Science.gov

Sample records for heat storage medium

  1. Medium Deep High Temperature Heat Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bär, Kristian; Rühaak, Wolfram; Schulte, Daniel; Welsch, Bastian; Chauhan, Swarup; Homuth, Sebastian; Sass, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    Heating of buildings requires more than 25 % of the total end energy consumption in Germany. Shallow geothermal systems for indirect use as well as shallow geothermal heat storage systems like aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) or borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) typically provide low exergy heat. The temperature levels and ranges typically require a coupling with heat pumps. By storing hot water from solar panels or thermal power stations with temperatures of up to 110 °C a medium deep high temperature heat storage (MDHTS) can be operated on relatively high temperature levels of more than 45 °C. Storage depths of 500 m to 1,500 m below surface avoid conflicts with groundwater use for drinking water or other purposes. Permeability is typically also decreasing with greater depth; especially in the crystalline basement therefore conduction becomes the dominant heat transport process. Solar-thermal charging of a MDHTS is a very beneficial option for supplying heat in urban and rural systems. Feasibility and design criteria of different system configurations (depth, distance and number of BHE) are discussed. One system is designed to store and supply heat (300 kW) for an office building. The required boreholes are located in granodioritic bedrock. Resulting from this setup several challenges have to be addressed. The drilling and completion has to be planned carefully under consideration of the geological and tectonical situation at the specific site.

  2. Research on medium and high temperature solar heat storage materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heine, D.; Jucker, J.; Koch, D.; Krahling, H.; Supper, W.

    1979-01-01

    Characteristics of solar heat storage materials, preliminary tests in which melting and solidification characteristics are tested, and service life and cycling tests are reported. Various aspects of corrosion are discussed as well as decision about ultimate selection of materials. A program for storage and evaluation of data is included.

  3. Permanent holographic storage medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gange, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Storage unit is electrostatically-charged multilayered laminate. Ability of system to store information in holographic forms is due to specific electrical, optical, and chemical characteristics of its materials.

  4. HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

  5. Solar Energy: Heat Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on heat storage is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies. The module…

  6. On the Method of Efficient Ice Cold Energy Storage Using a Heat Transfer of Direct Contact Phase Change and a Natural Circulation of a Working Medium in an Enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utaka, Yoshio; Saito, Akio; Nakata, Naoki

    The objectives of this report are to propose a new method of the high performance cold energy storage using ice as a phase change material and to clarify the heat transfer characteristics of the apparatus of ice cold energy storage based on the proposed principle. A working medium vapor layer a water layer and a working medium liquid layer stratified in this order from the top were kept in an enclosure composed of a condenser, an evaporator and a condensate receiver-and-return tube. The direct contact heat transfers between water or ice and a working medium in an enclosure were applied for realizing the high performance cold energy storage and release. In the storage and release processes, water changes the phase between the liquid and the solid, and the working medium cnanges between the vapor and the liquid with a natural circulation. Experimental apparatus was manufactured and R12 and R114 were selected as working media in the thermal energy storage enclosure. It was confirmed by the measurements that the efficient formation and melting of ice were achieved. Then, th e heat transfer characteristics were clarified for the effects of the initial water height, the initial height of woking medium liquid layer and the inlet coolant temperature.

  7. Advanced solar thermal storage medium test data and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, H.

    1981-01-01

    A comparative study has been made of experimentally obtained heat transfer and heat storage characteristics of a solar thermal energy storage bed utilizing containerized water or phase change material (PCM) and rock or brick. It is shown that (1) containers with an L/D ratio of 0.80 and a mass/surface area ratio of 2.74 in a random stacking arrangement have the optimum heat transfer characteristics; and (2) vertical stacking has the least pressure drop across the test bed. It is also found that standard bricks with appropriate holes make an excellent storage medium.

  8. Seasonal storage of energy in solar heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, J. E.; Klein, S. A.; Mitchell, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    This paper focuses on several aspects of seasonal storage for space heating using water as the storage medium. The interrelationships between collector area, storage volume, and system performance are investigated using the transient simulation program TRNSYS. The situations for which seasonal storage is most promising are presented. Particular emphasis is placed upon design of seasonal storage systems. A design method is presented which is applicable for storage capacities ranging from a few days to seasonal storage. This design method, coupled with cost information, should be useful in assessing the economic viability of seasonal storage systems. Also investigated are the importance of the load heat exchanger size, tank insulation, collector slope, and year-to-year weather variations in system design.

  9. Low temperature latent heat thermal energy storage - Heat storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhat, A.

    1983-01-01

    Heat-of-fusion storage materials for low temperature latent heat storage in the temperature range 0-120 C are reviewed. Organic and inorganic heat storage materials classified as paraffins, fatty acids, inorganic salt hydrates and eutectic compounds are considered. The melting and freezing behavior of the various substances is investigated using the techniques of Thermal Analysis and Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The importance of thermal cycling tests for establishing the long-term stability of the storage materials is discussed. Finally, some data pertaining to the corrosion compatibility of heat-of-fusion substances with conventional materials of construction is presented.

  10. Heat resistance of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in a nutrient medium and in ground beef patties as influenced by storage and holding temperatures.

    PubMed

    Jackson, T C; Hardin, M D; Acuff, G R

    1996-03-01

    Stationary-phase cultures of Escherichia coli O157:H7 were inoculated into tryptic soy broth, sealed in vials, and stored at -18 degrees C for 1, 8, and 15 days, or 3 or 15 degrees C for 3, 6, and 9 h. Thermal resistance was determined at 55 degrees C. Each storage treatment was repeated with additional holding at 23 or 30 degrees C for 1, 2, 3, or 4 h prior to heating to simulate potential temperature abuse during handling. Cultures under treatments enabling the growth of E. coli O157:H7 were generally more heat sensitive than those held at temperatures which restricted growth or enabled growth to stationary phase. Cultures stored frozen (-18 degrees C) without holding at elevated temperatures had greater heat resistance than those stored under refrigeration (3 degrees C) or at 15 degrees C. Subsequent holding of frozen cultures at 23 or 30 degrees C resulted in a decrease in heat resistance. To determine whether these responses would be observed under typical commercial preparation procedures, ground beef patties were inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 and stored at 3 or 15 degrees C for 9 h or at -18 degrees C for 8 d and then held at 21 or 30 degrees C for 0 or 4 h. Patties were grilled to an internal temperature of 54.4 degrees C (130 degrees F), 62.8 degrees C (145 degrees F), or 68.3 degrees C (155 degrees F). Cultures were most resistant in frozen patties, while cultures in patties stored at 15 degrees C were the most heat sensitive. Holding patties at 21 or 30 degrees C prior to grilling resulted in increased sensitivity. Storage and holding temperatures similar to those encountered in food service may influence the ability of E. coli O157:H7 to survive heat treatments. PMID:10463438

  11. Static solar heat storage composition

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, H.J.

    1981-09-08

    A composition for the storage of heat energy utilizing the heat of fusion of the composition. The composition includes a salthydrate, a nucleating agent and a porous solid. The porous solid is selected from calcium sulfate hemihydrate and soluble calcium sulfate anhydride.

  12. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenall, C. E.; Gueceri, S. I.

    1980-01-01

    The theory of eutectic transformation was examined to find guidelines to the best material combinations to examine. The heats of transformation were measured calorimetrically, and the volume changes of expanding solid mixtures and homogeneous liquid solutions, especially during the transformation between the two states at fixed temperature, were measured by changes in X-ray absorption. Heat flow models appropriate to storage in phase change materials were developed along with efficient calculating procedures so that the relative importance of the problems associated with energy storage density, heat conduction, and similar properties could be assessed.

  13. A solar heating system with annual storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzari, F.; Raffellini, G.

    1981-07-01

    A solar heated house with long term storage capability, built in Trento, Italy, is described. The one story house was built from modular components and has a total heated volume of 1130 cu m. Flat plate solar collectors with a water-antifreeze medium are located beneath the lawn, and six cylindrical underground tanks holding 130 cu m of water heated by thermal energy from the collectors are situated under the garden. The house walls have an 8 cm cavity filled with 5 cm of formaldehyde foam, yielding a heat transmission (U) of 0.37 W/sq m/deg C. The roof and ceilings are insulated with fiberglass and concrete, producing U-values of 0.46 W/sq m/deg C and 0.57 W/sq m/deg C, respectively. Heat pumps using 6 kW move thermal energy between the house and the tanks. Direct hot water heating occurs in the summer, and direct home heating when the stored water temperature exceeds 32 C. A computer model was developed which traces the annual heat flow and it is shown that the system supplies all heating requirements for the house, with electrical requirements equal to 20 percent of the annual house needs.

  14. Basalt-Block Heat-Storage Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    Concept for storage of solar heat for later use based on use of basalt, cast into blocks and stacked in inflatable gas-tight enclosure serving as heat-storage chamber. Heat flows to blocks from solar collector during day and from blocks to heat engine at night.

  15. Storage of Heat, Cold and Electricity.

    PubMed

    Stamatiou, Anastasia; Ammann, Andreas; Abdon, Andreas; Fischer, Ludger J; Gwerder, Damian; Worlitschek, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    A promising energy storage system is presented based on the combination of a heat pump, a heat engine, a hot and a cold storage. It can be operated as a pure bulk electricity storage (alternative to Pumped Heat Electrical Storage (PHES)/Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES)) or as combined storage of heat, cold and electricity. Both variations have been evaluated using a steady state, thermodynamic model and two promising concepts are proposed: A transcritical CO(2) cycle for the pure electricity storage and a subcritical NH(3) cycle for combined storage of electricity, heat and cold. Parametric studies are used to evaluate the influence of different parameters on the roundtrip efficiency of the storage system. PMID:26842329

  16. Phase-Change Heat-Storage Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulligan, James C.

    1989-01-01

    Heat-storage module accommodates momentary heating or cooling overload in pumped-liquid heat-transfer system. Large heat-storage capacity of module provided by heat of fusion of material that freezes at or near temperature desired to maintain object to be heated or cooled. Module involves relatively small penalties in weight, cost, and size and more than compensates by enabling design of rest of system to handle only average load. Latent heat of fusion of phase-change material provides large heat-storage capacity in small volume.

  17. Metal-halide mixtures for latent heat energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K.; Manvi, R.

    1981-01-01

    Some candidates for alkali metal and alkali halide mixtures suitable for thermal energy storage at temperatures 600 C are identified. A solar thermal system application which offer advantages such as precipitation of salt crystals away from heat transfer surfaces, increased thermal conductivity of phase change materials, corrosion inhibition, and a constant monotectic temperature, independent of mixture concentrations. By using the lighters, metal rich phase as a heat transfer medium and the denser, salt rich phase as a phase change material for latent heat storage, undesirable solidification on the heat transfer surface may be prevented, is presented.

  18. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenall, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    Heats of transformation of eutectic alloys were measured for many binary and ternary systems by differential scanning calorimetry and thermal analysis. Only the relatively cheap and plentiful elements Mg, Al, Si, P, Ca, Cu, Zn were considered. A method for measuring volume change during transformation was developed using x-ray absorption in a confined sample. Thermal expansion coefficients of both solid and liquid states of aluminum and of its eutectics with copper and with silicon also were determined. Preliminary evaluation of containment materials lead to the selection of silicon carbide as the initial material for study. Possible applications of alloy PCMs for heat storage in conventional and solar central power stations, small solar receivers and industrial furnace operations are under consideration.

  19. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birchenall, C. E.

    1980-03-01

    Heats of transformation of eutectic alloys were measured for many binary and ternary systems by differential scanning calorimetry and thermal analysis. Only the relatively cheap and plentiful elements Mg, Al, Si, P, Ca, Cu, Zn were considered. A method for measuring volume change during transformation was developed using x-ray absorption in a confined sample. Thermal expansion coefficients of both solid and liquid states of aluminum and of its eutectics with copper and with silicon also were determined. Preliminary evaluation of containment materials lead to the selection of silicon carbide as the initial material for study. Possible applications of alloy PCMs for heat storage in conventional and solar central power stations, small solar receivers and industrial furnace operations are under consideration.

  20. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenall, C. E.; Gueceri, S. I.; Farkas, D.; Labdon, M. B.; Nagaswami, N.; Pregger, B.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of using metal alloys as thermal energy storage media was determined. The following major elements were studied: (1) identification of congruently transforming alloys and thermochemical property measurements; (2) development of a precise and convenient method for measuring volume change during phase transformation and thermal expansion coefficients; (3) development of a numerical modeling routine for calculating heat flow in cylindrical heat exchangers containing phase change materials; and (4) identification of materials that could be used to contain the metal alloys. Several eutectic alloys and ternary intermetallic phases were determined. A method employing X-ray absorption techniques was developed to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion of both the solid and liquid phases and the volume change during phase transformation from data obtained during one continuous experimental test. The method and apparatus are discussed and the experimental results are presented. The development of the numerical modeling method is presented and results are discussed for both salt and metal alloy phase change media.

  1. Pore scale Assessment of Heat and Mass transfer in Porous Medium Using Phase Field Method with Application to Soil Borehole Thermal Storage (SBTES) Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, A.

    2015-12-01

    To properly model soil thermal performance in unsaturated porous media, for applications such as SBTES systems, knowledge of both soil hydraulic and thermal properties and how they change in space and time is needed. Knowledge obtained from pore scale to macroscopic scale studies can help us to better understand these systems and contribute to the state of knowledge which can then be translated to engineering applications in the field (i.e. implementation of SBTES systems at the field scale). One important thermal property that varies with soil water content, effective thermal conductivity, is oftentimes included in numerical models through the use of empirical relationships and simplified mathematical formulations developed based on experimental data obtained at either small laboratory or field scales. These models assume that there is local thermodynamic equilibrium between the air and water phases for a representative elementary volume. However, this assumption may not always be valid at the pore scale, thus questioning the validity of current modeling approaches. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the validity of the local thermodynamic equilibrium assumption as related to the effective thermal conductivity at pore scale. A numerical model based on the coupled Cahn-Hilliard and heat transfer equation was developed to solve for liquid flow and heat transfer through variably saturated porous media. In this model, the evolution of phases and the interfaces between phases are related to a functional form of the total free energy of the system. A unique solution for the system is obtained by solving the Navier-Stokes equation through free energy minimization. Preliminary results demonstrate that there is a correlation between soil temperature / degree of saturation and equivalent thermal conductivity / heat flux. Results also confirm the correlation between pressure differential magnitude and equilibrium time for multiphase flow to reach steady state conditions

  2. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenall, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of using metal alloys as thermal energy storage media was investigated. The elements selected as candidate media were limited to aluminum, copper, magnesium, silicon, zinc, calcium, and phosphorus on the basis of low cost and latent heat of transformation. Several new eutectic alloys and ternary intermetallic phases were determined. A new method employing X-ray absorption techniques was developed to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion of both the solid and liquid phases and the volume change during phase transformation. The method and apparatus are discussed and the experimental results are presented for aluminum and two aluminum-eutectic alloys. Candidate materials were evaluated to determine suitable materials for containment of the metal alloys. Graphite was used to contain the alloys during the volume change measurements. Silicon carbide was identified as a promising containment material and surface-coated iron alloys were also evaluated. System considerations that are pertinent if alloy eutectics are used as thermal energy storage media are discussed. Potential applications to solar receivers and industrial furnaces are illustrated schematically.

  3. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birchenall, C. E.

    1980-04-01

    The feasibility of using metal alloys as thermal energy storage media was investigated. The elements selected as candidate media were limited to aluminum, copper, magnesium, silicon, zinc, calcium, and phosphorus on the basis of low cost and latent heat of transformation. Several new eutectic alloys and ternary intermetallic phases were determined. A new method employing X-ray absorption techniques was developed to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion of both the solid and liquid phases and the volume change during phase transformation. The method and apparatus are discussed and the experimental results are presented for aluminum and two aluminum-eutectic alloys. Candidate materials were evaluated to determine suitable materials for containment of the metal alloys. Graphite was used to contain the alloys during the volume change measurements. Silicon carbide was identified as a promising containment material and surface-coated iron alloys were also evaluated. System considerations that are pertinent if alloy eutectics are used as thermal energy storage media are discussed. Potential applications to solar receivers and industrial furnaces are illustrated schematically.

  4. Sensitivity Analysis on the Performance of Medium Deep Borehole Thermal Energy Storage Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, Bastian; Rühaak, Wolfram; Schulte, Daniel O.; Bär, Kristian; Sass, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal thermal energy storages using arrays of medium deep (400 m - 1500 m) borehole heat exchangers (BHE) have two main advantages over near surface (< 400 m) BHE storages. Medium deep borehole thermal energy storages (MD-BTES) have a lower thermal impact on shallow groundwater resources and require less surface area. However, the storage performance indicators like the efficiency, the storage capacity and the supplied fluid temperature of MD-BTES are unknown as such system has not been put into practice so far. To study the influence of various design and operation parameters on the storage performance, more than 240 numerical models of different MD-BTES systems were compared in a sensitivity analysis. Most importantly, the BHE length, the number of BHEs, the spacing between the BHEs, the inlet temperatures of the heat transfer fluid into the BHEs and the underground properties were varied. A simplified underground model was used and also a simplified operation procedure was applied for a period of 30 years of storage operation. The results show a strong dependency of the storage performance on the studied design and operation parameters as well as on the underground properties. In the best case, storage efficiency reaches over 80 % in the 30th year of operation, whereas poorly designed storage systems show efficiencies of less than 20 %.

  5. Solar heat storage in phase change material

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, H.J.

    1984-02-28

    The objective of this project was to develop a chemical heat storage system that had a phase change with release of latent heat at about 105/sup 0/F. The primary reason this kind on system was sought was that heat storage capacity of commonly used storage systems do not match the heat collection capacity of open air collectors. In addition to the phase change three other factors were considered: the cost of the material, the amount of heat the system would hold per unit volume, and the rate at which the system released sensible and latent heat. One hundred nineteen tests were made on 32 systems. Only data on six of the more promising are presented. In the six systems, borax was used as the major component with other materials used as nucleating agents toraise the temperature of phase change.

  6. Electrochemical cells for medium- and large-scale energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Wei, Xiaoliang; Choi, Daiwon; Lu, Xiaochuan; Yang, G.; Sun, C.

    2014-12-12

    This is one of the chapters in the book titled “Advances in batteries for large- and medium-scale energy storage: Applications in power systems and electric vehicles” that will be published by the Woodhead Publishing Limited. The chapter discusses the basic electrochemical fundamentals of electrochemical energy storage devices with a focus on the rechargeable batteries. Several practical secondary battery systems are also discussed as examples

  7. Dynamics of heat storage in evapotranspiration estimate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the widely discussed reasons for a lack of surface energy balance closure when using eddy covariance is neglect of storage term elements. Storage as related to the surface energy balance refers to all heat stored below the observation level of eddies. It represents the sum of several componen...

  8. Dish-mounted latent heat buffer storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manvi, R.

    1981-01-01

    Dish-mounted latent heat storage subsystems for Rankine, Brayton, and Stirling engines operating at 427 C, 816 C, and 816 C respectively are discussed. Storage requirements definition, conceptual design, media stability and compatibility tests, and thermal performance analyses are considered.

  9. Fusible pellet transport and storage of heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    A new concept for both transport and storage of heat at high temperatures and heat fluxes is introduced and the first steps in analysis of its feasibility is taken. The concept utilizes the high energy storage capability of materials undergoing change of phase. The phase change material, for example a salt, is encapsulated in corrosion resistant sealed pellets and transported in a carrier fluid to heat source and storage. Calculations for heat transport from a typical solar collector indicate that the pellet mass flow rates are relatively small and that the required pumping power is only a small fraction of the energy transport capability of the system. Salts and eutectic salt mixtures as candidate phase change materials are examined and discussed. Finally, the time periods for melting or solidification of sodium chloride pellets is investigated and reported.

  10. Sulfuric acid-sulfur heat storage cycle

    DOEpatents

    Norman, John H.

    1983-12-20

    A method of storing heat is provided utilizing a chemical cycle which interconverts sulfuric acid and sulfur. The method can be used to levelize the energy obtained from intermittent heat sources, such as solar collectors. Dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated by evaporation of water, and the concentrated sulfuric acid is boiled and decomposed using intense heat from the heat source, forming sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The sulfur dioxide is reacted with water in a disproportionation reaction yielding dilute sulfuric acid, which is recycled, and elemental sulfur. The sulfur has substantial potential chemical energy and represents the storage of a significant portion of the energy obtained from the heat source. The sulfur is burned whenever required to release the stored energy. A particularly advantageous use of the heat storage method is in conjunction with a solar-powered facility which uses the Bunsen reaction in a water-splitting process. The energy storage method is used to levelize the availability of solar energy while some of the sulfur dioxide produced in the heat storage reactions is converted to sulfuric acid in the Bunsen reaction.

  11. Immiscible fluid: Heat of fusion heat storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, D. D.; Melsheimer, S. S.; Mullins, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Both heat and mass transfer in direct contact aqueous crystallizing systems were studied as part of a program desig- ned to evaluate the feasibility of direct contact heat transfer in phase change storage using aqueous salt system. Major research areas, discussed include (1) crystal growth velocity study on selected salts; (2) selection of salt solutions; (3) selection of immiscible fluids; (4) studies of heat transfer and system geometry; and (5) system demonstration.

