Science.gov

Sample records for heat problem solution

  1. Numberical Solution to Transient Heat Flow Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobiske, Ronald A.; Hock, Jeffrey L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the reduction of the one- and three-dimensional diffusion equation to the difference equation and its stability, convergence, and heat-flow applications under different boundary conditions. Indicates the usefulness of this presentation for beginning students of physics and engineering as well as college teachers. (CC)

  2. Numerical solution of the imprecisely defined inverse heat conduction problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smita, Tapaswini; Chakraverty, S.; Diptiranjan, Behera

    2015-05-01

    This paper investigates the numerical solution of the uncertain inverse heat conduction problem. Uncertainties present in the system parameters are modelled through triangular convex normalized fuzzy sets. In the solution process, double parametric forms of fuzzy numbers are used with the variational iteration method (VIM). This problem first computes the uncertain temperature distribution in the domain. Next, when the uncertain temperature measurements in the domain are known, the functions describing the uncertain temperature and heat flux on the boundary are reconstructed. Related example problems are solved using the present procedure. We have also compared the present results with those in [Inf. Sci. (2008) 178 1917] along with homotopy perturbation method (HPM) and [Int. Commun. Heat Mass Transfer (2012) 39 30] in the special cases to demonstrate the validity and applicability.

  3. Solution to problems of bacterial impurity of heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapov, V. I.; Zamaleev, M. M.

    2015-09-01

    The article describes the problems of the operation of open and closed district heating systems related to the bacteriological contamination of heating-system water. It is noted that district heating systems are basically safe in sanitary epidemiological terms. Data on the dangers of sulfide contamination of heating systems are given. It is shown that the main causes of the development of sulfate-reducing and iron bacteria in heating systems are a significant biological contamination of source water to fuel heating systems, which is determined by water oxidizability, and a low velocity of the motion of heating-system water in the heating system elements. A case of sulfide contamination of a part of the outdoor heat-supply system of the city of Ulyanovsk is considered in detail. Measures for cleaning pipelines and heating system equipment from the waste products of sulfate-reducing bacteria and iron bacteria and for improving the quality of heating-system water by organizing the hydraulic and water-chemistry condition that makes it possible to avoid the bacteriological contamination of heating systems are proposed. The positive effect of sodium silicate on the prevention of sulfide contamination of heating systems is shown.

  4. Analytical Solutions of Heat-Conduction Problems with Time-Varying Heat-Transfer Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudinov, V. A.; Eremin, A. V.; Stefanyuk, E. V.

    2015-05-01

    The problem on heat conduction of an infinite plate with a heat-transfer coefficient changing linearly with time for third-kind boundary conditions was solved analytically based on determination of the front of a temperature disturbance in this plate and introduction of additional boundary conditions. On the basis of the solution obtained, graphs of the distribution of isotherms in the indicated plate and the velocities of their movement along a spatial variable in it were constructed. As a result of the solution of the inverse problem on the heat conduction of the infinite plate with the use of the results of numerical calculation of the change in its temperature at any point on the indicated spatial coordinate, the Predvoditelev number was identified with an accuracy of 2%, which made it possible to determine the time dependence of the heat-transfer coefficient of the plate.

  5. Numerical solution of nonlinear heat problem with moving boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Mannai, Mona; Khabeev, Nail

    2012-01-01

    Two phase gas-liquid flow in pipes is widely spread in space applications: bubble flows appear in cryogenic components transport through fuel/oxidant supply lines. Another important application is based on the fact that in liquid flows with small bubbles a close contact between the two phases occurs resulting in high rates of transfer between them. The compactness of a system makes it ideally suited to serve as a space-based two-phase bio-reactor which forms an important unit in environmental control and life support system deployed onboard. A numerical method was developed for solving a nonlinear problem of thermal interaction between a spherical gas bubble and surrounding liquid. The system of equations for describing this interaction was formulated. It includes ordinary and nonlinear partial differential equations. The problem was solved using finite-difference technique by dividing the system into spherical layers inside the bubble and employing the new variable which "freezes" the moving boundary of the bubble. A numerical solution is obtained for the problem of radial bubble motion induced by a sudden pressure change in the liquid—a situation which corresponds to the behavior of bubbles beyond a shock wave front when the latter enters a bubble curtain.

  6. Removal of numerical instability in the solution of an inverse heat conduction problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourgholi, R.; Azizi, N.; Gasimov, Y. S.; Aliev, F.; Khalafi, H. K.

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we consider an inverse heat conduction problem (IHCP). A set of temperature measurements at a single sensor location inside the heat conduction body is required. Using a transformation, the ill-posed IHCP becomes a Cauchy problem. Since the solution of Cauchy problem, exists and is unique but not always stable, the ill-posed problem is closely approximated by a well-posed problem. For this new well-posed problem, the existence, uniqueness, and stability of the solution are proved.

  7. Heat Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Heat problems and heat cramps related to jogging can be caused by fluid imbalances, medications, dietary insufficiency, vomiting or diarrhea, among other factors. If the condition keeps reoccurring, the advice of a physician should be sought. Some preventive measures that can be taken include: (1) running during the cooler hours of the day; (2)…

  8. Conduction heat transfer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    VanSant, J.H.

    1980-03-01

    This text is a collection of solutions to a variety of heat conduction problems found in numerous publications, such as textbooks, handbooks, journals, reports, etc. Its purpose is to assemble these solutions into one source that can facilitate the search for a particular problem solution. Generally, it is intended to be a handbook on the subject of heat conduction. This material is useful for engineers, scientists, technologists, and designers of all disciplines, particularly those who design thermal systems or estimate temperatures and heat transfer rates in structures. More than 500 problem solutions and relevant data are tabulated for easy retrieval. There are twelve sections of solutions which correspond with the class of problems found in each. Geometry, state, boundary conditions, and other categories are used to classify the problems. A case number is assigned to each problem for cross-referencing, and also for future reference. Each problem is concisely described by geometry and condition statements, and many times a descriptive sketch is also included. At least one source reference is given so that the user can review the methods used to derive the solutions. Problem solutions are given in the form of equations, graphs, and tables of data, all of which are also identified by problem case numbers and source references.

  9. Exact analytical solution to a transient conjugate heat-transfer problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sucec, J.

    1973-01-01

    An exact analytical solution is found for laminar, constant-property, slug flow over a thin plate which is also convectively cooled from below. The solution is found by means of two successive Laplace transformations when a transient in the plate and the fluid is initiated by a step change in the fluid inlet temperature. The exact solution yields the transient fluid temperature, surface heat flux, and surface temperature distributions. The results of the exact transient solution for the surface heat flux are compared to the quasi-steady values, and a criterion for the validity of the quasi-steady results is found. Also the effect of the plate coupling parameter on the surface heat flux are investigated.

  10. Conduction heat transfer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    VanSant, J.H.

    1983-08-01

    This text is a collection of solutions to a variety of heat conduction problems found in numerous publications, such as textbooks, handbooks, journals, reports, etc. Its purpose is to assemble these solutions into one source that can facilitate the search for a particular problem solution. Generally, it is intended to be a handbook on the subject of heat conduction. There are twelve sections of solutions which correspond with the class of problems found in each. Geometry, state, boundary conditions, and other categories are used to classify the problems. Each problem is concisely described by geometry and condition statements, and many times a descriptive sketch is also included. The introduction presents a synopsis on the theory, differential equations, and boundary conditions for conduction heat transfer. Some discussion is given on the use and interpretation of solutions. Supplementary data such as mathematical functions, convection correlations, and thermal properties are included for aiding the user in computing numerical values from the solutions. 155 figs., 92 refs., 9 tabs.

  11. Analytical solution of two-phase spherical Stefan problem by heat polynomials and integral error functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharin, Stanislav N.; Sarsengeldin, Merey M.; Nouri, Hassan

    2016-08-01

    On the base of the Holm model, we represent two phase spherical Stefan problem and its analytical solution, which can serve as a mathematical model for diverse thermo-physical phenomena in electrical contacts. Suggested solution is obtained from integral error function and its properties which are represented in the form of series whose coefficients have to be determined. Convergence of solution series is proved.

  12. Determination of thermophysical characteristics of solid materials by electrical modelling of the solutions to the inverse problems in nonsteady heat conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozdoba, L. A.; Krivoshei, F. A.

    1985-01-01

    The solution of the inverse problem of nonsteady heat conduction is discussed, based on finding the coefficient of the heat conduction and the coefficient of specific volumetric heat capacity. These findings are included in the equation used for the electrical model of this phenomenon.

  13. Correct Problems, Desperate Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donohue, William A.

    1996-01-01

    Argues that the social problems confronting America have been bombarded with ill-conceived and unsuccessful social policy largely driven by fear. Explains that parental licensing is a draconian and unworkable solution. Vouchers for indigent youth to attend Catholic schools, developing after-school and summer programs, and reforming welfare are…

  14. Solution strategies for finite elements and finite volumes methods applied to flow and heat transfer problem in U-shaped geothermal exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egidi, Nadaniela; Giacomini, Josephin; Maponi, Pierluigi

    2016-06-01

    Matter of this paper is the study of the flow and the corresponding heat transfer in a U-shaped heat exchanger. We propose a mathematical model that is formulated as a forced convection problem for incompressible and Newtonian fluids and results in the unsteady Navier-Stokes problem. In order to get a solution, we discretise the equations with both the Finite Elements Method and the Finite Volumes Method. These procedures give rise to a non-symmetric indefinite quadratic system of equations. Thus, three regularisation techniques are proposed to make approximations effective and ideas to compare their results are provided.

  15. An analytical solution of a one-dimensional thermal contact conductance problem with one heat flux and one insulated boundary condition

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Y.M.; Crane, R.A. )

    1992-05-01

    Heat transfer across surfaces in imperfect contact occurs in many practical situations. Since the thermal contact conductance problem has appeared in the literature, substantial efforts have been made to estimate the thermal conductance across the interface. Some of the techniques recently developed of estimating thermal contact conductance are based on experimental temperature data at one or several interior positions of the contacting solids and the calculation of the temperature at these locations for known contact conductance. Consequently, an accurate and efficient method for computing temperature distributions because quite important. FDM and FEM are most widely used. However, for most contact conductance computation methods, only the temperatures at the contacting regions and several other positions near the interface need to be determined, so the general FDM and FEM are not particularly efficient in solving this problem. This paper presents an analytical temperature distribution solution to the one-dimensional symmetric system with heat flux on one outside surface and insulation on the other. This analysis provides a theoretical basis for transient measurement of thermal contact conductance. While it is common practice in steady-state measurements to use a water-cooled heat sink, it is possible to limit the transient solution to time interval prior to any detectable temperature increase at the cold end. This effectively eliminates the need for water cooling and permits the use of an insulated boundary. The analytical solution to the mentioned problem obtained shows that for a symmetric system the temperature distribution solution includes two sets of distinct eigenfunctions.

  16. Heat transfer in energy problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushina, T.; Yang, W. J.

    Results of recent research are presented concerning heat transfer in energy problems, including high-temperature heat transfer, high-flux heat transfer, high-performance heat transfer, heat transfer in nonconventional energy (power and propulsion) systems, and novel heat transfer techniques. Topics discussed include studies of full-coverage film cooling, radiative properties of metals and alloys at high temperature, critical heat flux conditions in high-quality boiling systems, heat transfer characteristics of the evaporation of a liquid droplet on heated surfaces, high-performance surfaces for non-boiling heat transfer, and high performance heat transfer surfaces for boiling and condensation. Also examined are high flux heat transfer in gaseous solid suspension flow, nuclear process heat applications of high temperature heat exchange, heat transfer considerations in the use of new energy resources, and high performance mist-cooled condensers for geothermal binary cycle plants. No individual items are abstracted in this volume

  17. Generating Problems from Problems and Solutions from Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arcavi, Abraham; Resnick, Zippora

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a geometrical solution to a problem that is usually solved geometrically as an example of how alternative solutions may enrich the teaching and learning of mathematics. (Contains 11 figures.)

  18. Classroom Management: Problems and Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Debra G.

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on classroom management in the music classroom. Discusses why a management system is important and how to meet student needs. Addresses types of behavior problems and solutions for four levels of problems related to student behavior. Explores the importance of proactive management on the part of the music teacher. (CMK)

  19. Viking heat sterilization - Progress and problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daspit, L. P.; Cortright, E. M.; Stern, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    The Viking Mars landers to be launched in 1975 will carry experiments in biology, planetology, and atmospheric physics. A terminal dry-heat sterilization process using an inert gas was chosen to meet planetary quarantine requirements and preclude contamination of the biology experiment by terrestrial organisms. Deep sterilization is performed at the component level and terminal surface sterilization at the system level. Solutions to certain component problems relating to sterilization are discussed, involving the gyroscope, tape recorder, battery, electronic circuitry, and outgassing. Heat treatment placed special requirements on electronic packaging, including fastener preload monitoring and solder joints. Chemical and physical testing of nonmetallic materials was performed to establish data on their behavior in heat-treatment and vacuum environments. A Thermal Effects Test Model and a Proof Test Capsule were used. It is concluded that a space vehicle can be designed and fabricated to withstand heat sterilization requirements.

  20. New computer program solves wide variety of heat flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almond, J. C.

    1966-01-01

    Boeing Engineering Thermal Analyzer /BETA/ computer program uses numerical methods to provide accurate heat transfer solutions to a wide variety of heat flow problems. The program solves steady-state and transient problems in almost any situation that can be represented by a resistance-capacitance network.

  1. One solution for two problems.

    PubMed

    This article presents Dr. Nicky Padayachee's resolution concerning AIDS and its effect on the problem of overpopulation. Dr. Nicky Padayachee of Johannesburg City Council's Health Department stated that both of these problems pose a threat to the economic development with solutions depending on the development of the country. The increasing population of South Africa in comparison with its economic decline resulted to unemployment and high fertility. It has been proposed that the local government should double its efforts in the promotion of family planning through the provision of electricity and using television as a mode of disseminating family planning information. Further, a strict implementation of optimal urbanization, education and general economic development opportunity for all individuals was suggested. It was estimated that 2.5-7.5 million people will be HIV-positive by the year 2005, and any long-term planning would need essential re-examination and review as the demographic situation unfolds. AIDS education was insufficient by itself to control AIDS, but the stability in education, family life and empowerment of women were important in the implementation of any AIDS prevention program. Generally, development plays a major role in the decrease of AIDS and fertility by providing individuals with opportunities and jobs. On his last statement, he concluded that the best treatment for AIDS and population growth is a job. PMID:12349359

  2. School Discipline: Problems Effecting Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitzman, Andrew J.; Wiley, David B.

    1987-01-01

    Failure to solve school discipline problems is attributed to four factors: school district priorities, unclear problem dimensions, inadequate teacher training, and flaws in teacher/ administrator applied psychology. Psychological approaches that provide systems to control student behavior are described, including biophysical, interactionist, and…

  3. Multiple Solutions Involving Geoboard Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lyle R.

    1993-01-01

    Illustrates various methods to determine the perimeter and area of triangles and polygons formed on the geoboard. Methods utilize algebraic techniques, trigonometry, geometric theorems, and analytic geometry to solve problems and connect a variety of mathematical concepts. (MDH)

  4. Solution of the Robbins problem.

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, W.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    1997-01-01

    In this article we show that the three equations known as commutativity, associativity, and the Robbins equation are a basis for the variety of Boolean algebras. The problem was posed by Herbert Robbins in the 1930s. The proof was found automatically by EQP, a theorem-proving program for equational logic. We present the proof and the search strategies that enabled the program to find the proof.

  5. A Mathematical Solution to the Motorway Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaelson, Matthew T.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a mathematical solution to a motorway problem. The motorway problem is an excellent application in optimisation. As it integrates the concepts of trigonometric functions and differentiation, the motorway problem can be used quite effectively as the basis for an assessment tool in senior secondary mathematics subjects.…

  6. Heat capacity of alkanolamine aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, L.F.; Li, M.H.

    1999-12-01

    Heat capacities of monoethanoloamine, diglycolamine, diethanolamine, di-w propanolamine, triethanolamine, N-methyldiethanolamine, 2-amino-2-methyl-l-propanol, and 2-piperidineethanol aqueous solutions were measured from 30 to 80 C with a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The mole fractions of alkanolamines studied are 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8. Heat capacities of N-methyldiethanolamine aqueous solutions have been measured to verify the validity of C{sub p} measurements for alkanolamine aqueous solutions. The estimated uncertainty of the measured heat capacities is {plus{underscore}minus}3%, including the effect of up to 5% impurities in a substance. An excess molar heat capacity expression using the Redlich-Kister equation for the composition dependence is used to represent the measured C{sub p} of alkanolamine aqueous solutions. For a total of 374 data points, the calculation results for eight alkanolamine solutions give the overall average absolute deviations of 11.9% and 0.29% for the excess molar heat capacity and the heat capacity, respectively. The heat capacities presented in this study are, in general, of sufficient accuracy for most engineering-design calculations. Solutions of alkanolamines are industrially important mixtures used in the natural gas industry, oil refineries, petroleum chemical plants, and synthetic ammonia plants for the removal of acidic components such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S from gas streams.

  7. Optimal solutions of unobservable orbit determination problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicci, David A.; Tapley, Byron D.

    1988-12-01

    The method of data augmentation, in the form ofa priori covariance information on the reference solution, as a means to overcome the effects of ill-conditioning in orbit determination problems has been investigated. Specifically, for the case when ill-conditioning results from parameter non-observability and an appropriatea priori covariance is unknown, methods by which thea priori covariance is optimally chosen are presented. In problems where an inaccuratea priori covariance is provided, the optimal weighting of this data set is obtained. The feasibility of these ‘ridge-type’ solution methods is demonstrated by their application to a non-observable gravity field recovery simulation. In the simulation, both ‘ridge-type’ and conventional solutions are compared. Substantial improvement in the accuracy of the conventional solution is realized by the use of these ridge-type solution methods. The solution techniques presented in this study are applicable to observable, but ill-conditioned problems as well as the unobservable problems directly addressed. For the case of observable problems, the ridge-type solutions provide an improvement in the accuracy of the ordinary least squares solutions.

  8. Radioactive Waste...The Problem and Some Possible Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivier, Jean-Pierre

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear safety is a highly technical and controversial subject that has caused much heated debate and political concern. This article examines the problems involved in managing radioactive wastes and the techniques now used. Potential solutions are suggested and the need for international cooperation is stressed. (Author/MA)

  9. Numerical solutions for heat flow in adhesive lap joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, P. A.; Winfree, William P.

    1992-01-01

    The present formulation for the modeling of heat transfer in thin, adhesively bonded lap joints precludes difficulties associated with large aspect ratio grids required by standard FEM formulations. This quasi-static formulation also reduces the problem dimensionality (by one), thereby minimizing computational requirements. The solutions obtained are found to be in good agreement with both analytical solutions and solutions from standard FEM programs. The approach is noted to yield a more accurate representation of heat-flux changes between layers due to a disbond.

  10. A Solution Framework for Environmental Characterization Problems

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes experiences developing a grid-enabled framework for solving environmental inverse problems. The solution approach taken here couples environmental simulation models with global search methods and requires readily available computational resources of the grid ...

  11. The Pizza Problem: A Solution with Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Kathryn G.; Mast, Caleb J.

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses the issues of coaching and assessing. A preservice middle school teacher's unique solution to the Pizza problem was not what the professor expected. The student's solution strategy, based on sequences and a reinvention of Pascal's triangle, is explained in detail. (Contains 8 figures.)

  12. Problem-Solving Competitions: Just the Solution!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Tracy L.; Karnes, Frances A.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes competitions across a range of curricular areas that develop students' problem solving skills by setting authentic, real-world tasks. As individuals or members of a team, students in these competitions are challenged with finding solutions to problems faced not only in today's scientific and technological world, but also in…

  13. Solution to the quantum Zermelo navigation problem.

    PubMed

    Brody, Dorje C; Meier, David M

    2015-03-13

    The solution to the problem of finding a time-optimal control Hamiltonian to generate a given unitary gate, in an environment in which there exists an uncontrollable ambient Hamiltonian (e.g., a background field), is obtained. In the classical context, finding the time-optimal way to steer a ship in the presence of a background wind or current is known as the Zermelo navigation problem, whose solution can be obtained by working out geodesic curves on a space equipped with a Randers metric. The solution to the quantum Zermelo problem, which is shown here to take a remarkably simple form, is likewise obtained by finding explicit solutions to the geodesic equations of motion associated with a Randers metric on the space of unitary operators. The result reveals that the optimal control in a sense "goes along with the wind." PMID:25815915

  14. Lie Symmetry Analysis of AN Unsteady Heat Conduction Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Stefano, O.; Sammarco, S.; Spinelli, C.

    2010-04-01

    We consider an unsteady thermal storage problem in a body whose surface is subjected to heat transfer by convection to an external environment (with a time varying heat transfer coefficient) within the context of Lie group analysis. We determine an optimal system of two-dimensional Abelian Lie subalgebras of the admitted Lie algebra of point symmetries, and show an example of reduction to autonomous form. Also, by adding a small term to the equation, rendering it hyperbolic, we determine the first order approximate Lie symmetries, and solve a boundary value problem. The solution is compared with that of the parabolic equation.

  15. Quantum solution to the Byzantine agreement problem.

    PubMed

    Fitzi, M; Gisin, N; Maurer, U

    2001-11-19

    We present a solution to an old problem in distributed computing. In its simplest form, a sender has to broadcast some information to two receivers, but they have access only to pairwise communication channels. Unlike quantum key distribution, here the goal is not secrecy but agreement, and the adversary (one of the receivers or the sender himself) is not outside but inside the game. Using only classical channels this problem is provably impossible. The solution uses pairwise quantum channels and entangled qutrits. PMID:11736379

  16. The Hubble Space Telescope: Problems and Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villard, Ray

    1990-01-01

    Presented is the best understanding of the flaw discovered in the optics of the Hubble Space Telescope and the possible solutions to the problems. The spherical aberration in the telescope's mirror and its effect on the quality of the telescope's imaging ability is discussed. (CW)

  17. It's No Problem to Invent a Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graca, Rose M.

    2012-01-01

    A kindergarten class learns about inventions, inventors, and how to be an inventor. Engaging students in learning about pencil sharpeners led to researching and developing a lesson plan designed so students could learn how inventions are solutions to problems. Through identifying, researching, and brainstorming new inventions, the students…

  18. Nature, Human Nature, and Solutions to Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, B. C.

    This paper promotes an undergraduate course that would discuss the great ideas of Plato, St. Paul, Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Jean Paul Sartre, B. F. Skinner, and Konrad Lorenz. This course would help students understand human values and behaviors while focusing on historical, world, and national problems. Tentative solutions would then be…

  19. Asymptotic solution for heat convection-radiation equation

    SciTech Connect

    Mabood, Fazle; Ismail, Ahmad Izani Md; Khan, Waqar A.

