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Sample records for heat resistant austenitic

  1. Effect of heat input on the microstructure, residual stresses and corrosion resistance of 304L austenitic stainless steel weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Unnikrishnan, Rahul; Idury, K.S.N. Satish; Ismail, T.P.; Bhadauria, Alok; Shekhawat, S.K.; Khatirkar, Rajesh K.; Sapate, Sanjay G.

    2014-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in high performance pressure vessels, nuclear, chemical, process and medical industry due to their very good corrosion resistance and superior mechanical properties. However, austenitic stainless steels are prone to sensitization when subjected to higher temperatures (673 K to 1173 K) during the manufacturing process (e.g. welding) and/or certain applications (e.g. pressure vessels). During sensitization, chromium in the matrix precipitates out as carbides and intermetallic compounds (sigma, chi and Laves phases) decreasing the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In the present investigation, 304L austenitic stainless steel was subjected to different heat inputs by shielded metal arc welding process using a standard 308L electrode. The microstructural developments were characterized by using optical microscopy and electron backscattered diffraction, while the residual stresses were measured by X-ray diffraction using the sin{sup 2}ψ method. It was observed that even at the highest heat input, shielded metal arc welding process does not result in significant precipitation of carbides or intermetallic phases. The ferrite content and grain size increased with increase in heat input. The grain size variation in the fusion zone/heat affected zone was not effectively captured by optical microscopy. This study shows that electron backscattered diffraction is necessary to bring out changes in the grain size quantitatively in the fusion zone/heat affected zone as it can consider twin boundaries as a part of grain in the calculation of grain size. The residual stresses were compressive in nature for the lowest heat input, while they were tensile at the highest heat input near the weld bead. The significant feature of the welded region and the base metal was the presence of a very strong texture. The texture in the heat affected zone was almost random. - Highlights: • Effect of heat input on microstructure, residual

  2. Cast, heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels having reduced alloying element content

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Pankiw, Roman I [Greensburg, PA

    2011-08-23

    A cast, austenitic steel composed essentially of, expressed in weight percent of the total composition, about 0.4 to about 0.7 C, about 20 to about 30 Cr, about 20 to about 30 Ni, about 0.5 to about 1 Mn, about 0.6 to about 2 Si, about 0.05 to about 1 Nb, about 0.05 to about 1 W, about 0.05 to about 1.0 Mo, balance Fe, the steel being essentially free of Ti and Co, the steel characterized by at least one microstructural component selected from the group consisting of MC, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and M(C, N).

  3. Cast, heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels having reduced alloying element content

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Pankiw, Roman I [Greensburg, PA

    2010-07-06

    A cast, austenitic steel composed essentially of, expressed in weight percent of the total composition, about 0.4 to about 0.7 C, about 20 to about 30 Cr, about 20 to about 30 Ni, about 0.5 to about 1 Mn, about 0.6 to about 2 Si, about 0.05 to about 1 Nb, about 0.05 to about 1 W, about 0.05 to about 1.0 Mo, balance Fe, the steel being essentially free of Ti and Co, the steel characterized by at least one microstructural component selected from the group consisting of MC, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and M(C, N).

  4. Creep Behavior at 1273 K (1000 °C) in Nb-Bearing Austenitic Heat-Resistant Cast Steels Developed for Exhaust Component Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinhui; Li, Mei; Godlewski, Larry A.; Zindel, Jacob W.; Feng, Qiang

    2016-05-01

    ABSTRACT A series of Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant cast steels with variations of N/C ratios were investigated, and the morphological change of Nb(C,N) from faceted blocks, mixed flake-blocks to "Chinese-script" was observed as N/C ratios decreased. The creep behavior of these alloys was studied at 1273 K (1000 °C), and the longest creep life and lowest creep rate occurred in model alloys with script Nb(C,N). Residual δ-ferrites and (Cr,Fe)23C6 were adverse to creep properties. This work indicates that the control of N/C ratio is required for the as-cast microstructural strengthening.

  5. Creep Behavior at 1273 K (1000 °C) in Nb-Bearing Austenitic Heat-Resistant Cast Steels Developed for Exhaust Component Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinhui; Li, Mei; Godlewski, Larry A.; Zindel, Jacob W.; Feng, Qiang

    2016-07-01

    A series of Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant cast steels with variations of N/C ratios were investigated, and the morphological change of Nb(C,N) from faceted blocks, mixed flake-blocks to "Chinese-script" was observed as N/C ratios decreased. The creep behavior of these alloys was studied at 1273 K (1000 °C), and the longest creep life and lowest creep rate occurred in model alloys with script Nb(C,N). Residual δ-ferrites and (Cr,Fe)23C6 were adverse to creep properties. This work indicates that the control of N/C ratio is required for the as-cast microstructural strengthening.

  6. Corrosion resistance of kolsterised austenitic 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Abudaia, F. B. Khalil, E. O. Esehiri, A. F. Daw, K. E.

    2015-03-30

    Austenitic stainless suffers from low wear resistance in applications where rubbing against other surfaces is encountered. This drawback can be overcome by surface treatment such as coating by hard materials. Other treatments such as carburization at relatively low temperature become applicable recently to improve hardness and wear resistance. Carburization heat treatment would only be justified if the corrosion resistance is unaffected. In this work samples of 304 stainless steels treated by colossal supersaturation case carburizing (known as Kolsterising) carried out by Bodycote Company was examined for pitting corrosion resistance at room temperature and at 50 °C. Comparison with results obtained for untreated samples in similar testing conditions show that there is no deterioration in the pitting resistance due to the Kolsterising heat treatment. X ray diffraction patterns obtained for Kolsterising sample showed that peaks correspond to the austenite phase has shifted to lower 2θ values compared with those of the untreated sample. The shift is an indication for expansion of austenite unit cells caused by saturation with diffusing carbon atoms. The XRD of Kolsterising samples also revealed additional peaks appeared in the patterns due to formation of carbides in the kolsterised layer. Examination of these additional peaks showed that these peaks are attributed to a type of carbide known as Hagg carbide Fe{sub 2}C{sub 5}. The absence of carbides that contain chromium means that no Cr depletion occurred in the layer and the corrosion properties are maintained. Surface hardness measurements showed large increase after Kolsterising heat treatment.

  7. Corrosion resistance of kolsterised austenitic 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abudaia, F. B.; Khalil, E. O.; Esehiri, A. F.; Daw, K. E.

    2015-03-01

    Austenitic stainless suffers from low wear resistance in applications where rubbing against other surfaces is encountered. This drawback can be overcome by surface treatment such as coating by hard materials. Other treatments such as carburization at relatively low temperature become applicable recently to improve hardness and wear resistance. Carburization heat treatment would only be justified if the corrosion resistance is unaffected. In this work samples of 304 stainless steels treated by colossal supersaturation case carburizing (known as Kolsterising) carried out by Bodycote Company was examined for pitting corrosion resistance at room temperature and at 50 °C. Comparison with results obtained for untreated samples in similar testing conditions show that there is no deterioration in the pitting resistance due to the Kolsterising heat treatment. X ray diffraction patterns obtained for Kolsterising sample showed that peaks correspond to the austenite phase has shifted to lower 2θ values compared with those of the untreated sample. The shift is an indication for expansion of austenite unit cells caused by saturation with diffusing carbon atoms. The XRD of Kolsterising samples also revealed additional peaks appeared in the patterns due to formation of carbides in the kolsterised layer. Examination of these additional peaks showed that these peaks are attributed to a type of carbide known as Hagg carbide Fe2C5. The absence of carbides that contain chromium means that no Cr depletion occurred in the layer and the corrosion properties are maintained. Surface hardness measurements showed large increase after Kolsterising heat treatment.

  8. The Effect of Nb and Ti on Structure and Mechanical Properties of 12Ni-25Cr-0.4C Austenitic Heat-Resistant Steel after Aging at 900 °C for 1000 h

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaheri, Vahid; Shahri, Farzad; Mohammadnezhad, Mahyar; Tamizifar, Morteza; Naseri, Masaab

    2014-10-01

    Austenitic heat-resistant steels are particularly suitable for applications where service conditions comprise high temperature. The demand for better performance has motivated developments in these steels. In this work, Ti and Nb were added to austenitic heat-resistant steels, Fe-12Ni-25Cr-0.4C, wt.% simultaneously. Microstructural changes were studied via scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectrum (EDS), optical microscopy, and x-ray diffraction (XRD) in as-cast condition and after aging in 900 °C for 1000 h. Mechanical properties were measured using tensile tests, impact energy, and Vickers hardness. It was observed that by formation of NbC and TiC, the level of fragmentation of the chromium carbides increased, as a positive aspect for mechanical properties. XRD and EDS results show increasing the amount of Ti can inhibit G-phase transformation.

  9. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  10. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1987-02-11

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01 to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties. 4 figs.

  11. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Braski, David N.; Rowcliffe, Arthur F.

    1989-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01% to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties.

  12. High temperature creep resistant austenitic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Swindeman, Robert W.; Goodwin, Gene M.

    1989-01-01

    An improved austenitic alloy having in wt % 19-21 Cr, 30-35 Ni, 1.5-2.5 Mn, 2-3 Mo, 0.1-0.4 Si, 0.3-0.5 Ti, 0.1-0.3 Nb, 0.1-0.5 V, 0.001-0.005 P, 0.08-0.12 C, 0.01-0.03 N, 0.005-0.01 B and the balance iron that is further improved by annealing for up to 1 hour at 1150.degree.-1200.degree. C. and then cold deforming 5-15 %. The alloy exhibits dramatically improved creep rupture resistance and ductility at 700.degree. C.

  13. Improved high temperature creep resistant austenitic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, P.J.; Swindeman, R.W.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1988-05-13

    An improved austenitic alloy having in wt% 19-21 Cr, 30-35 Ni, 1.5-2.5 Mn, 2-3 Mo, 0.1-0.4 Si, 0.3-0.5 Ti, 0.1-0.3 Nb, 0.1-0.5 V, 0.001-0.005 P, 0.08-0.12 C, 0.01-0.03 N, 0.005-0.01 B and the balance iron that is further improved by annealing for up to 1 hour at 1150-1200/degree/C and then cold deforming 5-15%. The alloy exhibits dramatically improved creep rupture resistance and ductility at 700/degree/C. 2 figs.

  14. Cast heat-resistant austenitic steel with improved temperature creep properties and balanced alloying element additions and methodology for development of the same

    DOEpatents

    Pankiw, Roman I; Muralidharan, Govindrarajan; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Maziasz, Philip J

    2012-11-27

    The present invention addresses the need for new austenitic steel compositions with higher creep strength and higher upper temperatures. The new austenitic steel compositions retain desirable phases, such as austenite, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and MC in its microstructure to higher temperatures. The present invention also discloses a methodology for the development of new austenitic steel compositions with higher creep strength and higher upper temperatures.

  15. Oxidation resistant high creep strength austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P.; Pint, Bruce A.; Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Maziasz, Philip J.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao P.

    2010-06-29

    An austenitic stainless steel displaying high temperature oxidation and creep resistance has a composition that includes in weight percent 15 to 21 Ni, 10 to 15 Cr, 2 to 3.5 Al, 0.1 to 1 Nb, and 0.05 to 0.15 C, and that is free of or has very low levels of N, Ti and V. The alloy forms an external continuous alumina protective scale to provide a high oxidation resistance at temperatures of 700 to 800.degree. C. and forms NbC nanocarbides and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure to give high strength and high creep resistance at these temperatures.

  16. Influence of retained austenite on short fatigue crack growth and wear resistance of case carburized steel

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, V.F. da; Canale, L.F.; Spinelli, D.P.; Bose-Filho, W.W.; Crnkovic, O.R.

    1999-10-01

    The influence of the amount of retained austenite on short fatigue crack growth and wear resistance in carburized SAE 8620 steel was studied in this article. Different amounts of retained austenite in the microstructure of the carburized case were obtained through different heat treatment routes applied after the carburizing process. The wear tests were carried out using pin on disk equipment. After every 200 turns the weight loss was registered. Four point bend fatigue tests were carried out at room temperature, using three different levels of stress and R = 0.1. Crack length versus number of cycles and crack growth rate versus mean crack length curves were analyzed. In both tests the results showed that the test pieces with higher levels of retained austenite in the carburized case exhibited longer fatigue life and better wear resistance.

  17. Evolution of Precipitate Phases During Long-Term Isothermal Aging at 1083 K (810 °C) in a New Precipitation-Strengthened Heat-Resistant Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Vu The; Jung, Woo Sang

    2012-09-01

    Evolution of precipitate phases in a precipitation-strengthened high nitrogen 15Cr-15Ni-4Mn-3Cu-1.5Mo-0.46Si-Nb-C-N-Al-B austenitic heat-resistant stainless steel during 10,000 hours of isothermal aging at 1083 K (810 °C) was investigated. The major precipitate phases found in microstructure after 330 hours of aging are coarser residual primary Nb(C,N) precipitates, Z-phase precipitates, (Nb,Cr)N precipitates with fcc crystal structure, Cu precipitates, and coarser Cr2N precipitates. No significant changes were noted in the chemical compositions, crystal structure of the precipitate phases, or the phase species after 10,000 hours at 1083 K (810 °C). The coarsening behavior of Z-phase, (Nb,Cr)N, and Cu precipitates was the only observed notable change in the microstructures during the performed aging. Z-phase and (Nb,Cr)N precipitates exhibited superior dimensional stability and morphology with extremely low coarsening rates, while Cu precipitates coarsened at the fastest rate. In addition, Z-phase particles showed a remarkable lower coarsening rate as compared to that of (Nb,Cr)N precipitates. The abnormal slow coarsening kinetics of Z-phase can be explained by the nucleation energy barrier (NEB) limited coarsening mechanism applied for faceted ceramic crystals.

  18. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, Scott L.

    1989-01-01

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

  19. Weldability of corrosion-resistant high-nitrogen austenitic Kh22AG16N8M-type steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannykh, O. A.; Blinov, V. M.; Kostina, M. V.; Blinov, E. V.; Zvereva, T. N.

    2007-10-01

    The influence of thermal treatment on the structures and mechanical properties of welds of corrosion-resistant high-nitrogen austenitic 05Kh22AG16N8M-type steels is studied. In these steels, austenite is found to be highly resistant to discontinuous precipitation and the formation of σ phase and δ ferrite upon cooling regardless of the temperature of heating for quenching (from 900 to 1250°C) and the cooling conditions (water, air, furnace). Welding of these steels can produce high-strength welds with an enhanced impact toughness.

  20. Heat treatment giving a stable high temperature micro-structure in cast austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Anton, Donald L.; Lemkey, Franklin D.

    1988-01-01

    A novel micro-structure developed in a cast austenitic stainless steel alloy and a heat treatment thereof are disclosed. The alloy is based on a multicomponent Fe-Cr-Mn-Mo-Si-Nb-C system consisting of an austenitic iron solid solution (.gamma.) matrix reinforced by finely dispersed carbide phases and a heat treatment to produce the micro-structure. The heat treatment includes a prebraze heat treatment followed by a three stage braze cycle heat treatment.

  1. Austenite Formation Kinetics During Rapid Heating in a Microalloyed Steel

    SciTech Connect

    BURNETT,M.E.; DYKHUIZEN,RONALD C.; KELLEY,J. BRUCE; PUSKAR,JOSEPH D.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.

    1999-09-07

    The model parameters for the normalized 1054V1 material were compared to parameters previously generated for 1026 steel, and the transformation behavior was relatively consistent. Validation of the model predictions by heating into the austenite plus undissolved ferrite phase field and rapidly quenching resulted in reasonable predictions when compared to the measured volume fractions from optical metallography. The hot rolled 1054V1 material, which had a much coarser grain size and a non-equilibrium volume fraction of pearlite, had significantly different model parameters and the on heating transformation behavior of this material was less predictable with the established model. The differences in behavior is consistent with conventional wisdom that normalized micro-structure produce a more consistent response to processing, and it reinforces the need for additional work in this area.

  2. Effect of material heat treatment on fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Alexandreanu, B.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2005-07-31

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the design of Class 1 components of nuclear power plants. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the Code specify design curves for applicable structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. The existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. Under certain environmental and loading conditions, fatigue lives of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) can be a factor of 20 lower in water than in air. This report presents experimental data on the effect of heat treatment on fatigue crack initiation in austenitic Type 304 SS in LWR coolant environments. A detailed metallographic examination of fatigue test specimens was performed to characterize the crack morphology and fracture morphology. The key material, loading, and environmental parameters and their effect on the fatigue life of these steels are also described. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves for austenitic SSs as a function of material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are presented.

  3. Enhancing Hydrogen Embrittlement Resistance of Lath Martensite by Introducing Nano-Films of Interlath Austenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meimei; Tasan, C. Cem; Koyama, Motomichi; Ponge, Dirk; Raabe, Dierk

    2015-09-01

    Partial reversion of interlath austenite nano-films is investigated as a potential remedy for hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of martensitic steels. We conducted uniaxial tensile tests on hydrogen-free and pre-charged medium-Mn transformation-induced plasticity-maraging steels with different austenite film thicknesses. Mechanisms of crack propagation and microstructure interaction are quantitatively analyzed using electron channelling contrast imaging and electron backscatter diffraction, revealing a promising strategy to utilize austenite reversion for hydrogen-resistant martensitic steel design.

  4. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Donald M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  5. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, D.M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe is described for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  6. The effect of heat treatment on the gouging abrasion resistance of alloy white cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Are, I. R. S.; Arnold, B. K.

    1995-02-01

    A series of heat treatments was employed to vary the microstructure of four commercially important alloy white cast irons, the wear resistance of which was then assessed by the ASTM jaw-crusher gouging abrasion test. Compared with the as-cast condition, standard austenitizing treatments produced a substantial increase in hardness, a marked decrease in the retained aus-tenite content in the matrix, and, in general, a significant improvement in gouging abrasion resistance. The gouging abrasion resistance tended to decline with increasing austenitizing tem-perature, although the changes in hardness and retained austenite content varied, depending on alloy composition. Subcritical heat treatment at 500 ° following hardening reduced the retained austenite content to values less than 10 pct, and in three of the alloys it caused a significant fall in both hardness and gouging abrasion resistance. The net result of the heat treatments was the development of optimal gouging abrasion resistance at intermediate levels of retained aus-tenite. The differing responses of the alloys to both high-temperature austenitizing treatments and to subcritical heat treatments at 500 ° were related to the effects of the differing carbon and alloying-element concentrations on changes in the M s temperature and secondary carbide precipitation.

  7. Corrosion behavior in high heat input welded heat-affected zone of Ni-free high-nitrogen Fe–18Cr–10Mn–N austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Joonoh Ha, Heon-Young; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2013-08-15

    The pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion behaviors in high heat input welded heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a metastable high-nitrogen Fe–18Cr–10Mn–N austenitic stainless steel were explored through electrochemical tests. The HAZs were simulated using Gleeble simulator with high heat input welding condition of 300 kJ/cm and the peak temperature of the HAZs was changed from 1200 °C to 1350 °C, aiming to examine the effect of δ-ferrite formation on corrosion behavior. The electrochemical test results show that both pitting corrosion resistance and interphase corrosion resistance were seriously deteriorated by δ-ferrite formation in the HAZ and their aspects were different with increasing δ-ferrite fraction. The pitting corrosion resistance was decreased by the formation of Cr-depleted zone along δ-ferrite/austenite (γ) interphase resulting from δ-ferrite formation; however it didn't depend on δ-ferrite fraction. The interphase corrosion resistance depends on the total amount of Cr-depleted zone as well as ferrite area and thus continuously decreased with increasing δ-ferrite fraction. The different effects of δ-ferrite fraction on pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion were carefully discussed in terms of alloying elements partitioning in the HAZ based on thermodynamic consideration. - Highlights: • Corrosion behavior in the weld HAZ of high-nitrogen austenitic alloy was studied. • Cr{sub 2}N particle was not precipitated in high heat input welded HAZ of tested alloy. • Pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion show a different behavior. • Pitting corrosion resistance was affected by whether or not δ-ferrite forms. • Interphase corrosion resistance was affected by the total amount of δ-ferrite.

  8. Retained Austenite in SAE 52100 Steel Post Magnetic Processing and Heat Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Pappas, Nathaniel R; Watkins, Thomas R; Cavin, Odis Burl; Jaramillo, Roger A; Ludtka, Gerard Michael

    2007-01-01

    Steel is an iron-carbon alloy that contains up to 2% carbon by weight. Understanding which phases of iron and carbon form as a function of temperature and percent carbon is important in order to process/manufacture steel with desired properties. Austenite is the face center cubic (fcc) phase of iron that exists between 912 and 1394 C. When hot steel is rapidly quenched in a medium (typically oil or water), austenite transforms into martensite. The goal of the study is to determine the effect of applying a magnetic field on the amount of retained austenite present at room temperature after quenching. Samples of SAE 52100 steel were heat treated then subjected to a magnetic field of varying strength and time, while samples of SAE 1045 steel were heat treated then subjected to a magnetic field of varying strength for a fixed time while being tempered. X-ray diffraction was used to collect quantitative data corresponding to the amount of each phase present post processing. The percentage of retained austenite was then calculated using the American Society of Testing and Materials standard for determining the amount of retained austenite for randomly oriented samples and was plotted as a function of magnetic field intensity, magnetic field apply time, and magnetic field wait time after quenching to determine what relationships exist with the amount of retained austenite present. In the SAE 52100 steel samples, stronger field strengths resulted in lower percentages of retained austenite for fixed apply times. The results were inconclusive when applying a fixed magnetic field strength for varying amounts of time. When applying a magnetic field after waiting a specific amount of time after quenching, the analyses indicate that shorter wait times result in less retained austenite. The SAE 1045 results were inconclusive. The samples showed no retained austenite regardless of magnetic field strength, indicating that tempering removed the retained austenite. It is apparent

  9. Kinetic study of austenite formation during continuous heating of unalloyed ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Gómez, Octavio; Barrera-Godínez, José Antonio; Vergara-Hernández, Héctor Javier

    2015-01-01

    The austenite formation kinetics in unalloyed cast ductile iron was studied on the basis of dilatometry measurements, and Avrami's equation was used to estimate the material's kinetic parameters. A continuous heating transformation diagram was constructed using heating rates in the range of 0.06 to 0.83°C·s-1. As the heating rate was augmented, the critical temperatures, A c1 and A α, as well as the intercritical range, which was evaluated as the difference between the critical temperatures, Δ T = A α - A c1, increased. At a low heating rate, the kinetics of austenite formation was slow as a consequence of the iron's silicon content. The effect of heating rate on k and n, the kinetic parameters of Avrami's equation, was also determined. Parameter n, which is associated with nucleation sites and growth geometry, decreased with an increase in heating rate. In addition, parameter k increased with the increase of heating rate, suggesting that the nucleation and growth rates are carbon- and silicon-diffusion controlled during austenite formation under continuous heating.

  10. Copper modified austenitic stainless steel alloys with improved high temperature creep resistance

    DOEpatents

    Swindeman, R.W.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1987-04-28

    An improved austenitic stainless steel that incorporates copper into a base Fe-Ni-Cr alloy having minor alloying substituents of Mo, Mn, Si, T, Nb, V, C, N, P, B which exhibits significant improvement in high temperature creep resistance over previous steels. 3 figs.

  11. A corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, S.L.

    1987-08-10

    A corrosive and erosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is pumped through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Long term corrosion resistance of alumina forming austenitic stainless steels in liquid lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejenstam, Jesper; Szakálos, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Alumina forming austenitic steels (AFA) and commercial stainless steels have been exposed in liquid lead with 10-7 wt.% oxygen at 550 °C for up to one year. It is known that chromia forming austenitic stainless steels, such as 316L and 15-15 Ti, have difficulties forming protective oxides in liquid lead at temperatures above 500 °C, which is confirmed in this study. By adding Al to austenitic steels, it is in general terms possible to increase the corrosion resistance. However this study shows that the high Ni containing AFA alloys are attacked by the liquid lead, i.e. dissolution attack occurs. By lowering the Ni content in AFA alloys, it is possible to achieve excellent oxidation properties in liquid lead. Following further optimization of the microstructural properties, low Ni AFA alloys may represent a promising future structural steel for lead cooled reactors.

  13. Modeling the Ferrite-Austenite Transformation in the Heat-Affected Zone of Stainless Steel Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; David, S.A.

    1997-12-01

    The diffusion-controlled ferrite-austenite transformation in stainless steel welds was modeled. An implicit finite-difference analysis that considers multi-component diffusion was used. The model was applied to the Fe-Cr-Ni system to investigate the ferrite- austenite transformation in the heat-affected zone of stainless steel weld metal. The transformation was followed as a function of time as the heat-affected zone was subjected to thermal cycles comparable to those experienced during gas-tungsten arc welding. The results showed that the transformation behavior and the final microstructural state are very sensitive to the maximum temperature that is experienced by the heat-affected zone. For high maximum exposure temperatures ({approximately} 1300{degree} C), the ferrite formation that occurs at the highest temperatures is not completely offset by the reverse ferrite dissolution at lower temperatures. As a result, for high temperature exposures there is a net increase in the amount of ferrite in the microstructure. It was also found that if compositional gradients are present in the initial ferrite and austenite phases, the extent of the transformation is impacted.

  14. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Deevi, S.C.; Fleischhauer, G.S.; Hajaligol, M.R.; Lilly, A.C. Jr.

    1999-11-02

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, {le}1% Cr and either {ge}0.05% Zr or ZrO{sub 2} stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or {ge}0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14--32% Al, {le}2% Ti, {le}2% Mo, {le}1% Zr, {le}1% C, {le}0.1% B, {le}30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, {le}1% rare earth metal, {le}1% oxygen, {le}3% Cu, balance Fe.

  15. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  16. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    1997-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  17. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, V.K.; Deevi, S.C.; Fleischhauer, G.S.; Hajaligol, M.R.; Lilly, A.C. Jr.

    1997-04-15

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, {<=}1% Cr and either {>=}0.05% Zr or ZrO{sub 2} stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or {>=}0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, {<=}2% Ti, {<=}2% Mo, {<=}1% Zr, {<=}1% C, {<=}0.1% B, {<=}30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, {<=}1% rare earth metal, {<=}1% oxygen, {<=}3% Cu, balance Fe. 64 figs.

  18. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  19. Heat resistant protective hand covering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tschirch, R. P.; Sidman, K. R.; Arons, I. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A heat-resistant aromatic polyamide fiber is described. The outer surface of the shell is coated with a fire-resistant elastomer and liner. Generally conforming and secured to the shell and disposed inwardly of the shell, the liner is made of a felt fabric of temperature-resistant aromatic polymide fiber.

  20. The Effects of Austenitizing Conditions on the Microstructure and Wear Resistance of a Centrifugally Cast High-Speed Steel Roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Minwoo; Lee, Young-Kook

    2016-04-01

    The influences of austenitizing conditions on the microstructure and wear resistance of a centrifugally cast high-speed steel roll were investigated through thermodynamic calculation, microstructural analysis, and high-temperature wear tests. When the austenitizing temperature was between 1323 K and 1423 K (1050 °C and 1150 °C), coarse eutectic M2C plates were decomposed into a mixture of MC and M6C particles. However, at 1473 K (1200 °C), the M2C plates were first replaced by both new austenite grains and MC particles without M6C particles, and then remaining M2C particles were dissolved during the growth of MC particles. The wear resistance of the HSS roll was improved with increasing austenitizing temperature up to 1473 K (1200 °C) because the coarse eutectic M2C plates, which are vulnerable to crack propagation, changed to disconnected hard M6C and MC particles.

