrence of oxidative stress and protective oxidative stress signaling responses in photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25618582

  19. Development of a radioisotope heat source for the two-watt radioisotope thermoelectric generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Edwin I.; McNeil, Dennis C.; Amos, Wayne R.

    1992-01-01

    Described is a radioisotope heat source for the Two-Watt Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) which is being considered for possible application by the U.S. Navy and for other Department of Defense applications. The heat source thermal energy (75 Wt) is produced from the alpha decay of plutonium-238 which is in the form of high-fired plutonium dioxide. The capsule is non-vented and consists of three domed cylindrical components each closed with a corresponding sealed end cap. Surrounding the fuel is the liner component, which is fabricated from a tantalum-based alloy, T-111. Also fabricated from T-111 is the next component, the strength member, which serves to meet pressure and impact criteria. The outermost component, or clad, is the oxidation- and corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy, Hastelloy S. This paper defines the design considerations, details the hardware fabrication and welding processes, discusses the addition of yttrium to the fuel to reduce liner embrittlement, and describes the testing that has been conducted or is planned to assure that there is fuel containment not only during the heat source operational life, but also in case of an accident environment.

  20. Effects of alloy heat treatment on oxidation kinetics and scale morphology for Crofer 22 APU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdefrau, Neal J.; Chen, Lei; Sun, Ellen Y.; Aindow, Mark

    2013-11-01

    The effect of alloy heat treatment on the oxidation kinetics and oxide scale microstructure of Crofer 22 APU has been studied. Parabolic oxidation rate constants were measured for the as-received alloy and after pre-oxidation heat treatment in argon at 1050 °C for 1 and 4 h. The oxide scale microstructure was investigated using scanning electron microscopy, focused ion beam milling and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the alloy forms a two-layer scale with a continuous chromia layer and a discontinuous MnCr2O4 overlayer. Two forms of internal oxides were also formed: subscale pockets of spinel and isolated TiOx precipitates in the underlying alloy. The pre-oxidation heat treatment had a profound effect on the grain size and morphology of the Cr2O3 and MnCr2O4 layers in the scale. The heat-treated samples exhibit a 3.5× lower parabolic oxidation rate constant than the as-received Crofer 22 APU. This improvement in oxidation resistance is attributed to the dramatic differences in the morphology of the oxide scale that forms during the earliest stages of oxidation (<5 h). The implications of these findings for oxidation mechanisms and long-term SOFC performance are discussed.

  1. Hydrodynamic performance and heat generation by centrifugal pumps.

    PubMed

    Ganushchak, Y; van Marken Lichtenbelt, W; van der Nagel, T; de Jong, D S

    2006-11-01

    For over a century, centrifugal pumps (CP) have been used in various applications, from large industrial pumps to flow pumps for aquariums. However, the use of CP as blood pumps has a rather short history. Consequently, the hydraulic performance data for a blood CP are limited. The aim of our investigation was to study the hydraulic performance and the heat generation of three commercially available CP: Bio-Medicus Bio-Pump BP80 (Medtronic), Rotaflow (Jostra Medizintechnik), and DeltaStream DP2 (MEDOS Medizintechnik AQ). The study was performed using a circuit primed with a water-glycerin mixture with a dynamic viscosity of 0.00272 pa/s. Pressure-flow curves were obtained by a stepwise stagnation of the pump outlet or inlet. The temperature changes were observed using ThermaCAM SC2000 (Flir Systems). The pumps' performance in close to clinical conditions ('operating region') was analysed in this report. The 'operating region' in the case of the BP80 is positioned around the pressure-flow curve at a pump speed of 3000 rpm. In the case of the Rotaflow, the 'operating region' was between the pump pressure-flow curves at a speed of 3000 and 4000 rpm, and the DP2 was found between 7000 and 8000 rpm. The standard deviation of mean pressure through the pump was used to characterise the stability of the pump. In experiments with outlet stagnation, the BP80 demonstrated high negative association between flow and pressure variability (r = -0.68, p < 0.001). In experiments with the DP2, this association was positive (r = 0.68, p < 0.001). All pumps demonstrated significantly higher variability of pressure in experiments with inlet stagnation in comparison to the experiments with outlet stagnation. The rise of relative temperature in the inlet of a pump was closely related to the flow rate. The heating of fluid was more pronounced in the 'zero-flow' mode, especially in experiments with inlet stagnation. In summary, (1) the 'zero-flow' regime, which is described in the manuals

  2. Study for radionuclide transfer ratio of aerosols generated during heat cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Iguchi, Yukihiro; Baba, Tsutomu; Kawakami, Hiroto; Kitahara, Takashi; Watanabe, Atsushi; Kodama, Mitsuhiro

    2007-07-01

    The metallic elements with a low melting point and high vapor pressure seemed to transfer in aerosols selectively at dismantling reactor internals using heat cutting. Therefore, the arc melting tests of neutron irradiated zirconium alloy were conducted to investigate the radionuclide transfer behavior of aerosols generated during the heat cutting of activated metals. The arc melting test was conducted using a tungsten inert gas welding machine in an inert gas or air atmosphere. The radioactive aerosols were collected by filter and charcoal filter. The test sample was obtained from Zry-2 fuel cladding irradiated in a Japanese boiling water reactor for five fuel cycles. The activity analysis, chemical composition measurement and scanning electron microscope observation of aerosols were carried out. Some radionuclides were enriched in the aerosols generated in an inert gas atmosphere and the radionuclide transfer ratio did not change remarkably by the presence of air. The transfer ratio of Sb-125 was almost the same as that of Co-60. It was expected that Sb-125 was enriched from other elements since Sb is an element with a low melting point and high vapor pressure compared with the base metal (Zr). In the viewpoint of the environmental impact assessment, it became clear that the influence if Sb-125 is comparable to Co-60. The transfer ratio of Mn-54 was one order higher compared with other radionuclides. The results were discussed on the basis of thermal properties and oxide formation energy of the metallic elements. (authors)

  3. Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

    2009-03-01

    The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

  4. Oxidative nanopatterning of titanium generates mesoporous surfaces with antimicrobial properties

    PubMed Central

    Variola, Fabio; Zalzal, Sylvia Francis; Leduc, Annie; Barbeau, Jean; Nanci, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Mesoporous surfaces generated by oxidative nanopatterning have the capacity to selectively regulate cell behavior, but their impact on microorganisms has not yet been explored. The main objective of this study was to test the effects of such surfaces on the adherence of two common bacteria and one yeast strain that are responsible for nosocomial infections in clinical settings and biomedical applications. In addition, because surface characteristics are known to affect bacterial adhesion, we further characterized the physicochemical properties of the mesoporous surfaces. Focused ion beam (FIB) was used to generate ultrathin sections for elemental analysis by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), nanobeam electron diffraction (NBED), and high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging. The adherence of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans onto titanium disks with mesoporous and polished surfaces was compared. Disks with the two surfaces side-by-side were also used for direct visual comparison. Qualitative and quantitative results from this study indicate that bacterial adhesion is significantly hindered by the mesoporous surface. In addition, we provide evidence that it alters structural parameters of C. albicans that determine its invasiveness potential, suggesting that microorganisms can sense and respond to the mesoporous surface. Our findings demonstrate the efficiency of a simple chemical oxidative treatment in generating nanotextured surfaces with antimicrobial capacity with potential applications in the implant manufacturing industry and hospital setting. PMID:24872694

  5. Oxidative nanopatterning of titanium generates mesoporous surfaces with antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Variola, Fabio; Zalzal, Sylvia Francis; Leduc, Annie; Barbeau, Jean; Nanci, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Mesoporous surfaces generated by oxidative nanopatterning have the capacity to selectively regulate cell behavior, but their impact on microorganisms has not yet been explored. The main objective of this study was to test the effects of such surfaces on the adherence of two common bacteria and one yeast strain that are responsible for nosocomial infections in clinical settings and biomedical applications. In addition, because surface characteristics are known to affect bacterial adhesion, we further characterized the physicochemical properties of the mesoporous surfaces. Focused ion beam (FIB) was used to generate ultrathin sections for elemental analysis by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), nanobeam electron diffraction (NBED), and high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging. The adherence of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans onto titanium disks with mesoporous and polished surfaces was compared. Disks with the two surfaces side-by-side were also used for direct visual comparison. Qualitative and quantitative results from this study indicate that bacterial adhesion is significantly hindered by the mesoporous surface. In addition, we provide evidence that it alters structural parameters of C. albicans that determine its invasiveness potential, suggesting that microorganisms can sense and respond to the mesoporous surface. Our findings demonstrate the efficiency of a simple chemical oxidative treatment in generating nanotextured surfaces with antimicrobial capacity with potential applications in the implant manufacturing industry and hospital setting. PMID:24872694

  6. Multifunctional Porous Graphene for High-Efficiency Steam Generation by Heat Localization.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshikazu; Tanabe, Yoichi; Han, Jiuhui; Fujita, Takeshi; Tanigaki, Katsumi; Chen, Mingwei

    2015-08-01

    Multifunctional nanoporous graphene is realized as a heat generator to convert solar illumination into high-energy steam. The novel 3D nanoporous graphene demonstrates a highly energy-effective steam generation with an energy conversation of 80%. PMID:26079440

  7. Copper oxide nanoparticles analysis with water as base fluid for peristaltic flow in permeable tube with heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Raza, M; Ellahi, R

    2016-07-01

    The peristaltic flow of a copper oxide water fluid investigates the effects of heat generation and magnetic field in permeable tube is studied. The mathematical formulation is presented, the resulting equations are solved exactly. The obtained expressions for pressure gradient, pressure rise, temperature, velocity profile are described through graphs for various pertinent parameters. It is found that pressure gradient is reduce with enhancement of particle concentration and velocity profile is upturn, beside it is observed that temperature increases as more volume fraction of copper oxide. The streamlines are drawn for some physical quantities to discuss the trapping phenomenon. PMID:27208518

  8. From Modules to a Generator: An Integrated Heat Exchanger Concept for Car Applications of a Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Henry

    2016-03-01

    A heat exchanger concept for a thermoelectric generator with integrated planar modules for passenger car applications is introduced. The module housings, made of deep drawn stainless steel sheet metal, are brazed onto the exhaust gas channel to achieve an optimal heat transfer on the hot side of the modules. The cooling side consists of winding fluid channels, which are mounted directly onto the cold side of the modules. Only a thin foil separates the cooling media from the modules for an almost direct heat contact on the cooling side. Thermoelectric generators with up to 20 modules made of PbTe and Bi2Te3, respectively, are manufactured and tested on a hot gas generator to investigate electrical power output and performance of the thermoelectric generator. The proof of concept of the light weight heat exchanger design made of sheet metal with integrated modules is positively accomplished.

  9. POWER GENERATION USING MEGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC GENERATOR WITH A CIRCULATION FLOW DRIVEN BY SOLAR-HEAT-INDUCED NATURAL CONVECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project team has theoretically studied the mechanism of magnetohydrodynamic generator, the coupling of heat transfer and buoyancy-driven free convection, and radiation heat transfer. A number of ideas for the projects have been brainstormed in the team. The underline physi...

  10. Solid oxide fuel cell systems for residential micro-combined heat and power in the UK: Key economic drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, Adam; Leach, Matthew

    The ability of combined heat and power (CHP) to meet residential heat and power demands efficiently offers potentially significant financial and environmental advantages over centralised power generation and heat-provision through natural-gas fired boilers. A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) can operate at high overall efficiencies (heat and power) of 80-90%, offering an improvement over centralised generation, which is often unable to utilise waste heat. This paper applies an equivalent annual cost (EAC) minimisation model to a residential solid oxide fuel cell CHP system to determine what the driving factors are behind investment in this technology. We explore the performance of a hypothetical SOFC system—representing expectations of near to medium term technology development—under present UK market conditions. We find that households with small to average energy demands do not benefit from installation of a SOFC micro-CHP system, but larger energy demands do benefit under these conditions. However, this result is sensitive to a number of factors including stack capital cost, energy import and export prices, and plant lifetime. The results for small and average dwellings are shown to reverse under an observed change in energy import prices, an increase in electricity export price, a decrease in stack capital costs, or an improvement in stack lifetime.

  11. Electricity-producing heating apparatus utilizing a turbine generator in a semi-closed brayton cycle

    DOEpatents

    Labinov, Solomon D.; Christian, Jeffrey E.

    2003-10-07

    The present invention provides apparatus and methods for producing both heat and electrical energy by burning fuels in a stove or boiler using a novel arrangement of a surface heat exchanger and microturbine-powered generator and novel surface heat exchanger. The equipment is particularly suited for use in rural and relatively undeveloped areas, especially in cold regions and highlands.

  12. Generator-Absorber heat exchange transfer apparatus and method using an intermediate liquor

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Zawacki, Thomas S.

    1996-11-05

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use the working solution of the absorption system for the heat transfer medium where the working solution has an intermediate liquor concentration.

  13. Analysis of the heat transfer at the tool-workpiece interface in machining: determination of heat generation and heat transfer coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddag, B.; Atlati, S.; Nouari, M.; Zenasni, M.

    2015-10-01

    This paper deals with the modelling and identification of the heat exchange at the tool-workpiece interface in machining. A thermomechanical modelling has been established including heat balance equations of the tool-workpiece interface which take into account the heat generated by friction and the heat transfer by conduction due to the thermal contact resistance. The interface heat balance equations involve two coefficients: heat generation coefficient (HGC) of the frictional heat and heat transfer coefficient (HTC) of the heat conduction (inverse of the thermal contact resistance coefficient). Using experimental average heat flux in the tool, estimated for several cutting speeds, an identification procedure of the HGC-HTC couple, involved in the established thermomechanical FE-based modelling of the cutting process, has been proposed, which gives the numerical heat flux equal the measured one for each cutting speed. Using identified values of the HGC-HTC couple, evolution laws are proposed for the HGC as function of cutting speed, and then as function of sliding velocity at the tool-workpiece interface. Such laws can be implemented for instance in a Finite Element code for machining simulations.

  14. Zirconium diboride nanofiber generation via microwave arc heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldridge, Tyson; Gupta, Mool C.

    2008-07-01

    Ultrahigh temperature zirconium diboride nanofibers were produced by microwave arc heating using micron-sized raw powder. While microwave heating the ZrB2 powder, the development of local arcing led to rapid heating and solidification of the samples, along with the creation of nanofibers. The morphology of these high aspect ratio nanofibers was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction showed the composition to contain zirconium, boron, nitrogen, aluminum and oxygen as well as the crystallographic orientation. ZrB2 nanofiber applications include aerospace and other harsh environments.

  15. Scale/Analytical Analyses of Freezing and Convective Melting with Internal Heat Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ali S. Siahpush; John Crepeau; Piyush Sabharwall

    2013-07-01

    Using a scale/analytical analysis approach, we model phase change (melting) for pure materials which generate constant internal heat generation for small Stefan numbers (approximately one). The analysis considers conduction in the solid phase and natural convection, driven by internal heat generation, in the liquid regime. The model is applied for a constant surface temperature boundary condition where the melting temperature is greater than the surface temperature in a cylindrical geometry. The analysis also consider constant heat flux (in a cylindrical geometry).We show the time scales in which conduction and convection heat transfer dominate.

  16. Plasmonic near-touching titanium oxide nanoparticles to realize solar energy harvesting and effective local heating.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jiahao; Liu, Pu; Ma, Churong; Lin, Zhaoyong; Yang, Guowei

    2016-04-28

    Through the excitation of plasmon resonance, the energy of plasmonic nanoparticles either reradiates through light scattering or decays into energetic electrons (absorption). The plasmon-induced absorption can greatly enhance the efficiency of solar energy harvesting, local heating, photodetection and photocatalysis. Here, we demonstrate that heavily self-doped titanium oxide nanoparticles (TiO1.67 analogue arising from oxygen vacancies in rutile TiO2) with the plasmon resonance dominated by an interband transition shows strong absorption to build a broadband perfect absorber in the wavelength range from 300 to 2000 nm covering the solar irradiation spectrum completely. The absorptivity of the fabricated array is greater than 90% in the whole spectral range. And the broadband and strong absorption is due to the plasmon hybridization and hot spot generation from near-touching TiO1.67 nanoparticles with different sizes. What is more, the local heating of a TiO1.67 nanoparticle layer is fast and effective. The temperature increases quickly from 30 °C to 80 °C within 200 seconds. This local heating can realize rapid solar-enabled evaporation which can find applications in large-scale distillation and seawater desalination. These findings actually open a pathway for applications of these newly developed plasmonic materials in the energy and environment fields. PMID:27067248

  17. A new absorption chiller to establish combined cold, heat, and power generation utilizing low-temperature heat

    SciTech Connect

    Schweigler, C.J.; Riesch, P.; Demmel, S.; Alefeld, G.

    1996-11-01

    Presently available absorption machines for air conditioning are driven with heat of a minimum of 80 C (176 F). A combination of the standard single-effect and a double-lift process has been identified as a new cycle that can use driving heat down to return temperatures of about 55 C (131 F) and permits temperature glides in generation of more than 30 K (54 F). Thus a larger cooling capacity can be produced from the same heat source compared to a single-effect chiller run with the same heat carrier supply temperature and mass flow. According to the estimated heat exchanger area, competitive machine costs for this new chiller can be expected. This single-effect/double-lift absorption chiller can be operated with waste heat from industrial processes, as well as with low-temperature heat (e.g., heat from solar collectors) as driving heat for air conditioning. The large temperature glide and the low return temperature especially fit the operating conditions in district heating networks during the summer. The cycle will be presented, followed by a discussion of suitable operating conditions.

  18. Importance of Plasmonic Heating on Visible Light Driven Photocatalysis of Gold Nanoparticle Decorated Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Tanujjal; Zoepfl, David; Dutta, Joydeep

    2016-05-01

    Herein we explore the role of localized plasmonic heat generated by resonantly excited gold (Au) NPs on visible light driven photocatalysis process. Au NPs are deposited on the surface of vertically aligned zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs). The localized heat generated by Au NPs under 532 nm continuous laser excitation (SPR excitation) was experimentally probed using Raman spectroscopy by following the phonon modes of ZnO. Under the resonant excitation the temperature at the surface of the Au-ZnO NRs reaches up to about 300 °C, resulting in almost 6 times higher apparent quantum yield (AQY) for photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) compared to the bare ZnO NRs. Under solar light irradiation the Au-ZnO NRs demonstrated visible light photocatalytic activity twice that of what was achieved with bare ZnO NRs, while significantly reduced the activation energy required for the photocatalytic reactions allowing the reactions to occur at a faster rate.

  19. Importance of Plasmonic Heating on Visible Light Driven Photocatalysis of Gold Nanoparticle Decorated Zinc Oxide Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Bora, Tanujjal; Zoepfl, David; Dutta, Joydeep

    2016-01-01

    Herein we explore the role of localized plasmonic heat generated by resonantly excited gold (Au) NPs on visible light driven photocatalysis process. Au NPs are deposited on the surface of vertically aligned zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs). The localized heat generated by Au NPs under 532 nm continuous laser excitation (SPR excitation) was experimentally probed using Raman spectroscopy by following the phonon modes of ZnO. Under the resonant excitation the temperature at the surface of the Au-ZnO NRs reaches up to about 300 °C, resulting in almost 6 times higher apparent quantum yield (AQY) for photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) compared to the bare ZnO NRs. Under solar light irradiation the Au-ZnO NRs demonstrated visible light photocatalytic activity twice that of what was achieved with bare ZnO NRs, while significantly reduced the activation energy required for the photocatalytic reactions allowing the reactions to occur at a faster rate. PMID:27242172

  20. Importance of Plasmonic Heating on Visible Light Driven Photocatalysis of Gold Nanoparticle Decorated Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Bora, Tanujjal; Zoepfl, David; Dutta, Joydeep

    2016-01-01

    Herein we explore the role of localized plasmonic heat generated by resonantly excited gold (Au) NPs on visible light driven photocatalysis process. Au NPs are deposited on the surface of vertically aligned zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs). The localized heat generated by Au NPs under 532 nm continuous laser excitation (SPR excitation) was experimentally probed using Raman spectroscopy by following the phonon modes of ZnO. Under the resonant excitation the temperature at the surface of the Au-ZnO NRs reaches up to about 300 °C, resulting in almost 6 times higher apparent quantum yield (AQY) for photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) compared to the bare ZnO NRs. Under solar light irradiation the Au-ZnO NRs demonstrated visible light photocatalytic activity twice that of what was achieved with bare ZnO NRs, while significantly reduced the activation energy required for the photocatalytic reactions allowing the reactions to occur at a faster rate. PMID:27242172

  1. Monolithic oxide-metal composite thermoelectric generators for energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funahashi, Shuichi; Nakamura, Takanori; Kageyama, Keisuke; Ieki, Hideharu

    2011-06-01

    Monolithic oxide-metal composite thermoelectric generators (TEGs) were fabricated using multilayer co-fired ceramic technology. These devices consisted of Ni0.9Mo0.1 and La0.035Sr0.965TiO3 as p- and n-type thermoelectric materials, and Y0.03Zr0.97O2 was used as an insulator, sandwiched between p- and n-type layers. To co-fire dissimilar materials, p-type layers contained 20 wt. % La0.035Sr0.965TiO3; thus, these were oxide-metal composite layers. The fabricated device had 50 pairs of p-i-n junctions of 5.9 mm × 7.0 mm × 2.6 mm. The calculated maximum value of the electric power output from the device was 450 mW/cm2 at ΔT = 360 K. Furthermore, this device generated 100 μW at ΔT = 10 K and operated a radio frequency (RF) transmitter circuit module assumed to be a sensor network system.

  2. An analytical model for the heat generation in friction stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, H.; Hattel, J.; Wert, J.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work is to establish an analytical model for heat generation by friction stir welding (FSW), based on different assumptions of the contact condition between the rotating tool surface and the weld piece. The material flow and heat generation are characterized by the contact conditions at the interface, and are described as sliding, sticking or partial sliding/sticking. Different mechanisms of heat generation are behind each contact condition, making this study important for further understanding of the real FSW process. The analytical expression for the heat generation is a modification of previous analytical models known from the literature and accounts for both conical surfaces and different contact conditions. Experimental results on plunge force and torque are used to determine the contact condition. The sliding condition yields a proportional relationship between the plunge force and heat generation. This is not demonstrated in the experiment, which suggests that the sticking contact condition is present at the tool/matrix interface.

  3. Plasma oxidative stress biomarkers, nitric oxide and heat shock protein 70 in trained elite soccer players.

    PubMed

    Banfi, G; Malavazos, A; Iorio, E; Dolci, A; Doneda, L; Verna, R; Corsi, M M

    2006-03-01

    The physiological response to the physical exercise involves a number of changes in the oxidative balance and in the metabolism of some important biological molecules, including nitric oxide (NO) and heat shock proteins (Hsp 70). With the aim to optimise previous laboratory diagnostic panels, we measured the plasma concentration of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs), total antioxidant status (TAS), glutathione reductase (GR) activity, and NO and Hsp 70 levels in 44 elite, antioxidant-supplemented and trained soccer players and in 15 sedentary controls. Although no statistically significant difference between athletes and controls was detected in the plasma level of ROMs and TAS, soccer players showed a significantly higher plasma GR activity, NO and Hst 70 levels than those of sedentary controls. These findings suggest that the measuring of relatively novel biomarkers in sport medicine, like GR, NO and Hsp 70, in addition to the well-known and reliable assays (d-ROMs test and TAS) may be useful to a clinician to better assess and evaluate the benefits of training and/or supplementation programs. PMID:16344941

  4. Oxidation and Volatilization from Tungsten Brush High Heat Flux Armor During High Temperature Steam Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Smolik, Galen Richard; Pawelko, Robert James; Anderl, Robert Andrew; Petti, David Andrew

    2000-05-01

    Tungsten brush accommodates thermal stresses and high heat flux in fusion reactor components such as plasma facing surfaces or armor. However, inherently higher surface areas are introduced with the brush design. We have tested a specific design of tungsten brush in steam between 500 and 1100°C. Hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization rates were determined to address fusion safety issues. The brush prepared from 3.2-mm diameter welding rods had a packing density of 85 percent. We found that both hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization from brush, fixtured to represent a unit within a larger component, were less than projections based upon the total integrated surface area (TSA). Steam access and the escape of hydrogen and volatile oxide from void spaces within the brush are restricted compared to specimens with more direct diffusion pathways to the test environment. Hydrogen generation rates from restrained specimens based on normal surface area (NSA) remain about five times higher than rates based on total surface areas from specimens with direct steam access. Volatilization rates from restrained specimens based upon normal surface area (NSA) were only 50 percent higher than our historic cumulative maximum flux plot (CMFP) for tungsten. This study has shown that hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization from brush do not scale according to predictions with previously determined rates, but in fact, with higher packing density could approach those from flat surfaces.

  5. District heating from electric-generating plants and municipal incinerators: local planner's assessment guide

    SciTech Connect

    Pferdehirt, W.; Kron, N. Jr.

    1980-11-01

    This guide is designed to aid local government planners in the preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of district heating using heat recovered from electric generating plants and municipal incinerators. System feasibility is indicated by: (1) the existence of an adequate supply of nearby waste heat, (2) the presence of a sufficiently dense and large thermal load, and (3) a favorable cost comparison with conventional heating methods. 34 references.

  6. Regional trends in radiogenic heat generation in the Precambrian basement of the Western Canadian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, F. W.; Majorowicz, J. A.

    Radiogenic heat generation values for 381 basement samples from 229 sites in the western Canadian basin exhibit a lognormal frequency distribution. The mean value = 2.06 (S.D. = 1.22) µWm-3 is larger than the radiogenic heat generation values reported for the shield in the Superior (ca. 1.2 µWm-3, Jessop and Lewis, 1978) and Churchill (ca. 0.7 µWm-3, Drury, 1985) provinces. When equal Log A contour intervals are used to map the basement heat generation, three large zones of relatively high heat generation are found. One coincides with the Peace River Arch basement structure and one with the Athabasca axis (Darnley, 1981). There is no apparent indication of increased heat flow through the Paleozoic formations associated with these two zones. The third zone, in southwestern Saskatchewan, coincides with a high heat flow zone in the Swift Current area. The lack of correlation between heat flow and heat generation in Alberta may be due to the disturbance to the heat flow in the Paleozoic formations by water motion, or may indicate that the heat is from uranium, thorium and potassium isotope enrichment near the basement surface rather than enrichment throughout the entire upper crust.

  7. Quantitative Comparison of Photothermal Heat Generation between Gold Nanospheres and Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhenpeng; Wang, Yiru; Randrianalisoa, Jaona; Raeesi, Vahid; Chan, Warren C. W.; Lipiński, Wojciech; Bischof, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are widely used for biomedical applications due to unique optical properties, established synthesis methods, and biological compatibility. Despite important applications of plasmonic heating in thermal therapy, imaging, and diagnostics, the lack of quantification in heat generation leads to difficulties in comparing the heating capability for new plasmonic nanostructures and predicting the therapeutic and diagnostic outcome. This study quantifies GNP heat generation by experimental measurements and theoretical predictions for gold nanospheres (GNS) and nanorods (GNR). Interestingly, the results show a GNP-type dependent agreement between experiment and theory. The measured heat generation of GNS matches well with theory, while the measured heat generation of GNR is only 30% of that predicted theoretically at peak absorption. This then leads to a surprising finding that the polydispersity, the deviation of nanoparticle size and shape from nominal value, significantly influences GNR heat generation (>70% reduction), while having a limited effect for GNS (<10% change). This work demonstrates that polydispersity is an important metric in quantitatively predicting plasmonic heat generation and provides a validated framework to quantitatively compare the heating capabilities between gold and other plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:27445172

  8. Quantitative Comparison of Photothermal Heat Generation between Gold Nanospheres and Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhenpeng; Wang, Yiru; Randrianalisoa, Jaona; Raeesi, Vahid; Chan, Warren C W; Lipiński, Wojciech; Bischof, John C

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are widely used for biomedical applications due to unique optical properties, established synthesis methods, and biological compatibility. Despite important applications of plasmonic heating in thermal therapy, imaging, and diagnostics, the lack of quantification in heat generation leads to difficulties in comparing the heating capability for new plasmonic nanostructures and predicting the therapeutic and diagnostic outcome. This study quantifies GNP heat generation by experimental measurements and theoretical predictions for gold nanospheres (GNS) and nanorods (GNR). Interestingly, the results show a GNP-type dependent agreement between experiment and theory. The measured heat generation of GNS matches well with theory, while the measured heat generation of GNR is only 30% of that predicted theoretically at peak absorption. This then leads to a surprising finding that the polydispersity, the deviation of nanoparticle size and shape from nominal value, significantly influences GNR heat generation (>70% reduction), while having a limited effect for GNS (<10% change). This work demonstrates that polydispersity is an important metric in quantitatively predicting plasmonic heat generation and provides a validated framework to quantitatively compare the heating capabilities between gold and other plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:27445172

  9. Quantitative Comparison of Photothermal Heat Generation between Gold Nanospheres and Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhenpeng; Wang, Yiru; Randrianalisoa, Jaona; Raeesi, Vahid; Chan, Warren C. W.; Lipiński, Wojciech; Bischof, John C.

    2016-07-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are widely used for biomedical applications due to unique optical properties, established synthesis methods, and biological compatibility. Despite important applications of plasmonic heating in thermal therapy, imaging, and diagnostics, the lack of quantification in heat generation leads to difficulties in comparing the heating capability for new plasmonic nanostructures and predicting the therapeutic and diagnostic outcome. This study quantifies GNP heat generation by experimental measurements and theoretical predictions for gold nanospheres (GNS) and nanorods (GNR). Interestingly, the results show a GNP-type dependent agreement between experiment and theory. The measured heat generation of GNS matches well with theory, while the measured heat generation of GNR is only 30% of that predicted theoretically at peak absorption. This then leads to a surprising finding that the polydispersity, the deviation of nanoparticle size and shape from nominal value, significantly influences GNR heat generation (>70% reduction), while having a limited effect for GNS (<10% change). This work demonstrates that polydispersity is an important metric in quantitatively predicting plasmonic heat generation and provides a validated framework to quantitatively compare the heating capabilities between gold and other plasmonic nanostructures.

  10. IMPROVING DESIGN AND OPERATION OF HEAT TREATMENT/LOW PRESSURE OXIDATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the investigation is to document possible improvements to design, operation, and maintenance of heat treatment and low pressure oxidation systems for conditioning sludge prior to dewatering in municipal wastewater treatment plants. The information in the report is ...

  11. Surface Catalysis and Oxidation on Stagnation Point Heat Flux Measurements in High Enthalpy Arc Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nawaz, Anuscheh; Driver, David M.; Terrazas-Salinas

    2013-01-01

    Heat flux sensors are routinely used in arc jet facilities to determine heat transfer rates from plasma plume. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of surface composition changes on these heat flux sensors. Surface compositions can change due to oxidation and material deposition from the arc jet. Systematic surface analyses of the sensors were conducted before and after exposure to plasma. Currently copper is commonly used as surface material. Other surface materials were studied including nickel, constantan gold, platinum and silicon dioxide. The surfaces were exposed to plasma between 0.3 seconds and 3 seconds. Surface changes due to oxidation as well as copper deposition from the arc jets were observed. Results from changes in measured heat flux as a function of surface catalycity is given, along with a first assessment of enthalpy for these measurements. The use of cupric oxide is recommended for future heat flux measurements, due to its consistent surface composition arc jets.

  12. Oxidation of boron nitride in an arc heated jet.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, J. D.

    1971-01-01

    Two grades of hot pressed boron nitride and a boron nitride composite were subjected to oxidation tests in a 2.5 megawatt atmospheric arc jet. The results showed that fabrication and/or composition influenced thermal shock and oxidation resistance. Changes in surface structure and recession due to oxidation suggest correlation with specimen composition. The boron nitride composite reacted with the oxygen in the hot subsonic airstream to produce a glassy coating on the hot face surface.

  13. Self-generated stochastic heating in an rf discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberg, A.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the nonlinear dynamics of stochastic heating arising from the reflection of electrons from moving sheaths as an underlying mechanism for electron power deposition in r.f. discharges. We examined the dynamics of the electron collision with the sheaths in the regime in which the sheath motion is small compared to the average electron velocity to de rive a mop that describes the electron motion. We have shown that for high frequency, ({omega}/2{pi}{approx gt}50MHz), the electrons will strike the moving wall with random phase. At low pressures this stochasticity is an intrinsic property of the dynamics. The stochastic electron heating leads to a power law electron distribution. The stochastic heating was determined in both the slow sheath and fast sheath velocity regimes assuming an incident Maxwellian distribution.

  14. Model and simulation of heat transfer, magnetite oxidation and NOx formation in a grate-kiln taconite pellet induration furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.A.

    1996-12-31

    A numerical model was developed to simulate the combined effects of heat transfer, magnetite oxidation, and NO{sub x} formation in a grate-kiln furnace for taconite pellet induration. Heat transfer from the flame in the kiln was described by the net radiation method. The shrinking core model was used to account for magnetite oxidation on the grate. A novel approach to oxidation of tumbling pellets in a kiln was derived. The Zeldovich mechanism was used to predict thermal NO generation. Temperature fluctuations in the gas streams were estimated with a clipped Gaussian probability density function. The thermal energy balances and mass balances resulted in coupled systems of first-order differential equations, which were solved numerically. The model is capable of predicting NO production and magnetite oxidation in agreement with observation of plant performance. Although the design of the grate-kiln system is for efficient heat and mass transfer, it may not be the optimal design for minimizing the formation of NOx. When natural gas is used to fuel the kiln burner in the presence of excess air, the principal mechanism of NOx formation is the thermally induced combination of oxygen and nitrogen in the air in the post combustion zone after the burner.

  15. Magnetoresistance effect of heat generation in a single-molecular spin-valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Feng; Yan, Yonghong; Wang, Shikuan; Yan, Yijing

    2016-02-01

    Based on non-equilibrium Green's functions' theory and small polaron transformation's technology, we study the heat generation by current through a single-molecular spin-valve. Numerical results indicate that the variation of spin polarization degree can change heat generation effectively, the spin-valve effect happens not only in electrical current but also in heat generation when Coulomb repulsion in quantum dot is smaller than phonon frequency and interestingly, when Coulomb repulsion is larger than phonon frequency, the inverse spin-valve effect appears by sweeping gate voltage and is enlarged with bias increasing. The inverse spin-valve effect will induce the unique heat magnetoresistance effect, which can be modulated from heat-resistance to heat-gain by gate voltage easily.

  16. Voltage generation of piezoelectric cantilevers by laser heating

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Chun-Yi; Liu, Wei-Hung; Chen, Yang-Fang; Shih, Wan Y.; Gao, Xiaotong; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2012-01-01

    Converting ambient thermal energy into electricity is of great interest in harvesting energy from the environment. Piezoelectric cantilevers have previously been shown to be an effective biosensor and a tool for elasticity mapping. Here we show that a single piezoelectric (lead-zirconate titanate (PZT)) layer cantilever can be used to convert heat to electricity through pyroelectric effect. Furthermore, piezoelectric-metal (PZT-Ti) bi-layer cantilever showed an enhanced induced voltage over the single PZT layer alone due to the additional piezoelectric effect. This type of device can be a way for converting heat energy into electricity. PMID:23258941

  17. Voltage generation of piezoelectric cantilevers by laser heating.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chun-Yi; Liu, Wei-Hung; Chen, Yang-Fang; Shih, Wan Y; Gao, Xiaotong; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2012-11-15

    Converting ambient thermal energy into electricity is of great interest in harvesting energy from the environment. Piezoelectric cantilevers have previously been shown to be an effective biosensor and a tool for elasticity mapping. Here we show that a single piezoelectric (lead-zirconate titanate (PZT)) layer cantilever can be used to convert heat to electricity through pyroelectric effect. Furthermore, piezoelectric-metal (PZT-Ti) bi-layer cantilever showed an enhanced induced voltage over the single PZT layer alone due to the additional piezoelectric effect. This type of device can be a way for converting heat energy into electricity. PMID:23258941

  18. Voltage generation of piezoelectric cantilevers by laser heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chun-Yi; Liu, Wei-Hung; Chen, Yang-Fang; Shih, Wan Y.; Gao, Xiaotong; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2012-11-01

    Converting ambient thermal energy into electricity is of great interest in harvesting energy from the environment. Piezoelectric cantilevers have previously been shown to be an effective biosensor and a tool for elasticity mapping. Here we show that a single piezoelectric (lead-zirconate titanate (PZT)) layer cantilever can be used to convert heat to electricity through pyroelectric effect. Furthermore, piezoelectric-metal (PZT-Ti) bi-layer cantilever showed an enhanced induced voltage over the single PZT layer alone due to the additional piezoelectric effect. This type of device can be a way for converting heat energy into electricity.

  19. Heat line analysis for MHD mixed convection flow of nanofluid within a driven cavity containing heat generating block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvin, Salma; Siddiqua, Ayesha

    2016-07-01

    Mixed convective flow and heat transfer characteristics of nanofluid inside a double lid driven cavity with a square heat generating block is analyzed numerically based on heat line approach. The water- alumina nanofluid is chosen as the operational fluid through the enclosure. The governing partial differential equations with proper boundary conditions are solved by Finite Element Method using Galerkin's weighted residual scheme. Calculations are performed for different solid volume fraction (χ) of nanoparticles 0 ≤ χ ≤ 0.15. Results are shown in terms of stream lines, isothermal lines, heat lines, average Nusselt number, average velocity and average temperature. An enhancement in heat transfer rate is observed with the increase of nanoparticles volume fraction.

  20. A topical nitric oxide-generating therapy for cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Davidson, R N; Yardley, V; Croft, S L; Konecny, P; Benjamin, N

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) synthesized by macrophages is cidal to Leishmania. Since NO diffuses into tissues, we reasoned that NO-generating creams applied topically to lesions might be an effective and inexpensive treatment for cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). NO was generated non-enzymatically by the acidification of nitrite (KNO2) by ascorbic acid (ASC) or salicylic acid (SAL). Experiments in vitro showed that the combinations of KNO2 and SAL, ASC, or KC1 all killed promastigotes and amastigotes of L. major in a dose- and time-dependent manner, but were toxic to macrophages at higher concentrations. Experiments in vivo showed modest efficacy of the combinations applied topically to L. major CL lesions of BALB/c mice. Forty patients with parasitologically proven L. tropica CL from Aleppo, Syria, were treated for 4 weeks with KNO2 in aqueous cream combined with KC1, ASC, or SAL. Only 11 (28%) of 40 patients showed improvement and only 5 (12%) of 40 were cured at 2 months. Further development of NO-generating creams is warranted. PMID:10975011

  1. Fast start-up reactor for partial oxidation of methane with electrically-heated metallic monolith catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Heon; Yoon, Wang Lai; Lee, Hotae; Park, Jong Soo; Shin, Jang Sik; La, Howon; Lee, Jong Dae

    A palladium-washcoated metallic monolith catalyst is applied to the partial oxidation of methane to syngas. This catalyst is highly active at a gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of 100,000 h -1. The compact partial oxidation (POX) reactor equipped with both 96 cc of the metallic monolith catalyst and an electrically-heated catalyst (EHC) has a start-up time of less than 1.5 min and a syngas generation capacity of 9.5 Nm 3 h -1. The POX reaction is sustained without the need for an external heater. With the stand-alone POX reactor, the methane conversion can be increased either by preheating the reactant mixture heat-exchanged with the product gas, or by supplying a larger amount of oxygen than is necessary for the reaction stoichiometry.

  2. CONVERTING ENERGY FROM RECLAIMED HEAT: THERMAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of solar energy acquiring devices has been slow to gain acceptance due to their overall low power generation versus high cost of a solar system. The goal of this project is to construct a model which increases the overall power generation of a solar building system by...