    2014-07-10

    In this paper, we employ a new approximate analytical method called the optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM) to solve steady state heat transfer problem in slabs. The heat transfer problem is modeled using nonlinear two-point boundary value problem. Using OHAM, we obtained the approximate analytical solution for dimensionless temperature with different values of a parameter ε. Further, the OHAM results for dimensionless temperature have been presented graphically and in tabular form. Comparison has been provided with existing results from the use of homotopy perturbation method, perturbation method and numerical method. For numerical results, we used Runge-Kutta Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method. It was found that OHAM produces better approximate analytical solutions than those which are obtained by homotopy perturbation and perturbation methods, in the sense of closer agreement with results obtained from the use of Runge-Kutta Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method.

  20. Loop observations and the coronal heating problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Fuentes, M. C.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    Coronal heating continues to be one of the fundamental problems of solar physics. In recent years, instrumental advances and the availability of data from space observatories produced important progress, imposing restrictions to the models proposed. However, since the physical processes occur at spatial scales below the present instrumental resolution, definitive answers are still due. Since the corona is strongly dominated by the magnetic field, active region plasma is confined in closed structures or loops. These are the basic observable blocks of the corona, so the analysis of their structure and evolution is essential to understand the heating. In this report, mainly addressed to astronomers not necessarily familiarized with the subject, we review some of the proposed heating models and we pay special attention to the sometimes confusing and apparently contradictory observations of coronal loops. We discuss the consequences of these observations for some of the heating models proposed, in particular those based on impulsive events known as nanoflares.

  1. Method of successive approximations for the solution of certain problems in aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shvets, M E

    1951-01-01

    A method of successive approximations for the solution of problems in the fields of diffusion, boundary-layer flow, and heat-transfer is illustrated by solving problems in each of these fields. In most of the examples, the approximate solutions are compared with known accurate solutions and the agreement is shown to be good.

  2. Perturbation solutions of combustion instability problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Googerdy, A.; Peddieson, J., Jr.; Ventrice, M.

    1979-01-01

    A method involving approximate modal analysis using the Galerkin method followed by an approximate solution of the resulting modal-amplitude equations by the two-variable perturbation method (method of multiple scales) is applied to two problems of pressure-sensitive nonlinear combustion instability in liquid-fuel rocket motors. One problem exhibits self-coupled instability while the other exhibits mode-coupled instability. In both cases it is possible to carry out the entire linear stability analysis and significant portions of the nonlinear stability analysis in closed form. In the problem of self-coupled instability the nonlinear stability boundary and approximate forms of the limit-cycle amplitudes and growth and decay rates are determined in closed form while the exact limit-cycle amplitudes and growth and decay rates are found numerically. In the problem of mode-coupled instability the limit-cycle amplitudes are found in closed form while the growth and decay rates are found numerically. The behavior of the solutions found by the perturbation method are in agreement with solutions obtained using complex numerical methods.

  3. Analytical solutions to matrix diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kekäläinen, Pekka

    2014-10-06

    We report an analytical method to solve in a few cases of practical interest the equations which have traditionally been proposed for the matrix diffusion problem. In matrix diffusion, elements dissolved in ground water can penetrate the porous rock surronuding the advective flow paths. In the context of radioactive waste repositories this phenomenon provides a mechanism by which the area of rock surface in contact with advecting elements is greatly enhanced, and can thus be an important delay mechanism. The cases solved are relevant for laboratory as well for in situ experiments. Solutions are given as integral representations well suited for easy numerical solution.

  4. [Adherence problems during CPAP usage and solutions].

    PubMed

    Altıntaş, Nejat; Fırat, Hikmet

    2013-01-01

    CPAP treatment has a great importance in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and preventing complications due to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome however if it is not used by the patients, there is no point to diagnose obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. In this review, we wanted to inform the physicians who meet with this kind of patients often in their daily practice about the compliance problems in patients who use CPAP and solution ways. That is why we presented compliance problems in subtitles such as treatment modalities, demographic properties of patients, severity of disease, clostrophobia, patient, physician, healthcare profesional. PMID:23581270

  5. Composting of MSW: Needs, problems and solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, T.J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper is constructed of three complementary sections. The first section discusses the need for composting municipal solid waste (MSW). Too often as scientists and engineers the focus narrows to solve a specific problem within a system or to find the most cost effective solution. One habitually fails to examine concepts holistically due to tight schedules or work backlogs. One understands how things work and gets renumerated by the ability to scale up from the bench or pilot, keep costs down and to troubleshoot cranky processes. Sitting back to understand the reason why something like composting makes sense is a luxury one usually cannot afford. Section two discusses problems specific to MSW composting such as product quality, production stabilization, nuisance odors, and vector attraction. The final segment deals with some solutions to these difficulties.

  6. Nonclassical Symmetry Analysis of Heated Two-Dimensional Flow Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, Imran; Naz, Rehana; Khan, Muhammad Danish

    2015-12-01

    This article analyses the nonclassical symmetries and group invariant solution of boundary layer equations for two-dimensional heated flows. First, we derive the nonclassical symmetry determining equations with the aid of the computer package SADE. We solve these equations directly to obtain nonclassical symmetries. We follow standard procedure of computing nonclassical symmetries and consider two different scenarios, ξ1≠0 and ξ1=0, ξ2≠0. Several nonclassical symmetries are reported for both scenarios. Furthermore, numerous group invariant solutions for nonclassical symmetries are derived. The similarity variables associated with each nonclassical symmetry are computed. The similarity variables reduce the system of partial differential equations (PDEs) to a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) in terms of similarity variables. The reduced system of ODEs are solved to obtain group invariant solution for governing boundary layer equations for two-dimensional heated flow problems. We successfully formulate a physical problem of heat transfer analysis for fluid flow over a linearly stretching porous plat and, with suitable boundary conditions, we solve this problem.

  7. Sensitivity of optimum solutions to problem parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.; Barthelemy, J. F.; Ryan, K. M.

    1981-01-01

    Derivation of the sensitivity equations that yield the sensitivity derivatives directly, which avoids the costly and inaccurate perturb-and-reoptimize approach, is discussed and solvability of the equations is examined. The equations apply to optimum solutions obtained by direct search methods as well as those generated by procedures of the sequential unconstrained minimization technique class. Applications are discussed for the use of the sensitivity derivatives in extrapolation of the optimal objective function and design variable values for incremented parameters, optimization with multiple objectives, and decomposition of large optimization problems.

  8. Least bad solutions to the 'drugs problem'.

    PubMed

    Mugford, S

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines the current difficulties being faced in Australia by policy-makers attempting to regulate the non-medical use of illegal drugs, and it is suggested that the difficulties centre upon two aspects. First, existing prohibitions are unsuccessful, with use levels rising and, in some arenas (e.g. cocaine use in the USA), quite out of control. On the other hand, a move towards decriminalization or legalization is difficult because past propaganda has been so vehement that a change now apparently risks sending the wrong messages to young people. This dilemma means that there is no solution, including inertia, which is risk-free, nor is there one free of difficulties. It is thus relevant to think in terms of 'least bad' rather than 'best' when formulating a system to face these problems. The exploration of what this least bad solution might be begins with the examination of the prominent myths (such as 'the drug-free society', 'the evil pusher', 'the user as victim' and 'the young person as cultural dope') that hinder our reasoning. Secondly, by suggesting that, in a climate of increasing crime related to drugs, inability of prohibitions to control that use and escalating health risks attendant on use (including the AIDS problem), the central policy thrust must be harm reduction and damage minimization rather than illusory goals such as widespread abstinence. The paper concludes with a discussion of some relevant evidence on alternative options. PMID:16818303

  9. Monotonic solution of heterogeneous anisotropic diffusion problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aricò, Costanza; Tucciarelli, Tullio

    2013-11-01

    Anisotropic problems arise in various areas of science and engineering, for example groundwater transport and petroleum reservoir simulations. The pure diffusive anisotropic time-dependent transport problem is solved on a finite number of nodes, that are selected inside and on the boundary of the given domain, along with possible internal boundaries connecting some of the nodes. An unstructured triangular mesh, that attains the Generalized Anisotropic Delaunay condition for all the triangle sides, is automatically generated by properly connecting all the nodes, starting from an arbitrary initial one. The control volume of each node is the closed polygon given by the union of the midpoint of each side with the “anisotropic” circumcentre of each final triangle. A structure of the flux across the control volume sides similar to the standard Galerkin Finite Element scheme is derived. A special treatment of the flux computation, mainly based on edge swaps of the initial mesh triangles, is proposed in order to obtain a stiffness M-matrix system that guarantees the monotonicity of the solution. The proposed scheme is tested using several literature tests and the results are compared with analytical solutions, as well as with the results of other algorithms, in terms of convergence order. Computational costs are also investigated.

  10. Basic Health Physics: Problems and Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevelacqua, Joseph John

    1999-01-01

    Radiation litigation, the cleanup and decommissioning of nuclear facilities, radon exposure, nuclear medicine, food irradiation, stricter regulatory climate--these are some of the reasons health physics and radiation protection professionals are increasingly called upon to upgrade their skills. Designed to prepare candidates for the American Board of Health Physics Comprehensive examination (Part I) and other certification examinations, Basic Health Physics: Problems and Solutions introduces professionals in the field to radiation protection principles and their practical application in routine and emergency situations. It features more than 650 worked examples illustrating concepts under discussion along with an in-depth coverage of sources of radiation, standards and regulations, biological effects of ionizing radiation, instrumentation, external and internal dosimetry, counting statistics, monitoring and interpretations, operational health physics, transportation and waste, nuclear emergencies, and more. Reflecting for the first time the true scope of health physics at an introductory level, Basic Health Physics: Problems and Solutions gives readers the tools to properly evaluate challenging situations in all areas of radiation protection, including the medical, university, power reactor, fuel cycle, research reactor, environmental, non-ionizing radiation, and accelerator health physics.

  11. Travelers' Health: Problems with Heat and Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... for temperature swings. Prevention of Heat Disorders Heat Acclimatization Heat acclimatization is a process of physiologic adaptation ... there is no heat exposure. Physical Conditioning and Acclimatization Higher levels of physical fitness improve exercise tolerance ...

  12. An extended classical solution of the droplet growth problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Hallett, J.; Beesley, M.

    1981-01-01

    Problems of applying the classical kinetic theory to the growth of small droplets from vapor are examined. A solution for the droplet growth equation is derived which is based on the assumption of a diffusive field extending to the drop surface. The method accounts for partial thermal and mass accommodation at the interface and the kinetic limit to the mass and heat fluxes, and it avoids introducing the artifact of a discontinuity in the thermal and vapor field near the droplet. Consideration of the environmental fields in spherical geometry utilizing directional fluxes yields boundary values in terms of known parameters and a new Laplace transform integral.

  13. Landmine research: technology solutions looking for problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevelyan, James P.

    2004-09-01

    The global landmine problem came to the attention of researchers in the mid 1990's and by 1997 several advanced and expensive sensor research programs had started. Yet, by the end of 2003, there is little sign of a major advance in the technology available to humanitarian demining programs. Given the motivation and dedication of researchers, public goodwill to support such programs, and substantial research resources devoted to the problem, it is worth asking why these programs do not seem to have had an impact on demining costs or casualty rates. Perhaps there are factors that have been overlooked. This paper reviews several research programs to gain a deeper understanding of the problem. A possible explanation is that researchers have accepted mistaken ideas on the nature of the landmine problems that need to be solved. The paper provides several examples where the realities of minefield conditions are quite different to what researchers have been led to believe. Another explanation may lie in the political and economic realities that drive the worldwide effort to eliminate landmines. Most of the resources devoted to landmine clearance programs come from humanitarian aid budgets: landmine affected countries often contribute only a small proportion because they have different priorities based on realistic risk-based assessment of needs and political views of local people. Some aid projects have been driven by the need to find a market for demining technologies rather than by user needs. Finally, there is a common misperception that costs in less developed countries are intrinsically low, reflecting low rates paid for almost all classes of skilled labour. When actual productivity is taken into account, real costs can be higher than industrialized countries. The costs of implementing technological solutions (even using simple technologies) are often significantly under-estimated. Some political decisions may have discouraged thorough investigation of cost

  14. Iterative method for the numerical prediction of heat transfer in problems involving large differences in thermal conductivities

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkar, K.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Heat exchange that occurs between materials with largely differing thermal conductivities is commonly encountered in engineering practice.Conventional iterative solution methods perform poorly for the numerical solution for such problems. Results for computations for test problems indicate that the proposed solution procedure enables efficient solution of heat transfer problems with large conductivity differences for which the conventional line-by-line method proves ineffective.

  15. Inverse coefficient problems for one-dimensional heat transfer with a preservation of medium temperature condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oralsyn, Gulaym

    2016-08-01

    We study an inverse coefficient problem for a model equation for one-dimensional heat transfer with a preservation of medium temperature. It is needed (together with finding its solution) to find time dependent unknown coefficient of the equation. So, for this inverse problem, existence of an unique generalized solution is proved. The main difficulty of the considered problems is that the eigenfunction system of the corresponding boundary value problems does not have the basis property.

  16. Transfer of Solutions to Conditional Probability Problems: Effects of Example Problem Format, Solution Format, and Problem Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Alan F.; Van Haneghan, James P.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the results of a study examining how easily students are able to transfer frequency solutions to conditional probability problems to novel situations. University students studied either a problem solved using the traditional Bayes formula format or using a natural frequency (tree diagram) format. In addition, the example problem…

  17. Anomalous solutions to the strong CP problem.

    PubMed

    Hook, Anson

    2015-04-10

    We present a new mechanism for solving the strong CP problem using a Z_{2} discrete symmetry and an anomalous U(1) symmetry. A Z_{2} symmetry is used so that two gauge groups have the same theta angle. An anomalous U(1) symmetry makes the difference between the two theta angles physical and the sum unphysical. Two models are presented where the anomalous symmetry manifests itself in the IR in different ways. In the first model, there are massless bifundamental quarks, a solution reminiscent of the massless up quark solution. In the IR of this model, the η^{'} boson relaxes the QCD theta angle to the difference between the two theta angles-in this case zero. In the second model, the anomalous U(1) symmetry is realized in the IR as a dynamically generated mass term that has exactly the phase needed to cancel the theta angle. Both of these models make the extremely concrete prediction that there exist new colored particles at the TeV scale. PMID:25910109

  18. A Solution in Search of Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Ferrofluids offered vast-problem solving potential. Under license for the NASA technology, Dr. Ronald Moskowitz and Dr. Ronald Rosensweig formed Ferrofluids Corporation. First problem they found a solution for was related to the manufacture of semiconductor "chips" for use in electronic systems. They developed a magnetic seal composed of ferrofluid and a magnetic circuit. Magnetic field confines the ferrofluid in the regions between the stationary elements and the rotary shaft of the seal. Result is a series of liquid barriers that totally bar passage of contaminants. Seal is virtually wear-proof and has a lifetime measured in billions of shaft revolutions. It has reduced maintenance, minimizes "downtime" of production equipment, and reduces the cost of expensive materials that had previously been lost through seal failures. Products based on ferrofluid are exclusion seals for computer disc drives and inertia dampers for stepper motors. Uses are performance-improving, failure-reducing coolants for hi-fi loudspeakers. Other applications include analytical instrumentation, medical equipment, industrial processes, silicon crystal growing furnaces, plasma processes, fusion research, visual displays, and automated machine tools.

  19. Real time solution of parameterised problems via Model Reduction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnik, Sergio; Signorini, Marianna; Modesto, David

    2016-04-01

    Parameterised problems, in which the solution depends on space, time and a set of predefined parameters (e.g. material properties, boundary conditions, domain geometry, initial conditions, ...), can be solved with extremely high efficiency with Model Reduction techniques. Among these techniques the Proper Generalized Decomposition (PGD), has some very interesting features that will be investigated and presented in this work. The PGD technique involves two computational phases: first, one "offline" phase that can be computationally expensive but it is executed only once in a lifetime and, second, an "online" phase that is extremely fast and lightweight in computer resources. The possibilities of PGD are shown here via several example problems: i) heat transport parameterised in the material properties, boundary conditions and interface locations, ii) Stokes flow parameterised in the geometry domain, and iii) wave propagation parameterised in boundary conditions, material properties and interface locations. The extremely fast evaluation of PGD-solutions make them ideal to be used within inverse problems where the unknowns are the values of the parameters and the data consist in some partial observation of the solution field.

  20. ASME Heat Transfer Division: Proceedings. Volume 1: Heat transfer in microgravity systems, radiative heat transfer and radiative heat transfer in low-temperature environments, and thermal contact conductance and inverse problems in heat transfer; HTD-Volume 332

    SciTech Connect

    Gopinath, A.; Sadhal, S.S.; Jones, P.D.; Seyed-Yagoobi, J.; Woodbury, K.A.

    1996-12-31

    In the first section on heat transfer in microgravity, the papers cover phase-change phenomena and thermocapillary flows and surface effects. In the second section, several papers cover solution methods for radiative heat transfer while the rest cover heat transfer in low-temperature environments. The last section covers papers containing valuable information for thermal contact conductance of various materials plus papers on inverse problems in heat transfer. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume.

  1. ESPs: On- and offshore problems and solutions. Part 4

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, J.F.; Wells, M.R.; Bearden, J.L.; Wilson, L.; Shepler, R.; Lannom, R.

    1996-03-01

    This is the fourth in a multipart series on the usage of electrical submersible pumps. This installment deals with high temperature, design, power consumption, run life, sweep efficiency and miscellaneous problems. The final installment next month will include a complete list of references. The column heating ``ESPs`` refers to the number of ESPs reported installed. Although all of the topics in this series can be considered ways of increasing run life and solving problems, the Run Life table includes several topics that specifically help to increase run life. Two cases were identified where ESPs are used to increase the sweep efficiency of a flood. The Sweep Efficiency table summarizes case histories where fluids were produced without the production losses that normally plague high volume systems. The Miscellaneous-Overall table includes several solutions that were part of an overall plan to increase run life. These strategies included automation, running and pulling procedures and surveillance.

  2. Locating CVBEM collocation points for steady state heat transfer problems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hromadka, T.V., II

    1985-01-01

    The Complex Variable Boundary Element Method or CVBEM provides a highly accurate means of developing numerical solutions to steady state two-dimensional heat transfer problems. The numerical approach exactly solves the Laplace equation and satisfies the boundary conditions at specified points on the boundary by means of collocation. The accuracy of the approximation depends upon the nodal point distribution specified by the numerical analyst. In order to develop subsequent, refined approximation functions, four techniques for selecting additional collocation points are presented. The techniques are compared as to the governing theory, representation of the error of approximation on the problem boundary, the computational costs, and the ease of use by the numerical analyst. ?? 1985.

  3. Asymptotic traveling wave solution for a credit rating migration problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jin; Wu, Yuan; Hu, Bei

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, an asymptotic traveling wave solution of a free boundary model for pricing a corporate bond with credit rating migration risk is studied. This is the first study to associate the asymptotic traveling wave solution to the credit rating migration problem. The pricing problem with credit rating migration risk is modeled by a free boundary problem. The existence, uniqueness and regularity of the solution are obtained. Under some condition, we proved that the solution of our credit rating problem is convergent to a traveling wave solution, which has an explicit form. Furthermore, numerical examples are presented.

  4. Geometric Series: A New Solution to the Dog Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dion, Peter; Ho, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    This article describes what is often referred to as the dog, beetle, mice, ant, or turtle problem. Solutions to this problem exist, some being variations of each other, which involve mathematics of a wide range of complexity. Herein, the authors describe the intuitive solution and the calculus solution and then offer a completely new solution…

  5. DNA solution of a graph coloring problem.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yachun; Xu, Jin; Pan, Linqiang; Wang, Shiying

    2002-01-01

    The graph-theoretic parameter that has probably received the most attention over the years is the chromatic number. As is well-known, the coloring problem is an NP-Complete problem. In this paper, it has been solved by means of molecular biology techniques. The algorithm is highly parallel and has satisfactory fidelity. This work shows further evidence for the ability of DNA computing to solve NP-Complete problems. PMID:12086509

  6. TOUGH Simulations of the Updegraff's Set of Fluid and Heat Flow Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.J.; Pruess , K.

    1992-11-01

    The TOUGH code [Pruess, 1987] for two-phase flow of water, air, and heat in penneable media has been exercised on a suite of test problems originally selected and simulated by C. D. Updegraff [1989]. These include five 'verification' problems for which analytical or numerical solutions are available, and three 'validation' problems that model laboratory fluid and heat flow experiments. All problems could be run without any code modifications (*). Good and efficient numerical performance, as well as accurate results were obtained throughout. Additional code verification and validation problems from the literature are briefly summarized, and suggestions are given for proper applications of TOUGH and related codes.

  7. Using Problem-Solution Maps to Improve Students' Problem-Solving Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvaratnam, Mailoo; Canagaratna, Sebastian G.

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of problem solving as a learning tool is often diminished because students typically use only an algorithmic approach to get to the answer. We discuss a way of encouraging students to reflect on the solution to their problem by requiring them--after they have arrived at their solution--to draw solution maps. A solution map…

  8. Hurricanes as Heat Engines: Two Undergraduate Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyykko, Pekka

    2007-01-01

    Hurricanes can be regarded as Carnot heat engines. One reason that they can be so violent is that thermodynamically, they demonstrate large efficiency, [epsilon] = (T[subscript h] - T[subscript c]) / T[subscript h], which is of the order of 0.3. Evaporation of water vapor from the ocean and its subsequent condensation is the main heat transfer…

  9. Articulation and Transfer: Definitions, Problems, and Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, M. Irene; And Others

    Although the Maricopa County Community College District (MCCCD), in Arizona, maintains an exemplary relationship and numerous transfer agreements with the state's public universities, systematic and operational problems still exist. Systematic problems include the accumulation of excessive college credit hours; changes in applicable transfer…

  10. Potential Solutions to Jurisdictional Problems on Reservations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skibine, A. T.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The second of two articles on criminal jurisdiction on Indian reservations proposes federal and local remedies to the jurisdictional problems caused by the 1978 Supreme Court "Oliphant" decision. Problem-solving models including cross deputization/mutual aid agreements, tribal/state commissions on jurisdiction, legislative proposals, and judicial…

  11. Similarity solutions for phase-change problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canright, D.; Davis, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    A modification of Ivantsov's (1947) similarity solutions is proposed which can describe phase-change processes which are limited by diffusion. The method has application to systems that have n-components and possess cross-diffusion and Soret and Dufour effects, along with convection driven by density discontinuities at the two-phase interface. Local thermal equilibrium is assumed at the interface. It is shown that analytic solutions are possible when the material properties are constant.

  12. Optimization of the heating surface shape in the contact melting problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fomin, Sergei A.; Cheng, Shangmo

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical analysis of contact melting by the migrating heat source with an arbitrary shaped isothermal heating surface is presented. After the substantiated simplification, the governing equations are transformed to the convenient equations for engineering calculations relationships. Analytical solutions are used for numerical prediction of optimal shape of the heating surface. The problem is investigated for the constant and for temperature dependent physical properties of the melt.

  13. Celestial mechanics: Fresh solutions to the four-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2016-05-01

    Describing the motion of three or more bodies under the influence of gravity is one of the toughest problems in astronomy. The report of solutions to a large subclass of the four-body problem is truly remarkable.