  1. The Effects of Austenitizing Conditions on the Microstructure and Wear Resistance of a Centrifugally Cast High-Speed Steel Roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Minwoo; Lee, Young-Kook

    2016-07-01

    The influences of austenitizing conditions on the microstructure and wear resistance of a centrifugally cast high-speed steel roll were investigated through thermodynamic calculation, microstructural analysis, and high-temperature wear tests. When the austenitizing temperature was between 1323 K and 1423 K (1050 °C and 1150 °C), coarse eutectic M2C plates were decomposed into a mixture of MC and M6C particles. However, at 1473 K (1200 °C), the M2C plates were first replaced by both new austenite grains and MC particles without M6C particles, and then remaining M2C particles were dissolved during the growth of MC particles. The wear resistance of the HSS roll was improved with increasing austenitizing temperature up to 1473 K (1200 °C) because the coarse eutectic M2C plates, which are vulnerable to crack propagation, changed to disconnected hard M6C and MC particles.

  2. Kinetics of Austenite Grain Growth During Heating and Its Influence on Hot Deformation of LZ50 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Shiwen; Li, Yongtang; Zheng, Yi

    2016-07-01

    Grain growth behaviors of LZ50 have been systematically investigated for various temperatures and holding times. Quantitative evaluations of the grain growth kinetics over a wide range of temperature (950-1200 °C) and holding time (10-180 min) have been performed. With the holding time kept constant, the average austenite grain size has an exponential relationship with the heating temperature, while with the heating temperature kept constant, the relationship between the austenite average grain size and holding time is a parabolic curve approximately. The holding time dependence of average austenite grain size obeys the Beck's equation. As the heating temperature increases, the time exponent for grain growth n increases from 0.21 to 0.39. On the basis of previous models and experimental results, taking the initial grain size into account, the mathematical model for austenite grain growth of LZ50 during isothermal heating and non-isothermal heating is proposed. The effects of initial austenite grain size on hot deformation behavior of LZ50 are analyzed through true stress-strain curves under different deformation conditions. Initial grain size has a slight effect on peak stress.

  3. Swelling and swelling resistance possibilities of austenitic stainless steels in fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    Fusion reactor helium generation rates in stainless steels are intermediate to those found in EBR-II and HFIR, and swelling in fusion reactors may differ from the fission swelling behavior. Advanced titanium-modified austenitic stainless steels exhibit much better void swelling resistance than AISI 316 under EBR-II (up to approx. 120 dpa) and HFIR (up to approx. 44 dpa) irradiations. The stability of fine titanium carbide (MC) precipitates plays an important role in void swelling resistance for the cold-worked titanium-modified steels irradiated in EBR-II. Futhermore, increased helium generation in these steels can (a) suppress void conversion, (b) suppress radiation-induced solute segregation (RIS), and (c) stabilize fine MC particles, if sufficient bubble nucleation occurs early in the irradation. The combined effects of helium-enhanced MC stability and helium-suppressed RIS suggest better void swelling resistance in these steels for fusion service than under EBR-II irradiation.

  4. Development of corrosion-resistant improved Al-doped austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Keietsu; Miwa, Yukio; Okubo, Nariaki; Kaji, Yoshiyuki; Tsukada, Takashi

    2011-10-01

    Aluminum-doped type 316L SS (316L/Al) has been developed for the purpose of suppressing the degradation of corrosion resistance induced by irradiation in austenitic stainless steels (SSs). The electrochemical corrosion properties of this material were estimated after Ni-ion irradiation at a temperature range from 330 °C to 550 °C. When irradiated at 550 °C up to 12 dpa, 316L/Al showed high corrosion resistance in the vicinity of grain boundaries (GBs) and in grains, while severe GB etching and local corrosion in grains were observed in irradiated 316L and 316 SS. It is supposed that aluminum enrichment was enhanced by high-temperature irradiation at GBs and in grains, to compensate for lost corrosion resistance induced by chromium depletion.

  5. Heat resistant polyphosphazene polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fewell, L. L.; Allcock, H. R.; Obrien, J. P.; Scopelianos, A. G.

    1981-01-01

    Polymers of carboranyl substituted polyphosphazene are stable at high temperatures and produce insulating char upon pyrolysis. Substituted compounds are prepared by heat polymerizing carboranyl halophosphazene, which is obtained by reacting lithium carborane with, for example, hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene under anhydrous conditions. Chlorine of polymer may be replaced by aryloxy and alkoxy groups.

  6. The Optimization and Design of a Fully Austenitic, Gamma-Prime Strengthened TRIP Steel for Blast and Fragment Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wengrenovich, Nicholas J.

    Current analysis into the property requirements of materials designed for blast and fragment protection has led to the need for high tensile uniform ductility to withstand the pressure wave and high shear localization resistance to withstand fragment penetration. Additionally, it has been shown that steels with retained austenite are able to outperform standard martensitic steels when subjected to fragment simulating projectiles (FSP) in ballistic experiments. Using a systems based, computational materials design approach, a series of prototype precipitation strengthened, fully austenitic steels have been designed to obtain superior performance in blast and fragment protection. The most recent design, TRIP-180, explores optimized transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) to counteract strain softening and thus significantly increase uniform plastic deformation in both tension and shear at high strength (1241 MPa / 180 ksi). The transformation hardening delays the onset of localization, which in tension delays necking, and in shear delays plugging. Through precipitation heat treatment, the matrix composition can be varied to optimize the austenite stability, quantified by the Ms sigma temperature. Baseline data quantifying the martensitic transformation in shear was obtained through a series of quasi-static torsion experiments performed on TRIP-180. Analysis of the postmortem microstructures allowed for calibration of M_s. sigma(sh) temperatures with the transformation product morphologiesin the stress-assisted regime, where the plate martensite forms at the same locations as when quenching, and strain-induced regime, where the finely dispersed martensite forms at the intersections of shear bands. Dynamic testing (E = 104/s) identified the optimal austenite stability ( T -- Ms sigma(sh) = 60°C ) required to delay the shear localization instability at higher ultimate shear stress levels (1420 MPa) and larger plastic strains (0.103) than an existing Navy standard

  7. Thermal embrittlement of simulated heat-affected zone in cast austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Mimura, H.; Taniguchi, T.; Horii, Y.; Kume, R.; Uesugi, N.

    1998-08-01

    Metallurgical factors controlling thermal embrittlement in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of cast austenitic stainless steels were investigated by using the simulated HAZ. It was shown that the simulated HAZ was more susceptible to the thermal embrittlement by aging at 673 K in correspondence with its higher tendency to age hardening and a higher content of ferrite than the parent casting. Electron microprobe analyzer measurement showed that application of the simulated thermal cycle gave a change in the chemical composition of the ferrite, which might be a cause of the higher age hardening of the ferrite in the simulated HAZ. This higher ferrite hardness had a good correlation with fine precipitates of presumably G-phase in the ferrite grain, which existed more in the simulated HAZ than in the parent casting, though it is not clear whether this correlation was only apparent. Ductility of the austenite portion was found to reduce remarkably when surrounded by the hard ferrite of a high fraction. Annealing after aging restored CTOD to some degree. Aging after fatigue cracking gave more embrittlement than a usual procedure for preparation of test specimens, i.e., fatigue cracking after aging.

  8. Role of microstructure and heat treatments on the desorption kinetics of tritium from austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chêne, J.; Brass, A.-M.; Trabuc, P.; Gastaldi, O.

    2007-02-01

    The liquid scintillation counting of solid samples (LSC-SS technique) was successfully used to study the role of microstructure and heat treatments on the behavior of residual tritium in several austenitic stainless steels (as-cast remelted tritiated waste, 316LN and 321 steels). The role of desorption annealing in the 100-600 °C range on the residual amount of tritium in tritiated waste was investigated. The residual tritium concentration computed from surface activity measurements is in good agreement with experimental values measured by liquid scintillation counting after full dissolution of the samples. The kinetics of tritium desorption recorded with the LSC-SS technique shows a significant desorption of residual tritium at room temperature, a strong barrier effect of thermal oxide films on the tritium desorption and a dependance of the tritium release on the steels microstructure. Annealing in the 300-600 °C range allows to desorb a large fraction of the residual tritium. However a significant trapping of tritium is evidenced. The influence of trapping phenomena on the concentration of residual tritium and on its dependance with the annealing temperature was investigated with different recrystallized and sensitized microstructures. Trapping is evidenced mainly below 150 °C and concerns a small fraction of the total amount of tritium introduced in austenitic steels. It presumably occurs preferentially on precipitates such as Ti(CN) or on intermetallic phases.

  9. Heat resistant protective hand covering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidman, K. R.; Arons, I. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    The heat resistant, protective glove is made up of first and second shell sections which define a palm side and a backside, respectively. The first shell section is made of a twill wave fabric of a temperature-resistant aromatic polyamide fiber. The second shell section is made of a knitted fabric of a temperature-resistant aromatic polyamide fiber. The first and second shell sections are secured to one another, e.g., by sewing, to provide the desired glove configuration and an opening for insertion of the wearer's hand. The protective glove also includes a first liner section which is secured to and overlies the inner surface of the first shell section and is made of a felt fabric of a temperature-resistant aromatic polyamide fiber and has a flame resistant, elastomenic coating on the surface facing and overlying the inner surface of the first shell section.

  10. On the decomposition of austenite in the heat-affected zone upon welding of high-strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimenko, L. A.; Ramus', A. A.; Merkulova, A. O.

    2015-05-01

    The kinetics of the decomposition of austenite in the heat-affected zone of welded joints of low-carbon microalloyed high-strength steels has been investigated. A new approach to selecting the parameters of the thermal cycle of welding that ensure the service characteristics of welded joints on a level no lower than the normative requirements is suggested.

  11. Structure and composition of nanometer-sized nitrides in a creep resistant cast austenitic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Neal D; Maziasz, Philip J; Shingledecker, John P.; Pollard, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    The microstructure of a new and improved high-temperature creep-resistant cast austenitic alloy, CF8C-Plus, was characterized after creep-rupture testing at 1023 K (750 C) and 100 MPa. Microstructures were investigated by detailed scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Principal component analysis of EDS spectrum images was used to examine the complex precipitate morphology. Thermodynamic modeling was performed to predict equilibrium phases in this alloy as well as the compositions of these phases at relevant temperatures. The improved high-temperature creep strength of CF8C-Plus over its predecessor CF8C is suggested to be due to the modified microstructure and phase stability in the alloy, including the absence of {delta}-ferrite in the as-cast condition and the development of a stable, slow-growing precipitation hardening nitride phase - the tetragonal Z-phase - which has not been observed before in cast austenitic stainless steels.

  12. Development of Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Fe-Cr-Ni Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloy with Improved High-Temperature Strength and Creep-Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Swindeman, R.W.

    2001-06-15

    In February of 1999, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Special Metals Corporation - Huntington Alloys (formerly INCO Alloys International, Inc.) to develop a modified wrought austenitic stainless alloy with considerably more strength and corrosion resistance than alloy 800H or 800HT, but with otherwise similar engineering and application characteristics. Alloy 800H and related alloys have extensive use in coal flue gas environments, as well as for tubing or structural components in chemical and petrochemical applications. The main concept of the project was make small, deliberate elemental microalloying additions to this Fe-based alloy to produce, with proper processing, fine stable carbide dispersions for enhanced high temperature creep-strength and rupture resistance, with similar or better oxidation/corrosion resistance. The project began with alloy 803, a Fe-25Cr-35NiTi,Nb alloy recently developed by INCO, as the base alloy for modification. Smaller commercial developmental alloy heats were produced by Special Metal. At the end of the project, three rounds of alloy development had produced a modified 803 alloy with significantly better creep resistance above 815 C (1500 C) than standard alloy 803 in the solution-annealed (SA) condition. The new upgraded 803 alloy also had the potential for a processing boost in that creep resistance for certain kinds of manufactured components that was not found in the standard alloy. The upgraded 803 alloy showed similar or slightly better oxidation and corrosion resistance relative to standard 803. Creep strength and oxidation/corrosion resistance of the upgraded 803 alloy were significantly better than found in alloy 800 H, as originally intended. The CRADA was terminated in February 2003. A contributing factor was Special Metals Corporation being in Chapter 11 Bankruptcy. Additional testing, further commercial scale-up, and any potential

  13. Turbulent resistivity, diffusion and heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fried, B. D.; Kennel, C. F.; Mackenzie, K.; Coroniti, F. V.; Kindel, J. M.; Stenzel, R.; Taylor, R. J.; White, R.; Wong, A. Y.; Bernstein, W.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies are reported on ion acoustic and ion cyclotron turbulence and their roles in anomalous resistivity, viscosity, diffusion and heating and in the structure of collisionless electrostatic shocks. Resistance due to ion acoustic turbulence has been observed in experiments with a streaming cesium plasma in which electron current, potential rise due to turbulent resistivity, spectrum of unstable ion acoustic waves, and associated electron heating were all measured directly. Kinetic theory calculations for an expanding, unstable plasma, give results in agreement with the experiment. In a strong magnetic field, with T sub e/T sub i approximately 1 and current densities typical for present Tokomaks, the plasma is stable to ion acoustic but unstable to current driven electrostatic ion cyclotron waves. Relevant characteristics of these waves are calculated and it is shown that for ion, beta greater than m sub e/m sub i, the electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave has a lower instability threshold than the electrostatic one. However, when ion acoustic turbulence is present experiments with double plasma devices show rapid anomalous heating of an ion beam streaming through a plasma.

  14. Characterization of Low Temperature Ferrite/Austenite Transformations in the Heat Affected Zone of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Arc Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Babu, S S; Vitek, J M

    2003-08-20

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) has been used to identify a previously unobserved low temperature ferrite ({delta})/austenite({gamma}) phase transformation in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) welds. In this ''ferrite dip'' transformation, the ferrite transforms to austenite during heating to peak temperatures on the order of 750 C, and re-transforms to ferrite during cooling, resulting in a ferrite volume fraction equivalent to that in the base metal. Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD) and laser dilatometry measurements during Gleeble{reg_sign} thermal simulations are performed in order to verify the existence of this low temperature phase transformation. Thermodynamic and kinetic models for phase transformations, including both local-equilibrium and para-equilibrium diffusion controlled growth, show that diffusion of substitutional alloying elements does not provide a reasonable explanation for the experimental observations. On the other hand, the diffusion of interstitial alloying elements may be rapid enough to explain this behavior. Based on both the experimental and modeling results, two mechanisms for the ''ferrite dip'' transformation, including the formation and decomposition of secondary austenite and an athermal martensitic-type transformation of ferrite to austenite, are considered.

  15. Development of Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Fe-Cr-Ni Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloy with Improved High Temperature Strenth and Creep-Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, PJ

    2004-09-30

    In February of 1999, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Special Metals Corporation-Huntington Alloys (formerly INCO Alloys International, Inc.) to develop a modified wrought austenitic stainless alloy with considerably more strength and corrosion resistance than alloy 800H or 800HT, but with otherwise similar engineering and application characteristics. Alloy 800H and related alloys have extensive use in coal flue gas environments, as well as for tubing or structural components in chemical and petrochemical applications. The main concept of the project was make small, deliberate elemental microalloying additions to this Fe-based alloy to produce, with proper processing, fine stable carbide dispersions for enhanced high temperature creep-strength and rupture resistance, with similar or better oxidation/corrosion resistance. The project began with alloy 803, a Fe-25Cr-35NiTi,Nb alloy recently developed by INCO, as the base alloy for modification. Smaller commercial developmental alloy heats were produced by Special Metals. At the end of the project, three rounds of alloy development had produced a modified 803 alloy with significantly better creep resistance above 815EC (1500EC) than standard alloy 803 in the solution-annealed (SA) condition. The new upgraded 803 alloy also had the potential for a processing boost in that creep resistance for certain kinds of manufactured components that was not found in the standard alloy. The upgraded 803 alloy showed similar or slightly better oxidation and corrosion resistance relative to standard 803. Creep strength and oxidation/corrosion resistance of the upgraded 803 alloy were significantly better than found in alloy 800H, as originally intended. The CRADA was terminated in February 2003. A contributing factor was Special Metals Corporation being in Chapter 11 Bankruptcy. Additional testing, further commercial scale-up, and any potential

  16. Crack growth rates of irradiated austenitic stainless steel weld heat affected zone in BWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Alexandreanu, B.; Gruber, E. E.; Daum, R. S.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of reactor pressure vessels because of their superior fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods can exacerbate the corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of these steels by affecting the material microchemistry, material microstructure, and water chemistry. Experimental data are presented on crack growth rates of the heat affected zone (HAZ) in Types 304L and 304 SS weld specimens before and after they were irradiated to a fluence of 5.0 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 0.75 dpa) at {approx}288 C. Crack growth tests were conducted under cycling loading and long hold time trapezoidal loading in simulated boiling water reactor environments on Type 304L SS HAZ of the H5 weld from the Grand Gulf reactor core shroud and on Type 304 SS HAZ of a laboratory-prepared weld. The effects of material composition, irradiation, and water chemistry on growth rates are discussed.

  17. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments.

    PubMed

    Sun, C; Zheng, S; Wei, C C; Wu, Y; Shao, L; Yang, Y; Hartwig, K T; Maloy, S A; Zinkle, S J; Allen, T R; Wang, H; Zhang, X

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304 L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500 °C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M(23)C(6) precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments. PMID:25588326

  18. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, C.; Zheng, S.; Wei, C. C.; Wu, Y.; Shao, L.; Yang, Y.; Hartwig, K. T.; Maloy, S. A.; Zinkle, S. J.; Allen, T. R.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500°C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M₂₃C₆ precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments.

  19. In vitro corrosion resistance of plasma source ion nitrided austenitic stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Le, M K; Zhu, X M

    2001-04-01

    Plasma source ion nitriding has emerged as a low-temperature, low-pressure nitriding approach for low-energy implanting nitrogen ions and then diffusing them into steel and alloy. In this work, a single high nitrogen face-centered-cubic (f.c.c.) phase (gammaN) formed on the 1Cr18Ni9Ti and AISI 316L austenitic stainless steels with a high nitrogen concentration of about 32 at % was characterized using Auger electron spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, glancing angle X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance of the gammaN-phase layer was studied by the electrochemical cyclic polarization measurement in Ringer's solutions buffered to pH from 3.5 to 7.2 at a temperature of 37 degrees C. No pitting corrosion in the Ringer's solutions with pH = 7.2 and 5.5 was detected for the gammaN-phase layers on the two stainless steels. The high pitting potential for the gammaN-phase layers is higher, about 500 and 600 mV, above that of the two original stainless steels, respectively, in the Ringer's solution with pH = 3.5. The corroded surface morphologies of the gammaN-phase layers observed by scanning electron microscopy are consistent with the results of the electrochemical polarization measurement. PMID:11246957

  20. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, C.; Zheng, S.; Wei, C. C.; Wu, Y.; Shao, L.; Yang, Y.; Hartwig, K. T.; Maloy, S. A.; Zinkle, S. J.; Allen, T. R.; et al

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304L SS with an average grain size ofmore » ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500°C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M₂₃C₆ precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments.« less

  1. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments

    PubMed Central

    Sun, C.; Zheng, S.; Wei, C. C.; Wu, Y.; Shao, L.; Yang, Y.; Hartwig, K. T.; Maloy, S. A.; Zinkle, S. J.; Allen, T. R.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500°C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M23C6 precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments. PMID:25588326

  2. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, C.; Zheng, S.; Wei, C. C.; Wu, Y.; Shao, L.; Yang, Y.; Hartwig, K. T.; Maloy, S. A.; Zinkle, S. J.; Allen, T. R.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500°C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M23C6 precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments.

  3. Heat resistant process gas line

    SciTech Connect

    Venable, C.R. Jr.

    1987-05-12

    A method is described of forming a heat resistant gas transfer line comprising a tubular metal outer shell, a tubular inner liner formed of prefired refractory rings joined together by shiplap joints having expansion gaps, and an intermediate liner comprising bubble alumina concrete filing the annular space between the inner liner and the outer shell. The method comprises placing on the inside lower surface of the outershell bubble alumina concrete forms capable of supporting the refractory rings in the desired location within the outer shell, securing decomposable rings to the refractory rings in the area where the shiplap joints are to be so that a suitable expansion gap will be provided in the shiplap joints when the combustible rings are destroyed.

  4. Improvement in the Corrosion Resistance of Austenitic Stainless Steel 316L by Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xun; Feng, Kai

    In the present work, austenitic stainless steel 316L (SS316L) samples were implanted with Ni and Ni-Cr. A nickel-rich layer about 100 nm in thickness and a Ni-Cr enriched layer about 60 nm thick are formed on the surface of SS316L. The effects of ion implantation on the corrosion performance of SS316L are investigated in a 0.5 M H2SO4 with 2 ppm HF solution at 80°C by open circuit potential (OCP), potentiodynamic and potentiostatic tests. The samples after the potentiostatic test are analyzed by XPS. The results indicate that the composition of the passive film change from a mixture of Fe oxides and Cr oxide to a Cr oxide dominated passive film after the potentiostatic test. The solutions after the potentiostatic test are analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results reveal that Fe is selectively dissolved in all cases and a proper Ni and Ni-Cr implant fluence can greatly improve the corrosion resistance of SS316L in the simulated polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCS) environment. They are in agreement with the electrochemical test results that the bare SS316L has the highest dissolution rate in both cathode and anode environments and the Ni and Ni-Cr implantation reduce markedly the dissolution rate. After the potentiostatic test the interfacial contact resistance (ICR) values are also measured. Ni and Ni-Cr are enriched in the passive film formed in the simulated PEMFC cathode environment after ion implantation thereby providing better conductivity than that formed in the anode one. A significant improvement of ICR is achieved for the SS316L implanted with Ni and Ni-Cr as compared to the bare SS316L, which is attributed to the reduction in passive layer thickness caused by Ni and Ni-Cr implantation. The ICR values for implanted specimens increase with increasing dose.

  5. Overview of strategies for high-temperature creep and oxidation resistance of alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P; Santella, Michael L; Bei, Hongbin; Maziasz, Philip J; Pint, Bruce A

    2011-01-01

    A family of creep-resistant, alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel alloys is under development for structural use in fossil energy conversion and combustion system applications. The AFA alloys developed to date exhibit comparable creep-rupture lives to state-of-the-art advanced austenitic alloys, and superior oxidation resistance in the {approx}923 K to 1173 K (650 C to 900 C) temperature range due to the formation of a protective Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale rather than the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales that form on conventional stainless steel alloys. This article overviews the alloy design approaches used to obtain high-temperature creep strength in AFA alloys via considerations of phase equilibrium from thermodynamic calculations as well as microstructure characterization. Strengthening precipitates under evaluation include MC-type carbides or intermetallic phases such as NiAl-B2, Fe{sub 2}(Mo,Nb)-Laves, Ni{sub 3}Al-L1{sub 2}, etc. in the austenitic single-phase matrix. Creep, tensile, and oxidation properties of the AFA alloys are discussed relative to compositional and microstructural factors.

  6. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Ren, W.

    1995-08-01

    Alloys for design and construction of structural components needed to contain process streams and provide internal structures in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems were examined. Emphasis was placed on high-strength, corrosion-resistant alloys for service at temperatures above 1000 {degrees}F (540{degrees}C). Data were collected that related to fabrication, joining, corrosion protection, and failure criteria. Alloys systems include modified type 310 and 20Cr-25Ni-Nb steels and sulfidation-resistance alloys HR120 and HR160. Types of testing include creep, stress-rupture, creep crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for high temperature service, a modified type 310 stainless steel was developed with a target strength of twice that for standard type 310 stainless steel.

  7. Integrity assessment of the ferritic / austenitic dissimilar weld joint between intermediate heat exchanger and steam generator in fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, T.; Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, S.; Kumar, J. G.; Mathew, M. D.

    2012-07-01

    Integrity of the modified 9Cr-1Mo / alloy 800 dissimilar joint welded with Inconel 182 electrodes has been assessed under creep condition based on the detailed analysis of microstructure and stress distribution across the joint by finite element analysis. A hardness peak at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface and a hardness trough at the inter-critical heat affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic base metal developed. Un-tempered martensite was found at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface to impart high hardness in it; whereas annealing of martensitic structure of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel by inter-critical heating during welding thermal cycle resulted in hardness tough in the inter-critical HAZ. Creep tests were carried out on the joint and ferritic steel base metal at 823 K over a stress range of 160-320 MPa. The joint possessed lower creep rupture strength than its ferritic steel base metal. Failure of the joint at relatively lower stresses occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface; whereas it occurred at inter-critical region of HAZ at moderate stresses. Cavity nucleation associated with the weld interface particles led to premature failure of the joint. Finite element analysis of stress distribution across the weld joint considering the micro-mechanical strength inhomogeneity across it revealed higher von-Mises and principal stresses at the weld interface. These stresses induced preferential creep cavitation at the weld interface. Role of precipitate in enhancing creep cavitation at the weld interface has been elucidated based on the FE analysis of stress distribution across it. (authors)

  8. Austenitic stainless steel alloys having improved resistance to fast neutron-induced swelling

    DOEpatents

    Bloom, Everett E.; Stiegler, James O.; Rowcliffe, Arthur F.; Leitnaker, James M.

    1977-03-08

    The present invention is based on the discovery that radiation-induced voids which occur during fast neutron irradiation can be controlled by small but effective additions of titanium and silicon. The void-suppressing effect of these metals in combination is demonstrated and particularly apparent in austenitic stainless steels.

  9. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    SciTech Connect

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    1981-05-05

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 015-0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the mo content.

  10. Spore heat resistance and specific mineralization.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, G R; Marquis, R E

    1985-01-01

    Spores of Bacillus megaterium ATCC 19213, Bacillus subtilis niger and Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 were converted to fully demineralized, but viable, H forms by controlled acid titration. H forms were more heat sensitive than were native forms, but z values were greater for killing of H spores than those for native spores. Therefore, the differences in heat sensitivity between native and H forms decreased with increasing killing temperature. The increase in heat sensitivity associated with demineralization did not appear to be due to damage to cortex lytic enzymes of the germination system because it could not be moderated by decoating heated H spores and plating them on medium with added lysozyme. H spores could be remineralized by means of back titration with appropriate base solutions. The remineralized spores, except for the Na form, were then more heat resistant than were H spores. Ca and Mn were more effective in restoring resistance than were Mg and K. Generally, the remineralized forms (except for the Na form) had z values greater than those of the native forms but still less than those of the H forms. At lower killing temperatures, the reinstatement of resistance could be related to the extent of remineralization. However, at higher killing temperatures, only a fraction of the mineral was effective in restoring resistance, and higher levels of remineralization did not result in greater resistance. Mineralization is clearly an important factor in spore heat resistance, but the relationship between resistance and mineralization is complex and dependent on killing temperature. PMID:3937495

  11. Corrosion resistance of multilayer hybrid sol-gel coatings deposited on the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, Y. T.; Rondón, E. A.; Rueda, L.; Hernández Barrios, C. A.; Coy, A.; Viejo, F.