  12. Cyclic high temperature heat storage using borehole heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boockmeyer, Anke; Delfs, Jens-Olaf; Bauer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The transition of the German energy supply towards mainly renewable energy sources like wind or solar power, termed "Energiewende", makes energy storage a requirement in order to compensate their fluctuating production and to ensure a reliable energy and power supply. One option is to store heat in the subsurface using borehole heat exchangers (BHEs). Efficiency of thermal storage is increasing with increasing temperatures, as heat at high temperatures is more easily injected and extracted than at temperatures at ambient levels. This work aims at quantifying achievable storage capacities, storage cycle times, injection and extraction rates as well as thermal and hydraulic effects induced in the subsurface for a BHE storage site in the shallow subsurface. To achieve these aims, simulation of these highly dynamic storage sites is performed. A detailed, high-resolution numerical simulation model was developed, that accounts for all BHE components in geometrical detail and incorporates the governing processes. This model was verified using high quality experimental data and is shown to achieve accurate simulation results with excellent fit to the available experimental data, but also leads to large computational times due to the large numerical meshes required for discretizing the highly transient effects. An approximate numerical model for each type of BHE (single U, double U and coaxial) that reduces the number of elements and the simulation time significantly was therefore developed for use in larger scale simulations. The approximate numerical model still includes all BHE components and represents the temporal and spatial temperature distribution with a deviation of less than 2% from the fully discretized model. Simulation times are reduced by a factor of ~10 for single U-tube BHEs, ~20 for double U-tube BHEs and ~150 for coaxial BHEs. This model is then used to investigate achievable storage capacity, injection and extraction rates as well as induced effects for

  13. An Assessment of Nuclear Isomers as an Energy Storage Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Hartouni, Edward P.

    2009-03-16

    Nuclear Isomers have been suggested as a potential high energy density medium that might be used to store energy. This talk assesses the state of the science supporting key elements of using nuclear isomers in energy storage applications. The focus is on the nuclear isomer {sup 178m2}Hf which has been most widely suggested for energy storage applications. However, the science issues apply to all nuclear isomer. The assessment addresses the production of the nuclear isomer, and inducing the release of the isomer. Also discussed are novel speculations on photon and/or neutron chain reactions, both as a 'pure' material as well as mixed with other materials.

  14. An Assessment of Nuclear Isomers as an Energy Storage Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Hartouni, E P

    2008-12-08

    Nuclear Isomers have been suggested as a potential high energy density medium that might be used to store energy. This talk assesses the state of the science supporting key elements of using nuclear isomers in energy storage applications. The focus is on the nuclear isomer {sup 178m2}Hf which has been most widely suggested for energy storage applications. However, the science issues apply to all nuclear isomer. The assessment addresses the production of the nuclear isomer, and inducing the release of the isomer. Also discussed are novel speculations on photon and/or neutron chain reactions, both as a 'pure' material as well as mixed with other materials.

  15. Advanced Heat Transfer and Thermal Storage Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Moens, L.; Blake, D.

    2005-01-01

    The design of the next generation solar parabolic trough systems for power production will require the development of new thermal energy storage options with improved economics or operational characteristics. Current heat-transfer fluids such as VP-1?, which consists of a eutectic mixture of biphenyl and diphenyl oxide, allow a maximum operating temperature of ca. 300 C, a limit above which the vapor pressure would become too high and would require pressure-rated tanks. The use of VP-1? also suffers from a freezing point around 13 C that requires heating during cold periods. One of the goals for future trough systems is the use of heat-transfer fluids that can act as thermal storage media and that allow operating temperatures around 425 C combined with lower limits around 0 C. This paper presents an outline of our latest approach toward the development of such thermal storage fluids.

  16. Thermodynamic Efficiency of Pumped Heat Electricity Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thess, André

    2013-09-01

    Pumped heat electricity storage (PHES) has been recently suggested as a potential solution to the large-scale energy storage problem. PHES requires neither underground caverns as compressed air energy storage (CAES) nor kilometer-sized water reservoirs like pumped hydrostorage and can therefore be constructed anywhere in the world. However, since no large PHES system exists yet, and theoretical predictions are scarce, the efficiency of such systems is unknown. Here we formulate a simple thermodynamic model that predicts the efficiency of PHES as a function of the temperature of the thermal energy storage at maximum output power. The resulting equation is free of adjustable parameters and nearly as simple as the well-known Carnot formula. Our theory predicts that for storage temperatures above 400°C PHES has a higher efficiency than existing CAES and that PHES can even compete with the efficiencies predicted for advanced-adiabatic CAES.

  17. Thermodynamic efficiency of pumped heat electricity storage.

    PubMed

    Thess, André

    2013-09-13

    Pumped heat electricity storage (PHES) has been recently suggested as a potential solution to the large-scale energy storage problem. PHES requires neither underground caverns as compressed air energy storage (CAES) nor kilometer-sized water reservoirs like pumped hydrostorage and can therefore be constructed anywhere in the world. However, since no large PHES system exists yet, and theoretical predictions are scarce, the efficiency of such systems is unknown. Here we formulate a simple thermodynamic model that predicts the efficiency of PHES as a function of the temperature of the thermal energy storage at maximum output power. The resulting equation is free of adjustable parameters and nearly as simple as the well-known Carnot formula. Our theory predicts that for storage temperatures above 400 °C PHES has a higher efficiency than existing CAES and that PHES can even compete with the efficiencies predicted for advanced-adiabatic CAES. PMID:24074066

  18. Experimental Study on Enhancing the Productivity of Solar Still Using Locally Available Material as a Storage Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, Thottipalayam Vellingri; Aybar, Hikmet Şelli; Nedunchezhian, Natarajan

    2016-06-01

    This experimental study focuses on the effect of pebbles as an energy storage medium on the performance of a solar distillation system. Two single basin solar stills are fabricated with an effective area of 0.5 m2, the glass cover was tilted at 10° with respect to the horizontal. The experiments on the still were carried out under the same climatic conditions for two different modes of operations, (1) conventional still and (2) modified still (pebbles as storage medium). From the study, it could be concluded that (1) the productivity of solar still is increases 9.5 % when pebbles are used as storage medium (2) the maximum amount of heat losses occurs in the solar still is the combined effect of radiation and convection heat transfer from glass to ambient (3) pebbles have the potentiality to store the heat during high solar intensity period and to release the stored energy to water when the solar intensity is low.

  19. Solar thermoelectricity via advanced latent heat storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, M. L.; Rea, J.; Glatzmaier, G. C.; Hardin, C.; Oshman, C.; Vaughn, J.; Roark, T.; Raade, J. W.; Bradshaw, R. W.; Sharp, J.; Avery, A. D.; Bobela, D.; Bonner, R.; Weigand, R.; Campo, D.; Parilla, P. A.; Siegel, N. P.; Toberer, E. S.; Ginley, D. S.

    2016-05-01

    We report on a new modular, dispatchable, and cost-effective solar electricity-generating technology. Solar ThermoElectricity via Advanced Latent heat Storage (STEALS) integrates several state-of-the-art technologies to provide electricity on demand. In the envisioned STEALS system, concentrated sunlight is converted to heat at a solar absorber. The heat is then delivered to either a thermoelectric (TE) module for direct electricity generation, or to charge a phase change material for thermal energy storage, enabling subsequent generation during off-sun hours, or both for simultaneous electricity production and energy storage. The key to making STEALS a dispatchable technology lies in the development of a "thermal valve," which controls when heat is allowed to flow through the TE module, thus controlling when electricity is generated. The current project addresses each of the three major subcomponents, (i) the TE module, (ii) the thermal energy storage system, and (iii) the thermal valve. The project also includes system-level and techno- economic modeling of the envisioned integrated system and will culminate in the demonstration of a laboratory-scale STEALS prototype capable of generating 3kWe.

  20. Heat Sponge: A Concept for Mass-Efficient Heat Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Splinter, Scott C.; Blosser, Max L.; Gifford, Andrew R.

    2008-01-01

    The heat sponge is a device for mass-efficient storage of heat. It was developed to be incorporated in the substructure of a re-entry vehicle to reduce thermal- protection-system requirements. The heat sponge consists of a liquid/vapor mixture contained within a number of miniature pressure vessels that can be embedded within a variety of different types of structures. As temperature is increased, pressure in the miniature pressure vessels also increases so that heat absorbed through vaporization of the liquid is spread over a relatively large temperature range. Using water as a working fluid, the heat-storage capacity of the liquid/vapor mixture is many times higher than that of typical structural materials and is well above that of common phase change materials over a temperature range of 200 F to 700 F. The use of pure ammonia as the working fluid provides a range of application between 432 deg R and 730 deg R, or the use of the more practical water-ammonia solution provides a range of application between 432 deg R and 1160 deg R or in between that of water and pure ammonia. Prototype heat sponges were fabricated and characterized. These heat sponges consisted of 1.0-inch-diameter, hollow, stainless-steel spheres with a wall thickness of 0.020 inches which had varying percentages of their interior volumes filled with water and a water-ammonia solution. An apparatus to measure the heat stored in these prototype heat sponges was designed, fabricated, and verified. The heat-storage capacity calculated from measured temperature histories is compared to numerical predictions.

  1. Position paper -- Waste storage tank heat removal

    SciTech Connect

    Stine, M.D.

    1995-01-03

    The purpose of this paper is to develop and document a position on the heat removal system to be used on the waste storage tanks currently being designed for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF), project W-236A. The current preliminary design for the waste storage primary tank heat removal system consists of the following subsystems: (1) a once-through dome space ventilation system; (2) a recirculation dome space ventilation system; and (3) an annulus ventilation system. Recently completed and ongoing studies have evaluated alternative heat removal systems in an attempt to reduce system costs and to optimize heat removal capabilities. In addition, a thermal/heat transfer analysis is being performed that will provide assurance that the heat removal systems selected will be capable of removing the total primary tank design heat load of 1.25 MBtu/hr at an allowable operating temperature of 190 F. Although 200 F is the design temperature limit, 190 F has been selected as the maximum allowable operating temperature limit based on instrumentation sensitivity, instrumentation location sensitivity, and other factors. Seven options are discussed and recommendations are made.

  2. Development of composite latent/sensible heat storage media

    SciTech Connect

    Petri, R.; Ong, E.T.; Kardas, A. )

    1990-12-01

    Results of an on-going program to develop a composite latent-sensible thermal energy storage medium, trade marked CompPhase, are presented. The target application area was periodic kiln energy recovery. The concept is that of a composite salt/ceramic material processed such that the medium maintains its shape and mechanical integrity through the salt melting temperature. As such, the media can be fabricated into a variety of shapes suitable for packed beds, fluidized beds, or direct contact heat exchangers. The properties of ten carbonate salt or eutectic mixtures of carbonate salts were reviewed to select the most appropriate candidates for development. Three salts and two ceramic materials were evaluated in laboratory tests to select the final material, a composite of sodium-barium eutectic/magnesium oxide, for development. Two methods of processing the constituent powders for fabrication into storage pellets were developed, and one method was applied to pellet fabrication by commercial processing equipment. Two different preliminary cost estimates bracketed the expected cost of commercially fabricating storage pellets. Also, two modifications to the material processing method were suggested to reduce costs. Thermal cycling was conducted on laboratory produced experimental pellets and on prototype pellets fabricated by commercial processes. Detailed laboratory tests to determine composite mechanical and thermal properties were conducted. It is concluded that further laboratory, field, and economic studies are required before the concept of composite storage media can be considered fully developed for commercialization. 5 refs., 73 figs., 20 tabs.

  3. Catalytic combustion of actual low and medium heating value gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Catalytic combustion of both low and medium heating value gases using actual coal derived gases obtained from operating gasifiers was demonstrated. A fixed bed gasifier with a complete product gas cleanup system was operated in an air blown mode to produce low heating value gas. A fluidized bed gasifier with a water quench product gas cleanup system was operated in both an air enriched and an oxygen blown mode to produce low and medium, heating value gas. Noble metal catalytic reactors were evaluated in 12 cm flow diameter test rigs on both low and medium heating value gases. Combustion efficiencies greater than 99.5% were obtained with all coal derived gaseous fuels. The NOx emissions ranged from 0.2 to 4 g NO2 kg fuel.

  4. Experimental testing of various heat transfer structures in a flat plate thermal energy storage unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Maike; Fiß, Michael; Klemm, Torsten

    2016-05-01

    For solar process heat applications with steam as the working fluid and varying application parameters, a novel latent heat storage concept has been developed using an adaptation of a flat plate heat exchanger as the storage concept. Since the pressure level in these applications usually does not exceed 30 bar, an adaptation with storage material chambers arranged between heat transfer medium chambers is possible. Phase change materials are used as the storage medium, so that the isothermal evaporation of steam during discharging of the storage is paired with the isothermal solidification of the storage material. Heat transfer structures can be inserted into the chambers to adjust the power level for a given application. By combining the required number of flat plate heat exchanger compartments and inserting the appropriate heat transfer structure, the design can easily be adjusted for the required power level and capacity for a specific application. Within this work, the technical feasibility of this concept is proven. The dependence of the operating characteristics on the geometry of the heat exchanger is identified. A focus is on varying the power density by integrating conductive heat structures in the PCM.

  5. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2005-07-29

    Electricity generated by distributed energy resources (DER) located close to end-use loads has the potential to meet consumer requirements more efficiently than the existing centralized grid. Installation of DER allows consumers to circumvent the costs associated with transmission congestion and other non-energy costs of electricity delivery and potentially to take advantage of market opportunities to purchase energy when attractive. On-site thermal power generation is typically less efficient than central station generation, but by avoiding non-fuel costs of grid power and utilizing combined heat and power (CHP) applications, i.e., recovering heat from small-scale on-site generation to displace fuel purchases, then DER can become attractive to a strictly cost-minimizing consumer. In previous efforts, the decisions facing typical commercial consumers have been addressed using a mixed-integer linear programme, the DER Customer Adoption Model(DER-CAM). Given the site s energy loads, utility tariff structure, and information (both technical and financial) on candidate DER technologies, DER-CAM minimizes the overall energy cost for a test year by selecting the units to install and determining their hourly operating schedules. In this paper, the capabilities of DER-CAM are enhanced by the inclusion of the option to store recovered low-grade heat. By being able to keep an inventory of heat for use in subsequent periods, sites are able to lower costs even further by reducing off-peak generation and relying on storage. This and other effects of storages are demonstrated by analysis of five typical commercial buildings in San Francisco, California, and an estimate of the cost per unit capacity of heat storage is calculated.

  6. Increasing Soil Heat Storage across Northern Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troy, T. J.; Wood, E. F.

    2009-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that the ocean, atmosphere, cryosphere, and continental land masses have gained heat over the past century [Hansen et al., 2009; Beltrami et al., 2002]. Although soil heat storage may play a lesser role than the ocean in absorbing heat, it plays an important role in identifying and understanding changes in climate, especially relating to changes in the permafrost active layer. Northern Eurasia has experienced some of the strongest warming trends over the twentieth century, and in situ measurements of soil temperature have shown that the land surface is responding by warming accordingly. The observational network presents an incomplete picture of the soil heat gain because the network is sparse and temperature does not account for latent heat effects and moisture dynamics in the soil column, which also affect the change in enthalpy. In the winter, the snowpack insulates the soil column, which may decouple the air and ground temperatures. To bridge this gap in our understanding, we use the VIC land surface model, which solves for both the energy and water budget at the land surface and subsurface with a 50 meter soil column, to calculate the change in ground heat between 1901 and 2005 after a 500-year model spin-up. We find that the heat stored in the soil column experienced a small but steady increase at the beginning of the twentieth century, with an abrupt increase in heat accumulation after 1980, indicating a possible tipping point in the system. There is heterogeneity in the spatial pattern of heat accumulation, with larger accumulation in the southern Ob River basin and the permafrost-dominated regions of Eurasia. The modeled heat accumulation in the permafrost zone confirms concerns in the scientific literature that the permafrost is particularly vulnerable to climate changes.

  7. Cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system

    DOEpatents

    Metz, P.D.

    A cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system wherein collected solar heat energy is ground stored and permitted to radiate into the adjacent ground for storage therein over an extended period of time when such heat energy is seasonally maximally available. Thereafter, when said heat energy is seasonally minimally available and has propagated through the adjacent ground a substantial distance, the stored heat energy may be retrieved by a circumferentially arranged heat transfer means having a high rate of heat transfer.

  8. Cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system

    DOEpatents

    Metz, Philip D.

    1982-01-01

    A cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system wherein collected solar heat energy is ground stored and permitted to radiate into the adjacent ground for storage therein over an extended period of time when such heat energy is seasonally maximally available. Thereafter, when said heat energy is seasonally minimally available and has propagated through the adjacent ground a substantial distance, the stored heat energy may be retrieved by a circumferentially arranged heat transfer means having a high rate of heat transfer.

  9. Thermal analysis of energy storage in packed beds of multilayer storing medium

    SciTech Connect

    Ziada, M.A.; Abdel Rehim, Z.S.

    1998-04-01

    Thermal analysis of energy storage in layers of various materials used as a packed bed storage system is presented. It is more economical to minimize insulation costs, to store more energy from the same input conditions, to lengthen the time of charging that the energy could be kept stored with acceptable losses, and to obtain higher storage capacity. These are the focus of this work. A cylindrical bed is formed from three layers of different materials, equal in length, as heat-absorbing media. The bed is charged with flowing hot air in the axial direction, the hot air representing the heat source. A transient one-dimensional model is used to describe the thermal behavior of the system. The partial differential equations that govern the flow and heat transfer for both the air and the solid, constituting the bed and their boundary conditions, are driven. The numerical solution of two partial differential equations is obtained using the finite difference method through a computer program especially constructed for this purpose. The temperature field for the air and the solid are obtained, and the energy stored inside the bed is computed. A wide range of layers of storage media of different materials with different thermal properties is selected. Comparison is made between the present system and packed bed systems using one storing medium. The results show that the bed packed with different layers has higher storage capacity and there is step stratification of the temperature between the materials layers. Also, the bed that includes metal material (such as steel) has a maximum storage capacity, and less considerable temperature than other beds, so such a bed can realize the claimed function.

  10. Heating of the interstellar medium by supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    Models for the mechanisms active during supernova (SN) heating of surrounding regions are examined. SNs heat both the matrix material and material in the nearby interstellar medium, and also accelerate cosmic rays with shock waves. Fountain and wind models vary according to the SN power and mass acquisition rate. Additionally, a warm intercloud medium may be fed by returning fountain material and stellar mass loss. The thermal wind temperature varies with the number of solar massess heated, although remnants have been observed to vanish in the LMC when more than 100 solar masses were heated. The possibility that the solar system is inside a remnant that produces the observed soft X-ray background is considered.

  11. Central solar heating plants with seasonal storage

    SciTech Connect

    Breger, D.S.; Sunderland, J.E.

    1989-03-01

    The University of Massachusetts has recently started a two year effort to identify and design a significant Central Solar Heating Plant with Seasonal Storage (CSHPSS) in Massachusetts. The work is closely associated with the U.S. participation in the International Energy Agency (IEA) Task on CSHPSS. The University is working closely with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to assist in identifying State facilities as potential sites and to explore and secure State support which will be essential for product development after the design phase. Currently, the primary site is the University of Massachusetts, Amherst campus with particular interest in several large buildings which are funded for construction over the next 4-5 years. Seasonal thermal energy storage will utilize one of several geological formations.

  12. Heating the intracluster medium by jet-inflated bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillel, Shlomi; Soker, Noam

    2016-01-01

    We examine the heating of the intracluster medium (ICM) of cooling flow clusters of galaxies by jet-inflated bubbles and conclude that mixing of hot bubble gas with the ICM is more important than turbulent heating and shock heating. We use the PLUTO hydrodynamical code in full 3D to properly account for the inflation of the bubbles and to the multiple vortices induced by the jets and bubbles. The vortices mix some hot shocked jet gas with the ICM. For the parameters used by us the mixing process accounts for about four times as much heating as that by the kinetic energy in the ICM, namely, turbulence and sound waves. We conclude that turbulent heating plays a smaller role than mixing. Heating by shocks is even less efficient.

  13. Thermal storage technologies for solar industrial process heat applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of thermal storage subsystems for the intermediate and high temperature (100 C to 600 C) solar industrial process heat generation is presented. Primary emphasis is focused on buffering and diurnal storage as well as total energy transport. In addition, advanced thermal storage concepts which appear promising for future solar industrial process heat applications are discussed.