  14. COYOTE: a finite-element computer program for nonlinear heat-conduction problems

    SciTech Connect

    Gartling, D.K.

    1982-10-01

    COYOTE is a finite element computer program designed for the solution of two-dimensional, nonlinear heat conduction problems. The theoretical and mathematical basis used to develop the code is described. Program capabilities and complete user instructions are presented. Several example problems are described in detail to demonstrate the use of the program.

  15. Some explicit solutions for a class of one-phase Stefan problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layeni, Olawanle P.; Johnson, Jesse V.

    2012-09-01

    Salva and Tarzia, [N.N. Salva, D.A. Tarzia, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 379 (2011) 240 - 244], gave explicit solutions of a similarity type for a class of free boundary problem for a semi-infinite material. In this paper, through an elementary approach and less stringent assumption on data, we obtain more general results than those given by their central result, and thereby construct explicit solutions for a wider class of Stefan problems with a type of variable heat flux boundary conditions. Further, explicit solutions of certain forced one-phase Stefan problems are given.

  16. The Numeric Solution of Eigenvalue Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, H.; Roth, K.

    1980-01-01

    Presents the mathematical background for solving eigenvalue problems, with illustrations of the applications in computer programing. The numerical matrix treatment is presented, with a demonstration of the simple HMO theory. (CS)

  17. Toward a solution of the coincidence problem

    SciTech Connect

    Campo, Sergio del; Herrera, Ramon; Pavon, Diego

    2008-07-15

    The coincidence problem of late cosmic acceleration constitutes a serious riddle with regard to our understanding of the evolution of the Universe. Here we argue that this problem may someday be solved - or better understood - by expressing the Hubble expansion rate as a function of the ratio of densities (dark matter/dark energy) and observationally determining the said rate in terms of the redshift.

  18. Equivalence of Two Solutions of Wahba's Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markley, F. Landis

    2013-12-01

    Many attitude estimation methods are based on an optimization problem posed in 1965 by Grace Wahba. All these methods yield the same optimal estimate, except for inevitable computer roundoff errors. This note shows shows that Shuster's Quaternion Estimator (QUEST) and Mortari's Estimator of the Optimal Quaternion (ESOQ) are essentially identical even in the presence of roundoff errors. It also shows some connections between two other algorithms for solving Wahba's problem: Davenport's q method and the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) method.

  19. Student Health Insurance: Problems and Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Robin

    2006-01-01

    Student health insurance experiences the same inflationary trends as employee benefits, but is rarely viewed as a significant direct cost to an institution, nor is the bill as high as the costs associated with employee health plans. Several long-term solutions and strategies that could help colleges to contain the ever-escalating cost of providing…

  20. Multigrid solution strategies for adaptive meshing problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the issues which arise when combining multigrid strategies with adaptive meshing techniques for solving steady-state problems on unstructured meshes. A basic strategy is described, and demonstrated by solving several inviscid and viscous flow cases. Potential inefficiencies in this basic strategy are exposed, and various alternate approaches are discussed, some of which are demonstrated with an example. Although each particular approach exhibits certain advantages, all methods have particular drawbacks, and the formulation of a completely optimal strategy is considered to be an open problem.

  1. The residential space heating problem in Lithuania

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakevicius, E.; Schipper, L.; Meyers, S.

    1996-02-01

    This report gives preliminary data on housing in Lithuania. We focus on the actual housing structure now that much of the stock has been privatized-an action that carries with it uncertainty regarding who is responsible for heating energy use, who is responsible for conservation measures and retrofitting, and who benefits from these actions. The paper then discusses some of the measures undertaken by both property owners and by governmental agencies to ameliorate poor heating conditions. The report summarizes results from a number of recent studies of the potential for energy savings in heating Lithuanian multifamily buildings. In closing we recommend actions that should be taken soon to ensure that Lithuanian housing moves along a path to greater energy efficiency. Some signals as to where this path should go can be taken from European countries with similar climatic conditions.

  2. Implicit solution of large-scale radiation diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P N; Graziani, F; Otero, I; Woodward, C S

    2001-01-04

    In this paper, we present an efficient solution approach for fully implicit, large-scale, nonlinear radiation diffusion problems. The fully implicit approach is compared to a semi-implicit solution method. Accuracy and efficiency are shown to be better for the fully implicit method on both one- and three-dimensional problems with tabular opacities taken from the LEOS opacity library.

  3. Viruses in Water: The Problem, Some Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerba, Charles P.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Increasing population and industrialization places heavy demands on water resources making recycling of wastewaters for domestic consumption inevitable. Eliminating human pathogenic viruses is a major problem of reclaiming wastewater. Present water treatment methods may not be sufficient to remove viruses. (MR)

  4. Solutions to the Triangular Bicycle Flags Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartweg, Kim

    2005-01-01

    Students in a fifth-grade general education class and a second-grade gifted class participated in the Triangular Bicycle Flags problem. The results indicated that providing students with geometric experiences at the correct van Hiele level is necessary for helping students move from one level of understanding to the next.

  5. Problem Solvers: Solutions--The Inaugural Address

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dause, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Fourth graders in Miss Dause's and Mrs. Hicks's mathematics classes at South Mountain Elementary School in Dillsburg, Pennsylvania, worked with the data from the Inauagural Address problem that was previously published published in the February 2013 issue of "Teaching Children Mathematics". This activity allowed students to…

  6. Student Absenteeism: Explanations, Problems and Possible Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truax, Cynthia T.

    Student absenteeism has become a major concern of educators, parents, and communities. Accordingly, this paper presents a series of annotations of articles addressing three aspects of this problem: (1) explanations of student absenteeism, including descriptions of the habitual offender, along with school, peer, and community influences; (2)…

  7. Molecular computation of solutions to combinatorial problems.

    PubMed

    Adleman, L M

    1994-11-11

    The tools of molecular biology were used to solve an instance of the directed Hamiltonian path problem. A small graph was encoded in molecules of DNA, and the "operations" of the computation were performed with standard protocols and enzymes. This experiment demonstrates the feasibility of carrying out computations at the molecular level. PMID:7973651

  8. English Preservice Teaching: Problems and Suggested Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naeem, Marwa Ahmed Refat

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the problems faced by Egyptian EFL prospective teachers during their first encounter with preservice teaching. The sample for the study included 135 prospective EFL teachers trained in five preparatory (middle) schools in Kafr El-Sheikh city, Egypt. At the end of their first year training course, the prospective…

  9. Training 101: Solutions to All Your Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrini, Cathy, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Two approaches to conflict resolution in the workplace are described. A systems approach questions the organization's systems rather than the behavior or motives of co-workers. Problem-solving retreats encourage team building and group cohesion and focus on long-term issues. (SK)

  10. Can False Memories Prime Problem Solutions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Mark L.; Garner, Sarah R.; Dewhurst, Stephen A.; Ball, Linden J.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that false memories can prime performance on related implicit and explicit memory tasks. The present research examined whether false memories can also be used to prime higher order cognitive processes, namely, insight-based problem solving. Participants were asked to solve a number of compound remote associate task…

  11. Problem Solvers: Solutions--Playing Basketball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    In this article, fourth grade Upper Allen Elementary School (Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania) teacher Jeffrey Smith describes his exploration of the Playing Basketball activity. Herein he describes how he found the problem to be an effective way to review concepts associated with the measurement of elapsed time with his students. Additionally, it…

  12. The Reading Problem: Some Sensible Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Kim

    1983-01-01

    Researchers from the Center for the Study of Reading at the University of Illinois assert that inadequate reading textbooks and the failure to teach reading comprehension in the primary grades contribute to reading comprehension problems in the upper grades. Shortcomings of textbooks are specified and methods for teaching reading comprehension are…

  13. Real Problems, Virtual Solutions: Engaging Students Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, A. Fiona

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author explains how she used online blogs with more than 263 students over a period of four semesters in an introductory social problems course. She describes how she uses blogs to enhance student participation, engagement, and skill building. Finally, she provides an overview of students' qualitative assessments of the blog…

  14. Cosmic strings - A problem or a solution?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, David P.; Bouchet, Francois R.

    1988-01-01

    The most fundamental issue in the theory of cosmic strings is addressed by means of Numerical Simulations: the existence of a scaling solution. The resolution of this question will determine whether cosmic strings can form the basis of an attractive theory of galaxy formation or prove to be a cosmological disaster like magnetic monopoles or domain walls. After a brief discussion of our numerical technique, results are presented which, though still preliminary, offer the best support to date of this scaling hypothesis.

  15. Exact optimal solution for a class of dual control problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Suping; Qian, Fucai; Wang, Xiaomei

    2016-07-01

    This paper considers a discrete-time stochastic optimal control problem for which only measurement equation is partially observed with unknown constant parameters taking value in a finite set of stochastic systems. Because of the fact that the cost-to-go function at each stage contains variance and the non-separability of the variance is so complicated that the dynamic programming cannot be successfully applied, the optimal solution has not been found. In this paper, a new approach to the optimal solution is proposed by embedding the original non-separable problem into a separable auxiliary problem. The theoretical condition on which the optimal solution of the original problem can be attained from a set of solutions of the auxiliary problem is established. In addition, the optimality of the interchanging algorithm is proved and the analytical solution of the optimal control is also obtained. The performance of this controller is illustrated with a simple example.

  16. The Effect of Alternative Solutions on Problem Solving Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shin-Yi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of instruction in alternative solutions on Taiwanese eighth-grade students' mathematical problem solving performance. This study was exploratory rather than experimental. Alternative-Solution Worksheet (ASW) was developed to encourage students' engagement with alternative solutions to…

  17. Ergonomics problems and solutions in biotechnology laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Coward, T.W.; Stengel, J.W.; Fellingham-Gilbert, P.

    1995-03-01

    The multi-functional successful ergonomics program currently implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will be presented with special emphasis on recent findings in the Biotechnology laboratory environment. In addition to a discussion of more traditional computer-related repetitive stress injuries and associated statistics, the presentation will cover identification of ergonomic problems in laboratory functions such as pipetting, radiation shielding, and microscope work. Techniques to alleviate symptoms and prevent future injuries will be presented.

  18. Marine geodesy - Problem areas and solution concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, N.

    1974-01-01

    This paper deals with a conceptional geodetic approach to solve various oceanic problems, such as submersible navigation under iced seas, demarcation/determination of boundaries in open ocean, resolving sea-level slope discrepancy, improving tsunami warning system, ecology, etc., etc. The required instrumentation is not described here. The achieved as well as desired positional accuracy estimates in open ocean for various tasks are also given.

  19. Computational solution of atmospheric chemistry problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jafri, J.; Ake, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    Extensive studies were performed on problems of interest in atmospheric chemistry. In addition to several minor projects, four major projects were performed and described (theoretical studies of ground and low-lying excited states of ClO2; ground and excited state potential energy surfaces of the methyl peroxy radical; electronic states ot the FO radical; and theoretical studies S02 (H2O) (sub n)).

  20. Bounding solutions of geometrically nonlinear viscoelastic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubstad, J. M.; Simitses, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    Integral transform techniques, such as the Laplace transform, provide simple and direct methods for solving viscoelastic problems formulated within a context of linear material response and using linear measures for deformation. Application of the transform operator reduces the governing linear integro-differential equations to a set of algebraic relations between the transforms of the unknown functions, the viscoelastic operators, and the initial and boundary conditions. Inversion either directly or through the use of the appropriate convolution theorem, provides the time domain response once the unknown functions have been expressed in terms of sums, products or ratios of known transforms. When exact inversion is not possible approximate techniques may provide accurate results. The overall problem becomes substantially more complex when nonlinear effects must be included. Situations where a linear material constitutive law can still be productively employed but where the magnitude of the resulting time dependent deformations warrants the use of a nonlinear kinematic analysis are considered. The governing equations will be nonlinear integro-differential equations for this class of problems. Thus traditional as well as approximate techniques, such as cited above, cannot be employed since the transform of a nonlinear function is not explicitly expressible.

  1. Bounding solutions of geometrically nonlinear viscoelastic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubstad, J. M.; Simitses, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    Integral transform techniques, such as the Laplace transform, provide simple and direct methods for solving viscoelastic problems formulated within a context of linear material response and using linear measures for deformation. Application of the transform operator reduces the governing linear integro-differential equations to a set of algebraic relations between the transforms of the unknown functions, the viscoelastic operators, and the initial and boundary conditions. Inversion either directly or through the use of the appropriate convolution theorem, provides the time domain response once the unknown functions have been expressed in terms of sums, products or ratios of known transforms. When exact inversion is not possible approximate techniques may provide accurate results. The overall problem becomes substantially more complex when nonlinear effects must be included. Situations where a linear material constitutive law can still be productively employed but where the magnitude of the resulting time dependent deformations warrants the use of a nonlinear kinematic analysis are considered. The governing equations will be nonlinear integro-differential equations for this class of problems. Thus traditional as well as approximate techniques, such as cited above, cannot be employed since the transform of a nonlinear function is not explicitly expressible.

  2. Symmetric periodic solutions of the Hill's problem. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batkhin, A. B.

    2013-07-01

    The planar circular Hill's problem is considered, as well as its limiting integrable variant called the Hénon problem, for which the original Hill's problem is a singular perturbation. Among solutions to the Hénon problem there are a countable number of generating solutions-arcs that are uniquely determined by the condition of successive passage through the origin of coordinates—singular point of equations of motion of the Hill's problem. Using the generating solutions-arcs as "letters" of a certain "alphabet", one can compose, according to some rules, the "words": generating solutions of families of periodic orbits of the Hill's problem. The sequence of letters in a word determines the order of orbit transfer from one invariant manifold to another, while the set of all properly specified words determine the system's symbolic dynamics.

  3. Cosmic strings: A problem or a solution

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, D.P.; Bouchet, F.R.

    1987-10-01

    The most fundamental issue in the theory of cosmic strings is addressed by means of Numerical Simulations: the existence of a scaling solution. The resolution of this question will determine whether cosmic strings can form the basis of an attractive theory of galaxy formation or prove to be a cosmological disaster like magnetic monopoles or domain walls. After a brief discussion of our numerical technique, results are presented which, though still preliminary, offer the best support to date of this scaling hypothesis. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Simple Solutions for Space Station Audio Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Throughout this summer, a number of different projects were supported relating to various NASA programs, including the International Space Station (ISS) and Orion. The primary project that was worked on was designing and testing an acoustic diverter which could be used on the ISS to increase sound pressure levels in Node 1, a module that does not have any Audio Terminal Units (ATUs) inside it. This acoustic diverter is not intended to be a permanent solution to providing audio to Node 1; it is simply intended to improve conditions while more permanent solutions are under development. One of the most exciting aspects of this project is that the acoustic diverter is designed to be 3D printed on the ISS, using the 3D printer that was set up earlier this year. Because of this, no new hardware needs to be sent up to the station, and no extensive hardware testing needs to be performed on the ground before sending it to the station. Instead, the 3D part file can simply be uploaded to the station's 3D printer, where the diverter will be made.

  5. Nonlinear Transient Problems Using Structure Compatible Heat Transfer Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Gene

    2000-01-01

    The report documents the recent effort to enhance a transient linear heat transfer code so as to solve nonlinear problems. The linear heat transfer code was originally developed by Dr. Kim Bey of NASA Largely and called the Structure-Compatible Heat Transfer (SCHT) code. The report includes four parts. The first part outlines the formulation of the heat transfer problem of concern. The second and the third parts give detailed procedures to construct the nonlinear finite element equations and the required Jacobian matrices for the nonlinear iterative method, Newton-Raphson method. The final part summarizes the results of the numerical experiments on the newly enhanced SCHT code.

  6. Numerical solution of large nonsymmetric eigenvalue problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saad, Youcef

    1988-01-01

    Several methods are discribed for combinations of Krylov subspace techniques, deflation procedures and preconditionings, for computing a small number of eigenvalues and eigenvectors or Schur vectors of large sparse matrices. The most effective techniques for solving realistic problems from applications are those methods based on some form of preconditioning and one of several Krylov subspace techniques, such as Arnoldi's method or Lanczos procedure. Two forms of preconditioning are considered: shift-and-invert and polynomial acceleration. The latter presents some advantages for parallel/vector processing but may be ineffective if eigenvalues inside the spectrum are sought. Some algorithmic details are provided that improve the reliability and effectiveness of these techniques.

  7. High order accurate solutions of viscous problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayder, M. E.; Turkel, Eli

    1993-01-01

    We consider a fourth order extension to MacCormack's scheme. The original extension was fourth order only for the inviscid terms but was second order for the viscous terms. We show how to modify the viscous terms so that the scheme is uniformly fourth order in the spatial derivatives. Applications are given to some boundary layer flows. In addition, for applications to shear flows the effect of the outflow boundary conditions are very important. We compare the accuracy of several of these different boundary conditions for both boundary layer and shear flows. Stretching at the outflow usually increases the oscillations in the numerical solution but the addition of a filtered sponge layer (with or without stretching) reduces such oscillations. The oscillations are generated by insufficient resolution of the shear layer. When the shear layer is sufficiently resolved then oscillations are not generated and there is less of a need for a nonreflecting boundary condition.

  8. The proton storage ring: Problems and solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    The Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) now operates with 35..mu..A at 20-Hz pulse repetition rate. Beam availability during 1988 suffered because of a number of problems with hardware reliability and from narrow operating margins for beam spill in the extraction line. A strong effort is underway to improve reliability with an eventual goal of obtaining beam availability in excess of 75%. Beam losses and the resulting component activation have limited operating currents to their present values. In detailed studies of the problem, loss rates were found to be approximately proportional to the circulating current and can be understood by a detailed accounting of emittance growth in the two-step injection process along with Coulomb scattering of the stored beam during multiple traversals of the injection foil. It is now apparent that the key to reducing losses is in reducing the number of foil traversals. A program of upgrades to reduce losses and improve the operating current is being planned. 8 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Food sustainability: problems, perspectives and solutions.

    PubMed

    Garnett, Tara

    2013-02-01

    The global food system makes a significant contribution to climate changing greenhouse gas emissions with all stages in the supply chain, from agricultural production through processing, distribution, retailing, home food preparation and waste, playing a part. It also gives rise to other major environmental impacts, including biodiversity loss and water extraction and pollution. Policy makers are increasingly aware of the need to address these concerns, but at the same time they are faced with a growing burden of food security and nutrition-related problems, and tasked with ensuring that there is enough food to meet the needs of a growing global population. In short, more people need to be fed better, with less environmental impact. How might this be achieved? Broadly, three main 'takes' or perspectives, on the issues and their interactions, appear to be emerging. Depending on one's view point, the problem can be conceptualised as a production challenge, in which case there is a need to change how food is produced by improving the unit efficiency of food production; a consumption challenge, which requires changes to the dietary drivers that determine food production; or a socio-economic challenge, which requires changes in how the food system is governed. This paper considers these perspectives in turn, their implications for nutrition and climate change, and their strengths and weaknesses. Finally, an argument is made for a reorientation of policy thinking which uses the insights provided by all three perspectives, rather than, as is the situation today, privileging one over the other. PMID:23336559

  10. School Budgeting: Problems and Solutions. AASA Critical Issues Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hymes, Donald L.

    School budget problems are discussed in 13 chapters, and solutions are suggested. Case studies present successful experiences with various problems while brief subsections summarize recommended actions. The first two chapters note that budget problems are worsening and trace the causes to tax revolts, state involvement in education, and the…

  11. Integrated Learning Systems: The Problems with the Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Edward

    1991-01-01

    Discusses problems with integrated learning systems (ILSs) in the schools, noting they are still an unproven solution to problems in education plagued by many serious limitations. The article recommends dealing with the fundamental problems of the educational system before investing time and money in ILS. (SM)

  12. Simulating water, solute, and heat transport in the subsurface with the VS2DI software package

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    The software package VS2DI was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for simulating water, solute, and heat transport in variably saturated porous media. The package consists of a graphical preprocessor to facilitate construction of a simulation, a postprocessor for visualizing simulation results, and two numerical models that solve for flow and solute transport (VS2DT) and flow and heat transport (VS2DH). The finite-difference method is used to solve the Richards equation for flow and the advection-dispersion equation for solute or heat transport. This study presents a brief description of the VS2DI package, an overview of the various types of problems that have been addressed with the package, and an analysis of the advantages and limitations of the package. A review of other models and modeling approaches for studying water, solute, and heat transport also is provided. ?? Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  13. Public problems: Still waiting on the marketplace for solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Gover, J.; Carayannis, E.; Huray, P.

    1997-10-01

    This report addresses the need for government sponsored R and D to address real public problems. The motivation is that a public benefit of the money spent must be demonstrated. The areas identified as not having appropriate attention resulting in unmet public needs include healthcare cost, cost and benefits of regulations, infrastructure problems, defense spending misaligned with foreign policy objectives, the crime problem, energy impact on the environment, the education problem, low productivity growth industry sectors, the income distribution problem, the aging problem, the propagation of disease and policy changes needed to address the solution of these problems.

  14. Methods for calculating conjugate problems of heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, E. K.; Dreitser, G. A.; Kostiuk, V. V.; Berlin, I. I.

    Methods are examined for calculating various conjugate problems of heat transfer in channels and closed vessels in cases of single-phase and two-phase flow in steady and unsteady conditions. The single-phase-flow studies involve the investigation of gaseous and liquid heat-carriers in pipes, annular and plane channels, and pipe bundles in cases of cooling and heating. General relationships are presented for heat transfer in cases of film, transition, and nucleate boiling, as well as for boiling crises. Attention is given to methods for analyzing the filling and cooling of conduits and tanks by cryogenic liquids; and ways to intensify heat transfer in these conditions are examined.

  15. Asymptotic expansions of solutions of the heat conduction equation in internally bounded cylindrical geometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ritchie, R.H.; Sakakura, A.Y.

    1956-01-01

    The formal solutions of problems involving transient heat conduction in infinite internally bounded cylindrical solids may be obtained by the Laplace transform method. Asymptotic series representing the solutions for large values of time are given in terms of functions related to the derivatives of the reciprocal gamma function. The results are applied to the case of the internally bounded infinite cylindrical medium with, (a) the boundary held at constant temperature; (b) with constant heat flow over the boundary; and (c) with the "radiation" boundary condition. A problem in the flow of gas through a porous medium is considered in detail.

  16. Chemicals in Household Products: Problems with Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glegg, Gillian A.; Richards, Jonathan P.

    2007-12-01

    The success of a regulatory regime in decreasing point-source emissions of some harmful chemicals has highlighted the significance of other sources. A growing number of potentially harmful chemicals have been incorporated into an expanding range of domestic household products and are sold worldwide. Tighter regulation has been proposed, and the European Commission has introduced the Regulation on the Registration, Evaluation, and Authorisation of Chemicals to address this concern. However, it is clear that in addition to the regulation, there is a potential to effect change through retailer and consumer attitudes and behaviours. Interviews were conducted with 7 key stakeholder groups to identify critical issues, which were then explored using a public survey questionnaire (1,008 respondents) and 8 subsequent focus groups. The findings demonstrated that the issue of chemicals in products is of concern to consumers for reasons of personal health rather than environmental protection. Key obstacles to the wider purchase of “green-alternative” products included perceived high cost and poor performance, lack of availability of products, and poor information concerning such products. Although improved regulation was seen as part of the solution, consumers must also play a role. It was clear from this study that consumers are not currently able to make informed choices about the chemicals they use but that they would be receptive to moving toward a more sustainable use of chemicals in the future if empowered to do so.