    2016-02-01

    In the present work multilayer hybrid sol-gel coatings were synthesized on the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel employed in the fabrication of orthopaedic implants. Hybrid sols were obtained from a mixture of inorganic precursor, TEOS, and organic, GPTMS, using ethanol as solvent, and acetic acid as catalyst. The characterization of the sols was performed using pH measurements, rheological tests and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) for different ageing times. On the other hand, the coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), while the corrosion resistance was evaluated using anodic potentiodynamic polarization in SBF solution at 37±2°C. The results confirmed that sol-gel synthesis employing TEOS-GPTMS systems produces uniform and homogeneous coatings, which enhanced the corrosion resistance with regard to the parent alloy. Moreover, corrosion performance was retained after applying more than one layer (multilayer coatings).

  12. Effects of surface preparation on pitting resistance, residual stress, and stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhouma, A. Ben; Sidhom, H.; Braham, C.; Lédion, J.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.

    2001-10-01

    Surface finishing treatments such as shot blasting and wire brushing can be beneficial in improving the integrity of machined surfaces of austenitic stainless steels. These operations optimize in-service properties such as resistance to pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). In this study, ground steel surfaces were subjected to a series of sand blasting and wire brushing treatments. The surfaces were then characterized by their hardness, surface residual stress state, and resistance to stress corrosion and pitting corrosion. Some samples were selected for depth profiling of residual stress. It is found that surface hardening and the generation of near-surface compressive residual stress are the benefits that can be introduced by sand blasting and brushing operations.

  13. Resistance heating releases structural adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glemser, N. N.

    1967-01-01

    Composite adhesive package bonds components together for testing and enables separation when testing is completed. The composite of adhesives, insulation and a heating element separate easily when an electrical current is applied.

  14. Improvement of the resistance to stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels by cyclic prestraining

    SciTech Connect

    Chambreuil-Paret, A.; Magnin, T.

    1999-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are known to be sensitive to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in hot chloride solutions. The aim of the present study is to find improvements in the SCC behavior of 316L-type austenitic stainless steels in 117 C MgCl{sub 2} solutions. Previously, the authors have proposed the corrosion-enhanced plasticity model (CEPM) to describe the discontinuous cracking process which occurs in SCC. This model is based on localized corrosion (anodic dissolution, and hydrogen absorption)-deformation (dislocations) interactions (CDI). From the framework of this model, it is proposed that a prestraining in fatigue at saturation decreases the SCC sensitivity. This idea is experimentally confirmed for both crack initiation and crack propagation, through the analysis of the SCC behavior by slow-strain-rate tests of single and polycrystals after different prestraining conditions.

  15. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Ren, W.

    1996-08-01

    Materials properties were collected for the design and construction of structural components for use in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems. Alloys systems included 9Cr-1Mo-V steel, modified 316 stainless steel, modified type 310 stainless steel, modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel, modified alloy 800, and two sulfidation resistant alloys: HR160 and HR120. Experimental work was undertaken to expand the databases for potentially useful alloys. Types of testing included creep, stress-rupture, creep-crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile tests. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for service at 700{degrees}C and higher, research emphasis was placed on a modified type 310 stainless steel and a modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel. Both steels were found to have useful strength to 925{degrees}C with good weldability and ductility.

  16. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015 to 0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

  17. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, James M.

    1981-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015-0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

  18. High Nb, Ta, and Al creep- and oxidation-resistant austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-13

    An austenitic stainless steel HTUPS alloy includes, in weight percent: 15 to 30 Ni; 10 to 15 Cr; 2 to 5 Al; 0.6 to 5 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1 W; up to 0.5 Cu; up to 4 Mn; up to 1 Si; 0.05 to 0.15 C; up to 0.15 B; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni wherein said alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, said particles comprising at least one composition selected from the group consisting of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure, said austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  19. Improved heat-resistant garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, R. S.

    1970-01-01

    Fabrication method for protective clothing eliminates the common heat-short by avoiding the stitch which is common to all layers, and preventing external exposure of any stitch to the outer environment. A unique overlap arrangement is described and additional protective methods are discussed.

  20. Plasma treatment of heat-resistant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, V. A.; Kosmachev, P. V.; Skripnikova, N. K.; Bezukhov, K. A.

    2015-11-01

    Refractory lining of thermal generating units is exposed to chemical, thermal, and mechanical attacks. The degree of fracture of heat-resistant materials depends on the chemical medium composition, the process temperature and the material porosity. As is known, a shortterm exposure of the surface to low-temperature plasma (LTP) makes possible to create specific coatings that can improve the properties of workpieces. The aim of this work is to produce the protective coating on heat-resistant chamotte products using the LTP technique. Experiments have shown that plasma treatment of chamotte products modifies the surface, and a glass-ceramic coating enriched in mullite is formed providing the improvement of heat resistance. For increasing heat resistance of chamotte refractories, pastes comprising mixtures of Bacor, alumina oxide, and chamot were applied to their surfaces in different ratios. It is proved that the appropriate coating cannot be created if only one of heat-resistant components is used. The required coatings that can be used and recommended for practical applications are obtained only with the introduction of powder chamot. The paste composition of 50% chamot, 25% Bacor, and 25% alumina oxide exposed to plasma treatment, has demonstrated the most uniform surface fusion.

  1. Some Properties of Heat-Resistant and Heat-Sensitive Strains of Clostridium perfringens I. Heat Resistance and Toxigenicity1

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Karl F.; Strong, Dorothy H.

    1967-01-01

    Heat resistance at 100 C (D-values), sporulating ratios, toxigenicity for mice, and lecithinase activity (as micrograms per milliliter of enzyme, ascertained by the lecithovitellin reaction) were determined for four strains of Clostridium perfringens. A definite inverse relationship between thermal resistance and toxigenicity was found. The D-values ranged from 17.6 for the most heat-resistant strain to 0.3 for the strain possessing the least heat resistance, with corresponding lecithinase activities from 25 to 133 μg/ml of enzyme. The sporulating ratios did not differ greatly between the strains. The heat stability of the toxin was greater at 100 C than at 75 C. There was a noticeable difference between the heat stabilities of the toxin in the culture fluids of the heat-sensitive and heat-resistant strains at pH 7.0 when the toxic filtrates were held at 100 C. At a holding temperature of 75 C, a similar but lesser difference was observed at pH 5.5. Heat resistance and lecithinase activity did not change when a substrain of the least heat-resistant parent strain was obtained through heat selection by a single transfer, or when the most heat-resistant strain was transferred serially 12 times. PMID:4289809

  2. The Effect of Aging Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 10Cr20Ni25Mo1.5NbN Austenitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhiyuan; Sha, Wanhua; Zhao, Qinxin; Wang, Chongbin; Wang, Jianyong; Jiang, Weiwei

    2016-01-01

    The effect of aging heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 10Cr20Ni25Mo1.5NbN austenitic steel was investigated in this article. The microstructure was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. Results show that the microstructure of 10Cr20Ni25Mo1.5NbN austenitic is composed of austenite. This steel was strengthened by precipitates of secondary phases that were mainly M23C6 carbides and NbCrN nitrides. As aging treatment time increased, the tensile strength first rose (0-3,000 h) and then fell (3,000-5,000 h) due to the decrease of high density of dislocations. The impact absorbed energy decreased sharply, causing the sulfides to precipitate at the grain boundary. Therefore, the content of sulfur should be strictly controlled in the steelmaking process.

  3. Turbulent resistive heating of solar coronal arches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, G.

    1983-01-01

    The possibility that coronal heating occurs by means of anomalous Joule heating by electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is examined, with consideration given to currents running from foot of a loop to the other. It is assumed that self-fields generated by the currents are absent and currents follow the direction of the magnetic field, allowing the plasma cylinder to expand radially. Ion and electron heating rates are defined within the cylinder, together with longitudinal conduction and convection, radiation and cross-field transport, all in terms of Coulomb and turbulent effects. The dominant force is identified as electrostatic ion cyclotron instability, while ion acoustic modes remain stable. Rapid heating from an initial temperature of 10 eV to 100-1000 eV levels is calculated, with plasma reaching and maintaining a temperature in the 100 eV range. Strong heating is also possible according to the turbulent Ohm's law and by resistive heating.

  4. Gas-Solid Interactions During Nonisothermal Heat Treatment of a High-Strength CrMnCN Austenitic Steel Powder: Influence of Atmospheric Conditions and Heating Rate on the Densification Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasokha, Nikolaj; Weber, Sebastian; Huth, Stephan; Zumsande, Kathrin; Theisen, Werner

    2012-11-01

    This work deals with gas-solid interactions between a high-alloyed steel powder and the surrounding atmosphere during continuous heating. It is motivated by the recently developed corrosion-resistant CrMnCN austenitic cast steels. Here, powder metallurgical processing would be desirable to manufacture highly homogeneous parts and/or novel corrosion-resistant metal-matrix composites. However, the successful use of this new production route calls for a comprehensive investigation of interactions between the sintering atmosphere and the metallic powder to prevent undesirable changes to the chemical composition, e.g., degassing of nitrogen or evaporation of manganese. In this study, dilatometric measurements combined with residual gas analysis, high-temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations provided detailed information about the influence of different atmospheric conditions on the microstructure, constitution, and densification behavior of a gas-atomized CrMnCN steel powder during continuous heating. Intensive desorption of nitrogen led to the conclusion that a vacuum atmosphere is not suitable for powder metallurgical (PM) processing. Exposure to an N2-containing atmosphere resulted in the formation of nitrides and lattice expansion. Experimental findings have shown that the N content can be controlled by the nitrogen partial pressure. Furthermore, the reduction of surface oxides because of a carbothermal reaction at elevated temperatures and the resulting enhancement of the powder's densification behavior are discussed in this work.

  5. Heat- and chemical-resistant oxdiazole elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Kwong, H.; Shalhoub, I. M.

    1980-01-01

    Heat and chemical resistant polymers with triazine crosslinks are prepared by thermal condensation reactions to form 1,2,4-oxdiazole linkages. They are compounded with variety of fillers, extenders, and modifiers for numerous applications in which stability, impermiability to liquids and gases, good plasticity, and elasticity or rigidity are important.

  6. Simulation of the elastic deformation of laser-welded joints of an austenitic corrosion-resistant steel and a titanium alloy with an intermediate copper insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugacheva, N. B.; Myasnikova, M. V.; Michurov, N. S.

    2016-02-01

    The macro- and microstructures and the distribution of elements and of the values of the microhardness and contact modulus of elasticity along the height and width of the weld metal and heat-affected zone of austenitic corrosion-resistant 12Kh18N10T steel (Russian analog of AISI 321) and titanium alloy VT1-0 (Grade 2) with an intermediate copper insert have been studied after laser welding under different conditions. The structural inhomogeneity of the joint obtained according to one of the regimes selected has been shown: the material of the welded joint represents a supersaturated solid solution of Fe, Ni, Cr, and Ti in the crystal lattice of copper with a uniformly distributed particles of intermetallic compounds Ti(Fe,Cr) and TiCu3. At the boundaries with steel and with the titanium alloy, diffusion zones with thicknesses of 0.1-0.2 mm are formed that represent supersaturated solid solutions based on iron and titanium. The strength of such a joint was 474 MPa, which corresponds to the level of strength of the titanium alloy. A numerical simulation of the mechanical behavior of welded joints upon the elastic tension-compression has been performed taking into account their structural state, which makes it possible to determine the amplitude values of the deformations of the material of the weld.

  7. Heat and chemical resistance of enterococci.

    PubMed

    Bradley, C R; Fraise, A P

    1996-11-01

    Recent reports have highlighted the tolerance of vancomycin-resistant strains of enterococci to heat. This study examined the tolerance of vancomycin-resistant and sensitive strains of enterococci and an NCTC type strain to 65, 71 and 80 degrees C, and also to low concentrations of a chlorine-releasing agent, alcohol and glutaraldehyde. Variation in the tolerance to chemicals was observed but there was no correlation between vancomycin resistance and tolerance to chemical disinfectants. The NCTC type strain was killed within the time/temperature parameters set by the Department of Health for thermal washer/disinfectors, i.e. 65 degrees C for 10 min, 71 degrees C for 3 min and 80 degrees C for 1 min. However, the clinical strains showed varying resistance to heat, irrespective of their vancomycin susceptibility. One strain survived 80 degrees C for 3 min. These results showed that clinical isolates can be resistant to commonly used disinfection processes, although the practical significance of these results is debatable. PMID:8923273

  8. Hot Ductility Behaviors in the Weld Heat-Affected Zone of Nitrogen-Alloyed Fe-18Cr-10Mn Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Tae-Ho; Hong, Hyun-Uk

    2015-04-01

    Hot ductility behaviors in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of nitrogen-alloyed Fe-18Cr-10Mn austenitic stainless steels with different nitrogen contents were evaluated through hot tension tests using Gleeble simulator. The results of Gleeble simulations indicated that hot ductility in the HAZs deteriorated due to the formation of δ-ferrite and intergranular Cr2N particles. In addition, the amount of hot ductility degradation was strongly affected by the fraction of δ-ferrite.

  9. Method for producing heat-resistant semi-inorganic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yajima, S.; Okamura, K.; Shishido, T.; Hasegawa, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The method for producing a heat resistant, semi-inorganic compound is discussed. Five examples in which various alcohols, phenols, and aromatic carbonic acids are used to test heat resistance and solubility are provided.

  10. Intergranular Cracking Susceptibility of 2.25Cr Heat-Resistant Steels Depending on Alloying Elements and Impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hyun Je; Heo, Nam Hoe; Kim, Sung-Joon

    2016-05-01

    The intergranular cracking susceptibility of 2.25Cr heat-resistant steels increases with increasing bulk phosphorus content. This is due to the increase in phosphorus segregation concentration of prior austenite grain boundaries (PAGBs) and the prior austenite grain boundary/carbide interfaces (GCIs) with increasing bulk phosphorus content. Moreover, the susceptibility is higher in tungsten-added steels than the molybdenum-added steel. This is attributed to the higher driving force for carbide formation of tungsten which causes more active carbide formation in the tungsten-added steel, the consequent absence of the repulsive segregation between carbon and phosphorus, and the final higher phosphorus segregation concentration at the PAGBs and the GCIs. Additionally, the absence of sulfur segregation at the PAGBs and the GCIs of the molybdenum-added steel, which arises from the repulsive segregation between carbon and sulfur, acts as an additional factor which lowers the intergranular cracking susceptibility.

  11. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Ren, W.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of the research is to provide databases and design criteria to assist in the selection of optimum alloys for construction of components needed to contain process streams in advanced heat recovery and hot-gas cleanup systems. Typical components include: steam line piping and superheater tubing for low emission boilers (600 to 700{degrees}C), heat exchanger tubing for advanced steam cycles and topping cycle systems (650 to 800{degrees}C), foil materials for recuperators, on advanced turbine systems (700 to 750{degrees}C), and tubesheets for barrier filters, liners for piping, cyclones, and blowback system tubing for hot-gas cleanup systems (850 to 1000{degrees}C). The materials being examined fall into several classes, depending on which of the advanced heat recovery concepts is of concern. These classes include martensitic steels for service to 650{degrees}C, lean stainless steels and modified 25Cr-30Ni steels for service to 700{degrees}C, modified 25Cr-20Ni steels for service to 900{degrees}C, and high Ni-Cr-Fe or Ni-Cr-Co-Fe alloys for service to 1000{degrees}C.

  12. Improved Erosion Resistance of Austenitic Stainless Steel in Corrosive Environment with Gas Tungsten Arc Melt Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Aiguo; Guo, Mianhuan; Ma, Yinan; Hu, Hailong

    2013-06-01

    Cr3C2-NiCr particles were injected into surface of 304 stainless steel using a gas tungsten arc melt injection process. Microstructure, composition, and phases in the treated layer were characterized. Hardness of the treated layer was tested. Corrosion resistance and erosion resistance of the treated layer were tested in 5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution. Polarization curve was obtained by an electrochemical measuring system. An untreated substrate was tested for comparison. The results showed that large amount of (Cr, Fe)7C3 carbides were formed in the treated layer. Corrosion potential of the substrate was increased from -1.04 to -0.618 V. But the passivation effect was weakened, and the corrosion current density became higher. The hardness of the treated layer was greatly improved, from Hv245.0 to Hv1098.9. The erosion resistance of the treated layer was 1.5 times higher than that of the untreated substrate.

  13. Genetic determinants of heat resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Ryan G.; Zheng, Jinshui; Garcia-Hernandez, Rigoberto; Ruan, Lifang; Gänzle, Michael G.; McMullen, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli AW1.7 is a heat resistant food isolate and the occurrence of pathogenic strains with comparable heat resistance may pose a risk to food safety. To identify the genetic determinants of heat resistance, 29 strains of E. coli that differed in their of heat resistance were analyzed by comparative genomics. Strains were classified as highly heat resistant strains, exhibiting a D60-value of more than 6 min; moderately heat resistant strains, exhibiting a D60-value of more than 1 min; or as heat sensitive. A ~14 kb genomic island containing 16 predicted open reading frames encoding putative heat shock proteins and proteases was identified only in highly heat resistant strains. The genomic island was termed the locus of heat resistance (LHR). This putative operon is flanked by mobile elements and possesses >99% sequence identity to genomic islands contributing to heat resistance in Cronobacter sakazakii and Klebsiella pneumoniae. An additional 41 LHR sequences with >87% sequence identity were identified in 11 different species of β- and γ-proteobacteria. Cloning of the full length LHR conferred high heat resistance to the heat sensitive E. coli AW1.7ΔpHR1 and DH5α. The presence of the LHR correlates perfectly to heat resistance in several species of Enterobacteriaceae and occurs at a frequency of 2% of all E. coli genomes, including pathogenic strains. This study suggests the LHR has been laterally exchanged among the β- and γ-proteobacteria and is a reliable indicator of high heat resistance in E. coli. PMID:26441869

  14. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1993-07-01

    Commercial and developmental alloys were evaluated in support of advanced steam cycle and combined cycle technology. Working with industrial groups, Grade 91 steel, which is a candidate for main steam line piping and superheater tubing in advanced steam cycle plants, was re-evaluated to examine metallurgical factors that influence long-time performance to 600{degree}C. Deformation models and aging effect models were developed. Testing of corrosion-resistant filler metals for tubing was extended to times approaching 30,000 h. Good strengths were observed. Modified Type 310 stainless steels were examined to 927{degree}C. It was found that these steels had up to twice the strength of standard Type 310H stainless steel. The behavior of aluminum-bearing, alloys and high chromium alloys was examined for potential applications to 870{degree}C. Thermal cycling of clad tubing was undertaken, and good performance was found.

  15. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot-gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1997-12-01

    Materials properties were collected for the design and construction of structural components for use in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems. Alloys systems included 9Cr-1Mo-V steel, modified 316 stainless steel, modified type 310 stainless steel, modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel, and modified alloy 800. Experimental work was undertaken to expand the databases for potentially useful alloys. Types of testing included creep, stress-rupture, creep-crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile tests. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for service at 700 C and higher, research emphasis was placed on a modified type 310 stainless steel and a modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel. Both steels were found to have useful strength to 925 C with good weldability and ductility.

  16. Heat resistance poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshii, F.; Makuuchi, K.; Darwis, D.; Iriawan, T.; Razzak, M. T.; Rosiak, Janusz M.

    1995-08-01

    Six methods were used to evaluate the heat resistance of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel prepared by a combination of electron beam irradiation and acetalization of PVA. The physical properties of the hydrogel depended on the degree of acetilization which was affected by content of water in PVA sheet of acetalization in formaldehyde solution at 60°C. It was found that the optimum water content was 20-30%. The acetalized PVA sheet gave maximum tensile strength in electron beams irradiation at 100 kGy. The tensile strength of the hydrogel film increased to 20 MPa from 14 MPa by the irradiation. Heat resistance of the hydrogel was evaluated by measuring the mechanical properties after sterilization in a steam autoclave at 121°C for 90 min. The tensile strength decreased to 10 MPa whereas the elongation at break increased to 300%. The tackiness of the hydrogel was improved by radiation grafting of acrylic acid. Wholesomeness of the hydrogel as a wound dressing was evaluated by attaching to a burn or wound of the back skin of marmots. Advantages of the hydrogel over a gauze dressing were homogeneous adhesion to the affected parts, easy removal without damage to renewed skin and slightly faster rate of reconstruction of the injured skin.

  17. Atomic-scale decoration for improving the pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y T; Zhang, B; Zheng, S J; Wang, J; San, X Y; Ma, X L

    2014-01-01

    Stainless steels are susceptible to the localized pitting corrosion that leads to a huge loss to our society. Studies in the past decades confirmed that the pitting events generally originate from the local dissolution in MnS inclusions which are more or less ubiquitous in stainless steels. Although a recent study indicated that endogenous MnCr2O4 nano-octahedra within the MnS medium give rise to local nano-galvanic cells which are responsible for the preferential dissolution of MnS, effective solutions of restraining the cells from viewpoint of electrochemistry are being tantalizingly searched. Here we report such a galvanic corrosion can be greatly resisted via bathing the steels in Cu(2+)-containing solutions. This chemical bath generates Cu(2-δ)S layers on the surfaces of MnS inclusions, invalidating the nano-galvanic cells. Our study provides a low-cost approach via an atomic scale decoration to improve the pitting corrosion resistance of stainless steels in a volume-treated manner. PMID:24398863

  18. Atomic-scale decoration for improving the pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y. T.; Zhang, B.; Zheng, S. J.; Wang, J.; San, X. Y.; Ma, X. L.

    2014-01-01

    Stainless steels are susceptible to the localized pitting corrosion that leads to a huge loss to our society. Studies in the past decades confirmed that the pitting events generally originate from the local dissolution in MnS inclusions which are more or less ubiquitous in stainless steels. Although a recent study indicated that endogenous MnCr2O4 nano-octahedra within the MnS medium give rise to local nano-galvanic cells which are responsible for the preferential dissolution of MnS, effective solutions of restraining the cells from viewpoint of electrochemistry are being tantalizingly searched. Here we report such a galvanic corrosion can be greatly resisted via bathing the steels in Cu2+-containing solutions. This chemical bath generates Cu2-δS layers on the surfaces of MnS inclusions, invalidating the nano-galvanic cells. Our study provides a low-cost approach via an atomic scale decoration to improve the pitting corrosion resistance of stainless steels in a volume-treated manner.

  19. Atomic-scale decoration for improving the pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y. T.; Zhang, B.; Zheng, S. J.; Wang, J.; San, X. Y.; Ma, X. L.

    2014-01-01

    Stainless steels are susceptible to the localized pitting corrosion that leads to a huge loss to our society. Studies in the past decades confirmed that the pitting events generally originate from the local dissolution in MnS inclusions which are more or less ubiquitous in stainless steels. Although a recent study indicated that endogenous MnCr2O4 nano-octahedra within the MnS medium give rise to local nano-galvanic cells which are responsible for the preferential dissolution of MnS, effective solutions of restraining the cells from viewpoint of electrochemistry are being tantalizingly searched. Here we report such a galvanic corrosion can be greatly resisted via bathing the steels in Cu2+-containing solutions. This chemical bath generates Cu2−δS layers on the surfaces of MnS inclusions, invalidating the nano-galvanic cells. Our study provides a low-cost approach via an atomic scale decoration to improve the pitting corrosion resistance of stainless steels in a volume-treated manner. PMID:24398863

  20. Microstructure of heat resistant chromium steel weld metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrén, Hans-Olof; Cai, Guangjun; Svensson, Lars-Erik

    1995-03-01

    The microstructure of weld metals of 2.25Cr-1Mo, 5Cr-0.5Mo, 9Cr-1Mo and 12Cr-1Mo type steels was studied with electron microscopy and atom probe field ion microscopy. Many different types of carbides and nitrides precipitated during welding and post-weld heat treatment (MC, M 2C, M 3C, M 7C 3, M 23C 6, MN, M 2N). The eutectoid decomposition of retained austenite gave large aggregates of carbides which were found to be detrimental to the impact toughness of the weld metal.

  1. Observations of Ferrite/Austenite Transformations in the Heat Affected Zone of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Spot Welds Using Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T; Elmer, J; Babu, S

    2003-10-29

    Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD) measurements are made in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) spot welds. Both the {gamma} {yields} {delta} and {delta} {yields} {gamma} transformations are monitored as a function of time during the rapid spot weld heating and cooling cycles. These observations are then correlated with calculated thermal cycles. Where the peak temperatures are highest ({approx}1342 C), the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation proceeds to completion, leaving a ferritic microstructure at the end of heating. With lower peak temperatures, the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation proceeds to only partial completion, resulting in a microstructure containing both transformed and untransformed austenite. Further analyses of the individual diffraction patterns show shifts in the peak positions and peak widths as a function of both time and temperature. In addition, these changes in the peak characteristics are correlated with measured changes in the ferrite volume fraction. Such changes in the peak positions and widths during the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation provide an indication of changes occurring in each phase. These changes in peak properties can be correlated with the diffusion of nitrogen and other substitutional alloying elements, which are recognized as the primary mechanisms for this transformation. Upon cooling, the {delta} {yields} {gamma} transformation is observed to proceed from both the completely and partially transformed microstructural regions in the TRXRD data. An examination of the resulting microstructures confirms the TRXRD observation as the evidence shows that austenite both nucleates and grows from the ferritic microstructure at locations closest to the fusion zone boundary and grows from untransformed austenite grains at locations further from this boundary.

  2. Direct estimation of austenitic grain dimensions in heat affected zones of a martensitic steel from EBSD images.

    PubMed

    Altendorf, H; Faessel, M; Jeulin, D; Latourte, F

    2015-05-01

    In the context of automated analyses of electron-backscattered-diffraction images, we present in this paper a novel method to automatically extract morphological properties of prior austenitic grains in martensitic steels based on raw crystallographic orientation maps. This quantification includes the estimation of the mean chord length in specific directions, with in addition the reconstruction of the mean shape of austenitic grains inducing anisotropic shape properties. The approach is based on the morphological measure of covariance on a decision curve of grain fidelity per disorientation angle. These efforts have been motivated by the need of realistic microstructures to perform micromechanical studies of grain boundary localized damage phenomenons in steels, one example being the type IV fracture phenomenon occurring in welded joints of grade P91/P92 steel. This failure is attributed to a change of the microstructure due to thermal gradients arising during the welding process. To precisely capture the relationships between microstructural changes and mechanical fields localization in a polycrystalline aggregate, we first need to achieve a reasonable stochastic model of its microstructure, which relies on a detailed knowledge of the microstructural morphology. As martensitic steels possess multiscale microstructures composed of prior austenitic grains, packets and laths, a relevant modelling strategy has to be proposed to account for the observed hierarchies. With this objective, this paper focuses on the larger scale entities present in the microstructure, namely, the austenitic grains. PMID:25689129

  3. Hypersonic Composites Resist Extreme Heat and Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Through research contracts with NASA, Materials and Electrochemical Research Corporation (MER), of Tucson, Arizona, contributed a number of technologies to record-breaking hypersonic flights. Through this research, MER developed a coating that successfully passed testing to simulate Mach 10 conditions, as well as provide several additional carbon-carbon (C-C) composite components for the flights. MER created all of the leading edges for the X-43A test vehicles at Dryden-considered the most critical parts of this experimental craft. In addition to being very heat resistant, the coating had to be very lightweight and thin, as the aircraft was designed to very precise specifications and could not afford to have a bulky coating. MER patented its carbon-carbon (C-C) composite process and then formed a spinoff company, Frontier Materials Corporation (FMC), also based in Tucson. FMC is using the patent in conjunction with low-cost PAN (polyacrylonitrile)-based fibers to introduce these materials to the commercial markets. The C-C composites are very lightweight and exceptionally strong and stiff, even at very high temperatures. The composites have been used in industrial heating applications, the automotive and aerospace industries, as well as in glass manufacturing and on semiconductors. Applications also include transfer components for glass manufacturing and structural members for carrier support in semiconductor processing.

