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Sample records for heat generates oxidized

  1. Corner heating in rectangular solid oxide electrochemical cell generators

    DOEpatents

    Reichner, Philip

    1989-01-01

    Disclosed is an improvement in a solid oxide electrochemical cell generator 1 having a rectangular design with four sides that meet at corners, and containing multiplicity of electrically connected fuel cells 11, where a fuel gas is passed over one side of said cells and an oxygen containing gas is passed into said cells, and said fuel is burned to form heat, electricity, and an exhaust gas. The improvement comprises passing the exhaust gases over the multiplicity of cells 11 in such a way that more of the heat in said exhaust gases flows at the corners of the generator, such as through channels 19.

  2. HEAT GENERATION

    DOEpatents

    Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

    1963-12-01

    Heat is generated by the utilization of high energy neutrons produced as by nuclear reactions between hydrogen isotopes in a blanket zone containing lithium, a neutron moderator, and uranium and/or thorium effective to achieve multtplicatton of the high energy neutron. The rnultiplied and moderated neutrons produced react further with lithium-6 to produce tritium in the blanket. Thermal neutron fissionable materials are also produced and consumed in situ in the blanket zone. The heat produced by the aggregate of the various nuclear reactions is then withdrawn from the blanket zone to be used or otherwise disposed externally. (AEC)

  3. Nanostructured oxide materials and modules for high-temperature power generation from waste heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo Van, Nong; Pryds, Nini

    2013-06-01

    A large amount of thermal energy emitted from many industrial processes is available as waste heat. Thermoelectric (TE) power generators that convert heat directly into electricity can offer a very promising means of waste heat recovery. However, the requirements for this task place in the materials are not easily satisfied by conventional TE materials. Not only must they possess a sufficient TE performance, but they should also be stable at high temperatures, nontoxic and have low-cost comprising elements, and must be also able to be processed and shaped cheaply. Oxides are among the strongest candidate materials for this purpose. In this review, the progress in the development of two representative p- and n-type novel oxide materials based on Ca3Co4O9 and doped-ZnO is presented. TE modules built up from these oxides were fabricated, tested at high temperatures, and compared with other similar oxide modules reported in the literature. A maximum power density of 45.3 mW cm-2 was obtained for an oxide module comprising eight p-n couples at a temperature difference of 496 K, an encouraging result in the context of the present high-temperature oxide modules. Invited talk at the 6th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology IWAMSN2012, 30 October-2 November, 2012, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  4. The effect of coating on heat generation properties of Iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yuan

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted more and more attention for their potential application as heating agents in cancer hyperthermia. The effectiveness of cancer hyperthermia can be increased by using particles that have a higher heat generation rate, quantified by specific absorption rate (SAR), at a smaller applied field. In order to optimize the functionality of nanoparticles as heating agents, it is essential to have a comprehensive understanding of factors that may influence SAR including coating and aggregation. In all biomedical applications, the magnetic particles are coated with surfactants and polymers to enhance biocompatibility, prevent agglomeration and add functionality. Coatings may profoundly influence particles' clustering behavior and magnetic properties. Yet its effect on the heat generation rate of the nanoparticles has been scarcely investigated. In this context, a systematic investigation was carried out in this dissertation in order to understand the impact of the surface coating of magnetic nanoparticles on their heat generation rate. The study also includes investigation of normal nerve cell viability in presence of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles with and without exposure to magnetic heating. Commercially available suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles with a diameter of approximately 10 nm and different coatings relevant to biomedical applications such as aminosilane, carboxymethyl-dextran, protein A, biotin were extensively characterized. First of all, magnetic phase reduction of magnetite nanoparticles was examined by studying the discrepancy between the volume fraction of magnetic phase calculated from magnetization curve and the magnetic core concentration obtained from Tiron chelation test. The findings indicated that coatings might interact with the surface atoms of the magnetic core and form a magnetically disordered layer reducing the total amount of the magnetic phase. Secondly, the impact of coating and aggregation

  5. The effect of coating on heat generation properties of Iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yuan

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted more and more attention for their potential application as heating agents in cancer hyperthermia. The effectiveness of cancer hyperthermia can be increased by using particles that have a higher heat generation rate, quantified by specific absorption rate (SAR), at a smaller applied field. In order to optimize the functionality of nanoparticles as heating agents, it is essential to have a comprehensive understanding of factors that may influence SAR including coating and aggregation. In all biomedical applications, the magnetic particles are coated with surfactants and polymers to enhance biocompatibility, prevent agglomeration and add functionality. Coatings may profoundly influence particles' clustering behavior and magnetic properties. Yet its effect on the heat generation rate of the nanoparticles has been scarcely investigated. In this context, a systematic investigation was carried out in this dissertation in order to understand the impact of the surface coating of magnetic nanoparticles on their heat generation rate. The study also includes investigation of normal nerve cell viability in presence of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles with and without exposure to magnetic heating. Commercially available suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles with a diameter of approximately 10 nm and different coatings relevant to biomedical applications such as aminosilane, carboxymethyl-dextran, protein A, biotin were extensively characterized. First of all, magnetic phase reduction of magnetite nanoparticles was examined by studying the discrepancy between the volume fraction of magnetic phase calculated from magnetization curve and the magnetic core concentration obtained from Tiron chelation test. The findings indicated that coatings might interact with the surface atoms of the magnetic core and form a magnetically disordered layer reducing the total amount of the magnetic phase. Secondly, the impact of coating and aggregation

  6. Impact of magnetic field parameters and iron oxide nanoparticle properties on heat generation for use in magnetic hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Rhythm R.; Davis, Todd P.; Glover, Amanda L.; Nikles, David E.; Brazel, Christopher S.

    2015-08-01

    Heating of nanoparticles (NPs) using an AC magnetic field depends on several factors, and optimization of these parameters can improve the efficiency of heat generation for effective cancer therapy while administering a low NP treatment dose. This study investigated magnetic field strength and frequency, NP size, NP concentration, and solution viscosity as important parameters that impact the heating efficiency of iron oxide NPs with magnetite (Fe3O4) and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) crystal structures. Heating efficiencies were determined for each experimental setting, with specific absorption rates (SARs) ranging from 3.7 to 325.9 W/g Fe. Magnetic heating was conducted on iron oxide NPs synthesized in our laboratories (with average core sizes of 8, 11, 13, and 18 nm), as well as commercially-available iron oxides (with average core sizes of 8, 9, and 16 nm). The experimental magnetic coil system made it possible to isolate the effect of magnetic field parameters and independently study the effect on heat generation. The highest SAR values were found for the 18 nm synthesized particles and the maghemite nanopowder. Magnetic field strengths were applied in the range of 15.1-47.7 kA/m, with field frequencies ranging from 123 to 430 kHz. The best heating was observed for the highest field strengths and frequencies tested, with results following trends predicted by the Rosensweig equation. An increase in solution viscosity led to lower heating rates in nanoparticle solutions, which can have significant implications for the application of magnetic fluid hyperthermia in vivo.

  7. Impact of magnetic field parameters and iron oxide nanoparticle properties on heat generation for use in magnetic hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rhythm R.; Davis, Todd P.; Glover, Amanda L.; Nikles, David E.; Brazel, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Heating of nanoparticles (NPs) using an AC magnetic field depends on several factors, and optimization of these parameters can improve the efficiency of heat generation for effective cancer therapy while administering a low NP treatment dose. This study investigated magnetic field strength and frequency, NP size, NP concentration, and solution viscosity as important parameters that impact the heating efficiency of iron oxide NPs with magnetite (Fe3O4) and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) crystal structures. Heating efficiencies were determined for each experimental setting, with specific absorption rates (SARs) ranging from 3.7 to 325.9 W/g Fe. Magnetic heating was conducted on iron oxide NPs synthesized in our laboratories (with average core sizes of 8, 11, 13, and 18 nm), as well as commercially-available iron oxides (with average core sizes of 8, 9, and 16 nm). The experimental magnetic coil system made it possible to isolate the effect of magnetic field parameters and independently study the effect on heat generation. The highest SAR values were found for the 18 nm synthesized particles and the maghemite nanopowder. Magnetic field strengths were applied in the range of 15.1 to 47.7 kA/m, with field frequencies ranging from 123 to 430 kHz. The best heating was observed for the highest field strengths and frequencies tested, with results following trends predicted by the Rosensweig equation. An increase in solution viscosity led to lower heating rates in nanoparticle solutions, which can have significant implications for the application of magnetic fluid hyperthermia in vivo. PMID:25960599

  8. Combined solid oxide fuel cell and gas turbine systems for efficient power and heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palsson, Jens; Selimovic, Azra; Sjunnesson, Lars

    The Department of Heat and Power Engineering at Lund University in Sweden has been conducting theoretical studies of combined SOFC and gas turbine (SOFC/GT) cycles. The overall goal is an unbiased evaluation of performance prospects and operational behaviour of such systems. The project is part of a Swedish national program on high-temperature fuel cells. Results of continuous studies started earlier by authors are presented. Recent developments in modelling techniques has resulted in a more accurate fuel cell model giving an advantage over previous system studies based on simplified SOFC models. The fuel cell model has been improved by detailed representation of resistive cell losses, reaction kinetics for the reforming reaction and heat conduction through the solid part of the cell. This SOFC model has further been confirmed against the literature and integrated into simulation software, Aspen Plus™. Recent calculations have focused on a system with external pre-reforming and anode gas recirculation for the internal supply of steam. A reference system, sized at 500 kW, has also been analyzed in variants with gas turbine reheat and air compression intercooling. In addition, knowledge of stack and system behaviour has been gained from sensitivity studies. It is shown that the pressure ratio has a large impact on performance and that electrical efficiencies of more than 65% are possible at low pressure ratios.

  9. Aerodynamic heated steam generating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.

    1986-08-12

    An aerodynamic heated steam generating apparatus is described which consists of: an aerodynamic heat immersion coil steam generator adapted to be located on the leading edge of an airframe of a hypersonic aircraft and being responsive to aerodynamic heating of water by a compression shock airstream to produce steam pressure; an expansion shock air-cooled condensor adapted to be located in the airframe rearward of and operatively coupled to the aerodynamic heat immersion coil steam generator to receive and condense the steam pressure; and an aerodynamic heated steam injector manifold adapted to distribute heated steam into the airstream flowing through an exterior generating channel of an air-breathing, ducted power plant.

  10. Learning from Nature to Improve the Heat Generation of Iron-Oxide Nanoparticles for Magnetic Hyperthermia Applications

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Boubeta, Carlos; Simeonidis, Konstantinos; Makridis, Antonios; Angelakeris, Makis; Iglesias, Oscar; Guardia, Pablo; Cabot, Andreu; Yedra, Lluis; Estradé, Sonia; Peiró, Francesca; Saghi, Zineb; Midgley, Paul A.; Conde-Leborán, Iván; Serantes, David; Baldomir, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The performance of magnetic nanoparticles is intimately entwined with their structure, mean size and magnetic anisotropy. Besides, ensembles offer a unique way of engineering the magnetic response by modifying the strength of the dipolar interactions between particles. Here we report on an experimental and theoretical analysis of magnetic hyperthermia, a rapidly developing technique in medical research and oncology. Experimentally, we demonstrate that single-domain cubic iron oxide particles resembling bacterial magnetosomes have superior magnetic heating efficiency compared to spherical particles of similar sizes. Monte Carlo simulations at the atomic level corroborate the larger anisotropy of the cubic particles in comparison with the spherical ones, thus evidencing the beneficial role of surface anisotropy in the improved heating power. Moreover we establish a quantitative link between the particle assembling, the interactions and the heating properties. This knowledge opens new perspectives for improved hyperthermia, an alternative to conventional cancer therapies. PMID:23576006

  11. Learning from Nature to Improve the Heat Generation of Iron-Oxide Nanoparticles for Magnetic Hyperthermia Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Boubeta, Carlos; Simeonidis, Konstantinos; Makridis, Antonios; Angelakeris, Makis; Iglesias, Oscar; Guardia, Pablo; Cabot, Andreu; Yedra, Lluis; Estradé, Sonia; Peiró, Francesca; Saghi, Zineb; Midgley, Paul A.; Conde-Leborán, Iván; Serantes, David; Baldomir, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    The performance of magnetic nanoparticles is intimately entwined with their structure, mean size and magnetic anisotropy. Besides, ensembles offer a unique way of engineering the magnetic response by modifying the strength of the dipolar interactions between particles. Here we report on an experimental and theoretical analysis of magnetic hyperthermia, a rapidly developing technique in medical research and oncology. Experimentally, we demonstrate that single-domain cubic iron oxide particles resembling bacterial magnetosomes have superior magnetic heating efficiency compared to spherical particles of similar sizes. Monte Carlo simulations at the atomic level corroborate the larger anisotropy of the cubic particles in comparison with the spherical ones, thus evidencing the beneficial role of surface anisotropy in the improved heating power. Moreover we establish a quantitative link between the particle assembling, the interactions and the heating properties. This knowledge opens new perspectives for improved hyperthermia, an alternative to conventional cancer therapies.

  12. Micro thrust and heat generator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, E.J.

    1998-11-17

    A micro thrust and heat generator have a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator`s ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachining techniques (LIGA). 30 figs.

  13. Micro thrust and heat generator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    1998-01-01

    A micro thrust and heat generator has a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator's ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachining techniques (LIGA).

  14. Micro thrust and heat generator

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    The present invention relates generally to micromachines such as microengines or micromotors. More specifically, the invention is directed to a micro rocket which functions as a source of heat and thrust, and utilizes chemical energy to drive or power micromechanical apparatuses. The invention is adaptable to applications involving defense, bio-medical, manufacturing, consumer product, aviation, automotive, computer, inspection, and safety systems. A micro thrust and heat generator has a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator`s ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachine techniques (LIGA).

  15. Heat operated cryogenic electrical generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Saffren, M. M.; Elleman, D. D. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An electrical generator useful for providing electrical power in deep space, is disclosed. The electrical generator utilizes the unusual hydrodynamic property exhibited by liquid helium as it is converted to and from a superfluid state to cause opposite directions of rotary motion for a rotor cell thereof. The physical motion of the rotor cell was employed to move a magnetic field provided by a charged superconductive coil mounted on the exterior of the cell. An electrical conductor was placed in surrounding proximity to the cell to interact with the moving magnetic field provided by the superconductive coil and thereby generate electrical energy. A heat control arrangement was provided for the purpose of causing the liquid helium to be partially converted to and from a superfluid state by being cooled and heated, respectively.

  16. Heat generation in aircraft tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, S. K.; Dodge, R. N.

    1985-01-01

    A method was developed for calculating the internal temperature distribution in an aircraft tire while free rolling under load. The method uses an approximate stress analysis of each point in the tire as it rolls through the contact patch, and from this stress change the mechanical work done on each volume element may be obtained and converted into a heat release rate through a knowledge of material characteristics. The tire cross-section is then considered as a body with internal heat generation, and the diffusion equation is solved numerically with appropriate boundary conditions of the wheel and runway surface. Comparison with data obtained with buried thermocouples in tires shows good agreement.

  17. Generator configuration for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Reichner, Philip

    1989-01-01

    Disclosed are improvements in a solid oxide fuel cell generator 1 having a multiplicity of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells 2, where a fuel gas is passed over one side of said cells and an oxygen-containing gas is passed over the other side of said cells resulting in the generation of heat and electricity. The improvements comprise arranging the cells in the configuration of a circle, a spiral, or folded rows within a cylindrical generator, and modifying the flow rate, oxygen concentration, and/or temperature of the oxygen-containing gases that flow to those cells that are at the periphery of the generator relative to those cells that are at the center of the generator. In these ways, a more uniform temperature is obtained throughout the generator.

  18. Helicity Generation by Heat Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    1996-11-01

    In a large laboratory plasma (ne ~= 10^12 cm-3, k Te ~= 2 eV, B0 ~= 30 G, 1 m ⊥ B_0, 2.5 m allel B_0), the electrons are heated locally by a short intense current pulse (100 A, 0.2 μs) using a magnetic loop antenna or a biased electrode. The heat transport along the field establishes a flux tube with strong radial and weak axial temperature gradients. The time scale of temperature relaxation (Δ t ~= 50 μs) is much longer than that of the transient whistler wave pulse excited by the initial current pulse (Δ t < 2 μs). The temperature gradients drive linked field-aligned and diamagnetic currents which, due to their linkage, exhibit helicity and form a flux rope with J × B ~= 0.(R. L. Stenzel and J. M. Urrutia, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76), 1469 (1996). Alternatively, the helicity generation can be understood by the twisting of magnetic field lines which, in the parameter regime of electron MHD, are frozen into the electron fluid. The electron heating at one end of the flux tube causes a nonuniform diamagnetic rotation, hence the helicity. The heat transport by helical convection and conduction is investigated. The slowly time-varying magnetic field may excite Alfvénic perturbations.

  19. Disperse generation; use waste heat

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Utility manager and American Public Power Association (APPA) president William H. Corkran, Jr. answers questions about the Easton (Maryland) Utilities Commission, which currently has a capacity nearly double its peak load. Power sales through interconnections are made by day, and low-cost purchases are made by night from a variety of widespread sources using different fuels. Easton's fuel mix and conservation strategy is aimed at oil substitution and efficiency measures, such as waste-heat recovery from diesel engines. Wind, photovoltaics, solar water heating, cogeneration, and small nuclear units are also under study. Although he anticipates an OPEC move to discourage new technologies, dispersed technologies will still offer more potential for efficient and secure power generation and transmission. Utilities, he feels, should lead the decentralization more rather than resist it in order to expand their service capability into cable television. The APPA can help by motivating young people to pursue these opportunities. (DCK)

  20. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Draper, Robert; George, Raymond A.; Shockling, Larry A.

    1993-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a pair of spaced apart tubesheets in a housing. At least two intermediate barrier walls are between the tubesheets and define a generator chamber between two intermediate buffer chambers. An array of fuel cells have tubes with open ends engaging the tubesheets. Tubular, axially elongated electrochemical cells are supported on the tubes in the generator chamber. Fuel gas and oxidant gas are preheated in the intermediate chambers by the gases flowing on the other side of the tubes. Gas leakage around the tubes through the tubesheets is permitted. The buffer chambers reentrain the leaked fuel gas for reintroduction to the generator chamber.

  1. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Draper, R.; George, R.A.; Shockling, L.A.

    1993-04-06

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a pair of spaced apart tubesheets in a housing. At least two intermediate barrier walls are between the tubesheets and define a generator chamber between two intermediate buffer chambers. An array of fuel cells have tubes with open ends engaging the tubesheets. Tubular, axially elongated electrochemical cells are supported on the tubes in the generator chamber. Fuel gas and oxidant gas are preheated in the intermediate chambers by the gases flowing on the other side of the tubes. Gas leakage around the tubes through the tubesheets is permitted. The buffer chambers reentrain the leaked fuel gas for reintroduction to the generator chamber.

  2. Role of radiogenic heat generation in surface heat flow formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutorskoi, M. D.; Polyak, B. G.

    2016-03-01

    Heat generation due to decay of long-lived radioactive isotopes is considered in the Earth's crust of the Archean-Proterozoic and Paleozoic provinces of Eurasia and North America. The heat flow that forms in the mantle is calculated as the difference between the heat flow observed at the boundary of the solid Earth and radiogenic heat flow produced in the crust. The heat regime in regions with anomalously high radiogenic heat generation is discussed. The relationship between various heat flow components in the Precambrian and Phanerozoic provinces has been comparatively analyzed, and the role of erosion of the surfaceheat- generating layer has been estimated.

  3. Effect of Microwave Heating on Phytosterol Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Leal-Castañeda, Everth Jimena; Inchingolo, Raffaella; Cardenia, Vladimiro; Hernandez-Becerra, Josafat Alberto; Romani, Santina; Rodriguez-Estrada, María Teresa; Galindo, Hugo Sergio García

    2015-06-10

    The oxidative stability of phytosterols during microwave heating was evaluated. Two different model systems (a solid film made with a phytosterol mixture (PSF) and a liquid mixture of phytosterols and triolein (1:100, PS + TAG (triacylglycerol))) were heated for 1.5, 3, 6, 12, 20, and 30 min at 1000 W. PS degraded faster when they were microwaved alone than in the presence of TAG, following a first-order kinetic model. Up to 6 min, no phytosterol oxidation products (POPs) were generated in both systems. At 12 min of heating, the POP content reached a higher level in PSF (90.96 μg/mg of phytosterols) than in PS + TAG (22.66 μg/mg of phytosterols), but after 30 min of treatment, the opposite trend was observed. 7-Keto derivates were the most abundant POPs in both systems. The extent of phytosterol degradation depends on both the heating time and the surrounding medium, which can impact the quality and safety of the food product destined to microwave heating/cooking. PMID:25973984

  4. Oxidizer heat exchanger component test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanic, P. G.

    1988-01-01

    The RL10-IIB engine, is capable of multimode thrust operation. The engine operates at two low-thrust levels: tank head idle (THI), approximately 1 to 2 percent of full thrust; and pumped idle, 10 percent of full thrust. Operation at THI provides vehicle propellant settling thrust and efficient thermal conditioning; PI operation provides vehicle tank prepressurization and maneuver thrust for low-g deployment. Stable combustion of the RL10-IIB engine during the low-thrust operating modes can be accomplished by using a heat exchanger to supply gaseous oxygen to the propellant injector. The oxidized heat exchanger (OHE) vaporizes the liquid oxygen using hydrogen as the energy source. This report summarizes the test activity and post-test data analysis for two possible heat exchangers, each of which employs a completely different design philosophy. One design makes use of a low-heat transfer (PHT) approach in combination with a volume to attenuate pressure and flow oscillations. The test data showed that the LHT unit satisfied the oxygen exit quality of 0.95 or greater in both the THI and PI modes while maintaining stability. The HHT unit fulfilled all PI requirements; data for THI satisfactory operation is implied from experimental data that straddle the exact THI operating point.

  5. Heat engine generator control system

    DOEpatents

    Rajashekara, K.; Gorti, B.V.; McMullen, S.R.; Raibert, R.J.

    1998-05-12

    An electrical power generation system includes a heat engine having an output member operatively coupled to the rotor of a dynamoelectric machine. System output power is controlled by varying an electrical parameter of the dynamoelectric machine. A power request signal is related to an engine speed and the electrical parameter is varied in accordance with a speed control loop. Initially, the sense of change in the electrical parameter in response to a change in the power request signal is opposite that required to effectuate a steady state output power consistent with the power request signal. Thereafter, the electrical parameter is varied to converge the output member speed to the speed known to be associated with the desired electrical output power. 8 figs.

  6. Heat engine generator control system

    DOEpatents

    Rajashekara, Kaushik; Gorti, Bhanuprasad Venkata; McMullen, Steven Robert; Raibert, Robert Joseph

    1998-01-01

    An electrical power generation system includes a heat engine having an output member operatively coupled to the rotor of a dynamoelectric machine. System output power is controlled by varying an electrical parameter of the dynamoelectric machine. A power request signal is related to an engine speed and the electrical parameter is varied in accordance with a speed control loop. Initially, the sense of change in the electrical parameter in response to a change in the power request signal is opposite that required to effectuate a steady state output power consistent with the power request signal. Thereafter, the electrical parameter is varied to converge the output member speed to the speed known to be associated with the desired electrical output power.

  7. Oxidizer heat exchanger component testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kmiec, T.; Kanic, P.

    1986-01-01

    As part of the RL10 Rocket Engine Product Improvement Program, Oxidizer Heat Exchanger (OHE) stages 1, 2, and 3 were designed and fabricated during late 1983 and early 1984. The purpose of the OHE is to provide gaseous oxygen to the propellant injector for stable engine operation at tank head idle and pumped idle operating modes. This report summarizes the OHE stages 1 and 3 rig testing, and includes the separation of the stage 1-and-2 assembly and the remanifolding of stage 1. The OHE performance analysis and analytical model modifications for both stages are also presented. The flow tests were accomplished during the time period from 9 October 1984 to 12 November 1984.

  8. Staged heating by oxidation of carbonaceous material

    DOEpatents

    Knell, Everett W.; Green, Norman W.

    1978-01-31

    A carbonaceous material is pyrolyzed in the presence of a particulate source of heat obtained by the partial oxidation of a carbon containing solid residue of the carbonaceous material. The heat obtained from the oxidation of the carbon containing solid residue is maximized by preheating the carbon containing solid residue with a hot gas stream obtained by oxidizing the gaseous combustion products of the carbon containing solid residue.

  9. Control system for fluid heated steam generator

    DOEpatents

    Boland, James F.; Koenig, John F.

    1985-01-01

    A control system for controlling the location of the nucleate-boiling region in a fluid heated steam generator comprises means for measuring the temperature gradient (change in temperature per unit length) of the heating fluid along the steam generator; means for determining a control variable in accordance with a predetermined function of temperature gradients and for generating a control signal in response thereto; and means for adjusting the feedwater flow rate in accordance with the control signal.

  10. Control system for fluid heated steam generator

    DOEpatents

    Boland, J.F.; Koenig, J.F.

    1984-05-29

    A control system for controlling the location of the nucleate-boiling region in a fluid heated steam generator comprises means for measuring the temperature gradient (change in temperature per unit length) of the heating fluid along the steam generator; means for determining a control variable in accordance with a predetermined function of temperature gradients and for generating a control signal in response thereto; and means for adjusting the feedwater flow rate in accordance with the control signal.

  11. Waste heat generation: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Yeşiller, Nazli; Hanson, James L; Yee, Emma H

    2015-08-01

    A comprehensive review of heat generation in various types of wastes and of the thermal regime of waste containment facilities is provided in this paper. Municipal solid waste (MSW), MSW incineration ash, and mining wastes were included in the analysis. Spatial and temporal variations of waste temperatures, thermal gradients, thermal properties of wastes, average temperature differentials, and heat generation values are provided. Heat generation was influenced by climatic conditions, mean annual earth temperatures, waste temperatures at the time of placement, cover conditions, and inherent heat generation potential of the specific wastes. Time to onset of heat generation varied between months and years, whereas timelines for overall duration of heat generation varied between years and decades. For MSW, measured waste temperatures were as high as 60-90°C and as low as -6°C. MSW incinerator ash temperatures varied between 5 and 87°C. Mining waste temperatures were in the range of -25 to 65°C. In the wastes analyzed, upward heat flow toward the surface was more prominent than downward heat flow toward the subsurface. Thermal gradients generally were higher for MSW and incinerator ash and lower for mining waste. Based on thermal properties, MSW had insulative qualities (low thermal conductivity), while mining wastes typically were relatively conductive (high thermal conductivity) with ash having intermediate qualities. Heat generation values ranged from -8.6 to 83.1MJ/m(3) and from 0.6 to 72.6MJ/m(3) for MSW and mining waste, respectively and was 72.6MJ/m(3) for ash waste. Conductive thermal losses were determined to range from 13 to 1111MJ/m(3)yr. The data and analysis provided in this review paper can be used in the investigation of heat generation and thermal regime of a wide range of wastes and waste containment facilities located in different climatic regions. PMID:25962825

  12. Heat-generating nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, G.; Fajeau, M.; Labrousse, M.; Lerouge, B.; Minguet, J.

    1981-01-20

    A reactor vessel filled with coolant fluid is divided by a wall into an upper region and a lower region which contains the reactor core, part of the coolant fluid in the upper region being injected into the lower region. The injection flow rate is regulated as a function of the variations in pressure in the lower region by means of a baffle-plate container which communicates with a leak-tight chamber and with a storage reservoir, a flow of fluid from the chamber to the reservoir being established only at the time of a reduction in the rate of injection into the container. The reactor can be employed for the production of hot water which is passed through a heat exchanger and supplied to a heating installation.

  13. A fully coupled model for water-gas-heat reactive transport with methane oxidation in landfill covers.

    PubMed

    Ng, C W W; Feng, S; Liu, H W

    2015-03-01

    Methane oxidation in landfill covers is a complex process involving water, gas and heat transfer as well as microbial oxidation. The coupled phenomena of microbial oxidation, water, gas, and heat transfer are not fully understood. In this study, a new model is developed that incorporates water-gas-heat coupled reactive transport in unsaturated soil with methane oxidation. Effects of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat are included. The model is calibrated using published data from a laboratory soil column test. Moreover, a series of parametric studies are carried out to investigate the influence of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat, initial water content on methane oxidation efficiency. Computed and measured results of gas concentration and methane oxidation rate are consistent. It is found that the coupling effects between water-gas-heat transfer and methane oxidation are significant. Ignoring microbial oxidation-generated water and heat can result in a significant difference in methane oxidation efficiency by 100%. PMID:25489976

  14. Heat Management in Thermoelectric Power Generators.

    PubMed

    Zebarjadi, M

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric power generators are used to convert heat into electricity. Like any other heat engine, the performance of a thermoelectric generator increases as the temperature difference on the sides increases. It is generally assumed that as more heat is forced through the thermoelectric legs, their performance increases. Therefore, insulations are typically used to minimize the heat losses and to confine the heat transport through the thermoelectric legs. In this paper we show that to some extend it is beneficial to purposely open heat loss channels in order to establish a larger temperature gradient and therefore to increase the overall efficiency and achieve larger electric power output. We define a modified Biot number (Bi) as an indicator of requirements for sidewall insulation. We show cooling from sidewalls increases the efficiency for Bi values less than one, and decreases the efficiency for Bi values larger than one. PMID:27033717

  15. Heat Management in Thermoelectric Power Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebarjadi, M.

    2016-04-01

    Thermoelectric power generators are used to convert heat into electricity. Like any other heat engine, the performance of a thermoelectric generator increases as the temperature difference on the sides increases. It is generally assumed that as more heat is forced through the thermoelectric legs, their performance increases. Therefore, insulations are typically used to minimize the heat losses and to confine the heat transport through the thermoelectric legs. In this paper we show that to some extend it is beneficial to purposely open heat loss channels in order to establish a larger temperature gradient and therefore to increase the overall efficiency and achieve larger electric power output. We define a modified Biot number (Bi) as an indicator of requirements for sidewall insulation. We show cooling from sidewalls increases the efficiency for Bi values less than one, and decreases the efficiency for Bi values larger than one.

