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Sample records for heat stable antiviral

  1. Antiviral activities of heated dolomite powder.

    PubMed

    Motoike, Koichi; Hirano, Shozo; Yamana, Hideaki; Onda, Tetsuhiko; Maeda, Takayoshi; Ito, Toshihiro; Hayakawa, Motozo

    2008-12-01

    The effect of the heating conditions of dolomite powder on its antiviral activity was studied against the H5N3 avian influenza virus. Calcium oxide (CaO) and magnesium oxide (MgO), obtained by the thermal decomposition of dolomite above 800 degrees C, were shown to have strong antiviral activity, but the effect was lessened when the heating temperature exceeded 1400 degrees C. Simultaneous measurement of the crystallite size suggested that the weakening of the activity was due to the considerable grain growth of the oxides. It was found that the presence of Mg in dolomite contributed to the deterrence of grain growth of the oxides during the heating process. Although both CaO and MgO exhibited strong antiviral activity, CaO had the stronger activity but quickly hydrated in the presence of water. On the other hand, the hydration of MgO took place gradually under the same conditions. Separate measurements using MgO and Mg(OH)2 revealed that MgO had a higher antiviral effect than Mg(OH)2. From the overall experiments, it was suggested that the strong antiviral activity of dolomite was related to the hydration reaction of CaO. PMID:19127652

  2. Antiviral Protection via RdRP-Mediated Stable Activation of Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Meghan M.; Morrison, James H.; Zoecklein, Laurie J.; Rinkoski, Tommy A.; Watzlawik, Jens O.; Papke, Louisa M.; Warrington, Arthur E.; Bieber, Allan J.; Matchett, William E.; Turkowski, Kari L.; Poeschla, Eric M.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-01-01

    For many emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, definitive solutions via sterilizing adaptive immunity may require years or decades to develop, if they are even possible. The innate immune system offers alternative mechanisms that do not require antigen-specific recognition or a priori knowledge of the causative agent. However, it is unclear whether effective stable innate immune system activation can be achieved without triggering harmful autoimmunity or other chronic inflammatory sequelae. Here, we show that transgenic expression of a picornavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), in the absence of other viral proteins, can profoundly reconfigure mammalian innate antiviral immunity by exposing the normally membrane-sequestered RdRP activity to sustained innate immune detection. RdRP-transgenic mice have life-long, quantitatively dramatic upregulation of 80 interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and show profound resistance to normally lethal viral challenge. Multiple crosses with defined knockout mice (Rag1, Mda5, Mavs, Ifnar1, Ifngr1, and Tlr3) established that the mechanism operates via MDA5 and MAVS and is fully independent of the adaptive immune system. Human cell models recapitulated the key features with striking fidelity, with the RdRP inducing an analogous ISG network and a strict block to HIV-1 infection. This RdRP-mediated antiviral mechanism does not depend on secondary structure within the RdRP mRNA but operates at the protein level and requires RdRP catalysis. Importantly, despite lifelong massive ISG elevations, RdRP mice are entirely healthy, with normal longevity. Our data reveal that a powerfully augmented MDA5-mediated activation state can be a well-tolerated mammalian innate immune system configuration. These results provide a foundation for augmenting innate immunity to achieve broad-spectrum antiviral protection. PMID:26633895

  3. Antiviral Protection via RdRP-Mediated Stable Activation of Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Painter, Meghan M; Morrison, James H; Zoecklein, Laurie J; Rinkoski, Tommy A; Watzlawik, Jens O; Papke, Louisa M; Warrington, Arthur E; Bieber, Allan J; Matchett, William E; Turkowski, Kari L; Poeschla, Eric M; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-12-01

    For many emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, definitive solutions via sterilizing adaptive immunity may require years or decades to develop, if they are even possible. The innate immune system offers alternative mechanisms that do not require antigen-specific recognition or a priori knowledge of the causative agent. However, it is unclear whether effective stable innate immune system activation can be achieved without triggering harmful autoimmunity or other chronic inflammatory sequelae. Here, we show that transgenic expression of a picornavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), in the absence of other viral proteins, can profoundly reconfigure mammalian innate antiviral immunity by exposing the normally membrane-sequestered RdRP activity to sustained innate immune detection. RdRP-transgenic mice have life-long, quantitatively dramatic upregulation of 80 interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and show profound resistance to normally lethal viral challenge. Multiple crosses with defined knockout mice (Rag1, Mda5, Mavs, Ifnar1, Ifngr1, and Tlr3) established that the mechanism operates via MDA5 and MAVS and is fully independent of the adaptive immune system. Human cell models recapitulated the key features with striking fidelity, with the RdRP inducing an analogous ISG network and a strict block to HIV-1 infection. This RdRP-mediated antiviral mechanism does not depend on secondary structure within the RdRP mRNA but operates at the protein level and requires RdRP catalysis. Importantly, despite lifelong massive ISG elevations, RdRP mice are entirely healthy, with normal longevity. Our data reveal that a powerfully augmented MDA5-mediated activation state can be a well-tolerated mammalian innate immune system configuration. These results provide a foundation for augmenting innate immunity to achieve broad-spectrum antiviral protection. PMID:26633895

  4. Storage-stable foamable polyurethane is activated by heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Polyurethane foamable mixture remains inert in storage unit activated to produce a rapid foaming reaction. The storage-stable foamable composition is spread as a paste on the surface of an expandable structure and, when heated, yields a rigid open-cell polyurethane foam that is self-bondable to the substrate.

  5. Dual Nature of Heat Flux in Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, P.; Sharan, M.

    2015-12-01

    The behavior of heat flux (H) with respect to the stability parameter (ζ) in stable surface layer (SSL) is analyzed with in the framework of Monin-Obukhov similarity (MOS) theory. The analytical expressions of H are obtained as functions of wind speed (U) and wind shear (dU/dz) using the linear similarity functions and accordingly two cases, (i) U = δ (constant) and (ii) dU/dz = δ are considered. The mathematical analysis shows that the magnitude of H increases with ζ till it attains a maximum value at ζ =ζc and then starts decreasing with increasing stability suggesting the dual characteristic of heat flux with stability parameter. The point of maximum heat flux is found to be dependent on the roughness length (z0) as well as the height above the surface. An attempt has been made to analyze the sensitivity of this dual characteristic of H with ζ using the non-linear similarity functions. The analysis shows that the dual nature of H persists in the case of linear as well as non-linear similarity functions. However, the point of extremum appears to be dependent on the nature of the similarity functions. Turbulent data over a tropical site Ranchi (India) is analyzed to validate the observed nature of H with the theoretical nature as predicted by MOS. The analysis of observational data reveals the non-existence of any preferred stability state in SSL as speculated by Wang and Bras (2010, 2011) and supports the conclusions of Malhi 1995, Derbyshire 1999, van de Wiel et al. 2007, Basu et al. 2008, and van de Wiel et al. 2011. Thus, the non-uniqueness of MOS equations does not appear to be a mathematical artifact and it is consistent with the observations as far as the nature of heat flux with respect to stability parameter in SSL is concerned.

  6. Typing of heat-stable and heat-labile antigens of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli by coagglutination.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, K H; Skelton, S K; Patton, C M; Feeley, J C; Morris, G

    1985-01-01

    A coagglutination system has been devised for typing heat-stable and heat-labile antigens of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli. The use of protein A-positive Staphylococcus aureus cells carrying Campylobacter sp. serotype antibody and the treatment of Campylobacter sp. cells with DNase in the antigen suspension permitted rapid and specific coagglutination of rough (autoagglutinable) as well as smooth cultures. Cells of S. aureus were sensitized with Campylobacter sp. serotype antisera. Four to five types of sensitized S. aureus cells were pooled. A strain of Campylobacter sp. was first tested with the pools and then typed with the individual reagents of the reactive pool. After the described procedures, 68 serotype strains tested blindly as unknowns were correctly typed according to their heat-stable or heat-labile antigens. The two most commonly used typing schemes which are based separately on the heat-stable or the heat-labile antigens as assayed by passive hemagglutination and slide agglutination, respectively, can be utilized simultaneously in the coagglutination system for strain characterization. The coagglutination system is simple, yields results rapidly, conserves typing reagents, and offers the flexibility of formulating the pools of reagents according to the experimental design or the prevalence of serotypes in a geographic location. It should be a practical system for the typing of Campylobacter spp. in public health or clinical laboratories. PMID:3998098

  7. Effect of heat stable salts on MDEA solution corrosivity: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Rooney, P.C.; DuPart, M.S.; Bacon, T.R.

    1997-04-01

    A comprehensive coupon corrosion testing program was undertaken to address the effect of various heat stable salts on methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) corrosivity to carbon steel and various stainless steels. Corrosion rates of carbon steel, 304SS, 316SS and 410SS liquid and vapor coupons towards MDEA, and MDEA containing various anions, at 180 F and 250 F, were measured in a reactor. Corrosion results of two refinery plant solutions before and after caustic neutralization were also performed. Based on these results, guidelines were determined for heat stable amine salt (HSAS) levels of oxalates, sulfates, formates, acetates and thiosulfates. In addition, caustic neutralization guidelines for MDEA heat stable salts were determined. Ongoing results include MDEA corrosivity with succinates, and malonates, glycolates, SO{sub 2} and ammonia.

  8. A volatile, heat-stable anesthetic is not present in the skin of Bufo asper (Gravenhorst).

    PubMed

    Ratanabanangkoon, K

    1988-01-01

    A study was made concerning the possible existance of a volatile, heat-stable anesthetic popularly believed by the Thai people to be in the skin of Bufo asper. The skin together with the paratoid glands of two toads were dried and pyrolyzed. Mice and rats inhaling a continuous stream of the smoke or injected with a high dose of the volatile material showed signs of extreme irritation with no loss of consciousness. It is concluded that the skin of this toad does not contain a volatile, heat-stable anesthetic. PMID:3363570

  9. An inducible heat shock protein 70 small molecule inhibitor demonstrates anti-dengue virus activity, validating Hsp70 as a host antiviral target.

    PubMed

    Howe, Matthew K; Speer, Brittany L; Hughes, Philip F; Loiselle, David R; Vasudevan, Subhash; Haystead, Timothy A J

    2016-06-01

    An estimated three billion people are at risk of Dengue virus (DENV) infection worldwide and there are currently no approved therapeutic interventions for DENV infection. Due to the relatively small size of the DENV genome, DENV is reliant on host factors throughout the viral life cycle. The inducible form of Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70i) has been implicated as a host factor in DENV pathogenesis, however the complete role remains to be elucidated. Here we further illustrate the importance of Hsp70i in dengue virus pathogenesis and describe the antiviral activity of the allosteric small molecule inhibitor that is selective for Hsp70i, called HS-72. In monocytes, Hsp70i is expressed at low levels preceding DENV infection, but Hsp70i expression is induced upon DENV infection. Targeting Hsp70i with HS-72, results in a dose dependent reduction in DENV infected monocytes, while cell viability was maintained. HS-72 works to reduce DENV infection by inhibiting the entry stage of the viral life cycle, through disrupting the association of Hsp70i with the DENV receptor complex. This work highlights Hsp70i as an antiviral target and HS-72 as a potential anti-DENV therapeutic agent. PMID:27058774

  10. Production of highly concentrated, heat-stable hepatitis B surface antigen in maize.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Celine A; Egelkrout, Erin M; Moscoso, Alessa M; Enrique, Cristina; Keener, Todd K; Jimenez-Flores, Rafael; Wong, Jeffrey C; Howard, John A

    2012-10-01

    Plant-based oral vaccines are a promising emergent technology that could help alleviate disease burden worldwide by providing a low-cost, heat-stable, oral alternative to parenterally administered commercial vaccines. Here, we describe high-level accumulation of the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) at a mean concentration of 0.51%TSP in maize T1 seeds using an improved version of the globulin1 promoter. This concentration is more than fourfold higher than any previously reported lines. HBsAg expressed in maize seeds was extremely heat stable, tolerating temperatures up to 55 °C for 1 month without degradation. Optimal heat stability was achieved after oil extraction of ground maize material, either by supercritical fluid extraction or hexane treatment. The contributions of this material towards the development of a practical oral vaccine delivery system are discussed. PMID:22816734

  11. Geodynamo Models With a Thick Stable Layer and Heterogeneous CMB Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, U. R.

    2015-12-01

    The upward revision of the thermal conductivity in the Earth's core makes it plausible that the mean heat flow at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) could be only afraction of what can be conducted down the core adiabat (perhaps one half). The upper part of the fluid core would be stably stratified to substantial depth. This is inconsistent with evidence for upwelling flow near the CMB from observations ofof magnetic flux expulsion. Heat flow at the CMB is likely very heterogeneous and would still be superadiabatic in some regions of the CMB. The dynamics of such a system is unclear. Gubbins et al. (Phys. Earth Planet. Int., in press, 2015)suggest that the locally unstable gradient would mix up the stable layer as a wholeand replace it by a weakly convecting one. We study dynamo models driven by a codensity flux from the inner core. On the outer boundary an inverse (on average) gradient is imposed, leading to stable stratification of the top 40% of the fluid shell. In addition to control cases with homogeneous CMB flux, we run models with two unstableregions centered on the equator. In the latter cases a predominantly horizontal circulation in a thin layer immediately below the outer boundary redistributes the heat that is conducted radially upward in the stable layer and transports ittowards the high heat-flow spots. Radial flow below these spots does not penetrate deeply into the stable layer, nor does the layer become mixed up to a significant degree. A dynamo operates in the convecting deep interior, however, its dipole moment is low in comparison to the Earth value. Heat flow heterogeneity at the CMB does not sem to solve the problems that exist for the geodynamo when the average heat flux is substantially subadiabatic.

  12. Highly Stable and Conductive Microcapsules for Enhancement of Joule Heating Performance.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhaoliang; Jin, Jidong; Xu, Guang-Kui; Zou, Jianli; Wais, Ulrike; Beckett, Alison; Heil, Tobias; Higgins, Sean; Guan, Lunhui; Wang, Ying; Shchukin, Dmitry

    2016-04-26

    Nanocarbons show great promise for establishing the next generation of Joule heating systems, but suffer from the limited maximum temperature due to precociously convective heat dissipation from electrothermal system to surrounding environment. Here we introduce a strategy to eliminate such convective heat transfer by inserting highly stable and conductive microcapsules into the electrothermal structures. The microcapsule is composed of encapsulated long-chain alkanes and graphene oxide/carbon nanotube hybrids as core and shell material, respectively. Multiform carbon nanotubes in the microspheres stabilize the capsule shell to resist volume-change-induced rupture during repeated heating/cooling process, and meanwhile enhance the thermal conductance of encapsulated alkanes which facilitates an expeditious heat exchange. The resulting microcapsules can be homogeneously incorporated in the nanocarbon-based electrothermal structures. At a dopant of 5%, the working temperature can be enhanced by 30% even at a low voltage and moderate temperature, which indicates a great value in daily household applications. Therefore, the stable and conductive microcapsule may serve as a versatile and valuable dopant for varieties of heat generation systems. PMID:27002594

  13. Highly Stable and Conductive Microcapsules for Enhancement of Joule Heating Performance

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nanocarbons show great promise for establishing the next generation of Joule heating systems, but suffer from the limited maximum temperature due to precociously convective heat dissipation from electrothermal system to surrounding environment. Here we introduce a strategy to eliminate such convective heat transfer by inserting highly stable and conductive microcapsules into the electrothermal structures. The microcapsule is composed of encapsulated long-chain alkanes and graphene oxide/carbon nanotube hybrids as core and shell material, respectively. Multiform carbon nanotubes in the microspheres stabilize the capsule shell to resist volume-change-induced rupture during repeated heating/cooling process, and meanwhile enhance the thermal conductance of encapsulated alkanes which facilitates an expeditious heat exchange. The resulting microcapsules can be homogeneously incorporated in the nanocarbon-based electrothermal structures. At a dopant of 5%, the working temperature can be enhanced by 30% even at a low voltage and moderate temperature, which indicates a great value in daily household applications. Therefore, the stable and conductive microcapsule may serve as a versatile and valuable dopant for varieties of heat generation systems. PMID:27002594

  14. The structure of (linearly) stable double diffusive flow patterns in a laterally heated stratified liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranenborg, E. Jurjen; Dijkstra, Henk A.

    1995-03-01

    Layered double diffusive flow patterns in a laterally heated stably stratified liquid are considered in a configuration which allows for steady states to exist. For the heat/salt system, these flows are characterized by the thermal and solutal Rayleigh numbers RaT and RaS, or equivalently by RaT and the buoyancy ratio Rρ. The bifurcation structure of steady patterns with respect to RaT is computed for two cases: fixed RaS and fixed Rρ. For the first case, results in N. Tsitverblit and E. Kit [Phys. Fluids A 5, 1062 (1993)], are computed and extended, and it is shown that many of the previously found flow patterns are unstable; only in a small interval of RaT, multiple (linearly) stable steady states exist. For the second case, the physical relevance of the unstable steady states with respect to the evolution of the flow toward a stable steady state is demonstrated.

  15. Stable water isotope and surface heat flux simulation using ISOLSM: Evaluation against in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Mick Y.; Wang, Lixin; Parkes, Stephen D.; Strauss, Josiah; McCabe, Matthew F.; Evans, Jason P.; Griffiths, Alan D.

    2015-04-01

    The stable isotopes of water are useful tracers of water sources and hydrological processes. Stable water isotope-enabled land surface modeling is a relatively new approach for characterizing the hydrological cycle, providing spatial and temporal variability for a number of hydrological processes. At the land surface, the integration of stable water isotopes with other meteorological measurements can assist in constraining surface heat flux estimates and discriminate between evaporation (E) and transpiration (T). However, research in this area has traditionally been limited by a lack of continuous in-situ isotopic observations. Here, the National Centre for Atmospheric Research stable isotope-enabled Land Surface Model (ISOLSM) is used to simulate the water and energy fluxes and stable water isotope variations. The model was run for a period of one month with meteorological data collected from a coastal sub-tropical site near Sydney, Australia. The modeled energy fluxes (latent heat and sensible heat) agreed reasonably well with eddy covariance observations, indicating that ISOLSM has the capacity to reproduce observed flux behavior. Comparison of modeled isotopic compositions of evapotranspiration (ET) against in-situ Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measured bulk water vapor isotopic data (10 m above the ground), however, showed differences in magnitude and temporal patterns. The disparity is due to a small contribution from local ET fluxes to atmospheric boundary layer water vapor (∼1% based on calculations using ideal gas law) relative to that advected from the ocean for this particular site. Using ISOLSM simulation, the ET was partitioned into E and T with 70% being T. We also identified that soil water from different soil layers affected T and E differently based on the simulated soil isotopic patterns, which reflects the internal working of ISOLSM. These results highlighted the capacity of using the isotope-enabled models to discriminate

  16. Activation of the heat-stable polypeptide of the ATP-dependent proteolytic system.

    PubMed Central

    Ciechanover, A; Heller, H; Katz-Etzion, R; Hershko, A

    1981-01-01

    It had been shown previously that the heat-stable polypeptide of the ATP-dependent proteolytic system of reticulocytes, designated APF-1, forms covalent conjugates with protein substrates in an ATP-requiring process. We now describe an enzyme that carries out the activation by ATP of the polypeptide with pyrophosphate displacement. The formation of AMP-polypeptide and transfer of the polypeptide to a secondary acceptor are suggested by an APF-1 requirement for ATP-PPi and ATP-AMP exchange reactions, respectively. With radiolabeled polypeptide, an ATP-dependent labeling of the enzyme was shown to be by a linkage that is acid stable but is labile to treatment with mild alkali, hydroxylamine, borohydride, or mercuric salts. It therefore appears that the AMP-polypeptide undergoes attack by an -SH group of the enzyme to form a thiolester. PMID:6262770

  17. Factors Influencing Protection Against Experimental Tuberculosis in Mice by Heat-Stable Cell Wall Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ribi, E.; Anacker, R. L.; Brehmer, W.; Goode, G.; Larson, C. L.; List, R. H.; Milner, K. C.; Wicht, W. C.

    1966-01-01

    Ribi, E. (Rocky Mountain Laboratory, Hamilton, Mont.), R. L. Anacker, W. Brehmer, G. Goode, C. L. Larson, R. H. List, K. C. Milner, and W. C. Wicht. Factors influencing protection against experimental tuberculosis in mice by heat-stable cell wall vaccines. J. Bacteriol. 92:869–879. 1966.—Studies of nonviable, heat-stable vaccines for active protection against experimental tuberculosis have been continued with a test involving aerosol challenge of intravenously vaccinated mice. The previously reported activating effect of light mineral oil on disrupted cells of the BCG strain was found to be shared by certain other mineral oils and a synthetic, 24-carbon hydrocarbon, but not by kerosene or any of several vegetable oils. Dry cell walls coated with a small amount of oil and dispersed in saline with aid of an emulsifier were suitable for intravenous administration and were effective in promoting resistance to challenge. Oil used in this manner, in contrast to water-in-oil emulsions of the Freund type which could not be administered intravenously, did not potentiate the tuberculin-sensitizing activity of the cell walls. Although the amount of oil required for full effect was small (< 0.5 ml/100 mg of dry antigen), there was a critical level below which optimal enhancement was not achieved. More stable suspensions than could be obtained with the other oils were readily prepared from cell walls treated with the synthetic hydrocarbon, 7-n-hexyloctadecane. Extended experience has shown that in this test system both the viable BCG standard vaccine and heated, oil-treated experimental vaccines gave highly reproducible results showing graded responses to graded doses. PMID:5332873

  18. Method and system to reclaim functional sites on a sorbent contaminated by heat stable salts

    DOEpatents

    Krutka, Holly; Sjostrom, Sharon; Morris, William J.

    2016-03-08

    The objective of this invention is to develop a method to reclaim functional sites on a CO.sub.2 sorbent that have reacted with an acid gas (other than CO.sub.2) to form heat stable salts (HSS). HSS are a significant concern for dry sorbent based CO.sub.2 capture because over time the buildup of HSS will reduce the overall functionality of the CO.sub.2 sorbent. A chemical treatment can remove the non-CO.sub.2 acid gas and reclaim functional sites that can then be used for further CO.sub.2 adsorption.

  19. A stable and high-order accurate conjugate heat transfer problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindström, Jens; Nordström, Jan

    2010-08-01

    This paper analyzes well-posedness and stability of a conjugate heat transfer problem in one space dimension. We study a model problem for heat transfer between a fluid and a solid. The energy method is used to derive boundary and interface conditions that make the continuous problem well-posed and the semi-discrete problem stable. The numerical scheme is implemented using 2nd-, 3rd- and 4th-order finite difference operators on Summation-By-Parts (SBP) form. The boundary and interface conditions are implemented weakly. We investigate the spectrum of the spatial discretization to determine which type of coupling that gives attractive convergence properties. The rate of convergence is verified using the method of manufactured solutions.

  20. The effects of Ohmic heating and stable radiation on magnetic tearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tachi, T.; Steinolfson, R. S.; Van Hoven, G.

    1983-01-01

    A study is made of the effect of a temperature-dependent Coulomb-like resistivity on the planar tearing mode. The local evolution of the temperature is described by an energy equation which includes Joule heating and optically thin radiation. The resulting system of coupled linear magnetohydrodynamic equations is solved numerically, and eigenfunctions and growth rates are obtained. In the absence of radiation, there are two distinct solutions above a critical value of the magnetic Reynolds number S, a tearing-like mode and a Joule-heating mode. Below this point, the growth rates coalesce into a conjugate-complex pair. When stable radiation (dR/dT greater than 0) is added, the heating mode disappears and a modified tearing excitation exists to much lower values of S before its growth is cut off by Ohmic heating. Examples are given for solar coronal parameters, and for those characteristic of fusion-research devices. The introduction of an effective value for the resistivity, in the presence of energy transport, allows a simple qualitative discussion of the different modes.

  1. Safe atmosphere entry of an isotope heat source with a single stable trim attitude at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, L. L., Jr.; Burns, R. K.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical investigation has been made to design an isotope heat source capable of satisfying the conflicting thermal requirements of steady-state operation and atmosphere entry. The isotope heat source must transfer heat efficiently to a heat exchange during normal operation with a power system in space, and in the event of a mission abort, it must survive the thermal environment of atmosphere entry and ground impact without releasing radioactive material. A successful design requires a compatible integration of the internal components of the heat source with the external aerodynamic shape. To this end, configurational, aerodynamic, motion, and thermal analyses were coupled and iterated during atmosphere entries at suborbital through superorbital velocities at very shallow and very steep entry angles. Results indicate that both thermal requirements can be satisfied by a heat source which has a single stable aerodynamic orientation at hypersonic speeds. For such a design, the insulation material required to adequately protect the isotope fuel from entry heating need extend only half way around the fuel capsule on the aerodynamically stable (wind-ward) side of the heat source. Thus, a low-thermal-resistance, conducting heat path is provided on the opposite side of the heat source through which heat can be transferred to an adjacent heat exchanger during normal operation without exceeding specified temperature limits.

  2. Radiolabeled Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin analogs for in vivo imaging of colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giblin, M. F.; Sieckman, G. L.; Owen, N. K.; Hoffman, T. J.; Forte, L. R.; Volkert, W. A.

    2005-12-01

    The human Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (STh, amino acid sequence N1SSNYCCELCCNPACTGCY19) binds specifically to the guanylate cyclase C (GC-C) receptor, which is present in high density on the apical surface of normal intestinal epithelial cells as well as on the surface of human colon cancer cells. In the current study, two STh analogs were synthesized and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Both analogs shared identical 6-19 core sequences, and had N-terminal pendant DOTA moieties. The analogs differed in the identity of a 6 amino acid peptide sequence intervening between DOTA and the 6-19 core. In one analog, the peptide was an RGD-containing sequence found in human fibronectin (GRGDSP), while in the other this peptide sequence was randomly scrambled (GRDSGP). The results indicated that the presence of the human fibronectin sequence in the hybrid peptide did not affect tumor localization in vivo.

  3. Association and dissociation of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin from rat brush border membrane receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.B.; Thompson, M.R.; Overmann, G.J.; Giannella, R.A.

    1987-02-01

    Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) binds to receptors on rat intestinal cells and brush border membranes (BBM). We devised experiments to examine the reversibility of ST binding. We found that both /sup 125/I-labeled ST and native ST were spontaneously dissociable from the BBM receptor. Radiolabeled ST bound to BBM was also dissociated by the addition of avid goat anti-ST antiserum. Furthermore, using a computer program for analysis of ligand binding, we calculated an apparent Ka of 10(8) liters/mol from competitive inhibition and saturation-binding data. This is significantly lower than the value previously reported by others. Our findings, of a lower Ka and a reversible ST-binding process, suggest that a therapeutic strategy of removing bound ST from its receptor or competing with the enterocyte receptor for unbound ST might be successful in terminating ST-induced secretion.

  4. Field trial of a heat-stable measles vaccine in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Climie, A; André, F E

    1984-12-01

    In Papua New Guinea, consideration has been given to the introduction of measles vaccination, and a trial was conducted to determine the optimum age for vaccination and the suitability of a heat-stable measles vaccine (Rimevax) for countrywide use. As much of the vaccination programme is carried out by MCH teams on foot patrols, the trial was designed to determine immunogenicity of the vaccine after being transported and used for a week in a standard issue vaccine Esky by MCH staff. A study of the relevant literature having indicated 9 months as the probable best minimum age for measles vaccination, younger children were not included. The study was carried out on 313 infants and children aged nine to 24 months. An overall seroconversion rate of 96.6% was achieved using initially potent vaccine kept under field conditions for up to 102h. Ninety-seven percent of the vaccinees less than 11 months and 15 days of age seroconverted, as did all 15 children who were less than 70% of the Harvard standard weight for age. All 35 children who had seroconverted and who were retested six months after vaccination had detectable measles antibodies in their serum. Parental recollection of past measles infection was found unreliable as was reporting of post-vaccination reactions by parental recall since the incidence of reported 'reactions' in initially seronegative and seropositive vaccinees were similar. It is concluded that use of this heat-stable vaccine is possible with existing cold chain facilities in PNG and that infants can be vaccinated from the age of 9 months. PMID:6534989

  5. Heat stable alkaline phosphatase from thermophiles. Final report, March-October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Combie, J.D.; Runnion, K.N.; Williamson, M.L.

    1994-07-01

    Alkaline phosphatase has been the most widely used enzyme for colorimetric immunoassays. The current potential for this enzyme lies in biosensors, fieldable assay kits, biotechnology applications, degradation of certain nerve agents and pesticides and detoxification of heavy metal waste streams. While the commercial source of this enzyme is predominantly from mammalian tissues, expanded commercial application is restricted by the enzyme's instability at elevated temperatures. Although alkaline phosphatases are ubiquitous in nature, two isolates out of 44 alkaline phosphatase producing isolates occurring in habitats at 50 deg C and above have been isolated possessing extremely stable enzymes. One enzyme retained 98% of original activity following boiling for 1 hr. The secretion of the enzyme by the organism is an added benefit promoting efficient and economical production capability. Procedures for the screening, isolation, and optimal growth and fermentation of organisms acquired from geothermal sources located in Yellowstone National Park, WY are described. Purification was most effectively achieved using size exclusion chromatography where 101% of the activity and 33% of the crude mother liquor protein were recovered. Although the presence of manganese in the assay buffer was observed to significantly elevate the enzyme's catalytic activity, a precipitate incompatibility with calcium chloride, a requirement for high temperature stability, prohibits its use. Bacteria, Fermentation, Alkaline phosphatase, Biosensors, Biotechnology, Heat stable enzymes, Biochemistry, Bioremediation, Thermophilic microorganisms.

  6. Heat-stable pullulanase from Bacillus acidopullulyticus: characterization and refolding after guanidinium chloride-induced unfolding.

    PubMed

    Stefanova, M E; Schwerdtfeger, R; Antranikian, G; Scandurra, R

    1999-05-01

    Heat-stable pullulanase from Bacillus acidopullulyticus was characterized with respect to its stability against thermal and chemical denaturation and its reactivation after complete chemical unfolding. The enzyme was quite thermostable and retained 55% of activity after heating at 60 degrees C for 30 min at pH 5.5. At pH 6.0, only 9% residual activity was observed. The addition of sucrose, polyols, and Na2SO4 strongly stabilized the enzyme against thermal inactivation. The processes of chemical unfolding by guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) and refolding were studied by enzymological and spectroscopic criteria. B. acidopullulyticus pullulanase was very sensitive to GdmC1 denaturation and had a transition midpoint at 1.2M GdmCl. Reactivation after complete unfolding in 5 M GdmCl was initiated by dilution of the unfolding mixture: 67% reactivation was observed under standard conditions. The influence of some chemical and physical parameters (pH, chemical agents, temperature, and unfolding and refolding time) on refolding was investigated. Of the additives tested to assist reactivation, only bovine serum albumin (BSA) increased the yield of activity to 80%. The full regain of structure and activity was proven by comparing the enzymological, physicochemical, and spectroscopic properties of the native and refolded pullulanase. PMID:10357001

  7. E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin and guanylyl cyclase C: new functions and unsuspected actions.

    PubMed Central

    Giannella, Ralph A.; Mann, Elizabeth A.

    2003-01-01

    Some E. coli cause diarrhea by elaborating heat-labile and heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins which stimulate intestinal secretion. E. coli ST's are small peptides which bind to intestinal luminal epithelial cell receptors. The ST receptor, one of a family of receptor-cyclases called guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C), is a membrane spanning protein containing an extracellular binding domain and intracellular protein kinase and catalytic domains. The intestine synthesizes and secretes homologous peptides, guanylin and uroguanylin. The kidney also synthesizes uroguanylin. ST, guanylin or uroguanylin binding to GC-C results in increased cGMP, phosphorylation of the CFTR Cl- channel and secretion. Proguanylin and prouroguanylin circulate in blood and bind to receptors in intestine, kidney, liver, brain etc. In the kidney, they stimulate the excretion of Na+ and K+. Study of GC-C "knock-out" mice reveal that GC-C is important to intestinal salt and water secretion, duodenal bicarbonate secretion, recovery from CCl4-induced liver injury, and to intestinal polyp formation in Min mice lacking GC-C. PMID:12813912

  8. Turbulent Energy Spectra and Cospectra of Momentum and Heat Fluxes in the Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dan; Katul, Gabriel G.; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2015-10-01

    The turbulent energy spectra and cospectra of momentum and sensible heat fluxes are examined theoretically and experimentally with increasing flux Richardson number () in the stable atmospheric surface layer. A cospectral budget model, previously used to explain the bulk relation between the turbulent Prandtl number () and the gradient Richardson number () as well as the relation between and , is employed to interpret field measurements over a lake and a glacier. The shapes of the vertical velocity and temperature spectra, needed for closing the cospectral budget model, are first examined with increasing . In addition, the wavenumber-dependent relaxation time scales for momentum and heat fluxes are inferred from the cospectral budgets and investigated. Using experimental data and proposed extensions to the cospectral budget model, the existence of a `' power-law scaling in the temperature spectra but its absence from the vertical velocity spectra is shown to reduce the magnitude of the maximum flux Richardson number (), which is commonly inferred from the Rf- Ri relation when becomes very large (idealized with ). Moreover, dissimilarity in relaxation time scales between momentum and heat fluxes, also affected by the existence of the `' power-law scaling in the temperature spectra, leads to under near-neutral conditions. It is further shown that the production rate of turbulent kinetic energy decreases more rapidly than that of turbulent potential energy as , which explains the observed disappearance of the inertial subrange in the vertical velocity spectra at a smaller as compared to its counterpart in the temperature spectra. These results further demonstrate novel linkages between the scale-wise turbulent kinetic energy and potential energy distributions and macroscopic relations such as stability correction functions to the mean flow and the - Ri relation.

  9. Stable hydrogen-isotope analysis of methyl chloride emitted from heated halophytic plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greule, Markus; Huber, Stefan G.; Keppler, Frank

    2012-12-01

    Stable isotope techniques are increasingly applied to study atmospheric budgets of methyl halides. Here we use compound specific thermal conversion isotope ratio mass spectrometry to measure the stable hydrogen isotope values of methyl chloride (δHCl) released thermally from dried leaves of halophyte plants collected from different geographical locations. We developed an automated purification and pre-concentration unit to enable measurement of δHCl from samples (100 ml) when mixing ratios were as low as 1 ppmv. Even though this is considerably higher than normal atmospheric mixing ratios this unit enabled measurement of the δ2H values of CH3Cl released during heating of samples at temperatures ranging from 30 to 300 °C. No substantial changes of δHCl values were observed over this temperature range. However, the δHCl values of all plants examined were strongly depleted (-178 ± 34‰) relative to the δ2H values of their modelled meteoric water, but differ only by 1-50‰ from those observed for their methoxyl groups. Our results indicate that plant methoxyl groups are an important precursor of the methyl group for CH3Cl thermally emitted from lyophilised and homogenized dry halophyte leaves. Furthermore, the thermal reaction producing CH3Cl did not show a substantial kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation between CH3Cl and precursor methoxyl groups over the temperature range investigated. Moreover, we found a moderate linear correlation (R2 = 0.37) for the relationship between δHCl values released from halophytes and the δ2H values of modelled precipitation at their geographical locations. As CH3Cl emissions from terrestrial vegetation, including senescent and dry plants and biomass burning, are considered to provide a substantial fraction of the global emissions our findings are important when establishing a global hydrogen isotope model for atmospheric CH3Cl.