  4. A Feasibility Study on Low Temperature Thermochemical Treatments of Austenitic Stainless Steel in Fluidized Bed Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruman, Esa; Sun, Yong; Triwiyanto, Askar; Manurung, Yupiter H. P.; Adesta, Erry Y.

    2011-04-01

    In this work, the feasibility of using an industrial fluidized bed furnace to perform low temperature thermochemical treatments of austenitic stainless steels has been studied, with the aim to produce expanded austenite layers with combined wear and corrosion resistance, similar to those achievable by plasma and gaseous processes. Several low temperature thermochemical treatments were studied, including nitriding, carburizing, combined nitridingcarburizing (hybrid treatment), and sequential carburizing and nitriding. The results demonstrate that it is feasible to produce expanded austenite layers on the investigated austenitic stainless steel by the fluidized bed heat treatment technique, thus widening the application window for the novel low temperature processes. The results also demonstrate that the fluidized bed furnace is the most effective for performing the hybrid treatment, which involves the simultaneous incorporation of nitrogen and carbon together into the surface region of the component in nitrogen and carbon containing atmospheres. Such hybrid treatment produces a thicker and harder layer than the other three processes investigated.

  5. A Comparison of the Corrosion Resistance of Iron-Based Amorphous Metals and Austenitic Alloys in Synthetic Brines at Elevated Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C

    2008-11-25

    Several hard, corrosion-resistant and neutron-absorbing iron-based amorphous alloys have now been developed that can be applied as thermal spray coatings. These new alloys include relatively high concentrations of Cr, Mo, and W for enhanced corrosion resistance, and substantial B to enable both glass formation and neutron absorption. The corrosion resistances of these novel alloys have been compared to that of several austenitic alloys in a broad range of synthetic brines, with and without nitrate inhibitor, at elevated temperature. Linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy have been used for in situ measurement of corrosion rates for prolonged periods of time, while scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) have been used for ex situ characterization of samples at the end of tests. The application of these new coatings for the protection of spent nuclear fuel storage systems, equipment in nuclear service, steel-reinforced concrete will be discussed.

  6. High post-irradiation ductility thermomechanical treatment for precipitation strengthened austenitic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Laidler, James J.; Borisch, Ronald R.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1982-01-01

    A method for improving the post-irradiation ductility is described which prises a solution heat treatment following which the materials are cold worked. They are included to demonstrate the beneficial effect of this treatment on the swelling resistance and the ductility of these austenitic precipitation hardenable alloys.

  7. Effect of chemical composition and ferrite content on room temperature SCC behavior of austenitic weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Raghunatha Rao, B.; Prasad Rao, K.; Iyer, K.J.L. )

    1993-03-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in the welded condition especially in chemical, petrochemical, thermal power, and nuclear industries where they are subjected to stresses in corrosive environments. Since austenitic stainless steel weld metals invariably contain some delta ferrite to avoid hot cracking, the effect of ferrite on the stress corrosion cracking behavior is important. Austenitic weld metals with different alloy additions and different ferrite contents were investigated for their resistance to room temperature stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in 5 N H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] + 0.5 N NaCl solution. It was found that the delta ferrite content in the weld metals had a predominant effect on the SCC resistance. Higher ferrite contents increased the tendency for SCC. Post-weld heat treatment of weld metals resulted in the improvement of the SCC resistance.

  8. Effect of Friction-Induced Deformation on the Structure, Microhardness, and Wear Resistance of Austenitic Chromium—Nickel Stainless Steel Subjected to Subsequent Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, L. G.; Chernenko, N. L.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of plastic deformation that occurs in the zone of the sliding friction contact on structural transformations in the 12Kh18N9T austenitic steel subjected to subsequent 1-h oxidation in air at temperatures of 300-800°C, as well as on its wear resistance, has been studied. It has been shown that severe deformation induced by dry sliding friction produces the two-phase nanocrystalline γ + α structure in the surface layer of the steel ~10 μm thick. This structure has the microhardness of 5.2 GPa. Subsequent oxidation of steel at temperatures of 300-500°C leads to an additional increase in the microhardness of its deformed surface layer to the value of 7.0 GPa. This is due to the active saturation of the austenite and the strain-assisted martensite (α') with the oxygen atoms, which diffuse deep into the metal over the boundaries of the γ and α' nanocrystals with an increased rate. The concentration of oxygen in the surface layer of the steel and in wear products reaches 8 wt %. The atoms of the dissolved oxygen efficiently pin dislocations in the γ and α' phases, which enhances the strength and wear resistance of the surface of the 12Kh18N9T steel. The oxidation of steel at temperatures of 550-800°C under a light normal load (98 N) results in the formation of a large number of Fe3O4 (magnetite) nanoparticles, which increase the resistance of the steel to thermal softening and its wear resistance during dry sliding friction in a pair with 40Kh13 steel. Under a heavy normal load (196 N), the toughness of 12Kh18N9T steel and, therefore, the wear resistance of its surface layer decrease due to the presence of the brittle oxide phase.

  9. Assessment of Retained Austenite in AISI D2 Tool Steel Using Magnetic Hysteresis and Barkhausen Noise Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahrobaee, Saeed; Kashefi, Mehrdad

    2015-03-01

    Inaccurate heat treatment process could result in excessive amount of retained austenite, which degrades the mechanical properties, like strength, wear resistance, and hardness of cold work tool steel parts. Thus, to control the mechanical properties, quantitative measurement of the retained austenite is a critical step in optimizing the heat-treating parameters. X-ray diffraction method is the most frequently used technique for this purpose. This technique is, however, destructive and time consuming. Furthermore, it is not applicable to 100% quality inspection of industrial parts. In the present paper, the influence of austenitizing temperature on the retained austenite content and hardness of AISI D2 tool steel has been studied. Additionally, nondestructive magnetic hysteresis parameters of the samples including coercivity, magnetic saturation, and maximum differential permeability as well as their magnetic Barkhausen noise features (RMS peak voltage and peak position) have been investigated. The results revealed direct relations between magnetic saturation, differential permeability, and MBN peak amplitude with increasing austenitizing temperature due to the retained austenite formation. Besides, both parameters of coercivity and peak position had an inverse correlation with the retained austenite fraction.

  10. Microstructure and mechanical properties of heat-resistant 12% Cr ferritic-martensitic steel EK-181 after thermomechanical treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polekhina, N. A.; Litovchenko, I. Yu.; Tyumentsev, A. N.; Astafurova, E. G.; Chernov, V. M.; Leontyeva-Smirnova, M. V.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of high-temperature thermomechanical treatment (TMT) with the deformation in the austenitic region on the features of microstructure, phase transformations and mechanical properties of low-activation 12% Cr ferritic-martensitic steel EK-181 is investigated. It is established, that directly after thermomechanical treatment (without tempering) the sizes and density of V(CN) particles are comparable with those after a traditional heat treatment (air quenching and tempering at 720°C, 3 h), where these particles are formed only during tempering. It causes the increasing of the yield strength of the steel up to ≈1450 MPa at room temperature and up to ≈430 MPa at the test temperature T = 650°C. The potential of microstructure modification by this treatment aimed at improving heat resistance of steel is discussed.

  11. Effect of flow twisting on hydraulic resistance and heat exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslov, V. Ya.; Makarov, N. A.

    1989-02-01

    On the basis of dimensional analysis through a differentiated approach to the dimensions of length we have obtained formulas for the effect of flow twisting in a circular tube on the hydraulic resistance and exchange of heat.

  12. Applications of resistive heating in gas chromatography: a review.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Matthew R; Hilder, Emily F; Shellie, Robert A

    2013-11-25

    Gas chromatography is widely applied to separate, identify, and quantify components of samples in a timely manner. Increasing demand for analytical throughput, instrument portability, environmental sustainability, and more economical analysis necessitates the development of new gas chromatography instrumentation. The applications of resistive column heating technologies have been espoused for nearly thirty years and resistively heated gas chromatography has been commercially available for the last ten years. Despite this lengthy period of existence, resistively heated gas chromatography has not been universally adopted. This low rate of adoption may be partially ascribed to the saturation of the market with older convection oven technology, coupled with other analytical challenges such as sampling, injection, detection and data processing occupying research. This article assesses the advantages and applications of resistive heating in gas chromatography and discusses practical considerations associated with adoption of this technology. PMID:24216193

  13. Vapor-Resistant Heat-Pipe Artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dussinger, Peter M.; Shaubach, Robert M.; Buchko, Matt

    1991-01-01

    Vapor lock in heat pipe delayed or prevented. Modifications of wick prevent flow of vapor into, or formation of vapor in, liquid-return artery. Small pores of fine-grained sintered wick help to prevent formation of large bubbles. Slotted tube offers few nucleation sites for bubbles. Improves return of liquid in heat pipe.

  14. In-vitro long term and electrochemical corrosion resistance of cold deformed nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels in simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Talha, Mohd; Behera, C K; Sinha, O P

    2014-07-01

    This work was focused on the evaluation of the corrosion behavior of deformed (10% and 20% cold work) and annealed (at 1050 °C for 15 min followed by water quenching) Ni-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels (HNSs) in simulated body fluid at 37°C using weight loss method (long term), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to understand the surface morphology of the alloys after polarization test. It has been observed that cold working had a significant influence on the corrosion resistant properties of these alloys. The weight loss and corrosion rates were observed to decrease with increasing degree of cold working and nitrogen content in the alloy. The corrosion resistance of the material is directly related to the resistance of the passive oxide film formed on its surface which was enhanced with cold working and nitrogen content. It was also observed that corrosion current densities were decreased and corrosion potentials were shifted to more positive values. By seeing pit morphology under SEM, shallower and smaller pits were associated with HNSs and cold worked samples, indicating that corrosion resistance increases with increasing nitrogen content and degree of cold deformation. X-ray diffraction profiles of annealed as well as deformed alloys were revealed and there is no evidence for formation of martensite or any other secondary phases. PMID:24857514

  15. Heat- And Oxidation-Resistant Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Alloys coated with electrically conductive ceramics used to make strong, oxidation-resistant electrodes for electrochemical cells operating at temperatures of 1,000 to 1,300 degrees C. Fe3Al or Ni3Al coated with strontium-doped lanthanum manganite more resistant to chemical attack than all-metal electrode, less brittle than all-ceramic electrode, and less costly than either alternative.

  16. Sporulation, Heat Resistance, and Biological Properties of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, S.; Seo, N.; Nakagawa, M.

    1969-01-01

    A sporulation medium for 134 Clostridium perfringens strains, including types A, B, C, D, E, and F, was devised according to Grelet's observation that sporulation occurred when cultural environment became limited in any nutritional requirement indispensable for the growth of the organism. Sporulation took place most prominently when 10% cooked-meat broth (pH 7.2) containing 3% Proteose Peptone and 1% glucose was used for the preculture and 2% Poli Peptone medium (pH 7.8) was used for the subculture medium. Sometimes, terminal spores could be observed. A correlation between sporulation and heat resistance was examined by use of C. perfringens strains isolated from samples heated at different temperatures. Almost all strains isolated from unheated samples and from those heated at lower temperatures gave rise to spores in our sporulation medium, but the spores were weakly heat-resistant, whereas strains isolated from samples heated at 100 C for 60 min were highly heat-resistant but sporulated poorly. A majority of these heat-resistant strains were non-gelatinolytic and definitely salicin-fermenting. Images PMID:4304763

  17. Bonding Heat-Resistant Fabric to Tile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, J. W.; Smiser, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    Acid etching, densification, and silica cement ensure strong bond. Key step in preparation for bonding to glazed tile is etching quartz fabric and tile with acid. This increases adhesion of silica cement used to form bond. Procedures use high-temperature materials exclusively and therefore suitable for securing flexible seals and heat barriers around doors and viewing ports in furnaces and kilns.

  18. Kinetics of isochronal austenization in modified high Cr ferritic heat-resistant steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chenxi; Liu, Yongchang; Zhang, Dantian; Yan, Zesheng

    2011-12-01

    Employment of high Cr ferritic steels as a main structural material is considered as a way to achieve economical competitiveness of main steam pipe and nuclear reactors in power plants. Differential dilatometry and microstructure observation were employed to investigate the isochronal austenitic transformation of the modified high Cr ferritic steel. The kinetics of the isochronal austenitic transformation were described by a phase-transformation model involving site saturation (pre-existing nuclei), diffusion-controlled growth, and incorporating an impingement correction. The experimental results and kinetic analysis indicate that an increase of the heating rate promotes the diffusion-controlled austenitic transformation. The dissolving degree of precipitates during the austenization process affects the activation energy for diffusion and the undissolved precipitates lead to an increase of the onset temperature of the subsequent martensite transformation upon cooling.

  19. Heat resistance of Yersinia enterocolitica grown at different temperatures and heated in different media.

    PubMed

    Pagán, R; Mañas, P; Raso, J; Trepat, F J

    1999-03-01

    In the range of 4-20 degrees C, growth temperature did not influence the heat resistance at 54-66 degrees C for Yersinia enterocolitica at pH 7 in citrate phosphate buffer. However, when cells were grown at 37 degrees C. the D62 increased from 0.044 to 0.17 min. This increase was constant at all heating temperatures tested (z = 5.7-5.8). Growth temperature did not influence the proportion of heat-damaged cells after a heat treatment, as measured by their response to a 2% of sodium chloride added to the recovery medium. The sensitivity of heat treated cells to nisin or lysozyme depended on growth temperature: Whereas the number of cells grown at 4 degrees C surviving heat treatment was the same regardless of the presence of 100 IU/ml of nisin or 100 microg/ml of lysozyme in the recovery medium, that of cells grown at 37 degrees C was, in these media, lower. The pH of maximum heat resistance in citrate phosphate buffer was pH 7 for cells grown at 37 degrees C, but pH 5 for those grown at 4 degrees C. In both suspensions the magnitude of the effect of pH on heat resistance was constant at all heating temperatures. For cells grown at 4 degrees C the heat resistance at 54-66 degrees C, in skimmed milk or pH 7 buffer, was the same. For cells grown at 37 degrees C this also applied for heat treatment at 66 degrees C but at 56 degrees C the heat resistance in skimmed milk was higher. PMID:10357274

  20. Heat resistant polymers of oxidized styrylphosphine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. J. L. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Homopolymers, copolymers and terpolymers of a styrene based monomer are prepared by polymerizing at least one oxidized styrylphosphine monomer or by polymerizing p-diphenylphosphinestyrene and then oxidizing the polymerized monomer with an organoazide. Copolymers can also be prepared by copolymerizing styrene with at least one oxidized styrylphosphine monomer. Flame resistant vinyl based polymers whose degradation products are non toxic and non corrosive are obtained.

  1. Effect of mechanical surface and heat treatments on erosion resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of erosion by glass beads and crushed glass and by heat treatments on the erosional resistance of 6061 aluminum alloy and 1045 steel were studied. The aluminum alloy's erosion resistance was found to be insensitive to mechanical surface treatment applied before testing, and was determined to depend on the properties of the work-hardened surface layer; this was also demonstrated for aluminum alloy single crystals. The aluminum alloy heat treatments included annealing, solution, and precipitation. Solution was found to increase erosion resistance but precipitation had the opposite effect. Hardness showed no correlation with erosion resistance for either aluminum alloy steel. The steel tests showed that crushed glass provides an order of magnitude more erosion than glass beads.

  2. Parallel resistivity and ohmic heating of laboratory dipole plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, W.

    2012-08-15

    The parallel resistivity is calculated in the long-mean-free-path regime for the dipole plasma geometry; this is shown to be a neoclassical transport problem in the limit of a small number of circulating electrons. In this regime, the resistivity is substantially higher than the Spitzer resistivity due to the magnetic trapping of a majority of the electrons. This suggests that heating the outer flux surfaces of the plasma with low-frequency parallel electric fields can be substantially more efficient than might be naively estimated. Such a skin-current heating scheme is analyzed by deriving an equation for diffusion of skin currents into the plasma, from which quantities such as the resistive skin-depth, lumped-circuit impedance, and power deposited in the plasma can be estimated. Numerical estimates indicate that this may be a simple and efficient way to couple power into experiments in this geometry.

  3. Influence of volumic heat treatments upon cavitation erosion resistance of duplex X2CrNiMoN 22-5-3 stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micu, L. M.; Bordeasu, I.; Popoviciu, M. O.; Popescu, M.; Bordeaşu, D.; Salcianu, L. C.

    2015-06-01

    The stainless steels Duplex 2205 with austenite and ferrite structure have mechanical characteristics close to those of martensite stainless steels but a better corrosion resistance; these steels are very sensitive on the heat treatments. Present work studies the cavitation erosion for those steels for three different heat treatments: simply quenched, annealed at 475°C post quenching and annealed at 875°C. The researches were undertaken at Timisoara “Politehnica” University in the Laboratory of Material Science and the Laboratory of Cavitation, using the T2 facility which integrally respects the recommendation of ASTM G32- 10 Standard. The best results were obtained with the specimens annealed at 875°C. In comparison with the stainless steel 41Cr4, with very good cavitation erosion qualities, all tested steels presented also good erosion resistance. So, Duplex 2205 steels can be used for details subjected to cavitation. The best results are obtained by increasing both the hardness and the quantity of the structure constituent with better cavitation erosion resistance, in our case the alloyed austenite.

  4. Fullerenes synthesis by combined resistive heating and arc discharge techniques.

    PubMed

    Kyesmen, Pannan Isa; Onoja, Audu; Amah, Alexander Nwabueze

    2016-01-01

    The two main electrode techniques for fullerenes production; the direct arc technique and the resistive heating of graphite rod were employed in this work. One of the electrodes was resistively heated to high temperature and subjected to arc discharge along its length by the second graphite rod. Fullerenes solid were extracted from carbon soot samples collected from an installed arc discharge system using the solvent extraction method. The fullerenes solid obtained from carbon soot collected for 2 min of arc discharge run when one of the electrodes was resistively heated at different voltages all gave higher yields (maximum of 67 % higher, at 150 A arc current and 200 Torr chamber pressure) compared to when no resistive heating was carried out. Scanning electron microscopy and ultraviolet visible spectroscopy analysis carried out on all fullerenes solid indicated the presence of fullerenes. The enhancement of fullerenes production by combined resistive and direct arc techniques shows prospect for possible use at industrial level for large scale production. PMID:27563518

  5. Protoplast dehydration correlated with heat resistance of bacterial spores.

    PubMed Central

    Nakashio, S; Gerhardt, P

    1985-01-01

    Water content of the protoplast in situ within the fully hydrated dormant bacterial spore was quantified by use of a spore in which the complex of coat and outer (pericortex) membrane was genetically defective or chemically removed, as evidenced by susceptibility of the cortex to lysozyme and by permeability of the periprotoplast integument to glucose. Water content was determined by equilibrium permeability measurement with 3H-labeled water (confirmed by gravimetric measurement) for the entire spore, with 14C-labeled glucose for the integument outside the inner (pericytoplasm) membrane, and by the difference for the protoplast. The method was applied to lysozyme-sensitive spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus, B. subtilis, B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, and B. megaterium (four types). Comparable lysozyme-resistant spores, in which the outer membrane functioned as the primary permeability barrier to glucose, were employed as controls. Heat resistances were expressed as D100 values. Protoplast water content of the lysozyme-sensitive spore types correlated with heat resistance exponentially in two distinct clusters, with the four B. megaterium types in one alignment, and with the four other species types in another. Protoplast water contents of the B. megaterium spore types were sufficiently low (26 to 29%, based on wet protoplast weight) to account almost entirely for their lesser heat resistance. Corresponding values of the other species types were similar or higher (30 to 55%), indicating that these spores depended on factors additional to protoplast dehydration for their much greater heat resistance. PMID:3988704

  6. Theory of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance of oil radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariamov, N B

    1942-01-01

    In the present report the coefficients of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance are theoretically obtained for the case of laminar flow of a heated viscous liquid in a narrow rectangular channel. The results obtained are applied to the computation of oil radiators, which to a first approximation may be considered as made up of a system of such channels. In conclusion, a comparison is given of the theoretical with the experimental results obtained from tests on airplane oil radiators.

  7. Performance of a Heating Block System Designed for Studying the Heat Resistance of Bacteria in Foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Xiao-Xi; Li, Rui; Hou, Li-Xia; Huang, Zhi; Ling, Bo; Wang, Shao-Jin

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of bacteria’s heat resistance is essential for developing effective thermal treatments. Choosing an appropriate test method is important to accurately determine bacteria’s heat resistances. Although being a major factor to influence the thermo-tolerance of bacteria, the heating rate in samples cannot be controlled in water or oil bath methods due to main dependence on sample’s thermal properties. A heating block system (HBS) was designed to regulate the heating rates in liquid, semi-solid and solid foods using a temperature controller. Distilled water, apple juice, mashed potato, almond powder and beef were selected to evaluate the HBS’s performance by experiment and computer simulation. The results showed that the heating rates of 1, 5 and 10 °C/min with final set-point temperatures and holding times could be easily and precisely achieved in five selected food materials. A good agreement in sample central temperature profiles was obtained under various heating rates between experiment and simulation. The experimental and simulated results showed that the HBS could provide a sufficiently uniform heating environment in food samples. The effect of heating rate on bacterial thermal resistance was evaluated with the HBS. The system may hold potential applications for rapid and accurate assessments of bacteria’s thermo-tolerances.

  8. Performance of a Heating Block System Designed for Studying the Heat Resistance of Bacteria in Foods

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Xiao-xi; Li, Rui; Hou, Li-xia; Huang, Zhi; Ling, Bo; Wang, Shao-jin

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of bacteria’s heat resistance is essential for developing effective thermal treatments. Choosing an appropriate test method is important to accurately determine bacteria’s heat resistances. Although being a major factor to influence the thermo-tolerance of bacteria, the heating rate in samples cannot be controlled in water or oil bath methods due to main dependence on sample’s thermal properties. A heating block system (HBS) was designed to regulate the heating rates in liquid, semi-solid and solid foods using a temperature controller. Distilled water, apple juice, mashed potato, almond powder and beef were selected to evaluate the HBS’s performance by experiment and computer simulation. The results showed that the heating rates of 1, 5 and 10 °C/min with final set-point temperatures and holding times could be easily and precisely achieved in five selected food materials. A good agreement in sample central temperature profiles was obtained under various heating rates between experiment and simulation. The experimental and simulated results showed that the HBS could provide a sufficiently uniform heating environment in food samples. The effect of heating rate on bacterial thermal resistance was evaluated with the HBS. The system may hold potential applications for rapid and accurate assessments of bacteria’s thermo-tolerances. PMID:27465120

  9. Performance of a Heating Block System Designed for Studying the Heat Resistance of Bacteria in Foods.

    PubMed

    Kou, Xiao-Xi; Li, Rui; Hou, Li-Xia; Huang, Zhi; Ling, Bo; Wang, Shao-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of bacteria's heat resistance is essential for developing effective thermal treatments. Choosing an appropriate test method is important to accurately determine bacteria's heat resistances. Although being a major factor to influence the thermo-tolerance of bacteria, the heating rate in samples cannot be controlled in water or oil bath methods due to main dependence on sample's thermal properties. A heating block system (HBS) was designed to regulate the heating rates in liquid, semi-solid and solid foods using a temperature controller. Distilled water, apple juice, mashed potato, almond powder and beef were selected to evaluate the HBS's performance by experiment and computer simulation. The results showed that the heating rates of 1, 5 and 10 °C/min with final set-point temperatures and holding times could be easily and precisely achieved in five selected food materials. A good agreement in sample central temperature profiles was obtained under various heating rates between experiment and simulation. The experimental and simulated results showed that the HBS could provide a sufficiently uniform heating environment in food samples. The effect of heating rate on bacterial thermal resistance was evaluated with the HBS. The system may hold potential applications for rapid and accurate assessments of bacteria's thermo-tolerances. PMID:27465120

  10. Evaluation of Heat Checking and Washout of Heat Resistant Superalloys and Coatings for Die inserts

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Yulong Zhu; Edward Courtright; Harold Adkins

    2005-01-30

    This project had two main objectives: (1) To design, fabricate and run a full size test for evaluating soldering and washout in die insert materials. This test utilizes the unique capabilities of the 350 Ton Squeeze Casting machine available in the Case Meal Casting Laboratory. Apply the test to evaluate resistance of die materials and coating, including heat resistant alloys to soldering and washout damage. (2) To evaluate materials and coatings, including heat resistant superalloys, for use as inserts in die casting of aluminum alloys.

  11. Heat resistant polymers of oxidized styrylphosphine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. J. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A flame resistant, nontoxic polymer which may be used safely in confined locations where there is inadequate ventilation is prepared either by polymerizing compounds having the formula R-N=P(C6H5)2(C6H4)CH=CH2 where R is an organic moeity selected from the group of (C6H5)2P(O)-, (C6H5O)2P(O)-, (C6H5)2 C3N3-, or their mixtures, or by reacting a polymer with an organic azide such as diphenylphosphinylazide, diphenyl-phosphorylazide, 2-azido-4,6-diphenly-5-triazine, 2,4-diazido-6-phenyl-s-triazine, trimethylsilyoazide, triphenylsilylazine, and phenylazine. The reaction of the styrylphosphine with the organozaide results in the oxidation of the trivalent phosphorus atom to the pentavalent state in the form of an unsaturated P=N linkage known as a phosphazene group.

  12. Alumina-Forming Austenitics: A New Approach to Thermal and Degradation Resistant Stainless Steels for Industrial Use

    SciTech Connect

    David A Helmick; John H Magee; Michael P Brady

    2012-05-31

    A series of developmental AFA alloys was selected for study based on: 25 Ni wt.% (alloys A-F), 20 wt% Ni (alloys G-H), and 12 Ni wt.% (alloys I-L). An emphasis in this work was placed on the lower alloy content direction for AFA alloys to reduce alloy raw material cost, rather than more highly alloyed and costly AFA alloys for higher temperature performance. Alloys A-D explored the effects of Al (3-4 wt.%) and C (0.05-0.2 wt.%) in the Fe-25Ni-14Cr-2Mn-2Mo-1W-1Nb wt.% base range; alloys E and F explored the effects of removing costly Mo and W additions in a Fe-25Ni-14Cr-4Al-2.5Nb-2Mn-0.2C base, alloys G and H examined Nb (1-2.5wt.%) and removal of Mo, W in a Fe-20Ni-14Cr-3Al-2Mn-0.2 C wt.% base; and alloys I-L examined effects of C (0.1-0.2 wt.%) and Mn (5-10 wt.%) on a low cost Fe-14Cr-12Ni-3Cu-2.5Al wt.% base (no Mo, W additions). Creep testing resulted in elemental trends that included the beneficial effect of higher carbon and lower niobium in 20-25%Ni AFA alloys and, the beneficial of lower Mn in 12%Ni AFA alloys. Corrosion tests in steam and sulfidation-oxidation environments showed, in general, these alloys were capable of a ten-fold improvement in performance when compared to conventional austenitic stainless steels. Also, corrosion test results in metal-dusting environments were promising and, warrant further investigation.

