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Sample records for heat of adsorption

  1. Possibility of using adsorption refrigeration unit in district heating network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzebielec, Andrzej; Rusowicz, Artur; Jaworski, Maciej; Laskowski, Rafał

    2015-09-01

    Adsorption refrigeration systems are able to work with heat sources of temperature starting with 50 °C. The aim of the article is to determine whether in terms of technical and economic issues adsorption refrigeration equipment can work as elements that produce cold using hot water from the district heating network. For this purpose, examined was the work of the adsorption air conditioning equipment cooperating with drycooler, and the opportunities offered by the district heating network in Warsaw during the summer. It turns out that the efficiency of the adsorption device from the economic perspective is not sufficient for production of cold even during the transitional period. The main problem is not the low temperature of the water supply, but the large difference between the coefficients of performance, COPs, of adsorption device and a traditional compressor air conditioning unit. When outside air temperature is 25 °C, the COP of the compressor type reaches a value of 4.49, whereas that of the adsorption device in the same conditions is 0.14. The ratio of the COPs is 32. At the same time ratio between the price of 1 kWh of electric power and 1 kWh of heat is only 2.85. Adsorption refrigeration equipment to be able to compete with compressor devices, should feature COPads efficiency to be greater than 1.52. At such a low driving temperature and even changing the drycooler into the evaporative cooler it is not currently possible to achieve.

  2. Adsorption of water vapor by homoionic montmorillonites: Heats of adsorption and desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Dios Cancela, G.; Huertas, F.J.; Romero Taboada, E.; Sanchez-Rasero, F.; Hernandez Laguna, A.

    1997-01-15

    Adsorption isotherms for water vapor, basal spacing, and immersion heats and water desorption heats of Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, and Fe{sup 3+} montmorillonite are measured at various relative humidities (r.h.). The amount of water adsorbed as a function of r.h. is found to increase gradually, whereas basal spacing increases and the adsorption heat decreases in steps. The water desorption heat also decreases in steps. The entropy of adsorbed water appears to be negative with respect to the entropy of liquid water. A theoretical model is proposed to describe the hydration process of Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, and Fe{sup 3+} montmorillonites. The experimental adsorption heats are found to have a direct relationship with the sum of the hydration energy of the cations plus expansion energy.

  3. Isosteric heat of hydrogen adsorption on MOFs: comparison between adsorption calorimetry, sorption isosteric method, and analytical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloutse, A. F.; Zacharia, R.; Cossement, D.; Chahine, R.; Balderas-Xicohténcatl, R.; Oh, H.; Streppel, B.; Schlichtenmayer, M.; Hirscher, M.

    2015-12-01

    Isosteric heat of adsorption is an important parameter required to describe the thermal performance of adsorptive storage systems. It is most frequently calculated from adsorption isotherms measured over wide ranges of pressure and temperature, using the so-called adsorption isosteric method. Direct quantitative estimation of isosteric heats on the other hand is possible using the coupled calorimetric-volumetric method, which involves simultaneous measurement of heat and adsorption. In this work, we compare the isosteric heats of hydrogen adsorption on microporous materials measured by both methods. Furthermore, the experimental data are compared with the isosteric heats obtained using the modified Dubinin-Astakhov, Tóth, and Unilan adsorption analytical models to establish the reliability and limitations of simpler methods and assumptions. To this end, we measure the hydrogen isosteric heats on five prototypical metal-organic frameworks: MOF-5, Cu-BTC, Fe-BTC, MIL-53, and MOF-177 using both experimental methods. For all MOFs, we find a very good agreement between the isosteric heats measured using the calorimetric and isosteric methods throughout the range of loading studied. Models' prediction on the other hand deviates from both experiments depending on the MOF studied and the range of loading. Under low-loadings of less than 5 mol kg-1, the isosteric heat of hydrogen adsorption decreases in the order Cu-BTC > MIL-53 > MOF-5 > Fe-BTC > MOF-177. The order of isosteric heats is coherent with the strength of hydrogen interaction revealed from previous thermal desorption spectroscopy measurements.

  4. Initial heats of H{sub 2}S adsorption on activated carbons: Effect of surface features

    SciTech Connect

    Bagreev, A.; Adib, F.; Bandosz, T.J.

    1999-11-15

    The sorption of hydrogen sulfide was studied on activated carbons of various origins by means of inverse gas chromatography at infinite dilution. The conditions of the experiment were dry and anaerobic. Prior to the experiments the surface of some carbon samples was oxidized using either nitric acid or ammonium persulfate. Then the structural parameters of carbons were evaluated from the sorption of nitrogen. From the IGC experiments at various temperatures, heats of adsorption were calculated. The results showed that the heat of H{sub 2}S adsorption under dry anaerobic conditions does not depend on surface chemistry. The dependence of the heat of adsorption on the characteristic energy of nitrogen adsorption calculated from the Dubinin-Raduskevich equation was found. This correlation can be used to predict the heat of H{sub 2}S adsorption based on the results obtained from nitrogen adsorption.

  5. Evaluation of the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero coverage for hydrogen on activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohnke, E.; Beckner, M.; Romanos, J.; Olsen, R.; Wexler, C.; Pfeifer, P.

    2011-03-01

    Activated carbons made from corn cob show promise as materials for high-capacity hydrogen storage. As part of our characterization of these materials, we are interested in learning how different production methods affect the adsorption energies. In this talk, we will show how hydrogen adsorption isotherms may be used to calculate these adsorption energies at zero coverage using Henry's law. We will additionally discuss differences between the binding energy and the isosteric heat of adsorption by applying this analysis at different temperatures.

  6. Demonstration of Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather; Iacomini, Christine; Powers, Aaron; Dunham, Jonah; Straub-Lopez, Katie; Anerson, Grant; MacCallum, Taber

    2007-01-01

    Patent-pending Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is currently being investigated for removal and rejection of CO2 and heat from a Portable Life Support System (PLSS) to a Martian environment. The metabolically-produced CO2 present in the vent loop gas is collected using a CO2 selective adsorbent that has been cooled via a heat exchanger to near CO2 sublimation temperatures (approx.195K) with liquid CO2 obtained from Martian resources. Once the adsorbent is fully loaded, fresh warm, moist vent loop (approx.300K) is used to heat the adsorbent via another heat exchanger. The adsorbent will then reject the collected CO2 to the Martian ambient. Two beds are used to achieve continuous CO2 removal by cycling between the cold and warm conditions for adsorbent loading and regeneration, respectively. Small experiments have already been completed to show that an adsorbent can be cycled between these PLSS operating conditions to provide adequate conditions for CO2 removal from a simulated vent loop. One of the remaining technical challenges is extracting enough heat from the vent loop to warm the adsorbent in an appreciable time frame to meet the required adsorb/desorb cycle. The other key technical aspect of the technology is employing liquid CO2 to achieve the appropriate cooling. A technology demonstrator has been designed, built and tested to investigate the feasibility of 1) warming the adsorbent using the moist vent loop, 2) cooling the adsorbent using liquid CO2, and 3) using these two methods in conjunction to successfully remove CO2 from a vent loop and reject it to Mars ambient. Both analytical and numerical methods were used to perform design calculations and trades. The demonstrator was built and tested. The design analysis and testing results are presented along with recommendations for future development required to increase the maturity of the technology.

  7. Overall Heat and Mass Transfer Coefficient of Water Vapor Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Mori, Hideo; Godo, Masazumi; Miura, Kunio; Watanabe, Yutaka; Ishizawa, Toshihiko; Takatsuka, Takeshi

    A fundamental investigation was performed to develop a compact and simple desiccant ventilation unit which is one of the main components of a novel energy saving air-conditioning system. Water vapor in the air is adsorbed and/or desorbed to be controlled the humidity of supply air through a unit of an adsorbent packed bed. A numerical simulation helps to understand the phenomena of heat and mass transfer in the bed. Overall transfer coefficients of them as properties for the simulation were estimated by performing both experiment and calculation. It was clarified that the transient overall equivalent heat and mass transfer does not strongly depend on the air flow rate through the packed bed, the averaged equivalent mass transfer is governed by surface and pore diffusion in a particle of adsorbent at low flow rate. Moreover, the coefficient during the adsorption process is slightly larger than desorption. An equation of the overall mass transfer coefficient is derived. It shows five times as large as the value estimated by experiment. Therefore, the correlation and fitting parameters are presented for prediction of the overall heat and mass transfer coefficients. The estimation accuracy was improved.

  8. Overall Heat and Mass Transfer Coefficient of Water Vapor Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Mori, Hideo; Godo, Masazumi; Miura, Kunio; Watanabe, Yutaka; Ishizawa, Toshihiko; Takatsuka, Takeshi

    A fundamental investigation was performed to develop a compact and simple desiccant ventilation unit which is one of the main components of a novel energy saving air-conditioning system. Water vapor in the air is adsorbed and/or desorbed to be controlled the humidity of supply air through a unit of an adsorbent rotor. A numerical simulation helps to understand the phenomena of heat and mass transfer in the rotor block. Overall transfer coefficients were estimated by performing both experiment and calculation. It was examined that the transient overall equivalent heat and mass transfer coefficient was not constant. It seems that both film fluid and diffusion resistance govern the coefficients in the block, and the influence of air flow on the time averaged coefficients is estimated by a considering the laminar forced convection from a flat plate. There is little difference of the coefficient between adsorption and desorption process. The correlation and fitting parameters are presented for prediction of the overall heat and mass transfer coefficients. The estimation accuracy was improved.

  9. Adsorption equilibrium of binary methane/ethane mixtures in BPL activated carbon: isotherms and calorimetric heats of adsorption.

    PubMed

    He, Yufeng; Yun, Jeong-Ho; Seaton, Nigel A

    2004-08-01

    The adsorption of pure methane and ethane in BPL activated carbon has been measured at temperatures between 264 and 373 K and at pressures up to 3.3 MPa with a bench-scale high-pressure open-flow apparatus. The same apparatus was used to measure the adsorption of binary methane/ethane mixtures in BPL at 301.4 K and at pressures up to 2.6 MPa. Thermodynamic consistency tests demonstrate that the data are thermodynamically consistent. In contrast to two sets of data previously published, we found that the adsorption of binary methane/ethane in BPL behaves ideally (in the sense of obeying ideal adsorbed solution theory, IAST) throughout the pressure and gas-phase composition range studied. A Tian-Calvet type microcalorimeter was used to measure low-pressure isotherms, the isosteric heats of adsorption of pure methane and ethane in BPL activated carbon, and the individual heats of adsorption in binary mixtures, at 297 K and at pressures up to 100 kPa. The mixture heats of adsorption were consistent with IAST. PMID:15274571

  10. Simulated Lunar Testing of Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Sebastian A.; Bower, Chad E.; Iacomini, Christie S.; Paul, Heather L.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed for thermal and carbon dioxide (CO2) control for a Portable Life Support System (PLSS), as well as water recycling. An Engineering Development Unit (EDU) of the MTSA Subassembly (MTSAS) was designed and assembled for optimized Martian operations, but also meets system requirements for lunar operations. For lunar operations the MTSA sorption cycle is driven via a vacuum swing between suit ventilation loop pressure and lunar vacuum. The focus of this effort was testing in a simulated lunar environment. This environment was simulated in Paragon's EHF vacuum chamber. The objective of the testing was to evaluate the full cycle performance of the MTSA Subassembly EDU, and to assess CO2 loading and pressure drop of the wash coated aluminum reticulated foam sorbent bed. Lunar environment testing proved out the feasibility of pure vacuum swing operation, making MTSA a technology that can be tested and used on the Moon prior to going to Mars. Testing demonstrated better than expected CO2 Nomenclature loading on the sorbent and nearly replicates the equilibrium data from the sorbent manufacturer. This exceeded any of the previous sorbent loading tests performed by Paragon. Subsequently, the increased performance of the sorbent bed design indicates future designs will require less mass and volume than the current EDU rendering MTSA as very competitive for Martian PLSS applications.

  11. Adsorption Behavior of Heat Modified Soybean Oil via Boundary Lubrication Coefficient of Friction Measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The frictional behaviors of soybean oil and heat modified soybean oils with different Gardner scale viscosities as additives in hexadecane have been examined in a boundary lubrication test regime (steel contacts) using Langmuir adsorption model. The free energy of adsorption (delta-Gads) of various...

  12. Direct Measurement of the Adsorbed Film Volume for Estimating Heats of Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Andrew; Dohnke, Elmar; Rash, Tyler; Stalla, David; Knight, Ernest; Seydel, Florian; Sweany, Mark; Pfeifer, Peter

    Compressed hydrogen and methane require extremely high pressures or low temperatures in order to compete with the energy density of conventional fossil fuels. Adsorbent materials provide a means to increase the energy density of these gasses up to 6 times that of compressed gas at the same temperature and pressure. One major concern in engineering adsorbed gas systems is thermal management during charging and discharging. Adsorption is an exothermic process, releasing heat during charging and absorbing heat during discharging. To estimate the heat of adsorption, it is common to analyze excess adsorption isotherms by converting to absolute adsorption and employ the Clausius Clapeyron relation. However, this method requires an assumed volume of the adsorbed state. It is common for researchers to assume that the adsorbed film occupies the entire pore volume of the adsorbent material. However, the adsorbed film only occupies a fraction of the total pore volume. This yields heats of adsorption that are underestimated by as much as 10kJ/mol at high coverage. In this talk, we present a method to directly measure the adsorbed film volume as a function of temperature and present the resulting heats of adsorption for both methane and hydrogen.

  13. SO2 gas adsorption by modified kaolin clays: influence of previous heating and time acid treatments.

    PubMed

    Volzone, Cristina; Ortiga, Jose

    2011-10-01

    Modified kaolin clays were used as adsorbents for SO(2) gas adsorptions. The clays were heated up to 900 °C previous to acid treatments with 0.5 N sulfuric acid solutions at boiling temperature during different times up to 1440 min. Equilibrium adsorption at 25 °C and 0.1 MPa was carried out by using a volumetric apparatus. The samples were characterized by chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction and infrared analysis. The heating of the clays followed by acid treatment improved the adsorption capacity of the kaolin clays. The presence of amorphous silica and hydroxyl in the final products improved SO(2) adsorption capacity. Better properties for SO(2) adsorption were found in kaolin rich in not well ordered kaolinite clay mineral. PMID:21696883

  14. Adsorption of hydrofluorocarbons HFC-134 and HFC-134A on X and Y zeolites: Effect of ion-exchange on selectivity and heat of adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Savitz, S.; Siperstein, F.R.; Huber, R.; Tieri, S.M.; Gorte, R.J.; Myers, A.L.; Grey, C.P.; Corbin, D.R.

    1999-09-30

    Adsorption isotherms and heats of adsorption were measured for HFC-134 (1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane) and HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) on a series of ion-exchanged (H, Li, Na, Rb, Cs) faujasites using volumetric and calorimetric techniques. The species and number of ions present in the zeolite strongly influence the heats of adsorption and the preferential adsorption of HFC-134 compared to HFC-134a. The selectivity is considerably higher in X than in Y zeolites because of the larger number of nonframework ions in X zeolites. The saturation capacity is six molecules per supercavity for both HFCs. The differences in observed heats of adsorption (except for RbX) can be explained by reasonable and consistent values of dispersion and ion-dipole electrostatic energies. The high selectivities for NaX and RbX indicate that either zeolite would be highly effective for gas separation.

  15. Adsorption and release of ofloxacin from acid- and heat-treated halloysite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Junping; Zheng, Yue; Wang, Aiqin

    2014-01-01

    Halloysite nanotube is an ideal vehicle of the controlled release of drugs. In this study, we systematically investigated the effects of acid- and heat-treatments on the physicochemical properties, structure and morphology of halloysite by XRD, FTIR, SEM and TEM. Afterwards, the adsorption and in vitro release properties of halloysite for cationic ofloxacin (OFL) were evaluated. The results indicate that HCl treatment has no influence on the crystal structure of halloysite, whereas it becomes amorphous after calcined at temperature higher than 500 °C. Both acid- and heat-treatments have no evident influence on the tubular structure of halloysite. OFL was adsorbed onto halloysite via electrostatic interaction between protonated OFL and negative halloysite surface, cation exchange as well as electrostatic interaction between the OFL-Al(3+) complexes and the negative halloysite surface. Acid-treatment facilitates the release of the adsorbed OFL compared with the natural halloysite in spite of a slight decrease of adsorption capacity. However, heat-treatment results in a sharp decrease of adsorption capacity for OFL owning to the OFL-promoted dissolution of aluminum and the disappearance of the porous structure. Although heat-treatment also facilitates release of the adsorbed OFL, the amount of OFL released is in fact less than the natural halloysite owing to the very low adsorption capacity. Thus, acid-activation is an effective protocol to improve the adsorption and release of halloysite for cationic drug molecules. PMID:24060930

  16. Adsorption of SO2 onto oxidized and heat-treated activated carbon fibers (ACFS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daley, M.A.; Mangun, C.L.; DeBarr, J.A.; Riha, S.; Lizzio, A.A.; Donnals, G.L.; Economy, J.

    1997-01-01

    A series of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) and heat-treated oxidized ACFs prepared from phenolic fiber precursors have been studied to elucidate the role of pore size, pore surface chemistry and pore volume for the adsorption of SO2 and its catalytic conversion to H2SO4. For untreated ACFs, the initial rate of SO2 adsorption from flue gas was shown to be inversely related to pore size. At longer times, the amount of SO2 adsorbed from flue gas was dependent on both the pore size and pore volume. Oxidation of the ACFs, using an aqueous oxidant, decreased their adsorption capacity for SO2 from flue gas due to a decrease in pore volume and repulsion of the SO2 from acidic surface groups. If these samples were heat-treated to desorb the oxygen containing function groups, the amount of SO2 adsorption increased. This increase in adsorption capacity was directly correlated to the amount of CO2 evolved during heat-treatment of the oxidized ACFs. The amount of SO2 adsorbed for these samples was related to the pore size, pore surface chemistry and pore volume. This analysis is explained in more detail in this paper. ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Protein adsorption enhanced radio-frequency heating of silica nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wosik, Jarek; Pande, Rohit; Xie, Leiming; Ketharnath, Dhivya; Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi; Godin, Biana

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of specific-absorption-rate (SAR) of silica 30, 50, and 100 nm nanoparticles (NP) suspended in water were carried out at 30 MHz in 7 kV/m radio-frequency (rf) electric field. Size dependent, NP-suspension interface related heating of silica NP was observed. To investigate a possible mechanism of heating, bovine serum albumin was adsorbed on the surface of silica NPs in suspension. It resulted in significant enhancement of SAR when compared to bare silica NPs. A calorimetric and rf loss model was used to calculate effective conductivity of silica NP with/without adsorbed albumin as a function of silica size and albumin concentration. PMID:23964135

  18. Use of heat of adsorption to quantify amorphous content in milled pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    Alam, Shamsul; Omar, Mahmoud; Gaisford, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Isothermal calorimetry operated in gas perfusion mode (IGPC) is often used to quantify the amorphous content of pharmaceutical powders. Typically, the calibration line is constructed using the heat of crystallisation as the sample is exposed to high levels of a plasticising vapour. However, since the physical form to which the amorphous fraction crystallises may be dependent on the presence of any crystalline seed, the calibration line is often seen to be non-linear, especially as the amorphous content of the sample approaches 100% w/w. Redesigning the experiment so that the calibration line is constructed with the heat of adsorption is an alternative approach that, because it is not dependent upon crystallisation to a physical form should ameliorate this problem. The two methods are compared for a model compound, salbutamol sulphate, which forms either a hydrate or an anhydrate depending on the amorphous content. The heat of adsorption method was linear between amorphous contents of 0 and 100% w/w and resulted in a detection limit of 0.3% w/w and a quantification limit of 0.92% w/w. The heat of crystallisation method was linear only between amorphous contents of 0 and 80% w/w and resulted in a detection limit of 1.7% w/w and a quantification limit of 5.28% w/w. Thus, the use of heat of adsorption is shown to be a better method for quantifying amorphous contents to better than 1% w/w. PMID:24315924

  19. Simulation of a High Efficiency Multi-bed Adsorption Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Humble, Paul H.; Sweeney, J. B.

    2012-05-01

    Attaining high energy efficiency with adsorption heat pumps is challenging due to thermodynamic losses that occur when the sorbent beds are thermally cycled without effective heat recuperation. The multi-bed concept described here effectively transfers heat from beds being cooled to beds being heated, which enables high efficiency in thermally driven heat pumps. A simplified lumped-parameter model and detailed finite element analysis are used to simulate the performance of an ammonia-carbon sorption compressor, which is used to project the overall heat pump coefficient of performance. The effects of bed geometry and number of beds on system performance are explored, and the majority of the performance benefit is obtained with four beds. Results indicate that a COP of 1.24 based on heat input is feasible at AHRI standard test conditions for residential HVAC equipment. When compared on a basis of primary energy input, performance equivalent to SEER 13 or 14 are theoretically attainable with this system.

  20. Preparation of modified semi-coke by microwave heating and adsorption kinetics of methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Peng, Jin-Hui; Duan, Xin-Hui; Srinivasakannan, Chandrasekar

    2013-01-01

    Preparation of modified semi-coke has been achieved, using phosphoric acid as the modifying agent, by microwave heating from virgin semi-coke. Process optimization using a Central Composite Design (CCD) design of Response Surface Methodology (RSM) technique for the preparation of modifies semi-coke is presented in this paper. The optimum conditions for producing modified semi-coke were: concentration of phosphoric acid 2.04, heating time 20 minutes and temperature 587 degrees C, with the optimum iodine of 862 mg/g and yield of 47.48%. The textural characteristics of modified semi-coke were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nitrogen adsorption isotherm. The BET surface area of modified semi-coke was estimated to be 989.60 m2/g, with the pore volume of 0.74 cm3/g and a pore diameter of 3.009 nm, with micro-pore volume contributing to 62.44%. The Methylene Blue monolayer adsorption capacity was found to be mg/g at K. The adsorption capacity of the modified semi-coke highlights its suitability for liquid phase adsorption application with a potential usage in waste water treatment. PMID:24779145

  1. Testing, Modeling and System Impact of Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacomini, Christine S.; Powers, Aaron; Lewis, Matthew; Linrud, Christopher; Waguespack, Glenn; Conger, Bruce; Paul, Heather L.

    2008-01-01

    Metabolic heat regenerated temperature swing adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed for removal and rejection of carbon dioxide (CO2) and heat from a portable life support system (PLSS) to the Martian environment. Previously, hardware was built and tested to demonstrate using heat from simulated, dry ventilation loop gas to affect the temperature swing required to regenerate an adsorbent used for CO2 removal. New testing has been performed using a moist, simulated ventilation loop gas to demonstrate the effects of water condensing and freezing in the heat exchanger during adsorbent regeneration. In addition, thermal models of the adsorbent during regeneration were modified and calibrated with test data to capture the effect of the CO2 heat of desorption. Finally, MTSA impact on PLSS design was evaluated by performing thermal balances assuming a specific PLSS architecture. Results using NASA s Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT), a PLSS system evaluation tool, are presented.

  2. Analysis of Adsorbate-Adsorbate and Adsorbate-Adsorbent Interactions to Decode Isosteric Heats of Gas Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Madani, S Hadi; Sedghi, Saeid; Biggs, Mark J; Pendleton, Phillip

    2015-12-21

    A qualitative interpretation is proposed to interpret isosteric heats of adsorption by considering contributions from three general classes of interaction energy: fluid-fluid heat, fluid-solid heat, and fluid-high-energy site (HES) heat. Multiple temperature adsorption isotherms are defined for nitrogen, T=(75, 77, 79) K, argon at T=(85, 87, 89) K, and for water and methanol at T=(278, 288, 298) K on a well-characterized polymer-based, activated carbon. Nitrogen and argon are subjected to isosteric heat analyses; their zero filling isosteric heats of adsorption are consistent with slit-pore, adsorption energy enhancement modelling. Water adsorbs entirely via specific interactions, offering decreasing isosteric heat at low pore filling followed by a constant heat slightly in excess of water condensation enthalpy, demonstrating the effects of micropores. Methanol offers both specific adsorption via the alcohol group and non-specific interactions via its methyl group; the isosteric heat increases at low pore filling, indicating the predominance of non-specific interactions. PMID:26538339

  3. Correlation between the spatial structure of molecules of saturated hydrocarbons and their heats of adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serezhkin, V. N.; Prokaeva, M. A.; Pushkin, D. V.; Serezhkina, L. B.; Onuchak, L. A.

    2008-08-01

    The total area s m of Voronoi-Dirichlet polyhedron (VDP) faces corresponding to all intermolecular contacts of a molecule in a crystal structure and the total volume V m of pyramids whose bases are such faces and whose vertices are the nuclei of atoms involved in intermolecular contacts were determined for 16 saturated hydrocarbons, including alicyclic and cage structures. In the Henry region, the differential molar heat of hydrocarbon adsorption on graphitized carbon black depends linearly on the integral parameter s m or V m of its molecular VDPs. These parameters were shown to be universal descriptors characterizing both the spatial structure of molecules and their ability to participate in intermolecular interactions during adsorption from the gas phase.

  4. Performance investigation of a waste heat driven pressurized adsorption refrigeration cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, K.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents performance investigation of a waste heat driven two bed pressurised adsorption refrigeration system. In this study, highly porous activated carbon (AC) of type Maxsorb III has been selected as adsorbent while n-butane, R-134a, R410a, R507a and carbon dioxide (CO2) are chosen as refrigerants. All the five refrigerants work at above atmospheric pressure. Among the five pairs studied, the best pairs will be identified which will be used to provide sufficient cooling capacity for a driving heat source temperature above 60°C. Results indicate that for a driving source temperature above 60°C, AC-R410a pair provides highest cooling capacity while AC-CO2 pairs works better when the heat source temperature falls below 60°C.

  5. Modeling Of Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) Subassembly For Prototype Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, Chad E.; Padilla, Sebastian A.; Iacomini, Christie S.; Paul, Heather L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes modeling methods for the three core components of a Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) subassembly: a sorbent bed, a sublimation (cooling) heat exchanger (SHX), and a condensing icing (warming) heat exchanger (CIHX). The primary function of the MTSA, removing carbon dioxide from a space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) ventilation loop, is performed via the sorbent bed. The CIHX is used to heat the sorbent bed for desorption and to remove moisture from the ventilation loop while the SHX is alternately employed to cool the sorbent bed via sublimation of a spray of water at low pressure to prepare the reconditioned bed for the next cycle. This paper describes subsystem heat a mass transfer modeling methodologies relevant to the description of the MTSA subassembly in Thermal Desktop and SINDA/FLUINT. Several areas of particular modeling interest are discussed. In the sorbent bed, capture of the translating carbon dioxide (CO2) front and associated local energy and mass balance in both adsorbing and desorbing modes is covered. The CIHX poses particular challenges for modeling in SINDA/FLUINT as accounting for solids states in fluid submodels are not a native capability. Methods for capturing phase change and latent heat of ice as well as the transport properties across a layer of low density accreted frost are developed. This extended modeling capacity is applicable to temperatures greater than 258 K. To extend applicability to the minimum device temperature of 235 K, a method for a mapped transformation of temperatures from below the limit temperatures to some value above is given along with descriptions for associated material property transformations and the resulting impacts to total heat and mass transfer. Similar considerations are given for the SHX along with functional relationships for areal sublimation rates as limited by flow mechanics in t1he outlet duct.

  6. Interrelation between the spatial structure of unsaturated hydrocarbon molecules and heats of their adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serezhkin, V. N.; Prokaeva, M. A.; Pushkin, D. V.; Serezhkina, L. B.; Kudryashov, S. Yu.

    2008-08-01

    The total area ( s m) of Voronoi-Dirichlet polyhedron faces corresponding to all intermolecular contacts of one molecule in the structure of crystals and the total volume of pyramids ( V m) built on such faces and containing the nuclei of atoms participating in intermolecular contacts in their vertices were determined for 19 unsaturated hydrocarbons. The differential molar heat of adsorption of the hydrocarbons on graphitized thermal carbon black was found to be linearly related to the s m or V m integral parameters of their Voronoi-Dirichlet polyhedra. Aromatic hydrocarbons on the one hand and saturated hydrocarbons, olefins, and acetylene on the other are characterized by different dependences because of the special shapes of their molecular Voronoi-Dirichlet polyhedra.

  7. System Modeling of Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) Subassembly for Prototype Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, Chad; Padilla, Sebastian; Iacomini, Christie; Paul, Heather L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes modeling methods for the three core components of a Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) subassembly: the sorbent bed, a sublimation (cooling) heat exchanger (SHX), and a condensing icing (warming) heat exchanger (CIHX). The primary function of the MTSA, removing carbon dioxide from a ventilation loop, is performed via the sorbent bed. The CIHX is used to heat the sorbent bed for desorption and to remove moisture from the ventilation loop while the SHX is alternately employed to cool the sorbent bed via sublimation of a spray of water at low pressure to prepare the reconditioned bed for the next cycle. This paper describes a system level model of the MTSA as developed in Thermal Desktop and SINDA/FLUINT including assumptions on geometry and physical phenomena, modeling methodology and relevant pa ra mete rizatio ns. Several areas of particular modeling interest are discussed. In the sorbent bed, capture of the translating CO2 saturation front and associated local energy and mass balance in both adsorbing and desorbing modes is covered. The CIHX poses particular challenges for modeling in SINDA/FLUINT as accounting for solids states in fluid submodels are not a native capability. Methods for capturing phase change and latent heat of ice as well as the transport properties across a layer of low density accreted frost are developed. This extended modeling capacity is applicable to temperatures greater than 258 K. To extend applicability to the minimum device temperature of 235 K, a method for a mapped transformation of temperatures from below the limit temperatures to some value above is given along with descriptions for associated material property transformations and the resulting impacts to total heat and mass transfer. Similar considerations are shown for the SHX along with assumptions for flow mechanics and resulting model methods for sublimation in a flow.

  8. New Carbon-Based Porous Materials with Increased Heats of Adsorption for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Snurr, Randall Q.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Nguyen, SonBinh T.

    2014-11-03

    . Only after modeling suggested record-breaking hydrogen uptake at 77 K did we proceed to synthesize, characterize, and test the material, ultimately yielding experimental results that agreed closely with predictions that were made before the material was synthesized. We also synthesized, characterized, and computationally simulated the behavior of two new materials displaying the highest experimental Brunauer−Emmett−Teller (BET) surface areas of any porous materials reported to date (∼7000 m2/g). Key to evacuating the initially solvent-filled materials without pore collapse, and thereby accessing the ultrahigh areas, was the use of a supercritical CO2 activation technique developed by our team. In our efforts to increase the hydrogen binding energy, we developed the first examples of “zwitterionic” metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The two structures feature zwitterionic characteristics arising from N-heterocyclic azolium groups in the linkers and negatively charged Zn2(CO2)5 nodes. These groups interact strongly with the H2 quadrupole. High initial isosteric heats of adsorption for hydrogen were measured at low H2 loading. Simulations were used to determine the H2 binding sites, and results were compared with inelastic neutron scattering. In addition to MOFs, the project produced a variety of related materials known as porous organic frameworks (POFs), including robust catechol-functionalized POFs with tunable porosities and degrees of functionalization. Post-synthesis metalation was readily carried out with a wide range of metal precursors (CuII, MgII, and MnII salts and complexes), resulting in metalated POFs with enhanced heats of hydrogen adsorption compared to the starting nonmetalated materials. Isosteric heats of adsorption as high as 9.6 kJ/mol were observed, compared to typical values around 5 kJ/mol in unfunctionalized MOFs and POFs. Modeling played an important role throughout the project. For example, we used molecular simulations to determine that

  9. EFFECT OF HEAT ON THE ADSORPTION CAPACITY OF AN ACTIVATED CARBON FOR DECOLORIZING/DEODORIZING YELLOW ZEIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Freundlich model was evaluated for use to assess the effect of heat on the adsorption capacity of an activated carbon for decolorizing/deodorizing corn zein. Because zein protein and its color/odor components are all adsorbed by activated carbon, a method to monitor their removal was needed. Y...

  10. Emulsifying properties and oil/water (O/W) interface adsorption behavior of heated soy proteins: effects of heating concentration, homogenizer rotating speed, and salt addition level.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhumei; Chen, Yeming; Kong, Xiangzhen; Zhang, Caimeng; Hua, Yufei

    2014-02-19

    The adsorption of heat-denatured soy proteins at the oil/water (O/W) interface during emulsification was studied. Protein samples were prepared by heating protein solutions at concentrations of 1-5% (w/v) and were then diluted to 0.3% (w/v). The results showed that soy proteins that had been heated at higher concentrations generated smaller droplet size of emulsion. Increase in homogenizer rotating speed resulted in higher protein adsorption percentages and lower surface loads at the O/W interface. Surface loads for both unheated and heated soy proteins were linearly correlated with the unadsorbed proteins' equilibrium concentration at various rotating speeds. With the rise in NaCl addition level, protein adsorption percentage and surface loads of emulsions increased, whereas lower droplet sizes were obtained at the ionic strength of 0.1 M. The aggregates and non-aggregates displayed different adsorption behaviors when rotating speed or NaCl concentration was varied. PMID:24460091

  11. Modeling the heat and mass transfers in temperature-swing adsorption of volatile organic compounds onto activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvain Giraudet; Pascaline Pre; Pierre Le Cloirec

    2009-02-15

    A theoretical model was built to simulate the adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) onto activated carbons in a fixed bed. This model was validated on a set of experimental data obtained for the adsorption of acetone, ethyl formate, and dichloromethane onto five commercial activated carbons. The influence of operating conditions was modeled with various VOC contents at the inlet of the adsorber and superficial velocities of the gas-phase from 0.14 to 0.28 m.s{sup -1}. Breakthrough times and maximum temperature rises were computed with a coefficient of determination of 0.988 and 0.901, respectively. The simulation was then extended to the adsorption of mixtures of VOCs. From the comparison of simulation and experimental results, the advantage of accounting for dispersions of heat and mass is shown and the importance in taking into account the temperature effect on the equilibrium data is demonstrated. 29 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The effect of pre-adsorption of OVA or WPC on subsequent OVA or WPC fouling on heated stainless steel surface.

    PubMed

    Lv, Huiting; Huang, Song; Mercadé-Prieto, Ruben; Wu, Xue E; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2015-05-01

    Fouling on the heat exchanger surface during food processing has been researched extensively due to its great importance in energy efficiency, product quality and food safety. The nature of heat exchanger surface has an effect on the initial deposition behavior and deposit removal behavior to some degree. Protein adsorption on surface is considered to be the initial stage in fouling. In the current study, protein 'pre-adsorption' at room temperature on stainless steel has been investigated as a means to influence the behavior of protein fouling at pasteurization temperatures. Pre-adsorption was carried out with whey protein concentrate (WPC) and ovalbumin (OVA), respectively, which reduced the fouling of OVA (∼20-30% energy saving in the processing time examined). However, the pre-adsorption had little effect on fouling of whey protein concentrate. Contact angles were measured to show the surface change due to protein pre-adsorption. Protein pre-adsorption made the surfaces more hydrophilic. PMID:25863709

  13. Simulated Lunar Testing of Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Sebastian A.; Bower, Chad; Iacomini, Christie S.; Paul, H.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed for thermal and carbon dioxide (CO2) control for a Portable Life Support System (PLSS), as well as water recycling. An Engineering Development Unit (EDU) of the MTSA subassembly was designed and assembled for optimized Martian operations, but also meets system requirements for lunar operations. For lunar operations the MTSA sorption cycle is driven via a vacuum swing between suit ventilation loop pressure and lunar vacuum. The focus of this effort is operations and testing in a simulated lunar environment. This environment was simulated in Paragon s EHF vacuum chamber. The objective of this testing was to evaluate the full cycle performance of the MTSA Subassembly EDU, and to assess CO2 loading and pressure drop of the wash coated aluminum reticulated foam sorbent bed. The lunar testing proved out the feasibility of pure vacuum swing operation, making MTSA a technology that can be tested and used on the Moon prior to going to Mars. Testing demonstrated better than expected CO2 loading on the sorbent and nearly replicates the equilibrium data from the sorbent manufacturer. This had not been achieved in any of the previous sorbent loading tests performed by Paragon. Subsequently, the increased performance of the sorbent bed design indicates future designs will require less mass and volume than the current EDU rendering MTSA as very competitive for Martian PLSS applications.

  14. Transient Modeling and Analysis of a Metabolic Heat-Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) System for a PLSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iacomini, Christie; Powers, Aaron; Speight, Garland; Padilla, Sebastian; Paul, Heather L.

    2009-01-01

    A Metabolic heat-regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) system is being developed for carbon dioxide, water and thermal control in a lunar and martian portable life support system (PLSS). A previous system analysis was performed to evaluate the impact of MTSA on PLSS design. That effort was Mars specific and assumed liquid carbon dioxide (LCO2) coolant made from martian resources. Transient effects were not considered but rather average conditions were used throughout the analysis. This effort takes into further consideration the transient effects inherent in the cycling MTSA system as well as assesses the use of water as coolant. Standard heat transfer, thermodynamic, and heat exchanger methods are presented to conduct the analysis. Assumptions and model verification are discussed. The tool was used to perform various system studies. Coolant selection was explored and takes into account different operational scenarios as the minimum bed temperature is driven by the sublimation temperature of the coolant (water being significantly higher than LCO2). From this, coolant mass is sized coupled with sorbent bed mass because MTSA adsorption performance decreases with increasing sublimation temperature. Reduction in heat exchanger performance and even removal of certain heat exchangers, like a recuperative one between the two sorbent beds, is also investigated. Finally, the coolant flow rate is varied over the cycle to determine if there is a more optimal means of cooling the bed from a mass perspective. Results of these studies and subsequent recommendations for system design are presented.

  15. High Efficiency Adsorption Chillers: High Efficiency Adsorption Cooling Using Metal Organic Heat Carriers

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    BEETIT Project: PNNL is incorporating significant improvements in materials that adsorb liquids or gases to design more efficient adsorption chillers. An adsorption chiller is a type of air conditioner that is powered by heat, solar or waste heat, or combustion of natural gas. Unlike typical chillers, this type has few moving parts and uses almost no electricity to operate. PNNL is designing adsorbent materials at the molecular level with at least 3 times higher refrigerant capacity and up to 20 times faster kinetics than adsorbents used in current chillers. By using the new adsorbent, PNNL is able to create a chiller that is significantly smaller, has twice the energy efficiency, and lower costs for materials and assembly time compared to conventional adsorption chillers.

  16. Effects of heat-treatment and hydrogen adsorption on Graphene grown on Cu foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jongweon; Gao, Li; Tian, Jifa; Cao, Helin; Yu, Qingkai; Guest, Jeffrey; Chen, Yong; Guisinger, Nathan

    2011-03-01

    Graphene has recently been a subject of intense research efforts due to its remarkable physical properties as an ideal two-dimensional material. While numerous different methods for graphene synthesis are being explored, CVD-grown graphene on Cu foil presents the possibility of a large-scale and high-quality synthesis of graphene.[1] To improve the quality of graphene films on Cu foil prepared by CVD and better understand its microscopic growth, atomic-scale characterization becomes of great importance. We have investigated the effects of thermal annealing and hydrogen adsorption/desorption on ex-situ CVD-grown monolayer graphene on polycrystalline Cu foil at the atomic-scale using ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy, and we will report on these studies.

  17. Gas adsorption/absorption heat switch, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1987-01-01

    The service life and/or reliability of far-infrared sensors on surveillance satellites is presently limited by the cryocooler. The life and/or reliability, however, can be extended by using redundant cryocoolers. To reduce parasitic heat leak, each stage of the inactive redundant cryocooler must be thermally isolated from the optical system, while each stage of the active cryocooler must be thermally connected to the system. The thermal break or the thermal contact can be controlled by heat switches. Among different physical mechanisms for heat switching, mechanically activated heat switches tend to have low reliability and, furthermore, require a large contact force. Magnetoresistive heat switches are, except at very low temperatures, of very low efficiency. Heat switches operated by the heat pipe principle usually require a long response time. A sealed gas gap heat switch operated by an adsorption pump has no mechanical motion and should provide the reliability and long lifetime required in long-term space missions. Another potential application of a heat switch is the thermal isolation of the optical plane during decontamination.

  18. Numerical modelling of heat and mass transfer in adsorption solar reactor of ammonia on active carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aroudam, El. H.

    In this paper, we present a modelling of the performance of a reactor of a solar cooling machine based carbon-ammonia activated bed. Hence, for a solar radiation, measured in the Energetic Laboratory of the Faculty of Sciences in Tetouan (northern Morocco), the proposed model computes the temperature distribution, the pressure and the ammonia concentration within the activated carbon bed. The Dubinin-Radushkevich formula is used to compute the ammonia concentration distribution and the daily cycled mass necessary to produce a cooling effect for an ideal machine. The reactor is heated at a maximum temperature during the day and cool at the night. A numerical simulation is carried out employing the recorded solar radiation data measured locally and the daily ambient temperature for the typical clear days. Initially the reactor is at ambient temperature, evaporating pressure; Pev=Pst(Tev=0 ∘C) and maintained at uniform concentration. It is heated successively until the threshold temperature corresponding to the condensing pressure; Pcond=Pst(Tam) (saturation pressure at ambient temperature; in the condenser) and until a maximum temperature at a constant pressure; Pcond. The cooling of the reactor is characterised by a fall of temperature to the minimal values at night corresponding to the end of a daily cycle. We use the mass balance equations as well as energy equation to describe heat and mass transfer inside the medium of three phases. A numerical solution of the obtained non linear equations system based on the implicit finite difference method allows to know all parameters characteristic of the thermodynamic cycle and consider principally the daily evolution of temperature, ammonia concentration for divers positions inside the reactor. The tube diameter of the reactor shows the dependence of the optimum value on meteorological parameters for 1 m2 of collector surface.

  19. Design and Assembly of an Integrated Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) Subassembly Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Sebastian A.; Powers, Aaron; Iacomini, Christie S.; Bower, Chad E.; Paul, Heather L.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed for thermal and carbon dioxide (CO2) control for a Portable Life Support System (PLSS), as well as water recycling. The core of the MTSA technology is a sorbent bed that removes CO2 from the PLSS ventilation loop gas via a temperature swing. A Condensing Icing Heat eXchanger (CIHX) is used to warm the sorbent while also removing water from the ventilation loop gas. A Sublimation Heat eXchanger (SHX) is used to cool the sorbent. Research was performed to explore an MTSA designed for both lunar and Martian operations. Previously the sorbent bed, CIHX, and SHX had been built and tested individually on a scale relevant to PLSS operations, but they had not been done so as an integrated subassembly. Design and analysis of an integrated subassembly was performed based on this prior experience and an updated transient system model. Focus was on optimizing the design for Martian operations, but the design can also be used in lunar operations. An Engineering Development Unit (EDU) of an integrated MTSA subassembly was assembled based on the design. Its fabrication is discussed. Some details on the differences between the as-assembled EDU and the future flight unit are considered.

  20. Design and Assembly of an Integrated Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) Subassembly Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Sebastian A.; Powers, Aaron; Iacomini, Christie S.; Paul, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed for thermal and carbon dioxide (CO2) control for a Portable Life Support System (PLSS), as well as water recycling. The core of the MTSA technology is a sorbent bed that removes CO2 from the PLSS ventilation loop gas via a temperature swing. A Condensing Ice Heat eXchanger (CIHX) is used to warm the sorbent while also removing water from the ventilation loop gas. A Sublimation Heat eXchanger (SHX) is used to cool the sorbent. Research was performed to explore an MTSA designed for both lunar and Martian operations. Previously each the sorbent bed, CIHX, and SHX had been built and tested individually on a scale relevant to PLSS operations, but they had not been done so as an integrated subassembly. Design and analysis of an integrated subassembly was performed based on this prior experience and an updated transient system model. Focus was on optimizing the design for Martian operations, but the design can also be used in lunar operations. An Engineering Development Unit (EDU) of an integrated MTSA subassembly was assembled based on the design. Its fabrication is discussed. Some details on the differences between the as-assembled EDU to the future flight unit are considered.

  1. Experimental study on removal of NO using adsorption of activated carbon/reduction decomposition of microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Shuang-Chen, Ma; Yao, Juan-Juan; Gao, Li

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies were carried out on flue gas denitrification using activated carbon irradiated by microwave. The effects of microwave irradiation power (reaction temperature), the flow rate of flue gas, the concentration of NO and the flue gas coexisting compositions on the adsorption property of activated carbon and denitrification efficiency were investigated. The results show that: the higher of microwave power, the higher of denitrification efficiency; denitrification efficiency would be greater than 99% and adsorption capacity of NO is relatively stable after seven times regeneration if the microwave power is more than 420 W; adsorption capacity of NO in activated carbon bed is 33.24 mg/g when the space velocity reaches 980 per hour; adsorption capacity declines with increasing of the flow rate of flue gas; the change in denitrification efficiency is not obvious with increasing oxygen content in the flue gas; and the maximum adsorption capacity of NO was observed when moisture in flue gas was about 5.88%. However, the removal efficiency of NO reduces with increasing moisture, and adsorption capacity and removal efficiency of NO reduce with increasing of SO2 concentration in the flue gas. PMID:22988643

  2. Bounding Limitations in the Practical Design of Adsorption Heat Pump Water Heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, Moonis Raza; Sharma, Vishaldeep; Gluesenkamp, Kyle R

    2016-01-01

    The boundary temperatures for any sorption-based technology can be estimated on the basis of Trouton s hypothesis that isosteres, extrapolated to infinite pressure (or analogously to infinite temperature) meet at a single point. In this paper we discuss the consequences of this hypothesis for many sorption devices that are thermally operated, suitable for exploiting renewable energy resources, or making better use of high or low level thermal energy. Trouton s hypothesis is independent of the working fluids making it particularly useful to both liquid-vapor and solid-vapor systems. We exemplify the use of the derived boundary temperatures derived from Trouton s hypothesis to important processes such as ice making, space cooling in hot climates, deep freezing, and residential hot water production. The boundary temperatures help determine which sorption or solar heating technology may be better suited to serve the given application, or whether it is beyond the scope of sorption systems.

  3. Electric Adsorption Heat Pump for Electric Vehicles: Electric-Powered Adsorption Heat Pump for Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-21

    HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a new class of advanced nanomaterial called an electrical metal organic framework (EMOF) for EV heating and cooling systems. The EMOF would function similar to a conventional heat pump, which circulates heat or cold to the cabin as needed. However, by directly controlling the EMOF's properties with electricity, the PNNL design is expected to use much less energy than traditional heating and cooling systems. The EMOF-based heat pumps would be light, compact, efficient, and run using virtually no moving parts.

  4. Development of facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers based on equilibrium adsorption cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Masato; Hirose, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Minoru; Thermal management technology Team

    Facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers was developed based on equilibrium adsorption cycles. Adsorption chillers are one of promising systems that can use heat energy efficiently because adsorption chillers can generate cooling energy using relatively low temperature heat energy. Properties of adsorption chillers are determined by heat source temperatures, adsorption/desorption properties of adsorbent, and kinetics such as heat transfer rate and adsorption/desorption rate etc. In our model, dependence of adsorption chiller properties on heat source temperatures was represented using approximated equilibrium adsorption cycles instead of solving conventional time-dependent differential equations for temperature changes. In addition to equilibrium cycle calculations, we calculated time constants for temperature changes as functions of heat source temperatures, which represent differences between equilibrium cycles and real cycles that stemmed from kinetic adsorption processes. We found that the present approximated equilibrium model could calculate properties of adsorption chillers (driving energies, cooling energies, and COP etc.) under various driving conditions quickly and accurately within average errors of 6% compared to experimental data.

  5. ADSORPTION OF OXYGEN BY HEAT-TREATED GRANULAR AND FIBROUS ACTIVATED CARBONS. (R828157)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  6. Analysis of the adsorption process and of desiccant cooling systems: a pseudo- steady-state model for coupled heat and mass transfer. [DESSIM, DESSIM2, DESSIM4

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, R.S.

    1982-12-01

    A computer model to simulate the adiabatic adsorption/desorption process is documented. Developed to predict the performance of desiccant cooling systems, the model has been validated through comparison with experimental data for single-blow adsorption and desorption. A literature review on adsorption analysis, detailed discussions of the adsorption process, and an initial assessment of the potential for performance improvement through advanced component development are included.

  7. Analysis of the adsorption process and of desiccant cooling systems: A pseudo- steady-state model for coupled heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, R. S.

    1982-12-01

    A computer model to simulate the adiabatic adsorption/desorption process is documented. Developed to predict the performance of desiccant cooling systems, the model has been validated through comparison with experimental data for single-blow adsorption and desorption. A literature review on adsorption analysis, detailed discussions of the adsorption process, and an initial assessment of the potential for performance improvement through advanced component development are included.

  8. Adsorption of xenon and krypton on shales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, F. A.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Kramer, F. E.

    1981-01-01

    A method that uses a mass spectrometer as a manometer is employed in the measurement of Xe and Kr adsorption parameters on shales and related samples, where gas partial pressures were lower than 10 to the -11th atm, corresponding adsorption coverages are only small fractions of a monolayer, and Henry's Law behavior is expected and observed. Results show heats of adsorption in the 2-7 kcal/mol range, and Henry constants at 0-25 C of 1 cu cm STP/g per atmosphere are extrapolated. Although the adsorption properties obtained are variable by sample, the range obtained suggests that shales may be capable of an equilibrium adsorption with modern air high enough to account for a significant fraction of the atmospheric inventory of Xe, and perhaps even of Kr. This effect will nevertheless not account for the factor-of-25 defficiency of atmospheric Xe, in comparison with the planetary gas patterns observed in meteorites.

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of adsorption refrigeration cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, B.B.; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    1997-12-31

    High- and mid-temperature waste heat can be recovered by using existing heat pump technologies. However, heat utilization near environmental temperatures still faces technical hurdles. Silica gel-water adsorption cycles have a distinct advantage over other systems in their ability to be driven by near-ambient temperature heat. Waste heat (above 60 C) can be exploited by using conventional silica gel-water adsorption chiller. The advanced silica gel-water adsorption chiller can operate effectively by utilizing low-grade waste heat ({approximately}50 C) as the driving source with a cooling source of 30 C. In this paper, the effect of operating temperatures on cycle performance is discussed from the thermodynamic viewpoint. The temperature effectiveness and the entropy generation number on cycle time are analyzed. For a comparatively short cycle time, adsorber/desorber heat exchanger temperature effectiveness reaches up to 92% after only 200 sec. The entropy generation number N{sub s} is defined by the ratio between irreversibility generated during a cycle and availability of the heat transfer fluid. The result showed that for the advanced adsorption cycle the entropy generation number N{sub s} is smaller for hot water temperature between 45 to 55 C with a cooling source of 30 C, while for the conventional cycle N{sub s} is smaller for hot water temperature between 65 to 75 C /with the same cooling source temperature.

  10. Adsorption Behavior of Nonplanar Phthalocyanines: Competition of Different Adsorption Conformations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Using density functional theory augmented with state-of-the-art van der Waals corrections, we studied the geometric and electronic properties of nonplanar chlorogallium-phthalocyanine GaClPc molecules adsorbed on Cu(111). Comparing these results with published experimental data for adsorption heights, we found indications for breaking of the metal–halogen bond when the molecule is heated during or after the deposition process. Interestingly, the work-function change induced by this dissociated geometry is the same as that computed for an intact adsorbate layer in the “Cl-down” configuration, with both agreeing well with the experimental photoemission data. This is unexpected, as the chemical natures of the adsorbates and the adsorption distances are markedly different in the two cases. The observation is explained as a consequence of Fermi-level pinning due to fractional charge transfer at the interface. Our results show that rationalizing the adsorption configurations on the basis of electronic interface properties alone can be ambiguous and that additional insight from dispersion-corrected DFT simulations is desirable. PMID:27066160

  11. Experimental study of water adsorption on activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Salame, I.I.; Bandosz, T.J. |

    1999-01-19

    Two carbons of different origins (wood and coal) were oxidized with nitric acid. The materials were characterized using sorption of nitrogen. Boehm titration, and potentiometric titration. The water adsorption isotherms were measured at various temperatures close to ambient (relative pressure from 0.001 to 0.3). From these isotherms heats of adsorption were calculated using virial equation. The results showed that the isosteric heats of water adsorption are affected by surface chemical heterogeneity only at low surface coverage. The shapes of heats obtained indicate strong water-water interactions as a result of adsorption on secondary sites and cluster formation. In all cases the limiting heat of adsorption equal to the heat of water condensation (45 kJ/mol) was obtained.

  12. Fundamentals of high pressure adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y.P.; Zhou, L.

    2009-12-15

    High-pressure adsorption attracts research interests following the world's attention to alternative fuels, and it exerts essential effect on the study of hydrogen/methane storage and the development of novel materials addressing to the storage. However, theoretical puzzles in high-pressure adsorption hindered the progress of application studies. Therefore, the present paper addresses the major theoretical problems that challenged researchers: i.e., how to model the isotherms with maximum observed in high-pressure adsorption; what is the adsorption mechanism at high pressures; how do we determine the quantity of absolute adsorption based on experimental data. Ideology and methods to tackle these problems are elucidated, which lead to new insights into the nature of high-pressure adsorption and progress in application studies, for example, in modeling multicomponent adsorption, hydrogen storage, natural gas storage, and coalbed methane enrichment, was achieved.

  13. Extracorporeal adsorption of endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Staubach, K H; Rosenfeldt, J A; Veit, O; Bruch, H P

    1997-02-01

    In a porcine endotoxin shock model using a continuous intravenous endotoxin infusion of 250 ng/kg body weight per hour, the cardiorespiratory and hematologic parameters were studied while applying a new on-line polymyxin B immobilized adsorption system. This preliminary report shows that the new adsorbent can remove endotoxin selectively from the circulation and confers a good amount of protection from endotoxin-induced cardiopulmonary decompensation as well as hematologic alterations. Survival time could be extended from 216 min to 313 min. Whereas cardiac output and mean arterial pressure declined critically after 3 h in the controls, the treated group remained stable for another 3 h. These data show that endotoxin adsorption by polymyxin B coupled covalently to acrylic spheres as an adjunctive on-line measure in the septic syndrome seems feasible. PMID:10225785

  14. A feasible way to remove the heat during adsorptive methane storage.

    PubMed

    Gütlein, Stefan; Burkard, Christoph; Zeilinger, Johannes; Niedermaier, Matthias; Klumpp, Michael; Kolb, Veronika; Jess, Andreas; Etzold, Bastian J M

    2015-01-01

    Methane originating from biogas or natural gas is an attractive and environmentally friendly alternative to gasoline. Adsorption is seen as promising storage technology, but the heat released limits fast filling of these systems. Here a lab scale adsorptive methane storage tank, capable to study the temperature increase during fast filling, was realized. A variation of the filling time from 1 h to 31 s, showed a decrease of the storage capacity of 14% and temperature increase of 39.6 °C. The experimental data could be described in good accordance with a finite element simulation solving the transient mass, energy, and impulse balance. The simulation was further used to extrapolate temperature development in real sized car tanks and for different heat pipe scenarios, resulting in temperature rises of approximately 110 °C. It could be clearly shown, that with heat conductivity as solei mechanism the heat cannot be removed in acceptable time. By adding an outlet to the tank a feed flow cooling with methane as heat carrier was realized. This setup was proofed in simulation and lab scale experiments to be a promising technique for fast adsorbent cooling and can be crucial to leverage the full potential of adsorptive methane gas storage. PMID:25485691

  15. Parametric study of a silica gel-water adsorption refrigeration cycle -- The influence of thermal capacitance and heat exchanger UA-values on cooling capacity, power density, and COP

    SciTech Connect

    Boelman, E.C.; Saha, B.B.; Kashiwagi, Takao

    1997-12-31

    The influence of heat exchanger UA-values (adsorber/desorber, evaporator, and condenser) is investigated for an adsorption chiller, with consideration given to the thermal capacitance of the adsorber/desorber by means of a lumped-parameter cycle simulation model developed by the authors and co-workers for the single-stage silica gel-water adsorption chiller. The closed-cycle-type chiller, for use in air conditioning, is driven by low-grade waste heat (85 C [185 F]) and cooled by water at 31 C (88 F) and operates on relatively short cycle times (420 seconds adsorption/desorption; 30 second adsorber/desorber sensible cooling and heating). The results showed cycle performance to be considerably affected by the thermal capacitance and UA-value of the adsorber/desorber, which is attributed to the severe sensible cooling/heating requirements resulting from batched cycle operation. The model is also sensitive to the evaporator UA-value--but to a lesser extent. The condenser UA-value is the least sensitive parameter due to the working pair adsorption behavior in the temperature range defined for desorption and condensation.

  16. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Equilibrium test was attempted to evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxane. • L2 had higher removal efficiency in carbon compared to noncarbon adsorbents. • Total adsorption capacity of siloxane was 300 mg/g by coal activated carbon. • Adsorption characteristics rely on size of siloxane molecule and adsorbent pore. • Conversion of siloxane was caused by adsorption of noncarbon adsorbents. - Abstract: Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane.

  17. Analysis of the use of adsorption processes in trigeneration systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzebielec, Andrzej; Rusowicz, Artur

    2013-12-01

    The trigeneration systems for production of cold use sorption refrigeration machines: absorption and adsorption types. Absorption systems are characterized namely by better cooling coefficient of performance, while the adsorptive systems are characterized by the ability to operate at lower temperatures. The driving heat source temperature can be as low as 60-70 °C. Such temperature of the driving heat source allows to use them in district heating systems. The article focuses on the presentation of the research results on the adsorption devices designed to work in trigeneration systems.

  18. Random sequential adsorption of tetramers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśla, Michał

    2013-07-01

    Adsorption of a tetramer built of four identical spheres was studied numerically using the random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. Tetramers were adsorbed on a two-dimensional, flat and homogeneous surface. Two different models of the adsorbate were investigated: a rhomboid and a square one; monomer centres were put on vertices of rhomboids and squares, respectively. Numerical simulations allow us to establish the maximal random coverage ratio as well as the available surface function (ASF), which is crucial for determining kinetics of the adsorption process. These results were compared with data obtained experimentally for KfrA plasmid adsorption. Additionally, the density autocorrelation function was measured.

  19. Adsorption behaviour of bulgur.

    PubMed

    Erbaş, Mustafa; Aykın, Elif; Arslan, Sultan; Durak, Atike N

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this research was to determine the adsorption behaviour of bulgur. Three different particle sizes (2of bulgur, purchased from market, were kept in nine different equilibrium levels of relative humidity (8.2-97.3%) at 20, 30 and 40 °C. The data obtained were evaluated using BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) and GAB (Guggenheim, Anderson and deBoer) sorption equations. The equilibrium moisture content of bulgur increased both with decreasing temperature and bulgur size. The constants m0 and C of BET and GAB equations were determined to be between 2.54 and 5.03 g water per 100 g of dry matter and 4.96-16.57, respectively. Constant k was between 0.85 and 0.93, and GAB equation was determined to fit very well for bulgur adsorption, because of %E values lower than 10%. Bulgur must be stored below 70% relative humidity and with less than 10 g water per 100 g of dry mater. PMID:26575716

  20. Adsorption of selected volatile organic vapors on multiwall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yang-hsin; Li, Mei-syue

    2008-06-15

    Carbon nanotubes are expected to play an important role in sensing, pollution treatment and separation techniques. This study examines the adsorption behaviors of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), n-hexane, benzene, trichloroethylene and acetone on two multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), CNT1 and CNT2. Among these VOCs, acetone exhibits the highest adsorption capacity. The highest adsorption enthalpies and desorption energies of acetone were also observed. The strong chemical interactions between acetone and both MWCNTs may be the result from chemisorption on the topological defects. The adsorption heats of trichloroethylene, benzene, and n-hexane are indicative of physisorption on the surfaces of both MWCNTs. CNT2 presents a higher adsorption capacity than CNT1 due to the existence of an exterior amorphous carbon layer on CNT2. The amorphous carbon enhances the adsorption capacity of organic chemicals on carbon nanotubes. The morphological and structure order of carbon nanotubes are the primary affects on the adsorption process of organic chemicals. PMID:17980962

  1. Adsorption of Gases on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbaye, Mamadou Thiao

    This research focus in studying the interaction between various classical and quantum gases with novel carbon nanostructures, mainly carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Since their discovery by the Japanese physicist Sumio Iijima [1] carbon nanotubes have, experimentally and theoretically, been subjected to many scientific investigation. Studies of adsorption on CNTs are particularly directed toward their better usage in gas storage, gas separation, catalyst, drug delivery, and water purification. We explore the adsorption of different gases entrapped in a single, double, or multi-bundles of CNTs using computer simulations. The first system we investigate consists of Ar and Kr films adsorbed on zigzag or armchair nanotubes. Our simulations revealed that Kr atoms on intermediate size zigzag NTs undergo two phase transitions: A liquid-vapor (L→V), and liquid-commensurate (L→CS) with a fractional coverage of one Kr atoms adsorbed for every four carbon atoms. For Ar on zigzag and armchair NTs, the only transition observed is a L→V. In the second problem, we explore the adsorption of CO2 molecules in a nanotube bundle and calculate the isosteric heat of adsorption of the entrapped molecules within the groove. We observed that the lower the temperature, the higher the isosteric of adsorption. Last, we investigate the adsorption of hydrogen, Helium, and Neon gases on the groove site of two parallel nanotubes. At low temperature, the transverse motion on the plane perpendicular to the tubes' axis is frozen out and as a consequence, the heat capacity is reduced to 1/2. At high temperature, the atoms gain more degree of freedom and as a consequence the heat capacity is 5/2.

  2. Effect of moisture on adsorption isotherms and adsorption capacities of CO{sub 2} on coals

    SciTech Connect

    Ekrem Ozdemir; Karl Schroeder

    2009-05-15

    The effect of moisture on the adsorption isotherms and adsorption capacities of CO{sub 2} on Argonne Premium coals has been investigated. In some experiments a small hysteresis was observed between the adsorption and desorption isotherms. The hysteresis was absent or negligible for high-rank and as-received coals but was discernible for lower rank and dried coals. An equation that accounted for the volumetric changes when an adsorbate alters the structure of an adsorbent was employed to interpret the data. The best-fit solutions indicate that the coal volume decreases upon drying. The microscopic shrinkage estimated using helium expansion was greater than the shrinkage reported using the bed-height technique. The microscopic shrinkage was 5-10% for low-moisture medium and high-rank coals and up to 40% for low-rank coals having higher moisture contents. The CO{sub 2} swelling of coals during adsorption isotherm measurements was estimated to be about the same as the shrinkage that occurred during the moisture loss. The adsorption capacity, isosteric heat of adsorption, average pore size, and surface area of the as-received (moist) and dried Argonne coals were estimated after accounting for the volume changes. The isosteric heat of adsorption of CO{sub 2} was found to be between 23 and 25 kJ/mol for as-received coals and between 25 and 27 kJ/mol for dried coals, regardless of the rank. The degree of drying was shown to affect the adsorption capacity and the calculated surface area. For dried coals, the adsorption capacity showed the typical 'U-shape' dependence on rank whereas the as-received coals displayed a more linear dependence. A relationship is proposed to quantify the effect of moisture on the adsorption capacity. The mechanism of CO{sub 2} adsorption on moist coals and the implications of the lower adsorption capacity of wet coals to coal seam sequestration of CO{sub 2} are presented. 70 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Adsorption of polymeric brushes: Bridging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johner, Albert; Joanny, Jean-François

    1992-04-01

    We study the adsorption of grafted polymer layers on a planar surface parallel to the grafting surface. The layer consists of two types of chains: nonadsorbed chains with a free end and adsorbed chains forming bridges between the two plates. In the limit of strong adsorption a dead zone exists in the vicinity of the adsorbing plate; its size increases with the adsorption strength. Two adsorption mechanisms are possible: adsorption of the last monomer only and adsorption of all the monomers. In both cases the adsorption regimes at equilibrium (when no external force acts on the plates) are discussed within the framework of the self-consistent mean-field theory. We also give scaling laws taking into account excluded volume correlations. Finally, we consider situations where a finite external force, either tangential or normal to the plates, is applied on the adsorbing plate. Pulling and tangential forces both reduce the fraction of bridges and eventually lead to rupture, whereas compressional forces favor bridging. For normal forces, force vs distance profiles between planes and crossed cylinders are given.