  10. Immunodot detection of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin b by using enhanced chemiluminescence reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Lortie, L A; Harel, J; Fairbrother, J M; Dubreuil, J D

    1991-01-01

    An indirect immunodot assay with rabbit antibodies raised against purified heat-stable enterotoxin type b (STb) and with a Western blotting (immunoblotting) detection system (ECL; Amersham International plc, Amersham, United Kingdom) was developed for the detection of STb toxin. Culture supernatants of 62 Escherichia coli isolates from pigs with diarrhea were blotted onto nitrocellulose and incubated with anti-STb serum. The chemiluminescence produced by the action of horseradish peroxidase with luminol and H2O2 was recorded by exposure of X-ray film. Over 90% correlation was observed between the rat or pig intestinal ligated loop assay and a radioactive DNA probe and the ECL immunodot assay for the detection of STb. In addition, using this new and sensitive technique, we could detect STb in the feces of a newborn pig inoculated with an STb-producing E. coli strain. Detection of STb-producing E. coli in pigs with diarrhea will be greatly facilitated by the use of this convenient and rapid diagnostic assay. Images PMID:1939579

  11. From Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin to mammalian endogenous guanylin hormones

    PubMed Central

    Lima, A.A.M.; Fonteles, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    The isolation of heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) from Escherichia coli and cholera toxin from Vibrio cholerae has increased our knowledge of specific mechanisms of action that could be used as pharmacological tools to understand the guanylyl cyclase-C and the adenylyl cyclase enzymatic systems. These discoveries have also been instrumental in increasing our understanding of the basic mechanisms that control the electrolyte and water balance in the gut, kidney, and urinary tracts under normal conditions and in disease. Herein, we review the evolution of genes of the guanylin family and STa genes from bacteria to fish and mammals. We also describe new developments and perspectives regarding these novel bacterial compounds and peptide hormones that act in electrolyte and water balance. The available data point toward new therapeutic perspectives for pathological features such as functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with constipation, colorectal cancer, cystic fibrosis, asthma, hypertension, gastrointestinal barrier function damage associated with enteropathy, enteric infection, malnutrition, satiety, food preferences, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and effects on behavior and brain disorders such as attention deficit, hyperactivity disorder, and schizophrenia. PMID:24652326

  12. The controlled synthesis of stable gold nanoparticles in quaternary ammonium ionic liquids by simple heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Chen, Shimou; Liu, Yusheng; Fu, Haiying; Wu, Guozhong

    2011-01-01

    Stable gold nanoparticle (AuNP) colloids were synthesized in a class of quaternary ammonium-based room-temperature ionic liquids (QAILs), [Me3NC2H4OH] + [ZnnCl2n + 1] - (n = 1 or 2), by heating in air at 135-145 °C. The QAIL was employed as a solvent, a reducing agent, and as a stabilizer. The size of the QAIL-AuNPs can be varied between 20 and 40 nm by changing the reaction temperature. A symproportionation reaction was employed to further decrease the size of the AuNPs by the addition of Au3 + ions. The surface covering of QAIL on the AuNPs had a significant impact on their surface plasmon resonance (SPR), which was red-shifted. The AuNPs synthesized by this simple and environmentally friendly reaction can be realized in several minutes and also exhibit high stability and good reproducibility, providing a new facile approach to metal nanoparticle preparation.

  13. Heat-Stable Dry Powder Oxytocin Formulations for Delivery by Oral Inhalation.

    PubMed

    Fabio, Karine; Curley, Kieran; Guarneri, Joseph; Adamo, Benoit; Laurenzi, Brendan; Grant, Marshall; Offord, Robin; Kraft, Kelly; Leone-Bay, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    In this work, heat stable dry powders of oxytocin (OT) suitable for delivery by oral inhalation were prepared. The OT dry powders were prepared by spray drying using excipients chosen to promote OT stability including trehalose, isoleucine, polyvinylpyrrolidone, citrate (sodium citrate and citric acid), and zinc salts (zinc chloride and zinc citrate). Characterization by laser diffraction indicated that the OT dry powders had a median particle size of 2 μm, making them suitable for delivery by inhalation. Aerodynamic performance upon discharge from proprietary dry powder inhalers was evaluated by Andersen cascade impaction (ACI) and in an anatomically correct airway (ACA) model, and confirmed that the powders had excellent aerodynamic performance, with respirable fractions up to 77% (ACI, 30 L/min). Physicochemical characterization demonstrated that the powders were amorphous (X-ray diffraction) with high glass transition temperature (modulated differential scanning calorimetry, MDSC), suggesting the potential for stabilization of the OT in a glassy amorphous matrix. OT assay and impurity profile were conducted by reverse phase HPLC and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) after storage up to 32 weeks at 40°C/75%RH. Analysis demonstrated that OT dry powders containing a mixture of citrate and zinc salts retained more than 90% of initial assay after 32 weeks storage and showed significant reduction in dimers and trisulfide formation (up to threefold reduction compared to control). PMID:25776985

  14. Occurrence of a Highly Heat-Sensitive Spore Subpopulation of Bacillus coagulans STCC 4522 and Its Conversion to a More Heat-Stable Form

    PubMed Central

    Palop, A.; Sala, F. J.; Condon, S.

    1997-01-01

    The profile of the survival curves, at different heating temperatures, of B. coagulans STCC 4522 sporulated at 52(deg)C has been studied, focusing on the early moments of treatment. A highly heat-sensitive spore subpopulation that includes more than 90% of the total spore population has been found. This heat-sensitive spore fraction was inactivated after 2 s of treatment at 111(deg)C. Its heat resistance was as much as 200-fold lower than that of the heat-resistant spore fraction (D(inf111(deg)C) of 0.01 min for the heat-sensitive spore fraction compared with D(inf111(deg)C) of 2 min for the heat-resistant fraction). The shape of the survival curve at 108.5(deg)C was modified after a sublethal heat shock at 80(deg)C for 3.5 h, resulting in a straight-line survival curve. The temperature of treatment also influenced the shape of the survival curves. The conversion of the highly heat-sensitive spore subpopulation to a more heat-stable form is discussed. PMID:16535625

  15. Heat treatment giving a stable high temperature micro-structure in cast austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Anton, Donald L.; Lemkey, Franklin D.

    1988-01-01

    A novel micro-structure developed in a cast austenitic stainless steel alloy and a heat treatment thereof are disclosed. The alloy is based on a multicomponent Fe-Cr-Mn-Mo-Si-Nb-C system consisting of an austenitic iron solid solution (.gamma.) matrix reinforced by finely dispersed carbide phases and a heat treatment to produce the micro-structure. The heat treatment includes a prebraze heat treatment followed by a three stage braze cycle heat treatment.

  16. Heat-stable antigen (CD24) as ligand for mouse P-selectin.

    PubMed

    Sammar, M; Aigner, S; Hubbe, M; Schirrmacher, V; Schachner, M; Vestweber, D; Altevogt, P

    1994-07-01

    Heat-stable antigen (HSA)/CD24 is a cell surface molecule expressed by many cell types in the mouse. The molecule has an unusual structure because of its small protein core and extensive glycosylation. In order to study the functional role of the HSA-associated glycoconjugates we have isolated different forms of HSA. Using lectin analysis we provide evidence for extensive heterogeneity in carbohydrate composition and sialic acid linkage. Several HSA forms were recognized by mouse P-selectin-IgG but not E-selectin-IgG in ELISA. As expected, P-selectin-IgG also bound to L2/HNK-1-positive neural glycoproteins (L2-glycoproteins) and sulfatides but not to gangliosides and other control glycoproteins. The binding of P-selectin-IgG to L2-glycoproteins and HSA required bivalent cations. The reactivity to HSA was sensitive to sialidase treatment whereas the binding to L2-glycoproteins was not. Studies with alpha 2-6 sialytransferase indicated that alpha 2-6 linked sialic acid was not involved in the P-selectin binding to HSA. Surprisingly, an L2/HNK-1 specific antibody was found to cross-react with some HSA glycoforms and its binding correlated with P-selectin-IgG reactivity. L2/HNK-1-positive or L2/HNK-1-negative HSA glycoforms were also analyzed after coating to polystyrene beads. Only the L2/HNK-1-positive HSA coated beads were reactive with P-selectin-IgG and could bind to activated bend3 endothelioma cells expressing P-selectin whereas the L2/HNK-1-negative HSA beads did not. It is suggested that in its L2/HNK-1 modified form the HSA molecule on leukocytes could represent a ligand for P-selectin on endothelial cells or platelets. PMID:7524641

  17. Glycoprotein receptors for a heat-stable enterotoxin (STh) produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, T; Wada, A; Iwata, N; Takasaki, S; Shimonishi, Y; Takeda, Y

    1992-01-01

    Glycoprotein receptors for heat-stable enterotoxin STh of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in the rat intestinal cell membrane were identified and characterized. Incubation of rat intestinal cell membranes with radioiodinated N-5-azidonitrobenzoyl-STh[5-19] (125I-ANB-STh[5-19]) followed by photolysis resulted in specific radiolabeling of two distinct proteins with M(r)s of 200,000 (designated STR-200A and STR-200B). STR-200A was found to be composed of two molecules of a protein with an M(r) of 70,000 (70-kDa protein), whereas STR-200B was composed of two different protein molecules with M(r)s of 53,000 (53-kDa protein) and 77,000 (77-kDa protein). These proteins showed no guanylate cyclase activity. The 70-kDa protein was labeled most with 125I-ANB-STh[5-19], suggesting that STR-200A is the main receptor protein in the rat intestinal cell membrane. The carbohydrate moieties of STR-200A and STR-200B were examined by enzymatic deglycosylation. The 70-kDa protein of STR-200A was found to contain N-linked high-mannose-type and/or hybrid-type oligosaccharides, and results suggested that it possesses at least three N glycosylation sites. The 53-kDa protein of STR-200B was found to have an N-linked complex-type oligosaccharide side chain. The deglycosylated 70-kDa protein retained activity for binding to STh, suggesting that the carbohydrate moieties of these receptor proteins are not important for binding with STh. Images PMID:1328055

  18. DIARRHEA OUTBREAK IN PERNAMBUCO, BRAZIL, ASSOCIATED WITH A HEAT-STABLE CYTOTOXIC ENTEROTOXIN PRODUCED BY Aeromonas caviae

    PubMed Central

    LOPES, Ana Carolina Amaral; MARTINS, Luciano Moura; GATTI, Maria Silvia Viccari; FALAVINA DOS REIS, Cristhiane Moura; HOFER, Ernesto; YANO, Tomomasa

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In the present study enterotoxic and cytotoxic activities of twenty Aeromonas caviaestrains were examined. They originated from fecal specimens of patients with acute diarrhea during an outbreak in Brazil in 2004. Culture supernatants of fourteen strains (70%) caused fluid accumulation in rabbit ileal intestinal loops and in suckling mice assays, and also showed a cytotoxic activity in Vero and Caco-2 cells. The enterotoxic and cytotoxic factors were heat-stable after culture supernatants treatment at 100 ºC. The results revealed that A. caviaestrains produce a putative diarrheagenic virulence factor, a heat-stable cytotoxic enterotoxin that could be linked to the diarrhea outbreak that took place in Brazil. PMID:26422161

  19. Bactericidal Effect of Selected Antidiarrhoeal Medicinal Plants on Intracellular Heat-Stable Enterotoxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Birdi, Tannaz J.; Brijesh, S.; Daswani, Poonam G.

    2014-01-01

    Diarrhoeal diseases due to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli continue to be a cause of global concern. Medicinal plants have been gaining popularity as promising antidiarrhoeal agents. In the present study, four antidiarrhoeal plants, viz. Aegle marmelos, Cyperus rotundus, Psidium guajava and Zingiber officinale were screened against a heat-stable toxin-producing enterotoxigenic E. coli strain. Decoctions of these plants were studied for their effect on intracellular killing of the bacterial strain using murine monocytic cell line, J774. [3H] thymidine release assay was used to evaluate the apoptotic/necrotic effect. All plants at concentrations <1% enhanced intracellular killing of the bacteria by J774 cells. However, at higher concentrations, the decoctions induced apoptosis in J774 cells. The study demonstrates that these plants could control diarrhoea caused by heat-stable toxin-producing enterotoxigenic E. coli through their immunomodulatory effect. PMID:25035535

  20. Allergenic Characterization of 27-kDa Glycoprotein, a Novel Heat Stable Allergen, from the Pupa of Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Son, Mina; Lee, June Yong

    2016-01-01

    Boiled silkworm pupa is a traditional food in Asia, and patients with silkworm pupa food allergy are common in these regions. Still now only one allergen from silkworm, arginine kinase, has been identified. The purpose of this study was to identify novel food allergens in silkworm pupa by analyzing a protein extract after heat treatment. Heat treated extracts were examined by proteomic analysis. A 27-kDa glycoprotein was identified, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. IgE reactivity of the recombinant protein was investigated by ELISA. High molecular weight proteins (above 100 kDa) elicited increased IgE binding after heat treatment compared to that before heat treatment. The molecular identities of these proteins, however, could not be determined. IgE reactivity toward a 27-kDa glycoprotein was also increased after heating the protein extract. The recombinant protein was recognized by IgE antibodies from allergic subjects (33.3%). Glycation or aggregation of protein by heating may create new IgE binding epitopes. Heat stable allergens are shown to be important in silkworm allergy. Sensitization to the 27-kDa glycoprotein from silkworm may contribute to elevation of IgE to silkworm. PMID:26770033

  1. Allergenic Characterization of 27-kDa Glycoprotein, a Novel Heat Stable Allergen, from the Pupa of Silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Son, Mina; Lee, June Yong; Park, Kyung Hee; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Park, Jung-Won

    2016-01-01

    Boiled silkworm pupa is a traditional food in Asia, and patients with silkworm pupa food allergy are common in these regions. Still now only one allergen from silkworm, arginine kinase, has been identified. The purpose of this study was to identify novel food allergens in silkworm pupa by analyzing a protein extract after heat treatment. Heat treated extracts were examined by proteomic analysis. A 27-kDa glycoprotein was identified, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. IgE reactivity of the recombinant protein was investigated by ELISA. High molecular weight proteins (above 100 kDa) elicited increased IgE binding after heat treatment compared to that before heat treatment. The molecular identities of these proteins, however, could not be determined. IgE reactivity toward a 27-kDa glycoprotein was also increased after heating the protein extract. The recombinant protein was recognized by IgE antibodies from allergic subjects (33.3%). Glycation or aggregation of protein by heating may create new IgE binding epitopes. Heat stable allergens are shown to be important in silkworm allergy. Sensitization to the 27-kDa glycoprotein from silkworm may contribute to elevation of IgE to silkworm. PMID:26770033

  2. A comparison of the toluene distillation and vacuum/heat methods for extracting soil water for stable isotopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingraham, Neil L.; Shadel, Craig

    1992-12-01

    Hanford Loam, from Richland, Washington, was used as a test soil to determine the precision, accuracy and nature of two methods to extract soil water for stable isotopic analysis: azeotropic distillation using toluene, and simple heating under vacuum. The soil was oven dried, rehydrated with water of known stable isotopic compositions, and the introduced water was then extracted. Compared with the introduced water, initial aliquots of evolved water taken during a toluene extraction were as much as 30 ‰ more depleted in D and 2.7 ‰ more depleted in 18O, whereas final aliquots were as much as 40 ‰ more enriched in D and 14.3 ‰ more enriched in 18O. Initial aliquots collected during the vacuum/heat extraction were as much as 64 ‰ more depleted in D and 8.4 ‰ more depleted in 18O than was the introduced water, whereas the final aliquots were as much as 139 ‰ more enriched in D, and 20.8 ‰ more enriched in 18O. Neither method appears quantitative; however, the difference in stable isotopic composition between the first and last aliquots of water extracted by the toluene method is less than that from the vacuum/heat method. This is attributed to the smaller fractionation factors involved with the higher average temperatures of distillation of the toluene. The average stable isotopic compositions of the extracted water varied from that of the introduced water by up to 1.4 ‰ in δD and 4.2 ‰ in δ18O with the toluene method, and by 11.0 ‰ in δD and 1.8 ‰ in δ18O for the vacuum/heat method. The lack of accuracy of the extraction methods is thought to be due to isotopic fractionation associated with water being weakly bound (not released below 110°C) in the soil. The isotopic effect of this heat-labile water is larger at low water contents (3.6 and 5.2% water by weight) as the water bound in the soil is a commensurately larger fraction of the total. With larger soilwater contents the small volume of water bound with an associated fractionation is

  3. Antiviral Drug Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Milpied-Homsi, Brigitte; Moran, Ellen M.; Phillips, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    Antiviral drugs used to treat HIV and hepatitis C are common causes of delayed drug hypersensitivities for which many of the more severe reactions have been recently shown to be immunogenetically mediated such as abacavir hypersensitivity where HLA-B*57:01 is now used routinely as a screening test to exclude patients carrying this allele from abacavir prescription. Most antiviral drug allergies consist of mild to moderate delayed rash without other serious features (e.g. fever, mucosal involvement, blistering rash, organ impairment. In these cases treatment can be continued with careful observation and symptomatic management and the discontinuation rate is low. PMID:25017682

  4. Free fatty acids released from phospholipids are the major heat-stable hemolytic factor of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites.

    PubMed Central

    Said-Fernández, S; López-Revilla, R

    1988-01-01

    The major hemolytic activity of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites is located in a vesicular fraction called P30 and known to be due to heat-labile and heat-stable hemolytic components whose effect increases up to 100 times during preincubation at 36 degrees C. The heat-stable hemolytic activity (HSHA) was found in the chloroform-methanol extract of preincubated P30, whose partition with 2 M KCl yielded a lipid fraction, an interphase, and an aqueous phase. HSHA was detected only in the lipid fraction, where it amounted to 59% of the chloroform-methanol extract activity and increased 50% when supplemented with the interphase material; it was accounted for by the free fatty acids, whose potency increased 33% with the interphase material, and was blocked by delipidated bovine serum albumin. A parallel increase in free fatty acids and lysophospholipids and a corresponding decrease in phospholipids were observed during P30 preincubation. Most of the phospholipase activity of trophozoite homogenates was also found in P30. Therefore, most of the HSHA generated during preincubation was due to free fatty acids released from phospholipids by a P30 phospholipase that may contribute significantly to E. histolytica cytopathogenicity and virulence. Images PMID:2894362

  5. A heat-stable component of Bartonella henselae upregulates intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression on vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Maeno, N; Yoshiie, K; Matayoshi, S; Fujimura, T; Mao, S; Wahid, M R; Oda, H

    2002-04-01

    Bartonella henselae upregulated the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The induction level of ICAM-1 depended on the inoculation bacterial dose. ICAM-1 expression began increasing 4 h after infection and reached a sustained peak beginning at 12 h after B. henselae infection; this time course was similar to that of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Escherichia coli. The stimulatory effect was abolished when live B. henselae were separated from HUVECs by a filter membrane. The nonpiliated strain, which is unable to invade endothelial cells, induced ICAM-1 expression to the same extent as the piliated strain. Inactivation of B. henselae by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, heat (56 degrees C, 30 min), or sonication did not alter its stimulatory activity. Polymyxin B, which strongly inhibited the effect of LPS, did not exert any influence on the stimulatory activity of B. henselae. Furthermore, the effect of sonicated B. henselae was not inhibited even by boiling, which was also the case with LPS. Our data suggest that some heat-stable component of B. henselae binds to the endothelial cell surface, inducing ICAM-1 expression. Though the participation of LPS could not be completely ruled out, we suppose that some unidentified heat-stable proteins, lipids, or polysaccharides may be the stimulatory factor(s). The ability of B. henselae to enhance the expression of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells may be an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of B. henselae infection. PMID:11967118

  6. Rapid presumptive identification of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis-bovis complex by radiometric determination of heat stable urease

    SciTech Connect

    Gandy, J.H.; Pruden, E.L.; Cox, F.R.

    1983-12-01

    Simple and rapid Bactec methodologies for the determination of neat (unaltered) and heat stable urease activity of mycobacteria are presented. Clinical isolates (63) and stock cultures (32)--consisting of: M. tuberculosis (19), M. bovis (5), M. kansasii (15), M. marinum (4), M. simiae (3), M. scrofulaceum (16), M. gordonae (6), M. szulgai (6), M. flavescens (1), M. gastri (1), M. intracellulare (6), M. fortuitum-chelonei complex (12), and M. smegmatis (1)--were tested for neat urease activity by Bactec radiometry. Mycobacterial isolates (50-100 mg wet weight) were incubated at 35 degrees C for 30 minutes with microCi14C-urea. Urease-positive mycobacteria gave Bactec growth index (GI) values greater than 100 units, whereas urease-negative species gave values less than 10 GI units. Eighty-three isolates possessing neat urease activity were heated at 80 degrees C for 30 minutes followed by incubation at 35 degrees C for 30 minutes with 1 microCi14C-urea. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-bovis complex demonstrated heat-stable urease activity (GI more than 130 units) and could be distinguished from mycobacteria other than tuberculosis (MOTT), which gave GI values equal to or less than 40 units.

  7. Stable nanoparticles prepared by heating electrostatic complexes of whey protein isolate-dextran conjugate and chondroitin sulfate.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qingyuan; Zhu, Xiuling; Abbas, Shabbar; Karangwa, Eric; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xia, Shuqin; Feng, Biao; Jia, Chengsheng

    2015-04-29

    A simple and green method was developed for preparing the stable biopolymer nanoparticles with pH and salt resistance. The method involved the macromolecular crowding Maillard process and heat-induced gelation process. The conjugates of whey protein isolate (WPI) and dextran were produced by Maillard reaction. The nanoparticles were fabricated by heating electrostatic complexes of WPI-dextran conjugate and chondroitin sulfate (ChS) above the denaturation temperature and near the isoelectric point of WPI. Then, the nanoparticles were characterized by spectrophotometry, dynamic laser scattering, zeta potential, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Results showed that the nanoparticles were stable in the pH range from 1.0 to 8.0 and in the presence of high salt concentration of 200 mM NaCl. WPI-dextran conjugate, WPI, and ChS were assembled into the nanoparticles with dextran conjugated to WPI/ChS shell and WPI/ChS core. The repulsive steric interactions, from both dextran covalently conjugated to WPI and ChS electrostatically interacted with WPI, were the major formation mechanism of the stable nanoparticles. As a nutrient model, lutein could be effectively encapsulated into the nanoparticles. Additionally, the nanoparticles exhibited a spherical shape and homogeneous size distribution regardless of lutein loading. The results suggested that the stable nanoparticles from proteins and strong polyelectrolyte polysaccharides would be used as a promising target delivery system for hydrophobic nutrients and drugs at physiological pH and salt conditions. PMID:25844903

  8. Magnetic field modeling for Mercury using dynamo models with a stable layer and laterally variable heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, ZhenLiang; Zuber, Maria T.; Stanley, Sabine

    2015-11-01

    Mercury's surface magnetic field is unique among planetary magnetic fields for its weak intensity, spin-aligned axisymmetry, and large dipole offset. An Earth-like dynamo setup applied to Mercury does not reproduce these features. Here we explain the magnetic field observations by a combination of two effects: (1) a stably stratified layer at the top of the outer core, and (2) a degree-1 north-south asymmetric spherical harmonic heat flux variation at the core-mantle boundary (CMB). We vary the stable layer thickness and size of the inner core, and find models that can produce surface magnetic fields possessing the observed features of Mercury.

  9. Activation of a heat-stable cytolytic protein associated with the surface membrane of Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed Central

    Lowrey, D M; McLaughlin, J

    1985-01-01

    Surface membrane-enriched fractions of Naegleria fowleri obtained after isopycnic centrifugation experiments contain a potent cytolytic activity as determined by hemolysis and 51Cr release assays. This surface membrane cytolysin was unaffected by a treatment at 75 degrees C for 30 min and accounted for 70 to 90% of cytolysis by whole-cell lysates of amoebae. This heat resistance as well as intimate membrane association distinguished the surface membrane cytolytic activity from a second heat-labile cytolytic activity which appears to be latent within lysosomes. The surface membrane cytolysin was found to be specifically activated by diluted samples of lysosomal fractions. The possible role of this surface membrane cytotoxin in the pathogenicity of N. fowleri is discussed. PMID:4055029

  10. Antiviral immunity in marine molluscs.

    PubMed

    Green, Timothy J; Raftos, David; Speck, Peter; Montagnani, Caroline

    2015-09-01

    Marine molluscs, like all living organisms, are constantly exposed to viruses and have evolved efficient antiviral defences. We review here recent developments in molluscan antiviral immunity against viruses belonging to the order Herpesvirales. Emerging results suggest an interferon-like response and autophagy are involved in the antiviral defence of bivalves to viral infection. Multi-functional plasma proteins from gastropods and bivalves have been identified to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity against mammalian viruses. The antiviral defences present in molluscs can be enhanced by genetic selection, as shown by the presence of oyster strains specifically resistant to ostreid herpesvirus type 1. Whether varying amounts or different isoforms of these antiviral plasma proteins contributes to genetic resistance is worthy of further research. Other evolutionarily conserved antiviral mechanisms, such as RNA interference and apoptosis, still need further characterization. PMID:26297577

  11. A novel PDZ protein regulates the activity of guanylyl cyclase C, the heat-stable enterotoxin receptor.

    PubMed

    Scott, Robert O; Thelin, William R; Milgram, Sharon L

    2002-06-21

    Secretory diarrhea is the leading cause of infectious diarrhea in humans. Secretory diarrhea may be caused by binding of heat-stable enterotoxins to the intestinal receptor guanylyl cyclase C (GCC). Activation of GCC catalyzes the formation of cGMP, initiating a signaling cascade that opens the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel at the apical cell surface. To identify proteins that regulate the trafficking or function of GCC, we used the unique COOH terminus of GCC as the "bait" to screen a human intestinal yeast two-hybrid library. We identified a novel protein, IKEPP (intestinal and kidney-enriched PDZ protein) that associates with the COOH terminus of GCC in biochemical assays and by co-immunoprecipitation. IKEPP is expressed in the intestinal epithelium, where it is preferentially accumulated at the apical surface. The GCC-IKEPP interaction is not required for the efficient targeting of GCC to the apical cell surface. Rather, the association with IKEPP significantly inhibits heat-stable enterotoxin-mediated activation of GCC. Our findings are the first to identify a regulatory protein that associates with GCC to modulate the catalytic activity of the enzyme and provides new insights in mechanisms that regulate GCC activity in response to bacterial toxin. PMID:11950846

  12. Height of layer of intense turbulent heat exchange under conditions of stable atmospheric stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamardin, A. P.; Nevzorova, I. V.; Odintsov, S. L.

    2015-11-01

    In the work, we consider estimates of the height of layer of intense turbulent heat exchange in stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer, made with the use of meteorological acoustic radar (sodar). Dependence of this height on temperature gradient is analyzed. Current temperature stratification of the atmosphere in the layer with height up to 1 000 m was determined with the help of MTP-5 meteorological temperature profiler.

  13. Quick, stable, safe and economical preheating of glass mat reinforced thermoplastics in a contact heating oven

    SciTech Connect

    Michaeli, W.; Starke, J.

    1993-12-31

    Glass mat reinforced thermoplastics (GMT) which belong to the group of sheet thermoplastic composites (STC) are processed in compression moulding for structural parts. Before moulding the material, it has to be preheated currently by IR-radiation or by air convection. Using a contact heating oven, preheating can be speeded up combined with a significant higher energetic efficiency. But up to now, operation using the contact heating method failed due to the tackiness of the matrix material in solid state. IKV has recently created a solution for the problem of tackiness by transporting the glass mat reinforced material between two belts coated with PTFE through a contact oven. This preheating line includes a shock-cooler to quickly cool down a thin layer of the GMT`s surface. By this, separating the GMT from the PTFE without leaving particles on the belt is possible. The contact heating method not only includes the advantage of a significant higher energetic efficiency, but also benefits in processing. The risk of matrix degradation is distinctly reduced in comparison to other preheating methods, since the material does not expand in thickness for more than 200% and therefore air cannot come intensively into contact with the material. Consequently, the contact preheating is well qualified for matrix materials susceptible for oxidation. In this paper the physical coherence, the adhesion and the cohesion of GMT, are, described. Furthermore experimental results with a contact preheating line are presented.

  14. Heat-stable oral alga-based vaccine protects mice from Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Dreesen, Imke A J; Charpin-El Hamri, Ghislaine; Fussenegger, Martin

    2010-02-01

    While 15 million deaths per year are caused by communicable pathogens worldwide, health care authorities emphasize the considerable impact of poverty on the incidence of infectious diseases. The emergence of antigen-expressing plant tissues (e.g. rice, tomato, potato) has indicated the potential of land plants for low-cost vaccines in oral immunization programs. In this study, we engineered the chloroplasts of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii for the stable expression of the D2 fibronectin-binding domain of Staphylococcus aureus fused with the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), under the control of rbcL UTRs. Analysis of sera and faeces of mice, fed for 5 weeks with transgenic algae grown in confined Wave Bioreactor, revealed the induction of specific mucosal and systemic immune responses. Algae-based vaccination significantly reduced the pathogen load in the spleen and the intestine of treated mice and protected 80% of them against lethal doses of S. aureus. Importantly, the alga vaccine was stable for more than 1.5 years at room temperature. These results indicate that C. reinhardtii may play an important role in molecular pharming, as it combines the beneficial features of land plant vaccines, while offering unmatched ease of growth compared to other members of the plant kingdom. PMID:19995584

  15. Abscisic acid-induced heat tolerance in Bromus inermis Leyss cell-suspension cultures. Heat-stable, abscisic acid-responsive polypeptides in combination with sucrose confer enhanced thermostability.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, A J; Ishikawa, M; Gusta, L V; MacKenzie, S L

    1994-01-01

    Increased heat tolerance is most often associated with the synthesis of heat-shock proteins following pre-exposure to a nonlethal heat treatment. In this study, a bromegrass (Bromus inermis Leyss cv Manchar) cell suspension cultured in a medium containing 75 microM abscisic acid (ABA) without prior heat treatment had a 87% survival rate, as determined by regrowth analysis, following exposure to 42.5 degrees C for 120 min. In contrast, less than 1% of the control cells survived this heat treatment. The heat tolerance provided by treatment with 75 microM ABA was first evidenced after 4 d of culture and reached a maximum tolerance after 11 d of culture. Preincubation with sucrose partially increased the heat tolerance of control cells and rendered ABA-treated cells tolerant to 45 degrees C for 120 min (a completely lethal heat treatment for control cells). Comparative two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of cellular protein isolated from heat-tolerant cells identified 43 ABA-responsive proteins of which 26 were heat stable (did not coagulate and remained soluble after 30 min at 90 degrees C). Eight heat-stable, ABA-responsive proteins ranging from 23 to 45 kD had similar N-terminal sequences. The ABA-responsive (43-20 kD), but none of the control heat-stable, proteins cross-reacted to varying degrees with a polyclonal antibody directed against a conserved, lysine-rich dehydrin sequence. A group of 20- to 30-kD heat-stable, ABA-responsive proteins cross-reacted with both the anti-dehydrin antibody and an antibody directed against a cold-responsive winter wheat protein (Wcs 120). In ABA-treated cells, there was a positive correlation between heat- and pH-induced coagulation of a cell-free homogenate and the heat tolerance of these cells. At 50 degrees C, control homogenates coagulated after 8 min, whereas cellular fractions from ABA-treated cells showed only marginal coagulation after 15 min. In protection assays, addition of heat-stable, ABA

  16. Existing antiviral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ravanfar, Parisa; Satyaprakash, Anita; Creed, Rosella; Mendoza, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    The innovation of vaccines has allowed for one of the greatest advancements in the history of public health. The first of the vaccines have been the antiviral vaccines, in particular the smallpox vaccine that was first developed by Edward Jenner in 1796. This article will review vaccination for the following viral diseases: measles, mumps, rubella, polio, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, influenza, rotavirus, rabies, monkeypox, smallpox, Japanese encephalitis, and yellow fever. PMID:19335723

  17. Removal of milk fat globules from whey protein concentrate 34% to prepare clear and heat-stable protein dispersions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Zhong, Qixin

    2014-10-01

    Whey protein concentrates (WPC) are low-cost protein ingredients, but their application in transparent ready-to-drink beverages is limited due to turbidity caused by fat globules and heat instability. In this work, fat globules were removed from WPC 34% (WPC-34) to prepare heat-stable ingredients via the Maillard reaction. The removal of fat globules by acid precipitation and centrifugation was observed to be the most complete at pH 4.0, and the loss of protein was caused by micrometer-sized fat globules and protein aggregates. Spray-dried powder prepared from the transparent supernatant was glycated at 130°C for 20 and 30min or 60°C for 24 and 48h. The 2 groups of samples had comparable heat stability and degree of glycation, evaluated by free amino content and analytical ultracentrifugation, but high-temperature, short-time treatment reduced the color formation during glycation. Therefore, WPC-34 can be processed for application in transparent beverages. PMID:25108870

  18. Heat stable antimicrobial activity of Allium ascalonicum against bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Amin, M; Kapadnis, B P

    2005-08-01

    To study antimicrobial activity of shallot in comparison with that of garlic and onion against 23 strains of fungi and bacteria, water extracts of garlic, shallot and onion bulbs were prepared. Each extract was studied in different forms for their antimicrobial activity viz., fresh extract, dry extract and autoclaved extract. Minimal inhibitory concentration and minimal lethal concentrations of these extracts were determined against all organisms by broth dilution susceptibility test. Fresh extract of garlic showed greater antimicrobial activity as compared to similar extracts of onion and shallot. However, dried and autoclaved extracts of shallot showed more activity than similar extracts of onion and garlic. Fungi were more sensitive to shallot extract than bacteria. Amongst bacteria, B. cereus was most sensitive (MIC=5 mg ml(-1)). The lowest minimum bactericidal concentration of shallot extract amongst bacteria tested was 5 mg ml(-1) for B. cereus. Amongst fungi, Aureobasidium pullulans and Microsporum gypseum were most sensitive (MIC= 0.15 mg ml(-1)). The lowest minimum lethal concentration was 2.5 mg ml(-1) for Microsporum gypseum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. It was therefore, expected that the antimicrobial principle of shallot was different than the antimicrobial compounds of onion and garlic. In addition, the antimicrobial component of the shallot extract was stable at 121 degrees C. PMID:16121720

  19. [Antiviral properties of basidiomycetes metabolites].

    PubMed

    Avtonomova, A V; Krasnopolskaya, L M

    2014-01-01

    The data on the antiviral action of the Ganoderma lucidum, Lentinus edodes, Grifola frondosa, Agaricus brasiliensis and other basidiomycetes metabolites are summurized. The metabolites of these species of basidiomycetes exhibit a direct antiviral effect on herpes simplex virus types I and II, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, influenza virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and others. Moreover, metabolites of basidiomycetes increased antiviral immunity. PMID:25975107

  20. Broad-spectrum antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun-Da; Meng, Wen; Wang, Xiao-Jia; Wang, Hwa-Chain R.

    2015-01-01

    Development of highly effective, broad-spectrum antiviral agents is the major objective shared by the fields of virology and pharmaceutics. Antiviral drug development has focused on targeting viral entry and replication, as well as modulating cellular defense system. High throughput screening of molecules, genetic engineering of peptides, and functional screening of agents have identified promising candidates for development of optimal broad-spectrum antiviral agents to intervene in viral infection and control viral epidemics. This review discusses current knowledge, prospective applications, opportunities, and challenges in the development of broad-spectrum antiviral agents. PMID:26052325

  1. Simplification of methods for the production and storage of specimens to be tested for heat-stable enterotoxin of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, J A; Rodrigues, A C; Simóes, M; Serafim, M B; De Castro, A F

    1979-01-01

    Experiments with the infant mouse test demonstrated that there is no need of shaking for heat-stable Escherichia coli enterotoxin production when low volume of medium per volume of flask ratios are used in stationary cultures. Centrifugation and filtration of the cultures to be tested are not necessary either, and Merthiolate (1:10,000) used as preservative has no deleterious effect on heat-stable enterotoxin activity. Based upon these findings, some modifications of the procedures for production and storage of heat-stable enterotoxin preparations are suggested. Standardized pieces of filter papers are wetted with Merthiolated stationary cultures which are to be assayed for heat-stable enterotoxin activity by the infant mouse test. From dried filter papers, heat-stable enterotoxin can be eulted unaltered up to 2 months after specimen preparation. With the proposed modifications, even modestly equipped laboratories will be able to carry out the infant mouse test or at least to prepare specimens to be assayed by more specialized laboratories. PMID:391814

  2. Single Chain Variable Fragments Produced in Escherichia coli against Heat-Labile and Heat-Stable Toxins from Enterotoxigenic E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Fernanda B.; Nepomuceno, Roberto; Silva, Anderson; Munhoz, Danielle D.; Yamamoto, Bruno B.; Luz, Daniela; Abreu, Patrícia A. E.; Horton, Denise S. P. Q.; Elias, Waldir P.; Ramos, Oscar H. P.; Piazza, Roxane M. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diarrhea is a prevalent pathological condition frequently associated to the colonization of the small intestine by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains, known to be endemic in developing countries. These strains can produce two enterotoxins associated with the manifestation of clinical symptoms that can be used to detect these pathogens. Although several detection tests have been developed, minimally equipped laboratories are still in need of simple and cost-effective methods. With the aim to contribute to the development of such diagnostic approaches, we describe here two mouse hybridoma-derived single chain fragment variable (scFv) that were produced in E. coli against enterotoxins of ETEC strains. Methods and Findings Recombinant scFv were developed against ETEC heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxin (ST), from previously isolated hybridoma clones. This work reports their design, construction, molecular and functional characterization against LT and ST toxins. Both antibody fragments were able to recognize the cell-interacting toxins by immunofluorescence, the purified toxins by ELISA and also LT-, ST- and LT/ST-producing ETEC strains. Conclusion The developed recombinant scFvs against LT and ST constitute promising starting point for simple and cost-effective ETEC diagnosis. PMID:26154103

  3. Heat-labile- and heat-stable-toxoid fusions (LTR₁₉₂G-STaP₁₃F) of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli elicit neutralizing antitoxin antibodies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei; Ruan, Xiaosai; Zhang, Chengxian; Lawson, Steve R; Knudsen, David E; Nataro, James P; Robertson, Donald C; Zhang, Weiping

    2011-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are a major cause of diarrheal disease in humans and animals. Adhesins and enterotoxins, including heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (STa) toxins, are the key virulence factors. Antigenic adhesin and LT antigens have been used in developing vaccines against ETEC diarrhea. However, STa has not been included because of its poor immunogenicity and potent toxicity. Our recent study showed that porcine-type STa toxoids became immunogenic and elicited neutralizing anti-STa antibodies after being genetically fused to a full-length porcine-type LT toxoid, LT(R₁₉₂G) (W. Zhang et al., Infect. Immun. 78:316-325, 2010). In this study, we mutated human-type LT and STa genes, which are highly homologous to porcine-type toxin genes, for a full-length LT toxoid (LT(R₁₉₂)) and a full-length STa toxoid (STa(P₁₃F)) and genetically fused them to produce LT₁₉₂-STa₁₃ toxoid fusions. Mice immunized with LT₁₉₂-STa₁₃ fusion antigens developed anti-LT and anti-STa IgG (in serum and feces) and IgA antibodies (in feces). Moreover, secretory IgA antibodies from immunized mice were shown to neutralize STa and cholera toxins in T-84 cells. In addition, we fused the STa₁₃ toxoid at the N terminus and C terminus, between the A1 and A2 peptides, and between the A and B subunits of LT₁₉₂ to obtain different fusions in order to explore strategies for enhancing STa immunogenicity. This study demonstrated that human-type LT₁₉₂-STa₁₃ fusions induce neutralizing antitoxin antibodies and provided important information for developing toxoid vaccines against human ETEC diarrhea. PMID:21788385

  4. Simultaneous Exposure to Escherichia coli Heat-Labile and Heat-Stable Enterotoxins Increases Fluid Secretion and Alters Cyclic Nucleotide and Cytokine Production by Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Read, Lisa T.; Hahn, Rachel W.; Thompson, Carli C.; Bauer, David L.; Norton, Elizabeth B.