  13. Effects of heat treatment on wear resistance and fracture toughness of duo-cast materials composed of high-chromium white cast iron and low-chromium steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Lee, Sunghak; Jung, Jae-Young

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate effects of heat treatment on wear resistance and fracture toughness in duo-cast materials composed of a high-chromium white cast iron and a low-chromium steel as a wear-resistant part and a ductile part, respectively. Different size, volume fraction, and distribution of M7C3 carbides were employed in the wear-resistant part by changing the amount of chromium, and the volume fraction of martensite in the austenitic matrix was varied by the heat treatment. In the alloys containing a small amount of chromium, an interdendritic structure of eutectic M7C3 carbides was formed, and led to the improvement of wear resistance and fracture toughness. After the heat treatment, the selective wear of the matrix and the cracking or spalled-off carbides were considerably reduced since the hardness difference between carbides and matrix decreased by the increase in the matrix hardness, thereby leading to the improvement of the wear resistance. However, the fracture toughness of the heat-treated alloys was lower than that of the as-cast alloys because the matrix containing a considerable amount of martensite did not effectively prevent the crack propagation.

  14. Hot deformation of heat-resistant superalloys -- An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhury, P.K.; Zhao, D.; Thirukkonda, M.; Guillard, S.

    1995-12-31

    The hot deformation behavior was investigated for four heat-resistant Ni-, Fe-, and Co-base superalloys: Haynes 188, 230, 556, and HR-160. Compression tests were conducted over a wide range of processing conditions. The flow behavior and deformed microstructures were characterized, while recrystallized grain size and percentage of recrystallization were measured for deformed specimens under selected conditions. From the experimental data, constitutive equations and microstructure maps were constructed. During the high temperature deformation, a number of mutually interacting metallurgical processes, such as dynamic recrystallization and precipitation, occurred. Their influence on hot formability and deformed microstructure have been represented by deformation microstructure maps that can serve as a guideline for hot deformation process design and subsequent heat treatment after hot forming. The workability and deformation behaviors of the heat-resistant alloys are also compared in The light of alloy development to ensure the fabricability of newly developed alloys.

  15. Testing Method for Heat Resistance Under Temperature Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, K.; Kawasaki, A.; Itoh, Y.; Harada, Y.; Ono, F.

    2007-12-01

    “Testing Method for Heat Resistance under Temperature Gradient” is a Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) newly established by the Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry, after deliberations by the Japanese Industrial Standards Committee, in accordance with the Industrial Standardization Law. This standard specified the testing method for heat resistance under temperature gradient of materials and coated members of equipment exposed to high temperature, such as aircraft engines, gas turbines, and so on. This paper introduces the principle and overview of the established standard. In addition, taking the heat cycle test using the burner rig for instance, we specifically illustrate the acquirable data and their analysis in the standard. Monitoring of the effective thermal conductivity and acoustic emission particularly enables to the non-destructive evaluation of failure cycle.

  16. Heat Shock-Independent Induction of Multidrug Resistance by Heat Shock Factor 1†

    PubMed Central

    Tchénio, Thierry; Havard, Marilyne; Martinez, Luis A.; Dautry, François

    2006-01-01

    The screening of two different retroviral cDNA expression libraries to select genes that confer constitutive doxorubicin resistance has in both cases resulted in the isolation of the heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) transcription factor. We show that HSF1 induces a multidrug resistance phenotype that occurs in the absence of heat shock or cellular stress and is mediated at least in part through the constitutive activation of the multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR-1). This drug resistance phenotype does not correlate with an increased expression of heat shock-responsive genes (heat shock protein genes, or HSPs). In addition, HSF1 mutants lacking HSP gene activation are also capable of conferring multidrug resistance, and only hypophosphorylated HSF1 complexes accumulate in transduced cells. Our results indicate that HSF1 can activate MDR-1 expression in a stress-independent manner that differs from the canonical heat shock-activated mechanism involved in HSP induction. We further provide evidence that the induction of MDR-1 expression occurs at a posttranscriptional level, revealing a novel undocumented role for hypophosphorylated HSF1 in posttranscriptional gene regulation. PMID:16382149

  17. Effect of mechanical surface and heat treatments on erosion resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of mechanical surface treatments as well as heat treatments on the erosion resistance of 6061 aluminum alloy and 1045 steel were studied. Mechanical surface treatments were found to have little or no effect on the erosion resistance. This is due to the formation by particle impact of a work hardened surface layer regardless of the initial surface condition. The erosion resistance of Al single crystals is found to be independent of orientation. This is due to destruction of the surface microstructure and formation of a polycrystalline surface layer by the impact of erodant particles as observed by X-ray diffraction. While upon solution treatment of annealed 6061 aluminum the increase in hardness is accompanied by an increase in erosion resistance, precipitation treatment which causes a further increase in hardness results in slightly lower erosion resistance. Using two types of erodant particles, glass beads and crushed glass, the erosion rate is found to be strongly dependent on erodant particle shape, being an order of magnitude higher for erosion with crushed glass as compared to glass beads. While for erosion with glass beads heat treatment of 1045 steel had a profound effect on its erosion resistance, little or no such effect was observed for erosion with crushed glass.

  18. Effect of Welding Current and Time on the Microstructure, Mechanical Characterizations, and Fracture Studies of Resistance Spot Welding Joints of AISI 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kianersi, Danial; Mostafaei, Amir; Mohammadi, Javad

    2014-09-01

    This article aims at investigating the effect of welding parameters, namely, welding current and welding time, on resistance spot welding (RSW) of the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel sheets. The influence of welding current and welding time on the weld properties including the weld nugget diameter or fusion zone, tensile-shear load-bearing capacity of welded materials, failure modes, energy absorption, and microstructure of welded nuggets was precisely considered. Microstructural studies and mechanical properties showed that the region between interfacial to pullout mode transition and expulsion limit is defined as the optimum welding condition. Electron microscopic studies indicated different types of delta ferrite in welded nuggets including skeletal, acicular, and lathy delta ferrite morphologies as a result of nonequilibrium phases, which can be attributed to a fast cooling rate in the RSW process. These morphologies were explained based on Shaeffler, WRC-1992, and pseudo-binary phase diagrams. The optimum microstructure and mechanical properties were achieved with 8-kA welding current and 4-cycle welding time in which maximum tensile-shear load-bearing capacity or peak load of the welded materials was obtained at 8070 N, and the failure mode took place as button pullout with tearing from the base metal. Finally, fracture surface studies indicated that elongated dimples appeared on the surface as a result of ductile fracture in the sample welded in the optimum welding condition.

  19. SIGNAL MEDIATORS AT INDUCTION OF HEAT RESISTANCE OF WHEAT PLANTLETS BY SHORT-TERM HEATING.

    PubMed

    Karpets, Yu V; Kolupaev, Yu E; Yastreb, T O

    2015-01-01

    The effects of functional interplay of calcium ions, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) in the cells of wheat plantlets roots (Triticum aestivum L.) at the induction of their heat resistance by a short-term influence of hyperthermia (heating at the temperature of 42 degrees C during 1 minute) have been investigated. The transitional increase of NO and H2O2 content, invoked by heating, was suppressed by the treatment of plantlets with the antagonists of calcium EGTA (chelator of exocellular calcium), lanthanum chloride (blocker of calcium channels of various types) and neomycin (inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-dependent phospholipase C). The rise of hydrogen peroxide content, caused by hardening, was partially suppressed by the action of inhibitors of nitrate reductase (sodium wolframate) and NO-synthase (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester--L-NAME), and the increasing of nitric oxide content was suppressed by the treatment of plants with the antioxidant ionol and with the scavenger of hydrogen peroxide (dimethylthiourea). These compounds and antagonists of calcium also partially removed the effect of the rise of plantlets' heat resistance, invoked by hardening heating. The conclusion on calcium's role in the activation of enzymatic systems, generating reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide, and on the functional interplay of these signal mediators at the induction of heat resistance of plantlets by hardening heating is made. PMID:27025064

  20. Replacing Resistance Heating with Mini-Split Heat Pumps, Sharon, Connecticut (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-05-01

    Mini-split heat pumps can provide space heating and cooling in many climates and are relatively affordable. These and other features make them potentially suitable for retrofitting into multifamily buildings in cold climates to replace electric resistance heating or other outmoded heating systems. This report investigates the suitability of mini-split heat pumps for multifamily retrofits. Various technical and regulatory barriers are discussed and modeling was performed to compare long-term costs of substituting mini-splits for a variety of other heating and cooling options. A number of utility programs have retrofit mini-splits in both single family and multifamily residences. Two such multifamily programs are discussed in detail.

  1. Development of a high strength, hydrogen-resistant austenitic alloy. [Fe-36 Ni-3 Ti-3 Ta-1. 3 Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, K.M.; Klahn, D.H.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    Research toward high-strength, high toughness nonmagnetic steels for use in the retaining rings of large electrical generators led to the development of a Ta-modified iron-based superalloy (Fe-36 Ni-3 Ti-3 Ta-0.5 Al-1.3 Mo-0.3 V-0.01 B) which combines high strength with good toughness after suitable aging. The alloy did, however, show some degradation in fatigue resistance in gaseous hydrogen. This sensitivity was associated with a deformation-induced martensitic transformation near the fracture surface. The addition of a small amount of chromium to the alloy suppressed the martensite transformation and led to a marked improvement in hydrogen resistance.

  2. Leather Coated with Mixtures of Humectant and Antioxidants to Improve UV and Heat Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ultraviolet (UV) and heat resistance are very important qualities for leather products. We recently developed an environmentally friendly finishing process for improving the UV- and heat resistance of automobile upholstery leather. We previously reported and demonstrated some promising results fro...

  3. Diesel particulate filter regeneration via resistive surface heating

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V; Ament, Frank

    2013-10-08

    An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system includes: a particulate filter (PF) that filters particulates from the exhaust wherein an upstream end of the PF receives exhaust from the engine; and a grid of electrically resistive material that is applied to an exterior upstream surface of the PF and that selectively heats exhaust passing through the grid to initiate combustion of particulates within the PF.

  4. Austenitic structure formation in an Fe-32% Ni alloy during slow heating in the critical temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemtsova, N. D.

    2014-08-01

    Electron diffraction is used to show (for the first time) that the reverse α → γ transformation in an Fe-32% Ni during slow heating develops via the formation of an intermediate paramagnetic 9 R phase. Coarse extended lamellae form according to a shear mechanism in the central part of the temperature range of the reverse transformation, which is called the critical range (here, the physical properties of the alloy change anomalously). The extended lamellae consist of 9 R-phase lamellae with γ-phase interlayers. A high density of periodic stacking faults in the structure of the 9 R phase and a high density of chaotic stacking faults in the complex 9 R + γ phase determine the nature of phase transformation-induced hardening.

  5. Steerable Catheter Microcoils for Interventional MRI: Reducing Resistive Heating

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Anthony; Wilson, Mark W.; Settecase, Fabio; Evans, Leland; Malba, Vincent; Martin, Alastair J.; Saeed, Maythem; Roberts, Timothy P. L.; Arenson, Ronald L.; Hetts, Steven W.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess resistive heating of microwires used for remote catheter steering in interventional magnetic resonance imaging. To investigate the use of alumina to facilitate heat transfer to saline flowing in the catheter lumen. MATERIALS AND METHODS A microcoil was fabricated using a laser lathe onto polyimide-tipped or alumina-tipped endovascular catheters. In vitro testing was performed in a 1.5 T MR system using a vessel phantom, body RF coil, and steady state pulse sequence. Resistive heating was measured with water flowing over a polyimide tip catheter, or saline flowing through the lumen of an alumina-tip catheter. Preliminary in vivo testing in porcine common carotid arteries was conducted with normal blood flow or after arterial ligation when current was applied to an alumnia-tip catheter for up to 5 minutes. RESULTS After application of up to 1 W of DC power, clinically significant temperature increases were noted with the polyimide-tip catheter: 23°C/W at zero flow, 13°C/W at 0.28 cc/s, and 7.9°C/W at 1 cc/s. Using the alumina-tip catheter, the effluent temperature rise using the lowest flow rate (0.12 cc/s) was 2.3°C/W. In vivo testing demonstrated no thermal injury to vessel walls at normal and zero arterial flow. CONCLUSION Resistive heating in current carrying wire pairs can be dissipated by saline coolant flowing within the lumen of a catheter tip composed of material that facilitates heat transfer. PMID:21075017

  6. Studies of Resistive Wall Heating at JLAB FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Rui; Benson, Stephen V.

    2013-06-01

    When the JLAB FEL is under CW operation, it had been observed that temperature rises over the wiggler vacuum chamber, presumably as the result of the power deposition on the resistive wall of the wiggler chamber. Previous analyses have been done on the resistive wall impedance for various cases, such as DC, AC, and anomalous skin effects*. Here we report an investigation on the beam kinetic energy losses for each of these cases. This study includes the non-ultrarelativistic effect on resistive wall loss, for both round pipe and parallel plates. We will present the comparison of our results with the measured data obtained during CW operation of the JLAB FEL. Other possible factors contributing to the measured heating will also be discussed.

  7. Evaluation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties in Dissimilar Austenitic/Super Duplex Stainless Steel Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Mehdi; Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza

    2014-10-01

    To study the effect of chemical composition on microstructural features and mechanical properties of dissimilar joints between super duplex and austenitic stainless steels, welding was attempted by gas tungsten arc welding process with a super duplex (ER2594) and an austenitic (ER309LMo) stainless steel filler metal. While the austenitic weld metal had vermicular delta ferrite within austenitic matrix, super duplex stainless steel was mainly comprised of allotriomorphic grain boundary and Widmanstätten side plate austenite morphologies in the ferrite matrix. Also the heat-affected zone of austenitic base metal comprised of large austenite grains with little amounts of ferrite, whereas a coarse-grained ferritic region was observed in the heat-affected zone of super duplex base metal. Although both welded joints showed acceptable mechanical properties, the hardness and impact strength of the weld metal produced using super duplex filler metal were found to be better than that obtained by austenitic filler metal.

  8. Nanostructured nickel-free austenitic stainless steel/hydroxyapatite composites.

    PubMed

    Tulinski, Maciej; Jurczyk, Mieczyslaw

    2012-11-01

    In this work Ni-free austenitic stainless steels with nanostructure and their nanocomposites with hydroxyapatite are presented and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction and optical profiling. The samples were synthesized by mechanical alloying, heat treatment and nitriding of elemental microcrystalline powders with addition of hydroxyapatite (HA). In our work we wanted to introduce into stainless steel hydroxyapatite ceramics that have been intensively studied for bone repair and replacement applications. Such applications were chosen because of their high biocompatibility and ability to bond to bone. Since nickel-free austenitic stainless steels seem to have better mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility compared to 316L stainless steels, it is possible that composite made of this steel and HA could improve properties, as well. Mechanical alloying and nitriding are very effective technologies to improve the corrosion resistance of stainless steel. Similar process in case of nanocomposites of stainless steel with hydroxyapatite helps achieve even better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Hence nanocrystalline nickel-free stainless steels and nickel-free stainless steel/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites could be promising bionanomaterials for use as a hard tissue replacement implants, e.g., orthopedic implants. In such application, the surface roughness and more specifically the surface topography influences the proliferation of cells (e.g., osteoblasts). PMID:23421285

  9. Evaluation of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Foil for Advanced Recuperators

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Brady, Michael P; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Santella, Michael L; Maziasz, Philip J; Matthews, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    A corrosion- and creep-resistant austenitic stainless steel has been developed for advanced recuperator applications. By optimizing the Al and Cr contents, the alloy is fully austenitic for creep strength while allowing the formation of a chemically stable external alumina scale at temperatures up to 900 C. An alumina scale eliminates long-term problems with the formation of volatile Cr oxy-hydroxides in the presence of water vapor in exhaust gas. As a first step in producing foil for primary surface recuperators, three commercially cast heats have been rolled to 100 m thick foil in the laboratory to evaluate performance in creep and oxidation testing. Results from initial creep testing are presented at 675 C and 750 C, showing excellent creep strength compared with other candidate foil materials. Laboratory exposures in humid air at 650 800 C have shown acceptable oxidation resistance. A similar oxidation behavior was observed for sheet specimens of these alloys exposed in a modified 65 kW microturbine for 2871 h. One composition that showed superior creep and oxidation resistance has been selected for the preparation of a commercial batch of foil. DOI: 10.1115/1.4002827

  10. Response of Two Heat Shock Genes to Selection for Knockdown Heat Resistance in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    McColl, G.; Hoffmann, A. A.; McKechnie, S. W.

    1996-01-01

    To identify genes involved in stress resistance and heat hardening, replicate lines of Drosophila melanogaster were selected for increased resistance to knockdown by a 39° heat stress. Two selective regimes were used, one with and one without prior hardening. Mean knockdown times were increased from ~5 min to >20 min after 18 generations. Initial realized heritabilities were as high as 10% for lines selected without hardening, and crosses between lines indicated simple additive gene effects for the selected phenotypes. To survey allelic variation and correlated selection responses in two candidate stress genes, hsr-omega and hsp68, we applied denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to amplified DNA sequences from small regions of these genes. After eight generations of selection, allele frequencies at both loci showed correlated responses for selection following hardening, but not without hardening. The hardening process itself was associated with a hsp68 frequency change in the opposite direction to that associated with selection that followed hardening. These stress loci are closely linked on chromosome III, and the hardening selection established a disequilibrium, suggesting an epistatic effect on resistance. The data indicate that molecular variation in both hsr-omega and hsp68 contribute to natural heritable variation for hardened heat resistance. PMID:8844150

  11. A resistively heated CeB{sub 6} emissive probe

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M. J. Bonde, J.; Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P.

    2015-05-15

    The plasma potential, V{sub p}, is a key quantity in experimental plasma physics. Its spatial gradients directly yield the electrostatic field present. Emissive probes operating under space-charge limited emission conditions float close to V{sub p} even under time-varying conditions. Throughout their long history in plasma physics, they have mostly been constructed with resistively heated tungsten wire filaments. In high density plasmas (>10{sup 12} cm{sup −3}), hexaboride emitters are required because tungsten filaments cannot be heated to sufficient emission without component failure. A resistively heated emissive probe with a cerium hexaboride, CeB{sub 6}, emitter has been developed to work in plasma densities up to 10{sup 13} cm{sup −3}. To show functionality, three spatial profiles of V{sub p} are compared using the emissive probe, a cold floating probe, and a swept probe inside a plasma containing regions with and without current. The swept probe and emissive probe agree well across the profile while the floating cold probe fails in the current carrying region.

  12. Effect of heating rate on highly heat-resistant spore-forming microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Jódar, Isabel; Ros-Chumillas, María; Palop, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    Highly heat-resistant spore-forming Bacillus cause nonsterility problems in canned food and reduce the shelf life of many processed foods. The aim of this research was to evaluate the thermal inactivation of Bacillus sporothermodurans IIC65, Bacillus subtilis IC9, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus T26 under isothermal and nonisothermal conditions. The data obtained showed that B. sporothermodurans and B. subtilis were more heat resistant than G. stearothermophilus. The survival curves of B. sporothermodurans and B. subtilis showed shoulders, while the survival curves of G. stearothermophilus showed tails. Under nonisothermal treatment, at heating rates of 1 and 20 ℃/min, time needed to completely inactivate G. stearothermophilus was shorter than that required for B. sporothermodurans and B. subtilis. In complex heat treatments (heating-holding-cooling), the survival curves of B. sporothermodurans and B. subtilis showed the same activation shoulders than those obtained under isothermal treatments and the activation shoulders were again absent in the case of G. stearothermophilus. Predictions fitted quite well the data obtained for B. sporothermodurans. In contrast, the data for B. subtilis showed half a log cycle more survival than expected and in the case of G. stearothermophilus, the survival curve obtained showed much higher inactivation than expected. PMID:25852134

  13. Mechanical properties and retained austenite in intercritically heat-treated bainite-transformed steel and their variation with Si and Mn additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, Yasuharu; Matsumura, Osamu; Takechi, Hiroshi

    1991-02-01

    Processing peculiarities and functions of alloying elements, such as Si and Mn, were studied for improving formability of steel sheets with mixed microstructures. Annealing a sheet steel with 0.2 pct C in the intercritical range produced very fine particles of retained austenite which were moderately stabilized due to C enrichment by subsequent holding in the bainite transformation range. Its strength-ductility balance is greatly superior to that of other dual-phase steels due to transformation-induced plasticity ( TRIP). The holding time in the bainite transformation range varies with temperature, depending on the activation energy of C diffusion in austenite, and shifts to longer times with an increase of Si or Mn additions. The optimum cooling rate from the intercritical region is reduced with an increase of Mn content but is not influenced by Si content. Additional Mn makes the retained austenite content larger, although uniform elongation remains the same. In this case, the product of tensile strength and total elongation is increased due to an increase in the tensile strength. Contrary to Mn, Si does not affect retained austenite content but improves the uniform elongation by increasing its stability.

  14. Heat sealable, flame and abrasion resistant coated fabric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tschirch, R. P.; Sidman, K. R. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Flame retardant, abrasion resistant elastomeric compositions are disclosed which are comprised of thermoplastic polyurethane polymer and flame retarding amounts of a filler selected from decabromodiphenyloxide and antimony oxide in a 3:1 weight ratio, and decabromodiphenyloxide, antimony oxide, and ammonium polyphosphate in a 3:1:3 weight ratio respectively. Heat sealable coated fabrics employing such elastomeric compositions as coating film are produced by dissolving the elastomeric composition to form a solution, casting the solution onto a release paper and drying it to form an elastomeric film. The film is then bonded to a woven, knitted, or felted fabric.

  15. Effect of initial microstructure on austenite formation kinetics in high-strength experimental microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Martínez, Edgar; Vázquez-Gómez, Octavio; Vergara-Hernández, Héctor Javier; Campillo, Bernardo

    2015-12-01

    Austenite formation kinetics in two high-strength experimental microalloyed steels with different initial microstructures comprising bainite-martensite and ferrite-martensite/austenite microconstituents was studied during continuous heating by dilatometric analysis. Austenite formation occurred in two steps: (1) carbide dissolution and precipitation and (2) transformation of residual ferrite to austenite. Dilatometric analysis was used to determine the critical temperatures of austenite formation and continuous heating transformation diagrams for heating rates ranging from 0.03°C•s-1 to 0.67°C•s-1. The austenite volume fraction was fitted using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov equation to determine the kinetic parameters k and n as functions of the heating rate. Both n and k parameters increased with increasing heating rate, which suggests an increase in the nucleation and growth rates of austenite. The activation energy of austenite formation was determined by the Kissinger method. Two activation energies were associated with each of the two austenite formation steps. In the first step, the austenite growth rate was controlled by carbon diffusion from carbide dissolution and precipitation; in the second step, it was controlled by the dissolution of residual ferrite to austenite.

  16. Viability and heat resistance of murine norovirus on bread.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Michiko; Takahashi, Hajime; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon

    2016-01-01

    Contaminated bread was the cause of a large-scale outbreak of norovirus disease in Japan in 2014. Contamination of seafood and uncooked food products by norovirus has been reported several times in the past; however the outbreak resulting from the contamination of bread products was unusual. A few reports on the presence of norovirus on bread products are available; however there have been no studies on the viability and heat resistance of norovirus on breads, which were investigated in this study. ce:italic>/ce:italic> strain 1 (MNV-1), a surrogate for human norovirus, was inoculated directly on 3 types of bread, but the infectivity of MNV-1 on bread samples was almost unchanged after 5days at 20°C. MNV-1 was inoculated on white bread that was subsequently heated in a toaster for a maximum of 2min. The results showed that MNV-1 remained viable if the heating period was insufficient to inactivate. In addition, bread dough contaminated with MNV-1 was baked in the oven. Our results indicated that MNV-1 may remain viable on breads if the heating duration or temperature is insufficient. PMID:26485672

  17. Influence of Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of 13 Wt Pct Cr-Type Martensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Si-Yuan; Yao, Ke-Fu; Chen, Yun-Bo; Wang, Miao-Hui; Ge, Xue-Yuan

    2015-12-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and the electrochemical properties of a typical corrosion-resistant plastic mold steel in Cl--containing solution were studied in this research. Through X-ray diffraction patterns, SEM and TEM analysis, it was found that the sequence of the precipitates in the steels tempered at 573 K, 773 K, and 923 K (300 °C, 500 °C, and 650 °C) was θ-M3C carbides, nano-sized Cr-rich M23C6 carbides, and micro/submicron-sized Cr-rich M23C6 carbides, respectively. The results of the electrochemical experiments showed that the pitting potential of the as-quenched martensitic stainless steels increased with the austenitizing temperature. However, the corrosion resistance of the steels would decreased after tempering, especially when tempered at 773 K (500 °C), no passivation regime could be found in the polarization curve of the MSSs and no effective passive film could be formed on the steels in Cl--containing environments. The present results suggested that the temperature around 773 K (500 °C) should be avoided for tempering process of MSS used as plastic molds.

  18. Anomalous resistivity and heating in current-driven plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choueiri, E. Y.

    1999-05-01

    A theory is presented of anomalous resistivity and particle heating in current-driven plasma accelerators such as the magnetoplasmadynamic thruster (MPDT). An electromagnetic dielectric tensor is used for a current-carrying, collisional and finite-beta plasma and it is found that an instability akin to the generalized lower hybrid drift instability (GLHDI) exists for electromagnetic modes (i.e., with finite polarization). Weak turbulence theory is then used to develop a second-order description of the heating rates of particles by the waves and the electron-wave momentum exchange rate that controls the anomalous resistivity effect. It is found that the electron Hall parameter strongly scales the level of anomalous dissipation for the case of the MPDT plasma. This scaling has recently been confirmed experimentally [Phys. Plasmas 5, 3581 (1997)]. Polynomial expressions of the relevant transport coefficients cast solely in terms of macroscopic parameters are also obtained for including microturbulence effects in numerical plasma fluid models used for thruster flow simulation.

  19. Self-healing of creep damage in heat resisting steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinya, Norio; Kyono, Junro

    2002-07-01

    In heat resisting steels, micro holes, called creep cavities, are formed at grain boundaries by long term use at high temperatures. These creep cavities grow along grain boundaries, form grain boundary cracks by linking up each other anc cause low ductility and premature fracture as shown in Fig. 1. Therefore long term creep rupture strength and ductilities chiefly depend upon the behavior of nucleation and growth of creep cavities. If the growth of creep cavities could be suppressed, creep rupture strength and ductilities should be improved remarkably. Present work is intended to propose a self-healing process for the cavitation, and improve the creep rupture properties by the self-healing. It is thought that chemical compound of BN precipitates at inside surface of creep cavity by addition of B and N to heat resisting steels. As the BN is very stable at high temperatures, the precipitation of BN at creep cavity surface is expected to suppress the creep cavity growth and bring about the healing effect on the cavitation.

  20. An Investigation on Low-Temperature Thermochemical Treatments of Austenitic Stainless Steel in Fluidized Bed Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruman, E.; Sun, Y.; Triwiyanto, A.; Manurung, Y. H. P.; Adesta, E. Y.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, the feasibility of using an industrial fluidized bed furnace to perform low-temperature thermochemical treatments of austenitic stainless steels has been studied, with the aim to produce expanded austenite layers with combined wear and corrosion resistance, similar to those achievable by plasma and gaseous processes. Several low-temperature thermochemical treatments were studied, including nitriding, carburizing, combined nitriding-carburizing (hybrid treatment), and sequential carburizing and nitriding. The results demonstrate that it is feasible to produce expanded austenite layers on the investigated austenitic stainless steel by the fluidized bed heat treatment technique, thus widening the application window for the novel low-temperature processes. The results also demonstrate that the fluidized bed furnace is the most effective for performing the hybrid treatment, which involves the simultaneous incorporation of nitrogen and carbon together into the surface region of the component in nitrogen- and carbon-containing atmospheres. Such hybrid treatment produces a thicker and harder layer than the other three processes investigated.