  4. Adsorption analysis of ammonia in an aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Arman, B.; Panchal, C.B.

    1993-08-01

    An analysis is carried out to determine the effects of the diffusional resistance on the rate of the adsorption of ammonia in an aqueous solution. A performance prediction model is developed to calculate the local rate of heat and mass transfer, including physical and thermodynamic property calculations of the mixture. An algorithm is developed for calculating the interfacial conditions. The local heat- and mass-transfer calculation is then incorporated into the performance prediction method for adsorption for a given geometry.

  5. Conventional and Advanced Silicagel-water Adsorption Cycles Driven by Near - environmental Temperature Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boelman, Elisa; B. Saha, Bidyut; Tanaka, Aiharu; Kashiwagi, Takao

    This work aims at clarifying the possible operating temperature ranges for silica gel-water adsorption refrigeration cycles driven by near-environmental temperature heat sources (between 50°C and 85°C), with relatively small regenerating temperature lifts (10 K to 65 K). A newly developed three stage advanced silica gel-water cycle, which is operational with 50°C driving heat source and 30°C cooling source is introduced and compared with a conventional single stage cycle. The cycles are evaluated in terms of cooling capacity, COP and the viability of operation with near-environmental temperature driving heat sources. The analysis is based on experimental and cycle simulation work. The results showed the advanced three stage cycle to be particularly suited for operation with low grade waste heat driving sources, since it worked with small regenerating temperature lifts (ΔTregen)of 10K to 30K. Another significant advantage of operation with small ΔTregen is the possibility to reduce irreversible heat losses from batched cycle operation. Experiments carried out on full-size machine suggested that, even with smallΔTregen, adsorber /desorber heat exchanger improvements such as higher thermal conductance and smaller heat capacitance can contribute to reduce heat losses while improving cycle performance in terms of cooling capacity and COP.

  6. Adsorption of isopropanol and cyclohexane on zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratchikova, I. G.; Pylinina, A. I.; Platonov, E. A.; Danilova, M. N.; Isaeva, N. Yu.; Yagodovskii, V. D.

    2015-01-01

    Adsorption isotherms of isopropanol and cyclohexane are obtained in the range of 234-303 K on an initial surface of zinc oxide and after its treatment with glow-discharge plasma in O2 and high-frequency plasma in Ar. The values of isosteric heat and adsorption entropy are shown to be only slightly affected by these treatments. It is found that the acidity of the surface increases by 38 and 97%, respectively, and the acidic sites are not adsorption sites for either adsorbate. At low degrees of occupation, the adsorption isotherms of (CH3)2CHOH are described by an equation of induced adsorption whose parameters are dependent on the plasma-chemical treatments. It is concluded that adsorbed isopropanol particles exist in positively and negatively charged forms. The adsorption of cyclohexane is described by the Hill-de Boer equation for the initial ZnO surface, and by the Langmuir equation after plasma-chemical treatments.

  7. Effect of controlled deactivation on the thermochemical characteristics of hydrogen adsorption on skeletal nickel from sodium hydroxide-water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prozorov, D. A.; Lukin, M. V.; Ulitin, M. V.

    2013-04-01

    Differential heats of adsorption in a wide range of surface coverage and maximum amounts of adsorbed hydrogen are determined by adsorption calorimetry on partially deactivated skeletal nickel from aqueous solutions of sodium hydroxide. The effect of the composition of solutions on the values of limiting adsorption and adsorption equilibria of individual forms of hydrogen is shown.

  8. Adsorption of nicotine from aqueous solution onto hydrophobic zeolite type USY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarevic, Natasa; Adnadjevic, Borivoj; Jovanovic, Jelena

    2011-07-01

    The isothermal adsorption of nicotine from an aqueous solution onto zeolite type USY was investigated. The adsorption isotherms of nicotine onto the zeolite at different temperatures ranging from 298 to 322 K were determined. It was found that the adsorption isotherms can be described by the model of Freundlich adsorption isotherm. Based on the adsorption isotherms the changes of adsorption heat, free energy and entropy with adsorption degree were determined. The determined decrease of adsorption heat with adsorption degree can be explained by the presence of the adsorption centers of different energy and concentration on interface of zeolite-nicotine solution. It was found that the probability function of density distribution of the heat of adsorption (DDF) has exponential form. It was concluded that the possibility of fitting the adsorption isotherms of nicotine onto the zeolite by Freundlich adsorption isotherm was a direct consequence of that. The determined increase in entropy with the increase in adsorption degree can be explained with the change of phase state of adsorbed nicotine.

  9. Adsorption properties of. cap alpha. -modification of boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilova, T.B.; Kiselev, A.V.; Parshina, I.V.; Roshchina, T.M.

    1986-11-01

    The adsorption properties of four samples of ..cap alpha..-BN were studied by means of gas chromatography. The particles of ..cap alpha..-BN particles, according to data obtained by electron microscopy, have the shape of thin platelets. A sample of ..cap alpha..-BN prepared from magnesium polyboride was found to be the most nearly homogeneous adsorbent. For a number of n-alkanes, benzene, and alkylbenzenes, data have been obtained on the retention volumes (Henry constants) and the differential heats of adsorption for surface coverages approaching zero. These thermodynamic data on the adsorption showed that ..cap alpha..-BN, like graphitized thermal carbon black, is a nonspecific adsorbent.

  10. Investigation of the synthesis, activation, and isosteric heats of CO2 adsorption of the isostructural series of metal-organic frameworks M3(BTC)2 (M = Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Mo, Ru).

    PubMed

    Wade, Casey R; Dincă, Mircea

    2012-07-14

    The synthesis, activation, and heats of CO(2) adsorption for the known members of the M(3)(BTC)(2) (HKUST-1) isostructural series (M = Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, Ni, Cu, Mo) were investigated to gain insight into the impact of CO(2)-metal interactions for CO(2) storage/separation applications. With the use of modified syntheses and activation procedures, improved BET surface areas were obtained for M = Ni, Mo, and Ru. The zero-coverage isosteric heats of CO(2) adsorption were measured for the Cu, Cr, Ni, Mo, and Ru analogues and gave values consistent with those reported for MOFs containing coordinatively unsaturated metal sites, but lower than for amine functionalized materials. Notably, the Ni and Ru congeners exhibited the highest CO(2) affinities in the studied series. These behaviors were attributed to the presence of residual guest molecules in the case of Ni(3)(BTC)(2)(Me(2)NH)(2)(H(2)O) and the increased charge of the dimetal secondary building unit in [Ru(3)(BTC)(2)][BTC](0.5). PMID:22539456

  11. Adsorption and Gas Separation of Molecules by Carbon Nanohorns.

    PubMed

    Gatica, Silvina M; Nekhai, Anton; Scrivener, Adam

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of Monte Carlo simulations of the adsorption of neon, argon, methane and carbon dioxide in carbon nanohorns. We model the nanohorns as an array of carbon cones and obtained adsorption isotherms and isosteric heats. The main sites of adsorption are inside the cones and in the interstices between three cones. We also calculated the selectivity of carbon dioxide/methane, finding that nanohorns are a suitable substrate for gas separation. Our simulations are compared to available experimental data. PMID:27213313

  12. Synthesis of Ordered Mesoporous Silica for Energy-efficient Adsorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Akira; Komori, Kou; Inagi, Yuki; Fujisaki, Satoko; Yamamoto, Takuji

    Energy-efficient adsorption systems, such as adsorption heat pump, desiccant cooling, humidity control system, and so on, are expected as a energy exchange process because they are able to utilize low temperature exhaust heat. As an adsorbent for such systems, materials with large adsorption capacity in the pressure range of practical operation are preferable. To enable the design and synthesis of materials with large heat storage capacity, the pore structure of adsorbents should be optimized for each systems. In this paper, we synthesized ordered mesoporous silica (MPS) with an arrow pore size distribution of around 2nm by a solvent evaporation method and evaluated their water adsorption properties. The adsorption isotherms for MPSs showed steep increase at a relative humidity corresponding to their pore size. Since MPSs have a large adsorption capacity than conventional materials in the relative humidity region of practical operation, they are expected for new adsorbents for energy-efficient adsorption systems.

  13. Adsorption of Organics from Domestic Water Supplies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Michael J.; Suffet, Irwin H.

    1978-01-01

    This article discusses the current state of the art of organics removal by adsorption. Various theoretical explanations of the adsorption process are given, along with practical results from laboratory, pilot-scale, and full-scale applications. (CS)

  14. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  15. Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption for CO(sub 2) and Heat Removal/Rejection in a Martian PLSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iacomini, Christine; Powers, Aaron; Bowers, Chad; Straub-Lopez, Katie; Anderson, Grant; MacCallum, Taber; Paul, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Two of the fundamental problems facing the development of a Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for use on Mars, are (i) heat rejection (because traditional technologies use sublimation of water, which wastes a scarce resource and contaminates the premises), and (ii) rejection of CO2 in an environment with a ppCO2 of 0.4-0.9 kPa. Patent-pending Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed to address both these challenges. The technology utilizes an adsorbent that when cooled with liquid CO2 to near sublimation temperatures (195K) removes metabolically-produced CO2 in the vent loop. Once fully loaded, the adsorbent is then warmed externally by the vent loop (approx. 300K), rejecting the captured CO2 to Mars ambient. Two beds are used to effect a continuous cycle of CO2 removal/rejection as well as facilitate heat exchange out of the vent loop. Any cryogenic fluid can be used in the application; however, since CO2 is readily available at Mars and can be easily produced and stored on the Martian surface, the solution is rather elegant and less complicated when employing liquid CO2. As some metabolic heat will need to be rejected anyway, finding a practical use for metabolic heat is also an overall benefit to the PLSS. To investigate the feasibility of the technology, a series of experiments was conducted which lead to the selection and partial characterization of an appropriate adsorbent. The adsorbent NaX successfully removed CO2 from a simulated vent loop at the prescribed temperature swing anticipated during PLSS operating conditions on Mars using a cryogenic fluid. Thermal conductivity of the adsorbent was also measured to eventually aid in a demonstrator design of the technology. These results provide no show stoppers to the development of MTSA technology and allow its development to focus on other design challenges as listed in the conclusions.

  16. Linear adsorption of nonionic organic compounds from water onto hydrophilic minerals: Silica and alumina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Su, Y.-H.; Zhu, Y.-G.; Sheng, G.; Chiou, C.T.

    2006-01-01

    To characterize the linear adsorption phenomena in aqueous nonionic organic solute-mineral systems, the adsorption isotherms of some low-molecular- weightnonpolar nonionic solutes (1,2,3-trichlorobenzene, lindane, phenanthrene, and pyrene) and polar nonionic solutes (1,3-dinitrobenzene and 2,4-dinitrotoluene) from single-and binary-solute solutions on hydrophilic silica and alumina were established. Toward this objective, the influences of temperature, ionic strength, and pH on adsorption were also determined. It is found that linear adsorption exhibits low exothermic heats and practically no adsorptive competition. The solute-solid configuration and the adsorptive force consistent with these effects were hypothesized. For nonpolar solutes, the adsorption occurs presumably by London (dispersion) forces onto a water film above the mineral surface. For polar solutes, the adsorption is also assisted by polar-group interactions. The reduced adsorptive forces of solutes with hydrophilic minerals due to physical separation by the water film and the low fractions of the water-film surface covered by solutes offer a theoretical basis for linear solute adsorption, low exothermic heats, and no adsorptive competition. The postulated adsorptive forces are supported by observations that ionic strength or pH poses no effect on the adsorption of nonpolar solutes while it exhibits a significant effect on the uptake of polar solutes. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  17. Studies of gas adsorption in flexible Metal-Organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircar, Sarmishtha

    minutes to >60 hours, and this in turn, led to a ˜300 fold increase in capacity, convergence of capacities at similar reduced temperatures (critical temperature being the reducing parameter), discontinuities in the isotherms, lowering of gate-opening pressures, changes in the isotherm shapes as well as width of hysteresis loops. Although an experimental time effect was also seen for H2 adsorption at 77K, H2 showed no discontinuity in the adsorption isotherm, adsorption-desorption hysteresis was much less pronounced, and equilibration required significantly less time. The significant difference in rates of adsorption by different gases was attributed to an activated configurational diffusion regime in which the diffusing species moves through a corrugated surface potential when the diameter of the adsorbate approaches that of the pore. A concentration-dependent diffusion model coupled with insufficient equilibration time provides an alternate explanation to describe the stepwise adsorption behavior in GO-MOFs and the changes in capacities. A sigmoid shape of adsorption rate data at cryogenic temperatures is atypical of simple Fickian diffusion, suggesting a more complex mechanistic explanation is required to explain adsorption kinetics to GO-MOFs. Extending the unreacted shrinking core model from the field of catalyst deactivation suggests that relaxation will be much faster relative to diffusion when temperature is increased even by just 10K. From a thermodynamic perspective, adsorption isotherms on (2) demonstrate universality when pressure and temperature are scaled/reduced according to those at critical conditions. At similar reduced conditions, isotherms of gases on (2) converged and both capacity and pressure points of discontinuities showed a predictive behavior. Discrete levels of capacities were found which decrease in temperature. Existence of a universal parameter of heat of gate-opening is calculated and the heats of adsorption and structural expansion are

  18. Dye adsorption behavior of Luffa cylindrica fibers.

    PubMed

    Demir, H; Top, A; Balköse, D; Ulkü, S

    2008-05-01

    Using natural Luffa cylindrica fibers as adsorbent removal of methylene blue dye from aqueous solutions at different temperatures and dye concentrations was investigated in this study. Thermodynamics and kinetics of adsorption were also investigated. The adsorption isotherms could be well defined with Langmuir model instead of Freundlich model. The thermodynamic parameters of methylene blue (MB) adsorption indicated that the adsorption is exothermic and spontaneous. The average MB adsorption capacity was found out as 49 mg/g and average BET surface area of fibers was calculated as 123 m(2)/g. PMID:17919814

  19. Adsorption of organic chemicals in soils.

    PubMed Central

    Calvet, R

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a review on adsorption of organic chemicals on soils sediments and their constituents. The first part of this review deals with adsorption from gas and liquid phases and gives a discussion on the physical meaning of the shape of adsorption isotherms. Results show that no general rules can be proposed to describe univocally the relation between the shape of isotherms and the nature of adsorbate-adsorbent system. Kinetics of adsorption is discussed through the description of various models. Theoretical developments exist both for the thermodynamics and the kinetics of adsorption, but there is a strong need for experimental results. Possible adsorption mechanisms are ion exchange, interaction with metallic cations, hydrogen bonds, charge transfers, and London-van der Waals dispersion forces/hydrophobic effect. However, direct proofs of a given mechanism are rare. Several factors influence adsorption behavior. Electronic structure of adsorbed molecules, properties of adsorbents, and characteristics of the liquid phase are discussed in relation to adsorption. Such properties as water solubility, organic carbon content of adsorbing materials, and the composition of the liquid phase are particularly important. Evaluation of adsorption can be obtained through either laboratory measurements or use of several correlations. Adsorption measurements must be interpreted, taking into account treatment of adsorbent materials, experimental conditions, and secondary phenomena such as degradations. Correlations between adsorption coefficients and water-octanol partition coefficient or water solubility are numerous. They may be useful tools for prediction purposes. Relations with transport, bioavailability, and degradation are described. PMID:2695323

  20. Adsorption kinetics of diatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Burde, Jared T; Calbi, M Mercedes

    2014-05-01

    The adsorption dynamics of diatomic molecules on solid surfaces is examined by using a Kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm. Equilibration times at increasing loadings are obtained, and explained based on the elementary processes that lead to the formation of the adsorbed film. The ability of the molecules to change their orientation accelerates the overall uptake and leads to competitive kinetic behaviour between the different orientations. The dependence of the equilibration time on coverage follows the same decreasing trend obtained experimentally for ethane adsorption on closed-end carbon nanotube bundles. The exploration of molecule-molecule interaction effects on this trend provides relevant insights to understand the kinetic behaviour of other species, from simpler molecules to larger polyatomic molecules, adsorbing on surfaces with different binding strength. PMID:24654004

  1. Sub-ambient carbon dioxide adsorption properties of nitrogen doped graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Tamilarasan, P.; Ramaprabhu, Sundara

    2015-04-14

    Carbon dioxide adsorption on carbon surface can be enhanced by doping the surface with heterogeneous atoms, which can increase local surface affinity. This study presents the carbon dioxide adsorption properties of nitrogen doped graphene at low pressures (<100 kPa). Graphene was exposed to nitrogen plasma, which dopes nitrogen atoms into carbon hexagonal lattice, mainly in pyridinic and pyrrolic forms. It is found that nitrogen doping significantly improves the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity at all temperatures, due to the enrichment of local Lewis basic sites. In general, isotherm and thermodynamic parameters suggest that doped nitrogen sites have nearly same adsorption energy of surface defects and residual functional groups. The isosteric heat of adsorption remains in physisorption range, which falls with surface coverage, suggesting the distribution of magnitude of adsorption energy. The absolute values of isosteric heat and entropy of adsorption are slightly increased upon nitrogen doping.

  2. Adsorption of lipase on polypropylene powder.

    PubMed

    Gitlesen, T; Bauer, M; Adlercreutz, P

    1997-04-01

    Adsorption of different lipases by EP-100 polypropylene powder from crude and pure lipase preparations was studied. Langmuir isotherms described the adsorption equilibria well both for protein and lipase activity adsorption. Adsorption isotherms for five different proteins all gave a similar saturation level of 220 mg protein per g carrier. Twelve commercial lipase preparations were tested for selectivity in the adsorption of lipase. For all preparations the selectivity factor was larger than one. In a crude lipase preparation from Pseudomonas fluorescence, the specific activity in solution decreased by two orders of magnitude after adsorption. The adsorption was not significantly influenced by pH changes in the adsorption buffer, indicating that hydrophobic and not electrostatic interactions are the dominating adsorption forces. Adsorption of a crude lipase from Candida rugosa (Sigma) was fast and equilibrium was reached in 30 and 100 min for protein and lipase activity adsorption respectively. Desorption in aqueous solution was negligible. Investigations with seven different lipases showed no correlation between the specific lipolytic activity of dissolved enzyme in aqueous solution and the specific activity of adsorbed enzyme in an esterification reaction in organic solvent. PMID:9106498

  3. Adsorptive properties of flyash carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, U.M.; Rathbone, R.F.; Robl, T.L.

    1996-10-01

    Flyash carbon constitutes the char particles that are left in flyash after the incomplete combustion of coal in the furnace, rendering flyash above spec for ASTM C618 applications for cement. A beneficiation process allows the selective separation of unburned carbon from flyash to be used for upgrading into a higher value product. Flyash carton is composed of several microscopically distinguishable types; inertinite is relatively unreactive in the thermal processing of coal and occurs essentially unaltered in the flyash while {open_quotes}coke{close_quotes} is produced from the melting, devolatilization, swelling and resolidification of the reactive macerals vitrinite and liptinite. The porosity, surface area, and surface chemistry of flyash carbons are characterized using mercury porosimetry, BET analysis, and vapor- and liquid-phase adsorption of various organic compounds. Results suggest that different carbon forms in flyash affect the degree of adsorption of phenols as will as other hydrocarbon pollutants onto the flyash carbon. A comparison of adsorptability of the flyash carbon compared to commercially available active carbons are discussed.

  4. Adsorption of amino acids and glucose by sediments of Resurrection Bay, Alaska, USA: Functional group effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrichs, Susan M.; Sugai, Susan F.

    1993-02-01

    The adsorption of amino acids and glucose was investigated in sediments from Resurrection Bay, Alaska. Adsorption of the basic amino acid lysine was greater than adsorption of glutamic acid, alanine, leucine, or glucose. Formaldehyde and heat treatments were used to separate adsorption from biological uptake, but can alter adsorption significantly; formaldehyde treatment, followed by a seawater rinse, was the most satisfactory. Much of the rapid amino acid adsorption by these sediments was due to the formation of ionic bonds, since adsorbed amino acids could be extracted using concentrated solutions of amino acid, cesium chloride, sodium citrate, ammonium chloride, or sodium acetate. However, most amino acid adsorption was not reversible by ion exchange solutions, indicating that additional processes or chemical reactions occur which result in irreversible binding to sediment. Consistent with literature reports of the negative surface charge of marine particulate matter, lysine (with a net positive charge) was adsorbed to the greatest extent and had the largest cation-exchangeable adsorption. However, negatively charged amino acid functional groups also influenced adsorption. Chemical modification of sediments with reagents reactive with aldehydes decreased lysine adsorption. This suggests that reactive functional groups of sediment organic matter contribute to adsorption, consistent with a melanoidintype reaction. An estimate of the rate of amino acid adsorption indicates that adsorption could produce a significant amount of the total refractory sediment organic nitrogen.

  5. Controlling the adsorption enthalpy of CO(2) in zeolites by framework topology and composition.

    PubMed

    Grajciar, Lukáš; Čejka, Jiří; Zukal, Arnošt; Otero Areán, Carlos; Turnes Palomino, Gemma; Nachtigall, Petr

    2012-10-01

    Zeolites are often investigated as potential adsorbents for CO(2) adsorption and separation. Depending on the zeolite topology and composition (Si/Al ratio and extra-framework cations), the CO(2) adsorption heats at low coverages vary from -20 to -60 kJ mol(-1), and with increasing surface coverage adsorption heats either stay approximately constant or they quickly drop down. Experimental adsorption heats obtained for purely siliceous porous solids and for ion-exchanged zeolites of the structural type MFI, FER, FAU, LTA, TUN, IMF, and -SVR are discussed in light of results of periodic density functional theory calculations corrected for the description of dispersion interactions. Key factors influencing the stability of CO(2) adsorption complexes are identified and discussed at the molecular level. A general model for CO(2) adsorption in zeolites and related materials is proposed and data reported in literature are evaluated with regard to the proposed model. PMID:22887989

  6. REMOVAL OF CESIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY ADSORPTION

    DOEpatents

    Knoll, K.C.

    1963-07-16

    A process of removing microquantities of cesium from aqueous solutions also containing macroquantities of other ions by adsorption on clinoptilolite is described. The invention resides in the pretreatment of the clinoptilolite by heating at 400 deg C and cooling prior to use. (AEC)

  7. Adsorption of octylamine on titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwińska, Daria; Kołodziejczak-Radzimska, Agnieszka; Krysztafkiewicz, Andrzej; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2009-05-01

    Processes of adsorption and desorption of a model active substance (octylamine) on the surface of unmodified titanium dioxide (E 171) have been performed. The effects of concentration of octylamine and time of the process on the character of adsorption have been studied and the efficiency of the adsorption/desorption has been determined. The samples obtained have been studied by X-ray diffraction. The nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, particle size distribution and absorption capacities of water, dibutyl phthalate and paraffin oil have been determined. The efficiency of octylamine adsorption on the surface of the titanium dioxide has been found positively correlated with the concentration of octylamine in the initial solution. The desorption of octylamine has decreased with increasing concentration of this compound adsorbed. For octylamine in low concentrations the physical adsorption has been found to dominate, which is desirable when using TiO 2 in the production of pharmaceuticals.

  8. Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption for CO2 and Heat Removal/Rejection in a Martian PLSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iacomini, Christine; Powers, Aaron; Bower, Chad; Straub-Lopez, Kathrine; Anderson, Grant; MacCallum, Taber; Paul, Heather L.

    2007-01-01

    Two of the fundamental problems facing the development of a Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for use on Mars, are (i) heat rejection (because traditional technologies use sublimation of water, which wastes a scarce resource and contaminates the premises), and (ii) rejection of carbon dioxide (CO2) in an environment with a CO2 partial pressure (ppCO2) of 0.4-0.9 kPa. Patent-pending Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed to address both these challenges. The technology utilizes an adsorbent that when cooled with liquid CO2 to near sublimation temperatures (195K) removes metabolically-produced CO2 in the ventilation loop. Once fully loaded, the adsorbent is then warmed externally by the ventilation loop (300K), rejecting the captured CO2 to Mars ambient. Two beds are used to provide a continuous cycle of CO2 removal/rejection as well as facilitate heat exchange out of the ventilation loop. Any cryogenic fluid can be used in the application; however, since CO2 is readily available on Mars and can be easily produced and stored on the Martian surface, the solution is rather elegant and less complicated when employing liquid CO2. As some metabolic heat will need to be rejected anyway, finding a practical use for metabolic heat is also an overall benefit to the PLSS. To investigate the feasibility of the technology, a series of experiments were conducted which lead to the selection and partial characterization of an appropriate adsorbent. The Molsiv Adsorbents 13X 8x12 (also known as NaX zeolite) successfully removed CO2 from a simulated ventilation loop at the prescribed temperature swing anticipated during PLSS operating conditions on Mars using a cryogenic fluid. Thermal conductivity of the adsorbent was also measured to eventually aid in a demonstrator design of the technology. These results provide no show stoppers to the development of MTSA technology and allow its development to focus on other design

  9. Adsorption of goethite onto quartz and kaolinite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, M.C.; Weiner, Eugene R.; Boymel, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption of colloidal goethite onto quartz and kaolinite substrates has been studied as a function of pH and NaCl concentration. Goethite adsorption was measured quantitatively by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate that adsorption onto both substrates is due primarily to coulombic forces; however, the pH dependence of adsorption is very different for the two substrates. This is explained by the fact that the surface charge on quartz is entirely pH-dependent, while kaolinite has surface faces which carry a permanent negative charge. Adsorption of goethite on to kaolinite increases markedly with increasing NaCl concentration, while adsorption onto quartz is relatively independent of NaCl concentration. This can be explained by the influence of NaCl concentration upon the development of surface charge on the substrates. A method is described for separating surface-bound goethite from free goethite.

  10. Adsorption of organic molecules on silica surface.

    PubMed

    Parida, Sudam K; Dash, Sukalyan; Patel, Sabita; Mishra, B K

    2006-09-13

    The adsorption behaviour of various organic adsorbates on silica surface is reviewed. Most of the structural information on silica is obtained from IR spectral data and from the characteristics of water present at the silica surface. Silica surface is generally embedded with hydroxy groups and ethereal linkages, and hence considered to have a negative charged surface prone to adsorption of electron deficient species. Adsorption isotherms of the adsorbates delineate the nature of binding of the adsorbate with silica. Aromatic compounds are found to involve the pi-cloud in hydrogen bonding with silanol OH group during adsorption. Cationic and nonionic surfactants adsorb on silica surface involving hydrogen bonding. Sometimes, a polar part of the surfactants also contributes to the adsorption process. Styryl pyridinium dyes are found to anchor on silica surface in flat-on position. On modification of the silica by treating with alkali, the adsorption behaviour of cationic surfactant or polyethylene glycol changes due to change in the characteristics of silica or modified silica surface. In case of PEG-modified silica, adsolubilization of the adsorbate is observed. By using a modified adsorption equation, hemimicellization is proposed for these dyes. Adsorptions of some natural macromolecules like proteins and nucleic acids are investigated to study the hydrophobic and hydrophilic binding sites of silica. Artificial macromolecules like synthetic polymers are found to be adsorbed on silica surface due to the interaction of the multifunctional groups of the polymers with silanols. Preferential adsorption of polar adsorbates is observed in case of adsorbate mixtures. When surfactant mixtures are considered to study competitive adsorption on silica surface, critical micelle concentration of individual surfactant also contributes to the adsorption isotherm. The structural study of adsorbed surface and the thermodynamics of adsorption are given some importance in this review

  11. Volumetric interpretation of protein adsorption kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnthip, Naris

    Protein adsorption is believed to be a very important factor ultimately leading to a predictive basis for biomaterials design and improving biocompatibility. Standard adsorption theories are modified to accommodate experimental observations. Adsorption from single-protein solutions and competitive adsorption from binary solutions are mainly considered. The standard solution-depletion method of measuring protein adsorption is implemented with SDS-gel electrophoresis as a multiplexing, separation-and-quantification tool to measure protein adsorption to hydrophobic octyl sepharose (OS) adsorbent particles. Standard radiometric methods have also been used as a further check on the electrophoresis method mentioned above for purified-protein cases. Experimental results are interpreted in terms of an alternative kinetic model called volumetric interpretation of protein adsorption. A partitioning process between bulk solution and a three-dimensional interphase region that separates bulk solution from the physical adsorbent surface is the concept of the model. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into an inflating interphase that is spontaneously formed by bringing a protein solution into contact with a physical surface, then follows by rearrangement of proteins within this interphase to achieve the maximum interphase concentration (dictated by energetics of interphase dehydration) within the thinnest (lowest volume) interphase possible. An important role of water in protein adsorption is emphasized and supported by this model. The fundamental aspects including the reversibility/irreversibility of protein adsorption, the multilayer adsorption, the applicability of thermodynamic/computational models, the capacity of protein adsorption, and the mechanism of so called Vroman effect are discussed and compared to the conventional theories. Superhydrophobic effect on the adsorption of human serum albumin is also examined.

  12. Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

  13. Adsorption interactions of humic acids with biocides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mal'Tseva, E. V.; Ivanov, A. A.; Yudina, N. V.

    2009-11-01

    The chemical composition of humic acids from brown coal (Aldrich) was determined by element analysis, 13C NMR spectroscopy, and potentiometric titration. The adsorption ability of humic acids with different biocides (cyproconasol, propiconasol, tebuconasol, irgarol 1051, and DCOIT) was studied. The adsorption ability of a mixture of biocides in aqueous solutions was higher than that of the individual components. The limiting concentration of humic acids at which adsorption of biocides was maximum was determined. Adsorption constants were calculated by the Freundlich equation for each biocide in aqueous solution.

  14. Adsorption and isotopic fractionation of Xe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical description of the mechanisms of isotopic fractionation arising during adsorption of noble gases in a Henry's Law pressure regime is given. Experimental data on the isotopic composition of Xe adsorbed on activated charcoal in the temperature range 220 K to 350 K are presented. Both theoretical considerations and the experimental data indicate that equilibrium adsorption does not significantly alter the isotopic structure of adsorbed structure of adsorbed noble gases. Therefore, if adsorption is responsible for the elemental noble gas pattern in meteorites and the earth, the heavy noble gas isotopic fractionation between them must have been produced prior to and by a different process than equilibrium adsorption.

  15. Adsorption of phenol on wood surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamleeva, N. A.; Lunin, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption of phenol on aspen and pine wood is investigated. It is shown that adsorption isotherms are described by the Langmuir model. The woods' specific surface areas and adsorption interaction constants are determined. It is found that the sorption of phenol on surfaces of aspen and pine is due to Van der Waals interactions ( S sp = 45 m2/godw for aspen and 85 m2/godw for pine). The difference between the adsorption characteristics is explained by properties of the wood samples' microstructures.

  16. Enthalpy of adsorption and isotherms for adsorption of naphthenic acid onto clays

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, L.; Han, B.; Yan, H.; Kasperski, K.L.; Xu, Y.; Hepler, L.G.

    1997-06-15

    The enthalpies of adsorption and the isotherms for adsorption of naphthenic acid onto Na-montmorillonite, Na-kaolinite, and Na-illite were studied by means of calorimetry and the static method at 298.15 K. The results show that the enthalpies of adsorption and saturated adsorption amounts of naphthenic acid on different clays change in the order Na-montmorillonite > Na-illite > Na-kaolinite. The interaction between naphthenic acid and clays is discussed.

  17. Adsorption of radon and water vapor on commercial activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, N.M.; Ghosh, T.K.; Hines, A.L.; Loyalka, S.K.

    1995-02-01

    Equilibrium adsorption isotherms are reported for radon and water vapor on two commercial activated carbons: coconut shell Type PCB and hardwood Type BD. The isotherms of the water vapor were measured gravimetrically at 298 K. The isotherms of radon from dry nitrogen were obtained at 293, 298, and 308 K while the data for the mixture of radon and water vapor were measured at 298 K. The concentrations of radon in the gas and solid phases were measured simultaneously, once the adsorption equilibrium and the radioactive equilibrium between the radon and its daughter products were established. The shape of the isotherms was of Type III for the radon and Type V for the water vapor, according to Brunauer`s classification. The adsorption mechanism was similar for both the radon and the water vapor, being physical adsorption on the macropore surface area in the low pressure region and micropore filling near saturation pressure. The uptake capacity of radon decreased both with increasing temperature and relative humidity. The heat of adsorption data indicated that the PCB- and the BD-activated carbons provided a heterogeneous surface for radon adsorption. The equilibrium data for radon were correlated with a modified Freundlich equation.

  18. Adsorption Refrigeration System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kai; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption refrigeration is an environmentally friendly cooling technology which could be driven by recovered waste heat or low-grade heat such as solar energy. In comparison with absorption system, an adsorption system has no problems such as corrosion at high temperature and salt crystallization. In comparison with vapor compression refrigeration system, it has the advantages of simple control, no moving parts and less noise. This paper introduces the basic theory of adsorption cycle as well as the advanced adsorption cycles such as heat and mass recovery cycle, thermal wave cycle and convection thermal wave cycle. The types, characteristics, advantages and drawbacks of different adsorbents used in adsorption refrigeration systems are also summarized. This article will increase the awareness of this emerging cooling technology among the HVAC engineers and help them select appropriate adsorption systems in energy-efficient building design.

  19. Ion Exchange and Adsorption of Inorganic Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the first part of the chapter, the fundamentals of ion exchange and adsorption processes are explained, with the goal of demonstrating how these principles influence process design for inorganic contaminant removal. In the second part, ion exchange and adsorption processes th...

  20. Adsorption of pyridine by combusted oil shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essington, M. E.

    1992-03-01

    Large volumes of solid waste material will be produced during the commercial production of shale oil. An alternative to the disposal of the solid waste product is utilization. One potential use of spent oil shale is for the stabilization of hazardous organic compounds. The objective of this study was to examine the adsorption of pyridine, commonly found in oil shale process water, by spent oil shale. The adsorption of pyridine by fresh and weathered samples of combusted New Albany Shale and Green River Formation oil shale was examined. In general, pyridine adsorption can be classified as L-type and the isotherms modeled with the Langmuir and Freundlich equations. For the combusted New Albany Shale, weathering reduced the predicted pyridine adsorption maximum and increased the amount of pyridine adsorbed at low solution concentrations. For the combusted Green River Formation oil shales, weathering increased the predicted pyridine adsorption maximum. The pyridine adsorption isotherms were similar to those produced for a combusted Australian oil shale. Although adsorption can be mathematically described by empirical models, the reduction in solution concentrations of pyridine was generally less than 10 mg/l at an initial concentration of 100 mg/l. Clearly, the observed reduction in solution pyridine concentrations does not sufficiently justify using spent oil shale as a stabilizing medium. However, data in the literature suggest that other organic compounds can be effectively removed from solution by spent oil shale and that adsorption is dependent on process conditions and organic compound type.

  1. Experimental investigation of an advanced adsorption refrigeration cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, B.B.; Kashiwagi, Takao

    1997-12-31

    Experimental measurements are made for a silica gel-water advanced absorption refrigeration chiller (1.2-kW [4,095-Btu/h] cooling capacity) to evaluate its performance under different temperature and adsorption/desorption cycle time conditions. This paper describes the operating principle of the chiller, outlines the experimental hardware, and discusses results obtained by varying the cooling and hot water inlet temperatures and adsorption/desorption cycle times, as well as their agreement with the simulated results given by a lumped parameter model. The chiller performance is analyzed in terms of cooling capacity and coefficient of performance (COP). Excellent qualitative agreement was obtained between the experimental data and simulated results. The results showed the advanced three-stage cycle to be particularly well suited for operation with low-grade-temperature waste heat as the driving source, since it worked with small regenerating temperature lifts (heat source-heat sink temperature) of 10 to 30 K.

  2. Study of water adsorption on activated carbons with different degrees of surface oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Salame, I.I.; Bandosz, T.J. |

    1999-02-15

    A carbon of wood origin was oxidized with different oxidizing agents (nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonium persulfate). The microstructural properties of the starting material and the oxidized samples were characterized using sorption of nitrogen. The surface acidity was determined using Boehm titration and potentiometric titration. The changes in the surface chemistry were also studied by diffuse reflectance FTIR. Water adsorption isotherms were measured at three different temperatures close to ambient (relative pressure from 0.001 to 0.3). From the isotherms the heats of adsorption were calculated using a virial equation. The results indicated that the isosteric heats of water adsorption are affected by the surface heterogeneity only at low surface coverage. In all cases the limiting heat of adsorption was equal to the heat of water condensation (45 kJ/mol).

  3. The influence of protein aggregation on adsorption kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovner, Joel; Roberts, Christopher; Furst, Eric; Hudson, Steven

    2015-03-01

    When proteins adsorb to an air-water interface they lower the surface tension and may form an age-dependent viscoelastic film. Protein adsorption to surfaces is relevant to both commercial uses and biological function. The rate at which the surface tension decreases depends strongly on temperature, solution pH, and protein structure. These kinetics also depend on the degree to which the protein is aggregated in solution. Here we explore these differences using Chymotrypsinogen as a model protein whose degree of aggregation is adjusted through controlled heat treatment and measured by chromatography. To study these effects we have used a micropipette tensiometer to produce a spherical-cap bubble whose interfacial pressure was controlled - either steady or oscillating. Short heat treatment produced small soluble aggregates, and these adsorbed faster than the original protein monomer. Longer heat treatment produced somewhat larger soluble aggregates which adsorbed more slowly. These results point to complex interactions during protein adsorption.

  4. Optimization of adsorption processes for climate control and thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, S; Yang, S; Kim, H; Wang, EN

    2014-10-01

    Adsorption based heat-pumps have received significant interest owing to their promise of higher efficiencies and energy savings when coupled with waste heat and solar energy compared to conventional heating and cooling systems. While adsorption systems have been widely studied through computational analysis and experiments, general design guidelines to enhance their overall performance have not been proposed. In this work, we identified conditions suitable for the maximum utilization of the adsorbent to enhance the performance of both intermittent as well as continuously operating adsorption systems. A detailed computational model was developed based on a general framework governing adsorption dynamics in a single adsorption layer and pellet. We then validated the computational analysis using experiments with a model system of zeolite 13X-water for different operating conditions. A dimensional analysis was subsequently carried out to optimize adsorption performance for any desired operating condition, which is determined by the choice of adsorbent-vapor pair, adsorption duration, operational pressure, intercrystalline porosity, adsorbent crystal size, and intracrystalline vapor diffusivity. The scaling analysis identifies the critical dimensionless parameters and provides a simple guideline to determine the most suitable geometry for the adsorbent particles. Based on this selection criterion, the computational model was used to demonstrate maximum utilization of the adsorbent for any given operational condition. By considering a wide range of parametric variations for performance optimization, these results offer important insights for designing adsorption beds for heating and cooling systems. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Moisture adsorption isotherms and glass transition temperature of pectin.

    PubMed

    Basu, Santanu; Shivhare, U S; Muley, S

    2013-06-01

    The moisture adsorption isotherms of low methoxyl pectin were determined at 30-70°C and water activity ranging from 0.11 to 0.94. The moisture adsorption isotherms revealed that the equilibrium moisture content increased with water activity. Increase in temperature, in general, resulted in decreased equilibrium moisture content. However in some cases, equilibrium moisture content values increased with temperature at higher water activities. Selected sorption models (GAB, Halsey, Henderson, Oswin, modified Oswin) were tested for describing the adsorption isotherms. Parameters of each sorption models were determined by nonlinear regression analysis. Oswin model gave the best fit for pectin sorption behaviour. Isosteric heat of sorption decreased with increase in moisture content and varied between 14.607 and 0.552 kJ/mol. Glass transition temperature decreased with increase in moisture content of pectin. PMID:24425957

  6. Characterization of Adsorption Enthalpy of Novel Water-Stable Zeolites and Metal-Organic Frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunho; Cho, H. Jeremy; Narayanan, Shankar; Yang, Sungwoo; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Schiffres, Scott; Li, Xiansen; Zhang, Yue-Biao; Jiang, Juncong; Yaghi, Omar M.; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2016-01-01

    Water adsorption is becoming increasingly important for many applications including thermal energy storage, desalination, and water harvesting. To develop such applications, it is essential to understand both adsorbent-adsorbate and adsorbate-adsorbate interactions, and also the energy required for adsorption/desorption processes of porous material-adsorbate systems, such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). In this study, we present a technique to characterize the enthalpy of adsorption/desorption of zeolites and MOF-801 with water as an adsorbate by conducting desorption experiments with conventional differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). With this method, the enthalpies of adsorption of previously uncharacterized adsorbents were estimated as a function of both uptake and temperature. Our characterizations indicate that the adsorption enthalpies of type I zeolites can increase to greater than twice the latent heat whereas adsorption enthalpies of MOF-801 are nearly constant for a wide range of vapor uptakes. PMID:26796523

  7. Characterization of Adsorption Enthalpy of Novel Water-Stable Zeolites and Metal-Organic Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunho; Cho, H. Jeremy; Narayanan, Shankar; Yang, Sungwoo; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Schiffres, Scott; Li, Xiansen; Zhang, Yue-Biao; Jiang, Juncong; Yaghi, Omar M.; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2016-01-01

    Water adsorption is becoming increasingly important for many applications including thermal energy storage, desalination, and water harvesting. To develop such applications, it is essential to understand both adsorbent-adsorbate and adsorbate-adsorbate interactions, and also the energy required for adsorption/desorption processes of porous material-adsorbate systems, such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). In this study, we present a technique to characterize the enthalpy of adsorption/desorption of zeolites and MOF-801 with water as an adsorbate by conducting desorption experiments with conventional differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). With this method, the enthalpies of adsorption of previously uncharacterized adsorbents were estimated as a function of both uptake and temperature. Our characterizations indicate that the adsorption enthalpies of type I zeolites can increase to greater than twice the latent heat whereas adsorption enthalpies of MOF-801 are nearly constant for a wide range of vapor uptakes.

  8. Characterization of Adsorption Enthalpy of Novel Water-Stable Zeolites and Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunho; Cho, H Jeremy; Narayanan, Shankar; Yang, Sungwoo; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Schiffres, Scott; Li, Xiansen; Zhang, Yue-Biao; Jiang, Juncong; Yaghi, Omar M; Wang, Evelyn N

    2016-01-01

    Water adsorption is becoming increasingly important for many applications including thermal energy storage, desalination, and water harvesting. To develop such applications, it is essential to understand both adsorbent-adsorbate and adsorbate-adsorbate interactions, and also the energy required for adsorption/desorption processes of porous material-adsorbate systems, such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). In this study, we present a technique to characterize the enthalpy of adsorption/desorption of zeolites and MOF-801 with water as an adsorbate by conducting desorption experiments with conventional differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). With this method, the enthalpies of adsorption of previously uncharacterized adsorbents were estimated as a function of both uptake and temperature. Our characterizations indicate that the adsorption enthalpies of type I zeolites can increase to greater than twice the latent heat whereas adsorption enthalpies of MOF-801 are nearly constant for a wide range of vapor uptakes. PMID:26796523

  9. Adsorption of lead over Graphite Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Olanipekun, Opeyemi; Oyefusi, Adebola; Neelgund, Gururaj M.; Oki, Aderemi

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption efficiency and kinetics of removal of lead in presence of graphite oxide (GO) was determined using the Atomic Absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). The GO was prepared by the chemical oxidation of graphite and characterized using FTIR, SEM, TGA and XRD. The adsorption efficiency of GO for the solution containing 50, 100 and 150 ppm of Pb2+ was found to be 98, 91 and 71% respectively. The adsorption ability of GO was found to be higher than graphite. Therefore, the oxidation of activated carbon in removal of heavy metals may be a viable option to reduce pollution in portable water. PMID:24152870

  10. On the physical adsorption of vapors by microporous carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, R.H. . Inst. of Surface Science and Technology); Rand, B. . Division of Ceramics)

    1995-01-01

    The physical adsorption of nonpolar and polar vapors by active carbons is discussed in relation to pore structure and pore wall chemistry. For nonpolar vapors the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation is used to derive micropore volumes (W[sub 0]), average adsorption energies (E[sub 0]), and micropore widths (L) for a number of systems. These parameters are used to interpret the adsorption behavior of nitrogen which, because it is a relatively small molecule, is frequently used at 77 K to probe porosity and surface area. Results are presented for three carbons from differing precursors, namely, coal, coconut shells, and polyvinylidene chloride (PVDC) to illustrate the applicability of the technique. For the latter carbon increases in micropore size, induced by activation in carbon dioxide, and reductions in accessible pore volume caused by heat treatment in argon are also characterized and related to structural changes. The approach is then extended to the adsorption of larger hydrogen vapors, where the resulting W[sub 0] values may require correction for molecular packing effects which occur in the lower relative pressure regions of the isotherms, i.e., during the filling of ultramicropores. These packing effects are shown to limit the use of the Polanyi characteristic curve for correlating isotherm data for several vapors, of differing molecular size, by one adsorbent. Data for the adsorption of water, which is a strongly polar liquid, have been interpreted using the Dubinin-Serpinsky equation.

  11. Equilibrium study of single-solute adsorption of anionic surfactants with polymeric XAD resins

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Delgado, R.A.; Cotoruelo-Minguez, L.M.; Rodriguez, J.J. )

    1992-06-01

    Equilibrium data for the adsorption of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) from aqueous solutions by Amberlite XAD-4 and XAD-7 polymeric resins at temperatures in the 10-40C range have been obtained. The specific surface area of the resins plays a major role in adsorption, and thus the best results have been obtained with XAD-4 resin. A higher adsorption of SDBS over SLS was also observed. Several adsorption isotherm models have been used to fit the experimental data. The best results have been obtained with the Redlich-Peterson and Langmuir-Freundlich equations. Estimations of the isosteric heat of adsorption, free energy, and entropy of adsorption are also reported.

  12. Adsorption of ciprofloxacin on surface-modified carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Carabineiro, S A C; Thavorn-Amornsri, T; Pereira, M F R; Figueiredo, J L

    2011-10-01

    The adsorption capacity of ciprofloxacin (CPX) was determined on three types of carbon-based materials: activated carbon (commercial sample), carbon nanotubes (commercial multi-walled carbon nanotubes) and carbon xerogel (prepared by the resorcinol/formaldehyde approach at pH 6.0). These materials were used as received/prepared and functionalised through oxidation with nitric acid. The oxidised materials were then heat treated under inert atmosphere (N2) at different temperatures (between 350 and 900°C). The obtained samples were characterised by adsorption of N2 at -196 °C, determination of the point of zero charge and by temperature programmed desorption. High adsorption capacities ranging from approximately 60 to 300 mgCPxgC(-1) were obtained (for oxidised carbon xerogel, and oxidised thermally treated activated carbon Norit ROX 8.0, respectively). In general, it was found that the nitric acid treatment of samples has a detrimental effect in adsorption capacity, whereas thermal treatments, especially at 900 °C after oxidation, enhance adsorption performance. This is due to the positive effect of the surface basicity. The kinetic curves obtained were fitted using 1st or 2nd order models, and the Langmuir and Freundlich models were used to describe the equilibrium isotherms obtained. The 2nd order and the Langmuir models, respectively, were shown to present the best fittings. PMID:21733541

  13. Studies of gas adsorption in flexible Metal-Organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircar, Sarmishtha

    minutes to >60 hours, and this in turn, led to a ˜300 fold increase in capacity, convergence of capacities at similar reduced temperatures (critical temperature being the reducing parameter), discontinuities in the isotherms, lowering of gate-opening pressures, changes in the isotherm shapes as well as width of hysteresis loops. Although an experimental time effect was also seen for H2 adsorption at 77K, H2 showed no discontinuity in the adsorption isotherm, adsorption-desorption hysteresis was much less pronounced, and equilibration required significantly less time. The significant difference in rates of adsorption by different gases was attributed to an activated configurational diffusion regime in which the diffusing species moves through a corrugated surface potential when the diameter of the adsorbate approaches that of the pore. A concentration-dependent diffusion model coupled with insufficient equilibration time provides an alternate explanation to describe the stepwise adsorption behavior in GO-MOFs and the changes in capacities. A sigmoid shape of adsorption rate data at cryogenic temperatures is atypical of simple Fickian diffusion, suggesting a more complex mechanistic explanation is required to explain adsorption kinetics to GO-MOFs. Extending the unreacted shrinking core model from the field of catalyst deactivation suggests that relaxation will be much faster relative to diffusion when temperature is increased even by just 10K. From a thermodynamic perspective, adsorption isotherms on (2) demonstrate universality when pressure and temperature are scaled/reduced according to those at critical conditions. At similar reduced conditions, isotherms of gases on (2) converged and both capacity and pressure points of discontinuities showed a predictive behavior. Discrete levels of capacities were found which decrease in temperature. Existence of a universal parameter of heat of gate-opening is calculated and the heats of adsorption and structural expansion are

  14. Adsorption equilibria of chlorinated organic solvents onto activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, J.H.; Choi, D.K.; Kim, S.H.

    1998-04-01

    Adsorption equilibria of dichloromethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and trichloroethylene on activated carbon were obtained by a static volumetric technique. Isotherms were measured for the pure vapors in the temperature range from 283 to 363 K and pressures up to 60 kPa for dichloromethane, 16 kPa for 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and 7 kPa for trichloroethylene, respectively. The Toth and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations were used to correlate experimental isotherms. Thermodynamic properties such as the isosteric heat of adsorption and the henry`s constant were calculated. It was found that the values of isosteric heat of adsorption were varied with surface loading. Also, the Henry`s constant showed that the order of adsorption affinity is 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and dichloromethane. By employing the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation, the limiting volume of the adsorbed space, which equals micropore volume, was determined, and its value was found to be approximately independent of adsorbates.

  15. Characterisation of protein adsorption on different liquid crystal phthalocyaninethin films.

    PubMed

    Paul, S; Paul, D; Basova, T; Ray, A K

    2010-03-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein adsorption on thin spun films of different metal octakishexylthiophthalocyanine [(C(6)S)(8)PcM, M=Cu, Ni] derivatives is investigated by using three independent spectroscopic measurements namely Raman spectroscopy, ellipsometry and surface plasmon resonance imaging. Thermally induced molecular self-reorganisations in the phthalocyanine films are found to have produced the changes in the surface energy which, in turn, control protein adsorption. The amount of BSA adsorption on [(C(6)S)(8)PcNi] is more limited than that on [(C(6)S)(8)PcCu] and this observation is consistent with the results on the surface wettability obtained from the contact angle measurements. The shift from the plasmonic resonance wavelength because of the BSA adsorption was significantly larger for the heat-treated [(C(6)S)(8)PcCu] than as-deposited film. Similar measurements on the [(C(6)S)(8)PcNi] films showed a limited BSA adsorption. The results of surface plasmon resonance experiments are consistent with those obtained from Raman spectroscopic and ellipsometric techniques. PMID:20170253

  16. Adsorption affinity of anions on metal oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechenyuk, S. I.; Semushina, Yu. P.; Kuz'mich, L. F.

    2013-03-01

    The dependences of anion (phosphate, carbonate, sulfate, chromate, oxalate, tartrate, and citrate) adsorption affinity anions from geometric characteristics, acid-base properties, and complex forming ability are generalized. It is shown that adsorption depends on the nature of both the anions and the ionic medium and adsorbent. It is established that anions are generally grouped into the following series of adsorption affinity reduction: PO{4/3-}, CO{3/2-} > C2O{4/2-}, C(OH)(CH2)2(COO){3/3-}, (CHOH)2(COO){2/2-} > CrO{4/2-} ≫ SO{4/2-}.

  17. Random sequential adsorption of trimers and hexamers.

    PubMed

    Cieśla, Michał; Barbasz, Jakub

    2013-12-01

    Adsorption of trimers and hexamers built of identical spheres was studied numerically using the random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. Particles were adsorbed on a two-dimensional, flat and homogeneous surface. Numerical simulations allowed us to determine the maximal random coverage ratio, RSA kinetics as well as the available surface function (ASF), which is crucial for determining the kinetics of the adsorption process obtained experimentally. Additionally, the density autocorrelation function was measured. All the results were compared with previous results obtained for spheres, dimers and tetramers. PMID:24193213

  18. Ethane adsorption on aggregates of dahlia-like nanohorns: experiments and computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Russell, Brice A; Migone, Aldo D; Petucci, Justin; Mercedes Calbi, M; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio

    2016-06-01

    This is a report on a study of the adsorption characteristics of ethane on aggregates of unopened dahlia-like carbon nanohorns. This sorbent presents two main groups of adsorption sites: the outside surface of individual nanohorns and deep, interstitial spaces between neighbouring nanohorns towards the interior of the aggregates. We have explored the equilibrium properties of the adsorbed ethane films by determining the adsorption isotherms and isosteric heat of adsorption. Computer simulations performed on different model structures indicate that the majority of ethane adsorption occurs on the outer region of the aggregates, near the ends of the nanohorns. We have also measured the kinetics of adsorption of ethane on this sorbent. The measurements and simulations were conducted along several isotherms spanning the range between 120 K and 220 K. PMID:27218414

  19. Arsenic Adsorption Equilibrium Concentration and Adsorption Rate of Activated Carbon Coated with Ferric-Aluminum Hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Oguma, T.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In some areas of developing countries, ground or well water contaminated with arsenic has been reluctantly used as drinking water. It is highly desirable that effective and inexpensive arsenic removal agents should be developed and provided to reduce the potential health risk. Previous studies demonstrated that activated carbon coated with ferric-aluminum hydroxides (Fe-Al-C) has high adsorptive potential for removal of arsenic. In this study, a series of experiments using Fe-Al-C were carried to discuss adsorption equilibrium time, adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorption rate of arsenic for Fe-Al-C. Fe-Al-C used in this study was provided by Astec Co., Ltd. Powder reagent of disodium hydrogen arsenate heptahydrate was dissolved into ion-exchanged water. The solution was then further diluted with ion-exchanged water to be 1 and 10 mg/L as arsenic concentration. The pH of the solution was adjusted to be around 7 by adding HCl and/or NaOH. The solution was used as artificial arsenic contaminated water in two types of experiments (arsenic adsorption equilibrium and arsenic adsorption rate tests). The results of the arsenic equilibrium tests were showed that a time period of about 3 days to reach apparent adsorption equilibrium for arsenic. The apparent adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorbed amount of arsenic on Fe-Al-C adsorbent could be estimated by application of various adsorption isotherms, but the distribution coefficient of arsenic between solid and liquid varies with experimental conditions such as initial concentration of arsenic and addition concentration of adsorbent. An adsorption rate equation that takes into account the reduction in the number of effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent caused by the arsenic adsorption reaction was derived based on the data obtained from the arsenic adsorption rate tests.

  20. ADSORPTION OF ORGANIC CATIONS TO SOILS AND SUBSURFACE MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study of the fundamentals of adsorption of amphiphilic organic cations on natural and pristine surfaces was conducted to elucidate (i) the factors that influence the extent of adsorption and (ii) indirect effects of adsorption of organic cations: the competitive adsorption of o...

  1. Adsorption of nisin and pediocin on nanoclays.

    PubMed

    Meira, Stela Maris Meister; Jardim, Arthur Izé; Brandelli, Adriano

    2015-12-01

    Three different nanoclays (bentonite, octadecylamine-modified montmorillonite and halloysite) were studied as potential carriers for the antimicrobial peptides nisin and pediocin. Adsorption occurred from peptide solutions in contact with nanoclays at room temperature. Higher adsorption of nisin and pediocin was obtained on bentonite. The antimicrobial activity of the resultant bacteriocin-nanoclay systems was analyzed using skimmed milk agar as food simulant and the largest inhibition zones were observed against Gram-positive bacteria for halloysite samples. Bacteriocins were intercalated into the interlayer space of montmorillonites as deduced from the increase of the basal spacing measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) assay. Infrared spectroscopy suggested non-electrostatic interactions, such as hydrogen bonding between siloxane groups from clays and peptide molecules. Transmission electron microscopy did not show any alteration in morphologies after adsorption of antimicrobial peptides on bentonite and halloysite. These results indicate that nanoclays, especially halloysite, are suitable nanocarriers for nisin and pediocin adsorption. PMID:26041178

  2. Adsorption of sulfur dioxide by native clinoptilolite

    SciTech Connect

    Merkun, I.I.; Kel'tsev, N.V.; Bratchuk, F.N.; Rogovik, M.I.

    1982-11-10

    The purpose of the present work was to study the adsorption capacity of the little-studied native clinoptilolite from Beregovo in the Zakarpatskaya region (Ruthenia) for sulfur dioxide. Adsorption of SO/sub 2/ under analogous conditions by Patrick's silica gel, prepared by us by a known method, was studied for comparison. Results indicated that native clinoptilolite studied has much higher adsorption capacity than Patrick's silica gel for sulfur dioxide in the temperature range studied. The adsorption capacity of this zeolite alters little with increase of temperature in the range 25-75/sup 0/. It is considered that native clinoptilolite can be used for removing sulfur dioxide from waste gases in the temperature and pressure ranges studied.

  3. Zeolite Y adsorbents with high vapor uptake capacity and robust cycling stability for potential applications in advanced adsorption heat pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Li, XS; Narayanan, S; Michaelis, VK; Ong, TC; Keeler, EG; Kim, H; Mckay, IS; Griffin, RG; Wang, EN

    2015-01-01

    Modular and compact adsorption heat pumps (AHPs) promise an energy-efficient alternative to conventional vapor compression based heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. A key element in the advancement of AHPs is the development of adsorbents with high uptake capacity, fast intracrystalline diffusivity and durable hydrothermal stability. Herein, the ion exchange of NaY zeolites with ingoing Mg2+ ions is systematically studied to maximize the ion exchange degree (IED) for improved sorption performance. It is found that beyond an ion exchange threshold of 64.1%, deeper ion exchange does not benefit water uptake capacity or characteristic adsorption energy, but does enhance the vapor diffusivity. In addition to using water as an adsorbate, the uptake properties of Mg, Na-Y zeolites were investigated using 20 wt.% MeOH aqueous solution as a novel anti-freeze adsorbate, revealing that the MeOH additive has an insignificant influence on the overall sorption performance. We also demonstrated that the lab-scale synthetic scalability is robust, and that the tailored zeolites scarcely suffer from hydrothermal stability even after successive 108-fold adsorption/desorption cycles. The samples were analyzed using N-2 sorption, Al-27/Si-29 MAS NMR spectroscopy, ICP-AES, dynamic vapor sorption, SEM, Fick's 2nd law and D-R equation regressions. Among these, close examination of sorption isotherms for H2O and N-2 adsorbates allows us to decouple and extract some insightful information underlying the complex water uptake phenomena. This work shows the promising performance of our modified zeolites that can be integrated into various AHP designs for buildings, electronics, and transportation applications. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Zeolite Y Adsorbents with High Vapor Uptake Capacity and Robust Cycling Stability for Potential Applications in Advanced Adsorption Heat Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiansen; Narayanan, Shankar; Michaelis, Vladimir K.; Ong, Ta-Chung; Keeler, Eric G.; Kim, Hyunho; McKay, Ian S.; Griffin, Robert G.; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2014-01-01

    Modular and compact adsorption heat pumps (AHPs) promise an energy-efficient alternative to conventional vapor compression based heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. A key element in the advancement of AHPs is the development of adsorbents with high uptake capacity, fast intracrystalline diffusivity and durable hydrothermal stability. Herein, the ion exchange of NaY zeolites with ingoing Mg2+ ions is systematically studied to maximize the ion exchange degree (IED) for improved sorption performance. It is found that beyond an ion exchange threshold of 64.1%, deeper ion exchange does not benefit water uptake capacity or characteristic adsorption energy, but does enhance the vapor diffusivity. In addition to using water as an adsorbate, the uptake properties of Mg,Na-Y zeolites were investigated using 20 wt.% MeOH aqueous solution as a novel anti-freeze adsorbate, revealing that the MeOH additive has an insignificant influence on the overall sorption performance. We also demonstrated that the labscale synthetic scalability is robust, and that the tailored zeolites scarcely suffer from hydrothermal stability even after successive 108-fold adsorption/desorption cycles. The samples were analyzed using N2 sorption, 27Al/29Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, ICP-AES, dynamic vapor sorption, SEM, Fick’s 2nd law and D-R equation regressions. Among these, close examination of sorption isotherms for H2O and N2 adsorbates allows us to decouple and extract some insightful information underlying the complex water uptake phenomena. This work shows the promising performance of our modified zeolites that can be integrated into various AHP designs for buildings, electronics, and transportation applications. PMID:25395877

  5. Zeolite Y Adsorbents with High Vapor Uptake Capacity and Robust Cycling Stability for Potential Applications in Advanced Adsorption Heat Pumps.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiansen; Narayanan, Shankar; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Ong, Ta-Chung; Keeler, Eric G; Kim, Hyunho; McKay, Ian S; Griffin, Robert G; Wang, Evelyn N

    2015-01-01

    Modular and compact adsorption heat pumps (AHPs) promise an energy-efficient alternative to conventional vapor compression based heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. A key element in the advancement of AHPs is the development of adsorbents with high uptake capacity, fast intracrystalline diffusivity and durable hydrothermal stability. Herein, the ion exchange of NaY zeolites with ingoing Mg(2+) ions is systematically studied to maximize the ion exchange degree (IED) for improved sorption performance. It is found that beyond an ion exchange threshold of 64.1%, deeper ion exchange does not benefit water uptake capacity or characteristic adsorption energy, but does enhance the vapor diffusivity. In addition to using water as an adsorbate, the uptake properties of Mg,Na-Y zeolites were investigated using 20 wt.% MeOH aqueous solution as a novel anti-freeze adsorbate, revealing that the MeOH additive has an insignificant influence on the overall sorption performance. We also demonstrated that the labscale synthetic scalability is robust, and that the tailored zeolites scarcely suffer from hydrothermal stability even after successive 108-fold adsorption/desorption cycles. The samples were analyzed using N2 sorption, (27)Al/(29)Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, ICP-AES, dynamic vapor sorption, SEM, Fick's 2(nd) law and D-R equation regressions. Among these, close examination of sorption isotherms for H2O and N2 adsorbates allows us to decouple and extract some insightful information underlying the complex water uptake phenomena. This work shows the promising performance of our modified zeolites that can be integrated into various AHP designs for buildings, electronics, and transportation applications. PMID:25395877

  6. Adsorption of chlorophenols on granular activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, M.

    1993-12-31

    Studies were undertaken of the adsorption of chlorinated phenols from aqueous solution on granular activated carbon (Filtrasorb-400, 30 x 40 mesh). Single-component equilibrium adsorption data on the eight compounds in two concentration ranges at pH 7.0 fit the Langmuir equation better than the Freundlich equation. The adsorptive capacities at pH 7.0 increase from pentachlorophenol to trichlorophenols and are fairly constant from trichlorophenols to monochlorophenols. The adsorption process was found to be exothermic for pentachlorophenol and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, and endothermic for 2,4-dichlorophenol and 4-chlorophenol. Equilibrium measurements were also conducted for 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, and 4-chlorophenol over a wide pH range. A surface complexation model was proposed to describe the effect of pH on adsorption equilibria of chlorophenols on activated carbon. The simulations of the model are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. Batch kinetics studies were conducted of the adsorption of chlorinated phenols on granular activated carbon. The results show that the surface reaction model best describes both the short-term and long-term kinetics, while the external film diffusion model describes the short-term kinetics data very well and the linear-driving-force approximation improved its performance for the long-term kinetics. Multicomponent adsorption equilibria of chlorophenols on granular activated carbon was investigated in the micromolar equilibrium concentration range. The Langmuir competitive and Ideal Adsorbed Solution (IAS) models were tested for their performance on the three binary systems of pentachlorophenol/2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol/2,4-dichlorophenol, and 2,4-dichlorophenol/4-chlorophenol, and the tertiary system of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol/2,4-dichlorophenol/4-chlorophenol, and found to fail to predict the two-component adsorption equilibria of the former two binary systems and the tertiary system.