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a significant cause of diarrheal disease and death, especially in children in developing countries. ETEC causes disease by colonizing the small intestine and producing heat-labile toxin (LT), heat-stable toxin (ST), or both LT and ST (LT+ST). The majority of ETEC strains produce both ST and LT. Despite the prevalence of LT+ST-producing organisms, few studies have examined the physiologic or immunologic consequences of simultaneous exposure to these two potent enterotoxins. In the current report, we demonstrate that when LT and ST are both present, they increase water movement into the intestinal lumen over and above the levels observed with either toxin alone. As expected, cultured intestinal epithelial cells increased their expression of intracellular cyclic GMP (cGMP) when treated with ST and their expression of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) when treated with LT. When both toxins were present, cGMP levels but not cAMP levels were synergistically elevated compared with the levels of expression caused by the corresponding single-toxin treatment. Our data also demonstrate that the levels of inflammatory cytokines produced by intestinal epithelial cells in response to LT are significantly reduced in animals exposed to both enterotoxins. These findings suggest that there may be complex differences between the epithelial cell intoxication and, potentially, secretory outcomes induced by ETEC strains expressing LT+ST compared with strains that express LT or ST only. Our results also reveal a novel mechanism wherein ST production may reduce the hosts' ability to mount an effective innate or adaptive immune response to infecting organisms. PMID:25287923

  5. TRANSPORT OF HEAT, WATER VAPOR AND CARBON DOXIDE BY LONG PERIOD EDDIES IN THE STABLE BOUNDARY LAYER

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.

    2010-07-26

    The vertical transport of heat and trace chemicals for a night in April has been studied with a wavelet analysis and conventional one-hour averages. It was found that for the night of April 20, 2009, turbulent kinetic energy, heat and trace chemicals were transported directed downward from the jet core. The most significant periods for this transport were less than 5 minutes and greater than one hour with intermittent transport taking place in the 5 min to 1 hour time frame. The nocturnal boundary layer is characterized by turbulent intermittency, long period oscillations, and a slow approach to equilibrium, (Mahrt, 1999). Although turbulence is usually maintained by surface friction, downward transport from low-level jets can also play an important role in turbulence maintenance and in the transport of scalars, Mahrt (1999), Banta et al. (2006). The eddy covariance flux measurement technique assumes continuous turbulence which is unusual in the stable boundary because significant flux transport occurs via turbulent eddies whose periods are long compared with the averaging time (Goulden et al., 1996). Systematic error in eddy flux measurements is attributed mainly to the neglect of long period eddies. Banta et al. (2006) noted that observations of turbulence below the low level jet suggested that while upward transport of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) is common, downward transport from the jet can also occur. They found that in the CASES 99 experiments that turbulence scaled well with the strength of the low-level jet, and that surface cooling was more important than surface roughness. Because nocturnal turbulence is intermittent and non-stationary, the appropriate averaging time for calculation of TKE and EC fluxes is not obvious. Wavelet analysis is, thus, a more suitable analysis tool than conventional Fourier analysis.

  6. Reversal of the biological activity of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin by disulfide-reducing agents.

    PubMed Central

    ElDeib, M M; Dove, C R; Parker, C D; Veum, T L; Zinn, G M; White, A A

    1986-01-01

    Various disulfide-reducing agents, mostly thiols and thiol precursors, were examined for their ability to reduce the disulfide bonds in the Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin STa; reduction of the bonds results in loss of biological activity. The biological activity measured was the stimulation of guanylate cyclase in pig intestinal brush border membranes by STa. Nearly all of the compounds inactivated STa, although at different rates; a smaller number appreciably decreased guanylate cyclase activity when they were introduced into the reaction mixture after STa bound to its receptor. With dithiothreitol, the decrease in reaction rate was both time and concentration dependent and resulted in a reversal to basal activity. The anionic thiols were relatively ineffective in reversing activation, the neutral monothiols were moderately effective, and the aminothiols and neutral dithiols were the most effective. The order of effectiveness of the compounds was S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethanethiol greater than 2,3-dimercaptopropanol = 2-aminoethylisothiuronium bromide greater than dithiothreitol greater than 2-mercaptoethylamine greater than alpha-thioglycerol. These compounds were used in weanling pig ligated-intestinal-loop bioassays to determine if STa-induced secretion was reduced when they were injected 20 min after the STa. Instead of S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethanethiol we used the phosphorylated derivative S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid; this compound and 2,3-dimercaptopropanol were the only compounds that reduced STa-induced secretion and had no direct secretory or pathological effects. PMID:2867044

  7. Binding of E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin to rat intestinal brush borders and to basolateral membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Guarino, A.; Cohen, M.B.; Overmann, G.; Thompson, M.R.; Giannella, R.A.

    1987-09-01

    We studied the binding of E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) to rat brush borders (BB) and to basolateral membranes (BLM) using a biologically active monoiodinated radioligand (( /sup 125/I)STa) and highly enriched BB and BLM preparations free of other significant organelle contamination. Binding of (/sup 125/I)STa to BB was specific; time-, temperature-, and pH-dependent; saturable; and partially reversible. Nonlabeled toxin competitively inhibited the binding of radioligand to BB in a dose-related manner. Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of receptors with an apparent affinity constant of 8.7 +/- 1.5 X 10(8) l/mol. Binding was not affected by amino acids, sugars, and lectins. Proteolytic enzymes significantly decreased binding, although several did so by modifying the radioligand. Trypsin inhibited binding without modifying the radioligand thus supporting the proteinaceous nature of the receptor. Since the enrichment in binding activity in the BB over the homogenate was significantly lower than the enrichment in sucrase activity, we concluded that binding activity is probably associated with other membranous domains, but direct examination revealed no binding activity on basolateral membranes.

  8. Development of a radioimmunoassay for Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin: comparison with the suckling mouse bioassay.

    PubMed Central

    Giannella, R A; Drake, K W; Luttrell, M

    1981-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains which produce heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) are usually identified by demonstrating the production of ST. At present, ST can be detected only by bioassay methods. Recently, we purified E. coli ST, which enabled us to develop a radioimmunoassay for ST. Radioiodination of ST was performed by the lactoperoxidase method, which resulted in a high specific activity and retained the biological activity of St. Anti-ST antisera were raised in goats by injecting the goats with pure ST coupled to bovine immunoglobin G. Antibody titers ranged from 1:8,000 to 1:40,000. Using these reagents, we examined assay conditions thoroughly and found that a 14- to 18-h incubation at 4 degrees C in sodium acetate buffer with an ionic strength of 120 mM (pH 6.2) gave maximal sensitivity and reproducibility. Free ST was separated from antibody-bound ST by dextran-coated charcoal. This radioimmunoassay accurately and reproducibly measured ST in the range from 50 to 500 pg of ST per tube and could quantitate ST accurately in complex bacteriological media. This assay was specific for STa, measured human and porcine STa equally well, and did not cross-react with STb, with several other enterotoxins, or with various gastrointestinal peptides. Intact disulfide bridges in the ST molecule were required for immunoreactive activity. PMID:7021423

  9. Reduction of the secretory response to Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin by thiol and disulfide compounds. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, R.N.; Dunn, J.A.; Guerrant, R.L.

    1983-07-01

    We examined the effects of disulfide and thiol compounds on Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) and cyclic GMP-induced secretion. Both cystamine and cystine (disulfide compounds) reduced the secretory responses to submaximal doses of ST in suckling mice (at 0.5 mumol per mouse) and reduced ST activation of guanylate cyclase (by 33 to 73% at 1 mM). In higher doses, cystamine completely eradicated a maximally effective ST dose as well. In addition, the sulfhydryl (thiol) compounds cysteamine, cysteine, and acetylcysteine strikingly reduced the secretory response and the guanylate cyclase response to ST. Neither the disulfide nor the thiol compounds tested reduced cyclic GMP-induced secretion. These studies suggest that disulfide and thiol compounds both block ST-induced secretion before its activation of guanylate cyclase. Taken with the work of others, these findings suggest that disulfide compounds may alter the oxidation reduction state of a cell or act directly on the guanylate cyclase enzyme, whereas thiol compounds may inactivate ST itself by breaking its disulfide bridges, or it may alter guanylate cyclase activation by ST. Both families of compounds deserve further consideration among potential antisecretory agents for application in the control of ST-induced diarrhea.

  10. Cloning and sequence analysis of the heat-stable acrylamidase from a newly isolated thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius AUT-01.

    PubMed

    Cha, Minseok; Chambliss, Glenn H

    2013-02-01

    A thermophilic bacterium capable of degrading acrylamide, AUT-01, was isolated from soil collected from a hot spring area in Montana, USA. The thermophilic strain grew with 0.2 % glucose as the sole carbon source and 1.4 mM acrylamide as the sole nitrogen source. The isolate AUT-01 was identified as Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius based on 16S rDNA sequence. An enzyme from the strain capable of transforming acrylamide to acrylic acid was purified by a series of chromatographic columns. The molecular weight of the enzyme was estimated to be 38 kDa by SDS-PAGE. The enzyme activity had pH and temperature optima of 6.2 and 70 ºC, respectively. The influence of different metals and amino acids on the ability of the purified protein to transform acrylamide to acrylic acid was evaluated. The gene from G. thermoglucosidasius encoding the acrylamidase was cloned, sequenced, and compared to aliphatic amidases from other bacterial strains. The G. thermoglucosidasius gene, amiE, encoded a 38 kDa, monomeric, heat-stable amidase that catalysed the cleavage of carbon-nitrogen bonds in acrylamide. Comparison of the amino acid sequence to other bacterial amidases revealed 99 and 82 % similarity to the amino acid sequences of Bacillus stearothermophilus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively. PMID:22639115

  11. RNA silencing: an antiviral mechanism.

    PubMed

    Csorba, T; Pantaleo, V; Burgyán, J

    2009-01-01

    RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved sequence-specific gene-inactivation system that also functions as an antiviral mechanism in higher plants and insects. To overcome antiviral RNA silencing, viruses express silencing-suppressor proteins which can counteract the host silencing-based antiviral process. After the discovery of virus-encoded silencing suppressors, it was shown that these viral proteins can target one or more key points in the silencing machinery. Here we review recent progress in our understanding of the mechanism and function of antiviral RNA silencing in plants, and on the virus's counterattack by expression of silencing-suppressor proteins. We also discuss emerging evidence that RNA silencing and expression of viral silencing-suppressor proteins are tools forged as a consequence of virus-host coevolution for fine-tuning host-pathogen coexistence. PMID:20109663

  12. Characterization of Immunological Cross-Reactivity between Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Heat-Stable Toxin and Human Guanylin and Uroguanylin

    PubMed Central

    Taxt, Arne M.; Diaz, Yuleima; Bacle, Amélie; Grauffel, Cédric; Reuter, Nathalie; Aasland, Rein; Sommerfelt, Halvor

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) expressing the heat-stable toxin (ST) (human-type [STh] and porcine-type [STp] variants) is among the five most important enteric pathogens in young children living in low- and middle-income countries. ST mediates diarrheal disease through activation of the guanylate cyclase C (GC-C) receptor and is an attractive vaccine target with the potential to confer protection against a wide range of ETEC strains. However, immunological cross-reactivity to the endogenous GC-C ligands guanylin and uroguanylin is a major concern because of the similarities to ST in amino acid sequence, structure, and function. We have investigated the presence of similar epitopes on STh, STp, guanylin, and uroguanylin by analyzing these peptides in eight distinct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). A fraction (27%) of a polyclonal anti-STh antibody and an anti-STh monoclonal antibody (MAb) cross-reacted with uroguanylin, the latter with a 73-fold-lower affinity. In contrast, none of the antibodies raised against STp, one polyclonal antibody and three MAbs, cross-reacted with the endogenous peptides. Antibodies raised against guanylin and uroguanylin showed partial cross-reactivity with the ST peptides. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that immunological cross-reactions between ST and the endogenous peptides can occur. However, the partial nature and low affinity of the observed cross-reactions suggest that the risk of adverse effects from a future ST vaccine may be low. Furthermore, our results suggest that this risk may be reduced or eliminated by basing an ST immunogen on STp or a selectively mutated variant of STh. PMID:24778111

  13. Heat stable antigen (mouse CD24) supports myeloid cell binding to endothelial and platelet P-selectin.

    PubMed

    Aigner, S; Ruppert, M; Hubbe, M; Sammar, M; Sthoeger, Z; Butcher, E C; Vestweber, D; Altevogt, P

    1995-10-01

    P-selectin is a Ca(2+)-dependent lectin that participates in leukocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium and platelets. Myeloid cells and a subset of T lymphocytes express carbohydrate ligands at the cell surface. Previously, we suggested that heat stable antigen (HSA/mouse CD24), an extensively glycosylated cell surface molecule on many mouse cells, is a ligand for P-selectin. Here we show that HSA mediates the binding of monocytic cells and neutrophils to P-selectin. The monocytic cell lines ESb-MP and J774, peritoneal exudate cells, and bone marrow neutrophils could bind to lipopolysaccharide-activated bend3 endothelioma cells under rotation-induced shear forces and this binding was inhibited by mAb to P-selectin and HSA. Blocking was weak at room temperature but more efficient at 4 degrees C when integrin-mediated binding was decreased. Also the adhesion of neutrophils to stimulated platelets expressing P-selectin was blocked by HSA- and P-selectin-specific mAb. Latex beads coated with purified HSA from myeloid cells bound to activated endothelioma cells or platelets, and the binding was similarly blocked by mAb to P-selectin and HSA respectively. The HSA-coated beads were stained with P-selectin-IgG, very weakly with L-selectin-IgG but not with E-selectin-IgG. The staining was dependent on divalent cations and treatment with endoglycosidase F or neuraminidase indicated that sialylated N-linked glycans were recognized. The presence of these glycans was confirmed by biosynthetic labeling studies. Our data suggest that HSA, in addition to the recently identified 160 kDa glycoprotein ligand on mouse neutrophils, belongs to a group of monospecific P-selectin ligands on myeloid cells. PMID:8562500

  14. The structure of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin b by nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroism.

    PubMed Central

    Sukumar, M.; Rizo, J.; Wall, M.; Dreyfus, L. A.; Kupersztoch, Y. M.; Gierasch, L. M.

    1995-01-01

    The heat-stable enterotoxin b (STb) is secreted by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli that cause secretory diarrhea in animals and humans. It is a 48-amino acid peptide containing two disulfide bridges, between residues 10 and 48 and 21 and 36, which are crucial for its biological activity. Here, we report the solution structure of STb determined by two- and three-dimensional NMR methods. Approximate interproton distances derived from NOE data were used to construct structures of STb using distance-geometry and simulated annealing procedures. The NMR-derived structure shows that STb is helical between residues 10 and 22 and residues 38 and 44. The helical structure in the region 10-22 is amphipathic and exposes several polar residues to the solvent, some of which have been shown to be important in determining the toxicity of STb. The hydrophobic residues on the opposite face of this helix make contacts with the hydrophobic residues of the C-terminal helix. The loop region between residues 21 and 36 has another cluster of hydrophobic residues and exposes Arg 29 and Asp 30, which have been shown to be important for intestinal secretory activity. CD studies show that reduction of disulfide bridges results in a dramatic loss of structure, which correlates with loss of function. Reduced STb adopts a predominantly random-coil conformation. Chromatographic measurements of concentrations of native, fully reduced, and single-disulfide species in equilibrium mixtures of STb in redox buffers indicate that the formation of the two disulfide bonds in STb is only moderately cooperative. Similar measurements in the presence of 8 M urea suggest that the native secondary structure significantly stabilizes the disulfide bonds. PMID:8528070

  15. Characterization of immunological cross-reactivity between enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli heat-stable toxin and human guanylin and uroguanylin.

    PubMed

    Taxt, Arne M; Diaz, Yuleima; Bacle, Amélie; Grauffel, Cédric; Reuter, Nathalie; Aasland, Rein; Sommerfelt, Halvor; Puntervoll, Pål

    2014-07-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) expressing the heat-stable toxin (ST) (human-type [STh] and porcine-type [STp] variants) is among the five most important enteric pathogens in young children living in low- and middle-income countries. ST mediates diarrheal disease through activation of the guanylate cyclase C (GC-C) receptor and is an attractive vaccine target with the potential to confer protection against a wide range of ETEC strains. However, immunological cross-reactivity to the endogenous GC-C ligands guanylin and uroguanylin is a major concern because of the similarities to ST in amino acid sequence, structure, and function. We have investigated the presence of similar epitopes on STh, STp, guanylin, and uroguanylin by analyzing these peptides in eight distinct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). A fraction (27%) of a polyclonal anti-STh antibody and an anti-STh monoclonal antibody (MAb) cross-reacted with uroguanylin, the latter with a 73-fold-lower affinity. In contrast, none of the antibodies raised against STp, one polyclonal antibody and three MAbs, cross-reacted with the endogenous peptides. Antibodies raised against guanylin and uroguanylin showed partial cross-reactivity with the ST peptides. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that immunological cross-reactions between ST and the endogenous peptides can occur. However, the partial nature and low affinity of the observed cross-reactions suggest that the risk of adverse effects from a future ST vaccine may be low. Furthermore, our results suggest that this risk may be reduced or eliminated by basing an ST immunogen on STp or a selectively mutated variant of STh. PMID:24778111

  16. Emerging antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2008-09-01

    Foremost among the newly described antiviral agents that may be developed into drugs are, for the treatment of human papilloma virus (HPV) infections, cPrPMEDAP; for the treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, BAY 57-1293; for the treatment of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections, FV-100 (prodrug of Cf 1743); for the treatment of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, maribavir; for the treatment of poxvirus infections, ST-246; for the treatment of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) (which in the meantime has already been approved in the EU); for the treatment of various DNA virus infections, the hexadecyloxypropyl (HDP) and octadecyloxyethyl (ODE) prodrugs of cidofovir; for the treatment of orthomyxovirus infections (i.e., influenza), peramivir; for the treatment of hepacivirus infections (i.e., hepatitis C), the protease inhibitors telaprevir and boceprevir, the nucleoside RNA replicase inhibitors (NRRIs) PSI-6130 and R1479, and various non-nucleoside RNA replicase inhibitors (NNRRIs); for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections, integrase inhibitors (INIs) such as elvitegravir, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) such as apricitabine, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) such as rilpivirine and dapivirine; and for the treatment of both HCV and HIV infections, cyclosporin A derivatives such as the non-immunosuppressive Debio-025. PMID:18764719

  17. Autoimmune disease: A role for new anti-viral therapies?

    PubMed

    Dreyfus, David H

    2011-12-01

    Many chronic human diseases may have an underlying autoimmune mechanism. In this review, the author presents a case of autoimmune CIU (chronic idiopathic urticaria) in stable remission after therapy with a retroviral integrase inhibitor, raltegravir (Isentress). Previous reports located using the search terms "autoimmunity" and "anti-viral" and related topics in the pubmed data-base are reviewed suggesting that novel anti-viral agents such as retroviral integrase inhibitors, gene silencing therapies and eventually vaccines may provide new options for anti-viral therapy of autoimmune diseases. Cited epidemiologic and experimental evidence suggests that increased replication of epigenomic viral pathogens such as Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) in chronic human autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus Erythematosus (SLE), and multiple sclerosis (MS) may activate endogenous human retroviruses (HERV) as a pathologic mechanism. Memory B cells are the reservoir of infection of EBV and also express endogenous retroviruses, thus depletion of memory b-lymphocytes by monoclonal antibodies (Rituximab) may have therapeutic anti-viral effects in addition to effects on B-lymphocyte presentation of both EBV and HERV superantigens. Other novel anti-viral therapies of chronic autoimmune diseases, such as retroviral integrase inhibitors, could be effective, although not without risk. PMID:21871974

  18. Synthesis of a 2,4,6,8,10-dodecapentanoic acid thioester as a substrate for biosynthesis of Heat Stable Antifungal Factor (HSAF)

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Andrew S.; Chen, Haotong; Du, Liangcheng; Dussault, Patrick H.

    2015-01-01

    The N-acetylcystamine (SNAC) thioester of dodecapentaenoic acid, an analog of a putative intermediate in the biosynthesis of Heat Stable Antifungal Factor (HSAF), is synthesized. Key steps include sequential Horner-Emmons homologations with the Weinreb amide of diethylphosponoacetic acid, and thioesterification of an aldol-derived 3-hydroxyalkanoate, which serves as a stable precursor of the sensitive polyenoate. The thioester was investigated as a biosynthetic substrate using a purified nonribosomal peptide synthetase and was not incorporated in the observed products. PMID:25750726

  19. Reactivity of heat-stable Leptospira antigenic preparation used in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies in swine serum.

    PubMed

    Wasiński, B; Pejsak, Z

    2012-01-01

    Serology plays an important role in laboratory diagnosis of leptospirosis. Apart from the most often used microscopic agglutination test (MAT), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) seems to be useful especially in screenings of animal herds. The ELISA used for detection of antibodies against selected Leptospira serogroups in swine serum samples was investigated during the study. An essential element of this test is heat-stable antigenic preparation from cultures of Leptospira interrogans serovars Icterohaemorrhagiae, Pomona and L. borgpetersenii serovar Sejroe. The aim of the present study was to identify and analyze ELISA heat-stable antigen fractions playing a role in the reaction with leptospiral antibodies indicated in swine serum. Reactivity of the three-component antigenic preparation was compared in immunoblotting with reactivity of six heat-stable antigenic preparations made from the following single serovars: L. interrogans serovars Icterohaemorrhagiae, Pomona, Canicola, L. borgpetersenii serovars Sejroe, Tarassovi and L. kirshneri serovar Grippotyphosa. All antigenic preparations were submitted to SDS-PAGE and transferred to a nitrocellulose membrane using a semidry system. After the transfer, the membrane was incubated with diluted swine serum containing antibodies specific for one of the six above mentioned Leptospira serovars. For the three-component antigenic preparation and antigens prepared from single serovars the immunoblot revealed reaction of sera with fractions of the 20-26 kDa region and around the 14.5 kDa region. The investigated heat-stable Leptospira antigenic preparation contains fractions demonstrating serogroup- and species-specificity. Fraction 20-26 kDa showed serogroup-specific activity, whereas the fraction around 14.5 kDa showed species-specific activity. PMID:22708354

  20. Viral ancestors of antiviral systems.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Luis P

    2011-10-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the 'Big Bang' theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features. PMID:22069523

  1. Viral Ancestors of Antiviral Systems

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Luis P.

    2011-01-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the ‘Big Bang’ theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features. PMID:22069523

  2. Novel antiviral activity of chemokines

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Takashi; Shirane, Jumi; Hieshima, Kunio; Shibano, Michiko; Watanabe, Masayasu; Jin, Zhe; Nagakubo, Daisuke; Saito, Takuya; Shimomura, Yoshikazu; Yoshie, Osamu . E-mail: o.yoshie@med.kindai.ac.jp

    2006-07-05

    Antimicrobial peptides are a diverse family of small, mostly cationic polypeptides that kill bacteria, fungi and even some enveloped viruses, while chemokines are a group of mostly cationic small proteins that induce directed migration of leukocytes through interactions with a group of seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors. Recent studies have shown that antimicrobial peptides and chemokines have substantially overlapping functions. Thus, while some antimicrobial peptides are chemotactic for leukocytes, some chemokines can kill a wide range of bacteria and fungi. Here, we examined a possible direct antiviral activity of chemokines against an enveloped virus HSV-1. Among 22 human chemokines examined, chemokines such as MIP-1{alpha}/CCL3, MIP-1{beta}/CCL4 and RANTES/CCL5 showed a significant direct antiviral activity against HSV-1. It is intriguing that these chemokines are mostly known to be highly expressed by effector CD8{sup +} T cells. The chemokines with a significant anti-HSV-1 activity commonly bound to HSV-1 virions via envelope glycoprotein gB. Electron microscopy revealed that the chemokines with a significant anti-HSV-1 activity were commonly capable of generating pores in the envelope of HSV-1. Thus, some chemokines have a significant direct antiviral activity against HSV-1 in vitro and may have a potential role in host defense against HSV-1 as a direct antiviral agent.

  3. Heat tolerance in a wild Oryza species is attributed to maintenance of Rubisco activation by a thermally stable Rubisco activase ortholog.

    PubMed

    Scafaro, Andrew P; Gallé, Alexander; Van Rie, Jeroen; Carmo-Silva, Elizabete; Salvucci, Michael E; Atwell, Brian J

    2016-08-01

    The mechanistic basis of tolerance to heat stress was investigated in Oryza sativa and two wild rice species, Oryza meridionalis and Oryza australiensis. The wild relatives are endemic to the hot, arid Australian savannah. Leaf elongation rates and gas exchange were measured during short periods of supra-optimal heat, revealing species differences. The Rubisco activase (RCA) gene from each species was sequenced. Using expressed recombinant RCA and leaf-extracted RCA, the kinetic properties of the two isoforms were studied under high temperatures. Leaf elongation was undiminished at 45°C in O. australiensis. The net photosynthetic rate was almost 50% slower in O. sativa at 45°C than at 28°C, while in O. australiensis it was unaffected. Oryza meridionalis exhibited intermediate heat tolerance. Based on previous reports that RCA is heat-labile, the Rubisco activation state was measured. It correlated positively with leaf elongation rates across all three species and four periods of exposure to 45°C. Sequence analysis revealed numerous polymorphisms in the RCA amino acid sequence from O. australiensis. The O. australiensis RCA enzyme was thermally stable up to 42°C, contrasting with RCA from O. sativa, which was inhibited at 36°C. We attribute heat tolerance in the wild species to thermal stability of RCA, enabling Rubisco to remain active. PMID:27145723

  4. How Stable Is Stable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baehr, Marie

    1994-01-01

    Provides a problem where students are asked to find the point at which a soda can floating in some liquid changes its equilibrium between stable and unstable as the soda is removed from the can. Requires use of Newton's first law, center of mass, Archimedes' principle, stable and unstable equilibrium, and buoyant force position. (MVL)

  5. Alzheimer's neurofibrillary tangles contain unique epitopes and epitopes in common with the heat-stable microtubule associated proteins tau and MAP2.

    PubMed Central

    Yen, S. H.; Dickson, D. W.; Crowe, A.; Butler, M.; Shelanski, M. L.

    1987-01-01

    Ten monoclonal antibodies raised against Alzheimer's neurofibrillary tangles (ANTs) were characterized for reactivity with heat-stable microtubule fractions from bovine and human brain. Five of the antibodies showed very little reaction, but the other five reacted strongly with heat-stable microtubule associated proteins (MAPs). The proteins recognized by these antibodies have estimated molecular weights similar to those of known heat-stable MAPs, tau (52-68 kd) and MAP2 (200-250 kd). That the proteins are indeed tau and MAP2 is demonstrated by reaction of electroblotted proteins with antibodies raised in mouse and guinea pig against bovine brain tau and MAP2. One anti-ANT antibody reacts only with tau, two bind strongly to tau and weakly to MAP2, one recognizes both tau and MAP2 equally well, and one primarily stains MAP2. Extraction of ANT with 2% SDS does not remove tau or MAP2 epitopes from ANT, indicating that epitopes shared with heat-stable MAPs are integral components of ANT. The existence of tau epitopes in ANT is also demonstrated by immunoblotting of ANT-enriched fractions with anti-tau antibodies. Most of the material recognized by anti-tau antibodies in ANT-enriched fractions is present in large molecules excluded by 3% polyacrylamide gel upon electrophoresis. Anti-tau antibodies immunostain ANT in immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase studies. The immunostaining can be blocked by absorption of anti-tau antibodies with purified tau proteins from bovine brain. Not all ANTs in any given tissue section or isolated Alzheimer perikarial preparations, however, are stained by anti-tau antibodies. These results are consistent with previous studies that have demonstrated heterogeneity of ANTs. Whether this heterogeneity is due to biochemical modification of MAPs or absence of MAPs in some ANTs is unknown. The significance of what appear to be shared epitopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies in tau and MAP2, and the implications this may have on the

  6. Henipavirus pathogenesis and antiviral approaches.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Cyrille; Horvat, Branka

    2015-03-01

    Hendra virus and Nipah virus are closely related, recently emerged zoonotic paramyxoviruses, belonging to the Henipavirus genus. Both viruses induce generalized vasculitis affecting particularly the respiratory tract and CNS. The exceptionally broad species tropism of Henipavirus, the high case fatality rate and person-to-person transmission associated with Nipah virus outbreaks emphasize the necessity of effective antiviral strategies for these intriguing threatening pathogens. Current therapeutic approaches, validated in animal models, target early steps in viral infection; they include the use of neutralizing virus-specific antibodies and blocking membrane fusion with peptides that bind the viral fusion protein. A better understanding of Henipavirus pathogenesis is critical for the further advancement of antiviral treatment, and we summarize here the recent progress in the field. PMID:25634624

  7. Competitive coexistence in antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Arnaout, R A; Nowak, M A

    2000-06-01

    Adaptive immunity to viruses in vertebrates is mediated by two distinct but complementary branches of the immune system: the cellular response, which eliminates infected cells, and the humoral response, which eliminates infectious virus. This leads to an interesting contest, since the two responses compete, albeit indirectly, for proliferative stimuli. How can a host mount a coordinated antiviral campaign? Here we show that competition may lead to a state of "competitive coexistence" in which, counterintuitively, each branch complements the other, with clinical benefit to the host. The principle is similar to free-market economics, in which firms compete, but the consumer benefits. Experimental evidence suggests this is a useful paradigm in antiviral immunity. PMID:10816366

  8. Dioscin's antiviral effect in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaohong; Wang, Yun; Wu, Chunchen; Pei, Rongjuan; Song, Jianhua; Chen, Shiyun; Chen, Xinwen

    2013-03-01

    Dioscin is chemical compound obtained from an extract from a medical plant, air potato that is a yam species. Its potential antiviral properties were analyzed in this study. In this study, dioscin's antiviral effects were tested against several viruses including adenovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). By time-of-addition assay, dioscin not only blocked the initial stage of adenovirus infection, but also affected the host cell's response for viral infection. In addition, 293 cells treated with dioscin displayed decreased mRNA levels for adenovirus receptor (CAR). Over expression of CAR in 293 cells pretreated with dioscin restored the infectivity of adenovirus. The inhibitory effect of dioscin against VSV infection was observed only in 293 cells pretreated with dioscin prior to infection. Finally, dioscin's inhibitory effect on secretion of HBeAg and HBsAg in HBV positive cell line HepG2 2.215 was observed by ELISA assay. PMID:23238077

  9. Approaches towards rational antiviral chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Oxford, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    Present epidemic influenza is uncontrolled by immuno- or chemoprophylaxis. Mutants of varying antigenic composition arise with relatively high frequency in nature and are able to circumvent herd, or induced, immunity. Also, drug-resistant viruses can be selected in vitro and this resistance can be exchanged to other viruses by gene reassortment. Combined immuno- and chemoprophylaxis may provide a more effective approach to the ultimate control of the disease. Most antiviral compounds have been selected by random screening in the laboratory. Application of more specific enzyme assays such as the virion-associated RNA transcriptase assays may produce other compounds with a defined mode of action - semi-rational chemotherapy. RNA and polypeptide sequence studies are in progress elsewhere to define transcription and translation initiation sites or virus adsorption sites. Such knowledge could lead to a new generation of antiviral compounds. Specific delivery of virus inhibitory compounds is an interesting problem. Liposomes are lipid spheres, and these have been used for the delivery of antiviral compounds. Images Fig. 3a. Fig. 3b. Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:461275

  10. Peptide-Induced Antiviral Protection by Cytotoxic T Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Manfred; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Hengartner, Hans

    1991-02-01

    A specific antiviral cytotoxic immune response in vivo could be induced by the subcutaneous injection of the T-cell epitope of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) nucleoprotein as an unmodified free synthetic peptide (Arg-Pro-Gln-Ala-Ser-Gly-Val-Tyr-Met-Gly-Asn-Leu-Thr-Ala-Gln) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant. This immunization rendered mice into a LCMV-specific protective state as shown by the inhibition of LCMV replication in spleens of such mice. The protection level of these mice correlated with the ability to respond to the peptide challenge by CD8^+ virus-specific cytotoxic T cells. This is a direct demonstration that peptide vaccines can be antivirally protective in vivo, thus encouraging further search for appropriate mixtures of stable peptides that may be used as T-cell vaccines.

  11. Stability of the Encoding Plasmids and Surface Expression of CS6 Differs in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Encoding Different Heat-Stable (ST) Enterotoxins (STh and STp).

    PubMed

    Tobias, Joshua; Von Mentzer, Astrid; Loayza Frykberg, Patricia; Aslett, Martin; Page, Andrew J; Sjöling, Åsa; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), one of the most common reasons of diarrhea among infants and children in developing countries, causes disease by expression of either or both of the enterotoxins heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST; divided into human-type [STh] and porcine-type [STp] variants), and colonization factors (CFs) among which CS6 is one of the most prevalent ETEC CFs. In this study we show that ETEC isolates expressing CS6+STh have higher copy numbers of the cssABCD operon encoding CS6 than those expressing CS6+STp. Long term cultivation of up to ten over-night passages of ETEC isolates harboring CS6+STh (n = 10) or CS6+STp (n = 15) showed instability of phenotypic expression of CS6 in a majority of the CS6+STp isolates, whereas most of the CS6+STh isolates retained CS6 expression. The observed instability was a correlated with loss of genes cssA and cssD as examined by PCR. Mobilization of the CS6 plasmid from an unstable CS6+STp isolate into a laboratory E. coli strain resulted in loss of the plasmid after a single over-night passage whereas the plasmid from an CS6+STh strain was retained in the laboratory strain during 10 passages. A sequence comparison between the CS6 plasmids from a stable and an unstable ETEC isolate revealed that genes necessary for plasmid stabilization, for example pemI, pemK, stbA, stbB and parM, were not present in the unstable ETEC isolate. Our results indicate that stable retention of CS6 may in part be affected by the stability of the plasmid on which both CS6 and STp or STh are located. PMID:27054573

  12. Stability of the Encoding Plasmids and Surface Expression of CS6 Differs in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Encoding Different Heat-Stable (ST) Enterotoxins (STh and STp)

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Joshua; Von Mentzer, Astrid; Loayza Frykberg, Patricia; Aslett, Martin; Page, Andrew J.; Sjöling, Åsa; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), one of the most common reasons of diarrhea among infants and children in developing countries, causes disease by expression of either or both of the enterotoxins heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST; divided into human-type [STh] and porcine-type [STp] variants), and colonization factors (CFs) among which CS6 is one of the most prevalent ETEC CFs. In this study we show that ETEC isolates expressing CS6+STh have higher copy numbers of the cssABCD operon encoding CS6 than those expressing CS6+STp. Long term cultivation of up to ten over-night passages of ETEC isolates harboring CS6+STh (n = 10) or CS6+STp (n = 15) showed instability of phenotypic expression of CS6 in a majority of the CS6+STp isolates, whereas most of the CS6+STh isolates retained CS6 expression. The observed instability was a correlated with loss of genes cssA and cssD as examined by PCR. Mobilization of the CS6 plasmid from an unstable CS6+STp isolate into a laboratory E. coli strain resulted in loss of the plasmid after a single over-night passage whereas the plasmid from an CS6+STh strain was retained in the laboratory strain during 10 passages. A sequence comparison between the CS6 plasmids from a stable and an unstable ETEC isolate revealed that genes necessary for plasmid stabilization, for example pemI, pemK, stbA, stbB and parM, were not present in the unstable ETEC isolate. Our results indicate that stable retention of CS6 may in part be affected by the stability of the plasmid on which both CS6 and STp or STh are located. PMID:27054573

  13. Dehydromonocrotaline generates sequence-selective N-7 guanine alkylation and heat and alkali stable multiple fragment DNA crosslinks.