  1. 49 CFR 179.201-5 - Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance....201-5 Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance. (a) Tanks and attachments welded directly... tested to demonstrate that they possess the corrosion resistance specified in § 179.200-7(d), Footnote...

  2. 49 CFR 179.201-5 - Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance....201-5 Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance. (a) Tanks and attachments welded directly... tested to demonstrate that they possess the corrosion resistance specified in § 179.200-7(d), Footnote...

  3. 49 CFR 179.201-5 - Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance....201-5 Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance. (a) Tanks and attachments welded directly... tested to demonstrate that they possess the corrosion resistance specified in § 179.200-7(d), Footnote...

  4. 49 CFR 179.201-5 - Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance....201-5 Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance. (a) Tanks and attachments welded directly... tested to demonstrate that they possess the corrosion resistance specified in § 179.200-7(d), Footnote...

  5. Transient heat-stress compromises the resistance of wheat seedlings to Hessian fly (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) infestation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat-stress exerts profound impact on resistance of plants to parasites. In this research, we investigated the impact of an acute, transient heat-stress on the resistance of the wheat line 'Molly', which contains the resistance gene H13, to an avirulent Hessian fly [Mayetiola destructor (Say)] popu...

  6. 49 CFR 179.201-5 - Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance....201-5 Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance. (a) Tanks and attachments welded directly... tested to demonstrate that they possess the corrosion resistance specified in § 179.200-7(d), Footnote...

  7. Formation Mechanism of Type IV Failure in High Cr Ferritic Heat-Resistant Steel-Welded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Tsukamoto, S.; Shirane, T.; Abe, F.

    2013-10-01

    The mechanism of type IV failure has been investigated by using a conventional 9Cr ferritic heat-resistant steel Gr.92. In order to clarify the main cause of type IV failure, different heat treatments were performed on the base metal in order to change the prior austenite grain (PAG) size and precipitate distribution after applying the heat-affected zone (HAZ) simulated thermal cycle at the peak temperature of around A c3 ( A c3 HAZ thermal cycle) and postweld heat treatment (PWHT). The microstructural evolution during the A c3 HAZ thermal cycle and PWHT was investigated by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). It was found that M23C6 carbides were scarcely precipitated at the newly formed fine PAG, block, and lath boundaries in A c3 HAZ-simulated Gr.92, because the carbide forming elements such as Cr and C were segregated at the former PAG and block boundaries of the base metal. On the other hand, if all the boundaries were covered by sufficient M23C6 carbides by homogenization of the alloying elements prior to applying the HAZ thermal cycle, the creep strength was much improved even if the fine PAG was formed. From these results, it is concluded that fine-grained microstructure cannot account for the occurrence of type IV failure, and it only has a small effect during long-term creep. The most important factor is the precipitate formation behavior at various boundaries. Without sufficient boundary strengthening by precipitates, the microstructure of A c3 HAZ undergoes severe changes even during PWHT and causes premature failure during creep.

  8. Advances in the application of in situ electrical resistance heating

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Gregory J.; Beyke, Gregory

    2007-07-01

    Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH) is an aggressive in situ thermal remediation technology that was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy from the original oil production technology to enhance vapor extraction remediation technologies in low permeability soils. Soil and groundwater are heated by the passage of electrical current through saturated and unsaturated soil between electrodes, not by the electrodes themselves. It is the resistance to the flow of electrical current that results in increased subsurface temperatures, and this is typically applied to the boiling point of water. It is estimated that more than 75 ERH applications have been performed. Capacity to perform these projects has increased over the years, and as many as 15 to 20 of these applications now being performed at any given time, mainly in North America, with some European applications. While the main focus has been to vaporize volatile organic compounds, as one would expect other semi-volatile and non-volatile organic compounds have also been encountered, resulting in observations of chemical and physical reactions that have not been normally incorporated into environmental restoration projects. One such reaction is hydrolysis, which is slow under normal groundwater temperatures, becomes very rapid under temperatures that can easily be achieved using ERH. As a result, these chemical and physical reactions are increasing the applicability of ERH in environmental restoration projects, treating a wider variety of compounds and utilizing biotic and abiotic mechanisms to reduce energy costs. For the treatment of oil and coal tar residues from manufactured gas plants, a process TRS has called steam bubble floatation is used to physically remove the coal and oil tar from the soils for collection using conventional multi-phase collection methods. Heat-enhanced hydrolysis has been used to remediate dichloromethane from soils and groundwater at a site in Illinois, while heat-enhanced biotic and

  9. Explosive Surface Hardening of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs-Coskun, T.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the effects of explosion hardening on the microstructure and the hardness of austenitic stainless steel have been studied. The optimum explosion hardening technology of austenitic stainless steel was researched. In case of the explosive hardening used new idea mean indirect hardening setup. Austenitic stainless steels have high plasticity and can be easily cold formed. However, during cold processing the hardening phenomena always occurs. Upon the explosion impact, the deformation mechanism indicates a plastic deformation and this deformation induces a phase transformation (martensite). The explosion hardening enhances the mechanical properties of the material, includes the wear resistance and hardness. In case of indirect hardening as function of the setup parameters specifically the flayer plate position the hardening increased differently. It was find a relationship between the explosion hardening setup and the hardening level.

  10. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Eskandarian, Masoomeh; Zabolian, Azam; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-08-15

    The evolution of microstructure and texture across an as-welded dissimilar UNS S32750 super duplex/UNS S30403 austenitic stainless steel joint welded by UNS S30986 (AWS A5.9 ER309LMo) austenitic stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process was evaluated by optical micrography and EBSD techniques. Due to their fabrication through rolling process, both parent metals had texture components resulted from deformation and recrystallization. The weld metal showed the highest amount of residual strain and had large austenite grain colonies of similar orientations with little amounts of skeletal ferrite, both oriented preferentially in the < 001 > direction with cub-on-cube orientation relationship. While the super duplex stainless steel's heat affected zone contained higher ferrite than its parent metal, an excessive grain growth was observed at the austenitic stainless steel's counterpart. At both heat affected zones, austenite underwent some recrystallization and formed twin boundaries which led to an increase in the fraction of high angle boundaries as compared with the respective base metals. These regions showed the least amount of residual strain and highest amount of recrystallized austenite grains. Due to the static recrystallization, the fraction of low degree of fit (Σ) coincident site lattice boundaries, especially Σ3 boundaries, was increased in the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone, while the formation of subgrains in the ferrite phase increased the content of < 5° low angle boundaries at that of the super duplex stainless steel. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Extensive grain growth in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel was observed. • Intensification of < 100 > orientated grains was observed adjacent to both fusion lines. • Annealing twins with Σ3 CSL boundaries were formed in the austenite of both HAZ. • Cub-on-cube OR was observed between austenite and ferrite in the weld metal.

  11. Heat resistant alloys as interconnect materials of reduced temperature SOFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Li; Jian, Pu; Guangyuan, Xie; Shunxu, Wang; Jianzhong, Xiao

    Heat-resistant alloys, Haynes 230 and SS310, were exposed to air and humidified H 2 at 750 °C for up to 1000 h, respectively, simulating the environments in reduced temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The oxidized samples were characterized by using SEM, EDS and X-ray diffraction to obtain the morphology, thickness, composition and crystal structure of the oxide scales. A mechanism for the formation of metallic Ni-rich nodules on top of the oxide scale in Haynes 230 sample oxidized in humidified H 2 was established. Thermodynamic analysis confirmed that MnCr 2O 4 is the favored spinel phase, together with Cr 2O 3, in the oxide scales.

  12. The 1,2,4-oxadiazole elastomers. [heat resistant polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Shalhoub, I. M.; Kwong, H. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Crosslinked 1,2,4-oxadiazole elastomers were prepared either by thermally condensing a monomer having the formula HwN(HON)C-R-Q, wherein Q is a triazine ring forming group such as nitrile or amidine, or by a mixture of said monomer with RC(NOH)NH22, with R in these formulas standing for a bivalent organic radical containing fluorine, hydrogen, or trifluoromethyl. In the monomer charge, the overall proportions of amidoxime groups to triazine ring forming groups varies depending on the extent of crosslinking desired in the final polymer. The heat and chemical resistant elastomers disclosed can serve, for instance, as adhesives, caulking compounds, channel sealants, fuel tank liners.

  13. Integrated Thermal Protection Systems and Heat Resistant Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pichon, Thierry; Lacoste, Marc; Glass, David E.

    2006-01-01

    In the early stages of NASA's Exploration Initiative, Snecma Propulsion Solide was funded under the Exploration Systems Research & Technology program to develop integrated thermal protection systems and heat resistant structures for reentry vehicles. Due to changes within NASA's Exploration Initiative, this task was cancelled early. This presentation provides an overview of the work that was accomplished prior to cancellation. The Snecma team chose an Apollo-type capsule as the reference vehicle for the work. They began with the design of a ceramic aft heatshield (CAS) utilizing C/SiC panels as the capsule heatshield, a C/SiC deployable decelerator and several ablators. They additionally developed a health monitoring system, high temperature structures testing, and the insulation characterization. Though the task was pre-maturely cancelled, a significant quantity of work was accomplished.

  14. Experience of application of a heat-resistant coating to protect billets in heating for metal forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radyuk, A. G.; Titlyanov, A. E.; Glukhov, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the work is to search for heat-resistant coatings for titanium and steel billets upon heating for metal forming. A water-based heat-resistant coating, which has an operating temperature of 1200°C and a binder consisting of an acrylic emulsion with additions of colloidal graphite, bentonite, and an aluminum powder, is studied. This coating favors a decrease in the thickness of the defective surface layer that forms when titanium and steel billets are heated for metal forming.

  15. A resistive heating system for homeothermic maintenance in small animals

    PubMed Central

    Kersemans, Veerle; Gilchrist, Stuart; Allen, Philip D.; Beech, John S.; Kinchesh, Paul; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Smart, Sean C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop an MR-compatible resistive heater for temperature maintenance of anaesthetized animals. Materials and Methods An MR-compatible resistive electrical heater was formed from a tightly-wound twisted pair wire, interfaced to a homeothermic maintenance controller. Fat-suppressed images and localized spectra were acquired with the twisted pair heater and a near-identical single strand heater during operation at maximum power. Data were also acquired in the absence of heating to demonstrate the insensitivity of MR to distortions arising from the passage of current through the heater elements. The efficacy of temperature maintenance was examined by measuring rectal temperature immediately following induction of general anesthesia and throughout and after the acquisition of a heater artifact-prone image series. Results Images and spectra acquired in the presence and absence of DC current through the twisted pair heater were identical whereas the passage of current through the single strand wire created field shifts and lineshape distortions. Temperature that is lost during anesthesia induction was recovered within approximately 10–20 minutes of induction, and a stable temperature is reached as the animal's temperature approaches the set target. Conclusion The twisted pair wire heater does not interfere with MR image quality and maintains adequate thermal input to the animal to maintain body temperature. PMID:25863135

  16. Frictional heating, fluid pressure, and the resistance to fault motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachenbruch, Arthur H.

    1980-11-01

    Expansion of pore fluid caused by frictional heating might have an important effect on the factional resistance and temperature during an earthquake and a controlling influence on the physics of the earthquake process. When confined water is heated, the pressure increases rapidly (≳10 bars/°C). As Sibson (1973) has pointed out, this could cause a sharp reduction of effective normal stress and dynamic friction on the fault surface. Whether or not this transient stress reduction occurs depends upon the tandem operation of several processes, any of which can break the chain that links frictional heat to frictional stress: the friction must cause an appreciable temperature rise (imposing conditions on the width of the shear zone and rate of conductive transport); the temperature rise must cause an appreciable fluid pressure rise (imposing conditions on the rate of pore dilatation or hydrofracturing, and the rate of Darcian transport); the fluid pressure rise must cause an appreciable reduction of friction (requiring the presence of a continuous fluid phase). Each process depends upon event duration, particle velocity, and the initial value of dynamic friction. With the present uncertainty in the controlling parameters (principally permeability, width of the shear zone, initial stress, and factors controlling transient hydrofracture and pore dilatation) a wide variety of fault behavior is possible. Limits to fault behavior for various ranges of the controlling parameters can be estimated from the governing equations, however, and results can be summarized graphically. If the effective stress law applies and pore dilatation is unimportant, dynamic friction would drop from an initial value of 1 kbar to ˜100 bars when shear strain reached 10 for most earthquakes if the permeability were less than 0.1 μdarcy; the maximum temperature rise would be only ˜150°C irrespective of final strain. If the permeability were ≳100 mdarcies, however, friction would be unaffected

  17. Corrosion resistance of GTAW and EBW welded joints of DIN W. Nr. 1.4462 (UNS S31803): Effect of post-weld-heat-treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Brandi, S.D.; Padilha, A.F.; Wolynec, S.

    1996-12-01

    The duplex stainless steels present better corrosion behavior than the conventional stainless steels. This is due to their chemical composition (Cr, Ni, Mo, N) and a balanced microstructure (50% ferrite). It might be an increase on the volumetric fraction of ferrite, depending on the cooling rate after welding. In the same way the chemical composition can be altered by a loss of the alloying elements during welding, such as N. Both phenomena will decrease the corrosion resistance of the weldment. Autogenous GTAW and EBW were used to join the plates. Several corrosion tests were used to evaluate the behavior of the joints in as-welded (AW) and post-welded-heat-treated (PWHT) conditions. The results were analyzed and correlated to the microstructure of the welded joints. The main conclusion of this work is that corrosion resistance of both joint processes (EBW and GTAW) in as-welded condition is inadequate. PWHT (post-weld-heat-treatment) dissolved the chromium-rich precipitates, restored the equilibrium amount of austenite in the joints and recovered their corrosion resistance.

  18. High-Temperature Performance of Cast CF8C-Plus Austenitic Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, Philip J; Pint, Bruce A

    2011-01-01

    Covers and casings of small to medium size gas turbines can be made from cast austenitic stainless steels, including grades such as CF8C, CF3M, or CF10M. Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Caterpillar have developed a new cast austenitic stainless steel, CF8C-Plus, which is a fully austenitic stainless steel, based on additions of Mn and N to the standard Nb-stabilized CF8C steel grade. The Mn addition improves castability, as well as increases the alloy solubility for N, and both Mn and N synergistically act to boost mechanical properties. CF8C-Plus steel has outstanding creep-resistance at 600-900 C, which compares well with Ni-based superalloys such as alloys X, 625, 617, and 230. CF8C-Plus also has very good fatigue and thermal fatigue resistance. It is used in the as-cast condition, with no additional heat-treatments. While commercial success for CF8C-Plus has been mainly for diesel exhaust components, this steel can also be considered for gas turbine and microturbine casings. The purposes of this paper are to demonstrate some of the mechanical properties, to update the long-term creep-rupture data, and to present new data on the high-temperature oxidation behavior of these materials, particularly in the presence of water vapor.

  19. Polymeric Coatings Containing Antioxidants to Improve UV- and Heat Resistance of Chrome-Free Leather

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For automotive upholstery leather, UV and heat resistance are very important qualities, particularly for non-chrome-tanned (chrome-free) leather. One of our research endeavors has focused on an environmentally friendly finishing process that will improve the UV and heat resistance of automobile uph...

  20. Developmental acclimation to low or high humidity conditions affect starvation and heat resistance of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Ravi; Ranga, Poonam; Aggarwal, Dau Dayal

    2014-09-01

    Several Drosophila species originating from tropical humid localities are more resistant to starvation and heat stress than populations from high latitudes but mechanistic bases of such physiological changes are largely unknown. In order to test whether humidity levels affect starvation and heat resistance, we investigated developmental acclimation effects of low to high humidity conditions on the storage and utilization of energy resources, body mass, starvation survival, heat knockdown and heat survival of D. melanogaster. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity (85% RH) stored significantly higher level of lipids and showed greater starvation survival hours but smaller in body size. In contrast, lines reared at low humidity evidenced reduced levels of body lipids and starvation resistance. Starvation resistance and lipid storage level were higher in females than males. However, the rate of utilization of lipids under starvation stress was lower for lines reared under higher humidity. Adult flies of lines reared at 65% RH and acclimated under high or low humidity condition for 200 hours also showed changes in resistance to starvation and heat but such effects were significantly lower as compared with developmental acclimation. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity showed greater heat knockdown time and heat-shock survival. These laboratory observations on developmental and adult acclimation effects of low versus high humidity conditions have helped in explaining seasonal changes in resistance to starvation and heat of the wild-caught flies of D. melanogaster. Thus, we may suggest that wet versus drier conditions significantly affect starvation and heat resistance of D. melanogaster. PMID:24845200

  1. Carbon content of austenite in austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.

    1998-06-05

    The development of austempered ductile iron (ADI) is a major achievement in cast iron technology. The austempering heat treatment enables the ductile cast iron containing mainly strong bainitic ferrite and ductile carbon-enriched austenite, with some martensite transforms from austenite during cooling down to room temperature. A key factor controlling the stability of the retained austenite can be evaluated soundly using the thermodynamics principles. It is the purpose here to demonstrate that the data of ADI from numerous sources have a similar trend.

  2. Low-thermal-resistance, high-electrical-isolation heat intercept connection

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Gonczy, J.D.; Nicol, T.H.

    1993-07-01

    A method for providing a low-thermal-resistance, high-electrical-isolation heat intercept connection is presented. Electrical conductors often require the removal of heat produced from their normal operation. The heat can be removed by mechanical connection to a refrigeration source. Such connections require both effective heat removal (low thermal resistance) and effective electrical isolation (high electrical resistance and high dielectric strength). Such connections should be straightforward to fabricate and provide reliable performance that is independent of operating temperature. The connection method described here involves clamping, by thermal interference fit, an electrically insulating cylinder between an outer metallic ring and an inner metallic disk.

  3. Low-thermal-resistance, high-electrical-isolation heat intercept connection

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Gonczy, J.D. ); Nicol, T.H. )

    1993-01-01

    A method for providing a low-thermal-resistance, high-electrical-isolation heat intercept connection is presented. Electrical conductors often require the removal of heat produced from their normal operation. The heat can be removed by mechanical connection to a refrigeration source. Such connections require both effective heat removal (low thermal resistance) and effective electrical isolation (high electrical resistance and high dielectric strength). Such connections should be straightforward to fabricate and provide reliable performance that is independent of operating temperature. The connection method described here involves clamping, by thermal interference fit, an electrically insulating cylinder between an outer metallic ring and an inner metallic disk.

  4. Heat-Resistant Crack-Free Superhydrophobic Polydivinylbenzene Colloidal Films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zefeng; Ye, Weiwei; Luo, Xinran; Wang, Zhonggang

    2016-03-29

    Highly cross-linked poly(divinylbenzene) (PDVB) spherical colloidal particles with nano-, submicron-, and micron-sizes of 157.2 nm, 602.1 nm, and 5.1 μm were synthesized through emulsion and dispersion polymerization methods. The influences of particle size on the surface morphology, roughness, superhydrophobicity, and critical cracking thickness of colloidal films were studied in detail. The results show that PDVB colloidal films possess large water contact angle (CA) over 151°, belonging to superhydrophobic materials. Moreover, it is interesting to observe that the highly cross-linked network structure leads to PDVB film's excellent heat-resistance. The CA and rough surface morphology remain nearly unchanged after thermal-treatment of films at 150 °C for 24 h. In addition, no cracks were observed in films with thicknesses up to 8.1 μm, exceeding most of polymer and inorganic particle films reported in the literature. The simple and scalable preparation method, low-cost, superhydrophobicity, and excellent thermal stability endow the PDVB colloidal films with promising applications in advanced coating fields, especially when employed in the high-temperature service environment. PMID:26986041

  5. Monitoring radio-frequency heating of contaminated soils using electrical resistance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.L.; Daily, W.D.

    1993-09-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) was used to monitor a radio-frequency heating process for the insitu remediation of volatile organic compounds from subsurface water and soil at the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, South Carolina. A dipole antenna located in a horizontal well in the unsaturated zone was used to heat a contaminated clay layer. The heat-induced changes were tomographically imaged by their effects on the formation electrical resistivity. The resistivity changes observed appear to be related to heating and vaporization of the pore water, formation of steam condensate, and infiltration of rainwater through the heated zones and adjacent areas. There is a clear asymmetry downward in the resistivity decreases associated with the heating process. The resistivity decreases observed in the vicinity of the heating well are believed to be caused by the heating and downward migration of warm water originally located within a radius of a few feet around the heating well; the magnitude of the change is between 10--20%. The decreasing resistivity implies an increasing rate of radio wave attenuation as heating progressed; therefore, the rate of energy deposition around the heating well increased while the penetration distance of the radio waves decreased. Saturation changes in the clay near the antenna during heating were estimated to be 50--55% based on the observed resistivity decreases. Resistivity changes observed at distances greater than 3 meters to one side of the antenna appear to be related to rainwater infiltration. We propose that gaps in near surface clay layers allow rainwater to migrate downward and reach the top of clay rich zone penetrated by the antenna borehole. The water may then accumulate along the top of the clay.

  6. Heat Resistance of Salmonella: the Uniqueness of Salmonella senftenberg 775W

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Henry; Bayne, Henry G.; Garibaldi, John A.

    1969-01-01

    Of approximately 300 cultures of Salmonella, representing 75 different serotypes, none was found to be as heat-resistant as S. senftenberg 775W. However, S. blockley 2004 was 5 times more heat-resistant and S. senftenberg 775W was 30 times more heat-resistant than S. typhimurium Tm-1, the reference strain in this study. All other strains of Salmonella tested, including 19 strains of S. senftenberg and 7 strains of S. blockley, had decimal reduction times at 57 C of about 1 min, equivalent to that of the reference organism, Tm-1. As observed in other bacterial species, strain 775W is more heat-sensitive in the log phase than in the stationary phase of growth. Cells from cultures grown at 44 C were more heat-resistant than those grown at either 35 or 15 C; the medium of growth, whether minimal or complex, made no appreciable difference in heat resistance. Cells from cultures limited by a carbon source were killed at a much slower rate than those limited by a nitrogen source and exhibited a 1-hr lag at 55 C before a significant rate of kill was attained. For any given set of growth conditions, strain 775W was always more heat-resistant than another strain of S. senftenberg, 197B, which has normal heat resistance. PMID:5774764

  7. The resistance to heat of thermo-resistant streptococci attached to stainless steel in the presence of milk.

    PubMed

    Flint, S; Brooks, J; Bremer, P; Walker, K; Hausman, E

    2002-03-01

    Skim milk residues had a significant impact on the sensitivity to heat of a dairy isolate of the thermo-resistant, Streptococcus thermophilus. Cells of S. thermophilus (H) suspended in water or in milk had D values at 60 degrees C of 2.0 and 14 min, respectively. Cells of S. thermophilus (H) attached to stainless steel in the presence of water or milk had D values at 60 degrees C of 2.2 and 8.1 min, respectively. The attached cells in both experiments were heat-treated in the presence of water. The increase in heat resistance could not be fully attributed to individual components (caseinate or whey) in the milk. The potential for thermo-resistant streptococci to survive heat treatment in a dairy manufacturing plant is therefore greater than may be expected for the organism in less complex environments. PMID:12074086

  8. Modeling of Austenite Grain Growth During Austenitization in a Low Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Dingqian; Chen, Fei; Cui, Zhenshan

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to develop a pragmatic model to predict austenite grain growth in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel. Austenite grain growth kinetics has been investigated under different heating conditions, involving heating temperature, holding time, as well as heating rate. Based on the experimental results, the mathematical model was established by regression analysis. The model predictions present a good agreement with the experimental data. Meanwhile, grain boundary precipitates and pinning effects on grain growth were studied by transmission electron microscopy. It is found that with the increasing of the temperature, the second-phase particles tend to be dissolved and the pinning effects become smaller, which results in a rapid growth of certain large grains with favorable orientation. The results from this study provide the basis for the establishment of large-sized ingot heating specification for SA508-III steel.

  9. Austenite Formation from Martensite in a 13Cr6Ni2Mo Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojack, A.; Zhao, L.; Morris, P. F.; Sietsma, J.

    2016-05-01

    The influence of austenitization treatment of a 13Cr6Ni2Mo supermartensitic stainless steel (X2CrNiMoV13-5-2) on austenite formation during reheating and on the fraction of austenite retained after tempering treatment is measured and analyzed. The results show the formation of austenite in two stages. This is probably due to inhomogeneous distribution of the austenite-stabilizing elements Ni and Mn, resulting from their slow diffusion from martensite into austenite and carbide and nitride dissolution during the second, higher temperature, stage. A better homogenization of the material causes an increase in the transformation temperatures for the martensite-to-austenite transformation and a lower retained austenite fraction with less variability after tempering. Furthermore, the martensite-to-austenite transformation was found to be incomplete at the target temperature of 1223 K (950 °C), which is influenced by the previous austenitization treatment and the heating rate. The activation energy for martensite-to-austenite transformation was determined by a modified Kissinger equation to be approximately 400 and 500 kJ/mol for the first and the second stages of transformation, respectively. Both values are much higher than the activation energy found during isothermal treatment in a previous study and are believed to be effective activation energies comprising the activation energies of both mechanisms involved, i.e., nucleation and growth.

  10. Sensitization of 21% Cr Ferritic Stainless Steel Weld Joints Fabricated With/Without Austenitic Steel Foil as Interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wenyong; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi; Ma, Li; Han, Jian

    2015-04-01

    The effects of sensitization heat treatment on the microstructure and electrochemical behavior of 21% Cr ferritic stainless steel weld joints with or without 309L austenite stainless steel as an interlayer were investigated. The joints were processed by pulsed gas tungsten arc welding. With the interlayer, grains in weld bead were refined, and almost fully ferrite. When the joints with the interlayer were maintained at 500 °C for 1 and 4 h, no microstructure changes occurred, whereas Widmanstatten austenite and needle-like austenite formed in the weld bead after sensitization at 815 °C for 1 h. In general, sensitization treatment worsens the corrosion resistance of welds, but the resistance of samples with the 4-h treatment at 500 °C recovered in part compared to those subjected to sensitization at 500 °C for 1 h. This could be due to Cr diffusion from the ferrite that heals the chromium-depletion zone along the grain boundary. However, an increase in temperature does not have the same effect. The corrosion morphology of samples in the weld bead is different from those in base metal after heat treatment at 500 °C for 1 h; in base metal, pitting corrosion occurs, whereas grain boundary corrosion occurs in the weld bead. Corrosion morphology is closely associated with precipitation and segregation along the grain boundary.

  11. Hydrogen-resistant heat pipes for bimodal reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, Mark T.; Anderson, William G.