  7. Adsorption of ferrous ions onto montmorillonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Dawei; Niu, Xia; Qiao, Min; Liu, Gang; Li, Hongxin; Meng, Zhenxiao

    2015-04-01

    The adsorption of Fe (II) onto montmorillonites was investigated through initial concentration, contact time, pH and temperature. During the whole adsorption process, the ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) was added as a kind of antioxidant, at the same time, deionized water (after boiling) and nitrogen protection were also used to avoid oxidation. The Fe2+/Fetotal ratio of the iron exists in the Fe-montmorillonites was found more than 95%. Two kinetic models, including pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order model, were used to analyze the adsorption process of Fe (II) on montmorillonites. The results of our study showed that adsorption process fitted with pseudo-second-order well. Adsorption isotherms showed that Langmuir model was better than Freundlich model. The thermodynamic parameters ΔG0 and ΔH0 were 3.696 kJ/mol and 6.689 kJ/mol (we just gave the values at 298 K), respectively. The positive values at different temperatures showed that the adsorption process was non-spontaneous and endothermic. The characteristics of materials were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), Surface area and porosity analyzer, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and Zeta potential distribution.

  8. Characterization and adsorption modeling of silicon carbide-derived carbons.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T X; Bae, J-S; Bhatia, S K

    2009-02-17

    We present characterization results of silicon carbide-derived carbons (Si-CDCs) prepared from both nano- and micron-sized betaSiC particles by oxidation in pure chlorine atmosphere at various synthesis temperatures (600-1000 degrees C). Subsequently, the adsorption modeling study of simple gases (CH4 and CO2) in these Si-CDC samples for a wide range of pressures and temperatures using our Finite Wall Thickness model [Nguyen, T. X.; Bhatia, S. K. Langmuir 2004, 20, 3532] was also carried out. In general, characterization results showed that the core of Si-CDC particles contains predominantly amorphous material while minor graphitization was also observed on the surface of these particles for all the investigated synthesis temperatures (600-1000 degrees C). Furthermore, postsynthetic heat treatment at 1000 degrees C for 3 days, as well as particle size of precursor (betaSiC) were shown to have slight impact on the graphitization. In spite of the highly disordered nature of Si-CDC samples, the adsorption modeling results revealed that the Finite Wall Thickness model provides reasonably good prediction of experimental adsorption data of CO2 and CH4 in all the investigated Si-CDC samples at the temperatures of 273 K, 313 K, and 333 K for a wide range of pressure up to 200 bar. Furthermore, the impact of the difference in molecular size and geometry between analysis and probing gases on the prediction of the experimental adsorption isotherm in a disordered carbon using the slit-pore model is also found. Finally, the correlation between compressibility of the Si-CDC samples under high pressure adsorption and their synthesis temperature was deduced from the adsorption modeling. PMID:19123908

  9. Albumin (BSA) Adsorption over Graphene in Aqueous Environment: Influence of Orientation, Adsorption Protocol, and Solvent Treatment.

    PubMed

    Vilhena, J G; Rubio-Pereda, Pamela; Vellosillo, Perceval; Serena, P A; Pérez, Rubén

    2016-02-23

    We report 150 ns explicit solvent MD simulations of the adsorption on graphene of albumin (BSA) in two orientations and using two different adsorption protocols, i.e., free and forced adsorption. Our results show that free adsorption occurs with little structural rearrangements. Even taking adsorption to an extreme, by forcing it with a 5 nN downward force applied during the initial 20 ns, we show that along a particular orientation BSA is able to preserve the structural properties of the majority of its binding sites. Furthermore, in all the cases considered in this work, the ibuprofen binding site has shown a strong resilience to structural changes. Finally, we compare these results with implicit solvent simulations and find that the latter predicts an extreme protein unfolding upon adsorption. The origin of this discrepancy is attributed to a poor description of the water entropic forces at interfaces in the implicit solvent methods. PMID:26799950

  10. Adsorption of aqueous copper on peanut hulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Kanika Octavia

    A method was established for measuring the adsorption of Cu(II) from aqueous solution to unmodified and modified peanut hulls at constant temperature and pH. Modification of the hulls was performed by oxidation with alkaline hydrogen peroxide. During the modification process, the hydrogen peroxide solubilizes the lignin component, making the surface more porous which increases the availability of binding sites, while simultaneously oxidizing the cellulose. The oxidation of alcohol groups creates more binding sites by creating functional groups such as COO-, which increases chelation to metal ions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms delignification of the peanut hulls by the disappearance of carboxyl peaks of the modified hulls, which were originally produced from the lignin content. Although, oxidation is not fully confirmed, it is not ruled out because the expected carboxylate peak (1680 cm-1) maybe overshadowed by a broad peak due to OH bending of water adsorbed to the hulls. Hulls adsorbed copper from solutions in the concentration range of 50-1000 ppm of CuCl2. Concentrations of pre- and post-adsorption solutions were determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The adsorption isotherms were fit to known two and three-parameter models, evaluated and the binding mechanism was inferred. Maximum surface coverage was 3.5 +/- 0.6 mg Cu2+ /g hull for unmodified hulls and 11 +/- 1 mg Cu2+/g hull for modified hulls. The adsorption for the hulls is best described by the Langmuir model, suggesting monolayer, homogeneous adsorption. With a free energy of adsorption of 10.5 +/- 0.9 kJ/mol for unmodified hulls and 14.5 +/-0.4 kJ/mol for modified hulls, the process is categorized as chemisorption for both types of hulls. The adsorption for both hulls is also described by the Redlich-Peterson model, giving beta nearer to 1 than 0, which further suggests homogeneous adsorption described by the Langmuir model. After rinsing the hulls

  11. Assessing the Adsorption Properties of Shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, R.

    2014-12-01

    Fine-grained rocks, such as shales, contain a significant amount of nanopores that can significantly contribute to their storage capacity through the mechanism of adsorption. The current ability to extract natural gas that is adsorbed in the rock's matrix is limited and current technology focuses primarily on the free gas in the fractures, thus leading to very low recovery efficiencies. Shales constitute also a great portion of so-called caprocks above potential CO2 sequestration sites; hereby, the adsorption process may limit the CO2 mobility within the cap-rock, thus minimizing leakage phenomena. Whether it is a reservoir or a caprock, understanding and quantifying the mechanisms of adsorption in these natural materials is key to improve the engineering design of subsurface operations. Results will be presented from a laboratory study that combines conventional techniques for the measurement of adsorption isotherms with novel methods that allows for the imaging of adsorption using x-rays. Various nanoporous materials are considered, thus including rocks, such as shales and coals, pure clay minerals and engineered adsorbents with well-defined nanopore structures, such as zeolites. Supercritical CO2 adsorption isotherms have been measured with a Rubotherm Magnetic Suspension balance by covering the pressure range 0.1-20~MPa. A medical x-ray CT scanner has been used to identify three-dimensional patterns of the adsorption properties of a packed-bed of adsorbent, thus enabling to assess the spatial variability of the adsorption isotherm. The data are analyzed by using thermodynamically rigorous measures of adsorption and a graphical method is applied for their interpretation. The density of the adsorbed phase is estimated and compared to data reported in the literature; the latter is key to disclose gas-reserves and/or potential storage capacity estimates. When evaluated against classic adsorbent materials, the adsorption mechanism in shales is further complicated by

  12. Methane Adsorption on Aggregates of Fullerenes: Site-Selective Storage Capacities and Adsorption Energies

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Alexander; Zöttl, Samuel; Bartl, Peter; Leidlmair, Christian; Mauracher, Andreas; Probst, Michael; Denifl, Stephan; Echt, Olof; Scheier, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Methane adsorption on positively charged aggregates of C60 is investigated by both mass spectrometry and computer simulations. Calculated adsorption energies of 118–281 meV are in the optimal range for high-density storage of natural gas. Groove sites, dimple sites, and the first complete adsorption shells are identified experimentally and confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations, using a newly developed force field for methane–methane and fullerene–methane interaction. The effects of corrugation and curvature are discussed and compared with data for adsorption on graphite, graphene, and carbon nanotubes. PMID:23744834

  13. Adsorption of atrazine on soils: model study.

    PubMed

    Kovaios, Ilias D; Paraskeva, Christakis A; Koutsoukos, Petros G; Payatakes, Alkiviades Ch

    2006-07-01

    The adsorption of the widely used herbicide atrazine onto three model inorganic soil components (silica gel, gamma-alumina, and calcite (CaCO(3)) was investigated in a series of batch experiments in which the aqueous phase equilibrated with the solid, under different solution conditions. Atrazine did not show discernible adsorption on gamma-alumina (theta=25 degrees C, 3.8adsorption from solutions was found for silica gel suspensions. The adsorption isotherms obtained for atrazine uptake on silica gel particles were best fitted with the Freundlich model. An increase of the ionic strength of the electrolytic solution induced an increase of the surface concentration of atrazine on silica gel, indicating significant electrostatic interactions between atrazine and silica gel particles, possibly through interaction with the surface silanol groups of the solid substrate. Increase of the pH value of the electrolyte solution from 6 to 9 considerably decreased the amount of atrazine adsorbed on the silica gel substrate. Decrease of the solution pH from 6 to 3 had only a slight effect on the surface concentration of the adsorbed atrazine. The adsorption of atrazine on silica gel increased when the temperature was decreased from 40 to 25 degrees C, an indication that the adsorption is exothermic. The calculated enthalpy of adsorption ( approximately 10 kJ/mol) indicates that the uptake at the solid-liquid equilibrium pH (6.1) was largely due to physisorption. PMID:16556447

  14. Visualization and Measurement of Adsorption/Desorption Process of Ethanol in Activated Carbon Adsorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Hitoshi; Murata, Kenta; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Saito, Yasushi

    Adsorption refrigerator is one of the efficient tools for waste heat recovery, because the system is driven by heat at relative low temperature. However, the coefficient of performance is low due to its batch operation and the heat capacity of the adsorber. In order to improve the performance, it is important to optimize the configuration to minimize the amount of driving heat, and to clarify adsorption/desorption phenomena in transient conditions. Neutron radiography was applied to visualize and measure the adsorption amount distribution in an adsorber. The visualization experiments had been performed at the neutron radiography facility of E-2 port of Kyoto University Research Reactor. Activated carbon and ethanol were used as the adsorbent and refrigerant. From the acquired radiographs, adsorption amount was quantitatively measured by applying the umbra method using a checkered neutron absorber with boron powder. Then, transient adsorption and desorption processes of a rectangular adsorber with 84 mm in width, 50 mm in height and 20 mm in depth were visualized. As the result, the effect of fins in the adsorbent layer on the adsorption amount distribution was clearly visualized.

  15. Effect of single silica gel particle adsorption on the transport processes in a humid air stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyal, Apratim; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Pramod

    2013-11-01

    The effect of adsorption due to a single silica gel particle on a convective field consisting of humid air has been investigated numerically. The adsorption is incorporated as a sink term in the transport equation for species (water vapor) and has been modeled using Linear Driving Force model, while the heat released due to adsorption is taken as source term in the energy equation and proportional to the amount of water vapor adsorbed. The heat released creates a coupling between the species and the temperature field as the adsorption characteristics are directly influenced by particle temperature. The extent of species and temperature boundary layer show the diffusion of the adsorption effects into the free stream. Surface adsorption is found to decrease with Reynolds no. The particle surface temperature increases from forward stagnation point till downstream. This work provides a model for understanding the adsorption kinetics in convective stream for other adsorbate-adsorbent pair. Further more complex scenarios can be modeled such as presence of multiple adsorbent particles, the interaction of species and temperature boundary layers setup due to individual particles and their influence on the overall adsorption characteristics.

  16. Adsorption behavior of heavy metals on biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Minamisawa, Mayumi; Minamisawa, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Shoichiro; Takai, Nobuharu

    2004-09-01

    We have investigated adsorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) at pH 2-6.7 onto the biomaterials chitosan, coffee, green tea, tea, yuzu, aloe, and Japanese coarse tea, and onto the inorganic adsorbents, activated carbon and zeolite. High adsorptive capabilities were observed for all of the biomaterials at pH 4 and 6.7. In the adsorption of Cd(II), blend coffee, tea, green tea, and coarse tea have comparable loading capacities to activated carbon and zeolite. Although activated carbon, zeolite, and chitosan are utilized in a variety of fields such as wastewater treatment, chemical and metallurgical engineering, and analytical chemistry, these adsorbents are costly. On the other hand, processing of the test biomaterials was inexpensive, and all the biomaterials except for chitosan were able to adsorb large amounts of Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions after a convenient pretreatment of washing with water followed by drying. The high adsorption capability of the biomaterials prepared from plant materials is promising in the development of a novel, low-cost adsorbent. From these results, it is concluded that heavy metal removal using biomaterials would be an effective method for the economic treatment of wastewater. The proposed adsorption method was applied to the determination of amounts of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in water samples. PMID:15373400

  17. Adsorption of aniline and toluidines on montmorillonite

    SciTech Connect

    Essington, M.E. )

    1994-09-01

    Bentonite clay liners are commonly employed to mitigate the movement of contaminants from waste disposal sites. In order to assess the ability of clay liner material to restrict the mobility of amine compounds under a variety of chemical conditions and to further elucidate amine adsorption characteristics, the adsorption of aniline and o-, m-, and p-toluidine on Ca[sup 2+]- and K[sup +]-saturated Wyoming bentonite (SWy-1) was investigated. Adsorption experiments were performed under conditions of varied pH and ionic environment. Amine adsorption on montmorillonite is pH dependent. Maximum amine adsorption occurs when solution pH is approximately equal to the pK[sub a] of the anilinium ion deprotonation reaction (pH 4.45-5.08). An amine adsorption envelope results from the combined influence of increasing anilinium ion and anilinium-aniline complex formation (as pH decreases to the pK[sub a]) and amine competition with H[sup +] for surface sites, decreasing anilinium-aniline complex concentration, and decreasing aniline available for water bridging with exchangeable Ca[sup 2+] and K[sup +] (as solution pH decreases below the pK[sub a]). For any given amine, maximum adsorption increases with decreasing ionic strength. Maximum amine adsorption is greater in the Ca[sup 2+] systems than in the K[sup +] systems at equivalent cation charge and reflects the formation of an amine water bridge with the exchangeable Ca[sup 2+]. Amine adsorption is also greater in chloride systems compared with sulfate systems at comparable cation concentrations, possibly due to the formation of aqueous anilinium-sulfate complexes. The amine compounds are retained mainly by bentonite through a cation exchange process, the capacity of the clay to adsorb the amine compounds being a significant percentage of the exchange capacity at the pK[sub a]. However, amine retention decreases with increasing pH and is minimal at solution pH values greater than 7. 19 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Investigation of Microgranular Adsorptive Filtration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhenxiao

    Over the past few decades, enormous advances have been made in the application of low-pressure membrane filtration to both drinking water and wastewater treatment. Nevertheless, the full potential of this technology has not been reached, due primarily to limitations imposed by membrane fouling. In drinking water treatment, much of the fouling is caused by soluble and particulate natural organic matter (NOM). Efforts to overcome the problem have focused on removal of NOM from the feed solution, usually by addition of conventional coagulants like alum and ferric chloride (FeCl3) or adsorbents like powdered activated carbon (PAC). While coagulants and adsorbents can remove a portion of the NOM, their performance with respect to fouling control has been inconsistent, often reducing fouling but sometimes having no effect or even exacerbating fouling. This research investigated microgranular adsorptive filtration (muGAF), a process that combines three existing technologies---granular media filtration, packed bed adsorption, and membrane filtration---in a novel way to reduce membrane fouling while simultaneously removing NOM from water. In this technology, a thin layer of micron-sized adsorbent particles is deposited on the membrane prior to delivering the feed to the system. The research reported here represents the first systematic study of muGAF, and the results demonstrate the promising potential of this process. A new, aluminum-oxide-based adsorbent---heated aluminum oxide particles (HAOPs)---was synthesized and shown to be very effective for NOM removal as well as fouling reduction in muGAF systems. muGAF has also been demonstrated to work well with powdered activated carbon (PAC) as the adsorbent, but not as well as when HAOPs are used; the process has also been successful when used with several different membrane types and configurations. Experiments using a wide range of operational parameters and several analytical tools lead to the conclusion that the fouling

  19. Adsorption of phenanthrene on natural snow.

    PubMed

    Domine, Florent; Cincinelli, Alessandra; Bonnaud, Elodie; Martellini, Tania; Picaud, Sylvain

    2007-09-01

    The snowpack is a reservoir for semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) and, in particular, for persistent organic pollutants (POPs), which are sequestered in winter and released to the atmosphere or hydrosphere in the spring. Modeling these processes usually assumes that SVOCs are incorporated into the snowpack by adsorption to snow surfaces, but this has never been proven because the specific surface area (SSA) of snow has never been measured together with snow composition. Here we expose natural snow to phenanthrene vapors (one of the more volatile POPs) and measure for the first time both the SSA and the chemical composition of the snow. The results are consistent with an adsorption equilibrium. The measured Henry's law constant is H(Phen)(T) = 2.88 x 10(22) exp(-10660/7) Pa m2 mol(-1), with Tin Kelvin. The adsorption enthalpy is delta H(ads) = -89 +/- 18 kJ mol(-1). We also perform molecular dynamics calculations of phenanthrene adsorption to ice and obtain AHads = -85 +/- 8 kJ mol(-1), close to the experimental value. Results are applied to the adsorption of phenanthrene to the Arctic and subarctic snowpacks. The subarctic snowpack, with a low snow area index (SAI = 1000), is a negligible reservoir of phenanthrene, butthe colder Arctic snowpack, with SAI = 2500, sequesters most of the phenanthrene present in the (snow + boundary layer) system. PMID:17937278

  20. Adsorption of gases on carbon molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, S.N.; Patwardhan, S.R.; Vijayalakshmi, S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Ganesh, K.S. )

    1994-12-01

    Adsorption on carbon molecular sieves (CMS) prepared by coke deposition has become an interesting area of adsorption due to its microporous nature and favorable separation factor on size and shape selectivity basis for many gaseous systems. In the present work CMS was synthesized from coconut shell through three major steps, namely, carbonization, activation, and coke deposition by hydrocarbon cracking. The crushed, washed, and sieved granules of coconut shell (particle size 2--3 mm) were pretreated with sodium silicate solution and oven-dried at 150 C to create the inorganic sites necessary for coke deposition. Carbonization and activation of the dried granules were carried out at 800 C, for 30 min each. The activated char thus produced was subjected to hydrocarbon cracking at 600 C for periods varying from 30 to 180 min. The product samples were characterized in terms of adsorption isotherm, kinetic adsorption curve, surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and characteristic energy for adsorption by using O[sub 2], N[sub 2], C[sub 2]H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], C[sub 3]H[sub 6], and CH[sub 4].

  1. Adsorption of tetrahydrothiophene (THT) onto soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juriga, Martin; Kubinec, Róbert; Rajzinger, Ján; Jelemenský, Karol; Gužela, Štefan

    2014-08-01

    Adsorption is one of the major industrial separation technique nowadays. Although adsorption is most commonly used as a separation method, in some cases cause harmful and undesirable effects such as capture odorant from natural gas onto soil. In the event of an accident, the gas can leak from pipes in two ways - either directly into the surrounding air, or the soil where the odorant can be mostly absorbed depending of type of soil, water content and temperature. Design of experimental apparatus for measurement of breakthrough curves is studied in detail. Alternative arrangement of experimental apparatus, calibration of measuring devices, method of measurement and processing the data are narrowly discussed. Moreover, experimental measurements of breakthrough curves are presented. The actual measurement was made to identify the equilibrium adsorption capacity of THT (tetrahydrothiophene) onto soils. Experimental data were evaluated using Linear, Freundlich, Langmuir and Koble-Corrigan model.

  2. Adsorption kinetics of silicic acid on akaganeite.

    PubMed

    Naren, Gaowa; Ohashi, Hironori; Okaue, Yoshihiro; Yokoyama, Takushi

    2013-06-01

    As part of a series of studies on the interaction between ferric ions and silicic acid in the hydrosphere, the adsorption of silicic acid on akaganeite was investigated kinetically at various pH values. The adsorption of silicic acid increased with increasing pH over an initial pH range of 4-11.5. In the kinetic experiment, the Cl(-) was released from akaganeite much faster than silicic acid was adsorbed. From this result, we concluded that chloride ions bound on the surface of akaganeite are released and Fe-OH or Fe-O(-) sites are formed, which then acts as an adsorption site for silicic acid. The uptake mechanism of silicic acid by akaganeite is significantly different from that by schwertmannite, despite the presence of the same tunnel structure. PMID:23538050

  3. The adsorption of ethylene on Au/Pd(100) alloy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenjun; Thuening, Theodore; Tysoe, Wilfred T.

    2016-04-01

    The surface chemistry of ethylene is explored on model Au/Pd(100) alloy surfaces using a combination of temperature-programmed desorption and reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy. The heat of adsorption of ethylene on the model alloy surface is found to increase monotonically with increasing palladium coverage in the alloy, from ~ 33 kJ/mol for a completely gold-covered surface to ~ 80 kJ/mol as the gold coverage decreases to zero. A large change in heat of adsorption is found for palladium coverages between 0 and ~ 0.35 monolayers, where previous studies have shown that the surface comprises exclusively isolated palladium sites. The heat of adsorption changes more slowly for higher palladium coverages, when palladium-palladium bridge sites appear. Vinyl species are identified for palladium coverages above ~ 0.8 ML from a vibrational mode at ~ 1120 cm- 1, which disappears when the sample is heated to ~ 250 K, due to vinyl decomposition.

  4. Adsorption of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrogen on an ultramicroporous copper metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaofei; Yuan, Bin; Bao, Zongbi; Deng, Shuguang

    2014-09-15

    An ultramicroporous copper metal-organic framework (Cu-MOF), Cu(hfipbb)(H2hfipbb)0.5 [H2hfipbb=4,4'-(hexafluoro-isopropylidene) bis(benzoic acid)] was successfully synthesized by a microwave-assisted method (1) with a shorter reaction time and higher MOFs yield. The obtained Cu-MOF sample was characterized with scanning electron microscopy for crystal structure, powder X-ray diffraction for phase structure, and carbon dioxide adsorption at 273 K for pore textural properties. Single-component adsorption (adsorption equilibrium and kinetics) of CO2, CH4, and N2 on 1 was measured using a Micromeritics ASAP 2020 adsorption porosimeter at 278, 298 and 318 K, and pressures up to 1 bar. Isosteric heats of adsorption, Henry's constants, and diffusion time constants were calculated and carefully analyzed. Adsorption equilibrium selectivity (α), adsorbent selection parameter for pressure swing adsorption processes (S), kinetic selectivity and combined separation selectivity (β) for CO2/CH4, CO2/N2 and CH4/N2 binary mixtures were estimated based on the single-component adsorption data. The relative high values of the adsorption selectivities suggest that Cu-MOF is a promising adsorbent for separating CO2/CH4, CO2/N2 and CH4/N2 gas pairs. PMID:24998057

  5. Effect of pyrolysis temperatures and times on the adsorption of cadmium onto orange peel derived biochar.

    PubMed

    Tran, Hai Nguyen; You, Sheng-Jie; Chao, Huan-Ping

    2016-02-01

    The mechanism and capacity of adsorption of cadmium (Cd) on orange peel (OP)-derived biochar at various pyrolysis temperatures (400, 500, 600, 700 and 800°C) and heating times (2 and 6 h) were investigated. Biochar was characterized using proximate analysis, point of zero charge (PZC) analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Equilibrium and kinetic experiments of Cd adsorption on biochar were performed. The results indicated that the pH value at PZC of biochar approached 9.5. Equilibrium can be reached rapidly (within 1 min) in kinetic experiments and a removal rate of 80.6-96.9% can be generated. The results fitted the pseudo-second-order model closely. The adsorption capacity was estimated using the Langmuir model. The adsorption capacity of Cd on biochar was independent of the pyrolysis temperature and heating time (p>0.01). The maximum adsorption capacity of Cd was 114.69 (mg g(-1)). The adsorption of Cd on biochar was regarded as chemisorption. The primary adsorption mechanisms were regarded as Cπ-cation interactions and surface precipitation. Cadmium can react with calcite to form the precipitation of (Ca,Cd)CO3 on the surface of biochar. The OP-derived biochar can be considered a favourable alternative and a new green adsorbent for removing Cd(2+) ions from an aqueous solution. PMID:26608900

  6. Adsorption of Sr by immobilized microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.S.; Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    Wastewaters from numerous industrial and laboratory operations can contain toxic or undesirable components such as metal ions, which must be removed before discharge to surface waters. Adsorption processes that have high removal efficiencies are attractive methods for removing such contaminants. For economic operations, it is desirable to have an adsorbent that is selective for the metal contaminant of interest, has high capacity for the contaminant, has rapid adsorption kinetics, can be economically produced, and can be regenerated to a concentrated waste product or decomposed to a low-volume waste. Selected microorganisms are potentially useful adsorbents for these applications because they can be inexpensive, have high selectivities, and have high capacities for adsorption of many heavy metals, which are often problems in a variety of industries. A laboratory-scale packed column containing microbial cells immobilized within a gelatin matrix has been prepared, and its application to removal of Sr from a simulated wastewater is described. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Thermodynamic formalism of water uptakes on solid porous adsorbents for adsorption cooling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Baichuan; Chakraborty, Anutosh

    2014-05-19

    This Letter presents a thermodynamic formulation to calculate the amount of water vapor uptakes on various adsorbents such as zeolites, metal organic frameworks, and silica gel for the development of an advanced adsorption chiller. This formalism is developed from the rigor of the partition distribution function of each water vapor adsorptive site on adsorbents and the condensation approximation of adsorptive water molecules and is validated with experimental data. An interesting and useful finding has been established that the proposed model is thermodynamically connected with the pore structures of adsorbent materials, and the water vapor uptake highly depends on the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero surface coverage and the adsorptive sites of the adsorbent materials. Employing the proposed model, the thermodynamic trends of water vapor uptakes on various adsorbents can be estimated.

  8. Surface shear rheology of saponin adsorption layers.

    PubMed

    Golemanov, Konstantin; Tcholakova, Slavka; Denkov, Nikolai; Pelan, Edward; Stoyanov, Simeon D

    2012-08-21

    Saponins are a wide class of natural surfactants, with molecules containing a rigid hydrophobic group (triterpenoid or steroid), connected via glycoside bonds to hydrophilic oligosaccharide chains. These surfactants are very good foam stabiliziers and emulsifiers, and show a range of nontrivial biological activities. The molecular mechanisms behind these unusual properties are unknown, and, therefore, the saponins have attracted significant research interest in recent years. In our previous study (Stanimirova et al. Langmuir 2011, 27, 12486-12498), we showed that the triterpenoid saponins extracted from Quillaja saponaria plant (Quillaja saponins) formed adsorption layers with unusually high surface dilatational elasticity, 280 ± 30 mN/m. In this Article, we study the shear rheological properties of the adsorption layers of Quillaja saponins. In addition, we study the surface shear rheological properties of Yucca saponins, which are of steroid type. The experimental results show that the adsorption layers of Yucca saponins exhibit purely viscous rheological response, even at the lowest shear stress applied, whereas the adsorption layers of Quillaja saponins behave like a viscoelastic two-dimensional body. For Quillaja saponins, a single master curve describes the data for the viscoelastic creep compliance versus deformation time, up to a certain critical value of the applied shear stress. Above this value, the layer compliance increases, and the adsorption layers eventually transform into viscous ones. The experimental creep-recovery curves for the viscoelastic layers are fitted very well by compound Voigt rheological model. The obtained results are discussed from the viewpoint of the layer structure and the possible molecular mechanisms, governing the rheological response of the saponin adsorption layers. PMID:22830458

  9. Adsorption of phenolic compounds on fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Akgerman, A.; Zardkoohi, M.

    1996-03-01

    Adsorption isotherms for adsorption of phenol, 3-chlorophenol, and 2,4-dichlorophenol from water onto fly ash were determined. These isotherms were modeled by the Freundlich isotherm. The fly ash adsorbed 67, 20, and 22 mg/g for phenol, chlorophenol, and 2,4-dichlorophenol, respectively, for the highest water phase concentrations used. The affinity of phenolic compounds for fly ash is above the expected amount corresponding to a monolayer coverage considering that the surface area of fly ash is only 1.87 m{sup 2}/g. The isotherms for contaminants studied were unfavorable, indicating that adsorption becomes progressively easier as more solutes are taken up. Phenol displayed a much higher affinity for fly ash than 3-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol.

  10. The Adsorption of Polyelectrolytes on Hydroxyapatite Crystals.

    PubMed

    Tsortos; Nancollas

    1999-01-01

    The adsorption of two polyelectrolytes, poly-L-Glutamate and poly-L-Aspartate, on hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystals was studied both experimentally and theoretically. Langmuir adsorption isotherms were obtained for both these molecules, with binding constants K = 6 x 10(6) and 3 x 10(6) M-1, respectively, at 37.0 degreesC, pH 7.4, and 0.15 M ionic strength. A theoretical analysis of the data, based on a model proposed by Hesselink, suggested a "train-loop" type of adsorption with non-electrostatic energy terms 3.51 and 4.76 (kT) for poly-L-Glu and poly-L-Asp, respectively. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:9878142

  11. Adsorption of herbicides using activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Derbyshire, F.; Jagtoyan, M.; Lafferty, C.; Kimber, G.

    1996-10-01

    This work describes development of a series of novel activated carbon materials and their testing for possible water treatment applications by studying the adsorption of sodium pentachlorphenolate, PCP (a common herbicide/wood preservative). Although the application of activated carbons is an established technology for the treatment of public water supplies, there is a growing need for materials with higher selectivity and adsorptive capacities as well as high abrasion resistance. The materials that will be discussed include extruded wood-derived carbons with novel pore size distributions and high hardness, as well as activated carbon fiber composites. Comparisons will be made with commercial granular water treatment carbons.

  12. Irreversible adsorption of particles on heterogeneous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Jaszczółt, Katarzyna; Michna, Aneta; Siwek, Barbara; Szyk-Warszyńska, Lilianna; Zembala, Maria

    2005-12-30

    Methods of theoretical and experimental evaluation of irreversible adsorption of particles, e.g., colloids and globular proteins at heterogeneous surfaces were reviewed. The theoretical models were based on the generalized random sequential adsorption (RSA) approach. Within the scope of these models, localized adsorption of particles occurring as a result of short-ranged attractive interactions with discrete adsorption sites was analyzed. Monte-Carlo type simulations performed according to this model enabled one to determine the initial flux, adsorption kinetics, jamming coverage and the structure of the particle monolayer as a function of the site coverage and the particle/site size ratio, denoted by lambda. It was revealed that the initial flux increased significantly with the site coverage theta(s) and the lambda parameter. This behavior was quantitatively interpreted in terms of the scaled particle theory. It also was demonstrated that particle adsorption kinetics and the jamming coverage increased significantly, at fixed site coverage, when the lambda parameter increased. Practically, for alpha = lambda2theta(s) > 1 the jamming coverage at the heterogeneous surfaces attained the value pertinent to continuous surfaces. The results obtained prove unequivocally that spherically shaped sites were more efficient in binding particles in comparison with disk-shaped sites. It also was predicted that for particle size ratio lambda < 4 the site multiplicity effect plays a dominant role, affecting significantly the structure of particle monolayers and the jamming coverage. Experimental results validating main aspects of these theoretical predictions also have been reviewed. These results were derived by using monodisperse latex particles adsorbing on substrates produced by covering uniform surface by adsorption sites of a desired size, coverage and surface charge. Particle deposition occurred under diffusion-controlled transport conditions and their coverage was

  13. Adsorption of polyampholytes on charged surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ozon, F; di Meglio, J-M; Joanny, J-F

    2002-06-01

    We have studied the adsorption of neutral polyampholytes on model charged surfaces that have been characterized by contact angle and streaming current measurements. The loop size distributions of adsorbed polymer chains have been obtained using atomic-force microscopy (AFM) and compared to recent theoretical predictions. We find a qualitative agreement with theory; the higher the surface charge, the smaller the number of monomers in the adsorbed layer. We propose an original scenario for the adsorption of polyampholytes on surfaces covered with both neutral long-chain and charged short-chain thiols. PMID:15010954

  14. Adsorption behavior of copper and zinc in soils: Influence of pH on adsorption characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Msaky, J.J. ); Calvet, R. )

    1990-08-01

    The authors studied adsorption of copper and zinc on three different soils: a brown silty soil, an Oxisol, and a Podzol. They determined the amounts adsorbed and the shapes of adsorption isotherms as a function of the pH of the adsorbing medium at a constant ionic strength. The adsorbed amount-pH relationship depended strongly on the natures of the metallic cation and of the soil. The pH greatly influenced the characteristics of adsorption isotherms. They based interpretation on the variations with the pH of both adsorbent affinity for the metal in relation to the surface electric charge and chemical speciation in solution. The adsorption mechanism in the Oxisol probably involves monohydroxylated cations but is more determined by bivalent cations in the brown silty soil and the Podzol. From a general point of view, adsorption of copper and zinc cannot be represented with a single adsorption constant, but should be described by adsorption isotherms obtained at various pH values.

  15. Adsorption of Benzoic Acid in Aqueous Solution by Bagasse Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, S.

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports the studies on the benzoic acid (BA) onto bagasse fly ash (BFA) was studied in aqueous solution in a batch system. Physico-chemical properties including surface area, surface texture of the GAC before and after BA adsorption onto BFA were analysed using X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The optimum initial pH for the adsorption of BA was found to be 5.56. The adsorbent dose was 10 g/l for BFA and the equilibrium time 8 h of reaction. Pseudo first and second order models were used to find the adsorption kinetics. It was found that intraparticle diffusion played important role in the adsorption mechanisms of BA and the adsorption kinetics followed pseudo-second order kinetic model rather than the pseudo first order kinetic model. Isotherm data were generated for BA solution having initial concentrations of BA in the range of 10-200 mg/l for the BFA dosage of 10 g/l at temperatures of 288, 303, and 318 K. The adsorption of BA onto BFA was favorably influenced by an increase in temperature. Equilibrium data were well represented by the Redlich-Peterson isotherm model. Values of the change in entropy ( ΔS 0), heat of adsorption ( ΔH 0) for adsorption of BA on BFA was found to be 120.10 and 19.61 kJ/mol respectively. The adsorption of BA onto BFA was an endothermic reaction. Desorption of BA from BFA was studied by various solvents method. Acetic acid was found to be a better eluant for desorption of BA with a maximum desorption efficiency of 55.2 %. Owing to its heating value, spent BFA can be used as a co-fuel for the production of heat in boiler furnaces.

  16. Adsorption of organic solvent vapors on hydrophobic Y-type zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, J.H.; Choi, D.K.; Kim, S.H.

    1998-06-01

    Experimental isotherms and prediction results for adsorption of benzene, toluene, dichloromethane and 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane on hydrophobic Y-type zeolite are reported. Isotherm shows the type-V shape according to the classification by Brunauer et al. A simple thermodynamic method is employed to predict the experimental equilibrium data at various temperatures simultaneously. This plain method is based on the assumption that the value of the isosteric heat of adsorption does not depend on temperature for a certain surface loading. The Clausius-Clapeyron equation was used to calculate the isosteric heat of adsorption. To apply the method, only two sets of the experimental isotherm data at two different temperatures are needed. The Clausius-Clapeyron equation with two isotherms provided simple and reliable prediction of adsorption equilibrium relationships at various temperatures. Results with this method showed that the predicted value agrees well with the experimental data in the range of temperatures for the system tested.

  17. On the explanation of hysteresis in the adsorption of ammonia on graphitized thermal carbon black.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yonghong; Do, D D; Horikawa, Toshihide; Nicholson, D; Nakai, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-14

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation and experimental study of ammonia adsorption on graphitized thermal carbon black. Our new molecular model for the adsorbent is composed of basal plane graphene surfaces with ultrafine pores grafted with hydroxyl groups at the junctions between graphene layers. The simulated adsorption isotherms and isosteric heats are in good agreement with the experimental data of Holmes and Beebe, and the simulations reproduce the unusual experimental hysteresis of ammonia adsorption on an open graphite surface for the first time in the literature. The detailed mechanisms of adsorption and desorption, and the origin of hysteresis, are investigated by the microscopic analysis of the adsorbate structures to show that restructuring occurs during adsorption. The main results from this work are: (i) at the triple point, ammonia adsorbs preferentially around the functional groups to form clusters in the ultrafine pores and spills-over onto the basal plane as the loading is increased; followed by a 2D condensation on the graphite surface to form a bilayer adsorbate; (ii) at the boiling point, adsorption occurs on the basal plane due to the increasing importance of thermal fluctuations (an entropic effect); (iii) the isosteric heat is very high at zero loading due to the strong interaction between ammonia and the functional groups, decreases steeply when the functional group is saturated, and eventually reaches the heat of condensation as the fluid-fluid interaction increases. PMID:26661571

  18. Optimal design of gas adsorption refrigerators for cryogenic cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1983-01-01

    The design of gas adsorption refrigerators used for cryogenic cooling in the temperature range of 4K to 120K was examined. The functional relationships among the power requirement for the refrigerator, the system mass, the cycle time and the operating conditions were derived. It was found that the precool temperature, the temperature dependent heat capacities and thermal conductivities, and pressure and temperature variations in the compressors have important impacts on the cooling performance. Optimal designs based on a minimum power criterion were performed for four different gas adsorption refrigerators and a multistage system. It is concluded that the estimates of the power required and the system mass are within manageable limits in various spacecraft environments.

  19. Optimal design of gas adsorption refrigerators for cryogenic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, C.K.

    1983-12-01

    The design of gas adsorption refrigerators used for cryogenic cooling in the temperature range of 4K to 120K was examined. The functional relationships among the power requirement for the refrigerator, the system mass, the cycle time and the operating conditions were derived. It was found that the precool temperature, the temperature dependent heat capacities and thermal conductivities, and pressure and temperature variations in the compressors have important impacts on the cooling performance. Optimal designs based on a minimum power criterion were performed for four different gas adsorption refrigerators and a multistage system. It is concluded that the estimates of the power required and the system mass are within manageable limits in various spacecraft environments.

  20. The adsorption of HCl on volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Xochilt; Schiavi, Federica; Keppler, Hans

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the interaction between volcanic gases and ash is important to derive gas compositions from ash leachates and to constrain the environmental impact of eruptions. Volcanic HCl could potentially damage the ozone layer, but it is unclear what fraction of HCl actually reaches the stratosphere. The adsorption of HCl on volcanic ash was therefore studied from -76 to +150 °C to simulate the behavior of HCl in the dilute parts of a volcanic plume. Finely ground synthetic glasses of andesitic, dacitic, and rhyolitic composition as well as a natural obsidian from Vulcano (Italy) served as proxies for fresh natural ash. HCl adsorption is an irreversible process and appears to increase with the total alkali content of the glass. Adsorption kinetics follow a first order law with rate constants of 2.13 ṡ10-6 s-1 to 1.80 ṡ10-4 s-1 in the temperature range investigated. For dacitic composition, the temperature and pressure dependence of adsorption can be described by the equation ln ⁡ c = 1.26 + 0.27 ln ⁡ p - 715.3 / T, where c is the surface concentration of adsorbed HCl in mg/m2, T is temperature in Kelvin, and p is the partial pressure of HCl in mbar. A comparison of this model with a large data set for the composition of volcanic ash suggests that adsorption of HCl from the gas phase at relatively low temperatures can quantitatively account for the majority of the observed Cl concentrations. The model implies that adsorption of HCl on ash increases with temperature, probably because of the increasing number of accessible adsorption sites. This temperature dependence is opposite to that observed for SO2, so that HCl and SO2 are fractionated by the adsorption process and the fractionation factor changes by four orders of magnitude over a temperature range of 250 K. The assumption of equal adsorption of different species is therefore not appropriate for deriving volcanic gas compositions from analyses of adsorbates on ash. However, with the experimental

  1. Assessing the adsorption properties of shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, Ronny

    2015-04-01

    Physical adsorption refers to the trapping of fluid molecules at near liquid-like densities in the pores of a given adsorbent material. Fine-grained rocks, such as shales, contain a significant amount of nanopores that can significantly contribute to their storage capacity. As a matter of fact, the current ability to extract natural gas that is adsorbed in the rock's matrix is limited, and current technology focuses primarily on the free gas in the fractures (either natural or stimulated), thus leading to recovery efficiencies that are very low. Shales constitute also a great portion of so-called cap-rocks above potential CO2 sequestration sites; hereby, the adsorption process may limit the CO2 mobility within the cap-rock, thus minimizing the impact of leakage on the whole operation. Whether it is an unconventional reservoir or a cap-rock, understanding and quantifying the mechanisms of adsorption in these natural materials is key to improve the engineering design of subsurface operations. Results will be presented from a laboratory study that combines conventional techniques for the measurement of adsorption isotherms with novel methods that allows for the imaging of adsorption using x-rays. Various nanoporous materials are considered, thus including rocks, such as shales and coals, pure clay minerals (a major component in mudrocks) and engineered adsorbents with well-defined nanopore structures, such as zeolites. Supercritical CO2 adsorption isotherms have been measured with a Rubotherm Magnetic Suspension balance by covering the pressure range 0.1-20~MPa. A medical x-ray CT scanner has been used to identify three-dimensional patterns of the adsorption properties of a packed-bed of adsorbent, thus enabling to assess the spatial variability of the adsorption isotherm in heterogeneous materials. The data are analyzed by using thermodynamically rigorous measures of adsorption, such as the net- and excess adsorbed amounts and a recently developed methodology is

  2. Adsorption equilibrium of organic vapors on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Agnihotri, S.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2005-01-01

    Gravimetric techniques were employed to determine the adsorption capacities of commercially available purified electric arc and HiPco single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for organic compounds (toluene, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), hexane and cyclohexane) at relative pressures, p/p0, ranging from 1 ?? 10-4 to 0.95 and at isothermal conditions of 25, 37 and 50 ??C. The isotherms displayed both type I and type II characteristics. Adsorption isotherm modeling showed that SWNTs are heterogeneous adsorbents, and the Freundlich equation best describes the interaction between organic molecules and SWNTs. The heats of adsorption were 1-4 times the heats of vaporization, which is typical for physical adsorption of organic vapors on porous carbons. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED PHOTOACOUSTIC SPECTROSCOPY (FTIR-PAS) STUDY OF THE ADSORPTION OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS COMPOUNDS ON HEAT-TREATED MAGNESIUM OXIDE. (R825549C015)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  4. Adsorption of H2, Ne, and N2 on Activated Charcoal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. K.; Tward, E.; Boudaie, K. I.

    1986-01-01

    9-page report presents measured adsorption isotherms of hydrogen, neon, and nitrogen on activated charcoal for temperatures from 77 to 400 K and pressures from 1 to 80 atmospheres (0.1 to 8.1 MPa). Heats of adsorption calculated from isotherms also presented. Report gives expressions, based on ideal-gas law, which show relationship between different definitions of volume of gas adsorbed and used in describing low-pressure isotherms.

  5. IMPACT OF OXYGEN MEDIATED OXIDATIVE COUPLING ON ADSORPTION KINETICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence of molecular oxygen in the test environment promotes oxidative coupling (polymer formation) of phenolic compounds on the surface of granular activated carbon (GAC). Both adsorption equilibria and adsorption kinetics are affected by these chemical reactions. Lack of...

  6. Adsorption of Ions at Uncharged Insoluble Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Peshkova, Tatyana V; Minkov, Ivan L; Tsekov, Roumen; Slavchov, Radomir I

    2016-09-01

    A method is proposed for the experimental determination of the adsorption of inorganic electrolytes at a surface covered with insoluble surfactant monolayer. This task is complicated by the fact that the change of the salt concentration alters both chemical potentials of the electrolyte and the surfactant. Our method resolves the question by combining data for the surface pressure versus area of the monolayer at several salt concentrations with data for the equilibrium spreading pressure of crystals of the surfactant (used to fix a standard state). We applied the method to alcohols spread at the surface of concentrated halide solutions. The measured salt adsorption is positive and has nonmonotonic dependence on the area per surfactant molecule. For the liquid expanded film, depending on the concentration, there is one couple of ions adsorbed per each 3-30 surfactant molecules. We analyzed which ion, the positive or the negative, stands closer to the surface, by measuring the effect of NaCl on the Volta potential of the monolayer. The potentiometric data suggest that Na(+) is specifically adsorbed, while Cl(-) remains in the diffuse layer, i.e., the surface is positively charged. The observed reverse Hofmeister series of the adsorptions of NaF, NaCl, and NaBr suggests the same conclusion holds for all these salts. The force that causes the adsorption of Na(+) seems to be the interaction of the ion with the dipole moment of the monolayer. PMID:27529571

  7. Adsorption of cadmium ions on oxygen surface sites in activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Y.F.; Thomas, K.M.

    2000-02-08

    Various types of oxygen functional groups were introduced onto the surface of coconut shell derived activated carbon by oxidation using nitric acid. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and selective neutralization were used to characterize the surface oxygen functional groups. The oxidized carbons were also heat treated to provide a suite of carbons where the oxygen functional groups of various thermal stabilities were varied progressively. The adsorption of cadmium ions was enhanced dramatically by oxidation of the carbon. The ratio of released protons to adsorbed cadmium ions on oxidized carbon was approximately 2, indicating cation exchange was involved in the process of adsorption. Na{sup +} exchange studies with the oxidized carbon gave a similar ratio. After heat treatment of the oxidized carbons to remove oxygen functional groups, the ratio of H{sup +} released to Cd{sup 2+} adsorbed and the adsorption capacity decreased significantly. Both reversible and irreversible processes were involved in cadmium ion adsorption with reversible adsorption having higher enthalpy. The irreversible adsorption resulted from cation exchange with carboxylic acid groups, whereas the reversible adsorption probably involved physisorption of the partially hydrated cadmium ion.

  8. ADSORPTION OF ORGANIC CATIONS TO NATURAL MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The factors that control the extent of adsorption of amphiphilic organic cations on environmental and pristine surfaces have been studied. he sorbents were kaolinite, montmorillonite, two aquifer materials, and a soil; solutions contained various concentrations of NaCl and CaC12,...

  9. ADSORPTION OF ORGANIC CATIONS TO NATURAL MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The factors that control the extent of adsorption of amphiphilic organic cations on environmental and pristine surfaces have been studied. The sorbents were kaolinite, montmorillonite, two aquifer materials, and a soil; solutions contained various concentrations of NaCl and CaCl,...

  10. Adsorptive Removal and Adsorption Kinetics of Fluoroquinolone by Nano-Hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yajun; Lan, Tao; Duan, Lunchao; Wang, Fenghe; Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Shengtian; Wei, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Various kinds of antibiotics, especially fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FQs) have been widely used for the therapy of infectious diseases in human and livestock. For their poorly absorbed by living organisms, large-scale misuse or abuse of FQs will foster drug resistance among pathogenic bacteria, as well as a variety of environmental problems when they were released in the environment. In this work, the adsorption properties of two FQs, namely norfloxacin (NOR) and ciprofloxacin (CIP), by nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HAP) were studied by batch adsorption experiments. The adsorption curves of FQs by n-HAP were simulated by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The results shown that NOR and CIP can be adsorbed effectively by the adsorbent of n-HAP, and the adsorption capacity of FQs increase with increasing dosage of n-HAP. The optimum dosage of n-HAP for FQs removal was 20 g·L-1, in which the removal efficiencies is 51.6% and 47.3%, and an adsorption equilibrium time is 20 min. The maximum removal efficiency occurred when pH is 6 for both FQs. The adsorption isotherm of FQs fits well for both Langmuir and Freundlich equations. The adsorption of both FQs by n-HAP follows second-order kinetics. PMID:26698573

  11. Modeling the Adsorption of Oxalate onto Montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Ramos, M Elena; Emiroglu, Caglayan; García, David; Sainz-Díaz, C Ignacio; Huertas, F Javier

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a multiscale modeling of the interaction of oxalate with clay mineral surfaces from macroscale thermodynamic equilibria simulations to atomistic calculations is presented. Previous results from macroscopic adsorption data of oxalate on montmorillonite in 0.01 M KNO3 media at 25 °C within the pH range from 2.5 to 9 have been used to develop a surface complexation model. The experimental adsorption edge data were fitted using the triple-layer model (TLM) with the aid of the FITEQL 4.0 computer program. Surface complexation of oxalate is described by two reactions: >AlOH + Ox(2-) + 2H(+) = >AlOxH + H2O (log K = 14.39) and >AlOH + Ox(2-) + H(+) = >AlOx(-) + H2O (log K = 10.39). The monodentate complex >AlOxH dominated adsorption below pH 4, and the bidentate complex >AlOx(-) was predominant at higher pH values. Both of the proposed inner-sphere oxalate species are qualitatively consistent with previously published diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopic results for oxalate on montmorillonite edge surface (Chem. Geol. 2014, 363, 283-292). Atomistic computational studies have been performed to understand the interactions at the molecular level between adsorbates and mineral surface, showing the atomic structures and IR frequency shifts of the adsorption complexes of oxalate with the edge surface of a periodic montmorillonite model. PMID:26444928

  12. Adsorption of aluminium by stream particulates.

    PubMed

    Tipping, E; Ohnstad, M; Woof, C

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study was made of the adsorption of aluminium by fine particulates from Whitray Beck, a hill stream in NW England. Adsorption increased with Al(3) activity, pH and concentration of particles, and could be quantitatively described by the empirical equation: [Formula: see text] [particles] where square brackets indicate concentrations, curly brackets, activities, and alpha, beta and gamma are constants with values of 5.14x10(-10) (mol litre(-1))(2.015) (g particles litre(-1))(-1), 0.457, and 1.472, respectively. For the experimental data, the equation gave a correlation ratio of 0.99. The equation accounts reasonably well for the adsorption of Al by particulates from seven other streams. In applying the equation, it must be borne in mind that the desorption kinetics of Al depend on pH, and rapid reversibility (<15min) can only be assumed for pHadsorption equation, and taking competition by dissolved humic substances into account, suggest that adsorbed Al may commonly account for a significant proportion (>or=10%) of total monomeric Al. PMID:15092454

  13. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium on dunite.

    PubMed

    Demetriou, Antri; Pashalidis, Ioannis

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents and discusses the effect of various physicochemical parameters (e.g. pH, ionic strength, Cr(VI) initial concentration, amount of the adsorbent, temperature and contact time between metal ion and adsorbent) on the adsorption efficiency of Cr(VI) on dunite in aqueous solutions under atmospheric conditions. Evaluation of the experimental data shows that dunite presents increased affinity for Cr(VI) over a wide pH range and Cr(VI) concentration, and the experimental data are well fitted by the K(d) adsorption model. The relative adsorption is pH dependent and decreases slightly (about 10%) with increasing pH, because of changes in the surface charge of the solid. The effect of the ionic strength is significant (particularly at low pH), indicating the predominance of outer-sphere complexes. Moreover, adsorption experiments at various temperatures, two different pH values (pH 3 and pH 8) and three different ionic strengths (0.0, 0.1 and 1.0 M NaClO(4)), indicate an endothermic but spontaneous entropy-driven processes. PMID:21330733

  14. PREDICTING PREFERENTIAL ADSORPTION OF ORGANICS BY ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Preferential adsorption of organic compounds onto activated carbon from dilute aqueous solutions was studied to develop a comprehensive theoretical basis for predicting adsorption of multicomponent solutes. The research program investigates why some solutes are strong adsorbers, ...

  15. Surface rheology of saponin adsorption layers.

    PubMed

    Stanimirova, R; Marinova, K; Tcholakova, S; Denkov, N D; Stoyanov, S; Pelan, E

    2011-10-18

    Extracts of the Quillaja saponaria tree contain natural surfactant molecules called saponins that very efficiently stabilize foams and emulsions. Therefore, such extracts are widely used in several technologies. In addition, saponins have demonstrated nontrivial bioactivity and are currently used as essential ingredients in vaccines, food supplements, and other health products. Previous preliminary studies showed that saponins have some peculiar surface properties, such as a very high surface modulus, that may have an important impact on the mechanisms of foam and emulsion stabilization. Here we present a detailed characterization of the main surface properties of highly purified aqueous extracts of Quillaja saponins. Surface tension isotherms showed that the purified Quillaja saponins behave as nonionic surfactants with a relatively high cmc (0.025 wt %). The saponin adsorption isotherm is described well by the Volmer equation, with an area per molecule of close to 1 nm(2). By comparing this area to the molecular dimensions, we deduce that the hydrophobic triterpenoid rings of the saponin molecules lie parallel to the air-water interface, with the hydrophilic glucoside tails protruding into the aqueous phase. Upon small deformation, the saponin adsorption layers exhibit a very high surface dilatational elasticity (280 ± 30 mN/m), a much lower shear elasticity (26 ± 15 mN/m), and a negligible true dilatational surface viscosity. The measured dilatational elasticity is in very good agreement with the theoretical predictions of the Volmer adsorption model (260 mN/m). The measured characteristic adsorption time of the saponin molecules is 4 to 5 orders of magnitude longer than that predicted theoretically for diffusion-controlled adsorption, which means that the saponin adsorption is barrier-controlled around and above the cmc. The perturbed saponin layers relax toward equilibrium in a complex manner, with several relaxation times, the longest of them being around 3

  16. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of sulforaphane adsorption on macroporous resin.

    PubMed

    Yuanfeng, Wu; Lei, Zhang; Jianwei, Mao; Shiwang, Liu; Jun, Huang; Yuru, You; Lehe, Mei

    2016-08-15

    The adsorption equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic of sulforaphane (SF) adsorption onto macroporous resin in aqueous phase were studied. The SP850 resin was screened as the appropriate resin for SF purification. From the equilibrium studies, the Redlich-Peterson model was found to be the best for description of the adsorption behavior of SF onto SP850 resin, followed by the Freundlich model and the Langmuir model. Batch equilibrium experiments demonstrated that, in the examined temperature range, the equilibrium adsorption capacity of SP850 resin decreased with increasing adsorption temperature. Thermodynamics studies indicated that the adsorption of SF was a physical, exothermic, and spontaneous process. The adsorption kinetics revealed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model was suitable to characterize the kinetics of adsorption of SF onto SP850. Finally, the intra-particle diffusion model demonstrated that SF diffused quickly into macropores, and that diffusion slowed down in the meso- and micropores. PMID:27391585

  17. Adsorption of diblock polypeptides on polystyrene latex.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ritesh; Forciniti, Daniel

    2012-10-30

    The adsorption of peptides at solid/liquid interfaces is affected by peptide/surface and peptide/peptide hydrophobic and electrostatic forces. Three diblock copolypeptides and two homopeptides were adsorbed on poly(styrene) nanospheres from water, water/methanol, and water/glycerol mixtures at different pH's to study both of these effects. Peptides with one hydrophilic (glutamic acid or lysine) and one nonpolar block (alanine) or with both hydrophilic blocks with opposite charges (glutamic acid and lysine) were chemically synthesized and used as adsorbates in this study. The amount adsorbed was determined, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) was used to measure the adsorbed layer thickness. It was found that peptide/surface and peptide/peptide electrostatic interactions dominate the adsorption process. Hydrophobic forces also play a role, but secondary to electrostatic forces. Positively charged blocks show high affinity for the surface, whereas negatively charged blocks were excluded from it. Poly(Lys) has the highest affinity by the surface, while (Glu)(14)-b-(Ala)(5) has the lowest. Adsorption of all peptides was inhibited by methanol and promoted by glycerol. The adsorption for (Lys)(5)-b-(Glu)(6) was extremely sensitive to pH, irrespective of cosolvent, whereas the thickness for (Lys)(30)-b-(Ala)(41) was sensitive to pH as well as cosolvent. Aggregation was observed in the presence of the nanosurfaces but not in the bulk peptides under some pH and solvent conditions. PMID:23009064

  18. Adsorption of SO2 on bituminous coal char and activated carbon fiber

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeBarr, J.A.; Lizzio, A.A.; Daley, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    The SO2 adsorption behaviors of activated carbons produced from Illinois coal and of commercially prepared activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were compared. There was no relation between surface area of coal-based carbons and SO2 adsorption, whereas adsorption of SO2 on the series of ACFs was inversely proportional to N2 BET surface area. Higher surface area ACFs had wider pores and adsorbed less SO2; thus, pore size distribution is thought to play a significant role in SO2 adsorption for these materials. Oxidation with HNO3 and/or H2SO4, followed by heat treatment at 700-925 ??C to remove carbon-oxygen complexes, resulted in increased SO2 adsorption for both coal chars and ACFs. This behavior was explained by an increase in the available number of free sites, previously occupied by oxygen and now available for SO2 adsorption. The use of nitrogen-containing functional groups on ACFs of proper pore size shows promise for further increasing SO2 adsorption capacities. Knowledge of the relationship among the number of free sites, pore size, and surface chemistry on corresponding SO2 adsorption should lead to the development of more efficient adsorbents prepared from either coal or ACFs.

  19. Atomistic simulations of surfactant adsorption kinetics at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskrenova, Eugeniya; Patnaik, Soumya

    2014-03-01

    Heat transfer control and enhancement is an important and challenging problem in a variety of industrial and technological applications including aircraft thermal management. The role of additives in nucleate boiling and phase change in general has long been recognized and studied experimentally and modeled theoretically but in-depth description and atomistic understanding of the multiscale processes involved are still needed for better prediction and control of the heat transfer efficiency. Surfactant additives have been experimentally observed to either enhance or inhibit the boiling heat transfer depending on the surfactant concentration and chemistry and, on a molecular level, their addition leads to dynamic surface tension and changes in interfacial and transfer properties, thus contributing to the complexity of the problem. We present our atomistic modeling study of the interfacial adsorption kinetics of aqueous surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) systems at a range of concentrations at room and boiling temperatures. Classical molecular dynamics and Umbrella Sampling simulations were used to study the surfactant transport properties and estimate the adsorption and desorption rates at liquid-vacuum and liquid-solid interfaces. The authors gratefully acknowledge funding from AFOSR Thermal Science Program and the Air Force Research Laboratory DoD Supercomputing Resource Center for computing time and resources.

  20. Factors affecting the adsorption of xenon on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Underhill, D.W.; DiCello, D.C.; Scaglia, L.A.; Watson, J.A.

    1986-08-01

    The presence of water vapor was found to interfere strongly with the dynamic adsorption of /sup 133/Xe on coconut-base activated charcoal. The percent loss in the xenon adsorption coefficient was similar to values reported earlier for the adsorption of krypton on humidified charcoal. Attempts to increase the adsorption of xenon by (a) using a petroleum-based adsorbent with an extremely high surface area and (b) by impregnation of the adsorbent with iodine were not successful.

  1. The Calculation of Adsorption Isotherms from Chromatographic Peak Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, M. G.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between adsorption isotherms and elution peak shapes in gas chromatography, and describes a laboratory experiment which involves the adsorption of hexane, cyclohexane, and benzene on alumina at different temperatures. (MLH)

  2. Adsorption isotherm of non-azeotropic solution onto porous adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, A.; Ramlan, N. A.; Anisuzzaman, S. M.; Chu, C. M.; Farm, Y. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Adsorption isotherm is essential component in the understanding of the adsorption process. Several methods of the measurements, analysis and interpretation of adsorption from solution have been reported in the literature. Most of the measurements of adsorption isotherm from solution were involved the measurement of excess isotherm conducted at low region of sorbates concentration. Direct interpretation of excess adsorption isotherm as adsorption isotherm is always been practice. Therefore, in this work a study on the measurement of the adsorption isotherm from solution of non-azeotropic organic solvent mixture onto porous adsorbents for whole range of liquid concentration was conducted. The study included the measurement of excess adsorption isotherm using conventional technique. Theoretical analysis and interpretation of adsorption isotherm from the excess isotherm were conducted using Pseudo Ideal Adsorption, Gibbs Dividing Plane Model and Langmuir-Fruendlich binary isotherm model. For organic solvents, acetone and propanol were chosen as the adsorbates due to the non-azeotropic properties in the mixture. Activated carbon and silicalite were chosen as adsorbents due to the different in their porosity such as macro porous and micro porous structure. The result of the study has revealed that the adsorption isotherm of non-azeotropic mixture onto activated carbon and silicalite can be interpreted as monolayer type of adsorption.

  3. Removal of phenol from aqueous solutions by adsorption.

    PubMed

    Roostaei, Nadia; Tezel, F Handan

    2004-02-01

    Experiments have been conducted to examine the liquid-phase adsorption of phenol from water by silica gel, HiSiv 3000, activated alumina, activated carbon, Filtrasorb-400, and HiSiv 1000. Experiments were carried out for the analysis of adsorption equilibrium capacities and kinetics. The adsorption isotherm model of the Langmuir-Freundlich type was the best to describe adsorption equilibrium data for phenol for the adsorbents studied. Results of kinetic experiments indicated that HiSiv 1000 had the highest rate of adsorption among the adsorbents studied and therefore more detailed studies were carried out with this adsorbent. The influence of particle size, temperature, and thermal regeneration on adsorption of phenol by HiSiv 1000 was evaluated. From particle size experiments it appeared that adsorption capacity of HiSiv 1000 did not change by changing the particle size, but the rate of adsorption decreased considerably by increasing the particle size. The effect of temperature on adsorption was studied by determining equilibrium isotherms for HiSiv 1000 at 25, 40, and 55 degrees C. The results showed that adsorption capacity decreased with increasing temperature. Thermal regeneration of HiSiv 1000 was performed at 360 degrees C. It was observed that adsorption capacity of HiSiv 1000 did not change after 14 regeneration cycles. Equilibrium experiments showed that the adsorption capacities of activated carbon and Filtrasorb-400 were several times higher than that of HiSiv 1000. PMID:15160741

  4. Adsorption and Degradation of Mesotrione in Four Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adsorption and degradation of mesotrione in four soils Dale Shaner, Galen Brunk, Scott Nissen and Phil Westra The adsorption and fate of mesotrione was studied in four diverse soil types varying in pH, organic matter (OM), and texture. The adsorption of mesotrione to each soil was determined using ...