  3. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Steam Generator and Intermediate Heat Exchanger Materials Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Wright

    2010-09-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Today’s high-temperature alloys and associated ASME Codes for reactor applications are approved up to 760°C. However, some primary system components, such as the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP will require use of materials that can withstand higher temperatures. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge. Examples include materials for the core barrel and core internals, such as the control rod sleeves. The requirements of the materials for the IHX are among the most demanding. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. A number of solid solution strengthened nickel based alloys have been considered for

  4. Inhibition of the oxidative stress response by heat stress in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Crombie, Timothy A; Tang, Lanlan; Choe, Keith P; Julian, David

    2016-07-15

    It has long been recognized that simultaneous exposure to heat stress and oxidative stress shows a synergistic interaction that reduces organismal fitness, but relatively little is known about the mechanisms underlying this interaction. We investigated the role of molecular stress responses in driving this synergistic interaction using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans To induce oxidative stress, we used the pro-oxidant compounds acrylamide, paraquat and juglone. As expected, we found that heat stress and oxidative stress interact synergistically to reduce survival. Compared with exposure to each stressor alone, during simultaneous sublethal exposure to heat stress and oxidative stress the normal induction of key oxidative-stress response (OxSR) genes was generally inhibited, whereas the induction of key heat-shock response (HSR) genes was not. Genetically activating the SKN-1-dependent OxSR increased a marker for protein aggregation and decreased whole-worm survival during heat stress alone, with the latter being independent of HSF-1. In contrast, compared with wild-type worms, inactivating the HSR by HSF-1 knockdown, which would be expected to decrease basal heat shock protein expression, increased survival during oxidative stress alone. Taken together, these data suggest that, in C. elegans, the HSR and OxSR cannot be simultaneously activated to the same extent that each can be activated during a single stressor exposure. We conclude that the observed synergistic reduction in survival during combined exposure to heat stress and oxidative stress is due, at least in part, to inhibition of the OxSR during activation of the HSR. PMID:27207646

  5. Alternative method for steam generation for thermal oxidation of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegelman, Jeffrey J.

    2010-02-01

    Thermal oxidation of silicon is an important process step in MEMS device fabrication. Thicker oxide layers are often used as structural components and can take days or weeks to grow, causing high gas costs, maintenance issues, and a process bottleneck. Pyrolytic steam, which is generated from hydrogen and oxygen combustion, was the default process, but has serious drawbacks: cost, safety, particles, permitting, reduced growth rate, rapid hydrogen consumption, component breakdown and limited steam flow rates. Results from data collected over a 24 month period by a MEMS manufacturer supports replacement of pyrolytic torches with RASIRC Steamer technology to reduce process cycle time and enable expansion previously limited by local hydrogen permitting. Data was gathered to determine whether Steamers can meet or exceed pyrolytic torch performance. The RASIRC Steamer uses de-ionized water as its steam source, eliminating dependence on hydrogen and oxygen. A non-porous hydrophilic membrane selectively allows water vapor to pass. All other molecules are greatly restricted, so contaminants in water such as dissolved gases, ions, total organic compounds (TOC), particles, and metals can be removed in the steam phase. The MEMS manufacturer improved growth rate by 7% over the growth range from 1μm to 3.5μm. Over a four month period, wafer uniformity, refractive index, wafer stress, and etch rate were tracked with no significant difference found. The elimination of hydrogen generated a four-month return on investment (ROI). Mean time between failure (MTBF) was increased from 3 weeks to 32 weeks based on three Steamers operating over eight months.

  6. Boiling Heat Transfer in High Temperature Generator of Absorption Chiller/Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Masahiro; Enomoto, Eiichi; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko

    The heat transfer performance of forced convective boiling was tested using a high temperature generator of absorption chiller/heater, the rear furnace wall of which was composed of two different surfaces; i. e., plain and sprayed heated surfaces. These two surfaces were bisymmetrically set. Wall surface temperatures of both the fire and fluid sides were measured at three locations along the upward flow direction in each heated surface for determining the heat flux and heat transfer coefficient. Nickel-chromium and alumina were employed as the spray materials. The test results show that the sprayed surface can yield a marked elevation in the heat transfer performance due to boiling on the plain surface. Therefore the level of heated surface temperature is largely reduced by means of the spraying surface treatment. This implies that the spraying would much improve a corrosive condition of the heated surface.

  7. Optimization of idealized ORC in domestic combined heat and power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybiński, Witold; Mikielewicz, Jarosław

    2013-09-01

    Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) is used, amongst the others, in geothermal facilities, in waste heat recovery or in domestic combined heat and power (CHP) generation. The paper presents optimization of an idealized ORC equivalent of the Carnot cycle with non-zero temperature difference in heat exchangers and with energy dissipation caused by the viscous fluid flow. In this analysis the amount of heat outgoing from the ORC is given. Such a case corresponds to the application of an ORC in domestic CHP. This assumption is different from the most of ORC models where the incoming amount of heat is given.

  8. Quantity, Quality, and Availability of Waste Heat from United States Thermal Power Generation.

    PubMed

    Gingerich, Daniel B; Mauter, Meagan S

    2015-07-21

    Secondary application of unconverted heat produced during electric power generation has the potential to improve the life-cycle fuel efficiency of the electric power industry and the sectors it serves. This work quantifies the residual heat (also known as waste heat) generated by U.S. thermal power plants and assesses the intermittency and transport issues that must be considered when planning to utilize this heat. Combining Energy Information Administration plant-level data with literature-reported process efficiency data, we develop estimates of the unconverted heat flux from individual U.S. thermal power plants in 2012. Together these power plants discharged an estimated 18.9 billion GJ(th) of residual heat in 2012, 4% of which was discharged at temperatures greater than 90 °C. We also characterize the temperature, spatial distribution, and temporal availability of this residual heat at the plant level and model the implications for the technical and economic feasibility of its end use. Increased implementation of flue gas desulfurization technologies at coal-fired facilities and the higher quality heat generated in the exhaust of natural gas fuel cycles are expected to increase the availability of residual heat generated by 10.6% in 2040. PMID:26061407

  9. Oxidative Activity of Heated Coal Affected by Antypirogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torosyan, V. F.; Torosyan, E. S.; Borovikov, I. F.; Yakutova, V. A.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of antypirogens on chemical activity of heated coal is studied. It is proved that ammonium sulfate, calcium phosphate, calcium chloride, calcium nitrate and acid fluoride are the most effective antypirogens.

  10. The oxidation behavior of SiC sintered with Al-B-C and improved oxidation resistance via heat treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Sixta, M

    1997-12-01

    The oxidation behavior of high strength and high toughness SiC, sintered with Al, B, and C (ABC-SiC), was examined. Kinetic data were acquired and the parabolic rate constant for oxidation was determined and compared with literature data on various SiC materials. The role of secondary phases on the oxide morphology was explored. ABC-SiC was compared to commercially available SiC, Hexoloy, and SiC sintered with 10% yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG). Two-step sintering (pre-coarsening) was employed with holds for 48 hours at 600--1,600 C, prior to the typical hot-pressing conditions of 1,900 C for 1 hour, to change the chemistry and reduce the number of bubbles in the silica scale. The effects on the oxide thickness and integrity was examined as a function of the precoarsening heat treatment temperature. Additionally, the hot-pressed ABC-SiC was subjected to heat treatments (anneals) at 1,800 C for 1 hour in nitrogen, Ar, and vacuum environments, and the effects on subsequent oxidation were evaluated. The Ar and vacuum heat treatments dramatically improved the oxidation resistance of ABC-SiC. Finally, reoxidation experiments were performed to try to alter the surface chemistry of the SiC to improve the oxidation resistance. The four-point bend strengths and two-parameter Weibull plots of the most successful heat treatments were compared with the standard ABC-SiC to ensure that significant degradation did not result from altering the processing of the material.

  11. Practical demonstration of heat pumps for utilization of animal-generated heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amberg, H. U.

    1980-09-01

    Airconditioning of pigpens to eliminate effects of temperature extremes is reported. A stall air conditioner was installed as heat pump in a pigpen for final fattening. The heat, recovered from the exhaust air, is supplied to the outside air so that heated fresh air is blown into the stall. The test was accomplished on a farm with intensive pig breeding with 120 preliminary fattening places and 240 final fattening places. The stall air conditioner offers the possibility to attenuate the extreme temperature variations during the year.

  12. Basic properties of GaAs oxide generated by scanning probe microscope tip-induced nano-oxidation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Yoshitaka; Iuchi, Yoshimasa; Kawabe, Mitsuo; Harris, James S.

    2000-07-01

    The basic properties of GaAs oxide generated by atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-induced nano-oxidation process have been investigated. The chemical analysis of the AFM tip-generated GaAs oxide was performed by using scanning microprobe x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the main constituents of GaAs anodic oxide were determined to be Ga2O3 and As2O3. The electrical characterization showed that the electron transport across a GaAs oxide nanodot of ˜5.7 nm thickness, from a doped n+-Si tip into the n+-GaAs substrate follows the Fowler-Nordheim tunneling mechanism over a range of applied bias. Further, the tip-generated GaAs oxide nanodots were found to withstand moderate thermal treatments, but some volume reduction was observed.

  13. Heat-transfer characteristics of dry porous particulate beds with internal heat generation. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J. E.; Hitchcock, J. T.; Schwarz, M. L.

    1982-08-01

    A combined experimental and analytical program has been undertaken to study the thermal characteristics of dry debris beds especially at high temperatures where radiative heat transfer contributes. Experiments have been conducted in-pile using intrinsic fission heating of UO/sub 2/ to simulate decay heat power levels. Both pure UO/sub 2/ and mixed UO/sub 2//steel beds in a helium atmosphere have been studied. Temperatures as high as 3100 K have been attained. Theremocouples and ultrasonic thermometers have been used to measure the bed temperatures. Also recent post-test metallographic examinations have revealed useful information on the materials interactions which can be correlated to changes in the thermal behavior of the bed. In addition to the experiments, a number of porous medium thermal conductivity models have been evaluated. From these, two models representing upper and lower bounds for the conductivity, in conjunction with a two-dimensional heat transfer analysis have been compared to the data.

  14. Oxidative Stress and Heat-Shock Responses in Desulfovibrio vulgaris by Genome-Wide Transcriptomic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Weiwen; Culley, David E.; Hogan, Mike; Vitiritti, Luigi; Brockman, Fred J.

    2006-05-30

    Abstract Sulfate-reducing bacteria, like Desulfovibrio vulgaris have developed a set of reactions allowing them to survive in environments. To obtain further knowledge of the protecting mechanisms employed in D. vulgaris against the oxidative stress and heat shock, we performed a genome-wide transcriptomic analysis to determine the cellular responses to both stimuli. The results showed that 130 genes were responsive to oxidative stress, while 427 genes responsive to heat-shock, respectively. Functional analyses suggested that the genes regulated were involved in a variety of cellular functions. Metabolic analysis showed that amino acid biosynthetic pathways were induced by both oxidative stress and heat shock treatments, while fatty acid metabolism, purine and cofactor biosynthesis were induced by heat shock only. Rubrerythrin gene (rbR) were upregulated by the oxidative stress, suggesting its important role in the oxidative resistance, whereas the expression of rubredoxin oxidoreductase (rbO), superoxide ismutase (sodB) and catalase (katA) genes were not subjected to regulation by oxidative stress in D. vulgaris. In addition, the results showed that thioredoxin reductase (trxB) was responsive to oxidative stress, suggesting the thiol-specific redox system might be involved in oxidative protection in D. vulgaris. Comparison of cellular responses to oxidative stress and heat-shock allowed the identification of 66 genes that showed a similar drastic response to both environmental stimuli, implying that they might be part of the general stress response (GSR) network in D. vulgaris, which was further supported by the finding of a conserved motif upstream these common-responsive genes.

  15. Enhancing Oxidative Stability of Sunflower Oil during Convective and Microwave Heating Using Grape Seed Extract

    PubMed Central

    Poiana, Mariana-Atena

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effectiveness of grape seed extract (GSE) compared to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) on retarding lipid oxidation of sunflower oil subjected to convection and microwave heating up to 240 min under simulated frying conditions. The progress of lipid oxidation was assessed in terms of peroxide value (PV), p-anisidine value (p-AV), conjugated dienes and trienes (CD, CT), inhibition of oil oxidation (IO) and TOTOX value. In addition, total phenolic content (TP) was evaluated in samples before and after heating in order to assess the changes in these compounds relative to the extent of lipid oxidation. The results of this study highlight that GSE showed a significantly inhibitory effect on lipid oxidation during both treatments, although to a different extent. This ability was dose-dependent; therefore, the extent of lipid oxidation was inversely related to GSE level. Convective heating, respective microwave exposure for 240 min of samples supplemented by GSE to a level of 1000 ppm, resulted in significant decreases of investigated indices relative to the control values as follows: PV (48%; 30%), p-AV (29%; 40%), CD (45%; 30%), CT (41%; 36%), TOTOX (35%; 37%). GSE to a level of 600–800 ppm inhibited the lipid oxidation in a similar manner to BHT. These results suggested that GSE can be used as a potential natural extract for improving oxidative stability of sunflower oil during thermal applications. PMID:22942764

  16. Physics of heat generation using magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Cindi L; Ivkov, Robert

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia and thermal ablation have been actively studied experimentally and theoretically. In this review, we provide a summary of the literature describing the properties of nanometer-scale magnetic materials suspended in biocompatible fluids and their interactions with external magnetic fields. Summarised are the properties and mechanisms understood to be responsible for magnetic heating, and the models developed to understand the behaviour of single-domain magnets exposed to alternating magnetic fields. Linear response theory and its assumptions have provided a useful beginning point; however, its limitations are apparent when nanoparticle heating is measured over a wide range of magnetic fields. Well-developed models (e.g. for magnetisation reversal mechanisms and pseudo-single domain formation) available from other fields of research are explored. Some of the methods described include effects of moment relaxation, anisotropy, nanoparticle and moment rotation mechanisms, interactions and collective behaviour, which have been experimentally identified to be important. Here, we will discuss the implicit assumptions underlying these analytical models and their relevance to experiments. Numerical simulations will be discussed as an alternative to these simple analytical models, including their applicability to experimental data. Finally, guidelines for the design of optimal magnetic nanoparticles will be presented. PMID:24131317

  17. Plasmonic near-touching titanium oxide nanoparticles to realize solar energy harvesting and effective local heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiahao; Liu, Pu; Ma, Churong; Lin, Zhaoyong; Yang, Guowei

    2016-04-01

    Through the excitation of plasmon resonance, the energy of plasmonic nanoparticles either reradiates through light scattering or decays into energetic electrons (absorption). The plasmon-induced absorption can greatly enhance the efficiency of solar energy harvesting, local heating, photodetection and photocatalysis. Here, we demonstrate that heavily self-doped titanium oxide nanoparticles (TiO1.67 analogue arising from oxygen vacancies in rutile TiO2) with the plasmon resonance dominated by an interband transition shows strong absorption to build a broadband perfect absorber in the wavelength range from 300 to 2000 nm covering the solar irradiation spectrum completely. The absorptivity of the fabricated array is greater than 90% in the whole spectral range. And the broadband and strong absorption is due to the plasmon hybridization and hot spot generation from near-touching TiO1.67 nanoparticles with different sizes. What is more, the local heating of a TiO1.67 nanoparticle layer is fast and effective. The temperature increases quickly from 30 °C to 80 °C within 200 seconds. This local heating can realize rapid solar-enabled evaporation which can find applications in large-scale distillation and seawater desalination. These findings actually open a pathway for applications of these newly developed plasmonic materials in the energy and environment fields.Through the excitation of plasmon resonance, the energy of plasmonic nanoparticles either reradiates through light scattering or decays into energetic electrons (absorption). The plasmon-induced absorption can greatly enhance the efficiency of solar energy harvesting, local heating, photodetection and photocatalysis. Here, we demonstrate that heavily self-doped titanium oxide nanoparticles (TiO1.67 analogue arising from oxygen vacancies in rutile TiO2) with the plasmon resonance dominated by an interband transition shows strong absorption to build a broadband perfect absorber in the wavelength range from 300 to

  18. Generation of Acoustic-Gravity Waves in Ionospheric HF Heating Experiments: Simulating Large-Scale Natural Heat Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradipta, Rezy

    In this thesis, we investigate the potential role played by large-scale anomalous heat sources (e.g. prolonged heat wave events) in generating acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) that might trigger widespread plasma turbulence in the ionospheric layer. The main hypothesis is that, the thermal gradients associated with the heat wave fronts could act as a source of powerful AGW capable of triggering ionospheric plasma turbulence over extensive areas. In our investigations, first we are going to examine a case study of the summer 2006 North American heat wave event. Our examination of GPS-derived total electron content (TEC) data over the North American sector reveals a quite noticeable increase in the level of daily plasma density fluctuations during the summer 2006 heat wave period. Comparison with the summer 2005 and summer 2007 data further confirms that the observed increase of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) during the summer 2006 heat wave period was not simply a regular seasonal phenomenon. Furthermore, a series of field experiments had been carried out at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in order to physically simulate the process of AGW/TID generation by large-scale thermal gradients in the ionosphere. In these ionospheric HF heating experiments, we create some time-varying artificial thermal gradients at an altitude of 200--300 km above the Earth's surface using vertically-transmitted amplitude-modulated 0-mode HF heater waves. For our experiments, a number of radio diagnostic instruments had been utilized to detect the characteristic signatures of heater-generated AGW/TID. So far, we have been able to obtain several affirmative indications that some artificial AGW/TID are indeed being radiated out from the heated plasma volume during the HAARP-AGW experiments. Based on the experimental evidence, we may conclude that it is certainly quite plausible for large-scale thermal gradients associated with severe heat wave

  19. Consideration of Thermoelectric Power Generation by Using Hot Spring Thermal Energy or Industrial Waste Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Keiichi; Horikawa, Daisuke; Goto, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Today, we face some significant environmental and energy problems such as global warming, urban heat island, and the precarious balance of world oil supply and demand. However, we have not yet found a satisfactory solution to these problems. Waste heat recovery is considered to be one of the best solutions because it can improve energy efficiency by converting heat exhausted from plants and machinery to electric power. This technology would also prevent atmospheric temperature increases caused by waste heat, and decrease fossil fuel consumption by recovering heat energy, thus also reducing CO2 emissions. The system proposed in this research generates electric power by providing waste heat or unharnessed thermal energy to built-in thermoelectric modules that can convert heat into electric power. Waste heat can be recovered from many places, including machinery in industrial plants, piping in electric power plants, waste incineration plants, and so on. Some natural heat sources such as hot springs and solar heat can also be used for this thermoelectric generation system. The generated power is expected to be supplied to auxiliary machinery around the heat source, stored as an emergency power supply, and so on. The attributes of this system are (1) direct power generation using hot springs or waste heat; (2) 24-h stable power generation; (3) stand-alone power system with no noise and no vibration; and (4) easy maintenance attributed to its simple structure with no moving parts. In order to maximize energy use efficiency, the temperature difference between both sides of the thermoelectric (TE) modules built into the system need to be kept as large as possible. This means it is important to reduce thermal resistance between TE modules and heat source. Moreover, the system's efficiency greatly depends on the base temperature of the heat sources and the material of the system's TE modules. Therefore, in order to make this system practical and efficient, it is necessary to

  20. Heat generation by electronic current in a quantum dot spin-valve

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Feng; Sun, Lian-Liang; Guo, Yu

    2014-10-28

    Electric-current-induced heat generation in an interacting single-level quantum dot connected to ferromagnetic leads with noncollinear magnetizations is theoretically investigated. We find that when the two leads' spin polarization rates are identical and much smaller than unit, the magnitude of the heat generation is almost monotonously enhanced as the angle between the leads' magnetic moments is varied from zero to π, while the magnitude of the electric current is continuously suppressed. Moreover, the properties of the heat generation depend on the lead's spin polarization rate in different ways when the angle is varied. If at least one of the leads' spin polarization rate approaches to unit, the spin-valve effect of the heat generation is identical to that of the electric current. Now the previously found negative differential of the heat generation disappears when the angle approaches to π. As compared to the current, the heat generation is more sensitive to the system's asymmetry when one of the electrodes is half-metallic in noncollinear configurations.

  1. Paleo-heat flows, radioactive heat generation, and the cooling and deformation history of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Javier; López, Valle; Egea-González, Isabel

    2013-07-01

    Estimates of lithospheric strength for Mercury, based on the depth of thrust faults associated with large lobate scarps (which were most probably formed previously to ˜3 Ga) or on the effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere supporting a broad rise in the northern smooth plains (whose formation is poorly constrained, but posterior to 3.8 Ga), serve as a basis for the calculation of paleo-heat flows, referred to the time when these structures were formed. The so-obtained paleo-heat flows can give information on the Urey ratio (Ur), the ratio between the total radioactive heat production and the total surface heat loss. By imposing the condition Ur < 1 (corresponding to a cooling Mercury, consistent with the observed widespread contraction), we obtain an upper limit of 0.4 times the average surface value for the abundance of heat-producing elements in the outer solid shell of Mercury. We also find that if the formation of the northern rise occurred in a time posterior to ˜3 Ga, then in that time the Urey ratio was lower, and the cooling more intense, than when most of large lobate scarps were formed. Thus, because largest lobate scarps deform older terrains (suggesting more intense contraction early in the mercurian history), we conclude that the northern rise was formed previously to 3 Ga. If the age of other smooth plains large wavelength deformations is similar, then tectonic activity in Mercury would have been limited in the last 3 billion of years.

  2. Heat and mass transfer in a steam-generating tube

    SciTech Connect

    Doroshchuk, V.Y.

    1990-01-01

    Reliable data on the distribution of phases of steam-water flow in a channel cross-section, on steam and water velocities, and on void fractions are almost non-existent. This paper reports that by assuming that u{sub 1}/u{sub 3} = square root {rho}{prime}/{rho}{prime}{prime} (where u{sub 1} and u{sub 3} are the velocities of steam in the flow core and of a liquid film near a wall, {rho}{prime}{prime} and {rho}{prime} are the densities of corresponding phases) and by using the limiting void fractions x{sup o}{sub lim}, the above-mentioned flow parameters can be determined analytically for the instant of onset of a heat transfer crisis of the second kind.

  3. Natural convective heat and mass transfer in a porous triangular enclosure filled with nanofluid in presence of heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Raju; Parvin, Salma; Khan, Md. Abdul Hakim

    2016-07-01

    The problem of natural convective heat and mass transfer in a triangular enclosure filled with nanofluid saturated porous medium in presence of heat generation has been studied in this paper. The bottom wall of the cavity is heated uniformly, the left inclined wall is heated linearly and the right inclined wall is considered to be cold. The concentration is higher at bottom wall, lower at right inclined wall and linearly concentrated at left inclined wall of the cavity. The governing equations are transformed to the dimensionless form and solved numerically using Galerkin weighted residual technique of finite element method. The results are obtained in terms of streamline, isotherms, isoconcentrations, Nusselt number (Nu) and Sherwood number (Sh) for the parameters thermal Rayleigh number (RaT), Heat generation parameter (λ) and Lewis number (Le) while Prandtl number (Pr), Buoyancy ratio (N) and Darcy number (Da) are considered to be fixed. It is observed that flow pattern, temperature fields and concentration fields are affected by the variation of above considered parameters.

  4. Local entropy generation analysis of a rotary magnetic heat pump regenerator

    SciTech Connect

    Drost, M.K.; White, M.D.

    1990-04-01

    The rotary magnetic heat pump has attractive thermodynamic performance but it is strongly influenced by the effectiveness of the regenerator. This study uses local entropy generation analysis to evaluate the regenerator design and to suggest design improvements. The results show that performance of the proposed design is dominated by heat transfer related entropy generation. This suggests that enhancement concepts that improve heat transfer should be considered, even if the enhancement causes a significant increase in viscous losses (pressure drop). One enhancement technique, the use of flow disrupters, was evaluated and the results showed that flow disrupters can significantly reduce thermodynamic losses.

  5. Mathematical model of a plate fin heat exchanger operating under solid oxide fuel cell working conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaniowski, Robert; Poniewski, Mieczysław

    2013-12-01

    Heat exchangers of different types find application in power systems based on solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Compact plate fin heat exchangers are typically found to perfectly fit systems with power output under 5 kWel. Micro-combined heat and power (micro-CHP) units with solid oxide fuel cells can exhibit high electrical and overall efficiencies, exceeding 85%, respectively. These values can be achieved only when high thermal integration of a system is assured. Selection and sizing of heat exchangers play a crucial role and should be done with caution. Moreover, performance of heat exchangers under variable operating conditions can strongly influence efficiency of the complete system. For that reason, it becomes important to develop high fidelity mathematical models allowing evaluation of heat exchangers under modified operating conditions, in high temperature regimes. Prediction of pressure and temperatures drops at the exit of cold and hot sides are important for system-level studies. Paper presents dedicated mathematical model used for evaluation of a plate fin heat exchanger, operating as a part of micro-CHP unit with solid oxide fuel cells.

  6. Parametric numerical investigaion of natural convection in a heat-generating fluid with phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Aksenova, A.E.; Chudanov, V.V.; Strizhov, V.F.; Vabishchevich, P.N.

    1995-09-01

    Unsteady natural convection of a heat-generating fluid with phase transitions in the enclosures of a square section with isothermal rigid walls is investigated numerically for a wide range of dimensionless parameters. The quasisteady state solutions of conjugate heat and mass transfer problem are compared with available experimental results. Correlation relations for heat flux distributions at the domain boundaries depending on Rayleigh and Ostrogradskii numbers are obtained. It is shown that generally heat transfer is governed both by natural circulation and crust formation phenomena. Results of this paper may be used for analysis of experiments with prototypic core materials.

  7. Compound heat transfer enhancement for shell side of double-pipe heat exchanger by helical fins and vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Guo, Hongmei; Wu, Jianhua; Du, Wenjuan

    2012-07-01

    To improve heat transfer performance of shell side of double-pipe heat exchanger with helical fins on its inner tube, some vortex generators (VGs) were installed along the centerline of the helical channel. Heat transfer performance and pressure drop characteristic of the enhanced heat exchangers were investigated using air as the working fluid and steam as the heating medium. The helical fins were in the annulus and span its full width at different helical pitch. Wing-type VGs (delta or rectangular wing) and winglet-type VGs (delta or rectangular winglet pair) were used to combine with helical fins. The friction factor and Nusselt number can be well correlated by power-law correlations in the Reynolds number range studied. In order to evaluate the thermal performance of the shell side enhanced over the shell side without enhancement, comparisons were made under three constraints: (1) identical mass flow rate, IMF; (2) identical pressure drop, IPD and (3) identical pumping power, IPP. The results show the shell side enhanced by the compound heat transfer enhancement has better performance than the shell side only enhanced by helical fins at shorter helical pitch under the three constraints.

  8. Internal heating of lithium-ion batteries using alternating current based on the heat generation model in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianbo; Ge, Hao; Li, Zhe; Ding, Zhanming

    2015-01-01

    This study develops a method to internally preheat lithium-ion batteries at low temperatures with sinusoidal alternating current (AC). A heat generation rate model in frequency domain is developed based on the equivalent electrical circuit. Using this model as the source term, a lumped energy conservation model is adopted to predict the temperature rise. These models are validated against the experimental results of preheating an 18650 cell at different thermal insulation conditions. The effects of current amplitude and frequency on the heating rate are illustrated with a series of simulated contours of heating time. These contours indicate that the heating rate increases with higher amplitude, lower frequency and better thermal insulation. The cell subjected to an alternating current with an amplitude of 7 A (2.25 C) and a frequency of 1 Hz, under a calibrated heat transfer coefficient of 15.9 W m-2 K-1, can be heated from -20 °C to 5 °C within 15 min and the temperature distribution remains essentially uniform. No capacity loss is found after repeated AC preheating tests, indicating this method incurs little damage to the battery health. These models are computationally-efficient and can be used in real time to control the preheating devices in electric vehicles.

  9. Characterization of heat flux generated by ICRH heating with cantilevered bars and a slotted box Faraday screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corre, Y.; Firdaouss, M.; Colas, L.; Argouarch, A.; Guilhem, D.; Gunn, J.; Hamlyn-Harris, C.; Jacquot, J.; Kubic, M.; Litaudon, X.; Missirlian, M.; Richou, M.; Ritz, G.; Serret, D.; Vulliez, K.

    2012-10-01

    In the framework of the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) development led at CEA Cadarache, an actively cooled Faraday screen (FS) prototype with cantilevered horizontal bars and a slotted box has been designed to increase the heat exhaust capability (for high-power operation), reduce the parallel RF electric field along long field lines and qualify alternative mechanical solutions for ITER (bars are disconnected from the septum to reduce the stress level). The new FS has been installed on an existing ICRH antenna, and was tested during the 2011 Tore Supra experimental campaign. The antenna hosting the new screen exhibits high sensitivity to the edge plasma condition, some instabilities of electrical matching and improved heat exhaust capabilities in accordance with the thermo-mechanical design. RF-induced heat loads derived from IR thermography have been found to be about five times higher in the equatorial plane with the new design compared with the conventional design. The experimental results show that minimizing the parallel RF electric field along long field lines is not enough to reduce the wave-plasma interaction on the screen. This paper summarizes the experimental RF-induced heat load for several plasma scenarios and edge parameters (plasma current, density and heating power level) with emphasis on RF-sheath rectification and E × B convection generated in front of the antenna through the differential biasing of adjacent field lines.

  10. MHD natural convection flow along a vertical wavy surface with heat generation and pressure work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, M. A.; Kabir, K. H.; Andallah, L. S.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the influence of pressure work on MHD natural convection flow of viscous incompressible fluid along a uniformly heated vertical wavy surface with heat generation has been investigated. The governing boundary layer equations are first transformed into a non-dimensional form using suitable set of dimensionless variables. The resulting nonlinear system of partial differential equations are mapped into the domain of a vertical flat plate and then solved numerically employing the implicit finite difference method, known as Keller-box scheme. The numerical results for the velocity profiles, temperature profiles, skin friction coefficient, the rate of heat transfers, the streamlines and the isotherms are shown graphically and skin friction coefficient and rate of heat transfer have been shown in tabular form for different values of the selective set of parameters consisting of pressure work parameter Ge, the magnetic parameter M, Prandtl number Pr, heat generation parameter Q and the amplitude of the wavy surface.

  11. Encouragement of Enzyme Reaction Utilizing Heat Generation from Ferromagnetic Particles Subjected to an AC Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masashi; Aki, Atsushi; Mizuki, Toru; Maekawa, Toru; Usami, Ron; Morimoto, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method of activating an enzyme utilizing heat generation from ferromagnetic particles under an ac magnetic field. We immobilize α-amylase on the surface of ferromagnetic particles and analyze its activity. We find that when α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids, that is, ferromagnetic particles, on which α-amylase molecules are immobilized, are subjected to an ac magnetic field, the particles generate heat and as a result, α-amylase on the particles is heated up and activated. We next prepare a solution, in which α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids and free, nonimmobilized chitinase are dispersed, and analyze their activities. We find that when the solution is subjected to an ac magnetic field, the activity of α-amylase immobilized on the particles increases, whereas that of free chitinase hardly changes; in other words, only α-amylase immobilized on the particles is selectively activated due to heat generation from the particles. PMID:25993268

  12. Wet Etching of Heat Treated Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposited Zirconium Oxide in HF Based Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Sriram; Raghavan, Srini

    2008-06-01

    Alternative materials are being considered to replace silicon dioxide as gate dielectric material. Of these, the oxides of hafnium and zirconium show the most promise. However, integrating these new high-k materials into the existing complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process remains a challenge. One particular area of concern is the wet etching of heat treated high-k dielectrics. In this paper, work done on the wet etching of heat treated atomic layer chemical vapor deposited (ALCVD) zirconium oxide in HF based solutions is presented. It was found that heat treated material, while refractory to wet etching at room temperature, is more amenable to etching at higher temperatures when methane sulfonic acid is added to dilute HF solutions. Selectivity over SiO2 is still a concern.

  13. Oxidized-LDL induce the expression of heat shock protein 70 in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Roma, P; Pellegatta, F; Catapano, A L

    1994-04-15

    Heat shock proteins are detectable in human atherosclerotic plaques, especially in endothelial cells. In this report we show by immunofluorescence that incubation "in vitro" with OxLDL is a stress capable of inducing the expression of heat shock protein 70 in both the EAhy-926 cell line and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). This induction was parallel to the cytotoxicity of oxidized LDL as determined by [3H]adenine release. When cells were confluent, however, both effects were greatly reduced. We speculate that induction of hsp70 is related to the cytotoxicity of oxidized LDL and that the detection of heat shock proteins in human atherosclerotic plaques is a further indication for the presence "in vivo" of oxidized LDL. These observations may be relevant to the understanding of endothelial response to injury in proatherosclerotic events. PMID:8166710

  14. Wearable thermoelectric generator for harvesting human body heat energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Ki; Kim, Myoung-Soo; Lee, Seok; Kim, Chulki; Kim, Yong-Jun

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents the realization of a wearable thermoelectric generator (TEG) in fabric for use in clothing. A TEG was fabricated by dispenser printing of Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 and Bi2Se0.3Te2.7 in a polymer-based fabric. The prototype consisted of 12 thermocouples connected by conductive thread over an area of 6 × 25 mm2. The device generated a power of 224 nW for a temperature difference of 15 K. When the TEG was used on the human body, the measured output power was 224 nW in an ambient temperature of 5 °C. The power of the TEG was affected by the movement of the wearer. A higher voltage was maintained while walking than in a stationary state. In addition, the device did not deform after it was bent and stretched several times. The prospect of using the TEG in clothing applications was confirmed under realistic conditions.

  15. Development of a hydrogen generator for fuel cells based on the partial oxidation of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Recupero, V.; Torre, T.; Saija, G.; Fiordano, N.

    1996-12-31

    As well known, the most acknowledged process for generation of hydrogen for fuel cells is based upon the steam reforming of methane or natural gas (SRM). The reaction is endothermic ({Delta}H{sub 298}= 206 kJ/mole) and high H{sub 2}O/CH{sub 4} ratios are required in order to limit coke formation at T higher than 1000 K. Moreover, it is a common practice that the process`s fuel economy is highly sensitive to proper heat fluxes and reactor design (tubular type) and to operational conditions. Efficient heat recovery can be accomplished only on large scale units (> 40,000 Nm{sup 3}/h), far from the range of interest of {open_quotes}on-site{close_quotes} fuel cells. Even if, to fit the needs of the fuel cell technology, medium sized external reforming units (50-200 Nm{sup 3} H{sub 2}/h) have been developed and/or planned for integration with both the first and the second generation fuel cells, amelioration in their heat recovery and efficiency is at the expense of an increased sophistication and therefore at higher per unit costs. In all cases, SRM requires an extra {open_quotes}fuel{close_quotes} supply (to substain the endothermicity of the reaction) in addition to stoichiometric requirements ({open_quotes}feed{close_quotes} gas). A valid alternative could be a process based on catalytic partial oxidation of CH{sub 4} (CSPOM), since the process is mildly exothermic ({Delta}H{sub 298}= -35.6 kJ/mole) and therefore not energy intensive. Consequently, great interest is expected from conversion of methane into syngas, if an autothermal, low energy intensive, compact and reliable process could be developed.

  16. Development of a Thermal Oxidizer for Distributed Microturbine Based Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Barton

    2009-03-01

    This project concerns the replacement of the catalytic bed in a microturbine with a thermal oxidizer. The advantage of a thermal oxidizer over a traditional combustion chamber is that the length and temperature of the device allows the volatile species to oxidize relatively slowly and without a flame front. With no flame, the temperature increase throughout the unit is spread over a much larger volume so there is no hot spot for thermal NO{sub x} formation, and the gas Btu level does not have to be above the ignition concentration. Project specific objectives included assessment of the materials and performance requirements of the thermal oxidizer, design the thermal oxidizer system, fabrication of the thermal oxidizer, testing of the oxidizer's performance in concert with the microturbine and comparison of the performance of the oxidizer with catalytic beds and traditional combustion chambers. The thermal oxidizer was designed and fabricated with the assistance of High Country Fabrication of Casper, Wyoming. The design consists of a long set of tubes surrounded by a packed bed of loose ceramic material. The outer vessel containing the tubes and packing is a 3-foot diameter steel shell with multiple layers of thermal insulation. After the metal components were fabricated, the vessel was shipped to Denver where the insulation was poured. The unit was shipped to the cosponsor site for integration with the 100 kW microturbine device. Connection of the thermal oxidizer to the Elliot microturbine turned out to be problematic. The high flow rate of gas tended to push the hot zone out of the oxidizer as assembled. The research team identified several approaches to improve the oxidizer performance including a longer gas path, increased residence time, higher surface area packing material and improved combustion catalysts. The cosponsor is working with an engineering form with oxidizer experience to reconfigure the hardware before moving to a field trial on landfill gas.

  17. Heat flow, heat generation and crustal thermal structure of the northern block of the South Indian Craton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Mohan L.; Sharma, S. R.; Sundar, A.

    1988-01-01

    Heat flow values and heat generation data calculated from the concentration of heat producing radioactive elements, U, Th and K in surface rocks were analyzed. The South Indian Craton according to Drury et al., can be divided into various blocks, separated by late Proterozoic shear belts. The northern block comprises Eastern and Western Dharwar Cratons of Rogers (1986), Naqvi and Rogers (1987) and a part of the South Indian granulite terrain up to a shear system occupying the Palghat-Cauvery low lands. The geothermal data analysis clearly demonstrates that the present thermal characteristics of the above two Archaean terrains of the Indian and Australian Shields are quite similar. Their crustal thermal structures are likely to be similar also.

  18. Heat flow, heat generation and crustal thermal structure of the northern block of the South Indian Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Mohan L.; Sharma, S. R.; Sundar, A.

    Heat flow values and heat generation data calculated from the concentration of heat producing radioactive elements, U, Th and K in surface rocks were analyzed. The South Indian Craton according to Drury et al., can be divided into various blocks, separated by late Proterozoic shear belts. The northern block comprises Eastern and Western Dharwar Cratons of Rogers (1986), Naqvi and Rogers (1987) and a part of the South Indian granulite terrain up to a shear system occupying the Palghat-Cauvery low lands. The geothermal data analysis clearly demonstrates that the present thermal characteristics of the above two Archaean terrains of the Indian and Australian Shields are quite similar. Their crustal thermal structures are likely to be similar also.

  19. System and method for generating current by selective electron heating

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Boozer, Allen H.

    1984-01-01

    A system for the generation of toroidal current in a plasma which is prepared in a toroidal magnetic field. The system utilizes the injection of high-frequency waves into the plasma by means of waveguides. The wave frequency and polarization are chosen such that when the waveguides are tilted in a predetermined fashion, the wave energy is absorbed preferentially by electrons traveling in one toroidal direction. The absorption of energy in this manner produces a toroidal electric current even when the injected waves themselves do not have substantial toroidal momentum. This current can be continuously maintained at modest cost in power and may be used to confine the plasma. The system can operate efficiently on fusion grade tokamak plasmas.