  16. Heat Management in Thermoelectric Power Generators

    PubMed Central

    Zebarjadi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric power generators are used to convert heat into electricity. Like any other heat engine, the performance of a thermoelectric generator increases as the temperature difference on the sides increases. It is generally assumed that as more heat is forced through the thermoelectric legs, their performance increases. Therefore, insulations are typically used to minimize the heat losses and to confine the heat transport through the thermoelectric legs. In this paper we show that to some extend it is beneficial to purposely open heat loss channels in order to establish a larger temperature gradient and therefore to increase the overall efficiency and achieve larger electric power output. We define a modified Biot number (Bi) as an indicator of requirements for sidewall insulation. We show cooling from sidewalls increases the efficiency for Bi values less than one, and decreases the efficiency for Bi values larger than one. PMID:27033717

  17. Heat generation and transport in the heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beek, Johannes H. G. M.

    1996-05-01

    During contraction of the heart, a large part of the energy in energy metabolism is converted to heat. The article presents the results of measurements of mechanical stresses in the myocardium and blood vessels, temperatures and rate of heat generation. Experimental data correlate well with the numerical solutions of the biothermal problem.

  18. OXIDE DISPERSION-STRENGTHENED HEAT EXCHANGER TUBING

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Mark A.

    2001-11-06

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys (e.g. the INCOLOY{reg_sign} MA956 alloy) are known for their excellent high temperature properties and are prime candidate materials for the construction of very high temperature heat exchangers that will be used in Vision 21 power plants. The main limitation of these materials is their poor weldability. Commercially available ODS tubing also tends to exhibit relatively poor circumferential creep strength due to current processing practices resulting in a fine grain size in the transverse direction. Thus far, these two characteristics of the ODS tubing have restricted its use to mostly non-pressure containing applications. The objectives of this program are to develop: (a) an MA956 tube with sufficient circumferential creep strength for long term use as heat exchanger tubing for very high temperatures; (b) a welding technique(s) for producing adequate joints between an MA956 tube and an MA956 tube, and an MA956 tube and an INCONEL 601 tube; (c) the bending strain limits, below which recrystallization will not occur in a MA956 tube during normal operation; and (d) the high temperature corrosion limits for the MA956 alloy with respect to working-fluid side and fireside environments. Also, this program seeks to generate data for use by heat exchanger designers and the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, and perform an analysis of the mechanical property, tube bending, and corrosion data in order to determine the implications on the design of a very high temperature heat exchanger (T>1093 C/2000 F). After one year, work is currently being conducted on increasing the circumferential strength of a MA956 tube, developing joining techniques for this material, determining the tube bending strain limits, and establishing the high temperature corrosion parameters for the MA956 alloy in environments expected to be present in Vision 21 power plants. Work in these areas will is continuing into the next fiscal year, with success

  19. Integrated Heat Switch/Oxide Sorption Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven

    1989-01-01

    Thermally-driven, nonmechanical compressor uses container filled with compressed praseodymium cerium oxide powder (PrCeOx) to provide high-pressure flow of oxygen gas for driving closed-cycle Joule-Thomson-expansion refrigeration unit. Integrated heat switch/oxide sorption compressor has no moving parts except check valves, which control flow of oxygen gas between compressor and closed-cycle Joule-Thomson refrigeration system. Oxygen expelled from sorbent at high pressure by evacuating heat-switch gap and turning on heater.

  20. Graphene oxide reduction by microwave heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Angela; Carotenuto, Gianfranco

    2016-05-01

    The possibility to prepare thermal reduced graphene oxide (Tr-GO) colloidal suspensions by microwave heating of graphene oxide (GO) suspensions in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) has been investigated. According to transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and absorption and emission spectroscopy characterization, such a type of thermal reduction does not lead to graphene quantum dots formation because only mono-functional oxygen-containing groups are removed.

  1. Heat flow and heat generation in greenstone belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drury, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Heat flow has been measured in Precambrian shields in both greenstone belts and crystalline terrains. Values are generally low, reflecting the great age and tectonic stability of the shields; they range typically between 30 and 50 mW/sq m, although extreme values of 18 and 79 mW/sq m have been reported. For large areas of the Earth's surface that are assumed to have been subjected to a common thermotectonic event, plots of heat flow against heat generation appear to be linear, although there may be considerable scatter in the data. The relationship is expressed as: Q = Q sub o + D A sub o in which Q is the observed heat flow, A sub o is the measured heat generation at the surface, Q sub o is the reduced heat flow from the lower crust and mantle, and D, which has the dimension of length, represents a scale depth for the distribution of radiogenic elements. Most authors have not used data from greenstone belts in attempting to define the relationship within shields, considering them unrepresentative and preferring to use data from relatively homogeneous crystalline rocks. A discussion follows.

  2. OXIDANT FORMATION IN THE GENERATION OF OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone samples generated by UV photolysis and silent electric discharge upon air or oxygen were examined to determine if other oxidants were formed. Chemical and physical methods (IR and UV spectroscopy) failed to show the presence of such oxidants. Absence of such oxidants was al...

  3. Solar steam generation by heat localization.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Hadi; Ni, George; Marconnet, Amy Marie; Loomis, James; Yerci, Selcuk; Miljkovic, Nenad; Chen, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Currently, steam generation using solar energy is based on heating bulk liquid to high temperatures. This approach requires either costly high optical concentrations leading to heat loss by the hot bulk liquid and heated surfaces or vacuum. New solar receiver concepts such as porous volumetric receivers or nanofluids have been proposed to decrease these losses. Here we report development of an approach and corresponding material structure for solar steam generation while maintaining low optical concentration and keeping the bulk liquid at low temperature with no vacuum. We achieve solar thermal efficiency up to 85% at only 10 kW m(-2). This high performance results from four structure characteristics: absorbing in the solar spectrum, thermally insulating, hydrophilic and interconnected pores. The structure concentrates thermal energy and fluid flow where needed for phase change and minimizes dissipated energy. This new structure provides a novel approach to harvesting solar energy for a broad range of phase-change applications. PMID:25043613

  4. Two Dimensional Polymer That Generates Nitric Oxide.

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F.; Koren, Amy B.

    2005-10-04

    A polymeric composition that generates nitric oxide and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate nonthrombogenic by applying a coating of the polymeric composition to the substrate are disclosed. The composition comprises: (1) a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, and (ii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups; and (2) a plurality of nitric oxide generating functional groups associated with the crosslinked chemical combination. Once exposed to a physiological environment, the coating generates nitric oxide thereby inhibiting platelet aggregation. In one embodiment, the nitric oxide generating functional groups are provided by a nitrated compound (e.g., nitrocellulose) imbedded in the polymeric composition. In another embodiment, the nitric oxide generating functional groups comprise N2O2- groups covalently bonded to amino groups on the polymer.

  5. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2005-07-29

    Electricity generated by distributed energy resources (DER) located close to end-use loads has the potential to meet consumer requirements more efficiently than the existing centralized grid. Installation of DER allows consumers to circumvent the costs associated with transmission congestion and other non-energy costs of electricity delivery and potentially to take advantage of market opportunities to purchase energy when attractive. On-site thermal power generation is typically less efficient than central station generation, but by avoiding non-fuel costs of grid power and utilizing combined heat and power (CHP) applications, i.e., recovering heat from small-scale on-site generation to displace fuel purchases, then DER can become attractive to a strictly cost-minimizing consumer. In previous efforts, the decisions facing typical commercial consumers have been addressed using a mixed-integer linear programme, the DER Customer Adoption Model(DER-CAM). Given the site s energy loads, utility tariff structure, and information (both technical and financial) on candidate DER technologies, DER-CAM minimizes the overall energy cost for a test year by selecting the units to install and determining their hourly operating schedules. In this paper, the capabilities of DER-CAM are enhanced by the inclusion of the option to store recovered low-grade heat. By being able to keep an inventory of heat for use in subsequent periods, sites are able to lower costs even further by reducing off-peak generation and relying on storage. This and other effects of storages are demonstrated by analysis of five typical commercial buildings in San Francisco, California, and an estimate of the cost per unit capacity of heat storage is calculated.

  6. Effect of heat treatments on oxidation kinetics in AZ91 and AM60 magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Barrena, M.I. Gomez de Salazar, J.M.; Matesanz, L.; Soria, A.

    2011-10-15

    The effect of heat treatments on a non protective atmosphere (air) on the morphology and composition of the oxide in AM60 and AZ91 alloys has been evaluated. With the aim of evaluating the loss of alloying elements during heat treatment, a study of these alloys has been carried out using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). In order to determine the nature of the oxides the reaction products generated were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Results show that the nature and morphology of the oxides generated are related to the temperature and the time of the heating conditions applied. - Highlights: {yields} The effect of heat treatments on the oxide growth in Mg-Al alloys has been evaluated. {yields} The nature and morphology of the oxides have been characterized. {yields} These oxides are associated to the time and the temperature conditions.

  7. Nanoparticle heating: nanoscale to bulk effects of electromagnetically heated iron oxide and gold for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhenpeng; Etheridge, Michael; Bischof, John C.

    2011-03-01

    Biomedical applications of nanoparticle heating range in scale from molecular activation (i.e. molecular beacons, protein denaturation, lipid melting and drug release), cellular heating (i.e. nanophotolysis and membrane permeability control and rupture) to whole tumor heating (deep and superficial). This work will present a review on the heating of two classes of biologically compatible metallic nanoparticles: iron oxide and gold with particular focus on spatial and temporal scales of the heating event. The size range of nanoparticles under discussion will focus predominantly in the 10 - 200 nm diameter size range. Mechanisms of heating range from Néelian and Brownian relaxation due to magnetic susceptibility at 100s of kHz, optical absorption due to VIS and NIR lasers and "Joule" heating at higher frequency RF (13.56 MHz). The heat generation of individual nanoparticles and the thermal responses at nano-, micro-, and macroscales are presented. This review will also discuss how to estimate a specific absorption rate (SAR, W/g) based on individual nanoparticles heating in bulk samples. Experimental setups are designed to measure the SAR and the results are compared with theoretical predictions.

  8. ULF Generation by Modulated Ionospheric Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Labenski, J.; Wallace, T.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2013-12-01

    Modulated ionospheric heating experiments designed to generate ULF waves using the HAARP heater have been conducted since 2007. Artificial ULF waves in the Pc1 frequency range were observed from space and by ground induction magnetometers located in the vicinity of the heater as well as at long distances. Two distinct generation mechanisms of artificial ULF waves were identified. The first was electroject modulation under geomagnetically disturbed conditions. The second was pressure modulation in the E and F regions of the ionosphere under quiet conditions. Ground detections of ULF waves near the heater included both Shear Alfven waves and Magnetosonic waves generated by electrojet and/or pressure modulations. Distant ULF detections involved Magnetosonic wave propagation in the Alfvenic duct with pressure modulation as the most likely source. Summary of our observations and theoretical interpretations will be presented at the meeting. We would like to acknowledge the support provided by the staff at the HAARP facility during our ULF experiments.

  9. Myeloperoxidase-generated oxidants and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Podrez, E A; Abu-Soud, H M; Hazen, S L

    2000-06-15

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory process where oxidative damage within the artery wall is implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. Mononuclear phagocytes, an inflammatory cell capable of generating a variety of oxidizing species, are early components of arterial lesions. Their normal functions include host defense and surveillance through regulated generation of diffusible radical species, reactive oxygen or nitrogen species, and HOCl (hypochlorous acid). However, under certain circumstances an excess of these oxidizing species can overwhelm local antioxidant defenses and lead to oxidant stress and oxidative tissue injury, processes implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. This review focuses on oxidation reactions catalyzed by myeloperoxidase (MPO), an abundant heme protein secreted from activated phagocytes which is present in human atherosclerotic lesions. Over the past several years, significant evidence has accrued demonstrating that MPO is one pathway for protein and lipoprotein oxidation during the evolution of cardiovascular disease. Multiple distinct products of MPO are enriched in human atherosclerotic lesions and LDL recovered from human atheroma. However, the biological consequences of these MPO-catalyzed reactions in vivo are still unclear. Here we discuss evidence for the occurrence of MPO-catalyzed oxidation reactions in vivo and the potential role MPO plays in both normal host defenses and inflammatory diseases like atherosclerosis. PMID:10946213

  10. Molybdenum oxide electrodes for thermoelectric generators

    DOEpatents

    Schmatz, Duane J.

    1989-01-01

    The invention is directed to a composite article suitable for use in thermoelectric generators. The article comprises a thin film comprising molybdenum oxide as an electrode deposited by physical deposition techniques onto solid electrolyte. The invention is also directed to the method of making same.

  11. Generator-absorber-heat exchange heat transfer apparatus and method and use thereof in a heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Zawacki, Thomas S.; Marsala, Joseph

    1994-11-29

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use the working solution of the absorption system for the heat transfer medium.

  12. Heat exchanger for power generation equipment

    DOEpatents

    Nirmalan, Nirm Velumylm; Bowman, Michael John

    2005-06-14

    A heat exchanger for a turbine is provided wherein the heat exchanger comprises a heat transfer cell comprising a sheet of material having two opposed ends and two opposed sides. In addition, a plurality of concavities are disposed on a surface portion of the sheet of material so as to cause hydrodynamic interactions and affect a heat transfer rate of the turbine between a fluid and the concavities when the fluid is disposed over the concavities.

  13. Heating subsurface formations by oxidizing fuel on a fuel carrier

    DOEpatents

    Costello, Michael; Vinegar, Harold J.

    2012-10-02

    A method of heating a portion of a subsurface formation includes drawing fuel on a fuel carrier through an opening formed in the formation. Oxidant is supplied to the fuel at one or more locations in the opening. The fuel is combusted with the oxidant to provide heat to the formation.

  14. Entropy and heat generation of lithium cells/batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Songrui, Wang

    2016-01-01

    The methods and techniques commonly used in investigating the change of entropy and heat generation in Li cells/batteries are introduced, as are the measurements, calculations and purposes. The changes of entropy and heat generation are concomitant with the use of Li cells/batteries. In order to improve the management and the application of Li cells/batteries, especially for large scale power batteries, the quantitative investigations of the change of entropy and heat generating are necessary.

  15. Generator-absorber-heat exchange heat transfer apparatus and method and use thereof in a heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Zawacki, Thomas S.

    1998-07-21

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use, as the heat transfer medium, the working fluid of the absorption system taken from the generator at a location where the working fluid has a rich liquor concentration.

  16. Generator-absorber-heat exchange heat transfer apparatus and method and use thereof in a heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, B.A.; Zawacki, T.S.

    1998-07-21

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use, as the heat transfer medium, the working fluid of the absorption system taken from the generator at a location where the working fluid has a rich liquor concentration. 5 figs.

  17. Generator-absorber-heat exchange heat transfer apparatus and method and use thereof in a heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Zawacki, Thomas S.

    1996-12-03

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use the working solution of the absorption system for the heat transfer medium. A combination of weak and rich liquor working solution is used as the heat transfer medium.

  18. SCALE ANALYSIS OF CONVECTIVE MELTING WITH INTERNAL HEAT GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    John Crepeau

    2011-03-01

    Using a scale analysis approach, we model phase change (melting) for pure materials which generate internal heat for small Stefan numbers (approximately one). The analysis considers conduction in the solid phase and natural convection, driven by internal heat generation, in the liquid regime. The model is applied for a constant surface temperature boundary condition where the melting temperature is greater than the surface temperature in a cylindrical geometry. We show the time scales in which conduction and convection heat transfer dominate.

  19. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen Minh

    2002-03-31

    This report summarizes the work performed by Honeywell during the January 2002 to March 2002 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a turbogenerator. For this reporting period the following activities have been carried out: {lg_bullet} Conceptual system design trade studies were performed {lg_bullet} System-level performance model was created {lg_bullet} Dynamic control models are being developed {lg_bullet} Mechanical properties of candidate heat exchanger materials were investigated {lg_bullet} SOFC performance mapping as a function of flow rate and pressure was completed

  20. Heat-Pipe-Associated Localized Thermoelectric Power Generation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pan-Jo; Rhi, Seok-Ho; Lee, Kye-Bock; Hwang, Hyun-Chang; Lee, Ji-Su; Jang, Ju-Chan; Lee, Wook-Hyun; Lee, Ki-Woo

    2014-06-01

    The present study focused on how to improve the maximum power output of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) system and move heat to any suitable space using a TEG associated with a loop thermosyphon (loop-type heat pipe). An experimental study was carried out to investigate the power output, the temperature difference of the thermoelectric module (TEM), and the heat transfer performance associated with the characteristic of the researched heat pipe. Currently, internal combustion engines lose more than 35% of their fuel energy as recyclable heat in the exhaust gas, but it is not easy to recycle waste heat using TEGs because of the limited space in vehicles. There are various advantages to use of TEGs over other power sources, such as the absence of moving parts, a long lifetime, and a compact system configuration. The present study presents a novel TEG concept to transfer heat from the heat source to the sink. This technology can transfer waste heat to any location. This simple and novel design for a TEG can be applied to future hybrid cars. The present TEG system with a heat pipe can transfer heat and generate power of around 1.8 V with T TEM = 58°C. The heat transfer performance of a loop-type heat pipe with various working fluids was investigated, with water at high heat flux (90 W) and 0.05% TiO2 nanofluid at low heat flux (30 W to 70 W) showing the best performance in terms of power generation. The heat pipe can transfer the heat to any location where the TEM is installed.

  1. Heat resistant polymers of oxidized styrylphosphine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. J. L. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Homopolymers, copolymers and terpolymers of a styrene based monomer are prepared by polymerizing at least one oxidized styrylphosphine monomer or by polymerizing p-diphenylphosphinestyrene and then oxidizing the polymerized monomer with an organoazide. Copolymers can also be prepared by copolymerizing styrene with at least one oxidized styrylphosphine monomer. Flame resistant vinyl based polymers whose degradation products are non toxic and non corrosive are obtained.

  2. Copper oxide aerosol: generation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Peoples, S M; McCarthy, J F; Chen, L C; Eppelsheimer, D; Amdur, M O

    1988-06-01

    Effluent gases from high temperature systems such as fossil fuel combustion and pyrometallurgical processes contain inorganic material which has the potential to interact with sulfur dioxide (SO2) on the surface of particles to form an irritant aerosol. The submicron fraction of this inorganic material is especially important as the fine particles may penetrate deep into the lung and cause serious health effects. A laboratory furnace was designed to produce a submicrometer copper oxide aerosol to stimulate emissions from copper smelters and other pyrometallurgical operations. The ultimate aim of this research is to investigate the interaction of SO2 and the copper oxide aerosol at different temperatures and humidities in order to determine the reaction products and their potential health effects upon inhalation. The initial work, as presented in this paper, was to reproducibly generate a submicrometer copper oxide aerosol and to characterize it in terms of size, morphology and composition. Two experimental regimes were set up. One admitted filtered air, without water vapor, into the furnace, and the other admitted filtered air and water vapor. The size and morphology of the aerosols were determined using an electrical aerosol analyzer and transmission electron microscopy. The particles appear as chain aggregates with a count median diameter of 0.026 micron when no water vapor was added and 0.031 micron when water vapor was added into the furnace. Composition of the aerosol was determined using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The aerosol, with or without water in the furnace, consists of a mixture of copper(I) oxide and copper(II) hydroxide. PMID:3400592

  3. Low heat transfer oxidizer heat exchanger design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanic, P. G.; Kmiec, T. D.; Peckham, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    The RL10-IIB engine, a derivative of the RLIO, is capable of multi-mode thrust operation. This engine operates at two low thrust levels: tank head idle (THI), which is approximately 1 to 2 percent of full thrust, and pumped idle (PI), which is 10 percent of full thrust. Operation at THI provides vehicle propellant settling thrust and efficient engine thermal conditioning; PI operation provides vehicle tank pre-pressurization and maneuver thrust for log-g deployment. Stable combustion of the RL10-IIB engine at THI and PI thrust levels can be accomplished by providing gaseous oxygen at the propellant injector. Using gaseous hydrogen from the thrust chamber jacket as an energy source, a heat exchanger can be used to vaporize liquid oxygen without creating flow instability. This report summarizes the design and analysis of a United Aircraft Products (UAP) low-rate heat transfer heat exchanger concept for the RL10-IIB rocket engine. The design represents a second iteration of the RL10-IIB heat exchanger investigation program. The design and analysis of the first heat exchanger effort is presented in more detail in NASA CR-174857. Testing of the previous design is detailed in NASA CR-179487.

  4. Self-heating induced instability of oxide thin film transistors under dynamic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kise, Kahori; Fujii, Mami N.; Urakawa, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Haruka; Kawashima, Emi; Tomai, Shigekazu; Yano, Koki; Wang, Dapeng; Furuta, Mamoru; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Uraoka, Yukiharu

    2016-01-01

    Degradation caused by Joule heating of transparent amorphous oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors (TFTs) is an important issue for display technology. Deep understanding of the mechanism of self-heating degradation generated by driving pulse voltage will pave the way for the development of highly reliable flexible displays. In this work, by using a pseudo interval measurement method, we examined the relationship of the highest and the lowest heating temperature in pulse 1 cycle and frequency. These self-heating converged to a constant temperature under pulse voltage applied at 1 kHz. Moreover, the long-term reliability under positive-bias stress voltage at 1 kHz of low converged temperature condition was improved relative to that of the stress voltage at 10 Hz of dynamic temperature change condition. We discussed the degradation mechanism of oxide TFTs generated by pulse voltage, and clarified that the degradation was accelerated by thermionic emission which occurred at low frequency.

  5. Conceptual study of measures against heat generation for TRU fuel fabrication system

    SciTech Connect

    Kawaguchi, Koichi; Namekawa, Takashi

    2007-07-01

    To lower the reprocessing cost and the environmental burden, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has developed low decontamination TRU fuel fabrication system. TRU fuel contains MA of 1.2 to 5 wt% and its decay heat is estimated a few tens W/kg-HM. As the heat affects fuel quality through oxidation of fuel material and members, it is necessary to remove decay heat. In this work, authors designed concepts of the measures against heat generation at typical equipments using with the thermal hydraulics analysis technique. As a result, it is shown that it is possible to cool fuel materials with specific heat generation up to 20 W/kg-HM enough, though more detailed study is required for comprehensive equipments. (authors)

  6. Generator powered electrically heated diesel particulate filter

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore, Jr., Michael J

    2014-03-18

    A control circuit for a vehicle powertrain includes a switch that selectivity interrupts current flow between a first terminal and a second terminal. A first power source provides power to the first terminal and a second power source provides power to the second terminal and to a heater of a heated diesel particulate filter (DPF). The switch is opened during a DPF regeneration cycle to prevent the first power source from being loaded by the heater while the heater is energized.

  7. Method and apparatus for enhanced heat recovery from steam generators and water heaters

    DOEpatents

    Knight, Richard A.; Rabovitser, Iosif K.; Wang, Dexin

    2006-06-27

    A heating system having a steam generator or water heater, at least one economizer, at least one condenser and at least one oxidant heater arranged in a manner so as to reduce the temperature and humidity of the exhaust gas (flue gas) stream and recover a major portion of the associated sensible and latent heat. The recovered heat is returned to the steam generator or water heater so as to increase the quantity of steam generated or water heated per quantity of fuel consumed. In addition, a portion of the water vapor produced by combustion of fuel is reclaimed for use as feed water, thereby reducing the make-up water requirement for the system.

  8. Method of forming oxide coatings. [for solar collector heating panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    This invention is concerned with an improved plating process for covering a substrate with a black metal oxide film. The invention is particularly directed to making a heating panel for a solar collector. A compound is electrodeposited from an aqueous solution containing cobalt metal salts onto a metal substrate. This compound is converted during plating into a black, highly absorbing oxide coating which contains hydrated oxides. This is achieved by the inclusion of an oxidizing agent in the plating bath. The inclusion of an oxidizing agent in the plating bath is contrary to standard electroplating practice. The hydrated oxides are converted to oxides by treatment in a hot bath, such as boiling water. An oxidizing agent may be added to the hot liquid treating bath.

  9. Constructal design for a rectangular body with nonuniform heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Huijun; Chen, Lingen; Xie, Zhihui; Sun, Fengrui

    2016-08-01

    Nonuniform heat generation models with constant and variable cross-section high-conductivity channels (HCCs) are built in this paper. The minimum dimensionless peak temperature (DPT) is taken as the optimization objective. Different from the models with uniform heat generation and constant cross-section HCCs built by Bejan (1997) and Ledezma et al. (1997), the model with nonuniform heat generation and variable cross-section HCC is more practical and can help to improve the heat conduction performance of a thermal system. The results show that for the rectangular first-order assembly (RFOA) with nonuniform heat generation, there exist both the optimal shape of the RFOA and the optimal HCCs width ratio, which lead to the minimum DPT. They are different from those with uniform heat generation. When the heat is nonuniformly generated in the RFOA, the minimum DPT of the RFOA with variable cross-section HCC is reduced by 12.11% compared with that with constant cross-section HCC. Moreover, the numerical results are also verified by the analytical method.

  10. Denaturation and Oxidative Stability of Hemp Seed (Cannabis sativa L.) Protein Isolate as Affected by Heat Treatment.

    PubMed

    Raikos, Vassilios; Duthie, Garry; Ranawana, Viren

    2015-09-01

    The present study investigated the impact of heat treatments on the denaturation and oxidative stability of hemp seed protein during simulated gastrointestinal digestion (GID). Heat-denatured hemp protein isolate (HPI) solutions were prepared by heating HPI (2 mg/ml, pH 6.8) to 40, 60, 80 and 100 °C for 10 min. Heat-induced denaturation of the protein isolates was monitored by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Heating HPI at temperatures above 80 °C significantly reduced solubility and led to the formation of large protein aggregates. The isolates were then subjected to in vitro GID and the oxidative stability of the generated peptides was investigated. Heating did not significantly affect the formation of oxidation products during GID. The results suggest that heat treatments should ideally remain below 80 °C if heat stability and solubility of HPI are to be preserved. PMID:26142888

  11. Nitric oxide generating/releasing materials

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hongying; Nacharaju, Parimala; Friedman, Adam; Friedman, Joel M

    2015-01-01

    Harnessing the impressive therapeutic potential of nitric oxide (NO) remains an ongoing challenge. This paper describes several of the current strategies both with respect to the underlying chemistry and physics and to the applications where they have shown promise. Included in this overview are molecular systems such as NONOates that release NO through chemical reactions and delivery vehicles such as nanoparticles that can generate, store, transport and deliver NO and related bioactive forms of NO such as nitrosothiols. Although there has been much positive movement, it is clear that we are only at the early stages of knowing how to precisely produce, transport and deliver to targeted sites therapeutic levels of NO and related molecules. PMID:26855790

  12. MEMS CLOSED CHAMBER HEAT ENGINE AND ELECTRIC GENERATOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A heat engine, preferably combined with an electric generator, and advantageously implemented using micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) technologies as an array of one or more individual heat engine/generators. The heat engine is based on a closed chamber containing a motive medium, preferably a gas; means for alternately enabling and disabling transfer of thermal energy from a heat source to the motive medium; and at least one movable side of the chamber that moves in response to thermally-induced expansion and contraction of the motive medium, thereby converting thermal energy to oscillating movement. The electrical generator is combined with the heat engine to utilize movement of the movable side to convert mechanical work to electrical energy, preferably using electrostatic interaction in a generator capacitor. Preferably at least one heat transfer side of the chamber is placed alternately into and out of contact with the heat source by a motion capacitor, thereby alternately enabling and disabling conductive transfer of heat to the motive medium.

  13. Solid–Liquid Phase Change Driven by Internal Heat Generation

    SciTech Connect

    John Crepeau; Ali s. Siahpush

    2012-07-01

    This article presents results of solid-liquid phase change, the Stefan Problem, where melting is driven internal heat generation, in a cylindrical geometry. The comparison between a quasi-static analytical solution for Stefan numbers less than one and numerical solutions shows good agreement. The computational results of phase change with internal heat generation show how convection cells form in the liquid region. A scale analysis of the same problem shows four distinct regions of the melting process.

  14. Oxidation and emittance of superalloys in heat shield applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, K. E.; Clark, R. K.; Unnam, J.