  5. [Adsorption and Desorption Characteristics of Endosulfan in Purple Soil].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Guo-can; Zhu, Heng; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Zhu, Xiu-ying; Hu, Shu-chun; Wu, Ya-lin

    2015-09-01

    In order to reveal the residual process of endosulfan in purple soil and protect soil ecological environment, the adsorption and desorption characteristics of endosulfan in purple soil were investigated, and effects of temperature, adsorbent amount, and initial pH of adsorption solution on the adsorption capacity were also examined by static adsorption and desorption experiments. The results showed that the adsorption kinetic process could be well described by the second-order kinetic equation with the initial rate constants of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 157 and 0. 115 mg.(g.min)-1, respectively. The adsorption thermodynamic process could be well described by the Langmuir isotherm with the maximum adsorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 257 mg . g -1 and 0. 155 mg . g -1, respectively. The adsorption process of endosulfan in purple soil may be an exothermic physicochemical process, and is dominated by physical adsorption. Under the experimental conditions examined in this study, the initial pH of adsorption solution had a relative great influence on the adsorption capacity, whereas the temperature and adsorbent amount had no significant influence. The desorption experiments found that the maximum desorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan adsorbed in purple soil were 0. 029 mg . g -1 and 0. 017 mg . g -1 at 6 and 4 h, and accounted for 10. 5% and 16. 1% in the maximum adsorption capacities, respectively. PMID:26717711

  6. On the thermodynamics of refrigerant + heterogeneous solid surfaces adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Azhar Bin; Li, Ang; Thu, Kyaw; Ng, K C; Chun, Wongee

    2013-11-26

    This Article presents a theoretical framework for the understanding of pressurized adsorption systems using the statistical rate methodology. Utilizing results from the statistical rate theory, basic thermodynamic variables including enthalpy (h(a)), entropy (s(a)), and the specific heat capacity (c(p,a)) of the adsorbed phase are derived using the thermodynamic requirements of chemical equilibrium, Gibbs law, as well as Maxwell relations. A built-in constant (K) describes the adsorbed molecular partition function (q(s)), and it captures the heterogeneous properties of the adsorbent + adsorbate pair at equilibrium states. Improved adsorbed-phase volume considerations were incorporated in the formulations of these variables where they could be utilized with relative ease for analyzing the energetic performances of any practical adsorption system. In this Article, we have demonstrated how derived thermodynamic quantities can bridge the information gap with respect to the states of adsorbed phase, as well as resolved some theoretical inconsistencies that were found in previously derived quantities. Experimentally, the adsorption isotherms of propane (refrigerant) on activated carbon powder (Maxsorb III) for temperatures from 5 to 75 °C and pressures up to 8 bar are presented, and they are used to illustrate the behaviors of the adsorbed-phase during uptakes, temperatures, and pressure excursions or changes. PMID:24191669

  7. Influence of Soil Solution Salinity on Molybdenum Adsorption by Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molybdenum (Mo) adsorption on five arid-zone soils from California was investigated as a function of equilibrium solution Mo concentration (0-30 mg L-1), solution pH (4-8), and electrical conductivity (EC = 0.3 or 8 dS m-1). Molybdenum adsorption decreased with increasing pH. An adsorption maximum...

  8. Evaluation of the adsorption capacity of alkali-treated waste materials for the adsorption of sulphamethoxazole.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Lisha

    2012-01-01

    The present work is to develop potential adsorbents from waste material and employ them for the removal of a hazardous antibacterial, sulphamethoxazole, from the wastewater by the Adsorption technique. The Adsorption technique was used to impound the dangerous antibiotics from wastewater using Deoiled Soya (DOS), an agricultural waste, and Water Hyacinth (WH), a prolific colonizer. The adsorption capacity of these adsorbents was further enhanced by treating them with sodium hydroxide solution and it was seen that the adsorption capacity increases by 10 to 25%. Hence a comparative account of the adsorption studies of all the four adsorbents, i.e. DOS, Alkali-treated DOS, WH and Alkali-treated Water Hyacinth has been discussed in this paper. Different isotherms like Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich were also deduced from the adsorption data. Isotherm studies were in turn used in estimating the thermodynamic parameters. DOS showed sorption capacity of 0.0007 mol g(-1) while Alkali-treated Deoiled Soya exhibited 0.0011 mol g(-1) of sorption capacity, which reveals that the adsorption is higher in case of alkali-treated adsorbent. The mean sorption energy (E) was obtained between 9 and 12 kJ mol, which shows that the reaction proceeds by ion exchange reaction. Kinetic study reveals that the reaction follows pseudo-second-order rate equation. Moreover, mass transfer studies performed for the ongoing processes show that the mass transfer coefficient obtained for alkali-treated moieties was higher than the parent moieties. The breakthrough curves plotted from the column studies show percentage saturation of 90-98%. About 87-97% of sulphamethoxazole was recovered from column by desorption. PMID:22508113

  9. Binary adsorption equilibrium of carbon dioxide and water vapor on activated alumina.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Xiao, Penny; Webley, Paul

    2009-09-15

    Adsorption equilibria of a CO2/H2O binary mixture on activated alumina F-200 were measured at several temperatures and over a wide range of concentrations from 4% to around 90% of the saturated water vapor pressure. In comparison with the single-component data, the loading of CO2 was not reduced in the presence of H2O, whereas at low relative humidity the adsorption of H2O was depressed. The binary system was described by a competitive/cooperative adsorption model where the readily adsorbed water layers acted as secondary sites for further CO2 adsorption via hydrogen bonding or hydration reaction. The combination of kinetic models, namely, a Langmuir isotherm for characterizing pure CO2 adsorption and a BET isotherm for H2O, was extended to derive a binary adsorption equilibrium model for the CO2/H2O mixture. Models based on the ideal adsorbed solution theory of Myers and Prausnitz failed to characterize the data over the whole composition range, and a large deviation of binary CO2/H2O equilibrium from ideal solution behavior was observed. The extended Langmuir-BET (LBET) isotherm, analogous to the extended Langmuir equation, drastically underestimated the CO2 loading. By incorporating the interactions between CO2 and H2O molecules on the adsorbent surface and taking into account the effect of nonideality, the realistic interactive LBET (R-LBET) model was found to be in very good agreement with the experimental data. The derived binary isosteric heat of adsorption showed that the heat was reduced by competitive adsorption but promoted by cooperative adsorption. PMID:19678623

  10. [Adsorption characteristics of the antibiotic sulfanilamide onto rice husk ash].

    PubMed

    Ji, Ying-Xue; Wang, Feng-He; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Yan-Hong; Wang, Guo-Xiang; Gu, Zhong-Zhu

    2013-10-01

    Under different conditions of initial rice husk ash (RHA) dosage, oscillating temperature, oscillating frequency and solution pH, the adsorption characteristics of sulfanilamide on RHA with the change of time and its adsorption kinetics were investigated. RHA was characterized by SEM and FTIR before and after sulfanilamide adsorption. The results indicated that the adsorption characteristics of sulfanilamide on RHA was influenced by RHA dosage, oscillating temperature, oscillating frequency and solution pH. Within the RHA dosing range (0. 1-2.0 g.L-1) in this experiment, the optimal temperature for the adsorption was 25C , and with the increase of RHA dosage, the removal efficiency of sulfanilamide increased, the time required to reach adsorption equilibrium was shortened and the adsorptive quantity of sulfanilamide by per unit mass of RHA decreased. A high oscillating frequency was used to ensure the adsorption effect when the RHA concentration was high. Strong acidic and strong alkaline conditions were conducive to the adsorption of sulfanilamide. The analysis of adsorption dynamics showed that for the adsorption process with high RHA dosage ( >or= 1.0 g.L-1), the pseudo-second-order model fitted the adsorption behavior well, and the process was controlled by physical and chemical adsorption. Intraparticle diffusion model showed that the adsorption process was controlled by both membrane diffusion and internal diffusion, and the influence of the former became more obvious with the increase of the adsorbent concentration. Both the SEM and FTIR spectra proved the effective adsorption of sulfanilamide by RHA. PMID:24364310

  11. Adsorption of hydrogen sulfide onto activated carbon fibers: effect of pore structure and surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenguo; Kwon, Seokjoon; Borguet, Eric; Vidic, Radisav

    2005-12-15

    To understand the nature of H2S adsorption onto carbon surfaces under dry and anoxic conditions, the effects of carbon pore structure and surface chemistry were studied using activated carbon fibers (ACFs) with different pore structures and surface areas. Surface pretreatments, including oxidation and heattreatment, were conducted before adsorption/desorption tests in a fixed-bed reactor. Raw ACFs with higher surface area showed greater adsorption and retention of sulfur, and heat treatment further enhanced adsorption and retention of sulfur. The retained amount of hydrogen sulfide correlated well with the amount of basic functional groups on the carbon surface, while the desorbed amount reflected the effect of pore structure. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the retained sulfurous compounds were strongly bonded to the carbon surface. In addition, surface chemistry of the sorbent might determine the predominant form of adsorbate on the surface. PMID:16475362

  12. Adsorption of antimony onto iron oxyhydroxides: adsorption behavior and surface structure.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuejun; Wu, Zhijun; He, Mengchang; Meng, Xiaoguang; Jin, Xin; Qiu, Nan; Zhang, Jing

    2014-07-15

    Antimony is detected in soil and water with elevated concentration due to a variety of industrial applications and mining activities. Though antimony is classified as a pollutant of priority interest by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and Europe Union (EU), very little is known about its environmental behavior and adsorption mechanism. In this study, the adsorption behaviors and surface structure of antimony (III/V) on iron oxides were investigated using batch adsorption techniques, surface complexation modeling (SCM), X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). The adsorption isotherms and edges indicated that the affinity of Sb(V) and Sb(III) toward the iron oxides depended on the Sb species, solution pH, and the characteristics of iron oxides. Sb(V) adsorption was favored at acidic pH and decreased dramatically with increasing pH, while Sb(III) adsorption was constant over a broad pH range. When pH is higher than 7, Sb(III) adsorption by goethite and hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was greater than Sb(V). EXAFS analysis indicated that the majority of Sb(III), either adsorbed onto HFO or co-precipitated by FeCl3, was oxidized into Sb(V) probably due to the involvement of O2 in the long duration of sample preservation. Only one Sb-Fe subshell was filtered in the EXAFS spectra of antimony adsorption onto HFO, with the coordination number of 1.0-1.9 attributed to bidentate mononuclear edge-sharing ((2)E) between Sb and HFO. PMID:24910911

  13. Adsorption of ammonium dinitramide (ADN) from aqueous solutions. 1. Adsorption on powdered activated charcoal.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, G; Venkatachalam, S; Ninan, K N; Sadhana, R; Alwan, S; Abarna, V; Joseph, M A

    2003-03-17

    Investigations on the adsorption of ammonium dinitramide (NH(4)N(NO(2))(2)) (ADN) from aqueous solutions on powdered activated charcoal (PAC) were carried out in order to find out an effective and easier method of separating ADN from aqueous solutions. The effectiveness of PAC in the selective adsorption of ADN from aqueous solutions of ADN (ADN-F) and ADN in presence of sulfate (SO(4)(2-)) and nitrate (NO(3)(-)) ions (ADN-PS) was examined and compared using batch and column methods. The adsorption process follows both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms and the isotherm parameters for the models were determined. The observed data favor the formation of monolayer adsorption. The adsorption capacities were found to be 63.3, 119, 105.3 and 82 mg of ADN per g of PAC for ADN-F (batch), ADN-PS (batch), ADN-F (column) and ADN-PS (column), respectively. Break-through curves for ADN-F and ADN-PS were obtained for the optimization of separation of ADN from aqueous solutions. Elution curves were generated for the desorption of ADN from PAC using hot water as eluent. PMID:12628781

  14. Thermoreversible crystallization of charged colloids due to adsorption/desorption of ionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Murakado, Ai; Toyotama, Akiko; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Nagano, Ryota; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-03-01

    We report that charged colloids exhibit thermoreversible crystallization via the adsorption of ionic surfactants onto particle surfaces. Due to the temperature dependence of the adsorption quantity, the colloids crystallized upon cooling and melted upon heating. To clarify the influences of surfactant adsorption on the crystallization, polystyrene (PS) particles dispersed in ethylene glycol (EG)/water mixtures were employed, enabling continuous tuning of the adsorption quantity by changing the EG concentration. The thermoreversible crystallization/melting behavior was found to be mainly attributable to changes in the ionic strength of the medium resulting from variation in the concentration of the non-adsorbed ionic surfactant molecules with temperature. We expect that the present findings will be useful for fine control of colloidal crystallization and the further study of colloidal crystallization in low permittivity media. PMID:26674236

  15. Adsorption of ammonia on multilayer iron phthalocyanine

    SciTech Connect

    Isvoranu, Cristina; Knudsen, Jan; Ataman, Evren; Andersen, Jesper N.; Schnadt, Joachim; Schulte, Karina; Wang Bin; Bocquet, Marie-Laure

    2011-03-21

    The adsorption of ammonia on multilayers of well-ordered, flat-lying iron phthalocyanine (FePc) molecules on a Au(111) support was investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the electron-donating ammonia molecules coordinate to the metal centers of iron phthlalocyanine. The coordination of ammonia induces changes of the electronic structure of the iron phthalocyanine layer, which, in particular, lead to a modification of the FePc valence electron spin.

  16. A COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF METAL AND COVALENT ORGANIC FRAMEWORKS USED IN ADSORPTION COOLING

    SciTech Connect

    Jenks, Jeromy WJ; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Motkuri, Radha K.; Paul, Brian; McGrail, B. Peter

    2015-07-09

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have recently attracted enormous interest over the past few years due to their potential applications in energy storage and gas separation. However, there have been few reports on MOFs for adsorption cooling applications. Adsorption cooling technology is an established alternative to mechanical vapor compression refrigeration systems. Adsorption cooling is an excellent alternative in industrial environments where waste heat is available. Applications also include hybrid systems, refrigeration, power-plant dry cooling, cryogenics, vehicular systems and building HVAC. Adsorption based cooling and refrigeration systems have several advantages including few moving parts and negligible power consumption. Key disadvantages include large thermal mass, bulkiness, complex controls, and low COP (0.2-0.5). We explored the use of metal organic frameworks that have very high mass loading and relatively low heats of adsorption, with certain combinations of refrigerants to demonstrate a new type of highly efficient adsorption chiller. An adsorption chiller based on MOFs suggests that a thermally-driven COP>1 may be possible with these materials, which would represent a fundamental breakthrough in performance of adsorption chiller technology. Computational fluid dynamics combined with a system level lumped-parameter model have been used to project size and performance for chillers with a cooling capacity ranging from a few kW to several thousand kW. In addition, a cost model has been developed to project manufactured cost of entire systems. These systems rely on stacked micro/mini-scale architectures to enhance heat and mass transfer. Presented herein are computational and experimental results for hydrophyilic MOFs, fluorophilic MOFs and also flourophilic Covalent-organic frameworks (COFs).

  17. Adsorption of maleic anhydride on Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Godhuli; Heikkinen, Olli; Vestberg, Matias; Mether, Lotta; Nordlund, Kai; Lahtinen, Jouko

    2014-02-01

    The surface chemistry of maleic anhydride (MA) has been studied on Pt(111) with temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Adsorption of MA takes place at 170 K forming multilayers. We have studied the behavior of distinct carbon and oxygen species of MA depending on the surface temperature. MA-TPD indicates three main desorption temperatures; at 240 K, approximately 60% of total MA on the surface shows molecular desorption. At high temperatures (360 and 550 K) MA shows dissociative decomposition with production of C2H2, CO and CO2 fragments. A plausible decomposition pathway of MA on the Pt(111) surface is discussed. DFT calculations provide details of the adsorption geometry.

  18. Adsorption of Atmospheric Gases on Pu Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A J; Holliday, K S; Stanford, J A; Grant, W K; Erler, R G; Allen, P G; McLean, W; Roussel, P

    2012-03-29

    Surface adsorption represents a competition between collision and scattering processes that depend on surface energy, surface structure and temperature. The surface reactivity of the actinides can add additional complexity due to radiological dissociation of the gas and electronic structure. Here we elucidate the chemical bonding of gas molecules adsorbed on Pu metal and oxide surfaces. Atmospheric gas reactions were studied at 190 and 300 K using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Evolution of the Pu 4f and O 1s core-level states were studied as a function of gas dose rates to generate a set of Langmuir isotherms. Results show that the initial gas dose forms Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the Pu metal surface followed by the formation of PuO{sub 2} resulting in a layered oxide structure. This work represents the first steps in determining the activation energy for adsorption of various atmospheric gases on Pu.

  19. Adsorption of herbicides using activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Derbyshire, F.; Jagtoyen, M.; Lafferty, C.; Kimber, G.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the results of research in which novel activated carbons have been examined for their efficacy in water treatment and, specifically, for the adsorption of a common herbicide and wood preservative, sodium pentachlorophenolate. To place this work in context, the introduction will discuss first some of the considerations of using activated carbons for water treatment, and then certain aspects of the authors research that has led to this particular topic.

  20. [Water binding of adsorptive immobilized lipases].

    PubMed

    Loose, S; Meusel, D; Muschter, A; Ruthe, B

    1990-01-01

    It is supposed that not only the total water content of lipase preparations but more their state of water binding is of technological importance in enzymatic interesterification reactions in systems nearly free from water. The isotherms at 65 degrees C of two microbial lipases immobilized on various adsorbents as well as different adsorbents themselves are shown. The water binding capacity in the range of water content of technological interest decreases from the anion exchange resin Amberlyst A 21 via nonpolar adsorbent Amberlite XAD-2 to kieselguhr Celite 545. It is demonstrated that water binding by lipases is depending on temperature but is also affected by adsorptive immobilization. Adsorptive immobilized lipases show hysteresis, which is very important for preparing a definite water content of the enzyme preparations. PMID:2325750

  1. Kinetics of phosphate adsorption on goethite: comparing batch adsorption and ATR-IR measurements.

    PubMed

    Luengo, Carina; Brigante, Maximiliano; Antelo, Juan; Avena, Marcelo

    2006-08-15

    The adsorption kinetics of phosphate on goethite has been studied by batch adsorption experiments and by in situ ATR-IR spectroscopy at different pH, initial phosphate concentrations and stirring rates. Batch adsorption results are very similar to those reported by several authors, and show a rather fast initial adsorption taking place in a few minutes followed by a slower process taking place in days or weeks. The adsorption kinetics could be also monitored by integrating the phosphate signals obtained in ATR-IR experiments, and a very good agreement between both techniques was found. At pH 4.5 two surface complexes, the bidentate nonprotonated (FeO)(2)PO(2) and the bidentate protonated (FeO)(2)(OH)PO complexes, are formed at the surface. There are small changes in the relative concentrations of these species as the reaction proceeds, and they seem to evolve in time rather independently. At pH 7.5 and 9 the dominating surface species is (FeO)(2)PO(2), which is accompanied by an extra unidentified species at low concentration. They also seem to evolve independently as the reaction proceeds. The results are consistent with a mechanism that involve a fast adsorption followed by a slow diffusion into pores, and are not consistent with surface precipitation of iron phosphate. PMID:16643942

  2. Removal of mercury by adsorption: a review.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin-Gang; Yue, Bao-Yu; Wu, Xiong-Wei; Liu, Qi; Jiao, Fei-Peng; Jiang, Xin-Yu; Chen, Xiao-Qing

    2016-03-01

    Due to natural and production activities, mercury contamination has become one of the major environmental problems over the world. Mercury contamination is a serious threat to human health. Among the existing technologies available for mercury pollution control, the adsorption process can get excellent separation effects and has been further studied. This review is attempted to cover a wide range of adsorbents that were developed for the removal of mercury from the year 2011. Various adsorbents, including the latest adsorbents, are presented along with highlighting and discussing the key advancements on their preparation, modification technologies, and strategies. By comparing their adsorption capacities, it is evident from the literature survey that some adsorbents have shown excellent potential for the removal of mercury. However, there is still a need to develop novel, efficient adsorbents with low cost, high stability, and easy production and manufacture for practical utility. PMID:26620868

  3. Adsorption of bacteriocins by ingestible silica compounds.

    PubMed

    Wan, J; Gordon, J; Hickey, M W; Mawson, R F; Coventry, M J

    1996-08-01

    Bacteriocins including nisin, pediocin PO2, brevicin 286 and piscicolin 126 were adsorbed from culture supernates by various food-grade porous silica anti-caking agents and the food colourant, titanium dioxide. All the porous silica (calcium silicate or silicon dioxide) materials showed substantial capacity in adsorbing bacteriocin activities from the culture supernate and biological activity was recovered in the adsorbents. In contrast, the food colourant titanium dioxide adsorbed most of the bacteriocin activity from the supernate, with minimal biological activity retained in the adsorbent. Experiments with piscicolin 126 showed that optimum adsorption could be achieved with Micro-Cel E within 30 min, independent of the supernate pH (2.0-10.0). Piscicolin activity of up to 5 x 10(7) AU g(-1) of Micro-Cel E was obtained after adsorption from culture supernates and the adsorbed piscicolin demonstrated substantial biological activity against Listeria monocytogenes in both broth and a milk growth medium. PMID:8926221

  4. [Characteristic of ammonia nitrogen adsorption on karst underground river sediments].

    PubMed

    Guo, Fang; Chen, Kun-Kun; Jiang, Guang-Hui

    2011-02-01

    Karst aquifers are one of the most important aquifers in Southwestern China. One of the characteristics of karst aquifers is the enhanced permeability permits high flow velocities are capable of transporting suspended and bedload sediments. Mobile sediment in karst may act as a vector for the transport of contaminates. 14 sediment samples were collected from two underground rivers in two typical karst areas in Liuzhou city, Guangxi Autonomous Region, China. According to simulated experiment methods, characteristic of adsorption of ammonia nitrogen on sediment was studied. The results of ammonia nitrogen adsorption dynamics on sediments showed that the maximum adsorption velocity was less than 2 h. The adsorption balance quantity in 5 h accounted for 71% - 98% of the maximum adsorption quantity. The maximum adsorption quantity of ammonia nitrogen was 385.5 mg/kg, which was sediment from a cave in the middle areas of Guancun underground river system. The study of isotherm adsorption indicated adsorption quantity of NH4+ increase followed by incremental balance concentration of NH4+ in the aquatic phase. Adsorption quantity of ammonia nitrogen in sediments has a relative linear relationship with adsorption balance concentrations. Adsorption-desorption balance concentrations were all low, indicating sediments from underground rivers have great adsorption potential. Under the condition of low and high concentrations of ammonia nitrogen in overlying water, Langmuir and Tempkin couldn't simulate or simulate results couldn't reach remarkable level, whilst Linear and Freundlich models could simulate well. Research on different type sediments, sampling times and depths from two underground rivers shows characteristic of ammonia nitrogen adsorption on karst underground river sediments doesn't have good correspondence with the type of sediments. One of the reasons is there is no big difference between sediments in the development of climate, geology, hydrological conditions

  5. Interlamellar adsorption of carbon dioxide by smectites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fripiat, J.J.; Cruz, M.I.; Bohor, B.F.; Thomas, J., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The adsorption of CO2 at low temperature (~ -70 ??C) on thin films of homoionic smectites was studied by X-ray diffraction and by i.r. absorption. An increase in the d001 spacings of these clay films upon adsorption of CO2 was observed. In addition, a dichroic effect was readily discernible by comparing the i.r. spectra at two different orientations of the smectite films; i.e. with the film normal and tilted 35 with respect to the i.r. beam. The CO2 stretching vibration at 2350 cm-1 was used for the i.r. study. These observations conclusively show that CO2 intercalates the smectite structure rather than being adsorbed only in pores between clay tactoids- the limiting process proposed by other investigators. Adsorption isotherm data from earlier surface area studies are re-examined here through application of the Dubinin equation. Again, intercalation is demonstrated by convergence of the plotted experimental data for smectites containing large monovalent interlayer cations toward a pore volume that is near the calculated theoretical value for a monolayer of intercalated CO2. Scanning electron photomicrographs of Li-and Cs- smectites provide additional evidence that aggregation differences are not responsible for the large observed difference in BET surface areas obtained for these smectites with CO2 as the adsorbate. At low magnification, visual differences in macro-aggregates are apparent, but at high magnification no significant differences are observed in the micro-structure of individual aggregates where the major amount of gas adsorption really occurs. ?? 1974.

  6. Interfacial adsorption and aggregation of amphiphilic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, David

    2012-02-01

    The adsorption and aggregation on liquid interfaces of proteins is important in many biological contexts, such as the formation of aerial structures, immune response, and catalysis. Likewise the adsorption of proteins onto interfaces has applications in food technology, drug delivery, and in personal care products. As such there has been much interest in the study of a wide range of biomolecules at liquid interfaces. One class of proteins that has attracted particular attention are hydrophobins, small, fungal proteins with a distinct, amphiphilic surface structure. This makes these proteins highly surface active and they recently attracted much interest. In order to understand their potential applications a microscopic description of their interfacial and self-assembly is necessary and molecular simulation provides a powerful tool for providing this. In this presentation I will describe some recent work using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to study the interfacial and aggregation behaviour of hydrophobins. Specifically this will present the calculation of their adsorption strength at oil-water and air-water interfaces, investigate the stability of hydrophobin aggregates in solution and their interaction with surfactants.

  7. Adsorption of copper at aqueous illite surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Q.; Sun, Z.; Forsling, W.; Tang, H.

    1997-03-01

    In this paper, the authors conducted potentiometric titrations, batch adsorption experiments and FT-IR analysis to study the uptake of copper in illite/water suspensions and then applied the constant capacitance surface complexation model to interpret the reaction mechanism at the aqueous illite surfaces. This research shows that the copper adsorption at these surfaces is strongly dependent on pH and that the adsorption causes a deprotonation of surface groups. The authors propose that the uptake of copper in the carbonate-free illite suspensions can be explained by the formation of mononuclear surface complexes, {triple_bond}SOCu{sup +} and {triple_bond}SOCuOH, and a multinuclear surface complex, {triple_bond}SOCu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}{sup +}, followed by the formation of a bulk precipitate, Cu(OH){sub 2}(s), or a surface precipitate, {triple_bond}SOCu{sub 2}(OH){sub 3}(sp). For the illite suspensions containing carbonates, the authors propose that the copper-illite interaction can be depicted by the formation of mononuclear surface complexes, {triple_bond}SOCu{sup +} and {triple_bond}SOCuOH, followed by the formation of a copper hydroxylcarbonate precipitate, Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}(s), rather than a copper hydroxide precipitate. The existence of Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}(s) in the carbonate-containing illite suspensions was identified by FT-IR analysis.

  8. Influence of calcium of the adsorption properties of EOR polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, L.T.; Lecourtier, J.; Chauveteau, G. )

    1988-05-01

    A controlling factor in the success of polymer flooding in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is the adsorption of polymers on reservoir rocks. Polymer adsorption depletes polymer from the mobility control slug, leading to delayed oil recovery and thus rendering the EOR process un-economical. Although there has been extensive research in the field of polymer adsorption, a comprehensive study of adsorption of high molecular weight EOR polymers under imposed field conditions have been few. One of the commonly encountered conditions is the presence of high levels of monovalent and multivalent ions which can interact with both polymers and solid surfaces, hence complicating further the adsorption process. Others have dealt mainly with methodologies for determining the adsorption of both polyacrylamides and xanthan on mineral surfaces, and the influence of pH and monovalent ions on adsorption of these polymers. This study aims at determining the effects of divalent ions, namely calcium, on the adsorption of polyacrylamides and xanthan on mineral supports. In addition, the solution behavior of the polymers in the presence of calcium is investigated and related to the adsorption properties.

  9. Methane adsorption in nanoporous carbon: the numerical estimation of optimal storage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, L.; Kuchta, B.; Firlej, L.; Roth, M. W.; Wexler, C.

    2016-05-01

    The efficient storage and transportation of natural gas is one of the most important enabling technologies for use in energy applications. Adsorption in porous systems, which will allow the transportation of high-density fuel under low pressure, is one of the possible solutions. We present and discuss extensive grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulation results of the adsorption of methane into slit-shaped graphitic pores of various widths (between 7 Å and 50 Å), and at pressures P between 0 bar and 360 bar. Our results shed light on the dependence of film structure on pore width and pressure. For large widths, we observe multi-layer adsorption at supercritical conditions, with excess amounts even at large distances from the pore walls originating from the attractive interaction exerted by a very high-density film in the first layer. We are also able to successfully model the experimental adsorption isotherms of heterogeneous activated carbon samples by means of an ensemble average of the pore widths, based exclusively on the pore-size distributions (PSD) calculated from subcritical nitrogen adsorption isotherms. Finally, we propose a new formula, based on the PSD ensemble averages, to calculate the isosteric heat of adsorption of heterogeneous systems from single-pore-width calculations. The methods proposed here will contribute to the rational design and optimization of future adsorption-based storage tanks.

  10. Multisite adsorption of cadmium on goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Venema, P.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, W.H. van

    1996-11-10

    Recently a new general ion adsorption model has been developed for ion binding to mineral surfaces (Hiemstra and van Riemsdijk, 1996). The model uses the Pauling concept of charge distribution (CD) and is an extension of the multi-site complexation (MUSIC) approach. In the CD-MUSIC model the charge of an adsorbing ion that forms an inner sphere complex is distributed over its ligands, which are present in two different electrostatic planes. In this paper the authors have applied the CD-MUSIC model to the adsorption of metal cations, using an extended data set for cadmium adsorbing on goethite. The adsorption of cadmium and the cadmium-proton exchange ratio were measured as function of metal ion concentration, pH, and ionic strength. The data could be described well, taking into account the surface heterogeneity resulting from the presence of two different crystal planes (the dominant 110 face and the minor 021 face). The surface species used in the model are consistent with recent EXAFS data. In accordance with the EXAFS results, high-affinity complexes at the 021 face were used in the model.

  11. Adsorption and Separation Modeling of Porous Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malanoski, Anthony; van Swol, Frank

    2001-03-01

    With the advent of self-assembly techniques has come the potential to tailor materials for adsorption and separation applications. For example, using surfactants as templating agents it is now feasible to finely control both the three-dimensional (3D) porosity as well as the surface chemistry. With an eye on assisting the emerging materials design we have embarked on a program that focuses on modeling adsorption/desorption, reactions and permeation phenomena in such structures. What makes the modeling particularly challenging is the coupling of length scales. The role of the atomic length scale features such as surface reactions and surface structure must be captured as well as the role of the network connectivity and other larger length scales. The latter include the pore shape and length, and the presence of external surfaces. This paper reports on how we employ refineable lattice models to tackle the modeling problems. We use both equilibrium and non-equilibrium Monte Carlo (MC) and 3D density functional theory (DFT) techniques to study the equilibrium and transport behavior in nanostructured porous materials. We will present 1) results of both adsorption/desorption hysteresis in large regular and random networks and 2) the results of using reactive sites in separation membranes, and compare these with experiments.

  12. Adsorptive separation of propylene-propane mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Jaervelin, H.; Fair, J.R. )

    1993-10-01

    The separation of propylene-propane mixtures is of great commercial importance and is carried out by fractional distillation. It is claimed to be the most energy-intensive distillation practiced in the United States. The purpose of this paper is to describe experimental work that suggests a practical alternative to distillation for separating the C[sub 3] hydrocarbons: adsorption. As studied, the process involves three adsorptive steps: initial separation with molecular sieves with heavy dilution with an inert gas; separation of propylene and propane separately from the inert gas, using activated carbon; and drying of the product streams with any of several available desiccants. The research information presented here deals with the initial step and includes both equilibrium and kinetic data. Isotherms are provided for propylene and propane adsorbed on three zeolites, activated alumina, silica gel, and coconut-based activated carbon. Breakthrough data are provided for both adsorption and regeneration steps for the zeolites, which were found to be superior to the other adsorbents for breakthrough separations. A flow diagram for the complete proposed process is included.

  13. Adsorption properties of aluminium oxide modified with palladium, gold, and cerium oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanin, S. N.; Bannykh, A. A.; Vinogradov, A. E.; Kovaleva, N. V.; Lanina, K. S.; Nikolaev, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    The adsorption properties of nanocomposites based on γ-Al2O3 modified with CeO x , Au/CeO x , and Pd/CeO x nanoparticles with contents of deposited metals ranging from 0.07 to 1.71 wt % are investigated by means of dynamic sorption method. n-Alkanes (C6-C8), acetonitrile, diethyl ether, tetrahydrofuran, and dioxane are used as test adsorbates. Adsorption isotherms are measured, and the isosteric heats of adsorption of a number of test adsorbates are calculated. Electron-donor and electron-acceptor characteristics of the surfaces of γ-Al2O3-based nanocomposites are estimated. It is shown that Au(0.1%)/CeO x (0.07%)/γ-Al2O3 nanocomposite, which has the lowest content of nanoparticles of the deposited metals, has the highest adsorption activity.

  14. The influence of soil organic matter on DNA adsorptions on andosols.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Kazutoshi; Sakai, Masao

    2009-01-01

    The influence of soil organic matter on DNA adsorption in andosols was investigated using various andosol samples including hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-treated, heated (400°C), and slurry-added soils. Remarkably less DNA was adsorbed in the slurry-added soil than the original soil. The increase in soil organic matter with the addition of slurry had an obvious negative influence on the adsorption. The decrease in organic matter with H(2)O(2) treatment slightly raised DNA adsorption per unit weight. Adsorption maxima estimated from a simple Langmuir equation were higher in the samples removed of organic matter by the H(2)O(2) treatment and heating at 400°C than in the untreated soil, although surface area was greatly decreased by both treatments. There was no correlation between the total carbon (T-C) content and the estimated DNA adsorption maxima of any of the soil samples. These results suggest little contribution of soil organic matter to DNA adsorption in andosols. PMID:21566371

  15. Preferential orientation of CO adsorption on Ni as determined by extended Hueckel calculations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, J. C.; Wilmsen, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    The adsorption of CO on the nickel surface has been calculated using a modified extended Hueckel technique for a number of different orientations of the CO with respect to the nickel surface. The calculations show that double site adsorption with the CO molecule normal to the surface and the carbon atom closest to the metal gives the most stable configuration (2.57 eV). The single site absorbs with an energy of 2.39 eV. However, other configurations also give fairly large bonding energies. The CO normal to the surface with oxygen closest to the metal gives a heat of adsorption of 0.37 eV. Two-center adsorption with the CO axis parallel to the surface and the molecule symmetrically placed between the nearest neighbors gives a chemisorption energy of 1.34 eV. These values compare with an experimental value of 1.98 eV.

  16. Microstructure-Dependent Gas Adsorption: Accurate Predictions of Methane Uptake in Nanoporous Carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ihm, Yungok; Cooper, Valentino R; Gallego, Nidia C; Contescu, Cristian I; Morris, James R

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a successful, efficient framework for predicting gas adsorption properties in real materials based on first-principles calculations, with a specific comparison of experiment and theory for methane adsorption in activated carbons. These carbon materials have different pore size distributions, leading to a variety of uptake characteristics. Utilizing these distributions, we accurately predict experimental uptakes and heats of adsorption without empirical potentials or lengthy simulations. We demonstrate that materials with smaller pores have higher heats of adsorption, leading to a higher gas density in these pores. This pore-size dependence must be accounted for, in order to predict and understand the adsorption behavior. The theoretical approach combines: (1) ab initio calculations with a van der Waals density functional to determine adsorbent-adsorbate interactions, and (2) a thermodynamic method that predicts equilibrium adsorption densities by directly incorporating the calculated potential energy surface in a slit pore model. The predicted uptake at P=20 bar and T=298 K is in excellent agreement for all five activated carbon materials used. This approach uses only the pore-size distribution as an input, with no fitting parameters or empirical adsorbent-adsorbate interactions, and thus can be easily applied to other adsorbent-adsorbate combinations.

  17. Comparative Adsorption of Saturated and Unsaturated Fatty Acids at the Iron Oxide/Oil Interface.

    PubMed

    Wood, Mary H; Casford, M T; Steitz, R; Zarbakhsh, A; Welbourn, R J L; Clarke, Stuart M

    2016-01-19

    A detailed comparison of the adsorption behavior of long straight chain saturated and unsaturated fatty acids at the iron oxide/oil interface has been considered using a combination of surface study techniques. Both depletion isotherms and polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) show that the extent of adsorption decreases as the number of double bonds in the alkyl chains increases. Sum frequency generation spectroscopic measurements demonstrate that there is also an increase in chain disorder within the adsorbed layer as the unsaturation increases. However, for the unsaturated analogues, a decrease in peak intensity is seen for the double bond peak upon heating, which is thought to arise from isomerization in the surface-bound layer. The PNR study of oleic acid adsorption indicates chemisorbed monolayer adsorption, with a further diffuse reversible adsorbed layer formed at higher concentrations. PMID:26707597

  18. Adsorption dynamics of methyl violet onto granulated mesoporous carbon: Facile synthesis and adsorption kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yohan; Bae, Jiyeol; Park, Hosik; Suh, Jeong-Kwon; You, Young-Woo; Choi, Heechul

    2016-09-15

    A new and facile one-step synthesis method for preparing granulated mesoporous carbon (GMC) with three-dimensional spherical mesoporous symmetry is prepared to remove large molecular weight organic compounds in aqueous phase. GMC is synthesized in a single step using as-synthesized mesoporous carbon particles and organic binders through a simple and economical synthesis approach involving a simultaneous calcination and carbonization process. Characterization results obtained from SEM, XRD, as well as surface and porosity analysis indicate that the synthesized GMC has similar physical properties to those of the powdered mesoporous carbon and maintains the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and pore volume because the new synthesis method prevents the collapse of the pores during the granulation process. Batch adsorption experiments revealed GMC showed a substantial adsorption capacity (202.8 mg/g) for the removal of methyl violet as a target large molecular contaminant in aqueous phase. The mechanisms and dynamics modeling of GMC adsorption were also fully examined, which revealed that surface diffusion was rate limiting step on adsorption process of GMC. Adsorption kinetics of GMC enables 3 times faster than that of granular activated carbon in terms of surface diffusion coefficient. This is the first study, to the best of our knowledge, to synthesize GMC as an adsorbent for water purification by using facile granulation method and to investigate the adsorption kinetics and characteristics of GMC. This study introduces a new and simple method for the synthesis of GMC and reveals its adsorption characteristics for large molecular compounds in a water treatment. PMID:27262123

  19. Molecular basis for the high CO2 adsorption capacity of chabazite zeolites.

    PubMed

    Pham, Trong D; Hudson, Matthew R; Brown, Craig M; Lobo, Raul F

    2014-11-01

    CO2 adsorption in Li-, Na-, K-CHA (Si/Al=6,=12), and silica chabazite zeolites was investigated by powder diffraction. Two CO2 adsorption sites were found in all chabazites with CO2 locating in the 8-membered ring (8MR) pore opening being the dominant site. Electric quadrupole-electric field gradient and dispersion interactions drive CO2 adsorption at the middle of the 8 MRs, while CO2 polarization due to interaction with cation sites controls the secondary CO2 site. In Si-CHA, adsorption is dominated by dispersion interactions with CO2 observed on the pore walls and in 8 MRs. CO2 adsorption complexes on dual cation sites were observed on K-CHA, important for K-CHA-6 samples due to a higher probability of two K(+) cations bridging CO2. Trends in isosteric heats of CO2 adsorption based on cation type and concentration can be correlated with adsorption sites and CO2 quantity. A decrease in the hardness of metal cations results in a decrease in the direct interaction of these cations with CO2. PMID:25273234

  20. Effect of pore blockage on adsorption isotherms and dynamics: Anomalous adsorption of iodine on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, S.K.; Liu, F.; Arvind, G.

    2000-04-18

    Isotherm hysteresis and pore-clocking effects of trapped molecules on adsorption dynamics is studied here, using the iodine-carbon system in the 300--343 K temperature range. It is found that a portion of the iodine is strongly adsorbed, and does not desorb, even over very long time scales, while the remainder adsorbs reversibly as a homogeneous monolayer with a Langmuirian isotherm in mesopores. The strongly adsorbed iodine appears to adsorb in micropores and at the mesopore mouths, hindering uptake of the reversible iodine. The uptake data for the adsorption and desorption dynamics of the reversible part is found to be best explained by means of a pore mouth resistance control mechanism. it is concluded that the dynamics of the adsorption and desorption at the pore mouth is important at early stages of the process.

  1. Impact of carbon nanotube morphology on phenanthrene adsorption.

    PubMed

    Apul, Onur Guven; Shao, Ting; Zhang, Shujuan; Karanfil, Tanju

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the roles of the specific surface area (SSA), diameter, and length of carbon nanotubes (CNT) on the adsorption of phenanthrene (PNT) by analyzing the adsorption isotherms obtained with several single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT). At low equilibrium concentrations (e.g., 1 ppb), MWNTs with larger outer diameters exhibited higher PNT adsorption capacity on an SSA basis than those with smaller diameters. With increasing equilibrium concentration, adsorption on an SSA basis became independent of MWNT diameter, and the total surface area controlled maximum adsorption capacity. A similar analysis for the adsorption of naphthalene, a planar molecule with one less benzene ring but 20 times higher solubility than PNT, showed no correlation with respect to MWNT outer diameter. The results indicated that the surface curvature of MWNT was more important on the adsorption of PNT than on the adsorption of naphthalene. Specific surface area normalized isotherms did not show a correlation between PNT adsorption and lengths of SWNTs and MWNTs. Characterization results indicated that the morphology of CNTs plays an important role on the SSA and pore volume. Data from the manufacturer may not always represent the characteristics of CNTs in a particular batch. Therefore, accurate characterization of CNTs is critical to systematically examine the behavior of CNTs, such as adsorption and transport, in environmental systems. PMID:22002628

  2. Effect of cropping systems on adsorption of metals by soils: I. Single-metal adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Basta, N.T.; Tabatabai, M.A. )

    1992-02-01

    The effect of long-term cropping systems on adsorption of metals was studied for soils obtained from two sites, Clarion-Webster Research Center (CWRC site) at Kanawha and Galva-Primghar Research Center (GPRC site) at Sutherland, under long-term rotation experiments in Iowa. Each experiment consisted of three cropping systems: continuous corn (CCCC), corn-soybean-corn-soybean (CSCS), and corn-oats-meadow-meadow (COMM), and treated with (+N) and without (0 N) ammoniacal fertilizer. In general, CSCS and COMM cropping systems did not significantly affect the metal adsorption maxima of soils obtained from both sites. Cadmium, Cu, and Pb adsorption were significantly correlated with pH and percentage base saturation for soils from both sites.

  3. Microscopic Theory of Hysteretic Hydrogen Adsorption in Nanoporous Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, J.; Wei, S. H.; Kim, Y. H.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding gas adsorption confined in nanoscale pores is a fundamental issue with broad applications in catalysis and gas storage. Recently, hysteretic H{sub 2} adsorption was observed in several nanoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Here, using first-principles calculations and simulated adsorption/desorption isotherms, we present a microscopic theory of the enhanced adsorption hysteresis of H{sub 2} molecules using the MOF Co(1,4-benzenedipyrazolate) [Co(BDP)] as a model system. Using activated H{sub 2} diffusion along the small-pore channels as a dominant equilibration process, we demonstrate that the system shows hysteretic H{sub 2} adsorption under changes of external pressure. For a small increase of temperature, the pressure width of the hysteresis, as well as the adsorption/desorption pressure, dramatically increases. The sensitivity of gas adsorption to temperature changes is explained by the simple thermodynamics of the gas reservoir. Detailed analysis of transient adsorption dynamics reveals that the hysteretic H{sub 2} adsorption is an intrinsic adsorption characteristic in the diffusion-controlled small-pore systems.

  4. Study of Solar Driven Silica gel-Water based Adsorption Chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, K.; Assadi, M. K.; Zainudin, M. H. B.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a dynamic behaviour of a solar powered single stage four bed adsorption chiller has been analysed designed for Malaysian climate. Silica gel and water have been used as adsorbent-refrigerant pair. A simulation program has been developed for modeling and performance evaluation of the chiller using the meteorological data of Kuala Lumpur. The optimum cooling capacity and coefficient of performance (COP) are calculated in terms of adsorption/desorption cycle time and regeneration temperature. Results indicate that the chiller is feasible even when low temperature heat source is available. Results also show that the adsorption cycle can achieve a cooling capacity of 14 kW when the heat source temperature is about 85°C.

  5. Short-Cycle Adsorption Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Modular adsorption/Joule-Thomson-effect refrigerator offers fast regeneration; adsorption/desorption cycle time expected to be 1 minute. Pressurized hydrogen generated by bank of compressor modules during heating phase passes through system of check valves and expands in Joule-Thomson junction as it enters refrigeration chamber. Hydrogen absorbs heat from load before it is sucked out by another bank of compressor modules in cooling phase.

  6. IMPORTANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON'S OXYGEN SURFACE FUNCTIONAL GROUPS ON ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of varying physical and chemical properties of activated carbons on adsorption of elemental mercury [Hg(0)] was studied by treating two activated carbons to modify their surface functional groups and pore structures. Heat treatment (1200 K) in nitrogen (N2), air oxidat...

  7. Study of intradrystalline diffusion in zeolites communication 3. Kinetics of adsorption of trans-2-butene by NaA and NaMgA zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Broddak, R.; Dubinin, M.M.; Falko, L.A.; Gorlov, V.A.; Kuhlmann, B.; Scholner, E.; Voloshchuk, A.M.

    1985-09-10

    This article studies the kinetics of adsorption of trans-2-butene by NaA zeolite with a varying crystal size, microcrystalline granulated NaA zeolite using granules of different sizes, and microcrystalline powdered Na/sub 8/Mg/sub 2/A zeolite. It is shown that the rate of adsorption is determined by the intracrystalline diffusion and that the effect of transfer in the transport pores and the final rate of dissipation of the heat of adsorption can be neglected. In adsorption of trans-2-butene by Na/sub 8/Mg/sub 2/A zeolite with a stepwise change in the pressure of the adsorbate, the kinetic curves are satisfactorily described by an internal diffusion equation for the kinetics of isothermal adsorption. The kinetics of adsorption were studied at 303 degrees K from the one-component vapor phase on a vacuum adsorption setup using quartz spring balance.

  8. Adsorption and desorption of contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, A.V.; Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; DeFlaun, M.; Ensley, B.

    1994-02-01

    The microbial remediation of sites Contaminated with organics is well documented, however, there are some significant problems that remain to be solved in the areas of contaminants sorbed to soils and non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contamination. Methods of in situ bioremediation techniques employ either the stimulation of indigenous populations by nutrient addition, or the addition of prepared bacterial cultures to the subsurface environment. Problems of contaminant sorption and NAPL`s are related in that both encompass reduced contaminant bioavailability. Non-aqueous phase liquids have been identified as a priority area for research in the In situ Program due to their presence at DOE sites and the lack of adequate technology to effectively treat this contamination. Bioremediation technologies developed as a result of this project are easily transferred to industry.

  9. Mapping the Surface Adsorption Forces of Nanomaterials in Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xin R.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.; Mathur, Sanjay; Song, Xuefeng; Xiao, Lisong; Oldenberg, Steven J.; Fadeel, Bengt; Riviere, Jim E.

    2011-01-01

    The biological surface adsorption index (BSAI) is a novel approach to characterize surface adsorption energy of nanomaterials that is the primary force behind nanoparticle aggregation, protein corona formation, and other complex interactions of nanomaterials within biological systems. Five quantitative nanodescriptors were obtained to represent the surface adsorption forces (hydrophobicity, hydrogen bond, polarity/polarizability, and lone-pair electrons) of the nanomaterial interaction with biological components. We have mapped the surface adsorption forces over 16 different nanomaterials. When the five-dimensional information of the nanodescriptors was reduced to two dimensions, the 16 nanomaterials were classified into distinct clusters according their surface adsorption properties. BSAI nanodescriptors are intrinsic properties of nanomaterials useful for quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) model development. This is the first success in quantitative characterization of the surface adsorption forces of nanomaterials in biological conditions, which could open a quantitative avenue in predictive nanomedicine development, risk assessment, and safety evaluation of nanomaterials. PMID:21999618

  10. Fractional statistical theory of finite multilayer adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takara, E. A.; Quiroga, E.; Matoz-Fernandez, D. A.; Ochoa, N. A.; Ramirez-Pastor, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, finite multilayer adsorption is described as a fractional statistics problem, based on Haldane's statistics. In this scheme, the Helmholtz free energy and its derivatives are written in terms of a parameter g, which relates to the configuration of the molecules in the adsorbed state. For values of g ranging between 0 and 1 the formalism is used to model experimental data of bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorbed onto an ion exchange resin for different values of pH and temperature. Excellent agreement between theory and experiments was found.

  11. Adsorption studies of methylene blue dye on tunisian activated lignin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriaa, A.; Hamdi, N.; Srasra, E.

    2011-02-01

    Activated carbon prepared from natural lignin, providing from a geological deposit, was used as the adsorbent for the removal of methylene blue (MB) dye from aqueous solutions. Batch adsorption studies were conducted to evaluate various experimental parameters like pH and contact time for the removal of this dye. Effective pH for MB removal was 11. Kinetic study showed that the adsorption of dye was gradual process. Quasi equilibrium reached in 4 h. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order were used to fit the experimental data. Pseudo-second-order rate equation was able to provide realistic description of adsorption kinetics. The experimental isotherms data were also modelled by the Langmuir and Freundlich equation of adsorption. Equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model with maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 147 mg/g. Activated lignin was shown to be a promising material for adsorption of MB from aqueous solutions.

  12. Adsorption of RDX on clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon, Yleana M.; Alzate, Liliana F.; Ramos, Carmen M.; Santana, Alberto; Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P.; Castro, Miguel E.; Munoz, Miguel; Mina, Nairmen

    2004-09-01

    The chemical spectroscopic signature of the RDX-clay mineral complex has been investigated by means of reflectance FT-IR micro spectroscopy. The mechanical analysis method was used to separate the clay from the other soil components. The soil was obtained from the University of Puerto Rico at Mayag'ez (UPRM) campus backyard. B3LYP/6-311G** calculations performed on RDX helped to determine the most stable conformations, their symmetry, and vibrational spectra. The FTIR technique confirmed the existence of two different RDX solid phases, known as the α-RDX and β-RDX, which have different symmetries and revealed significant differences in their spectra. The IR microspectroscopic study showed that the RDX-clay mineral complex and its interactions can be detected using the FTIR technique at a low concentration of 1000 part-per-millions. The results also suggest that the vibrational modes presenting changes in the different vibrational spectra correspond to the C-N and NO2 groups. In comparison with α-RDX spectrum, the complex exhibits three bands at 740, 754 and 792 cm-1. A 12 cm-1 red shift is observed in this last band assign to the C-N stretching and NO2 scissoring vibrations in the equatorial position. Differences in the spectra were also seen in the shifted bands at 942 and 953 cm-1. These vibrational modes are assigned to the ring breathing and N-N stretching vibration in the axial position for the -phase. Comparison of the spectra of the α-RDX, the β-RDX and the RDX mixed with clay in the range from 1190 to 1700 cm-1 clearly indicated that the FTIR technique can be used to study the interaction between RDX and clay. The results also indicate that the interaction between the RDX and the clay minerals affects mainly the NO2 groups of the explosive molecules. It is suggested that the electron donor nitrogen atoms from RDX are interacting with the electron acceptor oxygen atoms of the siloxane surface that is present in the majority of clays.

  13. Studies on adsorption of formaldehyde in zirconium phosphate-glyphosates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuejuan; Yi, Jianjun; Xu, Qinghong

    2011-01-01

    In our previous work [22], a kind of layered compound of zirconium phosphate-glyphosate (ZrGP) was synthesized. Its large surface area (445 m 2/g) indicates this compound has possible application in adsorptions. In this paper, adsorption to formaldehyde in ZrGP and mechanisms of the adsorption were studied carefully. Balance time of adsorption (about 6 h) and largest adsorbed amount (7.8%) were found when adsorption temperature was at 40 °C and pH value of adsorption environment was about 3.0. H-bonds were found existing between molecules of formaldehyde and ZrGP, and formaldehyde molecules could exist in ZrGP stably.

  14. Adsorption interaction parameter of polyethers in ternary mobile phases: the critical adsorption line.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, V Cuong; Trathnigg, Bernd

    2010-04-01

    It is shown that in LC of polymers, the interaction parameter in ternary mobile phases can be described by a plane, which is determined by the dependencies in binary mobile phases. Instead of a critical adsorption point, critical conditions are observed along a straight line of composition between the two critical points in binary mobile phases. Consequently, a separation of block copolymers under critical conditions for one block by an adsorption mechanism for the other block can be achieved in ternary mobile phases of different compositions, which allows an adjustment of the retention of the adsorbing block. PMID:20222074

  15. Characterization of the adsorption of water vapor and chlorine on microcrystalline silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skiles, J. A.; Wightman, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    The characterization of water adsorption on silica is necessary to an understanding of how hydrogen chloride interacts with silica. The adsorption as a function of outgas temperatures of silica and as a function of the isotherm temperature was studied. Characterization of the silica structure by infrared analysis, X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, surface area determinations, characterization of the sample surface by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), and determinations of the heat of immersion in water of silica were investigated. The silica with a scanning electron microscope was examined.

  16. Enthalpies of proton adsorption onto Bacillus licheniformis at 25, 37, 50, and 75 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman-Lewis, Drew

    2011-03-01

    Understanding bacterial surface reactivity requires many different lines of investigation. Toward this end, we used isothermal titration calorimetry to measure heats of proton adsorption onto a Gram positive thermophile Bacillus licheniformis at 25, 37, 50, and 75 °C. Proton adsorption under all conditions exhibited exothermic heat production. Below pH 4.5, exothermic heats decreased as temperature increased above 37 °C; above pH 4.5, there was no significant difference in heats evolved at the temperatures investigated. Total proton uptake did not vary significantly with temperature. Site-specific enthalpies and entropies were calculated by applying a 4-site, non-electrostatic surface complexation model to the calorimetric data. Interpretation of site-specific enthalpies and entropies of proton adsorption for site L1, L2, and L4 are consistent with previous interpretations of phosphoryl, carboxyl, and hydroxyl/amine site-identities, respectively, and with previous calorimetric measurements of proton adsorption onto mesophilic species. Enthalpies and entropies for surface site L3 are not consistent with the commonly inferred phosphoryl site-identity and are more consistent with sulfhydryl functional groups. These results reveal intricacies of surface reactivity that are not detectable by other methods.

  17. Factors affecting the adsorption of chromium (VI) on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yavuz, R.; Orbak, I.; Karatepe, N.

    2006-09-15

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the adsorption behavior of chromium (VI) on two different activated carbon samples produced from Tuncbilek lignite. The effects of the initial chromium (VI) concentration (250-1000 mg/L), temperature (297-323 K) and pH (2.0-9.5) on adsorption were investigated systematically. The effectiveness of the parameters on chromium adsorption was found to be in the order of pH, the initial Cr(VI) concentration and the temperature. Increasing the pH from 2.0 to 9.5 caused a decrease in adsorption. However, the adsorption was increased by increasing the initial Cr(VI) concentration and temperature. The multilinear mathematical model was also developed to predict the Cr(VI) adsorption on activated carbon samples within the experimental conditions.

  18. Adsorption-Desorption Kinetics of Soft Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osberg, Brendan; Nuebler, Johannes; Gerland, Ulrich

    2015-08-01

    Adsorption-desorption processes are ubiquitous in physics, chemistry, and biology. Models usually assume hard particles, but within the realm of soft matter physics the adsorbing particles are compressible. A minimal 1D model reveals that softness fundamentally changes the kinetics: Below the desorption time scale, a logarithmic increase of the particle density replaces the usual Rényi jamming plateau, and the subsequent relaxation to equilibrium can be nonmonotonic and much faster than for hard particles. These effects will impact the kinetics of self-assembly and reaction-diffusion processes.

  19. Adsorption to fish sperm of vertically transmitted fish viruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.; Pascho, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    More than 99 percent of a vertically transmitted fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus, was removed from suspension in less than 1 minute by adsorption to the surface membrane of sperm from two genera of salmonid fishes. The vertically transmitted, infectious pancreatic necrosis virus adsorbed to a lesser degree, but no adsorption occurred with a second fish rhabdovirus that is not vertically transmitted. Such adsorption may be involved in vertical transmission of these viruses.

  20. Kinetic studies of the sucrose adsorption onto an alumina interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kaman; Mohan, Sudhanshu

    2004-01-01

    An account is given of an experimental kinetic study of adsorption of analar reagent sucrose (ARS) onto an alumina interface spectrometrically ( λmax=570 nm) at pH 8.0 and at room temperature. The adsorption isotherm is a typical Langmuirian isotherm (S-type) and adsorption parameters have been deduced according to the Langmuir's model. The adsorption coefficient evaluated from the Langmuir's equation was found to be 2.52×10 2 l mol -1. Adsorption mechanism has been interpreted on the basis of metal-saccharide interaction as found in organometallic compounds and interaction due to negatively charged ends on the disaccharide molecules and positively charge groups on the surface on alumina which depends on the pH value. The effects of variation in experimental conditions of the adsorption system have also been investigated. The adsorption exhibited a typical response to the pH effect and on going towards the PZC the net charge decreases and any reaction making dependence on charge and maximum adsorption (amount) was found near the isoelectric point of alumina (pH 9.0). The presence of ions like Cl -, SO 42- and PO 43- affect the adsorbed amount quantitatively and it seems that these anions compete with sucrose for the positively charged surface sites. The addition of similar concentration of cations was found to reduce the adsorbed amount. The temperature was found to have an inverse effect on adsorption. The additions of catonic and anionic detergents influence both the adsorbed amount and the adsorption rate. The thermodynamics of the titled adsorption model indicates the spontaneous and exothermic nature. The negative value of entropy is an indication of probability of favorable and complex nature of the adsorption.

  1. CRYOGENIC ADSORPTION OF HYDROGEN ISOTOPES OVER NANO-STRUCTURED MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, S.; Heung, L.

    2010-10-07

    Porous materials such as zeolites, activated carbon, silica gels, alumina and a number of industrial catalysts are compared and ranked for hydrogen and deuterium adsorption at liquid nitrogen temperature. All samples show higher D{sub 2} adsorption than that of H{sub 2}, in which a HY sample has the greatest isotopic effect while 13X has the highest hydrogen uptake capacity. Material's moisture content has significant impact to its hydrogen uptake. A material without adequate drying could result in complete loss of its adsorption capacity. Even though some materials present higher H{sub 2} adsorption capacity at full pressure, their adsorption at low vapor pressure may not be as good as others. Adsorption capacity in a dynamic system is much less than in a static system. A sharp desorption is also expected in case of temperature upset.

  2. EFFECT OF GAC CHARACTERISTICS ON ADSORPTION OF ORGANIC POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of the characteristics of granular activated carbon (GAC) on adsorption capacity and on the potential for polymerization of phenolic compounds on the surface of GAC in the presence of molecular oxygen is evaluated in this study. Adsorption isotherm data were collected...

  3. Statistical mechanics of adsorption and wetting

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.T.; Benner, R.E. Jr.; Scriven, L.E.; Teletzke, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption and wetting behavior of fluids on solid surfaces and at fluid-fluid interfaces are consequential in numerous natural processes and technological applications. Though the scientific study of the subject is old, going back to the early nineteenth century when Young and Laplace identified the laws of capillarity, the molecular theory of interfacial phenomena is still a developing subject. It has been given a rigorous statistical mechanical foundation through the now classic works of Kirkwood, Buff and coworkers, the recent progress in the density functional theory of inhomogeneous systems, and the renormalization group theory of critical phenomena. It is interesting that perhaps the most fruitful development in the theory of interfacial phenomena has been the revival of the mean field theory of van der Waals. While not rigorous, this theory is tractable, has provided the insight and motivation for many useful new theories, and captures most of the known qualitative patterns of interfacial behavior, except for details near a critical point where renormalization group theory is required. Because of its simplicity and qualitative successes, we have chosen to use van der Waals theory as the main vehicle for presentation of an overview of our current understanding of adsorption and wetting. 52 refs., 25 figs.

  4. Adsorption behavior of epirubicin hydrochloride on carboxylated carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Pierre, Dramou; He, Hua; Tan, Shuhua; Pham-Huy, Chuong; Hong, Hao; Huang, Jilong

    2011-02-28

    The aim of this study was to understand the interaction between carboxylated carbon nanotubes (c-CNTs) and anticancer agents and evaluate the drug-loading ability of c-CNTs. We prepared carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (c-MWNTs) with nitric acid treatment, then evaluated the adsorption ability of c-MWNTs as adsorbents for loading of the anticancer drug, epirubicin hydrochloride (EPI), and investigated the adsorption behavior of EPI on c-MWNTs. Unmodified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were included as comparative adsorbents. The results showed that carbon nanotubes were able to form supramolecular complexes with EPI via π-π stacking and possessed favorable loading properties as drug carriers. The Freundilich adsorption model was successfully employed to describe the adsorption process. Because of the high surface area and hydrogen bonding, c-MWNTs' adsorption efficiency was the highest and the most stable and their drug-loading capacity was superior to that of MWNTs. With the increase of pH, the adsorption capacity of EPI on the c-MWNTs increased. Low-temperature facilitated the adsorption. More rapid EPI adsorption rate and higher drug-loading ability were observed from c-MWNTs with smaller diameter. Moreover, the adsorption kinetics of EPI on c-MWNTs could be well depicted by using the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. PMID:21145959

  5. Kinetic Interpretation of Water Vapor Adsorption-Desorption Behavior of a Desiccant Rotor Showing S-shaped Adsorption Isotherm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Kumiko; Oshima, Kazunori; Takewaki, Takahiko; Kodama, Akio

    Adsorption / desorption behavior of water vapor in a desiccant rotor containing an iron aluminophosphate type zeolite FAM-Z01 (Functional Adsorbent Material Zeolite 01) was experimentally investigated for humidity swing. This rotor exhibited an S-shaped adsorption isotherm with its temperature dependence. Humidity swing, using a small piece of the rotor, could be usefully applied to interpret adsorption / desorption mechanisms by observing their rates. The most significant finding was that the adsorption / desorption rates in humidity swing could be described by the amount of adsorption, temperature and amplitude of the humidity swing, not by cycle time. Also, using the liner driving force (LDF) model, the overall mass transfer coefficient changed with the elapse of time or with the amount of adsorbed water. This implied that the LDF model, considering constant value of the overall mass transfer coefficient, was probably unable to explain the water adsorption / desorption behavior of FAM-Z01 desiccant rotor.