    PubMed

    Pereira, T N; Webb, R I; Reilly, P E; Seawright, A A; Prakash, A S

    1998-12-01

    Monocrotaline is a pyrrolizidine alkaloid known to cause toxicity in humans and animals. Its mechanism of biological action is still unclear although DNA crosslinking has been suggested to a play a role in its activity. In this study we found that an active metabolite of monocrotaline, dehydromonocrotaline (DHM), alkylates guanines at the N7 position of DNA with a preference for 5'-GG and 5'-GA sequences. In addition, it generates piperidine- and heat-resistant multiple DNA crosslinks, as confirmed by electrophoresis and electron microscopy. On the basis of these findings, we propose that DHM undergoes rapid polymerization to a structure which is able to crosslink several fragments of DNA. PMID:9826770

  14. Dehydromonocrotaline generates sequence-selective N-7 guanine alkylation and heat and alkali stable multiple fragment DNA crosslinks.

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, T N; Webb, R I; Reilly, P E; Seawright, A A; Prakash, A S

    1998-01-01

    Monocrotaline is a pyrrolizidine alkaloid known to cause toxicity in humans and animals. Its mechanism of biological action is still unclear although DNA crosslinking has been suggested to a play a role in its activity. In this study we found that an active metabolite of monocrotaline, dehydromonocrotaline (DHM), alkylates guanines at the N7 position of DNA with a preference for 5'-GG and 5'-GA sequences. In addition, it generates piperidine- and heat-resistant multiple DNA crosslinks, as confirmed by electrophoresis and electron microscopy. On the basis of these findings, we propose that DHM undergoes rapid polymerization to a structure which is able to crosslink several fragments of DNA. PMID:9826770

  15. Design and characterization of a chimeric multiepitope construct containing CfaB, heat-stable toxoid, CssA, CssB, and heat-labile toxin subunit B of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: a bioinformatic approach.

    PubMed

    Zeinalzadeh, Narges; Salmanian, Ali Hatef; Ahangari, Ghasem; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Amani, Jafar; Bathaie, S Zahra; Jafari, Mahyat

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are the most common cause of bacterial diarrhea in children in developing countries and travelers to these areas. Enterotoxins and colonization factors (CFs) are two key virulence factors in ETEC pathogenesis, and the heterogeneity of the CFs is the bottleneck in reaching an effective vaccine. In this study, a candidate subunit vaccine, which is composed of CfaB, CssA and CssB, structural subunits of colonization factor antigen I and CS6 CFs, labile toxin subunit B, and the binding subunit of heat-labile and heat-stable toxoid, was designed to provide broad-spectrum protection against ETEC. The different features of chimeric gene, its mRNA stability, and chimeric protein properties were analyzed by using bioinformatic tools. The optimized chimeric gene was chemically synthesized and expressed successfully in a prokaryotic host. The purified protein was used for assessment of bioinformatic data by experimental methods. PMID:24372617

  16. Partial Purification and Characterization of a Heat Stable α-Amylase from a Thermophilic Actinobacteria, Streptomyces sp. MSC702.

    PubMed

    Singh, Renu; Kumar, Vijay; Kapoor, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    A partial purification and biochemical characterization of the α-amylase from Streptomyces sp. MSC702 were carried out in this study. The optimum operational conditions for enzyme substrate reaction for amylolytic enzyme activity from the strain were evaluated. The optimum pH, temperature, and incubation period for assaying the enzyme were observed to be 5.0, 55°C, and 30 min, respectively. The extracellular extract was concentrated using ammonium sulfate precipitation. It was stable in the presence of metal ions (5 mM) such as K(+), Co(2+), and Mo(2+), whereas Pb(2+), Mn(2+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Ba(2+), Ca(2+), Hg(2+), Sn(2+), Cr(3+), Al(3+), Ag(+), and Fe(2+) were found to have inhibitory effects. The enzyme activity was also unstable in the presence of 1% Triton X-100, 1% Tween 80, 5 mM sodium lauryl sulphate, 1% glycerol, 5 mM EDTA, and 5 mM denaturant urea. At temperature 60°C and pH 5.0, the enzyme stability was maximum. α-amylase retained 100% and 34.18% stability for 1 h and 4 h, respectively, at 60°C (pH 7.0). The enzyme exhibited a half-life of 195 min at 60°C temperature. The analysis of kinetic showed that the enzyme has K m of 2.4 mg/mL and V max of 21853.0 μmol/min/mg for soluble potato starch. The results indicate that the enzyme reflects their potentiality towards industrial utilization. PMID:25400941

  17. Detection of the heat-stable toxin coding gene (ST-gene) in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: development of a colour amplified PCR detection system.

    PubMed

    Fanning, S; O'Mullane, J; O'Meara, D; Ward, A; Joyce, C; Delaney, M; Cryan, B

    1995-12-01

    Screening biological samples using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has obvious advantages compared with current molecular analytical methods based on gel electrophoresis and/or hybridisation, both of which are expensive and time-consuming, therefore the development of a PCR assay format that is applicable to large sample numbers and that can readily use equipment commonly found in diagnostic laboratories would be advantageous. This report describes the development of a colour amplified PCR detection system which is simple in design and could be universally applied to the detection of any DNA template. As an example, the system has been applied in the detection of the heat-stable toxin coding gene (ST-gene) from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). The assay is sensitive, detecting 10 fg of a purified DNA template and 270 cfu of an ST-gene-positive ETEC strain. PMID:8555786

  18. What You Should Know about Flu Antiviral Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... to prevent seasonal influenza . Antiviral drugs are a second line of defense to treat the flu (including seasonal flu and variant flu viruses ) if you get sick. What are the benefits of antiviral drugs? When used for treatment, antiviral ...

  19. Home delivery of heat-stable vaccines in Indonesia: outreach immunization with a prefilled, single-use injection device.

    PubMed Central

    Sutanto, A.; Suarnawa, I. M.; Nelson, C. M.; Stewart, T.; Soewarso, T. I.

    1999-01-01

    Extending immunization coverage to underserved populations will require innovative immunization strategies. This study evaluated one such strategy: the use of a prefilled, single-use injection device for outreach immunization by village midwives. The device, UniJect, is designed to prevent refilling or reuse. Stored at ambient temperatures for up to 1 month in midwives' homes, vaccine-filled UniJect devices were immediately available for outreach. Between July 1995 and April 1996, 110 midwives on the Indonesia islands of Lombok and Bali visited the homes of newborn infants to deliver hepatitis B vaccine to the infants and tetanus toxoid to their mothers. Observations and interviews showed that the midwives used the device properly and safely to administer approximately 10,000 sterile injections in home settings. There were no problems with excessive heat exposure during the storage or delivery of vaccine. Injection recipients and midwives expressed a strong preference for the UniJect device over a standard syringe. Use of the prefilled device outside the cold chain simplified the logistics and facilitated the speed and efficiency of home visits, while the single-dose format minimized vaccine wastage. PMID:10083709

  20. IS1414, an Escherichia coli Insertion Sequence with a Heat-Stable Enterotoxin Gene Embedded in a Transposase-Like Gene

    PubMed Central

    McVeigh, Annette; Fasano, Alessio; Scott, Daniel A.; Jelacic, Sandra; Moseley, Steve L.; Robertson, Donald C.; Savarino, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) heat-stable enterotoxin 1 (EAST1) was originally discovered in EAEC but has also been associated with enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). Multiple genomic restriction fragments from each of three ETEC strains of human origin showed homology with an EAST1 gene probe. A single hybridizing fragment was detected on the plasmid of ETEC strain 27D that also encodes heat-stable enterotoxin Ib and colonization factor antigen I. We isolated and characterized this fragment, showing that it (i) carries an allele of astA nearly identical to that originally reported from EAEC 17-2 and (ii) expressed enterotoxic activity. Sequence analysis of the toxin coding region revealed that astA is completely embedded within a 1,209-bp open reading frame (ORF1), whose coding sequence is on the same strand but in the −1 reading frame in reference to the toxin gene. In vitro expression of the predicted Mr-∼46,000 protein product of ORF1 was demonstrated. ORF1 is highly similar to transposase genes of IS285 from Yersinia pestis, IS1356 from Burkholderia cepacia, and ISRm3 from Rhizobium meliloti. It is bounded by 30-bp imperfect inverted repeat sequences and flanked by 8-bp direct repeats. Based on these structural features, pathognomonic of a regular insertion sequence, this element was designated IS1414. Preliminary experiments to show IS1414 translocation were unsuccessful. Overlapping genes of the type suggested by the IS1414 core region have heretofore not been described in bacteria. It seems to offer a most efficient mechanism for intragenomic and horizontal dissemination of EAST1. PMID:10992475

  1. Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Todd H.; Zook, Christina E.; Boettcher, Tara L.; Wick, Scott T.; Pancoast, Jennifer S.; Zusman, Benjamin D.

    2011-01-01

    Currently there are relatively few antiviral therapeutics, and most which do exist are highly pathogen-specific or have other disadvantages. We have developed a new broad-spectrum antiviral approach, dubbed Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) Activated Caspase Oligomerizer (DRACO) that selectively induces apoptosis in cells containing viral dsRNA, rapidly killing infected cells without harming uninfected cells. We have created DRACOs and shown that they are nontoxic in 11 mammalian cell types and effective against 15 different viruses, including dengue flavivirus, Amapari and Tacaribe arenaviruses, Guama bunyavirus, and H1N1 influenza. We have also demonstrated that DRACOs can rescue mice challenged with H1N1 influenza. DRACOs have the potential to be effective therapeutics or prophylactics for numerous clinical and priority viruses, due to the broad-spectrum sensitivity of the dsRNA detection domain, the potent activity of the apoptosis induction domain, and the novel direct linkage between the two which viruses have never encountered. PMID:21818340

  2. Antiviral targets of human noroviruses.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Bv Venkataram; Shanker, Sreejesh; Muhaxhiri, Zana; Deng, Lisheng; Choi, Jae-Mun; Estes, Mary K; Song, Yongcheng; Palzkill, Timothy; Atmar, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    Human noroviruses are major causative agents of sporadic and epidemic gastroenteritis both in children and adults. Currently there are no licensed therapeutic intervention measures either in terms of vaccines or drugs available for these highly contagious human pathogens. Genetic and antigenic diversity of these viruses, rapid emergence of new strains, and their ability to infect a broad population by using polymorphic histo-blood group antigens for cell attachment, pose significant challenges for the development of effective antiviral agents. Despite these impediments, there is progress in the design and development of therapeutic agents. These include capsid-based candidate vaccines, and potential antivirals either in the form of glycomimetics or designer antibodies that block HBGA binding, as well as those that target essential non-structural proteins such as the viral protease and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. In addition to these classical approaches, recent studies suggest the possibility of interferons and targeting host cell factors as viable approaches to counter norovirus infection. This review provides a brief overview of this progress. PMID:27318434

  3. Antiviral effects of Glycyrrhiza species.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Cristina; Eisenhut, Michael; Krausse, Rea; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Pellati, Donatella; Armanini, Decio; Bielenberg, Jens

    2008-02-01

    Historical sources for the use of Glycyrrhiza species include ancient manuscripts from China, India and Greece. They all mention its use for symptoms of viral respiratory tract infections and hepatitis. Randomized controlled trials confirmed that the Glycyrrhiza glabra derived compound glycyrrhizin and its derivatives reduced hepatocellular damage in chronic hepatitis B and C. In hepatitis C virus-induced cirrhosis the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma was reduced. Animal studies demonstrated a reduction of mortality and viral activity in herpes simplex virus encephalitis and influenza A virus pneumonia. In vitro studies revealed antiviral activity against HIV-1, SARS related coronavirus, respiratory syncytial virus, arboviruses, vaccinia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus. Mechanisms for antiviral activity of Glycyrrhiza spp. include reduced transport to the membrane and sialylation of hepatitis B virus surface antigen, reduction of membrane fluidity leading to inhibition of fusion of the viral membrane of HIV-1 with the cell, induction of interferon gamma in T-cells, inhibition of phosphorylating enzymes in vesicular stomatitis virus infection and reduction of viral latency. Future research needs to explore the potency of compounds derived from licorice in prevention and treatment of influenza A virus pneumonia and as an adjuvant treatment in patients infected with HIV resistant to antiretroviral drugs. PMID:17886224

  4. Clinical relevance of HCV antiviral drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Welsch, C; Zeuzem, S

    2012-10-01

    The approval of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) against the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease revolutionized antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C. They mark the beginning of an era with drugs designed to inhibit specific viral proteins involved in the virus life cycle rather than the nonspecific antiviral activity of interferon. Upcoming generations of antivirals are expected that lead to viral eradication in most patients who undergo treatment with hope held for years that HCV can be cured without interferon. Antiviral drug resistance plays a key role in DAA-treatment failure. Knowledge on molecular escape mechanisms of resistant variants, their time to wild-type reversal and potential persistence is of upmost importance to design treatment strategies for patients with previous DAA-treatment failure. PMID:23006585

  5. Broad-spectrum antivirals against viral fusion

    PubMed Central

    Vigant, Frederic; Santos, Nuno C.; Lee, Benhur

    2015-01-01

    Effective antivirals have been developed against specific viruses, such as HIV, Hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. This ‘one bug–one drug’ approach to antiviral drug development can be successful, but it may be inadequate for responding to an increasing diversity of viruses that cause significant diseases in humans. The majority of viral pathogens that cause emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases are membrane-enveloped viruses, which require the fusion of viral and cell membranes for virus entry. Therefore, antivirals that target the membrane fusion process represent new paradigms for broad-spectrum antiviral discovery. In this Review, we discuss the mechanisms responsible for the fusion between virus and cell membranes and explore how broad-spectrum antivirals target this process to prevent virus entry. PMID:26075364

  6. Role of Heat-Stable Enterotoxins in the Induction of Early Immune Responses in Piglets after Infection with Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Schauvliege, Stijn; Gasthuys, Frank; van der Meulen, Jan; Dubreuil, J. Daniel; Goddeeris, Bruno M.; Niewold, Theo; Cox, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains that produce heat-stable (ST) and/or heat - labile (LT) enterotoxins are cause of post – weaning diarrhea in piglets. However, the relative importance of the different enterotoxins in host immune responses against ETEC infection has been poorly defined. In the present study, several isogenic mutant strains of an O149:F4ac+, LT+ STa+ STb+ ETEC strain were constructed that lack the expression of LT in combination with one or both types of ST enterotoxins (STa and/or STb). The small intestinal segment perfusion (SISP) technique and microarray analysis were used to study host early immune responses induced by these mutant strains 4 h after infection in comparison to the wild type strain and a PBS control. Simultaneously, net fluid absorption of pig small intestinal mucosa was measured 4 h after infection, allowing us to correlate enterotoxin secretion with gene regulation. Microarray analysis showed on the one hand a non-toxin related general antibacterial response comprising genes such as PAP, MMP1 and IL8. On the other hand, results suggest a dominant role for STb in small intestinal secretion early after post-weaning infection, as well as in the induced innate immune response through differential regulation of immune mediators like interleukin 1 and interleukin 17. PMID:22815904

  7. Precipitation rates and atmospheric heat transport during the Cenomanian greenhouse warming in North America: Estimates from a stable isotope mass-balance model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ufnar, David F.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Gonzalez, L.; Grocke, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Stable isotope mass-balance modeling results of meteoric ??18O values from the Cenomanian Stage of the Cretaceous Western Interior Basin (KWIB) suggest that precipitation and evaporation fluxes were greater than that of the present and significantly different from simulations of Albian KWIB paleohydrology. Sphaerosiderite meteoric ??18O values have been compiled from the Lower Tuscaloosa Formation of southwestern Mississippi (25??N paleolatitude), The Dakota Formation Rose Creek Pit, Fairbury Nebraska (35??N) and the Dunvegan Formation of eastern British Columbia (55??N paleolatitude). These paleosol siderite ??18O values define a paleolatitudinal gradient ranging from - 4.2??? VPDB at 25??N to - 12.5??? VPDB at 55??N. This trend is significantly steeper and more depleted than a modern theoretical siderite gradient (25??N: - 1.7???; 65??N: - 5.6??? VPDB ), and a Holocene meteoric calcite trend (27??N: - 3.6???; 67??N: - 7.4??? VPDB). The Cenomanian gradient is also comparatively steeper than the Albian trend determined for the KWIB in the mid- to high latitudes. The steep latitudinal trend in meteoric ??18O values may be the result of increased precipitation and evaporation fluxes (amount effects) under a more vigorous greenhouse-world hydrologic cycle. A stable-isotope mass-balance model has been used to generate estimates of precipitation and evaporation fluxes and precipitation rates. Estimates of Cenomanian precipitation rates based upon the mass-balance modeling of the KWIB range from 1400??mm/yr at 25??N paleolatitude to 3600??mm/yr at 45??N paleolatitude. The precipitation-evaporation (P-E) flux values were used to delineate zones of moisture surplus and moisture deficit. Comparisons between Cenomanian P-E and modern theoretical siderite, and Holocene calcite latitudinal trends shows an amplification of low-latitude moisture deficits between 5-25??N paleolatitude and moisture surpluses between 40-60??N paleolatitude. The low-latitude moisture deficits

  8. Development of three stable isotope dilution assays for the quantitation of (E)-2-butenal (crotonaldehyde) in heat-processed edible fats and oils as well as in food.

    PubMed

    Granvogl, Michael

    2014-02-12

    Three stable isotope dilution assays (SIDAs) were developed for the quantitation of (E)-2-butenal (crotonaldehyde) in heat-processed edible fats and oils as well as in food using synthesized [¹³C₄]-crotonaldehyde as internal standard. First, a direct headspace GC-MS method, followed by two indirect methods on the basis of derivatization with either pentafluorophenylhydrazine (GC-MS) or 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (LC-MS/MS), was developed. All methods are also suitable for the quantitation of acrolein using the standard [¹³C₃]-acrolein. Applying these three methods on five different types of fats and oils varying in their fatty acid compositions revealed significantly varying crotonaldehyde concentrations for the different samples, but nearly identical quantitative data for all methods. Formed amounts of crotonaldehyde were dependent not only on the type of oil, e.g., 0.29-0.32 mg/kg of coconut oil or 33.9-34.4 mg/kg of linseed oil after heat-processing for 24 h at 180 °C, but also on the applied temperature and time. The results indicated that the concentration of formed crotonaldehyde seemed to be correlated with the amount of linolenic acid in the oils. Furthermore, the formation of crotonaldehyde was compared to that of its homologue acrolein, demonstrating that acrolein was always present in higher amounts in heat-processed oils, e.g., 12.3 mg of crotonaldehyde/kg of rapeseed oil in comparison to 23.4 mg of acrolein/kg after 24 h at 180 °C. Finally, crotonaldehyde was also quantitated in fried food, revealing concentrations from 12 to 25 μg/kg for potato chips and from 8 to 19 μg/kg for donuts, depending on the oil used. PMID:24428123

  9. Virus assembly, allostery, and antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Zlotnick, Adam; Mukhopadhyay, Suchetana

    2010-01-01

    Assembly of virus capsids and surface proteins must be regulated to ensure that the resulting complex is an infectious virion. Here we examine assembly of virus capsids, focusing on hepatitis B virus and bacteriophage MS2, and formation of glycoproteins in the alphaviruses. These systems are structurally and biochemically well-characterized and are simplest-case paradigms of self-assembly. Published data suggest that capsid and glycoprotein assembly is subject to allosteric regulation, that is, regulation at the level of conformational change. The hypothesis that allostery is a common theme in viruses suggests that deregulation of capsid and glycoprotein assembly by small molecule effectors will be an attractive antiviral strategy, as has been demonstrated with hepatitis B virus. PMID:21163649

  10. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Cui, Wenxuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Guo, Yao

    2008-08-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10 5 kDa, 5 1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10 5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  11. Antiviral Natural Products and Herbal Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liang-Tzung; Hsu, Wen-Chan; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Viral infections play an important role in human diseases, and recent outbreaks in the advent of globalization and ease of travel have underscored their prevention as a critical issue in safeguarding public health. Despite the progress made in immunization and drug development, many viruses lack preventive vaccines and efficient antiviral therapies, which are often beset by the generation of viral escape mutants. Thus, identifying novel antiviral drugs is of critical importance and natural products are an excellent source for such discoveries. In this mini-review, we summarize the antiviral effects reported for several natural products and herbal medicines. PMID:24872930

  12. Epitope mapping and characterization of antigenic determinants of heat-stable enterotoxin (STh) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli by using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, T; Nair, G B; Suzuki, K; Zhe, H X; Yokoo, Y; De Mol, P; Hemelhof, W; Butzler, J P; Takeda, Y; Shimonishi, Y

    1993-01-01

    A panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the heat-stable enterotoxin (STh) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli was produced. All four MAbs (8G7, 53-4, 11C, and SH1) bound to native STh in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to various degrees, with clone SH1 showing the best affinity. The MAbs were screened for neutralizing and guanylate cyclase-inhibiting activities by the suckling mouse assay and the cyclic GMP assay using T84 cells, respectively. The contact amino acid residues governing the reactivity of the four MAbs were precisely determined by using several chemically synthesized analogs of the various heat-stable enterotoxins (STa's). Three distinct antigenic sites of STh sufficiently removed from each other, one near the N terminus, another in the core functional region of the toxin, and the third in the C-terminal region, were recognized by the different MAbs. MAb SH1, which recognized Asn at position 4 and Tyr at position 5 from the N terminus was 100 times more potent in neutralizing the bioactivity of STh in the suckling mouse assay than was MAb 11C, which recognized Thr at position 16 and Tyr at position 19 from the N terminus of the STh molecule. The MAbs which recognized Leu at position 9 from the N terminus (MAb 53-4) and Tyr at position 19 from the N terminus (MAb 8G7) showed intermediate activities in the neutralization assay. The guanylate cyclase-inhibiting activities of SH1 and 11C essentially paralleled the results for the neutralization of bioactivity, while MAbs 53-4 and 8G7 exhibited reverse activity. These results indicate that MAbs that recognize the N-terminal residues which have been shown not to be essential for toxic activity have a potent protective capacity. None of the MAbs reacted with reduced and carboxy-methylated native STh. This suggests that all of the MAbs mediate their effect by reacting with conformation-dependent antigenic determinants. PMID:7678100

  13. Escherichia coli K88ac fimbriae expressing heat-labile and heat-stable (STa) toxin epitopes elicit antibodies that neutralize cholera toxin and STa toxin and inhibit adherence of K88ac fimbrial E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengxian; Zhang, Weiping

    2010-12-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are a major cause of diarrheal disease in humans and animals. Bacterial adhesins and heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins are the virulence determinants in ETEC diarrhea. It is believed that vaccines inducing anti-adhesin immunity to inhibit bacterial adherence and anti-toxin immunity to eliminate toxin activity would provide broad-spectrum protection against ETEC. In this study, an ETEC fimbrial adhesin was used as a platform to express LT and STa for adhesin-toxin fusion antigens to induce anti-toxin and anti-adhesin immunity. An epitope from the B subunit of LT toxin (LTP1, (8)LCSEYRNTQIYTIN(21)) and an STa toxoid epitope ((5)CCELCCNPQCAGCY(18)) were embedded in the FaeG major subunit of E. coli K88ac fimbriae. Constructed K88ac-toxin chimeric fimbriae were harvested and used for rabbit immunization. Immunized rabbits developed anti-K88ac, anti-LT, and anti-STa antibodies. Moreover, induced antibodies not only inhibited adherence of K88ac fimbrial E. coli to porcine small intestinal enterocytes but also neutralized cholera toxin and STa toxin. Data from this study demonstrated that K88ac fimbriae expressing LT and STa epitope antigens elicited neutralizing anti-toxin antibodies and anti-adhesin antibodies and suggested that E. coli fimbriae could serve as a platform for the development of broad-spectrum vaccines against ETEC. PMID:20980482

  14. Escherichia coli K88ac Fimbriae Expressing Heat-Labile and Heat-Stable (STa) Toxin Epitopes Elicit Antibodies That Neutralize Cholera Toxin and STa Toxin and Inhibit Adherence of K88ac Fimbrial E. coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chengxian; Zhang, Weiping

    2010-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are a major cause of diarrheal disease in humans and animals. Bacterial adhesins and heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins are the virulence determinants in ETEC diarrhea. It is believed that vaccines inducing anti-adhesin immunity to inhibit bacterial adherence and anti-toxin immunity to eliminate toxin activity would provide broad-spectrum protection against ETEC. In this study, an ETEC fimbrial adhesin was used as a platform to express LT and STa for adhesin-toxin fusion antigens to induce anti-toxin and anti-adhesin immunity. An epitope from the B subunit of LT toxin (LTP1, 8LCSEYRNTQIYTIN21) and an STa toxoid epitope (5CCELCCNPQCAGCY18) were embedded in the FaeG major subunit of E. coli K88ac fimbriae. Constructed K88ac-toxin chimeric fimbriae were harvested and used for rabbit immunization. Immunized rabbits developed anti-K88ac, anti-LT, and anti-STa antibodies. Moreover, induced antibodies not only inhibited adherence of K88ac fimbrial E. coli to porcine small intestinal enterocytes but also neutralized cholera toxin and STa toxin. Data from this study demonstrated that K88ac fimbriae expressing LT and STa epitope antigens elicited neutralizing anti-toxin antibodies and anti-adhesin antibodies and suggested that E. coli fimbriae could serve as a platform for the development of broad-spectrum vaccines against ETEC. PMID:20980482

  15. Genetic Fusions of Heat-Labile Toxoid (LT) and Heat-Stable Toxin b (STb) of Porcine Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Elicit Protective Anti-LT and Anti-STb Antibodies ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiping; Francis, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC)-associated diarrhea causes a substantial economic loss to swine producers worldwide. The majority of ETEC strains causing porcine diarrhea, especially postweaning diarrhea (PWD), produce heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxin b (STb). LT is commonly used in vaccine development, but STb has not been included because of its poor immunogenicity. As a virulence factor in porcine diarrhea, STb needs to be included as an antigen for development of broad-spectrum vaccines. In this study, we used an LT toxoid (LTR192G [hereafter, LT192]) derived from porcine ETEC to carry a mature STb peptide for LT192-STb fusions to enhance STb immunogenicity for potential vaccine application. Anti-LT and anti-STb antibodies were detected in immunized rabbits and pigs. In addition, when challenged with an STb-positive ETEC strain, all 10 suckling piglets borne by immunized gilts remained healthy, whereas 7 out 9 piglets borne by unimmunized gilts developed moderate diarrhea. This study indicates that the LT192-STb fusion enhanced anti-STb immunogenicity and suggests the LT192-STb fusion antigen can be used in future vaccine development against porcine ETEC diarrhea. PMID:20505006

  16. Antiviral effect of ranpirnase against Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Thomas; Draper, Ken; Brasel, Trevor; Freiberg, Alexander; Squiquera, Luis; Sidransky, David; Sulley, Jamie; Taxman, Debra J

    2016-08-01

    The recent epidemic of Ebola has intensified the need for the development of novel antiviral therapeutics that prolong and improve survival against deadly viral diseases. We sought to determine whether ranpirnase, an endoribonuclease from Rana pipiens with a demonstrated human safety profile in phase III oncology trials, can reduce titers of Ebola virus (EBOV) in infected cells, protect mice against mouse-adapted EBOV challenge, and reduce virus levels in infected mice. Our results demonstrate that 0.50 μg/ml ranpirnase is potently effective at reducing EBOV Zaire Kikwit infection in cultured Vero E6 cells (Selectivity Index 47.8-70.2). In a prophylactic study, a single intravenous dose of 0.1 mg/kg ranpirnase protected 70% of mice from progressive infection. Additionally, in a post-exposure prophylactic study, 100% of female mice survived infection after intraperitoneal administration of 0.1 mg/kg ranpirnase for ten days beginning 1 h post challenge. Most of the male counterparts were sacrificed due to weight loss by Study Day 8 or 9; however, the Clinical Activity/Behavior scores of these mice remained low and no significant microscopic pathologies could be detected in the kidneys, livers or spleens. Furthermore, live virus could not be detected in the sera of ranpirnase-treated mice by Study Day 8 or in the kidneys, livers or spleens by Study Day 12, and viral RNA levels declined exponentially by Study Day 12. Because ranpirnase is exceptionally stable and has a long track record of safe intravenous administration to humans, this drug provides a promising new candidate for clinical consideration in the treatment of Ebola virus disease alone or in combination with other therapeutics. PMID:27350309

  17. Viruses and Antiviral Immunity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Cherry, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Viral pathogens present many challenges to organisms, driving the evolution of a myriad of antiviral strategies to combat infections. A wide variety of viruses infect invertebrates, including both natural pathogens that are insect-restricted, and viruses that are transmitted to vertebrates. Studies using the powerful tools available in the model organism Drosophila have expanded our understanding of antiviral defenses against diverse viruses. In this review, we will cover three major areas. First, we will describe the tools used to study viruses in Drosophila. Second, we will survey the major viruses that have been studied in Drosophila. And lastly, we will discuss the well-characterized mechanisms that are active against these diverse pathogens, focusing on non-RNAi mediated antiviral mechanisms. Antiviral RNAi is discussed in another paper in this issue. PMID:23680639

  18. miR-155 acts as an anti-inflammatory factor in atherosclerosis-associated foam cell formation by repressing calcium-regulated heat stable protein 1.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyi; Kong, Deyong; Chen, Heming; Liu, Shuiyi; Hu, Hui; Wu, Tangwei; Wang, Jing; Chen, Weiqun; Ning, Yong; Li, Yong; Lu, Zhongxin

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is chronic inflammation in response to lipid accumulation. MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) is being increasingly studied to evaluate its potential as diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets in many diseases. However, delineating the role of miR-155 in AS remains difficult. Here, we detected constitutive expression of several microRNAs (miRNAs) possibly associated with cardiovascular disease in foam cells and clinical specimens from patients with AS. Among them, we found that the level of miR-155 in foam cells was the most significantly elevated in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, the expression of miR-155 was elevated in the plasma and plaque of patients with AS. We also reported for the first time that miR-155 targets calcium-regulated heat stable protein 1 (CARHSP1), which regulates the stability of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) mRNA. Furthermore, we investigated the mechanism by which the miR-155 level is elevated. miR-155 upregulation is due to transcriptional regulation by nuclear factor (NF)-κB, which is activated by the inflammatory factor TNF-α. In summary, increased miR-155 relieves chronic inflammation by a negative feedback loop and plays a protective role during atherosclerosis-associated foam cell formation by signaling through the miR-155-CARHSP1-TNF-α pathway. PMID:26899994

  19. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of a heat-stable enterotoxin gene from Vibrio cholerae non-O1 isolated from a patient with traveler's diarrhea.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, A; Kato, J; Watanabe, H; Nair, B G; Takeda, T

    1990-01-01

    We determined the nucleotide sequence of the heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) gene of the Vibrio cholerae non-O1 strain NRT36 isolated from a patient with traveler's diarrhea. The gene is chromosomally encoded and the presumed product is 78 amino acids in length, with a molecular weight of 8,814, though the genes of Escherichia coli STa(s) (STh and STp) are encoded in plasmid DNA and both products are 72 amino acids in length. The first 18 amino acids at the NH2 terminus were hydrophobic, suggesting that this region of the polypeptide acts as a signal sequence for the toxin. The last 17 amino acids at the COOH terminus were identical to those deduced from the toxin (NAG-ST) produced by V. cholerae non-O1 strain A-5 isolated from a frozen shrimp. The deduced amino acid sequence of the NAG-ST precursor had 50 and 46% homology to those of E. coli STh and STp, respectively. The hydropathy plot analysis of each predicted protein revealed similar profiles between them, suggesting that the NAG-ST precursor has structural similarity to those of E. coli STa(s). PMID:2205577

  20. miR-155 acts as an anti-inflammatory factor in atherosclerosis-associated foam cell formation by repressing calcium-regulated heat stable protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyi; Kong, Deyong; Chen, Heming; Liu, Shuiyi; Hu, Hui; Wu, Tangwei; Wang, Jing; Chen, Weiqun; Ning, Yong; Li, Yong; Lu, Zhongxin

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is chronic inflammation in response to lipid accumulation. MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) is being increasingly studied to evaluate its potential as diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets in many diseases. However, delineating the role of miR-155 in AS remains difficult. Here, we detected constitutive expression of several microRNAs (miRNAs) possibly associated with cardiovascular disease in foam cells and clinical specimens from patients with AS. Among them, we found that the level of miR-155 in foam cells was the most significantly elevated in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, the expression of miR-155 was elevated in the plasma and plaque of patients with AS. We also reported for the first time that miR-155 targets calcium-regulated heat stable protein 1 (CARHSP1), which regulates the stability of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) mRNA. Furthermore, we investigated the mechanism by which the miR-155 level is elevated. miR-155 upregulation is due to transcriptional regulation by nuclear factor (NF)-κB, which is activated by the inflammatory factor TNF-α. In summary, increased miR-155 relieves chronic inflammation by a negative feedback loop and plays a protective role during atherosclerosis-associated foam cell formation by signaling through the miR-155–CARHSP1–TNF-α pathway. PMID:26899994

  1. Preliminary results from a microvolume, dynamically heated analytical column for preconcentration and separation of simple gases prior to stable isotopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetta, Robert James; Seed, Mike

    2016-04-01

    Stable isotope applications that call for preconcentration (i.e., greenhouse gas measurements, small carbonate samples, etc.) universally call for cryogenic fluids such as liquid nitrogen, dry ice slurries, or expensive external recirculation chillers. This adds significant complexity, first and foremost in the requirements to store and handle such dangerous materials. A second layer of complexity is the instrument itself - with mechanisms to physically move either coolant around the trap, or move a trap in or out of the coolant. Not to mention design requirements for hardware that can safely isolate the fluid from other sensitive areas. In an effort to simplify the isotopic analysis of gases requiring preconcentration, we have developed a new separation technology, UltiTrapTM (patent pending), which leverage's the proprietary Advanced Purge & Trap (APT) Technology employed in elemental analysers from Elementar Analysensysteme GmbH products. UltiTrapTM has been specially developed as a micro volume, dynamically heated GC separation column. The introduction of solid-state cooling technology enables sub-zero temperatures without cryogenics or refrigerants, eliminates all moving parts, and increases analytical longevity due to no boiling losses of coolant . This new technology makes it possible for the system to be deployed as both a focussing device and as a gas separation device. Initial data on synthetic gas mixtures (CO2/CH4/N2O in air), and real-world applications including long-term room air and a comparison between carbonated waters of different origins show excellent agreement with previous technologies.