    1986-01-01

    Recently developed superalloys that form alumina coatings have a high potential for heat shield applications for advanced aerospace vehicles at temperatures above 1095C. Both INCOLOY alloy MA 956 (of the Inco Alloys International, Inc.), an iron-base oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloy, and CABOT alloy No. 214 (of the Cabot Corporation), an alumina-forming nickel-chromium alloy, have good oxidation resistance and good elevated temperature strength. The oxidation resistance of both alloys has been attributed to the formation of a thin alumina layer (alpha-Al2O3) at the surface. Emittance and oxidation data were obtained for simulated Space Shuttle reentry conditions using a hypersonic arc-heated wind tunnel. The surface oxides and substrate alloys were characterized using X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy with an energy-dispersive X-ray analysis unit. The mass loss and emittance characteristics of the two alloys are discussed.

  15. Gas Generation from Actinide Oxide Materials

    SciTech Connect

    George Bailey; Elizabeth Bluhm; John Lyman; Richard Mason; Mark Paffett; Gary Polansky; G. D. Roberson; Martin Sherman; Kirk Veirs; Laura Worl

    2000-12-01

    This document captures relevant work performed in support of stabilization, packaging, and long term storage of plutonium metals and oxides. It concentrates on the issue of gas generation with specific emphasis on gas pressure and composition. Even more specifically, it summarizes the basis for asserting that materials loaded into a 3013 container according to the requirements of the 3013 Standard (DOE-STD-3013-2000) cannot exceed the container design pressure within the time frames or environmental conditions of either storage or transportation. Presently, materials stabilized and packaged according to the 3013 Standard are to be transported in certified packages (the certification process for the 9975 and the SAFKEG has yet to be completed) that do not rely on the containment capabilities of the 3013 container. Even though no reliance is placed on that container, this document shows that it is highly likely that the containment function will be maintained not only in storage but also during transportation, including hypothetical accident conditions. Further, this document, by summarizing materials-related data on gas generation, can point those involved in preparing Safety Analysis Reports for Packages (SARPs) to additional information needed to assess the ability of the primary containment vessel to contain the contents and any reaction products that might reasonably be produced by the contents.

  16. Choose the best heat-recovery method for thermal oxidizers

    SciTech Connect

    Klobucar, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    Thermal oxidation is current the most economically favorable add-on method of controlling hydrocarbon air emissions of moderate to low concentration (below 10,000 ppm). This concentration range covers emissions from a wide variety of chemical process industries (CPI) sources, including dryers, reactor vents, tank vents, and coaters. Thermal oxidizer systems consist of three basic sub-systems--burner, combustion chamber, and primary heat recovery. Selecting the type of primary heat recovery is probably the most important decision in the design of a thermal oxidizer, and requires consideration of a wide range of factors. The two most widely used types of primary heat recovery--recuperative and regenerative--each have distinct advantages and disadvantages. In general, recuperative oxidizers are simpler and less costly to purchase, whereas regenerative oxidizers offer substantially lower operating costs. Selecting between recuperative and regenerative heat recovery requires balancing a number of factors, such as capital and operating costs, exhaust gas composition and temperature, and secondary heat demand. This article provides guidance on when, where, and how to use each.

  17. [Study on catalytic oxidation of benzene by microwave heating].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-cai; Bo, Long-li; Wang, Xiao-hui; Liu, Hai-nan; Zhang, Hao

    2012-08-01

    The performance in catalytic oxidation of benzene was investigated in two different heating modes, microwave heating and conventional electric furnace heating. The effects of copper (Cu)-manganese (Mn) mass ratio, doping dose of cerium (Ce) and calcination temperature on the catalytic activity of Cu-Mn-Ce/molecular sieve catalyst were also checked in catalytic oxidation of benzene with microwave heating, and the catalysts were subsequently characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the catalyst had better catalytic activity for the oxidation of benzene under microwave heating than electric furnace heating, and high oxidation efficiency for benzene was reached due to the "local hot spots" and dipole polarization effect of microwave and stable bed reaction temperature. Under the conditions of Cu, Mn and Ce mass ratio 1:1:0.33 and calcination temperature 500 degrees C, the catalyst had the optimal catalytic activity for benzene oxidation, and its light-off temperature and complete combustion temperature were 165 degrees C and 230 degrees C, respectively. It was indicated by characteristics of XRD and SEM that the presence of copper and manganese oxides and Cu1.5Mn1.5O4 with spinel crystal improved the catalytic activity of the catalyst, and the doping of Ce promoted the dispersion and regularization of active components. High calcination temperature led to the sintering of the catalyst surface and agglomeration of active components, which decreased the catalytic activity of the catalyst in the catalytic oxidation PMID:23213902

  18. Feasibility analysis of a vortex generator for absorption heat pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Fineblum, S.S.

    1996-12-31

    Significant thermal resources in the form of low temperature industrial waste heat, between 211 to 528 trillion kJ (200 and 500 trillion BTU`s) per annum, have the potential to drive absorption heat pumps. The proposed vortex generator permits a practical heat pump to operate efficiently with as much as 20 to 30 C below the boiling temperature of water (70--80 C (158--176 F)). Energy flows and auxiliary power requirements are computed. The system is shown to operate with relatively low temperature waste heat with higher specific capacity than conventional systems.

  19. SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL HYBRID SYSTEM FOR DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

    2003-07-01

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC during the January 2003 to June 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. This report summarizes the results obtained to date on: System performance analysis and model optimization; Reliability and cost model development; System control including dynamic model development; Heat exchanger material tests and life analysis; Pressurized SOFC evaluation; and Pre-baseline system definition for coal gasification fuel cell system concept.

  20. INDUCTION HEATING OF CARBON-FIBER COMPOSITES: THERMAL GENERATION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A theory of local and global mechanisms of heat generation and distribution in carbon-fiber-based composites subjected to an alternating magnetic field has been proposed. A model that predicts the strength and distribution of thermal generation through the thickness of carbon-fib...

  1. Finned Tube With Vortex Generators For A Heat Exchanger.

    DOEpatents

    Sohal, Monohar S.; O'Brien, James E.

    2004-09-14

    A system for and method of manufacturing a finned tube for a heat exchanger is disclosed herein. A continuous fin strip is provided with at least one pair of vortex generators. A tube is rotated and linearly displaced while the continuous fin strip with vortex generators is spirally wrapped around the tube.

  2. Finned Tube With Vortex Generators For A Heat Exchanger.

    DOEpatents

    Sohal, Manohar S.; O'Brien, James E.

    2005-12-20

    A system for and method of manufacturing a finned tube for a heat exchanger is disclosed herein. A continuous fin strip is provided with at one pair of vortex generators. A tube is rotated and linearly displaced while the continuous fin strip with vortex generators is spirally wrapped around the tube.

  3. Heat- And Oxidation-Resistant Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Alloys coated with electrically conductive ceramics used to make strong, oxidation-resistant electrodes for electrochemical cells operating at temperatures of 1,000 to 1,300 degrees C. Fe3Al or Ni3Al coated with strontium-doped lanthanum manganite more resistant to chemical attack than all-metal electrode, less brittle than all-ceramic electrode, and less costly than either alternative.

  4. Numerical and Experimental Investigation for Heat Transfer Enhancement by Dimpled Surface Heat Exchanger in Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiping; Li, Shuai; Yang, Xue; Deng, Yadong; Su, Chuqi

    2016-03-01

    For vehicle thermoelectric exhaust energy recovery, the temperature difference between the heat exchanger and the coolant has a strong influence on the electric power generation, and ribs are often employed to enhance the heat transfer of the heat exchanger. However, the introduction of ribs will result in a large unwanted pressure drop in the exhaust system which is unfavorable for the engine's efficiency. Therefore, how to enhance the heat transfer and control the pressure drop in the exhaust system is quite important for thermoelectric generators (TEG). In the current study, a symmetrical arrangement of dimpled surfaces staggered in the upper and lower surfaces of the heat exchanger was proposed to augment heat transfer rates with minimal pressure drop penalties. The turbulent flow characteristics and heat transfer performance of turbulent flow over the dimpled surface in a flat heat exchanger was investigated by numerical simulation and temperature measurements. The heat transfer capacity in terms of Nusselt number and the pressure loss in terms of Fanning friction factors of the exchanger were compared with those of the flat plate. The pressure loss and heat transfer characteristics of dimples with a depth-to-diameter ratio ( h/D) at 0.2 were investigated. Finally, a quite good heat transfer performance with minimal pressure drop heat exchanger in a vehicle TEG was obtained. And based on the area-averaged surface temperature of the heat exchanger and the Seeback effect, the power generation can be improved by about 15% at Re = 25,000 compared to a heat exchanger with a flat surface.

  5. Anodic Oxidative Modification of Egg White for Heat Treatment.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masahito; Handa, Akihiro; Yamaguchi, Yusuke; Kodama, Risa; Chiba, Kazuhiro

    2016-08-31

    A new functionalization of egg white was achieved by an electrochemical reaction. The method involves electron transfer from thiol groups of egg white protein to form disulfide bonds. The oxidized egg white produced less hydrogen sulfide during heat treatment; with sufficient application of electricity, almost no hydrogen sulfide was produced. In addition, gels formed by heating electrochemically oxidized egg white exhibited unique properties, such as a lower gelation temperature and a softened texture, presumably due to protein aggregation and electrochemically mediated intramolecular disulfide bond formation. PMID:27518910

  6. Radiogenic heat generation in the Darling Range, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Mike F.

    2013-07-01

    New heat generation measurements for radiogenic granites were made for thirteen localities in the Darling Range, Western Australia. These are integrated with published data to estimate temperatures at depth within radiogenic-granite bodies for this region of the south-western Yilgarn Craton. The heat generation in the radiogenic granites is calculated from the concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium measured in the field. A reliable relationship between total counts from a commercial portable spectrometer and Geiger Müller counter was found for the various granites measured. The relationship Ao = 0.34 + 2.16 CU, with a correlation coefficient of 0.98, was found between uranium (CU in ppm) content and heat generation (Ao in units of µW/m3) for those radiogenic granites measured in the Darling Range, and also for two granites in the Pilbara Craton. Measured heat generation in the Darling Range was found to vary between 4 and 10μW/m3, the maximum of which is higher than previously known heat generation in granites for the Yilgarn Craton. Based on these new data, temperatures between depths of 3000 and 4000 m are modelled to fall between 60 and 110°C, depending on the thickness of the granitic bodies. These results are encouraging for potential low-temperature geothermal developments in this region, which is adjacent to the Perth metropolitan area.

  7. Effect on Non-Uniform Heat Generation on Thermionic Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    2012-01-19

    The penalty resulting from non-uniform heat generation in a thermionic reactor is examined. Operation at sub-optimum cesium pressure is shown to reduce this penalty, but at the risk of a condition analogous to burnout. For high pressure diodes, a simple empirical correlation between current, voltage and heat flux is developed and used to analyze the performance penalty associated with two different heat flux profiles, for series-and parallel-connected converters. The results demonstrate that series-connected converters require much finer power flattening than parallel converters. For example, a ±10% variation in heat generation across a series array can result in a 25 to 50% power penalty.

  8. Niobium alloy heat pipes for use in oxidizing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, C. C.

    Nb-alloy heat pipes employing oxidation-protection silicide coatings in conjunction with P/M techniques for the production of porous wicks have been shown capable of comfortably operating in flame temperatures in excess of 3000 K. Attention is presently given to Li corrosion tests conducted with Nb-10Hf-1Ti alloy heat pipes at up to 1477 K, in conjunction with the thermal performance data derived for specific heat-pipe designs. An Hf-rich reaction was detected after 200 hrs of exposure.

  9. Modeling of non-uniform heat generation in LDMOS transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, J.; Flores, D.; Urresti, J.; Hidalgo, S.; Rebollo, J.

    2005-01-01

    This work is devoted to the heat dissipation analysis in LDMOS transistors operating at high current conditions. Hence, a new expression for the Joule heat generated by electron current is provided to simplify the LDMOS electro-thermal modeling, thus giving physical insight and predicting hot spots. The model is based on the semiconductor physics and the required input data are the device geometrical and technological parameters as well as the applied bias.

  10. Heat transfer simulation in a helically coiled tube steam generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh, Bazargan; Keshavarz, Ali; Ebrahimi, Masood

    2014-01-01

    A symmetric helically coiled tube steam generator that operates by methane has been simulated analytically and numerically. In the analytical method, the furnace has been divided into five zones. The numerical method computes the total heat absorbed in the furnace, while the existing analytical methods compute only the radiation heat transfer. In addition, according to the numerical results, a correlation is proposed for the Nusselt number in the furnace.

  11. Generation of singlet oxygen on the surface of metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, V. M.; Kislyakov, I. M.; Burchinov, A. N.

    2016-04-01

    Generation of singlet oxygen on the surface of metal oxides is studied. It is shown that, under conditions of heterogeneous photo-catalysis, along with the conventional mechanism of singlet oxygen formation due to the formation of electron-hole pairs in the oxide structure, there is an additional and more efficient mechanism involving direct optical excitation of molecular oxygen adsorbed on the oxide surface. The excited adsorbate molecule then interacts with the surface or with other adsorbate molecules. It is shown that, with respect to singlet oxygen generation, yttrium oxide is more than an order of magnitude more efficient than other oxides, including titanium dioxide.

  12. Light bulb heat exchanger for magnetohydrodynamic generator applications - Preliminary evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.; Hwang, C. C.; Seikel, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    The light-bulb heat-exchanger concept is investigated as a possible means of using a combustion heat source to supply energy to an inert gas MHD power generator system. In this concept, combustion gases flow through a central passage which consists of a duct with transparent walls through which heat is transferred by radiation to a radiation receiver which in turn heats the inert gas by convection. The effects of combustion-gas emissivity, transparent-wall-transmissivity, radiation-receiver emissivity, and the use of fins in the inert gas coolant passage are studied. The results indicate that inert gas outlet temperatures of 2500 K are possible for combustion temperatures of 3200 K and that sufficient energy can be transferred from the combustion gas to reduce its temperature to approximately 2000 K. At this temperature more conventional heat exchangers can be used.

  13. Heat Pipe-Assisted Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology for Waste Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Ju-Chan; Chi, Ri-Guang; Rhi, Seok-Ho; Lee, Kye-Bock; Hwang, Hyun-Chang; Lee, Ji-Su; Lee, Wook-Hyun

    2015-06-01

    Currently, large amounts of thermal energy dissipated from automobiles are emitted through hot exhaust pipes. This has resulted in the need for a new efficient recycling method to recover energy from waste hot exhaust gas. The present experimental study investigated how to improve the power output of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) system assisted by a wickless loop heat pipe (loop thermosyphon) under the limited space of the exhaust gas pipeline. The present study shows a novel loop-type heat pipe-assisted TEG concept to be applied to hybrid vehicles. The operating temperature of a TEG's hot side surface should be as high as possible to maximize the Seebeck effect. The present study shows a novel TEG concept of transferring heat from the source to the sink. This technology can transfer waste heat to any local place with a loop-type heat pipe. The present TEG system with a heat pipe can transfer heat and generate an electromotive force power of around 1.3 V in the case of 170°C hot exhaust gas. Two thermoelectric modules (TEMs) for a conductive block model and four Bi2Te3 TEMs with a heat pipe-assisted model were installed in the condenser section. Heat flows to the condenser section from the evaporator section connected to the exhaust pipe. This novel TEG system with a heat pipe can be placed in any location on an automobile.

  14. Heat resistant polymers of oxidized styrylphosphine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. J. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A flame resistant, nontoxic polymer which may be used safely in confined locations where there is inadequate ventilation is prepared either by polymerizing compounds having the formula R-N=P(C6H5)2(C6H4)CH=CH2 where R is an organic moeity selected from the group of (C6H5)2P(O)-, (C6H5O)2P(O)-, (C6H5)2 C3N3-, or their mixtures, or by reacting a polymer with an organic azide such as diphenylphosphinylazide, diphenyl-phosphorylazide, 2-azido-4,6-diphenly-5-triazine, 2,4-diazido-6-phenyl-s-triazine, trimethylsilyoazide, triphenylsilylazine, and phenylazine. The reaction of the styrylphosphine with the organozaide results in the oxidation of the trivalent phosphorus atom to the pentavalent state in the form of an unsaturated P=N linkage known as a phosphazene group.

  15. Heat generation during overcharge of Ni/H2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, Hari; Kelly, W. H.; Earl, M. W.

    1992-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form on the heat generation during overcharge of nickel hydrogen cells. The heat dissipated during various rates of charge and overcharge was measured, using a radiative type calorimeter. Measurements made during the charging of the cell indicated that the total heat was greatest for C/10 charge, compared with C/2 or C/4. The endothermic to exothermic transition occurred at 1.43 V for C/10 charge, and increased to 1.467 V at C/2 charge. The magnitude of the endothermic heat was only 3.7 percent of the total heat generated during charging. Experimentally measured values were compared against those calculated using a thermoneutral potential of 1.51 V. Although there was general agreement between the calculated and measured values, a significant difference existed in the instantaneous heat values for the initial stages of cell discharge. Heat dissipated during self-discharge appears to depend on the charge rate preceding open circuit stand.

  16. New geothermal heat extraction process to deliver clean power generation

    ScienceCinema

    Pete McGrail

    2012-12-31

    A new method for capturing significantly more heat from low-temperature geothermal resources holds promise for generating virtually pollution-free electrical energy. Scientists at the Department of Energys Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will determine if their innovative approach can safely and economically extract and convert heat from vast untapped geothermal resources. The goal is to enable power generation from low-temperature geothermal resources at an economical cost. In addition to being a clean energy source without any greenhouse gas emissions, geothermal is also a steady and dependable source of power.

  17. Characterization of oxides on Bruce A NGS liner tubes and steam generator tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.G.; Burrill, K.A.

    1998-12-31

    Oxide deposits on end-fitting liner tubes and steam generator tubes from the Bruce A Nuclear Generating Station (NGS) were characterized in advance of the decontamination of the heat transport system (HTS) of Bruce Unit 2. Oxide loadings, and Co-60 surface activities and specific activities were determined for the oxides on inlet and outlet end-fitting liner tubes from Bruce Unit l, Bruce Unit 2 and Bruce Unit 4. Oxides on the inner surfaces of steam generator tubes from Bruce NGS Units 1 and 2 were also characterized. The consistency in the deposit characteristics on the inlet liner tubes and steam generator tubes from Bruce A, along with the absence of magnetite on the outlet liner tubes has led to the development of a model for iron transport in the HTS of pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs). The activity transport/fouling mechanism involves flow-accelerated corrosion of the outlet feeder pipes, followed by deposition of iron in the steam generators, along the inlet feeder pipes, on the inlet end fittings, on the inlet fuel bundles and on the inlet region of the pressure tube. The results of loop experiments using decontamination solutions indicated that the oxide was rapidly removed from inlet liner tubes. However, removal of the Cr-rich oxide from the outlet liner tubes was less efficient, requiring the Alkaline Permangante (AP) oxidizing pre-treatment that is typically used in light water reactors (LWRs). The steam generator tubes were effectively decontaminated.

  18. Heat-Transfer Enhancement by Artificially Generated Streamwise Vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanem, Akram; Habchi, Charbel; Lemenand, Thierry; Della Valle, Dominique; Peerhossaini, Hassan

    2012-11-01

    Vortex-induced heat transfer enhancement exploits longitudinal and transverse pressure-driven vortices through the deliberate artificial generation of large-scale vortical flow structures. Thermal-hydraulic performance, Nusselt number and friction factor are experimentally investigated in a HEV (high-efficiency vortex) mixer, which is a tubular heat exchanger and static mixer equipped with trapezoidal vortex generators. Pressure gradients are generated on the trapezoidal tab initiating a streamwise swirling motion in the form of two longitudinal counter-rotating vortex pairs (CVP). Due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, the shear layer generated at the tab edges, which is a production site of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), becomes unstable further downstream from the tabs and gives rise to periodic hairpin vortices. The aim of the study is to quantify the effects of hydrodynamics on the heat- and masstransfer phenomena accompanying such flows for comparison with the results of numerical studies and validate the high efficiency of the intensification process implementing such vortex generators. The experimental results reflect the enhancement expected from the numerical studies and confirm the high status of the HEV heat exchanger and static mixer.

  19. Waste-heat steam generation is economically viable in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    McMann, F.C.; Marshall, R.W.

    1984-03-01

    Generation of electric power by turbine-driven generators serviced by waste heat boilers is not a blue sky dream. It is time-proven technology, employing time-proven equipment-equipment that is expected to run uninterrupted in fouryear cycles. This equipment and its control are made right here in the U.S. The equipment is very simple to operate and maintain. This article describes the applications of ceramics in this industry.

  20. Modeling Joule Heating Effect on Lunar O2 Generation via Electrolytic Reduction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominquez, Jesus; Poizeau, Sophie; Sibille, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center is leading research work on lunar O2 generation via electrolytic reduction of regolith; the metal oxide present in the regolith is dissociated in oxygen anions and metal cations leading to the generation of gaseous oxygen at the anode and liquid metal at the cathode. Electrical resistance of molten regolith is high, leading to heating of the melt when electrical current is applied between the electrodes (Joule heating). The authors have developed a 3D model using a rigorous approach for two coupled physics (thermal and electrical potential) to not only study the effect of Joule heating on temperature distribution throughout the molten regolith but also to evaluate and optimize the design of the electrolytic cells. This paper presents the results of the thermal analysis performed on the model and used to validate the design of the electrolytic cell.

  1. Heat generated during seating of dental implant fixtures.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Dennis

    2014-04-01

    Frictional heat can be generated during seating of dental implants into a drill-prepared osteotomy. This in vitro study tested the heat generated by implant seating in dense bovine mandible ramus. A thermocouple was placed approximately 0.5 mm from the rim of the osteotomy during seating of each dental implant. Four diameters of implants were tested. The average temperature increases were 0.075°C for the 5.7-mm-diameter implant, 0.97°C for the 4.7-mm-diameter implant, 1.4°C for the 3.7-mm-diameter implant, and 8.6°C for the 2.5-mm-diameter implant. The results showed that heat was indeed generated and a small temperature rise occurred, apparently by the friction of the implant surface against the fresh-cut bone surface. Bone is a poor thermal conductor. The titanium of the implant and the steel of the handpiece are much better heat conductors. Titanium may be 70 times more heat conductive than bone. The larger diameter and displacement implant may act as a heat sink to draw away any heat produced from the friction of seating the implant at the bone-implant interface. The peak temperature duration was momentary, and not measured, but this was approximately less than 1 second. Except for the 2.5-mm-diameter implants, the temperature rises and durations were found to be below those previously deemed to be detrimental, so no clinically significant osseous damage would be expected during dental implant fixture seating of standard and large-diameter-sized implants. A 2.5-mm implant may generate detrimental heat during seating in nonvital bone, but this may be clinically insignificant in vital bone. The surface area and thermal conductivity are important factors in removing generated heat transfer at the bone-implant interface. The F value as determined by analysis of variance was 69.22, and the P value was less than .0001, demonstrating significant differences between the groups considered as a whole. PMID:24400840

  2. Niobium alloy heat pipes for use in oxidizing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig Wojcik, C.

    1991-01-01

    Niobium alloys have been used for many years in rocket propulsion systems and afterburner sections of gas turbine engines. In these applications, adequate oxidation resistance is provided by protective silicide coatings. By utilizing these coatings and niobium powder metallurgy to produce porous wicks, it has been demonstrated that niobium alloy heat pipes can comfortably operate in flame temperatures exceeding 3000 K. Results of lithium corrosion tests on C-103 (Nb-10%Hf-1%Ti) up to 1477 K will be presented along with thermal performance data for specific heat pipe designs.

  3. Modeling a Thermoelectric Generator Applied to Diesel Automotive Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, N.; Lazard, M.; Aixala, L.; Scherrer, H.

    2010-09-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are outstanding devices for automotive waste heat recovery. Their packaging, lack of moving parts, and direct heat to electrical conversion are the main benefits. Usually, TEGs are modeled with a constant hot-source temperature. However, energy in exhaust gases is limited, thus leading to a temperature decrease as heat is recovered. Therefore thermoelectric properties change along the TEG, affecting performance. A thermoelectric generator composed of Mg2Si/Zn4Sb3 for high temperatures followed by Bi2Te3 for low temperatures has been modeled using engineering equation solver (EES) software. The model uses the finite-difference method with a strip-fins convective heat transfer coefficient. It has been validated on a commercial module with well-known properties. The thermoelectric connection and the number of thermoelements have been addressed as well as the optimum proportion of high-temperature material for a given thermoelectric heat exchanger. TEG output power has been estimated for a typical commercial vehicle at 90°C coolant temperature.

  4. Heat generation in aircraft tires under free rolling conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, S. K.; Dodge, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    A method was developed for calculating the internal temperature distribution in an aircraft tire while free rolling under load. The method uses an approximate stress analysis of each point in the tire as it rolls through the contact patch, and from this stress change the mechanical work done on each volume element may be obtained and converted into a heat release rate through a knowledge of material characteristics. The tire cross-section is then considered as a body with internal heat generation, and the diffusion equation is solved numerically with appropriate boundary conditions of the wheel and runway surface. Comparison with data obtained with buried thermocouples in tires shows good agreement.

  5. Improved heat dissipation in gallium nitride light-emitting diodes with embedded graphene oxide pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Nam; Viet Cuong, Tran; Han, Min; Deul Ryu, Beo; Chandramohan, S.; Bae Park, Jong; Hye Kang, Ji; Park, Young-Jae; Bok Ko, Kang; Yun Kim, Hee; Kyu Kim, Hyun; Hyoung Ryu, Jae; Katharria, Y. S.; Choi, Chel-Jong; Hong, Chang-Hee

    2013-02-01

    The future of solid-state lighting relies on how the performance parameters will be improved further for developing high-brightness light-emitting diodes. Eventually, heat removal is becoming a crucial issue because the requirement of high brightness necessitates high-operating current densities that would trigger more joule heating. Here we demonstrate that the embedded graphene oxide in a gallium nitride light-emitting diode alleviates the self-heating issues by virtue of its heat-spreading ability and reducing the thermal boundary resistance. The fabrication process involves the generation of scalable graphene oxide microscale patterns on a sapphire substrate, followed by its thermal reduction and epitaxial lateral overgrowth of gallium nitride in a metal-organic chemical vapour deposition system under one-step process. The device with embedded graphene oxide outperforms its conventional counterpart by emitting bright light with relatively low-junction temperature and thermal resistance. This facile strategy may enable integration of large-scale graphene into practical devices for effective heat removal.

  6. Flexible transparent heaters with heating films made of indium tin oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Im, Kiju; Chol, Kyoungah; Kwak, Kiyeol; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Sangsig

    2013-05-01

    In this study, flexible transparent heaters with heating films made of indium tin oxide (ITO) are fabricated on plastic substrates. The optical transmittance of a representative flexible heater is above 90% in the visible and near infrared regions. The steady-state temperature is determined by the bias voltage and reaches about 180 degrees C at a bias voltage of 50 V. The heat-generating properties are nearly the same before and after the application of tensile strain. Furthermore, the defrosting ability is demonstrated using a block of dry-ice. PMID:23858892

  7. Parametric Optimization of Thermoelectric Generators for Waste Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shouyuan; Xu, Xianfan

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a methodology for design optimization of thermoelectric-based waste heat recovery systems called thermoelectric generators (TEGs). The aim is to maximize the power output from thermoelectrics which are used as add-on modules to an existing gas-phase heat exchanger, without negative impacts, e.g., maintaining a minimum heat dissipation rate from the hot side. A numerical model is proposed for TEG coupled heat transfer and electrical power output. This finite-volume-based model simulates different types of heat exchangers, i.e., counter-flow and cross-flow, for TEGs. Multiple-filled skutterudites and bismuth-telluride-based thermoelectric modules (TEMs) are applied, respectively, in higher and lower temperature regions. The response surface methodology is implemented to determine the optimized TEG size along and across the flow direction and the height of thermoelectric couple legs, and to analyze their covariance and relative sensitivity. A genetic algorithm is employed to verify the globality of the optimum. The presented method will be generally useful for optimizing heat-exchanger-based TEG performance.

  8. Increased use of reject heat from electric generation

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, R.W.; Piraino, M.

    1994-02-01

    This study aims to determine existing barriers to greater use of reject heat by electric power producers, including utilities and cogenerators. It includes analytical studies of the technical and economic issues and a survey of several electric power producers. The core analytic findings of the study are that although electric utility- based, cogenerated district heating is sometimes cost competitive with currently common furnaces and boilers, it is not clearly less expensive, and is often more expensive. Since market penetration by a new technology depends on strong perceived advantages, district heating will remain at a disadvantage unless its benefits, such as lowered emissions and decreased reliance on foreign oil, are given overt financial form through subsidies or tax incentives. The central finding from the survey was that electric utilities have arrived at the same conclusion by their own routes; we present a substantial list of their reasons for not engaging in district heating or for not pursuing it more vigorously, and many of them can be summarized as the lack of a clear cost advantage for district heat. We also note that small-scale district heating systems, based on diesel generators and located near the thermal load center, show very clear cost advantages over individual furnaces. This cost advantage is consistent with the explosive growth currently observed in private cogeneration systems.