  6. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna; Domka, Ludwik; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Kozak, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay - hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1‧-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d001) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH2 and CH3 groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  7. Adsorption of Ar on individual carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyubenko, Boris; Kahn, Joshua; Vilches, Oscar; Cobden, David

    2015-03-01

    We compare and contrast results of adsorption measurements of Ar on single-walled carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphite. Adsorption isotherms on individual suspended nanotubes were obtained using both the mechanical resonance frequency shift (sensitive to mass adsorption) and the electrical conductance. Isotherms on graphene mounted on hexagonal boron nitride were obtained using only the conductance. New volumetric adsorption isotherms on bulk exfoliated graphite were also obtained, paying special attention to the very low coverage region (less than 2% of a monolayer). This allowed us to compare the degree of heterogeneity on the three substrate types, the binding energies, and the van der Waals 2D parameters. Research supported by NSF DMR 1206208.

  8. Influence of Ca2+ on tetracycline adsorption on montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Parolo, M Eugenia; Avena, Marcelo J; Pettinari, Gisela R; Baschini, Miria T

    2012-02-15

    The adsorption of tetracycline (TC) on montmorillonite was studied as a function of pH and Ca(2+) concentration using a batch technique complemented with X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. In the absence of Ca(2+), TC adsorption was high at low pH and decreased as the pH increased. In the presence of Ca(2+), at least two different adsorption processes took place in the studied systems, i.e., cation exchange and Ca-bridging. Cation exchange was the prevailing process at pH<5, and thus, TC adsorption decreased by increasing total Ca(2+) concentration. On the contrary, Ca-bridging was the prevailing process at pH>5, and thus, TC adsorption increased by increasing Ca(2+) concentration. The pH 5 represents an isoadsorption pH where both adsorption processes compensate each other. TC adsorption became independent of Ca(2+) concentration at this pH. For TC adsorption on Ca(2+)-montmorillonite in 0.01 M NaCl experiments, the ratio adsorbed TC/retained Ca(2+) was close to 1 in the pH range of 5-9, indicating an important participation of Ca(2+) in the binding of TC to montmorillonite. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed that TC adsorption induced intercalation between montmorillonite layers forming a multiphase system with stacking of layers with and without intercalated TC. PMID:22189389

  9. Physical Adsorption of Gases on Heterogeneous Solids and Equilibrium Studies of the Pressure Swing Adsorption Process.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaochun

    1990-01-01

    Adsorption isotherms of ethane, propane, and n -butane on two polystyrene adsorbents and two activated carbons were measured at 0, 25, and 40^ circC. A dynamic chromatographic experimental system was used to measure the transmission curves of gases through a packed bed. The transmission is defined as the ratio of the adsorbate concentration at the bed outlet to that at the bed inlet. A mass-balance equation was used to calculate the solid-phase concentration and the dimensionless adsorption capacity. The structural and energetic heterogeneities of microporous adsorbents were explored by means of Dubinin's Theory of Volume Filling of Micropores (TVFM) and by a modified TVFM. The structural heterogeneity of a microporous adsorbent refers to the non-uniformity of the pore sizes and pore shapes. In polystyrene adsorbents, these non -uniform pores were formed by different copolymerization of monomers; while in activated carbons, these non-uniform pores were formed in the processes of carbonization and activation. The energetic heterogeneities of a microporous adsorbent comes from the structural heterogeneity as well as from the various atoms and functional groups exposed at the pore surface, the impurities strongly bound to the surface, and the irregularities in the crystallographical structure of the surface. Dubinin's original TVFM applies well in structurally homogeneous or weakly-heterogeneous microporous activated carbons; however, fits of experimental isotherms to the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation reveal deviations for structurally -heterogeneous adsorbents. We extended Dubinin's TVFM to the case of structurally-heterogeneous adsorbents by using an overall integral isotherm equation. A gamma-function type micropore-size distribution was used and a three-parameter isotherm equation was obtained. The experimental isotherms on activated carbons were fitted well by this isotherm equation. We characterized eight different activated carbons with the three

  10. Characterization of micro- and mesoporous materials using accelerated dynamics adsorption.

    PubMed

    Qajar, Ali; Peer, Maryam; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Foley, Henry C

    2013-10-01

    Porosimetry is a fundamental characterization technique used in development of new porous materials for catalysis, membrane separation, and adsorptive gas storage. Conventional methods like nitrogen and argon adsorption at cryogenic temperatures suffer from slow adsorption dynamics especially for microporous materials. In addition, CO2, the other common probe, is only useful for micropore characterization unless being compressed to exceedingly high pressures to cover all required adsorption pressures. Here, we investigated the effect of adsorption temperature, pressure, and type of probe molecule on the adsorption dynamics. Methyl chloride (MeCl) was used as the probe molecule, and measurements were conducted near room temperature under nonisothermal condition and subatmospheric pressure. A pressure control algorithm was proposed to accelerate adsorption dynamics by manipulating the chemical potential of the gas. Collected adsorption data are transformed into pore size distribution profiles using the Horvath-Kavazoe (HK), Saito-Foley (SF), and modified Kelvin methods revised for MeCl. Our study shows that the proposed algorithm significantly speeds up the rate of data collection without compromising the accuracy of the measurements. On average, the adsorption rates on carbonaceous and aluminosilicate samples were accelerated by at least a factor of 4-5. PMID:23919893

  11. Selective adsorption for removal of nitrogen compounds from hydrocarbon streams over carbon-based adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almarri, Masoud S.

    desulfurization of model diesel fuel, which contains equimolar concentrations of nitrogen (i.e., quinoline and indole), sulfur (i.e., dibenzothiophene and 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene), and aromatic compounds (naphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene, and fluorene), was examined. The results revealed that when both nitrogen and sulfur compounds coexist in the fuel, the type and density of oxygen functional groups on the surface of the activated carbon are crucial for selective adsorption of nitrogen compounds but have negligible positive effects for sulfur removal. The adsorption of quinoline and indole is largely governed by specific interactions. There is enough evidence to support the importance of dipole--dipole and acid-base-specific interactions for the adsorption of both quinoline and indole. Modified carbon is a promising material for the efficient removal of the nitrogen compounds from light cycle oil (LCO). Adsorptive denitrogenation of LCO significantly improved the hydrodesulfurization (HDS) performance, especially for the removal of the refractory sulfur compounds such as 4-methyldibenzothiophene and 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene. An essential factor in applying activated carbon for adsorptive denitrogenation and desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbon streams is regeneration after saturation. The regeneration method of the saturated adsorbents consisted of toluene washing followed by heating to remove the remaining toluene. The results show that the spent activated carbon can be regenerated to completely recover the adsorption capacity. The high capacity and selectivity of activated carbon for nitrogen compounds, along with their ability to be regenerated, indicate that activated carbon is a promising adsorbent for the deep denitrogenation of liquid hydrocarbon streams.

  12. Adsorption of polymer chains at penetrable interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimchuk, I. V.; Sommer, J.-U.; Gerasimchuk, V. S.

    2011-03-15

    We investigate the problem of adsorption (localization) of polymer chains in the system of two penetrable interfaces within the mean-field approximation. The saturation of the polymer system in the limit case of zero bulk concentration is studied. We find the exact solution of this mean-field polymer adsorption problem that opens the possibility to treat various localization problems for polymer chains in such environments using appropriate boundary conditions. The exact solution is controlled by a single scaling variable that describes the coupling between the interfaces due to the polymer chains. We obtain a nonmonotonic behavior of the amount of adsorbed polymers as a function of the distance between the interfaces. This leads to a high-energy and a low-energy phase for the double layer with respect to the amount of polymers localized. At the saturation point, we find the total energy of the system and determine the force acting between the interfaces to be strictly attractive and to monotonically decay to zero when the interface distance increases.

  13. Adsorption of Candida rugosa lipase at water-polymer interface: The case of poly( DL)lactide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamel, Gihan; Bordi, Federico; Chronopoulou, Laura; Lupi, Stefano; Palocci, Cleofe; Sennato, Simona; Verdes, Pedro V.

    2011-12-01

    Insights into the interactions between biological macromolecules and polymeric surfaces are of great interest because of potential uses in developing biotechnologies. In this study we focused on the adsorption of a model lipolytic enzyme, Candida rugosa lipase (CRL), on poly-(D,L)-lactic acid (PDLLA) polymer with the aim to gain deeper insights into the interactions between the enzyme and the carrier. Such studies are of particular relevance in order to establish the optimal conditions for enzyme immobilization and its applications. We employed two different approaches; by analyzing the influence of adsorbed CRL molecules on the thermodynamic behavior of Langmuir films of PDLLA deposited at air-water interface, we gained interesting information on the molecular interactions between the protein and the polymer. Successively, by a systematic analysis of the adsorption of CRL on PDLLA nanoparticles, we showed that the adsorption of a model lipase, CRL, on PDLLA is described in terms of a Langmuir-type adsorption behavior. In this model, only monomolecular adsorption takes place (i.e. only a single layer of the protein adsorbs on the support) and the interactions between adsorbed molecules and surface are short ranged. Moreover, both the adsorption and desorption are activated processes, and the heat of adsorption (the difference between the activation energy for adsorption and desorption) is independent from the surface coverage of the adsorbing species. Finally, we obtained an estimate of the number of molecules of the protein adsorbed per surface unit on the particles, a parameter of a practical relevance for applications in biocatalysis, and a semi-quantitative estimate of the energies (heat of adsorption) involved in the adsorption process.

  14. Effect of complexing ligands on the adsorption of Cu(II) onto the silica gel surface. 1: Adsorption of ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.J.; Jung, K.H.; Park, K.K.; Park, K.K.

    1995-04-01

    The adsorption of several ligands on silica gel was investigated in aqueous solutions. The ligands used were 2,2{prime},6{prime},2{double_prime}-terpyridine, pyridine, 3,4-lutidine, 2-aminomethyl pyridine, 2-pyridine methanol, picolinic acid, salicylic acid, and 5-sulfosalicylic acid. The adsorption behaviors of these ligands were interpreted by means of three adsorption modes: ion exchange, hydrogen bonding, and hydrophobic interaction. For 2,2{prime},6{prime},2{double_prime}-terpyridine, pyridine, and 3,4-lutidine, the adsorption maxima appeared near their respective pK{sub a} values and were found to be due mainly to ion exchange, whereas the adsorption of these ligands at low pH was strongly attributed to hydrophobic interaction. The adsorption of 2-aminomethyl pyridine increased with increasing pH over the entire pH range investigated and was due mainly to ion exchange. Picolinic acid was adsorbed mainly by hydrogen bonding either via pyridine N atoms at low pH or via carboxylic O atoms at high pH. 2-Pyridine methanol was adsorbed by hydrophobic interaction at low pH and by hydrogen bonding at high pH. The adsorptions of salicylic and 5-sulfosalicylic acid were very small over the entire pH ranges investigated. For the adsorption mechanism, the Stern model was used to fit adsorption data.

  15. Adsorption of diethyl phthalate ester to clay minerals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanhua; Si, Youbin; Zhou, Dongmei; Gao, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Phthalate esters are a group of plasticizers, which have been widely detected in China's agricultural and industrial soils. In this study, batch adsorption experiments were conducted to investigate the environmental effects on the adsorption of diethyl phthalate ester (DEP) to clay minerals. The results showed that DEP adsorption isotherms were well fitted with the Freundlich model; the interlayer spacing of K(+) saturated montmorillonite (K-mont) was the most important adsorption area for DEP, and di-n-butyl ester (DnBP) was limited to intercalate into the interlayer of K-mont due to the bigger molecular size; there was no significant effect of pH and ionic strength on DEP adsorption to K-mont/Ca-mont, but to Na-mont clay. The adsorption to kaolinite was very limited. Data of X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectra further proved that DEP molecules could intercalate into K-/Ca-mont interlayer, and might interact with clay through H-bonding between carbonyl groups and clay adsorbed water. Coated humic acid on clay surface would enhance DEP adsorption at low concentration, but not at high concentration (eg. Ce>0.26 mM). The calculated adsorption enthalpy (ΔHobs) and adsorption isotherms at varied temperatures showed that DEP could be adsorbed easier as more adsorbed. This study implied that clay type, compound structure, exchangeable cation, soil organic matter and temperature played important roles in phthalate ester's transport in soil. PMID:25150972

  16. Adsorption behavior of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) on boehmite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Chengshuai; Shih, Kaimin

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the interaction of perfluorochemicals, persistent pollutants with known human health effects, with mineral compounds in surface water and groundwater environments is essential to determining their fate and transport. Kinetic experiments showed that adsorption equilibrium can be achieved within 48 h and the boehmite (AlOOH) surface is receptive to perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) adsorption. The adsorption isotherms estimated the maximum adsorption capacities of PFOS and PFOA on boehmite as 0.877 μg m(-2) and 0.633 μg m(-2), respectively. Compared to the adsorption capacity on γ-alumina, the abundant hydroxyl groups on boehmite surfaces resulted in the 2-3 times higher adsorption of PFOS and PFOA. Increasing solution pH led to a moderate decrease in PFOS and PFOA adsorption, owing to an increase in ligand exchange reactions and the decrease of electrostatic interactions. The presence of NaCl and CaCl(2) in solution demonstrated negative effects for PFOS and PFOA adsorption on boehmite surfaces, with potential mechanisms being electrical double layer compression, competitive adsorption of chloride, and the Ca(2+) bridging effect between perfluorochemicals. PMID:22897837

  17. Acoustic and adsorption properties of submerged wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilde, Calvin Patrick

    Wood is a common material for the manufacture of many products. Submerged wood, in particular, is used in niche markets, such as the creation of musical instruments. An initial study performed on submerged wood from Ootsa Lake, British Columbia, provided results that showed that the wood was not suitable for musical instruments. This thesis re-examined the submerged wood samples. After allowing the wood to age unabated in a laboratory setting, the wood was retested under the hypothesis that the physical acoustic characteristics would improve. It was shown, however, that the acoustic properties became less adequate after being left to sit. The adsorption properties of the submerged wood were examined to show that the submerged wood had a larger accessible area of wood than that of control wood samples. This implied a lower amount of crystalline area within the submerged wood. From the combined adsorption and acoustic data for the submerged wood, relationships between the moisture content and speed of sound were created and combined with previous research to create a proposed model to describe how the speed of sound varies with temperature, moisture content and the moisture content corresponding to complete hydration of sorption sites within the wood.

  18. Kinetic aspects of the adsorption of xyloglucan onto cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Villares, Ana; Moreau, Céline; Dammak, Abir; Capron, Isabelle; Cathala, Bernard

    2015-08-28

    In this work, the adsorption of a neutral flexible polysaccharide, xyloglucan (XG), onto thin cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) surfaces has been investigated to get more insight into the CNC-XG association. Gold-coated quartz crystals were spin-coated with one layer of CNC, and XG adsorption was monitored in situ using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). The adsorption of XG under flow at different concentrations did not result in the same surface concentration, which evidenced a kinetically controlled process. In an attempt to describe the binding of XG to CNCs, adsorption data were fitted to a kinetic model comprising a contribution from XG adsorption onto uncovered CNC surfaces and a contribution from XG adsorption after rearrangement. Kinetic studies evidenced the presence of two adsorption regimes as a function of XG concentration. For low XG concentrations, the kinetic constant for chain rearrangement is comparable to the kinetic constant for adsorption. This fact implies a rearrangement and alignment of XG molecules on CNCs. Differently, for higher XG concentrations, the kinetic constant related to the conformational rearrangement decreases, indicating that XG molecules have no time to laterally rearrange before new XG molecules adsorb. PMID:26179417

  19. Adsorption of lead onto smectite from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Mhamdi, M; Galai, H; Mnasri, N; Elaloui, E; Trabelsi-Ayadi, M

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the effect of a new method of adsorption using membrane filtration to determine the maximum amount of lead adsorbed by clay and investigate the behavior of the clay after adsorption of the said metal. Treatment of wastewater contaminated with heavy metals depends on the characteristics of the effluent, the amount of final discharge, the cost of treatment, and the compatibility of the treatment process. The process of adsorption of heavy metals by clays may be a simple, selective, and economically viable alternative to the conventional physical-chemical treatment. This is justified by the importance of the surface developed by this material, the presence of negative charges on the said surface, the possibility of ion exchange taking place, and its wide availability in nature. The removal of lead from wastewater was studied by using the adsorption technique and using clay as the adsorbent. A method was optimized for adsorption through a membrane approaching natural adsorption. This new method is simple, selective, and the lead adsorption time is about 3 days. The various properties of clay were determined. It was observed that the cation exchange capacity of the clay was 56 meq/100 g of hydrated clay for the raw sample and 82 meq/100 g for the purified sample. The total surface area determined by the methylene blue method was equal to 556 and 783 m(2)/g for the raw and purified samples, respectively. The adsorption kinetics depends on several parameters. The Pb(II) clay, obeys the Langmuir, Freundlich, and the Elovich adsorption isotherms with high regression coefficients. The use of this adsorbent notably decreases the cost of treatment. It was concluded that clay shows a strong adsorption capacity on Pb(II), the maximum interaction occurring with purified clay treated at high concentration of lead. It is proposed that this adsorption through a membrane be extended for the treatment of effluents containing other metals. PMID

  20. On the fractality of the Freundlich adsorption isotherm in equilibrium and non-equilibrium cases.

    PubMed

    Borys, Przemysław; Grzywna, Zbigniew J

    2016-07-27

    We investigate the relationship between the Freundlich adsorption exponent and the fractal dimension of the adsorption sites for quasi-monolayer adsorption, and of the adsorbed aggregate for a simple case of multilayer adsorption. We further check whether the Freundlich adsorption mechanism may contribute to anomalous diffusion in the transport through porous materials. PMID:27414951

  1. Adsorption and co-adsorption of diclofenac and Cu(II) on calcareous soils.

    PubMed

    Graouer-Bacart, Mareen; Sayen, Stéphanie; Guillon, Emmanuel

    2016-02-01

    Pharmaceuticals are emerging contaminants and their presence in different compartments of the environment has been detected in many countries. In this study, laboratory batch experiments were conducted to characterize the adsorption of diclofenac, a widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, on six calcareous soils. The adsorption of diclofenac was relatively low, which may lead to a risk of groundwater contamination and plant uptake. A correlation between the soil-water distribution coefficient Kd and soil characteristics has been highlighted. Indeed, diclofenac adsorption as a function of soil organic matter content (% OM) and Rt=% CaCO3/% OM was successfully described through a simple empirical model, indicating the importance of considering the inhibiting effect of CaCO3 on OM retention properties for a better assessment of diclofenac fate in the specific case of calcareous soils. The simultaneous co-adsorption of diclofenac and copper - a ubiquitous pollutant in the environment - at the water/soil interface, was also investigated. It appeared quite unexpectedly that copper did not have a significant influence on diclofenac retention. PMID:26599281

  2. Adsorption of cadmium by biochar derived from municipal sewage sludge: Impact factors and adsorption mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tan; Zhou, Zeyu; Han, Rong; Meng, Ruihong; Wang, Hongtao; Lu, Wenjing

    2015-09-01

    Static equilibrium experiments were carried out to investigate the impact factors and the mechanism of cadmium adsorption on biochar derived from municipal sewage sludge. An appropriate dosage of biochar is sufficient; in the experiment, 0.2% is the optimal dosage for the largest removal capacity, while the removal capacity of biochar reduces with the increasing dosage. pH is another dominant factor of the adsorption process. The removal capacity of biochar is lower than 20 mg·g(-1) when the solution initial pH is lower than 2 pH units, comparatively retaining more than 40 mg·g(-1) at the solution initial pH higher than 3 pH units. Temperature has weak influence on the adsorptive performance. The main mechanism of the adsorption process of biochar for cadmium mainly involves (1) surface precipitation by forming insoluble cadmium compounds in alkaline condition, and (2) ion exchange for cadmium with exchangeable cations in the biochar, such as calcium ions. PMID:25966459

  3. Effect of purity on adsorption capacities of a Mars-like clay mineral at different pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Traci; Mcdoniel, Bridgett; Bustin, Roberta; Allton, Judith H.

    1992-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in adsorption of carbon dioxide on Marslike clay minerals. Some estimates of the carbon dioxide reservoir capacity of the martian regolith were calculated from the amount of carbon dioxide adsorbed on the ironrich smectite nontronite under martian conditions. The adsorption capacity of pure nontronite could place upper limits on the regolith carbon dioxide reservoir, both at present martian atmospheric pressure and at the postulated higher pressures required to permit liquid water on the surface. Adsorption of carbon dioxide on a Clay Mineral Society standard containing nontronite was studied over a wide range of pressures in the absence of water. Similar experiments were conducted on the pure nontronite extracted from the natural sample. Heating curves were obtained to help characterize and determine the purity of the clay sample.

  4. Experimental studies of hydrogen on boron nitride: I. Adsorption isotherms of HD

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.D.; Sullivan, N.S.

    1995-09-01

    The authors report the results of measurements of adsorption isotherms of deuterium hydride (HD) adsorbed onto boron nitride. From this data they derive both the two-dimensional critical point temperatures (using Larher`s method) and the heat of adsorption for the first few layers of this system. These results are compared with similar measurements of HD adsorbed onto graphite and MgO. While substantial substeps within some adlayer steps are evident in the adsorption isotherms of HD on graphite and MgO and have been shown to indicate a two-dimensional liquid-solid transition within the layer, no substep is evident at the level of one percent of a step level for HD adsorbed onto BN.

  5. Basicity, Catalytic and Adsorptive Properties of Hydrotalcites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueras, Francois

    Solid bases have numerous potential applications, not only as catalyst for the manufacture of fine chemicals, in refining and petrochemistry, but also for adsorption and anion exchange. The present processes use liquid bases, typically alcoholic potash, and require neutralisation of the reaction medium at the end of the reaction, with production of salts. The substitution of these liquid bases by solids would provide cleaner and safer processes, due to the reduction of salts, and facilitate separation of the products and recycling of the catalyst. This chapter reviews the recent ideas on the modification of the basic properties of hydrotalcites by anion exchange and on the catalytic properties of solid bases as catalysts. Many examples of successful applications are given, with emphasis to industrial processes recently presented such as isomerisation of olefins. The basic properties of hydrotalcites can also be used to carry the exchange of toxic anions, humic acids or dyes, and have driven recent developments proposing HDT as drug carriers.

  6. Thermodynamics and kinetics of adsorption of selected monoalkylbenzenes in H-ZSM-5

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, R.; Karge, H.G.

    1999-03-04

    In this study, the authors present the first systematic investigation of the adsorption of n-propylbenzene, isopropylbenzene, and n-butylbenzene in H-ZSM-5. Both the sorption isotherms and the rate of sorption uptake were investigated at temperatures between 315 and 425 K. The adsorption isotherms are of type 1 and are reasonably well described by the Langmuir-Freundlich model. It is shown that the heat of adsorption of the longer sorbate molecules depends significantly on the concentration, thus indicating an increased influence of sorbate-sorbate interaction. The uptake rates are determined by Fickian diffusion. The activation energies for the diffusion process are identical for all systems (32--36 kJ/mol). The diffusivities are also in the same order of magnitude decreasing noticeably for sorbates with longer or more complex substituents. A tentative explanation based on a simple jump-rate model for intracrystalline diffusion is given.

  7. Mechanism of Cr(VI) adsorption by coir pith studied by ESR and adsorption kinetic.

    PubMed

    Suksabye, Parinda; Nakajima, Akira; Thiravetyan, Paitip; Baba, Yoshinari; Nakbanpote, Woranan

    2009-01-30

    The oxidation state of chromium in coir pith after Cr(VI) adsorption from aqueous solution was investigated using electron spin resonance (ESR). To elucidate the mechanism of chromium adsorption on coir pith, the adsorption studies of Cr(VI) onto lignin, alpha-cellulose and holocellulose extracted from coir pith were also studied. ESR signals of Cr(V) and Cr(III) were observed in coir pith adsorbed Cr(VI) at solution pH 2, while ESR spectra of lignin extracted from coir pith revealed only the Cr(III) signal. In addition, ESR signal of Cr(V) was observed in alpha-cellulose and holocellulose extracted from coir pith adsorbed Cr(VI). These results confirmed that lignin in coir pith reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(III) while alpha-cellulose and holocellulose extracted from coir pith reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(V). The Cr(V) signal exhibited in ESR of alpha-cellulose and holocellulose might be bound with glucose in cellulose part of coir pith. In addition, xylose which is main in pentosan part of coir pith, indicated that it is involved in form complex with Cr(V) on coir pith. The adsorption kinetic of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution on coir pith was also investigated and described well with pseudo second order model. ESR and desorption experiments confirmed that Cr(VI), Cr(V) and Cr(III), exist in coir pith after Cr(VI) adsorption. The desorption data indicated that the percentage of Cr(VI), Cr(V) and Cr(III) in coir pith were 15.63%, 12.89% and 71.48%, respectively. PMID:18513862

  8. Adsorption of fulvic acid on goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Filius, J.D.; Lumsdon, D.G.; Meeussen, J.C.L.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsduk, W.H. van

    2000-01-01

    The adsorption of fulvic acid by goethite was determined experimentally as a function of concentration, pH, and ionic strength. The data were described with the CD-MUSIC model of Hiemstra and Van Riemsdijk (1996), which allows the distribution of charge of the bound fulvate molecule over a surface region. Simultaneously, the concentration, pH, and salt dependency of the binding of fulvic acid can be described. Using the same parameters, the basic charging behavior of the goethite in the absence of fulvic acid could be described well. The surface species used in the model indicate that inner sphere coordination of carboxylic groups of the fulvate molecule is important at low pH, whereas at high pH the outer sphere coordination with reactive groups of the fulvate molecule with high proton affinity is important.

  9. Adsorption of mercury on laterite from Guizhou Province, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaohong; Zhu, Lijun; Guo, Baiwei; He, Shouyang

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors of Hg(II) on laterite from Guizhou Province, China, were studied and the adsorption mechanism was discussed. The results showed that different mineral compositons in the laterite will cause differences in the adsorption capacity of laterite to Hg(II). Illite and non-crystalloids are the main contributors to enhancing the adsorption capacity of laterite to Hg(II). The pH of the solution is an important factor affecting the adsorption of Hg(II) on laterite. The alkalescent environment (pH 7-9) is favorable to the adsorption of Hg(II). The amount of adsorbed Hg(II) increases with increasing pH. When the pH reaches a certain value, the amount of the adsorbed Hg(II) will reach the maximum level. The amount of adsorbed Hg(II) decreases with increasing pH. The optimal pHs of laterite and kaolinite are 9 and 8, respectively. The optimal initial concentrations of Hg(II) on laterite and kaolinite are 250 and 200 microg/ml, respectively. The adsorption isotherms were described by the Langmuir model. The adsorption of Hg(II) on laterite is a quick process while that of Hg(II) on kaolinite is a slow reaction. Laterite from Guizhou Province is a promising environmental material which can be used in the removal of Hg(II) from wastewater. PMID:19202872

  10. Adsorption properties of biomass-based activated carbon prepared with spent coffee grounds and pomelo skin by phosphoric acid activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaodong; Ouyang, Feng

    2013-03-01

    Activated carbon prepared from spent coffee grounds and pomelo skin by phosphoric acid activation had been employed as the adsorbent for ethylene and n-butane at room temperature. Prepared activated carbon was characterized by means of nitrogen adsorption-desorption, X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscope and Fourier transform infrared spectroscope. It was confirmed that pore structure played an important role during the adsorption testes. Adsorption isotherms of ethylene and n-butane fitted well with Langmuir equation. The prepared samples owned better adsorption capacity for n-butane than commercial activated carbon. Isosteric heats of adsorptions at different coverage were calculated through Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Micropore filling effect was explained in a thermodynamic way.

  11. Adsorption and desorption characteristics of arsenic onto ceria nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qinzhong; Zhang, Zhiyong; Ma, Yuhui; He, Xiao; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang

    2012-01-01

    The rapid increase in the use of engineered nanoparticles [ENPs] has resulted in an increasing concern over the potential impacts of ENPs on the environmental and human health. ENPs tend to adsorb a large variety of toxic chemicals when they are emitted into the environment, which may enhance the toxicity of ENPs and/or adsorbed chemicals. The study was aimed to investigate the adsorption and desorption behaviors of arsenic on ceria NPs in aqueous solution using batch technique. Results show that the adsorption behavior of arsenic on ceria NPs was strongly dependent on pH and independent of ionic strength, indicating that the electrostatic effect on the adsorption of these elements was relatively not important compared to surface chemical reactions. The adsorption isotherms fitted very well to both the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The thermodynamic parameters (Δ H 0 , Δ S 0 , and Δ G 0 ) for the adsorption of arsenic were determined at three different temperatures of 283, 303, and 323 K. The adsorption reaction was endothermic, and the process of adsorption was favored at high temperature. The desorption data showed that desorption hysteresis occurred at the initial concentration studied. High adsorption capacity of arsenic on ceria NPs suggests that the synergistic effects of ceria NPs and arsenic on the environmental systems may exist when they are released into the environment.

  12. [Adsorption of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) onto modified activated carbons].

    PubMed

    Tong, Xi-Zhen; Shi, Bao-You; Xie, Yue; Wang, Dong-Sheng

    2012-09-01

    Modified coal and coconut shell based powdered activated carbons (PACs) were prepared by FeCl3 and medium power microwave treatment, respectively. Batch experiments were carried out to evaluate the characteristics of adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) onto original and modified PACs. Based on pore structure and surface functional groups characterization, the adsorption behaviors of modified and original PACs were compared. The competitive adsorption of humic acid (HA) and PFOS on original and modified coconut shell PACs were also investigated. Results showed that both Fe3+ and medium power microwave treatments changed the pore structure and surface functional groups of coal and coconut shell PACs, but the changing effects were different. The adsorption of PFOS on two modified coconut shell-based PACs was significantly improved. While the adsorption of modified coal-based activated carbons declined. The adsorption kinetics of PFOS onto original and modified coconut shell-based activated carbons were the same, and the time of reaching adsorption equilibrium was about 6 hours. In the presence of HA, the adsorption of PFOS by modified PAC was reduced but still higher than that of the original. PMID:23243870

  13. Derivation of the Freundlich Adsorption Isotherm from Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skopp, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The Freundlich adsorption isotherm is a useful description of adsorption phenomena. It is frequently presented as an empirical equation with little theoretical basis. In fact, a variety of derivations exist. Here a new derivation is presented using the concepts of fractal reaction kinetics. This derivation provides an alternative basis for…

  14. Adsorption of oleic acid at sillimanite/water interface.

    PubMed

    Kumar, T V Vijaya; Prabhakar, S; Raju, G Bhaskar

    2002-03-15

    The interaction of oleic acid at sillimanite-water interface was studied by adsorption, FT-IR, and zeta potential measurements. The isoelectric point (IEP) of sillimanite obtained at pH 8.0 was found to shift in the presence of oleic acid. This shift in IEP was attributed to chemisorption of oleic acid on sillimanite. Adsorption experiments were conducted at pH 8.0, where the sillimanite surface is neutral. The adsorption isotherm exhibited a plateau around 5 micromol/m2 that correspond to a monolayer formation. Adsorption of oleic acid on sillimanite, alumina, and aluminum hydroxide was studied by FT-IR. Chemisorption of oleic acid on the above substrates was confirmed by FT-IR studies. Hydroxylation of mineral surface was found to be essential for the adsorption of oleic acid molecules. These surface hydroxyl sites were observed to facilitate deprotonation of oleic acid and its subsequent adsorption. Thus protons from oleic acid react with surface hydroxyl groups and form water molecules. Based on the experimental results, the mechanism of oleic acid adsorption on mineral substrate was proposed. Free energy of adsorption was estimated using the Stern-Graham equation for a sillimanite-oleate system. PMID:16290466

  15. Influence of soil solution salinity on boron adsorption by soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boron adsorption on two arid-zone soils from the San Joaquin Valley of California was investigated as a function of equilibrium solution B concentration (0-250 mg L-1), solution pH (3-12), and electrical conductivity (EC = 0.3 or 7.8 dS m-1). Boron adsorption on both soils increased with increasing...

  16. Ion adsorption mechanism of bundled single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Y.; Tsutsui, M.; Al-zubaidi, A.; Ishii, Y.; Kawasaki, S.

    2016-07-01

    In order to elucidate ion adsorption mechanism of bundled single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), in situ synchrotron XRD measurements of SWCNT electrode in alkali halide aqueous electrolyte at several applied potentials were performed. It was found that the surface inside SWCNT is the important ion adsorption site.

  17. Adsorption of CO Molecules on Si(001) at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Eonmi; Eom, Daejin; Kim, Hanchul; Koo, Ja-Yong

    2015-03-01

    Initial adsorption of CO molecules on Si(001) is investigated by using room-temperature (RT) scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory calculations. Theoretical calculations show that only one adsorption configuration of terminal-bond CO (T-CO) is stable and that the bridge-bond CO is unstable. All the abundantly observed STM features due to CO adsorption can be identified as differently configured T-COs. The initial sticking probability of CO molecules on Si(001) at RT is estimated to be as small as ~ 1 x 10-4 monolayer/Langmuir, which is significantly increased at high-temperature adsorption experiments implying a finite activation barrier for adsorption. Thermal annealing at 900 K for 5 min results in the dissociation of the adsorbed CO molecules with the probability of 60-70% instead of desorption, indicating both a strong chemisorption state and an activated dissociation process. The unique adsorption state with a large binding energy, a tiny sticking probability, and a finite adsorption barrier is in stark contrast with the previous low-temperature (below 100 K) observations of a weak binding, a high sticking probability, and a barrierless adsorption. We speculate that the low-temperature results might be a signature of a physisorption state in the condensed phase.

  18. ADSORPTION AND TRANSPORT OF U(VI) IN SUBSURFACE MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    U(VI) adsorption and transport in three natural, heterogeneous subsurface media were investigated in batch and column experiments. The rate of U(VI) adsorption to the natural samples was rapid over the first few hours of the experiments, and then slowed appreciably after twenty-f...

  19. Random sequential adsorption of starlike particles.

    PubMed

    Cieśla, Michał; Karbowniczek, Paweł

    2015-04-01

    Random packing of surfaceless starlike particles built of 3 to 50 line segments was studied using random sequential adsorption algorithm. Numerical simulations allow us to determine saturated packing densities as well as the first two virial expansion coefficients for such objects. Measured kinetics of the packing growth supports the power law known to be valid for particles with a finite surface; however, the dependence of the exponent in this law on the number of star arms is unexpected. The density autocorrelation function shows fast superexponential decay as for disks, but the typical distance between closest stars is much smaller than between disks of the similar size, especially for a small number of arms. PMID:25974505

  20. [Adsorption properties of Beidellite (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Soulier, J P; Prou-Wartelle, O; Halle, L

    1975-01-01

    The beidellite is both an activator and an adsorbing agent for certain clotting factors: at low concentration (1 p. 1 000), factors XII and VII of human plasma are activated. At a concentration of 10 p. 1 000, the fibrinogen is totally adsorbed, leaving in the supernatant most of the VIII. At alpha 20 p. 1 000 concentrations, most of factor II remains unabsorbed, the remaining plasma being devoided of other clotting factors except minute amounts of factors XI and XII. Contrarely to bentonite, which has similar properties, beidellite does not absorb water and does not modify the pH. Beidellite is therefore a very useful agent for selective adsorption of clotting factors. PMID:241060

  1. Adsorption of flexible polyelectrolytes on charged surfaces.

    PubMed

    Subbotin, A V; Semenov, A N

    2016-08-10

    Adsorption of weakly charged polyelectrolyte (PE) chains from dilute solution on an oppositely charged surface is studied using the self-consistent mean-field approach. The structure of the adsorbed polymer layer and its excess charge are analyzed in the most important asymptotic and intermediate regimes both analytically and numerically. Different regimes of surface charge compensation by PE chains including partial and full charge inversion are identified and discussed in terms of physical parameters like the magnitude of specific short-range interactions of PE segments with the surface, solvent quality and ionic strength. The effect of excluded-volume monomer interactions is considered quantitatively both in the marginally good and poor solvent regimes. PMID:27452184

  2. Investigation of nitric oxide adsorption on Zr( 0 0 0 1 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Y. C.; Ramsier, R. D.

    2002-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO, 15N18O) adsorption on Zr(0 0 0 1) surfaces is studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The results of our TPD experiments imply that subsurface oxygen and hydrogen are involved in surface reactions during heating, resulting in water and ammonia evolution. NO exposure shifts the Zr(MNV) AES feature by 2 eV indicating a change in oxidation state of +1 after adsorption. A superstructure (1×1) LEED pattern is observed after annealing, and is attributed to residual nitrogen at or near the surface.

  3. Adsorption of a multicomponent rhamnolipid surfactant to soil

    SciTech Connect

    Noordmann, W.H.; Brusseau, M.L.; Janssen, D.B.

    2000-03-01

    The adsorption of rhamnolipid, a multicomponent biosurfactant with potential application in soil remediation, to two sandy soils was investigated using batch and column studies. The surfactant mixture contained six anionic components differing in lipid chain length and number of rhamnose moieties. Batch adsorption experiments indicated that the overall adsorption isotherms of total surfactant and of the individual components leveled off above a concentration at which micelles were formed. Column experiments showed that the retardation factors for the total surfactant and for the individual components decreased with increasing influent concentration. Extended tailing was observed in the distal portion of the surfactant breakthrough curve. The concentration-dependent retardation factors and the extended tailing are in accordance with the nonlinear (concave) adsorption isotherms found in the batch adsorption studies. The more hydrophobic rhamnolipid components were preferentially adsorbed, but adsorption was not correlated with the organic carbon content of the soil. This suggests that adsorption of rhamnolipid to soil is not a partitioning process but mainly an interfacial adsorption process.

  4. Adsorption of Pyrene onto the Agricultural By-Product: Corncob.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojun; Tong, Dongli; Allinson, Graeme; Jia, Chunyun; Gong, Zongqing; Liu, Wan

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of pyrene on corncob was studied to provide a theoretical basis for the possible use of this material as an immobilized carrier for improving the bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soil. The results were as follows. Kinetic experiments showed that the adsorption processes obeyed a pseudo-second-order model. The intraparticle diffusion of Weber-Morris model fitting showed that the film and intraparticle diffusions were the key rate-limiting processes, and the adsorption process mainly consisted of three steps: boundary layer diffusion and two intra-particle diffusions. Experimental adsorption data for pyrene were successfully described by the adsorption-partition equilibrium model. The maximum adsorption capacity at 25°C was 214.8 μg g(-1). The adsorption contribution decreased significantly when the Ce/Sw (the equilibrium concentration/solubility in water) was higher than 1. Adsorption decreased with increased temperature. Based on the above results, the corncob particles could be helpful in the bioremediation of pyrene-contaminated soil. PMID:26573838

  5. [Adsorption of Congo red from aqueous solution on hydroxyapatite].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yan-Hui; Lin, Jian-Wei

    2013-08-01

    The adsorption of Congo red (CR) from aqueous solution on hydroxyapatite was investigated using batch experiments. The hydroxyapatite was effective for CR removal from aqueous solution. The adsorption kinetics of CR on hydroxyapatite well followed a pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium adsorption data of CR on hydroxyapatite could be described by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. Thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change were calculated and showed that the adsorption of CR on hydroxyapatite was spontaneous and exothermic in nature. The CR adsorption capacity for hydroxyapatite decreased significantly with increasing pH from 8 to 10. Thermal regeneration showed that hydroxyapatite could be used for six desorption-adsorption cycles with high removal efficiency for CR in each cycle. The mechanisms for CR adsorption on hydroxyapatite with pH value below the pH at point of zero charge (pH(PZC)) include electrostatic attraction, hydrogen bonding and Lewis acid-base interaction. The mechanisms for CR adsorption on hydroxyapatite with pH value above its pH(PZC) include hydrogen bonding and Lewis acid-base interaction. Results of this work indicate that hydroxyapatite is a promising adsorbent for CR removal from aqueous solution. PMID:24191561

  6. Mechanism of amitriptyline adsorption on Ca-montmorillonite (SAz-2).

    PubMed

    Chang, Po-Hsiang; Jiang, Wei-Teh; Li, Zhaohui; Kuo, Chung-Yih; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Chen, Wan-Ru; Lv, Guocheng

    2014-07-30

    The uptake of amitriptyline (AMI) from aqueous environment by Ca-montmorillonite (SAz-2) was studied in a batch system under different physicochemical conditions. The adsorbent was characterized by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analyses. The AMI adsorption on SAz-2 obeyed the Langmuir isotherm with a capacity of 330mg/g (1.05mmol/g) at pH 6-7. The adsorption kinetics was fast, almost reaching equilibrium in 2h, and followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Desorption of exchangeable cations correlated with the AMI adsorption well, indicating that cation exchange was the major mechanism. X-ray diffraction patterns showing significant expansions of the d001 spacing and characteristic FTIR band shifts toward higher frequencies after AMI adsorption onto SAz-2 indicated that the adsorbed AMI molecules were intercalated into the interlayers of the mineral. Thermodynamic parameters based on partitioning coefficients suggested that the AMI adsorption was an endothermic physisorption at high adsorption levels. At low and higher AMI adsorption levels, the intercalated AMI molecules take a horizontal monolayer and bilayer conformation, respectively. The higher adsorption capacity suggested that SAz-2 could be a good candidate to remove AMI from wastewater and would be an important environmental sink for the fate and transport of AMI in soils and groundwater. PMID:24373983

  7. A review of protein adsorption on bioceramics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kefeng; Zhou, Changchun; Hong, Youliang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2012-01-01

    Bioceramics, because of its excellent biocompatible and mechanical properties, has always been considered as the most promising materials for hard tissue repair. It is well know that an appropriate cellular response to bioceramics surfaces is essential for tissue regeneration and integration. As the in vivo implants, the implanted bioceramics are immediately coated with proteins from blood and body fluids, and it is through this coated layer that cells sense and respond to foreign implants. Hence, the adsorption of proteins is critical within the sequence of biological activities. However, the biological mechanisms of the interactions of bioceramics and proteins are still not well understood. In this review, we will recapitulate the recent studies on the bioceramic–protein interactions. PMID:23741605

  8. Adsorption-induced fracture of branched macromolecules.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheiko, Sergei; Sun, Frank; Shirvanyants, David; Rubinstein, Michael; Lee, Hyung-Il; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2006-03-01

    Recently, we have discovered the remarkable phenomenon that brush-like macromolecules with long side chains undergo scission of the backbone bonds as a result of adsorption onto a substrate. The macromolecule's self-destruction occurs because its side chains stretch the polymer backbone as the macromolecule struggles to reconfigure and maximize the number of contacts with the substrate. We show that the tension imposed by the surface attraction is unevenly distributed over the covalent bonds of the molecular skeleton. Along the brush axis, a major fraction of the tensile force is carried by the backbone, while in the perpendicular direction the tension is distributed over many side chains. Using molecular visualization and computer simulation, we confirmed the first order kinetics and measured the corresponding rate constant, which revealed strong dependence on the attraction to the substrate.

  9. Kinetic study of lead adsorption to composite biopolymer adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, H.; Suzuki, A.

    1999-03-15

    A kinetic study of lead adsorption to composite biopolymer adsorbents was carried out. Spherical and membranous adsorbents containing two biopolymers, humic acid and alginic acid, were used for lead adsorption in dilute acidic solutions. The shrinking core model derived by M.G. Rao and A.K. Gupta was applied to describe the rate process of lead adsorption to spherical adsorbents (average radii of 0.12, 0.15, and 0.16 cm). Furthermore, the shrinking core model was modified and adapted for description of the rate process of lead adsorption to membranous adsorbent (average thickness of 0.0216 cm). The adsorption rate process for both the cases was well described and average apparent lead diffusion coefficients of about 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} and 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 2}/s were found for the spherical and membranous adsorbents, respectively.

  10. Adsorption of humic acids and trace metals in natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    Studies concerning the interactions between suspended hydrous iron oxide and dissolved humic acids and trace metals are reported. As a major component of dissolved organic matters and its readiness for adsorption at the solid/water interface, humic acids may play a very important role in the organometallic geochemistry of suspended sediments and in determining the fate and distribution of trace metals, pesticides and anions in natural water systems. Most of the solid phases in natural waters contain oxides and hydroxides. The most simple promising theory to describe the interactions of hydrous iron oxide interface is the surface complex formation model. In this model, the adsorptions of humic acids on hydrous iron oxide may be interpreted as complex formation of the organic bases (humic acid oxyanions) with surface Fe ions. Measurements on adsorptions were made in both fresh water and seawater. Attempts have been made to fit our data to Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Adsorption equilibrium constants were determined.

  11. Kinetic Study of Lead Adsorption to Composite Biopolymer Adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Seki; Suzuki

    1999-03-15

    A kinetic study of lead adsorption to composite biopolymer adsorbents was carried out. Spherical and membranous adsorbents containing two biopolymers, humic acid and alginic acid, were used for lead adsorption in dilute acidic solutions. The shrinking core model derived by M. G. Rao and A. K. Gupta (Chem. Eng. J. 24, 181, 1982) was applied to describe the rate process of lead adsorption to spherical adsorbents (average radii of 0.12, 0.15, and 0.16 cm). Furthermore, the shrinking core model was modified and adapted for description of the rate process of lead adsorption to membranous adsorbent (average thickness of 0.0216 cm). The adsorption rate process for the both cases was well described and average apparent lead diffusion coefficients of about 6 x 10(-6) and 7 x 10(-6) cm2 s-1 were found for the spherical and membranous adsorbents, respectively. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10049553

  12. Boronate affinity adsorption of RNA: possible role of conformational changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Willson, R. C.; Fox, G. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Batch equilibrium adsorption isotherm determination is used to characterize the adsorption of mixed yeast RNA on agarose-immobilized m-aminophenylboronic acid. It is shown that the affinity-enhancing influence of divalent cations depends strongly on the precise nature of the cation used, with barium being far more effective than the conventionally-used magnesium. This adsorption-promoting influence of barium is suggested to arise primarily from ionic influences on the structure and rigidity of the RNA molecule, as the adsorption of ribose-based small molecules is not similarly affected. The substitution of barium for the standard magnesium counterion does not greatly promote the adsorption of DNA, implying that the effect is specific to RNA and may be useful in boronate-based RNA separations. RNA adsorption isotherms exhibit sharp transitions as functions of temperature, and these transitions occur at different temperatures with Mg2+ and with Ba2+. Adsorption affinity and capacity were found to increase markedly at lower temperatures, suggestive of an enthalpically favored interaction process. The stoichiometric displacement parameter, Z, in Ba2+ buffer is three times the value in Mg2+ buffer, and is close to unity.

  13. Adsorption of caffeic acid on titanium dioxide: A spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto, Wagner José; Ando, Rômulo A.; Estevão, Bianca Martins; Zanoni, Kassio Papi da Silva

    2012-06-01

    Caffeic acid is an ortho-phenol found in vegetable tissues presenting important properties such as carcinogenesis inhibitor, anti-oxidant, anti-viral, anti-inflammatory and anti-rheumatic actions. It was observed that caffeic acid was not degraded in daylight during the adsorption on TiO2 at pH 4.8. The adsorption fit very well to a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller isotherm equation with a monolayer coverage of 68.15 mg gTiO-1 and saturation coverage of 195.4 mg gTiO-1. A strong adsorption of caffeic acid was verified on TiO2 for the dry solid obtained from the mixture. The Raman and IR spectroscopies revealed that the adsorption should occur through the interaction of the diphenol oxygens with contribution of CC double bond of the acrylic group, however, the carboxylic acid group did not have participation in the adsorption.

  14. Superior adsorption of pharmaceutical molecules by highly porous BN nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Lei, Weiwei; Qin, Si; Klika, Karel D; Chen, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Highly porous boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) were tested as a re-usable adsorbent for the removal of pharmaceuticals from aqueous solution. The BNNSs exhibit both unprecedentedly high adsorption capacities and excellent recyclability while maintaining their high adsorption capacity by a simple regeneration process. These advantages render BNNSs a promising material for water remediation applications. PMID:26618906

  15. Adsorption behavior of anionic polyelectrolyte for chemical mechanical polishing (CMP).

    PubMed

    Kim, Sarah; So, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Dong-Jun; Yang, Seung-Man

    2008-03-01

    In this work, we investigated the adsorption characteristics of anionic polyelectrolytes, which are used in shallow trench isolation chemical mechanical polishing with ceria abrasives. Specifically, the adsorption isotherms and chain conformation of anionic polyelectrolytes were studied in order to elucidate the difference in removal rates of silicon dioxide (SiO2) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) layers and the high selectivity characteristics of ceria slurry. Adsorption isotherms, FT-IR spectroscopy and contact angle measurements revealed that the anionic polyelectrolyte additives had much better adsorption affinities for the Si3N4 surface than for the SiO2 surface. Moreover, blanket wafer polishing results were successfully correlated with the adsorption isotherms of polyelectrolytes on the oxide particle suspensions. PMID:18078949

  16. Experimental comparison of adsorption characteristics of silica gel and zeolite in moist air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, F.; Yuan, Z. X.; Wang, W. C.; Du, C. X.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the macro adsorption characteristic of water vapor by the allochroic silica gel and the zeolite 5A and ZSM-5 were investigated experimentally. BET analysis method presented the difference of the porosity, the micro pore volume, and the specific surface area of the material. The dynamic and the equilibrium characteristics of the sample were measured thermo-gravimetrically in the moist air. In general, the ZSM-5 zeolite showed an inferior feature of the adsorption speed and the equilibrium concentration to the others. By comparison to the result of SAPO-34 zeolite in the open literature, the 5A zeolite showed some superiorities of the adsorption. The equilibrium concentration of the ZSM-5 zeolite was higher than that of the SAPO-34 calcined in the nitrogen, whereas it was lower than that calcined in the air. The adsorption isotherm was correlated and the relation of the isotherm to the microstructure of the material was discussed. With more mesopore volume involved, the zeolite presented an S-shaped isotherm in contrast to the exponential isotherm of the silica gel. In addition, the significance of the S-shaped isotherm for the application in adsorption heat pump has also been addressed.

  17. Effect of pressure on the moisture adsorption of silica gel and zeolite 13X adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yan-Ching; Weng, Ling-Chia; Tseng, Pen-Chang; Wang, Chi-Chuan

    2015-03-01

    The effect of pressure on the adsorption characteristics of spherical adsorbents of zeolite 13X and RD silica gel is numerically analyzed in this study. The numerical model considers simultaneous heat and mass transfer in a spherical desiccant particle, which accounts for diffusion of moisture into the particles by both Knudsen and surface diffusion. The calculations indicate a dramatic difference of the adsorption behaviors between silica gel and zeolite 13X at a higher pressure of 7.5 atm due to the capability of adsorption and the diffusive ability of adsorbate within the adsorbent. For a lower system pressure of 1 atm, the variation amid silica gel and zeolite 13X is opposite to that at P = 7.5 atm. This is because the amount of the adsorbate for silica gel at P = 1 atm is significantly reduced. At a higher system pressure of 7.5 atm, the initial water content casts a very small influence on the adsorption behaviors for silica gel. However, for a normal pressure of 1 atm, a detectable difference is encountered subject to initial water contents. On the other hand, the initial water content casts appreciable influence on the adsorption characteristics for zeolite 13X.

  18. Highly porous activated carbon based adsorption cooling system employing difluoromethane and a mixture of pentafluoroethane and difluoromethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askalany, Ahmed A.; Saha, Bidyut B.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a simulation for a low-grade thermally powered two-beds adsorption cooling system employing HFC-32 and a mixture of HFC-32 and HFC-125 (HFC-410a) with activated carbon of type Maxsorb III. The present simulation model adopts experimentally measured adsorption isotherms, adsorption kinetics and isosteric heat of adsorption data. Effect of operating conditions (mass flow rate of hot water, driving heat source temperature and evaporator temperature) on the system performance has been studied in detail. The simulation results showed that the system could be powered by low-grade heat source temperature (below 85 °C). AC/HFC-32 and AC/HFC-410a adsorption cooling cycles achieved close specific cooling power and coefficient of performance values of 0.15 kW/kg and 0.3, respectively at a regeneration temperature of 90 °C along with evaporator temperature of 10 °C. The investigated semi continuous adsorption cooling system could produce a cooling power of 9 kW.

  19. Adsorption and degradation of ketoprofen in soils.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Wu, Laosheng; Chen, Weiping; Chang, Andrew C

    2009-01-01

    Ketoprofen, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), was commonly found in treated wastewater due to its incomplete removal during sewage treatment plant processes. As treated wastewater is increasingly used for landscape irrigation, it is imperative to understand the leaching potential for ketoprofen in receiving soils. In this study, adsorption and degradation experiments were conducted in four U.S. soils with different physicochemical characteristics. Ketoprofen was not strongly adsorbed to the four soils with K(d) values ranging from 1.26 to 8.24 L kg(-1), suggesting its potential to move downward with percolating water. The adsorption was positively related to the soil organic matter (OM) content (R(2) = 0.890). Degradation experiment showed that half-lives (t(1/2)) of ketoprofen were 4.58 d in Arlington sandy loam (ASL, coarse-loamy, mixed, active, thermic Haplic Durixeralfs), 8.04 d in Hanford loamy sand (HLS, coarse-loamy, mixed, superactive, nonacid, thermic Typic Xerorthents), 15.37 d in Imperial silty clay (ISC, fine, semectitc, calcareous, hyperthermic Vertic Torrifluvents), and 27.61 d in Palouse silt loam (PSL) soil (fine-silty, mixed, superactive, mesic Pachic Ultic Haploxerolls), respectively. Degradation of ketoprofen in soils appeared to be influenced by the soil OM content. The prolonged t(1/2) by sterilization indicated that microbial degradation was the dominant pathway for ketoprofen degradation in soils, while photodegradation only contributed a small portion to the ketoprofen degradation. The t(1/2) and K(oc) values were fitted to screening models to predict the leaching potential of ketoprofen in soils. It appeared that relatively high leaching potential of ketoprofen existed in ISC and PSL soils. PMID:19398515

  20. High capacity adsorption media and method of producing

    DOEpatents

    Tranter, Troy J.; Mann, Nicholas R.; Todd, Terry A.; Herbst, Ronald S.

    2010-10-05

    A method of producing an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises dissolving and/or suspending at least one metal compound in a solvent to form a metal solution, dissolving polyacrylonitrile into the metal solution to form a PAN-metal solution, and depositing the PAN-metal solution into a quenching bath to produce the adsorption medium. The at least one constituent, such as arsenic, selenium, or antimony, is removed from the feed stream by passing the feed stream through the adsorption medium. An adsorption medium having an increased metal loading and increased capacity for arresting the at least one constituent to be removed is also disclosed. The adsorption medium includes a polyacrylonitrile matrix and at least one metal hydroxide incorporated into the polyacrylonitrile matrix.

  1. High capacity adsorption media and method of producing

    DOEpatents

    Tranter, Troy J.; Herbst, R. Scott; Mann, Nicholas R.; Todd, Terry A.

    2008-05-06

    A method of producing an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises dissolving at least one metal compound in a solvent to form a metal solution, dissolving polyacrylonitrile into the metal solution to form a PAN-metal solution, and depositing the PAN-metal solution into a quenching bath to produce the adsorption medium. The at least one constituent, such as arsenic, selenium, or antimony, is removed from the feed stream by passing the feed stream through the adsorption medium. An adsorption medium having an increased metal loading and increased capacity for arresting the at least one constituent to be removed is also disclosed. The adsorption medium includes a polyacrylonitrile matrix and at least one metal hydroxide incorporated into the polyacrylonitrile matrix.

  2. Robert Boyle's chiral crystal chemistry: computational re-evaluation of enantioselective adsorption on quartz.

    PubMed

    Kahr, Bart; Chittenden, Brianne; Rohl, Andrew

    2006-02-01

    While searching for early examples of interactions of organic chromophores with minerals in the context of a systematic study of the process of dyeing crystals, we came across Robert Boyle's description of an experiment that may have been evidence of the enantioselective adsorption of a natural product, carminic acid (7-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-9,10-dihydro-3,5,6,8-tetrahydroxy-1-methyl-9,10-dioxo-2-anthracenecarboxylic acid), to the chiral surfaces of alpha-quartz, three centuries before such interactions became the subject of active chemical investigations. In order to determine whether Boyle did indeed observe enantioselective adsorption--albeit unbeknownst to him--we attempted to dye quartz with carminic acid according to his recipe. Quartz adsorbs carminic acid only because on heating it develops a network of microfissures that adsorb dye. This process depends on capillarity, not on specific non-covalent interactions; there is no evidence of enantioselectivity adsorption to heated crystals or enantioselective epitaxy to unheated crystals. These failures changed the focus of our inquiry: Why have almost all attempts to demonstrate the enantioselective adsorption of additives to quartz crystal surfaces been generally confounding and equivocal? In order to answer this question, we complement our experimental historical re-investigation with contemporary computational techniques for modeling crystal surface structure and the adsorption of additives. Minimizations of the energies associated with the adsorption of carminic acid to relaxed, hydrated d- and l-quartz {10(-)0} surfaces are analyzed in light of quartz's abysmal record as an enantioselective stationary phase. PMID:16385623

  3. Modeling studies: Adsorption of aniline blue by using Prosopis Juliflora carbon/Ca/alginate polymer composite beads.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M; Tamilarasan, R

    2013-02-15

    The research article describes the experimental and modeling study for the adsorptive removal of aniline blue dye (AB dye) from aqueous matrices using a Prosopis Juliflora modified carbon/Ca/alginate polymer bead as a low cost and eco-friendly adsorbent. The rate of adsorption was investigated under various experimental parameters such as contact time, adsorbent dose, dye concentration, pH and temperature. The kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies were assessed to find out the efficiency of the adsorption process. The equilibrium uptake capacity of the adsorption process was found with Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherm equations and it was evaluated by dimensionless separation factor (R(L)). The dynamics of adsorption was predicted by pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order Lagergren's equation and intra particle diffusion model. Adsorption feasibility was assessed with thermodynamic parameters such as isosteric heat of adsorption (ΔH°), standard entropy (ΔS°) and Gibbs free energy (ΔG°) using VantHoff plot. The alginate bead was characterized with FTIR spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). PMID:23399273

  4. Adsorption of selenium by amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and manganese dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balistrieri, L.S.; Chao, T.T.

    1990-01-01

    This work compares and models the adsorption of selenium and other anions on a neutral to alkaline surface (amorphous iron oxyhydroxide) and an acidic surface (manganese dioxide). Selenium adsorption on these oxides is examined as a function of pH, particle concentration, oxidation state, and competing anion concentration in order to assess how these factors might influence the mobility of selenium in the environment. The data indicate that 1. 1) amorphous iron oxyhydroxide has a greater affinity for selenium than manganese dioxide, 2. 2) selenite [Se(IV)] adsorption increases with decreasing pH and increasing particle concentration and is stronger than selenate [Se(VI)] adsorption on both oxides, and 3. 3) selenate does not adsorb on manganese dioxide. The relative affinity of selenate and selenite for the oxides and the lack of adsorption of selenate on a strongly acidic surface suggests that selenate forms outer-sphere complexes while selenite forms inner-sphere complexes with the surfaces. The data also indicate that the competition sequence of other anions with respect to selenite adsorption at pH 7.0 is phosphate > silicate > molybdate > fluoride > sulfate on amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and molybdate ??? phosphate > silicate > fluoride > sulfate on manganese dioxide. The adsorption of phosphate, molybdate, and silicate on these oxides as a function of pH indicates that the competition sequences reflect the relative affinities of these anions for the surfaces. The Triple Layer surface complexation model is used to provide a quantitative description of these observations and to assess the importance of surface site heterogeneity on anion adsorption. The modeling results suggest that selenite forms binuclear, innersphere complexes with amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and monodentate, inner-sphere complexes with manganese dioxide and that selenate forms outer-sphere, monodentate complexes with amorphous iron oxyhydroxide. The heterogeneity of the oxide surface sites

  5. The adsorption of plutonium IV and V on goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Arthur L.; Murray, James W.; Sibley, Thomas H.

    1985-11-01

    The adsorption of Pu(IV) and Pu(V) on goethite (αFeOOH) from NaNO 3 solution shows distinct differences related to the different hydrolytic character of these two oxidation states. Under similar solution conditions, the adsorption edge of the more strongly hydrolyzable Pu(IV) occurs in the pH range 3 to 5 while that for Pu(V) is at pH 5 to 7. The adsorption edge for Pu(V) shifts with time to lower pH values and this appears to be due to the reduction of Pu(V) to Pu(IV) in the presence of the goethite surface. These results suggest that redox transformations may be an important aspect of Pu adsorption chemistry and the resulting scavenging of Pu from natural waters. Increasing ionic strength (from 0.1 M to 3 M NaCl or NaNO 3 and 0.03 M to 0.3 M Na 2SO 4) did not influence Pu(IV) or Pu(V) adsorption. In the presence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Pu(V) reduction to Pu(IV) occurred in solution. Pu(IV) adsorption on goethite decreased by 30% in the presence of 240 ppm natural DOC found in Soap Lake, Washington waters. Increasing concentrations of carbonate ligands decreased Pu(IV) and Pu(V) adsorption on goethite, with an alkalinity of 1000 meq/l totally inhibiting adsorption. The Pu-goethite adsorption system provides the data base for developing a thermodynamic model of Pu interaction with an oxide surface and with dissolved ligands, using the MINEQL computer program. From the model calculations we determined equilibrium constants for the adsorption of Pu(IV) hydrolysis species. The model was then applied to Pu adsorption in carbonate media to see how the presence of CO 3-2 could influence the mobility of Pu. The decrease in adsorption appears to be due to formation of a Pu-CO 3 complex. Model calculations were used to predict what the adsorption curves would look like if Pu-CO 3 complexes formed.

  6. Research and Development of a Small-Scale Adsorption Cooling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Yeshpal

    The world is grappling with two serious issues related to energy and climate change. The use of solar energy is receiving much attention due to its potential as one of the solutions. Air conditioning is particularly attractive as a solar energy application because of the near coincidence of peak cooling loads with the available solar power. Recently, researchers have started serious discussions of using adsorptive processes for refrigeration and heat pumps. There is some success for the >100 ton adsorption systems but none exists in the <10 ton size range required for residential air conditioning. There are myriad reasons for the lack of small-scale systems such as low Coefficient of Performance (COP), high capital cost, scalability, and limited performance data. A numerical model to simulate an adsorption system was developed and its performance was compared with similar thermal-powered systems. Results showed that both the adsorption and absorption systems provide equal cooling capacity for a driving temperature range of 70--120 ºC, but the adsorption system is the only system to deliver cooling at temperatures below 65 ºC. Additionally, the absorption and desiccant systems provide better COP at low temperatures, but the COP's of the three systems converge at higher regeneration temperatures. To further investigate the viability of solar-powered heat pump systems, an hourly building load simulation was developed for a single-family house in the Phoenix metropolitan area. Thermal as well as economic performance comparison was conducted for adsorption, absorption, and solar photovoltaic (PV) powered vapor compression systems for a range of solar collector area and storage capacity. The results showed that for a small collector area, solar PV is more cost-effective whereas adsorption is better than absorption for larger collector area. The optimum solar collector area and the storage size were determined for each type of solar system. As part of this dissertation

  7. Adsorption-driven translocation of polymer chain into nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuang; Neimark, Alexander V.