  14. THERMOCHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATED SOLAR POWER

    SciTech Connect

    PROJECT STAFF

    2011-10-31

    Thermal energy storage (TES) is an integral part of a concentrated solar power (CSP) system. It enables plant operators to generate electricity beyond on sun hours and supply power to the grid to meet peak demand. Current CSP sensible heat storage systems employ molten salts as both the heat transfer fluid and the heat storage media. These systems have an upper operating temperature limit of around 400 C. Future TES systems are expected to operate at temperatures between 600 C to 1000 C for higher thermal efficiencies which should result in lower electricity cost. To meet future operating temperature and electricity cost requirements, a TES concept utilizing thermochemical cycles (TCs) based on multivalent solid oxides was proposed. The system employs a pair of reduction and oxidation (REDOX) reactions to store and release heat. In the storage step, hot air from the solar receiver is used to reduce the oxidation state of an oxide cation, e.g. Fe3+ to Fe2+. Heat energy is thus stored as chemical bonds and the oxide is charged. To discharge the stored energy, the reduced oxide is re-oxidized in air and heat is released. Air is used as both the heat transfer fluid and reactant and no storage of fluid is needed. This project investigated the engineering and economic feasibility of this proposed TES concept. The DOE storage cost and LCOE targets are $15/kWh and $0.09/kWh respectively. Sixteen pure oxide cycles were identified through thermodynamic calculations and literature information. Data showed the kinetics of re-oxidation of the various oxides to be a key barrier to implementing the proposed concept. A down selection was carried out based on operating temperature, materials costs and preliminary laboratory measurements. Cobalt oxide, manganese oxide and barium oxide were selected for developmental studies to improve their REDOX reaction kinetics. A novel approach utilizing mixed oxides to improve the REDOX kinetics of the selected oxides was proposed. It partially

  15. Heat storage in alloy transformations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Birchenall, C E; Gueceri, S I; Farkas, D; Labdon, M B; Nagaswami, N; Pregger, B

    1981-03-01

    A study conducted to determine the feasibility of using metal alloys as thermal energy storage media is described. The study had the following major elements: (1) the identification of congruently transforming alloys and thermochemical property measurements, (2) the development of a precise and convenient method for measuring volume change during phase transformation and thermal expansion coefficients, (3) the development of a numerical modeling routine for calculating heat flow in cylindrical heat exchangers containing phase-change materials, and (4) the identification of materials that could be used to contain the metal alloys. The elements selected as candidate media were limited to aluminum, copper, magnesium, silicon, zinc, calcium, and phosphorus on the basis of low cost and latent heat of transformation. Several new eutectic alloys and ternary intermetallic phases have been determined. A new method employing x-ray absorption techniques was developed to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion of both the solid and liquid phases and the volume change during phase transformation from data that are obtained during one continuous experimental test. The method and apparatus are discussed and the experimental results are presented. The development of the numerical modeling method is presented and results are discussed for both salt and metal alloy phase-change media. Candidate materials were evaluated to determine suitable materials for containment of the metal alloys. Graphite was used to contain the alloys during the volume change measurements. Silicon carbide has been identified as a promising containment material and surface-coated iron alloys were considered.

  16. Information storage medium and method of recording and retrieving information thereon

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, D. D.; Begej, Stefan

    1986-01-01

    Information storage medium comprising a semiconductor doped with first and second impurities or dopants. Preferably, one of the impurities is introduced by ion implantation. Conductive electrodes are photolithographically formed on the surface of the medium. Information is recorded on the medium by selectively applying a focused laser beam to discrete regions of the medium surface so as to anneal discrete regions of the medium containing lattice defects introduced by the ion-implanted impurity. Information is retrieved from the storage medium by applying a focused laser beam to annealed and non-annealed regions so as to produce a photovoltaic signal at each region.

  17. Survey of sensible and latent heat thermal energy storage projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylin, F.; Merino, M.

    1981-05-01

    Ongoing and completed research projects on sensible and latent heat thermal enegy storage for low, intermediate, and high temperature applications are reviewed. Projects in the United States and abroad are included. Several research efforts are in the index although the project descriptions are absent. Project lists are organized into four sections: short term sensible heat storage; seasonal sensible heat storage; latent heat storage; and models, economic analysis, and support studies. The organization of the Department of Energy programs managing many of these projects is also outlined. Projects are presented in a standard format that includes laboratory; funding level and period; status; project description; technical and economic parameters; and applications.

  18. Simulation and evaluation of latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigmon, T. W.

    1980-01-01

    The relative value of thermal energy storage (TES) for heat pump storage (heating and cooling) as a function of storage temperature, mode of storage (hotside or coldside), geographic locations, and utility time of use rate structures were derived. Computer models used to simulate the performance of a number of TES/heat pump configurations are described. The models are based on existing performance data of heat pump components, available building thermal load computational procedures, and generalized TES subsystem design. Life cycle costs computed for each site, configuration, and rate structure are discussed.

  19. Parametric study of rock pile thermal storage for solar heating and cooling phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, H.

    1977-01-01

    The test data and an analysis were presented, of heat transfer characteristics of a solar thermal energy storage bed utilizing water filled cans as the energy storage medium. An attempt was made to optimize can size, can arrangement, and bed flow rates by experimental and analytical means. Liquid filled cans, as storage media, utilize benefits of both solids like rocks, and liquids like water. It was found that this combination of solid and liquid media shows unique heat transfer and heat content characteristics and is well suited for use with solar air systems for space and hot water heating. An extensive parametric study was made of heat transfer characteristics of rocks, of other solids, and of solid containers filled with liquids.

  20. Heat and Mass Transfer in a Freezing Unsaturated Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jame, Yih-Wu; Norum, Donald I.

    1980-08-01

    A numerical simulation of a laboratory experiment involving coupled heat and mass transfer in a horizontal porous medium column with one end subjected to a temperature below 0°C has been carried out. The model is essentially that of Harlan (1973) and is solved numerically by the finite difference method using the Crank-Nicholson scheme. The solution yields temperature, liquid water content, and ice content profiles along the column as a function of time. Comparison of the experimental results and the simulation analysis results shows that Harlan's model, with some modification in the hydraulic conductivity of the frozen medium, can be used successfully to simulate numerically the coupled heat and mass transfer processes when ice lensing does not occur.

  1. Combined conjugated heat transfer from a scattering medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, M.; Chung, B. T. F.

    1992-01-01

    Combined heat transfer from a radiating and convecting flow of an absorbing, emitting, and scattering medium in a reflecting channel with conducting wall was numerically investigated. The results clearly indicate that in any high-temperature applications, if the effects of scattering and wall reflection are ignored, the position and magnitude of the maximum wall temperature and the behavior of the convective Nusselt number can be grossly misrepresented.

  2. Thermal Storage and Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities in the area of thermal storage and advanced heat transfer fluids: measuring thermophysical properties, measuring fluid flow and heat transfer, and simulating flow of thermal energy and fluid.

  3. Devolatilization of bituminous coals at medium to high heating rates

    SciTech Connect

    Jamaluddin, A.S.; Truelove, J.S.; Wall, T.F.

    1986-03-01

    A high-volatile and a medium volatile bituminous coal, size-graded between 53 and 63 ..mu..m, were devolatilized in a laboratory-scale laminar-flow furnace at 800-1400/sup 0/C at heating rates of 1 x 10/sup 4/-5 x 10/sup 4/ /sup 0/C s. The weight loss was determined by both gravimetric and ash-tracer techniques. The experimental results were well correlated by a two-competing-reactions devolatilization model. The model was also evaluated against data from captive-sample experiments at moderate heating rates of 250-1000/sup 0/C/s. Heating rate was found to affect substantially the devolatilization weight loss.

  4. Thermal energy storage for industrial waste heat recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, H. W.; Kedl, R. J.; Duscha, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal energy storage systems designed for energy conservation through the recovery, storage, and reuse of industrial process waste heat are reviewed. Consideration is given to systems developed for primary aluminum, cement, the food processing industry, paper and pulp, and primary iron and steel. Projected waste-heat recovery and energy savings are listed for each category.

  5. A solar air collector with integrated latent heat thermal storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charvat, Pavel; Ostry, Milan; Mauder, Tomas; Klimes, Lubomir

    2012-04-01

    Simulations of the behaviour of a solar air collector with integrated latent heat thermal storage were performed. The model of the collector was created with the use of coupling between TRNSYS 17 and MATLAB. Latent heat storage (Phase Change Material - PCM) was integrated with the solar absorber. The model of the latent heat storage absorber was created in MATLAB and the model of the solar air collector itself was created in TRNSYS with the use of TYPE 56. The model of the latent heat storage absorber allows specification of the PCM properties as well as other parameters. The simulated air collector was the front and back pass collector with the absorber in the middle of the air cavity. Two variants were considered for comparison; the light-weight absorber made of sheet metal and the heat-storage absorber with the PCM. Simulations were performed for the climatic conditions of the Czech Republic (using TMY weather data).

  6. Development of a low-cost heat storage furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, E. )

    1987-01-01

    The author describes the development of a low cost central electric heat storage furnace for residential use in the USA. The heat storage furnace design uses crushed trap rock, a basaltic rock found throughout the USA. Residential furnaces were built and successfully tested both under laboratory conditions and in residences from Minnesota to New England. Although the furnace was developed for residential space heating, applications for commercial and industrial heating are under consideration. Heat storage using off-peak electricity is used as a load management tool in several ways. The specific application considered in this paper is space heating with warm air. In this application, the furnace converts off-peak electric power to heat and stores it for space heating during non-peak periods on a daily cycle basis.

  7. Parametric study of thermal storage containing rocks or fluid filled cans for solar heating and cooling, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, H.

    1981-01-01

    The test data and an analysis of the heat transfer characteristics of a solar thermal energy storage bed utilizing water filled cans and standard bricks as energy storage medium are presented. This experimental investigation was initiated to find a usable heat intensive solar thermal storage device other than rock storage and water tank. Four different sizes of soup cans were stacked in a chamber in three different arrangements-vertical, horizontal, and random. Air is used as transfer medium for charging and discharge modes at three different mass flow rates and inlet air temperature respectively. These results are analyzed and compared, which show that a vertical stacking and medium size cans with Length/Diameter (L/D) ratio close to one have better average characteristics of heat transfer and pressure drop.

  8. Heat Transfer Modeling of Dry Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    1999-01-13

    The present work was undertaken to provide heat transfer model that accurately predicts the thermal performance of dry spent nuclear fuel storage facilities. One of the storage configurations being considered for DOE Aluminum-clad Spent Nuclear Fuel (Al-SNF), such as the Material and Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel, is in a dry storage facility. To support design studies of storage options a computational and experimental program has been conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The main objective is to develop heat transfer models including natural convection effects internal to an interim dry storage canister and to geological codisposal Waste Package (WP). Calculated temperatures will be used to demonstrate engineering viability of a dry storage option in enclosed interim storage and geological repository WP and to assess the chemical and physical behaviors of the Al-SNF in the dry storage facilities. The current paper describes the modeling approaches and presents the computational results along with the experimental data.

  9. Evaluation of thermal energy storage for the proposed Twin Cities District Heating system. [using cogeneration heat production and aquifiers for heat storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, C. F.

    1980-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of incorporating thermal energy storage components into the proposed Twin Cities District heating project was evaluated. The technical status of the project is reviewed and conceptual designs of district heating systems with and without thermal energy storage were compared in terms of estimated capital requirements, fuel consumption, delivered energy cost, and environmental aspects. The thermal energy storage system is based on cogeneration and the storage of heat in aquifers.

  10. Shock-Bubble Heating of the Intracluster Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Samuel H.; Heinz, S.; Churazov, E.

    2011-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) Feedback via extragalactic jets requires a thermalization of the energy injected into the intracluster medium (ICM) in order for energy feedback to occur. Heinz and Churazov (2005) proposed a method using shock waves and previously inflated bubbles in the ICM to extract energy from the shock waves and turn the energy into rotational kinetic energy. This energy would decay and allow heating to occur elsewhere throughout the galaxy cluster. In this paper, we extend to three dimensions (3D) the previous work using hydrodynamic simulations. We also compare our results to previous related work done performed experimentally.

  11. Low and medium heating value coal gas catalytic combustor characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwab, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Catalytic combustion with both low and medium heating value coal gases obtained from an operating gasifier was demonstrated. A practical operating range for efficient operation was determined, and also to identify potential problem areas were identified for consideration during stationary gas turbine engine design. The test rig consists of fuel injectors, a fuel-air premixing section, a catalytic reactor with thermocouple instrumentation and a single point, water cooled sample probe. The test rig included inlet and outlet transition pieces and was designed for installation into an existing test loop.

  12. Chemical heat pump and chemical energy storage system

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Edward C.; Huxtable, Douglas D.

    1985-08-06

    A chemical heat pump and storage system employs sulfuric acid and water. In one form, the system includes a generator and condenser, an evaporator and absorber, aqueous acid solution storage and water storage. During a charging cycle, heat is provided to the generator from a heat source to concentrate the acid solution while heat is removed from the condenser to condense the water vapor produced in the generator. Water is then stored in the storage tank. Heat is thus stored in the form of chemical energy in the concentrated acid. The heat removed from the water vapor can be supplied to a heat load of proper temperature or can be rejected. During a discharge cycle, water in the evaporator is supplied with heat to generate water vapor, which is transmitted to the absorber where it is condensed and absorbed into the concentrated acid. Both heats of dilution and condensation of water are removed from the thus diluted acid. During the discharge cycle the system functions as a heat pump in which heat is added to the system at a low temperature and removed from the system at a high temperature. The diluted acid is stored in an acid storage tank or is routed directly to the generator for reconcentration. The generator, condenser, evaporator, and absorber all are operated under pressure conditions specified by the desired temperature levels for a given application. The storage tanks, however, can be maintained at or near ambient pressure conditions. In another form, the heat pump system is employed to provide usable heat from waste process heat by upgrading the temperature of the waste heat.

  13. Thermal energy storage heat exchanger: Molten salt heat exchanger design for utility power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferarra, A.; Yenetchi, G.; Haslett, R.; Kosson, R.

    1977-01-01

    Sizing procedures are presented for latent heat thermal energy storage systems that can be used for electric utility off-peak energy storage, solar power plants and other preliminary design applications.

  14. Method and apparatus for inoculating crystallization seeds into a liquid latent heat storage substance

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, F.; Scheunemann, K.

    1984-07-24

    A method and apparatus for inoculating a liquid latent heat storage substance of the type convertible to the solid state on cooling is disclosed. A portion of the substance is caused to crystallize on a cooled active surface, immersed in the substance and preferably vertically arranged, whereupon the active surface is heated to fuse-off the formed crystals to release them into the liquid portion of the storage substance to thus form inoculation seeds on which further crystallization of the storage substance takes place on withdrawal of heat from same. In one described embodiment, a pair of active surfaces is provided by using a Peltier element operating with a DC source having selectively reversible polarity whereby one surface is cooled down while the other is heated and vice versa, depending on the instant polarity of the DC source. In another embodiment, the active surface is alternately heated and cooled by heat carrier medium of a heat pump circulation system drawn from the respective sections of the system in alternating fashion. Due to the formation of crystallization seeds from the heat storage substance, problems normally associated with the use of a foreign inoculation substance are avoided.

  15. Central solar heating plants with seasonal storage in mines

    SciTech Connect

    Eikmeier, B.; Mohr, M.; Unger, H.

    1999-07-01

    The solar assisted heat supply of building offers a great technical potential for the substitution of fossil energy sources. Central solar Heating Plants with Seasonal Storage (CSHPSS) supply 100 and more buildings and reach a solar fraction of 50% or more of the total load with far less specific heat costs [$/kWh{sub solar}] compared to small domestic hot water systems (DHW) for single-family houses. However, the construction of seasonal storage is too expensive. At the Ruhu University Bochum the use of mines for a seasonal storage of low temperature heat is examined in cooperation with industrial partners. The use of available storage volumes may lead to a decrease of investment costs. Additional geothermal heat gains can be obtained from the warm surrounding rock; therefore a high efficiency can be achieved.

  16. Design and simulation of latent heat storage units. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsundar, N.; Stein, E.; Rooz, E.; Bascaran, E.; Lee, T.C.

    1992-04-01

    This report presents the results of two years of research and development on passive latent heat storage systems. Analytical models have been developed and extended, and a computer code for simulating the performance of a latent heat storage has been developed. The code is intended to be merged into a larger solar energy system simulation code and used for making realistic system studies. Simulation studies using a code which has a flexible and accurate routine for handling the storage subsystem should lead to the development of better systems than those in which storage is added on after the rest of the system has already been selected and optimized.

  17. Design and simulation of latent heat storage units

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsundar, N.; Stein, E.; Rooz, E.; Bascaran, E.; Lee, T.C. )

    1992-04-01

    This report presents the results of two years of research and development on passive latent heat storage systems. Analytical models have been developed and extended, and a computer code for simulating the performance of a latent heat storage has been developed. The code is intended to be merged into a larger solar energy system simulation code and used for making realistic system studies. Simulation studies using a code which has a flexible and accurate routine for handling the storage subsystem should lead to the development of better systems than those in which storage is added on after the rest of the system has already been selected and optimized.

  18. Control Spin Current and Data Recording on Spin Storage Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupa, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents the results of experimental studies of the physical mechanisms and dynamics of magnetization reversal of the films Al2O3/Tb25Co5Fe70/Al2O3, Al2O3/Tb22Co5Fe73/Al2O3, Al2O3/Tb19Co5Fe76/Al2O3, Al2O3/Co30Fe70/Al2O3 with a single magnetic layer and the films Al2O3/Tb22Co5Fe73/Pr6O11/Tb19Co5Fe76/Al2O3, Al2O3/Co80Fe20/Pr6O11/Co30Fe70/Al2O3 with two magnetic layers radiated by picosecond (τi ≈ 80 ps) and femtosecond (τi ≈ 130 fs) laser pulses. The experimental samples of spin transistors and data recording devices on the spin storage medium are also described. The results of studies have shown that magnetic switching effects in the nanolayers under femtosecond laser pulses can be used for creation of systems of high-speed controlling of spin currents with the response time τ ≤ 10-11s. Conclusions from the studies are the following: thermomagnetic switching under the influence of an external magnetic field or a demagnetization field, magnetic switching of antiferromagnetic films under the influence of an effective internal field of antiferromagnetic interaction between magnetic sublattices rare-earth and transitive metals, magnetic switching under the influence of a magnetic field of the inverse Faraday effect, or under the influence of a magnetic field of a spin current. The magnetic switching of magnetic layers under action of the magnetic field of a spin current is the most important for practical use in elements of spintronics. This mechanism of magnetic reversal takes place only in multilayer nanofilms and the heterogeneous multilayer magnetic nanofilms are the base material for creation of spintronic devices. The great advantage of the magnetization reversal of magnetic nanolayers of the spin current is that the mechanism of magnetization reversal is working in the films with perpendicular anisotropy and in the films with in-plane anisotropy. The injection of polarized electrons can also be realized using short electrical pulses. That is

  19. Molten Glass for Thermal Storage: Advanced Molten Glass for Heat Transfer and Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    HEATS Project: Halotechnics is developing a high-temperature thermal energy storage system using a new thermal-storage and heat-transfer material: earth-abundant and low-melting-point molten glass. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Halotechnics new thermal storage material targets a price that is potentially cheaper than the molten salt used in most commercial solar thermal storage systems today. It is also extremely stable at temperatures up to 1200°C—hundreds of degrees hotter than the highest temperature molten salt can handle. Being able to function at high temperatures will significantly increase the efficiency of turning heat into electricity. Halotechnics is developing a scalable system to pump, heat, store, and discharge the molten glass. The company is leveraging technology used in the modern glass industry, which has decades of experience handling molten glass.

  20. Filled Carbon Nanotubes: Superior Latent Heat Storage Enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    2009-04-01

    This factsheet describes a rstudy whose technical objective is to demonstrate the feasibility of filled carbon nanotubes (CNT) as latent heat storage enhancers, with potential applications as next generation thermal management fluids in diverse applications in industries ranging from high-demand microelectronic cooling, manufacturing, power generation, transportation, to solar energy storage.

  1. OVERVIEW OF CENTRAL HEATING PLANT, WITH OIL STORAGE ON LEFT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF CENTRAL HEATING PLANT, WITH OIL STORAGE ON LEFT, BOILER BUILDING ON RIGHT, SOUTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS, CAMERA FACING NORTH. - New Haven Rail Yard, Central Steam Plant and Oil Storage, Vicinity of Union Avenue, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  2. Storage-stable foamable polyurethane is activated by heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Polyurethane foamable mixture remains inert in storage unit activated to produce a rapid foaming reaction. The storage-stable foamable composition is spread as a paste on the surface of an expandable structure and, when heated, yields a rigid open-cell polyurethane foam that is self-bondable to the substrate.

  3. Phase Change Material Systems for High Temperature Heat Storage.

    PubMed

    Perraudin, David Y S; Binder, Selmar R; Rezaei, Ehsan; Ortonaa, Alberto; Haussener, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Efficient, cost effective, and stable high-temperature heat storage material systems are important in applications such as high-temperature industrial processes (metal processing, cement and glass manufacturing, etc.), or electricity storage using advanced adiabatic compressed air energy storage. Incorporating phase change media into heat storage systems provides an advantage of storing and releasing heat at nearly constant temperature, allowing steady and optimized operation of the downstream processes. The choice of, and compatibility of materials and encapsulation for the phase change section is crucial, as these must guarantee good and stable performance and long lifetime at low cost. Detailed knowledge of the material properties and stability, and the coupled heat transfer, phase change, and fluid flow are required to allow for performance and lifetime predictions. We present coupled experimental-numerical techniques allowing prediction of the long-term performance of a phase change material-based high-temperature heat storage system. The experimental investigations focus on determination of material properties (melting temperature, heat of fusion, etc.) and phase change material and encapsulation interaction (stability, interface reactions, etc.). The computational investigations focus on an understanding of the multi-mode heat transfer, fluid flow, and phase change processes in order to design the material system for enhanced performance. The importance of both the experimental and numerical approaches is highlighted and we give an example of how both approaches can be complementarily used for the investigation of long-term performance. PMID:26842330

  4. Parametric study on the operating efficiencies of a packed bed for high-temperature sensible heat storage

    SciTech Connect

    Adebiyi, G.A.; Steele, W.G.; Jalalzadeh-Azar, A.A.; Nsofor, E.C.