  9. Design with constructal theory: Steam generators, turbines and heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong Sung

    This dissertation shows that the architecture of steam generators, steam turbines and heat exchangers for power plants can be predicted on the basis of the constructal law. According to constructal theory, the flow architecture emerges such that it provides progressively greater access to its currents. Each chapter shows how constructal theory guides the generation of designs in pursuit of higher performance. Chapter two shows the tube diameters, the number of riser tubes, the water circulation rate and the rate of steam production are determined by maximizing the heat transfer rate from hot gases to riser tubes and minimizing the global flow resistance under the fixed volume constraint. Chapter three shows how the optimal spacing between adjacent tubes, the number of tubes for the downcomer and the riser and the location of the flow reversal for the continuous steam generator are determined by the intersection of asymptotes method, and by minimizing the flow resistance under the fixed volume constraints. Chapter four shows that the mass inventory for steam turbines can be distributed between high pressure and low pressure turbines such that the global performance of the power plant is maximal under the total mass constraint. Chapter five presents the more general configuration of a two-stream heat exchanger with forced convection of the hot side and natural circulation on the cold side. Chapter six demonstrates that segmenting a tube with condensation on the outer surface leads to a smaller thermal resistance, and generates design criteria for the performance of multi-tube designs.

  10. Assessment of next generation nuclear plant intermediate heat exchanger design.

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Moisseytsev, A.; Natesan, K.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-10-17

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is an advanced high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) concept with emphasis on production of both electricity and hydrogen, involves helium as the coolant and a closed-cycle gas turbine for power generation with a core outlet/gas turbine inlet temperature of 900-1000 C. In the indirect cycle system, an intermediate heat exchanger is used to transfer the heat from primary helium from the core to the secondary fluid, which can be helium, nitrogen/helium mixture, or a molten salt. The system concept for the vary high temperature reactor (VHTR) can be a reactor based on the prismatic block of the GT-MHR developed by a consortium led by General Atomics in the U.S. or based on the PBMR design developed by ESKOM of South Africa and British Nuclear Fuels of U.K. This report has made an assessment on the issues pertaining to the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP. A detailed thermal hydraulic analysis, using models developed at ANL, was performed to calculate heat transfer, temperature distribution, and pressure drop. Two IHX designs namely, shell and straight tube and compact heat exchangers were considered in an earlier assessment. Helical coil heat exchangers were analyzed in the current report and the results were compared with the performance features of designs from industry. In addition, a comparative analysis is presented between the shell and straight tube, helical, and printed circuit heat exchangers from the standpoint of heat exchanger volume, primary and secondary sides pressure drop, and number of tubes. The IHX being a high temperature component, probably needs to be designed using ASME Code Section III, Subsection NH, assuming that the IHX will be classified as a class 1 component. With input from thermal hydraulic calculations performed at ANL, thermal conduction and stress analyses were performed for the helical heat exchanger design and the results were compared with earlier-developed results on

  11. Heat Priming Induces Trans-generational Tolerance to High Temperature Stress in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Xin, Caiyun; Cai, Jian; Zhou, Qin; Dai, Tingbo; Cao, Weixing; Jiang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Wheat plants are very sensitive to high temperature stress during grain filling. Effects of heat priming applied to the first generation on tolerance of the successive generation to post-anthesis high temperature stress were investigated. Compared with the progeny of non-heat primed plants (NH), the progeny of heat-primed plants (PH) possessed higher grain yield, leaf photosynthesis and activities of antioxidant enzymes and lower cell membrane damage under high temperature stress. In the transcriptome profile, 1430 probes showed obvious difference in expression between PH and NH. These genes were related to signal transduction, transcription, energy, defense, and protein destination and storage, respectively. The gene encoding the lysine-specific histone demethylase 1 (LSD1) which was involved in histone demethylation related to epigenetic modification was up-regulated in the PH compared with NH. The proteome analysis indicated that the proteins involved in photosynthesis, energy production and protein destination and storage were up-regulated in the PH compared with NH. In short, thermos-tolerance was induced through heritable epigenetic alternation and signaling transduction, both processes further triggered prompt modifications of defense related responses in anti-oxidation, transcription, energy production, and protein destination and storage in the progeny of the primed plants under high temperature stress. It was concluded that trans-generation thermo-tolerance was induced by heat priming in the first generation, and this might be an effective measure to cope with severe high-temperature stresses during key growth stages in wheat production. PMID:27148324

  12. Heat Priming Induces Trans-generational Tolerance to High Temperature Stress in Wheat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Xin, Caiyun; Cai, Jian; Zhou, Qin; Dai, Tingbo; Cao, Weixing; Jiang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Wheat plants are very sensitive to high temperature stress during grain filling. Effects of heat priming applied to the first generation on tolerance of the successive generation to post-anthesis high temperature stress were investigated. Compared with the progeny of non-heat primed plants (NH), the progeny of heat-primed plants (PH) possessed higher grain yield, leaf photosynthesis and activities of antioxidant enzymes and lower cell membrane damage under high temperature stress. In the transcriptome profile, 1430 probes showed obvious difference in expression between PH and NH. These genes were related to signal transduction, transcription, energy, defense, and protein destination and storage, respectively. The gene encoding the lysine-specific histone demethylase 1 (LSD1) which was involved in histone demethylation related to epigenetic modification was up-regulated in the PH compared with NH. The proteome analysis indicated that the proteins involved in photosynthesis, energy production and protein destination and storage were up-regulated in the PH compared with NH. In short, thermos-tolerance was induced through heritable epigenetic alternation and signaling transduction, both processes further triggered prompt modifications of defense related responses in anti-oxidation, transcription, energy production, and protein destination and storage in the progeny of the primed plants under high temperature stress. It was concluded that trans-generation thermo-tolerance was induced by heat priming in the first generation, and this might be an effective measure to cope with severe high-temperature stresses during key growth stages in wheat production. PMID:27148324

  13. Infrared nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of stainless steel: micro iron-oxide zones generation.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Morales, M; Frausto-Reyes, C; Soto-Bernal, J J; Acosta-Ortiz, S E; Gonzalez-Mota, R; Rosales-Candelas, I

    2014-07-15

    Nanosecond-pulsed, infrared (1064 nm) laser irradiation was used to create periodic metal oxide coatings on the surface of two samples of commercial stainless steel at ambient conditions. A pattern of four different metal oxide zones was created using a galvanometer scanning head and a focused laser beam over each sample. This pattern is related to traverse direction of the laser beam scanning. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to find the elemental composition and Raman spectroscopy to characterize each oxide zone. Pulsed laser irradiation modified the composition of the stainless steel samples, affecting the concentration of the main components within each heat affected zone. The Raman spectra of the generated oxides have different intensity profiles, which suggest different oxide phases such as magnetite and maghemite. In addition, these oxides are not sensible to the laser power of the Raman system, as are the iron oxide powders reported in the literature. These experiments show that it is possible to generate periodic patterns of various iron oxide zones by laser irradiation, of stainless steel at ambient conditions, and that Raman spectroscopy is a useful punctual technique for the analysis and inspection of small oxide areas. PMID:24699286

  14. Infrared nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of stainless steel: Micro iron-oxide zones generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Morales, M.; Frausto-Reyes, C.; Soto-Bernal, J. J.; Acosta-Ortiz, S. E.; Gonzalez-Mota, R.; Rosales-Candelas, I.

    2014-07-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed, infrared (1064 nm) laser irradiation was used to create periodic metal oxide coatings on the surface of two samples of commercial stainless steel at ambient conditions. A pattern of four different metal oxide zones was created using a galvanometer scanning head and a focused laser beam over each sample. This pattern is related to traverse direction of the laser beam scanning. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to find the elemental composition and Raman spectroscopy to characterize each oxide zone. Pulsed laser irradiation modified the composition of the stainless steel samples, affecting the concentration of the main components within each heat affected zone. The Raman spectra of the generated oxides have different intensity profiles, which suggest different oxide phases such as magnetite and maghemite. In addition, these oxides are not sensible to the laser power of the Raman system, as are the iron oxide powders reported in the literature. These experiments show that it is possible to generate periodic patterns of various iron oxide zones by laser irradiation, of stainless steel at ambient conditions, and that Raman spectroscopy is a useful punctual technique for the analysis and inspection of small oxide areas.

  15. Energy harvesting thermoelectric generators manufactured using the complementary metal oxide semiconductor process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming-Zhi; Wu, Chyan-Chyi; Dai, Ching-Liang; Tsai, Wen-Jung

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of energy harvesting thermoelectric micro generators using the commercial complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The micro generator consists of 33 thermocouples in series. Thermocouple materials are p-type and n-type polysilicon since they have a large Seebeck coefficient difference. The output power of the micro generator depends on the temperature difference in the hot and cold parts of the thermocouples. In order to increase this temperature difference, the hot part of the thermocouples is suspended to reduce heat-sinking. The micro generator needs a post-CMOS process to release the suspended structures of hot part, which the post-process includes an anisotropic dry etching to etch the sacrificial oxide layer and an isotropic dry etching to remove the silicon substrate. Experiments show that the output power of the micro generator is 9.4 mW at a temperature difference of 15 K. PMID:23396193

  16. Micro- and Nanoscale Energetic Materials as Effective Heat Energy Sources for Enhanced Gas Generators.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Beom; Kim, Kyung Ju; Cho, Myung Hoon; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Kyung Tae; Kim, Soo Hyung

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we systematically investigated the effect of micro- and nanoscale energetic materials in formulations of aluminum microparticles (Al MPs; heat source)/aluminum nanoparticles (Al NPs; heat source)/copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs; oxidizer) on the combustion and gas-generating properties of sodium azide microparticles (NaN3 MPs; gas-generating agent) for potential applications in gas generators. The burn rate of the NaN3 MP/CuO NP composite powder was only ∼0.3 m/s. However, the addition of Al MPs and Al NPs to the NaN3 MP/CuO NP matrix caused the rates to reach ∼1.5 and ∼5.3 m/s, respectively. In addition, the N2 gas volume flow rate generated by the ignition of the NaN3 MP/CuO NP composite powder was only ∼0.6 L/s, which was significantly increased to ∼1.4 and ∼3.9 L/s by adding Al MPs and Al NPs, respectively, to the NaN3 MP/CuO NP composite powder. This suggested that the highly reactive Al MPs and NPs, with the assistance of CuO NPs, were effective heat-generating sources enabling the complete thermal decomposition of NaN3 MPs upon ignition. Al NPs were more effective than Al MPs in the gas generators because of the increased reactivity induced by the reduced particle size. Finally, we successfully demonstrated that a homemade airbag with a specific volume of ∼140 mL could be rapidly and fully inflated by the thermal activation of nanoscale energetic material-added gas-generating agents (i.e., NaN3 MP/Al NP/CuO NP composites) within the standard time of ∼50 ms for airbag inflation. PMID:27007287

  17. Induction heating to trigger the nickel surface modification by in situ generated 4-carboxybenzene diazonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrotin, Bastien; Jacques, Amory; Devillers, Sébastien; Delhalle, Joseph; Mekhalif, Zineb

    2016-05-01

    Nickel is commonly used in numerous applications and is one of the few materials that present strong ferromagnetic properties. These make it a suitable material for induction heating which can be used to activate the grafting of organic species such as diazonium salts onto the material. Diazonium compounds are often used for the modification of metals and alloys thanks to their easy chemical reduction onto the substrates and the possibility to apply a one-step in situ generation process of the diazonium species. This work focuses on the grafting of 4-aminocarboxybenzene on nickel substrates in the context of a spontaneous grafting conducted either at room temperature or by thermal assistance through conventional heating and induction heating. These modifications are also carried out with the goal of maintaining the oxides layer as much as possible unaffected. The benefits of using induction heating with respect to conventional heating are an increase of the grafting rate, a better control of the reaction and a slighter impact on the oxides layer.

  18. Microwave heating for the rapid generation of glycosylhydrazides.

    PubMed

    Mallevre, F; Roget, A; Minon, T; Kervella, Y; Ropartz, D; Ralet, M C; Canut, H; Livache, T

    2013-07-17

    Conditions for simple derivatization of reducing carbohydrates via adipic acid dihydrazide microwave-assisted condensation are described. We demonstrate with a diverse set of oligo- and polysaccharides how to improve a restrictive and labor intensive conventional conjugation protocol by using microwave-assisted chemistry. We show that 5 min of microwave heating in basic or acidic conditions are adequate to generate, in increased yields, intact and functional glycosylhydrazides, whereas hours to days and acidic conditions are generally required under conventional methods. PMID:23731134

  19. Car companies look to generate power from waste heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirber, Michael

    2008-04-01

    You might think that the steam engine is an outdated technology that had its heyday centuries ago, but in fact steam is once again a hot topic with vehicle manufacturers. Indeed, the next generation of hybrid cars and trucks may incorporate some form of steam power. Honda, for example, has just released details of a new prototype hybrid car that recharges its battery using a steam engine that exploits waste heat from the exhaust pipe.

  20. Sound generated by vortex ring impingement on a heated wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsari, E. Giannos; Howe, M. S.

    2009-11-01

    An analysis is made of the sound generated when a vortex ring impinges normally on a heated section of a plane wall. The unsteady convective diffusion occurring when the vortex is close to the wall causes a rapid increase in heat transfer and the emission of sound of monopole type. The approximate dependence on vortex Reynolds number of the enhancement of heat transfer is deduced from recent experiments reported by Arévalo et al. [Vortex ring head-on collision with a heated vertical plate, Physics of Fluids 19 (2007) 083603-1-083603-9], and is used to derive a scaling law for the acoustic pressure. The sound pressure signature is dominated by a large amplitude pulse associated with an explosive, but brief increase in the rate of heat transfer at the start of the vortex-wall interaction. The quadrupole sound pressure also produced during impingement on the wall is found to be smaller than the thermally induced sound by a factor proportional to M2T0/(Tw-T0) where M, Tw, T0 respectively denote the Mach number of the vortex motion, the mean wall temperature and the fluid temperature at large distances from the wall.

  1. Thermoelectric Generation Using Waste Heat in Steel Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroki, Takashi; Kabeya, Kazuhisa; Makino, Kazuya; Kajihara, Takeshi; Kaibe, Hiromasa; Hachiuma, Hirokuni; Matsuno, Hidetoshi; Fujibayashi, Akio

    2014-06-01

    The steelmaking industry in Japan has significantly reduced its energy use for the past several decades and has kept the highest energy efficiency in the world. However, the steelmaking industry is strongly required to develop new technologies for further energy conservation in view of energy security, high and volatile energy prices, and climate change. One of the key technologies to achieve the requirement is waste heat recovery. This paper describes the thermoelectric generation (TEG) system using the waste heat in the steelmaking process. In this system, the TEG unit, which consists of 16 thermoelectric modules made of Bi-Te thermoelectric materials, generates the electrical power directly by converting the radiant heat released from hot steel products. Each thermoelectric module, whose size is 50 mm × 50 mm × 4.2 mm, generates 18 W when the hot-side temperature is 523 K and the cold-side is 303 K. Therefore, the output of the TEG unit is over 250 W. The performance and the durability of the system have been investigated under various operating conditions in steel works. The results of the verification tests in the JFE steel Corporation's continuous casting line will be discussed.

  2. Heat Transfer Enhancement for Finned-Tube Heat Exchangers with Vortex Generators: Experimental and Numerical Results

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh; Huff, George Albert

    2002-08-01

    A combined experimental and numerical investigation is under way to investigate heat transfer enhancement techniques that may be applicable to large-scale air-cooled condensers such as those used in geothermal power applications. The research is focused on whether air-side heat transfer can be improved through the use of finsurface vortex generators (winglets,) while maintaining low heat exchanger pressure drop. A transient heat transfer visualization and measurement technique has been employed in order to obtain detailed distributions of local heat transfer coefficients on model fin surfaces. Pressure drop measurements have also been acquired in a separate multiple-tube row apparatus. In addition, numerical modeling techniques have been developed to allow prediction of local and average heat transfer for these low-Reynolds-number flows with and without winglets. Representative experimental and numerical results presented in this paper reveal quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer in the vicinity of a circular tube with a single delta winglet pair downstream of the cylinder. The winglets were triangular (delta) with a 1:2 height/length aspect ratio and a height equal to 90% of the channel height. Overall mean fin-surface Nusselt-number results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement (average enhancement ratio 35%) associated with the deployment of the winglets with oval tubes. Pressure drop measurements have also been obtained for a variety of tube and winglet configurations using a single-channel flow apparatus that includes four tube rows in a staggered array. Comparisons of heat transfer and pressure drop results for the elliptical tube versus a circular tube with and without winglets are provided. Heat transfer and pressure-drop results have been obtained for flow Reynolds numbers based on channel height and mean flow velocity ranging from 700 to 6500.

  3. Heat capacity, enthalpy and entropy of ternary bismuth tantalum oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, J.; Jakes, V.; Sofer, Z.; Sedmidubsky, D.; Ruzicka, K.; Svoboda, P.

    2011-02-15

    Heat capacity and enthalpy increments of ternary bismuth tantalum oxides Bi{sub 4}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 11}, Bi{sub 7}Ta{sub 3}O{sub 18} and Bi{sub 3}TaO{sub 7} were measured by the relaxation time method (2-280 K), DSC (265-353 K) and drop calorimetry (622-1322 K). Temperature dependencies of the molar heat capacity in the form C{sub pm}=445.8+0.005451T-7.489x10{sup 6}/T{sup 2} J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1}, C{sub pm}=699.0+0.05276T-9.956x10{sup 6}/T{sup 2} J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1} and C{sub pm}=251.6+0.06705T-3.237x10{sup 6}/T{sup 2} J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1} for Bi{sub 3}TaO{sub 7}, Bi{sub 4}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 11} and for Bi{sub 7}Ta{sub 3}O{sub 18}, respectively, were derived by the least-squares method from the experimental data. The molar entropies at 298.15 K, S{sup o}{sub m}(298.15 K)=449.6{+-}2.3 J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1} for Bi{sub 4}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 11}, S{sup o}{sub m}(298.15 K)=743.0{+-}3.8 J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1} for Bi{sub 7}Ta{sub 3}O{sub 18} and S{sup o}{sub m}(298.15 K)=304.3{+-}1.6 J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1} for Bi{sub 3}TaO{sub 7}, were evaluated from the low-temperature heat capacity measurements. -- Graphical Abstract: Temperature dependence of {Delta}{sub ox}C{sub pm} for bismuth tantalum mixed oxides. Display Omitted Research highlights: > Heat capacity, enthalpy and entropy of ternary bismuth tantalum oxides Bi{sub 4}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 11}, Bi{sub 7}Ta{sub 3}O{sub 18} and Bi{sub 3}TaO{sub 7}. > Heat capacity by DSC calorimetry and heat-pulsed calorimetry. > Enthalpy increments by drop calorimetry. > Einstein-Debye model for low-temperature dependence of the heat capacity. > Application of Neumann-Kopp rule.

  4. Oxidant generation and toxicity enhancement of aged-diesel exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qianfeng; Wyatt, Anna; Kamens, Richard M.

    Diesel exhaust related airborne Particulate Matter (PM) has been linked to a myriad of adverse health outcomes, ranging from cancer to cardiopulmonary disease. The underlying toxicological mechanisms are of great scientific interest. A hypothesis under investigation is that many of the adverse health effects may derive from oxidative stress, initiated by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within affected cells. In this study, the main objective was to determine whether aged-diesel exhaust PM has a higher oxidant generation and toxicity than fresh diesel exhaust PM. The diesel exhaust PM was generated from a 1980 Mercedes-Benz model 300SD, and a dual 270 m 3 Teflon film chamber was utilized to generate two test atmospheres. One side of the chamber is used to produce ozone-diesel exhaust PM system, and another side of the chamber was used to produce diesel exhaust PM only system. A newly optimized dithiothreitol (DTT) method was used to assess their oxidant generation and toxicity. The results of this study showed: (1) both fresh and aged-diesel exhaust PM had high oxidant generation and toxicity; (2) ozone-diesel exhaust PM had a higher toxicity response than diesel exhaust PM only; (3) the diesel exhaust PM toxicity increased with time; (4) the optimized DTT method could be used as a good quantitative chemical assay for oxidant generation and toxicity measurement.

  5. Second-harmonic generation in metal oxide/ormosils nanocomposites derived from sol-gel processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chih-Hsing; Xu, Yuhuan; Mackenzie, John D.; Chee, Joseph K.; Liu, Jia-ming

    1992-12-01

    Nanocomposites of Ormosis containing metal oxides, such as niobates, titanates and zirconates, were prepared by sol-gel processing. The materials were hydrolyzed partially and were dried in air atmosphere for appropriate periods. Afterwards, the materials were heat- treated between 200 degree(s) and 450 degree(s)C for 2 days in pure oxygen. The final bulk samples are transparent in infrared and visible ranges. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that these samples did not have any crystalline phases after heating up to 200 degree(s)C. Using a Nd:YAG laser of 1.064 micrometers wavelength, second harmonic generation, of green light (0.532 micrometers ), was observed in these metal oxides/Ormosils nanocomposites. The refractive index and other optical properties of the metal oxides/Ormosils were also measured. The microstructures of these samples were examined by transmission electron microscopy.

  6. SOFCo mobile planar solid oxide generator

    SciTech Connect

    Khandkar, A.C.; Privette, R.M.

    1995-08-01

    This paper presents results from the first phase of a three phase, four-year program with the objective of designing and demonstrating a 10 kW mobile electric power generator operating on logistic fuel. Objectives of the first phase include: the development of a preliminary system design, an assessment of technologies critical to system performance, and the fabrication of three multi-stack test units.

  7. Cellular level loading and heating of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kalambur, Venkat S; Longmire, Ellen K; Bischof, John C

    2007-11-20

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) hold promise for a variety of biomedical applications due to their properties of visualization using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), heating with radio frequency (rf), and movement in an external magnetic field. In this study, the cellular loading (uptake) mechanism of dextran- and surfactant-coated iron oxide NPs by malignant prostate tumor cells (LNCaP-Pro5) has been studied, and the feasibility of traditional rf treatment and a new laser heating method was evaluated. The kinetics of cell loading was quantified using magnetophoresis and a colorimetric assay. The results showed that loading of surfactant-coated iron oxide NPs with LNCaP-Pro5 was saturable with time (at 24 h) and extracellular concentration (11 pg Fe/cell at 0.5 mg Fe/mL), indicating that the particles are taken up by an "adsorptive endocytosis" pathway. Dextran-coated NPs, however, were taken up less efficiently (1 pg Fe/cell at 0.5 mg Fe/mL). Loading did not saturate with concentration suggesting uptake by fluid-phase endocytosis. Magnetophoresis suggests that NP-loaded cells can be held using external magnetic fields in microcirculatory flow velocities in vivo or in an appropriately designed extracorporeal circuit. Loaded cells were heated using traditional rf (260A, 357 kHz) and a new laser method (532 nm, 7 ns pulse duration, 0.03 J/pulse, 20 pulse/s). Iron oxide in water was found to absorb sufficiently strongly at 532 nm such that heating of individual NPs and thus loaded cells (1 pg Fe/cell) was effective (<10% cell survival) after 30 s of laser exposure. Radio frequency treatment required higher loading (>10 pg Fe/cell) and longer duration (30 min) when compared to laser to accomplish cell destruction (50% viability at 10 pg Fe/cell). Scaling calculations show that the pulsed laser method can lead to single-cell (loaded with NPs) treatments (200 degrees C temperature change at the surface of an individual NP) unlike traditional rf heating

  8. Safe radioisotope thermoelectric generators and heat sources for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, R. C.; Ambrosi, R. M.; Bannister, N. P.; Howe, S. D.; Atkinson, H. V.

    2008-07-01

    Several isotopes are examined as alternatives to 238Pu that is traditionally used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and heating units (RHUs). The radioisotopes discussed include 241Am, 208Po, 210Po, and 90Sr. The aim of this study is to facilitate the design of an RTG with a minimal radiation dose rate and mass including any required shielding. Applications of interest are primarily space and planetary exploration. In order to evaluate the properties of the alternative radioisotopes a Monte Carlo model was developed to examine the radiation protection aspect of the study. The thermodynamics of the power generation process is examined and possible materials for the housing and encapsulation of the radioisotopes are proposed. In this study we also present a historical review of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and the thermoelectric conversion mechanism in order to provide a direct comparison with the performance of our proposed alternative isotope systems.

  9. Microstructural evolution of char under oxidation induced by uneven heating

    SciTech Connect

    Kantorovich, I.I.; Bar-Ziv, E. |

    1996-04-01

    Single spherical char particles were intentionally irradiated nonuniformly in an electrodynamic chamber, in the temperature range 600--1,000 K. The char particles were irradiated from one side (bottom) and consequently heated unevenly. Nonuniform shrinkage of an initially spherical char particle has been observed during oxidation. The features of nonuniform shrinkage are rather peculiar: (1) up to 40%--60% conversion, the particle shrank uniformly. Then spatial preferential consumption initiated, indicating the threshold nature of the phenomenon; (2) preferential consumption, in most experiments, was observed to start from the top of the particle; (3) above the threshold conversion, a disk structure became clear; (4) at very high conversion the particle became like a center-hole doughnut. A model was developed to explain these features by nonuniform transformation of the micropore structure due to oxidation of the unevenly heated particle. The threshold nature of the phenomenon was also explained in terms of the dynamic stability of a particle. The threshold of nonuniform shrinkage corresponds to the transition of the particle to a stable position. After initiation of nonuniform shrinkage, the macroporosity distribution inside the particle becomes nonuniform. Macroporosity was shown to increase near the particle`s center; this eventually creates a hole at high conversion. The good agreement of modeling results with experimental observation confirms the notion that nonuniform shrinkage in regime 1 (kinetically controlled) is an indication of the fundamental microstructural transformations in the course of oxidation.

  10. Probing and controlling photothermal heat generation in plasmonic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Coppens, Zachary J; Li, Wei; Walker, D Greg; Valentine, Jason G

    2013-03-13

    In the emerging field of thermoplasmonics, Joule heating associated with optically resonant plasmonic structures is exploited to generate nanoscale thermal hotspots. In the present study, new methods for designing and thermally probing thermoplasmonic structures are reported. A general design rationale, based on Babinet's principle, is developed for understanding how the complementary version of ideal electromagnetic antennae can yield efficient nanoscale heat sources with maximized current density. Using this methodology, we show that the diabolo antenna is more suitable for heat generation compared with its more well-known complementary structure, the bow-tie antenna. We also demonstrate that highly localized and enhanced thermal hot spots can be realized by incorporating the diabolo antenna into a plasmonic lens. Using a newly developed thermal microscopy method based on the temperature-dependent photoluminescence lifetime of thin-film thermographic phosphors, we experimentally characterize the thermal response of various antenna and superstructure designs. Data from FDTD simulations and the experimental temperature measurements confirm the validity of the design rationale. The thermal microscopy technique, with its robust sensing method, could overcome some of the drawbacks of current micro/nanoscale temperature measurement schemes. PMID:23437919

  11. Vortex generator induced heat transfer augmentation past a rib in a heated duct air flow

    SciTech Connect

    Myrum, T.A.; Acharya, S.; Inamdar, S.; Mehrotra, A. )

    1992-02-01

    The present investigation represents the initial phase of a comprehensive experimental program designed to study the potential for increasing the heat transfer per unit pressure drop in a ribbed duct by positioning vortex generators at key locations in the flow. In particular, the present investigation consists of a rib positioned at the inlet to a rectangular test section with uniform heating at its bottom wall. Local and average Nusselt number results are obtained for a circular rod positioned either immediately above or just downstream of the rib.

  12. Design and optimization of geothermal power generation, heating, and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanoglu, Mehmet

    Most of the world's geothermal power plants have been built in 1970s and 1980s following 1973 oil crisis. Urgency to generate electricity from alternative energy sources and the fact that geothermal energy was essentially free adversely affected careful designs of plants which would maximize their performance for a given geothermal resource. There are, however, tremendous potentials to improve performance of many existing geothermal power plants by retrofitting, optimizing the operating conditions, re-selecting the most appropriate binary fluid in binary plants, and considering cogeneration such as a district heating and/or cooling system or a system to preheat water entering boilers in industrial facilities. In this dissertation, some representative geothermal resources and existing geothermal power plants in Nevada are investigated to show these potentials. Economic analysis of a typical geothermal resource shows that geothermal heating and cooling may generate up to 3 times as much revenue as power generation alone. A district heating/cooling system is designed for its incorporation into an existing 27 MW air-cooled binary geothermal power plant. The system as designed has the capability to meet the entire heating needs of an industrial park as well as 40% of its cooling needs, generating potential revenues of $14,040,000 per year. A study of the power plant shows that evaporative cooling can increase the power output by up to 29% in summer by decreasing the condenser temperature. The power output of the plant can be increased by 2.8 percent by optimizing the maximum pressure in the cycle. Also, replacing the existing working fluid isobutane by butane, R-114, isopentane, and pentane can increase the power output by up to 2.5 percent. Investigation of some well-known geothermal power generation technologies as alternatives to an existing 12.8 MW single-flash geothermal power plant shows that double-flash, binary, and combined flash/binary designs can increase the

  13. High heat transfer oxidizer heat exchanger design and analysis. [RL10-2B engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kmiec, Thomas D.; Kanic, Paul G.; Peckham, Richard J.