  17. Software for embedded processors: Problems and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogaerts, J. A. C.

    1990-08-01

    Data Acquistion systems in HEP experiments use a wide spectrum of computers to cope with two major problems: high event rates and a large data volume. They do this by using special fast trigger processors at the source to reduce the event rate by several orders of magnitude. The next stage of a data acquisition system consists of a network of fast but conventional microprocessors which are embedded in high speed bus systems where data is still further reduced, filtered and merged. In the final stage complete events are farmed out to a another collection of processors, which reconstruct the events and perhaps achieve a further event rejection by a small factor, prior to recording onto magnetic tape. Detectors are monitored by analyzing a fraction of the data. This may be done for individual detectors at an early state of the data acquisition or it may be delayed till the complete events are available. A network of workstations is used for monitoring, displays and run control. Software for trigger processors must have a simple structure. Rejection algorithms are carefully optimized, and overheads introduced by system software cannot be tolerated. The embedded microprocessors have to co-operate, and need to be synchronized with the preceding and following stages. Real time kernels are typically used to solve synchronization and communication problems. Applications are usually coded in C, which is reasonably efficient and allows direct control over low level hardware functions. Event reconstruction software is very similar or even identical to offline software, predominantly written in FORTRAN. With the advent of powerful RISC processors, and with manufacturers tending to adopt open bus architectures, there is a move towards commercial processors and hence the introduction of the UNIX operating system. Building and controlling such a heterogeneous data acquisition system puts a heavy strain on the software. Communications is now as important as CPU capacity and I

  18. Solution to the Cosmic Ray Anisotropy Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertsch, Philipp; Funk, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In the standard diffusive picture for transport of cosmic rays (CRs), a gradient in the CR density induces a typically small, dipolar anisotropy in their arrival directions. This is being widely advertised as a tool for finding nearby sources. However, the predicted dipole amplitude at TeV and PeV energies exceeds the measured one by almost 2 orders of magnitude. Here, we critically examine the validity of this prediction, which is based on averaging over an ensemble of turbulent magnetic fields. We focus on (1) the deviations of the dipole in a particular random realization from the ensemble average, and (2) the possibility of a misalignment between the regular magnetic field and the CR gradient. We find that if the field direction and the gradient direction are close to ˜90 ° , the dipole amplitude is considerably suppressed and can be reconciled with observations, which sheds light on a long-standing problem. Furthermore, we show that the dipole direction in general does not coincide with the gradient direction, thus hampering the search for nearby sources.

  19. Solution to the cosmic ray anisotropy problem.

    PubMed

    Mertsch, Philipp; Funk, Stefan

    2015-01-16

    In the standard diffusive picture for transport of cosmic rays (CRs), a gradient in the CR density induces a typically small, dipolar anisotropy in their arrival directions. This is being widely advertised as a tool for finding nearby sources. However, the predicted dipole amplitude at TeV and PeV energies exceeds the measured one by almost 2 orders of magnitude. Here, we critically examine the validity of this prediction, which is based on averaging over an ensemble of turbulent magnetic fields. We focus on (1) the deviations of the dipole in a particular random realization from the ensemble average, and (2) the possibility of a misalignment between the regular magnetic field and the CR gradient. We find that if the field direction and the gradient direction are close to ∼90°, the dipole amplitude is considerably suppressed and can be reconciled with observations, which sheds light on a long-standing problem. Furthermore, we show that the dipole direction in general does not coincide with the gradient direction, thus hampering the search for nearby sources. PMID:25635539

  20. Organ shortage crisis: problems and possible solutions.

    PubMed

    Abouna, G M

    2008-01-01

    The demand for organ transplantation has rapidly increased all over the world during the past decade due to the increased incidence of vital organ failure, the rising success and greater improvement in posttransplant outcome. However, the unavailability of adequate organs for transplantation to meet the existing demand has resulted in major organ shortage crises. As a result there has been a major increase in the number of patients on transplant waiting lists as well as in the number of patients dying while on the waiting list. In the United States, for example, the number of patients on the waiting list in the year 2006 had risen to over 95,000, while the number of patient deaths was over 6,300. This organ shortage crisis has deprived thousands of patients of a new and better quality of life and has caused a substantial increase in the cost of alternative medical care such as dialysis. There are several procedures and pathways which have been shown to provide practical and effective solutions to this crisis. These include implementation of appropriate educational programs for the public and hospital staff regarding the need and benefits of organ donation, the appropriate utilization of marginal (extended criteria donors), acceptance of paired organ donation, the acceptance of the concept of "presumed consent," implementation of a system of "rewarded gifting" for the family of the diseased donor and also for the living donor, developing an altruistic system of donation from a living donor to an unknown recipient, and accepting the concept of a controlled system of financial payment for the donor. As is outlined in this presentation, we strongly believe that the implementation of these pathways for obtaining organs from the living and the dead donors, with appropriate consideration of the ethical, religious and social criteria of the society, the organ shortage crisis will be eliminated and many lives will be saved through the process of organ donation and

  1. Penalized solutions to functional regression problems

    PubMed Central

    Harezlak, Jaroslaw; Coull, Brent A.; Laird, Nan M.; Magari, Shannon R.; Christiani, David C.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Recent technological advances in continuous biological monitoring and personal exposure assessment have led to the collection of subject-specific functional data. A primary goal in such studies is to assess the relationship between the functional predictors and the functional responses. The historical functional linear model (HFLM) can be used to model such dependencies of the response on the history of the predictor values. An estimation procedure for the regression coefficients that uses a variety of regularization techniques is proposed. An approximation of the regression surface relating the predictor to the outcome by a finite-dimensional basis expansion is used, followed by penalization of the coefficients of the neighboring basis functions by restricting the size of the coefficient differences to be small. Penalties based on the absolute values of the basis function coefficient differences (corresponding to the LASSO) and the squares of these differences (corresponding to the penalized spline methodology) are studied. The fits are compared using an extension of the Akaike Information Criterion that combines the error variance estimate, degrees of freedom of the fit and the norm of the bases function coefficients. The performance of the proposed methods is evaluated via simulations. The LASSO penalty applied to the linearly transformed coefficients yields sparser representations of the estimated regression surface, while the quadratic penalty provides solutions with the smallest L2-norm of the basis functions coefficients. Finally, the new estimation procedure is applied to the analysis of the effects of occupational particulate matter (PM) exposure on the heart rate variability (HRV) in a cohort of boilermaker workers. Results suggest that the strongest association between PM exposure and HRV in these workers occurs as a result of point exposures to the increased levels of particulate matter corresponding to smoking breaks. PMID:18552972

  2. Penalized solutions to functional regression problems.

    PubMed

    Harezlak, Jaroslaw; Coull, Brent A; Laird, Nan M; Magari, Shannon R; Christiani, David C

    2007-06-15

    Recent technological advances in continuous biological monitoring and personal exposure assessment have led to the collection of subject-specific functional data. A primary goal in such studies is to assess the relationship between the functional predictors and the functional responses. The historical functional linear model (HFLM) can be used to model such dependencies of the response on the history of the predictor values. An estimation procedure for the regression coefficients that uses a variety of regularization techniques is proposed. An approximation of the regression surface relating the predictor to the outcome by a finite-dimensional basis expansion is used, followed by penalization of the coefficients of the neighboring basis functions by restricting the size of the coefficient differences to be small. Penalties based on the absolute values of the basis function coefficient differences (corresponding to the LASSO) and the squares of these differences (corresponding to the penalized spline methodology) are studied. The fits are compared using an extension of the Akaike Information Criterion that combines the error variance estimate, degrees of freedom of the fit and the norm of the bases function coefficients. The performance of the proposed methods is evaluated via simulations. The LASSO penalty applied to the linearly transformed coefficients yields sparser representations of the estimated regression surface, while the quadratic penalty provides solutions with the smallest L(2)-norm of the basis functions coefficients. Finally, the new estimation procedure is applied to the analysis of the effects of occupational particulate matter (PM) exposure on the heart rate variability (HRV) in a cohort of boilermaker workers. Results suggest that the strongest association between PM exposure and HRV in these workers occurs as a result of point exposures to the increased levels of particulate matter corresponding to smoking breaks. PMID:18552972

  3. A History of Aerospace Problems, Their Solutions, Their Lessons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R. S.

    1996-01-01

    The positive aspect of problem occurrences is the opportunity for learning and a challenge for innovation. The learning aspect is not restricted to the solution period of the problem occurrence, but can become the beacon for problem prevention on future programs. Problems/failures serve as a point of departure for scaling to new designs. To ensure that problems/failures and their solutions guide the future programs, a concerted effort has been expended to study these problems, their solutions, their derived lessons learned, and projections for future programs. This includes identification of technology thrusts, process changes, codes development, etc. However, they must not become an excuse for adding layers upon layers of standards, criteria, and requirements, but must serve as guidelines that assist instead of stifling engineers. This report is an extension of prior efforts to accomplish this task. Although these efforts only scratch the surface, it is a beginning that others must complete.

  4. Numerical solution of control problems governed by nonlinear differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Heinkenschloss, M.

    1994-12-31

    In this presentation the author investigates an iterative method for the solution of optimal control problems. These problems are formulated as constrained optimization problems with constraints arising from the state equation and in the form of bound constraints on the control. The method for the solution of these problems uses the special structure of the problem arising from the bound constraint and the state equation. It is derived from SQP methods and projected Newton methods and combines the advantages of both methods. The bound constraint is satisfied by all iterates using a projection, the nonlinear state equation is satisfied in the limit. Only a linearized state equation has to be solved in every iteration. The solution of the linearized problems are done using multilevel methods and GMRES.

  5. Moving to solution: effects of movement priming on problem solving.

    PubMed

    Werner, K; Raab, M

    2013-01-01

    Embodied cognition theories suggest a link between bodily movements and cognitive functions. Given such a link, it is assumed that movement influences the two main stages of problem solving: creating a problem space and creating solutions. This study explores how specific the link between bodily movements and the problem-solving process is. Seventy-two participants were tested with variations of the two-string problem (Experiment 1) and the water-jar problem (Experiment 2), allowing for two possible solutions. In Experiment 1 participants were primed with arm-swing movements (swing group) and step movements on a chair (step group). In Experiment 2 participants sat in front of three jars with glass marbles and had to sort these marbles from the outer jars to the middle one (plus group) or vice versa (minus group). Results showed more swing-like solutions in the swing group and more step-like solutions in the step group, and more addition solutions in the plus group and more subtraction solutions in the minus group. This specificity of the connection between movement and problem-solving task will allow further experiments to investigate how bodily movements influence the stages of problem solving. PMID:23820945

  6. Rwanda. AIDS orphans: problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Descombes, M

    1993-01-01

    An estimated 300,000 of Rwanda's population of 7.5 million are infected with HIV. This includes 130,000 women and 20,000 children. Due to AIDS-related mortality, there are an estimated 62,000 orphans in the country, with 150,000 expected by 1997. War, adverse economic conditions, and ignorance of the minimal or nonexistent risk of being infected by these children, however, constrain extended biological and foster families from accepting these orphans into their homes. These children are very much alone and need to be placed in warm, caring households. Caritas Rwanda with the help of the Rwandan Ministry of Health launched the Family Homes Project in 1992 as an extension of the organization's general program of caring for AIDS-affected families in Rwanda in place since 1989. The program offers psychological counseling and assistance with regard to food, basic medicines, the payment of school fees, and funeral expenses. Family homes are structures designed to give orphans a background as similar as possible to that of the family which they have lost. Each harbors 7-10 children typically up to age 16 cared for by a woman who is also the biological mother of some of them. Caritas buys and equips an house in the Kigali suburbs or in one of the provincial towns. The mother is then provided a budget to pay for the daily household expenses of food, clothing, maintenance, water, and electricity. HIV-positive children lead in this setting, as far as their health permits, the same life as their healthy peers. When a serious health problem arises, the orphans are treated at the medical and social center, or the hospital if needed. Caritas Rwanda plans to open a care center staffed with a nurse and an additional outside social worker for orphans who require permanent treatment. Only several hundred children are presently in the program, but Rwanda has set an objective of assisting, by 1997, 50% of its AIDS orphans. PMID:12179314

  7. Inverse problems and optimal experiment design in unsteady heat transfer processes identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Artyukhin, Eugene A.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental-computational methods for estimating characteristics of unsteady heat transfer processes are analyzed. The methods are based on the principles of distributed parameter system identification. The theoretical basis of such methods is the numerical solution of nonlinear ill-posed inverse heat transfer problems and optimal experiment design problems. Numerical techniques for solving problems are briefly reviewed. The results of the practical application of identification methods are demonstrated when estimating effective thermophysical characteristics of composite materials and thermal contact resistance in two-layer systems.

  8. The Reasons and Solutions for Problems in Rural School Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qingyang, Guo

    2013-01-01

    Based on investigations in six midwestern provinces/autonomous regions, Hubei, Henan, Guangxi, Yunnan, Shaanxi, and Inner Mongolia, this article analyzes the reasons for problems in the process of consolidating rural schools and their solutions.

  9. Hamilton's Principle and Approximate Solutions to Problems in Classical Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlitt, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    Shows how to use the Ritz method for obtaining approximate solutions to problems expressed in variational form directly from the variational equation. Application of this method to classical mechanics is given. (MLH)

  10. Group Testing: Four Student Solutions to a Classic Optimization Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teague, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    This article describes several creative solutions developed by calculus and modeling students to the classic optimization problem of testing in groups to find a small number of individuals who test positive in a large population.

  11. On similarity solutions for turbulent and heated round jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Hwang, B. C.

    1986-01-01

    Commonly used empirical correlations for incompressible, heated round jets are shown to represent similarity solutions of the governing jet equations. These solutions give rise to self-similar eddy viscosities. Not all the similarity solutions are physically valid because some lead to zero eddy viscosities at the jet centerline. One physically valid solution is found to correlate best with round jet measurements and it gives a Gaussian error function description for the normalized mean velocity and temperature. Heat and momentum fluxes thus calculated are also in good agreement with measurements. Therefore, in addition to the classical similarity solution obtained by assuming constant eddy viscosity, another similarity solution to the jet equations is found where the eddy viscosity is self-similar.

  12. Parallel decomposition methods for the solution of electromagnetic scattering problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, Tom

    1992-01-01

    This paper contains a overview of the methods used in decomposing solutions to scattering problems onto coarse-grained parallel processors. Initially, a short summary of relevant computer architecture is presented as background to the subsequent discussion. After the introduction of a programming model for problem decomposition, specific decompositions of finite difference time domain, finite element, and integral equation solutions to Maxwell's equations are presented. The paper concludes with an outline of possible software-assisted decomposition methods and a summary.

  13. Mixed Boundary Value Problems for Stationary Magnetohydrodynamic Equations of a Viscous Heat-Conducting Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, Gennady

    2016-04-01

    We consider the boundary value problem for stationary magnetohydrodynamic equations of electrically and heat conducting fluid under inhomogeneous mixed boundary conditions for electromagnetic field and temperature and Dirichlet condition for the velocity. The problem describes the thermoelectromagnetic flow of a viscous fluid in 3D bounded domain with the boundary consisting of several parts with different thermo- and electrophysical properties. The global solvability of the boundary value problem is proved and the apriori estimates of the solution are derived. The sufficient conditions on the data are established which provide a local uniqueness of the solution.

  14. General Solution of the Kenamond HE Problem 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann

    2015-12-15

    A general solution for programmed burn calculations of the light times produced by a singlepoint initiation of a single HE region surrounding an inert region has been developed. In contrast to the original solutions proposed in References 1 and 2, the detonator is no longer restricted to a location on a Cartesian axis and can be located at any point inside the HE region. This general solution has been implemented in the ExactPack suite of exact solvers for verification problems.

  15. Optimal recovery of the solution of the heat equation from inaccurate data

    SciTech Connect

    Magaril-Il'yaev, G G; Osipenko, Konstantin Yu

    2009-06-30

    The problem of optimal recovery of the solution of the heat equation in the entire space at a fixed instant of time from inaccurate observations of this solution at some other instants of time is investigated. Explicit expressions for an optimal recovery method and its error are given. The solution of a similar problem with a priori information about the temperature distribution at some instants of time is also given. In all cases the optimal method uses information about at most two observations. Bibliography: 22 titles.

  16. A Procedure for Identifying Problems and Solutions in Desegregated Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhl, Norman P.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of a procedure (a modification of the Delphi technique) for identifying racially-related problems and achieving some consensus on solutions to these problems among students, parents, and the school staff. The students who participated attended six classes which were selected to provide a…

  17. Literacy: Problems and Solutions. A Resource Handbook for Correctional Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carsetti, Janet K.

    This resource handbook addresses the problem of illiteracy in correctional institutions and focuses on practical methods for improving the reading skills of offenders. It defines illiteracy, offers statistics on its incidence in correctional institutions, and lists barriers to overcoming the problem with suggested solutions. An overview of methods…

  18. Fast multigrid solution of the advection problem with closed characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Yavneh, I.; Venner, C.H.; Brandt, A.

    1996-12-31

    The numerical solution of the advection-diffusion problem in the inviscid limit with closed characteristics is studied as a prelude to an efficient high Reynolds-number flow solver. It is demonstrated by a heuristic analysis and numerical calculations that using upstream discretization with downstream relaxation-ordering and appropriate residual weighting in a simple multigrid V cycle produces an efficient solution process. We also derive upstream finite-difference approximations to the advection operator, whose truncation terms approximate {open_quotes}physical{close_quotes} (Laplacian) viscosity, thus avoiding spurious solutions to the homogeneous problem when the artificial diffusivity dominates the physical viscosity.

  19. Solution of the stochastic control problem in unbounded domains.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P.; Moore, J.

    1973-01-01

    Bellman's dynamic programming equation for the optimal index and control law for stochastic control problems is a parabolic or elliptic partial differential equation frequently defined in an unbounded domain. Existing methods of solution require bounded domain approximations, the application of singular perturbation techniques or Monte Carlo simulation procedures. In this paper, using the fact that Poisson impulse noise tends to a Gaussian process under certain limiting conditions, a method which achieves an arbitrarily good approximate solution to the stochastic control problem is given. The method uses the two iterative techniques of successive approximation and quasi-linearization and is inherently more efficient than existing methods of solution.

  20. Sensitivity Equation Derivation for Transient Heat Transfer Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Gene; Chien, Ta-Cheng; Sheen, Jeenson

    2004-01-01

    The focus of the paper is on the derivation of sensitivity equations for transient heat transfer problems modeled by different discretization processes. Two examples will be used in this study to facilitate the discussion. The first example is a coupled, transient heat transfer problem that simulates the press molding process in fabrication of composite laminates. These state equations are discretized into standard h-version finite elements and solved by a multiple step, predictor-corrector scheme. The sensitivity analysis results based upon the direct and adjoint variable approaches will be presented. The second example is a nonlinear transient heat transfer problem solved by a p-version time-discontinuous Galerkin's Method. The resulting matrix equation of the state equation is simply in the form of Ax = b, representing a single step, time marching scheme. A direct differentiation approach will be used to compute the thermal sensitivities of a sample 2D problem.

  1. Constructing high-pressure thermodynamic models: problems and possible solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosh, E.

    2013-12-01

    Conventional thermodynamic databases (e.g. Fabrichnaya et al. 2004, Holland and Powell 1998, 2011) consist of expressions for the Gibbs energy at ambient pressure, extended to higher pressures through the integration of some EOS (Equation Of State). While this is simple and straight-forward, such thermodynamic models are prone to produce manifestly unphysical predictions of negative thermal expansion and even negative heat capacity at high pressure. It has been shown (Brosh et al. 2007) that these errors arise not only from problems the EOS itself but also from incompatibilities between the EOS and the models used for extrapolations of the heat capacity at ambient pressure. One solution is a radical restructuring of thermodynamic databases. Instead of modelling the Gibbs energy, new databases can be based on modelling the Helmholtz energy using Debye-Mie-Grüneisen EOS. This approach is very successful for modelling solid substances (Jacobs 2009, 2010, Dorogokupets et al. 2007, 2012) but the Debye-Mie-Grüneisen equations of state are not easily applicable to liquids. Other difficulties stem from the treatment of the predicted mechanical instability above the normal melting point. However, the most severe difficulty with the utilization of the Debye-Mie-Grüneisen approach is that it is incompatible with the current ambient-pressure thermodynamic databases and one will not be able to use them as a basis for high pressure modelling. Another approach (Brosh et al. 2007) is based on an interpolation of the thermophysical properties between the ambient pressure models given in conventional databases and the Debye-Mie-Grüneisen model at extreme pressures. This avoids most of the spurious anomalies of conventional models. The limitations of the interpolation scheme are the inclusion of several model parameters whose physical essence is not well-defined and an underestimation of the heat capacity at high pressures. In this presentation, the predictions of the

  2. Leak testing of cryogenic components — problems and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, S. P.; Pandarkar, S. P.; Unni, T. G.; Sinha, A. K.; Mahajan, K.; Suthar, R. L.

    2008-05-01

    moderator pot was driving the MSLD out of range. Since it was very difficult to locate the leak by Tracer Probe Method, some other technique was ventured to solve the problem of leak location. Finally, it was possible to locate the leak by observing the change in Helium background reading of MSLD during masking/unmasking of the welded joints. This paper, in general describes the design and leak testing aspects of cryogenic components of Cold Neutron Source and in particular, the problems and solutions for leak testing of transfer lines and moderator pot.

  3. A genetic algorithm solution to the unit commitment problem

    SciTech Connect

    Kazarlis, S.A.; Bakirtzis, A.G.; Petridis, V.

    1996-02-01

    This paper presents a Genetic Algorithm (GA) solution to the Unit Commitment problem. GAs are general purpose optimization techniques based on principles inspired from the biological evolution using metaphors of mechanisms such as natural selection, genetic recombination and survival of the fittest. A simple Ga algorithm implementation using the standard crossover and mutation operators could locate near optimal solutions but in most cases failed to converge to the optimal solution. However, using the Varying Quality Function technique and adding problem specific operators, satisfactory solutions to the Unit Commitment problem were obtained. Test results for systems of up to 100 units and comparisons with results obtained using Lagrangian Relaxation and Dynamic Programming are also reported.

  4. Approximate solutions for certain bidomain problems in electrocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Peter R.