  2. Antiviral activity of silymarin against chikungunya virus

    PubMed Central

    Lani, Rafidah; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Chiam, Chun Wei; Moghaddam, Ehsan; Chu, Justin Jang Hann; Rausalu, Kai; Merits, Andres; Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana; Abu Bakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito-borne chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes chikungunya fever, with clinical presentations such as severe back and small joint pain, and debilitating arthritis associated with crippling pains that persist for weeks and even years. Although there are several studies to evaluate the efficacy of drugs against CHIKV, the treatment for chikungunya fever is mainly symptom-based and no effective licensed vaccine or antiviral are available. Here, we investigated the antiviral activity of three types of flavonoids against CHIKV in vitro replication. Three compounds: silymarin, quercetin and kaempferol were evaluated for their in vitro antiviral activities against CHIKV using a CHIKV replicon cell line and clinical isolate of CHIKV of Central/East African genotype. A cytopathic effect inhibition assay was used to determine their activities on CHIKV viral replication and quantitative reverse transcription PCR was used to calculate virus yield. Antiviral activity of effective compound was further investigated by evaluation of CHIKV protein expression using western blotting for CHIKV nsP1, nsP3, and E2E1 proteins. Briefly, silymarin exhibited significant antiviral activity against CHIKV, reducing both CHIKV replication efficiency and down-regulating production of viral proteins involved in replication. This study may have important consequence for broaden the chance of getting the effective antiviral for CHIKV infection. PMID:26078201

  3. Antiviral activity of silymarin against chikungunya virus.

    PubMed

    Lani, Rafidah; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Chiam, Chun Wei; Moghaddam, Ehsan; Chu, Justin Jang Hann; Rausalu, Kai; Merits, Andres; Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana; Abu Bakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito-borne chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes chikungunya fever, with clinical presentations such as severe back and small joint pain, and debilitating arthritis associated with crippling pains that persist for weeks and even years. Although there are several studies to evaluate the efficacy of drugs against CHIKV, the treatment for chikungunya fever is mainly symptom-based and no effective licensed vaccine or antiviral are available. Here, we investigated the antiviral activity of three types of flavonoids against CHIKV in vitro replication. Three compounds: silymarin, quercetin and kaempferol were evaluated for their in vitro antiviral activities against CHIKV using a CHIKV replicon cell line and clinical isolate of CHIKV of Central/East African genotype. A cytopathic effect inhibition assay was used to determine their activities on CHIKV viral replication and quantitative reverse transcription PCR was used to calculate virus yield. Antiviral activity of effective compound was further investigated by evaluation of CHIKV protein expression using western blotting for CHIKV nsP1, nsP3, and E2E1 proteins. Briefly, silymarin exhibited significant antiviral activity against CHIKV, reducing both CHIKV replication efficiency and down-regulating production of viral proteins involved in replication. This study may have important consequence for broaden the chance of getting the effective antiviral for CHIKV infection. PMID:26078201

  4. BEI Resources: Supporting antiviral research

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Robert; Peacock, Susan

    2008-01-01

    The Biodefense and Emerging Infections Research Resources Repository (BEI Resources) provides unique, quality-assured reagents to the scientific community for use in basic research and product development involving biodefense and emerging infectious diseases. These include microorganisms (up to Biosafety Level-3) on the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) lists of Category A, B and C priority pathogens. In addition to live microorganisms, related products such as polyclonal antisera, monoclonal antibodies, isolated nucleic acid preparations, overlapping peptide arrays, purified proteins, and assay kits are also available. Many of these materials have direct or indirect applications in antiviral research. These reagents are available free of charge to all registered investigators, regardless of funding source or affiliation. Acquisition of new reagents for the repository is one of the critically necessary and challenging tasks for BEI Resources. Therefore, investigators are encouraged to deposit relevant items, so as to provide access to materials, relief from the burden of distribution, protection of intellectual property rights, and secure storage. In addition, BEI Resources has the capability of contracting for the preparation of specific reagents. If there is a resource needed to advance a specific research area, contact an NIAID program officer or use the “suggest a reagent” option on the BEI Resources homepage, www.beiresources.org. PMID:18675849

  5. Helicases as Antiviral Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Frick, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Helicases catalytically unwind duplex DNA or RNA using energy derived from the hydrolysis of nucleoside triphosphates and are attractive drug targets because they are required for viral replication. This review discusses methods for helicase identification, classification and analysis, and presents an overview of helicases that are necessary for the replication of human pathogenic viruses. Newly developed methods to analyze helicases, coupled with recently determined atomic structures, have led to a better understanding of their mechanisms of action. The majority of this research has concentrated on enzymes encoded by the herpes simplex virus (HSV) and the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Helicase inhibitors that target the HSV helicase–primase complex comprised of the UL5, UL8 and UL52 proteins have recently been shown to effectively control HSV infection in animal models. In addition, several groups have reported structures of the HCV NS3 helicase at atomic resolutions, and mechanistic studies have uncovered characteristics that distinguish the HCV helicase from related cellular proteins. These new developments should eventually lead to new antiviral medications. PMID:12973446

  6. Antiviral activities of whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Wang, Yan; Ip, Denis Tsz Ming; Wan, David Chi Cheong; Xia, Jiang

    2015-09-01

    Milk contains an array of proteins with useful bioactivities. Many milk proteins encompassing native or chemically modified casein, lactoferrin, alpha-lactalbumin, and beta-lactoglobulin demonstrated antiviral activities. Casein and alpha-lactalbumin gained anti-HIV activity after modification with 3-hydroxyphthalic anhydride. Many milk proteins inhibited HIV reverse transcriptase. Bovine glycolactin, angiogenin-1, lactogenin, casein, alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, bovine lactoferrampin, and human lactoferrampin inhibited HIV-1 protease and integrase. Several mammalian lactoferrins prevented hepatitis C infection. Lactoferrin, methylated alpha-lactalbumin and methylated beta-lactoglobulin inhibited human cytomegalovirus. Chemically modified alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin and lysozyme, lactoferrin and lactoferricin, methylated alpha-lactalbumin, methylated and ethylated beta-lactoglobulins inhibited HSV. Chemically modified bovine beta-lactoglobulin had antihuman papillomavirus activity. Beta-lactoglobulin, lactoferrin, esterified beta-lactoglobulin, and esterified lactoferrindisplayed anti-avian influenza A (H5N1) activity. Lactoferrin inhibited respiratory syncytial virus, hepatitis B virus, adenovirus, poliovirus, hantavirus, sindbis virus, semliki forest virus, echovirus, and enterovirus. Milk mucin, apolactoferrin, Fe(3+)-lactoferrin, beta-lactoglobulin, human lactadherin, bovine IgG, and bovine kappa-casein demonstrated antihuman rotavirus activity. PMID:26198883

  7. Escherichia coli Heat-Stable Enterotoxin Mediates Na+/H+ Exchanger 4 Inhibition Involving cAMP in T84 Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán, Ana R.; Carraro-Lacroix, Luciene R.; Bezerra, Camila N. A.; Cornejo, Marcelo; Norambuena, Katrina; Toledo, Fernando; Araos, Joaquín; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Sanhueza, Carlos; Malnic, Gerhard; Sobrevia, Luis; Ramírez, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    The enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains lead to diarrhoea in humans due to heat-labile and heat-stable (STa) enterotoxins. STa increases Cl-release in intestinal cells, including the human colonic carcinoma T84 cell line, involving increased cGMP and membrane alkalization due to reduced Na+/H+ exchangers (NHEs) activity. Since NHEs modulate intracellular pH (pHi), and NHE1, NHE2, and NHE4 are expressed in T84 cells, we characterized the STa role as modulator of these exchangers. pHi was assayed by the NH4Cl pulse technique and measured by fluorescence microscopy in BCECF–preloaded cells. pHi recovery rate (dpHi/dt) was determined in the absence or presence of 0.25 μmol/L STa (30 minutes), 25 μmol/L HOE-694 (concentration inhibiting NHE1 and NHE2), 500 μmol/L sodium nitroprusside (SNP, spontaneous nitric oxide donor), 100 μmol/L dibutyryl cyclic GMP (db-cGMP), 100 nmol/L H89 (protein kinase A inhibitor), or 10 μmol/L forskolin (adenylyl cyclase activator). cGMP and cAMP were measured in cell extracts by radioimmunoassay, and buffering capacity (ßi) and H+ efflux (JH+) was determined. NHE4 protein abundance was determined by western blotting. STa and HOE-694 caused comparable reduction in dpHi/dt and JH+ (~63%), without altering basal pHi (range 7.144–7.172). STa did not alter ßi value in a range of 1.6 pHi units. The dpHi/dt and JH+ was almost abolished (~94% inhibition) by STa + HOE-694. STa effect was unaltered by db-cGMP or SNP. However, STa and forskolin increased cAMP level. STa–decreased dpHi/dt and JH+ was mimicked by forskolin, and STa + HOE-694 effect was abolished by H89. Thus, incubation of T84 cells with STa results in reduced NHE4 activity leading to a lower capacity of pHi recovery requiring cAMP, but not cGMP. STa effect results in a causal phenomenon (STa/increased cAMP/increased PKA activity/reduced NHE4 activity) ending with intracellular acidification that could have consequences in the gastrointestinal cells function promoting

  8. Escherichia coli Heat-Stable Enterotoxin Mediates Na+/H+ Exchanger 4 Inhibition Involving cAMP in T84 Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, Ana R; Carraro-Lacroix, Luciene R; Bezerra, Camila N A; Cornejo, Marcelo; Norambuena, Katrina; Toledo, Fernando; Araos, Joaquín; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Sanhueza, Carlos; Malnic, Gerhard; Sobrevia, Luis; Ramírez, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    The enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains lead to diarrhoea in humans due to heat-labile and heat-stable (STa) enterotoxins. STa increases Cl-release in intestinal cells, including the human colonic carcinoma T84 cell line, involving increased cGMP and membrane alkalization due to reduced Na+/H+ exchangers (NHEs) activity. Since NHEs modulate intracellular pH (pHi), and NHE1, NHE2, and NHE4 are expressed in T84 cells, we characterized the STa role as modulator of these exchangers. pHi was assayed by the NH4Cl pulse technique and measured by fluorescence microscopy in BCECF-preloaded cells. pHi recovery rate (dpHi/dt) was determined in the absence or presence of 0.25 μmol/L STa (30 minutes), 25 μmol/L HOE-694 (concentration inhibiting NHE1 and NHE2), 500 μmol/L sodium nitroprusside (SNP, spontaneous nitric oxide donor), 100 μmol/L dibutyryl cyclic GMP (db-cGMP), 100 nmol/L H89 (protein kinase A inhibitor), or 10 μmol/L forskolin (adenylyl cyclase activator). cGMP and cAMP were measured in cell extracts by radioimmunoassay, and buffering capacity (ßi) and H+ efflux (JH+) was determined. NHE4 protein abundance was determined by western blotting. STa and HOE-694 caused comparable reduction in dpHi/dt and JH+ (~63%), without altering basal pHi (range 7.144-7.172). STa did not alter ßi value in a range of 1.6 pHi units. The dpHi/dt and JH+ was almost abolished (~94% inhibition) by STa + HOE-694. STa effect was unaltered by db-cGMP or SNP. However, STa and forskolin increased cAMP level. STa-decreased dpHi/dt and JH+ was mimicked by forskolin, and STa + HOE-694 effect was abolished by H89. Thus, incubation of T84 cells with STa results in reduced NHE4 activity leading to a lower capacity of pHi recovery requiring cAMP, but not cGMP. STa effect results in a causal phenomenon (STa/increased cAMP/increased PKA activity/reduced NHE4 activity) ending with intracellular acidification that could have consequences in the gastrointestinal cells function promoting human

  9. Advances in Antiviral vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Barney S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Antiviral vaccines have been the most successful biomedical intervention for preventing epidemic viral disease. Vaccination for smallpox in humans and rinderpest in cattle was the basis for disease eradication, and recent progress in polio eradication is promising. While early vaccines were developed empirically by passage in live animals or eggs, more recent vaccines have been developed because of the advent of new technologies, particularly cell culture and molecular biology. Recent technological advances in gene delivery and expression, nanoparticles, protein manufacturing, and adjuvants have created the potential for new vaccine platforms that may provide solutions for vaccines against viral pathogens for which no interventions currently exist. In addition, the technological convergence of human monoclonal antibody isolation, structural biology, and high throughput sequencing is providing new opportunities for atomic-level immunogen design. Selection of human monoclonal antibodies can identify immunodominant antigenic sites associated with neutralization and provide reagents for stabilizing and solving the structure of viral surface proteins. Understanding the structural basis for neutralization can guide selection of vaccine targets. Deep sequencing of the antibody repertoire and defining the ontogeny of the desired antibody responses can reveal the junctional recombination and somatic mutation requirements for B-cell recognition and affinity maturation. Collectively, this information will provide new strategic approaches for selecting vaccine antigens, formulations, and regimens. Moreover, it creates the potential for rational vaccine design and establishing a catalogue of vaccine technology platforms that would be effective against any given family or class of viral pathogens and improve our readiness to address new emerging viral threats. PMID:23947359

  10. Advances in antiviral vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Graham, Barney S

    2013-09-01

    Antiviral vaccines have been the most successful biomedical intervention for preventing epidemic viral disease. Vaccination for smallpox in humans and rinderpest in cattle was the basis for disease eradication, and recent progress in polio eradication is promising. Although early vaccines were developed empirically by passage in live animals or eggs, more recent vaccines have been developed because of the advent of new technologies, particularly cell culture and molecular biology. Recent technological advances in gene delivery and expression, nanoparticles, protein manufacturing, and adjuvants have created the potential for new vaccine platforms that may provide solutions for vaccines against viral pathogens for which no interventions currently exist. In addition, the technological convergence of human monoclonal antibody isolation, structural biology, and high-throughput sequencing is providing new opportunities for atomic-level immunogen design. Selection of human monoclonal antibodies can identify immunodominant antigenic sites associated with neutralization and provide reagents for stabilizing and solving the structure of viral surface proteins. Understanding the structural basis for neutralization can guide selection of vaccine targets. Deep sequencing of the antibody repertoire and defining the ontogeny of the desired antibody responses can reveal the junctional recombination and somatic mutation requirements for B-cell recognition and affinity maturation. Collectively, this information will provide new strategic approaches for selecting vaccine antigens, formulations, and regimens. Moreover, it creates the potential for rational vaccine design and establishing a catalogue of vaccine technology platforms that would be effective against any given family or class of viral pathogens and improve our readiness to address new emerging viral threats. PMID:23947359

  11. Stable silylenes.

    PubMed

    Haaf, M; Schmedake, T A; West, R

    2000-10-01

    The field of stable silylene research has grown dramatically since the first isolation of a stable silylene in 1994. Prior to 1994, silylenes existed only as reactive intermediates, isolable only in low-temperature matrixes. Since then, several stable silylenes have been synthesized, some in fact showing remarkable thermal stability. This Account highlights the developments in stable silylene chemistry, including theoretical and experimental studies attempting to explain the remarkable stability of the silylenes as well as the rapidly expanding reaction chemistry of the stable silylenes. PMID:11041835

  12. Detection and genetic analysis of the enteroaggregative Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (EAST1) gene in clinical isolates of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) strains

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The enteroaggregative E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin 1 (EAST1) encoded by astA gene has been found in enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) strains. However, it is not sufficient to simply probe strains with an astA gene probe due to the existence of astA mutants (type 1 and type 2 SHEAST) and EAST1 variants (EAST1 v1-4). In this study, 222 EPEC (70 typical and 152 atypical) isolates were tested for the presence of the astA gene sequence by PCR and sequencing. Results The astA gene was amplified from 54 strains, 11 typical and 43 atypical. Sequence analysis of the PCR products showed that 25 strains, 7 typical and 18 atypical, had an intact astA gene. A subgroup of 7 atypical strains had a variant type of the astA gene sequence, with four non-synonymous nucleotide substitutions. The remaining 22 strains had mutated astA gene with nucleotide deletions or substitutions in the first 8 codons. The RT-PCR results showed that the astA gene was transcribed only by the strains carrying either the intact or the variant type of the astA gene sequence. Southern blot analysis indicated that astA is located in EAF plasmid in typical strains, and in plasmids of similar size in atypical strains. Strains carrying intact astA genes were more frequently found in diarrheic children than in non-diarrheic children (p < 0.05). Conclusion In conclusion, our data suggest that the presence of an intact astA gene may represent an additional virulence determinant in both EPEC groups. PMID:24884767

  13. Structure and Biosynthesis of Heat-Stable Antifungal Factor (HSAF), a Broad-Spectrum Antimycotic with a Novel Mode of Action▿

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fengan; Zaleta-Rivera, Kathia; Zhu, Xiangcheng; Huffman, Justin; Millet, Jeffrey C.; Harris, Steven D.; Yuen, Gary; Li, Xing-Cong; Du, Liangcheng

    2007-01-01

    A screen for antifungal compounds from Lysobacter enzymogenes strain C3, a bacterial biological control agent of fungal diseases, has previously led to the isolation of heat-stable antifungal factor (HSAF). HSAF exhibits inhibitory activities against a wide range of fungal species and shows a novel mode of antifungal action by disrupting the biosynthesis of a distinct group of sphingolipids. We have now determined the chemical structure of HSAF, which is identical to that of dihydromaltophilin, an antifungal metabolite with a unique macrocyclic lactam system containing a tetramic acid moiety and a 5,5,6-tricyclic skeleton. We have also identified the genetic locus responsible for the biosynthesis of HSAF in strain C3. DNA sequencing of this locus revealed genes for a hybrid polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS-NRPS), a sterol desaturase, a ferredoxin reductase, and an arginase. The disruption of the PKS-NRPS gene generated C3 mutants that lost the ability to produce HSAF and to inhibit fungal growth, demonstrating a hybrid PKS-NRPS that catalyzed the biosynthesis of the unique macrolactam system that is found in many biologically active natural products isolated from marine organisms. In addition, we have generated mutants with disrupted sterol desaturase, ferredoxin reductase, and arginase and examined the metabolites produced in these mutants. The work represents the first study of the genetic basis for the biosynthesis of the tetramic acid-containing macrolactams. The elucidation of the chemical structure of HSAF and the identification of the genetic locus for its biosynthesis establish the foundation for future exploitation of this group of compounds as new fungicides or antifungal drugs. PMID:17074795

  14. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a recombinant adenoviral based vaccine expressing heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) and K99 adhesion antigen of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in mice.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guangcun; Li, Wu; Wu, Xiaoling; Bao, Shaowen; Zeng, Jin; Zhao, Ning; Luo, Meihui; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yujiong

    2015-12-01

    The diarrheal disease of domestic animals or in humans caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infections remains a major issue for public health in developing countries. Unfortunately, there is no effective vaccine available for preventing from an ETEC infection. Therefore, the development of a safe and effective vaccine against ETEC is urgently needed. In the present study, A recombinant adenoviral vector Ad5-STa-K99 that capable of expressing a fusion protein of heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) and K99 adhesion antigen of ETEC was generated and its immunogenicity was evaluated in a murine model. The intestinal mucosal secretory IgA(sIgA), serum anti-STa-K99 antibody responses, antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells frequencies, as well as T-cell proliferation of mice immunized with the viral vector were determined as immunological indexes. The results demonstrated that Ad5-STa-K99 was able to enhance humoral responses with a dramatically augmented antigen-specific serum IgG antibody, and an elevated production of intestinal sIgA in immunized mice, suggesting the elicitation of both of humoral and mucosal immune responses. In addition, this adenoviral vector could significantly promote splenic T cell proliferation and increase the frequencies of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell populations in mice, indicative of a capacity to activate T cell responses. More importantly, vaccination of the Ad5-STa-K99 showed a potential to evoke a protective effect from ETEC challenge in mice. These data indicate that the Ad5-STa-K99 is a highly immunogenic vector able to induce a broad range of antigen-specific immune responses in vivo, and evoke a protective immune response against ETEC infections, implying that it may be a novel vaccine candidate warranted for further investigation. PMID:26589454

  15. Toxicity and immunogenicity of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli heat-labile and heat-stable toxoid fusion 3xSTa(A14Q)-LT(S63K/R192G/L211A) in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengxian; Knudsen, David E; Liu, Mei; Robertson, Donald C; Zhang, Weiping

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death to young children. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the most common bacteria causing diarrhea. Adhesins and enterotoxins are the virulence determinants in ETEC diarrhea. Adhesins mediate bacterial attachment and colonization, and enterotoxins including heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable type Ib toxin (STa) disrupt fluid homeostasis in host cells that leads to fluid hyper-secretion and diarrhea. Thus, adhesins and enterotoxins have been primarily targeted in ETEC vaccine development. A recent study reported toxoid fusions with STa toxoid (STa(P13F)) fused at the N- or C-terminus, or inside the A subunit of LT(R192G) elicited neutralizing antitoxin antibodies, and suggested application of toxoid fusions in ETEC vaccine development (Liu et al., Infect. Immun. 79:4002-4009, 2011). In this study, we generated a different STa toxoid (STa(A14Q)) and a triple-mutant LT toxoid (LT(S63K/R192G/L211A), tmLT), constructed a toxoid fusion (3xSTa(A14Q)-tmLT) that carried 3 copies of STa(A14Q) for further facilitation of anti-STa immunogenicity, and assessed antigen safety and immunogenicity in a murine model to explore its potential for ETEC vaccine development. Mice immunized with this fusion antigen showed no adverse effects, and developed antitoxin antibodies particularly through the IP route. Anti-LT antibodies were detected and were shown neutralizing against CT in vitro. Anti-STa antibodies were also detected in the immunized mice, and serum from the IP immunized mice neutralized STa toxin in vitro. Data from this study indicated that toxoid fusion 3xSTa(A14Q)-tmLT is safe and can induce neutralizing antitoxin antibodies, and provided helpful information for vaccine development against ETEC diarrhea. PMID:24146989

  16. 18th International Conference on Antiviral Research.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, William M

    2005-08-01

    The 18th International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR) was held at the Princess Sofia Hotel in Barcelona, Spain, from 11th-14th April, 2005. This is a yearly international meeting sponsored by the International Society for Antiviral Research (ISAR). The current president of ISAR is John A Secrest 3rd of the Southern Research Institute. The scientific programme committee was chaired by John C Drach from the University of Michigan. ISAR was founded in 1987 to exchange prepublication basic, applied and clinical information on the development of antiviral, chemical and biological agents as well as to promote collaborative research. The ISAR has had a major role in the significant advances of the past decade in the reduction of the societal burdens of viral diseases by the focus of ICAR on the discovery and clinical application of antiviral agents. The 18th ICAR was organised as a series of focus presentations on specific viral groups consisting of oral and poster presentations of original research findings. In addition, the conference included plenary speakers, award presentations, a minisymposium on bioterrorism, and a satellite symposium on clinical antiviral drug developments. The size of the conference (> 50 oral and 250 poster presentations) necessitates limitation to the most noteworthy in the judgment of this reviewer. The current membership of the ISAR is approximately 700 with approximately 50% the membership in attendance. PMID:16086663

  17. Emerging paramyxoviruses: molecular mechanisms and antiviral strategies

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Hector C.; Lee, Benhur

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, several paramyxoviruses have emerged to infect humans, including previously unidentified zoonoses. Hendra and Nipah virus (henipavirus (HNV)) zoonoses were first identified in 1994 or 1998, causing deaths in animals and humans in Australia or Malaysia, respectively. Other paramyxoviruses, such as menangle virus, tioman virus, human metapneumovirus, and avian paramyxovirus-1, with less morbidity in humans, have also been recently identified. Although the Paramyxoviridae family of viruses has been previously recognized as biomedically and veterinarily important, the recent emergence of these paramyxoviruses has increased our attention to this family. Antiviral drugs can be designed to target specific important determinants of the viral/cell life cycle. Therefore, identifying and understanding the mechanistic underpinnings of viral entry, replication, assembly, and budding will be critical in the development of antiviral therapeutic agents. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms discovered and the antiviral strategies pursued in recent years for emerging paramyxoviruses, with a concentration on viral entry and exit mechanisms. PMID:21345285

  18. Current Landscape of Antiviral Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Wade; Cox, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Continued discovery and development of new antiviral medications are paramount for global human health, particularly as new pathogens emerge and old ones evolve to evade current therapeutic agents. Great success has been achieved in developing effective therapies to suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV); however, the therapies are not curative and therefore current efforts in HIV and HBV drug discovery are directed toward longer-acting therapies and/or developing new mechanisms of action that could potentially lead to cure, or eradication, of the virus. Recently, exciting early clinical data have been reported for novel antivirals targeting respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza (flu). Preclinical data suggest that these new approaches may be effective in treating high-risk patients afflicted with serious RSV or flu infections. In this review, we highlight new directions in antiviral approaches for HIV, HBV, and acute respiratory virus infections. PMID:26962437

  19. Antiviral Defense Mechanisms in Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Brutscher, Laura M.; Daughenbaugh, Katie F.; Flenniken, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees are significant pollinators of agricultural crops and other important plant species. High annual losses of honey bee colonies in North America and in some parts of Europe have profound ecological and economic implications. Colony losses have been attributed to multiple factors including RNA viruses, thus understanding bee antiviral defense mechanisms may result in the development of strategies that mitigate colony losses. Honey bee antiviral defense mechanisms include RNA-interference, pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) triggered signal transduction cascades, and reactive oxygen species generation. However, the relative importance of these and other pathways is largely uncharacterized. Herein we review the current understanding of honey bee antiviral defense mechanisms and suggest important avenues for future investigation. PMID:26273564

  20. Total Synthesis of the Antiviral Natural Product Houttuynoid B.

    PubMed

    Kerl, Thomas; Berger, Florian; Schmalz, Hans-Günther

    2016-02-24

    The first total synthesis of houttuynoid B, a powerful antiviral flavonoid glycoside from the Chinese plant Houttuynia cordata, is described. In a key step, a Baker-Venkataraman rearrangement employing an already glycosylated substrate was used to efficiently set up the fully functionalized carbon skeleton. The required benzofuran building block was prepared through a domino Sonogashira coupling/5-endo-dig cyclization and converted into a stable 1-hydroxybenzotriazole-derived active ester prior to linking with a galactosylated hydroxyacetophenone unit. The elaborated synthesis requires only nine steps (11 % overall yield) along the longest linear sequence and paves the way for the preparation of structurally related compounds for further biological evaluation. PMID:26748612

  1. Antiviral activity of constituents of Tamus communis.

    PubMed

    Aquino, R; Conti, C; De Simone, F; Orsi, N; Pizza, C; Stein, M L

    1991-10-01

    The antiviral activity of the phenanthrene derivatives 1-6, of the spyrostane triglycosides dioscin (7) and gracillin (8), of the furostanol tetraglycosides methylprotodioscin (9), its (25S) epimer methylprotoneodioscin (10), and methylprotogracillin 11, have been tested towards two RNA viruses: vesicular stomatitis virus and human rhinovirus type 1B. All these products were extracted from the rizomes of Tamus communis L; compound 11 was isolated also from Asparagus cochinchinesis, together with pseudoprotodioscin (12), a 20 (22)-unsaturated furostanoside, which was also investigated for antiviral activity. The results were of some interest mainly for the phenanthrene derivatives. PMID:1667189

  2. Antiviral Drug Resistance: Mechanisms and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Sunwen

    2010-01-01

    Summary Antiviral drug resistance is an increasing concern in immunocompromised patient populations, where ongoing viral replication and prolonged drug exposure lead to the selection of resistant strains. Rapid diagnosis of resistance can be made by associating characteristic viral mutations with resistance to various drugs as determined by phenotypic assays. Management of drug resistance includes optimization of host factors and drug delivery, selection of alternative therapies based on knowledge of mechanisms of resistance, and the development of new antivirals. This article discusses drug resistance in herpesviruses and hepatitis B. PMID:20466277

  3. The limitations of a feed/water based heat-stable vaccine delivery system forNnewcastle disease-control strategies for backyard poultry flocks in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Oakeley, R D

    2000-12-01

    Backyard poultry are a major contributor to egg and meat consumption in sub-Saharan Africa and an important source of income for many rural producers. Production throughout Africa is severely constrained by continuing outbreaks of Newcastle disease. The livestock-service sector lacks the resources and infrastructure to control Newcastle disease in extensive flocks without the active participation of producers. The development of 'heat-stable' Newcastle disease vaccines offers a potential solution. Trials over the last two decades have examined the effectiveness of heat-stable vaccines in both controlling Newcastle disease and in involving the rural community in control strategies. Constraints highlighted include the reliability of the vaccines using alternative delivery methods and the capacity of rural communities to apply those methods. The search for appropriate Newcastle disease-control strategies in extensive poultry systems should focus on policies and methodologies that incorporate the wider concerns and priorities of extensive producers. PMID:11087958

  4. In vitro and in vivo comparison of human Escherichia coli heat-stable peptide analogues incorporating the 111In-DOTA group and distinct linker moieties.

    PubMed

    Giblin, Michael F; Gali, Hariprasad; Sieckman, Gary L; Owen, Nellie K; Hoffman, Timothy J; Forte, Leonard R; Volkert, Wynn A

    2004-01-01

    Three human Escherichia coli heat-stable peptide (STh) analogues, each containing a DOTA chelating group, were synthesized by SPPS and oxidative refolding and compared in in vitro and in vivo systems. One analogue, DOTA-F19-STh(1-19), contains an N-terminal DOTA group attached via an amide bond linkage to an STh moiety which is essentially wild-type except for a Tyr to Phe alteration at position 19 of the molecule. A second analogue, DOTA-R1,4,F19-STh(1-19), differs from the first in that asparagine residues in positions 1 and 4 have been altered to arginine residues in order to examine the effect of positively charged groups in the linker domain. A third analogue, DOTA-11AUN-F19-STh(1-19), differs from the first in that it incorporates an 11-aminoundecanoic acid spacer group between the DOTA group and the first asparagine residue. In vitro competitive binding assays utilizing T-84 human colon cancer cells demonstrated that significant alterations to the N-terminal region of the STh molecule were well tolerated and did not significantly affect binding affinity of STh for the guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C) receptor. Internalization and efflux studies of the indium-labeled species demonstrated that inclusion of positive charge in the linker moiety inhibits internalization of the compound within tumor cells. The characteristics of the three analogues were compared in an in vivo model utilizing T-84 human colon cancer cell xenografts in SCID mice. Clearance of all analogues was rapid, primarily via renal excretion into the urine, with >89% ID excreted into the urine at 1 h pi for all analogues. The 111In-DOTA-R1,4,F19-STh(1-19) and 111In-DOTA-11AUN-F19-STh(1-19) analogues both had longer residence times in the blood than did the 111In-DOTA-F19-STh(1-19) analogue, probably accounting for increased %ID/g values for tumors and nontarget tissues at 1 h pi. At 4 h pi, significant differences between analogues were only seen with respect to metabolic routes of excretion

  5. Bell's Palsy: Treatment with Steroids and Antiviral Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... PATIENTS and their FAMILIES BELL’S PALSY: TREATMENT WITH STEROIDS AND ANTIVIRAL DRUGS This information sheet is provided to help you understand the role of steroids and antiviral drugs for treating Bell’s palsy. Neurologists ...

  6. Genetic Fusions of Heat-Labile (LT) and Heat-Stable (ST) Toxoids of Porcine Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Elicit Neutralizing Anti-LT and Anti-STa antibodies ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiping; Zhang, Chengxian; Francis, David H.; Fang, Ying; Knudsen, David; Nataro, James P.; Robertson, Donald C.

    2010-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are a major cause of diarrheal disease in humans and farm animals. E. coli fimbriae, or colonization factor antigens (CFAs), and enterotoxins, including heat-labile enterotoxins (LT) and heat-stable enterotoxins (ST), are the key virulence factors in ETEC diarrhea. Unlike fimbriae or LT, STa has not often been included as an antigen in development of vaccines against ETEC diarrhea because of its poor immunogenicity. STa becomes immunogenic only after being coupled with a strongly immunogenic carrier protein. However, native or shorter STa antigens either had to retain toxic activity in order to become antigenic or elicited anti-STa antibodies that were not sufficiently protective. In this study, we genetically mutated the porcine LT (pLT) gene for a pLT192(R→G) toxoid and the porcine STa (pSTa) gene for three full-length pSTa toxoids [STa11(N→K), STa12(P→F), and STa13(A→Q)] and used the full-length pLT192 as an adjuvant to carry the pSTa toxoid for pLT192:pSTa-toxoid fusion antigens. Rabbits immunized with pLT192:pSTa12 or pLT192:pSTa13 fusion protein developed high titers of anti-LT and anti-STa antibodies. Furthermore, rabbit antiserum and antifecal antibodies were able to neutralize purified cholera toxin (CT) and STa toxin. In addition, preliminary data suggested that suckling piglets born by a sow immunized with the pLT192:pSTa13 fusion antigen were protected when challenged with an STa-positive ETEC strain. This study demonstrated that pSTa toxoids are antigenic when fused with a pLT toxoid and that the elicited anti-LT and anti-STa antibodies were protective. This fusion strategy could provide instructive information to develop effective toxoid vaccines against ETEC-associated diarrhea in animals and humans. PMID:19858307

  7. Interferon induced IFIT family genes in host antiviral defense

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Secretion of interferons (IFNs) from virus-infected cells is a hallmark of host antiviral immunity and in fact, IFNs exert their antiviral activities through the induction of antiviral proteins. The IFN-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs) family is among hundreds of IF stimulated ...

  8. Anti-viral Responses in Insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the study of anti-viral responses in insects has lagged behind studies of responses to other types of pathogens, progress has begun to rapidly accelerate over the past few years. Insects are subject to infection by many different kinds of DNA and RNA viruses. These include viruses that ar...