    1997-01-01

    A sodium heat pipe that is tolerant of hydrogen permeation was developed for bimodal space power applications. Hydrogen permeation out of the heat pipe is enhanced by using a condenser design with a re-entrant annular gas cavity and an array of small diameter, thin-walled tubes to increase the permeation area. An experimental heat pipe with a nickel envelope was fabricated and tested. The heat pipe operated between 993K and 1073K, using sodium as the working fluid. During steady-state operation, hydrogen gas was injected into the heat pipe. The response of the heat pipe was monitored while the hydrogen permeated out of the heat pipe in the condenser section. For each of the tests run, the hydrogen gas was removed from the heat pipe in approximately 5 to 10 minutes. A model of the experimental heat pipe was developed to predict the enhancement in the hydrogen permeation rate out of the heat pipe. A significant improvement in the rate at which hydrogen permeates out of a heat pipe was predicted for the use of the special condenser geometry developed here. Agreement between the model and the experimental results was qualitatively good. Inclusion of the additional effects of fluid flow in the heat pipe are recommended for future work.

  12. Heat-resistant fungi of importance to the food and beverage industry.

    PubMed

    Tournas, V

    1994-01-01

    Spoilage of pasteurized and canned fruit and fruit products caused by heat-resistant molds have been reported repeatedly in recent years. Species most commonly implicated in fruit and fruit product disintegration are Byssochlamys fulva, Byssochlamys nivea, Neosartorya fischeri, Talaromyces flavus, and Eupenicillium brefeldianum. These organisms are saprophytic rather than parasitic and usually contaminate fruits on or near the ground. They can survive heat treatments used for fruit processing and can grow and spoil the products during storage at room temperature, which results in great economic losses. Mold heat resistance is attributed to the formation of sexual spores, ascospores. Ascospores have a wide range of heat resistance, depending on species, strain, age of organism, heating medium, pH, presence of sugars, fats, and acids in heating medium, growth conditions, etc. The mechanism(s) of thermoresistance are not clear; probably some very stable compound(s) critical to germination and outgrowth are present in the heat-resistant ascospores. Besides spoilage, the heat-resistant molds produce a number of toxic secondary metabolites, such as byssotoxin A; byssochlamic acid; the carcinogen, patulin, the tremorgenic substances, fumitremorgin A and C, and verruculogen; fischerin, which caused fatal peritonitis in mice; and eupenifeldin, a compound possessing cytotoxicity as well as in vivo antitumor activity. Growth of heat-resistant fungi can be controlled by lowering the water activity, adding sulfur dioxide, sorbate, or benzoate; washing of fruits in hypochlorite solution before heat treatment reduces the number of ascospores and makes the heat destruction more successful. More research is needed to elucidate the mechanism(s) of thermoresistance and develop new methods for the complete inactivation of resistant ascospores. PMID:7857517

  13. Heat-shock induction of ultraviolet light resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchel, R.E.J.; Morrison, D.P.

    1983-10-01

    When exponentially growing diploid wild type Saccharomyces cervisiae cells were subjected to a sudden rise in temperature (heat shock) they responded by increasing their resistance to the lethal effects of ultraviolet light. We have previously reported heat shock-induced increases in heat and ionizing radiation resistance. The shock-induced rise in resistance to uv light reported here was examined in terms of DNA repair capacity, and we find that the increase is due to induction of the recombinational repair system with no significant response from the uv-excision repair process.

  14. Effect of thymol in heating and recovery media on the isothermal and non-isothermal heat resistance of Bacillus spores.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Maria-Dolores; Conesa, Raquel; Huertas, Juan-Pablo; Palop, Alfredo

    2015-06-01

    Members of the genus Bacillus include important food-borne pathogen and spoilage microorganisms for food industry. Essential oils are natural products extracted from herbs and spices, which can be used as natural preservatives in many foods because of their antibacterial, antifungal, antioxidant and anti-carcinogenic properties. The aim of this research was to explore the effect of the addition of different concentrations of thymol to the heating and recovery media on the thermal resistance of spores of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus subtilis at different temperatures. While the heat resistance was hardly reduced when thymol was present in the heating medium, the effect in the recovery medium was greater, reducing the D100 °C values down to one third for B. subtilis and B. cereus when 0.5 mM thymol was added. This effect was dose dependent and was also observed at other heating temperatures. PMID:25790989

  15. Quantifying variety-specific heat resistance and the potential for adaptation to climate change.

    PubMed

    Tack, Jesse; Barkley, Andrew; Rife, Trevor W; Poland, Jesse A; Nalley, Lawton Lanier

    2016-08-01

    The impact of climate change on crop yields has become widely measured; however, the linkages for winter wheat are less studied due to dramatic weather changes during the long growing season that are difficult to model. Recent research suggests significant reductions under warming. A potential adaptation strategy involves the development of heat resistant varieties by breeders, combined with alternative variety selection by producers. However, the impact of heat on specific wheat varieties remains relatively unstudied due to limited data and the complex genetic basis of heat tolerance. Here, we provide a novel econometric approach that combines field-trial data with a genetic cluster mapping to group wheat varieties and estimate a separate extreme heat impact (temperatures over 34 °C) across 24 clusters spanning 197 varieties. We find a wide range of heterogeneous heat resistance and a trade-off between average yield and resistance. Results suggest that recently released varieties are less heat resistant than older varieties, a pattern that also holds for on-farm varieties. Currently released - but not yet adopted - varieties do not offer improved resistance relative to varieties currently grown on farm. Our findings suggest that warming impacts could be significantly reduced through advances in wheat breeding and/or adoption decisions by producers. However, current adaptation-through-adoption potential is limited under a 1 °C warming scenario as increased heat resistance cannot be achieved without a reduction in average yields. PMID:26577840

  16. Heat resistance of Salmonella enterica is increased by pre-adaptation to peanut oil or sub-lethal heat exposure.

    PubMed

    Fong, Karen; Wang, Siyun

    2016-09-01

    Cross-protection represents a considerable challenge in the food industry where hurdled interventions are often employed to reduce Salmonella contamination. The heat resistance of Salmonella strains from five serotypes (i.e., Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Tennessee, Thompson and Hartford) at 70 °C was determined by measurement of viable cell populations before and after adaptation to two common stresses employed in low-water activity food processing, desiccation and sub-lethal heat treatment. Survival of Salmonella at 70 °C significantly increased (p < 0.05) following the six-day incubation in peanut oil (aw 0.52 ± 0.00) and/or the exposure to a sub-lethal heat treatment at 45 °C for 3 min. Quantitative PCR revealed upregulation of two desiccation stress-related genes, fadA and otsB, following the peanut oil incubation, whereas heat treatment induced upregulation of a heat-resistance gene, dnaK. Invasion gene invA and alternative sigma factor rpoE were downregulated following either of the treatments. Interestingly, different Salmonella strains yielded different transcriptional profiles. The strain-specific resistance phenotypes and transcriptional profiles provided further insights into the mechanisms employed to tolerate desiccation and heat stresses in the food industry. PMID:27217370

  17. Heat exchange and hydraulic resistance of compact laser mirror cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanin, Yu. I.; Shanin, O. I.

    2013-07-01

    The hydraulic resistance of cooling systems for laser mirrors and the heat exchange in them have been investigated experimentally. The data obtained have been generalized for several cooling systems with different porous elements.

  18. Heating power lowering by downscaling the cell dimensions in nanoscale filamentary resistive switching devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Qiaonan; Chen, Yan; Xia, Yidong; Xu, Bo; Yin, Jiang; Liu, Zhiguo

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we theoretically investigate the size dependence of the heat process in thermochemical filamentary resistive switching memories of crossbar structure. The equivalent heat resistance of the system increases with the device dimensions scaled down because of the size-dependent electric and thermal conductivity and geometry configurations. The higher equivalent heat resistance by diminishing the cell sizes induces an enhanced self-heating effect of the filament. It promises lower operation voltage and heating power to trigger the thermally activated dissolution of the filament in RESET process. These results strengthen the advantage of filamentary memories in lateral and longitudinal scaling down technologies where less power consumption has long been urged. Our results also show the opposite dependence of the driven electric field on the linewidth and thickness of the device.

  19. Effect of ultrasonic waves on the heat resistance of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus licheniformis spores.

    PubMed

    Burgos, J; Ordóñez, J A; Sala, F

    1972-09-01

    Heat resistance of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus licheniformis spores in quarter-strength Ringer solution decreases markedly after ultrasonic treatments which are unable to kill a significant proportion of the spore population. This effect does not seem to be caused by a loss of Ca(2+) or dipicolinic acid. The use of ultrasonics to eliminate vegetative cells or to break aggregates in Bacillus spore suspensions to be used subsequently in heat resistance experiments appears to be unadvisable. PMID:4627969

  20. A study of the dry heat resistance of naturally occurring organisms widely dispersed on a surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garst, D. M.; Lindell, K. F.

    1971-01-01

    Although Bacillus subtilis var. niger is the standard test organism for NASA planetary quarantine sterilization studies, it was found that some naturally occurring soil organisms are more heat resistant. The separation of these organisms from soil particles is described. Experiments are discussed which were designed to show that the heat resistance is a natural characteristic of the organisms, rather than a condition induced by the clumping effect of agglomerated particles and organisms.

  1. Influence of cyclopropane fatty acids on heat, high pressure, acid and oxidative resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan Yao; Gänzle, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    Heat and high pressure resistant strains of Escherichia coli are a challenge to food safety. This study investigated effects of cyclopropane fatty acids (CFAs) on stress tolerance in the heat- and pressure-resistant strain E. coli AW1.7 and the sensitive strain E. coli MG1655. The role of CFAs was explored by disruption of cfa coding for CFA synthase with an in-frame, unmarked deletion method. Both wild-type strains consumed all the unsaturated fatty acids (C16:1 and C18:1) that were mostly converted to CFAs and a low proportion to saturated fatty acid (C16:0). Moreover, E. coli AW1.7 contained a higher proportion of membrane C19:0 cyclopropane fatty acid than E. coli MG1655 (P<0.05). The Δcfa mutant strains did not produce CFAs, and the corresponding substrates C16:1 and C18:1 accumulated in membrane lipids. The deletion of cfa did not alter resistance to H2O2 but increased the lethality of heat, high pressure and acid treatments in E. coli AW1.7, and E. coli MG1655. E. coli AW1.7 and its Δcfa mutant were more resistant to pressure and heat but less resistant to acid stress than E. coli MG1655. Heat resistance of wild-type strains and their Δcfa mutant was also assessed in beef patties grilled to an internal temperature of 71 °C. After treatment, cell counts of wild type strains were higher than those of the Δcfa mutant strains. In conclusion, CFA synthesis in E. coli increases heat, high pressure and acid resistance, and increases heat resistance in food. This knowledge on mechanisms of stress resistance will facilitate the design of intervention methods for improved pathogen control in food production. PMID:26828814

  2. Method for restoring the resistance of indium oxide semiconductors after heating while in sealed structures

    DOEpatents

    Seager, Carleton H.; Evans, Jr., Joseph Tate

    1998-01-01

    A method for counteracting increases in resistivity encountered when Indium Oxide resistive layers are subjected to high temperature annealing steps during semiconductor device fabrication. The method utilizes a recovery annealing step which returns the Indium Oxide layer to its original resistivity after a high temperature annealing step has caused the resistivity to increase. The recovery anneal comprises heating the resistive layer to a temperature between 100.degree. C. and 300.degree. C. for a period of time that depends on the annealing temperature. The recovery is observed even when the Indium Oxide layer is sealed under a dielectric layer.

  3. Method for restoring the resistance of indium oxide semiconductors after heating while in sealed structures

    DOEpatents

    Seager, C.H.; Evans, J.T. Jr.

    1998-11-24

    A method is described for counteracting increases in resistivity encountered when Indium Oxide resistive layers are subjected to high temperature annealing steps during semiconductor device fabrication. The method utilizes a recovery annealing step which returns the Indium Oxide layer to its original resistivity after a high temperature annealing step has caused the resistivity to increase. The recovery anneal comprises heating the resistive layer to a temperature between 100 C and 300 C for a period of time that depends on the annealing temperature. The recovery is observed even when the Indium Oxide layer is sealed under a dielectric layer. 1 fig.

  4. Precipitation hardening austenitic superalloys

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1985-01-01

    Precipitation hardening, austenitic type superalloys are described. These alloys contain 0.5 to 1.5 weight percent silicon in combination with about 0.05 to 0.5 weight percent of a post irradiation ductility enhancing agent selected from the group of hafnium, yttrium, lanthanum and scandium, alone or in combination with each other. In addition, when hafnium or yttrium are selected, reductions in irradiation induced swelling have been noted.

  5. Porphyrin photosensitivity in cell lines expressing a heat-resistant phenotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomer, Charles J.; Rucker, Natalie; Wong, Sam

    1990-07-01

    In-vitro sensitivity to porphyrin mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been examined in cell lines resistant to hyperthermia. Parental (HA-i) and heat resistant (3012) Chinese hamster fibroblasts as well as parental (RIF-i) and temperature resistant (TR-4, TR-5 and TR-iO) mouse radiation-induced fibrosarcoma cells were evaluated for thermal and PDT sensitivity. Quantitative survival curves were generated and porphyrin uptake properties were obtained for all cell lines. Significant resistance to hyperthermia (450C for varying exposure periods) was documented for the 3012 and TR cell strains when compared to 'the parent lines. However, normal and heat resistant clones exhibited comparable levels of porphyrin uptake and photosensitivity. Our results indicate that cross resistance between hyperthermia and PDT is not observed and that members of the 70 kD heat shock protein family (which are elevated in the thermal resistant cells and may be associated with the heat resistant phenotype) do not play a significant role in modulating PDT sensitivity. Mechanisms of in-vitro cytotoxicity appear to be different for PDT and hyperthermia even though possible subcellular targets (such as the plasma membrane) and types of damage (protein denaturation) may be similar for the two modalities.

  6. Investigation of heat-resistant layered coating of Al-Cr-Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmorgun, V. G.; Trykov, Y. P.; Bogdanov, A. I.; Taube, A. O.

    2016-02-01

    The paper shows the transformation of the structure and phase composition of the layered coating system Al-Cr-Ni, obtained by the heat treatment of multilayered composite H20N80+AD1, welded by explosion, in the time range 1-300 hours. The cyclic heat resistance of the coating at 1150 ° C is studied.

  7. Modelling the influence of the sporulation temperature upon the bacterial spore heat resistance, application to heating process calculation.

    PubMed

    Leguérinel, I; Couvert, O; Mafart, P

    2007-02-28

    Environmental conditions of sporulation influence bacterial heat resistance. For different Bacillus species a linear Bigelow type relationship between the logarithm of D values determined at constant heating temperature and the temperature of sporulation was observed. The absence of interaction between sporulation and heating temperatures allows the combination of this new relationship with the classical Bigelow model. The parameters zT and zT(spo) of this global model were fitted to different sets of data regarding different Bacillus species: B. cereus, B. subtilis, B. licheniformis, B. coagulans and B. stearothermophilus. The origin of raw products or food process conditions before a heat treatment can lead to warm temperature conditions of sporulation and to a dramatic increase of the heat resistance of the generated spores. In this case, provided that the temperature of sporulation can be assessed, this model can be easily implemented to rectify F values on account of possible increase of thermal resistance of spores and to ensure the sterilisation efficacy. PMID:17184868

  8. The effect of heat treatment on the resistivity of polycrystalline silicon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fripp, A. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The resistivity of doped polycrystalline silicon films has been studied as a function of post deposition heat treatments in an oxidizing atmosphere. It was found that a short oxidation cycle may produce a resistivity increase as large as three orders of magnitude in the polycrystalline films. The extent of change was dependent on the initial resistivity and the films' doping level and was independent of the total oxidation time.

  9. Aluminum nitride bulk crystal growth in a resistively heated reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmau, Rafael Federico

    A resistively heated reactor capable of temperatures in excess of 2300°C was used to grow aluminum nitride (AlN) bulk single crystals from an AlN powder source by physical vapor transport (PVT) in nitrogen atmosphere. AlN crystals were grown at elevated temperatures by two different methods. Self-seeded crystals were obtained by spontaneous nucleation on the crucible walls, while seeded growth was performed on singular and vicinal (0001) surfaces of silicon carbide (SiC) seeds. During self-seeded growth experiments a variety of crucible materials, such as boron nitride, tungsten, tantalum, rhenium, tantalum nitride, and tantalum carbide, were evaluated. These studies showed that the morphology of crystals grown by spontaneous nucleation strongly depends on the growth temperature and contamination in the reactor. Crucible selection had a profound effect on contamination in the crystal growth environment, influencing nucleation, coalescence, and crystal morphology. In terms of high-temperature stability and compatibility with the growth process, the best results for AlN crystal growth were obtained in crucibles made of sintered tantalum carbide or tantalum nitride. In addition, contamination from the commercially purchased AlN powder source was reduced by presintering the powder prior to growth, which resulted in a drastic reduction of nearly all impurities. Spontaneously grown single crystals up to 15 mm in size were characterized by x-ray diffraction, x-ray topography, glow discharge mass spectrometry, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Average dislocation densities were on the order of 103 cm -3, with extended areas virtually free of dislocations. High resolution rocking curves routinely showed peak widths as narrow as 7 arcsec, indicating a high degree of crystalline perfection. Low-temperature partially polarized optical reflectance measurements were used to calculate the crystal-field splitting parameter of AlN, Deltacr = -230 meV, and a low-temperature (1

  10. Thin-Film Resistance Heat-Flux Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Blaha, Charles A.

    2005-01-01

    Thin-film heat-flux sensors of a proposed type would offer advantages over currently available thin-film heat flux sensors. Like a currently available thin-film heat-flux sensor, a sensor according to the proposal would be based on measurement of voltages related to the temperatures of thin metal films on the hotter and colder faces of a layer of an electrically insulating and moderately thermally conductive material. The heat flux through such a device is proportional to the difference between the temperatures and to the thermal conductivity of the layer. The advantages of the proposed sensors over the commercial ones would arise from the manner in which the temperature-related voltages would be generated and measured.

  11. Heat Transfer and Hydraulic Flow Resistance for Streams of High Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lelchuk, V. L.

    1943-01-01

    Problems of hydraulic flow resistance and heat transfer for streams with velocities comparable with acoustic have present great importance for various fields of technical science. Especially, they have great importance for the field of heat transfer in designing and constructing boilers.of the "Velox" type. In this article a description of experiments and their results as regards definition of the laws of heat transfer in differential form for high velocity air streams inside smooth tubes are given.

  12. Direct Resistance Joule Heating of Al-10 pct Si-Coated Press Hardening Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang Wook; Choi, Won Seok; Cho, Yeol Rae; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-06-01

    Various rapid heating methods have been developed to increase the productivity of press hardening steel. One of these methods is direct resistance Joule heating. This heating method results in the melting of the surface coating and the formation of a persistent liquid trail as a result of the high thermal conductivity and low melting temperature of the Al-10 pct Si alloy coating. This can be addressed by an alloying preheating treatment prior to the press hardening process.

  13. Direct Resistance Joule Heating of Al-10 pct Si-Coated Press Hardening Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang Wook; Choi, Won Seok; Cho, Yeol Rae; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-03-01

    Various rapid heating methods have been developed to increase the productivity of press hardening steel. One of these methods is direct resistance Joule heating. This heating method results in the melting of the surface coating and the formation of a persistent liquid trail as a result of the high thermal conductivity and low melting temperature of the Al-10 pct Si alloy coating. This can be addressed by an alloying preheating treatment prior to the press hardening process.

  14. Design and performance of low-thermal-resistance, high-electrical-isolation heat intercept connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, R. C.; Gonczy, J. D.; Phelan, P. E.; Nicol, T. H.

    Electrical conductors often require the removal of heat produced by normal operation. The heat can be removed by mechanical connection of the conductor to a refrigeration source. Such connections require both effective heat removal (low thermal resistance) and effective electrical isolation (high electrical resistance and high dielectric strength). Fabrication of these connections should be straightforward, and performance must be reliable and independent of operating temperature. The connection method described here involves clamping (by thermal interference fit) an electrically insulating cylinder between an outer metallic ring and an inner metallic disc. Material candidates for insulating cylinders include composites, e.g. epoxy/fibreglass, and ceramics, e.g. alumina. Design factors, including geometry, materials and thermal contact resistance are discussed. The design, construction experience and performance measurements of a heat intercept connection in a high-temperature superconducting lead assembly is presented.

  15. Heat-resistant protein expression during germination of maize seeds under water stress.

    PubMed

    Abreu, V M; Silva Neta, I C; Von Pinho, E V R; Naves, G M F; Guimarães, R M; Santos, H O; Von Pinho, R G

    2016-01-01

    Low water availability is one of the factors that limit agricultural crop development, and hence the development of genotypes with increased water stress tolerance is a challenge in plant breeding programs. Heat-resistant proteins have been widely studied, and are reported to participate in various developmental processes and to accumulate in response to stress. This study aimed to evaluate heat-resistant protein expression under water stress conditions during the germination of maize seed inbreed lines differing in their water stress tolerance. Maize seed lines 91 and 64 were soaked in 0, -0.3, -0.6, and -0.9 MPa water potential for 0, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h. Line 91 is considered more water stress-tolerant than line 64. The analysis of heat-resistant protein expression was made by gel electrophoresis and spectrophotometry. In general, higher expression of heat-resistant proteins was observed in seeds from line 64 subjected to shorter soaking periods and lower water potentials. However, in the water stress-tolerant line 91, a higher expression was observed in seeds that were subjected to -0.3 and -0.6 MPa water potentials. In the absence of water stress, heat-resistant protein expression was reduced with increasing soaking period. Thus, there was a difference in heat-resistant protein expression among the seed lines differing in water stress tolerance. Increased heat-resistant protein expression was observed in seeds from line 91 when subjected to water stress conditions for longer soaking periods. PMID:27525950

  16. Thermal treatment of low permeability soils using electrical resistance heating

    SciTech Connect

    Udell, K.S.

    1996-08-01

    The acceleration of recovery rates of second phase liquid contaminants from the subsurface during gas or water pumping operations is realized by increasing the soil and ground water temperature. Electrical heating with AC current is one method of increasing the soil and groundwater temperature and has particular applicability to low permeability soils. Several mechanisms have been identified that account for the enhanced removal of the contaminants during electrical heating. These are vaporization of liquid contaminants with low boiling points, temperature-enhanced evaporation rates of semi-volatile components, and removal of residual contaminants by the boiling of residual water. Field scale studies of electrical heating and fluid extraction show the effectiveness of this technique and its applicability to contaminants found both above and below the water table and within low permeability soils. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Heat resistant substrates and battery separators made therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, Alois (Inventor); Scala, Luciano C. (Inventor); Ruffing, Charles R. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A flexible substrate having a caustic resistant support and at least one membrane comprising a solid polymeric matrix containing a network of interconnected pores and interdispersed inorganic filler particles with a ratio of filler: polymer in the polymeric matrix of between about 1:1 to 5:1, is made by coating at least one side of the support with a filler:coating formulation mixture of inorganic filler particles and a caustic resistant, water insoluble polymer dissolved in an organic solvent, and removing the solvent from the mixture to provide a porous network within the polymeric matrix.

  18. In Situ Thermo-magnetic Investigation of the Austenitic Phase During Tempering of a 13Cr6Ni2Mo Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojack, A.; Zhao, L.; Morris, P. F.; Sietsma, J.

    2014-09-01

    The formation of austenite during tempering of a 13Cr6Ni2Mo supermartensitic stainless steel (X2CrNiMoV13-5-2) was investigated using an in situ thermo-magnetic technique to establish the kinetics of the martensite to austenite transformation and the stability of austenite. The austenite fraction was obtained from in situ magnetization measurements. It was found that during heating to the tempering temperature 1 to 2 vol pct of austenite, retained during quenching after the austenitization treatment, decomposed between 623 K and 753 K (350 °C and 480 °C). The activation energy for martensite to austenite transformation was found by JMAK-fitting to be 233 kJ/mol. This value is similar to the activation energy for Ni and Mn diffusion in iron and supports the assumption that partitioning of Ni and Mn to austenite are mainly rate determining for the austenite formation during tempering. This also indicates that the stability of austenite during cooling after tempering depends on these elements. With increasing tempering temperature the thermal stability of austenite is decreasing due to the lower concentrations of austenite-stabilizing elements in the increased fraction of austenite. After cooling from the tempering temperature the retained austenite was further partially decomposed during holding at room temperature. This appears to be related to previous martensite formation during cooling.

  19. In Situ Thermo-magnetic Investigation of the Austenitic Phase During Tempering of a 13Cr6Ni2Mo Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojack, A.; Zhao, L.; Morris, P. F.; Sietsma, J.

    2014-12-01

    The formation of austenite during tempering of a 13Cr6Ni2Mo supermartensitic stainless steel (X2CrNiMoV13-5-2) was investigated using an in situ thermo-magnetic technique to establish the kinetics of the martensite to austenite transformation and the stability of austenite. The austenite fraction was obtained from in situ magnetization measurements. It was found that during heating to the tempering temperature 1 to 2 vol pct of austenite, retained during quenching after the austenitization treatment, decomposed between 623 K and 753 K (350 °C and 480 °C). The activation energy for martensite to austenite transformation was found by JMAK-fitting to be 233 kJ/mol. This value is similar to the activation energy for Ni and Mn diffusion in iron and supports the assumption that partitioning of Ni and Mn to austenite are mainly rate determining for the austenite formation during tempering. This also indicates that the stability of austenite during cooling after tempering depends on these elements. With increasing tempering temperature the thermal stability of austenite is decreasing due to the lower concentrations of austenite-stabilizing elements in the increased fraction of austenite. After cooling from the tempering temperature the retained austenite was further partially decomposed during holding at room temperature. This appears to be related to previous martensite formation during cooling.

  20. Effect of Welding Heat Input on the Corrosion Resistance of Carbon Steel Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yongxin; Jing, Hongyang; Han, Yongdian; Xu, Lianyong

    2016-02-01

    The corrosion resistance of carbon steel weld metal with three different microstructures has been systematically evaluated using electrochemical techniques with the simulated produced water containing CO2 at 90 °C. Microstructures include acicular ferrite, polygonal ferrite, and a small amount of pearlite. With welding heat input increasing, weld metal microstructure becomes more uniform. Electrochemical techniques including potentiodynamic polarization curve, linear polarization resistance, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were utilized to characterize the corrosion properties on weld joint, indicating that the best corrosion resistance corresponded to the weld metal with a polygonal ferrite microstructure, whereas the weld metal with the acicular ferrite + polygonal ferrite microstructure showed the worst corrosion resistance. The samples with high welding heat input possessed better corrosion resistance. Results were discussed in terms of crystal plane orientation, grain size, and grain boundary type found in each weld metal by electron backscatter diffraction test.

  1. Microstructure Aspects of a Newly Developed, Low Cost, Corrosion-Resistant White Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sain, P. K.; Sharma, C. P.; Bhargava, A. K.