    1998-02-01

    A comprehensive computer model of a packed bed thermal energy storage system originally developed for storage media employing either sensible heat storage (SHS) materials or phase-change material (PCM), was validated for the sensible heat storage media using a rather extensive set of data obtained with a custom-made experimental facility for high-temperature energy storage. The model is for high-temperature storage and incorporates several features including (a) allowance for media property variations with temperature, (b) provisions for arbitrary initial conditions and time-dependent varying fluid inlet temperature to be set, (c) formulation for axial thermal dispersion effects in the bed, (d) modeling for intraparticle transient conduction in the storage medium, (e) provision for energy storage (or accumulation) in the fluid medium, (f) modeling for the transient conduction in the containment vessel wall, (g) energy recovery in two modes, one with flow direction parallel with that in the storage mode (cocurrent) and the other with flow in the opposite direction (countercurrent), and (h) computation of the first and second-law efficiencies. Parametric studies on the sensible heat storage system were carried out using the validated model to determine the effects of several of the design and operating parameters on the first and second-law efficiencies of the packed bed. Decisions on the thermodynamic optimum system design and operating parameters for the packed bed are based on the second-law evaluations made.

  5. Bacillus cereus endospores exhibit a heterogeneous response to heat treatment and low-temperature storage.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Ultan P; Wilkinson, Martin G

    2008-04-01

    Bacillus cereus endospores were challenged by heat treatments simulating typical domestic/industrial cooking regimes and the resulting effects on germination, viability and sub-lethal heat damage determined using differential plate counting on a rich versus selective medium, flow cytometry (FCM), beta-D-glucuronidase (GUD) activity and OD(600) measurement. Additionally, these techniques were used to investigate the effect on endospores of storage in a non-nutrient medium at 4 degrees C for 1 month. Plate counting revealed that heating generated sub-populations of sub-lethally damaged endospores, with the more severe heat treatments generating larger proportions of sub-lethally damaged endospores. These findings were also reflected in FCM analyses, which detected large amounts of heterogeneity among the populations of heat-treated endospores and uncovered differences in the proportions of membrane-damaged endospores and those displaying esterase activity pre- and post-treatment. Plate count data suggested that both the control and heat-treated endospores lost viability during storage, with FCM data indicating that the proportion of membrane-damaged endospores increased and those displaying the esterase activity decreased. The FCM, GUD and OD(600) data suggested that germination rates decreased with the increasing severity of heat treatment. This study demonstrates that a combination of plate counting and FCM can be used to detect heterogeneity in the response of endospores to insults. PMID:18206765

  6. Improved Heat-of-Fusion Energy Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K. H.; Manvi, R.

    1982-01-01

    Alkali metal/alkali-halide mixtures proposed for preventing solid buildup during energy recovery. When mixture melts (by absorption of heat of fusion), it forms two immiscible liquids. Salt-rich phase is heavier and has higher melting/recrysallization temperature; so during energy recovery salt crystallizes in this phase first. Since heat exchanger for energy recovery is in lighter metal-rich phase, solids do not form and there is no reduction of heat-recovery efficiency.

  7. Characterization and Evaluation of a Mass Efficient Heat Storage Device.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Splinter, Scott C.; Blosser, Max L.; Gifford, Andrew R.

    2007-01-01

    The heat sponge is a device for mass-efficient storage of heat. It was developed to be incorporated in the substructure of a reentry or hypersonic vehicle to reduce thermal protection system requirements. The heat sponge consists of a liquid-vapor mixture contained within a number of miniature pressure vessels that can be embedded within a variety of different types of structures. As temperature is increased, pressure in the miniature pressure vessels also increases so that heat absorbed through vaporization of the liquid is spread over a relatively large temperature range. Using water as a working fluid, the heat storage capacity of the liquid-vapor mixture is many times higher than that of typical structural materials and is well above that of common phase change materials over the temperature range of 660oR to 1160oR. Prototype heat sponges were fabricated and characterized. These heat sponges consisted of 1.0 inch diameter hollow stainless steel spheres with a wall thickness of 0.020 inches which had varying percentages of their interior volumes filled with water. An apparatus to measure the heat stored in these prototype heat sponges was designed, fabricated, and verified. The heat storage capacity calculated from measured temperature histories is compared to numerical predictions.

  8. Heat transfer in completely and partially filled spherical phase change thermal energy storage modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Muhammad Mustafizur

    2016-07-01

    A comprehensive investigation of heat transfer and induced fluid flow interactions during melting in a confined storage medium is reported in this paper. This study focuses on thermal characterization of a single constituent storage module rather than an entire storage system to precisely capture the energy exchange contributions of all fundamental heat transfer mechanisms during phase change process. Two-dimensional, axisymmetric, transient equations for mass, momentum and energy conservation were solved numerically by the finite volume scheme. Results report the influence of the Grashof, Stefan and Prandtl numbers on the melting dynamics of capsules with various diameters (20, 30, 40, and 50 mm). Also the effects of the shell material have been analyzed. Correlating equations for melt fraction and Nusselt number have been developed for possible general design applications.

  9. Aquifer thermal energy (heat and chill) storage

    SciTech Connect

    Jenne, E.A.

    1992-11-01

    As part of the 1992 Intersociety Conversion Engineering Conference, held in San Diego, California, August 3--7, 1992, the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program coordinated five sessions dealing specifically with aquifer thermal energy storage technologies (ATES). Researchers from Sweden, The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Denmark, Canada, and the United States presented papers on a variety of ATES related topics. With special permission from the Society of Automotive Engineers, host society for the 1992 IECEC, these papers are being republished here as a standalone summary of ATES technology status. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  10. Microencapsulated Phase-Change Materials For Storage Of Heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colvin, David P.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes research on engineering issues related to storage and transport of heat in slurries containing phase-change materials in microscopic capsules. Specific goal of project to develop lightweight, compact, heat-management systems used safely in inhabited areas of spacecraft. Further development of obvious potential of technology expected to lead to commercialization and use in aircraft, electronic equipment, machinery, industrial processes, and other sytems in which requirements for management of heat compete with severe restrictions on weight or volume.

  11. Rapid Charging of Thermal Energy Storage Materials through Plasmonic Heating

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongyong; Tao, Peng; Liu, Yang; Xu, Hao; Ye, Qinxian; Hu, Hang; Song, Chengyi; Chen, Zhaoping; Shang, Wen; Deng, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Direct collection, conversion and storage of solar radiation as thermal energy are crucial to the efficient utilization of renewable solar energy and the reduction of global carbon footprint. This work reports a facile approach for rapid and efficient charging of thermal energy storage materials by the instant and intense photothermal effect of uniformly distributed plasmonic nanoparticles. Upon illumination with both green laser light and sunlight, the prepared plasmonic nanocomposites with volumetric ppm level of filler concentration demonstrated a faster heating rate, a higher heating temperature and a larger heating area than the conventional thermal diffusion based approach. With controlled dispersion, we further demonstrated that the light-to-heat conversion and thermal storage properties of the plasmonic nanocomposites can be fine-tuned by engineering the composition of the nanocomposites. PMID:25175717

  12. Solar heating with seasonal storage (SHSS) prefeasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, J.H.

    1997-12-31

    Large annual solar fractions are possible with full capacity of active thermal collectors for room heating and DHW with seasonal storage. Urban housing schematic designs studied with heat load ranges include: townhouses (100 units) and apartments (3,4,5, and 10 story). Performance and economics are predicted with Seasonal.EES software for Madison, WI. Annual solar fractions of 82% and 75% resulted for a 3-story 138 apartment complex with 3.5 BTU/ft{sup 2}{sup {minus}}FDD room heating and 21,600 liters/d DHW, with rooftop flat-plate liquid collectors (tauAlpha{sub n} = .88 and .76) (3620 m{sup 2}/38,965 ft{sup 2}), and insulated cylindrical water storage tank (8482m{sup 3}/2.24 milgals). Influence of solar heating with seasonal storage (SHSS)(aka CSHPSS) to cold-grey climate big city building/urban sustainable design is discussed.

  13. Integrated heat pipe-thermal storage system performance evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Keddy, E.; Sena, J.T.; Merrigan, M.

    1987-01-01

    Performance verification tests of an integrated heat pipe-thermal energy storage system have been conducted. This system is being developed as a part of an Organic Rankine Cycle-Solar Dynamic Power System (ORC-SDPS) receiver for future space stations. The integrated system consists of potassium heat pipe elements that incorporate thermal energy storage (TES) canisters within the vapor space along with an organic fluid (toluene) heater tube used as the condenser region of the heat pipe. During the insolation period of the earth orbit, solar energy is delivered to the surface of the heat pipe elements of the ORC-SDPS receiver and is internally transferred by the potassium vapor for use and storage. Part of the thermal energy is delivered to the heater tube and the balance is stored in the TES units. During the eclipse period of the orbit, the stored energy in the TES units is transferred by the potassium vapor to the toluene heater tube. A developmental heat pipe element was fabricated that employs axial arteries and a distribution wick connecting the wicked TES units and the heater to the solar insolation surface of the heat pipe. Tests were conducted to verify the heat pipe operation and to evaluate the heat pipe/TES units/heater tube operation by interfacing the heater unit to a heat exchanger.

  14. Conversion of medium and low temperature heat to power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Johann; Wendland, Martin; Lai, Ngoc Anh

    2013-04-01

    Presently most electricity is produced in power plants which use high temperature heat supplied by coal, oil, gas or nuclear fission and Clausius-Rankine cycles (CRC) with water as working fluid (WF). On the other hand, geo-, solar-, ocean-, and biogenic-heat have medium and low temperatures. At these temperatures, however, the use of other WF and/or other cycles can yield higher efficiencies than those of the water-CRC. For an assessment of the efficiency we model systems which include the heat transfer to and from the WF and the cycle. Optimization criterion is the exergy efficiency defined as the ratio of the net power output to the incoming exergy flow of the heat carrier. First, for a better understanding we discuss some thermodynamic properties of the WFs: 1) the critical point parameters, 2) the shape of the vapour- liquid coexistence curve in the temperature vs entropy (T,s)-diagram which may be either bell-shaped or overhanging [1,2], and 3) the shape of sub- and supercritical isobars for pure fluids and fluid mixtures. Second, we show that the problems of a CRC with water at lower temperatures are 1) the shape of the T,s-diagram and 2) the exergy loss during heat transfer to the WF. The first problem can be overcome by using an organic working fluid in the CRC which then is called organic Rankine cycle (ORC). The second problem is reduced by supercritical organic Rankine cycles (sORC) [1,2], trilateral cycles (TLC) and the more general power-flash cycles (PFC) [2], and organic flash cycles (OFC) [3]. Next, selected results for systems with the above mentioned cycles will be presented. The heat carrier inlet temperatures THC range from 120°C to 350°C.The pure working fluids are water, refrigerants, alkanes, aromates and siloxanes and have to be selected to match with THC. It is found that TLC with water have the highest efficiencies but show very large volume flows at lower temperatures. Moreover, expansion machines for TLC and PFC are still under

  15. A&M. Radioactive parts security storage area, heat removal storage casks. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Radioactive parts security storage area, heat removal storage casks. Plan, section, and details. Ralph M. Parsons 1480-7 ANP/GE-3-720-S-1. Date: November 1958. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index no. 034-0720-60-693-107459 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. Efficient numerical simulation of heat storage in subsurface georeservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boockmeyer, A.; Bauer, S.

    2015-12-01

    The transition of the German energy market towards renewable energy sources, e.g. wind or solar power, requires energy storage technologies to compensate for their fluctuating production. Large amounts of energy could be stored in georeservoirs such as porous formations in the subsurface. One possibility here is to store heat with high temperatures of up to 90°C through borehole heat exchangers (BHEs) since more than 80 % of the total energy consumption in German households are used for heating and hot water supply. Within the ANGUS+ project potential environmental impacts of such heat storages are assessed and quantified. Numerical simulations are performed to predict storage capacities, storage cycle times, and induced effects. For simulation of these highly dynamic storage sites, detailed high-resolution models are required. We set up a model that accounts for all components of the BHE and verified it using experimental data. The model ensures accurate simulation results but also leads to large numerical meshes and thus high simulation times. In this work, we therefore present a numerical model for each type of BHE (single U, double U and coaxial) that reduces the number of elements and the simulation time significantly for use in larger scale simulations. The numerical model includes all BHE components and represents the temporal and spatial temperature distribution with an accuracy of less than 2% deviation from the fully discretized model. By changing the BHE geometry and using equivalent parameters, the simulation time is reduced by a factor of ~10 for single U-tube BHEs, ~20 for double U-tube BHEs and ~150 for coaxial BHEs. Results of a sensitivity study that quantify the effects of different design and storage formation parameters on temperature distribution and storage efficiency for heat storage using multiple BHEs are then shown. It is found that storage efficiency strongly depends on the number of BHEs composing the storage site, their distance and

  17. Heat transfer characteristics of a high temperature sensible heat storage water heater using cast iron as a storage material

    SciTech Connect

    Jotshi, C.K.; Goswami, D.Y.; Klausner, J.F.; Hsieh, C.K.; Leung, M.; Li, H.; Malakar, S.; Colacino, F.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the heat transfer characteristics of high temperature sensible heat storage in cast iron for water heating applications. An experimental setup consisting of a cast iron cylinder and a tube running through its center was fabricated and tested. The experimental data were compared with the theoretical model. It was observed that the contact resistance between the cast iron and the tube plays a dominant role in extracting the heat. An approximate contact resistance prediction was obtained by assuming the resistance due to the air gap modulated by a correction factor, which accounts for the contacting surface area. Based on the results from the experimental setup and theoretical modeling a prototype storage water heater using cast iron blocks as the storage material was designed, fabricated and tested.

  18. External stimulation-controllable heat-storage ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Tokoro, Hiroko; Yoshikiyo, Marie; Imoto, Kenta; Namai, Asuka; Nasu, Tomomichi; Nakagawa, Kosuke; Ozaki, Noriaki; Hakoe, Fumiyoshi; Tanaka, Kenji; Chiba, Kouji; Makiura, Rie; Prassides, Kosmas; Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Commonly available heat-storage materials cannot usually store the energy for a prolonged period. If a solid material could conserve the accumulated thermal energy, then its heat-storage application potential is considerably widened. Here we report a phase transition material that can conserve the latent heat energy in a wide temperature range, T<530 K and release the heat energy on the application of pressure. This material is stripe-type lambda-trititanium pentoxide, λ-Ti3O5, which exhibits a solid–solid phase transition to beta-trititanium pentoxide, β-Ti3O5. The pressure for conversion is extremely small, only 600 bar (60 MPa) at ambient temperature, and the accumulated heat energy is surprisingly large (230 kJ L−1). Conversely, the pressure-produced beta-trititanium pentoxide transforms to lambda-trititanium pentoxide by heat, light or electric current. That is, the present system exhibits pressure-and-heat, pressure-and-light and pressure-and-current reversible phase transitions. The material may be useful for heat storage, as well as in sensor and switching memory device applications. PMID:25962982

  19. External stimulation-controllable heat-storage ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokoro, Hiroko; Yoshikiyo, Marie; Imoto, Kenta; Namai, Asuka; Nasu, Tomomichi; Nakagawa, Kosuke; Ozaki, Noriaki; Hakoe, Fumiyoshi; Tanaka, Kenji; Chiba, Kouji; Makiura, Rie; Prassides, Kosmas; Ohkoshi, Shin-Ichi

    2015-05-01

    Commonly available heat-storage materials cannot usually store the energy for a prolonged period. If a solid material could conserve the accumulated thermal energy, then its heat-storage application potential is considerably widened. Here we report a phase transition material that can conserve the latent heat energy in a wide temperature range, T<530 K and release the heat energy on the application of pressure. This material is stripe-type lambda-trititanium pentoxide, λ-Ti3O5, which exhibits a solid-solid phase transition to beta-trititanium pentoxide, β-Ti3O5. The pressure for conversion is extremely small, only 600 bar (60 MPa) at ambient temperature, and the accumulated heat energy is surprisingly large (230 kJ L-1). Conversely, the pressure-produced beta-trititanium pentoxide transforms to lambda-trititanium pentoxide by heat, light or electric current. That is, the present system exhibits pressure-and-heat, pressure-and-light and pressure-and-current reversible phase transitions. The material may be useful for heat storage, as well as in sensor and switching memory device applications.

  20. High-capacity hydrogen storage medium: Ti doped fullerene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jun; Liu, Zhiguo; Liu, Suqin; Zhao, Xuehui; Huang, Kelong

    2011-01-01

    Using density functional theory, it is shown that titanium doped heterofullerene has superior property of hydrogen storage. The single titanium atom lies at a double bond position of C60 and bonds to four carbons by Dewar interaction. Each titanium atom binds up to six hydrogen molecules. The first and second hydrogen molecules are dissociated to form carbon hydrides with binding energy of -0.43 eV/H. The other four adsorptions are molecular with binding energy of -0.14 eV/H2. For substitutionally dope C60 with six titanium atoms, the gravimetric density of hydrogen reaches the 7.7 wt % limit necessary for applications in the mobile industry.

  1. Integrated heat pipe-thermal storage system performance evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keddy, E.; Sena, J. T.; Merrigan, M.; Heidenreich, Gary

    1987-01-01

    An integrated thermal energy storage (TES) system, developed as a part of an organic Rankine cycle solar dynamic power system is described, and the results of the performance verification tests of this TES system are presented. The integrated system consists of potassium heat-pipe elements that incorporate TES canisters within the vapor space, along with an organic fluid heater tube used as the condenser region of the heat pipe. The heat pipe assembly was operated through the range of design conditions from the nominal design input of 4.8 kW to a maximum of 5.7 kW. The performance verification tests show that the system meets the functional requirements of absorbing the solar energy reflected by the concentrator, transporting the energy to the organic Rankine heater, providing thermal storage for the eclipse phase, and allowing uniform discharge from the thermal storage to the heater.

  2. Use of moving interference fringes for holographic recording onto a moving storage medium.

    PubMed

    Tatemichi, H; Yamamoto, M

    1993-07-10

    We describe a feasibility study of a multiplexed holographic recording method onto a moving storage medium by using moving interference fringes caused by diffracted light beams that are generated from an acousto-optic deflector (AOD). The AOD, driven by amplitude-modulated electric signals, generates several diffracted beams with different frequencies because of Doppler shifting by AOD driving-frequency components. The interference between the beams results in a nonstationary light intensity distribution, i.e., a moving interference fringe. Its velocity is reduced by an image-reduction optical system, and the storage medium is moved at the same velocity as the fringe motion at the image-formation point. This compensates for a reduction of visibility with the movement of the medium, so a holographic recording onto a moving medium can be achieved. In addition, angular multiplexing is achieved by switching the AOD driving frequencies. PMID:20829997

  3. Earth storage of solar heat. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Garst, P.

    1982-04-19

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate that large quantities of heat could be collected and stored by modifing large buildings such as those commonly found on farms. The basic idea was to install a solar collection system on the south roof of such a building and store the heat collected in the earth under the building. To implement the project, a pole type sheet metal building was constructed. The size of the building was 20' x 40'. The peak of the roof ran down the 40' dimension and was offset from the center line so that the roof surface facing south was larger than that facing north. The collector was built on the south side by first constructing a roof of sheet metal with 2-1/2'' corrugations. The sheet metal was painted with flat black paint to absorb the solar heat. A space was created over the sheet metal roof by nailing 2 x 4's spaced 2' apart to it. Corrugated fiberglass sheets were nailed to these 2 x 4's to make the collector cover. At the top of the roof, a distribution pipe made of 3/4'' CVCP plastic pipe with 1/8'' holes to match the corrugations of the sheet metal was installed. A gutter was installed at the bottom to collect the heated water which flowed down the sheet metal. The collector roof and the gutter were insulated with 6'' fiberglass batts to complete the collector. Instrumentation, cost, and performance results are discussed.

  4. Do Heat Waves have an Impact on Terrestrial Water Storage?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brena-Naranjo, A.; Teuling, R.; Pedrozo-Acuña, A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent works have investigated the impact of heat waves on the surface energy and carbon balance. However, less attention has been given to the impacts on terrestrial hydrology. During the summer of 2010, the occurrence of an exceptional heat wave affected severely the Northern Hemisphere. The extension (more than 2 million km2) and severity of this extreme event caused substantial ecosystem damage (more than 1 million ha of forest fires), economic and human losses (~500 billion USD and more than 17 million of indirect deaths, respectively). This work investigates for the first time the impacts of the 2010 summer heat wave on terrestrial water storage. Our study area comprises three different regions where air temperature records were established or almost established during the summer: Western Russia, the Middle East and Eastern Sahel. Anomalies of terrestrial water storage derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) were used to infer water storage deficits during the 2003-2013 period. Our analysis shows that Russia experienced the most severe water storage decline, followed by the Middle East, whereas Eastern Sahel was not significantly affected. The impact of the heat wave was spatially uniform in Russia but highly variable in the Middle East, with the Northern part substantially more affected than the Southern region. Lag times between maxima air temperatures and lower water storage deficits for Russia and the Middle East were approximately two and seven months, respectively. The results suggest that the response of terrestrial water storage to heat waves is stronger in energy-limited environments than in water-limited regions. Such differences in the magnitude and timing between meteorological and hydrological extremes can be explained by the propagation time between atmospheric water demand and natural or anthropogenic sources of water storage.