  20. Predictable Heating and Positive MRI Contrast from a Mesoporous Silica-Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Katie R; Ring, Hattie L; Etheridge, Michael; Zhang, Jinjin; Gao, Zhe; Shao, Qi; Klein, Nathan D; Szlag, Victoria M; Chung, Connie; Reineke, Theresa M; Garwood, Michael; Bischof, John C; Haynes, Christy L

    2016-07-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have great potential as diagnostic and therapeutic agents in cancer and other diseases; however, biological aggregation severely limits their function in vivo. Aggregates can cause poor biodistribution, reduced heating capability, and can confound their visualization and quantification by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Herein, we demonstrate that the incorporation of a functionalized mesoporous silica shell can prevent aggregation and enable the practical use of high-heating, high-contrast iron oxide nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo. Unmodified and mesoporous silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were characterized in biologically relevant environments including phosphate buffered saline, simulated body fluid, whole mouse blood, lymph node carcinoma of prostate (LNCaP) cells, and after direct injection into LNCaP prostate cancer tumors in nude mice. Once coated, iron oxide nanoparticles maintained colloidal stability along with high heating and relaxivity behaviors (SARFe = 204 W/g Fe at 190 kHz and 20 kA/m and r1 = 6.9 mM(-1) s(-1) at 1.4 T). Colloidal stability and minimal nonspecific cell uptake allowed for effective heating in salt and agarose suspensions and strong signal enhancement in MR imaging in vivo. These results show that (1) aggregation can lower the heating and imaging performance of magnetic nanoparticles and (2) a coating of functionalized mesoporous silica can mitigate this issue, potentially improving clinical planning and practical use. PMID:26991550

  1. Membrane-Based Osmotic Heat Engine with Organic Solvent for Enhanced Power Generation from Low-Grade Heat

    SciTech Connect

    Shaulsky, E; Boo, C; Lin, SH; Elimelech, M

    2015-05-05

    We present a hybrid osmotic heat engine (OHE) system that uses draw solutions with an organic solvent for enhanced thermal separation efficiency. The hybrid OHE system produces sustainable energy by combining pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) as a power generation stage and membrane distillation (MD) utilizing low-grade heat as a separation stage. While previous OHE systems employed aqueous electrolyte draw solutions, using methanol as a solvent is advantageous because methanol is highly volatile and has a lower heat capacity and enthalpy of vaporization than water. Hence, the thermal separation efficiency of a draw solution with methanol would be higher than that of an aqueous draw solution. In this study, we evaluated the performance of LiCl-methanol as a potential draw solution for a PRO-MD hybrid OHE system. The membrane transport properties as well as performance with LiCl methanol draw solution were evaluated using thin-film composite (TFC) PRO membranes and compared to the results obtained with a LiCl water draw solution. Experimental PRO methanol flux and maximum projected power density of 47.1 L m(-2) h(-1) and 72.1 W m(-2), respectively, were achieved with a 3 M LiCl-methanol draw solution. The overall efficiency of the hybrid OHE system was modeled by coupling the mass and energy flows between the thermal separation (MD) and power generation (PRO) stages under conditions with and without heat recovery. The modeling results demonstrate higher ORE energy efficiency with the LiCl methanol draw solution compared to that with the LiCl water draw solution under practical operating conditions (i.e., heat recovery <90%). We discuss the implications of the results for converting low-grade heat to power.

  2. Membrane-based osmotic heat engine with organic solvent for enhanced power generation from low-grade heat.

    PubMed

    Shaulsky, Evyatar; Boo, Chanhee; Lin, Shihong; Elimelech, Menachem

    2015-05-01

    We present a hybrid osmotic heat engine (OHE) system that uses draw solutions with an organic solvent for enhanced thermal separation efficiency. The hybrid OHE system produces sustainable energy by combining pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) as a power generation stage and membrane distillation (MD) utilizing low-grade heat as a separation stage. While previous OHE systems employed aqueous electrolyte draw solutions, using methanol as a solvent is advantageous because methanol is highly volatile and has a lower heat capacity and enthalpy of vaporization than water. Hence, the thermal separation efficiency of a draw solution with methanol would be higher than that of an aqueous draw solution. In this study, we evaluated the performance of LiCl-methanol as a potential draw solution for a PRO-MD hybrid OHE system. The membrane transport properties as well as performance with LiCl-methanol draw solution were evaluated using thin-film composite (TFC) PRO membranes and compared to the results obtained with a LiCl-water draw solution. Experimental PRO methanol flux and maximum projected power density of 47.1 L m(-2) h(-1) and 72.1 W m(-2), respectively, were achieved with a 3 M LiCl-methanol draw solution. The overall efficiency of the hybrid OHE system was modeled by coupling the mass and energy flows between the thermal separation (MD) and power generation (PRO) stages under conditions with and without heat recovery. The modeling results demonstrate higher OHE energy efficiency with the LiCl-methanol draw solution compared to that with the LiCl-water draw solution under practical operating conditions (i.e., heat recovery<90%). We discuss the implications of the results for converting low-grade heat to power. PMID:25839239

  3. Solar power generation by use of Stirling engine and heat loss analysis of its cavity receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Tassawar

    Since concentrated power generation by Stirling engine has the highest efficiency therefore efficient power generation by concentrated systems using a Stirling engine was a primary motive of this research. A 1 kW Stirling engine was used to generate solar power using a Fresnel lens as a concentrator. Before operating On-Sun test, engine's performance test was conducted by combustion test. Propane gas with air was used to provide input heat to the Stirling Engine and 350W power was generated with 14% efficiency of the engine. Two kinds of receivers were used for On-Sun test, first type was the Inconel tubes with trapped helium gas and the second one was the heat pipe. Heat pipe with sodium as a working fluid is considered the best approach to transfer the uniform heat from the receiver to the helium gas in the heater head of the engine. A Number of On-Sun experiments were performed to generate the power. A minimum 1kW input power was required to generate power from the Stirling engine but it was concluded that the available Fresnel lens was not enough to provide sufficient input to the Stirling engine and hence engine was lagged to generate the solar power. Later on, for a high energy input a Beam Down system was also used to concentrate the solar light on the heater head of the Stirling engine. Beam down solar system in Masdar City UAE, constructed in 2009 is a variation of central receiver plant with cassegrainian optics. Around 1.5kW heat input was achieved from the Beam Down System and it was predicted that the engine receiver at beam down has the significant heat losses of about 900W. These high heat losses were the major hurdles to get the operating temperature (973K) of the heat pipes; hence power could not be generated even during the Beam Down test. Experiments were also performed to find the most suitable Cavity Receiver configuration for maximum solar radiation utilizations by engine receiver. Dimensionless parameter aperture ration (AR=d/D) and aperture

  4. Artifacts Generated During Azoalkane Peroxy Radical Oxidative Stress Testing of Pharmaceuticals Containing Primary and Secondary Amines.

    PubMed

    Nefliu, Marcela; Zelesky, Todd; Jansen, Patrick; Sluggett, Gregory W; Foti, Christopher; Baertschi, Steven W; Harmon, Paul A

    2015-12-01

    We report artifactual degradation of pharmaceutical compounds containing primary and secondary amines during peroxy radical-mediated oxidative stress carried out using azoalkane initiators. Two degradation products were detected when model drug compounds dissolved in methanol/water were heated to 40°C with radical initiators such as 2,2'-azobis(2-methylpropionitrile) (AIBN). The primary artifact was identified as an α-aminonitrile generated from the reaction of the amine group of the model drug with formaldehyde and hydrogen cyanide, generated as byproducts of the stress reaction. A minor artifact was generated from the reaction between the amine group and isocyanic acid, also a byproduct of the stress reaction. We report the effects of pH, initiator/drug molar ratio, and type of azoalkane initiator on the formation of these artifacts. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance were used for structure elucidation, whereas mechanistic studies, including stable isotope labeling experiments, cyanide analysis, and experiments exploring the effects of butylated hydroxyanisole addition, were employed to support the degradation pathways. PMID:26565996

  5. Determining iron oxide nanoparticle heating efficiency and elucidating local nanoparticle temperature for application in agarose gel-based tumor model.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rhythm R; Dombrowsky, Alexander R; Paulson, Abigail L; Johnson, Margaret P; Nikles, David E; Brazel, Christopher S

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) have been developed for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) cancer therapy, where cancer cells are treated through the heat generated by application of a high frequency magnetic field. This heat has also been proposed as a mechanism to trigger release of chemotherapy agents. In each of these cases, MNPs with optimal heating performance can be used to maximize therapeutic effect while minimizing the required dosage of MNPs. In this study, the heating efficiencies (or specific absorption rate, SAR) of two types of MNPs were evaluated experimentally and then predicted from their magnetic properties. MNPs were also incorporated in the core of poly(ethylene glycol-b-caprolactone) micelles, co-localized with rhodamine B fluorescent dye attached to polycaprolactone to monitor local, nanoscale temperatures during magnetic heating. Despite a relatively high SAR produced by these MNPs, no significant temperature rise beyond that observed in the bulk solution was measured by fluorescence in the core of the magnetic micelles. MNPs were also incorporated into a macro-scale agarose gel system that mimicked a tumor targeted by MNPs and surrounded by healthy tissues. The agarose-based tumor models showed that targeted MNPs can reach hyperthermia temperatures inside a tumor with a sufficient MNP concentration, while causing minimal temperature rise in the healthy tissue surrounding the tumor. PMID:27523991

  6. Design Option of Heat Exchanger for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Eung Soo Kim; Chang Oh

    2008-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a very High temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTGRS) concept, will provide the first demonstration of a closed-loop Brayton cycle at a commercial scale of a few hundred megawatts electric and hydrogen production. The power conversion system (PCS) for the NGNP will take advantage of the significantly higher reactor outlet temperatures of the VHTGRS to provide higher efficiencies than can be achieved in the current generation of light water reactors. Besides demonstrating a system design that can be used directly for subsequent commercial deployment, the NGNP will demonstrate key technology elements that can be used in subsequent advanced power conversion systems for other Generation IV reactors. In anticipation of the design, development and procurement of an advanced power conversion system for the NGNP, the system integration of the NGNP and hydrogen plant was initiated to identify the important design and technology options that must be considered in evaluating the performance of the proposed NGNP. As part of the system integration of the VHTGRS and hydrogen production plant, the intermediate heat exchanger is used to transfer the process heat from VHTGRS to hydrogen plant. Therefore, the design and configuration of the intermediate heat exchanger are very important. This paper will include analysis of one stage versus two stage heat exchanger design configurations and thermal stress analyses of a printed circuit heat exchanger, helical coil heat exchanger, and shell/tube heat exchanger.

  7. Heat transfer enhancement downstream of vortex generators on a flat plate

    SciTech Connect

    Turk, A.Y.

    1984-01-01

    This investigation was conducted in order to better understand the augmentation of forced convective heat transfer when a single row of counter-rotating vortex blades is attached to a flat surface. The major emphasis of the work is to study the way in which vortex generators augment the heat transfer coefficient of an initially-laminar boundary layer over a flat, constant heat flux surface exposed to favorable free stream pressure gradients. Particular emphasis is placed on the relationship between the geometry of vortex generators and the augmentation of local and overall heat transfer coefficients. The behavior of the boundary layer downstream of vortex generators is partially explored. This dissertation includes results of an experimental investigation that indicates the amount of heat transfer enhancement depends on the vortex blade height and arrangement on the plate surface. The local enhancement of the heat transfer coefficient was increased up to 300% over that for a plain flat plate mainly because of high turbulence produced over the region adjacent to the plate surface, resulting in increased mixing of the slower fluid near the plate surface with the free stream. A set of guidelines for the design of more efficient surface with vortex generators was proposed.

  8. HBOC Vasoactivity: Interplay Between Nitric Oxide Scavenging and Capacity to Generate Bioactive Nitric Oxide Species

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Despite many advances in blood substitute research, the development of materials that are effective in maintaining blood volume and oxygen delivery remains a priority for emergency care and trauma. Clinical trials on hemoglobin (Hb)-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) have not provided information on the mechanism of toxicity, although all commercial formulations have safety concerns. Specifically, it is important to reconcile the different hypotheses of Hb toxicity, such as nitric oxide (NO) depletion and oxidative reactions, to provide a coherent molecular basis for designing a safe HBOC. Recent Advances: HBOCs with different sizes often exhibit differences in the degree of HBOC-induced vasoactivity. This has been attributed to differences in the degree of NO scavenging and in the extent of Hb extravasation. Additionally, it is appears that Hb can undergo reactions that compensate for NO scavenging by generating bioactive forms of NO. Critical Issues: Engineering modifications to enhance bioactive NO production can result in diminished oxygen delivery by virtue of increased oxygen affinity. This strategy can prevent the HBOC from fulfilling the intended goal on preserving oxygenation; however, the NO production effects will increase perfusion and oxygen transport. Future Directions: Hb modifications influence NO scavenging and the capacity of certain HBOCs to compensate for NO scavenging through nitrite-mediated reactions that generate bioactive NO. Based on the current understanding of these NO-related factors, possible synthetic strategies are presented that address how HBOC formulations can be prepared that: (i) effectively deliver oxygen, (ii) maintain tissue perfusion, and (iii) limit/reverse underlying inflammation within the vasculature. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2284–2297. PMID:23249305

  9. Heat stress causes oxidative stress but not inflammatory signaling in porcine skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Montilla, Sandra I Rosado; Johnson, Theresa P; Pearce, Sarah C; Gardan-Salmon, Delphine; Gabler, Nicholas K; Ross, Jason W; Rhoads, Robert P; Baumgard, Lance H; Lonergan, Steven M; Selsby, Joshua T

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is associated with death and other maladaptions including muscle dysfunction and impaired growth across species. Despite this common observation, the molecular effects leading to these pathologic changes remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which heat stress disrupted redox balance and initiated an inflammatory response in oxidative and glycolytic skeletal muscle. Female pigs (5–6/group) were subjected to thermoneutral (20 °C) or heat stress (35 °C) conditions for 1 or 3 days and the semitendinosus removed and dissected into red (STR) and white (STW) portions. After 1 day of heat stress, relative abundance of proteins modified by malondialdehyde, a measure of oxidative damage, was increased 2.5-fold (P < 0.05) compared with thermoneutral in the STR but not the STW, before returning to thermoneutral conditions following 3 days of heat stress. This corresponded with increased catalase and superoxide dismutase-1 gene expression (P < 0.05) and superoxide dismutase-1 protein abundance (P < 0.05) in the STR but not the STW. In the STR catalase and total superoxide dismutase activity were increased by ~30% and ~130%, respectively (P < 0.05), after 1 day of heat stress and returned to thermoneutral levels by day 3. One or 3 days of heat stress did not increase inflammatory signaling through the NF-κB pathway in the STR or STW. These data suggest that oxidative muscle is more susceptible to heat stress-mediated changes in redox balance than glycolytic muscle during chronic heat stress.

  10. Techniques for in-service inspection of heat-transfer tubes in steam generators

    SciTech Connect

    McClung, R.W.; Day, R.A.; Neely, H.H.; Powers, T.

    1981-01-01

    A multifaceted development program is in progress in the United States to study techniques for in-service inspection (ISI) of heat transfer tubes in breeder reactor steam generators. Several steam generator designs are involved. Although there are some similarities in the approaches, many of the details of techniques and capabilities are specific to the steam generator design. This paper describes the ultrasonic, eddy-current and penetrating radiation techniques being studied for the various steam generators, including the Large Leak Test Rig, the Clinch River Breeder Reactor design, and alternate steam generators being developed by Westinghouse and Babcock and Wilcox.

  11. Thermal gain of CHP steam generator plants and heat supply systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziganshina, S. K.; Kudinov, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    Heating calculation of the surface condensate heat recovery unit (HRU) installed behind the BKZ-420-140 NGM boiler resulting in determination of HRU heat output according to fire gas value parameters at the heat recovery unit inlet and its outlet, heated water quantity, combustion efficiency per boiler as a result of installation of HRU, and steam condensate discharge from combustion products at its cooling below condensing point and HRU heat exchange area has been performed. Inspection results of Samara CHP BKZ-420-140 NGM power boilers and field tests of the surface condensate heat recovery unit (HRU) made on the bimetal calorifier base КСк-4-11 (KSk-4-11) installed behind station no. 2 Ulyanovsk CHP-3 DE-10-14 GM boiler were the basis of calculation. Integration of the surface condensation heat recovery unit behind a steam boiler rendered it possible to increase combustion efficiency and simultaneously decrease nitrogen oxide content in exit gases. Influence of the blowing air moisture content, the excess-air coefficient in exit gases, and exit gases temperature at the HRU outlet on steam condensate amount discharge from combustion products at its cooling below condensing point has been analyzed. The steam condensate from HRU gases is offered as heat system make-up water after degasification. The cost-effectiveness analysis of HRU installation behind the Samara CHP BKZ-420-140 NGM steam boiler with consideration of heat energy and chemically purified water economy has been performed. Calculation data for boilers with different heat output has been generalized.

  12. Heat generation rate measurement in a Li-ion cell at large C-rates through temperature and heat flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, S. J.; Martin, M.; Wetz, D. A.; Ostanek, J. K.; Miller, S. P.; Heinzel, J. M.; Jain, A.

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the rate of heat generation in a Li-ion cell is critical for safety and performance of Li-ion cells and systems. Cell performance, cycle life, and system safety all depend on temperature distribution in the cell, which, in turn, depends on heat generation rate within the cell and on heat removal rate at the cell surface. Despite the existence of a number of theoretical models to predict heat generation rate, there is not much literature on experimental measurement at high C-rates. This paper reports measurement of heat generation rate from a Li-ion cell at high discharge rates, up to 9.6C, using measurements of cell temperature and surface heat flux. As opposed to calorimetry-based approaches, this method can be applied in situ to yield measurements of heat generation rate in laboratory or field use provided that at least one a priori test is performed to measure the temperature gradient within a cell in the same ambient condition. This method is based on simultaneous determination of heat stored and heat lost from the cell through heat flux and temperature measurements. A novel method is established for measurement of the internal temperature of the cell. Heat generation measurements are shown to agree with well-established theoretical models. The effect of actively cooling the cell is briefly discussed.

  13. Heat transfer in vertical Bridgman growth of oxides - Effects of conduction, convection, and internal radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, S.; Derby, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    In the present investigation of crystalline phase internal radiation and heat conduction during the vertical Bridgman growth of a YAG-like oxide crystal, where transport through the melt is dominated by convection and conduction, heat is also noted to be conducted through ampoule walls via natural convection and enclosure radiation. The results of a quasi-steady-state axisymmetric Galerkin FEM indicate that heat transfer through the system is powerfully affected by the optical absorption coefficient of the crystal. The coupling of internal radiation through the crystal with conduction through the ampoule walls promotes melt/crystal interface shapes that are highly reflected near the ampoule wall.

  14. Method for restoring the resistance of indium oxide semiconductors after heating while in sealed structures

    DOEpatents

    Seager, Carleton H.; Evans, Jr., Joseph Tate

    1998-01-01

    A method for counteracting increases in resistivity encountered when Indium Oxide resistive layers are subjected to high temperature annealing steps during semiconductor device fabrication. The method utilizes a recovery annealing step which returns the Indium Oxide layer to its original resistivity after a high temperature annealing step has caused the resistivity to increase. The recovery anneal comprises heating the resistive layer to a temperature between 100.degree. C. and 300.degree. C. for a period of time that depends on the annealing temperature. The recovery is observed even when the Indium Oxide layer is sealed under a dielectric layer.

  15. Method for restoring the resistance of indium oxide semiconductors after heating while in sealed structures

    DOEpatents

    Seager, C.H.; Evans, J.T. Jr.

    1998-11-24

    A method is described for counteracting increases in resistivity encountered when Indium Oxide resistive layers are subjected to high temperature annealing steps during semiconductor device fabrication. The method utilizes a recovery annealing step which returns the Indium Oxide layer to its original resistivity after a high temperature annealing step has caused the resistivity to increase. The recovery anneal comprises heating the resistive layer to a temperature between 100 C and 300 C for a period of time that depends on the annealing temperature. The recovery is observed even when the Indium Oxide layer is sealed under a dielectric layer. 1 fig.

  16. An improved absorption generator for solar-thermal powered heat pumps. Part 2: Energy and economics

    SciTech Connect

    Fineblum, S.

    1997-12-31

    Solar heated absorption chiller installations have been very expensive for their rating. To enhance collector thermal efficiency the liquid flowing within the collectors must be kept as cool as possible. However, there is also a need to operate the absorption reported earlier. The compromise usually results in poor collector efficiency as well as a relatively poor specific chiller effect. The proposed vortex generator permits a heat pump to operate efficiently with relatively low temperature solar heated fluid (70--80 C). As a result, the collectors are cooler and more efficient. As noted in Part 1, the specific heat pumping capacity is about 27% greater than conventional systems operating at the same reduced generator temperatures. Therefore, a smaller, less expensive chiller is required. The reduced investment in solar arrays and absorption chillers is estimated along with a range of paybacks.

  17. An improved absorption generator for solar-thermal powered heat pumps. Part 1: Feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Fineblum, S.

    1997-12-31

    Solar heated absorption chiller installations have been, typically, very expensive for their rating. The need to keep the liquid flowing within the collectors as cool as possible to enhance collector thermal efficiency, conflicts with the need to operate the absorption chiller at a higher temperature. The compromise usually results in poor collector efficiency as well as a relatively poor specific chiller effect. The proposed vortex generator permits a heat pump to operate efficiently with relatively low temperature solar heated fluid (70--80 C). As a result, the collectors are cooler and much more efficient. In addition, the specific heat pumping capacity is about 27% greater than conventional systems operating at the same reduced generator temperatures and, therefore, a smaller chiller is required. The economic consequences of these benefits will be presented in Part 2.

  18. 100 Days of ELF/VLF Generation via HF Heating with HAARP (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M.; Golkowski, M.

    2013-12-01

    ELF/VLF radio waves are difficult to generate with conventional antennas. Ionospheric HF heating facilities generate ELF/VLF waves via modulated heating of the lower ionosphere. HF heating of the ionosphere changes the lower ionospheric conductivity, which in the presence of natural currents such as the auroral electrojet, creates an antenna in the sky when heating is modulated at ELF/VLF frequencies. We present a summary of nearly 100 days of ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at the 3.6 MW HAARP facility near Gakona, Alaska, and provide a baseline reference of ELF/VLF generation capabilities with HF heating. Between February 2007 and August 2008, HAARP was operated on close to 100 days for ELF/VLF wave generation experiments, at a variety of ELF/VLF frequencies, seasons and times of day. We present comprehensive statistics of generated ELF/VLF magnetic fields observed at a nearby site, in the 500-3500 Hz band. Transmissions with a specific HF beam configuration (3.25 MHz, vertical beam, amplitude modulation) are isolated so the data comparison is self-consistent, across nearly 5 million individual measurements of either a tone or a piece of a frequency-time ramp. There is a minimum in the average generation close to local midnight. It is found that generation during local nighttime is on average weaker, but more highly variable, with a small number of very strong generation periods. Signal amplitudes from day to day may vary by as much as 20-30 dB. Generation strengthens by ~5 dB during the first ~30 minutes of transmission, which may be a signature of slow electron density changes from sustained HF heating. Theoretical calculations are made to relate the amplitude observed to the power injected into the waveguide and reaching 250 km. The median power generated by HAARP and injected into the waveguide is ~0.05-0.1 W in this base-line configuration (vertical beam, 3.25 MHz, amplitude modulation), but may have generated hundreds of Watts for brief durations

  19. Rapid Online Non-Enzymatic Protein Digestion Combining Microwave Heating Acid Hydrolysis and Electrochemical Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Basile, Franco; Hauser, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    We report an online non-enzymatic method for site-specific digestion of proteins to yield peptides that are well suited for collision induced dissociation (CID) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The method combines online microwave heating acid hydrolysis at aspartic acid and online electrochemical oxidation at tryptophan and tyrosine. The combined microwave/electrochemical (microwave/echem) digestion is reproducible and produces peptides with an average sequence length of 10 amino acids. This peptide length is similar to the average peptide length of 9 amino acids obtained by digestion of proteins with the enzyme trypsin. As a result, the peptides produced by this novel non-enzymatic digestion method, when analyzed by ESI-MS, produce protonated molecules with mostly +1 and +2 charge states. The combination of these two non-enzymatic methods overcomes shortcomings with each individual method in that: i) peptides generated by the microwave-hydrolysis method have an average amino acid length of 16 amino acids, and ii) the inability of the electrochemical-cleavage method to reproducibly digest proteins with molecular masses above 4 kDa. Preliminary results are presented on the application and utility of this rapid online digestion (total of 6 min digestion time) on a series of standard peptides and proteins as well as an E. coli protein extract. PMID:21138252

  20. Aerosol palladium activation for electroless copper deposition and heat treatment with NO injection to fabricate Cu oxide/carbon fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Ryang Hwa; Hwang, Jungho

    2009-03-01

    This paper introduces a novel method for fabricating copper (Cu) oxide/activated carbon fibre (ACF) through the aerosol palladium (Pd) activation for use in electroless Cu deposition and heat treatment of Cu deposited ACF with nitric monoxide (NO) gas injection. Electroless Cu deposition was initiated by catalytically activating the ACF surface with spark generated Pd aerosol nanoparticles. The catalytically activated ACF was placed into a solution used for the electroless Cu deposition. Subjecting the Cu deposited ACF to a heat treatment in a NO/nitrogen (N2) gas injection (1000 ppm NO) resulted in changes to the morphology of the Cu particles. As the temperature increased from 100 to 500 °C, the relative mass fraction of oxygen in the Cu particles increased from 3.6% to 14.2% and the fraction of Cu decreased from 41.2% to 34.1%, which was caused by the formation of Cu oxides (Cu2O and CuO). The corresponding surface area and pore volume of the ACF decreased from 1019 m2 g-1 to 401 m2 g-1 and from 0.40 cm3 g-1 to 0.18 cm3 g-1, respectively. The morphological evolution and decrease in porosity were attributed to volume expansion of Cu particles during oxidation.

  1. The optimum fin spacing of circular tube bank fin heat exchanger with vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wanling; Su, Mei; Wang, Liangcheng; Zhang, Qiang; Chang, Limin; Liu, Song; Wang, Liangbi

    2013-09-01

    In real application, once the pattern of fin is determined, fin spacing of tube bank fin heat exchanger can be adjusted in a small region, and air flow velocity in the front of the heat exchanger is not all the same. Therefore, the effects of fin spacing on heat transfer performance of such heat exchanger are needed. This paper numerically studied the optimal fin spacing regarding the different front flow velocities of a circular tube bank fin heat exchanger with vortex generators. To screen the optimal fin spacing, an appropriate evaluation criterion JF was used. The results show that when front velocity is 1.75 m/s, the optimal fin spacing is 2.25 mm, when front velocity is 2.5 m/s, the optimal fin spacing is 2 mm, and when front velocity is higher than 2.5 m/s, the optimal fin spacing is 1.75 mm.

  2. Development and fabrication of a diffusion welded Columbium alloy heat exchanger. [for space power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W. F.; Duderstadt, E. C.; Wein, D.; Titran, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    A Mini Brayton space power generation system required the development of a Columbium alloy heat exchanger to transfer heat from a radioisotope heat source to a He/Xe working fluid. A light-weight design featured the simultaneous diffusion welding of 148 longitudinal fins in an annular heat exchanger about 9-1/2 in. in diameter, 13-1/2 in. in length and 1/4 in. in radial thickness. To complete the heat exchanger, additional gas ducting elements and attachment supports were added by GTA welding in a vacuum-purged inert atmosphere welding chamber. The development required the modification of an existing large size hot isostatic press to achieve HIP capabilities of 2800 F and 10,000 psi for at least 3 hr. Excellent diffusion welds were achieved in a high-quality component which met all system requirements.

  3. Diversity in Robustness of Lactococcus lactis Strains during Heat Stress, Oxidative Stress, and Spray Drying Stress

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Annereinou R.; Setyawati, Meily C.; Bayjanov, Jumamurat R.; Alkema, Wynand; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; Hugenholtz, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    In this study we tested 39 Lactococcus lactis strains isolated from diverse habitats for their robustness under heat and oxidative stress, demonstrating high diversity in survival (up to 4 log units). Strains with an L. lactis subsp. lactis phenotype generally displayed more-robust phenotypes than strains with an L. lactis subsp. cremoris phenotype, whereas the habitat from which the strains had been isolated did not appear to influence stress survival. Comparison of the stress survival phenotypes with already available comparative genomic data sets revealed that the absence or presence of specific genes, including genes encoding a GntR family transcriptional regulator, a manganese ABC transporter permease, a cellobiose phosphotransferase system (PTS) component, the FtsY protein, and hypothetical proteins, was associated with heat or oxidative stress survival. Finally, 14 selected strains also displayed diversity in survival after spray drying, ranging from 20% survival for the most robust strains, which appears acceptable for industrial application, to 0.1% survival for the least-tolerant strains. The high and low levels of survival upon spray drying correlated clearly with the combined robustness under heat and oxidative stress. These results demonstrate the relevance of screening culture collections for robustness under heat and oxidative stress on top of the typical screening for acidifying and flavor-forming properties. PMID:24212574

  4. Influence of chilling and heating stress on oxidative parameters and antioxidant systems in tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Tasti-Lee’ and ‘Sanibel’ tomatoes were chilled at 5 °C air for 4 day or heated at 52 °C water for 15 min. Oxidative parameters, antioxidant compounds and antioxidant-related enzymes in the tomatoes were measured immediately after treatment and four days after transfer to 20 °C. For ‘Tasti-Lee’, hea...

  5. Gas-phase generation of noble metal-tipped NiO nanorods by rapid thermal oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Kenji; Hirasawa, Makoto

    2014-12-01

    The thermal oxidation of alloy nanoparticles (NPs) composed of nickel and a noble metal was investigated by high-resolution electron microscopic observations of the NPs oxidized in a gas phase under different oxidation conditions. When Ni0.8Au0.2 NPs were heated with oxygen from room temperature, oxidation progressed to form Au-NiO core-shell structures, however, the Au core spilled out by breaking the NiO shell at high temperatures. In contrast, when the alloy NPs were subjected to rapid thermal oxidation, which was enabled by heating the NPs at high temperatures (≥500 °C) and then abruptly exposed to oxygen, oxidation advanced anisotropically such that a NiO island protruded and built up to form a NiO nanorod. This resulted in the formation of Au-tipped NiO nanorods in which a hemispherical Au tip bonded to a NiO nanorod via a Au {111}/NiO{100} interface. We found that the relative sizes of Au and NiO in Au-tipped NiO nanorods were easily and widely controlled by changing the Au mole fraction (0.05-0.8) of the alloy NPs. Similarly, rapid thermal oxidation of Ni-Pt NPs generated Pt-tipped NiO nanorods in which a spherical Pt tip was half-embedded in a NiO nanorod. The present gas-phase approach has great potential for fabricating functional asymmetric hybrid nanostructures in clean conditions.

  6. Estimation on Achievable Parameter Regime of Warm Dense Matter Generated by Isochoric Heating Discharge using Intense Pulsed Power Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Ryota; Kashine, Kenji; Tokuchi, Akira; Tamura, Fumihiro; Watabe, Arata; Kudo, Takahiro; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Sasaki, Toru; Kikuchi, Takashi; Aso, Tsukasa; Harada, Nob.; Jiang, Weihua

    2016-03-01

    An evaluation method for warm dense matter (WDM) with similar timescale in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) by isochoric heating using intense pulsed power generator ETIGO-II is considered for evaluating target behavior. The temperature increase of the sample is estimated from the numerical calculation using the measured current. As a result, in the case that the shape of sample is ϕ2 mm x 10 mm and the density is 0.01 times solid density of copper, the temperature of sample increases up to 30000 K. It is expected that the WDM is generated using the proposed method with ICF implosion timescale.

  7. Thermal behavior and electrochemical heat generation in a commercial 40 Ah lithium ion pouch cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Elke; Ziebert, Carlos; Melcher, Andreas; Rohde, Magnus; Seifert, Hans Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative data on the thermal behavior of lithium ion batteries under charging and discharging conditions are essential for designing thermal management systems and improving battery safety. In this work, commercial 40 Ah lithium ion pouch cells with Li(Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3)O2 cathodes were tested under isoperibolic and adiabatic conditions in an Accelerating Rate Calorimeter at different charging/discharging currents from 5 A to 40 A. Adiabatic tests simulate the worst-case scenario of a battery pack without cooling. For charging and discharging an overall exothermic behavior was found and a total temperature increase for one half cycle between 3 and 11 K. Isoperibolic tests simulate a single cell under constant environmental temperature. Here an exothermic behavior for discharging and an endothermic behavior for charging were observed. To transfer the measured temperature changes into heat data, the effective specific heat capacity and the heat transfer coefficient were determined. For the first time the heat generation data for a large format pouch cell have been determined using both isoperibolic and adiabatic conditions. These data were compared with the total heat data calculated as the sum of reversible and irreversible heat that were measured by potentiometric and current interruption techniques respectively. A good agreement was found between all three heat generation determination methods.

  8. Preliminary issues associated with the next generation nuclear plant intermediate heat exchanger design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natesan, K.; Moisseytsev, A.; Majumdar, S.

    2009-07-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant, with emphasis on production of both electricity and hydrogen, involves helium as the coolant and a closed-cycle gas turbine for power generation with a core outlet/gas turbine inlet temperature of 850-950 °C. In this concept, an intermediate heat exchanger is used to transfer the heat from primary helium from the core to the secondary fluid, which can be helium, a nitrogen/helium mixture, or a molten salt. This paper assesses the issues pertaining to shell-and-tube and compact heat exchangers. A detailed thermal-hydraulic analysis was performed to calculate heat transfer, temperature distribution, and pressure drop inside both printed circuit and shell-and-tube heat exchangers. The analysis included evaluation of the role of key process parameters, geometrical factors in heat exchanger designs, and material properties of structural alloys. Calculations were performed for helium-to-helium, helium-to-helium/nitrogen, and helium-to-salt heat exchangers.

  9. Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part I: Numerical Modeling and Baseline Model Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sumeet; Heister, Stephen D.; Xu, Xianfan; Salvador, James R.; Meisner, Gregory P.

    2013-04-01

    A numerical model has been developed to simulate coupled thermal and electrical energy transfer processes in a thermoelectric generator (TEG) designed for automotive waste heat recovery systems. This model is capable of computing the overall heat transferred, the electrical power output, and the associated pressure drop for given inlet conditions of the exhaust gas and the available TEG volume. Multiple-filled skutterudites and conventional bismuth telluride are considered for thermoelectric modules (TEMs) for conversion of waste heat from exhaust into usable electrical power. Heat transfer between the hot exhaust gas and the hot side of the TEMs is enhanced with the use of a plate-fin heat exchanger integrated within the TEG and using liquid coolant on the cold side. The TEG is discretized along the exhaust flow direction using a finite-volume method. Each control volume is modeled as a thermal resistance network which consists of integrated submodels including a heat exchanger and a thermoelectric device. The pressure drop along the TEG is calculated using standard pressure loss correlations and viscous drag models. The model is validated to preserve global energy balances and is applied to analyze a prototype TEG with data provided by General Motors. Detailed results are provided for local and global heat transfer and electric power generation. In the companion paper, the model is then applied to consider various TEG topologies using skutterudite and bismuth telluride TEMs.

  10. Non-oxidizing heating technology by high temperature nitrogen gas jet

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Tsuguhiko; Hara, Kazuaki; Furuhata, Tomohiko; Arai, Norio

    1998-07-01

    The authors have developed a non-oxidizing heating system for hot-cycle operation of tundish. The newly developed device, which is called the N2 jet heater, uses the principle of the storage type heat exchanger. By means of employing one set of two heaters, each containing regenerator, it is possible to heat N{sub 2} gas to 1,773 K. The high temperature nitrogen gas kept the tundish high temperature under the non-oxidizing condition. This system has been applied to Mizushima No. 4 Continuous Caster. As a result, the rate of occurrence of inclusion-related defects in the quality of start slab has been reduced to 1/5 to 1/3 the past level. This paper presents an outline of the device and describes the effect of its use on steel quality.

  11. Downhole steam generator having a downhole oxidant compressor

    DOEpatents

    Fox, R.L.

    1981-01-07

    Am improved apparatus is described for the downhole injection of steam into boreholes, for tertiary oil recovery. It includes an oxidant supply, a fuel supply, an igniter, a water supply, an oxidant compressor, and a combustor assembly. The apparatus is designed for efficiency, preheating of the water, and cooling of the combustion chamber walls. The steam outlet to the borehole is provided with pressure-responsive doors for closing the outlet in response to flameout. (DLC)

  12. Survival of the fittest: overcoming oxidative stress at the extremes of Acid, heat and metal.

    PubMed

    Maezato, Yukari; Blum, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The habitat of metal respiring acidothermophilic lithoautotrophs is perhaps the most oxidizing environment yet identified. Geothermal heat, sulfuric acid and transition metals contribute both individually and synergistically under aerobic conditions to create this niche. Sulfuric acid and metals originating from sulfidic ores catalyze oxidative reactions attacking microbial cell surfaces including lipids, proteins and glycosyl groups. Sulfuric acid also promotes hydrocarbon dehydration contributing to the formation of black "burnt" carbon. Oxidative reactions leading to abstraction of electrons is further impacted by heat through an increase in the proportion of reactant molecules with sufficient energy to react. Collectively these factors and particularly those related to metals must be overcome by thermoacidophilic lithoautotrophs in order for them to survive and proliferate. The necessary mechanisms to achieve this goal are largely unknown however mechanistics insights have been gained through genomic studies. This review focuses on the specific role of metals in this extreme environment with an emphasis on resistance mechanisms in Archaea. PMID:25371104

  13. Survival of the Fittest: Overcoming Oxidative Stress at the Extremes of Acid, Heat and Metal

    PubMed Central

    Maezato, Yukari; Blum, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The habitat of metal respiring acidothermophilic lithoautotrophs is perhaps the most oxidizing environment yet identified. Geothermal heat, sulfuric acid and transition metals contribute both individually and synergistically under aerobic conditions to create this niche. Sulfuric acid and metals originating from sulfidic ores catalyze oxidative reactions attacking microbial cell surfaces including lipids, proteins and glycosyl groups. Sulfuric acid also promotes hydrocarbon dehydration contributing to the formation of black “burnt” carbon. Oxidative reactions leading to abstraction of electrons is further impacted by heat through an increase in the proportion of reactant molecules with sufficient energy to react. Collectively these factors and particularly those related to metals must be overcome by thermoacidophilic lithoautotrophs in order for them to survive and proliferate. The necessary mechanisms to achieve this goal are largely unknown however mechanistics insights have been gained through genomic studies. This review focuses on the specific role of metals in this extreme environment with an emphasis on resistance mechanisms in Archaea. PMID:25371104

  14. Generation of whistler waves by continuous HF heating of the upper ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanyan, A.; Milikh, G. M.; Eliasson, B. E.; Sharma, A.; Chang, C.; Parrot, M.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2013-12-01

    We report observations of VLF waves by the DEMETER satellite overflying the HAARP facility during ionospheric heating experiments. The detected VLF waves were in the range 8-17 kHz and coincided with times of continuous heating. The experiments indicate whistler generation due to conversion of artificial lower hybrid waves to whistlers on small scale field-aligned plasma density striations. The observations are compared with theoretical models, taking into account both linear and nonlinear processes. Implications of the mode conversion technique on VLF generation with subsequent injection into the radiation belts to trigger particle precipitation are discussed.

  15. Calculation of the gain coefficient in cryogenically cooled Yb : YAG disks at high heat generation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Vadimova, O L; Mukhin, I B; Kuznetsov, I I; Palashov, O V; Perevezentsev, E A; Khazanov, Efim A

    2013-03-31

    We have calculated the stored energy and gain coefficient in disk gain elements cooled to cryogenic temperatures. The problem has been solved with allowance for intense heat generation, amplified spontaneous emission and parasitic lasing, without averaging over any spatial coordinate. The numerical simulation results agree well with experimental data, in particular at high heat generation rates. Experimental data and theoretical analysis indicate that composite disk gain elements containing an undoped region can store considerably more energy due to suppression of amplified spontaneous emission and parasitic lasing. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  16. Depolarization of mitochondria in neurons promotes activation of nitric oxide synthase and generation of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Katakam, Prasad V G; Dutta, Somhrita; Sure, Venkata N; Grovenburg, Samuel M; Gordon, Angellica O; Peterson, Nicholas R; Rutkai, Ibolya; Busija, David W

    2016-05-01

    The diverse signaling events following mitochondrial depolarization in neurons are not clear. We examined for the first time the effects of mitochondrial depolarization on mitochondrial function, intracellular calcium, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activation, and nitric oxide (NO) production in cultured neurons and perivascular nerves. Cultured rat primary cortical neurons were studied on 7-10 days in vitro, and endothelium-denuded cerebral arteries of adult Sprague-Dawley rats were studied ex vivo. Diazoxide and BMS-191095 (BMS), activators of mitochondrial KATP channels, depolarized mitochondria in cultured neurons and increased cytosolic calcium levels. However, the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate was unaffected by mitochondrial depolarization. In addition, diazoxide and BMS not only increased the nNOS phosphorylation at positive regulatory serine 1417 but also decreased nNOS phosphorylation at negative regulatory serine 847. Furthermore, diazoxide and BMS increased NO production in cultured neurons measured with both fluorescence microscopy and electron spin resonance spectroscopy, which was sensitive to inhibition by the selective nNOS inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI). Diazoxide also protected cultured neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation, which was blocked by NOS inhibition and rescued by NO donors. Finally, BMS induced vasodilation of endothelium denuded, freshly isolated cerebral arteries that was diminished by 7-NI and tetrodotoxin. Thus pharmacological depolarization of mitochondria promotes activation of nNOS leading to generation of NO in cultured neurons and endothelium-denuded arteries. Mitochondrial-induced NO production leads to increased cellular resistance to lethal stress by cultured neurons and to vasodilation of denuded cerebral arteries. PMID:26945078

  17. Hydrous mineral dehydration around heat-generating nuclear waste in bedded salt formations.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Amy B; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Caporuscio, Florie A; Robinson, Bruce A; Stauffer, Philip H

    2015-06-01

    Heat-generating nuclear waste disposal in bedded salt during the first two years after waste emplacement is explored using numerical simulations tied to experiments of hydrous mineral dehydration. Heating impure salt samples to temperatures of 265 °C can release over 20% by mass of hydrous minerals as water. Three steps in a series of dehydration reactions are measured (65, 110, and 265 °C), and water loss associated with each step is averaged from experimental data into a water source model. Simulations using this dehydration model are used to predict temperature, moisture, and porosity after heating by 750-W waste canisters, assuming hydrous mineral mass fractions from 0 to 10%. The formation of a three-phase heat pipe (with counter-circulation of vapor and brine) occurs as water vapor is driven away from the heat source, condenses, and flows back toward the heat source, leading to changes in porosity, permeability, temperature, saturation, and thermal conductivity of the backfill salt surrounding the waste canisters. Heat pipe formation depends on temperature, moisture availability, and mobility. In certain cases, dehydration of hydrous minerals provides sufficient extra moisture to push the system into a sustained heat pipe, where simulations neglecting this process do not. PMID:25965632

  18. Simulation and Optimization of the Heat Exchanger for Automotive Exhaust-Based Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C. Q.; Huang, C.; Deng, Y. D.; Wang, Y. P.; Chu, P. Q.; Zheng, S. J.