  9. New hypoxanthine nucleosides with RNA antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Nair, V; Ussery, M A

    1992-08-01

    A series of novel C-2 functionalized hypoxanthine and purine ribonucleosides have been synthesized and evaluated against exotic RNA viruses of the family or genus alpha, arena, flavi, and rhabdo. Both specific and broad-spectrum antiviral activities were discovered but only with hypoxanthine nucleosides. PMID:1444325

  10. Antiviral therapy: current concepts and practices.

    PubMed Central

    Bean, B

    1992-01-01

    Drugs capable of inhibiting viruses in vitro were described in the 1950s, but real progress was not made until the 1970s, when agents capable of inhibiting virus-specific enzymes were first identified. The last decade has seen rapid progress in both our understanding of antiviral therapy and the number of antiviral agents on the market. Amantadine and ribavirin are available for treatment of viral respiratory infections. Vidarabine, acyclovir, ganciclovir, and foscarnet are used for systemic treatment of herpesvirus infections, while ophthalmic preparations of idoxuridine, trifluorothymidine, and vidarabine are available for herpes keratitis. For treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infections, zidovudine and didanosine are used. Immunomodulators, such as interferons and colony-stimulating factors, and immunoglobulins are being used increasingly for viral illnesses. While resistance to antiviral drugs has been seen, especially among AIDS patients, it has not become widespread and is being intensely studied. Increasingly, combinations of agents are being used: to achieve synergistic inhibition of viruses, to delay or prevent resistance, and to decrease dosages of toxic drugs. New approaches, such as liposomes carrying antiviral drugs and computer-aided drug design, are exciting and promising prospects for the future. PMID:1576586

  11. Antiviral activity of oxidized polyamines.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, U

    2007-08-01

    Polyamines, oxidized by serum amine oxidase, yield aminoaldehydes and hydrogen peroxide. Acrolein may be formed from the aminoaldehydes by a spontaneous beta-elimination process. These oxidation products "oxidized polyamines" inhibit bacterial growth and exhibit anticancer activity. The antimicrobial activity of oxidized polyamines is not limited to bacteria; and the inactivation of bacterial viruses, plant viruses and animal viruses, was also reported. Bacteriophages of the T-odd series are permeable and were inactivated by oxidized polyamines. The inactive phages absorb to their bacterial host and injected their DNA, which formed a stable inactive complex with the aminoaldehydes. Aminoaldehydes, synthesized chemically, also inactivated viruses. The growth of the plant viruses: Tobacco mosaic virus, Potato virus X and Alfalfa mosaic virus was also inhibited by oxidized polyamines. The animal viruses, which were inactivated by oxidized polyamines included Myxoviruses (influenza and Newcastle disease viruses), West Nile, vaccinia and Sindbis viruses. These findings may have practical implications. PMID:17429570

  12. Liposomal incorporation of Artemisia arborescens L. essential oil and in vitro antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Sinico, Chiara; De Logu, Alessandro; Lai, Francesco; Valenti, Donatella; Manconi, Maria; Loy, Giuseppe; Bonsignore, Leonardo; Fadda, Anna Maria

    2005-01-01

    The effect of liposomal inclusion on the in vitro antiherpetic activity of Artemisia arborescens L. essential oil was investigated. In order to study the influence of vesicle structure and composition on the antiviral activity of the vesicle-incorporated oil, multilamellar (MLV) and unilamellar (SUV) positively charged liposomes were prepared by the film method and sonication. Liposomes were obtained from hydrogenated (P90H) and non-hydrogenated (P90) soy phosphatidylcholine. Formulations were examined for their stability for over one year, monitoring the oil leakage from vesicles and the average size distribution. The antiviral activity was studied against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) by a quantitative tetrazolium-based colorimetric method. Results showed that Artemisia essential oil can be incorporated in good amounts in the prepared vesicular dispersions. Stability studies pointed out that vesicle dispersions were very stable for at least six months and neither oil leakage nor vesicle size alteration occurred during this period. After one year of storage oil retention was still good, but vesicle fusion was present. Antiviral assays demonstrated that the liposomal incorporation of A. arborescens essential oil enhanced its in vitro antiherpetic activity especially when vesicles were made with P90H. On the contrary, no significant difference in antiviral activity was observed between the free and SUV-incorporated oil. PMID:15567314

  13. Antiviral effect of cationic compounds on bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Ly-Chatain, Mai H.; Moussaoui, Saliha; Vera, Annabelle; Rigobello, Véronique; Demarigny, Yann

    2013-01-01

    The antiviral activity of several cationic compounds – cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), chitosan, nisin, and lysozyme – was investigated on the bacteriophage c2 (DNA head and non-contractile tail) infecting Lactococcus strains and the bacteriophage MS2 (F-specific RNA) infecting E. coli. Firstly, these activities were evaluated in a phosphate buffer pH 7 – 10 mM. The CTAB had a virucidal effect on the Lactococcus bacteriophages, but not on the MS2. After 1 min of contact with 0.125 mM CTAB, the c2 population was reduced from 6 to 1.5 log(pfu)/mL and completely deactivated at 1 mM. On the contrary, chitosan inhibited the MS2 more than it did the bacteriophages c2. No antiviral effect was observed for the nisin or the lysozyme on bacteriophages after 1 min of treatment. A 1 and 2.5 log reduction was respectively observed for nisin and lysozyme when the treatment time increased (5 or 10 min). These results showed that the antiviral effect depended both on the virus and structure of the antimicrobial compounds. The antiviral activity of these compounds was also evaluated in different physico-chemical conditions and in complex matrices. The antiviral activity of CTAB was impaired in acid pH and with an increase of the ionic strength. These results might be explained by the electrostatic interactions between cationic compounds and negatively charged particles such as bacteriophages or other compounds in a matrix. Milk proved to be protective suggesting the components of food could interfere with antimicrobial compounds. PMID:23487495

  14. Antiviral therapy: old and current issues.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Guido; Turriziani, Ombretta

    2012-08-01

    Many antiviral drugs are currently approved and formally licensed for clinical use in the treatment of viral infections caused by human immunodeficiency virus, herpes simplex viruses, varicella-zoster virus, respiratory syncytial virus, cytomegalovirus, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus or influenza virus. Recent decades have seen major advances in our knowledge of the natural history and pathogenesis of viral diseases as well as ongoing developments and improvements in antiviral therapy. However, research is far from complete and indeed previously unknown and unexpected issues are currently arising. This review aims to discuss some of these issues in the belief that they should be carefully addressed to enhance the management of patients with viral infections. PMID:22727532

  15. Synthesis and antiviral activity of 5'-deoxypyrazofurin.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Schneller, S W; Ikeda, S; Snoeck, R; Andrei, G; Balzarini, J; De Clercq, E

    1993-11-12

    In searching for derivatives of pyrazofurin that could display antiviral properties by means that do not require C-5' phosphorylation, 5'-deoxypyrazofurin (3) has been synthesized in six steps from methyl5-deoxy-2,3-O-isopropylidene-beta-D-ribofuranoside (4). Compound 3 was evaluated for antiviral activity against a large number of viruses including herpes-, pox-, myxo-, toga-, arena-, rhabdo-, picorna-,reo-, and retroviruses. Compound 3 proved active against respiratory syncytial virus (in HeLa cells), vaccinia virus (in embryonic skin-muscle fibroblast cells), vesicular stomatitis virus (in HeLa cells), and influenza A virus (in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells) at concentrations (ranging from 4 to 20 micrograms/mL) that were nontoxic to the confluent host cell cultures. PMID:8246242

  16. Polyomavirus T Antigens Activate an Antiviral State

    PubMed Central

    Giacobbi, Nicholas S.; Gupta, Tushar; Coxon, Andrew; Pipas, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic expression of Simian Virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (LT) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) increased levels of mRNAs encoding interferon stimulated genes (ISGs). The mechanism by which T antigen increases levels of ISGs in MEFs remains unclear. We present evidence that expression of T antigen from SV40, Human Polyomaviruses BK (BKV) or JC (JCV) upregulate production of ISGs in MEFs, and subsequently result in an antiviral state, as determined by inhibition of VSV or EMCV growth. The first 136 amino acids of LT are sufficient for these activities. Furthermore, increased ISG expression and induction of the antiviral state requires STAT1. Finally, the RB binding motif of LT is necessary for activation of STAT1. We conclude that the induction of the STAT1 mediated innate immune response in MEFs is a common feature shared by SV40, BKV and JCV. PMID:25589241

  17. An antiviral furanoquinone from Paulownia tomentosa Steud.

    PubMed

    Kang, K H; Huh, H; Kim, B K; Lee, C K

    1999-11-01

    A methanol extract of the stem bark of Paulownia tomentosa showed antiviral activity against poliovirus types 1 and 3. Sequential liquid-liquid extraction with n-hexane, chloroform and water, and a silicagel column chromatography resulted in the purification of a compound. The compound was identified as methyl-5-hydroxy-dinaphthol[1,2-2',3']furan-7,12-dione-6-carbox yla te on the basis of spectroscopic data. The component caused a significant reduction of viral cytopathic effect when it was subjected to a standard antiviral assay by using HeLa cells. The EC(50) of the compound against poliovirus type 1 strain Brunhilde, and type 3 strain Leon were 0.3 microg/mL and 0.6 microg/mL, respectively. PMID:10548761

  18. Glycodendritic structures: promising new antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Javier; Delgado, Rafael

    2004-09-01

    DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin expressed by dendritic cells, is able to recognize high mannosylated glycoproteins at the surface of a broad range of pathogens including viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites. For at least some of these agents this interaction appears to be an important part of the infection process. Therefore, this lectin might be considered in the design of new antiviral drugs. In this manner, multivalent carbohydrate systems based on dendrimers and dendritic polymers are promising candidates as antiviral drugs. Boltorn hyperbranched dendritic polymers functionalized with mannose have been used to inhibit DC-SIGN-mediated infection in an Ebola-pseudotyped viral model. Their physiological solubility, lack of toxicity and especially their low price suggest the application of these glycodendritic polymers for possible formulation as microbicides. PMID:15308605

  19. Clinical Implications of Antiviral Resistance in Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Li, Timothy C. M.; Chan, Martin C. W.; Lee, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is a major cause of severe respiratory infections leading to excessive hospitalizations and deaths globally; annual epidemics, pandemics, and sporadic/endemic avian virus infections occur as a result of rapid, continuous evolution of influenza viruses. Emergence of antiviral resistance is of great clinical and public health concern. Currently available antiviral treatments include four neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir, laninamivir), M2-inibitors (amantadine, rimantadine), and a polymerase inhibitor (favipiravir). In this review, we focus on resistance issues related to the use of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs). Data on primary resistance, as well as secondary resistance related to NAI exposure will be presented. Their clinical implications, detection, and novel therapeutic options undergoing clinical trials are discussed. PMID:26389935

  20. Antiviral Lead Compounds from Marine Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, Sunil; Kaur, Mandeep; Minneman, Kenneth P.

    2010-01-01

    Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV). The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine) isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hopedto be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed. PMID:21116410

  1. Inhibition of immune functions by antiviral drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Heagy, W; Crumpacker, C; Lopez, P A; Finberg, R W

    1991-01-01

    Immune functions were evaluated in vitro for PBMC isolated from healthy donors and cultured with the antiviral agents, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT), ribavirin, ganciclovir, 2'3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI), or acyclovir. To identify methods for assessing the effects of antiviral drugs on immune cells, the PBMC response to mitogens, Con A, or phytohemagglutinin was evaluated from measurements of [3H]thymidine and [14C]-leucine incorporation, cell growth, cellular RNA, DNA, and protein levels, and the PBMC proliferative cycle (i.e., progression from G0----G1----S----G2 + M). At clinically relevant concentrations, AZT, ribavirin, or ganciclovir diminished PBMC responsiveness to mitogen. The numbers of proliferating cells in G1, S, and G2 + M phases of the cell cycle, DNA content, and [3H]thymidine uptake were decreased in cultures treated with AZT, ribavirin, or ganciclovir. AZT or ribavirin but not ganciclovir reduced RNA and protein in the cultures and inhibited cell growth. Whereas AZT, ribavirin, or ganciclovir were antiproliferative, ddI or acyclovir had little, if any, effect on PBMC mitogenesis. The inhibitory effects of antivirals on immune cells may contribute to the immune deterioration observed in patients following prolonged use of the drugs. PMID:1904068

  2. Reduction Sensitive Lipid Conjugates of Tenofovir: Synthesis, Stability, and Antiviral Activity.

    PubMed

    Giesler, Kyle E; Marengo, Jose; Liotta, Dennis C

    2016-08-11

    The therapeutic value of numerous small molecules hinges on their ability to permeate the plasma membrane. This is particularly true for tenofovir (TFV), adefovir, and other antiviral nucleosides that demonstrate potent antiviral activity but poor bioavailability. Using TFV as a model substrate, we hybridized two disparate prodrug strategies to afford novel reduction-sensitive lipid conjugates of TFV that exhibit subnanomolar activity toward HIV-1 and are stable in human plasma for more than 24 h with a therapeutic index approaching 30000. These compounds significantly rival the clinically approved formulation of TFV and revitalize the potential of disulfide-bearing prodrugs which have seen limited in vitro and in vivo success since their debut over 20 years ago. We further demonstrate the utility of these conjugates as a tool to indirectly probe the enzymatic hydrolysis of phosphonomonoesters that may further advance the development of other prodrug strategies for nucleosides, peptides, and beyond. PMID:27405794

  3. The contribution of ion-cyclotron waves to electron heating and SAR-arc excitation near the storm-time plasmapause. [Stable Auroral Red arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, Richard M.; Horne, Richard B.

    1992-01-01

    The potential role of ion-cyclotron waves in the electron heating process has been studied, using the HOTRAY code. It is demonstrated that ion-cyclotron waves can play an important role in both the energy transfer to plasmaspheric electrons and the subsequent downward heat conduction to SAR arc altitudes. In particular, such waves can experience enhanced path integrated amplification along the steep plasmapause density gradient. The latter tends to keep the wave normal angle small on several successive bounces across the equator, thus allowing cyclotron-resonant amplification leading to a total gain of up to 20 e-foldings. When the wave propagation vector becomes highly oblique, absorption occurs during Landau resonance with thermal plasmaspheric electrons, increasing the electron temperature in the direction parallel to the ambient field and leading directly to heat conduction into ionosphere.

  4. Stable compactifications

    SciTech Connect

    Accetta, F.S.; Gleiser, M.; Holman, R.; Kolb, E.W.

    1986-03-01

    We show that compactifications of theories with extra dimensions are unstable if due to monopole configurations of an antisymmetric tensor field balanced against one-loop Casimir corrections. In the case of ten dimensional supergravity, it is possible, at least for a portion of the phase space, to achieve a stable compactification without fine-tuning by including the contribution of fermionic condensates to the monopole configurations. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Determining Mechanism of Action of Antivirals for Respiratory Illness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Irma; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2015-03-01

    Viral infections in the respiratory tract are common in humans and can cause serious illness and death. Drug treatment is the principal line of protection against many of these illnesses and many compounds are tested as antivirals. Often the efficacy of these antivirals are determined before a mechanism of action is understood. We use mathematical models to represent the evolution of these diseases and establish which experiments can help determine the mechanism of action of antivirals.

  6. Systems biology: A tool for charting the antiviral landscape.

    PubMed

    Bowen, James R; Ferris, Martin T; Suthar, Mehul S

    2016-06-15

    The host antiviral programs that are initiated following viral infection form a dynamic and complex web of responses that we have collectively termed as "the antiviral landscape". Conventional approaches to studying antiviral responses have primarily used reductionist systems to assess the function of a single or a limited subset of molecules. Systems biology is a holistic approach that considers the entire system as a whole, rather than individual components or molecules. Systems biology based approaches facilitate an unbiased and comprehensive analysis of the antiviral landscape, while allowing for the discovery of emergent properties that are missed by conventional approaches. The antiviral landscape can be viewed as a hierarchy of complexity, beginning at the whole organism level and progressing downward to isolated tissues, populations of cells, and single cells. In this review, we will discuss how systems biology has been applied to better understand the antiviral landscape at each of these layers. At the organismal level, the Collaborative Cross is an invaluable genetic resource for assessing how genetic diversity influences the antiviral response. Whole tissue and isolated bulk cell transcriptomics serves as a critical tool for the comprehensive analysis of antiviral responses at both the tissue and cellular levels of complexity. Finally, new techniques in single cell analysis are emerging tools that will revolutionize our understanding of how individual cells within a bulk infected cell population contribute to the overall antiviral landscape. PMID:26795869

  7. Hydrogen bonds and antiviral activity of benzaldehyde derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Belkov, M. V.; Shadyro, O. I.; Brinkevich, S. D.; Samovich, S. N.

    2012-09-01

    We have obtained the Fourier transform IR spectra of solutions of benzaldehyde derivatives having different antiviral activities against a herpes virus. We observe a correlation between the presence of hydrogen bonds in the benzaldehyde molecules and the appearance of antiviral properties in the compounds. For compounds having antiviral activity, we have obtained spectral data suggesting the existence of hydrogen bonds of the type C=OṡṡṡH-O and O-HṡṡṡO in the molecules. When the hydrogen atom in the hydroxyl groups are replaced by a methyl group, no intramolecular hydrogen bonds are formed and the compounds lose their antiviral activity.

  8. Mechanism of TRIM25 Catalytic Activation in the Antiviral RIG-I Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Jacint G; Chiang, Jessica J; Sparrer, Konstantin M J; Alam, Steven L; Chi, Michael; Roganowicz, Marcin D; Sankaran, Banumathi; Gack, Michaela U; Pornillos, Owen

    2016-08-01

    Antiviral response pathways induce interferon by higher-order assembly of signaling complexes called signalosomes. Assembly of the RIG-I signalosome is regulated by K63-linked polyubiquitin chains, which are synthesized by the E3 ubiquitin ligase, TRIM25. We have previously shown that the TRIM25 coiled-coil domain is a stable, antiparallel dimer that positions two catalytic RING domains on opposite ends of an elongated rod. We now show that the RING domain is a separate self-association motif that engages ubiquitin-conjugated E2 enzymes as a dimer. RING dimerization is required for catalysis, TRIM25-mediated RIG-I ubiquitination, interferon induction, and antiviral activity. We also provide evidence that RING dimerization and E3 ligase activity are promoted by binding of the TRIM25 SPRY domain to the RIG-I effector domain. These results indicate that TRIM25 actively participates in higher-order assembly of the RIG-I signalosome and helps to fine-tune the efficiency of the RIG-I-mediated antiviral response. PMID:27425606

  9. [Antiviral activity of representatives of the family Crassulaceae].

    PubMed

    Shirobokov, V P; Evtushenko, A I; Lapchik, V F; Shirobokova, D N; Suptel', E A

    1981-12-01

    The antiviral properties of the juice of 11 species of the orpine family were studied. 8 of them belonged to the genera Kalanchoe, i. e. Kalanchoe diagremontiona R. Hamet, K. pinnata (Zam.) Persoon, K. Peteri Werd., K. prolifera (Bovie) R. Hamet, K. marnierriana (Mann. et Boit) Jacobs; K. blossfeldiana v. Poelln, K. beharensis Drake del Gastillo, K. waldheimii R. Hamet et Perr and 3 belonged to the Sedum genera, i. e. Sedum telephium L., S. spectabile Boreau, S. acre L. A high virus neutralizing activity of the juice from 4 species of Kalanchoe, i. e. K. blossfeldiana, K. waldheimii, K. pinnata and K. beharensis was shown. Inhibition of the virus infecting activity was observed at the juice dilutions from 1-2 to 1-8000 and higher. The viricidal factor of Kalanchoe is stable. It is not destroyed by ether, alcohol and potassium periodate. It is not absorbed by bentonite at the acid pH values. Addition of cattle serum or purified proteins to the juice resulted in their precipitation which suppressed the viricidal activity of the juice. PMID:7198890

  10. Neuropsychiatric Effects of HIV Antiviral Medications.

    PubMed

    Treisman, Glenn J; Soudry, Olivia

    2016-10-01

    The development of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has dramatically increased the lifespan of HIV patients but treatment is complicated by numerous adverse effects and toxicities. ART complications include neuropsychiatric, metabolic, gastrointestinal, cardiac, and numerous other toxicities, and clinicians often have to choose one toxicity over another to offer the best medication regimen for a patient. Some antiviral drugs cause significant neuropsychiatric complications, including depression, cognitive impairment, and sleep disturbance. Even in careful studies, it may be difficult to determine which effects are related to the virus, the immune system, or the treatment. Of the six currently marketed classes of antiviral drugs, the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors have been most commonly associated with neuropsychiatric complications. Within these classes, certain drugs are more likely to cause difficulty than others. We review the contention regarding the central nervous system (CNS) complications of efavirenz, as well as debate about the role of CNS penetration in drug effectiveness and toxicity. A thorough working knowledge of the neuropsychiatric consequences of ART allows clinicians to tailor treatment more successfully to individual patients as well as to identify ART more quickly as the source of a problem or symptom. PMID:27534750

  11. Exploiting Genetic Interference for Antiviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Elizabeth J; Kirkegaard, Karla A; Weinberger, Leor S

    2016-05-01

    Rapidly evolving viruses are a major threat to human health. Such viruses are often highly pathogenic (e.g., influenza virus, HIV, Ebola virus) and routinely circumvent therapeutic intervention through mutational escape. Error-prone genome replication generates heterogeneous viral populations that rapidly adapt to new selection pressures, leading to resistance that emerges with treatment. However, population heterogeneity bears a cost: when multiple viral variants replicate within a cell, they can potentially interfere with each other, lowering viral fitness. This genetic interference can be exploited for antiviral strategies, either by taking advantage of a virus's inherent genetic diversity or through generating de novo interference by engineering a competing genome. Here, we discuss two such antiviral strategies, dominant drug targeting and therapeutic interfering particles. Both strategies harness the power of genetic interference to surmount two particularly vexing obstacles-the evolution of drug resistance and targeting therapy to high-risk populations-both of which impede treatment in resource-poor settings. PMID:27149616

  12. Antiviral agents for herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Vere Hodge, R Anthony; Field, Hugh J

    2013-01-01

    This review starts with a brief description of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2), the clinical diseases they cause, and the continuing clinical need for antiviral chemotherapy. A historical overview describes the progress from the early, rather toxic antivirals to acyclovir (ACV) which led the way for its prodrug, valacyclovir, to penciclovir and its prodrug, famciclovir (FCV). These compounds have been the mainstay of HSV therapy for two decades and have established a remarkable safety record. This review focuses on these compounds, the preclinical studies which reveal potentially important differences, the clinical trials, and the clinical experience through two decades. Some possible areas for further investigation are suggested. The focus shifts to new approaches and novel compounds, in particular, the combination of ACV with hydrocortisone, known as ME609 or zovirax duo, an HSV helicase-primase inhibitor, pritelivir (AIC316), and CMX001, the cidofovir prodrug for treating resistant HSV infection in immunocompromised patients. Letermovir has established that the human cytomegalovirus terminase enzyme is a valid target and that similar compounds could be sought for HSV. We discuss the difficulties facing the progression of new compounds. In our concluding remarks, we summarize the present situation including a discussion on the reclassification of FCV from prescription-only to pharmacist-controlled for herpes labialis in New Zealand in 2010; should this be repeated more widely? We conclude that HSV research is emerging from a quiescent phase. PMID:23885997

  13. Exploiting Genetic Interference for Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kirkegaard, Karla A.; Weinberger, Leor S.

    2016-01-01

    Rapidly evolving viruses are a major threat to human health. Such viruses are often highly pathogenic (e.g., influenza virus, HIV, Ebola virus) and routinely circumvent therapeutic intervention through mutational escape. Error-prone genome replication generates heterogeneous viral populations that rapidly adapt to new selection pressures, leading to resistance that emerges with treatment. However, population heterogeneity bears a cost: when multiple viral variants replicate within a cell, they can potentially interfere with each other, lowering viral fitness. This genetic interference can be exploited for antiviral strategies, either by taking advantage of a virus’s inherent genetic diversity or through generating de novo interference by engineering a competing genome. Here, we discuss two such antiviral strategies, dominant drug targeting and therapeutic interfering particles. Both strategies harness the power of genetic interference to surmount two particularly vexing obstacles—the evolution of drug resistance and targeting therapy to high-risk populations—both of which impede treatment in resource-poor settings. PMID:27149616

  14. [Study of cytotoxic and antiviral effects of some eye drops].

    PubMed

    Dediulescu, Lucreţia; Dediulescu, Daniela Florentina

    2008-01-01

    The study of the cytotoxic and antiviral effect of six commercial mixtures, eye drops type, underlined the advantages of using eye drops with Indomethacin for Herpetic Keratitis, due to the antiviral effect and also for the lack of cytotoxicity. PMID:19354165

  15. Modulation of heme oxygenase-1 by metalloporphyrins increases anti-viral T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Bunse, C E; Fortmeier, V; Tischer, S; Zilian, E; Figueiredo, C; Witte, T; Blasczyk, R; Immenschuh, S; Eiz-Vesper, B

    2015-02-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1, the inducible isoform of HO, has immunomodulatory functions and is considered a target for therapeutic interventions. In the present study, we investigated whether modulation of HO-1 might have regulatory effects on in-vitro T cell activation. The study examined whether: (i) HO-1 induction by cobalt-protoporphyrin (CoPP) or inhibition by tin-mesoporphyrin (SnMP) can affect expansion and function of virus-specific T cells, (ii) HO-1 modulation might have a functional effect on other cell populations mediating effects on proliferating T cells [e.g. dendritic cells (DCs), regulatory T cells (T(regs)) and natural killer cells] and (iii) HO-1-modulated anti-viral T cells might be suitable for adoptive immunotherapy. Inhibition of HO-1 via SnMP in cytomegalovirus (CMV)pp65-peptide-pulsed peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) led to increased anti-viral T cell activation and the generation of a higher proportion of effector memory T cells (CD45RA(-) CD62L(-)) with increased capability to secrete interferon (IFN)-γ and granzyme B. T(reg) depletion and SnMP exposure increased the number of anti-viral T cells 15-fold. To test the possibility that HO-1 modulation might be clinically applicable in conformity with good manufacturing practice (GMP), SnMP was tested in isolated anti-viral T cells using the cytokine secretion assay. Compared to control, SnMP treatment resulted in higher cell counts and purity without negative impact on quality and effector function [CD107a, IFN-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels were stable]. These results suggest an important role of HO-1 in the modulation of adaptive immune responses. HO-1 inhibition resulted in markedly more effective generation of functionally active T cells suitable for adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:25196646

  16. Modulation of heme oxygenase-1 by metalloporphyrins increases anti-viral T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Bunse, C E; Fortmeier, V; Tischer, S; Zilian, E; Figueiredo, C; Witte, T; Blasczyk, R; Immenschuh, S; Eiz-Vesper, B

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1, the inducible isoform of HO, has immunomodulatory functions and is considered a target for therapeutic interventions. In the present study, we investigated whether modulation of HO-1 might have regulatory effects on in-vitro T cell activation. The study examined whether: (i) HO-1 induction by cobalt-protoporphyrin (CoPP) or inhibition by tin-mesoporphyrin (SnMP) can affect expansion and function of virus-specific T cells, (ii) HO-1 modulation might have a functional effect on other cell populations mediating effects on proliferating T cells [e.g. dendritic cells (DCs), regulatory T cells (Tregs) and natural killer cells] and (iii) HO-1-modulated anti-viral T cells might be suitable for adoptive immunotherapy. Inhibition of HO-1 via SnMP in cytomegalovirus (CMV)pp65-peptide-pulsed peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) led to increased anti-viral T cell activation and the generation of a higher proportion of effector memory T cells (CD45RA− CD62L−) with increased capability to secrete interferon (IFN)-γ and granzyme B. Treg depletion and SnMP exposure increased the number of anti-viral T cells 15-fold. To test the possibility that HO-1 modulation might be clinically applicable in conformity with good manufacturing practice (GMP), SnMP was tested in isolated anti-viral T cells using the cytokine secretion assay. Compared to control, SnMP treatment resulted in higher cell counts and purity without negative impact on quality and effector function [CD107a, IFN-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels were stable]. These results suggest an important role of HO-1 in the modulation of adaptive immune responses. HO-1 inhibition resulted in markedly more effective generation of functionally active T cells suitable for adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:25196646

  17. Antiviral activity of luteolin against Japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenchun; Qian, Suhong; Qian, Ping; Li, Xiangmin

    2016-07-15

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a member of family Flaviviridae, is a neurotropic flavivirus that causes Japanese encephalitis (JE). JEV is one of the most important causative agents of viral encephalitis in humans, and this disease leads to high fatality rates. Although effective vaccines are available, no effective antiviral therapy for JE has been developed. Hence, identifying effective antiviral agents against JEV infection is important. In this study, we found that luteolin was an antiviral bioflavonoid with potent antiviral activity against JEV replication in A549 cells with IC50=4.56μg/mL. Luteolin also showed extracellular virucidal activity on JEV. With a time-of-drug addition assay revealing that JEV replication was inhibited by luteolin after the entry stage. Overall, our results suggested that luteolin can be used to develop an antiviral drug against JEV. PMID:27126774

  18. The Antiviral Activities and Mechanisms of Marine Polysaccharides: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Shi-Xin; Guan, Hua-Shi

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the studies on the antiviral activities of marine natural products, especially marine polysaccharides, are attracting more and more attention all over the world. Marine-derived polysaccharides and their lower molecular weight oligosaccharide derivatives have been shown to possess a variety of antiviral activities. This paper will review the recent progress in research on the antiviral activities and the mechanisms of these polysaccharides obtained from marine organisms. In particular, it will provide an update on the antiviral actions of the sulfated polysaccharides derived from marine algae including carrageenans, alginates, and fucans, relating to their structure features and the structure–activity relationships. In addition, the recent findings on the different mechanisms of antiviral actions of marine polysaccharides and their potential for therapeutic application will also be summarized in detail. PMID:23235364

  19. Novel concept on antiviral strategies to dengue.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yu-Chih; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidence has revealed that asymptomatic and/or persistent dengue virus (DENV) infections play a role in the cycling pattern of dengue outbreaks. These findings add a new dimension to the continually evolving search for effective prevention strategies in dengue. Disappointing outcomes of clinical trials in anti-dengue modalities have become commonplace. These failures may result from confounding variables and/or unresolved scientific issues that surround dengue, including the replication cycle of DENV in a natural setting, the target cells and reservoir for viral replication in vivo, and the effect of asymptomatic/persistent carriers in the dissemination of dengue. This article sets forth to address these issues using the most updated information available in the literature and to propose a novel antiviral strategy for the prevention and control of dengue. PMID:27284691

  20. Ubiquitination in the Antiviral Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Meredith E.; Gack, Michaela U.

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination has long been known to regulate fundamental cellular processes through the induction of proteasomal degradation of target proteins. More recently, ‘atypical’ nondegradative types of polyubiquitin chains have been appreciated as important regulatory moieties by modulating the activity or subcellular localization of key signaling proteins. Intriguingly, many of these non-degradative types of ubiquitination regulate the innate sensing pathways initiated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), ultimately coordinating an effective antiviral immune response. Here we discuss recent advances in understanding the functional roles of degradative and atypical types of ubiquitination in innate immunity to viral infections, with a specific focus on the signaling pathways triggered by RIG-I-like receptors, Toll-like receptors, and the intracellular viral DNA sensor cGAS. PMID:25753787

  1. RNAi: antiviral therapy against dengue virus

    PubMed Central

    Idrees, Sobia; Ashfaq, Usman A

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus infection has become a global threat affecting around 100 countries in the world. Currently, there is no licensed antiviral agent available against dengue. Thus, there is a strong need to develop therapeutic strategies that can tackle this life threatening disease. RNA interference is an important and effective gene silencing process which degrades targeted RNA by a sequence specific process. Several studies have been conducted during the last decade to evaluate the efficiency of siRNA in inhibiting dengue virus replication. This review summarizes siRNAs as a therapeutic approach against dengue virus serotypes and concludes that siRNAs against virus and host genes can be next generation treatment of dengue virus infection. PMID:23620845

  2. Deubiquitinase USP2a Sustains Interferons Antiviral Activity by Restricting Ubiquitination of Activated STAT1 in the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin; Yuan, Yukang; Cheng, Qiao; Zuo, Yibo; Qian, Liping; Guo, Tingting; Qian, Guanghui; Li, Lemin; Ge, Jun; Dai, Jianfeng; Xiong, Sidong; Zheng, Hui

    2016-01-01

    STAT1 is a critical transcription factor for regulating host antiviral defenses. STAT1 activation is largely dependent on phosphorylation at tyrosine 701 site of STAT1 (pY701-STAT1). Understanding how pY701-STAT1 is regulated by intracellular signaling remains a major challenge. Here we find that pY701-STAT1 is the major form of ubiquitinated-STAT1 induced by interferons (IFNs). While total STAT1 remains relatively stable during the early stages of IFNs signaling, pY701-STAT1 can be rapidly downregulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Moreover, ubiquitinated pY701-STAT1 is located predominantly in the nucleus, and inhibiting nuclear import of pY701-STAT1 significantly blocks ubiquitination and downregulation of pY701-STAT1. Furthermore, we reveal that the deubiquitinase USP2a translocates into the nucleus and binds to pY701-STAT1, and inhibits K48-linked ubiquitination and degradation of pY701-STAT1. Importantly, USP2a sustains IFNs-induced pY701-STAT1 levels, and enhances all three classes of IFNs- mediated signaling and antiviral activity. To our knowledge, this is the first identified deubiquitinase that targets activated pY701-STAT1. These findings uncover a positive mechanism by which IFNs execute efficient antiviral signaling and function, and may provide potential targets for improving IFNs-based antiviral therapy. PMID:27434509

  3. Antifungal and antiviral products of marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Pan, Wen Liang; Chan, Yau Sang; Yin, Cui Ming; Dan, Xiu Li; Wang, He Xiang; Fang, Evandro Fei; Lam, Sze Kwan; Ngai, Patrick Hung Kui; Xia, Li Xin; Liu, Fang; Ye, Xiu Yun; Zhang, Guo Qing; Liu, Qing Hong; Sha, Ou; Lin, Peng; Ki, Chan; Bekhit, Adnan A; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; Wan, David Chi Cheong; Ye, Xiu Juan; Xia, Jiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2014-04-01

    Marine organisms including bacteria, fungi, algae, sponges, echinoderms, mollusks, and cephalochordates produce a variety of products with antifungal activity including bacterial chitinases, lipopeptides, and lactones; fungal (-)-sclerotiorin and peptaibols, purpurides B and C, berkedrimane B and purpuride; algal gambieric acids A and B, phlorotannins; 3,5-dibromo-2-(3,5-dibromo-2-methoxyphenoxy)phenol, spongistatin 1, eurysterols A and B, nortetillapyrone, bromotyrosine alkaloids, bis-indole alkaloid, ageloxime B and (-)-ageloxime D, haliscosamine, hamigeran G, hippolachnin A from sponges; echinoderm triterpene glycosides and alkene sulfates; molluscan kahalalide F and a 1485-Da peptide with a sequence SRSELIVHQR; and cepalochordate chitotriosidase and a 5026.9-Da antifungal peptide. The antiviral compounds from marine organisms include bacterial polysaccharide and furan-2-yl acetate; fungal macrolide, purpurester A, purpurquinone B, isoindolone derivatives, alterporriol Q, tetrahydroaltersolanol C and asperterrestide A, algal diterpenes, xylogalactofucan, alginic acid, glycolipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, sulfated polysaccharide p-KG03, meroditerpenoids, methyl ester derivative of vatomaric acid, lectins, polysaccharides, tannins, cnidarian zoanthoxanthin alkaloids, norditerpenoid and capilloquinol; crustacean antilipopolysaccharide factors, molluscan hemocyanin; echinoderm triterpenoid glycosides; tunicate didemnin B, tamandarins A and B and; tilapia hepcidin 1-5 (TH 1-5), seabream SauMx1, SauMx2, and SauMx3, and orange-spotted grouper β-defensin. Although the mechanisms of antifungal and antiviral activities of only some of the aforementioned compounds have been elucidated, the possibility to use those known to have distinctly different mechanisms, good bioavailability, and minimal toxicity in combination therapy remains to be investigated. It is also worthwhile to test the marine antimicrobials for possible synergism with existing drugs. The prospects of

  4. Litsea Species as Potential Antiviral Plant Sources.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yifu; Wang, Dongying; Tan, Ghee T; Van Hung, Nguyen; Cuong, Nguyen Manh; Pezzuto, John M; Fong, Harry H S; Soejarto, Djaja Doel; Zhang, Hongjie

    2016-04-01

    Litsea verticillata Hance (Lauraceae), a Chinese medicine used to treat swelling caused by injury or by snake bites, was the first plant identified by our National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded International Cooperative Biodiversity Group (ICBG) project to exhibit anti-HIV activities. From this plant, we discovered a class of 8 novel litseane compounds, prototypic sesquiterpenes, all of which demonstrated anti-HIV activities. In subsequent studies, 26 additional compounds of different structural types were identified. During our continuing investigation of this plant species, we identified two new litseanes, litseaverticillols L and M, and a new sesquiterpene butenolide, litseasesquibutenolide. Litseaverticillols L and M were found to inhibit HIV-1 replication, with an IC[Formula: see text] value of 49.6[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]M. To further determine the antiviral properties of this plant, several relatively abundant isolates, including a litseane compound, two eudesmane sesquiterpenes and three lignans, were evaluated against an additional 21 viral targets. Lignans 8 and 9 were shown to be active against the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), with EC[Formula: see text] values of 22.0[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]M ([Formula: see text]) and 16.2[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]M ([Formula: see text]), respectively. Since many antiviral compounds have been discovered in L. verticillata, we further prepared 38 plant extracts made from the different plant parts of 9 additional Litsea species. These extracts were evaluated for their anti-HIV and cytotoxic activities, and four of the extracts, which ranged across three different species, displayed 97-100% inhibitory effects against HIV replication without showing cytotoxicity to a panel of human cell lines at a concentration of 20[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]g/mL. PMID:27080941

  5. Antiviral Chemistry & Chemotherapy's current antiviral agents FactFile 2008 (2nd edition): RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik; Field, Hugh J

    2008-01-01

    Among the RNA viruses, other than the retroviruses (that is, HIV), which are dealt with separately in the current FactFile, the most important targets for the development of antiviral agents at the moment are the orthomyxoviruses (that is, influenza), the hepaciviruses (that is, hepatitis C virus [HCV]) and, to a lesser extent, the picornaviruses. Although the uncoating inhibitors amantadine and rimantadine were the first known inhibitors of influenza A, the neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir, zanamivir and peramivir have now become the prime antiviral drugs for the treatment of influenza A and B virus infections. For HCV infections, standard treatment consists of the combination of pegylated interferon-alpha with ribavirin, but several other antivirals targeted at specific viral functions such as the HCV protease and/ or polymerase may be expected to soon take an important share of this important market. Still untapped is the potential of a variety of uncoating inhibitors, as well as protease and/or polymerase inhibitors against the wide spectrum of picornaviruses. While ribavirin has been available for 35 years as a broad-spectrum anti-RNA virus agent, relatively new and unexplored is favipiravir (T-705) accredited with activity against influenza as well as flaviviruses, bunyaviruses and arenaviruses. PMID:18727441

  6. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Possesses an Antiviral Activity against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Labrie, Josée; Hernandez Reyes, Yenney; Burciaga Nava, Jorge A.; Gagnon, Carl A.; Jacques, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Pigs are often colonized by more than one bacterial and/or viral species during respiratory tract infections. This phenomenon is known as the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) are pathogens that are frequently involved in PRDC. The main objective of this project was to study the in vitro interactions between these two pathogens and the host cells in the context of mixed infections. To fulfill this objective, PRRSV permissive cell lines such as MARC-145, SJPL, and porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) were used. A pre-infection with PRRSV was performed at 0.5 multiplicity of infection (MOI) followed by an infection with App at 10 MOI. Bacterial adherence and cell death were compared. Results showed that PRRSV pre-infection did not affect bacterial adherence to the cells. PRRSV and App co-infection produced an additive cytotoxicity effect. Interestingly, a pre-infection of SJPL and PAM cells with App blocked completely PRRSV infection. Incubation of SJPL and PAM cells with an App cell-free culture supernatant is also sufficient to significantly block PRRSV infection. This antiviral activity is not due to LPS but rather by small molecular weight, heat-resistant App metabolites (<1 kDa). The antiviral activity was also observed in SJPL cells infected with swine influenza virus but to a much lower extent compared to PRRSV. More importantly, the PRRSV antiviral activity of App was also seen with PAM, the cells targeted by the virus in vivo during infection in pigs. The antiviral activity might be due, at least in part, to the production of interferon γ. The use of in vitro experimental models to study viral and bacterial co-infections will lead to a better understanding of the interactions between pathogens and their host cells, and could allow the development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic tools. PMID:24878741

  7. Antiviral Regulation in Porcine Monocytic Cells at Different Activation States

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Raymond R. R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monocytic cells, including macrophages and dendritic cells, exist in different activation states that are critical to the regulation of antimicrobial immunity. Many pandemic viruses are monocytotropic, including porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), which directly infects subsets of monocytic cells and interferes with antiviral responses. To study antiviral responses in PRRSV-infected monocytic cells, we characterized inflammatory cytokine responses and genome-wide profiled signature genes to investigate response pathways in uninfected and PRRSV-infected monocytic cells at different activation states. Our findings showed suppressed interferon (IFN) production in macrophages in non-antiviral states and an arrest of lipid metabolic pathways in macrophages at antiviral states. Importantly, porcine monocytic cells at different activation states were susceptible to PRRSV and responded differently to viral infection. Based on Gene Ontology (GO) analysis, two approaches were used to potentiate antiviral activity: (i) pharmaceutical modulation of cellular lipid metabolism and (ii) in situ PRRSV replication-competent expression of interferon alpha (IFN-α). Both approaches significantly suppressed exogenous viral infection in monocytic cells. In particular, the engineered IFN-expressing PRRSV strain eliminated exogenous virus infection and sustained cell viability at 4 days postinfection in macrophages. These findings suggest an intricate interaction of viral infection with the activation status of porcine monocytic cells. An understanding and integration of antiviral infection with activation status of monocytic cells may provide a means of potentiating antiviral immunity. IMPORTANCE Activation statuses of monocytic cells, including monocytes, macrophages (Mϕs), and dendritic cells (DCs), are critically important for antiviral immunity. Unfortunately, the activation status of porcine monocytic cells or how cell activation status

  8. Antivirals for Respiratory Viral Infections: Problems and Prospects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Zhou, Yuan-Hong; Ye, Feng; Yang, Zhan-Qiu

    2016-08-01

    In the past two decades, several newly emerging and reemerging viral respiratory pathogens including several influenza viruses (avian influenza and pandemic influenza), severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), have continued to challenge medical and public health systems. Thereafter, the development of cost-effective, broad-spectrum antiviral agents is the urgent mission of both virologists and pharmacologists. Current antiviral developments have focused targets on viral entry, replication, release, and intercellular pathways essential for viral life cycle. Here, we review the current literature on challenges and prospects in the development of these antivirals. PMID:27486742

  9. [Antiviral activity of the complexes obtained at different ratios of complementary homopolyribonucleotides].