  5. Heat loading limits for solid transuranic wastes storage

    SciTech Connect

    Spatz, T.L.

    1993-07-01

    Heat loading limits have been established for four storage configurations of TRU wastes. The calculations were performed assuming the worst case scenario whereby all the heat generated within a drum was generated within one ``cut`` and that this cut was located in the very center of the drum. Poly-boxes containing one HEPA filter were assumed to have a uniform heat generation throughout the filter. The maximum allowable temperatures were based on the materials in the containers. A comparison between the drum center temperature for a uniform heat load distribution and for the center temperature when the heat load is confined to one cut in the center of the drum is also illustrated. This comparison showed that the heat load of a particular drum can be more than doubled by distributing the sources of heat uniformly throughout the container.

  6. Studies of Phase Change Materials and a Latent Heat Storage Unit Used for a Natural Circulation Cooling/Latent Heat Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakitani, Katsumi; Honda, Hiroshi

    Experimental and theoretical studies were made of the heat transfer characteristics of a latent heat storage unit used for a natural circulation cooling /latent heat storage system. Heating and cooling curves of the latent heat storage unit undergoing solid-liquid phase change of a PCM (lauric acid) was obtained by using anatural circulation loop of R22 which consisted of an electrically heated evaporater, a water cooled condenser and the latent heat storage unit. The latent heat storage unit showed a heat transfer performance which was high enough for practical use. An approximate theoretical analysis was conducted to investigate transient behavior of the latent heat storage unit. Predictions of the refrigerant and outer surface temperatures during the melting process were in fair agreement with the experimental data, whereas that of the refrigerant temperature during the solidification process was considerably lower than the measurement.

  7. Flexible storage medium for write-once optical tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strandjord, Andrew J. G.; Webb, Steven P.; Perettie, Donald J.; Cipriano, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    A write-once data storage media was developed which is suitable for optical tape applications. The media is manufactured using a continuous film process to deposit a ternary alloy of tin, bismuth, and copper. This laser sensitive layer is sputter deposited onto commercial plastic web as a single-layer thin film. A second layer is sequentially deposited on top of the alloy to enhance the media performance and act as an abrasion resistant hard overcoat. The media was observed to have laser write sensitivities of less than 2.0 njoules/bit, carrier-to-noise levels of greater than 50dB's, modulation depths of approximately 100 percent, read-margins of greater than 35, uniform grain sizes of less than 200 Angstroms, and a media lifetime that exceeds 10 years. Prototype tape media was produced for use in the CREO drive system. The active and overcoat materials are first sputter deposited onto three mil PET film in a single pass through the vacuum coating system, and then converted down into multiple reels of 35mm x 880m tape. One mil PET film was also coated in this manner and then slit and packaged into 3480 tape cartridges.

  8. Heat transfer characteristics of uc(d)-mannitol as a phase change material for a medium thermal energy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibahara, Makoto; Liu, Qiusheng; Fukuda, Katsuya

    2015-11-01

    Melting process and heat transfer characteristics of uc(d)-mannitol were investigated experimentally and numerically to construct a fundamental database of the waste heat recovery systems for ships. uc(d-)Mannitol which has relatively high latent heat was selected in this study as a phase-change material for medium thermal energy storage. Experimental results indicate that the melting temperature and latent heat of uc(d)-mannitol were affected by the heating rate. The weight of uc(d)-mannitol did not decrease with the increase in temperature between 436 and 455 K. Moreover, numerical simulation was conducted using the commercial CFD code, ANSYS FLUENT. On the basis of the numerical simulation, melting process was affected by natural convection at the inner wall. As the heat flux of the cartridge heater input came from the inner wall, the liquid fraction increased from the inner wall to the outer wall through natural convection. The numerical result was compared with the experimental data. The temperature of the numerical simulation was approximately consistent with the experimental data. Moreover, the local heat transfer coefficients at the heater surface were calculated by the result of the numerical simulation. The heat transfer coefficients decreased during the phase change. It was considered that the heat transfer process changed from conductive heat transfer of solid state to natural convection heat transfer of liquid state as the liquid fraction increased with time.

  9. Building heating and cooling applications thermal energy storage program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eissenberg, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal energy storage technology and development of building heating and cooling applications in the residential and commercial sectors is outlined. Three elements are identified to undergo an applications assessment, technology development, and demonstration. Emphasis is given to utility load management thermal energy system application where the stress is on the 'customer side of the meter'. Thermal storage subsystems for space conditioning and conservation means of increased thermal mass within the building envelope and by means of low-grade waste heat recovery are covered.

  10. Copper-silicon-magnesium alloys for latent heat storage

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gibbs, P. J.; Withey, E. A.; Coker, E. N.; Kruizenga, A. M.; Andraka, C. E.

    2016-06-21

    The systematic development of microstructure, solidification characteristics, and heat of solidification with composition in copper-silicon-magnesium alloys for thermal energy storage is presented. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to relate the thermal characteristics to microstructural development in the investigated alloys and clarifies the location of one of the terminal three-phase eutectics. Repeated thermal cycling highlights the thermal storage stability of the transformation through multiple melting events. In conclusion, two near-terminal eutectic alloys display high enthalpies of solidification, relatively narrow melting ranges, and stable transformation hysteresis behaviors suited to thermal energy storage.

  11. Copper-Silicon-Magnesium Alloys for Latent Heat Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, P. J.; Withey, E. A.; Coker, E. N.; Kruizenga, A. M.; Andraka, C. E.

    2016-06-01

    The systematic development of microstructure, solidification characteristics, and heat of solidification with composition in copper-silicon-magnesium alloys for thermal energy storage is presented. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to relate the thermal characteristics to microstructural development in the investigated alloys and clarifies the location of one of the terminal three-phase eutectics. Repeated thermal cycling highlights the thermal storage stability of the transformation through multiple melting events. Two near-terminal eutectic alloys display high enthalpies of solidification, relatively narrow melting ranges, and stable transformation hysteresis behaviors suited to thermal energy storage.

  12. Radiant heat transfer from storage casks to the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R W; Hovingh, J; Thomas, G R

    1999-05-10

    A spent fuel storage cask must efficiently transfer the heat released by the fuel assemblies through the cask walls to the environment. This heat must be transferred through passive means, limiting the energy transfer mechanisms from the cask to natural convection and radiation heat transfer.. Natural convection is essentially independent of the characteristics of the array of casks, provided there is space between casks to permit a convection loop. Radiation heat transfer, however, depends on the geometric arrangement of the array of casks because the peripheral casks will shadow the interior casks and restrict radiant heat transfer from all casks to the environment. The shadowing of one cask by its neighbors is determined by a view factor that represents the fraction of radiant energy that leaves the surface of a cask and reaches the environment. This paper addresses the evaluation of the view factor between a centrally located spent fuel storage cask and the environment. By combining analytic expressions for the view factor of (1) infinitely long cylinders and (2) finite cylinders with a length-to-diameter ratio of 2 to represent spent fuel storage casks, the view factor can be evaluated for any practical array of spent fuel storage casks.

  13. Heat pipe solar receiver with thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W. F.

    1981-01-01

    An HPSR Stirling engine generator system featuring latent heat thermal energy storge, excellent thermal stability and self regulating, effective thermal transport at low system delta T is described. The system was supported by component technology testing of heat pipes and of thermal storage and energy transport models which define the expected performance of the system. Preliminary and detailed design efforts were completed and manufacturing of HPSR components has begun.

  14. Heat storage capability of a rolling cylinder using Glauber's salt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrick, C. S.; Zarnoch, K. P.

    1980-01-01

    The rolling cylinder phase change heat storage concept was developed to the point where a prototype design is completed and a cost analysis is prepared. A series of experimental and analytical tasks are defined to establish the thermal, mechanical, and materials behavior of rolling cylinder devices. These tasks include: analyses of internal and external heat transfer; performance and lifetime testing of the phase change materials; corrosion evaluation; development of a mathematical model; and design of a prototype and associated test equipment.

  15. Latent heat thermal energy storage: Determination of properties of storage media and development of a new transfer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhat, A.; Aboul-Enein, S.; Malatidis, N. A.

    1982-01-01

    A latent heat storage system for low temperature solar heating applications was developed. Latent heat storage materials were studied and a heat exchanger design was evaluated. Thermophysical properties of 14 organic and inorganic heat storage materials, including 5 inexpensive commercial paraffins, 2 fatty acids, and 5 salt hydrates, were measured with a precision differential scanning calorimeter. Data pertaining to phase transition temperature, enthalphy and, specific heat of the heat storage materials in solid and liquid phases were taken. The influence of thermal cycling on the melting and freezing behavior of the materials and on changes in thermophysical properties was analyzed. A heat exchanger with finned annulus heat exchanger elements was investigated. Tests were performed, using two laboratory models that employed a paraffin, two fatty acids and one salt hydrate as heat storage materials.

  16. The concrete columns as a sensible thermal energy storage medium and a heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünalan, Sebahattin; Özrahat, Evrim

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated storage possibility of sensible thermal energy in the concrete columns of multi-storey buildings and the heating performance of the indoors with the stored energy. In the suggested system, the dry air heated in an energy center will be circulated in stainless steel pipes through columns. The sensible thermal energy would firstly be stored by means of forced convection in column medium. Then, the stored thermal energy will transfer by natural convection and radiation from the column surfaces to indoor spaces. The transient thermal calculations are realized for a flat of the 11-storey building in Kayseri city of Turkey. The thermal energy requirement of the flat is nearby 5.3 kW as an average of a winter season. The simplified transient calculations were carried out over a concrete hollow cylindrical column having outer radius of 0.31 m and inner radius of 0.05 m corresponding an averaged column section in the sample flat. The flow temperature was selected between T = 350 and 500 K, which are considerably lower than the temperature of 573 K assumed as a limit for thermal strength of the concrete in the literature. The flow velocity ranges were selected between V = 1.0 and 5.0 m/s. The initial temperature was assumed as 293 K. After the first energy charging process of 23 h, for T = 350 K and V = 1.0 m/s, the total heat flux from the column surfaces into indoors are nearby 5.5 kW. The first charging time required to reach the energy requirement of 5.3 kW is decreased by increasing the flow velocity and temperature. Also for 5.0 m/s-350 K and 5.0 m/s-450 K, this time can decrease to 10 and 4.5 h, respectively. In addition, with 4.0 m/s-360 K or 2.0 m/s-400 K, after the energy charging of 8 h, the energy requirement of 5.3 kW can be provided by the energy discharging of 16 h and the energy charging of 8 h during 7 days. The results are very attractive in terms of the building heating systems of the future.

  17. Anisotropic storage medium development in a full-scale, sodium alanate-based, hydrogen storage system

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jorgensen, Scott W.; Johnson, Terry A.; Payzant, E. Andrew; Bilheux, Hassina Z.

    2016-06-11

    Deuterium desorption in an automotive-scale hydrogen storage tube was studied in-situ using neutron diffraction. Gradients in the concentration of the various alanate phases were observed along the length of the tube but no significant radial anisotropy was present. In addition, neutron radiography and computed tomography showed large scale cracks and density fluctuations, confirming the presence of these structures in an undisturbed storage system. These results demonstrate that large scale storage structures are not uniform even after many absorption/desorption cycles and that movement of gaseous hydrogen cannot be properly modeled by a simple porous bed model. In addition, the evidence indicatesmore » that there is slow transformation of species at one end of the tube indicating loss of catalyst functionality. These observations explain the unusually fast movement of hydrogen in a full scale system and shows that loss of capacity is not occurring uniformly in this type of hydrogen-storage system.« less

  18. Anisotropic Storage Medium Development in a Full-Scale, Sodium Alanate-Based, Hydrogen Storage System

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, Scott W; Johnson, Terry A; Payzant, E Andrew; Bilheux, Hassina Z

    2016-01-01

    Deuterium desorption in an automotive-scale hydrogen storage tube was studied in-situ using neutron diffraction. Gradients in the concentration of the various alanate phases were observed along the length of the tube but no significant radial anisotropy was present. In addition, neutron radiography and computed tomography showed large scale cracks and density fluctuations, confirming the presence of these structures in an undisturbed storage system. These results demonstrate that large scale storage structures are not uniform even after many absorption/desorption cycles and that movement of gaseous hydrogen cannot be properly modeled by a simple porous bed model. Furthermore, the evidence indicates that there is slow transformation of species at one end of the tube indicating loss of catalyst functionality. These observations explain the unusually fast movement of hydrogen in a full scale system and shows that loss of capacity is not occurring uniformly in this type of hydrogen-storage system.

  19. Building with integral solar-heat storage--Starkville, Mississippi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Column supporting roof also houses rock-storage bin of solar-energy system supplying more than half building space heating load. Conventional heaters supply hot water. Since bin is deeper and narrower than normal, individual pebble size was increased to keep airflow resistance at minimum.

  20. In Pursuit of Sustainable Hydrogen Storage with Boron-Nitride Fullerene as the Storage Medium.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Gaurab; Malakar, Tanmay; Paul, Ankan

    2016-06-22

    Using well calibrated DFT studies we predict that experimentally synthesized B24 N24 fullerene can serve as a potential reversible chemical hydrogen storage material with hydrogen-gas storage capacity up to 5.13 wt %. Our theoretical studies show that hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of the fullerene framework can be achieved at reasonable rates using existing metal-free hydrogenating agents and base metal-containing dehydrogenation catalysts. PMID:27174725

  1. Results on the characterization of gas hydrate formation in a direct contact heat pump cool storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ternes, M. P.

    1985-07-01

    This report describes an investigation of a latent cool storage system which employs a refrigerant gas hydrate as the storage medium. A refrigerant gas hydrate is a compound consisting of a refrigerant gas molecule contained within a crystalline water molecule cage. In this system, the storage component is incorporated directly into the refrigeration cycle, replacing the conventional evaporator. The refrigerant is used not only to form the gas hydrate, but also as a direct contact heat exchange fluid to remove heat from the storage tank. In this investigation, only the charging phase of the process was examined; that is, only the characteristics of the formation of gas hydrate were studied. The results of the tests showed that liquid refrigerant must be dispersed throughout the water in the storage tank during charging to obtain acceptance.

  2. Prolonging storage time of baby ginger by using a sand-based storage medium and essential oil treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji; Sui, Guoliang; He, Yongzhou; Liu, Dongjie; Yan, Jing; Liu, Shuxiang; Qin, Wen

    2014-04-01

    Wilt and rot occur readily during storage of baby ginger because of its tender skin and high moisture content (MC). A storage medium, which consisted of sand, 20% water, and 3.75% super absorbent polymers delayed weight loss and loss of firmness at 12 °C and 90% relative humidity. Microorganisms were isolated and purified from decayed rhizomes; among these, 3 fungi were identified as pathogens. The results of 18S rDNA sequence analysis showed that these fungi belonged to Penicillium, Fusarium, and Mortierella genera. The use of essential oil for controlling these pathogens was then investigated in vitro. Essential oils extracted from Cinnamomum zeylanicum (cinnamon) and Thymus vulgaris (thyme) completely inhibited the growth of all of the above pathogens at a concentration of 2000 ppm. Cinnamon oil showed higher antifungal activity in the drug sensitivity test with minimal fungicidal concentration (<500 ppm against all pathogens). In the in vivo test, cinnamon fumigation at a concentration of 500 ppm reduced infection rates of Penicillium, Fusarium, and Mortierella by 50.3%, 54.3%, and 60.7%, respectively. We recommended cinnamon oil fumigation combined with medium storage at 12 °C as an integrated approach to baby ginger storage. PMID:24547773

  3. Efficient Heat Storage Materials: Metallic Composites Phase-Change Materials for High-Temperature Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-21

    HEATS Project: MIT is developing efficient heat storage materials for use in solar and nuclear power plants. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun’s not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. MIT is designing nanostructured heat storage materials that can store a large amount of heat per unit mass and volume. To do this, MIT is using phase change materials, which absorb a large amount of latent heat to melt from solid to liquid. MIT’s heat storage materials are designed to melt at high temperatures and conduct heat well—this makes them efficient at storing and releasing heat and enhances the overall efficiency of the thermal storage and energy-generation process. MIT’s low-cost heat storage materials also have a long life cycle, which further enhances their efficiency.

  4. Sub-basement sensible heat storage for solar energy

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F.D.

    1982-03-30

    A sensible heat storage method for use in conventional buildings with basements is disclosed that permits the long term storage of solar energy at reasonable efficiency in amounts appropriate for home heating. An exchanger consisting of a plurality of closely spaced, small diameter parallel or serpentine tubes with suitable manifolds is constructed on the central portion of the basement floor. The exchanger is covered with a layer of fine gravel, followed with a layer of waterproof insulation. Finally a second floor is supported on studs resting edgewise on the original basement floor. Horizontal conduction heat losses are reduced by allowing a peripheral margin, insulated from above, about the exchanger and by using a flow reversing system that maintains a horizontal temperature gradient within the exchanger.

  5. Heat storage for a bus petrol internal-combustion engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, Leonard L.; Burak, Victor S.; Kulakov, Andry G.; Mishkinis, Donatas A.; Bohan, Pavel V.

    The heat storage (HS) system for pre-heating a bus petrol internal combustion engine to starting was mathematically modelled and experimentally investigated. The development of such devices is an extremely urgent problem especially for regions with a cold climate. We discuss how HS works on the effect of absorption and rejection of heat energy at a solid-liquid phase change of a HS substance. In the first part of the paper a numerical method to calculate the HS mass-dimensional parameters and their characteristics are described. In the experimental part of the paper results are given of experiments on the pre-heating device aiding to start a carburettor engine under operational conditions and analysis of data received. Practical confirmation of the theoretical development of HS devices for a bus engine for starting by pre-heating is given.

  6. Heat and storage effects on the flavour of peanuts.

    PubMed

    el-Kayati, S M; Fadel, H H; Abdel Mageed, M; Farghal, S A

    1998-12-01

    Two peanut varieties, Giza 4 and Giza 5 were subjected to different heat treatments such as drying in solar drier at air speed 0.5 and 2 m/sec with average temperature 45 and 60 degrees C and heating in oven at 120 and 150 degrees C. The sensory evaluation of the two varieties showed insignificant differences among varieties and heating processes. A correlation between the sensory and instrumental data was found. The high sensory scores of samples heated at 150 degrees C were attributed to the presence of high concentration of pyrazines which were thought to contribute to flavour and aroma of fresh roasted peanut. A comparative study between the main chemical classes retained in peanut samples after storage for 3 months at room temperature showed that the aldehydes derived lipids increased significantly in the solar dried samples. The antioxidative components produced via Maillard reaction resulted in oxidative stability of the samples heated in oven. PMID:9881373

  7. Medium- and long-term storage of the Pycnanthemum (mountain mint) germplasm collection.

    PubMed

    Jenderek, Maria M; Holman, Gregory E; DeNoma, Jeanine; Reed, Barbara M

    2013-01-01

    The United States of America collection of mountain mint (Pycnanthemum Michx.) is held at the USDA-ARS National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR) in Corvallis, Oregon as seed, potted plants and tissue cultures and a long-term storage collection is preserved at the USDA-ARS National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation (NCGRP) in Fort Collins, Colorado. The clonal collection is comprised of 34 accessions as potted plants that are duplicated with 31 accessions stored as in vitro cultures at 4 degrees C in tissue culture bags for medium-term storage at NCGR and as cryopreserved shoot tips in liquid nitrogen at NCGRP for long-term storage. This study reports on these two models of preservation of mountain mint at the U.S. National Plant Germplasm System. In vitro plants required 2 to 7 months for propagation on MS medium without growth regulators before storage at 4 degrees C. Plants remained in storage with good vigour in bags on 1/2x nitrogen MS medium without growth regulators for a mean of 2.08 y. An encapsulation-dehydration protocol was successful for cryopreservation of shoot tips from cold acclimated in vitro plants. Post-cryo viability, indicated by shoot tips with developed leaves and roots, ranged from 60 to 100 % for 27 accessions and 40 to 50 % for the other four. The encapsulation-dehydration cryopreservation method proved suitable for long-term preservation of the 31 Pycnanthemum accessions. These alternative storage forms allow for active use of the collection as well as base storage for clonally propagated accessions. PMID:24448768

  8. Candidate thermal energy storage technologies for solar industrial process heat applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furman, E. R.

    1979-01-01

    A number of candidate thermal energy storage system elements were identified as having the potential for the successful application of solar industrial process heat. These elements which include storage media, containment and heat exchange are shown.

  9. Influence of geologic layering on heat transport and storage in an aquifer thermal energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridger, D. W.; Allen, D. M.