    2008-10-01

    The simulation of problems in electrocardiography using the bidomain model for cardiac tissue often creates issues with satisfaction of the boundary conditions required to obtain a solution. Recent studies have proposed approximate methods for solving such problems by satisfying the boundary conditions only approximately. This paper presents an analysis of their approximations using a similar method, but one which ensures that the boundary conditions are satisfied during the whole solution process. Also considered are additional functional forms, used in the approximate solutions, which are more appropriate to specific boundary conditions. The analysis shows that the approximations introduced by Patel and Roth [Phys. Rev. E 72, 051931 (2005)] generally give accurate results. However, there are certain situations where functional forms based on the geometry of the problem under consideration can give improved approximations. It is also demonstrated that the recent methods are equivalent to different approaches to solving the same problems introduced 20years earlier.

  5. Solution of Boundary-Value Problems using Kantorovich Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. A.; Hai, L. L.; Chuluunbaatar, O.; Vinitsky, S. I.; Derbov, V. L.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a computational scheme for solving the eigenvalue problem for an elliptic differential equation in a two-dimensional domain with Dirichlet boundary conditions. The solution is sought in the form of Kantorovich expansion over the basis functions of one of the independent variables with the second variable treated as a parameter. The basis functions are calculated as solutions of the parametric eigenvalue problem for an ordinary second-order differential equation. As a result, the initial problem is reduced to a boundary-value problem for a set of self-adjoint second-order differential equations for functions of the second independent variable. The discrete formulation of the problem is implemented using the finite element method with Hermite interpolation polynomials. The effciency of the calculation scheme is shown by benchmark calculations for a square membrane with a degenerate spectrum.

  6. Fuzzy α-minimum spanning tree problem: definition and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian; Chen, Lu; Wang, Ke; Yang, Fan

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the minimum spanning tree problem is investigated on the graph with fuzzy edge weights. The notion of fuzzy ? -minimum spanning tree is presented based on the credibility measure, and then the solutions of the fuzzy ? -minimum spanning tree problem are discussed under different assumptions. First, we respectively, assume that all the edge weights are triangular fuzzy numbers and trapezoidal fuzzy numbers and prove that the fuzzy ? -minimum spanning tree problem can be transformed to a classical problem on a crisp graph in these two cases, which can be solved by classical algorithms such as the Kruskal algorithm and the Prim algorithm in polynomial time. Subsequently, as for the case that the edge weights are general fuzzy numbers, a fuzzy simulation-based genetic algorithm using Prüfer number representation is designed for solving the fuzzy ? -minimum spanning tree problem. Some numerical examples are also provided for illustrating the effectiveness of the proposed solutions.

  7. Solution of second order quasi-linear boundary value problems by a wavelet method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Youhe; Wang, Jizeng

    2015-03-10

    A wavelet Galerkin method based on expansions of Coiflet-like scaling function bases is applied to solve second order quasi-linear boundary value problems which represent a class of typical nonlinear differential equations. Two types of typical engineering problems are selected as test examples: one is about nonlinear heat conduction and the other is on bending of elastic beams. Numerical results are obtained by the proposed wavelet method. Through comparing to relevant analytical solutions as well as solutions obtained by other methods, we find that the method shows better efficiency and accuracy than several others, and the rate of convergence can even reach orders of 5.8.

  8. Solution of mathematical programming formulations of subgame perfect equilibrium problems

    SciTech Connect

    Macal, C.M.; Hurter, A.P.

    1992-02-12

    Mathematical programming models have been developed to represent imperfectly competitive (oligopolistic) market structures and the interdependencies of decision-making units in establishing prices and production levels. The solution of these models represents an economic equilibrium. A subgame perfect equilibrium formulation explicitly considers that each agent`s strategies depend on the current state of the system; the state depends solely on previous decisions made by the economic agents. The structure of an industry-wide model that is formulated as a subgame perfect equilibrium problem is a matrix of simultaneous mathematical programming problems, where the rows represent time periods and the columns represent agents. This paper formally defines the subgame perfect equilibrium problem that includes mathematical programs for agent decision problems, and it characterizes the feasible space in a way that is conducive to the solution of the problem. The existence of equilibrium solutions on convex subspaces of the feasible region is proved, and this set is shown to contain the subgame perfect equilibrium solutions. A procedure for computing equilibrium solutions and systematically searching the subspaces is illustrated by a numerical example.

  9. Numerical solutions of acoustic wave propagation problems using Euler computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reports solution procedures for problems arising from the study of engine inlet wave propagation. The first problem is the study of sound waves radiated from cylindrical inlets. The second one is a quasi-one-dimensional problem to study the effect of nonlinearities and the third one is the study of nonlinearities in two dimensions. In all three problems Euler computations are done with a fourth-order explicit scheme. For the first problem results are shown in agreement with experimental data and for the second problem comparisons are made with an existing asymptotic theory. The third problem is part of an ongoing work and preliminary results are presented for this case.

  10. A boundary identification method for an inverse heat conduction problem with an application in ironmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredman, T. P.

    2004-12-01

    A boundary identification problem in inverse heat conduction is studied, based on data from internal measurement of temperature and heat flux. Formulated as a sideways heat conduction equation, a spatial continuation technique is applied to extend the solution to a known boundary condition at the desired boundary position. Recording the positions traversed in the continuation for each time instant yields the boundary position trajectory and hence the solution of the identification problem. A prospective application of the method can be found in the ironmaking blast furnace, where it is desired to monitor the thickness of the accreted refractory wall based on measurement of its internal state. Simulations featuring noisy measurement data demonstrate the feasibility of the identification method for blast furnace wall thickness estimation.

  11. Parallel solution of sparse one-dimensional dynamic programming problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1989-01-01

    Parallel computation offers the potential for quickly solving large computational problems. However, it is often a non-trivial task to effectively use parallel computers. Solution methods must sometimes be reformulated to exploit parallelism; the reformulations are often more complex than their slower serial counterparts. We illustrate these points by studying the parallelization of sparse one-dimensional dynamic programming problems, those which do not obviously admit substantial parallelization. We propose a new method for parallelizing such problems, develop analytic models which help us to identify problems which parallelize well, and compare the performance of our algorithm with existing algorithms on a multiprocessor.

  12. Solitary solutions to a relativistic two-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcinkevicius, R.; Navickas, Z.; Ragulskis, M.; Telksnys, T.

    2016-06-01

    Necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of solitary solutions to a generalized model of a two-body problem perturbed by small post-Newtonian relativistic term are derived in this paper. It is demonstrated that kink, bright and dark solitary solutions exist in the model, when the relativistic effects are treated as higher order perturbations. Numerical experiments are used to verify theoretical results.

  13. Elementary solutions of the quantum planar two-center problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González León, M. A.; Mateos Guilarte, J.; de la Torre Mayado, M.

    2016-05-01

    The quantum problem of an electron moving in a plane under the field created by two Coulombian centers admits simple analytical solutions for some particular intercenter distances. These elementary eigenfunctions, akin to those found by Demkov for the analogous three-dimensional problem, are calculated using the framework of quasi-exact solvability of a pair of entangled ODE's descendants from the Heun equation. A different but interesting situation arises when the two centers have the same strength. In this case completely elementary solutions do not exist.

  14. Expert and novice solutions of genetic pedigree problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackling, Mark W.; Lawrence, Jeanette A.

    This study compared the problem-solving performance of university genetics professors and genetics students, and therefore fits the expert versus novice paradigm. The subjects solved three genetic pedigree problems. Data were gathered using standard think-aloud protocol procedures. Although the experts did not differ from the novices in terms of the number of correct solutions obtained, there were significant differences favoring the experts in terms of the completeness and conclusiveness of the solutions. The experts identified more critical cues in the pedigrees which were used to generate and test hypotheses, they tested more hypotheses by assigning genotypes to individuals in the pedigrees, and were more rigorous than the novices in the falsification of alternative hypotheses. The experts varied their problem-solving strategy to suit the particular conditions of problems involving rare or common traits. Novices did nor recognize the need to make such modifications to their strategies.

  15. Solution of the determinantal assignment problem using the Grassmann matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karcanias, Nicos; Leventides, John

    2016-02-01

    The paper provides a direct solution to the determinantal assignment problem (DAP) which unifies all frequency assignment problems of the linear control theory. The current approach is based on the solvability of the exterior equation ? where ? is an n -dimensional vector space over ? which is an integral part of the solution of DAP. New criteria for existence of solution and their computation based on the properties of structured matrices are referred to as Grassmann matrices. The solvability of this exterior equation is referred to as decomposability of ?, and it is in turn characterised by the set of quadratic Plücker relations (QPRs) describing the Grassmann variety of the corresponding projective space. Alternative new tests for decomposability of the multi-vector ? are given in terms of the rank properties of the Grassmann matrix, ? of the vector ?, which is constructed by the coordinates of ?. It is shown that the exterior equation is solvable (? is decomposable), if and only if ? where ?; the solution space for a decomposable ?, is the space ?. This provides an alternative linear algebra characterisation of the decomposability problem and of the Grassmann variety to that defined by the QPRs. Further properties of the Grassmann matrices are explored by defining the Hodge-Grassmann matrix as the dual of the Grassmann matrix. The connections of the Hodge-Grassmann matrix to the solution of exterior equations are examined, and an alternative new characterisation of decomposability is given in terms of the dimension of its image space. The framework based on the Grassmann matrices provides the means for the development of a new computational method for the solutions of the exact DAP (when such solutions exist), as well as computing approximate solutions, when exact solutions do not exist.

  16. Advance directives: principles, problems, and solutions for physicians.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, B F; Humniski, A

    1997-04-01

    Given the passage of recent legislation, the appearance of common-law reports in Canada and the United States, and the practical problems of implementation of advance directives in health care, physicians should understand the principles and issues involved. In this article, the advantages, disadvantages, and practical solutions to the problems are explored. Family physicians, geriatricians, neurologists, and psychiatrists are most likely to be consulted about advance directives in health care. PMID:12382657

  17. Application of genetics knowledge to the solution of pedigree problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackling, Mark W.

    1994-12-01

    This paper reports on a study of undergraduate genetics students' conceptual and procedural knowledge and how that knowledge influences students' success in pedigree problem solving. Findings indicate that many students lack the knowledge needed to test hypotheses relating to X-linked modes of inheritance using either patterns of inheritance or genotypes. Case study data illustrate how these knowledge deficiencies acted as an impediment to correct and conclusive solutions of pedigree problems.

  18. Bin packing problem solution through a deterministic weighted finite automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala-Díaz, J. C.; Pérez-Ortega, J.; Martínez-Rebollar, A.; Almanza-Ortega, N. N.; Hidalgo-Reyes, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this article the solution of Bin Packing problem of one dimension through a weighted finite automaton is presented. Construction of the automaton and its application to solve three different instances, one synthetic data and two benchmarks are presented: N1C1W1_A.BPP belonging to data set Set_1; and BPP13.BPP belonging to hard28. The optimal solution of synthetic data is obtained. In the first benchmark the solution obtained is one more container than the ideal number of containers and in the second benchmark the solution is two more containers than the ideal solution (approximately 2.5%). The runtime in all three cases was less than one second.

  19. Problems encountered in solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, M.

    1979-01-01

    Report discussing various experiences of workers at Marshall Space Flight Center in developing solar heating and cooling systems is presented. Presents compilation of problems and their resolutions which can assist designers of solar-energy systems and prevent repetition of errors.

  20. Water--Problems and Solutions. A Report Concerning the Problems and Solutions of Negative Water Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan

    Outdoor leaders constantly face problems created by water shortage and, to act effectively, must thoroughly understand the body's use of water and the ways to delay dehydration when water shortage occurs. Dehydration begins when there is a negative water balance, or more water lost than ingested, and progresses from the stage of dryness, to the…

  1. On Exact Solutions of Novel Multistate Landau-Zener Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Aniket; Yuzbashyan, Emil

    A multistate Landau-Zener (MLZ) Hamiltonian is used to model numerous non-equilibrium experiments involving cold atoms, quantum dots and quantum dot molecules. We recently showed that all the known MLZ problems either reduce to the 2 × 2 Landau Zener problem or belong to a family of mutually commuting Hamiltonians (that are polynomial in time). Based on this classification we identify previously unknown MLZ problems, explicitly obtain their solutions and discuss relevant experimental scenarios. Supported in part by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.

  2. WATER CONSERVATION: LOCAL SOLUTIONS TO A GLOBAL PROBLEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water conservation issues are discussed. Local solutions to a global problem include changing old habits relating to the usage and abuse of water resources. While the suggested behavioral changes may not solve the world's pending water crisis, they may ease the impact of the l...

  3. New approach to the solution of quantum problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, F. W.; Rajagopal, A. K.

    1986-11-01

    New exact forms for the equation for the resolvent operator are presented which take into account strong-interaction effects. The advantages of the method are illustrated by the exact solution of a problem in which the potential contains a random element.

  4. Solution to the cosmological horizon problem proposed by Zee

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, M.D.

    1981-08-15

    Applying a theory of gravity with broken symmetry, Zee has suggested a solution to the cosmological horizon problem. His idea has been criticized on two independent grounds by Linde and by Sato. In this paper, we suggest answers to both these criticisms.

  5. Finding Solutions to Environmental Problems: A Process Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wert, Jonathan M.; Magnoli, Michael A.

    This guide is an attempt to provide a workable methodology for helping college students and citizen groups to identify the most pressing environmental problems in their communities and to find solutions to them. With some modification, it can also be used by high school students who are interested in independent or team studies. The monograph…

  6. Image Indexing and Retrieval: Some Problems and Proposed Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Graeme; Anderson, Douglas

    1996-01-01

    Image processing technology allows libraries to include photographs, paintings, monograph title pages, and maps in their databases. This article examines problems of and solutions to image indexing and retrieval, focusing on thesaurus-based indexing systems, visual thesauri and related hybrid systems, picture description languages, and image…

  7. Generic Problems or Solutions in Rural Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marrs, Lawrence W.

    While most rural special education leaders agree on the universality of certain problems (funding inadequacies, personnel recruitment/retention, transportation, low-incidence handicapped populations, staff development needs, resistance to change) in rural areas, no agreement exists regarding generalizable solutions which will work in all rural…

  8. Exact solution for an optimal impermeable parachute problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupu, Mircea; Scheiber, Ernest

    2002-10-01

    In the paper there are solved direct and inverse boundary problems and analytical solutions are obtained for optimization problems in the case of some nonlinear integral operators. It is modeled the plane potential flow of an inviscid, incompressible and nonlimited fluid jet, witch encounters a symmetrical, curvilinear obstacle--the deflector of maximal drag. There are derived integral singular equations, for direct and inverse problems and the movement in the auxiliary canonical half-plane is obtained. Next, the optimization problem is solved in an analytical manner. The design of the optimal airfoil is performed and finally, numerical computations concerning the drag coefficient and other geometrical and aerodynamical parameters are carried out. This model corresponds to the Helmholtz impermeable parachute problem.

  9. Adjoint optimization of natural convection problems: differentially heated cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saglietti, Clio; Schlatter, Philipp; Monokrousos, Antonios; Henningson, Dan S.

    2016-06-01

    Optimization of natural convection-driven flows may provide significant improvements to the performance of cooling devices, but a theoretical investigation of such flows has been rarely done. The present paper illustrates an efficient gradient-based optimization method for analyzing such systems. We consider numerically the natural convection-driven flow in a differentially heated cavity with three Prandtl numbers (Pr=0.15{-}7 ) at super-critical conditions. All results and implementations were done with the spectral element code Nek5000. The flow is analyzed using linear direct and adjoint computations about a nonlinear base flow, extracting in particular optimal initial conditions using power iteration and the solution of the full adjoint direct eigenproblem. The cost function for both temperature and velocity is based on the kinetic energy and the concept of entransy, which yields a quadratic functional. Results are presented as a function of Prandtl number, time horizons and weights between kinetic energy and entransy. In particular, it is shown that the maximum transient growth is achieved at time horizons on the order of 5 time units for all cases, whereas for larger time horizons the adjoint mode is recovered as optimal initial condition. For smaller time horizons, the influence of the weights leads either to a concentric temperature distribution or to an initial condition pattern that opposes the mean shear and grows according to the Orr mechanism. For specific cases, it could also been shown that the computation of optimal initial conditions leads to a degenerate problem, with a potential loss of symmetry. In these situations, it turns out that any initial condition lying in a specific span of the eigenfunctions will yield exactly the same transient amplification. As a consequence, the power iteration converges very slowly and fails to extract all possible optimal initial conditions. According to the authors' knowledge, this behavior is illustrated here

  10. Integrated Force Method Solution to Indeterminate Structural Mechanics Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Halford, Gary R.

    2004-01-01

    Strength of materials problems have been classified into determinate and indeterminate problems. Determinate analysis primarily based on the equilibrium concept is well understood. Solutions of indeterminate problems required additional compatibility conditions, and its comprehension was not exclusive. A solution to indeterminate problem is generated by manipulating the equilibrium concept, either by rewriting in the displacement variables or through the cutting and closing gap technique of the redundant force method. Compatibility improvisation has made analysis cumbersome. The authors have researched and understood the compatibility theory. Solutions can be generated with equal emphasis on the equilibrium and compatibility concepts. This technique is called the Integrated Force Method (IFM). Forces are the primary unknowns of IFM. Displacements are back-calculated from forces. IFM equations are manipulated to obtain the Dual Integrated Force Method (IFMD). Displacement is the primary variable of IFMD and force is back-calculated. The subject is introduced through response variables: force, deformation, displacement; and underlying concepts: equilibrium equation, force deformation relation, deformation displacement relation, and compatibility condition. Mechanical load, temperature variation, and support settling are equally emphasized. The basic theory is discussed. A set of examples illustrate the new concepts. IFM and IFMD based finite element methods are introduced for simple problems.

  11. Anti-anthropic solutions to the cosmic coincidence problem

    SciTech Connect

    Fedrow, Joseph M.; Griest, Kim E-mail: kgriest@ucsd.edu

    2014-01-01

    A cosmological constant fits all current dark energy data, but requires two extreme fine tunings, both of which are currently explained by anthropic arguments. Here we discuss anti-anthropic solutions to one of these problems: the cosmic coincidence problem- that today the dark energy density is nearly equal to the matter density. We replace the ensemble of Universes used in the anthropic solution with an ensemble of tracking scalar fields that do not require fine-tuning. This not only does away with the coincidence problem, but also allows for a Universe that has a very different future than the one currently predicted by a cosmological constant. These models also allow for transient periods of significant scalar field energy (SSFE) over the history of the Universe that can give very different observational signatures as compared with a cosmological constant, and so can be confirmed or disproved in current and upcoming experiments.

  12. Anthropic versus cosmological solutions to the coincidence problem

    SciTech Connect

    Barreira, A.; Avelino, P. P.

    2011-05-15

    In this paper, we investigate possible solutions to the coincidence problem in flat phantom dark-energy models with a constant dark-energy equation of state and quintessence models with a linear scalar field potential. These models are representative of a broader class of cosmological scenarios in which the universe has a finite lifetime. We show that, in the absence of anthropic constraints, including a prior probability for the models inversely proportional to the total lifetime of the universe excludes models very close to the {Lambda} cold dark matter model. This relates a cosmological solution to the coincidence problem with a dynamical dark-energy component having an equation-of-state parameter not too close to -1 at the present time. We further show that anthropic constraints, if they are sufficiently stringent, may solve the coincidence problem without the need for dynamical dark energy.

  13. Mixed boundary value problems for the stationary magnetohydrodynamics model of a viscous heat-conducting fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, G. V.

    2015-12-01

    The boundary value problem for the stationary magnetohydrodynamics model of a viscous heatconducting fluid considered under inhomogeneous mixed boundary conditions for an electromagnetic field and the temperature and Dirichlet condition for the velocity is investigated. This problem describes the flow of an electricaland heat-conducting liquid in a bounded three-dimensional domain the boundary of which consists of several parts with different thermoand electrophysical properties. Sufficient conditions imposed on the initial data to provide for global solvability of the problem and local uniqueness of its solution are established.

  14. A stable and high-order accurate conjugate heat transfer problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindström, Jens; Nordström, Jan

    2010-08-01

    This paper analyzes well-posedness and stability of a conjugate heat transfer problem in one space dimension. We study a model problem for heat transfer between a fluid and a solid. The energy method is used to derive boundary and interface conditions that make the continuous problem well-posed and the semi-discrete problem stable. The numerical scheme is implemented using 2nd-, 3rd- and 4th-order finite difference operators on Summation-By-Parts (SBP) form. The boundary and interface conditions are implemented weakly. We investigate the spectrum of the spatial discretization to determine which type of coupling that gives attractive convergence properties. The rate of convergence is verified using the method of manufactured solutions.

  15. On the solution of time-dependent problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdou, M. A.

    2005-10-01

    The time-dependent radiative transfer problems involving non-equilibrium coupling to the material temperature to differential equation and ballistic-diffusive equation have been solved by means of two different techniques, namely, flux-limited approach and maximum entropy method. The behaviour of the radiative intensity is shown graphically. Knowing the radiative intensity allows us to calculate directly some physical parameters such as the reflection function and heat flux that are numerically computed.

  16. Probabilistic representations of solutions of elliptic boundary value problem and non-symmetric semigroups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan-Zhong; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we use a probabilistic approach to show that there exists a unique, bounded continuous solution to the Dirichlet boundary value problem for a general class of second order non-symmetric elliptic operators L with singular coefficients, which does not necessarily have the maximum principle. The theory of Dirichlet forms and heat kernel estimates play a crucial role in our approach. A probabilistic representation of the non-symmetric semigroup {Tt } t ≥ 0 generated by L is also given.

  17. A More General Solution of the Kenamond HE Problem 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann

    2015-12-15

    A more general solution for programmed burn calculations of the light times produced by an unobstructed line-of-sight, multi-point initiation of a composite HE region has been developed. The equations describing the interfaces between detonation fronts have also been included. In contrast to the original solutions proposed in References 1 and 2, four of the detonators are no longer restricted to specific locations on a Cartesian axis and can be located at any point inside the HE region. For the proposed solution, one detonator must be located at the origin. The more general solution for any locations on the 2D y-axis or 3D z-axis has been implemented in the ExactPack suite of exact solvers for verification problems. It could easily be changed to the most general case outlined above.

  18. Lessons Learned During Solutions of Multidisciplinary Design Optimization Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Suna N.; Coroneos, Rula M.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    Optimization research at NASA Glenn Research Center has addressed the design of structures, aircraft and airbreathing propulsion engines. During solution of the multidisciplinary problems several issues were encountered. This paper lists four issues and discusses the strategies adapted for their resolution: (1) The optimization process can lead to an inefficient local solution. This deficiency was encountered during design of an engine component. The limitation was overcome through an augmentation of animation into optimization. (2) Optimum solutions obtained were infeasible for aircraft and air-breathing propulsion engine problems. Alleviation of this deficiency required a cascading of multiple algorithms. (3) Profile optimization of a beam produced an irregular shape. Engineering intuition restored the regular shape for the beam. (4) The solution obtained for a cylindrical shell by a subproblem strategy converged to a design that can be difficult to manufacture. Resolution of this issue remains a challenge. The issues and resolutions are illustrated through six problems: (1) design of an engine component, (2) synthesis of a subsonic aircraft, (3) operation optimization of a supersonic engine, (4) design of a wave-rotor-topping device, (5) profile optimization of a cantilever beam, and (6) design of a cvlindrical shell. The combined effort of designers and researchers can bring the optimization method from academia to industry.