    1987-01-01

    The RL10-2B engine, a derivative of the RL10, is capable of multimode thrust operation. This engine operates at two low thrust levels: tank head idle (THI), which is approximately 1 to 2% of full thrust, and pumped idle (PI), which is 10% of full thrust. Operation at THI provides vehicle propellant settling thrust and efficient engine thermal conditioning; PI operation provides vehicle tank pre-pressurization and maneuver thrust for low-g deployment. Stable combustion of the RL10-2B engine during the low thrust operating modes can be accomplished by using a heat exchanger to supply gaseous oxygen to the propellant injector. The oxidizer heat exchanger (OHE) vaporizes the liquid oxygen using hydrogen as the energy source. The design, concept verification testing and analysis for such a heat exchanger is discussed. The design presented uses a high efficiency compact core to vaporize the oxygen, and in the self-contained unit, attenuates any pressure and flow oscillations which result from unstable boiling in the core. This approach is referred to as the high heat transfer design. An alternative approach which prevents unstable boiling of the oxygen by limiting the heat transfer is referred to as the low heat transfer design and is reported in Pratt & Whitney report FR-19135-2.

  14. Mechanism of heat generation from loading gaseous hydrogen isotopes into palladium nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriyeva, Olga

    I have carried out the study of hydrogen isotope reactions in the presence of palladium nanoparticles impregnated into oxide powder. My goal was to explain the mechanisms of heat generation in those systems as a result of exposure to deuterium gas. Some researchers have associated this heating with a nuclear reaction in the Pd lattice. While some earlier experiments showed a correlation between the generation of excess heat and helium production as possible evidence of a nuclear reaction, the results of that research have not been replicated by the other groups and the search for radiation was unsuccessful. Therefore, the unknown origin of the excess heat produced by these systems is of great interest. I synthesized different types of Pd and Pt-impregnated oxide samples similar to those used by other research groups. I used different characterization techniques to confirm that the fabrication method I used is capable of producing Pd nanoparticles on the surface of alumina support. I used a custom built gas-loading system to pressurize the material with hydrogen and deuterium gas while measuring heat output as a result of these pressurizations. My initial study confirmed the excess heat generation in the presence of deuterium. However, the in-situ radiometry and alpha-particle measurements did not show any abnormal increase in counts above the background level. In the absence of nuclear reaction products, I decided to look for a conventional chemical process that could account for the excess heat generation. It was earlier suggested that Pd in its nanoparticle form catalyzes hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions in the material. To prove the chemical nature of the observed phenomena I demonstrated that the reaction can be either exo- or endothermic based on the water isotope trapped in the material and the type of gas provided to the system. The H/D exchange was confirmed by RGA, NMR and FTIR analysis. I quantified the amount of energy that can be released due

  15. Acoustic Optimization of Automotive Exhaust Heat Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C. Q.; Ye, B. Q.; Guo, X.; Hui, P.

    2012-06-01

    The potential for thermoelectric exhaust heat recovery in vehicles has been increasing with recent advances in the efficiency of thermoelectric generators (TEGs). This study analyzes the acoustic attenuation performance of exhaust-based TEGs. The acoustic characteristics of two different thermal designs of exhaust gas heat exchanger in TEGs are discussed in terms of transmission loss and acoustic insertion loss. GT-Power simulations and bench tests on a dynamometer with a high-performance production engine are carried out. Results indicate that the acoustic attenuation of TEGs could be determined and optimized. In addition, the feasibility of integration of exhaust-based TEGs and engine mufflers into the exhaust line is tested, which can help to reduce space and improve vehicle integration.

  16. Modelling hot electron generation in short pulse target heating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircombe, N. J.; Hughes, S. J.

    2013-11-01

    Target heating experiments planned for the Orion laser facility, and electron beam driven fast ignition schemes, rely on the interaction of a short pulse high intensity laser with dense material to generate a flux of energetic electrons. It is essential that the characteristics of this electron source are well known in order to inform transport models in radiation hydrodynamics codes and allow effective evaluation of experimental results and forward modelling of future campaigns. We present results obtained with the particle in cell (PIC) code EPOCH for realistic target and laser parameters, including first and second harmonic light. The hot electron distributions are characterised and their implications for onward transport and target heating are considered with the aid of the Monte-Carlo transport code THOR.

  17. Thermoelectric generators as self-oscillating heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alicki, Robert

    2016-02-01

    In a previous paper [1] a model of a solar cell was proposed in which the non-periodic source of energy—photon flux—drives the collective periodic motion of electrons in a form of plasma oscillation. Subsequently, plasma oscillations are rectified by the p-n junction diode into dc (work). This approach makes a solar cell similar to standard macroscopic heat motors or turbines which always contain two heat baths, the working medium and the periodically moving piston or rotor. Here, a very similar model is proposed in order to describe the operation principles of thermoelectric generators based either on bimetallic or semiconductor p-n junctions. Again plasma oscillation corresponds to a piston and sunlight is replaced by a hot bath. The mathematical formalism is based on the Markovian master equations which can be derived in a rigorous way from the underlying Hamiltonian models and are consistent with the laws of thermodynamics.

  18. Heat generation in aircraft tires under braked rolling conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, S. K.; Dodge, R. N.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical model was developed to approximate the internal temperature distribution in an aircraft tire operating under conditions of unyawed braked rolling. The model employs an array of elements to represent the tire cross section and considers the heat generated within the tire to be caused by the change in strain energy associated with cyclic tire deflection. The additional heating due to tire slip and stresses induced by braking are superimposed on the previously developed free rolling model. An extensive experimental program was conducted to verify temperatures predicted from the analytical model. Data from these tests were compared with calculations over a range of operating conditions. The model results were in reasonably good agreement with measured values.

  19. Heating characteristics of ferromagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Eiji; Hashimoto, Shinji; Kayano, Takeru; Minagawa, Makoto; Yanagihara, Hideto; Kishimoto, Mikio; Yamada, Keiichi; Oda, Tatsuya; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Kanamori, Toshiyuki; Ikehata, Yoshio; Nagano, Isamu

    2010-05-01

    Heating characteristics of Fe oxide nanoparticles designed for hyperthermia were examined. Samples with coercive forces from 50 to 280 Oe(codoped magnetite) were produced with a coprecipitation technique following by hydrothermal reaction. The maximum specific loss powers (SLPs) of 420 W/g was obtained at 117 kHz (640 Oe) for a dispersant sample with coercive force of 280 Oe (ATH9D). SLPs measured on dry powder samples at 17 kHz and measured at 117 kHz on dispersant samples were compared. The measured SLP amplitudes are lower for 17 kHz and higher for 117 kHz than those expected from ferromagnetic dc minor loops. For the 117 kHz case, friction of particles in a carrier fluid (similar mechanism to Brown relaxation in superparamagnetic dispersant samples) is considered to contribute to the heating mechanism.

  20. Mixed-oxide fuel decay heat analysis for BWR LOCA safety evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, R. T.

    2013-07-01

    The mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel decay heat behavior is analyzed for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) safety evaluation. The physical reasoning on why the decay heat power fractions of MOX fuel fission product (FP) are significantly lower than the corresponding decay heat power fractions of uranium-oxide (UOX) fuel FP is illustrated. This is primarily due to the following physical phenomena. -The recoverable energies per fission of plutonium (Pu)-239 and Pu-241 are significantly higher than those of uranium (U)-235 and U-238. Consequently, the fission rate required to produce the same amount of power in MOX fuel is significantly lower than that in UOX fuel, which leads to lower subsequent FP generation rate and associated decay heat power in MOX fuel than those in UOX fuel. - The effective FP decay energy per fission of Pu-239 is significantly lower than the corresponding effective FP decay energy per fission of U-235, e.g., Pu-239's 10.63 Mega-electron-Volt (MeV) vs. U-235's 12.81 MeV at the cooling time 0.2 second. This also leads to lower decay heat power in MOX fuel than that in UOX fuel. The FP decay heat is shown to account for more than 90% of the total decay heat immediately after shutdown. The FP decay heat results based on the American National Standard Institute (ANSI)/American Nuclear Society (ANS)-5.1-1979 standard method are shown very close to the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-2005 standard method. The FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 simplified method are shown very close to but mostly slightly lower than the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1971 method. The FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 simplified method or the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1971 method are shown significantly larger than the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 standard method or the ANSI/ANS-5.1-2005 standard method. (authors)

  1. COMMIX analysis of the sodium heated helical coil steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Kakarala, C.R.; Burge, S.W.; Sha, W.T.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the COMMIX-HCSG computer program and compares predictions to data obtained from performance tests on a 76 MWt Helical Coil Steam Generator (HCSG) test unit. COMMIX-HCSG is a multi-dimensional thermal/hydraulic code that models both steady state and transient operation of an HCSG. The code solves a system of Navier-Stokes continuum equations that have been modified with a combination of volume and directional surface porosities and distributed resistances. This formulation properly accounts for the presence of tube bundle, supports, and baffles on the shell side of the steam generator. Turbulence models and heat transfer and pressure drop equations are used as applicable for the different regions including the upper plenum, the tube bundle, and the lower plenum of the HCSG. The data was obtained from performance tests conducted in early 1987 on the 76 MWt HCSG test unit at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC). The test unit contains over 700 instruments. HCSG development and tests are carried out as part of the Department of Energy program to develop reliable and economical liquid metal heated steam generators.

  2. Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste.

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, Christi D.; Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from United

  3. Cloud-generated radiative heating and its generation of available potential energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhlmann, R.; Smith, G. L.

    1989-01-01

    The generation of zonal available potential energy (APE) by cloud radiative heating is discussed. The APE concept was mathematically formulated by Lorenz (1955) as a measure of the maximum amount of total potential energy that is available for conversion by adiabatic processes to kinetic energy. The rate of change of APE is the rate of the generation of APE minus the rate of conversion between potential and kinetic energy. By radiative transfer calculations, a mean cloud-generated radiative heating for a well defined set of cloud classes is derived as a function of cloud optical thickness. The formulation is suitable for using a general cloud parameter data set and has the advantage of taking into account nonlinearities between the microphysical and macrophysical cloud properties and the related radiation field.

  4. Dynamic stability experiments in sodium-heated steam generators. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    France, D.M.; Roy, R.; Carlson, R.D.; Chiang, T.

    1984-01-01

    Seventy-two dynamic stability tests were performed in the sodium-heated boiling-water test facility at Argonne National Laboratory. A full-scale LMFBR steam generator tube was employed as the test section operating over the water parameter ranges of 6.9 to 15.9 MPa pressure and 170 to 800 kg/m/sup 2/.s mass flux. The stability thresholds from the test compared well to the predictions of a modified version of a correlation equation recently published by other investigators. Typical experimental data and the modified correlation equation are presented.

  5. Effects of Temperature Gradients and Heat Fluxes on High-Temperature Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.

    2008-04-01

    The effects of a temperature gradient and heat flux on point defect diffusion in protective oxide scales were examined. Irreversible thermodynamics were used to expand Fick’s first law of diffusion to include a heat-flux term—a Soret effect. Oxidation kinetics were developed for the oxidation of cobalt and of nickel doped with chromium. Research is described to verify the effects of a heat flux by oxidizing pure cobalt in a temperature gradient at 900 °C, and comparing the kinetics to isothermal oxidation. No evidence of a heat flux effect was found.

  6. Ballistic heat transport in laser generated nano-bubbles.

    PubMed

    Lombard, Julien; Biben, Thierry; Merabia, Samy

    2016-08-01

    Nanobubbles generated by laser heated plasmonic nanoparticles are of interest for biomedical and energy harvesting applications. Of utmost importance is the maximal size of these transient bubbles. Here, we report hydrodynamic phase field simulations of the dynamics of laser induced nanobubbles, with the aim to understand which physical processes govern their maximal size. We show that the nanobubble maximal size and lifetime are to a large extent controlled by the ballistic thermal flux which is present inside the bubble. Taking into account this thermal flux, we can reproduce the fluence dependence of the maximal nanobubble radius as reported experimentally. We also discuss the influence of the laser pulse duration on the number of nanobubbles generated and their maximal size. These studies represent a significant step toward the optimization of the nanobubble size, which is of crucial importance for photothermal cancer therapy applications. PMID:27461058

  7. Ballistic heat transport in laser generated nano-bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombard, Julien; Biben, Thierry; Merabia, Samy

    2016-08-01

    Nanobubbles generated by laser heated plasmonic nanoparticles are of interest for biomedical and energy harvesting applications. Of utmost importance is the maximal size of these transient bubbles. Here, we report hydrodynamic phase field simulations of the dynamics of laser induced nanobubbles, with the aim to understand which physical processes govern their maximal size. We show that the nanobubble maximal size and lifetime are to a large extent controlled by the ballistic thermal flux which is present inside the bubble. Taking into account this thermal flux, we can reproduce the fluence dependence of the maximal nanobubble radius as reported experimentally. We also discuss the influence of the laser pulse duration on the number of nanobubbles generated and their maximal size. These studies represent a significant step toward the optimization of the nanobubble size, which is of crucial importance for photothermal cancer therapy applications.Nanobubbles generated by laser heated plasmonic nanoparticles are of interest for biomedical and energy harvesting applications. Of utmost importance is the maximal size of these transient bubbles. Here, we report hydrodynamic phase field simulations of the dynamics of laser induced nanobubbles, with the aim to understand which physical processes govern their maximal size. We show that the nanobubble maximal size and lifetime are to a large extent controlled by the ballistic thermal flux which is present inside the bubble. Taking into account this thermal flux, we can reproduce the fluence dependence of the maximal nanobubble radius as reported experimentally. We also discuss the influence of the laser pulse duration on the number of nanobubbles generated and their maximal size. These studies represent a significant step toward the optimization of the nanobubble size, which is of crucial importance for photothermal cancer therapy applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C6NR02144A

  8. Exfoliation Propensity of Oxide Scale in Heat Exchangers Used for Supercritical CO2 Power Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Shingledecker, John P.; Kung, Steve; Wright, Ian G.; Nash, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Supercritical CO2 (sCO2) Brayton cycle systems offer the possibility of improved efficiency in future fossil energy power generation plants operating at temperatures of 650 C and above. As there are few data on the oxidation/corrosion behavior of structural alloys in sCO2 at these temperatures, modeling to predict the propensity for oxide exfoliation is not well developed, thus hindering materials selection for these novel cycles. The ultimate goal of this effort is to provide needed data on scale exfoliation behavior in sCO2 for confident alloy selection. To date, a model developed by ORNL and EPRI for the exfoliation of oxide scales formed on boiler tubes in high-temperature, high-pressure steam has proven useful for managing exfoliation in conventional steam plants. A major input provided by the model is the ability to predict the likelihood of scale failure and loss based on understanding of the evolution of the oxide morphologies and the conditions that result in susceptibility to exfoliation. This paper describes initial steps taken to extend the existing model for exfoliation of steam-side oxide scales to sCO2 conditions. The main differences between high-temperature, high-pressure steam and sCO2 that impact the model involve (i) significant geometrical differences in the heat exchangers, ranging from standard pressurized tubes seen typically in steam-producing boilers to designs for sCO2 that employ variously-curved thin walls to create shaped flow paths for extended heat transfer area and small channel cross-sections to promote thermal convection and support pressure loads; (ii) changed operating characteristics with sCO2 due to the differences in physical and thermal properties compared to steam; and (iii) possible modification of the scale morphologies, hence properties that influence exfoliation behavior, due to reaction with carbon species from sCO2. The numerical simulations conducted were based on an assumed sCO2 operating schedule and several

  9. The Next Generation Heated Halo for Blackbody Emissivity Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gero, P.; Taylor, J. K.; Best, F. A.; Revercomb, H. E.; Knuteson, R. O.; Tobin, D. C.; Adler, D. P.; Ciganovich, N. N.; Dutcher, S. T.; Garcia, R. K.

    2011-12-01

    The accuracy of radiance measurements from space-based infrared spectrometers is contingent on the quality of the calibration subsystem, as well as knowledge of its uncertainty. Future climate benchmarking missions call for measurement uncertainties better than 0.1 K (k=3) in radiance temperature for the detection of spectral climate signatures. Blackbody cavities impart the most accurate calibration for spaceborne infrared sensors, provided that their temperature and emissivity is traceably determined on-orbit. The On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard (OARS) has been developed at the University of Wisconsin to meet the stringent requirements of the next generation of infrared remote sensing instruments. It provides on-orbit determination of both traceable temperature and emissivity for calibration blackbodies. The Heated Halo is the component of the OARS that provides a robust and compact method to measure the spectral emissivity of a blackbody in situ. A carefully baffled thermal source is placed in front of a blackbody in an infrared spectrometer system, and the combined radiance of the blackbody and Heated Halo reflection is observed. Knowledge of key temperatures and the viewing geometry allow the blackbody cavity spectral emissivity to be calculated. We present the results from the Heated Halo methodology implemented with a new Absolute Radiance Interferometer (ARI), which is a prototype space-based infrared spectrometer designed for climate benchmarking that was developed under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). We compare our findings to models and other experimental methods of emissivity determination.

  10. HeatWave: the next generation of thermography devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman; Vidas, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    Energy sustainability is a major challenge of the 21st century. To reduce environmental impact, changes are required not only on the supply side of the energy chain by introducing renewable energy sources, but also on the demand side by reducing energy usage and improving energy efficiency. Currently, 2D thermal imaging is used for energy auditing, which measures the thermal radiation from the surfaces of objects and represents it as a set of color-mapped images that can be analysed for the purpose of energy efficiency monitoring. A limitation of such a method for energy auditing is that it lacks information on the geometry and location of objects with reference to each other, particularly across separate images. Such a limitation prevents any quantitative analysis to be done, for example, detecting any energy performance changes before and after retrofitting. To address these limitations, we have developed a next generation thermography device called Heat Wave. Heat Wave is a hand-held 3D thermography device that consists of a thermal camera, a range sensor and color camera, and can be used to generate precise 3D model of objects with augmented temperature and visible information. As an operator holding the device smoothly waves it around the objects of interest, Heat Wave can continuously track its own pose in space and integrate new information from the range and thermal and color cameras into a single, and precise 3D multi-modal model. Information from multiple viewpoints can be incorporated together to improve the accuracy, reliability and robustness of the global model. The approach also makes it possible to reduce any systematic errors associated with the estimation of surface temperature from the thermal images.

  11. Generation and Sustainment of Plasma Rotation by ICRF Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, F. W.

    2000-10-01

    When tokamak plasmas are heated by the fundamental minority ion-cyclotron process, they are observed to rotate toroidally, even though this heating process introduces negligable angular momentum. This work proposes and evaluates a physics mechanism which resolves this apparent conflict. The argument has two elements. First, it is assumed that angular momentum transport is governed by a diffusion equation with a v_tor = 0 boundary condition at the plasma surface and a torque-density source. When the source consists of separated regions of positive and negative torque density, a finite central rotation velocity results, even though the volume integrated torque density - the angular momentum input - vanishes. Secondly, ions energized by the ICRF process can generate separated regions of positive and negative torque density. Heating increases their banana widths which leads to radial energetic-particle transport that must be balanced by neutralizing radial currents and a j_rB_pR torque density in the bulk plasma. Additional, comparable torque density results from collisional transfer of mechanical angular momentum from energetic particles to the bulk plasma and particle loss through banana particles impacting the wall. Monte-Carlo calculations utilizing the ORBIT code evaluate all sources of torque density and rigorously assure that no net angular momentum is introduced. Two models of ICRF heating, diffusive and instantaneous, give similar results. When the resonance location is on the LFS, the calculated rotation has the magnitude, profile, and co-current sense of Alcator C-Mod observations. For HFS resonance locations, the model predicts counter-current rotation. Scans of rotational profiles vs. resonance location, initial energy, particle loss, pitch, and qm will be presented as will the location of the velocity shear layer its scaling to a reactor.

  12. Microwave torch as a plasmachemical generator of nitric oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Knyazev, V. Yu.; Kossyi, I. A.; Popov, N. A.

    2006-06-15

    The possibility of using a microwave coaxial plasmatron (a microwave torch) as an efficient plasmachemical generator of nitric oxides in an air jet has been studied experimentally. A plasmachemical model of the generator is developed. Results of calculations by this model do not contradict experimental results. A conclusion about the mechanisms governing NO{sub x} production in a plasma torch is drawn by comparing the experimental and calculated results.

  13. Downhole steam generator having a downhole oxidant compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, R.L.

    1983-04-19

    Apparatus and method for generation of steam in a borehole for penetration into an earth formation wherein a downhole oxidant compressor is used to compress relatively low pressure (Atmospheric) oxidant, such as air, to a relatively high pressure prior to mixing with fuel for combustion. The multi-stage compressor receives motive power through a shaft driven by a gas turbine powered by the hot expanding combustion gases. The main flow of compressed oxidant passes through a velocity increasing nozzle formed by a reduced central section of the compressor housing. An oxidant bypass feedpipe leading to peripheral oxidant injection nozzles of the combustion chamber are also provided. The downhole compressor allows effective steam generation in deep wells without need for high pressure surface compressors. Feedback preheater means are provided for preheating fuel in a preheat chamber. Preheating of the water occurs in both a water feed line running from aboveground and in a countercurrent water flow channel surrounding the combustor assembly. The countercurrent water flow channels advantageously serve to cool the combustion chamber wall. The water is injected through slotted inlets along the combustion chamber wall to provide an unstable boundary layer and stripping of the water from the wall for efficient steam generation. Pressure responsive doors are provided at the steam outlet for closing and sealing the combustion chamber from entry of reservoir fluids in the event of a flameout.

  14. Downhole steam generator having a downhole oxidant compressor

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Ronald L.

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus and method for generation of steam in a borehole for penetration into an earth formation wherein a downhole oxidant compressor is used to compress relatively low pressure (atmospheric) oxidant, such as air, to a relatively high pressure prior to mixing with fuel for combustion. The multi-stage compressor receives motive power through a shaft driven by a gas turbine powered by the hot expanding combustion gases. The main flow of compressed oxidant passes through a velocity increasing nozzle formed by a reduced central section of the compressor housing. An oxidant bypass feedpipe leading to peripheral oxidant injection nozzles of the combustion chamber are also provided. The downhole compressor allows effective steam generation in deep wells without need for high pressure surface compressors. Feedback preheater means are provided for preheating fuel in a preheat chamber. Preheating of the water occurs in both a water feed line running from aboveground and in a countercurrent water flow channel surrounding the combustor assembly. The countercurrent water flow channels advantageously serve to cool the combustion chamber wall. The water is injected through slotted inlets along the combustion chamber wall to provide an unstable boundary layer and stripping of the water from the wall for efficient steam generation. Pressure responsive doors are provided at the steam outlet for closing and sealing the combustion chamber from entry of reservoir fluids in the event of a flameout.

  15. Generating Apparatus for Gas Heat Pump System using Sensorless-Controlled Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toba, Akio; Fujita, Kouetsu; Maeda, Toshihiro; Kato, Tomohiko

    A unique generating system for Gas heat pump system (GHP) is presented. The GHP is an air-conditioning system, in which the compressors are driven by a gas engine. The proposed system is applied to the outside unit of GHP to feed the electrical equipments inside. The system utilizes a permanent magnet synchronous generator, which is connected to the gas engine, to realize high-efficiency and small-size. The generator is controlled by a converter with sensorless control technology to eliminate the position sensor. Another major topic is the “free-run startup" technique to start the converter when the generator is rotating. The system configuration and principles of the techniques are set forth, followed by experimental results which show that the system works properly and successfully.

  16. Molybdenum-platinum-oxide electrodes for thermoelectric generators

    DOEpatents

    Schmatz, Duane J.

    1990-01-01

    The invention is directed to a composite article suitable for use in thermoelectric generators. The article comprises a solid electrolyte carrying a thin film comprising molybdenum-platinum-oxide as an electrode deposited by physical deposition techniques. The invention is also directed to the method of making same.

  17. Heat flow and heat generation estimates for the Churchill basement of the Western Canadian Basin in Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.D.W.; Jones, F.W.; Majorowicz, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Heat flow through the sediments and temperatures of the Churchill province basement under the sedimentary cover are determined for 24 locations in the central part of the Prairies basin in Alberta where the vertical heat flux is approximately constant from the base of the sediments to the surface. The contribution to heat flow from heat generation in the sediments is also considered. The average heat flow through the sediments is found to be 71 mWm/sup -2/ +- 12mWm/sup -2/ which is about 30 mWm/sup -2/ higher than in the neighbouring shield area of the Churchill province, and the contribution from heat generation in the sediments to the surface heat flow is only approximately 2.5 mWm/sup -2/. The relationship between basement heat generation and heat flow is investigated, and it is found that the platform heat flow/heat generation values are in general higher than those from the Churchill province of the shield found by Drury (1985). Although for the platform and shield data, the reduced heat flow is about 40 mWm/sup -2/ and the slope is about 8km, it is apparent that the platform data alone are not good enough to establish a precise relationship.

  18. Studies on Effective Utilization of SOFC Exhaust Heat Using Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terayama, Takeshi; Nagata, Susumu; Tanaka, Yohei; Momma, Akihiko; Kato, Tohru; Kunii, Masaru; Yamamoto, Atsushi

    2013-07-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are being researched around the world. In Japan, a compact SOFC system with rated alternative current (AC) power of 700 W has become available on the market, since the base load electricity demand for a standard home is said to be less than 700 W AC. To improve the generating efficiency of SOFC systems in the 700-W class, we focused on thermoelectric generation (TEG) technology, since there are a lot of temperature gradients in the system. Analysis based on simulations indicated the possibility of introducing thermoelectric generation at the air preheater, steam generator, and exhaust outlet. Among these options, incorporating a TEG heat exchanger comprising multiple CoSb3/SiGe-based TEG modules into the air preheater had potential to produce additional output of 37.5 W and an improvement in generating efficiency from 46% to 48.5%. Furthermore, by introducing thermoelectric generation at the other two locations, an increase in maximum output of more than 50 W and generating efficiency of 50% can be anticipated.

  19. Method for heat treating and sintering metal oxides with microwave radiation

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.; Meek, Thomas T.

    1989-01-01

    A method for microwave sintering materials, primarily metal oxides, is described. Metal oxides do not normally absorb microwave radiation at temperatures ranging from about room temperature to several hundred degrees centrigrade are sintered with microwave radiation without the use of the heretofore required sintering aids. This sintering is achieved by enclosing a compact of the oxide material in a housing or capsule formed of a oxide which has microwave coupling properties at room temprature up to at least the microwave coupling temperature of the oxide material forming the compact. The heating of the housing effects the initial heating of the oxide material forming the compact by heat transference and then functions as a thermal insulator for the encased oxide material after the oxide material reaches a sufficient temperature to adequately absorb or couple with microwave radiation for heating thereof to sintering temperature.

  20. Blood flow, substrate utilization and heat generation in tissues drained by the azygos vein in man.

    PubMed

    Brundin, T; Hagenfeldt, L; Söderberg, R; Wahren, J

    1987-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the blood flow, heat generation and substrate utilization in tissues drained by the azygos vein in healthy subjects. Catheters were inserted percutaneously into the azygos vein and the pulmonary artery in 10 healthy male subjects in the basal, post-absorptive state. Blood flow in the azygos vein was measured by thermodilution technique, blood temperature was recorded in both the azygos vein and the pulmonary artery and blood samples for the determination of oxygen content and substrate concentrations were collected from both vessels repeatedly at timed intervals. Free fatty acid (FFA) exchange was evaluated following the intravenous infusion of 14-C labelled oleic acid. The average azygos vein blood flow was 94 +/- 10 ml/min. The coefficient of variation for the flow determination was 3.6%. The blood temperature in the azygos vein was consistently higher than that in the pulmonary artery, indicating an average calculated net heat production in the tissues of 0.5 W. The oxygen uptake to the tissues drained by the azygos vein amounted to 6 +/- 1 ml/min. Significant amounts of glucose, FFA and ketone bodies were taken up in the azygos area, while both glycerol and FFA were released. The FFA uptake could, if oxidized, account for about half of the oxygen uptake. In conclusion, the findings indicate that, in the basal state, the tissues drained by the azygos vein utilize both glucose and FFA. Heat is generated within the area but the rate of generation is low and can largely be explained by the oxidative metabolism. The findings do not support an important role for brown adipose tissue metabolism in the interscapular region in man. PMID:3427881

  1. A study on post blast generation of nitrogen oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, L.D.

    1996-12-31

    Certain blasting applications are more prone to the generation of significant levels of nitrogen dioxide post blast fumes, more commonly referred to as after blast smoke, generally ranging in color from dark yellow to bright red. This paper reviews basic background chemistry defining the observed fumes and attempts to correlate geology, blast design, and explosive composition effects on the level of nitrogen dioxide that can be observed in various blasting conditions. Additionally, a test setting for evaluating the generation of post blast fumes is presented with pertinent test data detailing generic explosive formulation modifications which effect the overall level of post detonation generation of nitrogen dioxide. Scaled up field trials were completed to evaluate the results obtained using data generated from the test model. Specifically, deep, wet blasting applications in softer geologies with reduced confinement appear to promote the generation of nitric oxide from the explosive composition within the borehole due to partial reaction of the nitrates contained in commercial explosives. As the nitric oxide is released from the muck pile following the detonation of the blast pattern, the gas is readily oxidized to form the colorful after blast fumes of nitrogen dioxide. Using the experimental testing procedure it has been determined that variations to the explosive composition which affect detonation velocity and explosion temperature seem to have a significant effect on the level of nitric oxide formed during a less than ideal detonation. Additional chemical additives to reduce the level of nitric oxide which results from a less than ideal detonation front have been evaluated using the proposed test procedure.