    2013-09-01

    A modeling study was carried out to evaluate the influence of aquifer heterogeneity, as represented by geologic layering, on heat transport and storage in an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system in Agassiz, British Columbia, Canada. Two 3D heat transport models were developed and calibrated using the flow and heat transport code FEFLOW including: a "non-layered" model domain with homogeneous hydraulic and thermal properties; and, a "layered" model domain with variable hydraulic and thermal properties assigned to discrete geological units to represent aquifer heterogeneity. The base model (non-layered) shows limited sensitivity for the ranges of all thermal and hydraulic properties expected at the site; the model is most sensitive to vertical anisotropy and hydraulic gradient. Simulated and observed temperatures within the wells reflect a combination of screen placement and layering, with inconsistencies largely explained by the lateral continuity of high permeability layers represented in the model. Simulation of heat injection, storage and recovery show preferential transport along high permeability layers, resulting in longitudinal plume distortion, and overall higher short-term storage efficiencies.

  10. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefrois, R. T.; Knowles, G. R.; Mathur, A. K.; Budimir, J.

    1979-01-01

    Active heat exchange concepts for use with thermal energy storage systems in the temperature range of 250 C to 350 C, using the heat of fusion of molten salts for storing thermal energy are described. Salt mixtures that freeze and melt in appropriate ranges are identified and are evaluated for physico-chemical, economic, corrosive and safety characteristics. Eight active heat exchange concepts for heat transfer during solidification are conceived and conceptually designed for use with selected storage media. The concepts are analyzed for their scalability, maintenance, safety, technological development and costs. A model for estimating and scaling storage system costs is developed and is used for economic evaluation of salt mixtures and heat exchange concepts for a large scale application. The importance of comparing salts and heat exchange concepts on a total system cost basis, rather than the component cost basis alone, is pointed out. The heat exchange concepts were sized and compared for 6.5 MPa/281 C steam conditions and a 1000 MW(t) heat rate for six hours. A cost sensitivity analysis for other design conditions is also carried out.

  11. Heat storage system utilizing phase change materials government rights

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    2000-09-12

    A thermal energy transport and storage system is provided which includes an evaporator containing a mixture of a first phase change material and a silica powder, and a condenser containing a second phase change material. The silica powder/PCM mixture absorbs heat energy from a source such as a solar collector such that the phase change material forms a vapor which is transported from the evaporator to the condenser, where the second phase change material melts and stores the heat energy, then releases the energy to an environmental space via a heat exchanger. The vapor is condensed to a liquid which is transported back to the evaporator. The system allows the repeated transfer of thermal energy using the heat of vaporization and condensation of the phase change material.

  12. Tunable blue laser compensates for thermal expansion of the medium in holographic data storage.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tomiji; Sako, Kageyasu; Kasegawa, Ryo; Toishi, Mitsuru; Watanabe, Kenjiro

    2007-09-01

    A tunable laser optical source equipped with wavelength and mode-hop monitors was developed to compensate for thermal expansion of the medium in holographic data storage. The laser's tunable range is 402-409 nm, and supplying 90 mA of laser diode current provides an output power greater than 40 mW. The aberration of output light is less than 0.05 lambdarms. The temperature range within which the laser can compensate for thermal expansion of the medium is estimated based on the tunable range, which is +/-13.5 degrees C for glass substrates and +/-17.5 degrees C for amorphous polyolefin substrates. PMID:17805360

  13. (Thermal energy storage technologies for heating and cooling applications)

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlinson, J.J.

    1990-12-19

    Recent results from selected TES research activities in Germany and Sweden under an associated IEA annex are discussed. In addition, several new technologies for heating and cooling of buildings and automobiles were reviewed and found to benefit similar efforts in the United states. Details of a meeting with Didier-Werke AG, a leading German ceramics manufacturer who will provide TES media necessary for the United States to complete field tests of an advanced high temperature latent heat storage material, are presented. Finally, an overview of the December 1990 IEA Executive Committee deliberations on TES is presented.

  14. Thermal energy storage systems using fluidized bed heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramanathan, V.; Weast, T. E.; Ananth, K. P.

    1980-01-01

    The viability of using fluidized bed heat exchangers (FBHX) for thermal energy storage (TES) in applications with potential for waste heat recovery was investigated. Of the candidate applications screened, cement plant rotary kilns and steel plant electric arc furnaces were identified, via the chosen selection criteria, as having the best potential for successful use of FBHX/TES system. A computer model of the FBHX/TES systems was developed and the technical feasibility of the two selected applications was verified. Economic and tradeoff evaluations in progress for final optimization of the systems and selection of the most promising system for further concept validation are described.

  15. Fluid Latent Heat Storage Material Using Ethanol Water Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, Hidetoshi; Yasunari, Yuki

    Ethanol water mixture has a liquidus line ( or crystallizing line) and a solidus line (or melting line) that are separated, and therefore it can have both liquid and solid phases existing together. With advances in low temperature technology in recent days, ethanol water mixture is attaching more and more attention as an environment-friendly coolant or as a thermal storage material. In the present study, we observed the crystallization process in the mixture and carried out experiments to evaluate fluidity of the mixture, with the objective of utilizing an ethanol water mixture as a coolant or a thermal energy storage material. Crystal formation and growing process within a minute droplet of a binary mixture was modeled. As a result, we found a novel method to produce a fluid latent heat storage material continuously and an apparent coefficient of viscosity show that rotational speed and solid phase fraction have a strong effect on the fluidity of the mixture.

  16. Wallboard with Latent Heat Storage for Passive Solar Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kedl, R.J.

    2001-05-31

    Conventional wallboard impregnated with octadecane paraffin [melting point-23 C (73.5 F)] is being developed as a building material with latent heat storage for passive solar and other applications. Impregnation was accomplished simply by soaking the wallboard in molten wax. Concentrations of wax in the combined product as high as 35% by weight can be achieved. Scale-up of the soaking process, from small laboratory samples to full-sized 4- by 8-ft sheets, has been successfully accomplished. The required construction properties of wallboard are maintained after impregnation, that is, it can be painted and spackled. Long-term, high-temperature exposure tests and thermal cycling tests showed no tendency of the paraffin to migrate within the wallboard, and there was no deterioration of thermal energy storage capacity. In support of this concept, a computer model was developed to handle thermal transport and storage by a phase change material (PCM) dispersed in a porous media. The computer model was confirmed by comparison with known analytical solutions and also by comparison with temperatures measured in wallboard during an experimentally generated thermal transient. Agreement between the model and known solution was excellent. Agreement between the model and thermal transient was good, only after the model was modified to allow the PCM to melt over a temperature range, rather than at a specific melting point. When the melting characteristics of the PCM (melting point, melting range, and heat of fusion), as determined from a differential scanning calorimeter plot, were used in the model, agreement between the model and transient data was very good. The confirmed computer model may now be used in conjunction with a building heating and cooling code to evaluate design parameters and operational characteristics of latent heat storage wallboard for passive solar applications.

  17. Integrated heat exchanger design for a cryogenic storage tank

    SciTech Connect

    Fesmire, J. E.; Bonner, T.; Oliveira, J. M.; Johnson, W. L.; Notardonato, W. U.; Tomsik, T. M.; Conyers, H. J.

    2014-01-29

    Field demonstrations of liquid hydrogen technology will be undertaken for the proliferation of advanced methods and applications in the use of cryofuels. Advancements in the use of cryofuels for transportation on Earth, from Earth, or in space are envisioned for automobiles, aircraft, rockets, and spacecraft. These advancements rely on practical ways of storage, transfer, and handling of liquid hydrogen. Focusing on storage, an integrated heat exchanger system has been designed for incorporation with an existing storage tank and a reverse Brayton cycle helium refrigerator of capacity 850 watts at 20 K. The storage tank is a 125,000-liter capacity horizontal cylindrical tank, with vacuum jacket and multilayer insulation, and a small 0.6-meter diameter manway opening. Addressed are the specific design challenges associated with the small opening, complete modularity, pressure systems re-certification for lower temperature and pressure service associated with hydrogen densification, and a large 8:1 length-to-diameter ratio for distribution of the cryogenic refrigeration. The approach, problem solving, and system design and analysis for integrated heat exchanger are detailed and discussed. Implications for future space launch facilities are also identified. The objective of the field demonstration will be to test various zero-loss and densified cryofuel handling concepts for future transportation applications.

  18. Integrated heat exchanger design for a cryogenic storage tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Tomsik, T. M.; Bonner, T.; Oliveira, J. M.; Conyers, H. J.; Johnson, W. L.; Notardonato, W. U.

    2014-01-01

    Field demonstrations of liquid hydrogen technology will be undertaken for the proliferation of advanced methods and applications in the use of cryofuels. Advancements in the use of cryofuels for transportation on Earth, from Earth, or in space are envisioned for automobiles, aircraft, rockets, and spacecraft. These advancements rely on practical ways of storage, transfer, and handling of liquid hydrogen. Focusing on storage, an integrated heat exchanger system has been designed for incorporation with an existing storage tank and a reverse Brayton cycle helium refrigerator of capacity 850 watts at 20 K. The storage tank is a 125,000-liter capacity horizontal cylindrical tank, with vacuum jacket and multilayer insulation, and a small 0.6-meter diameter manway opening. Addressed are the specific design challenges associated with the small opening, complete modularity, pressure systems re-certification for lower temperature and pressure service associated with hydrogen densification, and a large 8:1 length-to-diameter ratio for distribution of the cryogenic refrigeration. The approach, problem solving, and system design and analysis for integrated heat exchanger are detailed and discussed. Implications for future space launch facilities are also identified. The objective of the field demonstration will be to test various zero-loss and densified cryofuel handling concepts for future transportation applications.

  19. Light storage in a tripod medium as a basis for logical operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słowik, K.; Raczyński, A.; Zaremba, J.; Zielińska-Kaniasty, S.

    2012-05-01

    A photon being a carrier of a polarization qubit is stored inside an atomic medium in the tripod configuration in the form of atomic excitations. Such stored information can be processed in the atomic memory and carried away by the released photon. An implementation is proposed of single qubit gates, e.g., phase, NOT, √{NOT} and Hadamard, as well as for a two-qubit CNOT gate, operating on polarized photons and based on light storage.

  20. Constant Temperature Storage House Heated by the Respiration Heat of Agricultural Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobiyama, Masayoshi; Takegata, Kiyohide; Hashimoto, Yoshiaki; Kawamoto, Syuroh; Ohno, Syozi

    HIMURO type storage house, cooled by natural snow/ice, has been practically applied by means of its good storing condition and of the easy handling. As this type storage house is constructed by enough insulation structure, it can been used not only for a cool house in the summer but also a constant temperature storage house in the winter. In this paper, the authors suggested that the HIMURO type storage house might be used as the constant temperature house in the severe cold winter season after the theoretical investigation on the thermal characteristics of it. In general, the conventional type constant temperature storage house is heated by heater throughout storing period, that of this paper is self heated by the respiration heat of agricultural products stored in this house, so the house proposed in this paper look forward to smaller heat addition than that of conventional house. The practical experiment was performed to verify the theoretical investigation and to observe the storing condition of the product and we obtained enough results.

  1. Studies of Phase Change Materials and a Latent Heat Storage Unit Used for a Natural Circulation Cooling/Latent Heat Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakitani, Katsumi; Honda, Hiroshi

    Experiments were performed to investigate feasibility of using organic materials as a PCM for a latent heat storage unit of a natural circulation cooling/latent heat storage system. This system was designed to cool a shelter accommodating telecommunication equipment located in subtropical deserts or similar regions without using a power source. Taking into account practical considerations and the results of various experiments regarding the thermodynamic properties, thermal degradation, and corrosiveness to metals, lauric acid and iron was selected for the PCM and the latent heat storage unit material, respectively. Cyclic heating and cooling of the latent heat storage unit undergoing solid-liquid phase change was repeated for more than 430 days. The results showed that the heating-cooling curve was almost unchanged between the early stage and the 1,870th cycle. It was concluded that the latent heat storage unit could be used safely for more than ten years as a component of the cooling system.

  2. Active latent heat storage with a screw heat exchanger - experimental results for heat transfer and concept for high pressure steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipf, Verena; Willert, Daniel; Neuhäuser, Anton

    2016-05-01

    An innovative active latent heat storage concept was invented and developed at Fraunhofer ISE. It uses a screw heat exchanger (SHE) for the phase change during the transport of a phase change material (PCM) from a cold to a hot tank or vice versa. This separates heat transfer and storage tank in comparison to existing concepts. A test rig has been built in order to investigate the heat transfer coefficients of the SHE during melting and crystallization of the PCM. The knowledge of these characteristics is crucial in order to assess the performance of the latent heat storage in a thermal system. The test rig contains a double shafted SHE, which is heated or cooled with thermal oil. The overall heat transfer coefficient U and the convective heat transfer coefficient on the PCM side hPCM both for charging and discharging have been calculated based on the measured data. For charging, the overall heat transfer coefficient in the tested SHE was Uch = 308 W/m2K and for discharging Udis = 210 W/m2K. Based on the values for hPCM the overall heat transfer coefficients for a larger SHE with steam as heat transfer fluid and an optimized geometry were calculated with Uch = 320 W/m2K for charging and Udis = 243 W/m2K for discharging. For pressures as high as p = 100 bar, an SHE concept has been developed, which uses an organic fluid inside the flight of the SHE as working media. With this concept, the SHE can also be deployed for very high pressure, e.g. as storage in solar thermal power plants.

  3. Preparation of fine powdered composite for latent heat storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fořt, Jan; Pomaleski, Marina; Trník, Anton; Pavlíková, Milena; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-07-01

    Application of latent heat storage building envelope systems using phase-change materials represents an attractive method of storing thermal energy and has the advantages of high-energy storage density and the isothermal nature of the storage process. This study deals with a preparation of a new type of powdered phase change composite material for thermal energy storage. The idea of a composite is based upon the impregnation of a natural silicate material by a reasonably priced commercially produced pure phase change material and forming the homogenous composite powdered structure. For the preparation of the composite, vacuum impregnation method is used. The particle size distribution accessed by the laser diffraction apparatus proves that incorporation of the organic phase change material into the structure of inorganic siliceous pozzolana does not lead to the clustering of the particles. The compatibility of the prepared composite is characterized by the Fourier transformation infrared analysis (FTIR). Performed DSC analysis shows potential of the developed composite for thermal energy storage that can be easily incorporated into the cement-based matrix of building materials. Based on the obtained results, application of the developed phase change composite can be considered with a great promise.

  4. Quantum Storage and Cloning of Light States in Eit-Like Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alodjants, A. P.; Arakelian, S. M.

    In the paper we consider a new approach for storage and cloning of quantum information by three level atomic (molecular) systems in the presence of the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) effect. For that, the various schemes of transformation into the bright and dark polaritons for quantum states of optical field in the medium are proposed. Physical conditions of realization of quantum nondemolition (QND) storage of quantum optical state are formulated for the first time. We have shown that the best storage and cloning of can be achieved with the atomic ensemble in the Bose-Einstein condensation state. We discuss stimulated Raman two-color photoassociation for experimental realization of the schemes under consideration.

  5. Integral collector storage system with heat exchange apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, Richard O.

    2004-04-20

    The present invention relates to an integral solar energy collector storage systems. Generally, an integral collector storage system includes a tank system, a plurality of heat exchange tubes with at least some of the heat exchange tubes arranged within the tank system, a first glazing layer positioned over the tank system and a base plate positioned under the tank system. In one aspect of the invention, the tank system, the first glazing layer an the base plate each include protrusions and a clip is provided to hold the layers together. In another aspect of the invention, the first glazing layer and the base plate are ribbed to provide structural support. This arrangement is particularly useful when these components are formed from plastic. In yet another aspect of the invention, the tank system has a plurality of interconnected tank chambers formed from tubes. In this aspect, a supply header pipe and a fluid return header pipe are provided at a first end of the tank system. The heat exchange tubes have inlets coupled to the supply header pipe and outlets coupled to the return header pipe. With this arrangement, the heat exchange tubes may be inserted into the tank chambers from the first end of the tank system.

  6. Experimental simulation of latent heat thermal energy storage and heat pipe thermal transport for dish concentrator solar receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, R.; Zimmerman, W. F.; Poon, P. T. Y.

    1981-01-01

    Test results on a modular simulation of the thermal transport and heat storage characteristics of a heat pipe solar receiver (HPSR) with thermal energy storage (TES) are presented. The HPSR features a 15-25 kWe Stirling engine power conversion system at the focal point of a parabolic dish concentrator operating at 827 C. The system collects and retrieves solar heat with sodium pipes and stores the heat in NaF-MgF2 latent heat storage material. The trials were run with a single full scale heat pipe, three full scale TES containers, and an air-cooled heat extraction coil to replace the Stirling engine heat exchanger. Charging and discharging, constant temperature operation, mixed mode operation, thermal inertial, etc. were studied. The heat pipe performance was verified, as were the thermal energy storage and discharge rates and isothermal discharges.

  7. [Forecasting heat and functional state of human exposed to cooling in water medium].

    PubMed

    Afanas'eva, R F; Losik, T K; Bobrov, A F; Azhaev, A N; Ivanov, I V

    2005-01-01

    Based on mathematic and statistic analysis of results obtained in studies of human heat exchange with cooling water medium, the authors represented canonical correlational patterns to determine integral parameter of cooling conditions (IPCC) referred to naked human and with various clothes on, both with and without additional heat releasing sources. Mathematic and statistic analysis helped to present correlational patterns for predicting levels of changes in human functional state according to IPCC comprising complex of factors that determine heat exchange in water medium, including safe time for stay in it. PMID:16048063

  8. Heat transfer in porous medium embedded with vertical plate: Non-equilibrium approach - Part A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badruddin, Irfan Anjum; Quadir, G. A.

    2016-06-01

    Heat transfer in a porous medium embedded with vertical flat plate is investigated by using thermal non-equilibrium model. Darcy model is employed to simulate the flow inside porous medium. It is assumed that the heat transfer takes place by natural convection and radiation. The vertical plate is maintained at isothermal temperature. The governing partial differential equations are converted into non-dimensional form and solved numerically using finite element method. Results are presented in terms of isotherms and streamlines for various parameters such as heat transfer coefficient parameter, thermal conductivity ratio, and radiation parameter

  9. Conventional wallboard with latent heat storage for passive solar applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kedl, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Conventional wallboard impregnated with octadecane paraffin (Melting Point -- 73.5{degree}F) is being developed as a building material with latent heat storage for passive solar applications. Impregnation was accomplished simply by soaking the wallboard in molten paraffin. Concentrations of paraffin in the combined product as high as 35{percent} by weight were achieved. In support of this concept, a computer model was developed to describe thermal transport and storage by a phase change material (PCM) dispersed in a porous media. The computer model was confirmed by comparison with known analytical solutions where the PCM melts at a specific melting point. However, agreement between the model and an experimentally produced thermal transient involving impregnated wallboard was only good after the model was modified to allow the paraffin to melt over a temperature range. This was accomplished by replacing the heat of fusion with a triangular heat capacity relationship that mimics the triangular melt curve found through differential scanning calorimetry. When this change was made, agreement between the model and the experimental transient was very good. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  10. High temperature metal hydrides as heat storage materials for solar and related applications.

    PubMed

    Felderhoff, Michael; Bogdanović, Borislav

    2009-01-01

    For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 degrees C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described. PMID:19333448

  11. High Temperature Metal Hydrides as Heat Storage Materials for Solar and Related Applications

    PubMed Central

    Felderhoff, Michael; Bogdanović, Borislav

    2009-01-01

    For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 °C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described. PMID:19333448

  12. Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Anoop

    2013-08-14

    A key technological issue facing the success of future Concentrating Solar Thermal Power (CSP) plants is creating an economical Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system. Current TES systems use either sensible heat in fluids such as oil, or molten salts, or use thermal stratification in a dual-media consisting of a solid and a heat-transfer fluid. However, utilizing the heat of fusion in inorganic molten salt mixtures in addition to sensible heat , as in a Phase change material (PCM)-based TES, can significantly increase the energy density of storage requiring less salt and smaller containers. A major issue that is preventing the commercial use of PCM-based TES is that it is difficult to discharge the latent heat stored in the PCM melt. This is because when heat is extracted, the melt solidifies onto the heat exchanger surface decreasing the heat transfer. Even a few millimeters of thickness of solid material on heat transfer surface results in a large drop in heat transfer due to the low thermal conductivity of solid PCM. Thus, to maintain the desired heat rate, the heat exchange area must be large which increases cost. This project demonstrated that the heat transfer coefficient can be increase ten-fold by using forced convection by pumping a hyper-eutectic salt mixture over specially coated heat exchanger tubes. However,only 15% of the latent heat is used against a goal of 40% resulting in a projected cost savings of only 17% against a goal of 30%. Based on the failure mode effect analysis and experience with pumping salt at near freezing point significant care must be used during operation which can increase the operating costs. Therefore, we conclude the savings are marginal to justify using this concept for PCM-TES over a two-tank TES. The report documents the specialty coatings, the composition and morphology of hypereutectic salt mixtures and the results from the experiment conducted with the active heat exchanger along with the lessons learnt during

  13. Heat transfer in vertically aligned phase change energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    El-Dessouky, H.T.; Bouhamra, W.S.; Ettouney, H.M.; Akbar, M.