  19. Numerical solution-space analysis of satisfiability problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Alexander; Hartmann, A. K.

    2010-11-01

    The solution-space structure of the three-satisfiability problem (3-SAT) is studied as a function of the control parameter α (ratio of the number of clauses to the number of variables) using numerical simulations. For this purpose one has to sample the solution space with uniform weight. It is shown here that standard stochastic local-search (SLS) algorithms like average satisfiability (ASAT) exhibit a sampling bias, as does “Metropolis-coupled Markov chain Monte Carlo” (MCMCMC) (also known as “parallel tempering”) when run for feasible times. Nevertheless, unbiased samples of solutions can be obtained using the “ballistic-networking approach,” which is introduced here. It is a generalization of “ballistic search” methods and yields also a cluster structure of the solution space. As application, solutions of 3-SAT instances are generated using ASAT plus ballistic networking. The numerical results are compatible with a previous analytical prediction of a simple solution-space structure for small values of α and a transition to a clustered phase at αc≈3.86 , where the solution space breaks up into several non-negligible clusters. Furthermore, in the thermodynamic limit there are, even for α=4.25 close to the SAT-UNSAT transition αs≈4.267 , always clusters without any frozen variables. This may explain why some SLS algorithms are able to solve very large 3-SAT instances close to the SAT-UNSAT transition.

  20. Numerical solution-space analysis of satisfiability problems.

    PubMed

    Mann, Alexander; Hartmann, A K

    2010-11-01

    The solution-space structure of the three-satisfiability problem (3-SAT) is studied as a function of the control parameter α (ratio of the number of clauses to the number of variables) using numerical simulations. For this purpose one has to sample the solution space with uniform weight. It is shown here that standard stochastic local-search (SLS) algorithms like average satisfiability (ASAT) exhibit a sampling bias, as does "Metropolis-coupled Markov chain Monte Carlo" (MCMCMC) (also known as "parallel tempering") when run for feasible times. Nevertheless, unbiased samples of solutions can be obtained using the "ballistic-networking approach," which is introduced here. It is a generalization of "ballistic search" methods and yields also a cluster structure of the solution space. As application, solutions of 3-SAT instances are generated using ASAT plus ballistic networking. The numerical results are compatible with a previous analytical prediction of a simple solution-space structure for small values of α and a transition to a clustered phase at α(c)≈3.86 , where the solution space breaks up into several non-negligible clusters. Furthermore, in the thermodynamic limit there are, even for α=4.25 close to the SAT-UNSAT transition α(s)≈4.267 , always clusters without any frozen variables. This may explain why some SLS algorithms are able to solve very large 3-SAT instances close to the SAT-UNSAT transition. PMID:21230614

  1. Application of Genetic Algorithms in Nonlinear Heat Conduction Problems

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Waqar A.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are employed to optimize dimensionless temperature in nonlinear heat conduction problems. Three common geometries are selected for the analysis and the concept of minimum entropy generation is used to determine the optimum temperatures under the same constraints. The thermal conductivity is assumed to vary linearly with temperature while internal heat generation is assumed to be uniform. The dimensionless governing equations are obtained for each selected geometry and the dimensionless temperature distributions are obtained using MATLAB. It is observed that GA gives the minimum dimensionless temperature in each selected geometry. PMID:24695517

  2. CHAPARRAL: A library for solving large enclosure radiation heat transfer problems

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, M.W.

    1995-08-01

    Large, three-dimensional enclosure radiation beat transfer problems place a heavy demand on computing resources such as computational cycles, memory requirements, disk I/O, and disk space usage. This is primarily due to the computational and memory requirements associated with the view factor calculation and subsequent access of the view factor matrix during solution of the radiosity matrix equation. This is a fundamental problem that constrains Sandia`s current modeling capabilities. Reducing the computational and memory requirements for calculating and manipulating view factors would enable an analyst to increase the level of detail at which a body could be modeled and would have a major impact on many programs at Sandia such as weapon and transportation safety programs, component survivability programs, energy programs, and material processing programs. CHAPARRAL is a library package written to address these problems and is specifically tailored towards the efficient solution of extremely large three-dimensional enclosure radiation heat transfer problems.

  3. Transient modeling/analysis of hyperbolic heat conduction problems employing mixed implicit-explicit alpha method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; D'Costa, Joseph F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of mixed implicit-explicit finite element formulations for hyperbolic heat conduction problems involving non-Fourier effects. In particular, mixed implicit-explicit formulations employing the alpha method proposed by Hughes et al. (1987, 1990) are described for the numerical simulation of hyperbolic heat conduction models, which involves time-dependent relaxation effects. Existing analytical approaches for modeling/analysis of such models involve complex mathematical formulations for obtaining closed-form solutions, while in certain numerical formulations the difficulties include severe oscillatory solution behavior (which often disguises the true response) in the vicinity of the thermal disturbances, which propagate with finite velocities. In view of these factors, the alpha method is evaluated to assess the control of the amount of numerical dissipation for predicting the transient propagating thermal disturbances. Numerical test models are presented, and pertinent conclusions are drawn for the mixed-time integration simulation of hyperbolic heat conduction models involving non-Fourier effects.

  4. Geometric projection filter: an efficient solution to the SLAM problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Paul M.; Durrant-Whyte, Hugh F.

    2001-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the simultaneous localization and map building (SLAM) problem. The SLAM problem asks if it is possible for an autonomous vehicle to start in an unknown location in an unknown environment and then to incrementally build a map of this environment while simultaneously using this map to compute absolute vehicle location. Conventional approaches to this problem are plagued with a prohibitively large increase in computation with the size of the environment. This paper offers a new solution to the SLAM problem that is both consistent and computationally feasible. The proposed algorithm builds a map expressing the relationships between landmarks which is then transformed into landmark locations. Experimental results are presented employing the new algorithm on a subsea vehicle using a scanning sonar sensor.

  5. The exact fundamental solution for the Benes tracking problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, Bhashyam

    2009-05-01

    The universal continuous-discrete tracking problem requires the solution of a Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov forward equation (FPKfe) for an arbitrary initial condition. Using results from quantum mechanics, the exact fundamental solution for the FPKfe is derived for the state model of arbitrary dimension with Benes drift that requires only the computation of elementary transcendental functions and standard linear algebra techniques- no ordinary or partial differential equations need to be solved. The measurement process may be an arbitrary, discrete-time nonlinear stochastic process, and the time step size can be arbitrary. Numerical examples are included, demonstrating its utility in practical implementation.

  6. Superlinear nonlocal fractional problems with infinitely many solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binlin, Zhang; Molica Bisci, Giovanni; Servadei, Raffaella

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we study the existence of infinitely many weak solutions for equations driven by nonlocal integrodifferential operators with homogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions. A model for these operators is given by the fractional Laplacian where s ∈ (0, 1) is fixed. We consider different superlinear growth assumptions on the nonlinearity, starting from the well-known Ambrosetti-Rabinowitz condition. In this framework we obtain three different results about the existence of infinitely many weak solutions for the problem under consideration, by using the Fountain Theorem. All these theorems extend some classical results for semilinear Laplacian equations to the nonlocal fractional setting.

  7. Solution methods for one-dimensional viscoelastic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubstad, John M.; Simitses, George J.

    1987-01-01

    A recently developed differential methodology for solution of one-dimensional nonlinear viscoelastic problems is presented. Using the example of an eccentrically loaded cantilever beam-column, the results from the differential formulation are compared to results generated using a previously published integral solution technique. It is shown that the results obtained from these distinct methodologies exhibit a surprisingly high degree of correlation with one another. A discussion of the various factors affecting the numerical accuracy and rate of convergence of these two procedures is also included. Finally, the influences of some 'higher order' effects, such as straining along the centroidal axis are discussed.

  8. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer in polymer solutions exposed to intermittent infrared radiation heating

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.J.; Lin, J.D.

    1998-06-01

    Drying is one of the essential steps in a number of industrial applications, such as the preserving of food and the drying of paint, pulp, and paper. The quality of paper tubes is significantly affected by the heat and mass transfer process. The drying of polymer solution plays a crucial role in the manufacturer of photographic film, synthetic fibers, adhesives, and a variety of other polymeric products. During drying of wet materials, simultaneous heat and mass transfer occurs both inside the medium and in the boundary layer of the drying agent. Drying is one of the most energy-consuming processes in the industrial sector and can also be very time consuming as, for example, in conventional convective drying by hot air, while minimum cost and energy consumption and maximum product quality are among the main concerns in industry today. Here, a theoretical study is performed that describes heat transfer and moisture variation while a polymer solution is exposed to high-intensity infrared radiation flux and/or an airflow. While the intermittent heating is considered, the authors investigate the influences of various radiation and convection parameters on the transfer of heat and moisture variation of coated layers on an optically thick substrate. During the tempering stage in the intermittent heating process, the convective mass transfer is included to simulate the ambient air in reality. The effects of radiation and convection parameters on the transfer processes are presented in terms of the rate of water content removal, heat transfer, and moisture distributions. Numerical results show that the rate of water removal from the polymer solution is dominated by both the adsorbed radiative heat energy and the distributions of water mass fraction in the polymer solution.

  9. Solution of Exterior Acoustic Problems by the Boundary Element Method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkup, Stephen Martin

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The boundary element method is described and investigated, especially in respect of its application to exterior two -dimensional Laplace problems. Both empirical and algebraic analyses (including the effects of approximation of the boundary and boundary functions and the precision of the evaluation of the discrete forms) are developed. Methods for the automatic evaluation of the discrete forms of the Laplace and Helmholtz integral operators are reviewed and extended. Boundary element methods for the solution of exterior Helmholtz problems with general (but most importantly Neumann) boundary conditions are reviewed and some are explicitly stated using a new notation. Boundary element methods based on the boundary integral equations introduced by Brakhage & Werner/ Leis/ Panich/ Kussmaul (indirect) and Burton & Miller (direct) are given prime consideration and implemented for three -dimensional problems. The influence of the choice of weighting parameter on the performance of the methods is explored and further guidance is given. The application of boundary element methods and methods based on the Rayleigh integral to acoustic radiation problems are considered. Methods for speeding up their solution via the boundary element method are developed. Library subroutines for the solution of acoustic radiation problems are described and demonstrated. Computational techniques for the problem of predicting the noise produced by a running engine are reviewed and appraised. The application of the boundary element method to low-noise engine design and in the design of noise shields is considered. The boundary element method is applied to the Ricardo crankcase simulation rig, which is an engine -like structure. A comparison of predicted and measured sound power spectra is given.

  10. Solution of exterior acoustic problems by the boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkup, Stephen Martin

    The boundary element method is described and investigated, especially in respect of its application to exterior two-dimensional Laplace problems. Both empirical and algebraic analyses (including the effects of approximation of the boundary and boundary functions and the precision of the evaluation of the discrete forms) are developed. Methods for the automatic evaluation of the discrete forms of the Laplace and Helmholtz integral operators are reviewed and extended. Boundary element methods for the solution of exterior Helmholtz problems with general (but most importantly Neumann) boundary conditions are reviewed and some are explicitly stated using a new notation. Boundary element methods based on the boundary integral equations introduced by Brakhage and Werner/Leis/Panich/Kussmaul (indirect) and Burton and Miller (direct) are given prime consideration and implemented for three-dimensional problems. The influence of the choice of weighting parameter on the performance of the methods is explored and further guidance is given. The application of boundary element methods and methods based on the Rayleigh integral to acoustic radiation problems are considered. Methods for speeding up their solution via the boundary element method are developed. Library subroutines for the solution of acoustic radiation problems are described and demonstrated. Computational techniques for the problem of predicting the noise produced by a running engine are reviewed and appraised. The application of the boundary element method to low-noise engine design and in the design of noise shields is considered. The boundary element method is applied to the Ricardo crankcase simulation rig, which is an engine-like structure. A comparison of predicted and measured sound power spectra is given.

  11. A multilayer method of fundamental solutions for Stokes flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, F.; Obrist, D.; Kleiser, L.

    2012-07-01

    The method of fundamental solutions (MFS) is a meshless method for the solution of boundary value problems and has recently been proposed as a simple and efficient method for the solution of Stokes flow problems. The MFS approximates the solution by an expansion of fundamental solutions whose singularities are located outside the flow domain. Typically, the source points (i.e. the singularities of the fundamental solutions) are confined to a smooth source layer embracing the flow domain. This monolayer implementation of the MFS (monolayer MFS) depends strongly on the location of the user-defined source points: On the one hand, increasing the distance of the source points from the boundary tends to increase the convergence rate. On the other hand, this may limit the achievable accuracy. This often results in an unfavorable compromise between the convergence rate and the achievable accuracy of the MFS. The idea behind the present work is that a multilayer implementation of the MFS (multilayer MFS) can improve the robustness of the MFS by efficiently resolving different scales of the solution by source layers at different distances from the boundary. We propose a block greedy-QR algorithm (BGQRa) which exploits this property in a multilevel fashion. The proposed multilayer MFS is much more robust than the monolayer MFS and can compute Stokes flows on general two- and three-dimensional domains. It converges rapidly and yields high levels of accuracy by combining the properties of distant and close source points. The block algorithm alleviates the overhead of multiple source layers and allows the multilayer MFS to outperform the monolayer MFS.

  12. Numerical identification of boundary conditions on nonlinearly radiating inverse heat conduction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murio, Diego A.

    1991-01-01

    An explicit and unconditionally stable finite difference method for the solution of the transient inverse heat conduction problem in a semi-infinite or finite slab mediums subject to nonlinear radiation boundary conditions is presented. After measuring two interior temperature histories, the mollification method is used to determine the surface transient heat source if the energy radiation law is known. Alternatively, if the active surface is heated by a source at a rate proportional to a given function, the nonlinear surface radiation law is then recovered as a function of the interface temperature when the problem is feasible. Two typical examples corresponding to Newton cooling law and Stefan-Boltzmann radiation law respectively are illustrated. In all cases, the method predicts the surface conditions with an accuracy suitable for many practical purposes.

  13. Algebraic solution for phase unwrapping problems in multiwavelength interferometry.

    PubMed

    Falaggis, Konstantinos; Towers, David P; Towers, Catherine E

    2014-06-10

    Recent advances in multiwavelength interferometry techniques [Appl. Opt.52, 5758 (2013)] give new insights to phase unwrapping problems and allow the fringe order information contained in the measured phase to be extracted with low computational effort. This work introduces an algebraic solution to the phase unwrapping problem that allows the direct calculation of the unknown integer fringe order. The procedure resembles beat-wavelength approaches, but provides greater flexibility in choosing the measurement wavelengths, a larger measurement range, and a higher robustness against noise, due to the ability to correct for errors during the calculation. PMID:24921139

  14. Explicit solutions of one-dimensional total variation problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makovetskii, Artyom; Voronin, Sergei; Kober, Vitaly

    2015-09-01

    This work deals with denosing of a one-dimensional signal corrupted by additive white Gaussian noise. A common way to solve the problem is to utilize the total variation (TV) method. Basically, the TV regularization minimizes a functional consisting of the sum of fidelity and regularization terms. We derive explicit solutions of the one-dimensional TV regularization problem that help us to restore noisy signals with a direct, non-iterative algorithm. Computer simulation results are provided to illustrate the performance of the proposed algorithm for restoration of noisy signals.

  15. Multiresolution strategies for the numerical solution of optimal control problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sachin

    There exist many numerical techniques for solving optimal control problems but less work has been done in the field of making these algorithms run faster and more robustly. The main motivation of this work is to solve optimal control problems accurately in a fast and efficient way. Optimal control problems are often characterized by discontinuities or switchings in the control variables. One way of accurately capturing the irregularities in the solution is to use a high resolution (dense) uniform grid. This requires a large amount of computational resources both in terms of CPU time and memory. Hence, in order to accurately capture any irregularities in the solution using a few computational resources, one can refine the mesh locally in the region close to an irregularity instead of refining the mesh uniformly over the whole domain. Therefore, a novel multiresolution scheme for data compression has been designed which is shown to outperform similar data compression schemes. Specifically, we have shown that the proposed approach results in fewer grid points in the grid compared to a common multiresolution data compression scheme. The validity of the proposed mesh refinement algorithm has been verified by solving several challenging initial-boundary value problems for evolution equations in 1D. The examples have demonstrated the stability and robustness of the proposed algorithm. The algorithm adapted dynamically to any existing or emerging irregularities in the solution by automatically allocating more grid points to the region where the solution exhibited sharp features and fewer points to the region where the solution was smooth. Thereby, the computational time and memory usage has been reduced significantly, while maintaining an accuracy equivalent to the one obtained using a fine uniform mesh. Next, a direct multiresolution-based approach for solving trajectory optimization problems is developed. The original optimal control problem is transcribed into a

  16. Solution of an optimal control lifting body entry problem by an improved method of perturbation functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, F., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents a solution to a complex lifting reentry three-degree-of-freedom problem by using the calculus of variations to minimize the integral of the sum of the aerodynamics loads and heat rate input to the vehicle. The entry problem considered does not have state and/or control constraints along the trajectory. The calculus of variations method applied to this problem gives rise to a set of necessary conditions which are used to formulate a two point boundary value (TPBV) problem. This TPBV problem is then numerically solved by an improved method of perturbation functions (IMPF) using several starting co-state vectors. These vectors were chosen so that each one had a larger norm with respect to show how the envelope of convergence is significantly increased using this method and cases are presented to point this out.

  17. Mathematical modeling of heat transfer problems in the permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gornov, V. F.; Stepanov, S. P.; Vasilyeva, M. V.; Vasilyev, V. I.

    2014-11-01

    In this work we present results of numerical simulation of three-dimensional temperature fields in soils for various applied problems: the railway line in the conditions of permafrost for different geometries, the horizontal tunnel underground storage and greenhouses of various designs in the Far North. Mathematical model of the process is described by a nonstationary heat equation with phase transitions of pore water. The numerical realization of the problem is based on the finite element method using a library of scientific computing FEniCS. For numerical calculations we use high-performance computing systems.

  18. Baggie: A unique solution to an orbiter icing problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walkover, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    The orbiter icing problem, located in two lower surface mold line cavities, was solved. These two cavities are open during Shuttle ground operations and ascent, and are then closed after orbit insertion. If not protected, these cavities may be coated with ice, which may be detrimental to the adjacent thermal protection system (TPS) tiles if the ice breaks up during ascent, and may hinder the closing of the cavity doors if the ice does not break up. The problem of ice in these cavities was solved by the use of a passive mechanism called baggie, which is purge curtain used to enclose the cavity and is used in conjunction with gaseous nitrogen as the local purge gas. The baggie, the final solution, is unique in its simplicity, but its design and development were not. The final baggie design and its development testing are discussed. Also discussed are the baggie concepts and other solutions not used.

  19. Spectral solution of acoustic wave-propagation problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopriva, David A.

    1990-01-01

    The Chebyshev spectral collocation solution of acoustic wave propagation problems is considered. It is shown that the phase errors decay exponentially fast and that the number of points per wavelength is not sufficient to estimate the phase accuracy. Applications include linear propagation of a sinusoidal acoustic wavetrain in two space dimensions, and the interaction of a sound wave with the bow shock formed by placing a cylinder in a uniform Mach 4 supersonic free stream.

  20. Inverse heat transfer problem in digital temperature control in plate fin and tube heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taler, Dawid; Sury, Adam

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the paper is a steady-state inverse heat transfer problem for plate-fin and tube heat exchangers. The objective of the process control is to adjust the number of fan revolutions per minute so that the water temperature at the heat exchanger outlet is equal to a preset value. Two control techniques were developed. The first is based on the presented mathematical model of the heat exchanger while the second is a digital proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control. The first procedure is very stable. The digital PID controller becomes unstable if the water volumetric flow rate changes significantly. The developed techniques were implemented in digital control system of the water exit temperature in a plate fin and tube heat exchanger. The measured exit temperature of the water was very close to the set value of the temperature if the first method was used. The experiments showed that the PID controller works also well but becomes frequently unstable.

  1. An Improved Differential Evolution Solution for Software Project Scheduling Problem

    PubMed Central

    Biju, A. C.; Victoire, T. Aruldoss Albert; Mohanasundaram, Kumaresan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a differential evolution (DE) method for the software project scheduling problem (SPSP). The interest on finding a more efficient solution technique for SPSP is always a topic of interest due to the fact of ever growing challenges faced by the software industry. The curse of dimensionality is introduced in the scheduling problem by ever increasing software assignments and the number of staff who handles it. Thus the SPSP is a class of NP-hard problem, which requires a rigorous solution procedure which guarantees a reasonably better solution. Differential evolution is a direct search stochastic optimization technique that is fairly fast and reasonably robust. It is also capable of handling nondifferentiable, nonlinear, and multimodal objective functions like SPSP. This paper proposes a refined DE where a new mutation mechanism is introduced. The superiority of the proposed method is experimented and demonstrated by solving the SPSP on 50 random instances and the results are compared with some of the techniques in the literature. PMID:26495419

  2. Near earth propagation of distributed sensors: problems and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wert, R.; Goroch, A.; Worthington, E.; Chan, K.; Tremper, D.; Schuette, L.

    2006-05-01

    Both the military and consumer sectors are driving towards distributed networked sensors. A major stumbling block to deployment of these sensors is the radio frequency (RF) propagation environment within a few wavelengths of the earth. Increasing transmit power (battery consumption) is not the practical solution to the problem. This paper will discuss some aspects of the near earth propagation (NEP) problem and provide a few solutions. When radiating near the earth the communications link is subjected to a list of physical impairments. On the list are the expected Fresnel region encroachment and multipath reflections along with the intriguing radiation pattern changes and near earth boundary layer perturbations. A significant amount of data has been collected on NEP. Disturbances in the NEP atmosphere have a time varying attenuation related to the solar radiation (insolation). Solutions, or workarounds, to the near earth propagation problem hinge on dynamic adaptive RF elements. Adaptive RF elements will allow the distributed sensor to direct energy, beam form, impedance correct, increase communication efficiency, and decrease battery consumption. Small electrically controllable elements are under development to enable antenna impedance matching in a dynamic environment. Additionally, small dynamic beam forming antennas will be developed to focus RF energy in the direction of need. By creating provisions for decreasing the output RF power to the level required, battery consumption can be reduced. With the addition of adaptive RF elements, distributed autonomous networked sensors can become a reality within a few centimeters of the earth.

  3. Massively parallel solution of the assignment problem. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wein, J.; Zenios, S.

    1990-12-01

    In this paper we discuss the design, implementation and effectiveness of massively parallel algorithms for the solution of large-scale assignment problems. In particular, we study the auction algorithms of Bertsekas, an algorithm based on the method of multipliers of Hestenes and Powell, and an algorithm based on the alternating direction method of multipliers of Eckstein. We discuss alternative approaches to the massively parallel implementation of the auction algorithm, including Jacobi, Gauss-Seidel and a hybrid scheme. The hybrid scheme, in particular, exploits two different levels of parallelism and an efficient way of communicating the data between them without the need to perform general router operations across the hypercube network. We then study the performance of massively parallel implementations of two methods of multipliers. Implementations are carried out on the Connection Machine CM-2, and the algorithms are evaluated empirically with the solution of large scale problems. The hybrid scheme significantly outperforms all of the other methods and gives the best computational results to date for a massively parallel solution to this problem.