    2016-03-01

    In order to enhance the exhaust waste heat recovery efficiency of the automotive exhaust-based thermoelectric generator (TEG) system, a three-segment heat exchanger with folded-shaped internal structure for the TEG system is investigated in this study. As the major effect factors of the performance for the TEG system, surface temperature, and thermal uniformity of the heat exchanger are analyzed in this research, pressure drop along the heat exchanger is also considered. Based on computational fluid dynamics simulations and temperature distribution, the pressure drop along the heat exchanger is obtained. By considering variable length and thickness of folded plates in each segment of the heat exchanger, response surface methodology and optimization by a multi-objective genetic algorithm is applied for surface temperature, thermal uniformity, and pressure drop for the folded-shaped heat exchanger. An optimum design based on the optimization is proposed to improve the overall performance of the TEG system. The performance of the optimized heat exchanger in different engine conditions is discussed.

  19. Thermoelectric Power Generation Utilizing the Waste Heat from a Biomass Boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazdil, Marian; Pospisil, Jiri

    2013-07-01

    The objective of the presented work is to test the possibility of using thermoelectric power to convert flue gas waste heat from a small-scale domestic pellet boiler, and to assess the influence of a thermoelectric generator on its function. A prototype of the generator, able to be connected to an existing device, was designed, constructed, and tested. The performance of the generator as well as the impact of the generator on the operation of the boiler was investigated under various operating conditions. The boiler gained auxiliary power and could become a combined heat and power unit allowing self-sufficient operation. The created unit represents an independent source of electricity with effective use of fuel.

  20. Conjugate heat transfer of a finned tube. Part B: Heat transfer augmentation and avoidance of heat transfer reversal by longitudinal vortex generators

    SciTech Connect

    Fiebig, M.; Chen, Y.; Grosse-Gorgemann, A.; Mitra, N.K.

    1995-08-01

    Numerical investigations of three-dimensional flow and heat transfer in a finned tube with punched longitudinal vortex generators (LVG`s) are carried out for Reynolds number of 250 and 300. Air with a Prandtl number of 0.7 is used as the fluid. The flow is both thermally and hydrodynamically developing. The LVG is a delta winglet pair (DWP) punched out of the fin and is located directly behind the tube, symmetrically separated by one tube diameter. The DWP generates longitudinal vortices in the wake of the tube, defers flow separation on the tube, deflects the main stream into the tube wake, and strong reduces the ``dead water zone.`` Heat transfer reversal is avoided by the DWP. Comparison of the span-averaged Nusselt numbers for the fin with and without DWP shows significant local heat transfer enhancement of several hundred percent in the tube wake. For Re = 300 and Fi = 200 the global heat transfer augmentation by a DWP, which amounts to only 2.5% of the fin area, is 31%.

  1. Selective electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide from water oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine A.; Norskov, Jens K.

    2015-10-08

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. The present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e– water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e– oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. Furthermore, we present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively.

  2. Selective electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide from water oxidation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine A.; Norskov, Jens K.

    2015-10-08

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. The present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, wemore » show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e– water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e– oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. Furthermore, we present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively.« less

  3. Heat-induced reshaping and coarsening of metal nanoparticle-graphene oxide hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hanqing

    Glutathione-capped gold nanoparticles of size 1, 3, and 10 nm, CTAB-stabilized gold nanorods, as well as ro-carboxylate-functionalized palladium nanoparticles were synthesized and self-assembled onto graphene oxide to study their coarsening or reshaping behaviors upon heating at different temperatures ranging from 50 °C to 300 °C. These engineered nanoparticle- or nanorod-graphene oxide hybrid materials were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The spherical nanoparticles would undergo coalescence to become larger particles and the nanorods would undergo reshaping to spherical particles. UV-Vis results show that the plasmonic band of gold nanoparticles at 520 nm would shift to higher wavelength indicating the coarsening into larger particles upon heating. Transmission electron microscopy results were generally in good agreements with the UV-Vis results and would be used as a direct tool to observe the structural changes of gold nanoparticles upon heat treatments. Without the presence of graphene oxide, the nanoparticle coalescence began at the temperature between 150 and 200 °C for all three nanoparticles with different core sizes. But with the presence of graphene oxide, nanoparticles start to coalesce at the temperature below 150 °C. The gold nanorods have two plasmonic bands at ˜780 and ˜520 nm. The bands at ˜780 nm for gold nanorods would disappear when the gold nanorods-graphene oxide is heated at 50 °C indicating the complete reshaping of nanorods even at such a low temperature. Gold nanorods themselves are more stable and do not undergo the reshaping completely until the sample is heated above 150 °C. Since graphene oxide is an excellent thermal conductor, we propose that graphene oxide could transfer heat to the nanoparticles and nanorods efficiently, disrupt the interaction of stabilizing ligands, and make them to either

  4. Protein kinase Cδ regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression via Akt activation and nitric oxide generation

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Neetu; Wedgwood, Stephen; Black, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we explore the roles of the delta isoform of PKC (PKCδ) in the regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells isolated from fetal lambs (FPAECs). Pharmacological inhibition of PKCδ with either rottlerin or with the peptide, δV1-1, acutely attenuated NO production, and this was associated with a decrease in phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177 (S1177). The chronic effects of PKCδ inhibition using either rottlerin or the overexpression of a dominant negative PKCδ mutant included the downregulation of eNOS gene expression that was manifested by a decrease in both eNOS promoter activity and protein expression after 24 h of treatment. We also found that PKCδ inhibition blunted Akt activation as observed by a reduction in phosphorylated Akt at position Ser473. Thus, we conclude that PKCδ is actively involved in the activation of Akt. To determine the effect of Akt on eNOS signaling, we overexpressed a dominant negative mutant of Akt and determined its effect of NO generation, eNOS expression, and phosphorylation of eNOS at S1177. Our results demonstrated that Akt inhibition was associated with decreased NO production that correlated with reduced phosphorylation of eNOS at S1177, and decreased eNOS promoter activity. We next evaluated the effect of endogenously produced NO on eNOS expression by incubating FPAECs with the eNOS inhibitor 2-ethyl-2-thiopseudourea (ETU). ETU significantly inhibited NO production, eNOS promoter activity, and eNOS protein levels. Together, our data indicate involvement of PKCδ-mediated Akt activation and NO generation in maintaining eNOS expression. PMID:18192589

  5. Heat Transfer and Thermophotovoltaic Power Generation in Oil-fired Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, T.; Hammonds, J.S.; Horne, E.; Kamath, B.; Carpenter, J.; Woods, D.R.

    2010-10-21

    The focus of this study is the production of electric power in an oil-fired, residential heatingsystem using thermophotovoltaic (TPV) conversion devices. This work uses experimental, computational, and analytical methods to investigate thermal mechanisms that drive electric power production in the TPV systems. An objective of this work is to produce results that will lead to the development of systems that generate enough electricity such that the boiler is self-powering. An important design constraint employed in this investigation is the use of conventional, yellow-flame oil burners, integrated with a typical boiler. The power production target for the systems developed here is 100 W - the power requirement for a boiler that uses low-power auxiliary components. The important heattransfer coupling mechanisms that drive power production in the systems studied are discussed. The results of this work may lead to the development of systems that export power to the home electric system.

  6. Air feed tube support system for a solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Doshi, Vinod B.; Ruka, Roswell J.; Hager, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator (12), containing tubular fuel cells (36) with interior air electrodes (18), where a supporting member (82) containing a plurality of holes (26) supports oxidant feed tubes (51), which pass from an oxidant plenum (52") into the center of the fuel cells, through the holes (26) in the supporting member (82), where a compliant gasket (86) around the top of the oxidant feed tubes and on top (28) of the supporting member (82) helps support the oxidant feed tubes and center them within the fuel cells, and loosen the tolerance for centering the air feed tubes.

  7. Development of numerical model for predicting heat generation and temperatures in MSW landfills.

    PubMed

    Hanson, James L; Yeşiller, Nazli; Onnen, Michael T; Liu, Wei-Lien; Oettle, Nicolas K; Marinos, Janelle A

    2013-10-01

    A numerical modeling approach has been developed for predicting temperatures in municipal solid waste landfills. Model formulation and details of boundary conditions are described. Model performance was evaluated using field data from a landfill in Michigan, USA. The numerical approach was based on finite element analysis incorporating transient conductive heat transfer. Heat generation functions representing decomposition of wastes were empirically developed and incorporated to the formulation. Thermal properties of materials were determined using experimental testing, field observations, and data reported in literature. The boundary conditions consisted of seasonal temperature cycles at the ground surface and constant temperatures at the far-field boundary. Heat generation functions were developed sequentially using varying degrees of conceptual complexity in modeling. First a step-function was developed to represent initial (aerobic) and residual (anaerobic) conditions. Second, an exponential growth-decay function was established. Third, the function was scaled for temperature dependency. Finally, an energy-expended function was developed to simulate heat generation with waste age as a function of temperature. Results are presented and compared to field data for the temperature-dependent growth-decay functions. The formulations developed can be used for prediction of temperatures within various components of landfill systems (liner, waste mass, cover, and surrounding subgrade), determination of frost depths, and determination of heat gain due to decomposition of wastes. PMID:23664656

  8. Solar tower power plant using a particle-heated steam generator: Modeling and parametric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Michael; Bartsch, Philipp; Pointner, Harald; Zunft, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Within the framework of the project HiTExStor II, a system model for the entire power plant consisting of volumetric air receiver, air-sand heat exchanger, sand storage system, steam generator and water-steam cycle was implemented in software "Ebsilon Professional". As a steam generator, the two technologies fluidized bed cooler and moving bed heat exchangers were considered. Physical models for the non-conventional power plant components as air- sand heat exchanger, fluidized bed coolers and moving bed heat exchanger had to be created and implemented in the simulation environment. Using the simulation model for the power plant, the individual components and subassemblies have been designed and the operating parameters were optimized in extensive parametric studies in terms of the essential degrees of freedom. The annual net electricity output for different systems was determined in annual performance calculations at a selected location (Huelva, Spain) using the optimized values for the studied parameters. The solution with moderate regenerative feed water heating has been found the most advantageous. Furthermore, the system with moving bed heat exchanger prevails over the system with fluidized bed cooler due to a 6 % higher net electricity yield.

  9. Indium tin oxide nanowires as hyperbolic metamaterials for near-field radiative heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jui-Yung; Basu, Soumyadipta Wang, Liping

    2015-02-07

    We investigate near-field radiative heat transfer between Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) nanowire arrays which behave as type 1 and 2 hyperbolic metamaterials. Using spatial dispersion dependent effective medium theory to model the dielectric function of the nanowires, the impact of filling fraction on the heat transfer is analyzed. Depending on the filling fraction, it is possible to achieve both types of hyperbolic modes. At 150 nm vacuum gap, the heat transfer between the nanowires with 0.5 filling fraction can be 11 times higher than that between two bulk ITOs. For vacuum gaps less than 150 nm the heat transfer increases as the filling fraction decreases. Results obtained from this study will facilitate applications of ITO nanowires as hyperbolic metamaterials for energy systems.

  10. Oxidative damage induced by heat stress could be relieved by nitric oxide in Trichoderma harzianum LTR-2.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Yang, Zijun; Guo, Kai; Li, Zhe; Zhou, Hongzi; Wei, Yanli; Li, Jishun; Zhang, Xinjian; Harvey, Paul; Yang, Hetong

    2015-04-01

    Trichoderma harzianum is an important commercial biocontrol fungal agent. The temperature has been shown to be an important parameter and strain-specific to the mycelia growth of fungi, but less report makes the known of the mechanisms in T. harzianum. In our study, a 6-h treatment of heat increased the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and nitric oxide (NO) concentration in mycelia to 212 and 230 % the level of the control, respectively. The exogenous NO donor sodium nitroprusside (150 μM) reduced the TBARS concentration to 53 % of that under heat stress (HS). At the same time, the NO-specific scavenger at 250 μM, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-1-oxyl-3-oxide, prevented the exogenous NO-relieved TBARS accumulation under HS. The increased NO concentration under HS was reduced 41 % by the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-N(G)-nitroarginine methyl ester, but not the nitrate reductase (NR) inhibitor tungstate. Our study exhibited that NO can protect the mycelia of T. harzianum from HS and reduce the oxidative damage by enhancing the activity of NOS and NR. PMID:25561405

  11. 100 days of ELF/VLF generation via HF heating with HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. B.; Gołkowski, M.

    2013-10-01

    Extremely low frequency/very low frequency (ELF/VLF) radio waves are difficult to generate with conventional antennas. Ionospheric high frequency (HF) heating facilities generate ELF/VLF waves via modulated heating of the lower ionosphere. HF heating of the ionosphere changes the lower ionospheric conductivity, which in the presence of natural currents such as the auroral electrojet creates an antenna in the sky when heating is modulated at ELF/VLF frequencies. We present a summary of nearly 100 days of ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at the 3.6 MW High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility near Gakona, Alaska, at a variety of ELF/VLF frequencies, seasons, and times of day. We present comprehensive statistics of generated ELF/VLF magnetic fields observed at a nearby site, in the 500-3500 Hz band. Transmissions with a specific HF beam configuration (3.25 MHz, vertical beam, amplitude modulation) are isolated so the data comparison is self-consistent, across nearly 5 million individual measurements of either a tone or a piece of a frequency-time ramp. There is a minimum in the average generation close to local midnight. It is found that generation during local nighttime is on average weaker but more highly variable, with a small number of very strong generation periods. Signal amplitudes from day to day may vary by as much as 20-30 dB. Generation strengthens by ˜5 dB during the first ˜30 min of transmission, which may be a signature of slow electron density changes from sustained HF heating. Theoretical calculations are made to relate the amplitude observed to the power injected into the waveguide and reaching 250 km. The median power generated by HAARP and injected into the waveguide is ˜0.05-0.1 W in this baseline configuration (vertical beam, 3.25 MHz, amplitude modulation) but may have generated hundreds of watts for brief durations. Several efficiency improvements have improved the ELF/VLF wave generation efficiency further.

  12. Adsorption of SO2 onto oxidized and heat-treated activated carbon fibers (ACFS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daley, M.A.; Mangun, C.L.; DeBarr, J.A.; Riha, S.; Lizzio, A.A.; Donnals, G.L.; Economy, J.

    1997-01-01

    A series of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) and heat-treated oxidized ACFs prepared from phenolic fiber precursors have been studied to elucidate the role of pore size, pore surface chemistry and pore volume for the adsorption of SO2 and its catalytic conversion to H2SO4. For untreated ACFs, the initial rate of SO2 adsorption from flue gas was shown to be inversely related to pore size. At longer times, the amount of SO2 adsorbed from flue gas was dependent on both the pore size and pore volume. Oxidation of the ACFs, using an aqueous oxidant, decreased their adsorption capacity for SO2 from flue gas due to a decrease in pore volume and repulsion of the SO2 from acidic surface groups. If these samples were heat-treated to desorb the oxygen containing function groups, the amount of SO2 adsorption increased. This increase in adsorption capacity was directly correlated to the amount of CO2 evolved during heat-treatment of the oxidized ACFs. The amount of SO2 adsorbed for these samples was related to the pore size, pore surface chemistry and pore volume. This analysis is explained in more detail in this paper. ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effective thermal conductivity of binary mixed materials with and without heat generation - An empirical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Abu Saleem, R. A.; Rizwan-Uddin

    2012-07-01

    An empirical approach to determine the effective thermal conductivity of a binary mixed material with heat generation is developed and reported. The approach is developed for a steady state problem with spherical geometry. The approach is based on two main ideas: a structural approximation and an empirical formulation. As for the structural approximation, the binary mixed material was assumed to be equivalent to a binary layered system of adjacent fuel and moderator layers oriented perpendicular to the heat flux. An empirical approach was then used to conduct a general correlation for the effective thermal conductivity of a binary layered system with heat generation. This empirical approach was conducted systematically by considering the parametric and operational condition effects of the system on the overall effective thermal conductivity. Results are then compared to some experimental data as well as with thermal conductivity values predicted by an empirical correlation that is based on experimental data. (authors)

  14. Fast ion generation and bulk plasma heating with three-ion ICRF scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, Ye. O. Van Eester, D.; Ongena, J.; Lerche, E.; Messiaen, A.

    2015-12-10

    Launching electromagnetic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is an efficient method of plasma heating, actively employed in most of fusion machines. ICRF has a number of important supplementary applications, including the generation of high-energy ions. In this paper, we discuss a new set of three-ion ICRF scenarios and the prospect of their use as a dedicated tool for fast ion generation in tokamaks and stellarators. A distinct feature of these scenarios is a strong absorption efficiency possible at very low concentrations of resonant minority ions (∼ 1% or even below). Such concentration levels are typical for impurities contaminating fusion plasmas. An alternative ICRF scenario for maximizing the efficiency of bulk D-T ion heating is suggested for JET and ITER tokamaks, which is based on three-ion ICRF heating of intrinsic Beryllium impurities.

  15. Comparison of entropy generation and conventional design methods for heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbein, David S.

    1987-06-01

    The design of heat exchangers traditionally focuses on the known constraints of the problem such as inlet and outlet temperatures, flow rates, and pressure drops. This leads mainly to a sizing problem where the designer must select surfaces, flow configuration, and materials to meet the minimum design objectives. An alternate approach based on an acceptable level of thermodynamic irreversibility (entropy generation) has been proposed. When the entropy generation level has been set, the geometric parameters of the heat exchanger can be determined. The design of a plate-fin type, gas-to-gas recuperator for a regenerative open Brayton cycle has been used as a demonstrative device. The resulting heat exchanger designs are then examined to determine what caused the differences and why either method should be preferred over the other.

  16. Fast ion generation and bulk plasma heating with three-ion ICRF scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, Ye. O.; Van Eester, D.; Dumont, R.; Ongena, J.; Lerche, E.; Messiaen, A.

    2015-12-01

    Launching electromagnetic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is an efficient method of plasma heating, actively employed in most of fusion machines. ICRF has a number of important supplementary applications, including the generation of high-energy ions. In this paper, we discuss a new set of three-ion ICRF scenarios and the prospect of their use as a dedicated tool for fast ion generation in tokamaks and stellarators. A distinct feature of these scenarios is a strong absorption efficiency possible at very low concentrations of resonant minority ions (˜ 1% or even below). Such concentration levels are typical for impurities contaminating fusion plasmas. An alternative ICRF scenario for maximizing the efficiency of bulk D-T ion heating is suggested for JET and ITER tokamaks, which is based on three-ion ICRF heating of intrinsic Beryllium impurities.

  17. Natural convection on a vertical plate in a saturated porous medium with internal heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedda, M.; Sriti, M.; Achemlal, D.

    2014-08-01

    The main goal of this paper is to re-exam a class of exact solutions for the two-dimensional free convection boundary layers induced by a heated vertical plate embedded in a saturated porous medium with an exponential decaying heat generation. The temperature distribution of the plate has been assumed to vary as a power of the axial coordinate measured from the leading edge of the plate and subjected to an applied lateral mass flux. The boundary layer equations are solved analytically and numerically using a fifth-order Runge-Kutta scheme coupled with the shooting iteration method. As for the classical problem without internal heat generation, it is proved that multiple (unbounded) solutions arise for any and for any suction/injection parameter. For such solutions, the asymptotic behavior as the similarity variable approaches infinity is determined.

  18. Analysis and modeling of localized heat generation by tumor-targeted nanoparticles (Monte Carlo methods)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanattalab, Ehsan; SalmanOgli, Ahmad; Piskin, Erhan

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the tumor-targeted nanoparticles that influence heat generation. We suppose that all nanoparticles are fully functionalized and can find the target using active targeting methods. Unlike the commonly used methods, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the treatment procedure proposed in this study is purely noninvasive, which is considered to be a significant merit. It is found that the localized heat generation due to targeted nanoparticles is significantly higher than other areas. By engineering the optical properties of nanoparticles, including scattering, absorption coefficients, and asymmetry factor (cosine scattering angle), the heat generated in the tumor's area reaches to such critical state that can burn the targeted tumor. The amount of heat generated by inserting smart agents, due to the surface Plasmon resonance, will be remarkably high. The light-matter interactions and trajectory of incident photon upon targeted tissues are simulated by MIE theory and Monte Carlo method, respectively. Monte Carlo method is a statistical one by which we can accurately probe the photon trajectories into a simulation area.

  19. Hydromagnetic plane and axisymmetric flow near a stagnation point with heat generation

    SciTech Connect

    Chamkha, A.J.

    1998-02-01

    The steady, laminar, forced convection flow of an electrically-conducting and heat-generating/absorbing fluid at the stagnation point of an isothermal two-dimensional porous body and an axisymmetric body in the presence of a uniform applied magnetic field has been studied. The governing equations are transformed into ordinary differential equations using similarity variables. The obtained results are solved numerically by an implicit finite-difference method. A parametric study of all the physical parameters involved in the problem has been performed and graphical results for the velocity and temperature profiles as well as the skin-friction coefficient and the wall heat transfer are presented and discussed. This flow and heat transfer process occurs in many industrial applications such as heat exchangers design, cooling of nuclear reactors, and others.

  20. Thermal Optimization of the Heat Exchanger in an Automotive Exhaust-Based Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Y. D.; Liu, X.; Chen, S.; Tong, N. Q.

    2013-07-01

    Recent advances in thermoelectric technologies have made exhaust-based thermoelectric generators (TEGs) promising to recover waste heat. The thermal performance of the heat exchanger in exhaust-based TEGs is studied in this work. In terms of interface temperature and thermal uniformity, the thermal characteristics of heat exchangers with different internal structures, lengths, and materials are discussed. Following computational fluid dynamics simulations, infrared experiments are carried out on a high-performance production engine with a dynamometer. Simulation and experimental results show that a plate-shaped heat exchanger made of brass with fishbone-shaped internal structure and length of 600 mm achieves a relatively ideal thermal performance, which is practically helpful to enhance the thermal performance of the TEG.

  1. Visualization of expanding warm dense gold and diamond heated uniformly by laser-generated ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Vold, E. L.; Santiago Cordoba, M. A.; Hamilton, C. E.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    With a laser-generated beam of quasi-monoenergetic ions, a solid density target can be heated uniformly and isochorically. On the LANL Trident laser facility, we have used a beam of quasi-monoenergetic aluminum ions to heat gold and diamond foils. We visualized directly the expanding warm dense gold and diamond with an optical streak camera. Furthermore, we present a new technique to determine the initial temperatures of these heated samples from the measured expansion speeds of gold and diamond into vacuum. These temperatures are in good agreement with the expected temperatures calculated using the total deposited energy into the cold targets and SESAME equation-of-state tables at solid densities. We anticipate the uniformly heated solid density target will allow for direct quantitative measurements of equation-of-state, conductivity, opacity, and stopping power of warm dense matter, benefiting plasma physics, astrophysics, and nuclear physics. *This work is sponsored by the LANL LDRD Program.

  2. Animation Model to Conceptualize ATP Generation: A Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jena, Ananta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is the molecular unit of intracellular energy and it is the product of oxidative phosphorylation of cellular respiration uses in cellular processes. The study explores the growth of the misconception levels amongst the learners and evaluates the effectiveness of animation model over traditional methods. The data…

  3. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN INDUCED OXIDENT GENERATION AND ASTHMA SEVERITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of oxygen radicals is implicated in many disease processes, including asthma. There is evidence that elevated oxidant status is associated with airway hyper responsiveness, however it is less clear whether increased levels of circulating reactive oxygen species are assoc...

  4. GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION POTENTIAL WITH COMBINED HEAT AND POWER WITH DISTRIBUTED GENERATION PRIME MOVERS - ASME 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, Scott; Theiss, Timothy J; Bunce, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Pending or recently enacted greenhouse gas regulations and mandates are leading to the need for current and feasible GHG reduction solutions including combined heat and power (CHP). Distributed generation using advanced reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines and fuel cells has been shown to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) compared to the U.S. electrical generation mix due to the use of natural gas and high electrical generation efficiencies of these prime movers. Many of these prime movers are also well suited for use in CHP systems which recover heat generated during combustion or energy conversion. CHP increases the total efficiency of the prime mover by recovering waste heat for generating electricity, replacing process steam, hot water for buildings or even cooling via absorption chilling. The increased efficiency of CHP systems further reduces GHG emissions compared to systems which do not recover waste thermal energy. Current GHG mandates within the U.S Federal sector and looming GHG legislation for states puts an emphasis on understanding the GHG reduction potential of such systems. This study compares the GHG savings from various state-of-the- art prime movers. GHG reductions from commercially available prime movers in the 1-5 MW class including, various industrial fuel cells, large and small gas turbines, micro turbines and reciprocating gas engines with and without CHP are compared to centralized electricity generation including the U.S. mix and the best available technology with natural gas combined cycle power plants. The findings show significant GHG saving potential with the use of CHP. Also provided is an exploration of the accounting methodology for GHG reductions with CHP and the sensitivity of such analyses to electrical generation efficiency, emissions factors and most importantly recoverable heat and thermal recovery efficiency from the CHP system.

  5. Allicin protects spinal cord neurons from glutamate-induced oxidative stress through regulating the heat shock protein 70/inducible nitric oxide synthase pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Guang; Ren, Peng-Yu; Wang, Guo-Yu; Yao, Shu-Xin; He, Xi-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Allicin, the main biologically active compound derived from garlic, exerts a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities and is considered to have therapeutic potential in many neurological disorders. Using an in vitro spinal cord injury model induced by glutamate treatment, we sought to investigate the neuroprotective effects of allicin in primary cultured spinal cord neurons. We found that allicin treatment significantly attenuated glutamate-induced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, loss of cell viability and apoptotic neuronal death. This protection was associated with reduced oxidative stress, as evidenced by decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, reduced lipid peroxidation and preservation of antioxidant enzyme activities. The results of western blot analysis showed that allicin decreased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), but had no effects on the expression of neuronal NOS (nNOS) following glutamate exposure. Moreover, allicin treatment significantly increased the expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) at both mRNA and protein levels. Knockdown of HSP70 by specific targeted small interfere RNA (siRNA) not only mitigated allicin-induced protective activity, but also partially nullified its effects on the regulation of iNOS. Collectively, these data demonstrate that allicin treatment may be an effective therapeutic strategy for spinal cord injury, and that the potential underlying mechanism involves HSP70/iNOS pathway-mediated inhibition of oxidative stress. PMID:25473931

  6. Cost Scaling of a Real-World Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery Thermoelectric Generator: A Deeper Dive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, Terry J.; Yee, Shannon; LeBlanc, Saniya

    2016-03-01

    Cost is equally important to power density or efficiency for the adoption of waste heat recovery thermoelectric generators (TEG) in many transportation and industrial energy recovery applications. In many cases, the system design that minimizes cost (e.g., the /W value) can be very different than the design that maximizes the system's efficiency or power density, and it is important to understand the relationship between those designs to optimize TEG performance-cost compromises. Expanding on recent cost analysis work and using more detailed system modeling, an enhanced cost scaling analysis of a waste heat recovery TEG with more detailed, coupled treatment of the heat exchangers has been performed. In this analysis, the effect of the heat lost to the environment and updated relationships between the hot-side and cold-side conductances that maximize power output are considered. This coupled thermal and thermoelectric (TE) treatment of the exhaust waste heat recovery TEG yields modified cost scaling and design optimization equations, which are now strongly dependent on the heat leakage fraction, exhaust mass flow rate, and heat exchanger effectiveness. This work shows that heat exchanger costs most often dominate the overall TE system costs, that it is extremely difficult to escape this regime, and in order to achieve TE system costs of 1/W it is necessary to achieve heat exchanger costs of 1/(W/K). Minimum TE system costs per watt generally coincide with maximum power points, but preferred TE design regimes are identified where there is little cost penalty for moving into regions of higher efficiency and slightly lower power outputs. These regimes are closely tied to previously identified low cost design regimes. This work shows that the optimum fill factor F opt minimizing system costs decreases as heat losses increase, and increases as exhaust mass flow rate and heat exchanger effectiveness increase. These findings have profound implications on the design and

  7. Biologically Synthesized Gold Nanoparticles Ameliorate Cold and Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi-Feng; Shen, Wei; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2016-01-01

    Due to their unique physical, chemical, and optical properties, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have recently attracted much interest in the field of nanomedicine, especially in the areas of cancer diagnosis and photothermal therapy. Because of the enormous potential of these nanoparticles, various physical, chemical, and biological methods have been adopted for their synthesis. Synthetic antioxidants are dangerous to human health. Thus, the search for effective, nontoxic natural compounds with effective antioxidative properties is essential. Although AuNPs have been studied for use in various biological applications, exploration of AuNPs as antioxidants capable of inhibiting oxidative stress induced by heat and cold stress is still warranted. Therefore, one goal of our study was to produce biocompatible AuNPs using biological methods that are simple, nontoxic, biocompatible, and environmentally friendly. Next, we aimed to assess the antioxidative effect of AuNPs against oxidative stress induced by cold and heat in Escherichia coli, which is a suitable model for stress responses involving AuNPs. The response of aerobically grown E. coli cells to cold and heat stress was found to be similar to the oxidative stress response. Upon exposure to cold and heat stress, the viability and metabolic activity of E. coli was significantly reduced compared to the control. In addition, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) and leakage of proteins and sugars were significantly elevated, and the levels of lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) significantly lowered compared to in the control. Concomitantly, AuNPs ameliorated cold and heat-induced oxidative stress responses by increasing the expression of antioxidants, including glutathione (GSH), glutathione S-transferase (GST), super oxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT). These consistent physiology and biochemical data suggest that AuNPs can ameliorate cold and heat stress

  8. Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat andpower applications

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; HamachiLaCommare, Kristina

    2004-11-30

    While demand for electricity continues to grow, expansion of the traditional electricity supply system, or macrogrid, is constrained and is unlikely to keep pace with the growing thirst western economies have for electricity. Furthermore, no compelling case has been made that perpetual improvement in the overall power quality and reliability (PQR)delivered is technically possible or economically desirable. An alternative path to providing high PQR for sensitive loads would generate close to them in microgrids, such as the Consortium for Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid. Distributed generation would alleviate the pressure for endless improvement in macrogrid PQR and might allow the establishment of a sounder economically based level of universal grid service. Energy conversion from available fuels to electricity close to loads can also provide combined heat and power (CHP) opportunities that can significantly improve the economics of small-scale on-site power generation, especially in hot climates when the waste heat serves absorption cycle cooling equipment that displaces expensive on-peak electricity. An optimization model, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), developed at Berkeley Lab identifies the energy bill minimizing combination of on-site generation and heat recovery equipment for sites, given their electricity and heat requirements, the tariffs they face, and a menu of available equipment. DER-CAM is used to conduct a systemic energy analysis of a southern California naval base building and demonstrates atypical current economic on-site power opportunity. Results achieve cost reductions of about 15 percent with DER, depending on the tariff.Furthermore, almost all of the energy is provided on-site, indicating that modest cost savings can be achieved when the microgrid is free to select distributed generation and heat recovery equipment in order to minimize its over all costs.

  9. Kinetic and mechanistic investigations of the degradation of sulfamethazine in heat-activated persulfate oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yan; Ji, Yuefei; Kong, Deyang; Lu, Junhe; Zhou, Quansuo

    2015-12-30

    Sulfamethazine (SMZ) is widely used in livestock feeding and aquaculture as an antibiotic agent and growth promoter. Widespread occurrence of SMZ in surface water, groundwater, soil and sediment has been reported. In this study, degradation of SMZ by heat-activated persulfate (PS) oxidation was investigated in aqueous solution. Experimental results demonstrated that SMZ degradation followed pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics. The pseudo-first-order rate constant (kobs) was increased markedly with increasing concentration of PS and temperature. Radical scavenging tests revealed that the predominant oxidizing species was SO4·(-) with HO playing a less important role. Aniline moiety in SMZ molecule was confirmed to be the reactive site for SO4·(-) attack by comparison with substructural analogs. Nontarget natural water constituents affected SMZ removal significantly, e.g., Cl(-) and HCO3(-) improved the degradation while fulvic acid reduced it. Reaction products were enriched by solid phase extraction (SPE) and analyzed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). 6 products derived from sulfonamide S--N bond cleavage, aniline moiety oxidation and Smiles-type rearrangement were identified, and transformation pathways of SMZ oxidation were proposed. Results reveal that heat-activated PS oxidation could be an efficient approach for remediation of water contaminated by SMZ and related sulfonamides. PMID:26151383

  10. Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Sudhagar; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Togore, Sam; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

  11. GREEN CATALYZED OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS IN ALTERNATIVE SOLVENT SYSTEMS GENERATED BY PARIS II

    EPA Science Inventory

    Green Catalyzed Oxidation of Hydrocarbons in Alternative Solvent Systems Generated by PARIS II

    Michael A. Gonzalez*, Thomas M. Becker, and Paul F. Harten; Sustainable Technology Division, Office of Research and Development; United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26...

  12. Generation of pyridyl coordinated organosilicon cation pool by oxidative Si-Si bond dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Nokami, Toshiki; Soma, Ryoji; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa; Kamei, Toshiyuki; Itami, Kenichiro; Yoshida, Jun-ichi

    2007-01-01

    An organosilicon cation stabilized by intramolecular pyridyl coordination was effectively generated and accumulated by oxidative Si-Si bond dissociation of the corresponding disilane using low temperature electrolysis, and was characterized by NMR and CSI-MS. PMID:17288603

  13. Generation of pyridyl coordinated organosilicon cation pool by oxidative Si-Si bond dissociation.

    PubMed

    Nokami, Toshiki; Soma, Ryoji; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa; Kamei, Toshiyuki; Itami, Kenichiro; Yoshida, Jun-Ichi

    2007-01-01

    An organosilicon cation stabilized by intramolecular pyridyl coordination was effectively generated and accumulated by oxidative Si-Si bond dissociation of the corresponding disilane using low temperature electrolysis, and was characterized by NMR and CSI-MS. PMID:17288603

  14. GPHS (General Purpose Heat Source) uranium oxide encapsulations supporting satellite safety tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R.

    1989-04-24

    General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) simulant-fueled capsules were assembled, welded, nondestructively examined, and shipped to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for satellite safety tests. Simulant-fueled iridium capsules contain depleted uranium oxide pellets that serve as a stand-in for plutonium-238 oxide pellets. Information on forty seven capsules prepared during 1987 and 1988 is recorded in this memorandum along with a description of the processes used for encapsulation and evaluation. LANL expects to use all capsules for destructive safety tests, which are under way. Test results so far have demonstrated excellent integrity of the Savannah River capsule welds. 10 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Parametric design study of ``mini-generator`` with 6-watt heat source

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, A.; Or, C.T.

    1995-01-20

    The Fairchild study showed that generator designs based on a single 1-watt RHU had very poor thermal efficiencies. At their optimum operating point, more than half of the generated heat was lost through the thermal insulation. This resulted in system efficiency of only 2.2%, compared to 7.2% for current Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). Moreover, there were serious doubts about the fabricability of the required multicouples, particularly of the series/parallel connections between the large number (900) of thermoelectric legs of very small cross-section (0.21 mm square). All in all, the preceding paper showed that neither JPL`s Power Stick design nor the Fairchild-generated derivatives based on the 1-watt heat source looked promising. The present paper describes a similar parametric study of a mini-generator based on a 6-watt heat source, and compares its performance and fabricability to that of the optimum Power Stick derivative and of the current RTG design for the same mission. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  16. Parametric design study of ``mini-generator'' with 6-watt heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schock, Alfred; Or, Chuen T.

    1995-01-01

    The Fairchild study showed that generator designs based on a single 1-watt RHU had very poor thermal efficiencies. At their optimum operating point, more than half of the generated heat was lost through the thermal insulation. This resulted in system efficiency of only 2.2%, compared to 7.2% for current Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). Moreover, there were serious doubts about the fabricability of the required multicouples, particularly of the series/parallel connections between the large number (900) of thermoelectric legs of very small cross-section (0.21 mm square). All in all, the preceding paper showed that neither JPL's Power Stick design nor the Fairchild-generated derivatives based on the 1-watt heat source looked promising. The present paper describes a similar parametric study of a mini-generator based on a 6-watt heat source, and compares its performance and fabricability to that of the optimum Power Stick derivative and of the current RTG design for the same mission.

  17. Fabrication of superconducting metal-oxide textiles by heating impregnated polymeric material in a weakly oxidizing atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Sype, J.S.

    1993-07-13

    A process is described for producing crystalline fibers, textiles or shapes comprised of YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus]x] where x varies from about 0 to about 0.4, said process comprising: (a) impregnating a preformed organic polymeric material with three metal compounds to provide metal elements in said material in substantially the atomic ratio occurring in said YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus]x]; (b) heating said impregnated material in a weakly oxidizing atmosphere containing from about 0.05% to about 2% oxygen by volume to a temperature sufficiently high to at least partially pyrolize and oxidize said organic material and at least partially oxidize said metal compounds substantially without ignition of said organic material and without formation of a molten phase or reaching a decomposition temperature of said YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus]x]; and (c) cooling the resulting material in at least a moderately oxidizing atmosphere to room temperature so as to obtain said fibers, textiles or shapes.

  18. Do nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase contribute to the heat loss responses in older males exercising in the heat?