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the influence of heat treatment on the corrosion resistance of a newly developed white cast iron, basically suitable for corrosion- and wear-resistant applications, and to attain a microstructure that is most suitable from the corrosion resistance point of view. The composition was selected with an aim to have austenitic matrix both in as-cast and heat-treated conditions. The difference in electrochemical potential between austenite and carbide is less in comparison to that between austenite and graphite. Additionally, graphitic corrosion which is frequently encountered in gray cast irons is absent in white cast irons. These basic facts encouraged us to undertake this work. Optical metallography, hardness testing, X-ray diffractometry, and SEM-EDX techniques were employed to identify the phases present in the as-cast and heat-treated specimens of the investigated alloy and to correlate microstructure with corrosion resistance and hardness. Corrosion testing was carried out in 5 pct NaCl solution (approximate chloride content of sea water) using the weight loss method. In the investigated alloy, austenite was retained the in as-cast and heat-treated conditions. The same was confirmed by X-ray and EDX analysis. The stability and volume fraction of austenite increased with an increase of heat-treated temperature/time with a simultaneous decrease in the volume fraction of massive carbides. The decrease in volume fraction of massive carbides resulted in the availability of alloying elements. These alloying elements, on increasing the heat treatment temperature or increasing the soaking period at certain temperatures, get dissolved in austenite. As a consequence, austenite gets enriched as well as becomes more stable. On cooling from lower soaking period/temperature, enriched austenite decomposes to lesser enriched austenite and to a dispersed phase due to decreasing solid solubility of alloying elements with decreasing temperature

  2. Influence of Heat Treatment on Mercury Cavitation Resistance of Surface Hardened 316LN Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J; Hsu, Julia

    2010-11-01

    The cavitation-erosion resistance of carburized 316LN stainless steel was significantly degraded but not destroyed by heat treatment in the temperature range 500-800 C. The heat treatments caused rejection of some carbon from the carburized layer into an amorphous film that formed on each specimen surface. Further, the heat treatments encouraged carbide precipitation and reduced hardness within the carburized layer, but the overall change did not reduce surface hardness fully to the level of untreated material. Heat treatments as short as 10 min at 650 C substantially reduced cavitation-erosion resistance in mercury, while heat treatments at 500 and 800 C were found to be somewhat less detrimental. Overall, the results suggest that modest thermal excursions perhaps the result of a weld made at some distance to the carburized material or a brief stress relief treatment will not render the hardened layer completely ineffective but should be avoided to the greatest extent possible.

  3. Frictional and heat resistance characteristics of coconut husk particle filled automotive brake pad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahari, Shahril Anuar; Chik, Mohd Syahrizul; Kassim, Masitah Abu; Som Said, Che Mohamad; Misnon, Mohd Iqbal; Mohamed, Zulkifli; Othman, Eliasidi Abu

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the friction and heat resistance characteristics of automotive brake pad composed with different sizes and percentages of coconut husk particle. The materials used were phenolic resin (phenol formaldehyde) as binder, copper, graphite and brass as friction producer/modifiers, magnesium oxide as abrasive material, steel and barium sulfate as reinforcement while coconut husk particle as filler. To obtain particle, the coconut husk was ground and dried to 3% moisture content. Then the coconut husk particle was screened using 80 mesh (to obtain coarse dust) and 100 mesh (to obtain fine dust). Different percentages of particle, such as 10 and 30% were used in the mixture of brake pad materials. Then the mixture was hot-pressed to produce brake pad. Chase machine was used to determine the friction coefficient in friction resistance testing, while thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) machine was used to determine the heat decomposition values in heat resistance testing. Results showed that brake pad with 100 mesh and 10% composition of coconut husk particle showed the highest friction coefficient. For heat resistance, brake pad with 100 mesh and 30% composition of coconut husk dust showed the highest decomposition temperature, due to the high percentage of coconut husk particle in the composition, thus increased the thermal stability. As a comparison, brake pad composed with coconut husk particle showed better heat resistance results than commercial brake pad.

  4. Pinning of Austenite Grain Boundaries by

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doğan, Ömer N.; Michal, G. M.; Kwon, H.-W.

    1992-08-01

    The growth behavior of austenite grains in the presence of A1N precipitates varies with the temperature and time of anneal. To study this behavior, two iron alloys, (in weight percent) a 0.1 carbon base chemistry with 0.03A1/0.01N and 0.09A1/0.04N, respectively, were annealed between 1000 °C and 1200 °C for times of up to 180 minutes. Using optical microscopy, as many as 1000 austenite grains per heat-treatment condition were measured. Conditions of sup- pressed, abnormal, and uniform grain growth were observed. Using an extraction replica tech- nique, the size, shape, and distribution of the A1N particles were determined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The largest grain boundary curvatures calculated, using the Hellman- Hillert pinning model, were in close agreement with independent calculations of curvatures using the grain size data. The largest grains in the lognormal size distribution of austenite grains were found to be the ones with the potential to grow to abnormally large sizes.

  5. Heat resistance of Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius in water, various buffers, and orange juice.

    PubMed

    Palop, A; Alvarez, I; Raso, J; Condón, S

    2000-10-01

    The effect of the pH or the composition of the heating medium and of the sporulation temperature on the heat resistance of spores of a thermoacidophilic spore-forming microorganism isolated from a dairy beverage containing orange fruit concentrate was investigated. The species was identified as Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius. The spores showed the same heat resistance in citrate-phosphate buffers of pH 4 and 7, in distilled water, and in orange juice at any of the temperatures tested (D120 degrees C = 0.1 min and z = 7 degrees C). A raise in 20 degrees C in the sporulation temperature (from 45 to 65 degrees C) increased the heat resistance eightfold (from D110 degrees C = 0.48 min when sporulated at 45 degrees C to 3.9 min when sporulated at 65 degrees C). The z-values remained constant for all sporulation temperatures. The spores of this strain of A. acidocaldarius were very heat resistant and could easily survive any heat treatment currently applied to pasteurize fruit juices. PMID:11041137

  6. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800.degree. C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800.degree. C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700.degree. C. at a low cost

  7. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

  8. [The influence of oil heat treatment on wood decay resistance by Fourier infrared spectrum analysis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Mei; Ma, Shu-Ling; Feng, Li-Qun

    2014-03-01

    Wood preservative treatment can improve defects of plantation wood such as easy to corrupt and moth eaten. Among them heat-treatment is not only environmental and no pollution, also can improve the corrosion resistance and dimension stability of wood. In this test Poplar and Mongolian Seoteh Pine was treated by soybean oil as heat-conducting medium, and the heat treatment wood was studied for indoor decay resistance; wood chemical components before and after treatment, the effect of heat treatment on wood decay resistance performance and main mechanism of action were analysed by Fourier infrared spectrometric. Results showed that the mass loss rate of poplar fell from 19.37% to 5% and Mongolian Seoteh Pine's fell from 8.23% to 3.15%, so oil heat treatment can effectively improve the decay resistance. Infrared spectrum analysis shows that the heat treatment made wood's hydrophilic groups such as hydroxyl groups in largely reduced, absorbing capacity decreased and the moisture of wood rotting fungi necessary was reduced; during the heat treatment wood chemical components such as cellulose, hemicellu lose were degraded, and the nutrient source of wood rotting fungi growth necessary was reduced. Wood decay fungi can grow in the wood to discredit wood is because of that wood can provide better living conditions for wood decay fungi, such as nutrients, water, oxygen, and so on. The cellulose and hemicellulose in wood is the main nutrition source of wood decay fungi. So the oil heat-treatment can reduce the cellulose, hemicellulose nutrition source of wood decay fungi so as to improve the decay resistance of wood. PMID:25208386

  9. Heating of solid earthen material, measuring moisture and resistivity

    DOEpatents

    Heath, W.O.; Richardson, R.L.; Goheen, S.C.

    1994-07-19

    The present invention includes a method of treating solid earthen material having volatile, semi-volatile, and non-volatile contaminants. Six electrodes are inserted into a region of earthen material to be treated in a substantially equilateral hexagonal arrangement. Six phases of voltages are applied to corresponding electrodes. The voltages are adjusted within a first range of voltages to create multiple current paths between pairs of the electrodes. The current paths are evenly distributed throughout the region defined by the electrodes and therefore uniformly heat the region. The region of earthen material is heated to a temperature sufficient to substantially remove volatile and semi-volatile contaminants by promoting microbial action. This temperature is less than a melting temperature of the earthen material. 13 figs.

  10. Heating of solid earthen material, measuring moisture and resistivity

    DOEpatents

    Heath, William O.; Richardson, Richard L.; Goheen, Steven C.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of treating solid earthen material having volatile, semi-volatile, and non-volatile contaminants. Six electrodes are inserted into a region of earthen material to be treated in a substantially equilateral hexagonal arrangement. Six phases of voltages are applied to corresponding electrodes. The voltages are adjusted within a first range of voltages to create multiple current paths between pairs of the electrodes. The current paths are evenly distributed throughout the region defined by the electrodes and therefore uniformly heat the region. The region of earthen material is heated to a temperature sufficient to substantially remove volatile and semi-volatile contaminants by promoting microbial action. This temperature is less than a melting temperature of the earthen material.

  11. Co-Optimization of Wrought Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Composition Ranges for High-Temperature Creep and Oxidation/Corrosion Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Magee, John H; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Helmick, David; Wang, Lu

    2014-01-01

    A seriesofcandidatealumina-formingaustenitic(AFA)stainlesssteelsdesignedtoevaluatetheeffectsof variationinAl,C,Cr,Mn,Nb,andNicontentonhigh-temperaturetensileproperties,creep,and oxidation/corrosionresistancewerestudied.ThecompositionsassessedwerebasedonmediumNi (20 25 wt%)andlowNi(12wt%)AFAvariationsstrengthenedprimarilybyMCand/orM23C6 carbide precipitates,andahighNi(32wt%)AFAsuperalloyvariationstrengthenedprimarilyby -Ni3Al intermetallic precipitates.Tensileandcreeppropertiesweremeasuredat650and750/760 1C, oxidation resistance from650to900 1C inairwithwatervaporandsteamenvironments,andsulfidation oxidation resistance inAr 20%H2 20%H2O 5% H2S at550and650 1C. Optimizedcompositionrangesfordifferent use temperaturesrangesbasedontheseevaluationsarepresented.

  12. Comparison of Direct Solar Energy to Resistance Heating for Carbothermal Reduction of Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.; Gustafson, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    A comparison of two methods of delivering thermal energy to regolith for the carbo thermal reduction process has been performed. The comparison concludes that electrical resistance heating is superior to direct solar energy via solar concentrators for the following reasons: (1) the resistance heating method can process approximately 12 times as much regolith using the same amount of thermal energy as the direct solar energy method because of superior thermal insulation; (2) the resistance heating method is more adaptable to nearer-term robotic exploration precursor missions because it does not require a solar concentrator system; (3) crucible-based methods are more easily adapted to separation of iron metal and glass by-products than direct solar energy because the melt can be poured directly after processing instead of being remelted; and (4) even with projected improvements in the mass of solar concentrators, projected photovoltaic system masses are expected to be even lower.

  13. Experimental study on heat transfer and flow resistance in improved latticework cooling channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hongwu; Wang, Kai; Zhu, Jianqin; Pan, Wenyan

    2013-06-01

    Characteristics of heat transfer and flow resistance of the latticework (vortex) cooling channel with ribs truncated at their two ends were theoretically and experimentally studied compared with regular and smooth channels of the same configuration. The results showed: the heat transfer efficiency of the latticework channel with two slots was better than those of regular and smooth channels of the same configuration, its flow resistance situation in the slotted channel becomes quite complex; The flow resistances of 2 mm- and 4 mm-slotted channels were obviously lower than that of the regular channel, but they are still much higher than that of the smooth channel; Compared with the regular channel, the total heat transfer efficiencies of the slotted channels were pretty improved, among them the 4-mm slotted channel has the biggest enhancement. From the experimental results, it is obvious that the latticework channel with proper slots has a great prospect in the design of the inner cooling channels of turbine blades.

  14. Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels Strengthened by Laves Phase and MC Carbide Precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Brady, M. P.; Lu, Z. P.; Liu, C. T.; Takeyama, M.; Maziasz, P. J.; Pint, B. A.

    2007-11-01

    Creep strengthening of Al-modified austenitic stainless steels by MC carbides or Fe2Nb Laves phase was explored. Fe-20Cr-15Ni-(0-8)Al and Fe-15Cr-20Ni-5Al base alloys (at. pct) with small additions of Nb, Mo, W, Ti, V, C, and B were cast, thermally-processed, and aged. On exposure from 650 °C to 800 °C in air and in air with 10 pct water vapor, the alloys exhibited continuous protective Al2O3 scale formation at an Al level of only 5 at. pct (2.4 wt pct). Matrices of the Fe-20Cr-15Ni-5Al base alloys consisted of γ (fcc) + α (bcc) dual phase due to the strong α-Fe stabilizing effect of the Al addition and exhibited poor creep resistance. However, adjustment of composition to the Fe-15Cr-20Ni-5Al base resulted in alloys that were single-phase γ-Fe and still capable of alumina scale formation. Alloys that relied solely on Fe2Nb Laves phase precipitates for strengthening exhibited relatively low creep resistance, while alloys that also contained MC carbide precipitates exhibited creep resistance comparable to that of commercially available heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels. Phase equilibria studies indicated that NbC precipitates in combination with Fe2Nb were of limited benefit to creep resistance due to the solution limit of NbC within the γ-Fe matrix of the alloys studied. However, when combined with other MC-type strengtheners, such as V4C3 or TiC, higher levels of creep resistance were obtained.

  15. HNS/Teflon, a new heat resistant explosive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, H.; Bertram, A. L.

    1973-01-01

    HNS/Teflon (90/10) is a new pressed explosive developed for use in the Apollo program. The major advantages of HNS/Teflon are (1) excellent thermal stability at elevated temperatures, (2) superior resistance to sublimation at high temperatures and low pressures and (3) ease of molding powder preparation, pressing and machining. The impact sensitivity of HNS/Teflon is between that of Comp B and Comp A-3 while its explosive performance is about the same as TNT. Under the severe environmental conditions of the moon's surface, this explosive successfully performed its intended function of generating seismic waves in the Apollo ALSEP and LSPE experiments. (Modified author abstract)

  16. Heating of solid earthen material, measuring moisture and resistivity

    DOEpatents

    Heath, William O.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Pillay, Gautam; Bergsman, Theresa M.; Eschbach, Eugene A.; Goheen, Steven C.; Richardson, Richard L.; Roberts, Janet S.; Schalla, Ronald

    1996-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of treating solid earthen material having volatile, semi-volatile, and non-volatile contaminants that utilizes electrical energy. A plurality of electrodes are inserted into a region of earthen material to be treated in a selected geometric pattern. Varying phase and voltages configurations are applied to corresponding electrodes to achieve heating, physical phase changes, and the placement of substances within the treatment region. Additionally, treatment mediums can be added to either treat the contamination within the soil or to restrict their mobility.

  17. Heating of solid earthen material, measuring moisture and resistivity

    DOEpatents

    Heath, W.O.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Pillay, G.; Bergsman, T.M.; Eschbach, E.A.; Goheen, S.C.; Richardson, R.L.; Roberts, J.S.; Schalla, R.

    1996-08-13

    The present invention includes a method of treating solid earthen material having volatile, semi-volatile, and non-volatile contaminants that utilizes electrical energy. A plurality of electrodes are inserted into a region of earthen material to be treated in a selected geometric pattern. Varying phase and voltages configurations are applied to corresponding electrodes to achieve heating, physical phase changes, and the placement of substances within the treatment region. Additionally, treatment mediums can be added to either treat the contamination within the soil or to restrict their mobility. 29 figs.

  18. Study on modeling of resist heating effect correction in EB mask writer EBM-9000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Haruyuki; Kamikubo, Takashi; Suganuma, Mizuna; Kato, Yasuo; Yashima, Jun; Nakayamada, Noriaki; Anze, Hirohito; Ogasawara, Munehiro

    2015-07-01

    Resist heating effect which is caused in electron beam lithography by rise in substrate temperature of a few tens or hundreds of degrees changes resist sensitivity and leads to degradation of local critical dimension uniformity (LCDU). Increasing writing pass count and reducing dose per pass is one way to avoid the resist heating effect, but it worsens writing throughput. As an alternative way, NuFlare Technology is developing a heating effect correction system which corrects CD deviation induced by resist heating effect and mitigates LCDU degradation even in high dose per pass conditions. Our developing correction model is based on a dose modulation method. Therefore, a kind of conversion equation to modify the dose corresponding to CD change by temperature rise is necessary. For this purpose, a CD variation model depending on local pattern density was introduced and its validity was confirmed by experiments and temperature simulations. And then the dose modulation rate which is a parameter to be used in the heating effect correction system was defined as ideally irrelevant to the local pattern density, and the actual values were also determined with the experimental results for several resist types. The accuracy of the heating effect correction was also discussed. Even when deviations depending on the pattern density slightly remains in the dose modulation rates (i.e., not ideal in actual), the estimated residual errors in the correction are sufficiently small and acceptable for practical 2 pass writing with the constant dose modulation rates. In these results, it is demonstrated that the CD variation model is effective for the heating effect correction system.

  19. Dry-heat resistance of selected psychrophiles. [Viking lander in spacecraft sterilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winans, L.; Pflug, I. J.; Foster, T. L.

    1977-01-01

    The dry-heat resistance characteristics of spores of psychrophilic organisms isolated from soil samples from the Viking spacecraft assembly areas at Cape Kennedy Space Flight Center, Cape Canaveral, Fla., were studied. Spore suspensions were produced, and dry-heat D values were determined for the microorganisms that demonstrated growth or survival under a simulated Martian environment. The dry-heat tests were carried out by using the planchet-boat-hot plate system at 110 and 125 C with an ambient relative humidity of 50% at 22 C. The spores evaluated had a relatively low resistance to dry heat. D (110 C) values ranged from 7.5 to 122 min, whereas the D (125 C) values ranged from less than 1.0 to 9.8 min.

  20. Investigations of temperature dependences of electrical resistivity and specific heat capacity of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eser, Erhan; Koç, Hüseyin

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we calculated the electrical resistivity and heat capacities of some ideal metals (Cu, Pt, and Pd) using a method that it employs the statistical model and Debye functions. The method is used to provide a simple and reliable analytical procedure for wide temperature range. The results obtained for the electrical resistivity and heat capacity have been compared with the results in literature. The results obtained at low temperature are in excellent agreement with experimental and theoretical results. Finally the used approximation and analytical method are a useful approach to calculate thermophysical properties of metals.

  1. Electrical resistivity and specific heat of La 2-XSr XNiO 4+δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Akiyuki; Matsumoto, Takehiko; Takayanagi, Shigeru; Mōri, Nobuo

    1990-08-01

    Specific heat and electrical resistivity were measured on La 2-XSr XNiO 4+δ with various Sr concentrations as a function of temerature. The behaviors of electrical resistivity and lattice constants show a marked change at X⋃0.5 (Xc). The specific heat shows a hump at about 6K in C/T vs. T 2 plot for all of samples annealed in air. For the samples annealed in hydrogen no hump is observed. The relationship between Xc and interstitial oxygen defect is discussed.

  2. Corrosion of austenitic alloys in aerated brines

    SciTech Connect

    Heidersbach, R.; Shi, A.; Sharp, S.

    1999-11-01

    This report discusses the results of corrosion exposures of three austenitic alloys--3l6L stainless steel, UNS N10276, and UNS N08367. Coupons of these alloys were suspended in a series of brines used for processing in the pharmaceutical industry. The effects of surface finish and welding processes on the corrosion behavior of these alloys were determined. The 316L coupons experienced corrosion in several environments, but the other alloys were unaffected during the one-month exposures of this investigation. Electropolishing the surfaces improved corrosion resistance.

  3. Origin of Self-preservation Effect for Hydrate Decomposition: Coupling of Mass and Heat Transfer Resistances

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Dongsheng; Zhang, Diwei; Zhang, Xianren; Chen, Guangjin

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates could show an unexpected high stability at conditions out of thermodynamic equilibrium, which is called the self-preservation effect. The mechanism of the effect for methane hydrates is here investigated via molecular dynamics simulations, in which an NVT/E method is introduced to represent different levels of heat transfer resistance. Our simulations suggest a coupling between the mass transfer resistance and heat transfer resistance as the driving mechanism for self-preservation effect. We found that the hydrate is initially melted from the interface, and then a solid-like water layer with temperature-dependent structures is formed next to the hydrate interface that exhibits fractal feature, followed by an increase of mass transfer resistance for the diffusion of methane from hydrate region. Furthermore, our results indicate that heat transfer resistance is a more fundamental factor, since it facilitates the formation of the solid-like layer and hence inhibits the further dissociation of the hydrates. The self-preservation effect is found to be enhanced with the increase of pressure and particularly the decrease of temperature. Kinetic equations based on heat balance calculations is also developed to describe the self-preservation effect, which reproduces our simulation results well and provides an association between microscopic and macroscopic properties. PMID:26423519

  4. Origin of Self-preservation Effect for Hydrate Decomposition: Coupling of Mass and Heat Transfer Resistances.

    PubMed

    Bai, Dongsheng; Zhang, Diwei; Zhang, Xianren; Chen, Guangjin

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates could show an unexpected high stability at conditions out of thermodynamic equilibrium, which is called the self-preservation effect. The mechanism of the effect for methane hydrates is here investigated via molecular dynamics simulations, in which an NVT/E method is introduced to represent different levels of heat transfer resistance. Our simulations suggest a coupling between the mass transfer resistance and heat transfer resistance as the driving mechanism for self-preservation effect. We found that the hydrate is initially melted from the interface, and then a solid-like water layer with temperature-dependent structures is formed next to the hydrate interface that exhibits fractal feature, followed by an increase of mass transfer resistance for the diffusion of methane from hydrate region. Furthermore, our results indicate that heat transfer resistance is a more fundamental factor, since it facilitates the formation of the solid-like layer and hence inhibits the further dissociation of the hydrates. The self-preservation effect is found to be enhanced with the increase of pressure and particularly the decrease of temperature. Kinetic equations based on heat balance calculations is also developed to describe the self-preservation effect, which reproduces our simulation results well and provides an association between microscopic and macroscopic properties. PMID:26423519

  5. Resistively Heated SiC Nozzle for Generating Molecular Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagiano, Steven; Abell, Robert; Patrick, Edward; Bendt, Miri; Gundersen, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    An improved nozzle has been developed to replace nozzles used previously in an apparatus that generates a substantially unidirectional beam of molecules passing through a vacuum at speeds of several kilometers per second. The basic principle of operation of the apparatus is the same for both the previous and the present nozzle designs. The main working part of the nozzle is essentially a cylinder that is closed except that there is an inlet for a pressurized gas and, at one end, the cylinder is closed by a disk that contains a narrow central hole that serves as an outlet. The cylinder is heated to increase the thermal speeds of the gas molecules into the desired high-speed range. Heated, pressurized gas escapes through the outlet into a portion of the vacuum chamber that is separated, by a wall, from the rest of the vacuum chamber. In this portion of the vacuum chamber, the gas undergoes a free jet expansion. Most of the expanded gas is evacuated and thus does not become part of the molecular beam. A small fraction of the expanded beam passes through a narrow central orifice in the wall and thereby becomes a needle- thin molecular beam in the portion of the vacuum on the downstream side of the wall.

  6. Hot Hydroforming of 22MnB5 Tube by Resistance Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, G. N.; Lin, Y. L.; Ding, M. Q.

    2016-05-01

    To promote the application of high strength steels in automobile bodies, the practicability of hot hydroforming of tube by resistance heating is illustrated. From the results of experiments conducted to measure temperature distributions of the tube during the forming process, a method to improve temperature uniformity has been proposed and achieved. Validity was evaluated by examining the effects of hot gas forming on the microstructure and hardness. Results indicate an obvious temperature difference along the axial direction for two cross-sectional shapes: the temperature in the middle zone of the tube is higher than that at its ends. Both thermal convection and cross-sectional shape have only a limited effect on the temperature distribution. The main reason for non-uniform temperature distribution is the heat transition between the electrodes and the tube ends. The temperature difference decreased as the heating rate increased. In contrast, the temperature distribution was even along the circumferential direction for both cross-sectional shapes. Adjusting the contact resistance is a useful method of reducing the temperature difference. In this study, the temperature difference was successfully decreased to 20°C, while reaching a maximum temperature of 750°C, which is adequate for both forming and quenching. A rectangular component was formed to validate the practicality and efficiency of tube hot hydroforming by resistance heating. The hardness and microstructure met the requirements of 22MnB5, which demonstrates both the forming efficiency and quantity advantages of hot gas hydroforming by resistance heating.

  7. Hot Hydroforming of 22MnB5 Tube by Resistance Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, G. N.; Lin, Y. L.; Ding, M. Q.

    2016-07-01

    To promote the application of high strength steels in automobile bodies, the practicability of hot hydroforming of tube by resistance heating is illustrated. From the results of experiments conducted to measure temperature distributions of the tube during the forming process, a method to improve temperature uniformity has been proposed and achieved. Validity was evaluated by examining the effects of hot gas forming on the microstructure and hardness. Results indicate an obvious temperature difference along the axial direction for two cross-sectional shapes: the temperature in the middle zone of the tube is higher than that at its ends. Both thermal convection and cross-sectional shape have only a limited effect on the temperature distribution. The main reason for non-uniform temperature distribution is the heat transition between the electrodes and the tube ends. The temperature difference decreased as the heating rate increased. In contrast, the temperature distribution was even along the circumferential direction for both cross-sectional shapes. Adjusting the contact resistance is a useful method of reducing the temperature difference. In this study, the temperature difference was successfully decreased to 20°C, while reaching a maximum temperature of 750°C, which is adequate for both forming and quenching. A rectangular component was formed to validate the practicality and efficiency of tube hot hydroforming by resistance heating. The hardness and microstructure met the requirements of 22MnB5, which demonstrates both the forming efficiency and quantity advantages of hot gas hydroforming by resistance heating.

  8. Effect of chemical heat treatment on the fatigue resistance of titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Matokhnyuk, L.E.; Nochovnaya, N.A.; Voinalovich, A.V.; Yakovleva, T.Y.

    1985-11-01

    In order to improve the wear resistance of titanium alloy articles, chemical heat treatment, in particular, oxidation and nitriding diffusion impregnation of the article is performed. As a result of this treatment there is a marked increase in surface layer hardness. The change in structure and properties of surface layers have a marked effect on material resistance in fatigue failure as well as on sensitivity to stress concentration. This is the subject of the research discussed here.

  9. Heat treatment effect on microstructure, hardness and wear resistance of Cr26 white cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shaoping; Shen, Yehui; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Dequan

    2015-01-01

    High chromium cast iron(HCCI) is taken as material of coal water slurry pump impeller, but it is susceptible to produce serious abrasive wear and erosion wear because of souring of hard coal particles. The research on optimization of heat treatments to improve abrasive wear properties of HCCI is insufficient, so effect of heat treatments on the microstructure, hardness, toughness, and wear resistance of Cr26 HCCI is investigated to determine the optimal heat treatment process for HCCI. A series of heat treatments are employed. The microstructures of HCCI specimens are examined by using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The hardness and impact fracture toughness of as-cast and heat treated specimens are measured. The wear tests are assessed by a Type M200 ring-on block wear tester. The results show the following: With increase of the quenching temperature from 950 °C to 1050 °C, the hardness of Cr26 HCCI increased to a certain value, kept for a time and then decreased. The optimal heat treatment process is 2 h quenching treatment at 1000 °C, followed by a subsequent 2 h tempering at 400 °C. The hardness of HCCI is related to the precipitation and redissolution of secondary carbides in the process of heat treatment. The subsequent tempering treatment would result in a slight decrease of hardness but increase of toughness. The wear resistance is much related to the "supporting" effect of the matrix and the "protective" effect of the hard carbide embedded in the matrix, and the wear resistance is further dependent on the hardness and the toughness of the matrix. This research can provide an important insight on developing an optimized heat treatment method to improve the wear resistance of HCCI.

  10. Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy 600 to optimize resistance to intergranular stress corrosion

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, A.F.; Bibb, A.E.

    A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprises heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cooling the alloy body, and heating the cooled body to a temperature between 1100 to 1500/sup 0/F for about 1 to 30 hours.