  4. HEAP: Heat Energy Analysis Program, a computer model simulating solar receivers. [solving the heat transfer problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, F. L.

    1979-01-01

    A computer program which can distinguish between different receiver designs, and predict transient performance under variable solar flux, or ambient temperatures, etc. has a basic structure that fits a general heat transfer problem, but with specific features that are custom-made for solar receivers. The code is written in MBASIC computer language. The methodology followed in solving the heat transfer problem is explained. A program flow chart, an explanation of input and output tables, and an example of the simulation of a cavity-type solar receiver are included.

  5. Topological inversion for solution of geodesy-constrained geophysical problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltogianni, Vasso; Stiros, Stathis

    2015-04-01

    Geodetic data, mostly GPS observations, permit to measure displacements of selected points around activated faults and volcanoes, and on the basis of geophysical models, to model the underlying physical processes. This requires inversion of redundant systems of highly non-linear equations with >3 unknowns; a situation analogous to the adjustment of geodetic networks. However, in geophysical problems inversion cannot be based on conventional least-squares techniques, and is based on numerical inversion techniques (a priori fixing of some variables, optimization in steps with values of two variables each time to be regarded fixed, random search in the vicinity of approximate solutions). Still these techniques lead to solutions trapped in local minima, to correlated estimates and to solutions with poor error control (usually sampling-based approaches). To overcome these problems, a numerical-topological, grid-search based technique in the RN space is proposed (N the number of unknown variables). This technique is in fact a generalization and refinement of techniques used in lighthouse positioning and in some cases of low-accuracy 2-D positioning using Wi-Fi etc. The basic concept is to assume discrete possible ranges of each variable, and from these ranges to define a grid G in the RN space, with some of the gridpoints to approximate the true solutions of the system. Each point of hyper-grid G is then tested whether it satisfies the observations, given their uncertainty level, and successful grid points define a sub-space of G containing the true solutions. The optimal (minimal) space containing one or more solutions is obtained using a trial-and-error approach, and a single optimization factor. From this essentially deterministic identification of the set of gridpoints satisfying the system of equations, at a following step, a stochastic optimal solution is computed corresponding to the center of gravity of this set of gridpoints. This solution corresponds to a

  6. Periodic solutions about the collinear Lagrangian solution in the general problem of three bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broucke, R.; Davoust, E.; Anderson, J. D.; Lass, H.; Blitzer, L.

    1981-01-01

    The article describes the solutions near Lagrange's circular collinear configuration in the planar problem of three bodies with three finite masses. The article begins with a detailed review of the properties of Lagrange's collinear solution. Lagrange's quintic equation is derived and several expressions are given for the angular velocity of the rotating frame. The equations of motion are then linearized near the circular collinear solution, and the characteristic equation is also derived in detail. The different types of roots and their corresponding solutions are discussed. The special case of two equal outer masses receives special attention, as well as the special case of two small outer masses. Finally, the fundamental family of periodic solutions is extended by numerical integration all the way up to and past a binary collision orbit. The stability and the bifurcations of this family are briefly enumerated.

  7. Green's function of a heat problem with a periodic boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erzhanov, Nurzhan E.

    2016-08-01

    In the paper, a nonlocal initial-boundary value problem for a non-homogeneous one-dimensional heat equation is considered. The domain under consideration is a rectangle. The classical initial condition with respect to t is put. A nonlocal periodic boundary condition by a spatial variable x is put. It is well-known that a solution of problem can be constructed in the form of convergent orthonormal series according to eigenfunctions of a spectral problem for an operator of multiple differentiation with periodic boundary conditions. Therefore Green's function can be also written in the form of an infinite series with respect to trigonometric functions (Fourier series). For classical first and second initial-boundary value problems there also exists a second representation of the Green's function by Jacobi function. In this paper we find the representation of the Green's function of the nonlocal initial-boundary value problem with periodic boundary conditions in the form of series according to exponents.

  8. North Dakota's Centennial Quilt and Problem Solvers: Solutions: The Library Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Marian

    2010-01-01

    Quilt investigations, such as the Barn quilt problem in the December 2008/January 2009 issue of "Teaching Children Mathematics" and its solutions in last month's issue, can spark interdisciplinary pursuits for teachers and exciting connections for the full range of elementary school students. This month, North Dakota's centennial quilt problem…

  9. Numerical Solution of the k-Eigenvalue Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Steven Paul

    2011-12-01

    Obtaining solutions to the k-eigenvalue form of the radiation transport equation is an important topic in the design and analysis of nuclear reactors. Although this has been an area of active interest in the nuclear engineering community for several decades, to date no truly satisfactory solution strategies exist. In general, existing techniques are either slow to converge for difficult problems or suffer from stability and robustness issues that can cause solvers to diverge for some problems. This work provides a comparison between a variety of methods and introduces a new strategy based on the Davidson method that has been used in other fields for many years but never for this problem. The Davidson method offers an alternative to the nested iteration structure inherent to standard approaches and allows expensive linear solvers to be replaced by a potentially cheap preconditioner. To fill the role of this preconditioner, a strategy based on a multigrid treatment of the energy variable is developed. Numerical experiments using the 2-D NEWT transport package are presented, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed strategy.

  10. Novel Problem Solving - The NASA Solution Mechanism Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeton, Kathryn E.; Richard, Elizabeth E.; Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past five years, the Human Health and Performance (HH&P) Directorate at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) has conducted a number of pilot and ongoing projects in collaboration and open innovation. These projects involved the use of novel open innovation competitions that sought solutions from "the crowd", non-traditional problem solvers. The projects expanded to include virtual collaboration centers such as the NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC) and more recently a collaborative research project between NASA and the National Science Foundation (NSF). These novel problem-solving tools produced effective results and the HH&P wanted to capture the knowledge from these new tools, to teach the results to the directorate, and to implement new project management tools and coursework. The need to capture and teach the results of these novel problem solving tools, the HH&P decided to create a web-based tool to capture best practices and case studies, to teach novice users how to use new problem solving tools and to change project management training/. This web-based tool was developed with a small, multi-disciplinary group and named the Solution Mechanism Guide (SMG). An alpha version was developed that was tested against several sessions of user groups to get feedback on the SMG and determine a future course for development. The feedback was very positive and the HH&P decided to move to the beta-phase of development. To develop the web-based tool, the HH&P utilized the NASA Tournament Lab (NTL) to develop the software with TopCoder under an existing contract. In this way, the HH&P is using one new tool (the NTL and TopCoder) to develop the next generation tool, the SMG. The beta-phase of the SMG is planed for release in the spring of 2014 and results of the beta-phase testing will be available for the IAC meeting in September. The SMG is intended to disrupt the way problem solvers and project managers approach problem solving and to increase the

  11. On Comparison of Series and Numerical Solutions for Flow of Eyring-Powell Fluid with Newtonian Heating And Internal Heat Generation/Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Ali, Shafqat; Farooq, Muhammad Asif; Alsaedi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the combined effects of Newtonian heating and internal heat generation/absorption in the two-dimensional flow of Eyring-Powell fluid over a stretching surface. The governing non-linear analysis of partial differential equations is reduced into the ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations. The resulting problems are computed for both series and numerical solutions. Series solution is constructed using homotopy analysis method (HAM) whereas numerical solution is presented by two different techniques namely shooting method and bvp4c. A comparison of homotopy solution with numerical solution is also tabulated. Both solutions are found in an excellent agreement. Dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles are plotted and discussed for various emerging physical parameters. PMID:26402366

  12. Application of inverse heat conduction problem on temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Zhou, G.; Dong, B.; Li, Q.; Liu, L. Q.

    2013-09-01

    For regenerative cooling devices, such as G-M refrigerator, pulse tube cooler or thermoacoustic cooler, the gas oscillating bring about temperature fluctuations inevitably, which is harmful in many applications requiring high stable temperatures. To find out the oscillating mechanism of the cooling temperature and improve the temperature stability of cooler, the inner temperature of the cold head has to be measured. However, it is difficult to measure the inner oscillating temperature of the cold head directly because the invasive temperature detectors may disturb the oscillating flow. Fortunately, the outer surface temperature of the cold head can be measured accurately by invasive temperature measurement techniques. In this paper, a mathematical model of inverse heat conduction problem is presented to identify the inner surface oscillating temperature of cold head according to the measured temperature of the outer surface in a GM cryocooler. Inverse heat conduction problem will be solved using control volume approach. Outer surface oscillating temperature could be used as input conditions of inverse problem and the inner surface oscillating temperature of cold head can be inversely obtained. A simple uncertainty analysis of the oscillating temperature measurement also will be provided.

  13. MAST solution of advection problems in irrotational flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aricò, Costanza; Tucciarelli, Tullio

    2007-03-01

    A new numerical-analytical Eulerian procedure is proposed for the solution of convection-dominated problems in the case of existing scalar potential of the flow field. The methodology is based on the conservation inside each computational elements of the 0th and 1st order effective spatial moments of the advected variable. This leads to a set of small ODE systems solved sequentially, one element after the other over all the computational domain, according to a MArching in Space and Time technique. The proposed procedure shows the following advantages: (1) it guarantees the local and global mass balance; (2) it is unconditionally stable with respect to the Courant number, (3) the solution in each cell needs information only from the upstream cells and does not require wider and wider stencils as in most of the recently proposed higher-order methods; (4) it provides a monotone solution. Several 1D and 2D numerical test have been performed and results have been compared with analytical solutions, as well as with results provided by other recent numerical methods.

  14. The iteration method for the Wahba problem solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruzhilov, Ivan

    2014-12-01

    Wahba problem is the task of constrained optimization on SO(3). Solution of this task is vital for satellite attitude determination using star trackers. An iterative method having quadratic convergence is proposed. Each iteration of the proposed method is reduced to sequential rotation of the vectors and solving the system of linear algebraic equations. The method needs an initial approximation, which can be obtained by the TRIAD method. The quaternion form of the TRIAD method is given. One or two iterations are sufficient for finding the optimal solution using the proposed method. The primary advantage of the proposed method as compared with classical methods based on calculation of eigenvectors and singular decomposition is the simplicity of its implementation.

  15. Solution to certain problems in the failure of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodsell, Johnathan

    The present work contains the solution of two problems in composite structures. In the first, an approximate elasticity solution for prediction of the displacement, stress and strain fields within the m-layer, symmetric and balanced angle-ply composite laminate of finite-width subjected anticlastic bending deformation is developed. The solution is shown to recover classical laminated plate theory predictions at interior regions of the laminate and thereby illustrates the boundary layer character of this interlaminar phenomenon. The results exhibit the anticipated response in congruence with the solutions for uniform axial extension and uniform temperature change, where divergence of the interlaminar shearing stress is seen to occur at the intersection of the free-edge and planes between lamina of +theta and -theta orientation. The analytical results show excellent agreement with the finite-element predictions for the same boundary-value problem and thereby provide an efficient and compact solution available for parametric studies of the influence of geometry and material properties. The solution is combined with previously developed solutions for uniform axial extension and uniform temperature change of the identical laminate and the combined solution is exercised to compare the relative magnitudes of free-edge phenomenon arising from the different loading conditions, to study very thick laminates and laminates where the laminate width is less than the laminate thickness. Significantly, it was demonstrated that the solution is valid for arbitrary stacking sequence and the solution was exercised to examine antisymmetric and non-symmetric laminates. Finally, the solution was exercised to determine the dimensions of the boundary layer for very large numbers of layers. It was found that the dimension of the boundary layer width in bending is approximately twice that in uniform axial extension and uniform temperature change. In the second, the intrinsic flaw concept is

  16. Wavelets in the solution of nongray radiative heat transfer equation

    SciTech Connect

    Bayazitoglu, Y.; Wang, B.Y.

    1996-12-31

    The wavelet basis functions are introduced into the radiative transfer equation in the frequency domain. The intensity of radiation is expanded in terms of Daubechies` wrapped around wavelet functions. It is shown that the wavelet basis approach to modeling nongrayness can be incorporated into any solution method for the equation of transfer. In this paper the resulting system of equations is solved for the one-dimensional radiative equilibrium problem using the P-N approximation.

  17. New discretization and solution techniques for incompressible viscous flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunzburger, M. D.; Nicolaides, R. A.; Liu, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    Several topics arising in the finite element solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are considered. Specifically, the question of choosing finite element velocity/pressure spaces is addressed, particularly from the viewpoint of achieving stable discretizations leading to convergent pressure approximations. The role of artificial viscosity in viscous flow calculations is studied, emphasizing work by several researchers for the anisotropic case. The last section treats the problem of solving the nonlinear systems of equations which arise from the discretization. Time marching methods and classical iterative techniques, as well as some modifications are mentioned.

  18. Solutions of contact problems by the assumed stress hybrid model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubomura, K.; Pian, T. H. H.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for contact problems which may be either frictional or frictionless and may involve extensive sliding between deformable bodies. It was based on an assumed stress hybrid approach and on an incremental variational principle for which the Euler's equations of the functional include the equilibrium and compatibility conditions at the contact surface. The tractions at an assumed contact surface were introduced as Lagrangian multipliers in the formulation. It was concluded from the results of several example solutions that the extensive sliding contact between deformable bodies can be solved by the present method.

  19. Analytical solution of the bosonic three-body problem.

    PubMed

    Gogolin, Alexander O; Mora, Christophe; Egger, Reinhold

    2008-04-11

    We revisit the problem of three identical bosons in free space, which exhibits a universal hierarchy of bound states (Efimov trimers). Modeling a narrow Feshbach resonance within a two-channel description, we map the integral equation for the three-body scattering amplitude to a one-dimensional Schrödinger-type single-particle equation, where an analytical solution of exponential accuracy is obtained. We give exact results for the trimer binding energies, the three-body parameter, the threshold to the three-atom continuum, and the recombination rate. PMID:18518009

  20. Building Science and Technology Solutions for National Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, Alan R.

    2012-06-05

    The nation's investment in Los Alamos has fostered scientific capabilities for national security missions. As the premier national security science laboratory, Los Alamos tackles: (1) Multidisciplinary science, technology, and engineering challenges; (2) Problems demanding unique experimental and computational facilities; and (3) Highly complex national security issues requiring fundamental breakthroughs. Our mission as a DOE national security science laboratory is to develop and apply science, technology, and engineering solutions that: (1) ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the US nuclear deterrent; (2) protect against the nuclear threat; and (3) solve national security challenges.

  1. Addition of simultaneous heat and solute transport and variable fluid viscosity to SEAWAT

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorne, D.; Langevin, C.D.; Sukop, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    SEAWAT is a finite-difference computer code designed to simulate coupled variable-density ground water flow and solute transport. This paper describes a new version of SEAWAT that adds the ability to simultaneously model energy and solute transport. This is necessary for simulating the transport of heat and salinity in coastal aquifers for example. This work extends the equation of state for fluid density to vary as a function of temperature and/or solute concentration. The program has also been modified to represent the effects of variable fluid viscosity as a function of temperature and/or concentration. The viscosity mechanism is verified against an analytical solution, and a test of temperature-dependent viscosity is provided. Finally, the classic Henry-Hilleke problem is solved with the new code. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Finite element solution of optimal control problems with inequality constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, Robert R.; Hodges, Dewey H.

    1990-01-01

    A finite-element method based on a weak Hamiltonian form of the necessary conditions is summarized for optimal control problems. Very crude shape functions (so simple that element numerical quadrature is not necessary) can be used to develop an efficient procedure for obtaining candidate solutions (i.e., those which satisfy all the necessary conditions) even for highly nonlinear problems. An extension of the formulation allowing for discontinuities in the states and derivatives of the states is given. A theory that includes control inequality constraints is fully developed. An advanced launch vehicle (ALV) model is presented. The model involves staging and control constraints, thus demonstrating the full power of the weak formulation to date. Numerical results are presented along with total elapsed computer time required to obtain the results. The speed and accuracy in obtaining the results make this method a strong candidate for a real-time guidance algorithm.

  3. Multidimensional Assessment of Criminal Recidivism: Problems, Pitfalls, and Proposed Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Vrieze, Scott I.; Grove, William M.

    2010-01-01

    All states have statutes in place to commit civilly individuals at high risk for violence. This note addresses difficulties in assessing such risk, but uses as an example the task of predicting sexual violence recidivism; the principles espoused here generalize to predicting all violence. As part of commitment process, mental health professionals, who are often psychologists, evaluate an individual’s risk of sexual recidivism. It is common for professionals conducting these risk assessments to use several actuarial risk prediction instruments (i.e., psychological tests). These tests rarely agree closely in the risk figures they provide. Serious epistemological and psychometric problems in the multivariate assessment of recidivism risk are pointed out. Sound psychometric, or in some cases heuristic, solutions to these problems are proffered, in hope of improving clinical practice. We focus on how to make these tests’ outputs commensurable, and discuss various ways to combine them in coherent, justifiable, fashions. PMID:20528065

  4. Phononic heat transport in the transient regime: An analytic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuovinen, Riku; Säkkinen, Niko; Karlsson, Daniel; Stefanucci, Gianluca; van Leeuwen, Robert

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the time-resolved quantum transport properties of phonons in arbitrary harmonic systems connected to phonon baths at different temperatures. We obtain a closed analytic expression of the time-dependent one-particle reduced density matrix by explicitly solving the equations of motion for the nonequilibrium Green's function. This is achieved through a well-controlled approximation of the frequency-dependent bath self-energy. Our result allows for exploring transient oscillations and relaxation times of local heat currents, and correctly reduces to an earlier known result in the steady-state limit. We apply the formalism to atomic chains, and benchmark the validity of the approximation against full numerical solutions of the bosonic Kadanoff-Baym equations for the Green's function. We find good agreement between the analytic and numerical solutions for weak contacts and baths with a wide energy dispersion. We further analyze relaxation times from low to high temperature gradients.

  5. Exact solution of two phase spherical Stefan problem with two free boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavokin, Alexey A.; Nauryz, Targyn; Bizhigitova, Nazerke T.

    2016-08-01

    Solution of the heat equation in a spherical domain with two free boundaries (two-phase Stefan problem) when one of the subdomains degenerates at the initial time is considered. The use of conventional finite-difference methods in these cases is not expedient because of the degenerate domain. The solution is found in the form of combination of Integral Error functions series, [M. Sarsengeldin, and S. Kharin, Filomat, (2016), (in Press)] and then recurrent solvability of nonlinear algebraic equations for determining the coefficients of the series is proved. Such problems are of practical interest for the simulation of laser material processing as well for the modeling of thermal effects of electric arc that ignites during the opening of electric contacts [S. N. Kharin, and M. Sarsengeldin, Influence of contact materials on phenomena in a short electrical arc, in Key Engineering Materials, Trans tech publications, Islamabad, Pakistan, 2012, pp. 321-329].

  6. Integrating LPR with CCTV systems: problems and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bissessar, David; Gorodnichy, Dmitry O.

    2011-06-01

    A new generation of high-resolution surveillance cameras makes it possible to apply video processing and recognition techniques on live video feeds for the purpose of automatically detecting and identifying objects and events of interest. This paper addresses a particular application of detecting and identifying vehicles passing through a checkpoint. This application is of interest to border services agencies and is also related to many other applications. With many commercial automated License Plate Recognition (LPR) systems available on the market, some of which are available as a plug-in for surveillance systems, this application still poses many unresolved technological challenges, the main two of which are: i) multiple and often noisy license plate readings generated for the same vehicle, and ii) failure to detect a vehicle or license plate altogether when the license plate is occluded or not visible. This paper presents a solution to both of these problems. A data fusion technique based on the Levenshtein distance is used to resolve the first problem. An integration of a commercial LPR system with the in-house built Video Analytic Platform is used to solve the latter. The developed solution has been tested in field environments and has been shown to yield a substantial improvement over standard off-the-shelf LPR systems.