  2. Heat transport by phonons and the generation of heat by fast phonon processes in ferroelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, X.; Salje, E. K. H.

    2015-05-01

    Thermal conductivity of ferroelastic device materials can be reversibly controlled by strain. The nucleation and growth of twin boundaries reduces thermal conductivity if the heat flow is perpendicular to the twin wall. The twin walls act as phonon barriers whereby the thermal conductivity decreases linearly with the number of such phonon barriers. Ferroelastic materials also show elasto-caloric properties with a high frequency dynamics. The upper frequency limit is determined by heat generation on a time scale, which is some 5 orders of magnitude below the typical bulk phonon times. Some of these nano-structural processes are irreversible under stress release (but remain reversible under temperature cycling), in particular the annihilation of needle domains that are a key indicator for ferroelastic behaviour in multiferroic materials.

  3. Generation of mirage effect by heated carbon nanotube thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, L. H.; Lim, C. W.; Li, Y. C.; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Quoc Bui, Tinh

    2014-06-01

    Mirage effect, a common phenomenon in nature, is a naturally occurring optical phenomenon in which lights are bent due to the gradient variation of refraction in the temperature gradient medium. The theoretical analysis of mirage effect generated by heated carbon nanotube thin film is presented both for gas and liquid. Excellent agreement is demonstrated through comparing the theoretical prediction with published experimental results. It is concluded from the theoretical prediction and experimental observation that the mirage effect is more likely to happen in liquid. The phase of deflected optical beam is also discussed and the method for measurement of thermal diffusivity of medium is theoretically verified. Furthermore, a method for measuring the refractive index of gas by detecting optical beam deflection is also presented in this paper.

  4. Some aspects of materials development for sodium heated steam generators

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, P.; Spalaris, C.N.

    1980-10-01

    A development program was undertaken to support the materials selection for steam generator piping and IHX which are to be used in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR). Four major topics were reviewed, describing the results obtained as well as the direction of future tests. These topics are: carbon transport in sodium, effect of carbon loss/gain upon materials in the reactor Intermediate Heat Transport System (IHTS), corrosion fatigue and aqueous corrosion. The results support the initial assumptions made in specifying the use of 2-1/4Cr-1Mo as the construction material for the evaporator and superheater and Type 316 piping of the IHT system. Future direction of the experimental programs is to further verify the materials choice and to also obtain information which will be essential during the plant installation, operation and reliability of the components.

  5. Heat generation in Aircraft tires under yawed rolling conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, Richard N.; Clark, Samuel K.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical model was developed for approximating the internal temperature distribution in an aircraft tire operating under conditions of yawed rolling. The model employs an assembly of elements to represent the tire cross section and treats the heat generated within the tire as a function of the change in strain energy associated with predicted tire flexure. Special contact scrubbing terms are superimposed on the symmetrical free rolling model to account for the slip during yawed rolling. An extensive experimental program was conducted to verify temperatures predicted from the analytical model. Data from this program were compared with calculation over a range of operating conditions, namely, vertical deflection, inflation pressure, yaw angle, and direction of yaw. Generally the analytical model predicted overall trends well and correlated reasonably well with individual measurements at locations throughout the cross section.

  6. Generation of mirage effect by heated carbon nanotube thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, L. H.; Lim, C. W.; Li, Y. C.; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Quoc Bui, Tinh

    2014-06-28

    Mirage effect, a common phenomenon in nature, is a naturally occurring optical phenomenon in which lights are bent due to the gradient variation of refraction in the temperature gradient medium. The theoretical analysis of mirage effect generated by heated carbon nanotube thin film is presented both for gas and liquid. Excellent agreement is demonstrated through comparing the theoretical prediction with published experimental results. It is concluded from the theoretical prediction and experimental observation that the mirage effect is more likely to happen in liquid. The phase of deflected optical beam is also discussed and the method for measurement of thermal diffusivity of medium is theoretically verified. Furthermore, a method for measuring the refractive index of gas by detecting optical beam deflection is also presented in this paper.

  7. Role of heat generation and thermal diffusion during frontal photopolymerization.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, Matthew G; Vitale, Alessandra; Cabral, João T; Matar, Omar K

    2015-08-01

    Frontal photopolymerization (FPP) is a rapid and versatile solidification process that can be used to fabricate complex three-dimensional structures by selectively exposing a photosensitive monomer-rich bath to light. A characteristic feature of FPP is the appearance of a sharp polymerization front that propagates into the bath as a planar traveling wave. In this paper, we introduce a theoretical model to determine how heat generation during photopolymerization influences the kinetics of wave propagation as well as the monomer-to-polymer conversion profile, both of which are relevant for FPP applications and experimentally measurable. When thermal diffusion is sufficiently fast relative to the rate of polymerization, the system evolves as if it were isothermal. However, when thermal diffusion is slow, a thermal wavefront develops and propagates at the same rate as the polymerization front. This leads to an accumulation of heat behind the polymerization front which can result in a significant sharpening of the conversion profile and acceleration of the growth of the solid. Our results also suggest that a novel way to tailor the dynamics of FPP is by imposing a temperature gradient along the growth direction. PMID:26382412

  8. Role of heat generation and thermal diffusion during frontal photopolymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, Matthew G.; Vitale, Alessandra; Cabral, João T.; Matar, Omar K.

    2015-08-01

    Frontal photopolymerization (FPP) is a rapid and versatile solidification process that can be used to fabricate complex three-dimensional structures by selectively exposing a photosensitive monomer-rich bath to light. A characteristic feature of FPP is the appearance of a sharp polymerization front that propagates into the bath as a planar traveling wave. In this paper, we introduce a theoretical model to determine how heat generation during photopolymerization influences the kinetics of wave propagation as well as the monomer-to-polymer conversion profile, both of which are relevant for FPP applications and experimentally measurable. When thermal diffusion is sufficiently fast relative to the rate of polymerization, the system evolves as if it were isothermal. However, when thermal diffusion is slow, a thermal wavefront develops and propagates at the same rate as the polymerization front. This leads to an accumulation of heat behind the polymerization front which can result in a significant sharpening of the conversion profile and acceleration of the growth of the solid. Our results also suggest that a novel way to tailor the dynamics of FPP is by imposing a temperature gradient along the growth direction.

  9. Dynamic conversion of solar generated heat to electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. C.; Fourakis, E.; Hammer, J. M.; Smith, G. A.; Grosskreutz, J. C.; Mcbride, E.

    1974-01-01

    The effort undertaken during this program led to the selection of the water-superheated steam (850 psig/900 F) crescent central receiver as the preferred concept from among 11 candidate systems across the technological spectrum of the dynamic conversion of solar generated heat to electricity. The solar power plant designs were investigated in the range of plant capacities from 100 to 1000 Mw(e). The investigations considered the impacts of plant size, collector design, feed-water temperature ratio, heat rejection equipment, ground cover, and location on solar power technical and economic feasibility. For the distributed receiver systems, the optimization studies showed that plant capacities less than 100 Mw(e) may be best. Although the size of central receiver concepts was not parametrically investigated, all indications are that the optimal plant capacity for central receiver systems will be in the range from 50 to 200 Mw(e). Solar thermal power plant site selection criteria and methodology were also established and used to evaluate potentially suitable sites. The result of this effort was to identify a site south of Inyokern, California, as typically suitable for a solar thermal power plant. The criteria used in the selection process included insolation and climatological characteristics, topography, and seismic history as well as water availability.

  10. Resistively Heated SiC Nozzle for Generating Molecular Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagiano, Steven; Abell, Robert; Patrick, Edward; Bendt, Miri; Gundersen, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    An improved nozzle has been developed to replace nozzles used previously in an apparatus that generates a substantially unidirectional beam of molecules passing through a vacuum at speeds of several kilometers per second. The basic principle of operation of the apparatus is the same for both the previous and the present nozzle designs. The main working part of the nozzle is essentially a cylinder that is closed except that there is an inlet for a pressurized gas and, at one end, the cylinder is closed by a disk that contains a narrow central hole that serves as an outlet. The cylinder is heated to increase the thermal speeds of the gas molecules into the desired high-speed range. Heated, pressurized gas escapes through the outlet into a portion of the vacuum chamber that is separated, by a wall, from the rest of the vacuum chamber. In this portion of the vacuum chamber, the gas undergoes a free jet expansion. Most of the expanded gas is evacuated and thus does not become part of the molecular beam. A small fraction of the expanded beam passes through a narrow central orifice in the wall and thereby becomes a needle- thin molecular beam in the portion of the vacuum on the downstream side of the wall.

  11. Modeling of heat generation in ammonia-treated solid rocket propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Raun, R.L.; Isom, K.B.

    1995-06-01

    With the end of the Cold War, safe, environmentally sound separation, recycling, and disposal of ingredients in solid rocket propellants and munitions has become a national priority. One approach to demilitarize solid rocket propellants is treatment with ammonia. Ammonia extracts the oxidizers ammonium perchlorate and HMX, yielding a solid reside that is more suitable for incineration and less sensitive to impact and other modes of accidental initiation. Ammonia treatment of nitroglycerin-containing propellants is complicated by an exothermic reaction between ammonia and nitroglycerin. If not removed, the heat generated by this reaction can cause propellant ignition. To help design safe treatment processes, a model for the ammonia-propellant reaction was developed, which integrates transient energy and species conservation equations to simulate ammonia diffusion, heat generation, and heat flow in a propellant and in the solid residue resulting from ammonia treatment. It was calibrated using residue thickness and thermocouple data for one propellant. The calibrated model was used to predict conditions leading to ignition of thin propellant strips. The results agree well with experimental observations.

  12. Model of Heat Exchangers for Waste Heat Recovery from Diesel Engine Exhaust for Thermoelectric Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Chad; Vuppuluri, Prem; Shi, Li; Hall, Matthew

    2012-06-01

    The performance and operating characteristics of a hypothetical thermoelectric generator system designed to extract waste heat from the exhaust of a medium-duty turbocharged diesel engine were modeled. The finite-difference model consisted of two integrated submodels: a heat exchanger model and a thermoelectric device model. The heat exchanger model specified a rectangular cross-sectional geometry with liquid coolant on the cold side, and accounted for the difference between the heat transfer rate from the exhaust and that to the coolant. With the spatial variation of the thermoelectric properties accounted for, the thermoelectric device model calculated the hot-side and cold-side heat flux for the temperature boundary conditions given for the thermoelectric elements, iterating until temperature and heat flux boundary conditions satisfied the convection conditions for both exhaust and coolant, and heat transfer in the thermoelectric device. A downhill simplex method was used to optimize the parameters that affected the electrical power output, including the thermoelectric leg height, thermoelectric n-type to p-type leg area ratio, thermoelectric leg area to void area ratio, load electrical resistance, exhaust duct height, coolant duct height, fin spacing in the exhaust duct, location in the engine exhaust system, and number of flow paths within the constrained package volume. The calculation results showed that the configuration with 32 straight fins was optimal across the 30-cm-wide duct for the case of a single duct with total height of 5.5 cm. In addition, three counterflow parallel ducts or flow paths were found to be an optimum number for the given size constraint of 5.5 cm total height, and parallel ducts with counterflow were a better configuration than serpentine flow. Based on the reported thermoelectric properties of MnSi1.75 and Mg2Si0.5Sn0.5, the maximum net electrical power achieved for the three parallel flow paths in a counterflow arrangement was 1

  13. Effect of patchouli alcohol on the regulation of heat shock-induced oxidative stress in IEC-6 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Jiang, Linshu; Liu, Fenghua; Chen, Yuping; Xu, Lei; Li, Deyin; Ma, Yunfei; Li, Huanrong; Xu, Jianqin

    2016-08-01

    Purpose Patchouli alcohol (PA) is used to treat gastrointestinal dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the function of PA in the regulated process of oxidative stress in rat intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6). Materials and methods Oxidative stress was stimulated by exposing IEC-6 cells to heat shock (42 °C for 3 h). IEC-6 cells in treatment groups were pretreated with various concentrations of PA (10, 40, and 80 ng/mL) for 3 h before heat shock. Results Heat shock caused damage to the morphology of IEC-6 cells, and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Moreover, mRNA and protein expression by target genes related to oxidative stress in heat shock were also altered. Specifically, the mRNA expression by HSP70, HSP90, GSH-px, NRF2 nd HO-1were all increased, and Nrf2 and Keap1 protein expression were increased after heat shock. However, pretreatment with PA weakened the level of damage to the cellular morphology, and decreased the MDA content caused by heat shock, indicating PA had cytoprotective activities. Pretreatment with PA at high dose significantly increased generation of intracellular ROS. Compared with the heat shock group alone, PA pretreatment significantly decreased the mRNA expression by HSP70, HSP90, SOD, CAT, GSH-px, KEAP1 and HO-1. Furthermore, the high dose of PA significantly increased Nrf2 protein expression, while both the intermediate and high dose of PA significantly increased HO-1 protein expression. Conclusion Heat-shock-induced oxidative stress in IEC-6 cells, and PA could alleviate the Nrf2-Keap1 cellular oxidative stress responses. PMID:27056378

  14. Synthesis and heating effect of iron/iron oxide composite and iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Q.; Baker, I.; Loudis, J. A.; Liao, Y. F.; Hoopes, P. J.

    2007-02-01

    Fe/Fe oxide nanoparticles, in which the core consists of metallic Fe and the shell is composed of Fe oxides, were obtained by reduction of an aqueous solution of FeCl 3 within a NaBH 4 solution, or, using a water-in-oil micro-emulsion with CTAB as the surfactant. The reduction was performed either in an inert atmosphere or in air, and passivation with air was performed to produce the Fe/Fe 3O 4 core/shell composite. Phase identification and particle size were determined by X-ray diffraction and TEM. Thermal analysis was performed using a differential scanning calorimeter. The quasistatic magnetic properties were measured using a VSM, and the specific absorption rates (SARs) of both Fe oxide and Fe/Fe 3O 4 composite nanoparticles either dispersed in methanol or in an epoxy resin were measured by Luxtron fiber temperature sensors in an alternating magnetic field of 150 Oe at 250 kHz. It was found that the preparation conditions, including the concentrations of solutions, the mixing procedure and the heat treatment, influence the particle size, the crystal structure and consequently the magnetic properties of the particles. Compared with Fe oxides, the saturation magnetization (MS) of Fe/Fe 3O 4 particles (100-190 emu/g) can be twice as high, and the coercivity (H C) can be tunable from several Oe to several hundred Oe. Hence, the SAR of Fe/Fe 3O 4 composite nanoparticles can be much higher than that of Fe oxides, with a maximum SAR of 345 W/g. The heating behavior is related to the magnetic behavior of the nanoparticles.

  15. Synthesis and heating effect of iron/iron oxide composite and iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Q.; Baker, I.; Loudis, J. A.; Liao, Y.F.; Hoopes, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Fe/Fe oxide nanoparticles, in which the core consists of metallic Fe and the shell is composed of Fe oxides, were obtained by reduction of an aqueous solution of FeCl3 within a NaBH4 solution, or, using a water-in-oil micro-emulsion with CTAB as the surfactant. The reduction was performed either in an inert atmosphere or in air, and passivation with air was performed to produce the Fe/Fe3O4 core/shell composite. Phase identification and particle size were determined by X-ray diffraction and TEM. Thermal analysis was performed using a differential scanning calorimeter. The quasistatic magnetic properties were measured using a VSM, and the specific absorption rates (SARs) of both Fe oxide and Fe/Fe3O4 composite nanoparticles either dispersed in methanol or in an epoxy resin were measured by Luxtron fiber temperature sensors in an alternating magnetic field of 150 Oe at 250 kHz. It was found that the preparation conditions, including the concentrations of solutions, the mixing procedure and the heat treatment, influence the particle size, the crystal structure and consequently the magnetic properties of the particles. Compared with Fe oxides, the saturation magnetization (MS) of Fe/Fe3O4 particles (100–190 emu/g) can be twice as high, and the coercivity (HC) can be tunable from several Oe to several hundred Oe. Hence, the SAR of Fe/Fe3O4 composite nanoparticles can be much higher than that of Fe oxides, with a maximum SAR of 345 W/g. The heating behavior is related to the magnetic behavior of the nanoparticles. PMID:25301983

  16. Effect of reactor heat transfer limitations on CO preferential oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, X.; Besser, R. S.

    Our recent studies of CO preferential oxidation (PrOx) identified systematic differences between the characteristic curves of CO conversion for a microchannel reactor with thin-film wall catalyst and conventional mini packed-bed lab reactors (m-PBR's). Strong evidence has suggested that the reverse water-gas-shift (r-WGS) side reaction activated by temperature gradients in m-PBR's is the source of these differences. In the present work, a quasi-3D tubular non-isothermal reactor model based on the finite difference method was constructed to quantitatively study the effect of heat transport resistance on PrOx reaction behavior. First, the kinetic expressions for the three principal reactions involved were formed based on the combination of experimental data and literature reports and their parameters were evaluated with a non-linear regression method. Based on the resulting kinetic model and an energy balance derived for PrOx, the finite difference method was then adopted for the quasi-3D model. This model was then used to simulate both the microreactor and m-PBR's and to gain insights into their different conversion behavior. Simulation showed that the temperature gradients in m-PBR's favor the reverse water-gas-shift (r-WGS) reaction, thus causing a much narrower range of permissible operating temperature compared to the microreactor. Accordingly, the extremely efficient heat removal of the microchannel/thin-film catalyst system eliminates temperature gradients and efficiently prevents the onset of the r-WGS reaction.

  17. Influence of heat generation and heat flux on peristaltic flow with interacting nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Raza, M.; Ellahi, R.

    2014-08-01

    In the current study, we have examined the peristaltic flow of three different nanoparticles with water as base fluid under the influence of slip boundary conditions through a vertical asymmetric porous channel in the presence of MHD. The selected nanoparticles are titanium dioxide ( TiO2 , copper oxide (CuO) and silicon dioxide ( SiO2 . The Brownian motion shows that the effective conductivity increases to result in a lower temperature gradient for a given heat flux. To examine these transport phenomena thoroughly, we also consider the thermal conductivity model of Brownian motion for nanofluids, this increases the effect of the particle size, particle volume fraction and temperature dependence. The mathematical formulation is presented. Exact solutions are obtained from the resulting equations. The obtained expressions for pressure gradient, temperature and velocity profile are described through graphs for the various relevant parameters. The streamlines are drawn for some physical quantities to discuss the trapping phenomenon.

  18. Three-zonal engineering method of heat calculation for fluidized bed furnaces based on data on commercial investigations of heat generation distribution during biomass combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litun, D. S.; Ryabov, G. A.

    2016-02-01

    A three-zonal method of heat calculation of furnaces for combustion of biomass and low-caloric fuel in the fluidized bed is described. The method is based on equations of thermal and material balances that account for heat generation by fuel in the zone, heat-and-mass transfer heat exchange between the furnace media and surfaces that bound the zone, and heat-and-mass transfer between furnace zones. The calculation procedure for heat generation by fuel in the fluidized bed (FB) using the heat generation portion by the fuel is proposed. Based on commercial investigations, the main factors that affect the average temperature in the FB and the portion of fuel heat that is released in the FB are determined. Results of commercial investigations showed that the airflow coefficient in the FB should be recognized as the main operation parameter that affects the average temperature in the FB and, consequently, heat generation in the FB. The gas flow rate in the FB can be marked out as the second factor that affects the consumption degree of oxidizer supplied in the FB. Commercial investigations revealed that mixing is affected by the gas flow rate in the FB and the bed material particle size, which may be changed during the boiler operation because of the agglomeration of particles of sand and ash. The calculation processing of commercial investigations on a KM-75-40M boiler of a CHP-3 of an Arkhangelsk Pulp and Paper Mill (APPM), which was carried out using the inverse problem procedure by means of a developed computer program, determined the range of the fuel heat release share in the FB, which was 0.26-0.45 at an excess air factor of 0.59-0.93 in the bed, and the heat release share in the maximum temperature zone in the total heat release in the superbed space. The heat release share in the bed is determined as an approximating function of the excess air factor in the bed and the fluidization number. The research results can be used during designing boilers with the

  19. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    David Deangelis; Rich Depuy; Debashis Dey; Georgia Karvountzi; Nguyen Minh; Max Peter; Faress Rahman; Pavel Sokolov; Deliang Yang

    2004-09-30

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the April to October 2004 reporting period in Task 2.3 (SOFC Scaleup for Hybrid and Fuel Cell Systems) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. This study analyzes the performance and economics of power generation systems for central power generation application based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology and fueled by natural gas. The main objective of this task is to develop credible scale up strategies for large solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine systems. System concepts that integrate a SOFC with a gas turbine were developed and analyzed for plant sizes in excess of 20 MW. A 25 MW plant configuration was selected with projected system efficiency of over 65% and a factory cost of under $400/kW. The plant design is modular and can be scaled to both higher and lower plant power ratings. Technology gaps and required engineering development efforts were identified and evaluated.

  20. The chemical transformation of copper in aluminium oxide during heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yu-Ling; Wang, Hsi-Chih; Yang, Yaw-Wen; Lee, Jyh-Fu

    2004-08-01

    Thermal treatment has recently been emerging as a promising environmental technology to stabilize heavy metal-containing industrial sludge. This study used x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to identify the species of copper contaminant contained in aluminium oxide that is one of the main compositions of sludge and soil. Results indicate that the originally loaded copper nitrate was transformed into Cu(OH)2 after its dissolution in the aluminium oxide slurry. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) fitting indicates that the main copper species in the 105 °C dried Cu(NO3)2-loaded aluminium oxide is Cu(OH)2 which accounts for ca. 75% of the loaded copper. After thermal treatment at 500 °C for 1 h, both x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and EXAFS fitting results show that CuO became the prevailing copper species (about 85%); the rest of the copper consisted of {\\sim }15{%} Cu(OH)2 and a negligible amount of Cu(NO3)2. It was found that most Cu(OH)2 and Cu(NO3)2 decomposed into CuO at 500 °C. Further increase of the heating temperature from 500 to 900 °C resulted in more decomposition of Cu(OH)2 and Cu(NO3)2; therefore CuO remained as the main copper species. However, it was suggested that about 15% of the loaded copper formed CuAl2O4 through the chemical reaction between CuO and Al2O3 at 900 °C.

  1. Heat of combustion of tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composites

    SciTech Connect

    Cervantes, Octavio G.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Gash, Alexander E.; Munir, Zuhair A.

    2010-12-15

    The heat of combustion of two distinctly synthesized stoichiometric tantalum-tungsten oxide energetic composites was investigated by bomb calorimetry. One composite was synthesized using a sol-gel (SG) derived method in which micrometric-scale tantalum is immobilized in a tungsten oxide three-dimensional nanostructured network structure. The second energetic composite was made from the mixing of micrometric-scale tantalum and commercially available (CA) nanometric tungsten oxide powders. The energetic composites were consolidated using the spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique under a 300 MPa pressure and at temperatures of 25, 400, and 500 C. For samples consolidated at 25 C, the density of the CA composite is 61.65 {+-} 1.07% in comparison to 56.41 {+-} 1.19% for the SG derived composite. In contrast, the resulting densities of the SG composite are higher than the CA composite for samples consolidated at 400 and 500 C. The theoretical maximum density for the SG composite consolidated to 400 and 500 C are 81.30 {+-} 0.58% and 84.42 {+-} 0.62%, respectively. The theoretical maximum density of the CA composite consolidated to 400 and 500 C are 74.54 {+-} 0.80% and 77.90 {+-} 0.79%, respectively. X-ray diffraction analyses showed an increase of pre-reaction of the constituents with an increase in the consolidation temperature. The increase in pre-reaction results in lower stored energy content for samples consolidated to 400 and 500 C in comparison to samples consolidated at 25 C. (author)

  2. Residential Solar Combined Heat and Power Generation using Solar Thermoelectric Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, B.; Wagner, M.; Kunkle, C.; Watson, P.; Williams, R.; Donohoe, R.; Ugarte, K.; Wilmoth, R.; Chong, M. Zachary; Lee, H.

    2015-06-01

    Recent reports on improved efficiencies of solar thermoelectric generation (STEG) systems have generated interest in STEGs as a competitive power generation system. In this paper, the design of a combined cooling and power utilizing concentrated solar power is discussed. Solar radiation is concentrated into a receiver connected to thermoelectric modules, which are used as a topping cycle to generate power and high grade heat necessary to run an absorption chiller. Modeling of the overall system is discussed with experimental data to validate modeling results. A numerical modeling approach is presented which considers temperature variation of the source and sink temperatures and is used to maximize combined efficiency. A system is built with a demonstrated combined efficiency of 32% in actual working conditions with power generation of 3.1 W. Modeling results fell within 3% of the experimental results verifying the approach. An optimization study is performed on the mirror concentration ration and number of modules for thermal load matching and is shown to improve power generation to 26.8 W.

  3. CHALLENGES IN GENERATING HYDROGEN BY HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS USING SOLID OXIDE CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; M. G. McKellar; J. S. Herring; E. A. Harvego

    2008-03-01

    Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) high temperature electrolysis research to generate hydrogen using solid oxide electrolysis cells is presented in this paper. The research results reported here have been obtained in a laboratory-scale apparatus. These results and common scale-up issues also indicate that for the technology to be successful in a large industrial setting, several technical, economical, and manufacturing issues have to be resolved. Some of the issues related to solid oxide cells are stack design and performance optimization, identification and evaluation of cell performance degradation parameters and processes, integrity and reliability of the solid oxide electrolysis (SOEC) stacks, life-time prediction and extension of the SOEC stack, and cost reduction and economic manufacturing of the SOEC stacks. Besides the solid oxide cells, balance of the hydrogen generating plant also needs significant development. These issues are process and ohmic heat source needed for maintaining the reaction temperature (~830°C), high temperature heat exchangers and recuperators, equal distribution of the reactants into each cell, system analysis of hydrogen and associated energy generating plant, and cost optimization. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. These issues need interdisciplinary research effort of federal laboratories, solid oxide cell manufacturers, hydrogen consumers, and other such stakeholders. This paper discusses research and development accomplished by INL on such issues and highlights associated challenges that need to

  4. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen Minh

    2004-07-04

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the January to June 2004 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

  5. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

    2004-01-04

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the July 2003 to December 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

  6. Gas Generation Testing of Neptunium Oxide at Elevated Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, JM

    2004-01-30

    Elevated temperature gas generation tests have been conducted using neptunium dioxide produced on a laboratory scale using the HB-Line Phase II flowsheet. These tests were performed to determine what effect elevated temperatures would have on the neptunium dioxide in comparison to neptunium dioxide tested at ambient temperature. The headspace gas compositions following storage at elevated temperatures associated with normal conditions of transport (NCT) have been measured. These test results show an increase in hydrogen generation rate at elevated temperature and significant removal of oxygen from the headspace gas. The elevated temperature gas generation tests described in this report involved heating small test vessels containing neptunium dioxide and measuring the headspace gas pressure and composition at the end of the test period. Four samples were used in these tests to evaluate the impact of process variables on the gas generation rate. Two samples were calcined to 600 degrees Celsius and two were calcined to 650 degrees Celsius. Each test vessel contained approximately 9.5 g of neptunium dioxide. Following exposure to 75 per cent relative humidity (RH) for five days, these samples were loaded in air and then heated to between 105 and 115 degrees Celsius for about one month. At the conclusion of the test period, the headspace gas of each container was analyzed using a micro-gas chromatograph installed in the glovebox where the experiments were conducted. The pressure, volume, and composition data for the headspace gas samples were used to calculate average H2 generation rates.

  7. Detailed study of heat generation in porous LiCoO2 electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heubner, C.; Schneider, M.; Michaelis, A.

    2016-03-01

    In this work the heat generation in porous LiCoO2 based electrodes for lithium ion batteries is studied in detail. Irreversible heat generation rates due to ohmic resistance, charge transfer and mass transport limitations as well as the reversible heat of the electrode reaction are determined from electrochemical measurements as a function of the C-rate, the temperature and the lithium concentration in the active material. The results show that all the individual heat sources contribute significantly to the total heat generation in the electrode. The heat sources are functions of the C-rate and the temperature as well as the lithium concentration in the active material. The reversible heat contribution was found to be most significant at higher temperatures und lower C-rates, which tend to reduce kinetic limitations and irreversible heats, respectively. The heat generation rate due to mass transport limitations is most influential among the irreversible heats, whereas the ohmic contribution shows a minor impact. The total heat generation was found to increase with increasing C-rate and decreasing temperature. Furthermore, the heat generation is significantly reduced for charging compared to discharging due to the intrinsic asymmetry of the reversible heat and larger kinetic limitations for lithiation compared to delithiation of LiCoO2.

  8. Effects of Heat Generation on Nuclear Waste Disposal in Salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, D. J.