    PubMed

    Novokhatskiĭ, A S; Kogan, E M; Timkovskiĭ, A L

    1978-05-01

    Antiviral activity of the complexes of synthetic polyribonucleotides, i.e. poly (I).poly (C) and poly (G).poly (C) obtained at non-equimolar ratios of homopolymers was studied. The system of chick embryon fibroblasts and horse Venezuellan eguine encephalitis virus served as the model. It was shown that the active and stable complexes poly (I).poly (C) and poly (G).poly (C) were formed at some excess of poly (C), i.e. at the ratio of poly G) or poly (I) to poly (C) equal to 40/60 to 20/80 molar per cent. The role of the excessive poly (C) in formation of the stable secondary structure of the nucleotide complexes and its significance as one of the means for affecting the fine structure of double-stranded RNA were discussed. PMID:655685

  10. Dengue Virus Entry as Target for Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alen, Marijke M. F.; Schols, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infections are expanding worldwide and, because of the lack of a vaccine, the search for antiviral products is imperative. Four serotypes of DENV are described and they all cause a similar disease outcome. It would be interesting to develop an antiviral product that can interact with all four serotypes, prevent host cell infection and subsequent immune activation. DENV entry is thus an interesting target for antiviral therapy. DENV enters the host cell through receptor-mediated endocytosis. Several cellular receptors have been proposed, and DC-SIGN, present on dendritic cells, is considered as the most important DENV receptor until now. Because DENV entry is a target for antiviral therapy, various classes of compounds have been investigated to inhibit this process. In this paper, an overview is given of all the putative DENV receptors, and the most promising DENV entry inhibitors are discussed. PMID:22529868

  11. Potential Antiviral Agents from Marine Fungi: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Nikzad, Sonia; Kadir, Habsah Abdul; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-07-01

    Biodiversity of the marine world is only partially subjected to detailed scientific scrutiny in comparison to terrestrial life. Life in the marine world depends heavily on marine fungi scavenging the oceans of lifeless plants and animals and entering them into the nutrient cycle by. Approximately 150 to 200 new compounds, including alkaloids, sesquiterpenes, polyketides, and aromatic compounds, are identified from marine fungi annually. In recent years, numerous investigations demonstrated the tremendous potential of marine fungi as a promising source to develop new antivirals against different important viruses, including herpes simplex viruses, the human immunodeficiency virus, and the influenza virus. Various genera of marine fungi such as Aspergillus, Penicillium, Cladosporium, and Fusarium were subjected to compound isolation and antiviral studies, which led to an illustration of the strong antiviral activity of a variety of marine fungi-derived compounds. The present review strives to summarize all available knowledge on active compounds isolated from marine fungi with antiviral activity. PMID:26204947

  12. Antiviral agents against equid alphaherpesviruses: Current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vissani, María A; Thiry, Etienne; Dal Pozzo, Fabiana; Barrandeguy, María

    2016-01-01

    Equid herpesvirus infections cause respiratory, neurological and reproductive syndromes. Despite preventive and control measures and the availability of vaccines and immunostimulants, herpesvirus infections still constitute a major threat to equine health and for the equine industry worldwide. Antiviral drugs, particularly nucleoside analogues and foscarnet, are successfully used for the treatment of human alphaherpesvirus infections. In equine medicine, the use of antiviral medications in alphaherpesvirus infections would decrease the excretion of virus and diminish the risk of contagion and the convalescent time in affected horses, and would also improve the clinical outcome of equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy. The combined use of antiviral compounds, along with vaccines, immune modulators, and effective preventive and control measures, might be beneficial in diminishing the negative impact of alphaherpesvirus infections in horses. The purpose of this review is to analyse the available information regarding the use of antiviral agents against alphaherpesviruses, with particular emphasis on equine alphaherpesvirus infections. PMID:26654843

  13. Potential Antiviral Agents from Marine Fungi: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Nikzad, Sonia; Abdul Kadir, Habsah; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity of the marine world is only partially subjected to detailed scientific scrutiny in comparison to terrestrial life. Life in the marine world depends heavily on marine fungi scavenging the oceans of lifeless plants and animals and entering them into the nutrient cycle by. Approximately 150 to 200 new compounds, including alkaloids, sesquiterpenes, polyketides, and aromatic compounds, are identified from marine fungi annually. In recent years, numerous investigations demonstrated the tremendous potential of marine fungi as a promising source to develop new antivirals against different important viruses, including herpes simplex viruses, the human immunodeficiency virus, and the influenza virus. Various genera of marine fungi such as Aspergillus, Penicillium, Cladosporium, and Fusarium were subjected to compound isolation and antiviral studies, which led to an illustration of the strong antiviral activity of a variety of marine fungi-derived compounds. The present review strives to summarize all available knowledge on active compounds isolated from marine fungi with antiviral activity. PMID:26204947

  14. Antiviral immunity in Drosophila requires systemic RNAi spread

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Maria-Carla; Tassetto, Michel; van Rij, Ronald P.; Goic, Bertsy; Gausson, Valérie; Berry, Bassam; Jacquier, Caroline; Antoniewski, Christophe; Andino, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Multicellular organisms evolved sophisticated defense systems to confer protection against pathogens. An important characteristic of these immune systems is their ability to act both locally at the site of infection and at distal uninfected locations1-4. In insects, such as Drosophila melanogaster, RNA interference (RNAi) mediates antiviral immunity5-7. However, the antiviral RNAi defense in flies is thought to be a local, cell-autonomous process, since flies are considered unable to generate a systemic RNAi response8. Here we show that a recently defined double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) uptake pathway9 is essential for effective antiviral RNAi immunity in adult flies. Mutant flies defective in this dsRNA uptake pathway were hypersensitive to infection with Drosophila C virus (DCV) and Sindbis virus. Mortality in dsRNA-uptake defective flies was accompanied by 100-to 105-fold increases in viral titers and higher levels of viral RNA. Furthermore, inoculating naked dsRNA into flies elicited a sequence specific antiviral immune response that required an intact dsRNA uptake pathway. These findings suggest that spread of dsRNA to uninfected sites is essential for effective antiviral immunity. Strikingly, infection with Sindbis-GFP suppressed expression of host-encoded GFP at a distal site. Thus, similar to protein-based immunity in vertebrates, the antiviral RNAi-response in flies also relies on the systemic spread of a virus-specific immunity signal. PMID:19204732

  15. Perspective of Use of Antiviral Peptides against Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Skalickova, Sylvie; Heger, Zbynek; Krejcova, Ludmila; Pekarik, Vladimir; Bastl, Karel; Janda, Jozef; Kostolansky, Frantisek; Vareckova, Eva; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-10-01

    The threat of a worldwide influenza pandemic has greatly increased over the past decade with the emergence of highly virulent avian influenza strains. The increased frequency of drug-resistant influenza strains against currently available antiviral drugs requires urgent development of new strategies for antiviral therapy, too. The research in the field of therapeutic peptides began to develop extensively in the second half of the 20(th) century. Since then, the mechanisms of action for several peptides and their antiviral prospect received large attention due to the global threat posed by viruses. Here, we discussed the therapeutic properties of peptides used in influenza treatment. Peptides with antiviral activity against influenza can be divided into three main groups. First, entry blocker peptides such as a Flupep that interact with influenza hemagglutinin, block its binding to host cells and prevent viral fusion. Second, several peptides display virucidal activity, disrupting viral envelopes, e.g., Melittin. Finally, a third set of peptides interacts with the viral polymerase complex and act as viral replication inhibitors such as PB1 derived peptides. Here, we present a review of the current literature describing the antiviral activity, mechanism and future therapeutic potential of these influenza antiviral peptides. PMID:26492266

  16. Perspective of Use of Antiviral Peptides against Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Skalickova, Sylvie; Heger, Zbynek; Krejcova, Ludmila; Pekarik, Vladimir; Bastl, Karel; Janda, Jozef; Kostolansky, Frantisek; Vareckova, Eva; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    The threat of a worldwide influenza pandemic has greatly increased over the past decade with the emergence of highly virulent avian influenza strains. The increased frequency of drug-resistant influenza strains against currently available antiviral drugs requires urgent development of new strategies for antiviral therapy, too. The research in the field of therapeutic peptides began to develop extensively in the second half of the 20th century. Since then, the mechanisms of action for several peptides and their antiviral prospect received large attention due to the global threat posed by viruses. Here, we discussed the therapeutic properties of peptides used in influenza treatment. Peptides with antiviral activity against influenza can be divided into three main groups. First, entry blocker peptides such as a Flupep that interact with influenza hemagglutinin, block its binding to host cells and prevent viral fusion. Second, several peptides display virucidal activity, disrupting viral envelopes, e.g., Melittin. Finally, a third set of peptides interacts with the viral polymerase complex and act as viral replication inhibitors such as PB1 derived peptides. Here, we present a review of the current literature describing the antiviral activity, mechanism and future therapeutic potential of these influenza antiviral peptides. PMID:26492266

  17. Optimizing Distribution of Pandemic Influenza Antiviral Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsin-Chan; Morton, David P.; Johnson, Gregory P.; Gutfraind, Alexander; Galvani, Alison P.; Clements, Bruce; Meyers, Lauren A.

    2015-01-01

    We provide a data-driven method for optimizing pharmacy-based distribution of antiviral drugs during an influenza pandemic in terms of overall access for a target population and apply it to the state of Texas, USA. We found that during the 2009 influenza pandemic, the Texas Department of State Health Services achieved an estimated statewide access of 88% (proportion of population willing to travel to the nearest dispensing point). However, access reached only 34.5% of US postal code (ZIP code) areas containing <1,000 underinsured persons. Optimized distribution networks increased expected access to 91% overall and 60% in hard-to-reach regions, and 2 or 3 major pharmacy chains achieved near maximal coverage in well-populated areas. Independent pharmacies were essential for reaching ZIP code areas containing <1,000 underinsured persons. This model was developed during a collaboration between academic researchers and public health officials and is available as a decision support tool for Texas Department of State Health Services at a Web-based interface. PMID:25625858

  18. Probiotics as Antiviral Agents in Shrimp Aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, Bestha; Sai Gopal, D. V. R.

    2013-01-01

    Shrimp farming is an aquaculture business for the cultivation of marine shrimps or prawns for human consumption and is now considered as a major economic and food production sector as it is an increasingly important source of protein available for human consumption. Intensification of shrimp farming had led to the development of a number of diseases, which resulted in the excessive use of antimicrobial agents, which is finally responsible for many adverse effects. Currently, probiotics are chosen as the best alternatives to these antimicrobial agents and they act as natural immune enhancers, which provoke the disease resistance in shrimp farm. Viral diseases stand as the major constraint causing an enormous loss in the production in shrimp farms. Probiotics besides being beneficial bacteria also possess antiviral activity. Exploitation of these probiotics in treatment and prevention of viral diseases in shrimp aquaculture is a novel and efficient method. This review discusses the benefits of probiotics and their criteria for selection in shrimp aquaculture and their role in immune power enhancement towards viral diseases. PMID:23738078

  19. The antiviral activities of ISG15

    PubMed Central

    Morales, David J.; Lenschow, Deborah J.

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational protein modification is an important strategy for the regulation of the cell proteome independent of the need for new gene expression. Ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers mediate the regulation of protein levels, signaling pathways, vesicular trafficking, and many other cellular processes through their covalent conjugation to proteins. Interferon stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) is a type I interferon induced ubiquitin-like modifier. In addition to conjugating to potentially hundreds of target proteins, ISG15 can be found in an unconjugated form both inside of the cell and released from interferon stimulated cells into the extracellular environment. Due to its robust expression after type I interferon stimulation and the broad panel of proteins that it targets, ISG15 has drawn much attention as a potential regulator of the immune response and has been shown to mediate protection in a number of different viral infection models. Here we will review the current state of the field of ISG15, the viruses against which ISG15 mediates protection, and the mechanisms by which ISG15 exerts antiviral activity. PMID:24095857

  20. Searching for antiviral drugs for human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Underwood, M R; Shewchuk, L M; Hassell, A M; Phelps, W C

    2000-12-01

    The human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are ubiquitous human pathogens that cause a wide variety of benign and pre-malignant epithelial tumours. Of the almost 100 different types of HPV that have been characterized to date, approximately two dozen specifically infect genital and oral mucosa. Mucosal HPVs are most frequently sexually transmitted and, with an incidence roughly twice that of herpes simplex virus infection, are considered one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases throughout the world. A subset of genital HPVs, termed 'high-risk' HPVs, is highly associated with the development of genital cancers including cervical carcinoma. The absence of a simple monolayer cell culture system for analysis and propagation of the virus has substantially retarded progress in the development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for HPV infection. In spite of these difficulties, great progress has been made in the elucidation of the molecular controls of virus gene expression, replication and pathogenesis. With this knowledge and some important new tools, there is great potential for the development of improved diagnostic and prognostic tests, prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines, and traditional antiviral medicines. PMID:11142617

  1. Virus infection, antiviral immunity, and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Getts, Daniel R.; Chastain, Emily M. L.; Terry, Rachael L.; Miller, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary As a group of disorders, autoimmunity ranks as the third most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western World. However, the etiology of most autoimmune diseases remains unknown. Although genetic linkage studies support a critical underlying role for genetics, the geographic distribution of these disorders as well as the low concordance rates in monozygotic twins suggest that a combination of other factors including environmental ones are involved. Virus infection is a primary factor that has been implicated in the initiation of autoimmune disease. Infection triggers a robust and usually well-coordinated immune response that is critical for viral clearance. However, in some instances, immune regulatory mechanisms may falter, culminating in the breakdown of self-tolerance, resulting in immune-mediated attack directed against both viral and self-antigens. Traditionally, cross-reactive T-cell recognition, known as molecular mimicry, as well as bystander T-cell activation, culminating in epitope spreading, have been the predominant mechanisms elucidated through which infection may culminate in an T-cell-mediated autoimmune response. However, other hypotheses including virus-induced decoy of the immune system also warrant discussion in regard to their potential for triggering autoimmunity. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which virus infection and antiviral immunity contribute to the development of autoimmunity. PMID:23947356

  2. [Study of the antiviral action of gentamicin].

    PubMed

    Novokhatskiĭ, A S; Gerasimova, S S

    1975-05-01

    Experimental data on the effect of various concentrations of gentamycin on reproduction of VEE and Sindbis viruses in tissue culture are presented. It was found that gentamycin had no cytotoxic effect on the primary tripsinized chick embryon fibroblasts (CEF) when used in doses of 10, 20 or 30 mg/ml and only when used in a dose of 50 mg/ml it induced 50 percent destruction of the cell layer. Multiplication of the VEE and Sindbis viruses in the culture of CEF was inhibited in the presence of gentamycin by 1.5--3.5 lg PFU/ml. Two stages in the virus inhibiting effect of gentamycin were determined on the model of VEE, i. e. the stage of inhibition in the absence of visible damages of the cells and the stage associated with their destruction. The doses of gentamycin higher than 3 mg/ml inhibited in parallel the virus specific synthesis and synthesis of the cell proteins and nucleic acids. At the same time, when gentamycin was used in a dose of 10 mg/ml, no impairement of the cell viability was observed and the cell capacity to produce high titers of the model virus was reduced after incubation without the antibiotic for 24 hours. The antiviral activity of gentamycin were therefore determined by revers inhibition of the cell metabolic activity. PMID:1225192

  3. Influenza antiviral susceptibility monitoring activities in relation to national antiviral stockpiles in Europe during the winter 2006/2007 season.

    PubMed

    Meijer, A; Lackenby, A; Hay, A; Zambon, M

    2007-04-01

    Due to the influenza pandemic threat, many countries are stockpiling antivirals in the hope of limiting the impact of a future pandemic virus. Since resistance to antiviral drugs would probably significantly alter the effectiveness of antivirals, surveillance programmes to monitor the emergence of resistance are of considerable importance. During the 2006/2007 influenza season, an inventory was conducted by the European Surveillance Network for Vigilance against Viral Resistance (VIRGIL) in collaboration with the European Influenza Surveillance Scheme (EISS) to evaluate antiviral susceptibility testing by the National Influenza Reference Laboratories (NIRL) in relation to the national antiviral stockpile in 30 European countries that are members of EISS. All countries except Ukraine had a stockpile of the neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI) oseltamivir. Additionally, four countries had a stockpile of the NAI zanamivir and three of the M2 ion channel inhibitor rimantadine. Of 29 countries with a NAI stockpile, six countries' NIRLs could determine virus susceptibility by 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) and in 13 countries it could be done by sequencing. Only in one of the three countries with a rimantadine stockpile could the NIRL determine virus susceptibility, by sequencing only. However, including the 18 countries that had plans to introduce or extend antiviral susceptibility testing, the NIRLs of 21 of the 29 countries with a stockpile would be capable of susceptibility testing appropriate to the stockpiled drug by the end of the 2007/2008 influenza season. Although most European countries in this study have stockpiles of influenza antivirals, susceptibility surveillance capability by the NIRLs appropriate to the stockpiled antivirals is limited. PMID:17991386

  4. Alteration of Antiviral Signalling by Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) of Mitochondrial Antiviral Signalling Protein (MAVS)

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Fei; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Hayakari, Ryo; Yoshida, Hidemi; Kawaguchi, Shogo; Takahashi, Ippei; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variation is associated with diseases. As a type of genetic variation occurring with certain regularity and frequency, the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is attracting more and more attention because of its great value for research and real-life application. Mitochondrial antiviral signalling protein (MAVS) acts as a common adaptor molecule for retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs), which can recognize foreign RNA, including viral RNA, leading to the induction of type I interferons (IFNs). Therefore, MAVS is thought to be a crucial molecule in antiviral innate immunity. We speculated that genetic variation of MAVS may result in susceptibility to infectious diseases. To assess the risk of viral infection based on MAVS variation, we tested the effects of twelve non-synonymous MAVS coding-region SNPs from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database that result in amino acid substitutions. We found that five of these SNPs exhibited functional alterations. Additionally, four resulted in an inhibitory immune response, and one had the opposite effect. In total, 1,032 human genomic samples obtained from a mass examination were genotyped at these five SNPs. However, no homozygous or heterozygous variation was detected. We hypothesized that these five SNPs are not present in the Japanese population and that such MAVS variations may result in serious immune diseases. PMID:26954674

  5. Liposome-incorporated santolina insularis essential oil: preparation, characterization and in vitro antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Valenti, D; De Logu, A; Loy, G; Sinico, C; Bonsignore, L; Cottiglia, F; Garau, D; Fadda, A M

    2001-01-01

    The effect of liposomal inclusion on the stability and in vitro antiherpetic activity of Santolina insularis essential oil was investigated. In order to study the influence of vesicle structure on the liposome properties, multilamellar and unilamellar vesicles were prepared by the film method and sonication, respectively. Vesicles were obtained from hydrogenated soya phosphatydilcholine and cholesterol. Formulations were examined for their stability for over one year monitoring the drug leakage from vesicles and the average size distribution. The stability of the incorporated oil was verified by studying its quali-quantitative composition. The antiviral activity was studied against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) by plaque reduction and yield reduction assays. Results showed that Santolina insularis essential oil can be incorporated in high amounts in the prepared liposomes, which successfully prevented its degradation. Moreover, stability studies pointed out that vesicle dispersions were stable for at least one year and neither oil leakage nor vesicle size alteration occurred during this period. Antiviral activity assays demonstrated that Santolina insularis essential oil is effective in inactivating HSV-1 and that the activity is principally due to direct virucidal effects. Free essential oil proved to be more effective than liposomal oil and a different activity was discovered which related to the vesicular structure. The ED(50) values, significantly lower when cells were pre-incubated with the essential oil before the virus adsorption, indicate an intracellular mechanism in the antiviral activity of Santolina insularis. Moreover, liposomal Santolina essential oil is non toxic in the range of the concentration tested. PMID:19530920

  6. Antiviral immune responses of bats: a review.

    PubMed

    Baker, M L; Schountz, T; Wang, L-F

    2013-02-01

    Despite being the second most species-rich and abundant group of mammals, bats are also among the least studied, with a particular paucity of information in the area of bat immunology. Although bats have a long history of association with rabies, the emergence and re-emergence of a number of viruses from bats that impact human and animal health has resulted in a resurgence of interest in bat immunology. Understanding how bats coexist with viruses in the absence of disease is essential if we are to begin to develop therapeutics to target viruses in humans and susceptible livestock and companion animals. Here, we review the current status of knowledge in the field of bat antiviral immunology including both adaptive and innate mechanisms of immune defence and highlight the need for further investigations in this area. Because data in this field are so limited, our discussion is based on both scientific discoveries and theoretical predictions. It is hoped that by provoking original, speculative or even controversial ideas or theories, this review may stimulate further research in this important field. Efforts to understand the immune systems of bats have been greatly facilitated in recent years by the availability of partial genome sequences from two species of bats, a megabat, Pteropus vampyrus, and a microbat, Myotis lucifugus, allowing the rapid identification of immune genes. Although bats appear to share most features of the immune system with other mammals, several studies have reported qualitative and quantitative differences in the immune responses of bats. These observations warrant further investigation to determine whether such differences are associated with the asymptomatic nature of viral infections in bats. PMID:23302292

  7. Antiviral macrophage responses in flavivirus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Ashhurst, Thomas Myles; Vreden, Caryn van; Munoz-Erazo, Luis; Niewold, Paula; Watabe, Kanami; Terry, Rachael L; Deffrasnes, Celine; Getts, Daniel R; Cole King, Nicholas Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    Mosquito-borne flaviviruses are a major current and emerging threat, affecting millions of people worldwide. Global climate change, combined with increasing proximity of humans to animals and mosquito vectors by expansion into natural habitats, coupled with the increase in international travel, have resulted in significant spread and concomitant increase in the incidence of infection and severe disease. Although neuroinvasive disease has been well described for some viral infections such as Japanese Encephalitis virus (JEV) and West Nile virus (WNV), others such as dengue virus (DENV) have recently displayed an emerging pattern of neuroinvasive disease, distinct from the previously observed, systemically-induced encephalomyelopathy. In this setting, the immune response is a crucial component of host defence, in preventing viral dissemination and invasion of the central nervous system (CNS). However, subversion of the anti-viral activities of macrophages by flaviviruses can facilitate viral replication and spread, enhancing the intensity of immune responses, leading to severe immune-mediated disease which may be further exacerbated during the subsequent infection with some flaviviruses. Furthermore, in the CNS myeloid cells may be responsible for inducing specific inflammatory changes, which can lead to significant pathological damage during encephalitis. The interaction of virus and cells of the myeloid lineage is complex, and this interaction is likely responsible at least in part, for crucial differences between viral clearance and pathology. Recent studies on the role of myeloid cells in innate immunity and viral control, and the mechanisms of evasion and subversion used by flaviviruses are rapidly advancing our understanding of the immunopathological mechanisms involved in flavivirus encephalitis and will lead to the development of therapeutic strategies previously not considered. PMID:24434318

  8. Essential Oil Composition, Antioxidant, Cytotoxic and Antiviral Activities of Teucrium pseudochamaepitys Growing Spontaneously in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Hammami, Saoussen; Jmii, Habib; El Mokni, Ridha; Khmiri, Abdelbaki; Faidi, Khaled; Dhaouadi, Hatem; El Aouni, Mohamed Hédi; Aouni, Mahjoub; Joshi, Rajesh K

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition, antioxidant, cytotoxic and antiviral activities of the essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation from the aerial parts of Teucrium pseudochamaepitys (Lamiaceae) collected from Zaghouan province of Tunisia are reported. The essential oil was analyzed by gas chromatography equipped with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Thirty-one compounds were identified representing 88.6% of the total essential oil. Hexadecanoic acid was found to be the most abundant component (26.1%) followed by caryophyllene oxide (6.3%), myristicin (4.9%) and α-cubebene (3.9%). The antioxidant capacity of the oil was measured on the basis of the scavenging activity to the stable 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). The IC50 value of the oil was evaluated as 0.77 mg·mL(-1). In addition, the essential oil was found to possess moderate cytotoxic effects on the HEp-2 cell line (50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50)=653.6 µg·mL(-1)). The potential antiviral effect was tested against Coxsackievirus B (CV-B), a significant human and mouse pathogen that causes pediatric central nervous system disease, commonly with acute syndromes. The reduction of viral infectivity by the essential oil was measured using a cytopathic (CPE) reduction assay. PMID:26580590

  9. PD-1 promotes immune exhaustion by inducing antiviral T cell motility paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Zinselmeyer, Bernd H.; Heydari, Sara; Sacristán, Catarina; Nayak, Debasis; Cammer, Michael; Herz, Jasmin; Cheng, Xiaoxiao; Davis, Simon J.; Dustin, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Immune responses to persistent viral infections and cancer often fail because of intense regulation of antigen-specific T cells—a process referred to as immune exhaustion. The mechanisms that underlie the induction of exhaustion are not completely understood. To gain novel insights into this process, we simultaneously examined the dynamics of virus-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells in the living spleen by two-photon microscopy (TPM) during the establishment of an acute or persistent viral infection. We demonstrate that immune exhaustion during viral persistence maps anatomically to the splenic marginal zone/red pulp and is defined by prolonged motility paralysis of virus-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. Unexpectedly, therapeutic blockade of PD-1–PD-L1 restored CD8+ T cell motility within 30 min, despite the presence of high viral loads. This result was supported by planar bilayer data showing that PD-L1 localizes to the central supramolecular activation cluster, decreases antiviral CD8+ T cell motility, and promotes stable immunological synapse formation. Restoration of T cell motility in vivo was followed by recovery of cell signaling and effector functions, which gave rise to a fatal disease mediated by IFN-γ. We conclude that motility paralysis is a manifestation of immune exhaustion induced by PD-1 that prevents antiviral CD8+ T cells from performing their effector functions and subjects them to prolonged states of negative immune regulation. PMID:23530125

  10. Screening for antiviral activities of isolated compounds from essential oils.

    PubMed

    Astani, Akram; Reichling, Jürgen; Schnitzler, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Essential oil of star anise as well as phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes, for example, trans-anethole, eugenol, β-eudesmol, farnesol, β-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene oxide, which are present in many essential oils, were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in vitro. Antiviral activity was analyzed by plaque reduction assays and mode of antiviral action was determined by addition of the drugs to uninfected cells, to the virus prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells. Star anise oil reduced viral infectivity by >99%, phenylpropanoids inhibited HSV infectivity by about 60-80% and sesquiterpenes suppressed herpes virus infection by 40-98%. Both, star anise essential oil and all isolated compounds exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity by direct inactivation of free virus particles in viral suspension assays. All tested drugs interacted in a dose-dependent manner with herpesvirus particles, thereby inactivating viral infectivity. Star anise oil, rich in trans-anethole, revealed a high selectivity index of 160 against HSV, whereas among the isolated compounds only β-caryophyllene displayed a high selectivity index of 140. The presence of β-caryophyllene in many essential oils might contribute strongly to their antiviral ability. These results indicate that phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes present in essential oils contribute to their antiviral activity against HSV. PMID:20008902

  11. Antiviral responses of arthropod vectors: an update on recent advances.

    PubMed

    Rückert, Claudia; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Fazakerley, John K; Fragkoudis, Rennos

    2014-01-01

    Arthropod vectors, such as mosquitoes, ticks, biting midges and sand flies, transmit many viruses that can cause outbreaks of disease in humans and animals around the world. Arthropod vector species are invading new areas due to globalisation and environmental changes, and contact between exotic animal species, humans and arthropod vectors is increasing, bringing with it the regular emergence of new arboviruses. For future strategies to control arbovirus transmission, it is important to improve our understanding of virus-vector interactions. In the last decade knowledge of arthropod antiviral immunity has increased rapidly. RNAi has been proposed as the most important antiviral response in mosquitoes and it is likely to be the most important antiviral response in all arthropods. However, other newly-discovered antiviral strategies such as melanisation and the link between RNAi and the JAK/STAT pathway via the cytokine Vago have been characterised in the last few years. This review aims to summarise the most important and most recent advances made in arthropod antiviral immunity. PMID:25674592

  12. Recent developments in antiviral agents against enterovirus 71 infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-71) is the main etiological agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Recent EV-71 outbreaks in Asia-Pacific were not limited to mild HFMD, but were associated with severe neurological complications such as aseptic meningitis and brainstem encephalitis, which may lead to cardiopulmonary failure and death. The absence of licensed therapeutics for clinical use has intensified research into anti-EV-71 development. This review highlights the potential antiviral agents targeting EV-71 attachment, entry, uncoating, translation, polyprotein processing, virus-induced formation of membranous RNA replication complexes, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The strategies for antiviral development include target-based synthetic compounds, anti-rhinovirus and poliovirus libraries screening, and natural compound libraries screening. Growing knowledge of the EV-71 life cycle will lead to successful development of antivirals. The continued effort to develop antiviral agents for treatment is crucial in the absence of a vaccine. The coupling of antivirals with an effective vaccine will accelerate eradication of the disease. PMID:24521134

  13. Pharmacological and biological antiviral therapeutics for cardiac coxsackievirus infections.

    PubMed

    Fechner, Henry; Pinkert, Sandra; Geisler, Anja; Poller, Wolfgang; Kurreck, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Subtype B coxsackieviruses (CVB) represent the most commonly identified infectious agents associated with acute and chronic myocarditis, with CVB3 being the most common variant. Damage to the heart is induced both directly by virally mediated cell destruction and indirectly due to the immune and autoimmune processes reacting to virus infection. This review addresses antiviral therapeutics for cardiac coxsackievirus infections discovered over the last 25 years. One group represents pharmacologically active low molecular weight substances that inhibit virus uptake by binding to the virus capsid (e.g., pleconaril) or inactivate viral proteins (e.g., NO-metoprolol and ribavirin) or inhibit cellular proteins which are essential for viral replication (e.g., ubiquitination inhibitors). A second important group of substances are interferons. They have antiviral but also immunomodulating activities. The third and most recently discovered group includes biological and cellular therapeutics. Soluble receptor analogues (e.g., sCAR-Fc) bind to the virus capsid and block virus uptake. Small interfering RNAs, short hairpin RNAs and antisense oligonucleotides bind to and led to degradation of the viral RNA genome or cellular RNAs, thereby preventing their translation and viral replication. Most recently mesenchymal stem cell transplantation has been shown to possess antiviral activity in CVB3 infections. Taken together, a number of antiviral therapeutics has been developed for the treatment of myocardial CVB infection in recent years. In addition to low molecular weight inhibitors, biological therapeutics have become promising anti-viral agents. PMID:21989310

  14. The 17th International Conference on Antiviral Research.

    PubMed

    Buckheit, Robert W

    2004-09-01

    The focus of the 17th International Conference on Antiviral Research was the discovery and development of antiviral agents (chemistry, biology, animal models and clinical trial results) against a variety of human infectious agents including HIV, herpes viruses, hepatitis viruses, respiratory viruses and emerging/re-emerging pathogens. The meeting included the symposium 'Clinical Update on Antiviral Drugs', plenary sessions dedicated to each of the individual classes of infectious agents, a symposium on new developments surrounding emerging pathogens, and three special award lectures, which discussed the history of nucleotide antiviral agents, mechanisms of viral persistence and drug resistance, and the therapy of herpes virus infections. Within each infectious agent session the presentations included those describing the development of new and novel anti-infectives, including research based on the preclinical development of new molecules, and the results of animal modelling and clinical studies on advanced-stage antiviral agents. A summary of the meeting highlights, segregated by infectious agent, will be presented in this review. PMID:15330752

  15. Screening for Antiviral Activities of Isolated Compounds from Essential Oils

    PubMed Central

    Astani, Akram; Reichling, Jürgen; Schnitzler, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Essential oil of star anise as well as phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes, for example, trans-anethole, eugenol, β-eudesmol, farnesol, β-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene oxide, which are present in many essential oils, were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in vitro. Antiviral activity was analyzed by plaque reduction assays and mode of antiviral action was determined by addition of the drugs to uninfected cells, to the virus prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells. Star anise oil reduced viral infectivity by >99%, phenylpropanoids inhibited HSV infectivity by about 60–80% and sesquiterpenes suppressed herpes virus infection by 40–98%. Both, star anise essential oil and all isolated compounds exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity by direct inactivation of free virus particles in viral suspension assays. All tested drugs interacted in a dose-dependent manner with herpesvirus particles, thereby inactivating viral infectivity. Star anise oil, rich in trans-anethole, revealed a high selectivity index of 160 against HSV, whereas among the isolated compounds only β-caryophyllene displayed a high selectivity index of 140. The presence of β-caryophyllene in many essential oils might contribute strongly to their antiviral ability. These results indicate that phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes present in essential oils contribute to their antiviral activity against HSV. PMID:20008902

  16. SiSPAT-Isotope, a coupled heat, water and stable isotope (HDO and H 218O) transport model for bare soil. Part II. Evaluation and sensitivity tests using two laboratory data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braud, I.; Bariac, T.; Vauclin, M.; Boujamlaoui, Z.; Gaudet, J. P.; Biron, Ph.; Richard, P.

    2005-07-01

    Stable water isotopes are tracers of water movement within the soil-vegetation-atmosphere system. They have the potential for a better understanding of water vapour transport within soils, evaporation and transpiration processes. To better understand those potentialities and possible lack of knowledge, a coupled heat-water and stable isotope transport model, called SiSPAT-Isotope was developed for bare soil. We presented the theoretical basis of the model in the first part of the paper, including a first validation of the likelihood of model results and a comparison with existing analytical solutions. In this companion paper, we go a step further by comparing the model results with two data sets collected on laboratory columns. In both cases, five soil columns were saturated and let drying during 173 and 253 days, respectively. At selected dates, one of the column was cut into slices and analysed to determine the volumetric water content, the deuterium and oxygen 18 concentrations profiles. The first data set was acquired on disturbed soil columns. The second one was collected on non-disturbed soil columns and it included a complete monitoring of atmospheric variables. It was not the case for the first one and a sensitivity analysis of model results to the air humidity was performed, showing its large influence on surface isotope concentrations. For both data sets, we also conducted a sensitivity analysis to the formulation of the kinetic fractionation factor, conditioning the resistance to isotope transport between the soil surface and the atmosphere, and to the value of soil tortuosity. The results showed that the model was able to reproduce the behaviour of the observed concentration profiles. A fair agreement between measured and calculated values was obtained for all profiles for the disturbed soil. Near surface concentrations were in general overestimated for the undisturbed soil, raising the question of possible influence of immobile water on concentrations

  17. Inverse relationship between heat stable enterotoxin-b induced fluid accumulation and adherence of F4ac-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in ligated jejunal loops of F4ab/ac fimbria receptor-positive swine.