    2012-06-01

    The polymer translocation into nanopores is generally facilitated by external driving forces, such as electric or hydrodynamic fields, to compensate for entropic restrictions imposed by the confinement. We investigate the dynamics of translocation driven by polymer adsorption to the confining walls that is relevant to chromatographic separation of macromolecules. By using the self-consistent field theory, we study the passage of a chain trough a small opening from cis to trans compartments of spherical shape with adsorption potential applied in the trans compartment. The chain transfer is modeled as the Fokker-Plank diffusion along the free energy landscape of the translocation pass represented as a sum of the free energies of cis and trans parts of the chain tethered to the pore opening. We investigate how the chain length, the size of trans compartment, the magnitude of adsorption potential, and the extent of excluded volume interactions affect the translocation time and its distribution. Interplay of these factors brings about a variety of different translocation regimes. We show that excluded volume interactions within a certain range of adsorption potentials can cause a local minimum on the free energy landscape, which is absent for ideal chains. The adsorption potential always leads to the decrease of the free energy barrier, increasing the probability of successful translocation. However, the translocation time depends non-monotonically of the magnitude of adsorption potential. Our calculations predict the existence of the critical magnitude of adsorption potential, which separates favorable and unfavorable regimes of translocation.

  8. Adsorption-driven translocation of polymer chain into nanopores.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Neimark, Alexander V

    2012-06-01

    The polymer translocation into nanopores is generally facilitated by external driving forces, such as electric or hydrodynamic fields, to compensate for entropic restrictions imposed by the confinement. We investigate the dynamics of translocation driven by polymer adsorption to the confining walls that is relevant to chromatographic separation of macromolecules. By using the self-consistent field theory, we study the passage of a chain trough a small opening from cis to trans compartments of spherical shape with adsorption potential applied in the trans compartment. The chain transfer is modeled as the Fokker-Plank diffusion along the free energy landscape of the translocation pass represented as a sum of the free energies of cis and trans parts of the chain tethered to the pore opening. We investigate how the chain length, the size of trans compartment, the magnitude of adsorption potential, and the extent of excluded volume interactions affect the translocation time and its distribution. Interplay of these factors brings about a variety of different translocation regimes. We show that excluded volume interactions within a certain range of adsorption potentials can cause a local minimum on the free energy landscape, which is absent for ideal chains. The adsorption potential always leads to the decrease of the free energy barrier, increasing the probability of successful translocation. However, the translocation time depends non-monotonically of the magnitude of adsorption potential. Our calculations predict the existence of the critical magnitude of adsorption potential, which separates favorable and unfavorable regimes of translocation. PMID:22697566

  9. Electronic Parameters of Mesoporous Silicon Upon Adsorption of Plant Viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashpanov, Yuriy; Son, Jung-Young; Kwack, Kae-Dal; Shin, Seung-Jung

    2008-06-01

    Changes in the electronic parameters of mesoporous silicon upon adsorption of nematodetransmitted polyhedral (NEPO) viruses of plant [tomato ringspot virus (TORSV), grapevine virus A (GVA), and grapevine fan leaf virus (GFLV)] measured at room temperature are investigated. The adsorption of these viruses affected essentially on the electronic characteristic of the porous material. The measurement of the electronic characteristics of porous silicon can be applied to the creation of detectors for the presence of viruses in a given environment.

  10. Modelling of CO2 Adsorption from Exhaust Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panowski, Marcin; Klainy, Roman; Sztelder, Karol

    World tendencies in environmental protection points out necessity of reduction of CO2 emission to atmosphere. The one of the main sources of CO2 emission is placed in energy sector where electric energy and heat are produced based on fossil fuels combustion. Therefore, it seems to be necessary to perform research on CO2 emission reduction in this sector. The main aim of work presented in this paper was focused on the analysis and assessment of CO2 separation from flue gases on the total efficiency of conventional power station. The paper shows the numerical calculations performed with IPSEpro simulation software by SimTech.For the CO2 separation the PTSA (pressure-Temperature Swing Adsorption) process was chosen and the numerical as well as simulation model of such process was formulated. The calculations were made for few different adsorbents taking into account varying values of such thermodynamic parameters of separation process like temperature or pressure. Results obtained from calculations point out that mixed PTSA technology is not very energy consuming process. Owing to utilisation of waste heat for sorbent regeneration, it does not decrease the total efficiency for more than 0.6%. However, that is caused by separation only, while after that CO2 must be compressed for further treatment.

  11. Insolubilization of Chestnut Shell Pigment for Cu(II) Adsorption from Water.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zeng-Yu; Qi, Jian-Hua; Hu, Yong; Wang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Chestnut shell pigment (CSP) is melanin from an agricultural waste. It has potential as an adsorbent for wastewater treatment but cannot be used in its original state because of its solubility in water. We developed a new method to convert CSP to insolubilized chestnut shell pigment (ICSP) by heating, and the Cu(II) adsorption performance of ICSP was evaluated. The conversion was characterized, and the thermal treatment caused dehydration and loss of carboxyl groups and aliphatic structures in CSP. The kinetic adsorption behavior obeyed the pseudo-second-order rate law, and the equilibrium adsorption data were well described with both the Langmuir and the Freundlich isotherms. ICSP can be used as a renewable, readily-available, easily-producible, environmentally-friendly, inexpensive and effective adsorbent to remove heavy-metal from aquatic environments. PMID:27043502

  12. DFT modelling of hydrogen sulphide adsorption on α-Cr2O3 (0001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Frank; Stashans, Arvids

    2016-05-01

    Density functional theory has been used to predict properties of hydrogen sulphide, H2S, adsorption on the α-Cr2O3 (0001) surface. Five energetically most favourable adsorption configurations have been selected for the study. Our work reveals adsorption geometries as well as discusses electronic and magnetic properties of the adsorbate on chromium oxide surface. It is shown that two different adsorption types, namely molecular adsorption and dissociative adsorption, can take place leading to two sets of adsorption energies. The most favourable arrangement is found to correspond to the case of dissociative adsorption with molecular hydrogen forming OH group at the α-Cr2O3 (0001) surface.

  13. Pulsed laser deposited metal oxide thin films mediated controlled adsorption of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Jin

    Several metal oxide thin films were grown on Si substrate by pulsed laser deposition for controlling adsorption of proteins. No intentional heating of substrate and introduction of oxygen gas during growth were employed. Additionally, fibrinogen, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and lysozyme were used as model protein in this study. The film properties such as cyratllinity, surface roughness, surface electrical charge and chemistry were investigated by many techniques in order to obtain the relationship with protein adsorption. Firstly, as grown Ta2O5 and ZnO thin film were used to study the effects of surface charge on the behaviors of BSA and lysozyme adsorption. The protein thickness results by ellipsometry showed that negatively charged Ta2O5 had a stronger affinity to positively charged lysozyme, while positively charged ZnO had a stronger affinity to negatively charged BSA. The results confirmed electrostatic interaction due to surface charge is one of main factors for determining adsorption of proteins. Furthermore, annealing studies were performed by heat treatment of as grown Ta2O5 and ZnO at 800°C in air ambience. Annealed Ta2O5 thin film had almost wetting property (from 10.02° to less than 1˜2°) and the change of cystallinity (from amorphous to cyrsalline) while annealed ZnO thin film had a reduced contact angle (from 75.65° to 39.41°) and remained to crystalline structure. The fibrinogen thickness on annealed Ta2O5 film was increased compared with as grown sample, while heat treated ZnO film showed much reduction of fibrinogen adsorption. Binary Ta-Zn oxide thin films (TZ) were grown by preparing PLD target composed of 50 wt% Ta2O5 and 50 wt% ZnO. This binary film had IEP pH 7.1 indicating nearly neutral charge in pH 7.4 PBS solution, and hydrophilic property. Ellipsometrical results showed that TZ film had the lowest fibrinogen, BSA and lysozyme thickness after 120 min adsorption compared with Ta2O5 and ZnO. Other samples, bilayer oxide films in

  14. High temperature adsorption of nitrogen on a polycrystalline nickel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boughaba, S.; Auvert, G.

    1994-01-01

    Nickel tetracarbonyl [Ni(CO)4] molecules were used as a probe to investigate the coverage of a heated polycrystalline nickel surface with nitrogen adspecies. For this purpose, the deposition kinetics of nickel (Ni) microstructures from the thermal decomposition of nickel tetracarbonyl was investigated as a function of the partial pressure of nitrogen (N2), used as buffer gas. The laser-induced chemical vapor deposition technique was used to produce polycrystalline nickel lines in an atmosphere of pure Ni(CO)4 or a [Ni(CO)4+N2] mixture. The deposition process was performed on polysilicon/silicon dioxide/<100> monosilicon substrates. As a heat source, a cw argon-ion laser was used. The laser-induced surface temperature was varied in the range 500-850 °C. For Ni(CO)4 partial pressures typically below 0.3 mbar, the nickel deposition rate was found to decrease as the N2 partial pressure increases. For higher Ni(CO)4 partial pressures, the deposition rate was found to be independent of the N2 partial pressure. On the basis of these results, the high temperature adsorption of nitrogen on a polycrystalline nickel surface was investigated. A model which accounts for the dependence of the nickel deposition rate and surface coverage with nitrogen adspecies on the N2 partial pressure was elaborated.

  15. Adsorption of xenon on vicinal copper and platinum surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Layton

    The adsorption of xenon was studied on Cu(111), Cu(221), Cu(643) and on Pt(111), Pt(221), and Pt(531) using low energy electron diffraction (LEED), temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of xenon, and ultraviolet photoemission of adsorbed xenon (PAX). These experiments were performed to study the atomic and electronic structure of stepped and step-kinked, chiral metal surfaces. Xenon TPD and PAX were performed on each surface in an attempt to titrate terrace, step edge, and kink adsorption sites by adsorption energetics (TPD) and local work function differences (PAX). Due to the complex behavior of xenon on the vicinal copper and platinum metal surfaces, adsorption sites on these surfaces could not be adequately titrated by xenon TPD. On Cu(221) and Cu(643), xenon desorption from step adsorption sites was not apparent leading to the conclusion that the energy difference between terrace and step adsorption is minuscule. On Pt(221) and Pt(531), xenon TPD indicated that xenon prefers to bond at step edges and that the xenon-xenon interaction at step edges in repulsive but no further indication of step-kink adsorption was observed. The Pt(221) and Pt(531) TPD spectra indicated that the xenon overlayer undergoes strong compression near monolayer coverage on these surfaces due to repulsion between step-edge adsorbed xenon and other encroaching xenon atoms. The PAX experiments on the copper and platinum surfaces demonstrated that the step adsorption sites have lower local work functions than terrace adsorption sites and that higher step density leads to a larger separation in the local work function of terrace and step adsorption sites. The PAX spectra also indicated that, for all surfaces studied at 50--70 K, step adsorption is favored at low coverage but the step sites are not saturated until monolayer coverage is reached; this observation is due to the large entropy difference between terrace and step adsorption states and to repulsive interactions between xenon atoms

  16. Modifying the catalytic and adsorption properties of metals and oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagodovskii, V. D.

    2015-11-01

    A new approach to interpreting the effect of promoters (inhibitors) of nonmetals and metals added to a host metal (catalyst) is considered. Theoretical calculations are based on a model of an actual two-dimensional electron gas and adsorbate particles. An equation is derived for the isotherm of induced adsorption on metals and semiconductors with respect to small fillings of θ ~ 0.1-0.15. The applicability of this equation is verified experimentally for metals (Ag, Pd, Cu, Fe, and Ni), graphitized ash, and semiconductor oxides Ta2O5, ZnO, and Ni. The applicability of the theoretical model of promotion is verified by the hydrogenation reaction of CO on ultradispersed nickel powder. The use of plasmachemical surface treatments of metals and oxides, accompanied by an increase in activity and variation in selectivity, are investigated based on the dehydrocyclization reactions of n-hexane and the dehydrogenation and dehydration of alcohols. It is established that such treatments for metals (Pt, Cu, Ni, and Co) raise their activity due to the growth of the number of active centers upon an increase in the activation energy. Applying XPES and XRD methods to metallic catalysts, it is shown that the rise in activity is associated with a change in their surface states (variation in the structural characteristics of metal particles and localization of certain forms of carbon in catalytically active centers). It is shown that plasmachemical treatments also alter their surface composition, surface activity, and raise their activity when used with complex phosphate oxides of the NASICON type. It is shown by the example of conversion of butanol-2 that abrupt variations in selectivity (prevalence of dehydration over dehydrogenation and vice versa) occur, depending on the type of plasma. It is concluded that plasmachemical treatments of metals and ZnO and NiO alter the isosteric heats and entropies of adsorption of isopropanol.

  17. Computational studies of adsorption in metal organic frameworks and interaction of nanoparticles in condensed phases

    SciTech Connect

    Annapureddy, HVR; Motkuri, RK; Nguyen, PTM; Truong, TB; Thallapally, PK; McGrail, BP; Dang, LX

    2014-02-05

    In this review, we describe recent efforts to systematically study nano-structured metal organic frameworks (MOFs), also known as metal organic heat carriers, with particular emphasis on their application in heating and cooling processes. We used both molecular dynamics and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation techniques to gain a molecular-level understanding of the adsorption mechanism of gases in these porous materials. We investigated the uptake of various gases such as refrigerants R12 and R143a. We also evaluated the effects of temperature and pressure on the uptake mechanism. Our computed results compared reasonably well with available measurements from experiments, thus validating our potential models and approaches. In addition, we investigated the structural, diffusive and adsorption properties of different hydrocarbons in Ni-2(dhtp). Finally, to elucidate the mechanism of nanoparticle dispersion in condensed phases, we studied the interactions among nanoparticles in various liquids, such as n-hexane, water and methanol.

  18. Method and apparatus for thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Rassat, Scot D.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Drost, Kevin; Vishwanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2004-06-08

    The present invention provides compact adsorption systems that are capable of rapid temperature swings and rapid cycling. Novel methods of thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption are also described. In some aspects of the invention, a gas is passed through the adsorbent thus allowing heat exchangers to be very close to all portions of the adsorbent and utilize less space. In another aspect, the adsorption media is selectively heated, thus reducing energy costs. Methods and systems for gas adsorption/desorption having improved energy efficiency with capability of short cycle times are also described. In another aspect, the apparatus or methods utilize heat exchange channels of varying lengths that have volumes controlled to provide equal heat fluxes. Methods of fuel cell startup are also described. Advantages of the invention include the ability to use (typically) 30-100 times less adsorbent compared to conventional systems.

  19. Adsorption of cadmium(II) on waste biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Baláž, M; Bujňáková, Z; Baláž, P; Zorkovská, A; Danková, Z; Briančin, J

    2015-09-15

    Significant increase of the adsorption ability of the eggshell biomaterial toward cadmium was observed upon milling, as is evidenced by the value of maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 329mgg(-1), which is markedly higher than in the case of most "green" sorbents. The main driving force of the adsorption was proven to be the presence of aragonite phase as a consequence of phase transformation from calcite occurring during milling. Cadmium is adsorbed in a non-reversible way, as documented by different techniques (desorption tests, XRD and EDX measurements). The optimum pH for cadmium adsorption was 7. The adsorption process was accompanied by the increase of the value of specific surface area. The course of adsorption has been described by Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. The adsorption kinetics was evaluated using three models, among which the best correlation coefficients and the best normalized standard deviation values were achieved for the pseudo-second order model and the intraparticle diffusion model, respectively. PMID:26005798

  20. Adsorption of ammonia on treated stainless steel and polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaittinen, O.; Metsälä, M.; Persijn, S.; Vainio, M.; Halonen, L.

    2014-05-01

    Adsorption of dynamically diluted ammonia at part-per-billion to low part-per-million concentrations in dry nitrogen was studied with treated and non-treated stainless steel and polymer test tubes. The treatments included electropolishing and two types of coatings based on amorphous silicon. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy with an external cavity diode laser operating in the near-infrared wavelength range was used to monitor the adsorption process in real time in continuous-flow conditions to obtain quantitative assessment of the adsorptive properties of the studied surfaces. The investigated polymers were all less adsorptive than any of the treated or non-treated stainless steel surfaces. Some of the commercial coatings reduced the adsorption loss of stainless steel by a factor of ten or more. Polyvinylidene fluoride was found to be superior (less adsorption) to the four other studied polymer coatings. The number of adsorbed ammonia molecules per surface area obtained at different ammonia gas phase concentrations was modeled with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The time behavior of the adsorption-desorption process occurring in the time scale of seconds and minutes was simulated with a simple kinetic model.

  1. Effective adsorption of phosphate from wastewaters by big composite pellets made of reduced steel slag and iron ore concentrate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjuan; Shen, Shaobo; Liu, Longhui; Ji, Yilong; Wang, Fuming

    2015-01-01

    In order to remove phosphate from wastewater, a large plastic adsorption column filled with big phosphate-adsorbing pellets with diameters of 10 mm, heated by electromagnetic induction coils, was conceived. It was found that the prepared big pellets, which were made of reduced steel slag and iron ore concentrate, contain magnetic Fe and Fe3O4. The thermodynamics and kinetics of adsorption of phosphate from synthetic wastewaters on the pellets were studied in this work. The phosphate adsorption on the pellets followed three models of Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevick. The maximum phosphate adsorption capacity Qmax of the pellets were 2.46, 2.74 and 2.77 mg/g for the three temperatures of 20°C, 30°C and 40°C, respectively, based on the Langmuir model. The apparent adsorption energies were -12.9 kJ/mol for the three temperatures. It implied that ion exchange was the main mechanism involved in the adsorption processes. The adsorbed phosphate existed on the pellet surface mainly in the form of Fe3(PO4)2. A reduction pre-treatment of the pellet precursor with H2 greatly enhanced pellet adsorption for phosphate. The adsorption kinetics is better represented by a pseudo-first-order model. The adsorbed phosphate amounts were similar for both real and synthetic wastewaters under similar adsorption conditions. The percentage of adsorbed phosphate for a real wastewater increased with increasing pellet concentration and reached 99.2% at a pellet concentration of 64 (g/L). Some specific phosphate adsorption mechanisms for the pellets were revealed and the pellets showed the potential to efficiently adsorb phosphate from a huge amount of real wastewaters in an industrial scale. PMID:26038973

  2. Modeling adsorption of liquid mixtures on porous materials.

    PubMed

    Monsalvo, Matias A; Shapiro, Alexander A

    2009-05-01

    The multicomponent potential theory of adsorption (MPTA), which was previously applied to adsorption from gases, is extended onto adsorption of liquid mixtures on porous materials. In the MPTA, the adsorbed fluid is considered as an inhomogeneous liquid with thermodynamic properties that depend on the distance from the solid surface (or position in the porous space). The theory describes the two kinds of interactions present in the adsorbed fluid, i.e. the fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interactions, by means of an equation of state and interaction potentials, respectively. The proposed extension of the MPTA onto liquids has been tested on experimental binary and ternary adsorption data. We show that, for the set of experimental data considered in this work, the MPTA model is capable of correlating binary adsorption equilibria. Based on binary adsorption data, the theory can then predict ternary adsorption equilibria. Good agreement with the theoretical predictions is achieved in most of the cases. Some limitations of the model are also discussed. PMID:19243781

  3. Adsorption of bovine serum albumin on nanosized magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Peng, Z G; Hidajat, K; Uddin, M S

    2004-03-15

    Adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on nanosized magnetic particles (Fe(3)O(4)) was carried out in the presence of carbodiimide. The equilibrium and kinetics of the adsorption process were studied. Nanosized magnetic particles (Fe(3)O(4)) were prepared by the chemical precipitation method using Fe2+, Fe3+ salts, and ammonium hydroxide under a nitrogen atmosphere. Characterizations of magnetic particles were carried out using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to confirm the attachment of BSA on magnetic particles. Effects of pH and salt concentrations were investigated on the adsorption process. The experimental results show that the adsorption of BSA on magnetic particles was affected greatly by the pH, while the effect of salt concentrations was insignificant at a low concentration range. The adsorption equilibrium isotherm was fitted well by the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption of BSA on magnetic particles occurred at the isoelectric point of BSA. Adsorption kinetics was analyzed by a linear driving force mass-transfer model. BSA was desorbed from magnetic particles under alkaline conditions, which was confirmed by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and FTIR results. PMID:14972603

  4. Adsorption kinetic process of thiol ligands on gold nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hao; Yang, Lina; Jiang, Yong; Huang, Yuanyuan; Sun, Zhihu; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Tiandou; Pan, Zhiyun; Pan, Guoqiang; Yao, Tao; Bian, Qing; Wei, Shiqiang

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the kinetic mechanism during ligand adsorption on gold nanocrystals is important for designing and fine-tuning their properties and implications. Here, we report a kinetic study on the adsorption process of dodecanethiol ligands on Au nanocrystals of 3.3 nm by an in situ time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure technique. A two-step process of dodecanethiol adsorption on Au NC surfaces is proposed based on the obtained ligand coverage, which shows a quick increase from 0 to 0.40 within the first 20 min, followed by a much slower increase to the limiting value of 0.94. In-depth analysis suggests that the first stage involves the quick adsorption of dodecanethiol to the corner and edge sites of Au NCs surfaces, leading to remarkable surface Au-Au bond length relaxation (from 2.79 to 2.81 Å) and pronounced gold-to-ligand charge transfer. The second step that corresponds to the much slower adsorption process to the surface facets could be described by the Langmuir kinetics equation with an adsorption rate constant of 0.0132 min(-1) and an initial coverage of 0.41, in good agreement with the initially preferable adsorption of thiols to the most favorable sites. PMID:24122096

  5. The adsorption of chromium (VI) from industrial wastewater by acid and base-activated lignocellulosic residues.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Patricia; Blanco, Clara; Granda, Marcos

    2007-06-01

    This study deals with the adsorption of Cr(VI) from synthetic and industrial wastewater, produced by a sewage plant. The activated carbons were prepared from a lignocellulosic raw material by thermal treatment at 450 and 650 degrees C in the presence of acid (AlCl(3), HCl, H(3)PO(4) and H(2)SO(4)) and base (NaOH) agents. To optimize the adsorption of Cr(VI), the chemical modifications caused by each activating agent (related to the capability of Cr(VI) removal), and the optimal experimental conditions of the pH, Cr(VI) concentration, adsorbent dose and residence time, were studied. Thus, treatment with H(3)PO(4) gives rise to carbons with a high surface area and high efficiency for Cr(VI) removal at short equilibrium times. In contrast, the generation of active surface sites by means of NaOH requires longer equilibrium times, the adsorption being less effective than in the former case. The adsorption isotherms obey the Langmuir equation only in the first stages of the reaction but fit the Freundlich equations over the whole range studied, so the heat of adsorption can be easily calculated. The results also show that the activated carbons obtained can be recovered by filtration with an efficiency of 30% in the third cycle. PMID:17126488

  6. Influence of milling on the adsorption ability of eggshell waste.

    PubMed

    Baláž, Matej; Ficeriová, Jana; Briančin, Jaroslav

    2016-03-01

    Eggshell waste was successfully used for the removal of heavy metal ions from model solutions. The effect of ball milling on the structure and adsorption ability of eggshell (ES) and its membrane (ESM) was investigated, with the conclusion that milling is benefitial only for the ES. The adsorption experiments showed that the ESM is a selective adsorbent, as the adsorption ability toward different ions decreased in the following order: Ag(I) > Cd(II) > Zn(II). The obtained Qm values for Ag(I) adsorption on the ESM and ES were 52.9 and 55.7 mg g(-1), respectively. The potential industrial application of ES was also demonstrated by successful removal of Ag(I) from the technological waste. PMID:26741552

  7. An assay for measurement of protein adsorption to glass vials.

    PubMed

    Varmette, Elizabeth; Strony, Brianne; Haines, Daniel; Redkar, Rajendra

    2010-01-01

    Protein adsorption to primary packaging is one of the problems faced by biopharmaceutical drug companies. An assay was developed to quantify loss of proteins to glass vial surfaces. The assay involves the labeling of protein with a fluorescent dye, incubation of the labeled protein with the vial surface, elution of the adsorbed protein using a stripping buffer, and determination of fluorescence of the adsorbed protein using a fluorometer. The assay is simple to set up, accurate, sensitive, and flexible. The assay can be modified for indirect measurement of protein adsorption and offers an attractive alternative for researchers to quantify protein adsorption to glass vials and syringes. PMID:21502031

  8. [Adsorption of Cr (VI) on magnetic graphene from aqueous solution].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Yang, Qi; Li, Bo; Chen, Hai; Nie, Lan-Yu

    2015-02-01

    Chemical deposition method was applied to prepare magnetic graphene composites using graphite oxide and ferric salt (FeCl2 - 4H2O and FeCl3 x 6H2O) as starting materials. The static experiments were performed to study kinetics, thermodynamic, adsorption isotherm and effects of various parameters, such as pH, temperature and time on Cr(VI) adsorption. The results showed that adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order model. Compared with Freundlich isotherm, Langmuir isotherm could better describe the adsorption process. The parameters of thermodynamics were ΔHθ = 33.89 kJ x mol(-1), ΔSθ = 120.15 J x (mol x K)(-1), ΔGθ = -2.51 kJ x mol(-1) (303 K), it demonstrated that the adsorption was a spontaneously endothermic process. It also indicated that the optimal pH was 2. Higher temperature and extension of time were in favor of adsorption. When used repeatedly for three times, the adsorption capacity decreased from 3.9 mg x g(-1) to 2.1 mg x g(-1) with an initial concentration of 5 mg x L(-1). By using a permanent magnet, the recycling process of adsorbent was easy to be operated and adsorbent could be regenerated by sodium hydrate solution. Hence, the composites is a promising adsorbent for efficient removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater. PMID:26031080

  9. A Density Functional Theory Study of Formaldehyde Adsorption on Ceria

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Donghai; Deskins, N. Aaron; Dupuis, Michel

    2007-11-01

    Molecular adsorption of formaldehyde on the stoichiometric CeO2(111) and CeO2(110) surfaces was studied using periodic density functional theory. Two adsorption modes (strong chemisorbed and weak physisorbed) were identified on both surfaces. This is consistent with recent experimental observations. On the (111) surface, formaldehyde strongly chemisorbs with an adsorption energy of 0.86 eV to form a dioxymethylene-like structure, in which a surface O lifts from the surface to bind with the C of formaldehyde. A weak physisorbed state with adsorption energy of 0.28 eV was found with the O of formaldehyde interacting with a surface Ce. On the (110) surface, dioxymethyelene formation was also observed, with an adsorption energy of 1.31 eV. The weakly adsorbed state of formaldehyde on the (110) surface was energetically comparable to the weak adsorption state on the (111) surface, but adsorption occurred through a formaldehyde C and surface O interaction. Analysis of the local density of states and charge density differences after adsorption shows that strong covalent bonding occurs between the C of formaldehyde and surface O when dioxymethylene forms. Calculated vibrational frequencies also confirm dioxymethylene formation. Our results also show that as the coverage increases, the adsorption of formaldehyde on the (111) surface becomes weak, but is nearly unaffected on the (110) surface. This work was supported by a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The computations were performed using the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, which is a U.S. Department of Energy national scientific user facility located at PNNL in Richland, Washington. Computing time was made under a Computational Grand Challenge “Computational Catalysis”. Part of the computing time was also granted by the National Energy Research Scientific Computing

  10. Study of Adsorption of Copper Species onto Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Functionalized CNTs have improved adsorptive capacities over pristine CNTs. These can be used for sensors, membranes, filters and matrix composite enhancements made possible because of their nano-size.

  11. Kinetics and isotherms of Neutral Red adsorption on peanut husk.

    PubMed

    Han, Runping; Han, Pan; Cai, Zhaohui; Zhao, Zhenhui; Tang, Mingsheng

    2008-01-01

    Adsorption of Neutral Red (NR) onto peanut husk in aqueous solutions was investigated at 295 K. Experiments were carried out as function of pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time, and initial concentration. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, Dubinin-Radushkevich, and Toth isotherm models. The results indicated that the Toth and Langmuir models provided the best correlation of the experimental data. The adsorption capacity of peanut husk for the removal of NR was determined with the Langmuir and found to be 37.5 mg/g at 295 K. The adsorption kinetic data were modeled using the pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and intra-particle diffusion kinetic equations. It was seen that the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic equations could describe the adsorption kinetics. The intraparticle diffusion model was also used to express the adsorption process at the two-step stage. It was implied that peanut husk may be suitable as adsorbent material for adsorption of NR from aqueous solutions. PMID:19143308

  12. Preparation, characterization and dye adsorption of Au nanoparticles/ZnAl layered double oxides nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu Xin; Hao, Xiao Dong; Kuang, Min; Zhao, Han; Wen, Zhong Quan

    2013-10-01

    In this work, Au/ZnAl-layer double oxides (LDO) nanocomposties were prepared through a facile calcination process of AuCl4- intercalated ZnAl-layered double hydroxides (LDHs) nanocomposites. The morphology and crystal structure of these nanocomposites were characterized by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and N2 sorption analysis. By tailoring the process parameter, such as calcination temperature, heating time and the component composition, the adsorption properties of methyl orange (MO) on the Au/ZnAl-LDO nanocomposites were investigated in this work. In a typical adsorption process, it was found that 0.985 mg of MO (0.01 g L-1, 100 mL, 1 mg of MO in total) can be removed in 60 min by utilizing only 2.5 mg of Au/ZnAl-LDO (Au content, 1%) as adsorbents. Our adsorption data obtained from the Langmuir model also gave good values of the determination coefficient, and the saturated adsorption capacity of Au/ZnAl-LDO nanocomposites for MO was found to be 627.51 mg/g under ambient condition (e.g., room temperature, 1 atm). In principle, these hybrid nanostructures with higher adsorption abilities could be very promising adsorbents for wastewater treatment.

  13. Adsorption of CO2 on amine-functionalised MCM-41: experimental and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Thiago Custódio; Bourrelly, Sandrine; Llewellyn, Philip L; Carneiro, José Walkimar de M; Ronconi, Célia Machado

    2015-04-28

    Adsorption of CO2 on MCM-41 functionalised with [3-(2-aminoethylamino)propyl]trimethoxysilane (MCM-41-N2), N(1)-(3-trimethoxysilylpropyl)diethylenetriamine (MCM-41-N3), 4-aminopyridine (MCM-41-aminopyridine), 4-(methylamino)pyridine (MCM-41-methylaminopyridine) and 1,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.4.0]dec-5-ene (MCM-41-guanidine) was investigated. The amine-functionalised materials were characterised by (29)Si and (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. CO2 adsorption at 1.0 bar and 30 °C showed that the amount of CO2 (nads/mmol g(-1)) adsorbed on MCM-41-N2 and MCM-41-N3 is approximately twice the amount adsorbed on MCM-41. For MCM-41-aminopyridine, MCM-41-methylaminopyridine and MCM-41-guanidine, the CO2 adsorption capacity was smaller than that of MCM-41 at the same conditions. The proton affinity (computed with wB97x-D/6-311++G(d,p)) of the secondary amino groups is higher than that of the primary amino groups; however, the relative stabilities of the primary and secondary carbamates are similar. The differential heat of adsorption decreases as the number of secondary amino groups increases. PMID:25826235

  14. Adsorption and regenerative oxidation of trichlorophenol with synthetic zeolite: Ozone dosage and its influence on adsorption performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjun; Prigent, Bastien; Geißen, Sven-Uwe

    2016-07-01

    Regeneration of loaded adsorbents is a key step for the sustainability of an adsorption process. In this study, ozone was applied to regenerate a synthetic zeolite for the adsorption of trichlorophenol (TCP) as an organic model pollutant. Three initial concentrations of TCP in water phase were used in adsorption tests. After the equilibrium, zeolite loaded different amounts of TCP was dried and then regenerated with ozone gas. It was found that the adsorption capacity of zeolite was increased through three regeneration cycles. However, the adsorption kinetics was compromised after the regeneration with slightly declined 2nd order reaction constants. The ozone demand for the regeneration was highly dependent on the TCP mass loaded onto the zeolite. It was estimated that the mass ratio of ozone to TCP was 1.2 ± 0.3 g O3/g TCP. PMID:27043379

  15. Adsorption sites, adsorption enthalpies and potential removal of terpenoids by atmospheric ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czech, Christian; Hammer, Sonja M.; Bonn, Boris; Schmidt, Martin U.

    2011-01-01

    Ice crystal formation and its effect on atmospheric trace gases are currently an important area of research because of its radiation and climate effects. However, the processes of adsorption of trace gases on ice surfaces and absorption into ice crystals are poorly understood. Both processes are investigated by lattice-energy minimisation for a selected number of atmospherically relevant volatile organic compounds, i.e. isoprene, methacrolein, acetone, methylbutenol, perillyl alcohol and 2,10-pinanediol, which can be considered as exemplary substances for similar structured compounds. Adsorption and absorption geometries and enthalpies are computed and the potential uptake strength is approximated. According to our calculations non-polar terpenes like isoprene are not significantly adsorbed by ice crystals. Oxidized terpenoids have stronger interactions with the ice surface (at least two hydrogen bonds) leading to larger adsorption enthalpies. Absorption into the ice crystal plays only a minor role. Correspondingly, in the atmosphere terpenoid compounds are increasingly adsorbed to ice surfaces with increasing oxygen numbers. Subsequently this process can contribute to the wet removal of terpenoids by ice, which is so far ignored in global transport models.

  16. Computer simulations for the adsorption of polymers onto surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Balazs, A.C.

    1992-01-01

    The objective is to develop theoretical models and computer simulations to examine the adsorption of polymers onto a variety of surfaces, and to understand how the chain architecture and conditions such as the surface or solvent affect the extent of adsorption and the morphology of the interfacial layers. Results obtained last year are summarized under the following headings: behavior of copolymers at a liquid-liquid interface, grafted homopolymer chains in a poor solvent, amphiphilic comb copolymers in oil/water solutions, modeling polymer adsorption onto influenza virus, and behavior of polymers in concentrated surfactant solutions. Plans for future work are also given. 17 refs. (DLC)

  17. Adsorption of highly charged Gaussian polyelectrolytes onto oppositely charged surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Sandipan; Jho, Y. S.

    2016-03-01

    In many biological processes highly charged biopolymers are adsorbed onto oppositely charged surfaces of macroions and membranes. They form strongly correlated structures close to the surface which cannot be explained by the conventional Poisson-Boltzmann theory. In this work strong coupling theory is used to study the adsorption of highly charged Gaussian polyelectrolytes. Two cases of adsorptions are considered, when the Gaussian polyelectrolytes are confined (a) by one charged wall, and (b) between two charged walls. The effects of salt and the geometry of the polymers on their adsorption-depletion transitions in the strong coupling regime are discussed.

  18. Density functional study of the cysteine adsorption on Au nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, L. A.; López-Lozano, X.; Garzón, I. L.

    2009-04-01

    The adsorption of the cysteine amino acid (H-SCβH2-CαH-NH2-COOH) on the Au55 cluster is investigated through density functional theory calculations. Two isomers, with icosahedral (Ih) and chiral (C1) geometries, of the Au55 cluster are used to calculate the adsorption energy of the cysteine on different facets of these isomers. Results, only involving the S(thiolate)-Au bonding show that the higher adsorption energies are obtained when the sulfur atom is bonded to an asymmetrical bridge site at the facet containing Au atoms with the lowest coordination of the C1 cluster isomer.

  19. Adsorption behavior and mechanism of glufosinate onto goethite.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Gu, Xueyuan; Guo, Yong; Tong, Fei; Chen, Liangyan

    2016-08-01

    The adsorption of glufosinate (GLU), a widely used herbicide similar to glyphosate (GLY), onto goethite was investigated as a function of the pH, ionic strength, background cations and anions, heavy metal ions and fulvic acids (FAs) by using batch adsorption experiments. In situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out to characterize the molecular interactions between GLU and goethite surfaces. The macroscopic results indicated that an increasing pH exerted an adverse effect on GLU adsorption because of the electrostatic repulsion, and the adsorption was not sensitive to ionic strengths or background cation types, indicating that an inner-sphere surface complex was involved. GLU adsorption can be considerably depressed by PO4(3-), SO4(2-), and a high level of FA because of the competitive effect, while being enhanced by Cu(2+) with a maximum adsorption at approximately pH5 because of the metal ion bridging effect. Other examined divalent metal cations (Cd(2+), Zn(2+), and Pb(2+)) showed almost no effect on GLU adsorption, indicating weak interaction between them. ATR-FTIR spectra and the DFT calculations further proved that GLU was bonded to goethite surfaces through the formation of a monodentate mononuclear inner-sphere complex between the phosphinic moiety and surface Fe(III) centers under an acidic condition. The results showed that GLU had a similar adsorption mechanism to that of GLY onto goethite, but with a lower adsorption affinity, possibly exerting higher mobility and risk in soils. PMID:27096492

  20. Possible selective adsorption of enantiomers by Na-montmorillonite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friebele, E.; Shimoyama, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1981-01-01

    Racemic amino acids including (D,L) alpha-alamine, (D,L) alpha-aminobutyric acid, (D,L) valine, and (D,L) norvaline were incubated with Na-montmorillonite at 100% CEC at three hydrogen ion concentrations, and amino acid adsorption was determined by ion exchange chromatography. Enantiomers were analyzed by gas chromatography. Differences in the quantities of D and L enantiomers in any of the fractions was no larger than a few percent. Although a large difference in the adsorption of the amino acid enantiomers was not observed, the analysis may indicate a small preferential adsorption (0.5-2%) of L-amino acids by Na-montmorillonite.

  1. Adsorption of Cadmium, Nickel and Zinc in a Brazilian Oxisoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, José Carlos; Martins, Susian Christian; Soares, Marcio Roberto

    2010-05-01

    The adsorption reactions mechanisms provide the understanding of the pollutant fate metals and often control the bioavailability and transport of heavy metals ions in soil, indicating the preventive environmental control. The cadmium, nickel and zinc behavior in the soils are explained by the reactions of adsorption, influenced by pH and ionic strength. The objective of this work was to study the influence of those factors on cadmium, nickel and zinc adsorption in an oxisol. It was studied the Cd, Ni and Zn adsorption in soil samples of the State of São Paulo (Anionic "Xanthic" Acrudox), collected in surface and in depth and submitted to solutions of Ca(NO3)2 1,0; 0,1 and 0,01 mol L-1. The pH of the samples from 3,0 to 10,0 was varied adding NaOH or HCl 4 mol L-1 not surpassing 2% of the electrolyte volume. The soil samples received 5,0 mg dm-3 of cadmium, nickel and zinc, ratio 1:10 (2,0 g of soil: 20 solution ml) and were shacked for 24 hours. The cadmium, nickel and zinc adsorption increased with pH, reaching it picks at pH 7,0 for cadmium and approximately at pH 6,0 for nickel and zinc. This indicates that zinc and nickel have higher affinity than cadmium with the soil colloids, because it reached the maximum adsorption in a small pH value. In other words, the amount of negative charges necessary to promote the maximum adsorption was small for zinc. The influence of ionic strengths was small for cadmium, nickel and zinc adsorption, being similar from pH 3,0 to 10,0, in surface soil layer and in depth, demonstrating that competition with Ca2+ for the retention colloid sites of the soils didn't interfere in the adsorption. In that way, it is supposed that cadmium, nickel and zinc binding energy is high in a soil rich in Fe and Al oxides. Adsorption of cadmium, nickel and zinc was similar for the ionic strengths, not depending on PZSE. The cadmium, nickel and zinc adsorption increased with pH elevation, with small ionic strength influence. Nickel and zinc have

  2. Effect of DOM Size on Organic Micropollutant Adsorption by GAC.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Anthony M; Summers, R Scott

    2015-06-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption of the micropollutants 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and warfarin (WFN) at ng/L levels was investigated in five waters with isolated natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) held at a constant dissolved organic carbon concentration. Each water was evaluated for competitive adsorption effects based on the pretreatment of ultrafiltration, coagulation, and additional background micropollutants. Using the breakthrough with unfractionated DOM as a baseline, on average, the water with lower molecular weight (MW) DOM decreased MIB and WFN adsorption capacity by 59%, whereas the water with higher MW DOM increased MIB and WFN adsorption capacity by 64%. All waters showed similar decreasing MIB and WFN adsorption capacity with increasing empty bed contact time (EBCT), with more dramatic effects seen for the more strongly adsorbing WFN. On average, MIB and WFN adsorption kinetics were two times slower in the water with higher MW DOM compared to the water with lower MW DOM, as described by the intraparticle pore diffusion tortuosity. Increased adsorption competition from 27 micropollutants other than MIB and WFN at environmentally relevant concentrations had little to no effect on MIB and WFN breakthrough behavior. Any competitive effect from background micropollutants became indiscernible at longer EBCTs. PMID:25955134

  3. Adsorption of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by an Andosol.

    PubMed

    Hiradate, Syuntaro; Furubayashi, Akihiro; Uchida, Natsuyo; Fujii, Yoshiharu

    2007-01-01

    To identify the important soil components involved in 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) adsorption on Andosols, 2,4-D adsorption on a surface horizon of an Andosol was compared with that on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-treated (soil organic matter [SOM] was removed), acid-oxalate (OX)-treated (active metal hydroxides and SOM were removed), and dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB)-treated (free and active metal [hydr]oxides and SOM were removed) soil samples at equilibrium pHs ranging from 4 to 8. Although the untreated soil contained a large amount of organic C (71.9 g kg-1), removal of SOM had little effect on 2,4-D adsorption. Active surface hydroxyls, which were attached to the active and free metal (hydr)oxides and metal SOM complexes, were identified as the most important soil functional group for 2,4-D adsorption. The dominant mechanism of the 2,4-D adsorption was a ligand exchange reaction in which the carboxylic group of 2,4-D displaced the active surface hydroxyl associated with metals and formed a strong coordination bond between the 2,4-D molecule and soil solid phase. The ligand exchange reaction reasonably accounted for the selective adsorption of 2,4-D over Cl-, competitive adsorption of phosphate over 2,4-D, reduction in plant-growth-inhibitory activity of soil-adsorbed 2,4-D, and the high 2,4-D adsorption ability of Andosols. Although a humic acid purified from the soil did not adsorb 2,4-D, the presence of the humic acid increased 2,4-D adsorption on Al and Fe, probably by inhibiting the hydrolysis and polymerization of Al and Fe resulting in the preservation of available adsorption sites on these metals. The adsorption behavior of 2,4-D on soils could be a good index for predicting the adsorption behavior of other organic acids in soils. PMID:17215217

  4. Adsorption of PTCDA on Si(001) - 2 × 1 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takayuki; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Yagyu, Kazuma; Tochihara, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Adsorption structures of the 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) molecule on the clean Si(001) - 2 × 1 surface were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments in conjunction with first principles theoretical calculations. Four dominant adsorption structures were observed in the STM experiments and their atomic coordinates on the Si(001) surface were determined by comparison between the experimental STM images and the theoretical simulations. Maximizing the number of the Si—O bonds is more crucial than that of the Si—C bonds in the PTCDA adsorption.

  5. Adsorption of PTCDA on Si(001) - 2 × 1 surface.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takayuki; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Yagyu, Kazuma; Tochihara, Hiroshi

    2015-03-14

    Adsorption structures of the 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) molecule on the clean Si(001) - 2 × 1 surface were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments in conjunction with first principles theoretical calculations. Four dominant adsorption structures were observed in the STM experiments and their atomic coordinates on the Si(001) surface were determined by comparison between the experimental STM images and the theoretical simulations. Maximizing the number of the Si-O bonds is more crucial than that of the Si-C bonds in the PTCDA adsorption. PMID:25770493

  6. Nutrient depletion modifies cell wall adsorption activity of wine yeast.

    PubMed

    Sidari, R; Caridi, A

    2016-06-01

    Yeast cell wall is a structure that helps yeasts to manage and respond to many environmental stresses. The mannosylphosphorylation is a modification in response to stress that provides the cell wall with negative charges able to bind compounds present in the environment. Phenotypes related to the cell wall modification such as the filamentous growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are affected by nutrient depletion. The present work aimed at describing the effect of carbon and/or nitrogen limitation on the aptitude of S. cerevisiae strains to bind coloured polyphenols. Carbon- and nitrogen-rich or deficient media supplemented with grape polyphenols were used to simulate different grape juice conditions-early, mid, 'adjusted' for nitrogen, and late fermentations. In early fermentation condition, the R+G+B values range from 106 (high adsorption, strain Sc1128) to 192 (low adsorption, strain Σ1278b), in mid-fermentation the values range from 111 (high adsorption, strain Sc1321) to 258 (low adsorption, strain Sc2306), in 'adjusted' for nitrogen conditions the values range from 105 (high adsorption, strain Sc1321) to 194 (low adsorption, strain Sc2306) while in late fermentation conditions the values range from 101 (high adsorption, strain Sc384) to 293 (low adsorption, strain Sc2306). The effect of nutrient availability is not univocal for all the strains and the different media tested modified the strains behaviour. In all the media the strains show significant differences. Results demonstrate that wine yeasts decrease/increase their parietal adsorption activity according to the nutrient availability. The wide range of strain variability observed could be useful in selecting wine starters. PMID:27116955

  7. Comparative study of carbon nanotubes and granular activated carbon: Physicochemical properties and adsorption capacities.

    PubMed

    Gangupomu, Roja Haritha; Sattler, Melanie L; Ramirez, David

    2016-01-25

    The overall goal was to determine an optimum pre-treatment condition for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to facilitate air pollutant adsorption. Various combinations of heat and chemical pre-treatment were explored, and toluene was tested as an example hazardous air pollutant adsorbate. Specific objectives were (1) to characterize raw and pre-treated single-wall (SW) and multi-wall (MW) CNTs and compare their physical/chemical properties to commercially available granular activated carbon (GAC), (2) to determine the adsorption capacities for toluene onto pre-treated CNTs vs. GAC. CNTs were purified via heat-treatment at 400 °C in steam, followed by nitric acid treatment (3N, 5N, 11N, 16N) for 3-12 h to create openings to facilitate adsorption onto interior CNT sites. For SWNT, Raman spectroscopy showed that acid treatment removed impurities up to a point, but amorphous carbon reformed with 10h-6N acid treatment. Surface area of SWNTs with 3 h-3N acid treatment (1347 m(2)/g) was higher than the raw sample (1136 m(2)/g), and their toluene maximum adsorption capacity was comparable to GAC. When bed effluent reached 10% of inlet concentration (breakthrough indicating time for bed cleaning), SWNTs had adsorbed 240 mg/g of toluene, compared to 150 mg/g for GAC. Physical/chemical analyses showed no substantial difference for pre-treated vs. raw MWNTs. PMID:26476807

  8. Adsorption of n-alkane vapours at the water surface.

    PubMed

    Biscay, Frédéric; Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2011-06-21

    Monte Carlo simulations are reported here to predict the surface tension of the liquid-vapour interface of water upon adsorption of alkane vapours (methane to hexane). A decrease of the surface tension has been established from n-pentane. A correlation has been evidenced between the decrease of the surface tension and the absence of specific arrangement at the water surface for n-pentane and n-hexane. The thermodynamic stability of the adsorption layer and the absence of film for longer alkanes have been checked through the calculation of a potential of mean force. This complements the work recently published [Ghoufi et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2010, 12, 5203] concerning the adsorption of methane at the water surface. The decrease of the surface tension has been interpreted in terms of the degree of hydrogen bonding of water molecules at the liquid-vapour interface upon adsorption. PMID:21584320

  9. Wettability changes induced by adsorption of asphaltenes

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, J.; Plancher, H.; Morrow, N.R.

    1997-11-01

    Asphaltene fractions were precipitated from two crude oils (designated as Prudhoe Bay `95 and Wyoming `95) by addition of n-hexane. A solution of 250 mg/L of asphaltenes in toluene was used to induce wettability changes in Berea sandstone cores by flow of asphaltene solutions through the core. Concentration of asphaltenes in the effluent was measured by ultraviolet (UV) absorbance. Wettability changes were assessed from measurements of the rate of spontaneous imbibition for changes in initial water saturation and brine composition. Water wetness decreased markedly with increase in ionic strength, increase in cation valency, and decrease in initial water saturation. For comparable conditions, changing the brine anions (chloride, nitrate, carbonate, and sulfate) caused lesser but fairly consistent changes in wetting. Wetting changes induced by asphaltenes from the Wyoming `95 crude oil were always higher than for those prepared from the Prudhoe Bay `95 crude oil. Waterflood recoveries for NaCl, CaCl{sub 2}, and AlCl{sub 3} brines (0.09 M) increased with decrease in water wetness, with recovery reaching a maximum at an Amott wettability index of about 0.2. This result agrees with results reported previously for wettability changes induced by adsorption from crude oil.

  10. Multistage adsorption of diffusing macromolecules and viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Tom; D'Orsogna, Maria R.

    2007-09-01

    We derive the equations that describe adsorption of diffusing particles onto a surface followed by additional surface kinetic steps before being transported across the interface. Multistage surface kinetics occurs during membrane protein insertion, cell signaling, and the infection of cells by virus particles. For example, viral entry into healthy cells is possible only after a series of receptor and coreceptor binding events occurs at the cellular surface. We couple the diffusion of particles in the bulk phase with the multistage surface kinetics and derive an effective, integrodifferential boundary condition that contains a memory kernel embodying the delay induced by the surface reactions. This boundary condition takes the form of a singular perturbation problem in the limit where particle-surface interactions are short ranged. Moreover, depending on the surface kinetics, the delay kernel induces a nonmonotonic, transient replenishment of the bulk particle concentration near the interface. The approach generalizes that of Ward and Tordai [J. Chem. Phys. 14, 453 (1946)] and Diamant and Andelman [Colloids Surf. A 183-185, 259 (2001)] to include surface kinetics, giving rise to qualitatively new behaviors. Our analysis also suggests a simple scheme by which stochastic surface reactions may be coupled to deterministic bulk diffusion.

  11. Coulometric study of ethanol adsorption at a polycrystalline platinum electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, Sol

    2012-01-01

    For the first time, use of a novel pre-conditioning sequence and measurements of hydrogen blockage during fast cathodic scans has enabled the determination of rates of accumulation of ethanolic species on the surface of a platinum electrode under well-controlled conditions of surface cleanliness/activity and mass transport. For dilute solutions of ethanol in 1 N perchloric acid (HClO4), oxidative adsorption rates maximize at 0.3 V, drop off at more cathodic potentials due to competition with adsorbed hydrogen and drop off at more anodic potentials due to oxidative processes that produce products released to the electrolyte. The time and concentration dependence of adsorption follows relationships that are common for adsorption on a heterogeneous surface. Some evidence are presented supporting a mechanism for production of soluble products that does not involve the adsorbed species that are detected through the measurement of blockage of hydrogen adsorption sites.

  12. Adsorption of pyridine onto the metal organic framework MIL-101.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Jin; Park, Se Min; Song, Sun-Jung; Won, Jiyeon; Lee, Jin Yong; Yoon, Minyoung; Kim, Kimoon; Seo, Gon

    2011-09-15

    The adsorption of pyridine onto the metal organic framework MIL-101 was investigated by experimental and theoretical methods. The amount of pyridine adsorbed on MIL-101 was extraordinarily large at 20 °C, corresponding to about 950 mg/g of dried MIL-101 and approximately half of the voids being filled. Most of the pyridine that had filled the voids was rapidly removed by evacuation at room temperature, but some of the pyridine was so strongly adsorbed that it was retained even under evacuation at 150 °C. Although IR spectra of the adsorbed pyridine indicated the adsorption of pyridine as pyridinium ions and coordinated pyridine at low temperatures, increasing the adsorption temperature induced partial cleavage of the pyridine rings. The high stabilization energy of pyridine on the coordinative unsaturated sites (CUS) of MIL-101, obtained by theoretical calculation, -103 kJ/mol, supported the strong adsorption of pyridine on the CUS. PMID:21700293

  13. The adsorption and reaction of adenine nucleotides on montmorillonite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, James P.; Hagan, William J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The binding of AMP to Zn(2+)-montmorillonite is investigated in the presence of salts and Good's zwitterion buffers, PIPES and MES. The initial concentrations of nucleotide and the percent adsorbtion are used to calculate the adsorption isotherms, and the Langmuir adsorption equation is used for the analysis of data. The adsorption coefficient was found to be three times greater in the presence of 0.2 M PIPES than in its absence. In addition, basal spacings measured by X-ray diffraction were increased by the buffer. These results are interpreted in terms of a model in which the adsorption of AMP is mediated by a Zn(2+) complex of PIPES in different orientations in the interlamellar region of the montmorillonite. Mixed ligand complexes of this type are reminiscent of the complexes observed between metal ions and biological molecules in living systems.

  14. Adsorption of acenaphthene on porous organic polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Eichenmueller, B.; Bunke, G.; Buchholz, R.; Goetz, P.; Behrend, K.

    1997-09-01

    Adsorption behavior of the three-ring polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) acenaphthene from aqueous solutions on the adsorber polymers Wofatit EP 61 and EP 63 was examined. Using dimethylsulfoxide as a solubilizer, equilibrium, kinetic, and fixed-bed dynamic experiments could be carried out. Freundlich parameters for equilibrium data were obtained, exhibiting high capacities at low liquid concentrations: K{sub F} = 0.14 mg{sup 1{minus}n} {center_dot} L{sup n}/mg{sub A} and n = 0.5 for EP 61; and K{sub F} = 0.22 mg{sup 1{minus}n} {center_dot} L/mg{sub A} and n = 0.39 for EP 63. By fitting the numerical solution of a mathematical model to experimental data from kinetic experiments in a differential bed adsorber operated at high circulation velocity, effective intraparticle diffusivity could be estimated to be D{sub eff} = 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup {minus}10} cm{sup 2}/s. According to these data and parameters from empirical equations, breakthrough curves were predicted analytically and numerically and compared to experimental data. A good agreement with the numerical solution was observed. The presence of dimethylsulfoxide influenced neither equilibrium nor kinetic data.

  15. A Comprehensive Analysis of Organic Contaminant Adsorption by Clays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macroscopic studies of nonionic organic contaminant (NOC) sorption by clays have revealed many important clues regarding factors that influence sorption affinity, and enabled the development of structural hypotheses for operative adsorption mechanisms. Integrating this understanding with knowledge g...

  16. ADSORPTION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN AGED HARBOR SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of hydrophobic organic contaminants which have low aqueous solubilities and are common pollutants in harbor sediments. Adsorption and desorption isotherms for PAHs are conducted to study the abiotic sorption of PAHs in uncontami...

  17. Microscopic Perspective on the Adsorption Isotherm of a Heterogeneous Surface

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Rogan; Comer, Jeffrey; Ginsberg, Mark D.; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2012-01-01

    Adsorption of dissolved molecules onto solid surfaces can be extremely sensitive to the atomic-scale properties of the solute and surface, causing difficulties for the design of fluidic systems in industrial, medical and technological applications. In this communication, we show that the Langmuir isotherm for adsorption of a small molecule to a realistic, heterogeneous surface can be predicted from atomic structures of the molecule and surface through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We highlight the method by studying the adsorption of dimethyl-methylphosphonate (DMMP) to amorphous silica substrates and show that subtle differences in the atomic-scale surface properties can have drastic effects on the Langmuir isotherm. The sensitivity of the method presented is sufficient to permit the optimization of fluidic devices and to determine fundamental design rules for controlling adsorption at the nanoscale. PMID:22611479

  18. Adsorption study of Ammonia Nitrogen by watermelon rind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, A.; Yusof, L.; Beddu, N. S.; Galasin, N.; Lee, P. Y.; Lee, R. N. S.; Zahrim, A. Y.

    2016-06-01

    The utilization of fruit waste for low-cost adsorbents as a replacement for costly conventional methods of removing ammonia nitrogen from wastewater has been reviewed. The adsorption studies were conducted as a function of contact time and adsorbent dosage and it were carried out on four different adsorbents; fresh watermelon rind and modified watermelon rind with sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH) and sulphuric acid (H2SO4). Adsorbents were tested for characterization by using zeta potential test and all samples shows negative values thus makes it favourable for the adsorption process. The batch experimental result showed that adsorption process is rapid and equilibrium was established within 40 minutes of contact time. The ammonia nitrogen removal rate amounted in range of 96% to 99%, and the adsorption capacities were in range of 1.21 to 1.24 mg/g for all four different types of adsorbents used.

  19. Adsorption of vitamin E on mesoporous titania nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, C.J.; Lin, C.T.; Wu, S.M.

    2010-07-15

    Tri-block nonionic surfactant and titanium chloride were used as starting materials for the synthesis of mesoporous titania nanocrystallite powders. The main objective of the present study was to examine the synthesis of mesoporous titania nanocrystals and the adsorption of vitamin E on those nanocrystals using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms. When the calcination temperature was increased to 300 {sup o}C, the reflection peaks in the XRD pattern indicated the presence of an anatase phase. The crystallinity of the nanocrystallites increased from 80% to 98.6% with increasing calcination temperature from 465 {sup o}C to 500 {sup o}C. The N{sub 2} adsorption data and XRD data taken after vitamin E adsorption revealed that the vitamin E molecules were adsorbed in the mesopores of the titania nanocrystals.

  20. The effects of CO{sub 2} on steam adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Palar, Steve; Horne, Roland N.

    1994-01-20

    Water adsorption in geothermal reservoir materials was investigated by transient flow technique using steam and COz gas. Theoretical and experimental results indicate that water adsorption exists in vapordominated type of reservoir, but experiments in the past have been limited to pure gases. The common presence of CO2, a non-condensible gas, in a geothermal reservoir necessitated a study of the effect of partial CO2 concentration on adsorption. Experimental laboratory work using a crushed Geysers rock sample at low pressure was carried out. Transient pressure exerted by steam pressure inside the sample was measured against time during a desorption process. It was found that the partial presence of CO2 did not significantly affect the adsorption of water.

  1. Numerical Analysis on Adsorption Characteristics of Activated Carbon/Ethanol Pair in Finned Tube Type Adsorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makimoto, Naoya; Kariya, Keishi; Koyama, Shigeru

    The cycle performance of adsorption cooling system depends on the thermophysical properties of the adsorbent/refrigerant pair and configuration of the adsorber/desorber heat exchanger. In this study, a twodimensional analysis is carried out in order to clarify the performance of the finned tube type adsorber/desorber heat exchanger using a highly porous activated carbon powder (ACP)/ethanol pair. The simulation results show that the average cooling capacity per unit volume of adsorber/desorber heat exchanger and coefficient of performance (COP) can be improved by optimizing fin thickness, fin height, fin pitch and tube diameter. The performance of a single stage adsorption cooling system using ACP/ethanol pair is also compared with that of activated carbon fiber (ACF)/ethanol pair. It is found that the cooling capacities of each adsorbent/refrigerant pair increase with the decrease of adsorption/desorption time and the cooling capacity of ACP/ethanol pair is approximately 2.5 times as much as that of ACF/ethanol pair. It is also shown that COP of ACP/ethanol pair is superior to that of ACF/ethanol pair.

  2. Adsorption and decolorization kinetics of methyl orange by anaerobic sludge.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Li, Wen-Wei; Lam, Michael Hon-Wah; Yu, Han-Qing

    2011-05-01

    Adsorption and decolorization kinetics of methyl orange (MO) by anaerobic sludge in anaerobic sequencing batch reactors were investigated. The anaerobic sludge was found to have a saturated adsorption capacity of 36 ± 1 mg g MLSS(-1) to MO. UV/visible spectrophotometer and high-performance liquid chromatography analytical results indicated that the MO adsorption and decolorization occurred simultaneously in this system. This process at various substrate concentrations could be well simulated using a modified two-stage model with apparent pseudo first-order kinetics. Furthermore, a noncompetitive inhibition kinetic model was also developed to describe the MO decolorization process at high NaCl concentrations, and an inhibition constant of 3.67 g NaCl l(-1) was estimated. This study offers an insight into the adsorption and decolorization processes of azo dyes by anaerobic sludge and provides a better understanding of the anaerobic dye decolorization mechanisms. PMID:21279343

  3. Tolerance of Flexible MOFs toward Repeated Adsorption Stress.

    PubMed

    Bon, Volodymyr; Kavoosi, Negar; Senkovska, Irena; Kaskel, Stefan

    2015-10-14

    The adsorption/desorption cyclability of four flexible MOFs, namely, MIL-53(Al), ELM-11, DUT-8(Ni), and SNU-9, was studied at 298 K using n-butane as adsorptive. The detailed analysis of thermal response curves, physisorption isotherm data, powder X-ray diffraction patterns, as well as SEM images revealed the highly stable switching performance of MIL-53(Al) and ELM-11 materials during 100 adsorption/desorption cycles. In contrast, for DUT-8(Ni) and SNU-9, the multiple adsorption/desorption stress leads to the reduction of crystallite size, causing changes in the switching behavior in the initial 10 physisorption runs, and a characteristic shift of the "gate-opening" pressure to higher values is observed. PMID:26397165

  4. Adsorption-induced magnetic properties and metallic behavior of graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yungang; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Gao, Fei; Lv, H. F.; Xiao, Haiyan J.

    2009-09-21

    Magnetic properties and electronic structures of graphene with Cl, S, and P adsorption have been investigated using ab initio calculations. The adsorption of Cl leads to Fermi level shifting to valence band, which results in metallic graphene. A band gap of 0.6 eV emerges in a S-absorbed graphene, leading to the semiconducting graphene. The unpaired electrons in the absorbed P atom is polarized and thus, exhibits a magnetic moment of 0.86 μB, while no magnetic moment has been observed after Cl and S adsorption. This demonstrates that the magnetic properties and conductive behavior of graphene can be modified via atom adsorption. Specially, P-absorbed graphene may be useful for spintronic applications, such as tunneling magnetoresistance.

  5. Proton adsorption onto alumina: extension of multisite complexation (MUSIC) theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nagashima, K.; Blum, F.D.

    1999-09-01

    The adsorption isotherm of protons onto a commercial {gamma}-alumina sample was determined in aqueous nitric acid with sodium nitrate as a background electrolyte. Three discrete regions could be discerned in the log-log plots of the proton isotherm determined at the solution pH 5 to 2. The multisite complexation (MUSIC) model was modified to analyze the simultaneous adsorption of protons onto various kinds of surface species.