    2008-12-01

    Disposal of nuclear waste in salt is an established technology, as evidenced by the successful operations of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) since 1999. The WIPP is located in bedded salt in southeastern New Mexico and is a deep underground facility for transuranic (TRU) nuclear waste disposal. There are many advantages for placing radioactive wastes in a geologic bedded-salt environment. One desirable mechanical characteristic of salt is that it flows plastically with time ("creeps"). The rate of salt creep is a strong function of temperature and stress differences. Higher temperatures and deviatoric stresses increase the creep rate. As the salt creeps, induced fractures may be closed and eventually healed, which then effectively seals the waste in place. With a backfill of crushed salt emplaced around the waste, the salt creep can cause the crushed salt to reconsolidate and heal to a state similar to intact salt, serving as an efficient seal. Experiments in the WIPP were conducted to investigate the effects of heat generation on the important phenomena and processes in and around the repository (Munson et al. 1987; 1990; 1992a; 1992b). Brine migration towards the heaters was induced from the thermal gradient, while salt creep rates showed an exponential dependence on temperature. The project "Backfill and Material Behavior in Underground Salt Repositories, Phase II" (BAMBUS II) studied the crushed salt backfill and material behavior with heat generation at the Asse mine located near Remlingen, Germany (Bechthold et al. 2004). Increased salt creep rates and significant reconsolidation of the crushed salt were observed at the termination of the experiment. Using the data provided from both projects, exploratory modeling of the thermal-mechanical response of salt has been conducted with varying thermal loading and waste spacing. Increased thermal loading and decreased waste spacing drive the system to higher temperatures, while both factors are desired to

  9. Dynamic modeling and evaluation of solid oxide fuel cell - combined heat and power system operating strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanaeda, Kimihiro; Mueller, Fabian; Brouwer, Jacob; Samuelsen, Scott

    Operating strategies of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) combined heat and power (CHP) systems are developed and evaluated from a utility, and end-user perspective using a fully integrated SOFC-CHP system dynamic model that resolves the physical states, thermal integration and overall efficiency of the system. The model can be modified for any SOFC-CHP system, but the present analysis is applied to a hotel in southern California based on measured electric and heating loads. Analysis indicates that combined heat and power systems can be operated to benefit both the end-users and the utility, providing more efficient electric generation as well as grid ancillary services, namely dispatchable urban power. Design and operating strategies considered in the paper include optimal sizing of the fuel cell, thermal energy storage to dispatch heat, and operating the fuel cell to provide flexible grid power. Analysis results indicate that with a 13.1% average increase in price-of-electricity (POE), the system can provide the grid with a 50% operating range of dispatchable urban power at an overall thermal efficiency of 80%. This grid-support operating mode increases the operational flexibility of the SOFC-CHP system, which may make the technology an important utility asset for accommodating the increased penetration of intermittent renewable power.

  10. Mass production of two-dimensional oxides by rapid heating of hydrous chlorides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunsong; Zhang, Haitian; Si, Wenjie; Wu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanoscale oxides have attracted research interest owing to their electronic, magnetic optical and catalytic properties. If they could be manufactured on a large scale, 2D oxides would be attractive for applications ranging from electronics to energy conversion and storage. Herein, we report facile fabrication of oxide nanosheets by rapid thermal annealing of corresponding hydrous-chloride compounds. By heating CrCl3·6H2O, ZrOCl2·8H2O, AlCl3·6H2O and YCl3·6H2O crystals as precursors, we immediately collect large quantities of ultrathin Cr2O3, ZrO2, Al2O3 and Y2O3 nanosheets, respectively. The formation of layered nanosheets relies on exfoliation driven by rapid evaporation of water and/or other gas molecules generated under annealing. Our route allows simple, efficient and inexpensive production of 2D oxides. As a demonstration, we evaluate Cr2O3 nanosheets prepared by our method as anodes in lithium-ion batteries and find superior performance in comparison with their microcrystalline counterparts. PMID:27610589

  11. Heat generation and stability of a plasmonic nanogold system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yuan; Kan, Caixia; Gao, Qi; Wei, Jingjing; Xu, Haiying; Wang, Changshun

    2016-02-01

    The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of Au nanostructures can be precisely tuned in the visible to near-infrared (vis-NIR) region with the size and morphology. The photothermal effect induced by the SPR can raise the temperature of Au nanostructures and the surrounding matrix under external illumination. In this work, hollow Au nanostructures such as nanoboxes and nanorings with a tunable SPR in the region of 650-1100 nm were obtained by a replacement reaction between HAuCl4 and the as-prepared Ag nanostructures as the sacrificed templates. Compared with the solid Au nanorods, studies on the photothermal conversion and stability of hollow Au nanostructures were systematically carried out with the assistance of the near-infrared (NIR) lasers available. Under NIR laser irradiation, the temperatures of the colloidal Au nanostructures increased rapidly from ~30 °C to ~65 °C. Combining the experimental results with a finite-different time-domain (FDTD) numerical simulation, the heat generation of different Au nanostructures was investigated. With the consideration of the concentration of the Au nanostructures, it is indicated that hollow Au nanostructures are superior to solid Au nanorods in photothermal conversion. On increasing the NIR laser power (3 W), Au nanorods undergo a shape deformation from nanorods to spherical nanoparticles, while the SPR and morphology of hollow Au nanoboxes and nanorings maintain high stability, promising to be candidates for nanoheaters. This work provides a standard to design optimized plasmonic nanoheaters.

  12. Localizing heat-generating defects using fluorescent microthermal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tangyunyong, P.; Liang, A.Y.; Righter, A.W.; Barton, D.L.; Soden, J.M.

    1996-10-01

    Fluorescent microthermal imaging (FMI) involves coating a sample surface with a thin fluorescent film that, upon exposure to UV light source, emits temperature-dependent fluorescence. The principle behind FMI was thoroughly reviewed at the ISTFA in 1994. In two recent publications, we identified several factors in film preparation and data processing that dramatically improved the thermal resolution and sensitivity of FMI. These factors include signal averaging, the use of base mixture films, film stabilization and film curing. These findings significantly enhance the capability of FMI as a failure analysis tool. In this paper, we show several examples that use FMI to quickly localize heat-generating defects (``hot spots``). When used with other failure analysis techniques such as focused ion beam (FIB) cross sectioning and scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging, we demonstrate that FMI is a powerful tool to efficiently identify the root cause of failures in complex ICs. In addition to defect localization, we use a failing IC to I determine the sensitivity of FMI (i.e., the lowest power that can be detected) in an ideal situation where the defects are very localized and near the surface.

  13. Enhancement of nitric oxide generation by low frequency electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa; Tanigawa; Tanigawa; Imai; Hongo; Kondo

    2000-07-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the intracellular signal transduction pathways for nitric oxide synthase (NOS) induction. The electromagnetic field (EMF) is believed to increase the free radical lifespan [S. Roy, Y. Noda, V. Eckert, M.G. Traber, A. Mori, R. Liburdy, L. Packer, The phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced oxidative burst in rat peritoneal neutrophils is increased by a 0.1 mT (60 Hz) magnetic field, FEBS Lett. 376 (1995) 164-6; F.S. Prato, M. Kavaliers, J.J. Carson, Behavioural evidence that magnetic field effects in the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis, might not depend on magnetite or induced electric currents, Bioelectromagnetics 17 (1996) 123-30; A.L. Hulbert, J. Metcalfe, R. Hesketh, Biological response to electromagnetic fields, FASEB 12 (1998) 395-420]. We tested the effects of EMF on endotoxin induced nitric oxide (NO) generation in vivo. Male BALB/C mice were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intraperitoneously (i.p.), followed by the exposure to EMF (0.1 mT, 60 Hz). Five hours and 30 min after the LPS administration, mice were administered with a NO spin trap, ferrous N-methyl-D-glucaminedithiocarbamate (MGD-Fe). Thirty minutes later, mice were sacrificed, and their livers were removed. The results were compared to three control groups: group A (LPS (-) EMF(-)); group B (LPS(-) EMF(+)); group C (LPS(+) EMF(-)). The ESR spectra of obtained livers were examined at room temperature. Three-line spectra of NO adducts were observed in the livers of all groups. In groups A and B very weak signals were observed, but in groups C and D strong spectra were observed. The signal intensity of the NO adducts in Group D was also significantly stronger than that in Group C. EMF itself did not induce NO generation, however, it enhanced LPS induced NO generation in vivo. PMID:10927193

  14. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Wei; Liu, Fu-Chao; Wang, Yu-Ren; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system. PMID:26637174

  15. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Ren; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system. PMID:26637174

  16. Interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism, the generation of oxidative stress and the mitigative oxidative stress response.

    PubMed

    Busch, Andrea W U; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2015-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles are involved in light harvesting and light perception, electron-transfer reactions, and as co-factors for key enzymes and sensory proteins. Under conditions in which cells exhibit stress-induced imbalances of photosynthetic reactions, or light absorption exceeds the ability of the cell to use photoexcitation energy in synthesis reactions, redox imbalance can occur in photosynthetic cells. Such conditions can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with alterations in tetrapyrrole homeostasis. ROS accumulation can result in cellular damage and detrimental effects on organismal fitness, or ROS molecules can serve as signals to induce a protective or damage-mitigating oxidative stress signaling response in cells. Induced oxidative stress responses include tetrapyrrole-dependent and -independent mechanisms for mitigating ROS generation and/or accumulation. Thus, tetrapyrroles can be contributors to oxidative stress, but are also essential in the oxidative stress response to protect cells by contributing to detoxification of ROS. In this review, we highlight the interconnection and interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism with the occurrence of oxidative stress and protective oxidative stress signaling responses in photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25618582

  17. Interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism, the generation of oxidative stress and the mitigative oxidative stress response

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Andrea W.U.; Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2015-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles are involved in light harvesting and light perception, electron-transfer reactions, and as co-factors for key enzymes and sensory proteins. Under conditions in which cells exhibit stress-induced imbalances of photosynthetic reactions, or light absorption exceeds the ability of the cell to use photoexcitation energy in synthesis reactions, redox imbalance can occur in photosynthetic cells. Such conditions can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with alterations in tetrapyrrole homeostasis. ROS accumulation can result in cellular damage and detrimental effects on organismal fitness, or ROS molecules can serve as signals to induce a protective or damage-mitigating oxidative stress signaling response in cells. Induced oxidative stress responses include tetrapyrrole-dependent and -independent mechanisms for mitigating ROS generation and/or accumulation. Thus, tetrapyrroles can be contributors to oxidative stress, but are also essential in the oxidative stress response to protect cells by contributing to detoxification of ROS. In this review, we highlight the interconnection and interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism with the occurrence of oxidative stress and protective oxidative stress signaling responses in photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25618582

  18. Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator for Electrical Power Generation from Automotive Waste Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisner, Gregory

    2012-02-01

    Filled skutterudites are state-of-the- art thermoelectric (TE) materials for electrical power generation from waste heat. They have suitable intrinsic transport properties as measured by the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT = S^2σT/κ (S = Seebeck coefficient, σ = electrical conductivity, T = temperature, and κ = thermal conductivity) and good mechanical strength for operation at vehicle exhaust gas temperatures of >550 C. We have demonstrated TE electrical power generation on a production test vehicle equipped with a fully functional prototype TE generator (TEG). It was assembled with TE modules fabricated from filled skutterudites synthesized at GM. Our results and analysis show that improvement in total power generated can be achieved by enhanced thermal and electrical interfaces and contacts. A substantial T decrease along the exhaust gas flow results in a large variation of voltage, current, and power output for each TE module depending on its position in the module array. Total TEG output power depends directly on the position-dependent T profile via the temperature dependence of both ZT and Carnot efficiency. Total TEG power output also depends on how the modules are connected in parallel or series combinations because mismatch in output voltage and/or internal resistance among the modules degrades the performance of the entire array. Uniform T profiles and consistent TE module internal resistances improve overall TEG performance.

  19. Development of a radioisotope heat source for the two-watt radioisotope thermoelectric generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Edwin I.; McNeil, Dennis C.; Amos, Wayne R.

    1992-01-01

    Described is a radioisotope heat source for the Two-Watt Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) which is being considered for possible application by the U.S. Navy and for other Department of Defense applications. The heat source thermal energy (75 Wt) is produced from the alpha decay of plutonium-238 which is in the form of high-fired plutonium dioxide. The capsule is non-vented and consists of three domed cylindrical components each closed with a corresponding sealed end cap. Surrounding the fuel is the liner component, which is fabricated from a tantalum-based alloy, T-111. Also fabricated from T-111 is the next component, the strength member, which serves to meet pressure and impact criteria. The outermost component, or clad, is the oxidation- and corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy, Hastelloy S. This paper defines the design considerations, details the hardware fabrication and welding processes, discusses the addition of yttrium to the fuel to reduce liner embrittlement, and describes the testing that has been conducted or is planned to assure that there is fuel containment not only during the heat source operational life, but also in case of an accident environment.

  20. Effects of alloy heat treatment on oxidation kinetics and scale morphology for Crofer 22 APU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdefrau, Neal J.; Chen, Lei; Sun, Ellen Y.; Aindow, Mark

    2013-11-01

    The effect of alloy heat treatment on the oxidation kinetics and oxide scale microstructure of Crofer 22 APU has been studied. Parabolic oxidation rate constants were measured for the as-received alloy and after pre-oxidation heat treatment in argon at 1050 °C for 1 and 4 h. The oxide scale microstructure was investigated using scanning electron microscopy, focused ion beam milling and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the alloy forms a two-layer scale with a continuous chromia layer and a discontinuous MnCr2O4 overlayer. Two forms of internal oxides were also formed: subscale pockets of spinel and isolated TiOx precipitates in the underlying alloy. The pre-oxidation heat treatment had a profound effect on the grain size and morphology of the Cr2O3 and MnCr2O4 layers in the scale. The heat-treated samples exhibit a 3.5× lower parabolic oxidation rate constant than the as-received Crofer 22 APU. This improvement in oxidation resistance is attributed to the dramatic differences in the morphology of the oxide scale that forms during the earliest stages of oxidation (<5 h). The implications of these findings for oxidation mechanisms and long-term SOFC performance are discussed.

  1. Hydrodynamic performance and heat generation by centrifugal pumps.

    PubMed

    Ganushchak, Y; van Marken Lichtenbelt, W; van der Nagel, T; de Jong, D S

    2006-11-01

    For over a century, centrifugal pumps (CP) have been used in various applications, from large industrial pumps to flow pumps for aquariums. However, the use of CP as blood pumps has a rather short history. Consequently, the hydraulic performance data for a blood CP are limited. The aim of our investigation was to study the hydraulic performance and the heat generation of three commercially available CP: Bio-Medicus Bio-Pump BP80 (Medtronic), Rotaflow (Jostra Medizintechnik), and DeltaStream DP2 (MEDOS Medizintechnik AQ). The study was performed using a circuit primed with a water-glycerin mixture with a dynamic viscosity of 0.00272 pa/s. Pressure-flow curves were obtained by a stepwise stagnation of the pump outlet or inlet. The temperature changes were observed using ThermaCAM SC2000 (Flir Systems). The pumps' performance in close to clinical conditions ('operating region') was analysed in this report. The 'operating region' in the case of the BP80 is positioned around the pressure-flow curve at a pump speed of 3000 rpm. In the case of the Rotaflow, the 'operating region' was between the pump pressure-flow curves at a speed of 3000 and 4000 rpm, and the DP2 was found between 7000 and 8000 rpm. The standard deviation of mean pressure through the pump was used to characterise the stability of the pump. In experiments with outlet stagnation, the BP80 demonstrated high negative association between flow and pressure variability (r = -0.68, p < 0.001). In experiments with the DP2, this association was positive (r = 0.68, p < 0.001). All pumps demonstrated significantly higher variability of pressure in experiments with inlet stagnation in comparison to the experiments with outlet stagnation. The rise of relative temperature in the inlet of a pump was closely related to the flow rate. The heating of fluid was more pronounced in the 'zero-flow' mode, especially in experiments with inlet stagnation. In summary, (1) the 'zero-flow' regime, which is described in the manuals

  2. Study for radionuclide transfer ratio of aerosols generated during heat cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Iguchi, Yukihiro; Baba, Tsutomu; Kawakami, Hiroto; Kitahara, Takashi; Watanabe, Atsushi; Kodama, Mitsuhiro

    2007-07-01

    The metallic elements with a low melting point and high vapor pressure seemed to transfer in aerosols selectively at dismantling reactor internals using heat cutting. Therefore, the arc melting tests of neutron irradiated zirconium alloy were conducted to investigate the radionuclide transfer behavior of aerosols generated during the heat cutting of activated metals. The arc melting test was conducted using a tungsten inert gas welding machine in an inert gas or air atmosphere. The radioactive aerosols were collected by filter and charcoal filter. The test sample was obtained from Zry-2 fuel cladding irradiated in a Japanese boiling water reactor for five fuel cycles. The activity analysis, chemical composition measurement and scanning electron microscope observation of aerosols were carried out. Some radionuclides were enriched in the aerosols generated in an inert gas atmosphere and the radionuclide transfer ratio did not change remarkably by the presence of air. The transfer ratio of Sb-125 was almost the same as that of Co-60. It was expected that Sb-125 was enriched from other elements since Sb is an element with a low melting point and high vapor pressure compared with the base metal (Zr). In the viewpoint of the environmental impact assessment, it became clear that the influence if Sb-125 is comparable to Co-60. The transfer ratio of Mn-54 was one order higher compared with other radionuclides. The results were discussed on the basis of thermal properties and oxide formation energy of the metallic elements. (authors)

  3. Oxidative nanopatterning of titanium generates mesoporous surfaces with antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Variola, Fabio; Zalzal, Sylvia Francis; Leduc, Annie; Barbeau, Jean; Nanci, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Mesoporous surfaces generated by oxidative nanopatterning have the capacity to selectively regulate cell behavior, but their impact on microorganisms has not yet been explored. The main objective of this study was to test the effects of such surfaces on the adherence of two common bacteria and one yeast strain that are responsible for nosocomial infections in clinical settings and biomedical applications. In addition, because surface characteristics are known to affect bacterial adhesion, we further characterized the physicochemical properties of the mesoporous surfaces. Focused ion beam (FIB) was used to generate ultrathin sections for elemental analysis by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), nanobeam electron diffraction (NBED), and high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging. The adherence of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans onto titanium disks with mesoporous and polished surfaces was compared. Disks with the two surfaces side-by-side were also used for direct visual comparison. Qualitative and quantitative results from this study indicate that bacterial adhesion is significantly hindered by the mesoporous surface. In addition, we provide evidence that it alters structural parameters of C. albicans that determine its invasiveness potential, suggesting that microorganisms can sense and respond to the mesoporous surface. Our findings demonstrate the efficiency of a simple chemical oxidative treatment in generating nanotextured surfaces with antimicrobial capacity with potential applications in the implant manufacturing industry and hospital setting. PMID:24872694

  4. Oxidative nanopatterning of titanium generates mesoporous surfaces with antimicrobial properties

    PubMed Central

    Variola, Fabio; Zalzal, Sylvia Francis; Leduc, Annie; Barbeau, Jean; Nanci, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Mesoporous surfaces generated by oxidative nanopatterning have the capacity to selectively regulate cell behavior, but their impact on microorganisms has not yet been explored. The main objective of this study was to test the effects of such surfaces on the adherence of two common bacteria and one yeast strain that are responsible for nosocomial infections in clinical settings and biomedical applications. In addition, because surface characteristics are known to affect bacterial adhesion, we further characterized the physicochemical properties of the mesoporous surfaces. Focused ion beam (FIB) was used to generate ultrathin sections for elemental analysis by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), nanobeam electron diffraction (NBED), and high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging. The adherence of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans onto titanium disks with mesoporous and polished surfaces was compared. Disks with the two surfaces side-by-side were also used for direct visual comparison. Qualitative and quantitative results from this study indicate that bacterial adhesion is significantly hindered by the mesoporous surface. In addition, we provide evidence that it alters structural parameters of C. albicans that determine its invasiveness potential, suggesting that microorganisms can sense and respond to the mesoporous surface. Our findings demonstrate the efficiency of a simple chemical oxidative treatment in generating nanotextured surfaces with antimicrobial capacity with potential applications in the implant manufacturing industry and hospital setting. PMID:24872694

  5. Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

    2009-03-01

    The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

  6. Multifunctional Porous Graphene for High-Efficiency Steam Generation by Heat Localization.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshikazu; Tanabe, Yoichi; Han, Jiuhui; Fujita, Takeshi; Tanigaki, Katsumi; Chen, Mingwei

    2015-08-01

    Multifunctional nanoporous graphene is realized as a heat generator to convert solar illumination into high-energy steam. The novel 3D nanoporous graphene demonstrates a highly energy-effective steam generation with an energy conversation of 80%. PMID:26079440

  7. Copper oxide nanoparticles analysis with water as base fluid for peristaltic flow in permeable tube with heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Raza, M; Ellahi, R

    2016-07-01

    The peristaltic flow of a copper oxide water fluid investigates the effects of heat generation and magnetic field in permeable tube is studied. The mathematical formulation is presented, the resulting equations are solved exactly. The obtained expressions for pressure gradient, pressure rise, temperature, velocity profile are described through graphs for various pertinent parameters. It is found that pressure gradient is reduce with enhancement of particle concentration and velocity profile is upturn, beside it is observed that temperature increases as more volume fraction of copper oxide. The streamlines are drawn for some physical quantities to discuss the trapping phenomenon. PMID:27208518

  8. From Modules to a Generator: An Integrated Heat Exchanger Concept for Car Applications of a Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Henry

    2016-03-01

    A heat exchanger concept for a thermoelectric generator with integrated planar modules for passenger car applications is introduced. The module housings, made of deep drawn stainless steel sheet metal, are brazed onto the exhaust gas channel to achieve an optimal heat transfer on the hot side of the modules. The cooling side consists of winding fluid channels, which are mounted directly onto the cold side of the modules. Only a thin foil separates the cooling media from the modules for an almost direct heat contact on the cooling side. Thermoelectric generators with up to 20 modules made of PbTe and Bi2Te3, respectively, are manufactured and tested on a hot gas generator to investigate electrical power output and performance of the thermoelectric generator. The proof of concept of the light weight heat exchanger design made of sheet metal with integrated modules is positively accomplished.

  9. Solid oxide fuel cell systems for residential micro-combined heat and power in the UK: Key economic drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, Adam; Leach, Matthew

    The ability of combined heat and power (CHP) to meet residential heat and power demands efficiently offers potentially significant financial and environmental advantages over centralised power generation and heat-provision through natural-gas fired boilers. A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) can operate at high overall efficiencies (heat and power) of 80-90%, offering an improvement over centralised generation, which is often unable to utilise waste heat. This paper applies an equivalent annual cost (EAC) minimisation model to a residential solid oxide fuel cell CHP system to determine what the driving factors are behind investment in this technology. We explore the performance of a hypothetical SOFC system—representing expectations of near to medium term technology development—under present UK market conditions. We find that households with small to average energy demands do not benefit from installation of a SOFC micro-CHP system, but larger energy demands do benefit under these conditions. However, this result is sensitive to a number of factors including stack capital cost, energy import and export prices, and plant lifetime. The results for small and average dwellings are shown to reverse under an observed change in energy import prices, an increase in electricity export price, a decrease in stack capital costs, or an improvement in stack lifetime.

  10. POWER GENERATION USING MEGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC GENERATOR WITH A CIRCULATION FLOW DRIVEN BY SOLAR-HEAT-INDUCED NATURAL CONVECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project team has theoretically studied the mechanism of magnetohydrodynamic generator, the coupling of heat transfer and buoyancy-driven free convection, and radiation heat transfer. A number of ideas for the projects have been brainstormed in the team. The underline physi...

  11. Generator-Absorber heat exchange transfer apparatus and method using an intermediate liquor

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Zawacki, Thomas S.

    1996-11-05

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use the working solution of the absorption system for the heat transfer medium where the working solution has an intermediate liquor concentration.

  12. Electricity-producing heating apparatus utilizing a turbine generator in a semi-closed brayton cycle

    DOEpatents

    Labinov, Solomon D.; Christian, Jeffrey E.

    2003-10-07

    The present invention provides apparatus and methods for producing both heat and electrical energy by burning fuels in a stove or boiler using a novel arrangement of a surface heat exchanger and microturbine-powered generator and novel surface heat exchanger. The equipment is particularly suited for use in rural and relatively undeveloped areas, especially in cold regions and highlands.

  13. Plasmonic near-touching titanium oxide nanoparticles to realize solar energy harvesting and effective local heating.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jiahao; Liu, Pu; Ma, Churong; Lin, Zhaoyong; Yang, Guowei

    2016-04-28

    Through the excitation of plasmon resonance, the energy of plasmonic nanoparticles either reradiates through light scattering or decays into energetic electrons (absorption). The plasmon-induced absorption can greatly enhance the efficiency of solar energy harvesting, local heating, photodetection and photocatalysis. Here, we demonstrate that heavily self-doped titanium oxide nanoparticles (TiO1.67 analogue arising from oxygen vacancies in rutile TiO2) with the plasmon resonance dominated by an interband transition shows strong absorption to build a broadband perfect absorber in the wavelength range from 300 to 2000 nm covering the solar irradiation spectrum completely. The absorptivity of the fabricated array is greater than 90% in the whole spectral range. And the broadband and strong absorption is due to the plasmon hybridization and hot spot generation from near-touching TiO1.67 nanoparticles with different sizes. What is more, the local heating of a TiO1.67 nanoparticle layer is fast and effective. The temperature increases quickly from 30 °C to 80 °C within 200 seconds. This local heating can realize rapid solar-enabled evaporation which can find applications in large-scale distillation and seawater desalination. These findings actually open a pathway for applications of these newly developed plasmonic materials in the energy and environment fields. PMID:27067248

  14. Analysis of the heat transfer at the tool-workpiece interface in machining: determination of heat generation and heat transfer coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddag, B.; Atlati, S.; Nouari, M.; Zenasni, M.

    2015-10-01

    This paper deals with the modelling and identification of the heat exchange at the tool-workpiece interface in machining. A thermomechanical modelling has been established including heat balance equations of the tool-workpiece interface which take into account the heat generated by friction and the heat transfer by conduction due to the thermal contact resistance. The interface heat balance equations involve two coefficients: heat generation coefficient (HGC) of the frictional heat and heat transfer coefficient (HTC) of the heat conduction (inverse of the thermal contact resistance coefficient). Using experimental average heat flux in the tool, estimated for several cutting speeds, an identification procedure of the HGC-HTC couple, involved in the established thermomechanical FE-based modelling of the cutting process, has been proposed, which gives the numerical heat flux equal the measured one for each cutting speed. Using identified values of the HGC-HTC couple, evolution laws are proposed for the HGC as function of cutting speed, and then as function of sliding velocity at the tool-workpiece interface. Such laws can be implemented for instance in a Finite Element code for machining simulations.

  15. Scale/Analytical Analyses of Freezing and Convective Melting with Internal Heat Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ali S. Siahpush; John Crepeau; Piyush Sabharwall

    2013-07-01

    Using a scale/analytical analysis approach, we model phase change (melting) for pure materials which generate constant internal heat generation for small Stefan numbers (approximately one). The analysis considers conduction in the solid phase and natural convection, driven by internal heat generation, in the liquid regime. The model is applied for a constant surface temperature boundary condition where the melting temperature is greater than the surface temperature in a cylindrical geometry. The analysis also consider constant heat flux (in a cylindrical geometry).We show the time scales in which conduction and convection heat transfer dominate.

  16. Zirconium diboride nanofiber generation via microwave arc heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldridge, Tyson; Gupta, Mool C.

    2008-07-01

    Ultrahigh temperature zirconium diboride nanofibers were produced by microwave arc heating using micron-sized raw powder. While microwave heating the ZrB2 powder, the development of local arcing led to rapid heating and solidification of the samples, along with the creation of nanofibers. The morphology of these high aspect ratio nanofibers was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction showed the composition to contain zirconium, boron, nitrogen, aluminum and oxygen as well as the crystallographic orientation. ZrB2 nanofiber applications include aerospace and other harsh environments.

  17. Monolithic oxide-metal composite thermoelectric generators for energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funahashi, Shuichi; Nakamura, Takanori; Kageyama, Keisuke; Ieki, Hideharu

    2011-06-01

    Monolithic oxide-metal composite thermoelectric generators (TEGs) were fabricated using multilayer co-fired ceramic technology. These devices consisted of Ni0.9Mo0.1 and La0.035Sr0.965TiO3 as p- and n-type thermoelectric materials, and Y0.03Zr0.97O2 was used as an insulator, sandwiched between p- and n-type layers. To co-fire dissimilar materials, p-type layers contained 20 wt. % La0.035Sr0.965TiO3; thus, these were oxide-metal composite layers. The fabricated device had 50 pairs of p-i-n junctions of 5.9 mm × 7.0 mm × 2.6 mm. The calculated maximum value of the electric power output from the device was 450 mW/cm2 at ΔT = 360 K. Furthermore, this device generated 100 μW at ΔT = 10 K and operated a radio frequency (RF) transmitter circuit module assumed to be a sensor network system.

  18. Importance of Plasmonic Heating on Visible Light Driven Photocatalysis of Gold Nanoparticle Decorated Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Tanujjal; Zoepfl, David; Dutta, Joydeep

    2016-05-01

    Herein we explore the role of localized plasmonic heat generated by resonantly excited gold (Au) NPs on visible light driven photocatalysis process. Au NPs are deposited on the surface of vertically aligned zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs). The localized heat generated by Au NPs under 532 nm continuous laser excitation (SPR excitation) was experimentally probed using Raman spectroscopy by following the phonon modes of ZnO. Under the resonant excitation the temperature at the surface of the Au-ZnO NRs reaches up to about 300 °C, resulting in almost 6 times higher apparent quantum yield (AQY) for photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) compared to the bare ZnO NRs. Under solar light irradiation the Au-ZnO NRs demonstrated visible light photocatalytic activity twice that of what was achieved with bare ZnO NRs, while significantly reduced the activation energy required for the photocatalytic reactions allowing the reactions to occur at a faster rate.