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Naoto; Paull, Gabrielle; Meade, Robert D; McGinn, Ryan; Stapleton, Jill M; Akbari, Pegah; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the separate and combined roles of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) in forearm sweating and cutaneous vasodilatation in older adults during intermittent exercise in the heat. Twelve healthy older (62 ± 7 years) males peformed two 30 min cycling bouts at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (400 W) in the heat (35°C, 20% relative humidity). The exercise bouts were followed by 20 and 40 min of recovery, respectively. Forearm sweat rate (ventilated capsule) and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC, laser Doppler perfusion units/mean arterial pressure) were evaluated at four skin sites that were continuously perfused via intradermal microdialysis with: (1) lactated Ringer solution (Control), (2) 10 mm ketorolac (non-selective COX inhibitor), (3) 10 mm NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; non-selective NOS inhibitor) or (4) a combination of 10 mm ketorolac + 10 mm l-NAME. Sweating was not different between the four sites during either exercise bout (main effect P = 0.92) (average of last 5 min of second exercise, Control, 0.80 ± 0.06; ketorolac, 0.77 ± 0.09; l-NAME, 0.74 ± 0.07; ketorolac + l-NAME, 0.77 ± 0.09 mg min−1 cm−2). During both exercise bouts, relative to CVC evaluated at the Control site (average of last 5 min of second exercise, 69 ± 6%max), CVC was similar at the ketorolac site (P = 0.62; 66 ± 4%max) whereas it was attenuated to a similar extent at both the l-NAME (49 ± 8%max) and ketorolac + l-NAME (54 ± 8%max) sites (both P < 0.05). Thus, we demonstrate that NOS and COX are not functionally involved in forearm sweating whereas only NOS contributes to forearm cutaneous vasodilatation in older adults during intermittent exercise in the heat. Key points Studies show that nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) are involved in sweating and cutaneous vascular regulation in young adults in a potentially interactive manner. We evaluated the

  19. Reduction in oxidatively generated DNA damage following smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is a known cause of cancer, and cancer may be in part due to effects of oxidative stress. However, whether smoking cessation reverses oxidatively induced DNA damage unclear. The current study sought to examine the extent to which three DNA lesions showed significant reductions after participants quit smoking. Methods Participants (n = 19) in this study were recruited from an ongoing 16-week smoking cessation clinical trial and provided blood samples from which leukocyte DNA was extracted and assessed for 3 DNA lesions (thymine glycol modification [d(TgpA)]; formamide breakdown of pyrimidine bases [d(TgpA)]; 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine [d(Gh)]) via liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Change in lesions over time was assessed using generalized estimating equations, controlling for gender, age, and treatment condition. Results Overall time effects for the d(TgpA) (χ2(3) = 8.068, p < 0.045), d(PfpA) (χ2(3) = 8.477, p < 0.037), and d(Gh) (χ2(3) = 37.599, p < 0.001) lesions were seen, indicating levels of each decreased significantly after CO-confirmed smoking cessation. The d(TgpA) and d(PfpA) lesions show relatively greater rebound at Week 16 compared to the d(Gh) lesion (88% of baseline for d(TgpA), 64% of baseline for d(PfpA), vs 46% of baseline for d(Gh)). Conclusions Overall, results from this analysis suggest that cigarette smoking contributes to oxidatively induced DNA damage, and that smoking cessation appears to reduce levels of specific damage markers between 30-50 percent in the short term. Future research may shed light on the broader array of oxidative damage influenced by smoking and over longer durations of abstinence, to provide further insights into mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis. PMID:21569419

  20. Exergy destruction analysis of a vortices generator in a gas liquid finned tube heat exchanger: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazikhani, M.; Khazaee, I.; Monazzam, S. M. S.; Takdehghan, H.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, the effect of using different shapes of vortices generator (VG) on a gas liquid finned heat exchanger is investigated experimentally with irreversibility analysis. In this project the ambient air with mass flow rates of 0.047-0.072 kg/s is forced across the finned tube heat exchanger. Hot water with constant flow rate of 240 L/h is circulated inside heat exchanger tubes with inlet temperature range of 45-73 °C. The tests are carried out on the flat finned heat exchanger and then repeated on the VG finned heat exchanger. The results show that using the vortex generator can decrease the ratio of air side irreversibility to heat transfer (ASIHR) of the heat exchanger. Also the results show that the IASIHR is >1.05 for all air mass flow rates, which means that ASIHR for the initial heat exchanger is higher than 5 % greater than that of improved heat exchanger.

  1. Do nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase contribute to the heat loss responses in older males exercising in the heat?

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; Paull, Gabrielle; Meade, Robert D; McGinn, Ryan; Stapleton, Jill M; Akbari, Pegah; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-07-15

    This study evaluated the separate and combined roles of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) in forearm sweating and cutaneous vasodilatation in older adults during intermittent exercise in the heat. Twelve healthy older (62 ± 7 years) males performed two 30 min cycling bouts at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (400 W) in the heat (35°C, 20% relative humidity). The exercise bouts were followed by 20 and 40 min of recovery, respectively. Forearm sweat rate (ventilated capsule) and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC, laser Doppler perfusion units/mean arterial pressure) were evaluated at four skin sites that were continuously perfused via intradermal microdialysis with: (1) lactated Ringer solution (Control), (2) 10 mm ketorolac (non-selective COX inhibitor), (3) 10 mm N(G) -nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; non-selective NOS inhibitor) or (4) a combination of 10 mm ketorolac + 10 mm l-NAME. Sweating was not different between the four sites during either exercise bout (main effect P = 0.92) (average of last 5 min of second exercise, Control, 0.80 ± 0.06; ketorolac, 0.77 ± 0.09; l-NAME, 0.74 ± 0.07; ketorolac + l-NAME, 0.77 ± 0.09 mg min(-1) cm(-2) ). During both exercise bouts, relative to CVC evaluated at the Control site (average of last 5 min of second exercise, 69 ± 6%max), CVC was similar at the ketorolac site (P = 0.62; 66 ± 4%max) whereas it was attenuated to a similar extent at both the l-NAME (49 ± 8%max) and ketorolac + l-NAME (54 ± 8%max) sites (both P < 0.05). Thus, we demonstrate that NOS and COX are not functionally involved in forearm sweating whereas only NOS contributes to forearm cutaneous vasodilatation in older adults during intermittent exercise in the heat. PMID:25820454

  2. Temperature-dependent electrochemical heat generation in a commercial lithium-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandhauer, Todd M.; Garimella, Srinivas; Fuller, Thomas F.

    2014-02-01

    Lithium-ion batteries suffer from inherent thermal limitations (i.e., capacity fade and thermal runaway); thus, it is critical to understand heat generation experienced in the batteries under normal operation. In the current study, reversible and irreversible electrochemical heat generation rates were measured experimentally on a small commercially available C/LiFePO4 lithium-ion battery designed for high-rate applications. The battery was tested over a wide range of temperatures (10-60 °C) and discharge and charge rates (∼C/4-5C) to elucidate their effects. Two samples were tested in a specially designed wind tunnel to maintain constant battery surface temperature within a maximum variation of ±0.88 °C. A data normalization technique was employed to account for the observed capacity fade, which was largest at the highest rates. The heat rate was shown to increase with both increasing rate and decreasing temperature, and the reversible heat rate was shown to be significant even at the highest rate and temperature (7.4% at 5C and 55 °C). Results from cycling the battery using a dynamic power profile also showed that constant-current data predict the dynamic performance data well. In addition, the reversible heat rate in the dynamic simulation was shown to be significant, especially for charge-depleting HEV applications.

  3. Research and Development for Thermoelectric Generation Technology Using Waste Heat from Steelmaking Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroki, Takashi; Murai, Ryota; Makino, Kazuya; Nagano, Kouji; Kajihara, Takeshi; Kaibe, Hiromasa; Hachiuma, Hirokuni; Matsuno, Hidetoshi

    2015-06-01

    In Japan, integrated steelworks have greatly lowered their energy use over the past few decades through investment in energy-efficient processes and facilities, maintaining the highest energy efficiency in the world. However, in view of energy security, the steelmaking industry is strongly required to develop new technologies for further energy saving. Waste heat recovery can be one of the key technologies to meet this requirement. To recover waste heat, particularly radiant heat from steel products which has not been used efficiently yet, thermoelectric generation (TEG) is one of the most effective technologies, being able to convert heat directly into electric power. JFE Steel Corporation (JFE) implemented a 10-kW-class grid-connected TEG system for JFE's continuous casting line with KELK Ltd. (KELK), and started verification tests to generate electric power using radiant heat from continuous casting slab at the end of fiscal year 2012. The TEG system has 56 TEG units, each containing 16 TEG modules. This paper describes the performance and durability of the TEG system, which has been investigated under various operating conditions at the continuous casting line.

  4. Self-generated Local Heating Induced Nanojoining for Room Temperature Pressureless Flexible Electronic Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Peng; Hu, Anming; Gerlich, Adrian P.; Liu, Yangai; Zhou, Y. Norman

    2015-01-01

    Metallic bonding at an interface is determined by the application of heat and/or pressure. The means by which these are applied are the most critical for joining nanoscale structures. The present study considers the feasibility of room-temperature pressureless joining of copper wires using water-based silver nanowire paste. A novel mechanism of self-generated local heating within the silver nanowire paste and copper substrate system promotes the joining of silver-to-silver and silver-to-copper without any external energy input. The localized heat energy was delivered in-situ to the interfaces to promote atomic diffusion and metallic bond formation with the bulk component temperature stays near room-temperature. This local heating effect has been detected experimentally and confirmed by calculation. The joints formed at room-temperature without pressure achieve a tensile strength of 5.7 MPa and exhibit ultra-low resistivity in the range of 101.3 nOhm·m. The good conductivity of the joint is attributed to the removal of organic compounds in the paste and metallic bonding of silver-to-copper and silver-to-silver. The water-based silver nanowire paste filler material is successfully applied to various flexible substrates for room temperature bonding. The use of chemically generated local heating may become a potential method for energy in-situ delivery at micro/nanoscale. PMID:25788019

  5. Boiling Heat Transfer in High Temperature Generator of Absorption Chiller/Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Masahiro; Enomoto, Eiichi; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko

    Heat transfer performance of forced convective boiling in high temperature generator was experimentally studied using an actual absorption chiller/heater. Measurements were made at six locations, three different levels on a couple of laterally separated lines, for the fluid rising along the rear wall of the high temperature generator furnace. Fluids tested were water and lithium bromide aqueous solution. System pressures were maintained at 96 and 24 kPa, and firing rates were changed from 100 to 40 % of the full load of the machine. Through the experiments, thermodynamic states of both of the fluids were in subcooled region at the lower and middle locations and in saturated region at the upper location. It can be suggested that saturated boiling occurs at comparatively narrow area, located at the upper zone of heat transfer surface of the generator, while forced convective heat transfer and subcooled boiling appear at the remaining broad area. Enhancement of heat transfer due to saturated boiling was not pronounced for lithium bromide aqueous solution than for water.

  6. Impact of heat treatment and oxidation of Carbon-carbon composites on microstructure and physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Sardar Sarwat

    Carbon-carbon (C/C) composites are notable among engineering materials in aerospace and defense industries possessing excellent specific mechanical, thermal, frictional and wear properties. C/C maintain their properties at temperatures where most of the high end alloys give in, and maintain their dimensional stability at temperatures above 2000 °C. C/C is frequently used in aircraft and automotive industries as brake materials. However, frictional performance is dependent on various parameters: microstructure, fiber type, fiber orientation distribution, fiber/matrix interfacial bond, heat treatment, and oxidation. The present study in dissertation provides an insight into the impact of heat treatment, and oxidation on microstructure, mechanical and thermal properties. The heat treatment (performed at 1800, 2100, 2400 °C in argon) of two-directional (2-D) pitch-fiber with charred resin carbon matrix, and three-directional (3-D) PAN-fiber with CVI carbon matrix influenced microstructure, mechanical and thermal properties. Microstructure characterized by polarized light microscopy (PLM), XRD, and Raman spectroscopy changed with increasing heat treatment temperature. The RL microstructure of 3-D C/C progressively highly organized, whereas ISO microstructure of 2-D C/C's charred resin hardly organized into an ordered structure as evident from Raman spectroscopy and Raman profiling of polished samples. Pitch-fiber organized more than the ISO microstructure of charred resin matrix. On the other, PAN-fiber became more ordered, but was organization was lower than pitch-fiber. Thermal conductivity increased for both (2-D, 3-D C/C) materials in comparison to non-heat treated (NHT) C/Cs. Thermal conductivity of oxidized samples decreased significantly than non-oxidized samples. In-plane thermal conductivity of 3-D C/C was much higher than that of 2-D C/C, and was attributed to the rough laminar (RL) microstructure of carbon matrix and continuous PAN-fiber when compared to

  7. Solid oxide fuel cell power plant having a fixed contact oxidation catalyzed section of a multi-section cathode air heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Saito, Kazuo; Lin, Yao

    2015-02-17

    The multi-section cathode air heat exchanger (102) includes at least a first heat exchanger section (104), and a fixed contact oxidation catalyzed section (126) secured adjacent each other in a stack association. Cool cathode inlet air flows through cool air channels (110) of the at least first (104) and oxidation catalyzed sections (126). Hot anode exhaust flows through hot air channels (124) of the oxidation catalyzed section (126) and is combusted therein. The combusted anode exhaust then flows through hot air channels (112) of the first section (104) of the cathode air heat exchanger (102). The cool and hot air channels (110, 112) are secured in direct heat exchange relationship with each other so that temperatures of the heat exchanger (102) do not exceed 800.degree. C. to minimize requirements for using expensive, high-temperature alloys.

  8. Some aspects of two-phase flow, heat transfer and dynamic instabilities in medium and high pressure steam generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unal, H. C.

    1981-03-01

    Experimental data for void fraction, incipient point of boiling, initial point of net vapor generation, bubble dynamics, dryout, two-phase flow pressure drop and density-wave oscillations were obtained in long, sodium heated steam generator tubes of different geometries for a wide range of operating conditions and at medium and high pressures. These data and data from literature taken in sodium and electrically heated steam generator tubes were correlated. Aspects of two-phase flow, heat transfer and density-wave oscillations in these steam generators disclosed include the distribution factor in small- and medium-size diameter steam generator tubes, the characteristic of the transitions at the incipient point of boiling and initial point of net vapor generation, bubble growth during subcooled nucleate flow boiling, the importance of the equivalent length for dryout in non-uniformly heated steam generator tubes and the mechanisms of density-wave oscillations in once-through steam generator tubes.

  9. Engineering Scoping Study of Thermoelectric Generator Systems for Industrial Waste Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, Terry; Choate, William T.

    2006-11-01

    This report evaluates thermoelectric generator (TEG) systems with the intent to: 1) examine industrial processes in order to identify and quantify industrial waste heat sources that could potentially use TEGs; 2) describe the operating environment that a TEG would encounter in selected industrial processes and quantify the anticipated TEG system performance; 3) identify cost, design and/or engineering performance requirements that will be needed for TEGs to operate in the selected industrial processes; and 4) identify the research, development and deployment needed to overcome the limitations that discourage the development and use of TEGs for recovery of industrial waste heat.

  10. Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation and Topological Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sumeet; Heister, Stephen D.; Xu, Xianfan; Salvador, James R.; Meisner, Gregory P.

    2013-06-01

    A comprehensive numerical model has been proposed to model thermoelectric generators (TEGs) for automotive waste heat recovery. Details of the model and results from the analysis of General Motors' prototype TEG were described in part I of the study. In part II of this study, parametric evaluations are considered to assess the influence of heat exchanger, geometry, and thermoelectric module configurations to achieve optimization of the baseline model. The computational tool is also adapted to model other topologies such as transverse and circular configurations (hexagonal and cylindrical) maintaining the same volume as the baseline TEG. Performance analysis of these different topologies and parameters is presented and compared with the baseline design.

  11. Degradation of toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene using heat and chelated-ferrous iron activated persulfate oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, P.; Sleep, B.

    2014-12-01

    Toluene, ethylbenze, and xylene (TEX) are common contaminants in the subsurface. Activated persulfate has shown promise for degrading a wide variety of organic compounds. However, studies of persulfate application for in situ degradation of TEX and effects on the subsequent bioremediation are limited. In this work, degradation studies of TEX in aqueous media and soil are being conducted using heat activated and chelated-ferrous iron activated persulfate oxidation in batch and flow-through column experiments. In the batch experiments, sodium persulfate is being used at different concentrations to provide an initial persulfate to TEX molar ratios between 10:1 and 100:1. Sodium persulfate solutions are being activated at 20, 37, 60, and 80 oC temperatures for the heat activated oxidation. For the chelated-ferrous iron activated oxidation, ferrous iron and citric acid, both are being used at concentration of 5 mM. In the experiments with soil slurry, a soil to water ratio of 1 to 5 is being used. Flow through water saturated column experiments are being conducted with glass columns (45 cm in length and 4 cm in diameter) uniformly packed with soils, and equilibrated with water containing TEX at the target concentrations. Both the heat activation and chelated-ferrous iron activation of persulfate are being employed in the column experiments. Future experiments are planned to determine the suitability of persulfate oxidation of TEX on the subsequent biodegradation using batch microcosms containing TEX degrading microbial cultures. In these experiments, the microbial biomass will be monitored using total phospholipids, and the microbial community will be determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) on the extracted DNA. This study is expected to provide suitable operating conditions for in situ chemical oxidation of TEX with activated persulfate followed by bioremediation.

  12. Effects of nitric oxide synthase inhibition on cutaneous vasodilation during body heating in humans.

    PubMed

    Shastry, S; Dietz, N M; Halliwill, J R; Reed, A S; Joyner, M J

    1998-09-01

    We sought to examine further the potential role of nitric oxide (NO) in the neurally mediated cutaneous vasodilation in nonacral skin during body heating in humans. Six subjects were heated with a water-perfused suit while cutaneous blood flow was measured by using laser-Doppler flowmeters placed on both forearms. The NO synthase inhibitor NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) was given selectively to one forearm via a brachial artery catheter after marked cutaneous vasodilation had been established. During body heating, oral temperature increased by 1.1 +/- 0.1 degreesC while heart rate increased by 30 +/- 6 beats/min. Mean arterial pressure stayed constant at 84 +/- 2 mmHg. In the experimental forearm, cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; laser-Doppler) decreased to 86 +/- 5% of the peak response to heating (P < 0.05 vs. pre-L-NMMA values) after L-NMMA infusion. In some subjects, L-NMMA caused CVC to fall by approximately 30%; in others, it had little impact on the cutaneous circulation. CVC in the control arm showed a similar increase with heating, then stayed constant while L-NMMA was given to the contralateral side. These results demonstrate that NO contributes modestly, but not consistently, to cutaneous vasodilation during body heating in humans. They also indicate that NO is not the only factor responsible for the dilation. PMID:9729554

  13. Optimizing electro-thermo Helds for soot oxidation using microwave heating and metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Wakeel, Haitham B.; Karim, Z. A. Abdul; Al-Kayiem, Hussain H.

    2015-04-01

    Soot is produced by incomplete combustion of various carbon-containing compounds. Soot is one of the main environmental pollutants and has become an important environmental and specific objective. To reduce soot from exhaust emission of diesel engine, a new technique is proposed and implemented by using metal inserted in the soot exposed to electromagnetic radiation. This paper presents a simulation to obtain optimum metal length and shape that give optimum electric field for attaining temperature enough for soot oxidation using microwave heating and a thin metal rod. Four cases were numerically examined to investigate the electric field and temperature distributions in a mono-mode TE10 microwave cavity having closed surfaces of perfect electric conductors. The operating frequency is 2.45 GHz, and power supply is 1500 W. The simulation methodology is coupling the absorbed electromagnetic energy with heat transfer energy. The absorbed electromagnetic energy is found from the electric field within the soot. The simulation was run using ANSYS based on finite element method. The results of the four simulation cases show that the optimum simulation is represented by case 2 where the value of electric field is 39000 V/m and heating time to arrive at the oxidation temperature (873 K) is 35 s using cylindrical metal rod of 8 mm length. It is revealed that the concept of achieving high temperature for soot oxidation by using thin metal rod inside a microwave cavity can be applied.

  14. Iron sulfide oxidation and the chemistry of acid generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Patrick J.; Yelton, Jennifer L.; Reddy, K. J.

    1988-06-01

    Acid mine drainage, produced from the oxidation of iron sulfides, often contains elevated levels of dissolved aluminum (AI), iron (Fe), and sulfate (SO4) and low pH. Understanding the interactions of these elements associated with acid mine drainage is necessary for proper solid waste management planning. Two eastern oil shales were leached using humidity cell methods. This study used a New Albany Shale (4.6 percent pyrite) and a Chattanooga Shale (1.5 percent pyrite). The leachates from the humidity cells were filtered, and the filtrates were analyzed for total concentrations of cations and anions. After correcting for significant solution species and complexes, ion activities were calculated from total concentrations. The results show that the activities of Fe3+, Fe2+, Al3+, and SO4 2- increased due to the oxidation of pyrite. Furthermore, the oxidation of pyrite resulted in a decreased pH and an increased pe+pH (redox-potential). The Fe3+ and Fe2+ activities appeared to be controlled by amorphous Fe(OH)3 solid phase above a pH of 6.0 and below pe+pH 11.0. The Fe3+, Fe2+, and SO4 2- activities reached saturation with respect to FeOHSO4 solid phase between pH 3.0 and 6.0 and below pe+pH 11.0 Below a pH of 3.0 and above a pe+pH of 11.0, Fe2+, Fe3+, and SO4 2- activities are supported by FeSO4·7H2O solid phase. Above a pH of 6.0, the Al3+ activity showed an equilibrium with amorphous Al(OH)3 solid phase. Below pH 6.0, Al3+ and SO4 2- activities are regulated by the AlOHSO4 solid phase, irrespective of pe+pH. The results of this study suggest that under oxidizing conditions with low to high leaching potential, activities of Al and Fe can be predicted on the basis of secondary mineral formation over a wide range of pH and redox. As a result, the long-term chemistry associated with disposal environments can be largely predicted (including trace elements).

  15. Heat recovery steam generator outlet temperature control system for a combined cycle power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, A.; Myers, G.A.; McCarty, W.L.; Wescott, K.R.

    1986-04-01

    This patent describes a command cycle electrical power plant including: a steam turbine and at least one set comprising a gas turbine, an afterburner and a heat recovery steam generator having an attemperator for supplying from an outlet thereof to the steam turbine superheated steam under steam turbine operating conditions requiring predetermined superheated steam temperature, flow and pressure; with the gas turbine and steam turbine each generating megawatts in accordance with a plant load demand; master control means being provided for controlling the steam turbine and the heat recovery steam generator so as to establish the steam operating conditions; the combination of: first control means responsive to the gas inlet temperature of the heat recovery steam generator and to the plant load demand for controlling the firing of the afterburner; second control means responsive to the superheated steam predetermined temperature and to superheated steam temperature from the outlet for controlling the attemperator between a closed and an open position; the first and second control means being operated concurrently to maintain the superheated steam outlet temperature while controlling the load of the gas turbine independently of the steam turbine operating conditions.

  16. A review on the generation, determination and mitigation of urban heat island.

    PubMed

    Memon, Rizwan Ahmed; Leung, Dennis Y C; Chunho, Liu

    2008-01-01

    Urban Heat Island (UHI) is considered as one of the major problems in the 21st century posed to human beings as a result of urbanization and industrialization of human civilization. The large amount of heat generated from urban structures, as they consume and re-radiate solar radiations, and from the anthropogenic heat sources are the main causes of UHI. The two heat sources increase the temperatures of an urban area as compared to its surroundings, which is known as Urban Heat Island Intensity (UHII). The problem is even worse in cities or metropolises with large population and extensive economic activities. The estimated three billion people living in the urban areas in the world are directly exposed to the problem, which will be increased significantly in the near future. Due to the severity of the problem, vast research effort has been dedicated and a wide range of literature is available for the subject. The literature available in this area includes the latest research approaches, concepts, methodologies, latest investigation tools and mitigation measures. This study was carried out to review and summarize this research area through an investigation of the most important feature of UHI. It was concluded that the heat re-radiated by the urban structures plays the most important role which should be investigated in details to study urban heating especially the UHI. It was also concluded that the future research should be focused on design and planning parameters for reducing the effects of urban heat island and ultimately living in a better environment. PMID:18572534

  17. Experiments and Simulations on a Heat Exchanger of an Automotive Exhaust Thermoelectric Generation System Under Coupling Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Yu, C. G.; Chen, S.; Wang, Y. P.; Su, C. Q.

    2014-06-01

    The present experimental and computational study investigates an exhaust gas waste heat recovery system for vehicles, using thermoelectric modules and a heat exchanger to produce electric power. It proposes a new plane heat exchanger of a thermoelectric generation (TEG) system, producing electricity from a limited hot surface area. To investigate the new plane heat exchanger, we make a coupling condition of heat-flow and flow-solid coupling analysis on it to obtain the temperature, heat, and pressure field of the heat exchanger, and compared it with the old heat exchanger. These fields couple together to solve the multi-field coupling of the flow, solid, and heat, and then the simulation result is compared with the test bench experiment of TEG, providing a theoretical and experimental basis for the present exhaust gas waste heat recovery system.

  18. Emerging Role of Nitric Oxide and Heat Shock Proteins in Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Molina, Marisa Nile; Ferder, León; Manucha, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is present in pathologies such as diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, impaired glucose tolerance, hypertension, inflammation, cardiac disease, and dyslipidemias. Population studies show that IR is multifactorial and has genetic components, such as defects in the insulin-signaling pathway (as serine phosphorylation on insulin substrate or decreased activation of signaling molecules) and RAS/MAPK-dependent pathways. IR is connected to mitochondrial dysfunction, overproduction of oxidants, accumulation of fat, and an over-activation of the renin-angiotensin system linked to the NADPH oxidase activity. In addition, nitric oxide (NO), synthesized by nitric oxide synthases (endothelial and inducible), is also associated with IR when both impaired release and reduced bioavailability of all which lead to inflammation and hypertension. However, increased NO may promote vasculoprotection. Moreover, reduced NO release induces heat shock protein 70 kDa (HSP70) expression in IR and diabetes, mediating beneficial effects against oxidative stress injury, inflammation and apoptosis. HSP70 may be used as biomarker of the chronicity of diabetes. Hsp72 (inducible protein) is linked to vascular complications with a high-fat diet by blocking inflammation signaling (cytoprotective and anti-cytotoxicity intracellular role). Elucidating the IR signaling pathways and the roles of NO and HSPs is relevant to the application of new treatments, such as heat shock and thermal therapy, nitrosylated drugs, chemical chaperones or exercise training. PMID:26694820

  19. Oxidation of chlorinated ethenes by heat-activated persulfate: kinetics and products.

    PubMed

    Waldemer, Rachel H; Tratnyek, Paul G; Johnson, Richard L; Nurmi, James T

    2007-02-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) and in situ thermal remediation (ISTR) are applicable to treatment of groundwater contaminated with chlorinated ethenes. ISCO with persulfate (S2O8(2-)) requires activation, and this can be achieved with the heat from ISTR, so there may be advantages to combining these technologies. To explore this possibility, we determined the kinetics and products of chlorinated ethene oxidation with heat-activated persulfate and compared them to the temperature dependence of other degradation pathways. The kinetics of chlorinated ethene disappearance were pseudo-first-order for 1-2 half-lives, and the resulting rate constants-measured from 30 to 70 degrees C--fit the Arrhenius equation, yielding apparent activation energies of 101 +/- 4 kJ mol(-1) for tetrachloroethene (PCE), 108 +/- 3 kJ mol(-1) for trichloroethene (TCE), 144 +/- 5 kJ mol(-1) for cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), and 141 +/- 2 kJ mol(-1) for trans-1,2-dichloroethene (trans-DCE). Chlorinated byproducts were observed, but most of the parent material was completely dechlorinated. Arrhenius parameters for hydrolysis and oxidation by persulfate or permanganate were used to calculate rates of chlorinated ethene degradation by these processes over the range of temperatures relevant to ISTR and the range of oxidant concentrations and pH relevant to ISCO. PMID:17328217

  20. Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 particles formed by oxidation of pyrite heated in an anoxic atmosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Talley, R.; Hetherington, S.; Dulong, F.

    1990-01-01

    As a follow-up to previous gas analysis experiments in which pyrite was heated to 681 K in an anoxic (oxygen starved) atmosphere, the first oxidation product, FeSO4, was studied as a bulk material. No decomposition of FeSO4 to Fe3O4 was observed in the temperature range studied. The lack of decomposition of bulk FeSO4 to Fe3O4 suggests that FeS2 oxidizes directly to Fe3O4, or that FeSO4, FeS2 and O2 react together to form Fe3O4. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetization measurements, along with magnetic hysteresis curves, show that small particles of Fe3O4 form on the pyrite surface, rather than a continuous layer of bulk Fe3O4. A working model describing the oxidation steps is presented. ?? 1990.

  1. In-vessel Zircaloy oxidation/hydrogen generation behavior during severe accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Cronenberg, A.W. )

    1990-09-01

    In-vessel Zircaloy oxidation and hydrogen generation data from various US Nuclear Regulatory Commission severe-fuel damage test programs are presented and compared, where the effects of Zircaloy melting, bundle reconfiguration, and bundle quenching by reflooding are assessed for common findings. The experiments evaluated include fuel bundles incorporating fresh and previously irradiated fuel rods, as well as control rods. Findings indicate that the extent of bundle oxidation is largely controlled by steam supply conditions and that high rates of hydrogen generation continued after melt formation and relocation. Likewise, no retardation of hydrogen generation was noted for experiments which incorporated control rods. Metallographic findings indicate extensive oxidation of once-molten Zircaloy bearing test debris. Such test results indicate no apparent limitations to Zircaloy oxidation for fuel bundles subjected to severe-accident coolant-boiloff conditions. 46 refs., 22 figs., 12 tabs.

  2. Analysis of transient thermal stress in heat-generating plates and hollow cylinders caused by sudden environmental temperature changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, G. S.; Schoeberle, D. F.; Valentin, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Analysis and solution are presented for transient thermal stresses in a free heat-generating flat plate and a free, hollow-generating cylinder as a result of sudden environmental changes. The technique used and graphical results obtained are of interest to the heat transfer industry.

  3. Multidimensional Model of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Generation-IV Supercritical Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gallaway, Tara; Antal, Steven P.; Podowski, Michael Z.

    2006-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the mechanistic modeling and theoretical/computational analysis of flow and heat transfer in future Generation-IV Supercritical Water Cooled Reactors (SCWR). The issues discussed in the paper include: the development of analytical models of the properties of supercritical water, and the application of full three-dimensional computational modeling framework to simulate fluid flow and heat transfer in SCWRs. Several results of calculations are shown, including the evaluation of water properties (density, specific heat, thermal conductivity, viscosity, and Prandtl number) near the pseudo-critical temperature for various supercritical pressures, and the CFD predictions using the NPHASE computer code. It is demonstrated that the proposed approach is very promising for future mechanistic analyses of SCWR thermal-hydraulics and safety. (authors)

  4. Time, entropy generation, and optimization in low-dissipation heat devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo Hernández, A.; Medina, A.; Roco, J. M. M.

    2015-07-01

    We present new results obtained from the Carnot-like low-dissipation model of heat devices when size- and time-constraints are taken into account, in particular those obtained from the total cycle time and the contact times of the working system with the external heat reservoirs. The influence of these constraints and of the characteristic time scale of the model on the entropy generation allows for a clear and unified interpretation of different energetic properties for both heat engines and refrigerators (REs). Some conceptual subtleties with regard to different optimization criteria, especially for REs, are discussed. So, the different status of power input, cooling power, and the unified figure of merit χ are analyzed on the basis of their absolute or local role as optimization criteria.

  5. Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell and Thermoelectric Generator for Maximum Power Output in Micro-CHP Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosendahl, L. A.; Mortensen, Paw V.; Enkeshafi, Ali A.

    2011-05-01

    One of the most obvious early market applications for thermoelectric generators (TEG) is decentralized micro combined heat and power (CHP) installations of 0.5 kWe to 5 kWe based on fuel cell technology. Through the use of TEG technology for waste heat recovery it is possible to increase the electricity production in micro-CHP systems by more than 15%, corresponding to system electrical efficiency increases of some 4 to 5 percentage points. This will make fuel cell-based micro-CHP systems very competitive and profitable and will also open opportunities in a number of other potential business and market segments which are not yet quantified. This paper quantifies a micro-CHP system based on a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and a high-performance TE generator. Based on a 3 kW fuel input, the hybrid SOFC implementation boosts electrical output from 945 W to 1085 W, with 1794 W available for heating purposes.

  6. Novel metallic alloys as phase change materials for heat storage in direct steam generation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto-Maestre, J.; Iparraguirre-Torres, I.; Velasco, Z. Amondarain; Kaltzakorta, I.; Zubieta, M. Merchan

    2016-05-01

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) is one of the key electricity production renewable energy technologies with a clear distinguishing advantage: the possibility to store the heat generated during the sunny periods, turning it into a dispatchable technology. Current CSP Plants use an intermediate Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF), thermal oil or inorganic salt, to transfer heat from the Solar Field (SF) either to the heat exchanger (HX) unit to produce high pressure steam that can be leaded to a turbine for electricity production, or to the Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system. In recent years, a novel CSP technology is attracting great interest: Direct Steam Generation (DSG). The direct use of water/steam as HTF would lead to lower investment costs for CSP Plants by the suppression of the HX unit. Moreover, water is more environmentally friendly than thermal oils or salts, not flammable and compatible with container materials (pipes, tanks). However, this technology also has some important challenges, being one of the major the need for optimized TES systems. In DSG, from the exergy point of view, optimized TES systems based on two sensible heat TES systems (for preheating of water and superheating vapour) and a latent heat TES system for the evaporation of water (around the 70% of energy) is the preferred solution. This concept has been extensively tested [1, 2, 3] using mainly NaNO3 as latent heat storage medium. Its interesting melting temperature (Tm) of 306°C, considering a driving temperature difference of 10°C, means TES charging steam conditions of 107 bar at 316°C and discharging conditions of 81bar at 296°C. The average value for the heat of fusion (ΔHf) of NaNO3 from literature data is 178 J/g [4]. The main disadvantage of inorganic salts is their very low thermal conductivity (0.5 W/m.K) requiring sophisticated heat exchanging designs. The use of high thermal conductivity eutectic metal alloys has been recently proposed [5, 6, 7] as a feasible alternative. Tms

  7. Ionic Liquids for Utilization of Waste Heat from Distributed Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Joan F. Brennecke; Mihir Sen; Edward J. Maginn; Samuel Paolucci; Mark A. Stadtherr; Peter T. Disser; Mike Zdyb

    2009-01-11

    The objective of this research project was the development of ionic liquids to capture and utilize waste heat from distributed power generation systems. Ionic Liquids (ILs) are organic salts that are liquid at room temperature and they have the potential to make fundamental and far-reaching changes in the way we use energy. In particular, the focus of this project was fundamental research on the potential use of IL/CO2 mixtures in absorption-refrigeration systems. Such systems can provide cooling by utilizing waste heat from various sources, including distributed power generation. The basic objectives of the research were to design and synthesize ILs appropriate for the task, to measure and model thermophysical properties and phase behavior of ILs and IL/CO2 mixtures, and to model the performance of IL/CO2 absorption-refrigeration systems.

  8. Heat generation and thermo-mechanical effect modeling in longitudinally diode-pumped solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhdari, Fouad; Osmani, Ismahen; Tabet, Saida

    2015-09-01

    Thermal management in solid state laser is a challenge to the high power laser industry's ability to provide continued improvements in device and system performance. In this work an investigation of heat generation and thermo-mechanical effect in a high-power Nd:YAG and Yb:YAG cylindrical-type solid state laser pumped longitudinally with different power by fibre coupled laser diode is carried out by numerical simulation based on the finite element method (FEM). Impact of the dopant concentration on the power conversion efficiency is included in the simulation. The distribution of the temperature inside the lasing material is resolute according to the thermal conductivity. The thermo-mechanical effect is explored as a function of pump power in order to determine the maximum pumping power allowed to prevent the crystal's fracture. The presented simulations are in broad agreement with analytical solutions; provided that the boundary condition of the pump induced heat generation is accurately modelled.

  9. Generation of Artificial Acoustic-Gravity Waves and Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances in HF Heating Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradipta, R.; Lee, M. C.; Cohen, J. A.; Watkins, B. J.

    2015-10-01

    We report the results of our ionospheric HF heating experiments to generate artificial acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) and traveling ionospheric disturbances (TID), which were conducted at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program facility in Gakona, Alaska. Based on the data from UHF radar, GPS total electron content, and ionosonde measurements, we found that artificial AGW/TID can be generated in ionospheric modification experiments by sinusoidally modulating the power envelope of the transmitted O-mode HF heater waves. In this case, the modulation frequency needs to be set below the characteristic Brunt-Vaisala frequency at the relevant altitudes. We avoided potential contamination from naturally-occurring AGW/TID of auroral origin by conducting the experiments during geomagnetically quiet time period. We determine that these artificial AGW/TID propagate away from the edge of the heated region with a horizontal speed of approximately 160 m/s.

  10. Numerical and experimental investigation of melting with internal heat generation within cylindrical enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Amber Shrivastava; Brian Williams; Ali S. Siahpush; Bruce Savage; John Crepeau

    2014-06-01

    There have been significant efforts by the heat transfer community to investigate the melting phenomenon of materials. These efforts have included the analytical development of equations to represent melting, numerical development of computer codes to assist in modeling the phenomena, and collection of experimental data. The understanding of the melting phenomenon has application in several areas of interest, for example, the melting of a Phase Change Material (PCM) used as a thermal storage medium as well as the melting of the fuel bundle in a nuclear power plant during an accident scenario. The objective of this research is two-fold. First a numerical investigation, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), of melting with internal heat generation for a vertical cylindrical geometry is presented. Second, to the best of authors knowledge, there are very limited number of engineering experimental results available for the case of melting with Internal Heat Generation (IHG). An experiment was performed to produce such data using resistive, or Joule, heating as the IHG mechanism. The numerical results are compared against the experimental results and showed favorable correlation. Uncertainties in the numerical and experimental analysis are discussed. Based on the numerical and experimental analysis, recommendations are made for future work.

  11. Anoxic photochemical oxidation of siderite generates molecular hydrogen and iron oxides

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J. Dongun; Yee, Nathan; Nanda, Vikas; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2013-01-01

    Photochemical reactions of minerals are underappreciated processes that can make or break chemical bonds. We report the photooxidation of siderite (FeCO3) by UV radiation to produce hydrogen gas and iron oxides via a two-photon reaction. The calculated quantum yield for the reaction suggests photooxidation of siderite would have been a significant source of molecular hydrogen for the first half of Earth’s history. Further, experimental results indicate this abiotic, photochemical process may have led to the formation of iron oxides under anoxic conditions. The reaction would have continued through the Archean to at least the early phases of the Great Oxidation Event, and provided a mechanism for oxidizing the atmosphere through the loss of hydrogen to space, while simultaneously providing a key reductant for microbial metabolism. We propose that the photochemistry of Earth-abundant minerals with wide band gaps would have potentially played a critical role in shaping the biogeochemical evolution of early Earth. PMID:23733945

  12. Dynamic behaviors of approximately ellipsoidal microbubbles photothermally generated by a graphene oxide-microheater

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Xiaobo; Zheng, Jiapeng; Li, Fengjia; Sun, Chao; Cai, Xiang; Zhu, Debin; Lei, Liang; Wu, Ting; Zhou, Bin; Evans, Julian; Chen, Ziyi

    2014-01-01

    Thermal microbubbles generally grow directly from the heater and are spherical to minimize surface tension. We demonstrate a novel type of microbubble indirectly generated from a graphene oxide-microheater. Graphene oxide's photothermal properties allowed for efficient generation of a thermal gradient field on the microscale. A series of approximately ellipsoidal microbubbles were generated on the smooth microwire based on heterogeneous nucleation. Other dynamic behaviors induced by the microheater such as constant growth, directional transport and coalescence were also investigated experimentally and theoretically. The results are not only helpful for understanding the bubble dynamics but also useful for developing novel photothermal bubble-based devices. PMID:25124694

  13. Comparison of losses and heating in generator rotors following severe supply system disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Hammons, T.J. )

    1990-12-01

    The paper examines losses and heating in rotors of large synchronous-generators following sustained stator-terminal and HV busbar L-L short-circuits at full-load and no-load, L-L-L short-circuits on a weak line which is connected to the HV generator transformer busbar with clearance at fault current zeros where the generator either remains in synchronism or falls from synchronism, and worst-case malsynchronization. Comparison s are made with negative sequence losses in solid generator rotors following these disturbances given by I{sub 2}{sup 2} t computed from detailed analysis and estimated from approximate analytical expressions for an unloaded machine.

  14. Generation of plasma rotation by ion cyclotron resonance heating in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.S.; Phillips, C.K.; White, R.; Zweben, S.; Bonoli, P.T.; Rice, J.E.; Greenwald, M.J.; deGrassie, J.

    1999-05-01

    A physical mechanism for generation of a plasma rotation and radial electric field by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is presented in a tokamak geometry. By breaking the omnigenity of resonant ion orbits, ICRH can induce a nonambipolar minor-radial transport of resonant ions. This yields a radial charge separation, a modification to radial electric field E{sub r}, and the generation of plasma rotation. It is estimated that the ICRH fast-wave power available in the present-day tokamak experiments can be large enough to give a significant modification to plasma rotation. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Evaluation Metrics for Intermediate Heat Exchangers for Next Generation Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Eung Soo Kim; Nolan Anderson

    2011-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the United States with abundant, clean, and secure energy as initiated by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct; Public Law 109-58,2005). The NGNP Project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and/or high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications.