  6. Adsorption and dehydrogenation of tetrahydroxybenzene on Cu(111).

    PubMed

    Bebensee, Fabian; Svane, Katrine; Bombis, Christian; Masini, Federico; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Besenbacher, Flemming; Ruben, Mario; Hammer, Bjørk; Linderoth, Trolle

    2013-10-18

    Adsorption of tetrahydroxybenzene (THB) on Cu(111) and Au(111) surfaces is studied using a combination of STM, XPS, and DFT. THB is deposited intact, but on Cu(111) it undergoes gradual dehydrogenation of the hydroxyl groups as a function of substrate temperature, yielding a pure dihydroxy-benzoquinone phase at 370 K. Subtle changes to the adsorption structure upon dehydrogenation are explained from differences in molecule-surface bonding. PMID:23999460

  7. The adsorption enthalpy of nitrogen oxides on crystalline ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels-Rausch, T.; Eichler, B.; Zimmermann, P.; Gäggeler, H. W.; Ammann, M.

    2002-09-01

    The partitioning of nitrogen oxides between ice and air is of importance to the ozone budget in the upper troposphere. In the present study, adsorption of nitrogen oxides on ice was investigated at atmospheric pressure using a chromatographic technique with radioactively labelled nitrogen oxides at low concentrations. The measured retentions solely depended on molecular adsorption and were not influenced by dimerisation, formation of encapsulated hydrates on the ice surface, dissociation of the acids, nor by migration into a quasi-liquid layer or grain boundaries. Based on the chromatographic retention and the model of thermo-chromatography, the standard adsorption enthalpy of -20 kJ mol-1 for NO, -22kJ mol-1 for NO2, -30kJ mol-1 for peroxyacetyl nitrate, -32kJ mol-1 for HON} and -44 kJ mol-1 for HNO3 was calculated. To perform those calculations within the model of thermo-chromatography, the standard adsorption entropy was calculated based on statistical thermodynamics. In this work, two different choices of standard states were applied, and consequently different values of the standard adsorption entropy, of either between -39 kJ mol-1 and -45kJ mol-1, or -164 kJ mol-1 and -169 kJ mol-1 for each nitrogen oxide were derived. The standard adsorption enthalpy was identical for both standard adsorption entropies and thus shown to be independent of the choice of standard state. A brief outlook on environmental implications of our findings indicates that adsorption on ice might be an important removal process of HNO3. In addition, it might be of some importance for HONO and peroxyacetyl nitrate and irrelevant for NO and NO2.

  8. Proton Adsorption onto Alumina: Extension of Multisite Complexation (MUSIC) Theory.

    PubMed

    Nagashima; Blum

    1999-09-01

    The adsorption isotherm of protons onto a commercial gamma-alumina sample was determined in aqueous nitric acid with sodium nitrate as a background electrolyte. Three discrete regions could be discerned in the log-log plots of the proton isotherm determined at the solution pH 5 to 2. The multisite complexation (MUSIC) model was modified to analyze the simultaneous adsorption of protons onto various kinds of surface species. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10441408

  9. Treatment of arsenic-contaminated water using akaganeite adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Cadena C., Fernando; Johnson, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    The present invention comprises a method and composition using akaganeite, an iron oxide, as an ion adsorption medium for the removal of arsenic from water and affixing it onto carrier media so that it can be used in filtration systems.

  10. Surfaces of Microparticles in Colloids: Structure and Molecular Adsorption Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hai-Lung

    2002-03-01

    Surfaces of micron and sub-micron size particles in liquid solution are probed by second harmonic generation (SHG) facilitated with femtosecond laser pulses. The particles probed include inorganic objects such as carbon black and color pigments, polymeric species like polystyrene beads, and biological systems such as blood cells and ecoli. In the experiments, dye molecules are first adsorbed onto the particle surface to allow generation of second harmonics upon light irradiation. Competition for adsorption between these surface dye molecules and the molecules of interest in the solution is then monitored by the SHG signal to reveal the molecular adsorption kinetics and surface structure. Specifically, surfactant adsorption on polymer surfaces, the structure of carbon black surface, and protein adsorption on biological surfaces, monitored by this technique, will be discussed.

  11. Methods of using adsorption media for separating or removing constituents

    DOEpatents

    Tranter, Troy J.; Herbst, R. Scott; Mann, Nicholas R.; Todd, Terry A.

    2011-10-25

    Methods of using an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises contacting an adsorption medium with a feed stream comprising at least one constituent and removing the at least one constituent from the feed stream. The adsorption medium comprises a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) matrix and at least one metal hydroxide homogenously dispersed therein. The adsorption medium may comprise from approximately 15 wt % to approximately 90 wt % of the PAN and from approximately 10 wt % to approximately 85 wt % of the at least one metal hydroxide. The at least one metal hydroxide may be selected from the group consisting of ferric hydroxide, zirconium hydroxide, lanthanum hydroxide, cerium hydroxide, titanium hydroxide, copper hydroxide, antimony hydroxide, and molybdenum hydroxide.

  12. Optimization of salt adsorption rate in membrane capacitive deionization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, R; Satpradit, O; Rijnaarts, H H M; Biesheuvel, P M; van der Wal, A

    2013-04-01

    Membrane capacitive deionization (MCDI) is a water desalination technique based on applying a cell voltage between two oppositely placed porous electrodes sandwiching a spacer channel that transports the water to be desalinated. In MCDI, ion-exchange membranes are positioned in front of each porous electrode to prevent co-ions from leaving the electrode region during ion adsorption, thereby enhancing the salt adsorption capacity. MCDI can be operated at constant cell voltage (CV), or at a constant electrical current (CC). In this paper, we present both experimental and theoretical results for desalination capacity and rate in MCDI (both in the CV- and the CC-mode) as function of adsorption/desorption time, salt feed concentration, electrical current, and cell voltage. We demonstrate how by varying each parameter individually, it is possible to systematically optimize the parameter settings of a given system to achieve the highest average salt adsorption rate and water recovery. PMID:23395310

  13. A Study of Adsorptive Characteristics of Australian Coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Y. P.; Tsai, L. L.

    2012-04-01

    Ever since the Kyoto Protocol, controlling carbon dioxide emission and reducing its content in atmosphere are very important environmental issues up to today. One of the effective methods for permanent sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 is to inject CO2 into deep, unminable coal seams and recover coal bed methane at the same time. CO2-ECBM technology had been proved to be very promising to meet the needs of both environment and energy. Beside other external environment factors, capacity of CO2 adsorption and CH4 desorption are the most influencing factors in selection of sites for the geological storage of CO2. Therefore, the objective of this study is to understand the relationship between gas adsorption and CO2 sequestration, by various experiments for the characterization of Australian of coals. Generally speaking, coal seam gas comprises mostly of CH4, CO2, C2H6, and N2. However, some of the Australian coals were reported with significant amount of CO2 up to 90%, which might strongly affect their capacity of CO2 capture and storage (CCS). High to medium volatile bituminous coals from Sydney Basin and Bowen Basin, southeast Australia were selected in this study. Experiments include maceral composition and vitrinite reflectance measurements, petrographic analysis, Proximate analysis, Ultimate analysis, specific surface area analysis as well as CO2 and CH4 adsorption experiments were performed. Parameters for difference adsorption functions (Langmuir, BET, D-R and D-A) were then calculated to fit their adsorption isotherms the best fitting curve can then be found. Among these adsorption functions, Langmuir is the most basic and commonly used function theory. The results of all experiments were synthesized to discuss the relations among each other, so as to establish the relationship between gas adsorption and coal characteristics.

  14. Adsorption of sodium lauryl sulfate onto arsenic-bearing ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Quan, C; Khoe, G; Bagster, D

    2001-02-01

    Ferrihydrite is an excellent adsorbent for binding trace toxic contaminants such as arsenic, and precipitate flotation of the arsenic-bearing ferrihydrite has been studied. Anionic surfactants such as sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and sodium oleate (NaOL) are suitable collectors for the flotation. The adsorption of SLS both alone and after the subsequent addition of NaOL on these precipitates at pH 4-5 was measured. It has been shown that the synergistic effect of the two surfactants on flotation is dependent on their addition order. The presence of NaOL before SLS in the conditioning stage can prevent the adsorption of SLS because of the electrostatic shielding of adsorption sites on the precipitates. The post addition of NaOL to the SLS-bearing precipitates can promote the flocculation of the precipitates and enhance entrainment of SLS for better flotation. The SLS adsorption data fit better with the modified Frumkin isotherm than the Langmuir isotherm. Thermodynamic parameters (-delta Gads0,delta Hads0, and delta Sads0) have been derived from the analysis of the adsorption isotherms. The results suggest that the adsorption of SLS on AFH is physical and exothermic. PMID:11229002

  15. Computation of Adsorption Energies of Some Interstellar Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sil, Milan; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Das, Ankan; Majumdar, Liton; Gorai, Prasanta; Etim, Emmanuel; Arunan, Elangannan

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption energies of surface species are most crucial for chemical complexity of interstellar grain mantle. Aim of this work is to study the variation of the adsorption energies depending upon the nature of adsorbent. We use silicate and carbonaceous grains for the absorbents. For silicate grains, we use very simple crystalline ones, namely, Enstatite (MgSiO_3)_n, Ferrosilite (FeSiO_3)_n, Forsterite (Mg_2SiO_4)_n and Fayalite (Fe_2SiO_4)_n. We use n=1, 2, 4, 8 to study the variation of adsorption energies with the increase in cluster size. For carbonaceous grain, we use Coronene (polyaromatic hydrocarbon surface). Adsorption energy of all these species are calculated by means of quantum chemical calculation using self consistent density functional theory (DFT). MPWB1K hybrid meta-functional is employed since it has been proven useful to study the systems with weak interactions such as van der Waals interactions. Optimization are also carried out with MPWB1K/6-311g(d) and MPWB1K/6311g(d,p) and a comparison of adsorption energies are discussed for these two different basis sets. We use crystalline structure of the adsorbent. The adsorbate is placed in the different site of the grain with a suitable distance. The energy of adsorption for a species on the grain surface is defined as follows: E_a_d_s = E_s_s - (E_s_u_r_f_a_c_e + E_s_p_e_c_i_e_s), where E_a_d_s is the adsorption energy, E_s_s is the optimized energy for species placed in a suitable distance from the grain surface, E_s_u_r_f_a_c_e and E_s_p_e_c_i_e_s respectively are the optimized energies of the surface and species separately.

  16. Evaluating the Adsorptive Capacities of Chemsorb 1000 and Chemsorb 1425

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, Oscar Alberto Monje; Surma, Jan M.; Johnsey, Marissa N.; Melendez, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    The Air Revitalization Lab at KSC tested Chemsorb 1000 and 1425, two candidate sorbents for use in future air revitalization technologies being evaluated by the ARREM project. Chemsorb 1000 and 1425 are granular coconut-shell activated carbon sorbents produced by Molecular Products, Inc. that may be used in the TCCS. Chemsorb 1000 is a high grade activated carbon for organic vapor adsorption. In contrast, Chemsorb 1425 is a high-grade impregnated activated carbon for adsorption of airborne ammonia and amines. Chemsorb 1000 was challenged with simulated spacecraft gas streams in order to determine its adsorptive capacities for mixtures of volatile organics compounds. Chemsorb 1425 was challenged with various NH3 concentrations to determine its adsorptive capacity.

  17. Effects of Cabin Upsets on Adsorption Columns for Air Revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVan, Douglas

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) utilizes adsorption technology as part of contaminant removal systems designed for long term missions. A variety of trace contaminants can be effectively removed from gas streams by adsorption onto activated carbon. An activated carbon adsorption column meets NASA's requirements of a lightweight and efficient means of controlling trace contaminant levels aboard spacecraft and space stations. The activated carbon bed is part of the Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) which is utilized to purify the cabin atmosphere. TCCS designs oversize the adsorption columns to account for irregular fluctuations in cabin atmospheric conditions. Variations in the cabin atmosphere include changes in contaminant concentrations, temperature, and relative humidity. Excessively large deviations from typical conditions can result from unusual crew activity, equipment malfunctions, or even fires. The research carried out under this award focussed in detail on the effects of cabin upsets on the performance of activated carbon adsorption columns. Both experiments and modeling were performed with an emphasis on the roll of a change in relative humidity on adsorption of trace contaminants. A flow through fixed-bed apparatus was constructed at the NASA Ames Research Center, and experiments were performed there. Modeling work was performed at the University of Virginia.

  18. Adsorption of DDT and PCB by Nanomaterials from Residual Soil

    PubMed Central

    Taha, Mohd Raihan; Mobasser, Shariat

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a study on adsorption of dichlorodiphenythreechloroethen (DDT) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on three nanomaterials including Multi walled Carbon Nanotube (MWNT), nano-clay and nano-alumina. DDT and PCBs are of significant concern due their high toxicity and long environmental half-lives. Experiments were conducted using batch adsorption procedures at different DDT and PCBs concentrations, from 10 to 60 mg/L. The amounts of MWNT, nano-clay and Nano-alumina used were 0.25%, 0.50%, 0.75%, 1%, 2% and 10%. The adsorption of PCBs solution onto the MWNT, nano-clay and nano-alumina was characterized by an initial rapid adsorption which eventually became constant within 22, 20, and 17 hours, respectively. The adsorption of DDT solution onto the MWNT, nano-clay and nano-alumina was also characterized by an initial rapid adsorption which gradually became constant within 22, 22 and 16 hours, respectively. Results of this study indicated that MWNT was a better adsorbent material compared to nano-clay and nano-alumina for both contaminants in this study. While at 10% of MWNT 88.9% and 77% of DDT and PCB were removed by MWNT, respectively. The effect of pH and temperature were also investigated. PMID:26659225

  19. Enhancement of heat transfer in waste-heat heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeffler, R. C.

    1980-07-01

    The Fluidfire shallow fluidized bed heat transfer facility was modified to give increased air flow capacity and to allow testing with different distributor plates and with two stage heat exchangers. The effect of reduced distributor plate pressure loss and amount and type of bed material on the heat transfer performance of a single stage fluidized bed heat exchanger is explored. Elutriation from the bed was measured for different bed materials and distributor plates; alternate heat exchanger surfaces having different fin spacings were also tested. Two types of two stage fluidized bed heat exchangers were tested: one having a baffle (having almost no pressure loss) located between the stages and which allowed bed material to recirculate between upper and lower beds; the second having two distributor plates in series with no recirculation of the bed material.

  20. Calcium adsorption on MgO(100): energetics, structure, and role of defects.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junfa; Farmer, Jason A; Ruzycki, Nancy; Xu, Lijun; Campbell, Charles T; Henkelman, Graeme

    2008-02-20

    The adsorption of Ca on the MgO(100) surface at 300 K has been studied using microcalorimetry, in combination with LEED, AES, ISS, work function, sticking probability measurements, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The MgO(100) thin films (approximately 4 nm thick) were grown epitaxially on a 1 microm thick Mo(100) single-crystal. The sticking probability of Ca on MgO(100) at 300 K is unity. On the basis of AES and ISS measurements, it was determined that Ca grows mainly as 3D particles on the MgO(100) surface with a density of approximately 1 x 10(12) islands/cm2. Ca adsorbs initially at defect sites with a very high heat of adsorption (approximately 410 kJ/mol). DFT calculations attribute this high initial heat to Ca binding to kink sites (376 kJ/mol), step sites (205 kJ/mol), and lower concentrations of stronger binding sites. The heat of adsorption decreases rapidly with coverage, reaching a minimum of 162 kJ/mol at approximately 0.3 ML, where Ca is mainly adding to small 3D Ca clusters. Afterward, it increases to the value of bulk Ca heat of sublimation (178 kJ/mol) at approximately 1.2 ML, attributed to the increase in stability with increasing Ca particle size. A 1.0 eV decrease of the work function with Ca coverage from 0 to 0.3 ML indicates that Ca adsorbed at defects is cationic, in agreement with calculations showing that Ca donates electron density to the MgO. Light ion sputtering of the MgO(100) surface generates point defects, but these do not change the heat of adsorption versus coverage, implying that they do not nucleate Ca particles. Oxygen vacancies are a likely candidate; DFT calculations show that F and F+ center vacancies bind Ca more weakly than terrace sites. More extensive sputtering creates extended defects (such as steps and kinks) that adsorb Ca with heats of adsorption up to approximately 400 kJ/mol, similar to that at the intrinsic defect sites. PMID:18229925

  1. Multiscale Study of Hydrogen Adsorption on Six Designed Covalent Organic Frameworks Based on Porphyrazine, Cyclobutane and Scandium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Le-Le; Gao, Teng-Fei; Zhang, Ruan-Yu; Zhang, Hong

    2014-09-01

    The first-principles method of hydrogen adsorption is used to investigate the interaction of H2 with the scandium-porphyrazine (Sc-Pz) and porphyrazine (Pz) clusters. The result shows that the interaction of H2 with Sc-Pz is stronger than with Pz. Then grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations are used to investigate hydrogen adsorption in six designed covalent organic frameworks (COFs), which are designed based on porphyrazine, cyclobutane and scandium. When the pressure is from 0.1 to 100 bar and the temperature is 298 K and 77 K, the hydrogen adsorption capacities of the six COFs are calculated. We further study the importance of Sc and fillers to improve the H2 uptake in the modified COFs by analyzing the isosteric heat of hydrogen adsorption.

  2. A review of heavy metal adsorption by marine algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin-Fen, Pan; Rong-Gen, Lin; Li, Ma

    2000-09-01

    Accumulation of heavy metals by algae had been studied extensively for biomonitoring or bioremediation purposes. Having the advantages of low cost raw material, big adsorbing capacity, no secondary pollution, etc., algae may be used to treat industrial water containing heavy metals. The adsorption processes were carried out in two steps: rapid physical adsorption first, and then slow chemical adsorption. pH is the major factor influencing the adsorption. The Freundlich equation fitted very well the adsorption isotherms. The uptake decreased with increasing ionic strength. The principal mechanism of metallic cation sequestration involves the formation of complexes between a metal ion and functional groups on the surface or inside the porous structure of the biological material. The carboxyl groups of alginate play a major role in the complexation. Different species of algae and the algae of the same species may have different adsorption capacity. Their selection affinity for heavy metals was the major criterion for the screening of a biologic adsorbent to be used in water treatment. The surface complex formation model (SCFM) can solve the equilibrium and kinetic problems in the biosorption.

  3. Adsorption of CO on Ni/Cu(110) bimetallic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirci, E.; Carbogno, C.; Groß, A.; Winkler, A.

    2009-08-01

    The adsorption behavior of CO on bimetallic Ni/Cu(110) surfaces has been studied experimentally by thermal-desorption spectroscopy and theoretically by density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. The bimetallic surfaces were produced either by evaporation of nickel or by decomposition of Ni(CO)4 on Cu(110). Adsorption of CO at 180 K on such a bimetallic surface yields three new adsorption states with adsorption energies between that of CO on clean Cu(110) and clean Ni(110). The new desorption peaks from the bimetallic surface, designated as β1-β3 , can be observed at 250, 300, and 360 K, respectively. These new states are most pronounced when (1)/(2) monolayer of nickel is present on the copper surface. DFT calculations, using the Vienna ab initio simulation package code, were performed to identify the most probable Ni/Cu atomic arrangements at the bimetallic surface to reconcile with the experimental results. It turned out that CO adsorption on nickel dimers consisting of in-surface and adjacent subsurface atoms can best explain the observed experimental data. The result shows that CO adsorption is determined by local (geometric) effects rather than by long-range (electronic) effects. These findings should contribute to a better understanding of tailoring catalytic processes with the help of bimetallic catalysts.

  4. Characterization and adsorption of Lactobacillus virulent phage P1.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Xi, Y; Zhang, H; Wang, Z; Fan, M; Liu, Y; Wu, W

    2016-09-01

    Bacteriophage infection of lactic acid bacteria is considered an important problem worldwide in the food fermentation industry, as it may produce low quality or unsafe foods, cause fermentation failure, and result in economic losses. To increase current knowledge on the properties of Lactobacillus virulent phages, we evaluated the effect of divalent cations, temperature, pH, and chloramphenicol on the adsorption ability of Lactobacillus virulent phage P1. Phage P1 was isolated from the abnormal fermentation liquid of Lactobacillus plantarum IMAU10120. The results showed that this phage belonged to the Siphoviridae family. The latent period of this phage was 45min, and the burst time was 90min. Burst size was 132.88±2.37 phage counts expressed per milliliter per infective center. This phage showed good tolerance at different temperatures, but incubation at 50°C only affected its adsorption. Adsorption rate reached a maximum value between 30 and 42°C. A high adsorption value of phage infectivity was obtained from pH 6 to 8. Moreover, calcium ions promoted and increased the adsorption capacity of phage P1, but magnesium ions had negative effects. Chloramphenicol had no effect on phage adsorption. This study increased current knowledge on the characterization and biological aspects of Lactobacillus virulent phages, and may provide some basic information that can be used to design successful antiphage strategies in the food industry. PMID:27372579

  5. Adsorption and desorption of uranium (VI) in aerated zone soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolong; Wu, Jiaojiao; Liao, Jiali; Zhang, Dong; Yang, Jijun; Feng, Yue; Zeng, Junhui; Wen, Wei; Yang, Yuanyou; Tang, Jun; Liu, Ning

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the adsorption and desorption behavior of uranium (VI) in aerated zone soil (from Southwest China) was systematically investigated using a static experimental method in order to provide useful information for safety assessment of the disposal of (ultra-)low uraniferous radioactive waste, as well as a potential remediation method for uranium-contaminated soils. The adsorption behavior of uranium (VI) was firstly studied by batch experiments as functions of contact time, pH, liquid/solid ratio, temperature, colloids, minerals and coexistent ions. The results indicated that the adsorption of uranium (VI) by natural soil was efficient at an initial concentration of 10 mg/L uranium (VI) nitrate solution with 100 mg natural soil at room temperature when pH is about 7.0. The adsorption was strongly influenced by the solution pH, contact time, initial concentration and colloids. The adsorption equilibrium for uranium (VI) in soil was obtained within 24 h and the process could be described by the Langmuir adsorption equation. For uranium (VI) desorption, EDTA, citric acid and HNO(3) were evaluated under different conditions of temperature, concentration and proportion of liquid to solid. The adsorbed uranium (VI) on natural soil could be easily extracted by all these agents, especially by HNO(3), implying that the uranium-contaminated soils can be remedied by these reagents. PMID:22939949

  6. Highly efficient adsorption of chlorophenols onto chemically modified chitosan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Liang-Chun; Meng, Xiang-Guang; Fu, Jing-Wei; Yang, Yu-Chong; Yang, Peng; Mi, Chun

    2014-02-01

    A novel chemically modified chitosan CS-SA-CD with phenol and β-cyclodextrin groups was prepared. The adsorptions of phenol, 2-chlorophenol (2-CP), 4-chlorophenol (4-CP), 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP) and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) on the functional chitosan from aqueous solution were investigated. CS-SA-CD exhibited excellent adsorption ability for chlorophenols especially for DCP and TCP. The maximum adsorption capacities of phenol, 2-CP, 4-CP, DCP and TCP on CS-SA-CD were 59.74, 70.52, 96.43, 315.46 and 375.94 mg/g, respectively. The scanning electron microscope and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analyses revealed that the introduction of phenol group changed the surface morphology and surface properties of chitosan. The modified chitosan CS-SA-CD possesses larger surface areas (4.72 m2/g), pore volume (7.29 × 10-3 mL/g) and average pore diameter (59.99 Å) as compared to those of chitosan 3.27 m2/g, 2.00 × 10-3 mL/g and 15.95 Å, respectively. The enhanced adsorption of chlorophenols was also attributed to the interaction of hydrogen bond between Cl atom and sbnd OH group. The adsorption of chlorophenols on CS-SA-CD followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Adsorbent could be regenerated easily and the regenerated CS-SA-CD remained 80-91% adsorption efficiency.

  7. Sorption Characteristics of Sorption Material Coated on Heat Transfer surface of a Heat Exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Komatsu, Fujio; Horibe, Akihiko; Haruki, Naoto; Machida, Akito

    This paper describes sorption characteristics of organic sorbent coated on heat transfer surface of a plate-fin-tube heat exchanger. The organic sorbent is a bridged complex of soldium polyacrylate. This bridged complex containing the carboxyl group as water vapor adsorption site has a larger adsorption abilities as compared with silica gel. The experiments in which the moist air was passed into the heat exchanger coated with sorption material were conducted under various conditions of air flow rate and the temperature of brine that was the heat transfer fluid to cool the air flow in the dehumidifying process. It is found that the sorption rate of vapor is affected by the air flow rate and the brine temperature. Meanwhile, the attempt of clarifying the sorption mechanism is also conducted. Finally the average mass transfer coefficient of the organic sorbent was non-dimensionalized as a function of Reynolds number and non-dimensional temperature. In addition, it was observed that the factor which affects the sorption rate in the water vapor sorption process of the organic sorbent coated on the heat exchanger shifts from the “adsorption step” to the “sorption step”.

  8. Enhanced adsorption of quaternary amine using modified activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Prahas, Devarly; Wang, M J; Ismadji, Suryadi; Liu, J C

    2014-01-01

    This study examined different methodologies to modify activated carbon (AC) for the removal of quaternary amine, tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH), from water. Commercial carbon (WAC) was treated by nitric acid oxidation (NA-WAC), silica impregnation (SM-WAC0.5), and oxygen plasma (P10-WAC), and their characteristics and adsorption capacity were compared. The Langmuir model fitted the equilibrium adsorption data well under different pH. The maximum adsorption capacity of WAC was 27.77 mg/g, while those of NA-WAC, SM-WAC 0.5, and P10-WAC were 37.46, 32.83 and 29.03 mg/g, respectively. Nitric acid oxidation was the most effective method for enhancing the adsorption capacity of TMAH. Higher pH was favorable for TMAH adsorption. Desorption study revealed that NA-WAC had no considerable reduction in performance even after five cycles of regeneration by 0.1 N hydrochloric acid. It was proposed that electrostatic interaction was the main mechanism of TMAH adsorption on activated carbon. PMID:24845325

  9. Adsorption of naphthalene onto sonicated talc from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Sener, Savaş; Ozyilmaz, Azat

    2010-06-01

    The adsorption behavior of naphthalene onto naturally hydrophobic talc from aqueous solution was investigated in this study. The natural talc was first pretreated by sonication to improve the surface characteristics and enhance the uptake capacity by increasing the specific surface area (SSA) of talc. The naphthalene uptake of talc was found as 276 mg g(-1) and increased to 359 mg g(-1) after the sonication. Adsorption studies also showed that the adsorption of naphthalene onto the sonicated talc was not affected by changes in pH suggesting that the main driving forces for naphthalene adsorption onto talc was hydrophobic bonding rather than electrostatic force. The pseudo-first and pseudo-second orders and intraparticle diffusion equation were used to evaluate the kinetic data and the constants were determined. Adsorption process of naphthalene onto talc followed the pseudo-second-order rate expression for different initial naphthalene concentrations. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were used to model the isotherm data for their applicability. The Freundlich isotherm best fitted for the adsorption of naphthalene onto talc. PMID:20163977

  10. Adsorption of dyes using different types of clay: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeyemo, Aderonke Ajibola; Adeoye, Idowu Olatunbosun; Bello, Olugbenga Solomon

    2015-09-01

    Increasing amount of dyes in the ecosystem particularly in wastewater has propelled the search for more efficient low-cost adsorbents. The effective use of the sorption properties (high surface area and surface chemistry, lack of toxicity and potential for ion exchange) of different clays as adsorbents for the removal of different type of dyes (basic, acidic, reactive) from water and wastewater as potential alternatives to activated carbons has recently received widespread attention because of the environmental-friendly nature of clay materials. Insights into the efficiencies of raw and modified/activated clay adsorbents and ways of improving their efficiencies to obtain better results are discussed. Acid-modified clay resulted in higher rate of dye adsorption and an increased surface area and porosity (49.05 mm2 and 53.4 %). Base-modified clay has lower adsorption capacities, while ZnCl2-modified clay had the least rate of adsorption with a surface area of 44.3 mm2 and porosity of 43.4 %. This review also explores the grey areas of the adsorption properties of the raw clays and the improved performance of activated/modified clay materials with particular reference to the effects of pH, temperature, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption capacities of the clays. Various challenges encountered in using clay materials are highlighted and a number of future prospects for the adsorbents are proposed.

  11. Cyclic steady state performance of adsorption chiller with low regeneration temperature zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Mr. Suxin; Gluesenkamp, Kyle R; Hwang, Dr. Yunho; Radermacher, Reinhard; Chun, Mr. Ho-Hwan

    2013-10-01

    Adsorption chillers are capable of utilizing inexpensive or free low grade thermal energy such as waste heat and concentrated solar thermal energy. Recently developed low regeneration temperature working pairs allow adsorption chillers to be driven by even lower temperature sources such as engine coolant and flat plate solar collectors. In this work, synthetic zeolite/water was implemented into a 3kW adsorption chiller test facility driven by hot water at 70 C. The zeolite was coated onto two fin-and-tube heat exchangers, with heat recovery employed between the two. Cyclic steady state parametric studies were experimentally conducted to evaluate the chiller's performance, resulting in a cooling coefficient of performance (COP) ranging from 0.1 to 0.6 at different operating conditions. Its performance was compared with published values for other low regeneration temperature working pairs. The physical limitations of the synthetic zeolite revealed by parametric study results were then discussed. A novel operating control strategy was proposed based on the unique characteristics of synthetic zeolite. In addition, a physics-based COP prediction model was derived to predict the performance of the chiller under equilibrium loading, and was validated by the experiment results. This analytical expression can be used to estimate the cyclic steady state performance for future studies.

  12. Thiol Adsorption on and Reduction of Copper Oxide Particles and Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiwen; Im, Jisun; Soares, Jason W; Steeves, Diane M; Whitten, James E

    2016-04-26

    The adsorption of 1-dodecanethiol at room temperature and at 75 °C on submicron cuprous and cupric oxide particles suspended in ethanol has been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Thiol adsorption occurs in all cases via Cu-S bond formation, with partial dissolution of CuO at 75 °C and formation of a copper-thiolate complex replacement layer. Regardless of temperature, the surface of the CuO particles is essentially completely reduced to either Cu2O or metallic copper, as evidenced by loss of the characteristic Cu(2+) XPS features of dried powder samples. Companion ultrahigh-vacuum studies have been performed by dosing clean, oxygen-dosed, and ozone-treated single crystal Cu(111) with methanethiol (MT) gas at room temperature. In the latter case, the surface corresponds to CuO/Cu(111). XPS confirms MT adsorption in all cases, with an S 2p peak binding energy of 162.9 ± 0.1 eV, consistent with methanethiolate adsorption. Heating of MT-covered Cu(111) and oxygen-dosed Cu(111) leads to decomposition/desorption of the MT by 100 °C and formation of copper sulfide with an S 2p binding energy of 161.8 eV. Dosing CuO/Cu(111) with 50-200 L of MT leads to only partial reduction/removal of the CuO surface layers prior to methanethiolate adsorption. This is confirmed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), which measures the occupied states near the Fermi level. For both the colloidal CuO and single crystal CuO/Cu(111) studies, the reduction of the Cu(2+) surface is believed to occur by formation and desorption of the corresponding dithiol prior to thiolate adsorption. PMID:27036074

  13. Mercury adsorption properties of sulfur-impregnated adsorbents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsi, N.-C.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Chen, S.; Chang, R.

    2002-01-01

    Carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous adsorbents were impregnated with elemental sulfur to evaluate the chemical and physical properties of the adsorbents and their equilibrium mercury adsorption capacities. Simulated coal combustion flue gas conditions were used to determine the equilibrium adsorption capacities for Hg0 and HgCl2 gases to better understand how to remove mercury from gas streams generated by coal-fired utility power plants. Sulfur was deposited onto the adsorbents by monolayer surface deposition or volume pore filling. Sulfur impregnation increased the total sulfur content and decreased the total and micropore surface areas and pore volumes for all of the adsorbents tested. Adsorbents with sufficient amounts of active adsorption sites and sufficient microporous structure had mercury adsorption capacities up to 4,509 ??g Hg/g adsorbent. Elemental sulfur, organic sulfur, and sulfate were formed on the adsorbents during sulfur impregnation. Correlations were established with R2>0.92 between the equilibrium Hg0/HgCl2 adsorption capacities and the mass concentrations of elemental and organic sulfur. This result indicates that elemental and organic sulfur are important active adsorption sites for Hg0 and HgCl2.

  14. Adsorption of lanthanum to goethite in the presence of gluconate

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, Laurence C.; Sarah Pepper; Sue Clark

    2005-05-01

    Adsorption of Lanthanum to Goethite in the Presence of Gluconic Acid L. C. HULL,1 S. E. PEPPER2 AND S. B. CLARK2 1Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (hulllc@inel.gov) 2Washington State University, Pullman, WA (spepper@wsu.edu), (s_clark@wsu.edu) Lanthanide and trivalent-actinide elements in radioactive waste can pose risks to humans and ecological systems for many years. Organic complexing agents, from natural organic matter or the degradation of waste package components, can alter the mobility of these elements. We studied the effect of gluconic acid, as an analogue for cellulose degradation products, on the adsorption of lanthanum, representing lanthanide and trivalent-actinide elments, to goethite, representing natural iron minearals and degradation products of waste packages. Batch pH adsorption edge experiments were conducted with lanthanum alone, and with lanthanum and gluconate at a 1:1 mole ratio. Lanthanum concentrations studied were 0.1, 1, and 10 mM, covering a range from 10% to 1000% of the calculated available adsorption sites on goethite. In the absence of gluconate, lanthanum was primarily present in solution as free lanthanum ion. With gluconate present, free lanthanum concentration in solution decreased with increasing pH as step-wise deprotonation of the gluconate molecule increased the fraction lanthanum complexed with gluconate. Adsorption to the goethite surface was represented with the diffuse double-layer model. The number of adsorption sites and the intrinsic binding constants for the surface complexes were estimated from the pH adsorption edge data using the computer code FITEQL 4.0. Two surface reactions were used to fit the adsorption data in the absence of gluconate. A strong binding site with no proton release and a much higher concentration of weak binding sites with release of two protons per lanthanum adsorbed. The adsorption of lanthanum was not measurably affected by the presence of gluconate

  15. Adsorption and leaching behaviour of bispyribac-sodium in soils.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neera; Singh, S B

    2015-01-01

    Adsorption-desorption of the herbicide bispyribac-sodium was studied in four Indian soil types. Bispyribac-sodium was poorly adsorbed in the four soils and adsorption decreased with an increase in the herbicide concentration in solution. Freundlich adsorption coefficient (Kf) values for bispyribac-sodium ranged between 0.37 and 0.87. Slope (1/n) values varied from 0.2 to 0.31 suggesting that bispyribac-sodium adsorption was highly dependent on its initial concentration in solution. Bispyribac-sodium adsorption showed a positive correlation with soil pH (r = 0.809) and clay content (r = 0.699) while no correlation was observed with the organic carbon (r = 0.063) content. Sorbed herbicide was completely desorbed during a single desorption step suggesting that the herbicide was bound by weak adsorptive forces. Leaching studies of herbicide in soil 1 packed column indicated complete loss of soil applied herbicide under a simulated rainfall equivalent to 162 mm. PMID:25381585

  16. [Preparation, characterization and adsorption performance of high surface area biomass-based activated carbons].

    PubMed

    Li, Kun-Quan; Li, Ye; Zheng, Zheng; Sang, Da-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    High surface area activated carbons were prepared with Spartina alterniflora and cotton stalk as raw materials and KOH as activating agent. Effects of materials type, impregnation ratio, activation temperature and heat preservation time on the yield, elemental composition and adsorptive capacity of activated carbon were studied. The properties and pore structure of the carbons were characterized with nitrogen adsorption, powder X-ray diffractometry (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Main pore characteristics of activated carbons were analyzed by BET equation, Horvath-Kawazoe BET method and DFT method. The considerable preparation conditions are obtained as follows: impregnation ratio of 3: 1, an activation temperature of 800 degrees C and an activation time of 1.5 h. The BET surface area of activated carbon prepared from Spartina alterniflora reached 2 825 m2 x g(-1) when its total pore volume, yield, iodine number and methylene blue adsorption were 1.374 cm3 x g(-1), 16.36%, 1797 mg x g(-1) and 495 mg x g(-1) respectively under above conditions. The activated carbon from cotton stalk was prepared with BET surface area of 2 135 m2 x g(-1), total pore volume of 1.038 cm3 x g(-1), yield of 11.22%, methylene blue adsorption of 1 251 mg x g(-1), and iodine number of 478 mg x g(-1), respectively. The methylene blue adsorption and iodine number are much higher than the national first level for activated carbon. The Langmuir maximum adsorption capacities of 2,4-dinitrophenol on the two carbons were 932 mg x g(-1) and 747 mg x g(-1), respectively, which are superior to ordinary activated carbon and activated carbon fiber. PMID:23487959

  17. Applicability of poorly crystalline aluminum oxide for adsorption of arsenate.

    PubMed

    Park, Youn-Jong; Yang, Jae-Kyu; Lee, Seung-Mok; Choi, Sang-Il

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the characteristics of arsenate adsorption on poorly crystalline oxide (PCAO) which was obtained from recycling of dry sanding powders (DSP) produced during sanding and sawing process in a decorative interior company. After calcinating DSP at 550°C, poorly crystalline oxide (PCAO) was obtained as an adsorbent. From the batch adsorption experiments, arsenate was completely removed up to the concentration of 10 mg/L by PCAO. The stability of PCAO as an adsorbent was evaluated at pH 7 and found that the arsenate adsorbed on PCAO was stable for 24 h. The predominant interaction between arsenate and PCAO was thought to be a strong chemical bond by spectroscopic analysis. The arsenate adsorption behavior onto PCAO was satisfactorily simulated with MINEQL+, suggesting that arsenate formed inner-sphere complexes with the surface of PCAO by chemisorption. Meanwhile, the presence of competitive anions such as PO(4) (3-), SO(4) (2-) and CO(3) (2-) decreased somewhat the removal efficiency of arsenate and the effects of competing anions on the adsorption of arsenate were in the order of PO(4) (3-) > SO(4) (2-) > CO(3) (2-) under pH 6. The application of PCAO to the real mine drainage was also carried out. Although the adsorption of arsenic on the PCAO was slightly decreased rather than that removed from synthetic wastewater due to competitive sorption by multiple ions, it was possible to meet the national discharge standard limit with increasing adsorbent concentration. PMID:21942390

  18. Competitive adsorption of heavy metals onto sesame straw biochar in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hwan; Ok, Yong Sik; Kim, Seong-Heon; Cho, Ju-Sik; Heo, Jong-Soo; Delaune, Ronald D; Seo, Dong-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Objective of this research was to evaluate adsorption of heavy metals in mono and multimetal forms onto sesame straw biochar (SSB). Competitive sorption of metals by SSB has never been reported previously. The maximum adsorption capacities (mgg(-1)) of metals by SSB were in the order of Pb (102)≫Cd (86)≫Cr (65)>Cu (55)≫Zn (34) in the monometal adsorption isotherm and Pb (88)≫Cu (40)≫Cr (21)>Zn (7)⩾Cd (5) in the multimetal adsorption isotherm. Based on data obtained from the distribution coefficients, Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption models, and three-dimensional simulation, multimetal adsorption behaviors differed from monometal adsorption due to competition. Especially, during multimetal adsorption, Cd was easily exchanged and substituted by other metals. Further competitive adsorption studies are necessary in order to accurately estimate the heavy metal adsorption capacity of biochar in natural environments. PMID:26082184

  19. Microwave preparation of triethylenetetramine modified graphene oxide/chitosan composite for adsorption of Cr(VI).

    PubMed

    Ge, Huacai; Ma, Ziwei

    2015-10-20

    A novel triethylenetetramine modified graphene oxide/chitosan composite (TGOCS) was successfully synthesized by microwave irradiation (MW) method and compared with one prepared by conventional heating. This composite was characterized by FTIR, XRD, SEM, BET and elemental analysis. Adsorption of Cr(VI) on the composite was studied. The experimental results indicated that the product obtained by MW had higher yield and uptake than one obtained by the conventional and uptake of TGOCS for Cr(VI) was higher than that of the recently reported adsorbents. The effects of various variables on adsorption of Cr(VI) by TGOCS were further researched. The highest adsorption capacity of 219.5mg g(-1) was obtained at pH 2. Adsorption followed pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm. The capacity increased as increasing temperature. The adsorbent could be recyclable. These results have important implications for the application expansion of microwave preparation and the design of new effective composites for Cr(VI) removal in effluents. PMID:26256186

  20. Fundamentals of heat measurement. [heat flux transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerashchenko, O. A.

    1979-01-01

    Various methods and devices for obtaining experimental data on heat flux density over wide ranges of temperature and pressure are examined. Laboratory tests and device fabrication details are supplemented by theoretical analyses of heat-conduction and thermoelectric effects, providing design guidelines and information relevant to further research and development. A theory defining the measure of correspondence between transducer signal and the measured heat flux is established for individual (isolated) heat flux transducers subject to space and time-dependent loading. An analysis of the properties of stacked (series-connected) transducers of various types (sandwich-type, plane, and spiral) is used to derive a similarity theory providing general governing relationships. The transducers examined are used in 36 types of derivative devices involving direct heat loss measurements, heat conduction studies, radiation pyrometry, calorimetry in medicine and industry and nuclear reactor dosimetry.

  1. Microcolumn studies of dye adsorption onto manganese oxides modified diatomite.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghouti, M A; Khraisheh, M A M; Ahmad, M N; Allen, S J

    2007-07-19

    The method described here cannot fully replace the analysis of large columns by small test columns (microcolumns). The procedure, however, is suitable for speeding up the determination of adsorption parameters of dye onto the adsorbent and for speeding up the initial screening of a large adsorbent collection that can be tedious if a several adsorbents and adsorption conditions must be tested. The performance of methylene blue (MB), a basic dye, Cibacron reactive black (RB) and Cibacron reactive yellow (RY) was predicted in this way and the influence of initial dye concentration and other adsorption conditions on the adsorption behaviour were demonstrated. On the basis of the experimental results, it can be concluded that the adsorption of RY onto manganese oxides modified diatomite (MOMD) exhibited a characteristic "S" shape and can be simulated effectively by the Thomas model. It is shown that the adsorption capacity increased as the initial dye concentration increased. The increase in the dye uptake capacity with the increase of the adsorbent mass in the column was due to the increase in the surface area of adsorbent, which provided more binding sites for the adsorption. It is shown that the use of high flow rates reduced the time that RY in the solution is in contact with the MOMD, thus allowing less time for adsorption to occur, leading to an early breakthrough of RY. A rapid decrease in the column adsorption capacity with an increase in particle size with an average 56% reduction in capacity resulting from an increase in the particle size from 106-250 microm to 250-500 microm. The experimental data correlated well with calculated data using the Thomas equation and the bed depth-service time (BDST) equation. Therefore, it might be concluded that the Thomas equation and the BDST equations can produce accurate predication for variation of dye concentration, mass of the adsorbent, flow rate and particle size. In general, the values of adsorption isotherm capacity

  2. Charge induced enhancement of adsorption for hydrogen storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiang

    2009-12-01

    The rising concerns about environmental pollution and global warming have facilitated research interest in hydrogen energy as an alternative energy source. To apply hydrogen for transportations, several issues have to be solved, within which hydrogen storage is the most critical problem. Lots of materials and devices have been developed; however, none is able to meet the DOE storage target. The primary issue for hydrogen physisorption is a weak interaction between hydrogen and the surface of solid materials, resulting negligible adsorption at room temperature. To solve this issue, there is a need to increase the interaction between the hydrogen molecules and adsorbent surface. In this study, intrinsic electric dipole is investigated to enhance the adsorption energy. The results from the computer simulation of single ionic compounds with hydrogen molecules to form hydrogen clusters showed that electrical charge of substances plays an important role in generation of attractive interaction with hydrogen molecules. In order to further examine the effects of static interaction on hydrogen adsorption, activated carbon with a large surface area was impregnated with various ionic salts including LiCl, NaCl, KCl, KBr, and NiCl2 and their performance for hydrogen storage was evaluated by using a volumetric method. Corresponding computer simulations have been carried out by using DFT (Density Functional Theory) method combined with point charge arrays. Both experimental and computational results prove that the adsorption capacity of hydrogen and its interaction with the solid materials increased with electrical dipole moment. Besides the intrinsic dipole, an externally applied electric field could be another means to enhance hydrogen adsorption. Hydrogen adsorption under an applied electric field was examined by using porous nickel foil as electrodes. Electrical signals showed that adsorption capacity increased with the increasing of gas pressure and external electric voltage

  3. Enthalpies and entropies of proton and cadmium adsorption onto Bacillus subtilis bacterial cells from calorimetric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman-Lewis, Drew; Fein, Jeremy B.; Jensen, Mark P.

    2006-10-01

    We used titration calorimetry to measure the bulk heats of proton and Cd adsorption onto a common Gram positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis at 25.0 °C. Using the 4-site non-electrostatic model of Fein et al. [Fein, J.B., Boily, J.-F., Yee, N., Gorman-Lewis, D., Turner, B.F., 2005. Potentiometric titrations of Bacillus subtilis cells to low pH and a comparison of modeling approaches. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta69 (5), 1123-1132.] to describe the bacterial surface reactivity to protons, our bulk enthalpy measurements can be used to determine the following site-specific enthalpies of proton adsorption for Sites 1-4, respectively: -3.5 ± 0.2, -4.2 ± 0.2, -15.4 ± 0.9, and -35 ± 2 kJ/mol, and these values yield the following third law entropies of proton adsorption onto Sites 1-4, respectively: +51 ± 4, +78 ± 4, +79 ± 5, and +60 ± 20 J/mol K. An alternative data analysis using a 2-site Langmuir-Freundlich model to describe proton binding to the bacterial surface (Fein et al., 2005) resulted in the following site-specific enthalpies of proton adsorption for Sites 1 and 2, respectively: -3.6 ± 0.2 and -35.1 ± 0.3 kJ/mol. The thermodynamic values for Sites 1-3 for the non-electrostatic model and Site 1 of the Langmuir-Freundlich model of proton adsorption onto the bacterial surface are similar to those associated with multifunctional organic acid anions, such as citrate, suggesting that the protonation state of a bacterial surface site can influence the energetics of protonation of neighboring sites. Our bulk Cd enthalpy data, interpreted using the 2-site non-electrostatic Cd adsorption model of Borrok et al. [Borrok, D., Fein, J.B., Tischler, M., O'Loughlin, E., Meyer, H., Liss, M., Kemner, K.M., 2004b. The effect of acidic solutions and growth conditions on the adsorptive properties of bacterial surfaces. Chem. Geol.209 (1-2), 107-119.] to account for Cd adsorption onto B. subtilis, yield the following site-specific enthalpies of Cd adsorption onto bacterial

  4. Isotherm study of reactive Blue 19 adsorption by an alum sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khim, Ong Keat; Nor, Mohd Asri Md; Mohamad, Syuriya; Nasaruddin, Nas Aulia Ahmad; Jamari, Nor Laili-Azua; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the adsorption of Reactive Blue 19 using dewatered alum sludge. The dewatered alum sludge was a sludge produced from drinking water treatment plant. Batch adsorption experiments were performed to investigate the mechanism of the dye adsorption. The adsorption was rapid at its initial stage but the rate decreased as it approached equilibrium. The adsorption data were evaluated by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models but was best described by the Langmuir isotherm model as it gave the highest correlation.

  5. Effect of ferrihydrite crystallite size on phosphate adsorption reactivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoming; Li, Wei; Harrington, Richard; Liu, Fan; Parise, John B; Feng, Xionghan; Sparks, Donald L

    2013-09-17

    The influence of crystallite size on the adsorption reactivity of phosphate on 2-line to 6-line ferrihydrites was investigated by combining adsorption experiments, structure and surface analysis, and spectroscopic analysis. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the ferrihydrite samples possessed a similar fundamental structure with a crystallite size varying from 1.6 to 4.4 nm. N2 adsorption on freeze-dried samples revealed that the specific surface area (SSABET) decreased from 427 to 234 m(2) g(-1) with increasing crystallite size and micropore volume (Vmicro) from 0.137 to 0.079 cm(3) g(-1). Proton adsorption (QH) at pH 4.5 and 0.01 M KCl ranged from 0.73 to 0.55 mmol g(-1). Phosphate adsorption capacity at pH 4.5 and 0.01 M KCl for the ferrihydrites decreased from 1690 to 980 μmol g(-1) as crystallite size increased, while the adsorption density normalized to SSABET was similar. Phosphate adsorption on the ferrihydrites exhibited similar behavior with respect to both kinetics and the adsorption mechanism. The kinetics could be divided into three successive first-order stages: relatively fast adsorption, slow adsorption, and a very slow stage. With decreasing crystallite size, ferrihydrites exhibited increasing rate constants per mass for all stages. Analysis of OH(-) release and attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) and differential pair distribution function (d-PDF) results indicated that initially phosphate preferentially bound to two Fe-OH2(1/2+) groups to form a binuclear bidentate surface complex without OH(-) release, with smaller size ferrihydrites exchanging more Fe-OH2(1/2+) per mass. Subsequently, phosphate exchanged with both Fe-OH2(1/2+) and Fe-OH(1/2-) with a constant amount of OH(-) released per phosphate adsorbed. Also in this stage binuclear bidentate surface complexes were formed with a P-Fe atomic pair distance of ~3.25 Å. PMID:23992548

  6. Hydrophobic cryogels for DNA adsorption: effect of embedding of monosize microbeads into cryogel network on their adsorptive performances.

    PubMed

    Emin Çorman, M; Bereli, Nilay; Özkara, Serpil; Uzun, Lokman; Denizli, Adil

    2013-11-01

    As alternative hydrophobic adsorbent for DNA adsorption, supermacroporous cryogel disks were synthesized via free radical polymerization. In this study, we have prepared two kinds of cryogel disks: (i) poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-l-tryptophan) [p(HEMA-MATrp)] cryogel containing specific hydrophobic ligand MATrp; and (ii) monosize p(HEMA-MATrp) particles synthesized via suspension polymerization embedded into p(HEMA) cryogel structure to obtain p(HEMA-MATrp)/p(HEMA) composite cryogel disks. These cryogel disks containing hydrophobic functional group were characterized via swelling studies, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, surface area measurements and scanning electron microscopy. DNA adsorption onto both p(HEMA-MATrp) cryogel and p(HEMA-MATrp)/p(HEMA) composite cryogels was investigated. Maximum adsorption of DNA on p(HEMA-MATrp) cryogel was found to be 15 mg/g polymer. Otherwise, p(HEMA-MATrp)/p(HEMA) composite cryogels significantly increased the DNA adsorption capacity to 38 mg/g polymer. Composite cryogels could be used repeatedly without significant loss on adsorption capacity after 10 repetitive adsorption-desorption cycles. PMID:23780689

  7. Synthesis of Microporous Materials and Their VSC Adsorption Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokogawa, Y.; Morikawa, H.; Sakanishi, M.; Utaka, H.; Nakamura, A.; Kishida, I.

    2011-10-01

    Oral malodor is caused by volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide produced in mouth. VSC induces permeability of mucous membrane and oral malodor formation. Thus, the adsorbent which highly adsorbs VSC should be useful for health in mouth and may prevent teeth from decaying. The microporous material, hydrotalcite, was synthesized by a wet method, and the H2S adsorption was studied. The samples, identified by powder X-ray diffraction method, were put into glass flask filled with H2S gas. The initial concentration of H2S was 30 ppm. The change in concentrations of H2S was measured at rt, and the amount of H2S absorbed on the hydrotalcite for 24 h was 300 micro L/g. The samples were taken out from the above glass flask and put into a pyrolysis plant attached to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to determine the amount of H2S desorbed from samples. Only 3 % of H2S was desorbed when heated at 500 °C. H2S in water was also found to adsorb into hydrotalcite, which was confirmed by the headspace gas chromatography with flame photometric detector. The hydrotalcite material should be expected to be an adsorbent material, useful for health in mouth.

  8. Irreversible adsorption of atmospheric helium on olivine: A lobster pot analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protin, Marie; Blard, Pierre-Henri; Marrocchi, Yves; Mathon, François

    2016-04-01

    This study reports new experimental results that demonstrate that large amounts of atmospheric helium may be adsorbed onto the surfaces of olivine grains. This behavior is surface-area-related in that this contamination preferentially affects grains that are smaller than 125 μm in size. One of the most striking results of our study is that in vacuo heating at 900 °C for 15 min is not sufficient to completely remove the atmospheric contamination. This suggests that the adsorption of helium may involve high-energy trapping of helium through irreversible anomalous adsorption. This trapping process of helium can thus be compared to a "lobster pot" adsorption: atmospheric helium easily gets in, but hardly gets out. While this type of behavior has previously been reported for heavy noble gases (Ar, Kr, Xe), this is the first time that it has been observed for helium. Adsorption of helium has, until now, generally been considered to be negligible on silicate surfaces. Our findings have significant implications for helium and noble gas analysis of natural silicate samples, such as for cosmic-ray exposure dating or noble gas characterization of extraterrestrial material. Analytical procedures in future studies should be adapted in order to avoid this contamination. The results of this study also allow us to propose an alternative explanation for previously described matrix loss of cosmogenic 3He.

  9. Reanalysis and New Measurements of N(2) and CH(4) Adsorption on Ice and Snow.

    PubMed

    Dominé; Chaix; Hanot

    2000-07-01

    Numerous literature data indicate that the mean heat of adsorption of a monolayer of N(2) (DeltaQ(N(2))) on ice or snow at 77.15 K, determined by volumetric methods, is highly variable, suggesting that ice surface properties strongly depend on its mode of formation and its thermal history. Less numerous data on CH(4) adsorption show smaller variations of DeltaQ(CH(4)). If such variations are real, the extrapolation to atmospheric chemistry models of adsorption parameters measured on laboratory-made ice may be unwarranted. We have measured CH(4) adsorption on variable amounts of a crushed ice sample, to show that when the total surface area of the sample is below a threshold value, DeltaQ(CH(4)) decreases. We identify the cause of this artifact as an error in the molar budget, because the temperature gradient in the tube connecting the introduction and expansion volumes is not taken into account. Performing an adequate molar budget suppresses this artifact, except for ice samples with very small total surface areas, where the resolution of the manometer becomes a limiting factor and a further decrease in DeltaQ(CH(4)) is observed. Error in DeltaQ(gas) results in large errors in surface area, and we suggest that the value of DeltaQ(gas) obtained can be used to test the reliability of the surface area measurement. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10860600

  10. The role of beaded activated carbon's surface oxygen groups on irreversible adsorption of organic vapors.

    PubMed

    Jahandar Lashaki, Masoud; Atkinson, John D; Hashisho, Zaher; Phillips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the contribution of surface oxygen groups to irreversible adsorption (aka heel formation) during cyclic adsorption/regeneration of organic vapors commonly found in industrial systems, including vehicle-painting operations. For this purpose, three chemically modified activated carbon samples, including two oxygen-deficient (hydrogen-treated and heat-treated) and one oxygen-rich sample (nitric acid-treated) were prepared. The samples were tested for 5 adsorption/regeneration cycles using a mixture of nine organic compounds. For the different samples, mass balance cumulative heel was 14 and 20% higher for oxygen functionalized and hydrogen-treated samples, respectively, relative to heat-treated sample. Thermal analysis results showed heel formation due to physisorption for the oxygen-deficient samples, and weakened physisorption combined with chemisorption for the oxygen-rich sample. Chemisorption was attributed to consumption of surface oxygen groups by adsorbed species, resulting in formation of high boiling point oxidation byproducts or bonding between the adsorbates and the surface groups. Pore size distributions indicated that different pore sizes contributed to heel formation - narrow micropores (<7Å) in the oxygen-deficient samples and midsize micropores (7-12Å) in the oxygen-rich sample. The results from this study help explain the heel formation mechanism and how it relates to chemically tailored adsorbent materials. PMID:27295065

  11. Adsorption and reaction of methanethiol on Ru(0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, D.R.; Lyman, P.F. )

    1993-11-18

    Methanethiol (CH[sub 3]SH) adsorbs dissociatively on Ru(0001) at 100 K forming two molecular intermediates. These species have been identified by S 2p soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SXPS) as methylthiolate moieties adsorbed in different bonding sites. At low coverages only a high coordination adsorption site is occupied. The high coordination site is saturated at about 0.20 monolayer of CH[sub 3]SH, and then a low coordination site is populated. Upon heating, the thiolates totally decompose into atomic C, S, and gaseous H[sub 2] with a competing pathway producing atomic S and gaseous CH[sub 4] at high coverage. The methylthiolate in the low coordination site decomposes more readily than the methylthiolate in the high coordination site. Some surface hydrocarbon fragments are formed following C-S bond scission which totally decompose at higher temperatures. Isotopic labeling indicates that the desorption of the sulfhydryl hydrogen precedes the decomposition of the thiolate at high coverage and that there is exchange of hydrogen between the surface and the methyl group. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Understanding mechanisms of asphaltene adsorption from organic solvent on mica.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Anand; Kuznicki, Natalie; Harbottle, David; Masliyah, Jacob; Zeng, Hongbo; Xu, Zhenghe

    2014-08-12

    The adsorption process of asphaltene onto molecularly smooth mica surfaces from toluene solutions of various concentrations (0.01-1 wt %) was studied using a surface forces apparatus (SFA). Adsorption of asphaltenes onto mica was found to be highly dependent on adsorption time and asphaltene concentration of the solution. The adsorption of asphaltenes led to an attractive bridging force between the mica surfaces in asphaltene solution. The adsorption process was identified as being controlled by the diffusion of asphaltenes from the bulk solution to the mica surface with a diffusion coefficient on the order of 10(-10) m(2)/s at room temperature, depending on the asphaltene bulk concentration. This diffusion coefficient corresponds to a hydrodynamic molecular radius of approximately 0.5 nm, indicating that asphaltene diffuses to mica surfaces as individual molecules at very low concentration (e.g., 0.01 wt %). Atomic force microscopy images of the adsorbed asphaltenes on mica support the results of the SFA force measurements. The results from the SFA force measurements provide valuable insights into the molecular interactions (e.g., steric repulsion and bridging attraction as a function of distance) of asphaltenes in organic media and hence their roles in crude oil and bitumen production. PMID:24978299

  13. Asphaltene Adsorption onto Self-Assembled Monolayers of Mixed Aromatic

    SciTech Connect

    Turgman-Cohen, S.; Smith, M; Fischer, D; Kilpatrick, P; Genzer, J

    2009-01-01

    The adsorption of asphaltenes onto flat solid surfaces modified with mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of aliphatic and aromatic trichlorosilanes with varying wettabilities, aromaticities, and thicknesses is tested. The mixed SAMs are characterized by means of contact angle to assess hydrophobicity and molecular and chemical uniformity, spectroscopic ellipsometry to measure the thickness of the films, and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to assess chemical and molecular composition. The molecular characteristics of the adsorbed asphaltene layer and the extent of asphaltene adsorption are determined using NEXAFS and spectroscopic ellipsometry, respectively. The SAMs are formed by depositing phenyl-, phenethyl-, butyl-, and octadecyl- trichlorosilanes from toluene solutions onto silica-coated substrates; the chemical composition and the wettability of the SAM surface is tuned systematically by varying the trichlorosilane composition in the deposition solutions. The adsorption of asphaltenes on the substrates does not correlate strongly with the SAM chemical composition. Instead, the extent of asphaltene adsorption decreases with increasing SAM thickness. This observation suggests that the leading interaction governing the adsorption of asphaltenes is their interaction with the polar silica substrate and that the chemical composition of the SAM is of secondary importance.

  14. Adsorption of water vapor on modified methacrylate polymeric sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Platonova, N.P.; Tataurova, O.G.; Vartapetyan, R.Sh.

    1995-12-31

    Adsorption of water vapor on methacrylate copolymers and terpolymers was studied. An increase in the content of the cross-linking agent gives rise to increase in the limiting adsorption of water vapor at the saturation pressure (a{sub s}) and to decrease in the concentration of primary adsorption centers. Modification of the initial copolymer containing 60% of 2,3-epoxypropyl methacrylate (EPMA) monomer and 40% of cross-linking agent, ethylene dimethacrylate, with diethylenetriamine (DETA) results in an increase in the a{sub s} value, while modification with C{sub 12} and C{sub 18} alkyl, benzyl, and phenyl groups gives rise to decrease in the a{sub s} values for the copolymeric sorbents. The concentration of primary adsorption centers (a{sub m}) increases considerably on modification of the copolymer with DETA and C{sub 12} groups and decreases markedly on modification with benzyl and phenyl groups. For terpolymers, containing EPMA and styrene, an increase in the styrene/EPMA ratio reduces the a{sub s}, and a{sub m} values. The copolymer modified with DETA groups possesses the most hydrophilic properties, while the copolymer modified with benzyl group exhibits the most hydrophobic properties. The mechanism of adsorption of water molecules on the polymers is discussed.