  19. Importance of Plasmonic Heating on Visible Light Driven Photocatalysis of Gold Nanoparticle Decorated Zinc Oxide Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Bora, Tanujjal; Zoepfl, David; Dutta, Joydeep

    2016-01-01

    Herein we explore the role of localized plasmonic heat generated by resonantly excited gold (Au) NPs on visible light driven photocatalysis process. Au NPs are deposited on the surface of vertically aligned zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs). The localized heat generated by Au NPs under 532 nm continuous laser excitation (SPR excitation) was experimentally probed using Raman spectroscopy by following the phonon modes of ZnO. Under the resonant excitation the temperature at the surface of the Au-ZnO NRs reaches up to about 300 °C, resulting in almost 6 times higher apparent quantum yield (AQY) for photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) compared to the bare ZnO NRs. Under solar light irradiation the Au-ZnO NRs demonstrated visible light photocatalytic activity twice that of what was achieved with bare ZnO NRs, while significantly reduced the activation energy required for the photocatalytic reactions allowing the reactions to occur at a faster rate. PMID:27242172

  20. Importance of Plasmonic Heating on Visible Light Driven Photocatalysis of Gold Nanoparticle Decorated Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Bora, Tanujjal; Zoepfl, David; Dutta, Joydeep

    2016-01-01

    Herein we explore the role of localized plasmonic heat generated by resonantly excited gold (Au) NPs on visible light driven photocatalysis process. Au NPs are deposited on the surface of vertically aligned zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs). The localized heat generated by Au NPs under 532 nm continuous laser excitation (SPR excitation) was experimentally probed using Raman spectroscopy by following the phonon modes of ZnO. Under the resonant excitation the temperature at the surface of the Au-ZnO NRs reaches up to about 300 °C, resulting in almost 6 times higher apparent quantum yield (AQY) for photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) compared to the bare ZnO NRs. Under solar light irradiation the Au-ZnO NRs demonstrated visible light photocatalytic activity twice that of what was achieved with bare ZnO NRs, while significantly reduced the activation energy required for the photocatalytic reactions allowing the reactions to occur at a faster rate. PMID:27242172

  1. A new absorption chiller to establish combined cold, heat, and power generation utilizing low-temperature heat

    SciTech Connect

    Schweigler, C.J.; Riesch, P.; Demmel, S.; Alefeld, G.

    1996-11-01

    Presently available absorption machines for air conditioning are driven with heat of a minimum of 80 C (176 F). A combination of the standard single-effect and a double-lift process has been identified as a new cycle that can use driving heat down to return temperatures of about 55 C (131 F) and permits temperature glides in generation of more than 30 K (54 F). Thus a larger cooling capacity can be produced from the same heat source compared to a single-effect chiller run with the same heat carrier supply temperature and mass flow. According to the estimated heat exchanger area, competitive machine costs for this new chiller can be expected. This single-effect/double-lift absorption chiller can be operated with waste heat from industrial processes, as well as with low-temperature heat (e.g., heat from solar collectors) as driving heat for air conditioning. The large temperature glide and the low return temperature especially fit the operating conditions in district heating networks during the summer. The cycle will be presented, followed by a discussion of suitable operating conditions.

  2. Plasma oxidative stress biomarkers, nitric oxide and heat shock protein 70 in trained elite soccer players.

    PubMed

    Banfi, G; Malavazos, A; Iorio, E; Dolci, A; Doneda, L; Verna, R; Corsi, M M

    2006-03-01

    The physiological response to the physical exercise involves a number of changes in the oxidative balance and in the metabolism of some important biological molecules, including nitric oxide (NO) and heat shock proteins (Hsp 70). With the aim to optimise previous laboratory diagnostic panels, we measured the plasma concentration of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs), total antioxidant status (TAS), glutathione reductase (GR) activity, and NO and Hsp 70 levels in 44 elite, antioxidant-supplemented and trained soccer players and in 15 sedentary controls. Although no statistically significant difference between athletes and controls was detected in the plasma level of ROMs and TAS, soccer players showed a significantly higher plasma GR activity, NO and Hst 70 levels than those of sedentary controls. These findings suggest that the measuring of relatively novel biomarkers in sport medicine, like GR, NO and Hsp 70, in addition to the well-known and reliable assays (d-ROMs test and TAS) may be useful to a clinician to better assess and evaluate the benefits of training and/or supplementation programs. PMID:16344941

  3. Oxidation and Volatilization from Tungsten Brush High Heat Flux Armor During High Temperature Steam Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Smolik, Galen Richard; Pawelko, Robert James; Anderl, Robert Andrew; Petti, David Andrew

    2000-05-01

    Tungsten brush accommodates thermal stresses and high heat flux in fusion reactor components such as plasma facing surfaces or armor. However, inherently higher surface areas are introduced with the brush design. We have tested a specific design of tungsten brush in steam between 500 and 1100°C. Hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization rates were determined to address fusion safety issues. The brush prepared from 3.2-mm diameter welding rods had a packing density of 85 percent. We found that both hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization from brush, fixtured to represent a unit within a larger component, were less than projections based upon the total integrated surface area (TSA). Steam access and the escape of hydrogen and volatile oxide from void spaces within the brush are restricted compared to specimens with more direct diffusion pathways to the test environment. Hydrogen generation rates from restrained specimens based on normal surface area (NSA) remain about five times higher than rates based on total surface areas from specimens with direct steam access. Volatilization rates from restrained specimens based upon normal surface area (NSA) were only 50 percent higher than our historic cumulative maximum flux plot (CMFP) for tungsten. This study has shown that hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization from brush do not scale according to predictions with previously determined rates, but in fact, with higher packing density could approach those from flat surfaces.

  4. An analytical model for the heat generation in friction stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, H.; Hattel, J.; Wert, J.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work is to establish an analytical model for heat generation by friction stir welding (FSW), based on different assumptions of the contact condition between the rotating tool surface and the weld piece. The material flow and heat generation are characterized by the contact conditions at the interface, and are described as sliding, sticking or partial sliding/sticking. Different mechanisms of heat generation are behind each contact condition, making this study important for further understanding of the real FSW process. The analytical expression for the heat generation is a modification of previous analytical models known from the literature and accounts for both conical surfaces and different contact conditions. Experimental results on plunge force and torque are used to determine the contact condition. The sliding condition yields a proportional relationship between the plunge force and heat generation. This is not demonstrated in the experiment, which suggests that the sticking contact condition is present at the tool/matrix interface.

  5. District heating from electric-generating plants and municipal incinerators: local planner's assessment guide

    SciTech Connect

    Pferdehirt, W.; Kron, N. Jr.

    1980-11-01

    This guide is designed to aid local government planners in the preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of district heating using heat recovered from electric generating plants and municipal incinerators. System feasibility is indicated by: (1) the existence of an adequate supply of nearby waste heat, (2) the presence of a sufficiently dense and large thermal load, and (3) a favorable cost comparison with conventional heating methods. 34 references.

  6. Regional trends in radiogenic heat generation in the Precambrian basement of the Western Canadian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, F. W.; Majorowicz, J. A.

    Radiogenic heat generation values for 381 basement samples from 229 sites in the western Canadian basin exhibit a lognormal frequency distribution. The mean value = 2.06 (S.D. = 1.22) µWm-3 is larger than the radiogenic heat generation values reported for the shield in the Superior (ca. 1.2 µWm-3, Jessop and Lewis, 1978) and Churchill (ca. 0.7 µWm-3, Drury, 1985) provinces. When equal Log A contour intervals are used to map the basement heat generation, three large zones of relatively high heat generation are found. One coincides with the Peace River Arch basement structure and one with the Athabasca axis (Darnley, 1981). There is no apparent indication of increased heat flow through the Paleozoic formations associated with these two zones. The third zone, in southwestern Saskatchewan, coincides with a high heat flow zone in the Swift Current area. The lack of correlation between heat flow and heat generation in Alberta may be due to the disturbance to the heat flow in the Paleozoic formations by water motion, or may indicate that the heat is from uranium, thorium and potassium isotope enrichment near the basement surface rather than enrichment throughout the entire upper crust.

  7. Quantitative Comparison of Photothermal Heat Generation between Gold Nanospheres and Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhenpeng; Wang, Yiru; Randrianalisoa, Jaona; Raeesi, Vahid; Chan, Warren C W; Lipiński, Wojciech; Bischof, John C

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are widely used for biomedical applications due to unique optical properties, established synthesis methods, and biological compatibility. Despite important applications of plasmonic heating in thermal therapy, imaging, and diagnostics, the lack of quantification in heat generation leads to difficulties in comparing the heating capability for new plasmonic nanostructures and predicting the therapeutic and diagnostic outcome. This study quantifies GNP heat generation by experimental measurements and theoretical predictions for gold nanospheres (GNS) and nanorods (GNR). Interestingly, the results show a GNP-type dependent agreement between experiment and theory. The measured heat generation of GNS matches well with theory, while the measured heat generation of GNR is only 30% of that predicted theoretically at peak absorption. This then leads to a surprising finding that the polydispersity, the deviation of nanoparticle size and shape from nominal value, significantly influences GNR heat generation (>70% reduction), while having a limited effect for GNS (<10% change). This work demonstrates that polydispersity is an important metric in quantitatively predicting plasmonic heat generation and provides a validated framework to quantitatively compare the heating capabilities between gold and other plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:27445172

  8. Quantitative Comparison of Photothermal Heat Generation between Gold Nanospheres and Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhenpeng; Wang, Yiru; Randrianalisoa, Jaona; Raeesi, Vahid; Chan, Warren C. W.; Lipiński, Wojciech; Bischof, John C.

    2016-07-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are widely used for biomedical applications due to unique optical properties, established synthesis methods, and biological compatibility. Despite important applications of plasmonic heating in thermal therapy, imaging, and diagnostics, the lack of quantification in heat generation leads to difficulties in comparing the heating capability for new plasmonic nanostructures and predicting the therapeutic and diagnostic outcome. This study quantifies GNP heat generation by experimental measurements and theoretical predictions for gold nanospheres (GNS) and nanorods (GNR). Interestingly, the results show a GNP-type dependent agreement between experiment and theory. The measured heat generation of GNS matches well with theory, while the measured heat generation of GNR is only 30% of that predicted theoretically at peak absorption. This then leads to a surprising finding that the polydispersity, the deviation of nanoparticle size and shape from nominal value, significantly influences GNR heat generation (>70% reduction), while having a limited effect for GNS (<10% change). This work demonstrates that polydispersity is an important metric in quantitatively predicting plasmonic heat generation and provides a validated framework to quantitatively compare the heating capabilities between gold and other plasmonic nanostructures.

  9. Quantitative Comparison of Photothermal Heat Generation between Gold Nanospheres and Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhenpeng; Wang, Yiru; Randrianalisoa, Jaona; Raeesi, Vahid; Chan, Warren C. W.; Lipiński, Wojciech; Bischof, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are widely used for biomedical applications due to unique optical properties, established synthesis methods, and biological compatibility. Despite important applications of plasmonic heating in thermal therapy, imaging, and diagnostics, the lack of quantification in heat generation leads to difficulties in comparing the heating capability for new plasmonic nanostructures and predicting the therapeutic and diagnostic outcome. This study quantifies GNP heat generation by experimental measurements and theoretical predictions for gold nanospheres (GNS) and nanorods (GNR). Interestingly, the results show a GNP-type dependent agreement between experiment and theory. The measured heat generation of GNS matches well with theory, while the measured heat generation of GNR is only 30% of that predicted theoretically at peak absorption. This then leads to a surprising finding that the polydispersity, the deviation of nanoparticle size and shape from nominal value, significantly influences GNR heat generation (>70% reduction), while having a limited effect for GNS (<10% change). This work demonstrates that polydispersity is an important metric in quantitatively predicting plasmonic heat generation and provides a validated framework to quantitatively compare the heating capabilities between gold and other plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:27445172

  10. IMPROVING DESIGN AND OPERATION OF HEAT TREATMENT/LOW PRESSURE OXIDATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the investigation is to document possible improvements to design, operation, and maintenance of heat treatment and low pressure oxidation systems for conditioning sludge prior to dewatering in municipal wastewater treatment plants. The information in the report is ...

  11. Surface Catalysis and Oxidation on Stagnation Point Heat Flux Measurements in High Enthalpy Arc Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nawaz, Anuscheh; Driver, David M.; Terrazas-Salinas

    2013-01-01

    Heat flux sensors are routinely used in arc jet facilities to determine heat transfer rates from plasma plume. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of surface composition changes on these heat flux sensors. Surface compositions can change due to oxidation and material deposition from the arc jet. Systematic surface analyses of the sensors were conducted before and after exposure to plasma. Currently copper is commonly used as surface material. Other surface materials were studied including nickel, constantan gold, platinum and silicon dioxide. The surfaces were exposed to plasma between 0.3 seconds and 3 seconds. Surface changes due to oxidation as well as copper deposition from the arc jets were observed. Results from changes in measured heat flux as a function of surface catalycity is given, along with a first assessment of enthalpy for these measurements. The use of cupric oxide is recommended for future heat flux measurements, due to its consistent surface composition arc jets.

  12. Oxidation of boron nitride in an arc heated jet.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, J. D.

    1971-01-01

    Two grades of hot pressed boron nitride and a boron nitride composite were subjected to oxidation tests in a 2.5 megawatt atmospheric arc jet. The results showed that fabrication and/or composition influenced thermal shock and oxidation resistance. Changes in surface structure and recession due to oxidation suggest correlation with specimen composition. The boron nitride composite reacted with the oxygen in the hot subsonic airstream to produce a glassy coating on the hot face surface.

  13. Model and simulation of heat transfer, magnetite oxidation and NOx formation in a grate-kiln taconite pellet induration furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.A.

    1996-12-31

    A numerical model was developed to simulate the combined effects of heat transfer, magnetite oxidation, and NO{sub x} formation in a grate-kiln furnace for taconite pellet induration. Heat transfer from the flame in the kiln was described by the net radiation method. The shrinking core model was used to account for magnetite oxidation on the grate. A novel approach to oxidation of tumbling pellets in a kiln was derived. The Zeldovich mechanism was used to predict thermal NO generation. Temperature fluctuations in the gas streams were estimated with a clipped Gaussian probability density function. The thermal energy balances and mass balances resulted in coupled systems of first-order differential equations, which were solved numerically. The model is capable of predicting NO production and magnetite oxidation in agreement with observation of plant performance. Although the design of the grate-kiln system is for efficient heat and mass transfer, it may not be the optimal design for minimizing the formation of NOx. When natural gas is used to fuel the kiln burner in the presence of excess air, the principal mechanism of NOx formation is the thermally induced combination of oxygen and nitrogen in the air in the post combustion zone after the burner.

  14. Self-generated stochastic heating in an rf discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberg, A.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the nonlinear dynamics of stochastic heating arising from the reflection of electrons from moving sheaths as an underlying mechanism for electron power deposition in r.f. discharges. We examined the dynamics of the electron collision with the sheaths in the regime in which the sheath motion is small compared to the average electron velocity to de rive a mop that describes the electron motion. We have shown that for high frequency, ({omega}/2{pi}{approx gt}50MHz), the electrons will strike the moving wall with random phase. At low pressures this stochasticity is an intrinsic property of the dynamics. The stochastic electron heating leads to a power law electron distribution. The stochastic heating was determined in both the slow sheath and fast sheath velocity regimes assuming an incident Maxwellian distribution.

  15. A topical nitric oxide-generating therapy for cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Davidson, R N; Yardley, V; Croft, S L; Konecny, P; Benjamin, N

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) synthesized by macrophages is cidal to Leishmania. Since NO diffuses into tissues, we reasoned that NO-generating creams applied topically to lesions might be an effective and inexpensive treatment for cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). NO was generated non-enzymatically by the acidification of nitrite (KNO2) by ascorbic acid (ASC) or salicylic acid (SAL). Experiments in vitro showed that the combinations of KNO2 and SAL, ASC, or KC1 all killed promastigotes and amastigotes of L. major in a dose- and time-dependent manner, but were toxic to macrophages at higher concentrations. Experiments in vivo showed modest efficacy of the combinations applied topically to L. major CL lesions of BALB/c mice. Forty patients with parasitologically proven L. tropica CL from Aleppo, Syria, were treated for 4 weeks with KNO2 in aqueous cream combined with KC1, ASC, or SAL. Only 11 (28%) of 40 patients showed improvement and only 5 (12%) of 40 were cured at 2 months. Further development of NO-generating creams is warranted. PMID:10975011

  16. Magnetoresistance effect of heat generation in a single-molecular spin-valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Feng; Yan, Yonghong; Wang, Shikuan; Yan, Yijing

    2016-02-01

    Based on non-equilibrium Green's functions' theory and small polaron transformation's technology, we study the heat generation by current through a single-molecular spin-valve. Numerical results indicate that the variation of spin polarization degree can change heat generation effectively, the spin-valve effect happens not only in electrical current but also in heat generation when Coulomb repulsion in quantum dot is smaller than phonon frequency and interestingly, when Coulomb repulsion is larger than phonon frequency, the inverse spin-valve effect appears by sweeping gate voltage and is enlarged with bias increasing. The inverse spin-valve effect will induce the unique heat magnetoresistance effect, which can be modulated from heat-resistance to heat-gain by gate voltage easily.

  17. Voltage generation of piezoelectric cantilevers by laser heating

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Chun-Yi; Liu, Wei-Hung; Chen, Yang-Fang; Shih, Wan Y.; Gao, Xiaotong; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2012-01-01

    Converting ambient thermal energy into electricity is of great interest in harvesting energy from the environment. Piezoelectric cantilevers have previously been shown to be an effective biosensor and a tool for elasticity mapping. Here we show that a single piezoelectric (lead-zirconate titanate (PZT)) layer cantilever can be used to convert heat to electricity through pyroelectric effect. Furthermore, piezoelectric-metal (PZT-Ti) bi-layer cantilever showed an enhanced induced voltage over the single PZT layer alone due to the additional piezoelectric effect. This type of device can be a way for converting heat energy into electricity. PMID:23258941

  18. Voltage generation of piezoelectric cantilevers by laser heating.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chun-Yi; Liu, Wei-Hung; Chen, Yang-Fang; Shih, Wan Y; Gao, Xiaotong; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2012-11-15

    Converting ambient thermal energy into electricity is of great interest in harvesting energy from the environment. Piezoelectric cantilevers have previously been shown to be an effective biosensor and a tool for elasticity mapping. Here we show that a single piezoelectric (lead-zirconate titanate (PZT)) layer cantilever can be used to convert heat to electricity through pyroelectric effect. Furthermore, piezoelectric-metal (PZT-Ti) bi-layer cantilever showed an enhanced induced voltage over the single PZT layer alone due to the additional piezoelectric effect. This type of device can be a way for converting heat energy into electricity. PMID:23258941

  19. Voltage generation of piezoelectric cantilevers by laser heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chun-Yi; Liu, Wei-Hung; Chen, Yang-Fang; Shih, Wan Y.; Gao, Xiaotong; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2012-11-01

    Converting ambient thermal energy into electricity is of great interest in harvesting energy from the environment. Piezoelectric cantilevers have previously been shown to be an effective biosensor and a tool for elasticity mapping. Here we show that a single piezoelectric (lead-zirconate titanate (PZT)) layer cantilever can be used to convert heat to electricity through pyroelectric effect. Furthermore, piezoelectric-metal (PZT-Ti) bi-layer cantilever showed an enhanced induced voltage over the single PZT layer alone due to the additional piezoelectric effect. This type of device can be a way for converting heat energy into electricity.

  20. Heat line analysis for MHD mixed convection flow of nanofluid within a driven cavity containing heat generating block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvin, Salma; Siddiqua, Ayesha

    2016-07-01

    Mixed convective flow and heat transfer characteristics of nanofluid inside a double lid driven cavity with a square heat generating block is analyzed numerically based on heat line approach. The water- alumina nanofluid is chosen as the operational fluid through the enclosure. The governing partial differential equations with proper boundary conditions are solved by Finite Element Method using Galerkin's weighted residual scheme. Calculations are performed for different solid volume fraction (χ) of nanoparticles 0 ≤ χ ≤ 0.15. Results are shown in terms of stream lines, isothermal lines, heat lines, average Nusselt number, average velocity and average temperature. An enhancement in heat transfer rate is observed with the increase of nanoparticles volume fraction.

  1. Fast start-up reactor for partial oxidation of methane with electrically-heated metallic monolith catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Heon; Yoon, Wang Lai; Lee, Hotae; Park, Jong Soo; Shin, Jang Sik; La, Howon; Lee, Jong Dae

    A palladium-washcoated metallic monolith catalyst is applied to the partial oxidation of methane to syngas. This catalyst is highly active at a gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of 100,000 h -1. The compact partial oxidation (POX) reactor equipped with both 96 cc of the metallic monolith catalyst and an electrically-heated catalyst (EHC) has a start-up time of less than 1.5 min and a syngas generation capacity of 9.5 Nm 3 h -1. The POX reaction is sustained without the need for an external heater. With the stand-alone POX reactor, the methane conversion can be increased either by preheating the reactant mixture heat-exchanged with the product gas, or by supplying a larger amount of oxygen than is necessary for the reaction stoichiometry.

  2. Alternative method for steam generation for thermal oxidation of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegelman, Jeffrey J.

    2010-02-01

    Thermal oxidation of silicon is an important process step in MEMS device fabrication. Thicker oxide layers are often used as structural components and can take days or weeks to grow, causing high gas costs, maintenance issues, and a process bottleneck. Pyrolytic steam, which is generated from hydrogen and oxygen combustion, was the default process, but has serious drawbacks: cost, safety, particles, permitting, reduced growth rate, rapid hydrogen consumption, component breakdown and limited steam flow rates. Results from data collected over a 24 month period by a MEMS manufacturer supports replacement of pyrolytic torches with RASIRC Steamer technology to reduce process cycle time and enable expansion previously limited by local hydrogen permitting. Data was gathered to determine whether Steamers can meet or exceed pyrolytic torch performance. The RASIRC Steamer uses de-ionized water as its steam source, eliminating dependence on hydrogen and oxygen. A non-porous hydrophilic membrane selectively allows water vapor to pass. All other molecules are greatly restricted, so contaminants in water such as dissolved gases, ions, total organic compounds (TOC), particles, and metals can be removed in the steam phase. The MEMS manufacturer improved growth rate by 7% over the growth range from 1μm to 3.5μm. Over a four month period, wafer uniformity, refractive index, wafer stress, and etch rate were tracked with no significant difference found. The elimination of hydrogen generated a four-month return on investment (ROI). Mean time between failure (MTBF) was increased from 3 weeks to 32 weeks based on three Steamers operating over eight months.

  3. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Steam Generator and Intermediate Heat Exchanger Materials Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Wright

    2010-09-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Today’s high-temperature alloys and associated ASME Codes for reactor applications are approved up to 760°C. However, some primary system components, such as the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP will require use of materials that can withstand higher temperatures. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge. Examples include materials for the core barrel and core internals, such as the control rod sleeves. The requirements of the materials for the IHX are among the most demanding. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. A number of solid solution strengthened nickel based alloys have been considered for

  4. CONVERTING ENERGY FROM RECLAIMED HEAT: THERMAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of solar energy acquiring devices has been slow to gain acceptance due to their overall low power generation versus high cost of a solar system. The goal of this project is to construct a model which increases the overall power generation of a solar building system by...

  5. Inhibition of the oxidative stress response by heat stress in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Crombie, Timothy A; Tang, Lanlan; Choe, Keith P; Julian, David

    2016-07-15

    It has long been recognized that simultaneous exposure to heat stress and oxidative stress shows a synergistic interaction that reduces organismal fitness, but relatively little is known about the mechanisms underlying this interaction. We investigated the role of molecular stress responses in driving this synergistic interaction using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans To induce oxidative stress, we used the pro-oxidant compounds acrylamide, paraquat and juglone. As expected, we found that heat stress and oxidative stress interact synergistically to reduce survival. Compared with exposure to each stressor alone, during simultaneous sublethal exposure to heat stress and oxidative stress the normal induction of key oxidative-stress response (OxSR) genes was generally inhibited, whereas the induction of key heat-shock response (HSR) genes was not. Genetically activating the SKN-1-dependent OxSR increased a marker for protein aggregation and decreased whole-worm survival during heat stress alone, with the latter being independent of HSF-1. In contrast, compared with wild-type worms, inactivating the HSR by HSF-1 knockdown, which would be expected to decrease basal heat shock protein expression, increased survival during oxidative stress alone. Taken together, these data suggest that, in C. elegans, the HSR and OxSR cannot be simultaneously activated to the same extent that each can be activated during a single stressor exposure. We conclude that the observed synergistic reduction in survival during combined exposure to heat stress and oxidative stress is due, at least in part, to inhibition of the OxSR during activation of the HSR. PMID:27207646

  6. Boiling Heat Transfer in High Temperature Generator of Absorption Chiller/Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Masahiro; Enomoto, Eiichi; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko

    The heat transfer performance of forced convective boiling was tested using a high temperature generator of absorption chiller/heater, the rear furnace wall of which was composed of two different surfaces; i. e., plain and sprayed heated surfaces. These two surfaces were bisymmetrically set. Wall surface temperatures of both the fire and fluid sides were measured at three locations along the upward flow direction in each heated surface for determining the heat flux and heat transfer coefficient. Nickel-chromium and alumina were employed as the spray materials. The test results show that the sprayed surface can yield a marked elevation in the heat transfer performance due to boiling on the plain surface. Therefore the level of heated surface temperature is largely reduced by means of the spraying surface treatment. This implies that the spraying would much improve a corrosive condition of the heated surface.

  7. Optimization of idealized ORC in domestic combined heat and power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybiński, Witold; Mikielewicz, Jarosław

    2013-09-01

    Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) is used, amongst the others, in geothermal facilities, in waste heat recovery or in domestic combined heat and power (CHP) generation. The paper presents optimization of an idealized ORC equivalent of the Carnot cycle with non-zero temperature difference in heat exchangers and with energy dissipation caused by the viscous fluid flow. In this analysis the amount of heat outgoing from the ORC is given. Such a case corresponds to the application of an ORC in domestic CHP. This assumption is different from the most of ORC models where the incoming amount of heat is given.

  8. Quantity, Quality, and Availability of Waste Heat from United States Thermal Power Generation.

    PubMed

    Gingerich, Daniel B; Mauter, Meagan S

    2015-07-21

    Secondary application of unconverted heat produced during electric power generation has the potential to improve the life-cycle fuel efficiency of the electric power industry and the sectors it serves. This work quantifies the residual heat (also known as waste heat) generated by U.S. thermal power plants and assesses the intermittency and transport issues that must be considered when planning to utilize this heat. Combining Energy Information Administration plant-level data with literature-reported process efficiency data, we develop estimates of the unconverted heat flux from individual U.S. thermal power plants in 2012. Together these power plants discharged an estimated 18.9 billion GJ(th) of residual heat in 2012, 4% of which was discharged at temperatures greater than 90 °C. We also characterize the temperature, spatial distribution, and temporal availability of this residual heat at the plant level and model the implications for the technical and economic feasibility of its end use. Increased implementation of flue gas desulfurization technologies at coal-fired facilities and the higher quality heat generated in the exhaust of natural gas fuel cycles are expected to increase the availability of residual heat generated by 10.6% in 2040. PMID:26061407

  9. Oxidative Activity of Heated Coal Affected by Antypirogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torosyan, V. F.; Torosyan, E. S.; Borovikov, I. F.; Yakutova, V. A.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of antypirogens on chemical activity of heated coal is studied. It is proved that ammonium sulfate, calcium phosphate, calcium chloride, calcium nitrate and acid fluoride are the most effective antypirogens.

  10. The oxidation behavior of SiC sintered with Al-B-C and improved oxidation resistance via heat treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Sixta, M

    1997-12-01

    The oxidation behavior of high strength and high toughness SiC, sintered with Al, B, and C (ABC-SiC), was examined. Kinetic data were acquired and the parabolic rate constant for oxidation was determined and compared with literature data on various SiC materials. The role of secondary phases on the oxide morphology was explored. ABC-SiC was compared to commercially available SiC, Hexoloy, and SiC sintered with 10% yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG). Two-step sintering (pre-coarsening) was employed with holds for 48 hours at 600--1,600 C, prior to the typical hot-pressing conditions of 1,900 C for 1 hour, to change the chemistry and reduce the number of bubbles in the silica scale. The effects on the oxide thickness and integrity was examined as a function of the precoarsening heat treatment temperature. Additionally, the hot-pressed ABC-SiC was subjected to heat treatments (anneals) at 1,800 C for 1 hour in nitrogen, Ar, and vacuum environments, and the effects on subsequent oxidation were evaluated. The Ar and vacuum heat treatments dramatically improved the oxidation resistance of ABC-SiC. Finally, reoxidation experiments were performed to try to alter the surface chemistry of the SiC to improve the oxidation resistance. The four-point bend strengths and two-parameter Weibull plots of the most successful heat treatments were compared with the standard ABC-SiC to ensure that significant degradation did not result from altering the processing of the material.