    PubMed

    Erume, Joseph; Wijemanne, Prageeth; Berberov, Emil M; Kachman, Stephen D; Oestmann, Daniel J; Francis, David H; Moxley, Rodney A

    2013-01-25

    Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) increases bacterial adherence to porcine enterocytes in vitro and enhances small intestinal colonization in swine. Heat-stable enterotoxin-b (STb) is not known to affect colonization; however, through an induction of net fluid accumulation it might reduce bacterial adherence. The relationship between fluid accumulation and bacterial adherence in jejunal loops inoculated with ETEC strains that produce LT, STb, both, or neither toxin was studied. Ligated jejunal loops were constructed in weaned Yorkshire pigs in two independent experiments (Exp. 1, n=5, 8-week-old; Exp. 2, n=6, 6-8-week-old). Each pig was inoculated with six F4ac(+)E. coli strains: (1) LT(+), STb(+) parent (WAM2317); (2) STb(-) (ΔestB) mutant (MUN297); (3) MUN297 complemented with STb (MUN298); (4) LT(-) STb(-) (ΔeltAB ΔestB) mutant (MUN300); (5) MUN300 complemented with LT (MUN301); and (6) 1836-2 (non-enterotoxigenic, wild-type). Pigs were confirmed to be K88 (F4)ab/ac receptor-positive in Exp. 2 by testing for intestinal mucin-type glycoproteins and inferred to be receptor-positive in both Exp. 1 and 2 based on histopathologic evidence of bacterial adherence. Strains that produced STb induced marked fluid accumulation with the response (ml/cm) to WAM2317 and MUN298 significantly greater than that to the other strains (P<0.0001). Conversely, bacterial adherence scores based on immunohistochemistry and CFU/g of washed mucosa were both lowest in the strains that expressed STb and highest in those that did not. For the two experiments combined, the Pearson correlation coefficient (R) between fluid volume (ml/cm) and log CFU per gram was -0.57021 (P<0.0001); R(2)=0.3521 (n=197). These results support the hypothesis that enterotoxin-induced fluid accumulation flushes progeny organisms into the lumen of the bowel, thereby increasing the likelihood of fecal shedding and transmission of the pathogen to new hosts. PMID

  18. Antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis B in China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xin; Wang, Junzhong; Yang, Dongliang

    2015-02-01

    The vaccination program against hepatitis B virus (HBV) has greatly reduced the incidence of HBV infection. However, almost one-fourth of the HBV infected patients worldwide are still located in China. The healthcare burden from chronic HBV infection is a big challenge for the Chinese government and clinicians. Antiviral therapy plays a central role in controlling chronic HBV infection and preventing the disease progression. However, due to the specific economic and medical system issues, the first-line antiviral agents recommended by the AASLD and EASL have not been widely used for Chinese patients. In this review, we will discuss some key issues in the area of antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis B in China. PMID:25540038

  19. An innate antiviral pathway acting before interferons at epithelial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Marie B; Reinert, Line S; Thomsen, Martin K; Bagdonaite, Ieva; Nandakumar, Ramya; Cheshenko, Natalia; Prabakaran, Thaneas; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Krzyzowska, Malgosha; Kratholm, Sine K; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Petersen, Steen V; Goriely, Stanislas; Bibby, Bo Martin; Eriksson, Kristina; Ruland, Jürgen; Thomsen, Allan R; Herold, Betsy C; Wandall, Hans H; Frische, Sebastian; Holm, Christian K; Paludan, Søren R

    2016-02-01

    Mucosal surfaces are exposed to environmental substances and represent a major portal of entry for microorganisms. The innate immune system is responsible for early defense against infections and it is believed that the interferons (IFNs) constitute the first line of defense against viruses. Here we identify an innate antiviral pathway that works at epithelial surfaces before the IFNs. The pathway is activated independently of known innate sensors of viral infections through a mechanism dependent on viral O-linked glycans, which induce CXCR3 chemokines and stimulate antiviral activity in a manner dependent on neutrophils. This study therefore identifies a previously unknown layer of antiviral defense that exerts its action on epithelial surfaces before the classical IFN response is operative. PMID:26595890

  20. Antiviral selection in the management of acute retinal necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Patrick MK; Hooper, Claire Y; Lightman, Susan

    2010-01-01

    There is no consensus on the optimal antiviral regimen in the management of acute retinal necrosis, a disease caused by herpetic viruses with devastating consequences for the eye. The current gold standard is based on retrospective case series. Because the incidence of disease is low, few well-designed, randomized trials have evaluated treatment dosage and duration. Newer oral antiviral agents are emerging as alternatives to high-dose intravenous acyclovir, avoiding the need for inpatient intravenous treatment. Drug resistance is uncommon but may also be difficult to identify. Antiviral drugs have few side effects, but special attention needs to be paid to patients who have underlying renal disease, are pregnant or are immunocompromised. PMID:20169044

  1. Phytochemistry, cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of Eleusine indica (sambau)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iberahim, Rashidah; Yaacob, Wan Ahmad; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2015-09-01

    Goose grass also known as Eleusine indica (EI) is a local medicinal plant that displays antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer activities. The present study is to determine the phytochemical constituents, cytotoxicity and antiviral activities for both crude extract and fraction obtained from the plant. The crude extract contained more secondary metabolites compared to the hexane fraction as gauged using standard phytochemical tests. Cytotoxicity screening against Vero cells using MTT assay showed that the CC50 values for crude extract and hexane fraction were 2.07 and 5.62 mg/ml respectively. The antiviral activity towards Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) was determined using plaque reduction assay. The selective indices (SI = CC50 / EC50) for both methanol extract and hexane fraction were 12.2 and 6.2 respectively. These results demonstrate that the extract prepared from E. indica possesses phytochemical compound that was non cytotoxic to the cell with potential antiviral activity.

  2. Origins and Evolution of tetherin, an Orphan Antiviral Gene.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Melo, Daniel; Venkatesh, Siddarth; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2016-08-10

    Tetherin encodes an interferon-inducible antiviral protein that traps a broad spectrum of enveloped viruses at infected cell surfaces. Despite the absence of any clearly related gene or activity, we describe possible scenarios by which tetherin arose that exemplify how protein modularity, evolvability, and robustness can create and preserve new functions. We find that tetherin genes in various organisms exhibit no sequence similarity and share only a common architecture and location in modern genomes. Moreover, tetherin is part of a cluster of three potential sister genes encoding proteins of similar architecture, some variants of which exhibit antiviral activity while others can be endowed with antiviral activity by a simple modification. Only in slowly evolving species (e.g., coelacanths) does tetherin exhibit sequence similarity to one potential sister gene. Neofunctionalization, drift, and genetic conflict appear to have driven a near complete loss of sequence similarity among modern tetherin genes and their sister genes. PMID:27427209

  3. The Antiviral Effect of Baicalin on Enterovirus 71 In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Liu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Tingting; Jin, Yue; Cheng, Jianpin; Wan, Changbiao; Qian, Weihe; Xing, Fei; Shi, Weifeng

    2015-01-01

    Baicalin is a flavonoid compound extracted from Scutellaria roots that has been reported to possess antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antiviral activities. However, the antiviral effect of baicalin on enterovirus 71 (EV71) is still unknown. In this study, we found that baicalin showed inhibitory activity on EV71 infection and was independent of direct virucidal or prophylactic effect and inhibitory viral absorption. The expressions of EV71/3D mRNA and polymerase were significantly blocked by baicalin treatment at early stages of EV71 infection. In addition, baicalin could decrease the expressions of FasL and caspase-3, as well as inhibit the apoptosis of EV71-infected human embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells. Altogether, these results indicate that baicalin exhibits potent antiviral effect on EV71 infection, probably through inhibiting EV71/3D polymerase expression and Fas/FasL signaling pathways. PMID:26295407

  4. Ubiquitin in the activation and attenuation of innate antiviral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Viral infection activates danger signals that are transmitted via the retinoic acid–inducible gene 1–like receptor (RLR), nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR), and Toll-like receptor (TLR) protein signaling cascades. This places host cells in an antiviral posture by up-regulating antiviral cytokines including type-I interferon (IFN-I). Ubiquitin modifications and cross-talk between proteins within these signaling cascades potentiate IFN-I expression, and inversely, a growing number of viruses are found to weaponize the ubiquitin modification system to suppress IFN-I. Here we review how host- and virus-directed ubiquitin modification of proteins in the RLR, NLR, and TLR antiviral signaling cascades modulate IFN-I expression. PMID:26712804

  5. Antiviral properties from plants of the Mediterranean flora.

    PubMed

    Sanna, G; Farci, P; Busonera, B; Murgia, G; La Colla, P; Giliberti, G

    2015-01-01

    Natural products are a successful source in drug discovery, playing a significant role in maintaining human health. We investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of extracts from 18 traditionally used Mediterranean plants. Noteworthy antiviral activity was found in the extract obtained from the branches of Daphne gnidium L. against human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (EC50 = 0.08 μg/mL) and coxsackievirus B5 (EC50 = 0.10 μg/mL). Other relevant activities were found against BVDV, YFV, Sb-1, RSV and HSV-1. Interestingly, extracts from Artemisia arborescens L. and Rubus ulmifolius Schott, as well as those from D. gnidium L., showed activities against two different viruses. This extensive antiviral screening allowed us to identify attractive activities, offering opportunities to develop lead compounds with a great pharmaceutical potential. PMID:25613403

  6. A single Argonaute gene is required for induction of RNA silencing antiviral defense and promotes viral RNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qihong; Choi, Gil H; Nuss, Donald L

    2009-10-20

    Dicer gene dcl2, required for the RNA silencing antiviral defense response in the chestnut blight fungus Cryphonectria parasitica, is inducible upon mycovirus infection and promotes viral RNA recombination. We now report that the antiviral defense response requires only one of the four C. parasitica Argonaute-like protein genes, agl2. The agl2 gene is required for the virus-induced increase in dcl2 transcript accumulation. Agl2 and dcl2 transcripts accumulated to much higher levels in response to hairpin RNA production or infection by a mutant CHV1-EP713 hypovirus lacking the suppressor of RNA silencing p29 than to wild-type CHV1-EP713. Similar results were obtained for an agl2-promoter/EGFP-reporter construct, indicating that p29-mediated repression of agl2 transcript accumulation is promoter-dependent. Significantly, the agl2 deletion mutant exhibited stable maintenance of non-viral sequences in recombinant hypovirus RNA virus vectors and the absence of hypovirus-defective interfering (DI) RNA production. These results establish a key role for an Argonaute gene in the induction of an RNA silencing antiviral defense response and the promotion of viral RNA recombination. They also provide evidence for a mechanism by which a virus-encoded RNA silencing suppressor represses the transcriptional induction of an RNA silencing component. PMID:19822766

  7. Stable Fly Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adult stable flies feed on the blood of humans, pets and livestock, inflicting painful bites. Stable flies need one and sometimes two bloodmeals each day to develop their eggs. Unlike mosquitoes where only the females bloodfeed, both male and female stable flies require blood to reproduce. Stable fl...

  8. Antiviral Activity and Induction of Interferon-Like Substance by Quinacrine and Acranil

    PubMed Central

    Gláz, E. T.; Szolgay, Erika; Stöger, Ivana; Tálas, Margarita

    1973-01-01

    Several drugs with certain structural similarities (tricyclic ring system with dialkylaminoalkyl side chains) to tilorone, a potent interferon inducer, were screened for antiviral activity in vivo. Two acridine drugs, Acranil and quinacrine, were found to be effective, the former being almost as protective as tilorone and the latter less so. Both agents induced an interferon-like substance which could be detected in the serum of treated mice. The concentration of the inhibitory factor in the serum was highest after exposure to tilorone, followed in turn by Acranil and quinacrine, based on the administration of equal weights of drugs. Both tilorone and Acranil induced lower levels of circulating interferon-like substance in Balb/c mice than in other strains of mice. The serum factor induced by Acranil was shown to be stable at pH 2. PMID:4790609

  9. Development of antiviral agents toward enterovirus 71 infection.

    PubMed

    Pourianfar, Hamid Reza; Grollo, Lara

    2015-02-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection remains a public health problem at a global level, particularly in the Asia-Pacific region. The infection normally manifests as hand-foot-mouth disease; however, it is capable of developing into potentially fatal neurological complications. There is currently no approved vaccine or antiviral substance available for the prevention or treatment of EV71 infection. This paper, thus, reviews efforts to develop or discover synthetic as well as naturally occurring compounds directed against EV71 infection. The recent achievements in cellular receptors of EV71 are also highlighted, and their contribution to the development of antiviral drugs against EV71 is discussed in this article. PMID:24560700

  10. Is Minocycline an Antiviral Agent? A Review of Current Literature.

    PubMed

    Nagarakanti, Sandhya; Bishburg, Eliahu

    2016-01-01

    Minocycline is a second-generation semi-synthetic derivative of tetracycline and has well-known anti-bacterial effects. The drug possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-apoptotic and immunomodulatory effects. The drug is widely used in bacterial infections and non-infectious conditions such as acne, dermatitis, periodontitis and neurodegenerative conditions. Minocycline was shown to have antiviral activity in vitro and also against different viruses in some animal models. Some studies have been done on human patients infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus. We have review the available data regarding minocycline activity as an antiviral agent. PMID:26177421

  11. New Study Shows Clinicians Under-Prescribing Flu Antiviral Drugs and Possibly Overprescribing Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Should Know About Flu Antiviral Drugs Antiviral Drug Supply Mixing Tamiflu Capsules Drug Resistance Information for Health ... The Flu Season Seasonal Influenza, More Information Vaccine Supply for 2015-2016 Season Seasonal Influenza-Associated Hospitalizations ...

  12. Effect of Antiviral Therapy on Serum Activity of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Husic-Selimovic, Azra; Sofic, Amela; Huskic, Jasminko; Bulja, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Renin-angiotenzin system (RAS) is frequently activated in patients with chronic liver disease. Angiotenzin - II (AT-II), produced by angiotenzin converting enzyme (ACE), has many physiological effects, including an important role in liver fibrogenesis. Combined antiviral therapy with PEG-IFN and ribavirin besides its antiviral effect also leads to a reduction in liver parenchyma fibrosis. Aim of the study: Determining the value of ACE in serum of patients with chronic hepatitis C before and after combined antiviral therapy, as well as the value of ACE activities in sera of the control group. Materials and methods: We studied 50 patients treated at Gastroenterohepatology Department, in the time-period of four years. Value of ACE in serum was determined by Olympus AU 400 device, with application of kit “Infinity TN ACE Liquid Stable Reagent”. HCV RNA levels in sera were measured by real time PCR. HCV RNA test was performed with modular analysis of AMPLICOR and COBAS AMPLICOR HCV MONITOR test v2.0, which has proved infection and was used for quantification of the viruses and monitoring of the patients’ response to therapy. Liver histology was evaluated in accordance with the level of necroinflammation activity and stage of fibrosis. Results: Serum activities of ACE in chronic hepatitis C patients is statistically higher than the values in the control group (p=0.02). Antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C patients statistically decreases serum activities of ACE (p= 0.02) and indirectly affects fibrogenesis of the liver parenchyma. Correlation between ACE and ALT activity after the therapy was proved (0.3934). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the activity of ACE in serum is a good indirect parameter of the liver damage, and could be used as an indirect prognostic factor of the level of liver parenchyma damage. Serum activity of ACE can be used as a parameter for non-invasive assessment of intensity of liver damage. PMID:27147779

  13. Pharmacokinetics of antiviral polyoxometalates in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Ni, L; Boudinot, F D; Boudinot, S G; Henson, G W; Bossard, G E; Martellucci, S A; Ash, P W; Fricker, S P; Darkes, M C; Theobald, B R

    1994-01-01

    Polyoxometalates are soluble mineral compounds formed principally of oxide anions and early transition metal cations. The polyoxometalates K12H2[P2W12O48].24H2O (JM 1591), K10[P2W18Zn4(H2O)2O68].20H2O (JM 1596), and [(CH3)3NH]8[Si2W18Nb6O77] (JM 2820) demonstrate potent antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus in vitro. The preclinical pharmacokinetics of these three compounds were characterized after single-dose intravenous administration of 50 mg/kg to rats. Plasma, urine, and feces were collected for 168 h, and polyoxometalate concentrations were determined by atomic emission. Serum protein binding was measured by equilibrium dialysis. All three compounds were highly bound to serum proteins in a concentration-dependent manner. Total and unbound concentrations of the three compounds in plasma declined in a triexponential manner with terminal half-lives of 246.0 +/- 127.0, 438.4 +/- 129.4, and 32.2 +/- 5.37 h (mean +/- standard deviation) for JM 1591, JM 1596, and JM 2820, respectively. Systemic clearances based on total concentrations in plasma were low, averaging 0.016 +/- 0.002, 0.015 +/- 0.002, and 0.018 +/- 0.003 liter/h/kg for JM 1591, JM 1596, and JM 2820, respectively. The clearances of unbound compounds from plasma averaged 0.966 +/- 0.136, 0.050 +/- 0.005, and 0.901 +/- 0.165 liter/h/kg for JM 1591, JM 1596, and JM 2820, respectively. For JM 1596, the clearance of unbound compound from the kidneys was lower than the glomerular filtration rate (0.086 liter/h/kg), suggesting this polyoxometalate underwent renal tubular reabsorption. However, JM 1591 and JM 2820 appeared to undergo tubular secretion. The fraction of the dose recovered in urine was 11.5, 46.8, and 10.6% for JM 1591, JM 1596, and JM 2820, respectively. Approximately 5% of the dose of each polyoxometalate was recovered in feces. The steady-state volume of distribution based on total concentrations averaged 1.44 liters

  14. Magnetotelluric Data, Stable Distributions and Stable Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chave, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    The author has noted for many years that the residuals from robust or bounded influence estimates of the magnetotelluric response function are systematically long tailed compared to a Gaussian or Rayleigh distribution. Consequently, the standard statistical model of a Gaussian core contaminated by a fraction of outlying data is not really valid. However, the typical result is an improvement on ordinary least squares, and has become standard in the electromagnetic induction community. A recent re-evaluation of the statistics of magnetotelluric response function estimation has shown that, in almost all cases, the residuals are alpha stable rather than Gaussian. Alpha stable distributions are characterized by four parameters: a shape parameter lying on (0, 2], a skewness parameter, a scale parameter and a location parameter, and cannot be expressed in closed form except for a few special cases. When the shape parameter is 2, the result is Gaussian, but when it is smaller the resulting distribution has infinite variance. Typical magnetotelluric residuals are alpha stable with a shape parameter lying between 1 and 2. This suggests that robust methods improve response function estimates by eliminating data corresponding to the largest stable residuals while leaving the bulk of the population alone. A better statistical approach is based on stable regression that directly accommodates the actual residual distribution without eliminating the most extreme ones. This paper will introduce such an algorithm, and illustrate its functionality with a variety of magnetotelluric data. Further work remains to produce a robust stable regression algorithm that will eliminate real outliers such as lightning strikes or instrument problems without affecting the bulk stable population. Stable distributions are intimately associated with fractional derivative physical processes. Since the Maxwell equations and the constitutive relations pertaining to the earth do not contain any fractional

  15. Liposomal Systems as Nanocarriers for the Antiviral Agent Ivermectin.

    PubMed

    Croci, Romina; Bottaro, Elisabetta; Chan, Kitti Wing Ki; Watanabe, Satoru; Pezzullo, Margherita; Mastrangelo, Eloise; Nastruzzi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    RNA virus infections can lead to the onset of severe diseases such as fever with haemorrhage, multiorgan failure, and mortality. The emergence and reemergence of RNA viruses continue to pose a significant public health threat worldwide with particular attention to the increasing incidence of flaviviruses, among others Dengue, West Nile Virus, and Yellow Fever viruses. Development of new and potent antivirals is thus urgently needed. Ivermectin, an already known antihelminthic drug, has shown potent effects in vitro on Flavivirus helicase, with EC50 values in the subnanomolar range for Yellow Fever and submicromolar EC50 for Dengue Fever, Japanese encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. However ivermectin is hampered in its application by pharmacokinetic problems (little solubility and high cytotoxicity). To overcome such problems we engineered different compositions of liposomes as ivermectin carriers characterizing and testing them on several cell lines for cytotoxicity. The engineered liposomes were less cytotoxic than ivermectin alone and they showed a significant increase of the antiviral activity in all the Dengue stains tested (1, 2, and S221). In the current study ivermectin is confirmed to be an effective potential antiviral and liposomes, as drug carriers, are shown to modulate the drug activity. All together the results represent a promising starting point for future improvement of ivermectin as antiviral and its delivery. PMID:27242902

  16. Liposomal Systems as Nanocarriers for the Antiviral Agent Ivermectin

    PubMed Central

    Croci, Romina; Bottaro, Elisabetta; Chan, Kitti Wing Ki; Watanabe, Satoru; Pezzullo, Margherita; Mastrangelo, Eloise; Nastruzzi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    RNA virus infections can lead to the onset of severe diseases such as fever with haemorrhage, multiorgan failure, and mortality. The emergence and reemergence of RNA viruses continue to pose a significant public health threat worldwide with particular attention to the increasing incidence of flaviviruses, among others Dengue, West Nile Virus, and Yellow Fever viruses. Development of new and potent antivirals is thus urgently needed. Ivermectin, an already known antihelminthic drug, has shown potent effects in vitro on Flavivirus helicase, with EC50 values in the subnanomolar range for Yellow Fever and submicromolar EC50 for Dengue Fever, Japanese encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. However ivermectin is hampered in its application by pharmacokinetic problems (little solubility and high cytotoxicity). To overcome such problems we engineered different compositions of liposomes as ivermectin carriers characterizing and testing them on several cell lines for cytotoxicity. The engineered liposomes were less cytotoxic than ivermectin alone and they showed a significant increase of the antiviral activity in all the Dengue stains tested (1, 2, and S221). In the current study ivermectin is confirmed to be an effective potential antiviral and liposomes, as drug carriers, are shown to modulate the drug activity. All together the results represent a promising starting point for future improvement of ivermectin as antiviral and its delivery. PMID:27242902

  17. 6-azacytidine--compound with wide spectrum of antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Alexeeva, I; Dyachenko, N; Nosach, L; Zhovnovataya, V; Rybalko, S; Lozitskaya, R; Fedchuk, A; Lozitsky, V; Gridina, T; Shalamay, A; Palchikovskaja, L; Povnitsa, O

    2001-01-01

    6-azacytidine demonstrates activity against adenoviruses types 1, 2, 5. It inhibit synthesis of viral DNA and proteins. 6-AC shows antiherpetic and antiinfluenza action during experimental infection in mice. 6-AC is prospective for drug development as an antiviral substance with a wide spectrum of activity. PMID:11562975

  18. Cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of methanol extract from Polygonum minus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, Noor Zarina Abd; Bunawan, Hamidun; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2015-09-01

    A study was carried out to test the cytotoxicity and antiviral effects of methanolic extracts from the leaves and stem of Polygonum minus or kesum. Cytotoxicity tests were performed on Vero cells indicates the LC50 value for leaf extract towards the Vero cells was 875 mg/L and the LC50 value for stem extract was 95 mg/L. The LC50 values indidcate the non-cytotoxic effect of the extracts and worth for further testing. Antiviral test were carried out towards herpes simplex virus infected Vero cells using three concentration of extract which were equivalent to 1.0 LC50, 0.1 LC50 and 0.01 LC50. Three different treatments to detect antiviral activity were used. Mild antiviral activity of the stem extract was detected when cells were treated for 24 hours with plant extract before viral infection. This demonstrates the capability of the test compound to protect the cells from viral attachment and of the possible prophylactic effect of the P. minus stem methanol extract.

  19. Approved Antiviral Drugs over the Past 50 Years.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik; Li, Guangdi

    2016-07-01

    Since the first antiviral drug, idoxuridine, was approved in 1963, 90 antiviral drugs categorized into 13 functional groups have been formally approved for the treatment of the following 9 human infectious diseases: (i) HIV infections (protease inhibitors, integrase inhibitors, entry inhibitors, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and acyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogues), (ii) hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections (lamivudine, interferons, nucleoside analogues, and acyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogues), (iii) hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections (ribavirin, interferons, NS3/4A protease inhibitors, NS5A inhibitors, and NS5B polymerase inhibitors), (iv) herpesvirus infections (5-substituted 2'-deoxyuridine analogues, entry inhibitors, nucleoside analogues, pyrophosphate analogues, and acyclic guanosine analogues), (v) influenza virus infections (ribavirin, matrix 2 protein inhibitors, RNA polymerase inhibitors, and neuraminidase inhibitors), (vi) human cytomegalovirus infections (acyclic guanosine analogues, acyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogues, pyrophosphate analogues, and oligonucleotides), (vii) varicella-zoster virus infections (acyclic guanosine analogues, nucleoside analogues, 5-substituted 2'-deoxyuridine analogues, and antibodies), (viii) respiratory syncytial virus infections (ribavirin and antibodies), and (ix) external anogenital warts caused by human papillomavirus infections (imiquimod, sinecatechins, and podofilox). Here, we present for the first time a comprehensive overview of antiviral drugs approved over the past 50 years, shedding light on the development of effective antiviral treatments against current and emerging infectious diseases worldwide. PMID:27281742

  20. Synergistic antiviral activity of gemcitabine and ribavirin against enteroviruses.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyunju; Kim, Chonsaeng; Kim, Dong-eun; Song, Jae-Hyoung; Choi, Miri; Choi, Kwangman; Kang, Mingu; Lee, Kyungjin; Kim, Hae Soo; Shin, Jin Soo; Kim, Janghwan; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Mi-Young; Lee, Su Ui; Lee, Chong-Kyo; Kim, Meehyein; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Cho, Sungchan

    2015-12-01

    Enteroviruses are major causative agents of various human diseases, and some of them are currently considered to be an enormous threat to public health. However, no effective therapy is currently available for the treatment of these infections. We identified gemcitabine, a nucleoside-analog drug used for cancer treatment, from a screen of bioactive chemicals as a novel inhibitor of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) and enterovirus 71 (EV71). Gemcitabine potently inhibited the proliferation of CVB3 and EV71, as well as the replication of CVB3 and EV71 replicons, in cells with a low micromolar IC50 (1-5 μM). Its strong inhibitory effect was also observed in cells infected with human rhinoviruses, demonstrating broad-spectrum antiviral effects on enteroviruses. Mechanistically, an extensive analysis excluded the involvement of 2C, 3A, IRES-dependent translation, and also that of polyprotein processing in the antiviral effects of gemcitabine. Importantly, gemcitabine in combination with ribavirin, an antiviral drug currently being used against a few RNA viruses, exhibited a synergistic antiviral effect on the replication of CVB3 and EV71 replicons. Consequently, our results clearly demonstrate a new indication for gemcitabine as an effective broad-spectrum inhibitor of enteroviruses and strongly suggest a new therapeutic strategy using gemcitabine alone or in combination with ribavirin for the treatment of various diseases associated with enterovirus infection. PMID:26526589

  1. 75 FR 16151 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  2. 76 FR 62418 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  3. Novel antiviral activity of baicalein against dengue virus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dengue is a serious arboviral disease currently with no effective antiviral therapy or approved vaccine available. Therefore, finding the effective compound against dengue virus (DENV) replication is very important. Among the natural compounds, bioflavonoids derived mainly from plants are of interest because of their biological and medicinal benefits. Methods In the present study, antiviral activity of a bioflavonoid, baicalein, was evaluated against different stages of dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) replication in Vero cells using focus forming unit reduction assay and quantitative RT-PCR. Results Baicalein inhibited DENV-2 replication in Vero cells with IC50= 6.46 μg/mL and SI= 17.8 when added after adsorption to the cells. The IC50 against DENV-2 was 5.39 μg/mL and SI= 21.3 when cells were treated 5 hours before virus infection and continuously up to 4 days post infection. Baicalein exhibited direct virucidal effect against DENV-2 with IC 50= 1.55 μg/mL and showed anti-adsorption effect with IC50 = 7.14 μg/mL. Conclusions Findings presented here suggest that baicalein exerts potent antiviral activity against DENV. Baicalein possesses direct virucidal activity against DENV besides its effects against dengue virus adsorption and intracellular replication of DENV-2. Baicalein, hence, should be considered for in vivo evaluation in the development of an effective antiviral compound against DENV. PMID:23140177

  4. Mitochondrial DNA Stress Primes the Antiviral Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    West, A. Phillip; Khoury-Hanold, William; Staron, Matthew; Tal, Michal C.; Pineda, Cristiana M.; Lang, Sabine M.; Bestwick, Megan; Duguay, Brett A.; Raimundo, Nuno; MacDuff, Donna A.; Kaech, Susan M.; Smiley, James R.; Means, Robert E.; Iwasaki, Akiko; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is normally present at thousands of copies per cell and is packaged into several hundred higher-order structures termed nucleoids1. The abundant mtDNA-binding protein, transcription factor A mitochondrial (TFAM), regulates nucleoid architecture, abundance, and segregation2. Complete mtDNA depletion profoundly impairs oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), triggering calcium-dependent stress signaling and adaptive metabolic responses3. However, the cellular responses to mtDNA instability, a physiologically relevant stress observed in many human diseases and aging, remain ill-defined4. Here we show that moderate mtDNA stress elicited by TFAM deficiency engages cytosolic antiviral signaling to enhance the expression of a subset of interferon-stimulated genes (ISG). Mechanistically, we have found that aberrant mtDNA packaging promotes escape of mtDNA into the cytosol, where it engages the DNA sensor cGAS and promotes STING-IRF3-dependent signaling to elevate ISG expression, potentiate type I interferon responses, and confer broad viral resistance. Furthermore, we demonstrate that herpesviruses induce mtDNA stress, which potentiates antiviral signaling and type I interferon responses during infection. Our results further demonstrate that mitochondria are central participants in innate immunity, identify mtDNA stress as a cell-intrinsic trigger of antiviral signaling, and suggest that cellular monitoring of mtDNA homeostasis cooperates with canonical virus sensing mechanisms to fully license antiviral innate immunity. PMID:25642965

  5. Mitochondrial DNA stress primes the antiviral innate immune response.

    PubMed

    West, A Phillip; Khoury-Hanold, William; Staron, Matthew; Tal, Michal C; Pineda, Cristiana M; Lang, Sabine M; Bestwick, Megan; Duguay, Brett A; Raimundo, Nuno; MacDuff, Donna A; Kaech, Susan M; Smiley, James R; Means, Robert E; Iwasaki, Akiko; Shadel, Gerald S

    2015-04-23

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is normally present at thousands of copies per cell and is packaged into several hundred higher-order structures termed nucleoids. The abundant mtDNA-binding protein TFAM (transcription factor A, mitochondrial) regulates nucleoid architecture, abundance and segregation. Complete mtDNA depletion profoundly impairs oxidative phosphorylation, triggering calcium-dependent stress signalling and adaptive metabolic responses. However, the cellular responses to mtDNA instability, a physiologically relevant stress observed in many human diseases and ageing, remain poorly defined. Here we show that moderate mtDNA stress elicited by TFAM deficiency engages cytosolic antiviral signalling to enhance the expression of a subset of interferon-stimulated genes. Mechanistically, we find that aberrant mtDNA packaging promotes escape of mtDNA into the cytosol, where it engages the DNA sensor cGAS (also known as MB21D1) and promotes STING (also known as TMEM173)-IRF3-dependent signalling to elevate interferon-stimulated gene expression, potentiate type I interferon responses and confer broad viral resistance. Furthermore, we demonstrate that herpesviruses induce mtDNA stress, which enhances antiviral signalling and type I interferon responses during infection. Our results further demonstrate that mitochondria are central participants in innate immunity, identify mtDNA stress as a cell-intrinsic trigger of antiviral signalling and suggest that cellular monitoring of mtDNA homeostasis cooperates with canonical virus sensing mechanisms to fully engage antiviral innate immunity. PMID:25642965

  6. Small molecules with antiviral activity against the Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Litterman, Nadia; Lipinski, Christopher; Ekins, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has highlighted the clear shortage of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs for emerging viruses. There are numerous FDA approved drugs and other small molecules described in the literature that could be further evaluated for their potential as antiviral compounds. These molecules are in addition to the few new antivirals that have been tested in Ebola patients but were not originally developed against the Ebola virus, and may play an important role as we await an effective vaccine. The balance between using FDA approved drugs versus novel antivirals with minimal safety and no efficacy data in humans should be considered. We have evaluated 55 molecules from the perspective of an experienced medicinal chemist as well as using simple molecular properties and have highlighted 16 compounds that have desirable qualities as well as those that may be less desirable. In addition we propose that a collaborative database for sharing such published and novel information on small molecules is needed for the research community studying the Ebola virus. PMID:25713700

  7. Small molecules with antiviral activity against the Ebola virus

    PubMed Central

    Litterman, Nadia; Lipinski, Christopher; Ekins, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has highlighted the clear shortage of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs for emerging viruses. There are numerous FDA approved drugs and other small molecules described in the literature that could be further evaluated for their potential as antiviral compounds. These molecules are in addition to the few new antivirals that have been tested in Ebola patients but were not originally developed against the Ebola virus, and may play an important role as we await an effective vaccine. The balance between using FDA approved drugs versus novel antivirals with minimal safety and no efficacy data in humans should be considered. We have evaluated 55 molecules from the perspective of an experienced medicinal chemist as well as using simple molecular properties and have highlighted 16 compounds that have desirable qualities as well as those that may be less desirable. In addition we propose that a collaborative database for sharing such published and novel information on small molecules is needed for the research community studying the Ebola virus. PMID:25713700

  8. Novel drug delivery approaches on antiviral and antiretroviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pooja; Chawla, Anuj; Arora, Sandeep; Pawar, Pravin

    2012-01-01

    Viruses have the property to replicate very fast in host cell. It can attack any part of host cell. Therefore, the clinical efficacy of antiviral drugs and its bioavailability is more important concern taken into account to treat viral infections. The oral and parenteral routes of drug administration have several shortcomings, however, which could lead to the search for formulating better delivery systems. Now, a day's novel drug delivery systems (NDDS) proved to be a better approach to enhance the effectiveness of the antivirals and improve the patient compliance and decrease the adverse effect. The NDDS have reduced the dosing frequency and shorten the duration of treatment, thus, which could lead the treatment more cost-effective. The development of NDDS for antiviral and antiretroviral therapy aims to deliver the drug devoid of toxicity, with high compatibility and biodegradability, targeting the drug to specific sites for viral infection and in some instances it also avoid the first pass metabolism effect. This article aims to discuss the usefulness of novel delivery approaches of antiviral agents such as niosomes, microspheres, microemulsions, nanoparticles that are used in the treatment of various Herpes viruses and in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. PMID:23057001

  9. Antiviral medication in sexually transmitted diseases. Part I: HSV, HPV.

    PubMed

    Mlynarczyk-Bonikowska, Beata; Majewska, Anna; Malejczyk, Magdalena; Mlynarczyk, Grazyna; Majewski, Slawomir

    2013-11-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) are one of the most prevalent infectious diseases in the world and important cause of morbidity and mortality. Especially STDs of viral etiology are difficult to cure. In many cases the antiviral therapy can relieve the symptoms but not eliminate the virus. During the past decades, considerable progress has been made in the development of antiviral drugs. One of the oldest antiviral medications is acyclovir (ACV). It is approved to treat initial and recurrent genital herpes and as a suppressive therapy in severe recurrent genital infections as well. Drug resistance to ACV and related drugs is seen among immunocompromised hosts, including human immunodeficiency virus HIV-infected patients. Resistant infections can be managed by second-line drugs - foscarnet or cidofovir- but they are more toxic than ACV. In case of HPV there is not known specific target for the medication and that is why the substances used in human papilloma virus HPV infection therapy are either antimitotics or immunomodulators. The Part I review focuses on mechanisms of actions and mechanisms of resistance to antiviral agents used in a treatment of the genital herpes and genital HPV infection. In Part II we will show the therapeutic options in other sexually transmitted infections: hepatitis B, C and HIV. PMID:24032509

  10. Gutsy Microbes Fly High in the Antiviral War.

    PubMed

    Robalino, Javier; Wu, Louisa

    2016-01-01

    The importance of microbiomes in health and disease is now well appreciated. New work from Sansone and colleagues adds to this understanding by showing that gut microbes are key for the local induction of an ERK-dependent antiviral response in flies. PMID:26690611