  15. Sequential and competitive adsorption of peptides at pendant PEO layers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangming; Ryder, Matthew P; McGuire, Joseph; Snider, Joshua L; Schilke, Karl F

    2015-06-01

    Earlier work provided direction for development of responsive drug delivery systems based on modulation of the structure, amphiphilicity, and surface density of bioactive peptides entrapped within pendant polyethylene oxide (PEO) brush layers. In this work, we describe the sequential and competitive adsorption behavior of such peptides at pendant PEO layers. Three cationic peptides were used for this purpose: the arginine-rich, amphiphilic peptide WLBU2, a peptide chemically identical to WLBU2 but of scrambled sequence (S-WLBU2), and the non-amphiphilic peptide poly-L-arginine (PLR). Optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS) was used to quantify the rate and extent of peptide adsorption and elution at surfaces coated with PEO. UV spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) were used to quantify the extent of peptide exchange during the course of sequential and competitive adsorption. Circular dichroism (CD) was used to evaluate conformational changes after adsorption of peptide mixtures at PEO-coated silica nanoparticles. Results indicated that amphiphilic peptides are able to displace adsorbed, non-amphiphilic peptides in PEO layers, while non-amphiphilic peptides were not able to displace more amphiphilic peptides. In addition, peptides of greater amphiphilicity dominated the adsorption at the PEO layer from mixtures with less amphiphilic or non-amphiphilic peptides. PMID:25909181

  16. Adsorption of sugar beet herbicides to Finnish soils.

    PubMed

    Autio, Sari; Siimes, Katri; Laitinen, Pirkko; Rämö, Sari; Oinonen, Seija; Eronen, Liisa

    2004-04-01

    Three sugar beet herbicides, ethofumesate, phenmedipham and metamitron, are currently used on conventional sugar beet cultivation, while new varieties of herbicide resistant (HR) sugar beet, tolerant of glyphosate or glufosinate-ammonium, are under field testing in Finland. Little knowledge has so far been available on the adsorption of these herbicides to Finnish soils. The adsorption of these five herbicides was studied using the batch equilibrium method in 21 soil samples collected from different depths. Soil properties like organic carbon content, texture, pH and partly the phosphorus and oxide content of the soils were tested against the adsorption coefficients of the herbicides. In general, the herbicides studied could be arranged according to their adsorption coefficients as follows: glyphosate>phenmedipham>ethofumesate approximately glufosinate-ammonium>metamitron, metamitron meaning the highest risk of leaching. None of the measured soil parameters could alone explain the adsorption mechanism of these five herbicides. The results can be used in model assessments of risk for leaching to ground water resulting from weed control of sugar beet in Finland. PMID:14761694

  17. Electrothermal adsorption and desorption of volatile organic compounds on activated carbon fiber cloth.

    PubMed

    Son, H K; Sivakumar, S; Rood, M J; Kim, B J

    2016-01-15

    Adsorption is an effective means to selectively remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from industrial gas streams and is particularly of use for gas streams that exhibit highly variable daily concentrations of VOCs. Adsorption of such gas streams by activated carbon fiber cloths (ACFCs) and subsequent controlled desorption can provide gas streams of well-defined concentration that can then be more efficiently treated by biofiltration than streams exhibiting large variability in concentration. In this study, we passed VOC-containing gas through an ACFC vessel for adsorption and then desorption in a concentration-controlled manner via electrothermal heating. Set-point concentrations (40-900 ppm(v)) and superficial gas velocity (6.3-9.9 m/s) were controlled by a data acquisition and control system. The results of the average VOC desorption, desorption factor and VOC in-and-out ratio were calculated and compared for various gas set-point concentrations and superficial gas velocities. Our results reveal that desorption is strongly dependent on the set-point concentration and that the VOC desorption rate can be successfully equalized and controlled via an electrothermal adsorption system. PMID:26342148

  18. KOH catalysed preparation of activated carbon aerogels for dye adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ling, Sie King; Tian, H Y; Wang, Shaobin; Rufford, Thomas; Zhu, Z H; Buckley, C E

    2011-05-01

    Organic carbon aerogels (CAs) were prepared by a sol-gel method from polymerisation of resorcinol, furfural, and hexamethylenetetramine catalysed by KOH at around pH 9 using ambient pressure drying. The effect of KOH in the sol-gel on CA synthesis was studied. It was found that addition of KOH prior to the sol-gel polymerisation process improved thermal stability of the gel, prevented the crystallinity of the gel to graphite, increased the microporosity of CA and promoted activation of CA. The CAs prepared using the KOH catalyst exhibited higher porosity than uncatalysed prepared samples. Activation in CO(2) at higher temperature also enhanced the porosity of CAs. Adsorption tests indicated that the CAs were effective for both basic and acid dye adsorption and the adsorption increased with increasing surface area and pore volume. The kinetic adsorption of dyes was diffusion control and could be described by the second-order kinetic model. The equilibrium adsorption of dyes was higher than activated carbon. PMID:21345448

  19. Oxidative coupling and the irreversible adsorption of phenol by graphite.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Pimenta, Aluisio Cesar; Kilduff, James E

    2006-01-15

    Uptake of phenol by graphite, and regeneration by methanol extraction, was measured to evaluate irreversible adsorption of phenols to carbon surfaces. The emphasis of this work was to identify the role of oxidative coupling, which has been invoked to explain irreversible phenol sorption by activated carbons. Graphite was chosen as a model carbon surface to eliminate potentially confounding effects of microporosity present in other types of carbonaceous sorbents. The isotherm data were well described by the Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm from pH 3 to 9. At pH 12, measured uptakes were higher than expected based on model predictions, suggesting the occurrence of an adsorption mechanism besides physisorption. One oxidative coupling product, 2,2'-dihydroxybiphenyl, was obtained exclusively after adsorption at pH values above 7, and appeared both in aqueous solution and in the methanol regenerant solution. The fraction of total uptake that was not recoverable by methanol extraction decreased with increasing phenol concentration in solution, suggesting preferential sorption by high-energy sites. However, absolute irreversible adsorption increased with phenol concentration in solution. Both fractional irreversible adsorption and 2,2'-dihydroxybiphenyl oxidative coupling product recovery as a function of pH and contact time demonstrated that irreversible sorption of phenol by graphite could not be explained by an oxidative coupling mechanism alone. PMID:16054157

  20. [Adsorption of methylene blue onto vanadium-doped magnetite].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yuan-Hong; Liang, Xiao-Liang; Zhu, Jian-Xi; He, Hong-Ping; Yuan, Peng

    2010-06-01

    A series of vanadium-doped magnetite (Fe3-x VxO4, x < 0.4) synthesized by an oxidation-precipitation method, were characterized using chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), as well as thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) analyses. The obtained results show that the synthetic Fe3-x VxO4 has spinel structure while vanadium mostly replaces Fe3+ in the octahedral sites. The synthetic Fe3-x VxO4 is magnetic material, with crystal size ranging from 28 to 35 nm. The substitution of vanadium in the magnetite structure increases the amount of surface hydroxyls. The experimental adsorption results indicate that, in neutral pH condition, the maximum adsorption capacities of Fe3-x VxO4 increase obviously with the increase of vanadium concentration in magnetite while the adsorption isotherm complies well with the Langmuir model. The adsorption of methylene blue (MB) on Fe3-x VxO4 can get equilibrium in the first 25 min, supporting a pseudo-second order equation. Moreover, the rise of the solution pH value results in an increase of the adsorption capability of MB on Fe3-x VxO4. PMID:20698274

  1. Immobilization of Acetobacter aceti on cellulose ion exchangers: adsorption isotherms

    SciTech Connect

    Bar, R.; Gainer, J.L.; Kirwan, D.J.

    1986-08-01

    The adsorptive behavior of cells of Acetobacter aceti, ATCC 23746, on DEAE-, TEAE-, and DEHPAE-cellulose ion exchangers in a modified Hoyer's medium at 30 degrees Centigrade was investigated. The maximum observed adsorption capacities varied from 46 to 64 mg dry wt/g resin. The Langmuir isotherm form was used to fit the data, since the cells formed a monolayer on the resin and exhibited saturation. The equilibrium constant in the Langmuir expression was qualitatively correlated with the surface charge density of the resin. The adsorption was also ''normalized'' by considering the ionic capacities of the resins. The exceptionally high normalized adsorption capacity of ECTEOLA-cellulose, 261 mg dry/meq, may be explained by an interaction between the cell wall and the polyglyceryl chains of the exchanging groups in addition to the electrostatic effects. The effect of pH on the bacterial adsorption capacity of ECTEOLA-, TEAE-, and phosphate-cellulose resins was studied and the pH of the bacteria was estimated to be 3.0. 17 references.

  2. Adsorption of pesticides from water by functionalized organobentonites.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Guzmán, Marta; Celis, Rafael; Hermosín, M Carmen; Koskinen, William C; Cornejo, Juan

    2005-09-21

    Replacement of natural inorganic cations of clay minerals with organic cations has been proposed as a strategy to improve the adsorptive capacity of clay minerals for organic compounds, including pesticides. The organic cations most commonly used for this purpose have been quaternary ammonium ions containing alkyl or aryl chains without specific functional groups. In this work, we evaluated the ability of two bentonites (SWy-2 and SAz-1) exchanged with four natural organic cations containing diverse functional groups (L-carnitine, L-cysteine ethyl ester, L-cystine dimethyl ester, and thiamine) as adsorbents of pesticides varying in their chemical structures (simazine, hexazinone, triadimefon, alachlor, carbaryl, and imazethapyr). For comparison purposes, the adsorptive properties of two "classical" organobentonites, hexadecyltrimethylammonium- and phenyltrimethylammonium-exchanged bentonites, were also determined. Most organobentonites displayed higher affinity for the pesticides than the untreated bentonites, but the improvement in adsorption capacity varied depending on the characteristics of the pesticide and the interlayer organic cation. Triadimefon, carbaryl, and imazethapyr displayed the highest affinity for carnitine (K(f) = 229-2377)-, thiamine (K(f) = 83-354)-, and cystine (K(f) = 96-100)-treated bentonites, respectively, whereas alachlor was adsorbed similarly by all organobentonites. In general, pesticide adsorption-desorption hysteresis was greater for adsorbents with the highest adsorption capacities. The results demonstrate that selective modification of smectitic clay minerals with natural organic cations containing appropriate functional groups can be a useful strategy to improve their performance for the removal of specific pesticides from the environment. PMID:16159179

  3. Competitive Adsorption of Plasma Proteins Using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance.

    PubMed

    Felgueiras, Helena P; Murthy, N Sanjeeva; Sommerfeld, Sven D; Brás, M Manuela; Migonney, Véronique; Kohn, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    Proteins that get adsorbed onto the surfaces of biomaterials immediately upon their implantation mediate the interactions between the material and the environment. This process, in which proteins in a complex mixture compete for adsorption sites on the surface, is determined by the physicochemical interactions at the interface. Competitive adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA), fibronectin (Fn), and collagen type I (Col I), sequentially and from mixtures, was investigated so as to understand the performances of different surfaces used in biomedical applications. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation was used to monitor the adsorption of these proteins onto two materials used in functional bone replacement, a titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) and Ti6Al4V physisorbed with poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) [poly(NaSS)], and three controls, gold, poly(desaminotyrosyltyrosine ethyl ester carbonate) [poly(DTEc)], and polystyrene (PS). In experiments with individual proteins, the adsorption was the highest with Fn and Col I and the least with BSA. Also, protein adsorption was the highest on poly(NaSS) and Ti6Al4V and the least on poly(DTEc). In sequential adsorption experiments, protein exchange was observed in BSA + Fn, Fn + Col I, and BSA + Col I sequences but not in Fn + BSA and Col I + BSA because of the lower affinity of BSA to surfaces relative to Fn and Col I. Protein adsorption was the highest with Col I + Fn on hydrophobic surfaces. In experiments with protein mixtures, with BSA & Fn, Fn appears to be preferentially adsorbed; with Fn & Col I, both proteins were adsorbed, probably as multilayers; and with Col I & BSA, the total amount of protein was the highest, greater than that in sequential and individual adsorption of the two proteins, probably because of the formation of BSA and Col I complexes. Protein conformational changes induced by the adsorbing surfaces, protein-protein interactions, and affinities of proteins appear to be the important factors that

  4. Quantum Monte Carlo investigations of adsorption energetics on graphene.

    PubMed

    Hsing, C R; Wei, C M; Chou, M Y

    2012-10-01

    We have performed calculations of adsorption energetics on the graphene surface using the state-of-the-art diffusion quantum Monte Carlo method. Two types of configurations are considered in this work: the adsorption of a single O, F, or H atom on the graphene surface and the H-saturated graphene system (graphane). The adsorption energies are compared with those obtained from density functional theory with various exchange-correlation functionals. The results indicate that the approximate exchange-correlation functionals significantly overestimate the binding of O and F atoms on graphene, although the preferred adsorption sites are consistent. The energy errors are much less for atomic hydrogen adsorbed on the surface. We also find that a single O or H atom on graphene has a higher energy than in the molecular state, while the adsorption of a single F atom is preferred over the gas phase. In addition, the energetics of graphane is reported. The calculated equilibrium lattice constant turns out to be larger than that of graphene, at variance with a recent experimental suggestion. PMID:22909778

  5. Zeolites for the selective adsorption of sulfur hexafluoride.

    PubMed

    Matito-Martos, I; Álvarez-Ossorio, J; Gutiérrez-Sevillano, J J; Doblaré, M; Martin-Calvo, A; Calero, S

    2015-07-21

    Molecular simulations have been used to investigate at the molecular level the suitability of zeolites with different topology on the adsorption, diffusion and separation of a nitrogen-sulfur hexafluoride mixture containing the latter at low concentration. This mixture represents the best alternative for the sulfur hexafluoride in industry since it reduces the use of this powerful greenhouse gas. A variety of zeolites are tested with the aim to identify the best structure for the recycling of sulfur hexafluoride in order to avoid its emission to the atmosphere and to overcome the experimental difficulties of its handling. Even though all zeolites show preferential adsorption of sulfur hexafluoride, we identified local structural features that reduce the affinity for sulfur hexafluoride in zeolites such as MOR and EON, providing exclusive adsorption sites for nitrogen. Structures such as ASV and FER were initially considered as good candidates based on their adsorption features. However, they were further discarded based on their diffusion properties. Regarding operation conditions for separation, the range of pressure that spans from 3 × 10(2) to 3 × 10(3) kPa was identified as the optimal to obtain the highest adsorption loading and the largest SF6/N2 selectivity. Based on these findings, zeolites BEC, ITR, IWW, and SFG were selected as the most promising materials for this particular separation. PMID:26099734

  6. The mechanism of Zn sup 2+ adsorption on calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, J.M. ); Kittrick, J.A.; Harsh, J.B. )

    1988-09-01

    The adsorption of Zn{sup 2+} on calcite (CaCO{sub 3(s)}) was investigated from aqueous solutions in equilibrium with CaCO{sub 3(s)} and undersaturated with respect to Zn{sub 5}(OH){sub 6}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2(s)}. Zinc adsorption occurred via exchange with Ca{sub 2+} in a surface-adsorbed layer on calcite. The validity of this exchange reaction was supported by adsorption isotherm and constant concentration experiments, where Ca{sup 2+}{sub aq} was varied by systematically changing the pH and CO{sub 2(g)}. Greater adsorption of Zn{sup 2+} occurred at higher pH and Co{sub 2(g)} levels, where Ca{sup 2+} activities were lowest. Sites available for Zn{sup 2+} sorption were less than 10% of Ca{sup 2+} sites on the calcite surface. Surface exchange of Zn{sup 2+} did not affect the solubility of calcite. Zinc sorption was apparently independent of surface charge, which suggested that the surface complex had covalent character. Desorption and isotopic exchange experiments indicated that the surface complex remained hydrated and labile as Zn{sup 2+} was rapidly exchangeable with Ca{sup 2+}. Careful analysis of the adsorption data showed that Zn{sup 2+} and ZnOH{sup +} were the sorbing species.

  7. Correlations for Adsorption of Oxygenates onto Zeolites from Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Mallon, Elizabeth E.; Babineau, Ian J.; Kranz, Joshua I.; Guefrachi, Yasmine; Siepmann, J. Ilja; Bhan, Aditya; Tsapatsis, Michael

    2011-10-06

    Henry’s constants (K{sub ads}) for adsorption of C₃ polyfunctional molecules onto zeolites from aqueous solutions at 278 K were obtained and compared with the octanol–water partition coefficients, K{sub ow}, which were calculated using the prevalent ClogP group contribution method. K{sub ads} increases linearly with K{sub ow} for these adsorbates on H–ZSM-5 (MFI), FAU, BEA, and ITQ-1 (MWW). K{sub ads} values for C₂–C₆ diol adsorption at 278 K are also linearly correlated with K{sub ow} regardless of interactions in the bulk phase as measured by the solution activity coefficient. Exceptions to the correlation established between K{sub ads} and K{sub ow} are the adsorption of 1,2,ω-triols with carbon number greater than three on H–ZSM-5 and adsorption of all oxygenates studied on FER, which we postulate to be due to the effect of changing adsorption configuration with adsorbate/zeolite structure which cannot be captured by K{sub ow} alone. These results enable the prediction of separation selectivities of biomass-derived compounds on zeolite adsorbents.

  8. Liquid Phase Adsorption of α-Tocopherol by Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, Awang; Ming, Chu Chi; Sundang, Murni

    α-Tocopherol or commonly called vitamin E can be found in major commercial vegetable oils such as soya oil and palm oil. However the existence in these oil is in low concentration. The recovery of low concentration of α-tocopherol from palm oils is increasingly popular. Adsorption technique for the recovery of α-tocopherol from palm oil is believed to be much lower in cost and more effective. As a case study in this work, activated carbon is chosen as the adsorbent and ethanol as the solvent. The adsorption equilibria of α-tocopherol onto activated carbon was conducted in batch and the concentration of α-tocopherol was identified by LCMS. Langmuirian monolayer adsorption theory was used for the analysis of the isotherm equilibria. The adsorptivity of α-tocopherol onto activated carbon was identified. The adsorption equilibria at low concentration found to be linear. The breakthrough curve was then generated using model assuming isothermal, single transition trace component with intraparticle diffusion. Sensitivity test on the curve indicated that the system is very sensitive to changes in diffusitivity and passive to changes on the equilibrium constant.

  9. Regenerable adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Perry, Jay (Inventor); Walsh, Dennis (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method for regenerable adsorption includes providing a substrate that defines at least one layer of ultra short channel length mesh capable of conducting an electrical current therethrough, coating at least a portion of the substrate with a desired sorbent for trace contaminant control or CO.sub.2 sorption, resistively heating the substrate, and passing a flowstream through the substrate and in contact with the sorbent.

  10. Adsorption of fluorescently labeled microbeads on PDMS surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikcevic, Irena; Bange, Adam; Peterson, Erik T. K.; Papautsky, Ian; Heineman, William R.; Halsall, H. B.; Seliskar, Carl J.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescently labeled beads may be utilized in transparent microfluidic devices to facilitate a variety of immunoassay based chemical measurements. We investigate the ability to visualize, quantitate, and reduce undesirable adsorption of beads within a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel device. These methods are prerequisites to the design of practical bead-based microfluidic sensing devices. The PDMS microchannels were shown to be transparent enough to make accurate quantitative optical measurements, although significant adsorption was observed. Epifluorescence microscopy was employed in an attempt to quantitatively evaluate microbead adsorption to PDMS microchannel walls and bulk surfaces after different agitation, solution, and surface treatments. This microscopy method provides reproducible imaging of individual beads and allows for characterization of adsorption to PDMS microchannel walls. Solution composition seemed to play a more important role in the ability to reduce the number of adsorbed beads to the PDMS surface than agitation. The most significant reduction in bead adsorption was seen in surface treatment. The most effective surface treatment examined in this study was Teflon AF.

  11. Macroscopic and spectroscopic analysis of lanthanide adsorption to bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwenya, Bryne T.; Mosselmans, J. Fred W.; Magennis, Marisa; Atkinson, Kirk D.; Tourney, Janette; Olive, Valerie; Ellam, Robert M.

    2009-06-01

    This study was designed to combine surface complexation modelling of macroscopic adsorption data with X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic (XAS) measurements to identify lanthanide sorption sites on the bacterial surface. The adsorption of selected representatives for light (La and Nd), middle (Sm and Gd) and heavy (Er and Yb) lanthanides was measured as a function of pH, and biomass samples exposed to 4 mg/L lanthanide at pH 3.5 and 6 were analysed using XAS. Surface complexation modelling was consistent with the light lanthanides adsorbing to phosphate sites, whereas the adsorption of middle and heavy lanthanides could be modelled equally well by carboxyl and phosphate sites. The existence of such mixed mode coordination was confirmed by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) analysis, which was also consistent with adsorption to phosphate sites at low pH, with secondary involvement of carboxyl sites at high adsorption density (high pH). Thus, the two approaches yield broadly consistent information with regard to surface site identity and lanthanide coordination environment. Furthermore, spectroscopic analysis suggests that coordination to phosphate sites is monodentate at the metal/biomass ratios used. Based on the best-fitting p Ka site, we infer that the phosphate sites are located on N-acetylglucosamine phosphate, the most likely polymer on gram-negative cells with potential phosphate sites that deprotonate around neutral pH.

  12. Adsorption and Desorption of Nitrogen and Water Vapor by clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Deshan; Chen, Qiong; Xiang, Wei; Huang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Adsorption and desorption of nitrogen and water vapor by clay has a significant impact on unsaturated soil physical and mechanical properties. In order to study the adsorption and desorption characteristics of nitrogen and water vapor by montmorillonite, kaolin and sliding zone soils, the Autosorb-iQ specific surface area and pore size analyzer instrument of United State was taken to carry out the analysis test. The adsorption and desorption of nitrogen at 77K and water vapor at 293K on clay sample were conducted. The theories of BET, FHH and hydration energy were taken to calculate the specific surface, surface fractal dimension and adsorption energy. The results show that the calculated specific surface of water vapor by clay is bigger than nitrogen adsorption test because clay can adsorb more water vapor molecule than nitrogen. Smaller and polar water vapor molecule can access the micropore and then adsorb on the mineral surface and mineral intralayer, which make the mineral surface cations hydrate and the mineral surface smoother. Bigger and nonpolar nitrogen molecule can not enter into the micropore as water vapor molecule and has weak interaction with clay surface.

  13. Adsorption of oxygen on Au(111) by exposure to ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, N.; Parker, D. H.; Koel, B. E.

    1998-08-01

    Atomic oxygen coverages of up to 1.2 ML may be cleanly adsorbed on the Au(111) surface by exposure to O 3 at 300 K. We have studied the adsorbed oxygen layer by AES, XPS, HREELS, LEED, work function measurements and TPD. A plot of the O(519 eV)/Au(239 eV) AES ratio versus coverage is nearly linear, but a small change in slope occurs at ΘO=0.9 ML. LEED observations show no ordered superlattice for the oxygen overlayer for any coverage studied. One-dimensional ordering of the adlayer occurs at low coverages, and disordering of the substrate occurs at higher coverages. Adsorption of 1.0 ML of oxygen on Au(111) increases the work function by +0.80 eV, indicating electron transfer from the Au substrate into an oxygen adlayer. The O(1s) peak in XPS has a binding energy of 530.1 eV, showing only a small (0.3 eV) shift to a higher binding energy with increasing oxygen coverage. No shift was detected for the Au 4f 7/2 peak due to adsorption. All oxygen is removed by thermal desorption of O 2 to leave a clean Au(111) surface after heating to 600 K. TPD spectra initially show an O 2 desorption peak at 520 K at low ΘO, and the peak shifts to higher temperatures for increasing oxygen coverages up to ΘO=0.22 ML. Above this coverage, the peak shifts very slightly to higher temperatures, resulting in a peak at 550 K at ΘO=1.2 ML. Analysis of the TPD data indicates that the desorption of O 2 from Au(111) can be described by first-order kinetics with an activation energy for O 2 desorption of 30 kcal mol -1 near saturation coverage. We estimate a value for the Au-O bond dissociation energy D(Au-O) to be ˜56 kcal mol -1.

  14. Adsorption and thermal decomposition of phenol on Ni(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, J. N.; Sarvis, S. S.; Morris, R. E.

    1995-09-01

    The thermal decomposition of phenol on Ni(110) between 150 and 800 K was investigated with temperature programmed desorption (TPD), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). After adsorption at 150 K, the phenol monolayer completely decomposed into H 2, CO, and adsorbed carbon upon heating to 800 K. Molecular phenol desorbed from an unreactive state at 225 K and from the multilayer at 200 K. The saturated reactive monolayer resulted in four H 2 desorption states, β1- β4. The β1-H 2 state observed between 250 and 350 K, resulted from OH bond scission and demonstrated the formation of a phenoxy species. A deuterium kinetic isotope effect (DKIE) for β1-hydrogen desorption indicated that OH bond scission occurs between 250 and 350 K. However, the absence of a DKIE in the reactive adsorption at 290 K of OH/OD and CH/CD labeled phenol showed that phenol chemisorbed on Ni(110) via the π bonds of the ring. The β2- β4-H 2 desorption states occurred in a continuum between 370 and 650 K and resulted from decomposition of the phenyl ring. The observation of a deuterium kinetic isotope effect for β2-H 2 desorption from 2,4,6- d3-phenol, compared to h6-phenol, and 3,5- d2-phenol indicated that scission of the CH bond in either the (2,6) or the 4 position on the ring was the rate limiting step. CO desorption began near 400 K, and continued to about 650 K, exhibiting the same general thermal desorption distribution as the β2- β4-H 2 desorption spectrum. In CO desorption, a DKIE indicated CH bond scission influenced the decomposition of the CC bonds in the ring which resulted in CO production. 13C labeling revealed that 60% of the CO bond units remained intact. At 650 K, the carbon residue had a graphitic Auger lineshape, and exhibited a LEED pattern that is consistent with graphite microcrystallites. The surface C dissolved into the bulk above 700 K.

  15. Adsorption and separation of proteins by a smectitic clay mineral.

    PubMed

    Ralla, Kathrin; Sohling, Ulrich; Riechers, Daniel; Kasper, Cornelia; Ruf, Friedrich; Scheper, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    The adsorption of proteins by a smectitic clay mineral was investigated. The clay used in this study is a mixture of montmorillonite and amorphous SiO(2). Due to the high porosity the montmorillonite units are accessible for protein adsorption. The amorphous silica prevents the montmorillonite from swelling and allows column packing. Protein adsorption was performed at different pH under static conditions. Furthermore, static capacities were determined. The material reveals high adsorption capacities for proteins under static conditions (270-408 mg/g), whereby proteins are mainly adsorbed via electrostatic interactions. The Freundlich isotherm is suggested as an adsorption model. For desorption a pH shift was found to be most effective. Binding and elution of human serum albumin and ovalbumin were tested under dynamic conditions. Dynamic capacities of about 40 mg/g for ovalbumin at 764 cm/h were found. The clay mineral provides suitable properties for the application as cost-efficient, alternative separation material. PMID:20340034

  16. Adsorption dynamics of trichlorofluoromethane in activated carbon fiber beds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhao, Xin; Hu, Jiaqi; Wei, Chaohai; Bi, Hsiaotao T

    2011-02-28

    Adsorption on carbon fixed-beds is considered as an inexpensive and highly effective way for controlling chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) emissions. In the present work, a dynamic model under constant-pattern wave conditions has been developed to predict the breakthrough behavior of trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11) adsorption in a fixed bed packed with activated carbon fibers (ACFs). The adsorption of CFC-11 vapor onto viscose-based ACFs was performed in a fixed bed at different test conditions. The results showed that, in a deep bed (>120 mm), the analytical model based on the external mass transfer with the Langmuir isotherm could describe the adsorption dynamics well. The model parameters, the characteristic breakthrough time and the film mass-transfer coefficients are related to such operating parameters as the superficial gas velocity, feed concentration and bed height. It was found from the breakthrough dynamics that the mass transfer from the fluid phase to the fiber surface dominated the CFC-11 adsorption onto ACFs in fixed beds. PMID:21216098

  17. Water Vapor Adsorption - Desorption Behavior of a Small Piece of Desiccant Rotor in Temperature Swing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washio, Yasuko; Kodama, Akio

    This study aims to clarify the adsorption / desorption behavior of water vapor onto / from a desiccant rotor in temperature swing. A magnetic suspension balance followed time variations of the weight of a small piece of desiccant rotor at various desorption temperature, adsorption / desorption time and their duration time ratio. Adsorption-desorption swing in steady state settled down at certain amplitude of the amount adsorbed keeping the balance of the adsorption and desorption rates averaged over each period. At low regeneration temperature around 40-50 oC, adsorption and desorption rates were affected considerably by the change of driving force of adsorption q*-q rather than the temperature dependence of the mass transfer coefficient. At constant adsorption and desorption air conditions, the adsorption /desorption rates could be summarized by the amount of adsorption and temperature, independently of the length of cycle time. Also, region of the amount of adsorption at which adsorption - desorption swing occurred was predicted considering the adsorption / desorption rates - amount adsorbed relationship and the adsorption / desorption duration ratio.

  18. Memory effect in the adsorption phenomena of neutral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zola, R. S.; Lenzi, E. K.; Evangelista, L. R.; Barbero, G.

    2007-04-01

    The adsorption-desorption phenomenon of neutral particles dissolved in an isotropic fluid is investigated by using a nonsingular kernel in the kinetic equation at the limiting surfaces. To account for the relevance of a memory effect, three types of kernels in the kinetic equation are considered. Similar kernels have been used to investigate nonexponential relaxation including several contexts such as dielectric relaxation, diffusion-controlled relaxation in liquids, liquid crystals, and amorphous polymers. A suitable choice for a temporal kernel can account for the relative importance of physisorption or chemisorption, according to the time scale governing the adsorption phenomena, and can be the key mechanism to understand the specific roles of both processes. By using a general procedure, the time evolution of the density of particles is determined in closed analytical form. The analysis is relevant in the description of the adsorption phenomena in general.

  19. A generalized procedure for the prediction of multicomponent adsorption equilibria

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ladshaw, Austin; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-01-01

    Prediction of multicomponent adsorption equilibria has been investigated for several decades. While there are theories available to predict the adsorption behavior of ideal mixtures, there are few purely predictive theories to account for nonidealities in real systems. Most models available for dealing with nonidealities contain interaction parameters that must be obtained through correlation with binary-mixture data. However, as the number of components in a system grows, the number of parameters needed to be obtained increases exponentially. Here, a generalized procedure is proposed, as an extension of the predictive real adsorbed solution theory, for determining the parameters of any activity model,more » for any number of components, without correlation. This procedure is then combined with the adsorbed solution theory to predict the adsorption behavior of mixtures. As this method can be applied to any isotherm model and any activity model, it is referred to as the generalized predictive adsorbed solution theory.« less

  20. A generalized procedure for the prediction of multicomponent adsorption equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Ladshaw, Austin; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-01-01

    Prediction of multicomponent adsorption equilibria has been investigated for several decades. While there are theories available to predict the adsorption behavior of ideal mixtures, there are few purely predictive theories to account for nonidealities in real systems. Most models available for dealing with nonidealities contain interaction parameters that must be obtained through correlation with binary-mixture data. However, as the number of components in a system grows, the number of parameters needed to be obtained increases exponentially. Here, a generalized procedure is proposed, as an extension of the predictive real adsorbed solution theory, for determining the parameters of any activity model, for any number of components, without correlation. This procedure is then combined with the adsorbed solution theory to predict the adsorption behavior of mixtures. As this method can be applied to any isotherm model and any activity model, it is referred to as the generalized predictive adsorbed solution theory.

  1. Analytical study of a gas-fired adsorptive air-conditioning system

    SciTech Connect

    Poyelle, F.; Guilleminot, J.J.; Meunier, F.

    1996-11-01

    Adsorptive air conditioning represents a potential alternative to chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) systems. But to compete with other systems, adsorption systems must exhibit sufficient figures of merit and energetic densities. An analytical study to predict the overall heat transfer coefficient in an adsorber has been conducted and is presented here. This study, based on a method-of-moment analysis, shows the influence of three parameters limiting the heat transfer in adsorbent beds. Heat transfer in adsorbent beds has been intensified. Using new consolidated materials, the machine utilizes two uniform temperature adsorbent beds in a cycle that incorporates both heat and mass recovery. It uses a zeolite-water pair. It is designed to produce 3 kW of cooling. Expected cooling performances are 300 W/kg of adsorbent with a coefficient of performance (COP) close to 0.8 and a cycle time of 20 minutes. The thermal conditions used to test the cycle are: the heater, 220 C; the cooler, 40 C; and the evaporation temperature, 3 C.

  2. The Extent of Reversibility of Polychlorinated Biphenyl Adsorption

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extent of reversibility of PCB bonding to sediments has been characterized in studies on the partitioning behavior of a hexachlorobiphenyl isomer. Linear non-singular isotherms have been observed for the adsorption and desorption of 2.4.5.2?,4?,5? hexachlorobiphenyl (HCBP) to...

  3. Effect of hydrocarbon adsorption on the wettability of rare earth oxide ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, Daniel J.; Miljkovic, Nenad; Sack, Jean; Queeney, John; Wang, Evelyn N.; Enright, Ryan

    2014-07-07

    Vapor condensation is routinely used as an effective means of transferring heat, with dropwise condensation exhibiting a 5 − 7x heat transfer improvement compared to filmwise condensation. However, state-of-the-art techniques to promote dropwise condensation rely on functional hydrophobic coatings, which are often not robust and therefore undesirable for industrial implementation. Natural surface contamination due to hydrocarbon adsorption, particularly on noble metals, has been explored as an alternative approach to realize stable dropwise condensing surfaces. While noble metals are prohibitively expensive, the recent discovery of robust rare earth oxide (REO) hydrophobicity has generated interest for dropwise condensation applications due to material costs approaching 1% of gold; however, the underlying mechanism of REO hydrophobicity remains under debate. In this work, we show through careful experiments and modeling that REO hydrophobicity occurs due to the same hydrocarbon adsorption mechanism seen previously on noble metals. To investigate adsorption dynamics, we studied holmia and ceria REOs, along with control samples of gold and silica, via X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and dynamic time-resolved contact angle measurements. The contact angle and surface carbon percent started at ≈0 on in-situ argon-plasma-cleaned samples and increased asymptotically over time after exposure to laboratory air, with the rare earth oxides displaying hydrophobic (>90°) advancing contact angle behavior at long times (>4 days). The results indicate that REOs are in fact hydrophilic when clean and become hydrophobic due to hydrocarbon adsorption. Furthermore, this study provides insight into how REOs can be used to promote stable dropwise condensation, which is important for the development of enhanced phase change surfaces.

  4. The dynamic adsorption characteristics of phenol by granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Namane, A; Hellal, A

    2006-09-01

    The objective of the present work is to determine the operating conditions of an activated carbon filter, based on the characteristics of breakthrough curves. For this we apply the technical developed by Mickaels for the ionic exchange and applied by Luchkis for the adsorption, and which is the mass transfer zone. To reach our goal, an evaluation of the operating conditions (height of the bed, flow and concentration of effluent) on the characteristics of the mass transfer zone was made and an explanation of the mechanism of adsorption was given. Thereafter a modeling of the experimental results was done. PMID:16621251

  5. Improvement of chitosan adsorption onto cellulosic fabrics by plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Fras Zemljic, Lidija; Persin, Zdenka; Stenius, Per

    2009-05-11

    Oxygen plasma treatment was applied in order to improve the adsorption of chitosan onto viscose fabric. Modification of the surface and adsorption of chitosan was monitored by determination of XPS spectra, determination of contact angles from rates of water imbibition, and conductometric titration. The plasma treatment resulted in hydrophilization of the surfaces through oxidation. The hydrophilic surfaces were stable for at least 24 h. The treatment also yielded binding sites that resulted in over 20% increase of the amount of chitosan adsorbed over that adsorbed on nontreated fabric. Layers of chitosan adsorbed after plasma treatment were substantially more active as antimicrobial agents than those on nontreated surfaces. PMID:19301906

  6. Adsorption and desorption of chlorpyrifos to soils and sediments.

    PubMed

    Gebremariam, Seyoum Yami; Beutel, Marc W; Yonge, David R; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B

    2012-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos, one of the most widely used insecticides, has been detected in air, rain, marine sediments, surface waters, drinking water wells, and solid and liquid dietary samples collected from urban and rural areas. Its metabolite, TCP, has also been widely detected in urinary samples collected from people of various age groups. With a goal of elucidating the factors that control the environmental contamination, impact, persistence, and ecotoxicity of chlorpyrifos, we examine, in this review, the peer-reviewed literature relating to chlorpyrifos adsorption and desorption behavior in various solid-phase matrices. Adsorption tends to reduce chlorpyrifos mobility, but adsorption to erodible particulates, dissolved organic matter, or mobile inorganic colloids enhances its mobility. Adsorption to suspended sediments and particulates constitutes a major off-site migration route for chlorpyrifos to surface waters, wherein it poses a potential danger to aquatic organisms. Adsorption increases the persistence of chlorpyrifos in the environment by reducing its avail- ability to a wide range of dissipative and degradative forces, whereas the effect of adsorption on its ecotoxicity is dependent upon the route of exposure. Chlorpyrifos adsorbs to soils, aquatic sediments, organic matter, and clay minerals to differing degrees. Its adsorption strongly correlates with organic carbon con- tent of the soils and sediments. A comprehensive review of studies that relied on the batch equilibrium technique yields mean and median Kd values for chlorpyrifos of 271 and 116 L/kg for soils, and 385 and 403 L/kg for aquatic sediments. Chlorpyrifos adsorption coefficients spanned two orders of magnitude in soils. Normalizing the partition coefficient to organic content failed to substantially reduce variability to commonly acceptable level of variation. Mean and median values for chlorpyrifos partition coefficients normalized to organic carbon, K, were 8,163 and 7,227 L/kg for soils and 13

  7. Effect of calcium on adsorption capacity of powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Shang, Junteng; Wang, Ying; Li, Yansheng; Gao, Hong

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the effect of calcium ion on the adsorption of humic acid (HA) (as a target pollutant) by powered activated carbon. The HA adsorption isotherms at different pH and kinetics of two different solutions including HA alone and HA doped Ca(2+), were performed. It was showed that the adsorption capacity of powdered activated carbon (PAC) for HA was markedly enhanced when Ca(2+) was doped into HA. Also, HA and Ca(2+) taken as nitrate were tested on the uptake of each other respectively and it was showed that the adsorbed amounts of both of them were significantly promoted when HA and calcium co-existed. Furthermore, the adsorbed amount of HA slightly decreased with the increasing of Ca(2+) concentration, whereas the amount of calcium increased with the increasing of HA concentration, but all above the amounts without addition. Finally, the change of pH before and after adsorption process is studied. In the two different solutions including HA alone and HA doped Ca(2+), pH had a small rise, but the extent of pH of later solution was bigger. PMID:25078809

  8. Adsorption as a control of metal concentrations in sediment extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Rendell, P.S.; Batley, G.E.; Cameron, A.J.

    1980-03-01

    The adsorption of Cu, Pb, and Cd from selected extractant solutions, onto uncontaminated river sediments, has been investigated under typical extraction conditions. Significant adsorption of added metal was found to occur during overnight extraction with dilute HCl (pH>1.5), 0.1 M hydroxylamine hydrochloride (pH 2), 0.1 M sodium citrate (pH 4.6), 1 M ammonium acetate, 10% sodium citrate-1% sodium dithionite, and 25% acetic acid. Adsorption also occurred during a hydrogen peroxide digestion procedure. The inability of reagents to prevent losses of soluble metal in these experiments strongly suggests that a proportion of the metal actually released from a sediment sample during an extraction will be readsorbed. This may lead to serious misinterpretation of extraction data because the metal concentrations determined in the extract do not represent metal levels in the sediment fractions attacked.

  9. Multilayer adsorption of slightly soluble organic compounds from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Aranovich, G.L.; Donohue, M.D.

    1996-03-25

    Adsorption isotherms are analyzed for slightly soluble organic components from water for a wide range of reduced concentrations. It is shown that the behavior of these systems can be modeled by an equation of the form a = Ac/[(1 + Bc)(1 {minus} c/c{sub 0}){sup d}] over the range of c/c{sub 0} from about 0.05 to 0.9. Here a is the adsorption amount, c is the concentration of organic compound in the water, c{sub 0} is a solubility limit for the organic compound, and A, B, and d are adjustable parameters. Comparison is made with experimental data for the adsorption of n-caproic acid, n-valeric acid, n-amyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol, aniline, cyclohexanol, and phenol from aqueous solutions on carbon adsorbents.

  10. The adsorption and reaction of vinyl acetate on Au/Pd(100) alloy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhenjun; Calaza, Florencia C; Tysoe, Wilfred

    2012-01-01

    The surface chemistry of vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) is studied on Au/Pd(100) alloys as a function of alloy composition using temperature-programmed desorption and reflection adsorption infrared spectroscopy. VAM adsorbs weakly on isolated palladium sites on the alloy with a heat of adsorption of ~55 kJ/mol, with the plane of the VAM adsorbed close to parallel to the surface. The majority of the VAM adsorbed on isolated sites desorbs molecularly with only a small portion decomposing. At lower gold coverages (below ~0.5 ML of gold), where palladium palladium bridge sites are present, VAM binds to the surface in a distorted geometry via a rehybridized vinyl group. A larger proportion of this VAM decomposes and this reaction is initiated by C\\O bond scission in the VAM to form adsorbed acetate and vinyl species. The implication of this surface chemistry for VAM synthesis on Au/Pd(100) alloys is discussed.

  11. Adsorption of binary gas mixtures in heterogeneous carbon predicted by density functional theory: on the formation of adsorption azeotropes.

    PubMed

    Ritter, James A; Pan, Huanhua; Balbuena, Perla B

    2010-09-01

    Classical density functional theory (DFT) was used to predict the adsorption of nine different binary gas mixtures in a heterogeneous BPL activated carbon with a known pore size distribution (PSD) and in single, homogeneous, slit-shaped carbon pores of different sizes. By comparing the heterogeneous results with those obtained from the ideal adsorbed solution theory and with those obtained in the homogeneous carbon, it was determined that adsorption nonideality and adsorption azeotropes are caused by the coupled effects of differences in the molecular size of the components in a gas mixture and only slight differences in the pore sizes of a heterogeneous adsorbent. For many binary gas mixtures, selectivity was found to be a strong function of pore size. As the width of a homogeneous pore increases slightly, the selectivity for two different sized adsorbates may change from being greater than unity to less than unity. This change in selectivity can be accompanied by the formation of an adsorption azeotrope when this same binary mixture is adsorbed in a heterogeneous adsorbent with a PSD, like in BPL activated carbon. These results also showed that the selectivity exhibited by a heterogeneous adsorbent can be dominated by a small number of pores that are very selective toward one of the components in the gas mixture, leading to adsorption azeotrope formation in extreme cases. PMID:20712330

  12. Adsorption of benzene, cyclohexane and hexane on ordered mesoporous carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Dou, Baojuan; Zhang, Zhongshen; Wang, Junhui; Liu, Haier; Hao, Zhengping

    2015-04-01

    Ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) with high specific surface area and large pore volume was synthesized and tested for use as an adsorbent for volatile organic compound (VOC) disposal. Benzene, cyclohexane and hexane were selected as typical adsorbates due to their different molecular sizes and extensive utilization in industrial processes. In spite of their structural differences, high adsorption amounts were achieved for all three adsorbates, as the pore size of OMC is large enough for the access of these VOCs. In addition, the unusual bimodal-like pore size distribution gives the adsorbates a higher diffusion rate compared with conventional adsorbents such as activated carbon and carbon molecular sieve. Kinetic analysis suggests that the adsorption barriers mainly originated from the difficulty of VOC vapor molecules entering the pore channels of adsorbents. Therefore, its superior adsorption ability toward VOCs, together with a high diffusion rate, makes the ordered mesoporous carbon a promising potential adsorbent for VOC disposal. PMID:25872710

  13. Accurate Treatment of Electrostatics during Molecular Adsorption in Nanoporous Crystals without Assigning Point Charges to Framework Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, T; Manz, TA; Sholl, DS

    2011-03-24

    Molecular simulations have become an important complement to experiments for studying gas adsorption and separation in crystalline nanoporous materials. Conventionally, these simulations use force fields that model adsorbate-pore interactions by assigning point charges to the atoms of the adsorbent. The assignment of framework charges always introduces ambiguity because there are many different choices for defining point charges, even when the true electron density of a material is known. We show how to completely avoid such ambiguity by using the electrostatic potential energy surface (EPES) calculated from plane wave density functional theory (DFT). We illustrate this approach by simulating CO(2) adsorption in four metal-organic frameworks (MOFs): IRMOF-1, ZIE-8, ZIE-90, and Zn(nicotinate)(2). The resulting CO(2) adsorption isotherms are insensitive to the exchange-correlation functional used in the DFT calculation of the EPES but are sensitive to changes in the crystal structure and lattice parameters. Isotherms computed from the DFT EPES are compared to those computed from several point charge models. This comparison makes possible, for the first time, an unbiased assessment of the accuracy of these point charge models for describing adsorption in MOFs. We find an unusually high Henry's constant (109 mmol/g.bar) and intermediate isosteric heat of adsorption (34.9 kJ/mol) for Zn(nicotinate)(2), which makes it a potentially attractive mateiial for CO(2) adsorption applications.

  14. Effects of Cabin Upsets on Adsorption Columns for Air Revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVan, M. Douglas

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) utilizes adsorption technology as part of contaminant removal systems designed for long term missions. A variety of trace contaminants can be effectively removed from gas streams by adsorption onto activated carbon. An activated carbon adsorption column meets NASA's requirements of a lightweight and efficient means of controlling trace contaminant levels aboard spacecraft and space stations. The activated carbon bed is part of the Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) which is utilized to purify the cabin atmosphere. TCCS designs oversize the adsorption columns to account for irregular fluctuations in cabin atmospheric conditions. Variations in the cabin atmosphere include changes in contaminant concentrations, temperature, and relative humidity. Excessively large deviations from typical conditions can result from unusual crew activity, equipment malfunctions, or even fires. The research carried out under this award focussed in detail on the effects of cabin upsets on the performance of activated carbon adsorption columns. Both experiments and modeling were performed with an emphasis on the roll of a change in relative humidity on adsorption of trace contaminants. A flow through fixed-bed apparatus was constructed at the NASA Ames Research Center, and experiments were performed there by W. Scot Appel under the direction of Dr. John E. Finn. Modeling work was performed at the University of Virginia and at Vanderbilt University by W. Scot Appel under the direction of M. Douglas LeVan. All three participants collaborated in all of the various phases of the research. The most comprehensive document describing the research is the Ph.D. dissertation of W. Scot Appel. Results have been published in several papers and presented in talks at technical conferences. All documents have been transmitted to Dr. John E. Finn.

  15. Removal of Arsenic from Drinking Water by Adsorption and Coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2013-12-01

    Removal of arsenic from drinking water has been an important issue worldwide, which has attracted greater attentions in recent years especially for supplying safe drinking water in developing countries. Although many kinds of treatment approaches that are available or applicable both in principle and practice, such as adsorption, coagulation, membrane filtration, ion exchange, biological process, electrocoagulation and so on, the first 2 approaches (i.e., adsorption and coagulation) are most promising due to the low-cost, high-efficiency, simplicity of treating systems, and thus can be practically used in developing countries. In this study, a literature survey on water quality in Bangladesh was performed to understand the ranges of arsenic concentration and pH of groundwater in Bangladesh. A series of tests were then organized and performed to investigate the effects of arsenic concentration, arsenic forms, pH, chemical compositions of the materials used for adsorption and coagulation, particle size distribution and treatment time on quality of treated water. The experimental results obtained in the study illustrated that both adsorption and coagulation can be used to effectively reduce the concentrations of either arsenic (V) or arsenic (III) from the contaminated water. Coagulation of arsenic with a magnesium-based material developed in this study can be very effective to remove arsenic, especially arsenic (V), from contaminated water with a concentration of 10 ppm to an undetectable level of 0.002 ppm by ICP analyses. Compared to arsenic (III), arsenic (V) is easier to be removed. The materials used for adsorption and coagulation in this study can remove arsenic (V) up to 9 mg/g and 6 mg/g, and arsenic (III) up to 4 mg/g and 3 mg/g, respectively, depending on test conditions and compositions of the materials being used. The control of pH during treatment can be a challenging technical issue for developing both adsorbent and coagulant. Keywords: Water Treatment

  16. Design theory and performance of cryogenic molecular adsorption refrigeration systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, W. H.; Woltman, A. W.; Masson, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Closed-cycle operation of molecular adsorption refrigeration systems (MARS) has been demonstrated by using thermally cycled zeolites to adsorb and desorb various gases under pressures of 20-60 atm. This paper develops three aspects of the design theory: the physical theory of molecular adsorption of small molecules such as A, N2, N2O and NH3, the design relations for closed-cycle flow for three or more compressors, and the coefficient of performance. This work is intended to demonstrate nonmechanical gas compression for various cryogenic gases than can compete with mechanical systems with a different mix of advantages and disadvantages.

  17. Nanoscale elastic properties of montmorillonite upon water adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Davoud; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Whittle, Andrew J

    2012-12-11

    Smectites are an important group of clay minerals that experience swelling upon water adsorption. This paper uses molecular dynamics with the CLAYFF force field to simulate isothermal isobaric water adsorption of interlayer Wyoming Na-montmorillonite, a member of the smectite group. Nanoscale elastic properties of the clay-interlayer water system are calculated from the potential energy of the model system. The transverse isotropic symmetry of the elastic constant matrix was assessed by calculating Euclidean and Riemannian distance metrics. Simulated elastic constants of the clay mineral are compared with available results from acoustic and nanoindentation measurements. PMID:23181550

  18. Molecular dynamics of adsorption and segregation from an Alkane mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, T.K.; Landman, U. )

    1993-09-03

    Adsorption and segregation of n-hexadecane molecules from an equal by weight mixture of n-hexadecane and n-hexane to an Au(001) surface at 315 kelvin are studied with the use of molecular dynamics simulations. Preferential adsorption of n-hexadecane at the solid-to-liquid interface together with subsequent layer-by-layer growth of an ordered, wetting interface were observed. The long chains penetrate and adsorb at the interfacial layer by means of a sequential segmental mechanism involving end-segment anchoring and displacive desorption of preadsorbed n-hexane molecules.

  19. Two-dimensional convex-molecule fluid model for surface adsorption of proteins: Effect of soft interaction on adsorption equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahata, Paritosh; Das, Sovan Lal

    2014-12-01

    Adsorption of proteins on membrane surfaces plays an important role in cell biological processes. In this work, we develop a two-dimensional fluid model for proteins. The protein molecules have been modeled as two-dimensional convex and soft particles. The Lennard-Jones potential for circular particles and Kihara (12,6) potential for elliptical particles with hard core have been used to model pairwise intermolecular interactions. The equation of state of the fluid model has been derived using Weeks-Chandler-Andersen decomposition and it involves three parameters, an attraction, a repulsion, and a size parameter, which depend on the shape and core size of the molecules. For validation of the model, a two-dimensional molecular dynamics simulation has been performed. Finally, the model has been applied to study the adsorption of proteins on a flat membrane. In comparison with the existing model of hard and convex particles for protein adsorption, our model predicts a higher packing fraction for the adsorption equilibria. Although the present work is based on Lennard-Jones-type interaction, it can be extended for other specific soft interactions between convex molecules. Thus the model has general applicability for any other two-dimensional adsorption systems of molecules with soft interaction.

  20. The adsorption of cesium on lanthanum hexaboride surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, P. R.; Swanson, L. W.; Chambers, S. A.

    1980-01-01

    The adsorption/desorption characteristics of cesium on clean and oxygen-covered LaB6 (100) surfaces were studied using various surface analysis techniques. On the initially clean surface (phi = 2.77 eV), adsorption produces a minimum work function of 1.96 eV and a saturation work function of 2.07 eV. For the oxygen-saturated surface, the cesium adsorption curve shows no minimum, the lowest work function (1.35 eV) occurring at cesium saturation. The utility of LaB6 (100) as an emitter or collector in thermionic converter applications (particularly for space nuclear electric propulsion) is evaluated.

  1. Novel sandwich structure adsorptive membranes for removal of 4-nitrotoluene from water.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuexin; Jia, Zhiqian

    2016-11-01

    Novel sandwich PES-SPES/PS-PDVB/PTFE adsorptive membranes were prepared by a filtration/immersion precipitation method and employed for the removal of 4-nitrotoluene from water. The static adsorption thermodynamics, kinetics, dynamic adsorption/desorption and membrane reusability were investigated. The results showed that the Freundlich model describes the adsorption isotherm satisfactorily. With increased PS-PDVB content, the maximum static adsorption capacity, partition coefficient, apparent adsorption rate constant, and dynamic adsorption capacity all significantly increased. The sandwich membranes showed much higher removal efficiency and adsorption capacity than those of mixed matrix membranes. With respect to dynamics adsorption/desorption, the sandwich membranes exhibited excellent reusability, with a removal efficiency greater than 95% even after five recycles. PMID:27322899

  2. Efficient adsorption of phenanthrene by simply synthesized hydrophobic MCM-41 molecular sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yun; He, Yinyun; Wang, Xiaowen; Wei, Chaohai

    2014-08-01

    Hydrophobic molecular sieve MCM-41 including surfactant template was synthesized by a simple method. The adsorption properties of this material toward phenanthrene were studied. The effects of adsorbent dose and pH value on the adsorption process as well as the adsorption mechanism and reuse performance were investigated. The template-containing MCM-41 showed a significant adsorption for phenanthrene, due to its hydrophobicity created by the surfactant template in MCM-41. The solution pH had little effect on the adsorption capacity. The adsorption kinetic could be fitted well with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The adsorption equilibrium was fitted well by the linear model, and the adsorption process followed the liquid/solid phase distribution mechanism. The thermodynamic results indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous and exothermic process.

  3. Effect of grain size on uranium(VI) surface complexation kinetics and adsorption additivity.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M

    2011-07-15

    The contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption was studied using a sediment from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.053-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (<0.053 mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch and flow-cell experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms and kinetic uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. One important implication of this study is that grain-size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location. PMID:21648458

  4. Adsorption of biopolymers on SWCNT: ordered poly(rC) and disordered poly(rI).

    PubMed

    Karachevtsev, Maksym V; Gladchenko, Galina O; Plokhotnichenko, Alexander M; Leontiev, Victor S; Karachevtsev, Victor A

    2013-03-01

    Polymer adsorption onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) depends on its rigidity/flexibility. The adsorption properties of two related homopolynucleotides poly(rI) and poly(rC) but of different rigidities were compared, employing absorption spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation. It was shown that adsorption of the poor base stacked poly(rI) onto the nanotube is less effective than that of the strong base stacked poly(rC), the chain of which is of higher rigidity. Analysis of UV absorption spectra of polymer:nanotube suspension at heating until 90 °C, which leads to partial nanotube aggregation because of the weakly bound polymer sliding from the tube surface, revealed that the percent of precipitated nanotubes in suspension with poly(rI) is larger than that in suspension with poly(rC) (16% vs 7%). This fact indicates the higher stability of SWCNT:poly(rC) hybrid in comparison with SWCNT:poly(rI). Less effective adsorption of poly(rI) is confirmed with a weaker hypochromic effect of nanotubes covered with poly(rI) than with poly(rC), which originates from π-π stacking of nitrogen bases with the nanotube surface. Spontaneous adsorption of oligomers on the nanotube simulated by the molecular dynamics showed that oligomer r(I)25 has a weaker energy of binding to the carbon nanotube surface than r(C)25. The oligomer with ordered bases has a tendency to form the stretched conformation along the nanotube, which provides a higher binding energy, while more flexible r(I)25 forms the stable loop spaced away from the nanotube surface, the stability of which is strengthened with H-bonding between bases. PMID:23402540

  5. [Degradation and adsorption behavior of napropamide in soils].

    PubMed

    Guo, Hua; Zhu, Hong-mei; Yang, Hong

    2008-06-01

    Chromatography (HPLC and GC-MS) and spectroscopy (UV and FT-IR) methods were conducted to study the degradation and adsorption behavior of napropamide in soils. Influence factors of degradation, degradation products and adsorption mechanism were analyzed. The results showed that degradation rate of napropamide increased with enhancing temperature (15-35 degrees C) and organic matter content in soil was the most important factor which influenced the degradation half-life of napropamide in soil, and their relative coefficient (r) reached 0.9794. The degradation half-life of napropamide in sterilized soil was almost 3-fold of that in non-sterilized soil, and soil microorganisms were contributed to the degradation of napropamide. The probable degradation products were N-methyl-2-(1-naphthoxy)-propionamide and N-ethyl-2-(1-naphthoxy)-propionamide. The possible degradation pathways were dealkylation. Adsorption isoterms of napropamide on three soils such as Yellow-brown soil, Latersol and Black Soil could be described by Freundlich equation with the corresponding adsorption coefficient (Kf) of 1.29, 3.43 and 13.36, and the adsorption free energy (delta G) of napropamide on the three soils was less than 40 kJ x mol(-1) which largely resulted from the physical adsorption involving in hydrogen-bonding, hydrophobic bonding, coordination and van der waal force. Comparison to the FT-IR spectra of the three soils, the results certificated that the sorption capacity of three soils was Black Soil > Latersol > Yellow-brown Soil. PMID:18763531

  6. Adsorption of silver dimer on graphene - A DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Rani, Pooja; Dharamvir, Keya

    2014-04-24

    We performed a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study of the adsorption of silver dimer (Ag{sub 2}) on graphene using SIESTA (Spanish Initiative for Electronic Simulations with Thousands of Atoms) package, in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The adsorption energy, geometry, and charge transfer of Ag2-graphene system are calculated. The minimum energy configuration for a silver dimer is parallel to the graphene sheet with its two atoms directly above the centre of carbon-carbon bond. The negligible charge transfer between the dimer and the surface is also indicative of a weak bond. The methodology demonstrated in this paper may be applied to larger silver clusters on graphene sheet.

  7. An adsorption model of the heterogeneous nucleation of solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, W.T.; Cantor, B. . Oxford Centre for Advanced Materials and Composites)

    1994-09-01

    An adsorption model has been developed to describe the heterogeneous nucleation of solidification in an A-B eutectic or monotectic alloy system. The interface between A-rich [alpha] solid and B-rich liquid is treated as a mixture of A solid, B solid, A liquid and B liquid atoms, randomly distributed as a monolayer between the two phases. The interfacial energy is calculated by summing pairwise bonding energies, and is then minimized to determine the equilibrium interface solid fraction and composition. With decreasing temperature, the interface monolayer changes sharply from liquid to solid, with a composition close to pure B. This sharp onset of interface adsorption of solid B atoms corresponds to [alpha] acting as a catalyst for the heterogeneous nucleation of B-rich [beta] solid. Adsorption close to the eutectic temperature and therefore efficient nucleation catalysis is promoted by a large difference between the melting points of A and B, and a small difference between the solid and liquid immiscibilities of A and B. Predicted undercoolings for the onset of adsorption and nucleation catalysis can be obtained directly from simple phase diagram data, and give good agreement with previous measurements in the Ag-Pb and Al-Sn alloy systems.

  8. Adsorption of nanoparticles at the solid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Thorsten; Paulus, Michael; Schroer, Martin A; Tiemeyer, Sebastian; Sternemann, Christian; Möller, Johannes; Tolan, Metin; Degen, Patrick; Rehage, Heinz

    2012-05-15

    The adsorption of differently charged nanoparticles at liquid-solid interfaces was investigated by in situ X-ray reflectivity measurements. The layer formation of positively charged maghemite (γ-Fe(2)O(3)) nanoparticles at the aqueous solution-SiO(2) interface was observed while negatively charged gold nanoparticles show no adsorption at this interface. Thus, the electrostatic interaction between the particles and the charged surface was determined as the driving force for the adsorption process. The data analysis shows that a logarithmic particle size distribution describes the density profile of the thin adsorbed maghemite layer. The size distribution in the nanoparticle solution determined by small angle X-ray scattering shows an average particle size which is similar to that found for the adsorbed film. The formed magehemite film exhibits a rather high stability. PMID:22386203

  9. Transferable force fields for adsorption of small gases in zeolites.

    PubMed

    Martin-Calvo, A; Gutiérrez-Sevillano, J J; Parra, J B; Ania, C O; Calero, S

    2015-10-01

    We provide transferable force fields for oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon monoxide that are able to reproduce experimental adsorption in both pure silica and alumino-substituted zeolites at cryogenic and high temperatures. The force field parameters can be combined with those previously reported for carbon dioxide, methane, and argon, opening the possibility for studying mixtures of interest containing the six components. Using these force field parameters we obtained some adsorption isotherms at cryogenic temperatures that at first sight were in discrepancies with experimental values for certain molecules and structures. We attribute these discrepancies to the sensitiveness of the equipment and to kinetic impedimenta that can lead to erratic results. Additional problems can be found during simulations when extra-framework cations are present in the system as their lack of mobility at low temperatures could lead to kinetic effects that hinder experimental adsorption. PMID:26313242

  10. Chemical speciation and adsorption behavior of plutonium in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, A.L.

    1983-01-01

    Dissolved Pu profiles in two partially anoxic basins--Saanich Inlet, an intermittently anoxic marine fiord in Vancouver Island, British Columbia, and Soap Lake, a saline, alkaline lake in eastern Washington state, revealed minimum concentrations at the O/sub 2//H/sub 2/S interface. The Pu concentrations in the anoxic waters of Saanich Inlet were less than the surface concentrations; however, in Soap Lake, a 15- to 50-fold increase in Pu concentration in the anoxic monimolimnion correlated with large increases in the major ions, total alkalinity, and dissolved organic carbon. Laboratory experiments were designed to investigate the effects of pH, ionic strength, dissolved organic carbon, and carbonate ions on the adsorption of tracer amounts of Pu IV and Pu V. The Pu-goethite adsorption system provided the data base for developing a thermodynamic model of Pu interaction with an oxide surface and with dissolved ligands, using the MINEQL computer program. Pu IV and Pu V interacted very differently with goethite, which is consistent with their different hydrolytic character. A reduction of Pu V to Pu IV occurred on the goethite surface and also on montmorillonite and silica gel, suggesting that redox transformations are an important aspect of Pu adsorption. Increases in ionic strength (up to 3 M NaCl or NaNO/sub 3/) did not affect Pu IV or V adsorption. In the presence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Pu V reduction to Pu IV occurred in solution. Pu IV adsorption on goethite decreased only 30% in the presence of 240 ppm of natural DOC from Soap Lake; however, carbonate anions inhibited Pu IV adsorption on goethite at the alkalinity levels (1500 meq/L total alkalinity, 0.57 M CO/sub 3/=) measured for Soap Lake monimolimnion waters.

  11. Investigation of adsorption kinetics and isotherm of cellulase and B-Glucosidase on lignocellulosic substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clear understanding of enzyme adsorption during enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass is essential to enhance the cost-efficiency of hydrolysis. However, conclusions from literatures often contradicted each other because enzyme adsorption is enzyme, biomass/pretreatment and experimental co...

  12. PREDICTION OF SELECTIVITY FOR ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION OF TRACE ORGANIC (HOMOLOGUE) CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Preferential adsorption of organic compounds onto activated carbon from dilute aqueous solutions was studied to develop a comprehensive theoretical basis for predicting adsorption of multicomponent solutes. The authors investigated in this research program a comparison of differe...

  13. Strong adsorption of Al-doped carbon nanotubes toward cisplatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Li, Guo-Qing; Lu, Xiao-Min; Ma, Juan-Juan; Zeng, Peng-Yu; He, Qin-Yu; Wang, Yin-Zhen

    2016-08-01

    The adsorption of cisplatin molecule on Al-doped CNTs is investigated using density functional theory. The obtained results indicate that Al-doped carbon nanotubes can strongly absorb cisplatin. After absorbing cisplatin, the symmetry of CNTs has some changes. We innovatively defined a parameter of symmetry variation which relates to the adsorption. By analyzing the electronic structure, it can be concluded that under the circumstance that cisplatin was absorbed by Al-doped CNTs through aluminum atom of Al-doped CNTs. In conclusion, Al-doped CNTs is a kind of potential delivery carrier with high quality for anticancer drug cisplatin.

  14. Effect of tribology processes on adsorption of albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yu; Yang, Hongjuan; Wang, Linghe; Su, Yanjing; Qiao, Lijie

    2016-03-01

    As soon as artificial joint replacements are implanted into patients, the adsorption of proteins can occur. Joint implants operate in a protein-rich and relatively corrosive environment under tribological contact. The contacted area acted as an anodic part and the rest of the surface was more cathodic. Therefore, the adsorption of proteins is different in and outside the wear track. Adsorbed proteins would denature during rubbing and a tribofilm could form. The tribofilm can lubricate the surface and act as a barrier to corrosion damage. However, to observe the adsorption of proteins in situ has always been a challenge. Scanning Kelvin probe force microscope (SKPFM) was used to study the adsorption of albumin on the surface of CoCrMo alloy under simulated tribology movement. Fluorescence microscopy (FM) was employed to reveal the protein molecules in the wear scar. It was found that albumin molecules can decrease the surface potential and accelerate the corrosion process. In the wear track, albumin denatured and changed the surface potential as time progressed.

  15. Adsorption of cinnabarinic acid f