  16. Electromagnetic Induction Heat Generation of Nano-ferrofluid and Other Stimulants for Heavy Oil Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramana, A. A.; Abdassah, D.; Rachmat, S.; Mikrajuddin, A.

    2010-10-01

    Nano-ferrofluid and graphite-fluid are proposed to be used as stimulants for heavy oil recovery processes using electromagnetic induction. The heat generation in the stimulants will be used for reducing the viscosity of heavy oil. The temperature increase of the stimulants are observed with the presence of electromagnetic induction. These increments are better compared to those of the varying concentration of salt water (brine) usually exist in the oil reservoir.

  17. Thermoelectric energy converter for generation of electricity from low-grade heat

    DOEpatents

    Jayadev, T.S.; Benson, D.K.

    1980-05-27

    A thermoelectric energy conversion device which includes a plurality of thermoelectric elements is described. A hot liquid is supplied to one side of each element and a cold liquid is supplied to the other side of each element. The thermoelectric generator may be utilized to produce power from low-grade heat sources such as ocean thermal gradients, solar ponds, and low-grade geothermal resources. (WHK)

  18. Gas-generated thermal oxidation of a coordination cluster for an anion-doped mesoporous metal oxide

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Kenji; Isobe, Shigehito; Sada, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    Central in material design of metal oxides is the increase of surface area and control of intrinsic electronic and optical properties, because of potential applications for energy storage, photocatalysis and photovoltaics. Here, we disclose a facile method, inspired by geochemical process, which gives rise to mesoporous anion-doped metal oxides. As a model system, we demonstrate that simple calcination of a multinuclear coordination cluster results in synchronic chemical reactions: thermal oxidation of Ti8O10(4-aminobenzoate)12 and generation of gases including amino-group fragments. The gas generation during the thermal oxidation of Ti8O10(4-aminobenzoate)12 creates mesoporosity in TiO2. Concurrently, nitrogen atoms contained in the gases are doped into TiO2, thus leading to the formation of mesoporous N-doped TiO2. The mesoporous N-doped TiO2 can be easily synthesized by calcination of the multinuclear coordination cluster, but shows better photocatalytic activity than the one prepared by a conventional sol-gel method. Owing to an intrinsic designability of coordination compounds, this facile synthetic will be applicable to a wide range of metal oxides and anion dopants. PMID:26681104

  19. Gas-generated thermal oxidation of a coordination cluster for an anion-doped mesoporous metal oxide.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Kenji; Isobe, Shigehito; Sada, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    Central in material design of metal oxides is the increase of surface area and control of intrinsic electronic and optical properties, because of potential applications for energy storage, photocatalysis and photovoltaics. Here, we disclose a facile method, inspired by geochemical process, which gives rise to mesoporous anion-doped metal oxides. As a model system, we demonstrate that simple calcination of a multinuclear coordination cluster results in synchronic chemical reactions: thermal oxidation of Ti8O10(4-aminobenzoate)12 and generation of gases including amino-group fragments. The gas generation during the thermal oxidation of Ti8O10(4-aminobenzoate)12 creates mesoporosity in TiO2. Concurrently, nitrogen atoms contained in the gases are doped into TiO2, thus leading to the formation of mesoporous N-doped TiO2. The mesoporous N-doped TiO2 can be easily synthesized by calcination of the multinuclear coordination cluster, but shows better photocatalytic activity than the one prepared by a conventional sol-gel method. Owing to an intrinsic designability of coordination compounds, this facile synthetic will be applicable to a wide range of metal oxides and anion dopants. PMID:26681104

  20. The effects of pre-oxidation heating rate on bio-based carbon fibers and its surface repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H.; Cheng, L. F.; Fan, S. W.; Yuan, X. W.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2015-03-01

    Low-cost carbon fibers (CFs) are fabricated from jute fibers after pre-oxidation, carbonization and surface repair. This paper investigates the effects of pre-oxidation heating rate on jute fibers, and explores a repair method for surface defects of CFs in C/C composite. The results show the reaction mechanism of jute fibers in air is not changed at higher pre-oxidation heating rates while a low heating rate is still required as the oxidation of jute fibers cannot be fully achieved under rapid heating. The tensile strength of CFs increases after repair with a 5% phenolic resin solution. Jute-based CFs play a positive role in C/C composite performance through crack bridging and deflection.

  1. On the effect of fractal generated turbulence on the heat transfer of circular impinging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astarita, Tommaso; Cafiero, Gioacchino; Discetti, Stefano

    2013-11-01

    The intense local heat transfer achieved by circular impinging jets is exploited in countless industrial applications (cooling of turbine blades, paper drying, tempering of glass and metals, etc). The heat transfer rate depends mainly on the Reynolds number, the nozzle-to-plate distance and the upstream turbulence. It is possible to enhance the heat transfer by exciting/altering the large scale structures embedded within the jet. In this work turbulent energy is injected by using a fractal grid at the nozzle exit. Fractal grids can generate more intense turbulence with respect to regular grids with the same blockage ratio by enhancing the jet turbulence over different scales. Consequently, they are expected to improve the convective heat transfer. The results outline that a significant improvement is achieved (for small nozzle-to-plate distances up to 100% at the stagnation point and more than 10% on the integral heat transfer over a circular area of 3 nozzle diameters) under the same power input.

  2. Thermal performance of plate-fin heat exchanger using passive techniques: vortex-generator and nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshvaght-Aliabadi, Morteza

    2016-04-01

    This experimental study investigates the effects of vortex-generator (VG) and Cu/water nanofluid flow on performance of plate-fin heat exchangers. The Cu/water nanofluids are produced by using a one-step method, namely electro-exploded wire technique, with four nanoparticles weight fractions (i.e. 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 %). Required properties of nanofluids are systematically measured, and empirical correlations are developed. A highly precise test loop is fabricated to obtain accurate results of the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics. Experiments are conducted for nanofluids flow inside the plain and VG channels. Based on the experimental results, utilizing the VG channel instead of the plain channel enhances the heat transfer rate, remarkably. Also, the results show that the VG channel is more effective than the nanofluid on the performance of plate-fin heat exchangers. It is observed that the combination of the two heat transfer enhancement techniques has a noticeably high thermal-hydraulic performance, about 1.67. Finally, correlations are developed to predict Nusselt number and friction factor of nanofluids flow inside the VG channel.

  3. Numerical study of heat transfer enhancement in a channel flow using an oscillating vortex generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S.-J.

    2002-04-01

    A numerical simulation is performed to study the unsteady flow and heat transfer in a channel with an oscillating bar, which is called an oscillating vortex generator. The behavior of the oscillating bar and flow is coupled, and the variation of the flow and thermal fields is classified as a moving boundary problem. An arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian kinematic description method is adopted to describe the flow and thermal fields, and a Galerkin finite element formulation with moving meshes is applied to solve the governing equations. The effects of Reynolds number, maximum oscillating speed, oscillating amplitude, and oscillating frequency of the bar on the flow and heat transfer are examined in details. The results show that the unsteady flow of transverse vortices is actively and largely formed behind the bar as the bar oscillates in the channel. The transverse vortices transport the low-temperature and high-speed core flow toward the heated regions of the channel. Also, the high-temperature wall flow is carried away from the heated regions of the channel to mix with the low-temperature core flow by transverse vortices. Based upon the fixed heat transfer area, the efficiency index is greater than 1.0 for almost all cases.

  4. Application of Carbon Nanotube Assemblies for Sound Generation and Heat Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Mikhail; Haines, Carter; Oh, Jiyoung; Lima, Marcio; Fang, Shaoli

    2011-03-01

    Nanotech approaches were explored for the efficient transformation of an electrical signal into sound, heat, cooling action, and mechanical strain. The studies are based on the aligned arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT forests) that can be grown on various substrates using a conventional CVD technique. They form a three-dimensional conductive network that possesses uncommon electrical, thermal, acoustic and mechanical properties. When heated with an alternating current or a near-IR laser modulated in 0.01--20 kHz range, the nanotube forests produce loud, audible sound. High generated sound pressure and broad frequency response (beyond 20 kHz) show that the forests act as efficient thermo-acoustic (TA) transducers. They can generate intense third and fourth TA harmonics that reveal peculiar interference-like patterns from ac-dc voltage scans. A strong dependence of the patterns on forest height can be used for characterization of carbon nanotube assemblies and for evaluation of properties of thermal interfaces. Because of good coupling with surrounding air, the forests provide excellent dissipation of heat produced by IC chips. Thermoacoustic converters based on forests can be used for thermo- and photo-acoustic sound generation, amplification and noise cancellation.

  5. Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft Using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Whyatt, Greg A.; Chick, Lawrence A.

    2012-04-01

    This report examines the potential for Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) to provide electrical generation on-board commercial aircraft. Unlike a turbine-based auxiliary power unit (APU) a solid oxide fuel cell power unit (SOFCPU) would be more efficient than using the main engine generators to generate electricity and would operate continuously during flight. The focus of this study is on more-electric aircraft which minimize bleed air extraction from the engines and instead use electrical power obtained from generators driven by the main engines to satisfy all major loads. The increased electrical generation increases the potential fuel savings obtainable through more efficient electrical generation using a SOFCPU. However, the weight added to the aircraft by the SOFCPU impacts the main engine fuel consumption which reduces the potential fuel savings. To investigate these relationships the Boeing 787­8 was used as a case study. The potential performance of the SOFCPU was determined by coupling flowsheet modeling using ChemCAD software with a stack performance algorithm. For a given stack operating condition (cell voltage, anode utilization, stack pressure, target cell exit temperature), ChemCAD software was used to determine the cathode air rate to provide stack thermal balance, the heat exchanger duties, the gross power output for a given fuel rate, the parasitic power for the anode recycle blower and net power obtained from (or required by) the compressor/expander. The SOFC is based on the Gen4 Delphi planar SOFC with assumed modifications to tailor it to this application. The size of the stack needed to satisfy the specified condition was assessed using an empirically-based algorithm. The algorithm predicts stack power density based on the pressure, inlet temperature, cell voltage and anode and cathode inlet flows and compositions. The algorithm was developed by enhancing a model for a well-established material set operating at atmospheric pressure to reflect the

  6. Cutaneous interstitial nitric oxide concentration does not increase during heat stress in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; MacLean, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    Inhibition of cutaneous nitric oxide (NO) synthase reduces the magnitude of cutaneous vasodilation during whole body heating in humans. However, this observation is insufficient to conclude that NO concentration increases in the skin during a heat stress. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that whole body heating increases cutaneous interstitial NO concentration. This was accomplished by placing 2 microdialysis membranes in the forearm dermal space of 12 subjects. Both membranes were perfused with lactated Ringer solutions at a rate of 2 microl/min. In both normothermia and during whole body heating via a water perfused suit, dialysate from these membranes were obtained and analyzed for NO using the chemiluminescence technique. In six of these subjects, after the heat stress, the membranes were perfused with a 1 M solution of acetylcholine to stimulate NO release. Dialysate from these trials was also assayed to quantify cutaneous interstitial NO concentration. Whole body heating increased skin temperature from 34.6 +/- 0.2 to 38.8 +/- 0.2 degrees C (P < 0.05), which increased sublingual temperature (36.4 +/- 0.1 to 37.6 +/- 0.1 degrees C; P < 0.05), heart rate (63 +/- 5 to 93 +/- 5 beats/min; P < 0.05), and skin blood flow over the membranes (21 +/- 4 to 88 +/- 10 perfusion units; P < 0.05). NO concentration in the dialysate did not increase significantly during of the heat stress (7.6 +/- 0.7 to 8.6 +/- 0.8 microM; P > 0.05). After the heat stress, administration of acetylcholine in the perfusate significantly increased skin blood flow (128 +/- 6 perfusion units) relative to both normothermic and heat stress values and significantly increased NO concentration in the dialysate (15.8 +/- 2.4 microM). These data suggest that whole body heating does not increase cutaneous interstitial NO concentration in forearm skin. Rather, NO may serve in a permissive role in facilitating the effects of an unknown neurotransmitter, leading to cutaneous vasodilation

  7. An assessment on convective and radiative heat transfer modelling in tubular solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, D.; Muñoz, A.; Sánchez, T.

    Four models of convective and radiative heat transfer inside tubular solid oxide fuel cells are presented in this paper, all of them applicable to multidimensional simulations. The work is aimed at assessing if it is necessary to use a very detailed and complicated model to simulate heat transfer inside this kind of device and, for those cases when simple models can be used, the errors are estimated and compared to those of the more complex models. For the convective heat transfer, two models are presented. One of them accounts for the variation of film coefficient as a function of local temperature and composition. This model gives a local value for the heat transfer coefficients and establishes the thermal entry length. The second model employs an average value of the transfer coefficient, which is applied to the whole length of the duct being studied. It is concluded that, unless there is a need to calculate local temperatures, a simple model can be used to evaluate the global performance of the cell with satisfactory accuracy. For the radiation heat transfer, two models are presented again. One of them considers radial radiation exclusively and, thus, radiative exchange between adjacent cells is neglected. On the other hand, the second model accounts for radiation in all directions but increases substantially the complexity of the problem. For this case, it is concluded that deviations between both models are higher than for convection. Actually, using a simple model can lead to a not negligible underestimation of the temperature of the cell.

  8. Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Heat Exchangers for the Mars Science Laboratory Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastropietro, A. J.; Beatty, John S.; Kelly, Frank P.; Bhandari, Pradeep; Bame, David P.; Liu, Yuanming; Birux, Gajanana C.; Miller, Jennifer R.; Pauken, Michael T.; Illsley, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    The addition of the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) to the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover requires an advanced thermal control system that is able to both recover and reject the waste heat from the MMRTG as needed in order to maintain the onboard electronics at benign temperatures despite the extreme and widely varying environmental conditions experienced both on the way to Mars and on the Martian surface. Based on the previously successful Mars landed mission thermal control schemes, a mechanically pumped fluid loop (MPFL) architecture was selected as the most robust and efficient means for meeting the MSL thermal requirements. The MSL heat recovery and rejection system (HRS) is comprised of two Freon (CFC-11) MPFLs that interact closely with one another to provide comprehensive thermal management throughout all mission phases. The first loop, called the Rover HRS (RHRS), consists of a set of pumps, thermal control valves, and heat exchangers (HXs) that enables the transport of heat from the MMRTG to the rover electronics during cold conditions or from the electronics straight to the environment for immediate heat rejection during warm conditions. The second loop, called the Cruise HRS (CHRS), is thermally coupled to the RHRS during the cruise to Mars, and provides a means for dissipating the waste heat more directly from the MMRTG as well as from both the cruise stage and rover avionics by promoting circulation to the cruise stage radiators. A multifunctional structure was developed that is capable of both collecting waste heat from the MMRTG and rejecting the waste heat to the surrounding environment. It consists of a pair of honeycomb core sandwich panels with HRS tubes bonded to both sides. Two similar HX assemblies were designed to surround the MMRTG on the aft end of the rover. Heat acquisition is accomplished on the interior (MMRTG facing) surface of each HX while heat rejection is accomplished on the exterior surface of

  9. HIGH-TEMPERATURE TUBULAR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL GENERATOR DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    S.E. Veyo

    1998-09-01

    During the Westinghouse/USDOE Cooperative Agreement period of November 1, 1990 through November 30, 1997, the Westinghouse solid oxide fuel cell has evolved from a 16 mm diameter, 50 cm length cell with a peak power of 1.27 watts/cm to the 22 mm diameter, 150 cm length dimensions of today's commercial prototype cell with a peak power of 1.40 watts/cm. Accompanying the increase in size and power density was the elimination of an expensive EVD step in the manufacturing process. Demonstrated performance of Westinghouse's tubular SOFC includes a lifetime cell test which ran for a period in excess of 69,000 hours, and a fully integrated 25 kWe-class system field test which operated for over 13,000 hours at 90% availability with less than 2% performance degradation over the entire period. Concluding the agreement period, a 100 kW SOFC system successfully passed its factory acceptance test in October 1997 and was delivered in November to its demonstration site in Westervoort, The Netherlands.

  10. Truck co-generation system based on combustion heated thermoelectric conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Meleta, Ye.A.; Yarygin, V.I.; Klepikov, V.V.; Wolff, L.R.

    1997-12-31

    Among the micro-co-generation systems using direct conversion of combustion heat into electricity (thermionic, thermoelectric converters) and fuel cells with an electric power of up to several kW, only the thermoelectric co-generation systems have a demonstrated life-time of up to 10 years. This is one of the most important factors making these systems a more likely commercialization candidate. The report deals with a conceptual design of a combustion heated thermoelectric cogeneration system to be applied in vehicles (truck, trailer, yacht, etc.). The authors named these systems the Thermoelectric Transport Co-generation Systems (TTCS). The report is concerned with one example of these systems--the Thermoelectric Truck Co-generation System (TT-kCS) designed to support the lives of both the driver and the car, when operating in the northern regions. In particular, the TT-kCS should provide the start-up of the cold engine of a truck at an ambient temperature of down to 50 C below zero and create comfortable conditions for a driver during the long-term halts and in emergency situations. The estimates made for a standard truck with an engine of 210 HP employed in Russia showed that the TT-kCS should generate {approximately}600 W of electrical power and {approximately}18 kW of heat. The report deals with two options for the thermoelectric converter design: one of them using the planar geometry of thermoelectric batteries, and the other one using a radial-cylindrical thermoelectric battery configuration. The economic feasibility of the TT-kCS application is based on a considerable reduction in fuel consumption of the TT-kCS equipped truck as compared to that of a conventional truck when the engine is idling. Another advantage is the prolongation of the engine`s service life.

  11. Heat generation caused by ablation of dental hard tissues with an ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) system.

    PubMed

    Braun, Andreas; Krillke, Raphael Franz; Frentzen, Matthias; Bourauel, Christoph; Stark, Helmut; Schelle, Florian

    2015-02-01

    Heat generation during the removal of dental hard tissues may lead to a temperature increase and cause painful sensations or damage dental tissues. The aim of this study was to assess heat generation in dental hard tissues following laser ablation using an ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) system. A total of 85 specimens of dental hard tissues were used, comprising 45 specimens of human dentine evaluating a thickness of 1, 2, and 3 mm (15 samples each) and 40 specimens of human enamel with a thickness of 1 and 2 mm (20 samples each). Ablation was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser at 1,064 nm, a pulse duration of 9 ps, and a repetition rate of 500 kHz with an average output power of 6 W. Specimens were irradiated for 0.8 s. Employing a scanner system, rectangular cavities of 1-mm edge length were generated. A temperature sensor was placed at the back of the specimens, recording the temperature during the ablation process. All measurements were made employing a heat-conductive paste without any additional cooling or spray. Heat generation during laser ablation depended on the dental hard tissue (enamel or dentine) and the thickness of the respective tissue (p < 0.05). Highest temperature increase could be observed in the 1-mm thickness group for enamel. Evaluating the 1-mm group for dentine, a significantly lower temperature increase could be measured (p < 0.05) with lowest values in the 3-mm group (p < 0.05). A time delay for temperature increase during the ablation process depending on the material thickness was observed for both hard tissues (p < 0.05). Employing the USPL system to remove dental hard tissues, heat generation has to be considered. Especially during laser ablation next to pulpal tissues, painful sensations and potential thermal injury of pulp tissue might occur. PMID:23666547

  12. rf plasma oxidation of Ni thin films sputter deposited to generate thin nickel oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoey, Megan L.; Carlson, J. B.; Osgood, R. M.; Kimball, B.; Buchwald, W.

    2010-10-01

    Nickel oxide (NiO) layers were formed on silicon (Si) substrates by plasma oxidation of nickel (Ni) film lines. This ultrathin NiO layer acted as a barrier layer to conduction, and was an integral part of a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) diode, completed by depositing gold (Au) on top of the oxide. The electrical and structural properties of the NiO thin film were examined using resistivity calculations, current-voltage (I-V) measurements and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) imaging. The flow rate of the oxygen gas, chamber pressure, power, and exposure time and their influence on the characteristics of the NiO thin film were studied.

  13. Isolation and identification of oxidation products of syringol from brines and heated meat matrix.

    PubMed

    Bölicke, Sarah-Maria; Ternes, Waldemar

    2016-08-01

    In this study we developed new extraction and detection methods (using HPLC-UV and LC-MS), making it possible to analyze the smoke phenol syringol and its oxidation products nitrososyringol, nitrosyringol, and the syringol dimer 3,3',5,5'-tetramethoxy-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diol, which were identified in heated meat for the first time. Preliminary brine experiments performed with different concentrations of ascorbic acid showed that high amounts of this antioxidant also resulted in almost complete degradation of syringol and to formation of the oxidation products when the brines were heated at low pH values. Heat treatment (80°C) and subsequent simulated digestion applied to meat samples containing syringol, ascorbic acid and different concentrations of sodium nitrite produced 3,3',5,5'-tetramethoxy-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diol even at a low nitrite level in the meat matrix, while nitroso- and nitrosyringol were isolated only after the digestion experiments. Increasing amounts of oxygen in the meat matrix decreased the syringol concentration and enhanced the formation of the reaction products in comparison to the samples without added oxygen. PMID:27085115

  14. Impact of heat and pollution on oxidative stress and CC16 secretion after 8 km run.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Elisa Couto; Stone, Vicki; Florida-James, Geraint

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the acute effect of a hot, humid and ozone-polluted (O(3)) environment on lung inflammation and oxidative tress of runners performing 8 km time trial run. Using a single-blinded randomized design, 10 male athletes (mean[Formula: see text]= 64.4 mlO(2) kg(-1) min(-1), SD = 4.4) took part in a time trial run in four different environmental conditions: 20°C + 50% relative humidity (rh) (Control); 20°C + 50% rh + 0.10 ppm O(3) (Control + O(3)); 31°C + 70% rh (Heat); 31°C + 70% rh + 0.10 ppm O(3) (Heat + O(3)). Blood samples and nasal lavage were collected post-exercise and analyzed for inflammatory, epithelial damage and oxidative stress markers. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA with Tukey's post hoc test. A significant increase in CC16 concentration (P < 0.05) and GSH/protein concentration (P < 0.05) in the upper respiratory airways was observed following the 8 km run in the Heat + O(3) trial compared with the control trial. There were no differences in the neutrophil counts between trials. No differences were observed for the other antioxidants analyzed. A hot, humid and ozone-polluted environment (0.1 ppm) elicits an early epithelial damage and antioxidant protection process in the upper respiratory airways of athletes immediately after performing 8 km time trial run. PMID:21267745

  15. Advanced Soldier Thermoelectric Power System for Power Generation from Battlefield Heat Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, Terry J.; Hogan, Tim; Case, Eldon D.; Cauchy, Charles J.

    2010-09-01

    The U.S. military uses large amounts of fuel during deployments and battlefield operations. This project sought to develop a lightweight, small form-factor, soldier-portable advanced thermoelectric (TE) system prototype to recover and convert waste heat from various deployed military equipment (i.e., diesel generators/engines, incinerators, vehicles, and potentially mobile kitchens), with the ultimate purpose of producing power for soldier battery charging, advanced capacitor charging, and other battlefield power applications. The technical approach employed microchannel technology, a unique “power panel” approach to heat exchange/TE system integration, and newly-characterized LAST (lead-antimony-silver-telluride) and LASTT (lead-antimony-silver-tin-telluride) TE materials segmented with bismuth telluride TE materials in designing a segmented-element TE power module and system. This project researched never-before-addressed system integration challenges (thermal expansion, thermal diffusion, electrical interconnection, thermal and electrical interfaces) of designing thin “power panels” consisting of alternating layers of thin, microchannel heat exchangers (hot and cold) sandwiching thin, segmented-element TE power generators. The TE properties, structurally properties, and thermal fatigue behavior of LAST and LASTT materials were developed and characterized such that the first segmented-element TE modules using LAST / LASTT materials were fabricated and tested at hot-side temperatures = 400 °C and cold-side temperatures = 40 °C. LAST / LASTT materials were successfully segmented with bismuth telluride and electrically interconnected with diffusion barrier materials and copper strapping within the module electrical circuit. A TE system design was developed to produce 1.5-1.6 kW of electrical energy using these new TE modules from the exhaust waste heat of 60-kW Tactical Quiet Generators as demonstration vehicles.

  16. Assessment of the possibilities of electricity and heat co-generation from biomass in Romania's case

    SciTech Connect

    Matei, M.

    1998-07-01

    This paper examines the use of biomass for electricity (and heat) production. The objectives of the works developed by RENEL--GSCI were to determine the Romanian potential biomass resources available in economic conditions for electricity production from biomass, to review the routes and the available equipment for power generation from biomass, to carry out a techno-economic assessment of different systems for electricity production from biomass, to identify the most suitable system for electricity and heat cogeneration from biomass, to carry out a detailed techno-economic assessment of the selected system, to perform an environmental impact assessment of the selected system and to propose a demonstration project. RENEL--GSCI (former ICEMENERG) has carried out an assessment concerning Romania's biomass potential taking into account the forestry and wood processing wastes (in the near term) and agricultural wastes (in mid term) as well as managing plantations (in the long term). Comparative techno-economical evaluation of biomass based systems for decentralized power generation was made. The cost analysis of electricity produced from biomass has indicated that the system based on boiler and steam turbine of 2,000 kW running on wood-wastes is the most economical. A location for a demonstration project with low cost financing possibilities and maximum benefits was searched. To mitigate the electricity cost it was necessary to find a location in which the fuel price is quite low, so that the low yield of small installation can be balanced. In order to demonstrate the performances of a system which uses biomass for electricity and heat generation, a pulp and paper mill which needed electricity and heat, and, had large amount of wood wastes from industrial process was found as the most suitable location. A technical and economical analysis for 8 systems for electricity production from bark and wood waste was performed.

  17. RELAP5-3D Modeling of Heat Transfer Components (Intermediate Heat Exchanger and Helical-Coil Steam Generator) for NGNP Application

    SciTech Connect

    N. A. Anderson; P. Sabharwall

    2014-01-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant project is aimed at the research and development of a helium-cooled high-temperature gas reactor that could generate both electricity and process heat for the production of hydrogen. The heat from the high-temperature primary loop must be transferred via an intermediate heat exchanger to a secondary loop. Using RELAP5-3D, a model was developed for two of the heat exchanger options a printed-circuit heat exchanger and a helical-coil steam generator. The RELAP5-3D models were used to simulate an exponential decrease in pressure over a 20 second period. The results of this loss of coolant analysis indicate that heat is initially transferred from the primary loop to the secondary loop, but after the decrease in pressure in the primary loop the heat is transferred from the secondary loop to the primary loop. A high-temperature gas reactor model should be developed and connected to the heat transfer component to simulate other transients.

  18. ELF/VLF wave generation from the beating of two HF ionospheric heating sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. B.; Moore, R. C.; Golkowski, M.; Lehtinen, N. G.

    2012-12-01

    It is well established that Extremely Low Frequency (ELF, 0.3-3 kHz) and Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) radio waves can be generated via modulated High Frequency (HF, 3-10 MHz) heating of the lower ionosphere (60-100 km). The ionospheric absorption of HF power modifies the conductivity of the lower ionosphere, which in the presence of natural currents such as the auroral electrojet, creates an `antenna in the sky.' We utilize a theoretical model of the HF to ELF/VLF conversion and the ELF/VLF propagation, and calculate the amplitudes of the generated ELF/VLF waves when two HF heating waves, separated by the ELF/VLF frequency, are transmitted from two adjacent locations. The resulting ELF/VLF radiation pattern exhibits a strong directional dependence (as much as 15 dB) that depends on the physical spacing of the two HF sources. This beat wave source can produce signals 10-20 dB stronger than those generated using amplitude modulation, particularly for frequencies greater than 5-10 kHz. We evaluate recent suggestions that beating two HF waves generates ELF/VLF waves in the F-region (>150 km), and conclude that those experimental results may have misinterpreted, and can be explained strictly by the much more well established D region mechanism.

  19. Generation of Electron Suprathermal Tails in the Upper Solar Atmosphere: Implications for Coronal Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinas, Adolfo F.; Wong, Hung K.; Klimas, Alexander J.

    1999-01-01

    We present a mechanism for the generation of non-Maxwellian electron distribution function in the upper regions of the solar atmosphere in the presence of collisional damping. It is suggested that finite amplitude, low frequency, obliquely propagating electromagnetic waves can carry a substantial electric field component parallel to the mean magnetic field that can be significantly larger than the Dreicer electric field. This long wavelength electric fluctuation is capable of generating high frequency electron plasma oscillations and low frequency ion acoustic-like waves. The analysis has been performed using 1-1/2D Vlasov and PIC numerical simulations in which both electrons and ions are treated kinetically and self consistently. The simulation results indicate that high frequency electron plasma oscillations and low frequency ion acoustic-like waves are generated. The high frequency electron plasma oscillation drives electron plasma turbulence, which subsequently is damped out by the background electrons. The turbulence damping results in electron acceleration and the generation of non-Maxwellian suprathermal tails on time scales short compared to collisional damping. Bulk heating also occurs if the fluctuating parallel electric field is strong enough. This study suggests that finite amplitude, low frequency, obliquely propagating, electromagnetic waves can play a significant role in the acceleration and heating of the solar corona electrons and in the coupling of medium and small-scale phenomena.

  20. Mechanisms for generation of oxide trapped charges in ultrathin silicon dioxide films during electrical stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Piyas

    2008-02-01

    Charge trapping characteristics of ultrathin silicon dioxide (SiO2) films during constant voltage stress (CVS) in direct tunneling regime have been presented. Both bulk and border traps have been segregated from oxide trapped charges. Our measurement results indicate that electron trapping in as fabricated traps in ultrathin samples was suppressed and/or absent during prolonged stress. In addition, the generation kinetics of "border" and "bulk" trapped positive oxide charges have been studied. From the bulk oxide charge relaxation experiments, nature of as-fabricated intrinsic hole traps in SiO2 has been determined. Our results show that both bulk and border trapped positive oxide charges are mostly contributed by proton related species possibly the [Si2dbnd OH]+ centers. Based on experimental observations, a physical model of stress-induced bulk positive charge generation/trapping has been proposed.

  1. DOS-HEATING6: A general conduction code with nuclear heat generation derived from DOT-IV transport calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.L.; Yuecel, A.; Nadkarny, S.

    1988-05-01

    The HEATING6 heat conduction code is modified to (a) read the multigroup particle fluxes from a two-dimensional DOT-IV neutron- photon transport calculation, (b) interpolate the fluxes from the DOT-IV variable (optional) mesh to the HEATING6 control volume mesh, and (c) fold the interpolated fluxes with kerma factors to obtain a nuclear heating source for the heat conduction equation. The modified HEATING6 is placed as a module in the ORNL discrete ordinates system (DOS), and has been renamed DOS-HEATING6. DOS-HEATING6 provides the capability for determining temperature distributions due to nuclear heating in complex, multi-dimensional systems. All of the original capabilities of HEATING6 are retained for the nuclear heating calculation; e.g., generalized boundary conditions (convective, radiative, finned, fixed temperature or heat flux), temperature and space dependent thermal properties, steady-state or transient analysis, general geometry description, etc. The numerical techniques used in the code are reviewed and the user input instructions and JCL to perform DOS-HEATING6 calculations are presented. Finally a sample problem involving coupled DOT-IV and DOS-HEATING6 calculations of a complex space-reactor configurations described, and the input and output of the calculations are listed. 10 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Effect of thermal radiation and suction on convective heat transfer of nanofluid along a wedge in the presence of heat generation/absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasmani, Ruhaila Md; Sivasankaran, S.; Bhuvaneswari, M.; Siri, Zailan

    2015-10-01

    An analysis is presented to find the effects of thermal radiation and heat generation/absorption on convection heat transfer of nanofluid past a wedge in the presence of wall suction. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations using similarity transformation. The resulting system is solved numerically using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta method with shooting technique. Numerical computations are carried out for different values of dimensionless parameters to predict the effects of wedge angle, thermophoresis, Brownian motion, heat generation/absorption, thermal radiation and suction. It is found that the temperature increases significantly when the value of the heat generation/absorption parameter increases. But the opposite observation is found for the effect of thermal radiation.

  3. Effect of thermal radiation and suction on convective heat transfer of nanofluid along a wedge in the presence of heat generation/absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Kasmani, Ruhaila Md; Bhuvaneswari, M.; Sivasankaran, S.; Siri, Zailan

    2015-10-22

    An analysis is presented to find the effects of thermal radiation and heat generation/absorption on convection heat transfer of nanofluid past a wedge in the presence of wall suction. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations using similarity transformation. The resulting system is solved numerically using a fourth-order Runge–Kutta method with shooting technique. Numerical computations are carried out for different values of dimensionless parameters to predict the effects of wedge angle, thermophoresis, Brownian motion, heat generation/absorption, thermal radiation and suction. It is found that the temperature increases significantly when the value of the heat generation/absorption parameter increases. But the opposite observation is found for the effect of thermal radiation.

  4. Generation of reactive oxidative species from thermal treatment of sugar solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingyang; Durand, Erwann; Elias, Ryan J; Tikekar, Rohan V

    2016-04-01

    Sugars, prominently fructose, have been shown to accelerate the degradation of food components during thermal treatment. Yet, the mechanism by which this occurs is not well understood. Fructose and glucose have been reported to undergo autoxidation to generate reactive oxidative species (ROS) under physiological conditions; however, information on ROS generation during thermal treatment is limited. We observed that hydrogen peroxide was generated during thermal treatment (up to 70 °C) of aqueous solutions of fructose and glucose (up to 10% w/v), with significantly higher concentrations observed in fructose solutions. The rate of generation of hydrogen peroxide increased with temperature, pH, oxygen concentration and the presence of phosphate buffer. Singlet oxygen was also detected in fructose and glucose solutions prepared in phosphate buffer. Results of this study indicated that fructose and glucose undergo oxidation during thermal treatment resulting in generation of ROS that may have deleterious effects on food components. PMID:26593495

  5. Application of program generation technology in solving heat and flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Shui; Wu, Bangxian; Chen, Ningning

    2007-05-01

    Based on a new DIY concept for software development, an automatic program-generating technology attached on a software system called as Finite Element Program Generator (FEPG) provides a platform of developing programs, through which a scientific researcher can submit his special physico-mathematical problem to the system in a more direct and convenient way for solution. For solving flow and heat problems by using finite element method, the stabilization technologies and fraction-step methods are adopted to overcome the numerical difficulties caused mainly due to the dominated convection. A couple of benchmark problems are given in this paper as examples to illustrate the usage and the superiority of the automatic program generation technique, including the flow in a lid-driven cavity, the starting flow in a circular pipe, the natural convection in a square cavity, and the flow past a circular cylinder, etc. They are also shown as the verification of the algorithms.

  6. Study of a small heat and power PEM fuel cell system generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Charles-Emile; Achard, Patrick; Metkemeijer, Rudolf

    A micro-cogenerator based on a natural gas reformer and a PEMFC is studied in its entirety, pointing out the links between different sub-systems. The study is conducted within the EPACOP project, which aims at testing PEMFC systems on user sites to evaluate development and acceptance of this technology for small stationary applications. Five units were installed from November 2002 to May 2003 and have been operated until now, in real life conditions. They deliver up to 4 kW of AC power and about 6 kW of heat. Center for Energy and Processes (CEP), one of the scientific partners, processes and analyses the experimental data from the five units, running in different regions of France. This database and the study of the flowsheet enable to propose changes to enhance the efficiency of the system composed of a steam reforming, a shift and a preferential oxidation reactor, a fuel cell stack and heat exchangers. The steady state modelling and optimisation of the system is done with Thermoptim ®, a software developed within CEP for applied thermodynamics. At constant power, main targets are to decrease natural gas consumption, to increase heat recovery and to improve the water balance. This study is made using the pinch point analysis, at full load and partial load. Main results of this study are different system configurations that allow improvement of gross electrical and thermal efficiency and enable to obtain a positive water balance.

  7. Surface oxide net charge of a titanium alloy: comparison between effects of treatment with heat or radiofrequency plasma glow discharge.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Daniel E; Rapuano, Bruce E; Schniepp, Hannes C

    2011-01-01

    In the current study, we have compared the effects of heat and radiofrequency plasma glow discharge (RFGD) treatment of a Ti6Al4V alloy on the physico-chemical properties of the alloy's surface oxide. Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) disks were passivated alone, heated to 600 °C, or RFGD plasma treated in pure oxygen. RFGD treatment did not alter the roughness, topography, elemental composition or thickness of the alloy's surface oxide layer. In contrast, heat treatment altered oxide topography by creating a pattern of oxide elevations approximately 50-100 nm in diameter. These nanostructures exhibited a three-fold increase in roughness compared to untreated surfaces when RMS roughness was calculated after applying a spatial high-pass filter with a 200 nm-cutoff wavelength. Heat treatment also produced a surface enrichment in aluminum and vanadium oxides. Both RFGD and heat treatment produced similar increases in oxide wettability. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of metal surface oxide net charge signified by a long-range force of attraction to or repulsion from a (negatively charged) silicon nitride AFM probe were also obtained for all three experimental groups. Force measurements showed that the RFGD-treated Ti6Al4V samples demonstrated a higher net positive surface charge at pH values below 6 and a higher net negative surface charge at physiological pH (pH values between 7 and 8) compared to control and heat-treated samples. These findings suggest that RFGD treatment of metallic implant materials can be used to study the role of negatively charged surface oxide functional groups in protein bioactivity, osteogenic cell behavior and osseointegration independently of oxide topography. PMID:20880672

  8. Surface Oxide Net Charge of a Titanium Alloy; Comparison Between Effects of Treatment With Heat or Radiofrequency Plasma Glow Discharge

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Daniel E.; Rapuano, Bruce E.; Schniepp, Hannes C.

    2010-01-01

    In the current study, we have compared the effects of heat and radiofrequency plasma glow discharge (RFGD) treatment of a Ti6Al4V alloy on the physico-chemical properties of the alloy’s surface oxide. Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) disks were passivated alone, heated to 600 °C, or RFGD plasma treated in pure oxygen. RFGD treatment did not alter the roughness, topography, elemental composition or thickness of the alloy’s surface oxide layer. In contrast, heat treatment altered oxide topography by creating a pattern of oxide elevations approximately 50–100 nm in diameter. These nanostructures exhibited a three-fold increase in roughness compared to untreated surfaces when RMS roughness was calculated after applying a spatial high-pass filter with a 200 nm cutoff wavelength. Heat treatment also produced a surface enrichment in aluminum and vanadium oxides. Both RFGD and heat treatment produced similar increases in oxide wettability. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of metal surface oxide net charge signified by a long range force of attraction to or repulsion from a (negatively charged) silicon nitride AFM probe were also obtained for all three experimental groups. Force measurements showed that the RFGD-treated Ti6Al4V samples demonstrated a higher net positive surface charge at pH values below 6 and a higher net negative surface charge at physiological pH (pH values between 7 and 8) compared to control and heat-treated samples These findings suggest that RFGD treatment of metallic implant materials can be used to study the role of negatively charged surface oxide functional groups in protein bioactivity, osteogenic cell behavior and osseointegration independently of oxide topography. PMID:20880672

  9. Heat transfer enhancement by a multilobe vortex generator in internally finned tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Y.Y.; Leu, S.W.

    1999-04-01

    A three-dimensional computational method is employed to study the flow and heat transfer in internally finned tubes with a multilobe vortex generator inserted. Governing equations are discretized using the finite volume method. The irregular lobe geometry is treated using curvilinear nonstaggered grids. The linear interpolation method is adopted to calculate face velocities. The results show that secondary flows induced by the lobes are transformed to become axial vortices downstream of the vortex generator. As a consequence of the transport by the vortex flow, the core flow is moved to the fins and the tube wall, while the wall flow moves to the core. In this way, both heat transfer and flow mixing are enhanced. When the fin height is increased, the axial vortex is more restricted in the centerline region, and the strength of the vortex flow, represented by circulation, is decreased. In turn, the total pressure loss is also decreased. However, the heat transfer increases with fin height. Consequently, efficiency is greatly promoted.