    1999-05-01

    Convection effects on heat transfer are analyzed in low temperature and vertically aligned phase change energy storage systems. This is performed by detailed temperature measurements in the phase change material (PCM) in eighteen locations forming a grid of six radial and three axial positions. The system constitutes a double pipe configuration, where commercial grade paraffin wax is stored in the annular space between the two pipes and water flows inside the inner pipe. Vertical alignment of the system allowed for reverse of the flow direction of the heat transfer fluid (HTF), which is water. Therefore, the PCM is heated from the bottom for HTF flow from bottom to top and from the top as the HTF flow direction is reversed. For the former case, natural convection affects the melting process. Collected data are used to study variations in the transient temperature distribution at axial and radial positions as well as for the two-dimensional temperature field. The data are used to calculate the PCM heat transfer coefficient and to develop correlations for the melting Fourier number. Results indicate that the PCM heat transfer coefficient is higher for the case of PCM heating from bottom to top. Nusselt number correlations are developed as a function of Rayleigh, Stefan, and Fourier numbers for the HTF flow from bottom to top and as a function of Stefan and Fourier numbers for HTF flow from top to bottom. The enhancement ratio for heat transfer caused by natural convection increases and then levels off as the inlet temperature of the HTF is increased.

  14. A method to determine stratification efficiency of thermal energy storage processes independently from storage heat losses

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, Michel Y.; Streicher, Wolfgang; Bales, Chris

    2010-06-15

    A new method for the calculation of a stratification efficiency of thermal energy storages based on the second law of thermodynamics is presented. The biasing influence of heat losses is studied theoretically and experimentally. Theoretically, it does not make a difference if the stratification efficiency is calculated based on entropy balances or based on exergy balances. In practice, however, exergy balances are less affected by measurement uncertainties, whereas entropy balances can not be recommended if measurement uncertainties are not corrected in a way that the energy balance of the storage process is in agreement with the first law of thermodynamics. A comparison of the stratification efficiencies obtained from experimental results of charging, standby, and discharging processes gives meaningful insights into the different mixing behaviors of a storage tank that is charged and discharged directly, and a tank-in-tank system whose outer tank is charged and the inner tank is discharged thereafter. The new method has a great potential for the comparison of the stratification efficiencies of thermal energy storages and storage components such as stratifying devices. (author)

  15. Sensible heat storage technologies for solar thermal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dincer, I.; Dost, S.; Li, X.

    1997-07-01

    This study mainly deals with the sensible heat storage (SHS) systems and their performance evaluations. In this respect, a detailed investigation on the availability of SHS techniques for solar thermal applications, selection criteria of SHS systems, economics of SHS systems, main issues for evaluating SHS systems, the viability of SHS systems, environmental impacts of SHS systems and criteria for a SHS feasibility study, as well as energy saving options is presented. In addition, several definitions of energy and exergy efficiency for the performance of SHS systems are provided with an illustrative example.

  16. Thermal energy storage for industrial waste heat recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, H. W.; Kedl, R. J.; Duscha, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    The potential is examined for waste heat recovery and reuse through thermal energy storage in five specific industrial categories: (1) primary aluminum, (2) cement, (3) food processing, (4) paper and pulp, and (5) iron and steel. Preliminary results from Phase 1 feasibility studies suggest energy savings through fossil fuel displacement approaching 0.1 quad/yr in the 1985 period. Early implementation of recovery technologies with minimal development appears likely in the food processing and paper and pulp industries; development of the other three categories, though equally desirable, will probably require a greater investment in time and dollars.

  17. Nanoparticles for heat transfer and thermal energy storage

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Dileep; Cingarapu, Sreeram; Timofeeva, Elena V.; Moravek, Michael

    2015-07-14

    An article of manufacture and method of preparation thereof. The article of manufacture and method of making the article includes an eutectic salt solution suspensions and a plurality of nanocrystalline phase change material particles having a coating disposed thereon and the particles capable of undergoing the phase change which provides increase in thermal energy storage. In addition, other articles of manufacture can include a nanofluid additive comprised of nanometer-sized particles consisting of copper decorated graphene particles that provide advanced thermal conductivity to heat transfer fluids.

  18. Optimization of storage in passive solar heating systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bahm, R.J.

    1980-05-01

    The search for a simple method of estimating the optimum amount of storage for passive solar space heating system designs and the results of that search are described. The project goals, and why the project is important are described. The major project results are presented in the order of their importance with respect to meeting the project goal. A narrative description of the project is given. Here the various approaches attempted are described, giving the reasons for failure in those areas that were not successful. The Appendices contain the bulk of data generated by this project. Most of the data is presented in graphical form. (MHR)

  19. Thermal storage for industrial process and reject heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duscha, R. A.; Masica, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Industrial production uses about 40% of the total energy consumed in the United States. The major share of this is derived from fossil fuel. Potential savings of scarce fuel is possible through the use of thermal energy storage (TES) of reject or process heat for subsequent use. Results of study contracts awarded by the Department of Energy (DOE) and managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center have identified three especially significant industries where high temperature TES appears attractive - paper and pulp, iron and steel, and cement. Potential annual fuel savings with large scale implementation of near-term TES systems for these three industries is nearly 9 million bbl of oil.

  20. Thermal storage for industrial process and reject heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duscha, R. A.; Masica, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Industrial production uses about 40 percent of the total energy consumed in the United States. The major share of this is derived from fossil fuel. Potential savings of scarce fuel is possible through the use of thermal energy storage (TES) of reject or process heat for subsequent use. Three especially significant industries where high temperature TES appears attractive - paper and pulp, iron and steel, and cement are discussed. Potential annual fuel savings, with large scale implementation of near-term TES systems for these three industries, is nearly 9,000,000 bbl of oil.

  1. Study of thermal energy storage using fluidized bed heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weast, T. E.; Shannon, L. J.; Ananth, K. P.

    1980-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of fluid bed heat exchangers (FBHX) for thermal energy storage (TES) in waste heat recovery applications is assessed by analysis of two selected conceptual systems, the rotary cement kiln and the electric arc furnace. It is shown that the inclusion of TES in the energy recovery system requires that the difference in off-peak and on-peak energy rates be large enough so that the value of the recovered energy exceeds the value of the stored energy by a wide enough margin to offset parasitic power and thermal losses. Escalation of on-peak energy rates due to fuel shortages could make the FBHX/TES applications economically attractive in the future.

  2. Monitoring changes in upper ocean heat storage from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    A one-dimensional model of the upper ocean mixed-layer was developed to determine how the parameters which can be measured from satellites affect the development of the layer. The results show that the form of the dissipation term is important in achieving cyclic annual states, that the layer deepending rate depends on the averaging period for the surface heat flux and wind stress, that wind direction, as well as magnitude, can affect the deepening rate and that horizontal advective effects cannot simply be superimposed on the model results. An algorithm is given which uses satellite derived wind stress and sea surface temperature data to predict real time changes in upper ocean heat storage during the cooling seasons.

  3. Iron-doped lithium niobate as a read-write holographic storage medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alphonse, G. A.; Phillips, W.

    1976-01-01

    The response of iron-doped lithium niobate under conditions corresponding to hologram storage and retrieval is described, and the material characteristics are discussed. The optical sensitivity can be improved by heavy chemical reduction of lightly doped crystals such that most of the iron is in the divalent state, the remaining part being trivalent. The best reduction process found to be reproducible so far is the anneal of the doped crystal in the presence of a salt such as lithium carbonate. It is shown by analysis and simulation that a page-oriented read-write holographic memory with 1000 bits per page would have a cycle time of about 60 msec and a signal-to-noise ratio of 27 dB. This cycle time, although still too long for a practical memory, represents an improvement of two orders of magnitude over that of previous laboratory prototypes using a thermoplastic storage medium

  4. Performance of direct contact latent heat storage unit

    SciTech Connect

    Farid, M.; Yacoub, K. )

    1989-01-01

    The performance of direct contact latent heat storage unit has been investigated in a glass column having an inside diameter and length of 0.2 m and 1.5 m respectively. Kerosene, as a heat transfer fluid, was bubbled through the continuous phase which was a solution of one of the hydrated salts: Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}{center dot}10H{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{center dot}10H{sub 2}O, and Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}{center dot}12H{sub 2}O. The continuous phase temperature at different heights together with the kerosene inlet and outlet temperatures were measured with time during both heat charge and discharge. Theoretical prediction of the performance of the unit has been achieved employing the model for drop with internal circulation which was used to evaluate the transfer efficiency. Thermal efficiency of the nit was found to increase with the larger column. A sharp decrease in the magnitude of the heat transfer coefficient was observed soon after crystallization started. The coefficient increased significantly at higher kerosene flow rates due to the information of smaller bubbles.

  5. Central unresolved issues in thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Swet, C.J.; Baylin, F.

    1980-07-01

    This document explores the frontier of the rapidly expanding field of thermal energy storage, investigates unresolved issues, outlines research aimed at finding solutions, and suggests avenues meriting future research. Issues related to applications include value-based ranking of storage concepts, temperature constraints, consistency of assumptions, nomenclature and taxonomy, and screening criteria for materials. Issues related to technologies include assessing seasonal storage concepts, diurnal coolness storage, selection of hot-side storage concepts for cooling-only systems, phase-change storage in building materials, freeze protection for solar water heating systems, and justification of phase-change storage for active solar space heating.

  6. Wallboard with latent heat storage for passive solar applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kedl, R.J.

    1991-05-01

    Conventional wallboard impregnated with octadecane paraffin is being developed as a building material with latent heat storage for passive solar and other applications. Impregnation was accomplished simply by soaking the wallboard in molten wax. Concentrations of wax in the combined product as high as 35% by weight can be achieved. Scale-up of the soaking process, from small laboratory samples to full-sized 4- by 8-ft sheets, has been successfully accomplished. The required construction properties of wallboard are maintained after impregnation, that is, it can be painted and spackled. Long-term, high-temperature exposure tests and thermal cycling tests showed no tendency of the paraffin to migrate within the wallboard, and there was no deterioration of thermal energy storage capacity. In support of this concept, a computer model was developed to handle thermal transport and storage by a phase change material (PCM) dispersed in a porous media. The computer model was confirmed by comparison with known analytical solutions and also by comparison with temperatures measured in wallboard during an experimentally generated thermal transient. Agreement between the model and known solution was excellent. Agreement between the model and thermal transient was good, only after the model was modified to allow the PCM to melt over a temperature range, rather than at a specific melting point. When the melting characteristics of the PCM, as determined from a differential scanning calorimeter plot, were used in the model, agreement between the model and transient data was very good. 11 refs., 25 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Packed bed heat storage: Continuum mechanics model and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knödler, Philipp; Dreißigacker, Volker; Zunft, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) systems are key elements for various types of new power plant concepts. As possible cost-effective storage inventory option, packed beds of miscellaneous material come into consideration. However, high technical risks arise due to thermal expansion and shrinking of the packed bed's particles during cyclic thermal operation, possibly leading to material failure. Therefore, suitable tools for designing the heat storage system are mandatory. While particle discrete models offer detailed simulation results, the computing time for large scale applications is inefficient. In contrast, continuous models offer time-efficient simulation results but are in need of effective packed bed parameters. This work focuses on providing insight into some basic methods and tools on how to obtain such parameters and on how they are implemented into a continuum model. In this context, a particle discrete model as well as a test rig for carrying out uniaxial compression tests (UCT) is introduced. Performing of experimental validation tests indicate good agreement with simulated UCT results. In this process, effective parameters required for a continuous packed bed model were identified and used for continuum simulation. This approach is validated by comparing the simulated results with experimental data from another test rig. The presented method significantly simplifies subsequent design studies.

  8. Thermal Assessment of a Latent-Heat Energy Storage Module During Melting and Freezing for Solar Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos Archibold, Antonio

    Capital investment reduction, exergetic efficiency improvement and material compatibility issues have been identified as the primary techno-economic challenges associated, with the near-term development and deployment of thermal energy storage (TES) in commercial-scale concentrating solar power plants. Three TES techniques have gained attention in the solar energy research community as possible candidates to reduce the cost of solar-generated electricity, namely (1) sensible heat storage, (2) latent heat (tank filled with phase change materials (PCMs) or encapsulated PCMs packed in a vessel) and (3) thermochemical storage. Among these the PCM macro-encapsulation approach seems to be one of the most-promising methods because of its potential to develop more effective energy exchange, reduce the cost associated with the tank and increase the exergetic efficiency. However, the technological barriers to this approach arise from the encapsulation techniques used to create a durable capsule, as well as an assessment of the fundamental thermal energy transport mechanisms during the phase change. A comprehensive study of the energy exchange interactions and induced fluid flow during melting and solidification of a confined storage medium is reported in this investigation from a theoretical perspective. Emphasis has been placed on the thermal characterization of a single constituent storage module rather than an entire storage system, in order to, precisely capture the energy exchange contributions of all the fundamental heat transfer mechanisms during the phase change processes. Two-dimensional, axisymmetric, transient equations for mass, momentum and energy conservation have been solved numerically by the finite volume scheme. Initially, the interaction between conduction and natural convection energy transport modes, in the absence of thermal radiation, is investigated for solar power applications at temperatures (300--400°C). Later, participating thermal radiation

  9. Experimental determination of soil heat storage for the simulation of heat transport in a coastal wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, Michael; Swain, Matthew; Lohmann, Melinda; Swain, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Two physical experiments were developed to better define the thermal interaction of wetland water and the underlying soil layer. This information is important to numerical models of flow and heat transport that have been developed to support biological studies in the South Florida coastal wetland areas. The experimental apparatus consists of two 1.32. m diameter by 0.99. m tall, trailer-mounted, well-insulated tanks filled with soil and water. A peat-sand-soil mixture was used to represent the wetland soil, and artificial plants were used as a surrogate for emergent wetland vegetation based on size and density observed in the field. The tanks are instrumented with thermocouples to measure vertical and horizontal temperature variations and were placed in an outdoor environment subject to solar radiation, wind, and other factors affecting the heat transfer. Instruments also measure solar radiation, relative humidity, and wind speed.Tests indicate that heat transfer through the sides and bottoms of the tanks is negligible, so the experiments represent vertical heat transfer effects only. The temperature fluctuations measured in the vertical profile through the soil and water are used to calibrate a one-dimensional heat-transport model. The model was used to calculate the thermal conductivity of the soil. Additionally, the model was used to calculate the total heat stored in the soil. This information was then used in a lumped parameter model to calculate an effective depth of soil which provides the appropriate heat storage to be combined with the heat storage in the water column. An effective depth, in the model, of 5.1. cm of wetland soil represents the heat storage needed to match the data taken in the tank containing 55.9. cm of peat/sand/soil mix. The artificial low-density laboratory sawgrass reduced the solar energy absorbed by the 35.6. cm of water and 55.9. cm of soil at midday by less than 5%. The maximum heat transfer into the underlying peat-sand-soil mix

  10. Experimental determination of soil heat storage for the simulation of heat transport in a coastal wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Michael; Swain, Matthew; Lohmann, Melinda; Swain, Eric

    2012-02-01

    SummaryTwo physical experiments were developed to better define the thermal interaction of wetland water and the underlying soil layer. This information is important to numerical models of flow and heat transport that have been developed to support biological studies in the South Florida coastal wetland areas. The experimental apparatus consists of two 1.32 m diameter by 0.99 m tall, trailer-mounted, well-insulated tanks filled with soil and water. A peat-sand-soil mixture was used to represent the wetland soil, and artificial plants were used as a surrogate for emergent wetland vegetation based on size and density observed in the field. The tanks are instrumented with thermocouples to measure vertical and horizontal temperature variations and were placed in an outdoor environment subject to solar radiation, wind, and other factors affecting the heat transfer. Instruments also measure solar radiation, relative humidity, and wind speed. Tests indicate that heat transfer through the sides and bottoms of the tanks is negligible, so the experiments represent vertical heat transfer effects only. The temperature fluctuations measured in the vertical profile through the soil and water are used to calibrate a one-dimensional heat-transport model. The model was used to calculate the thermal conductivity of the soil. Additionally, the model was used to calculate the total heat stored in the soil. This information was then used in a lumped parameter model to calculate an effective depth of soil which provides the appropriate heat storage to be combined with the heat storage in the water column. An effective depth, in the model, of 5.1 cm of wetland soil represents the heat storage needed to match the data taken in the tank containing 55.9 cm of peat/sand/soil mix. The artificial low-density laboratory sawgrass reduced the solar energy absorbed by the 35.6 cm of water and 55.9 cm of soil at midday by less than 5%. The maximum heat transfer into the underlying peat

  11. Castor-1C spent fuel storage cask decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, D.R.; McCann, R.A.; Jenquin, U.P.; Heeb, C.M.; Creer, J.M.; Wheeler, C.L.

    1986-12-01

    This report documents the decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses of the Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear Services (GNS) CASTOR-1C cask used in a spent fuel storage demonstration performed at Preussen Elektra's Wurgassen nuclear power plant. The demonstration was performed between March 1982 and January 1984, and resulted in cask and fuel temperature data and cask exterior surface gamma-ray and neutron radiation dose rate measurements. The purpose of the analyses reported here was to evaluate decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding computer codes. The analyses consisted of (1) performing pre-look predictions (predictions performed before the analysts were provided the test data), (2) comparing ORIGEN2 (decay heat), COBRA-SFS and HYDRA (heat transfer), and QAD and DOT (shielding) results to data, and (3) performing post-test analyses if appropriate. Even though two heat transfer codes were used to predict CASTOR-1C cask test data, no attempt was made to compare the two codes. The codes are being evaluated with other test data (single-assembly data and other cask data), and to compare the codes based on one set of data may be premature and lead to erroneous conclusions.

  12. Reversible storage of a weak light pulse in a thermal atomic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guo-Jian; Qiu, Tianhui; Wang, Kaige; Xie, Min

    2010-06-01

    We investigate the storage and retrieval of a weak signal pulse in a medium composed of NΛ-type three-level atoms in thermal motion. Both atomic internal and translational degrees of freedom are treated quantum mechanically, based on which momentum families that are closed with respect to the action of the interaction Hamiltonian are defined. We introduce momentum-dependent collective atomic density operators by sorting the atoms into groups according to their momenta and establish Heisenberg equations for these atomic operators and the signal field. Because of the thermal-motion-dependent dephasing effect in the establishment of electromagnetically induced transparency of the medium, the efficiency of transfer between the signal pulse and the medium is reduced. The numerical simulations show that the performance of the scheme can be improved by applying the copropagation configuration of the light fields and preparing the atoms initially with a small width of the thermal momentum distribution, which is assumed to be the Gaussian function, or in the state where the Raman-Nath approximation is tenable.

  13. The effect of heat treatment on the hardness and impact properties of medium carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazni Ismail, Noor; Khatif, Nurul Aida Amir; Aliff Kamil Awang Kecik, Mohamad; Hanafiah Shaharudin, Mohd Ali

    2016-02-01

    This paper covers the effect of heat treatment on the mechanical properties of medium carbon steel. The main objective of this project is to investigate the hardness and impact properties of medium carbon steel treated at different heat treatment processes. Three types of heat treatment were performed in this project which are annealing, quenching and tempering. During annealing process, the specimens were heated at 900°C and soaked for 1 hour in the furnace. The specimens were then quenched in a medium of water and open air, respectively. The treatment was followed by tempering processes which were done at 300°C, 450°C, and 600°C with a soaking time of 2 hours for each temperature. After the heat treatment process completed, Rockwell hardness test and Charpy impact test were performed. The results collected from the Rockwell hardness test and Charpy impact test on the samples after quenching and tempering were compared and analysed. The fractured surfaces of the samples were also been examined by using Scanning Electron Microscope. It was observed that different heat treatment processes gave different hardness value and impact property to the steel. The specimen with the highest hardness was found in samples quenched in water. Besides, the microstructure obtained after tempering provided a good combination of mechanical properties due to the process reduce brittleness by increasing ductility and toughness.

  14. Heating of the Warm Ionized Medium by Low-energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Mark A.

    2016-02-01

    In light of evidence for a high ionization rate due to low-energy cosmic rays (LECR) in diffuse molecular gas in the solar neighborhood, we evaluate their heat input to the warm ionized medium (WIM). LECR are much more effective at heating plasma than they are at heating neutrals. We show that the upper end of the measured ionization rates corresponds to a local LECR heating rate sufficient to maintain the WIM against radiative cooling, independent of the nature of the ionizing particles or the detailed shape of their spectrum. Elsewhere in the Galaxy the LECR heating rates may be higher than those measured locally. In particular, higher fluxes of LECR have been suggested for the inner Galactic disk, based on the observed hard X-ray emission, with correspondingly larger heating rates implied for the WIM. We conclude that LECR play an important and perhaps dominant role in the thermal balance of the WIM.