  7. Comet solutions to a stylized BWR benchmark problem

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D.; Rahnema, F.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a stylized 3-D BWR benchmark problem was used to evaluate the performance of the coarse mesh radiation transport method COMET. The benchmark problem consists of 560 fuel bundles at 3 different burnups and 3 coolant void states. The COMET solution was compared with the corresponding Monte Carlo reference solution using the same 2-group material cross section library for three control blade (rod) configurations, namely, all rods out (ARO), all rods in (ARI) and some rods in (SRJ). The differences in the COMET and MCNP eigenvalues were 43 pcm, 66 pcm and 32 pcm for the ARO, ARI and SRI cases, respectively. These differences are all within 3 standard deviations of the COMET uncertainty. The average relative differences in the bundle averaged fission densities for these three cases were 0.89%, 1.24%, and 1.05%, respectively. The corresponding differences in the fuel pin averaged fission densities were 1.24%, 1.84% and 1.29%, respectively. It was found that COMET is 3,000 times faster than Monte Carlo, while its statistical uncertainty in the fuel pin fission density is much lower than that of Monte Carlo (i.e., {approx}40 times lower). (authors)

  8. Numerical strategies for the solution of inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebber (Haber), Eldad

    This thesis deals with the numerical solutions of linear and nonlinear inverse problems. The goal of this thesis is to review and develop new techniques for solving such problems. In so doing, the computations tools for solving inverse problems are comprehensively studied. The thesis can be divided into two parts. In the first part, linear inverse theory is dealt with. Methods to estimate noise and efficiently invert large and full matrixes are reviewed and developed. Emphasis is given to Generalized Cross Validation (GCV) for noise estimation, and to Krylov space methods for efficient methods to invert large systems. This part is summarized by applying and comparing the methods developed on linear inverse problems which arise in gravity and tomography. In the second part of this thesis, extensive use of the linear algebra and the noise estimation methods which were developed in the first part of the thesis is made. A review of the current methods to carry out nonlinear inverse problems is given. A test example is constructed to demonstrate that these methods may fail. Next, a new algorithm for solving nonlinear inverse problems is developed. The algorithm is based on the ability to differentiate between correlated errors which comes from the linearization, and non-correlated noise which comes from the measurement. Based on these two types of noise, a regularization procedure which has two parts is developed. The first part is made of global regulation, to deal with the measurement noise, and the second part is made from a local regularization, to deal with the nonlinearity. The thesis demonstrates that GCV can be used in order to determine the measurement noise, and the Damped Gauss-Newton method can be used in order to deal with the local nonlinear terms. Another aspect of nonlinear inverse theory which is developed in this work concerns approximate sensitivities. A new formulation is suggested for the approximate sensitivities and bounds are calculated using

  9. Nucleate pool boiling heat transfer in aqueous surfactant solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasekar, Vivek Mahadeorao

    Saturated, nucleate pool boiling in aqueous surfactant solutions is investigated experimentally. Also, the role of Marangoni convection, driven both by temperature and surfactant concentration gradients at the vapor-liquid interface of a nucleating bubble is computationally explored. Experimental measurements of dynamic and equilibrium sigma using the maximum bubble pressure method indicate dynamic sigma to be higher than the corresponding equilibrium value, both at room and elevated temperatures. Also, nonionic surfactants (Triton X-100, Triton X-305) show larger sigma depression than anionic surfactants (SDS, SLES), and a normalized representation of their dynamic adsorption isotherms is shown to be helpful in generalizing the surfactant effectiveness to reduce surface tension. The dynamic sigma has a primary role in the modification of bubble dynamics and associated heat transfer, and is dictated by the adsorption kinetics of the surfactant molecules at boiling temperatures. In general, an enhancement in heat transfer is observed, which is characterized by an early incipience and an optimum boiling performance at or around the critical micelle concentration of the surfactant. The optimum performances, typically in the fully developed boiling regime ( q''w > 100 kW/m2), show a reverse trend with respect to surfactant molecular weights M, i.e., higher molecular weight additives promote lower enhancement. Normalized boiling performance using the respective solution's dynamic sigma correlates heat transfer coefficient by M-0.5 for anionics and M 0 for nonionics. This has been shown to be brought about by the surfactant concentration and its interfacial activity in a concentration sublayer around the growing vapor bubble, which governs the bubble growth behavior through the mechanism of dynamic sigma. The ionic nature of the surfactant influences the thickness and molecular makeup of the enveloping sublayer, thereby affecting the bubble dynamics and boiling heat

  10. Stability of Solutions to Classes of Traveling Salesman Problems.

    PubMed

    Niendorf, Moritz; Kabamba, Pierre T; Girard, Anouck R

    2016-04-01

    By performing stability analysis on an optimal tour for problems belonging to classes of the traveling salesman problem (TSP), this paper derives margins of optimality for a solution with respect to disturbances in the problem data. Specifically, we consider the asymmetric sequence-dependent TSP, where the sequence dependence is driven by the dynamics of a stack. This is a generalization of the symmetric non sequence-dependent version of the TSP. Furthermore, we also consider the symmetric sequence-dependent variant and the asymmetric non sequence-dependent variant. Amongst others these problems have applications in logistics and unmanned aircraft mission planning. Changing external conditions such as traffic or weather may alter task costs, which can render an initially optimal itinerary suboptimal. Instead of optimizing the itinerary every time task costs change, stability criteria allow for fast evaluation of whether itineraries remain optimal. This paper develops a method to compute stability regions for the best tour in a set of tours for the symmetric TSP and extends the results to the asymmetric problem as well as their sequence-dependent counterparts. As the TSP is NP-hard, heuristic methods are frequently used to solve it. The presented approach is also applicable to analyze stability regions for a tour obtained through application of the k -opt heuristic with respect to the k -neighborhood. A dimensionless criticality metric for edges is proposed, such that a high criticality of an edge indicates that the optimal tour is more susceptible to cost changes in that edge. Multiple examples demonstrate the application of the developed stability computation method as well as the edge criticality measure that facilitates an intuitive assessment of instances of the TSP. PMID:25910270

  11. Assessing student written problem solutions: A problem-solving rubric with application to introductory physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docktor, Jennifer L.; Dornfeld, Jay; Frodermann, Evan; Heller, Kenneth; Hsu, Leonardo; Jackson, Koblar Alan; Mason, Andrew; Ryan, Qing X.; Yang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Problem solving is a complex process valuable in everyday life and crucial for learning in the STEM fields. To support the development of problem-solving skills it is important for researchers and curriculum developers to have practical tools that can measure the difference between novice and expert problem-solving performance in authentic classroom work. It is also useful if such tools can be employed by instructors to guide their pedagogy. We describe the design, development, and testing of a simple rubric to assess written solutions to problems given in undergraduate introductory physics courses. In particular, we present evidence for the validity, reliability, and utility of the instrument. The rubric identifies five general problem-solving processes and defines the criteria to attain a score in each: organizing problem information into a Useful Description, selecting appropriate principles (Physics Approach), applying those principles to the specific conditions in the problem (Specific Application of Physics), using Mathematical Procedures appropriately, and displaying evidence of an organized reasoning pattern (Logical Progression).

  12. ULTRA-SHARP solution of the Smith-Hutton problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, B. P.; Mokhtari, Simin

    1992-01-01

    Highly convective scalar transport involving near-discontinuities and strong streamline curvature was addressed in a paper by Smith and Hutton in 1982, comparing several different convection schemes applied to a specially devised test problem. First order methods showed significant artificial diffusion, whereas higher order methods gave less smearing but had a tendency to overshoot and oscillate. Perhaps because unphysical oscillations are more obvious than unphysical smearing, the intervening period has seen a rise in popularity of low order artificially diffusive schemes, especially in the numerical heat transfer industry. The present paper describes an alternate strategy of using non-artificially diffusive high order methods, while maintaining strictly monotonic transitions through the use of simple flux limited constraints. Limited third order upwinding is usually found to be the most cost effective basic convection scheme. Tighter resolution of discontinuities can be obtained at little additional cost by using automatic adaptive stencil expansion to higher order in local regions, as needed.

  13. Hierarchical Adaptive Solution of Radiation Transport Problems on Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Cassiano R. E de Oliveira

    2008-06-30

    Computational radiation transport has steadily gained acceptance in the last decade as a viable modeling tool due to the rapid advancements in computer software and hardware technologies. It can be applied for the analysis of a wide range of problems which arise in nuclear reactor physics, medical physics, atmospheric physics, astrophysics and other areas of engineering physics. However, radiation transport is an extremely chanllenging computational problem since the governing equation is seven-deimensional (3 in space, 2 in direction, 1 in energy, and 1 in time) with a high degree of coupleing betwen these variables. If not careful, this relatively large number of independent variables when discretized can potentially lead to sets of linear equations of intractable size. Though parallel computing has allowed the solution of very large problems, avaliable computational resources will always be finite due to the fact that every more sophisticated multiphysics models are being demanded by industry. There is thus the pressing requirement to optimize the discretizations so as to minimize the effort and maximize the accuracy.

  14. [Problems and solutions in giving an expert evaluation].

    PubMed

    Martin, M

    2006-03-01

    According to the law for the prevention of cruelty to animals, the officially employed veterinarians are the experts per se. All administrative legal steps are based on their reports. Such reports are also of major significance at court hearings. However, veterinary colleagues working in private practices or clinics are often requested to submit an expert evaluation in cases of cruelty to animals. The problems which occur in putting together an expert's report are often based on a lack of knowledge about the clear structure of such a report (preliminary details, description of the situation as found, assessments of results, evaluation of findings, justification). The situation is made more complicated by the two different languages of lawyers (that of administrative officials, advocates of district courts and higher district courts or public prosecutors) and of veterinarians. A detailed description and a clear assessment together with a detailed justification of the concluding findings are absolutely essential. By providing examples of the correct way to write an expert's report, both the problems and solutions to improve the situation can be pointed out. This will be of the utmost importance in the future when quality management of animal rights is introduced. Specific training should be introduced during studies, in training courses for district examinations and in practical, further education. In addition, the range of problems caused by the constantly rising number of expert's reports made as a favour should also be considered. PMID:16669192

  15. Heat flux determination at the AWJ cutting zone using IR thermography and inverse heat conduction problem

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, R.S.; Kovacevic, R.; Beardsley, H.E.

    1996-12-31

    In abrasive waterjet (AWJ) cutting, the cutting tool is a thin stream of high velocity abrasive waterjet slurry which can be considered as a moving line heat source that increases the temperature of the narrow zone along the cut kerf wall. A suitably defined inverse heat conduction problem which uses the experimentally determined temperature histories at various points in the workpiece, is adopted to determine the heat flux at the cutting zone. Temperature distribution in the workpiece and the cutting nozzle during AWJ cutting is monitored using infrared thermography. A suitable strategy for on-line monitoring of the radial and axial wear of the AWJ nozzle based on the nozzle temperature distribution is also proposed.

  16. Contact Problem Of Conducting And Heated Punch On A Multifield Foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowski, B.

    2015-08-01

    The solution for a multifield material subjected to temperature loading in a circular region is presented in an explicit analytical form. The study concerns the steady - state thermal loading infinite region (heated embedded inclusion), half - space region and two - constituent magneto - electro - thermo - elastic material region. The new mono - harmonic potential functions, obtained by the author, are used in the analysis of punch problem. The more interested case in which the contact region is annular is analyzed. By using the methods of triple integral equations and series solution technique the solution for an indentured multifield substrate over an annular contact region is given. The sensitivity analysis of obtained indentation parameters shows some interesting points. In particular, it shows that the increasing of the applied electric and magnetic potentials reduces the indentation depth in multifield materials.

  17. Efficient solution of an inverse problem in cell population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, Andreas; Krebs, Jochen; Wagner, Mathias

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, a size-structured model for cell division is examined and the question of determining the division (birth) rate from a measurable stable size distribution of the population is addressed. This inverse problem can be formulated as a differential-dilation equation. We propose a novel solution scheme based on mollification. The method of approximate inverse allows us to shift the derivative from the data to a precomputable reconstruction kernel. To comprise all available a priori information, a presmoothing step based on regression in reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces is introduced. We establish an error theory for the emerging algorithm, prove convergence and deduce a parameter strategy. The results are substantiated with extensive numerical tests both for artificial and real data based on proliferating tumor cells.

  18. General solutions of optimum problems in nonstationary flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miele, Angelo

    1955-01-01

    A general method concerning optimum problems in nonstationary flight is developed and discussed. Best flight techniques are determined for the following conditions: climb with minimum time, climb with minimum fuel consumption, steepest climb, descending and gliding flight with maximum time or with maximum distance. Optimum distributions of speed with altitude are derived assuming constant airplane weight and neglecting curvatures and squares of path inclination in the projection of the equation of motion on the normal to the flight path. The results of this paper differ from the well-known results obtained by neglecting accelerations with one exception, namely the case of gliding with maximum range. The paper is concluded with criticisms and remarks concerning the physical nature of the solutions and their usefulness for practical applications.

  19. Solution to the Delta vehicle second stage pogo problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, M.; Morgan, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    A discussion of the pogo phenomenon observed on the Delta launch vehicle second stage is presented. The pressure-fed engine and the high frequency of the oscillation (125 Hz) required unique analysis and extensive testing to support analysis detail. In addition, the need to continue a one vehicle per month launch rate required both an immediate interim and a timely long-term solution to the problem. The development and implementation of a program involving analysis, ground test, and flight instrumentation is described. An analytical model was developed and used to investigate both structural and propulsion system modifications. The factors which influenced the final suppression system selection, the analytical predictions for that system, and flight data which validate that system's effectiveness are presented.

  20. Graphene in therapeutics delivery: Problems, solutions and future opportunities.

    PubMed

    McCallion, Catriona; Burthem, John; Rees-Unwin, Karen; Golovanov, Alexander; Pluen, Alain

    2016-07-01

    Graphene based nanomaterials are being used experimentally to deliver therapeutic agents to cells or tissues both in vitro and in vivo. However, substantial challenges remain before moving to safe and effective use in humans. In particular, it is recognised that graphene molecules undergo complex interactions with solutes, proteins or cellular systems within the body, and that these interactions impact significantly on the behaviour or toxicity of the molecule. Approaches to overcome these problems include modification of the graphene or its combination with other molecules to accentuate favourable characteristics or modify adverse interactions. This has led to an emerging role for graphene as one part of highly-tailored multifunctional delivery vehicles. This review examines the knowledge that underpins present approaches to exploit graphene in therapeutics delivery, discussing both favourable and unfavourable aspects of graphene behaviour in biological systems and how these may be modified; then considers the present place of the molecule and the challenges for its further development. PMID:27113141

  1. Robustness of solutions to a benchmark control problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.; Marrison, Christopher I.

    1992-01-01

    The robustness of 10 solutions to a benchmark control design problem presented at the 1990 American Control Conference has been evaluated. The 10 controllers have second-to-eighth-order transfer functions and have been designed using several different methods, including H-infinity optimization, loop-transfer recovery, imaginary-axis shifting, constrained optimization, structured covariance, game theory, and the internal model principle. Stochastic robustness analysis quantifies the controllers' stability and performance robustness with structured uncertainties in up to six system parameters. The analysis provides insights into system response that are not readily derived from other robustness criteria and provides a common ground for judging controllers produced by alternative methods. One important conclusion is that gain and phase margins are not reliable indicators of the probability of instability. Furthermore, parameter variations actually may improve the likelihood of achieving selected performance metrics, as demonstrated by results for the probability of settling-time exceedance.

  2. Testable solution of the cosmological constant and coincidence problems

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Douglas J.; Barrow, John D.

    2011-02-15

    We present a new solution to the cosmological constant (CC) and coincidence problems in which the observed value of the CC, {Lambda}, is linked to other observable properties of the Universe. This is achieved by promoting the CC from a parameter that must be specified, to a field that can take many possible values. The observed value of {Lambda}{approx_equal}(9.3 Gyrs){sup -2}[{approx_equal}10{sup -120} in Planck units] is determined by a new constraint equation which follows from the application of a causally restricted variation principle. When applied to our visible Universe, the model makes a testable prediction for the dimensionless spatial curvature of {Omega}{sub k0}=-0.0056({zeta}{sub b}/0.5), where {zeta}{sub b}{approx}1/2 is a QCD parameter. Requiring that a classical history exist, our model determines the probability of observing a given {Lambda}. The observed CC value, which we successfully predict, is typical within our model even before the effects of anthropic selection are included. When anthropic selection effects are accounted for, we find that the observed coincidence between t{sub {Lambda}={Lambda}}{sup -1/2} and the age of the Universe, t{sub U}, is a typical occurrence in our model. In contrast to multiverse explanations of the CC problems, our solution is independent of the choice of a prior weighting of different {Lambda} values and does not rely on anthropic selection effects. Our model includes no unnatural small parameters and does not require the introduction of new dynamical scalar fields or modifications to general relativity, and it can be tested by astronomical observations in the near future.

  3. Dust in the divertor sheath: a problem or a possible solution to a problem?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delzanno, Gian Luca; Tang, Xianzhu

    2012-03-01

    In this work, we will present results on dust transport in the magnetized sheath near the divertor plate for micron-sized dust. We consider conditions relevant to present short-pulse tokamak machines as well as conditions for long-pulse ITER/DEMO reactors. We solve the dust charging equation, the dust equation of motion and the equations for dust heating and mass loss in the magnetized sheath. We present parametric studies changing the divertor plasma conditions and the angle of the equilibrium magnetic field relative to the wall. Our main result is that, for conditions relavant to DEMO, the stronger heat flux to the wall severely limits the dust survivability and mobility. We discuss the implications of this result for the divertor plates of long-pulse fusion reactors. We will also discuss two fusion technology solutions to DEMO PFC, the dust patch and the dust shield, based on externally introduced solid particulates to patch areas of net erosion and to provide the primary heat exhaust for the divertor.

  4. A spatiotemporal dynamic distributed solution to the MEG inverse problem

    PubMed Central

    Lamus, Camilo; Hämäläinen, Matti S.; Temereanca, Simona; Brown, Emery N.; Purdon, Patrick L.

    2012-01-01

    MEG/EEG are non-invasive imaging techniques that record brain activity with high temporal resolution. However, estimation of brain source currents from surface recordings requires solving an ill-conditioned inverse problem. Converging lines of evidence in neuroscience, from neuronal network models to resting-state imaging and neurophysiology, suggest that cortical activation is a distributed spatiotemporal dynamic process, supported by both local and long-distance neuroanatomic connections. Because spatiotemporal dynamics of this kind are central to brain physiology, inverse solutions could be improved by incorporating models of these dynamics. In this article, we present a model for cortical activity based on nearest-neighbor autoregression that incorporates local spatiotemporal interactions between distributed sources in a manner consistent with neurophysiology and neuroanatomy. We develop a dynamic Maximum a Posteriori Expectation-Maximization (dMAP-EM) source localization algorithm for estimation of cortical sources and model parameters based on the Kalman Filter, the Fixed Interval Smoother, and the EM algorithms. We apply the dMAP-EM algorithm to simulated experiments as well as to human experimental data. Furthermore, we derive expressions to relate our dynamic estimation formulas to those of standard static models, and show how dynamic methods optimally assimilate past and future data. Our results establish the feasibility of spatiotemporal dynamic estimation in large-scale distributed source spaces with several thousand source locations and hundreds of sensors, with resulting inverse solutions that provide substantial performance improvements over static methods. PMID:22155043

  5. A verifiable solution to the MEG inverse problem.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Gareth R; Furlong, Paul L; Singh, Krish D; Hillebrand, Arjan

    2006-06-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a non-invasive brain imaging technique with the potential for very high temporal and spatial resolution of neuronal activity. The main stumbling block for the technique has been that the estimation of a neuronal current distribution, based on sensor data outside the head, is an inverse problem with an infinity of possible solutions. Many inversion techniques exist, all using different a-priori assumptions in order to reduce the number of possible solutions. Although all techniques can be thoroughly tested in simulation, implicit in the simulations are the experimenter's own assumptions about realistic brain function. To date, the only way to test the validity of inversions based on real MEG data has been through direct surgical validation, or through comparison with invasive primate data. In this work, we constructed a null hypothesis that the reconstruction of neuronal activity contains no information on the distribution of the cortical grey matter. To test this, we repeatedly compared rotated sections of grey matter with a beamformer estimate of neuronal activity to generate a distribution of mutual information values. The significance of the comparison between the un-rotated anatomical information and the electrical estimate was subsequently assessed against this distribution. We found that there was significant (P < 0.05) anatomical information contained in the beamformer images across a number of frequency bands. Based on the limited data presented here, we can say that the assumptions behind the beamformer algorithm are not unreasonable for the visual-motor task investigated. PMID:16480896

  6. A spatiotemporal dynamic distributed solution to the MEG inverse problem.

    PubMed

    Lamus, Camilo; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Temereanca, Simona; Brown, Emery N; Purdon, Patrick L

    2012-11-01

    MEG/EEG are non-invasive imaging techniques that record brain activity with high temporal resolution. However, estimation of brain source currents from surface recordings requires solving an ill-conditioned inverse problem. Converging lines of evidence in neuroscience, from neuronal network models to resting-state imaging and neurophysiology, suggest that cortical activation is a distributed spatiotemporal dynamic process, supported by both local and long-distance neuroanatomic connections. Because spatiotemporal dynamics of this kind are central to brain physiology, inverse solutions could be improved by incorporating models of these dynamics. In this article, we present a model for cortical activity based on nearest-neighbor autoregression that incorporates local spatiotemporal interactions between distributed sources in a manner consistent with neurophysiology and neuroanatomy. We develop a dynamic maximum a posteriori expectation-maximization (dMAP-EM) source localization algorithm for estimation of cortical sources and model parameters based on the Kalman Filter, the Fixed Interval Smoother, and the EM algorithms. We apply the dMAP-EM algorithm to simulated experiments as well as to human experimental data. Furthermore, we derive expressions to relate our dynamic estimation formulas to those of standard static models, and show how dynamic methods optimally assimilate past and future data. Our results establish the feasibility of spatiotemporal dynamic estimation in large-scale distributed source spaces with several thousand source locations and hundreds of sensors, with resulting inverse solutions that provide substantial performance improvements over static methods. PMID:22155043

  7. Solution of open region electromagnetic scattering problems on hypercube multiprocessors

    SciTech Connect

    Gedney, S.D.

    1991-01-01

    This thesis focuses on development of parallel algorithms that exploit hypercube multiprocessor computers for the solution of the scattering of electromagnetic fields by bodies situated in an unbounded space. Initially, algorithms based on the method of moments are investigated for coarse-grained MIMD hypercubes as well as finite-grained MIMD and SIMD hypercubes. It is shown that by exploiting the architecture of each hypercube, supercomputer performance can be obtained using the JPL Mark III hypercube and the Thinking Machine's CM2. Second, the use of the finite-element method for solution of the scattering by bodies of composite materials is presented. For finite bodies situated in an unbounded space, use of an absorbing boundary condition is investigated. A method known as the mixed-{chi} formulation is presented, which reduces the mesh density in the regions away from the scatterer, enhancing the use of an absorbing boundary condition. The scattering by troughs or slots is also investigated using a combined FEM/MoM formulation. This method is extended to the problem of the diffraction of electromagnetic waves by thick conducting and/or dielectric gratings. Finally, the adaptation of the FEM method onto a coarse-grained hypercube is presented.

  8. Continued development of a semianalytical solution for two-phase fluid and heat flow in a porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, C.; Pruess, K.

    1991-06-01

    Over the past few years the authors have developed a semianalytical solution for transient two-phase water, air, and heat flow in a porous medium surrounding a constant-strength linear heat source, using a similarity variable {eta} = r/{radical}t. Although the similarity transformation approach requires a simplified geometry, all the complex physical mechanisms involved in coupled two-phase fluid and heat flow can be taken into account in a rigorous way, so that the solution may be applied to a variety of problems of current interest. The work was motivated by adverse to predict the thermohydrological response to the proposed geologic repository for heat-generating high-level nuclear wastes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in a partially saturated, highly fractured volcanic formation. The paper describes thermal and hydrologic conditions near the heat source; new features of the model; vapor pressure lowering; and the effective-continuum representation of a fractured/porous medium.

  9. Exploiting New Features of COMSOL Version 4 on Conjugate Heat Transfer Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Freels, James D; Arimilli, Rao V; Bodey, Isaac T

    2010-01-01

    Users of COMSOL Multiphysics at version 3.5a and earlier have enjoyed many features that have provided not only a good user experience at the GUI interface, but also the capability to solve many classes of problems in a consistent manner with the physics being simulated. With the new release version 4.0 and later (4+) of COMSOL, the user is provided a dramatic new interface from which to interact, and many new features ``under the hood'' for solving problems more efficiently and with even greater accuracy and consistency than before. This paper will explore several of these new version 4+ features for the conjugate heat transfer class of problems. Our environment is challenging in that we demand high-quality solutions for nuclear-reactor systems and the models tend to become large and difficult to solve. Areas investigated include turbulence modeling, distributed parallel processing, solver scaling, and opengl graphics issues in a Linux computing environment.

  10. MHD and heat transfer benchmark problems for liquid metal flow in rectangular ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorenkov, S.I.; Hua, T.Q.; Araseki, H.

    1994-12-31

    Liquid metal cooling systems of a self-cooled blanket in a tokamak reactor will likely include channels of rectangular cross section where liquid metal is circulated in the presence of strong magnetic fields. MHD pressure drop, velocity distribution and heat transfer characteristics are important issues in the engineering design considerations. Computer codes for the reliable solution of three-dimensional MHD flow problems are needed for fusion relevant conditions. Argonne National Laboratory and The Efremov Institute have jointly defined several benchmark problems for code validation. The problems, described in this paper, are based on two series of rectangular duct experiments conducted at ANL; one of the series is a joint ANL/Efremov experiment. The geometries consist of variation of aspect ratio and wall thickness (thus wall conductance ratio). The transverse magnetic fields are uniform and nonuniform in the axial direction.