  10. Irreversibilities and efficiency at maximum power of heat engines: the illustrative case of a thermoelectric generator.

    PubMed

    Apertet, Y; Ouerdane, H; Goupil, C; Lecoeur, Ph

    2012-03-01

    Energy conversion efficiency at maximum output power, which embodies the essential characteristics of heat engines, is the main focus of the present work. The so-called Curzon and Ahlborn efficiency η(CA) is commonly believed to be an absolute reference for real heat engines; however, a different but general expression for the case of stochastic heat engines, η(SS), was recently found and then extended to low-dissipation engines. The discrepancy between η(CA) and η(SS) is here analyzed considering different irreversibility sources of heat engines, of both internal and external types. To this end, we choose a thermoelectric generator operating in the strong-coupling regime as a physical system to qualitatively and quantitatively study the impact of the nature of irreversibility on the efficiency at maximum output power. In the limit of pure external dissipation, we obtain η(CA), while η(SS) corresponds to the case of pure internal dissipation. A continuous transition between from one extreme to the other, which may be operated by tuning the different sources of irreversibility, also is evidenced. PMID:22587047

  11. Kinetic Model of Coronal Hole Protons Undergoing Turbulent Stochastic Heating and Quasilinear Wave Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isenberg, P. A.; Vasquez, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    We have constructed a kinetic model of coronal hole protons heated in the directions perpendicular to the magnetic field according to the turbulent stochastic heating mechanism of Chandran et al. The kinetic heating is modeled by a proton diffusion in v_perp. The protons additionally respond to the coronal hole forces of gravity, charge-separation electric field, and the mirror force as described in our previous kinetic guiding-center models. We have further extended this kinetic model to include wave growth and damping by the anisotropic protons through the quasilinear cyclotron-resonant interaction. We solve the coupled equations for the kinetic proton behavior and for the self-consistent development of ion-cyclotron wave spectra propagating within 60˚ of the magnetic field direction. We seek to obtain a steady-state solution, showing the evolution of the proton distribution and the wave spectra with increasing heliocentric radial position due to the combined effects of heating, resonant scattering coupled to the wave generation, and the kinetic response to the large-scale forces of the inhomogeneous coronal hole. We will report on our results and the implications for the measurements to be made by the Solar Probe Plus mission.

  12. Silver nanoparticles induced heat shock protein 70, oxidative stress and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Posgai, Ryan; Gorey, Timothy J.; Nielsen, Mark; Hussain, Saber M.; Rowe, John J.

    2010-02-01

    Due to the intensive commercial application of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs), risk assessment of this nanoparticle is of great importance. Our previous in vitro study demonstrated that Ag NPs caused DNA damage and apoptosis in mouse embryonic stem cells and fibroblasts. However, toxicity of Ag NPs in vivo is largely lacking. This study was undertaken to examine the toxic effects of well-characterized polysaccharide coated 10 nm Ag NPs on heat shock stress, oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Third instar larvae of D. melanogaster were fed a diet of standard cornmeal media mixed with Ag NPs at the concentrations of 50 and 100 mug/ml for 24 and 48 h. Ag NPs up-regulated the expression of heat shock protein 70 and induced oxidative stress in D. melanogaster. Malondialdehyde level, an end product of lipid peroxidation was significantly higher while antioxidant glutathione content was significantly lower in Ag NPs exposed organisms. Activities of antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase and catalase were also significantly higher in the organisms exposed to Ag NPs. Furthermore, Ag NPs up-regulated the cell cycle checkpoint p53 and cell signaling protein p38 that are involved in the DNA damage repair pathway. Moreover, activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9, markers of apoptosis were significantly higher in Ag NPs exposed organisms. The results indicate that Ag NPs in D. melanogaster induce heat shock stress, oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis. This study suggests that the organism is stressed and thus warrants more careful assessment of Ag NPs using in vivo models to determine if chronic exposure presents developmental and reproductive toxicity.

  13. Influence of Heat Treatment Conditions on the Properties of Vanadium Oxide Thin Films for Thermochromic Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donguk; Kwon, Samyoung; Park, Young; Boo, Jin-Hyo; Nam, Sang-Hun; Joo, Yang Tae; Kim, Minha; Lee, Jaehyeong

    2016-05-01

    In present work, the effects of the heat treatment on the structural, optical, and thermochromic properties of vanadium oxide films were investigated. Vanadium dioxide (VO2) thin films were deposited on glass substrate by reactive pulsed DC magnetron sputtering from a vanadium metal target in mixture atmosphere of argon and oxygen gas. Various heat treatment conditions were applied in order to evaluate their influence on the crystal phases formed, surface morphology, and optical properties. The films were characterized by an X-ray diffraction (XRD) in order to investigate the crystal structure and identify the phase change as post-annealing temperature of 500-600 degrees C for 5 minutes. Surface conditions of the obtained VO2(M) films were analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and the semiconductor-metal transition (SMT) characteristics of the VO2 films were evaluate by optical spectrophotometry in the UV-VIS-NIR, controlling temperature of the films. PMID:27483853

  14. Facile synthesis of graphene oxide-modified lithium hydroxide for low-temperature chemical heat storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xixian; Huang, Hongyu; Wang, Zhihui; Kubota, Mitsuhiro; He, Zhaohong; Kobayashi, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    LiOH·H2O nanoparticles supported on graphene oxide (GO) were facilely synthesized by a hydrothermal process. The mean diameter of nanoparticles on the integrated graphene sheet was about 5-10 nm showed by SEM and TEM results. XRD results suggested that the nanoparticles are in good agreement with the data of LiOH·H2O. The as-prepared sample showed a greatly enhanced thermal energy storage density and exhibit higher rate of heat release than pure lithium hydroxide, and thermal conductivity of composites increased due to the introduction of nano carbon. LiOH·H2O/GO nanocomposites are novel chemical heat storage materials for potential highly efficient energy system.

  15. Transport phenomena in solid oxide fuel cell electrodes focusing on heat transfer related to chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navasa, M.; Andersson, M.; Yuan, J.; Sundén, B.

    2012-11-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are widely studied for their advantages especially at high temperatures. However, operating at high temperatures represents a high cost due to the strict requirements the materials are expected to fulfill. Thus, the main goal in SOFC research has been to decrease the operating temperature so that the range of available materials is widened and hence, the operating cost can be reduced. In this paper, the different heat sources that contribute to the cell energy balance are presented with strong emphasis on the chemical reactions that take place in SOFCs. The knowledge of which heat sources or sinks taking place and their locations within the SOFC can provide useful information for further design and efficiency improvements.

  16. Alternating magnetic field heat behaviors of PVDF fibrous mats filled with iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinu; Choi, Jung-Su; Yang, Heejae; Ko, Frank K.; Kim, Ki Hyeon

    2016-05-01

    To study the magnetic heat behaviors, iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) fibrous mats filled with IONPs were prepared by using coprecipitaion method and the electrospinning technique. The synthesized IONPs exhibited a magnetization of about 72 emu/g with average diameter of about 10 nm. The magnetizations of PVDF fibrous mats filled with IONPs showed 2.6 emu/g, 5.5 emu/g and 9.9 emu/g for 5 wt.%, 10 wt.% and 20 wt.% IONPs concentration, respectively. The heat of the magnetic fibrous mats were measured under various alternating magnetic fields (90, 128, and 167 Oe), frequencies (190, 250 and 355 kHz). The maximum saturated temperature showed up to 62 °C for 20 wt.% IONPs filled in PVDF fibrous mat under 167 Oe and 355 kHz.

  17. In situ growth of silver nanoparticles on TEMPO-oxidized jute fibers by microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinwang; Ding, Bin; Yu, Jianyong; Al-Deyab, Salem S

    2013-01-30

    Cellulose fibers deposited with metallic nanoparticles as one kind of renewable, biocompatible and antimicrobial nanomaterials evoke much interest because of their versatility in various applications. Herein, for the first time, a facile, simple and rapid method was developed to fabricate TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical) selectively oxidized jute fibers in situ deposited with silver nanoparticles in the absence of reducing reagents. The average size of silver nanoparticles deposited on the fibers is 50.0 ± 2.0 nm by microwave heating for 5 min and 90.0 ± 4.7 nm for 10 min heating sample, respectively. The versatile jute-silver nanoparticles nanocomposites with superior thermal stability and high crystallinity would be particularly useful for applications in the public health care and biomedical fields. PMID:23218337

  18. Generation of oxidative stress in human cutaneous models following in vitro ozone exposure.

    PubMed

    Cotovio, J; Onno, L; Justine, P; Lamure, S; Catroux, P

    2001-01-01

    Ozone, one of the main components of photochemical smog, represents an important source of environmental oxidative stress. The skin, being the outermost barrier of the body, is directly exposed to environmental oxidant toxicants. Skin sebum and cellular plasma membrane lipids contain polyunsaturated fatty acids which are primary targets for ozone and free radical attack induced lipid peroxides. These ozonation processes in skin can also generate aldehydes, hydroxyhydroperoxides and specific Criegee's ozonides. In order to evaluate in vitro human skin susceptibility to ozone, we have exposed cultured immortalized human keratinocytes (DK7-NR) and the reconstructed human epidermis Episkin to 10 ppm of ozone in a specific incubator. We measured the formation of protein carbonyls by an ELISA method and monitored the oxidative stress using the fluorogenic probe 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin-diacetate (DCFH-DA). Results showed a time-dependent increase of fluorescence levels (linked to oxidative stress) in both models exposed to ozone. Using this protocol, we investigated the protective potential of different products including vitamin C, a thiol derivative and a plant extract. All products dramatically reduced oxidative responses during ozone exposure. Decreases observed in fluorescence levels were between 60 and 90% as compared to non-protected controls. These results demonstrate: (a) cutaneous in vitro models are remarkably susceptible to oxidative stress generated by an environmental air pollutant as ozone, and (b) raw antioxidants, thiols and vitamin C were efficient products to prevent ozone induced cellular oxidative damage. PMID:11566563

  19. Generation of free radical intermediates from foreign compounds by neutrophil-derived oxidants.

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanaraman, B; Sohnle, P G

    1985-01-01

    A large number of foreign compounds, including many drugs, industrial pollutants, and environmental chemicals, can be oxidized under appropriate conditions to potentially toxic free radical intermediates. We evaluated the ability of the oxidants produced by the neutrophil myeloperoxidase system to generate free radical intermediates from several such compounds. Sodium hypochlorite or hypochlorous acid produced by human peripheral blood neutrophils and trapped in the form of taurine chloramine were both found to be capable of producing free radicals from chlorpromazine, aminopyrine, and phenylhydrazine. These radical intermediates were demonstrated by visible light spectroscopy and by direct electron spin resonance (for the chlorpromazine and aminopyrine radicals) or by spin-trapping (for the phenyl radical generated from phenylhydrazine). Stable oxidants produced by the neutrophils (i.e., those present in the supernatants of stimulated neutrophils in the absence of added taurine) also were found to be capable of generating free radical intermediates. The production of the oxidants and the ability of neutrophil supernatants to generate these radicals were almost completely eliminated by sodium azide, a myeloperoxidase inhibitor. We suggest that the oxidation by neutrophils of certain chemical compounds to potentially damaging electrophilic free radical forms may represent a new metabolic pathway for these substances and could be important in the processes of drug toxicity and chemical carcinogenesis. PMID:2987307

  20. Solid oxide fuel cell generator with removable modular fuel cell stack configurations

    DOEpatents

    Gillett, J.E.; Dederer, J.T.; Zafred, P.R.; Collie, J.C.

    1998-04-21

    A high temperature solid oxide fuel cell generator produces electrical power from oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel gases such as natural gas, or conditioned fuel gases, such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen, with oxidant gases, such as air or oxygen. This electrochemical reaction occurs in a plurality of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells bundled and arrayed in a unitary modular fuel cell stack disposed in a compartment in the generator container. The use of a unitary modular fuel cell stack in a generator is similar in concept to that of a removable battery. The fuel cell stack is provided in a pre-assembled self-supporting configuration where the fuel cells are mounted to a common structural base having surrounding side walls defining a chamber. Associated generator equipment may also be mounted to the fuel cell stack configuration to be integral therewith, such as a fuel and oxidant supply and distribution systems, fuel reformation systems, fuel cell support systems, combustion, exhaust and spent fuel recirculation systems, and the like. The pre-assembled self-supporting fuel cell stack arrangement allows for easier assembly, installation, maintenance, better structural support and longer life of the fuel cells contained in the fuel cell stack. 8 figs.

  1. Solid oxide fuel cell generator with removable modular fuel cell stack configurations

    DOEpatents

    Gillett, James E.; Dederer, Jeffrey T.; Zafred, Paolo R.; Collie, Jeffrey C.

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature solid oxide fuel cell generator produces electrical power from oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel gases such as natural gas, or conditioned fuel gases, such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen, with oxidant gases, such as air or oxygen. This electrochemical reaction occurs in a plurality of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells bundled and arrayed in a unitary modular fuel cell stack disposed in a compartment in the generator container. The use of a unitary modular fuel cell stack in a generator is similar in concept to that of a removable battery. The fuel cell stack is provided in a pre-assembled self-supporting configuration where the fuel cells are mounted to a common structural base having surrounding side walls defining a chamber. Associated generator equipment may also be mounted to the fuel cell stack configuration to be integral therewith, such as a fuel and oxidant supply and distribution systems, fuel reformation systems, fuel cell support systems, combustion, exhaust and spent fuel recirculation systems, and the like. The pre-assembled self-supporting fuel cell stack arrangement allows for easier assembly, installation, maintenance, better structural support and longer life of the fuel cells contained in the fuel cell stack.

  2. Enhanced thermal conductivity by aggregation in heat transfer nanofluids containing metal oxide nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wensel, Jesse; Wright, Brian; Thomas, Dustin; Douglas, Wayne; Mannhalter, Bert; Cross, William; Hong, Haiping; Kellar, Jon; Smith, Pauline; Roy, Walter

    2008-01-01

    An approximately 10% increase in the thermal conductivity (TC) of heat transfer nanofluids containing metal oxide nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes has been determined with very low percentage loading (around 0.02wt%) of these two nanomaterials. These fluids are very stable and the viscosity remains approximately the same as water. A possible explanation for these interesting results is the aggregation of metal oxide particles on the surface of nanotubes by electrostatic attraction and form the aggregation chain along the nanotube. Time dependant magnetic results demonstrate that, under the influence of a strong outside magnetic field, the TC value decreases. Also, the TC value decreases when the pH is shifted from 7 to 11.45.

  3. Heat removal from high temperature tubular solid oxide fuel cells utilizing product gas from coal gasifiers.

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, W. J. ,

    2003-01-01

    In this work we describe the results of a computer study used to investigate the practicality of several heat exchanger configurations that could be used to extract heat from tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) . Two SOFC feed gas compositions were used in this study. They represent product gases from two different coal gasifier designs from the Zero Emission Coal study at Los Alamos National Laboratory . Both plant designs rely on the efficient use of the heat produced by the SOFCs . Both feed streams are relatively rich in hydrogen with a very small hydrocarbon content . One feed stream has a significant carbon monoxide content with a bit less hydrogen . Since neither stream has a significant hydrocarbon content, the common use of the endothermic reforming reaction to reduce the process heat is not possible for these feed streams . The process, the method, the computer code, and the results are presented as well as a discussion of the pros and cons of each configuration for each process .

  4. Damp and dry heat degradation of thermal oxide passivation of p+ silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Andrew; Gardner, Matthew; McIntosh, Keith; Shalav, Avi; Bullock, James

    2014-03-01

    Thermal SiO2 passivates both moderately and heavily doped silicon surfaces irrespective of the dopant type, which is advantageous in high-efficiency solar cell designs. Commercial photovoltaic cells are submitted to accelerated ageing tests, such as damp-heat exposure, to ensure they maintain their performance for at least 20 yr. We find damp-heat exposure causes a severe and rapid degradation of thermal SiO2 passivation on p+ silicon surfaces. The reaction is so severe that the diffused-region recombination in the degraded state is limited by the diffusion of minority carriers to the Si-SiO2 interface not the density of interface defects Dit. Certainly, this effect renders the thermal-oxide passivation useless if employed on a solar cell. To study the cause of the degradation, we also test the effects of storage in dry heat and room ambient conditions. Examination of the rate of degradation in the tested storage conditions in comparison with modelled diffusion of moisture in SiO2, we find a significant correlation between the time dependent J0e and moisture supplied to the interface, leading us to the conclusion that moisture ingression and subsequent reaction at the SiO2-Si interface are the cause of both damp-heat and room- ambient degradation.

  5. Low effective activation energies for oxygen release from metal oxides: evidence for mass-transfer limits at high heating rates.

    PubMed

    Jian, Guoqiang; Zhou, Lei; Piekiel, Nicholas W; Zachariah, Michael R

    2014-06-01

    Oxygen release from metal oxides at high temperatures is relevant to many thermally activated chemical processes, including chemical-looping combustion, solar thermochemical cycles and energetic thermite reactions. In this study, we evaluated the thermal decomposition of nanosized metal oxides under rapid heating (~10(5) K s(-1)) with time-resolved mass spectrometry. We found that the effective activation-energy values that were obtained using the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa isoconversional method are much lower than the values found at low heating rates, indicating that oxygen transport might be rate-determining at a high heating rate. PMID:24619858

  6. Characterization and oxidation behavior of NiCoCrAlY coating fabricated by electrophoretic deposition and vacuum heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiming; Qian, Shiqiang; Wang, Wei

    2011-03-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) was showed to be a feasible and convenient method to fabricate NiCoCrAlY coatings on nickel based supperalloys. The microstructure and composition of the NiCoCrAlY coatings after vacuum heat treatment were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX). Isothermal-oxidation test was performed at 1100 °C in static air for 100 h. The results show that the major phases in electrophoretic deposited and vacuum heat treated NiCoCrAlY coating are γ-Ni and γ‧-Ni3Al phases, also there is an extremely small quantity of Al2O3 in the coating. Composition fluctuations occur in the coating and a certain amount of titanium diffuse from the superalloy substrate to the top of the coating during vacuum heat treatment. The oxidation test results exhibit that the oxidation kinetics of this coating has two typical stages. The protective oxide layer is mainly formed in the initial linear growth stage and then the oxide layer hinders further oxidation of the coating in the subsequent parabolic growth stage. The coating can effectively protect the superalloy substrate from oxidation. A certain amount of rutile TiO2 is formed in the coating during oxidation and it is adverse to the oxidation resistance of the coating.

  7. Size-dependant heating rates of iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales-Weimuller, Marcela; Zeisberger, Matthias; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-01-01

    Using the thermal decomposition of organometallics method we have synthesized high-quality, iron oxide nanoparticles of tailorable size up to ~15nm and transferred them to a water phase by coating with a biocompatible polymer. The magnetic behavior of these particles was measured and fit to a log-normal distribution using the Chantrell method and their polydispersity was confirmed to be very narrow. By performing calorimetry measurements with these monodisperse particles we have unambiguously demonstrated, for the first time, that at a given frequency, heating rates of superparamagnetic particles are dependent on particle size, in agreement with earlier theoretical predictions. PMID:26405373

  8. An experimental study of catalytic and non-catalytic reaction in heat recirculating reactors and applications to power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jeongmin

    An experimental study of the performance of a Swiss roll heat exchanger and reactor was conducted, with emphasis on the extinction limits and comparison of results with and without Pt catalyst. At Re<40, the catalyst was required to sustain reaction; with the catalyst self-sustaining reaction could be obtained at Re less than 1. Both lean and rich extinction limits were extended with the catalyst, though rich limits were extended much further. At low Re, the lean extinction limit was rich of stoichiometric and rich limit had equivalence ratios 80 in some cases. Non-catalytic reaction generally occurred in a flameless mode near the center of the reactor. With or without catalyst, for sufficiently robust conditions, a visible flame would propagate out of the center, but this flame could only be re-centered with catalyst. Gas chromatography indicated that at low Re, CO and non-C3 H8 hydrocarbons did not form. For higher Re, catalytic limits were slightly broader but had much lower limit temperatures. At sufficiently high Re, catalytic and gas-phase limits merged. Experiments with titanium Swiss rolls have demonstrated reducing wall thermal conductivity and thickness leads to lower heat losses and therefore increases operating temperatures and extends flammability limits. By use of Pt catalysts, reaction of propane-air mixtures at temperatures 54°C was sustained. Such low temperatures suggest that polymers may be employed as a reactor material. A polyimide reactor was built and survived prolonged testing at temperatures up to 500°C. Polymer reactors may prove more practical for microscale devices due to their lower thermal conductivity and ease of manufacturing. Since the ultimate goal of current efforts is to develop combustion driven power generation devices at MEMS like scales, a thermally self-sustaining miniature power generation device was developed utilizing a single-chamber solid-oxide-fuel-cell (SOFC) placed in a Swiss roll. With the single-chamber design

  9. Development of Design Criteria for Fluid Induced Structural Vibration in Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Catton, Ivan; Dhir, Vijay K.; Alquaddoomi, O.S.; Mitra, Deepanjan; Adinolfi, Pierangelo

    2004-03-26

    OAK-B135 Flow-induced vibration in heat exchangers has been a major cause of concern in the nuclear industry for several decades. Many incidents of failure of heat exchangers due to apparent flow-induced vibration have been reported through the USNRC incident reporting system. Almost all heat exchangers have to deal with this problem during their operation. The phenomenon has been studied since the 1970s and the database of experimental studies on flow-induced vibration is constantly updated with new findings and improved design criteria for heat exchangers. In the nuclear industry, steam generators are often affected by this problem. However, flow-induced vibration is not limited to nuclear power plants, but to any type of heat exchanger used in many industrial applications such as chemical processing, refrigeration and air conditioning. Specifically, shell and tube type heat exchangers experience flow-induced vibration due to the high velocity flow over the tube banks. Flow-induced vibration in these heat exchangers leads to equipment breakdown and hence expensive repair and process shutdown. The goal of this research is to provide accurate measurements that can help modelers to validate their models using the measured experimental parameters and thereby develop better design criteria for avoiding fluid-elastic instability in heat exchangers. The research is divided between two primary experimental efforts, the first conducted using water alone (single phase) and the second using a mixture of air or steam and water as the working fluid (two phase). The outline of this report is as follows: After the introduction to fluid-elastic instability, the experimental apparatus constructed to conduct the experiments is described in Chapter 2 along with the measurement procedures. Chapter 3 presents results obtained on the tube array and the flow loop, as well as techniques used in data processing. The project performance is described and evaluated in Chapter 4 followed by

  10. Heat generation caused by ablation of dental restorative materials with an ultra short pulse laser (USPL) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Andreas; Wehry, Richard; Brede, Olivier; Frentzen, Matthias; Schelle, Florian

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess heat generation in dental restoration materials following laser ablation using an Ultra Short Pulse Laser (USPL) system. Specimens of phosphate cement (PC), ceramic (CE) and composite (C) were used. Ablation was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser at 1064 nm and a pulse length of 8 ps. Heat generation during laser ablation depended on the thickness of the restoration material. A time delay for temperature increase was observed in the PC and C group. Employing the USPL system for removal of restorative materials, heat generation has to be considered.

  11. Development of a High-Performance Fin-and-Tube Heat Exchanger with Vortex Generators for a Vending Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Masamichi; Saito, Hiroshi; Mochizuki, Sadanari; Murata, Akira

    The effect of delta-wing-vortex generators (combination of a delta wing and a delta winglet pair) on the heat transfer performance of fin-and-tube heat exchangers for vending machines has been investegated. Flow visualizations, numerical simulations and heat transfer experiments were conducted to find an optimum geometrical shape and arrangement of the vortex generators. Maximum heat transfer enhancement was achieved by the combination of (a) the delta wing with the apex angle of 86 degrees and (b) the delta winglet pair with the inline angle of 45 degrees. In relatively low Reynolds number range, about 40 % increase in heat transfer coefficient was attained with the above mentioned combination of the vortex generators compared to the ordinary heat exchangers with plain fins. It was revealed that the heat transfer enhancement was attributed to (1) the longitudinal vortexes generated by the delta wing and (2) the reduction of wake area behind the tube. It was also found that an increase in the apex angle of the delta wing brought about heat transfer enhancement, and the scale as well as the streggth of the induced longitudinal vortices played an important role in the heat transfer performance.

  12. Perpendicular heating of electrons by upper hybrid waves generated by a ring distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. S.; Menietti, J. D.; Wong, H. K.

    1990-01-01

    Satellite observations of electron conical distributions with enhanced fluxes just outside the loss cone suggest that telectrons have been heated perpendicularly to the magnetic field in the mid-altitude polar magnetosphere. To understand electron conical distributions, plasma simulations are conducted to examine an upper hybrid wave instability of a ring electron distribution perpendicular to the magnetic field in a cold electron background. The simulations indicate that both the cold and ring distributions are heated perpendicularly during the saturation stage. From the plasma data, a ring distribution can be identified as a trapped distribution function with an enhancement near 90-deg pitch angle in the phase space density plot. It is suggested that the ring distribution might provide an additional free energy source for generating upper hybrid waves associated with electron conical events.

  13. Generation of energetic electrons at second harmonic cyclotron resonance in ionospheric HF heating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Rubinraut, M.

    2005-10-01

    The theory of electron acceleration by upper hybrid waves at second harmonic cyclotron resonance is presented. The results show that the meter-scale upper hybrid waves can incorporate the finite Larmour radius effect to make a second harmonic cyclotron resonance interaction effective. The finite Larmour radius effect provides a positive feedback to the interaction, thus the energies of the accelerated electrons increase in time exponentially, rather than linearly as in the case of fundamental cyclotron resonance. Consequently, energetic electrons (having energies larger than 10.7 eV) can be generated even at very low upper hybrid wave intensities. The threshold field for parametric excitation of meter-scale upper hybrid waves by O-mode HF heating wave is shown to be very low. The theory can be a reasonable basis for explaining the enhancement of airglow at 777.4 nm observed in recent low-heating-power experiment at HAARP.

  14. A study of cloud-generated radiative heating and its generation of available potential energy. I - Theoretical background. II - Results for a climatological zonal mean January

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhlmann, R.; Smith, G. L.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of radiative heating and cooling by clouds on the available potential energy (APE) is theoretically discussed. It is shown that the cloud radiative contribution to the generation of APE is determined by the net cloud radiative heating and the efficiency factor, which is a function of the temperature distribution of the atmosphere. Results are presented for low and middle cloud effects for three atmospheric layers. Cloud radiative heating is found to be a single function of cloud optical thickness for all classes designed in terms of cloud top heights and optical thickness. Low clouds at low latitudes destroy APE an midclouds generate APE. A concept is developed to relate the cloud radiative heating to cloud heights and optical depths. Cloud-generated radiative heating is computed for January zonal mean conditions for low and midclouds. For both cases, the strongest influence is found in the low troposphere, with marked differences in signs and magnitudes. At extratropical latitudes, both cloud classes generate net radiative cooling. In the tropics, the effect of low cloud changes from net cooling to the net heating as the optical thickness increases, and midclouds cause net heating. A mechanism is described whereby this dependence produces a strong positive feedback effect on the development of SST anomalies in the tropical oceans.

  15. Characterization of Elevated Temperature Properties of Heat Exchanger and Steam Generator Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    J.K. Wright; L.J. Carroll; J.K. Benz; J.A. Simpson; R.N. Wright; W.R. Lloyd; J.A. Chapman

    2010-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant project is considering Alloy 800H and Alloy 617 for steam generator and intermediate heat exchangers. It is envisioned that a steam generator would operate with reactor outlet temperatures from 750 to 800°C, while an intermediate heat exchanger for primary to secondary helium would operate up to an outlet temperature of 950°C. Although both alloys are of interest due in part to their technical maturity, a number of specific properties require further characterization for design of nuclear components. Strain rate sensitivity of both alloys has been characterized and is found to be significant above 600°C. Both alloys also exhibit dynamic strain aging, characterized by serrated flow, over a wide range of temperatures and strain rates. In general dynamic strain aging is observed to begin at higher temperatures and serrated flow persists to higher temperatures in Alloy 617 compared to Alloy 800H. Dynamic strain aging is a concern for these materials since it is observed to result in reduced ductility for many solid solution alloys. The role of dynamic strain aging in the creep-fatigue behavior of Alloy 617 at temperatures of 800°C and above has also been examined in detail. Serrated flow is found to persist in cyclic stress-strain curves up to nearly the cycle to failure in some temperature and strain regimes. Results of those experiments and implications for creep-fatigue testing protocols will be described.

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF ELEVATED TEMPERATURE PROPERTIES OF HEAT EXCHANGER AND STEAM GENERATOR ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    J.K. Wright; L.J. Carroll; C.J. Cabet; T. Lillo; J.K. Benz; J.A. Simpson; A. Chapman; R.N. Wright

    2012-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant project is considering Alloy 800H and Alloy 617 for steam generator and intermediate heat exchangers. It is envisioned that a steam generator would operate with reactor outlet temperatures from 750 to 800 C, while an intermediate heat exchanger for primary to secondary helium would operate up to an outlet temperature of 950 C. Although both alloys are of interest due in part to their technical maturity, a number of specific properties require further characterization for design of nuclear components. Strain rate sensitivity of both alloys has been characterized and is found to be significant above 600 C. Both alloys also exhibit dynamic strain aging, characterized by serrated flow, over a wide range of temperatures and strain rates. High temperature tensile testing of Alloy 617 has been conducted over a range of temperatures. Dynamic strain aging is a concern for these materials since it is observed to result in reduced ductility for many solid solution alloys. Creep, fatigue, and creep-fatigue properties of Alloy 617 have been measured as well, with the goal of determining the influence of the temperature, strain rate and atmosphere on the creep fatigue life of Alloy 617. Elevated temperature properties and implications for codification of the alloys will be described.

  17. Magnetic heating properties and neutron activation of tungsten-oxide coated biocompatible FePt core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Seemann, K M; Luysberg, M; Révay, Z; Kudejova, P; Sanz, B; Cassinelli, N; Loidl, A; Ilicic, K; Multhoff, G; Schmid, T E

    2015-01-10

    Magnetic nanoparticles are highly desirable for biomedical research and treatment of cancer especially when combined with hyperthermia. The efficacy of nanoparticle-based therapies could be improved by generating radioactive nanoparticles with a convenient decay time and which simultaneously have the capability to be used for locally confined heating. The core-shell morphology of such novel nanoparticles presented in this work involves a polysilico-tungstate molecule of the polyoxometalate family as a precursor coating material, which transforms into an amorphous tungsten oxide coating upon annealing of the FePt core-shell nanoparticles. The content of tungsten atoms in the nanoparticle shell is neutron activated using cold neutrons at the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRMII) neutron facility and thereby transformed into the radioisotope W-187. The sizeable natural abundance of 28% for the W-186 precursor isotope, a radiopharmaceutically advantageous gamma-beta ratio of γβ≈30% and a range of approximately 1mm in biological tissue for the 1.3MeV β-radiation are promising features of the nanoparticles' potential for cancer therapy. Moreover, a high temperature annealing treatment enhances the magnetic moment of nanoparticles in such a way that a magnetic heating effect of several degrees Celsius in liquid suspension - a prerequisite for hyperthermia treatment of cancer - was observed. A rise in temperature of approximately 3°C in aqueous suspension is shown for a moderate nanoparticle concentration of 0.5mg/ml after 15min in an 831kHz high-frequency alternating magnetic field of 250Gauss field strength (25mT). The biocompatibility based on a low cytotoxicity in the non-neutron-activated state in combination with the hydrophilic nature of the tungsten oxide shell makes the coated magnetic FePt nanoparticles ideal candidates for advanced radiopharmaceutical applications. PMID:25445697

  18. Potential vertical movement of large heat-generating waste packages in salt.

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Daniel James; Martinez, Mario J.; Hardin, Ernest L.

    2013-05-01

    With renewed interest in disposal of heat-generating waste in bedded or domal salt formations, scoping analyses were conducted to estimate rates of waste package vertical movement. Vertical movement is found to result from thermal expansion, from upward creep or heave of the near-field salt, and from downward buoyant forces on the waste package. A two-pronged analysis approach was used, with thermal-mechanical creep modeling, and coupled thermal-viscous flow modeling. The thermal-mechanical approach used well-studied salt constitutive models, while the thermal-viscous approach represented the salt as a highly viscous fluid. The Sierra suite of coupled simulation codes was used for both approaches. The waste package in all simulations was a right-circular cylinder with the density of steel, in horizontal orientation. A time-decaying heat generation function was used to represent commercial spent fuel with typical burnup and 50-year age. Results from the thermal-mechanical base case showed approximately 27 cm initial uplift of the package, followed by gradual relaxation closely following the calculated temperature history. A similar displacement history was obtained with the package density set equal to that of salt. The slight difference in these runs is attributable to buoyant displacement (sinking) and is on the order of 1 mm in 2,000 years. Without heat generation the displacement stabilizes at a fraction of millimeter after a few hundred years. Results from thermal-viscous model were similar, except that the rate of sinking was constant after cooldown, at approximately 0.15 mm per 1,000 yr. In summary, all calculations showed vertical movement on the order of 1 mm or less in 2,000 yr, including calculations using well-established constitutive models for temperature-dependent salt deformation. Based on this finding, displacement of waste packages in a salt repository is not a significant repository performance issue.

  19. Effect of irrigation and stainless steel drills on dental implant bed heat generation.

    PubMed

    Bullon, B; Bueno, E F; Herrero, M; Fernandez-Palacin, A; Rios, J V; Bullon, P; Gil, F J

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is assessing the influence of the use of different drill types and external irrigation on heat generation in the bone. In-vitro study to compare two different sequences for implant-bed preparation by means of two stainless steels: precipitation-hardening stainless steel (AISI 420B) (K drills), and martensitic stainless steel (AISI 440) (S drills). Besides, the drilled sequences were realized without irrigation, and with external irrigation by means of normal saline solution at room temperature. The study was realized on bovine ribs using: K without irrigation (KSI) and with irrigation (KCI) and S without irrigation (SSI) and with irrigation (SCI) with five drills for each system. Each drill was used 100 times. Bone temperature was measured with a thermocouple immediately after drilled. Average bone temperature with irrigation was for K drills 17.58±3.32 °C and for S drills 16.66±1.30 °C. Average bone temperature without irrigation was for K drills 23.58±2.94 °C and for S drills 19.41±2.27 °C. Statistically significant differences were found between K without irrigation versus S with irrigation and K with irrigation (p<0.05, Bonferroni correction). Lower temperature variation coefficient throughout the 50 measurements was observed in irrigated groups (K=5.6%, S=5.1% vs. without irrigation groups K=9.4%, S=9.3%). The first K drill generated more heat than the remaining drills. No significant differences were detected among temperature values in any of the analyzed drill groups. Unlike irrigation, drill use and type were observed to have no significant impact on heat generation. The stainless steel AISI 420B presents better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance than AISI440. PMID:25631272

  20. Targeting tumor hypoxia with the epigenetic anticancer agent, RRx-001: a superagonist of nitric oxide generation.

    PubMed

    Fens, Marcel H; Cabrales, Pedro; Scicinski, Jan; Larkin, Sandra K; Suh, Jung H; Kuypers, Frans A; Oronsky, Neil; Lybeck, Michelle; Oronsky, Arnold; Oronsky, Bryan

    2016-08-01

    This study reveals a novel interaction between deoxyhemoglobin, nitrite and the non-toxic compound, RRx-001, to generate supraphysiologic levels of nitric oxide (NO) in blood. We characterize the nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin, which in the presence of bound RRx-001 reduces nitrite at a much faster rate, leading to markedly increased NO generation. These data expand on the paradigm that hemoglobin generates NO via nitrite reduction during hypoxia and ischemia when nitric oxide synthase (NOS) function is limited. Here, we demonstrate that RRx-001 greatly enhances NO generation from nitrite reduction. RRx-001 is thus the first example of a functional superagonist for nitrite reductase. We hypothesize that physiologically this reaction releases the potentially cytotoxic effector NO selectively in hypoxic tumor regions. It may be that a binary NO-H2O2 trigger is indirectly responsible for the observed tumoricidal activity of RRx-001 since NO is known to inhibit mitochondrial respiration. PMID:27377482

  1. Wheat cultivars differing in heat tolerance show a differential response to oxidative stress during monocarpic senescence under high temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Khanna-Chopra, Renu; Chauhan, Shakti

    2015-09-01

    Wheat crop may experience heat stress during post-anthesis phase associated with oxidative stress, enhanced senescence, and reduced productivity. Stay green is a desirable character for the selection for heat tolerance in wheat. In the present study, antioxidant metabolism was studied under post-anthesis heat stress in field during monocarpic senescence by comparing two wheat genotypes, namely Hindi62 (heat tolerant and delayed senescent) and PBW343 (heat susceptible and early senescent). Hindi62 exhibited lesser oxidative stress, membrane damage, and coordinated antioxidant defense as compared to PBW343 under heat stress during post-anthesis stage. Higher activity of SOD, CAT, APX, GR, and MDHAR under heat stress contributed towards delayed senescence in Hindi62 compared to PBW343. GSH/GSSG ratio was also maintained at higher level in Hindi62 under heat stress compared to PBW343 during senescence. Hence, the present study clearly shows that upregulated level of the total antioxidant capacity during grain development contributed towards delayed senescence and heat tolerance in Hindi62 compared to the heat-susceptible PBW343. PMID:25586109

  2. Aluminum/ammonia heat pipe gas generation and long term system impact for the Space Telescope's Wide Field Planetary Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    In the Space Telescope's Wide Field Planetary Camera (WFPC) project, eight heat pipes (HPs) are used to remove heat from the camera's inner electronic sensors to the spacecraft's outer, cold radiator surface. For proper device functioning and maximization of the signal-to-noise ratios, the Charge Coupled Devices (CCD's) must be maintained at -95 C or lower. Thermoelectric coolers (TEC's) cool the CCD's, and heat pipes deliver each TEC's nominal six to eight watts of heat to the space radiator, which reaches an equilibrium temperature between -15 C to -70 C. An initial problem was related to the difficulty to produce gas-free aluminum/ammonia heat pipes. An investigation was, therefore, conducted to determine the cause of the gas generation and the impact of this gas on CCD cooling. In order to study the effect of gas slugs in the WFPC system, a separate HP was made. Attention is given to fabrication, testing, and heat pipe gas generation chemistry studies.

  3. Improved efficiency of heat generation in nonlinear dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rácz, J; de Châtel, P F; Szabó, I A; Szunyogh, L; Nándori, I

    2016-01-01

    The deterministic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation has been used to investigate the nonlinear dynamics of magnetization and the specific loss power in magnetic nanoparticles with uniaxial anisotropy driven by a rotating magnetic field. We propose a new type of applied field, which is "simultaneously rotating and alternating," i.e., the direction of the rotating external field changes periodically. We show that a more efficient heat generation by magnetic nanoparticles is possible with this new type of applied field and we suggest its possible experimental realization in cancer therapy which requires the enhancement of loss energies. PMID:26871122

  4. The analysis of a reactive hydromagnetic internal heat generating poiseuille fluid flow through a channel.

    PubMed

    Hassan, A R; Maritz, R

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the analysis of a reactive hydromagnetic Poiseuille fluid flow under different chemical kinetics through a channel in the presence of a heat source is carried out. An exothermic reaction is assumed while the concentration of the material is neglected. The Adomian decomposition method together with Pade approximation technique are used to obtain the solutions of the governing nonlinear non-dimensional differential equations. Effects of various physical parameters on the velocity and temperature fields of the fluid flow are investigated. The entropy generation analysis, irreversibility distribution ratio, Bejan number and the conditions for thermal criticality for different chemical kinetics are also presented. PMID:27563527

  5. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative - Projected Linear Heat Generation Rate and Burnup Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Richard G. Ambrosek; Gray S. Chang; Debbie J. Utterbeck

    2005-02-01

    This report provides documentation of the physics analysis performed to determine the linear heat generation rate (LHGR) and burnup calculations for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) tests, AFC-1D, AFC-1H, and AFC-1G. The AFC-1D and AFC-1H tests consists of low-fertile metallic fuel compositions and the AFC-1G test consists of non-fertile and low-fertile nitride compositions. These tests will be irradiated in the East Flux Trap (EFT) positions E1, E2, and E3, respectively, during Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycle 135B.

  6. Improved efficiency of heat generation in nonlinear dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rácz, J.; de Châtel, P. F.; Szabó, I. A.; Szunyogh, L.; Nándori, I.

    2016-01-01

    The deterministic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation has been used to investigate the nonlinear dynamics of magnetization and the specific loss power in magnetic nanoparticles with uniaxial anisotropy driven by a rotating magnetic field. We propose a new type of applied field, which is "simultaneously rotating and alternating," i.e., the direction of the rotating external field changes periodically. We show that a more efficient heat generation by magnetic nanoparticles is possible with this new type of applied field and we suggest its possible experimental realization in cancer therapy which requires the enhancement of loss energies.

  7. Electron-beam-induced deposition and post-treatment processes to locally generate clean titanium oxide nanostructures on Si(100).

    PubMed

    Schirmer, M; Walz, M-M; Vollnhals, F; Lukasczyk, T; Sandmann, A; Chen, C; Steinrück, H-P; Marbach, H

    2011-02-25

    We have investigated the lithographic generation of TiO(x) nanostructures on Si(100) via electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and local Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). In addition, the fabricated nanostructures were also characterized ex situ via atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient conditions. In EBID, a highly focused electron beam is used to locally decompose precursor molecules and thereby to generate a deposit. A drawback of this nanofabrication technique is the unintended deposition of material in the vicinity of the impact position of the primary electron beam due to so-called proximity effects. Herein, we present a post-treatment procedure to deplete the unintended deposits by moderate sputtering after the deposition process. Moreover, we were able to observe the formation of pure titanium oxide nanocrystals (<100 nm) in situ upon heating the sample in a well-defined oxygen atmosphere. While the nanocrystal growth for the as-deposited structures also occurs in the surroundings of the irradiated area due to proximity effects, it is limited to the pre-defined regions, if the sample was sputtered before heating the sample under oxygen atmosphere. The described two-step post-treatment procedure after EBID presents a new pathway for the fabrication of clean localized nanostructures. PMID:21242619

  8. Electron-beam-induced deposition and post-treatment processes to locally generate clean titanium oxide nanostructures on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.; Walz, M.-M.; Vollnhals, F.; Lukasczyk, T.; Sandmann, A.; Chen, C.; Steinrück, H.-P.; Marbach, H.

    2011-02-01

    We have investigated the lithographic generation of TiOx nanostructures on Si(100) via electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and local Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). In addition, the fabricated nanostructures were also characterized ex situ via atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient conditions. In EBID, a highly focused electron beam is used to locally decompose precursor molecules and thereby to generate a deposit. A drawback of this nanofabrication technique is the unintended deposition of material in the vicinity of the impact position of the primary electron beam due to so-called proximity effects. Herein, we present a post-treatment procedure to deplete the unintended deposits by moderate sputtering after the deposition process. Moreover, we were able to observe the formation of pure titanium oxide nanocrystals (<100 nm) in situ upon heating the sample in a well-defined oxygen atmosphere. While the nanocrystal growth for the as-deposited structures also occurs in the surroundings of the irradiated area due to proximity effects, it is limited to the pre-defined regions, if the sample was sputtered before heating the sample under oxygen atmosphere. The described two-step post-treatment procedure after EBID presents a new pathway for the fabrication of clean localized nanostructures.

  9. Development of a water boil-off spent-fuel calorimeter system. [To measure decay heat generation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Creer, J.M.; Shupe, J.W. Jr.

    1981-05-01

    A calorimeter system was developed to measure decay heat generation rates of unmodified spent fuel assemblies from commercial nuclear reactors. The system was designed, fabricated, and successfully tested using the following specifications: capacity of one BWR or PWR spent fuel assembly; decay heat generation range 0.1 to 2.5 kW; measurement time of < 12 h; and an accuracy of +-10% or better. The system was acceptance tested using a dc reference heater to simulate spent fuel assembly heat generation rates. Results of these tests indicated that the system could be used to measure heat generation rates between 0.5 and 2.5 kW within +- 5%. Measurements of heat generation rates of approx. 0.1 kW were obtained within +- 15%. The calorimeter system has the potential to permit measurements of heat generation rates of spent fuel assemblies and other devices in the 12- to 14-kW range. Results of calorimetry of a Turkey Point spent fuel assembly indicated that the assembly was generating approx. 1.55 kW.

  10. Overexpression of heat shock protein 70 and its relationship to intestine under acute heat stress in broilers: 2. Intestinal oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Gu, X H; Hao, Y; Wang, X L

    2012-04-01

    Oxidative stress injury is one important factor in intestinal mucosal barrier damage. Expression of heat shock protein (HSP)70 is an endogenous mechanism by which living cells adapt to stress. This study was undertaken to investigate the protective effects of HSP70 on intestinal oxidative stress. Two hundred and forty broilers were injected intraperitoneally with HSP70 inducer l-(1)-glutamine or with the inhibitor quercetin. Twenty-four hours later, they were heat stressed for 0, 2, 3, 5, and 10 h, respectively, at 36 ± 1°C. The l-(1)-glutamine significantly increased HSP70 expression (P < 0.001). At 2 h or 3 h of heat stress, the HSP70 expression obviously elevated (P < 0.001). Levels of corticosterone and the heterophil:lymphocyte ratio significantly increased when HSP70 expression was inhibited (P < 0.0001). Serum corticosterone was negatively correlated with the HSP70 expression at 3 h of heat stress (P = 0.0015; R = -0.6537). Heat shock protein 70 significantly protected the integrity of the intestinal mucosa from heat stress, with significantly decreased lactic dehydrogenase when HSP70 expression was enhanced (P < 0.001). In addition, heat-stress time significantly affected the lactic dehydrogenase release (P < 0.001). Furthermore, HSP70 significantly elevated antioxidant enzyme activities (such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and total antioxidant capacity) and inhibited lipid peroxidation to relieve intestinal mucosal oxidative injury (P < 0.001). These results suggest that HSP70 is capable of protecting the intestinal mucosa from heat-stress injury by improving antioxidant capacity of broilers and inhibiting the lipid peroxidation production. PMID:22399716

  11. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 6: Process Heat and Hydrogen Co-Generation PIRTs

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, Charles W; Gorensek, M. B.; Herring, S.; Pickard, P.

    2008-03-01

    A Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) exercise was conducted to identify potential safety-0-related physical phenomena for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) when coupled to a hydrogen production or similar chemical plant. The NGNP is a very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) with the design goal to produce high-temperature heat and electricity for nearby chemical plants. Because high-temperature heat can only be transported limited distances, the two plants will be close to each other. One of the primary applications for the VHTR would be to supply heat and electricity for the production of hydrogen. There was no assessment of chemical plant safety challenges. The primary application of this PIRT is to support the safety analysis of the NGNP coupled one or more small hydrogen production pilot plants. However, the chemical plant processes to be coupled to the NGNP have not yet been chosen; thus, a broad PIRT assessment was conducted to scope alternative potential applications and test facilities associated with the NGNP. The hazards associated with various chemicals and methods to minimize risks from those hazards are well understood within the chemical industry. Much but not all of the information required to assure safe conditions (separation distance, relative elevation, berms) is known for a reactor coupled to a chemical plant. There is also some experience with nuclear plants in several countries that have produced steam for industrial applications. The specific characteristics of the chemical plant, site layout, and the maximum stored inventories of chemicals can provide the starting point for the safety assessments. While the panel identified events and phenomena of safety significance, there is one added caveat. Multiple high-temperature reactors provide safety-related experience and understanding of reactor safety. In contrast, there have been only limited safety studies of coupled chemical and nuclear plants. The work herein provides a

  12. Lipid oxidation in baked products: impact of formula and process on the generation of volatile compounds.

    PubMed

    Maire, Murielle; Rega, Barbara; Cuvelier, Marie-Elisabeth; Soto, Paola; Giampaoli, Pierre

    2013-12-15

    This paper investigates the effect of ingredients on the reactions occurring during the making of sponge cake and leading to the generation of volatile compounds related to flavour quality. To obtain systems sensitive to lipid oxidation (LO), a formulation design was applied varying the composition of fatty matter and eggs. Oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and formation of related volatile compounds were followed at the different steps of cake-making. Optimised dynamic Solid Phase Micro Extraction was applied to selectively extract either volatile or semi-volatile compounds directly from the baking vapours. We show for the first time that in the case of alveolar baked products, lipid oxidation occurs very early during the step of dough preparation and to a minor extent during the baking process. The generation of lipid oxidation compounds depends on PUFA content and on the presence of endogenous antioxidants in the raw matter. Egg yolk seemed to play a double role on reactivity: protecting unsaturated lipids from oxidation and being necessary to generate a broad class of compounds of the Maillard reaction during baking and linked to the typical flavour of sponge cake. PMID:23993514

  13. Proteome profiling of heat, oxidative, and salt stress responses in Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Baolei; Liu, Jinliang; Van Duyet, Le; Sun, Ying; Xuan, Yuan H.; Cheong, Gang-Won

    2015-01-01

    The thermophilic species, Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1, a model microorganism for studying hyperthermophiles, has adapted to optimal growth under conditions of high temperature and salinity. However, the environmental conditions for the strain are not always stable, and this strain might face different stresses. In the present study, we compared the proteome response of T. kodakarensis to heat, oxidative, and salt stresses using two-dimensional electrophoresis, and protein spots were identified through MALDI-TOF/MS. Fifty-nine, forty-two, and twenty-nine spots were induced under heat, oxidative, and salt stresses, respectively. Among the up-regulated proteins, four proteins (a hypothetical protein, pyridoxal biosynthesis lyase, peroxiredoxin, and protein disulphide oxidoreductase) were associated with all three stresses. Gene ontology analysis showed that these proteins were primarily involved metabolic and cellular processes. The KEGG pathway analysis suggested that the main metabolic pathways involving these enzymes were related to carbohydrate metabolism, secondary metabolite synthesis, and amino acid biosynthesis. These data might enhance our understanding of the functions and molecular mechanisms of thermophilic Archaea for survival and adaptation in extreme environments. PMID:26150806

  14. The Response to Heat Shock and Oxidative Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Morano, Kevin A.; Grant, Chris M.; Moye-Rowley, W. Scott

    2012-01-01

    A common need for microbial cells is the ability to respond to potentially toxic environmental insults. Here we review the progress in understanding the response of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to two important environmental stresses: heat shock and oxidative stress. Both of these stresses are fundamental challenges that microbes of all types will experience. The study of these environmental stress responses in S. cerevisiae has illuminated many of the features now viewed as central to our understanding of eukaryotic cell biology. Transcriptional activation plays an important role in driving the multifaceted reaction to elevated temperature and levels of reactive oxygen species. Advances provided by the development of whole genome analyses have led to an appreciation of the global reorganization of gene expression and its integration between different stress regimens. While the precise nature of the signal eliciting the heat shock response remains elusive, recent progress in the understanding of induction of the oxidative stress response is summarized here. Although these stress conditions represent ancient challenges to S. cerevisiae and other microbes, much remains to be learned about the mechanisms dedicated to dealing with these environmental parameters. PMID:22209905

  15. Isolation and identification of oxidation products of guaiacol from brines and heated meat matrix.

    PubMed

    Bölicke, Sarah-Maria; Ternes, Waldemar

    2016-07-01

    In this study we investigated the formation of the oxidation products of guaiacol in brines and heated meat matrix: 6-nitrosoguaiacol, 4-nitroguaiacol and 6-nitroguaiacol. For this purpose we applied a newly developed HPLC-UV and LC-MS method. For the first time, 6-nitrosoguaiacol was determined in brine and meat (containing guaiacol and sodium nitrite), which had been heated to 80°C and subsequently subjected to simulated digestion. Application of 500mg/L ascorbic acid to the brines reduced guaiacol degradation at pH3 and simultaneously inhibited the formation of 6-nitrosoguaiacol compared to brines containing only 100mg/L of ASC. The oxidation products were isolated with a new extraction method from meat samples containing 400mg/kg sodium nitrite at pH3.6 following simulated digestion. When oxygen was added, 6-nitrosoguaiacol was determined even at legally allowed levels (150mg/kg) of the curing agent. Finally, we developed a new LC-MS method for the separation and qualitative determination of the four main smoke methoxyphenols. PMID:26937586

  16. Free convection flow past an impulsively started infinite vertical porous plate with Newtonian heating in the presence of heat generation and viscous dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamran, M.; Narahari, M.; Jaafar, A.

    2014-10-01

    The effects of heat generation and viscous dissipation on free convective flow past an impulsively started infinite vertical porous plate with Newtonian heating have been investigated. The governing boundary layer equations are solved by using an analytical technique known as Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM). The effects of heat source parameter (Q), suction parameter (s), Eckert number (Ec) and Grashof number (Gr) on the velocity and temperature fields are determined. The study revealed that the fluid temperature increases by increasing heat generation and Eckert number whereas it decreases with increasing suction velocity. The present results are compared with the exact solution results in the absence of viscous dissipation and it is found that the HAM results coincide with the exact solution results.

  17. Effect of heat generation on free convection boundary layer flow of a viscoelastic fluid past a horizontal circular cylinder with constant surface heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Kasim, Abdul Rahman; Mohammad, Nurul Farahain; Shafie, Sharidan

    2012-05-01

    Effect of heat generation on free convection boundary layer flow of a viscoelastic fluid past a horizontal circular cylinder with constant surface heat flux has been investigated. The boundary layer equations are an order higher than those for the Newtonian (viscous) fluid and the adherence boundary conditions are insufficient to determine the solution of these equations completely. The governing equations are transformed into dimensionless non-similar equations by using a set of suitable transformations and solved numerically by the finite difference method along with Newton's linearization approximation. Computations are performed numerically by using Keller-box method by augmenting an extra boundary condition at infinity. We have focused our attention on the evaluation of velocity profiles, temperature profiles, shear stress in terms of local skin friction and the rate of heat transfer in terms of local Nusselt number for different values of heat generation parameter, viscoelastic parameter and the Prandlt number and the numerical results have been shown graphically.

  18. Stress generation in thermally grown oxide films. [oxide scale spalling from superalloy substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumnick, A. J.; Ebert, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    A three dimensional finite element analysis was conducted, using the ANSYS computer program, of the stress state in a thin oxide film thermally formed on a rectangular piece of NiCrAl alloy. The analytical results indicate a very high compressive stress in the lateral directions of the film (approximately 6200 MPa), and tensile stresses in the metal substrate that ranged from essentially zero to about 55 MPa. It was found further that the intensity of the analytically determined average stresses could be approximated reasonably well by the modification of an equation developed previously by Oxx for stresses induced into bodies by thermal gradients.

  19. Gas Generation Testing of Neptunium Oxide Generated Using the HB-Line Phase IIFlowsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, J

    2003-08-29

    The hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gas generation rate for neptunium dioxide (NpO{sub 2}) samples produced on a laboratory scale using the HB-Line Phase II flowsheet has been measured following exposure to 75% relative humidity (RH). As expected, the observed H{sub 2} generation rates for these samples increase with increasing moisture content. A maximum H{sub 2} generation rate of 1.8 x 10{sup -6} moles per day per kilogram (mol {center_dot} day{sup -1} kg{sup -1}) was observed for NpO{sub 2} samples with approximately one and one-half times (1 1/2 X) the expected specific surface area (SSA) for the HB-Line Phase II product. The SSA of NpO{sub 2} samples calcined at 650 C is similar to plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) calcined at 950 C according to the Department of Energy (DOE) standard for packaging and storage of PuO{sub 2}. This low SSA of the HB-Line Phase II product limits moisture uptake to less than 0.2 weight percent (wt %) even with extended exposure to 75% RH.

  20. Generation of large scale field-aligned density irregularities in ionospheric heating experiments. [electromagnetic wave decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fejer, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Threshold and growth rate for stimulated Brillouin scattering are calculated for a uniform magnetoplasma. These are then compared with the threshold and growth rate of a new thermal instability in which the nonlinear Lorentz force felt by the electrons at the beat frequency of the two electromagnetic waves is replaced by a pressure force due to differential heating in the interference pattern of the pump wave and the generated electromagnetic wave. This thermal instability, which is still essentially stimulated Brillouin scattering, has a threshold which is especially low when the propagation vector of the beat wave is almost normal to the magnetic field. The threshold is then considerably lower than the threshold for normal stimulated Brillouin scattering and therefore this new instability is probably responsible for the generation of large scale field aligned irregularities and ionospheric spread F.

  1. A novel pyroelectric generator utilising naturally driven temperature fluctuations from oscillating heat pipes for waste heat recovery and thermal energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabek, D.; Taylor, J.; Ayel, V.; Bertin, Y.; Romestant, C.; Bowen, C. R.

    2016-07-01

    Low temperature thermal to electrical energy converters have the potential to provide a route for recovering waste energy. In this paper, we propose a new configuration of a thermal harvester that uses a naturally driven thermal oscillator free of mechanical motion and operates between a hot heat source and a cold heat sink. The system exploits a heat induced liquid-vapour transition of a working fluid as a primary driver for a pyroelectric generator. The two-phase instability of a fluid in a closed looped capillary channel of an oscillating heat pipe (OHP) creates pressure differences which lead to local high frequency temperature oscillations in the range of 0.1-5 K. Such temperature changes are suitable for pyroelectric thermal to electrical energy conversion, where the pyroelectric generator is attached to the adiabatic wall of the OHP, thereby absorbing thermal energy from the passing fluid. This new pyroelectric-oscillating heat pipe (POHP) assembly of a low temperature generator continuously operates across a spatial heat source temperature of 55 °C and a heat sink temperature of 25 °C, and enables waste heat recovery and thermal energy harvesting from small temperature gradients at low temperatures. Our electrical measurements with lead zirconate titanate (PZT) show an open circuit voltage of 0.4 V (AC) and with lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) an open circuit voltage of 0.8 V (AC) at a frequency of 0.45 Hz, with an energy density of 95 pJ cm-3 for PMN-PT. Our novel POHP device therefore has the capability to convert small quantities of thermal energy into more desirable electricity in the nW to mW range and provides an alternative to currently used batteries or centralised energy generation.

  2. Nitric oxide-generating l-cysteine-grafted graphene film as a blood-contacting biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhen; Dou, Ruixia; Zu, Mian; Liu, Xueying; Yin, Wenyan; Zhao, Yuliang; Chen, Jingbo; Yan, Liang; Gu, Zhanjun

    2016-06-24

    By using polyethylenimine molecules as the linker, l-cysteine was immobilized onto graphene nanosheets, endowing the biocompatible l-cysteine-functionalized graphene film with the ability for catalytic decomposition of exogenous or endogenous donors to generate nitric oxide, and thus inhibiting the platelet activation and aggregation and reducing platelet adhesion. PMID:27111404

  3. Characterization and quantification of oxides generated by anodization on titanium for implantation purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloia Games, L.; Pastore, J.; Bouchet, A.; Ballarre, J.

    2011-12-01

    The use of titanium as implant material is widely known in the surgery field. The formation of natural or artificial compact and protective oxide is a convenient tool for metal protection and a good way to generate phosphate deposits to enhance biocompatibility and bone fixation with the existing tissue. The present work has the aim of superficially modify commercially pure titanium sheets used in orthopedics and odontology, with a potencistatic anodization process with an ammonium phosphate and ammonium fluoride solution as electrolyte. The objective is to generate titanium oxides doped with phosphorous on the surface, to promote bioactivity. The characterization and quantification of the generated deposits is presented as a starting point for the future application of these materials. The applied characterization methods are X ray diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis for evaluating the chemical and phase composition on the modified surface and PDI image analysis techniques that allow the segmentation of SEM images and the measurement and quantification of the oxides generated by the anodization process. The samples with polished treated surface at 30V have the deposit of a phosphate rich thick layer covering almost all the surface and spherical-shaped titanium oxide crystals randomly placed (covering more than 20% of the surface area).

  4. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN NITROGEN OXIDE EMISSIONS FROM ELECTRICAL GENERATING UNITS IN THE U.S. AND METEOROLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from electrical generating units (EGUs) in the northeast US have declined dramatically during the past few years as a result of a series of air quality rules (RACT rule, Clean Air Act Amendments Title IV, and the NOx SIP call)....

  5. Minimization of nitrous oxide emission in a pilot-scale oxidation ditch: generation, spatial variation and microbial interpretation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Maosheng; Tian, Yuhao; Liu, Tang; Ma, Tao; Li, Li; Li, Can; Ahmad, Muhammad; Chen, Qian; Ni, Jinren

    2015-03-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) has received increasing attention. This paper presented how N2O emission was significantly reduced in a pilot-scale Carrousel oxidation ditch under reasonable nitrification and denitrification. N2O emission from the reactor was found as low as 0.027% of influent nitrogen, which was much less than that from other processes. Further measurements on spatial variation of N2O emission in the alternative aerobic/anoxic zones with help of a series of batch experiments demonstrated that about 90% of the emission was contributed by nitrifier denitrification (ND). Moreover, the taxonomic analysis based on high through-put 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that the high abundance of denitrifying bacteria and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) was responsible for low nitrite accumulations and consequent low N2O emissions. However, N2O generation would be greatly increased upon the normal operation being shocked by either ammonia overload or aeration failure of the oxidation ditch system. PMID:25575212

  6. Post-scram Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) heat transport system dynamics and steam generator control: Figures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brukx, J. F. L. M.

    1982-06-01

    Dynamic modeling of LMFBR heat transport system is discussed. Uncontrolled transient behavior of individual components and of the integrated heat transport system are considered. For each component, results showing specific dynamic features of the component and/or model capability were generated. Controlled dynamic behavior for alternative steam generator control systems during forced and natural sodium coolant circulation was analyzed. Combined free and forced convection of laminar and turbulent vertical pipe flow of liquid metals was investigated.

  7. Use of vortex generators and ribs for heat transfer enhancement at the top surface of a uniformly heated horizontal channel with mixed convection flow

    SciTech Connect

    Maughan, J.R.; Incropera, F.P. )

    1991-05-01

    Although secondary flows driven by buoyancy forces enhance heat transfer from the bottom surface of a heated, horizontal channel, heat transfer coefficients at the upper surface are known to remain near forced convection levels. In situations where performance is limited by the maximum local temperature, such as the cooling of electronic circuitry, enhanced heat transfer at one surface may be of little advantage if approximately equivalent enhancement does not exist at the opposite surface. Hence differences between top and bottom surface conditions may prevent a designer from taking full advantage of buoyancy-driven flows. This note reports on exploratory experiments to assess the feasibility of using mechanical vortex generators or perforated ribs at the top surface of a uniformly heated channel to provide comparable enhancement at both surfaces.

  8. Generation of purified nitric oxide from liquid N2O4 for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension in hypoxemic swine.

    PubMed

    Lovich, Mark A; Fine, David H; Denton, Ryan J; Wakim, Matt G; Wei, Abraham E; Maslov, Mikhail Y; Gamero, Lucas G; Vasquez, Gregory B; Johnson, Bryan J; Roscigno, Robert F; Gilbert, Richard J

    2014-02-15

    Inhaled nitric oxide (NO) selectively dilates pulmonary blood vessels, reduces pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), and enhances ventilation-perfusion matching. However, existing modes of delivery for the treatment of chronic pulmonary hypertension are limited due to the bulk and heft of large tanks of compressed gas. We present a novel system for the generation of inhaled NO that is based on the initial heat-induced evaporation of liquid N2O4 into gas phase NO2 followed by the room temperature reduction to NO by an antioxidant, ascorbic acid cartridge just prior to inhalation. The biologic effects of NO generated from liquid N2O4 were compared with the effects of NO gas, on increased mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) and PVR in a hypoxemic (FiO2 15%) swine model of pulmonary hypertension. We showed that NO concentration varied directly with the fixed cross sectional flow of the outflow aperture when studied at temperatures of 45, 47.5 and 50°C and was independent of the rate of heating. Liquid N2O4-sourced NO at 1, 5, and 20 ppm significantly reduced the elevated mPAP and PVR induced by experimental hypoxemia and was biologically indistinguishable from gas source NO in this model. These experiments show that it is feasible to generate highly purified NO gas from small volumes of liquid N2O4 at concentrations sufficient to lower mPAP and PVR in hypoxemic swine, and suggest that a miniaturized ambulatory system designed to generate biologically active NO from liquid N2O4 is achievable. PMID:24513304

  9. Thermally assisted electroluminescence: a viable means to generate electricity from solar or waste heat?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeg, Bauke; Wang, Jiang-Bo; Johnson, Shane R.; Buckner, Benjamin D.; Zhang, Yong-Hang

    2007-02-01

    It has been proposed recently that thermally assisted electroluminescence may in principle provide a means to convert solar or waste heat into electricity. The basic concept is to use an intermediate active emitter between a heat source and a photovoltaic (PV) cell. The active emitter would be a forward biased light emitting diode (LED) with a bias voltage, V b, below bandgap, E g (i.e., qV b < E g), such that the average emitted photon energy is larger than the average energy that is required to create charge carriers. The basic requirement for this conversion mechanism is that the emitter can act as an optical refrigerator. For this process to work and be efficient, however, several materials challenges will need to be addressed and overcome. Here, we outline a preliminary analysis of the efficiency and conversion power density as a function of temperature, bandgap energy and bias voltage, by considering realistic high temperature radiative and non-radiative rates as well as radiative heat loss in the absorber/emitter. From this analysis, it appears that both the overall efficiency and net generated power increase with increasing bandgap energy and increasing temperature, at least for temperatures up to 1000 K, despite the fact that the internal quantum yield for radiative recombination decreases with increasing temperature. On the other hand, the escape efficiency is a crucial design parameter which needs to be optimized.

  10. Fabrication of TiO2 Crystalline Coatings by Combining Ti-6Al-4V Anodic Oxidation and Heat Treatments.

    PubMed

    Vera, María Laura; Rosenberger, Mario Roberto; Schvezov, Carlos Enrique; Ares, Alicia Esther

    2015-01-01

    The bio- and hemocompatibility of titanium alloys are due to the formation of a TiO2 layer. This natural oxide may have fissures which are detrimental to its properties. Anodic oxidation is used to obtain thicker films. By means of this technique, at low voltages oxidation, amorphous and low roughness coatings are obtained, while, above a certain voltage, crystalline and porous coatings are obtained. According to the literature, the crystalline phases of TiO2, anatase, and rutile would present greater biocompatibility than the amorphous phase. On the other hand, for hemocompatible applications, smooth and homogeneous surfaces are required. One way to obtain crystalline and homogeneous coatings is by heat treatments after anodic oxidation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of heat treatments on the thickness, morphology, and crystalline structure of the TiO2 anodic coatings. The characterization was performed by optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray reflectometry. Coatings with different colors of interference were obtained. There were no significant changes in the surface morphology and roughness after heat treatment of 500°C. Heat treated coatings have different proportions of the crystalline phases, depending on the voltage of anodic oxidation and the temperature of the heat treatment. PMID:25784939

  11. Fabrication of TiO2 Crystalline Coatings by Combining Ti-6Al-4V Anodic Oxidation and Heat Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Schvezov, Carlos Enrique; Ares, Alicia Esther

    2015-01-01

    The bio- and hemocompatibility of titanium alloys are due to the formation of a TiO2 layer. This natural oxide may have fissures which are detrimental to its properties. Anodic oxidation is used to obtain thicker films. By means of this technique, at low voltages oxidation, amorphous and low roughness coatings are obtained, while, above a certain voltage, crystalline and porous coatings are obtained. According to the literature, the crystalline phases of TiO2, anatase, and rutile would present greater biocompatibility than the amorphous phase. On the other hand, for hemocompatible applications, smooth and homogeneous surfaces are required. One way to obtain crystalline and homogeneous coatings is by heat treatments after anodic oxidation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of heat treatments on the thickness, morphology, and crystalline structure of the TiO2 anodic coatings. The characterization was performed by optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray reflectometry. Coatings with different colors of interference were obtained. There were no significant changes in the surface morphology and roughness after heat treatment of 500°C. Heat treated coatings have different proportions of the crystalline phases, depending on the voltage of anodic oxidation and the temperature of the heat treatment. PMID:25784939

  12. 3D CFD ELECTROCHEMICAL AND HEAT TRANSFER MODEL OF AN INTERNALLY MANIFOLDED SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Grant L. Hawkes; James E. O'Brien; Greg Tao

    2011-11-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) electrochemical model has been created to model high-temperature electrolysis cell performance and steam electrolysis in an internally manifolded planar solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) stack. This design is being evaluated at the Idaho National Laboratory for hydrogen production from nuclear power and process heat. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, operating potential, steam-electrode gas composition, oxygen-electrode gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Single-cell and five-cell results will be presented. Flow distribution through both models is discussed. Flow enters from the bottom, distributes through the inlet plenum, flows across the cells, gathers in the outlet plenum and flows downward making an upside-down ''U'' shaped flow pattern. Flow and concentration variations exist downstream of the inlet holes. Predicted mean outlet hydrogen and steam concentrations vary linearly with current density, as expected. Effects of variations in operating temperature, gas flow rate, oxygen-electrode and steam-electrode current density, and contact resistance from the base case are presented. Contour plots of local electrolyte temperature, current density, and Nernst potential indicate the effects of heat transfer, reaction cooling/heating, and change in local gas composition. Results are discussed for using this design in the electrolysis mode. Discussion of thermal neutral voltage, enthalpy of reaction, hydrogen production, cell thermal

  13. Laboratory convection experiments with internal, noncontact, microwave generated heating, applied to Earth's mantle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limare, Angela; Surducan, Emanoil; di Giuseppe, Erika; Surducan, Vasile; Neamtu, Camelia; Vilella, Kenny; Fourel, Loic; Farnetani, Cinzia; Kaminski, Edouard; Jaupart, Claude

    2014-05-01

    The thermal evolution of terrestrial planets is controlled by secular cooling and internal heating due to the decay of radiogenic isotopes, two processes which are equivalent from the standpoint of convection dynamics. Few studies have been devoted to the intrinsic characteristics of this form of convection, which are dominated by instabilities of a single boundary layer and which involve a non-isentropic interior thermal structure. Laboratory studies of such convection have been plagued by considerable technical difficulties and have been mostly restricted to aqueous solutions with moderate values of the Prandtl number, contrary to planetary mantles. Here, we describe a new laboratory setup to generate internal heating in controlled conditions based on microwave (MW) absorption. The advantages of our technique include, but are not limited to: (1) a volumetric heat source that can be localized or distributed in space, (2) selectively heating part of the volume with time varying intensity and space distribution. Our tank prototype had horizontal dimensions of 30 cm × 30 cm and 5 cm height. A uniform and constant temperature was maintained at the upper boundary by an aluminium heat exchanger and adiabatic conditions were imposed at the tank base. Experimental fluids were hydroxyethylcellulose - water mixtures whose viscosities were varied within a wide range depending on concentration. Experimental Prandtl numbers were set at values larger than 100. Thermochromic Liquid Crystals (TLC) were used to visualize the temperature field, and the velocity field was determined using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The Rayleigh-Roberts number was varied from 105 to 107. We also conducted numerical simulations in 3D cartesian geometry using Stag-3D (Tackley 1993) to reproduce the experimental conditions, including the tank aspect ratio and the temperature dependence of physical properties. We observed that convection is driven by cold descending plumes generated at the upper

  14. Metal/Oxide Interface Nanostructures Generated by Surface Segregation for Electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Weng, Zhe; Liu, Wen; Yin, Li-Chang; Fang, Ruopian; Li, Min; Altman, Eric I; Fan, Qi; Li, Feng; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Wang, Hailiang

    2015-11-11

    Strong metal/oxide interactions have been acknowledged to play prominent roles in chemical catalysis in the gas phase, but remain as an unexplored area in electrocatalysis in the liquid phase. Utilization of metal/oxide interface structures could generate high performance electrocatalysts for clean energy storage and conversion. However, building highly dispersed nanoscale metal/oxide interfaces on conductive scaffolds remains a significant challenge. Here, we report a novel strategy to create metal/oxide interface nanostructures by growing mixed metal oxide nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and then selectively promoting migration of one of the metal ions to the surface of the oxide nanoparticles and simultaneous reduction to metal. Employing this strategy, we have synthesized Ni/CeO2 nanointerfaces coupled with CNTs. The Ni/CeO2 interface promotes hydrogen evolution catalysis by facilitating water dissociation and modifying the hydrogen binding energy. The Ni/CeO2-CNT hybrid material exhibits superior activity for hydrogen evolution as a result of synergistic effects including strong metal/oxide interactions, inorganic/carbon coupling, and particle size control. PMID:26509583

  15. Evidence for the generation of reactive oxygen species from hydroquinone and benzoquinone: Roles in arsenite oxidation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wenxiu; Wang, Yujun; Fang, Guodong; Wu, Tongliang; Liu, Cun; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-05-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) significantly affects the fate, bioavailability, and toxicity of arsenic in the environment. In the present study, we investigated the oxidation of As(III) in the presence of hydroquinone (HQ) and benzoquinone (BQ), which were selected as model quinone moieties for NOM. It was found that As(III) was oxidized to As(V) in the presence of HQ or BQ at neutral conditions, and the oxidation efficiency of As(III) increased from 33% to 92% in HQ solutions and from 0 to 80% in BQ solutions with pH increasing from 6.5 to 8.5. The oxidation mechanism was further explored with electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. The results showed that semiquinone radicals (SQ(-)) were generated from the comproportionation reaction between BQ and HQ, which mediated the formation of superoxide anion (O2(-)), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical (OH). Both the SQ(-), H2O2 and OH contributed to the oxidation of As(III). The increase of pH favored the formation of SQ(-), and thus promoted the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as As(III) oxidation. Increasing concentrations of HQ and BQ from 0.1 to 1.0 mM enhanced As(III) oxidation from 65% to 94% and from 10% to 53%, respectively. The findings of this study facilitate our understanding of the fate and transformation of As(III) in organic-rich aquatic environments and highlight quinone moieties as the potential oxidants for As(III) in the remediation of arsenic contaminated sites. PMID:26891359

  16. The reduction of dioxin emissions from the processes of heat and power generation.

    PubMed

    Wielgosiński, Grzegorz

    2011-05-01

    The first reports that it is possible to emit dioxins from the heat and power generation sector are from the beginning of the 1980s. Detailed research proved that the emission of dioxins might occur during combustion of hard coal, brown coal, and furnace oil as well as coke-oven gas. The emission of dioxins occurs in wood incineration; wood that is clean and understood as biomass; or, in particular, wood waste (polluted). This paper thoroughly discusses the mechanism of dioxin formation in thermal processes, first and foremost in combustion processes. The parameters influencing the quantity of dioxins formed and the dependence of their quantity on the conditions of combustion are highlighted. Furthermore, the methods of reducing dioxin emissions from combustion processes (primary and secondary) are discussed. The most efficacious methods that may find application in the heat and power generation sector are proposed; this is relevant from the point of view of the implementation of the Stockholm Convention resolutions in Poland with regard to persistent organic pollutants. PMID:21608491

  17. Heat Transfer Measurements and Predictions on a Power Generation Gas Turbine Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giel, Paul W.; Bunker, Ronald S.; VanFossen, G. James; Boyle, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Detailed heat transfer measurements and predictions are given for a power generation turbine rotor with 129 deg of nominal turning and an axial chord of 137 mm. Data were obtained for a set of four exit Reynolds numbers comprised of the design point of 628,000, -20%, +20%, and +40%. Three ideal exit pressure ratios were examined including the design point of 1.378, -10%, and +10%. Inlet incidence angles of 0 deg and +/-2 deg were also examined. Measurements were made in a linear cascade with highly three-dimensional blade passage flows that resulted from the high flow turning and thick inlet boundary layers. Inlet turbulence was generated with a blown square bar grid. The purpose of the work is the extension of three-dimensional predictive modeling capability for airfoil external heat transfer to engine specific conditions including blade shape, Reynolds numbers, and Mach numbers. Data were obtained by a steady-state technique using a thin-foil heater wrapped around a low thermal conductivity blade. Surface temperatures were measured using calibrated liquid crystals. The results show the effects of strong secondary vortical flows, laminar-to-turbulent transition, and also show good detail in the stagnation region.

  18. Enhanced Actuation Performance and Reduced Heat Generation in Shear-Bending Mode Actuator at High Temperature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianguo; Liu, Guoxi; Cheng, Jinrong; Dong, Shuxiang

    2016-08-01

    The actuation performance, strain hysteresis, and heat generation of the shear-bending mode actuators based on soft and hard BiScO3-PbTiO3 (BS-PT) ceramics were investigated under different thermal (from room temperature to 300 °C) and electrical loadings (from 2 to 10 kV/cm and from 1 to 1000 Hz). The actuator based on both soft and hard BS-PT ceramics worked stably at the temperature as high as 300 °C. The maximum working temperature of this shear-bending actuators is 150 °C higher than those of the traditional piezoelectric actuators based on commercial Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 materials. Furthermore, although the piezoelectric properties of soft-type ceramics based on BS-PT ceramics were superior to those of hard ceramics, the maximum displacement of the actuator based on hard ceramics was larger than that fabricated by soft ceramics at high temperature. The maximum displacement of the actuator based on hard ceramics was [Formula: see text] under an applied electric field of 10 kV/cm at 300 °C. The strain hysteresis and heat generation of the actuator based on hard ceramics was smaller than those of the actuator based on soft ceramics in the wide temperature range. These results indicated that the shear-bending actuator based on hard piezoelectric ceramics was more suitable for high-temperature piezoelectric applications. PMID:27214895

  19. Heat-sterilized silver oxide-zinc cells: Cycle life studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arms, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    A JPL study was conducted to evaluate the cell design parameters that contribute to the cycle life of sealed, heat-sterilized silver oxide-zinc cells. Test cells having a rated capacity of 4.2 A-h were fabricated using zinc oxide electrodes prepared by the sintered Teflon process. Two separator variations were evaluated, one having acrylic acid and the other methacrylic acid grafted to irradiated polyethylene film. Significant results of this study include the following: (1) cycle life in excess of 300 cycles was attained; (2) a zinc oxide/silver stoichiometric ratio of 1.5 resulted in greater cycle life than a ratio of 1.1, and similar cycle life to cells having a ratio of 2; (3) cells having methacrylic acid grafted separators suffered somewhat less in capacity loss due to zinc electrode shape change than cells having acrylic acid type; (4) use of acrylic acid grafted separators was slightly superior to the methacrylic acid type in respect to silver penetration; and (5) the inclusion of a layer of potassium titanate paper adjacent to the zinc electrodes resulted in cells that achieved higher cycle life before any of the group failed than that reached by cells of any other construction.

  20. Preliminary issues associated with the next generation nuclear plant intermediate heat exchanger design.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Moisseytsev, A.; Majumdar, S.; Shankar, P. S.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-04-05

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is an advanced high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) concept with emphasis on production of both electricity and hydrogen, involves helium as the coolant and a closed-cycle gas turbine for power generation with a core outlet/gas turbine inlet temperature of 900-1000 C. In the indirect cycle system, an intermediate heat exchanger is used to transfer the heat from primary helium from the core to the secondary fluid, which can be helium, nitrogen/helium mixture, or a molten salt. The system concept for the vary high temperature reactor (VHTR) can be a reactor based on the prismatic block of the GT-MHR developed by a consortium led by General Atomics in the U.S. or based on the PBMR design developed by ESKOM of South Africa and British Nuclear Fuels of U.K. This report has made a preliminary assessment on the issues pertaining to the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP. Two IHX designs namely, shell and tube and compact heat exchangers were considered in the assessment. Printed circuit heat exchanger, among various compact heat exchanger (HX) designs, was selected for the analysis. Irrespective of the design, the material considerations for the construction of the HX are essentially similar, except may be in the fabrication of the units. As a result, we have reviewed in detail the available information on material property data relevant for the construction of HX and made a preliminary assessment of several relevant factors to make a judicious selection of the material for the IHX. The assessment included four primary candidate alloys namely, Alloy 617 (UNS N06617), Alloy 230 (UNS N06230), Alloy 800H (UNS N08810), and Alloy X (UNS N06002) for the IHX. Some of the factors addressed in this report are the tensile, creep, fatigue, creep fatigue, toughness properties for the candidate alloys, thermal aging effects on the mechanical properties, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code compliance