  15. Novel metallic alloys as phase change materials for heat storage in direct steam generation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto-Maestre, J.; Iparraguirre-Torres, I.; Velasco, Z. Amondarain; Kaltzakorta, I.; Zubieta, M. Merchan

    2016-05-01

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) is one of the key electricity production renewable energy technologies with a clear distinguishing advantage: the possibility to store the heat generated during the sunny periods, turning it into a dispatchable technology. Current CSP Plants use an intermediate Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF), thermal oil or inorganic salt, to transfer heat from the Solar Field (SF) either to the heat exchanger (HX) unit to produce high pressure steam that can be leaded to a turbine for electricity production, or to the Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system. In recent years, a novel CSP technology is attracting great interest: Direct Steam Generation (DSG). The direct use of water/steam as HTF would lead to lower investment costs for CSP Plants by the suppression of the HX unit. Moreover, water is more environmentally friendly than thermal oils or salts, not flammable and compatible with container materials (pipes, tanks). However, this technology also has some important challenges, being one of the major the need for optimized TES systems. In DSG, from the exergy point of view, optimized TES systems based on two sensible heat TES systems (for preheating of water and superheating vapour) and a latent heat TES system for the evaporation of water (around the 70% of energy) is the preferred solution. This concept has been extensively tested [1, 2, 3] using mainly NaNO3 as latent heat storage medium. Its interesting melting temperature (Tm) of 306°C, considering a driving temperature difference of 10°C, means TES charging steam conditions of 107 bar at 316°C and discharging conditions of 81bar at 296°C. The average value for the heat of fusion (ΔHf) of NaNO3 from literature data is 178 J/g [4]. The main disadvantage of inorganic salts is their very low thermal conductivity (0.5 W/m.K) requiring sophisticated heat exchanging designs. The use of high thermal conductivity eutectic metal alloys has been recently proposed [5, 6, 7] as a feasible alternative. Tms

  16. Engineering Model of Liquid Storage Utility Tank for Heat Transfer Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, K.C.

    1995-09-27

    The utility or chemical storage tank requires special engineering attention and heat transfer analysis because the tank content is very sensitive to temperature and surrounding environment such as atmospheric or outside air, humidity, and solar radiation heat. A simplified heat transfer model was developed to calculate the liquid content temperature of utility storage tank. The content of the utility storage tanks can be water or any other chemical liquid. An engineering model of liquid storage tank for heat transfer analysis and temperature calculations are presented and discussed in the examples of Tanks No. 1 containing oxalic acid and No. 2 containing sodium tetraphenylborate solution.

  17. Metal-halide mixtures for latent heat energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K.; Manvi, R.

    1981-01-01

    Alkali metal and alkali halide mixtures are identified which may be suitable for thermal energy storage at temperatures above 600 C. The use of metal-halides is appropriate because of their tendency to form two immiscible melts with a density difference, which reduces scale formation and solidification on heat transfer surfaces. Also, the accumulation of phase change material along the melt interface is avoided by the self-dispersing characteristic of some metal-halides, in particular Sr-SrCl2, Ba-BaCl2, and Ba-BaBr2 mixtures. Further advantages lie in their high thermal conductivities, ability to cope with thermal shock, corrosion inhibition, and possibly higher energy densities.

  18. Characterization of desert sand as a sensible thermal energy storage medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diago, Miguel; Iniesta, Alberto Crespo; Delclos, Thomas; Soum-Glaude, Audrey; Shamim, Tariq; Calvet, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    Desert sand from the United Arab Emirates (UAE) is considered as a possible sensible heat, thermal energy storage (TES) material. Its thermal stability, specific heat capacity and tendency to agglomerate are studied at high temperatures. The analyses show that it is possible to use desert sand as a TES material up to 800-1000 °C. Above 800 °C, weak agglomeration effects start to become significant. The samples become solid above 1000 °C. This may represent a major operating limit depending on the handling mechanism in place for the possible transport of the sand. The sand chemical composition is analyzed with the XRF and XRD techniques, which reveal the dominance of quartz and carbonates. Finally, the spectral absorptivity of the samples is measured before and after a thermal cycle, as it may be possible to use the desert sand not only as a TES material but also as a direct solar absorber.

  19. Magnesium fluoride as energy storage medium for spacecraft solar thermal power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurio, Charles A.

    1992-01-01

    MgF2 was investigated as a phase-change energy-storage material for LEO power systems using solar heat to run thermal cycles. It provides a high heat of fusion per unit mass at a high melting point (1536 K). Theoretical evaluation showed the basic chemical compatibility of liquid MgF2 with refractory metals at 1600 K, though transient high pressures of H2 can occur in a closed container due to reaction with residual moisture. The compatibility was tested in two refractory metal containers for over 2000 h. Some showed no deterioration, while there was evidence that the fluoride reacted with hafnium in others. Corollary tests showed that the MgF2 supercooled by 10-30 K and 50-90 K.

  20. Origin of abnormal formation of pearlite in medium-carbon steel under nonequilibrium conditions of heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaev, D. A.; Yakovleva, I. L.; Tereshchenko, N. A.; Urtsev, V. N.; Degtyarev, V. N.; Shmakov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    The structure and kinetics of the formation of austenite in medium-carbon steel during shortterm heating above the temperature Ac 1 followed by accelerated cooling are analyzed. It has been shown that the abnormal formation of pearlite in steel results from the concentrational and structural inhomogeneity of austenite, as well as the presence of carbide particles in ferrite areas.

  1. Heat transfer in porous medium embedded with vertical plate: Non-equilibrium approach - Part B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quadir, G. A.; Badruddin, Irfan Anjum

    2016-06-01

    This work is continuation of the paper Part A. Due to large number of results, the paper is divided into two section with section-A (Part A) discussing the effect of various parameters such as heat transfer coefficient parameter, thermal conductivity ratio etc. on streamlines and isothermal lines. Section-B highlights the heat transfer characteristics in terms of Nusselt number The Darcy model is employed to simulate the flow inside the medium. It is assumed that the heat transfer takes place by convection and radiation. The governing partial differential equations are converted into non-dimensional form and solved numerically using finite element method.

  2. Applications of thermal energy storage to waste heat recovery in the food processing industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojnar, F.; Lunberg, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    A study to assess the potential for waste heat recovery in the food industry and to evaluate prospective waste heat recovery system concepts employing thermal energy storage was conducted. The study found that the recovery of waste heat in canning facilities can be performed in significant quantities using systems involving thermal energy storage that are both practical and economical. A demonstration project is proposed to determine actual waste heat recovery costs and benefits and to encourage system implementation by the food industry.

  3. Li-doped B2C graphene as potential hydrogen storage medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Hui; Liu, Chun-sheng; Zeng, Zhi; Fan, Chao; Ju, Xin

    2011-04-01

    Based on first-principles density functional theory, we show that Li-doped B2C graphene can serve as a high-capacity hydrogen storage medium with the gravimetric density of 7.54 wt %. The present results indicate that the strong binding of Li onto the substrate comes from the hybridizations of B 2p and C 2p orbitals with the partial occupancy of Li 2p orbitals. Both the polarization mechanism and the orbital hybridizations contribute to the adsorption of H2 molecules and the resulting adsorption energy is in the range of 0.12-0.22 eV/H2. The system reported here is favorable for the reversible hydrogen adsorption/desorption at the room temperature.

  4. Pressure loss and heat transfer in a toothed finned heat transfer medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, W. D.; Leidinger, B. J. G.

    Thermohydraulic investigation was carried out in a special toothed-finned geometry, which was provided for increasing heat transfer in an evaporator cooler. The evaporator cooler has applications in space navigation. The toothed-finned heat carrier was used in a counter current, with a view to simplifying the heat transfer coefficient evaluation, from the temperature and volume flows measured. Test results obtained confirmed the suitability of this test arrangement. Relationships were derived from test results, for the pressure loss coefficient and the Nusselt number, with regard to the Reynolds number for this determined finned geometry.

  5. Numerical model of heat transfer in three phases of the poroelastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uciechowska-Grakowicz, Anna; Strzelecki, Tomasz

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the results of numerical analysis of the thermal consolidation of a two phase medium, under the assumption of independent heat transfer in fluid and the solid phase of the medium, are presented. Three cases of pore fluid were considered: liquid, represented by water, and gas, represented by air and carbon dioxide. The mathematical model was derived from irreversible thermodynamics, with the assumption of a constant heat transfer between the phases. In the case of the accepted geometry of the classical dimensions of the soil sample and boundary conditions, the process leads to equalization of temperatures of the skeleton on the pore fluid. Heat transfer is associated with the fluid flow in the pores of the medium. In the case of gas as the pore fluid, a non-linear mathematical model of gas filtration through the pores of the medium was accepted. For the computing process, relationships between viscosity or density and temperature proposed by other authors were taken into account. Despite accepting mechanical constants of the solid phase that do not depend on temperature, the obtained model is nonlinear and develops the classical Biot-Darcy model.

  6. Natural convection heat transfer of nanofluids along a vertical plate embedded in porous medium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The unsteady natural convection heat transfer of nanofluid along a vertical plate embedded in porous medium is investigated. The Darcy-Forchheimer model is used to formulate the problem. Thermal conductivity and viscosity models based on a wide range of experimental data of nanofluids and incorporating the velocity-slip effect of the nanoparticle with respect to the base fluid, i.e., Brownian diffusion is used. The effective thermal conductivity of nanofluid in porous media is calculated using copper powder as porous media. The nonlinear governing equations are solved using an unconditionally stable implicit finite difference scheme. In this study, six different types of nanofluids have been compared with respect to the heat transfer enhancement, and the effects of particle concentration, particle size, temperature of the plate, and porosity of the medium on the heat transfer enhancement and skin friction coefficient have been studied in detail. It is found that heat transfer rate increases with the increase in particle concentration up to an optimal level, but on the further increase in particle concentration, the heat transfer rate decreases. For a particular value of particle concentration, small-sized particles enhance the heat transfer rates. On the other hand, skin friction coefficients always increase with the increase in particle concentration and decrease in nanoparticle size. PMID:23391481

  7. Natural convection heat transfer of nanofluids along a vertical plate embedded in porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Ziya; Harmand, Souad

    2013-02-01

    The unsteady natural convection heat transfer of nanofluid along a vertical plate embedded in porous medium is investigated. The Darcy-Forchheimer model is used to formulate the problem. Thermal conductivity and viscosity models based on a wide range of experimental data of nanofluids and incorporating the velocity-slip effect of the nanoparticle with respect to the base fluid, i.e., Brownian diffusion is used. The effective thermal conductivity of nanofluid in porous media is calculated using copper powder as porous media. The nonlinear governing equations are solved using an unconditionally stable implicit finite difference scheme. In this study, six different types of nanofluids have been compared with respect to the heat transfer enhancement, and the effects of particle concentration, particle size, temperature of the plate, and porosity of the medium on the heat transfer enhancement and skin friction coefficient have been studied in detail. It is found that heat transfer rate increases with the increase in particle concentration up to an optimal level, but on the further increase in particle concentration, the heat transfer rate decreases. For a particular value of particle concentration, small-sized particles enhance the heat transfer rates. On the other hand, skin friction coefficients always increase with the increase in particle concentration and decrease in nanoparticle size.

  8. Relations for local radiative heat transfer between rectangular boundaries of an absorbing-emitting medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1993-01-01

    An analytical solution was obtained by Siegel (1991, 1992) for local boundary heat fluxes by a radiating medium at uniform temperature in a 2D rectangular region. It is shown here that, after local fluxes from the medium to the walls have been evaluated, it is very easy to compute local fluxes arriving from the adjacent and opposite walls. This extends the previous analysis and provides convenient relations to include radiation from a black boundary, each side of the rectangle being at a different uniform temperature. The final expressions are helpful in performing spectral calculations that must be made for many spectral bands.

  9. Nonsimilar hydromagnetic simultaneous heat and mass transfer by mixed convection from a vertical plate embedded in a uniform porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Chamkha, A.J.; Khaled, A.R.A.

    1999-08-27

    Simultaneous heat and mass transfer from different geometries embedded in porous media has many engineering and geophysical applications, such as migration of water in geothermal reservoirs, underground spreading of chemical wastes and other pollutants, thermal insulation, enhanced oil recovery, packed-bed catalytic reactors, cooling of nuclear reactors, grain storage, and evaporative cooling and solidification. This work considers steady, laminar, hydromagnetic simultaneous heat and mass transfer by mixed convection flow over a permeable vertical plate immersed in a uniform porous medium for the cases of power law variations of both the wall temperature and concentration and the wall heat flux and mass flux. Appropriate transformations are employed to transform the governing differential equations to a nonsimilar form. The transformed equations are solved numerically by an accurate, implicit, iterative, finite difference method. The obtained results are validated by favorable comparisons with previously published work on special cases of the problem. A parametric study illustrating the influence of all involved parameters on the local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers is conducted. The results of this parametric study are shown graphically, and the physical aspects of the problem are discussed.

  10. Effect of pre-storage heat treatment on enzymological changes in peach.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Parshant; Masoodi, F A

    2010-08-01

    Peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) fruit was subjected to hot water and moist hot air treatment at varying temperatures. The activities of polyphenoloxidase (PPO) and polygalacturonase (PG) were monitored during storage for 0, 3 and 6 days. PPO activity decreased in all treatments during storage. This decrease was more in hot water treated fruits than in hot air. PPO activity decreased with the increase in treatment duration. However, the PG activity increased in heat treated fruits as well as control. This increase was more in mild heat treatments as compared to severe heat treatment. Both polyphenol and pectin contents decreased during storage in both heat treatments. PMID:23572672

  11. Design and development of integral heat pipe/thermal energy storage devices. [used with spacecraft cryocoolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahefkey, E. T.; Richter, R.

    1981-01-01

    The major design and performance test subtasks in the development of small (200 to 1,000 whr) integral heat pipe/thermal energy storage devices for use with thermally driven spacecraft cryo-coolers are described. The design of the integral heat pipe/thermal energy storage device was based on a quasi steady resistance heat transfer, lumped capacitance model. Design considerations for the heat pipe and thermal storage annuli are presented. The thermomechanical stress and insulation system design for the device are reviewed. Experimental correlations are described, as are the plans for the further development of the concept.

  12. Effective-medium model of wire metamaterials in the problems of radiative heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Mirmoosa, M. S. Nefedov, I. S. Simovski, C. R.; Rüting, F.

    2014-06-21

    In the present work, we check the applicability of the effective medium model (EMM) to the problems of radiative heat transfer (RHT) through so-called wire metamaterials (WMMs)—composites comprising parallel arrays of metal nanowires. It is explained why this problem is so important for the development of prospective thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems. Previous studies of the applicability of EMM for WMMs were targeted by the imaging applications of WMMs. The analogous study referring to the transfer of radiative heat is a separate problem that deserves extended investigations. We show that WMMs with practically realizable design parameters transmit the radiative heat as effectively homogeneous media. Existing EMM is an adequate tool for qualitative prediction of the magnitude of transferred radiative heat and of its effective frequency band.

  13. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, J.; Kosson, R.; Haslett, R.

    1980-01-01

    Various active heat exchange concepts were identified from among three generic categories: scrapers, agitators/vibrators and slurries. The more practical ones were given a more detailed technical evaluation and an economic comparison with a passive tube-shell design for a reference application (300 MW sub t storage for 6 hours). Two concepts were selected for hardware development: (1) a direct contact heat exchanger in which molten salt droplets are injected into a cooler counterflowing stream of liquid metal carrier fluid, and (2) a rotating drum scraper in which molten salt is sprayed onto the circumference of a rotating drum, which contains the fluid salt is sprayed onto the circumference of a rotating drum, which contains the fluid heat sink in an internal annulus near the surface. A fixed scraper blade removes the solidified salt from the surface which was nickel plated to decrease adhesion forces. In addition to improving performance by providing a nearly constant transfer rate during discharge, these active heat exchanger concepts were estimated to cost at least 25% less than the passive tube-shell design.

  14. Thermal energy storage heat exchanger: Molten salt heat exchanger design for utility power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferarra, A.; Yenetchi, G.; Haslett, R.; Kosson, R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of thermal energy storage (TES) in the latent heat of molten salts as a means of conserving fossil fuels and lowering the cost of electric power was evaluated. Public utility systems provided electric power on demand. This demand is generally maximum during late weekday afternoons, with considerably lower overnight and weekend loads. Typically, the average demand is only 60% to 80% of peak load. As peak load increases, the present practice is to purchase power from other grid facilities or to bring older less efficient fossil-fuel plants on line which increase the cost of electric power. The widespread use of oil-fired boilers, gas turbine and diesel equipment to meet peaking loads depletes our oil-based energy resources. Heat exchangers utilizing molten salts can be used to level the energy consumption curve. The study begins with a demand analysis and the consideration of several existing modern fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants for use as models. Salts are evaluated for thermodynamic, economic, corrosive, and safety characteristics. Heat exchanger concepts are explored and heat exchanger designs are conceived. Finally, the economics of TES conversions in existing plants and new construction is analyzed. The study concluded that TES is feasible in electric power generation. Substantial data are presented for TES design, and reference material for further investigation of techniques is included.

  15. Combined solar heat and power system with a latent heat storage - system simulations for an economic assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipf, Verena; Neuhäuser, Anton

    2016-05-01

    Decentralized solar combined heat and power (CHP) systems can be economically feasible, especially when they have a thermal storage. In such systems, heat provided by solar thermal collectors is used to generate electricity and useful heat for e.g. industrial processes. For the supply of energy in times without solar irradiation, a thermal storage can be integrated. In this work, the performance of a solar CHP system using an active latent heat storage with a screw heat exchanger is investigated. Annual yield calculations are conducted in order to calculate annual energy gains and, based on them; economic assumptions are used to calculated economic numbers in order to assess the system performance. The energy savings of a solar system, compared to a system with a fossil fuel supply, are calculated. Then the net present value and the dynamic payback are calculated with these savings, the initial investment costs and the operational costs. By interpretation and comparison of these economic numbers, an optimum system design in terms of solar field size and storage size was determined. It has been shown that the utilization of such systems can be economical in remote areas without gas and grid connection. Optimal storage design parameters in terms of the temperature differences in the heat exchanger and the storage capacity have been determined which can further increase the net present value of such system.

  16. Microscale Enhancement of Heat and Mass Transfer for Hydrogen Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Drost, Kevin; Jovanovic, Goran; Paul, Brian

    2015-09-30

    The document summarized the technical progress associated with OSU’s involvement in the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. OSU focused on the development of microscale enhancement technologies for improving heat and mass transfer in automotive hydrogen storage systems. OSU’s key contributions included the development of an extremely compact microchannel combustion system for discharging hydrogen storage systems and a thermal management system for adsorption based hydrogen storage using microchannel cooling (the Modular Adsorption Tank Insert or MATI).

  17. Heat pump water heater and storage tank assembly

    DOEpatents

    Dieckmann, John T.; Nowicki, Brian J.; Teagan, W. Peter; Zogg, Robert

    1999-09-07

    A water heater and storage tank assembly comprises a housing defining a chamber, an inlet for admitting cold water to the chamber, and an outlet for permitting flow of hot water from the chamber. A compressor is mounted on the housing and is removed from the chamber. A condenser comprises a tube adapted to receive refrigerant from the compressor, and winding around the chamber to impart heat to water in the chamber. An evaporator is mounted on the housing and removed from the chamber, the evaporator being adapted to receive refrigerant from the condenser and to discharge refrigerant to conduits in communication with the compressor. An electric resistance element extends into the chamber, and a thermostat is disposed in the chamber and is operative to sense water temperature and to actuate the resistance element upon the water temperature dropping to a selected level. The assembly includes a first connection at an external end of the inlet, a second connection at an external end of the outlet, and a third connection for connecting the resistance element, compressor and evaporator to an electrical power source.

  18. Thermal energy storage systems using fluidized bed heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weast, T.; Shannon, L.

    1980-01-01

    A rotary cement kiln and an electric arc furnace were chosen for evaluation to determine the applicability of a fluid bed heat exchanger (FBHX) for thermal energy storage (TES). Multistage shallow bed FBHX's operating with high temperature differences were identified as the most suitable for TES applications. Analysis of the two selected conceptual systems included establishing a plant process flow configuration, an operational scenario, a preliminary FBHX/TES design, and parametric analysis. A computer model was developed to determine the effects of the number of stages, gas temperatures, gas flows, bed materials, charge and discharge time, and parasitic power required for operation. The maximum national energy conservation potential of the cement plant application with TES is 15.4 million barrels of oil or 3.9 million tons of coal per year. For the electric arc furnance application the maximum national conservation potential with TES is 4.5 million barrels of oil or 1.1 million tons of coal per year. Present time of day utility rates are near the breakeven point required for the TES system. Escalation of on-peak energy due to critical fuel shortages could make the FBHX/TES applications economically attractive in the future.

  19. Inverse coefficient problems for one-dimensional heat transfer with a preservation of medium temperature condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oralsyn, Gulaym

    2016-08-01

    We study an inverse coefficient problem for a model equation for one-dimensional heat transfer with a preservation of medium temperature. It is needed (together with finding its solution) to find time dependent unknown coefficient of the equation. So, for this inverse problem, existence of an unique generalized solution is proved. The main difficulty of the considered problems is that the eigenfunction system of the corresponding boundary value problems does not have the basis property.

  20. Thermodynamic and thermoeconomic analysis of combined geothermal space heating and thermal storage using phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, V.; Ragnarsson, Á.

    2015-12-01

    The present work discusses the utilization of phase change materials for energy storage in geothermal space heating systems. Thermodynamics and thermoeconomics of the combined heating and thermal storing system were studied to show the scope of energy storage and cost savings. A computational model of the combined space heating and thermal storage system was developed and used to perform thermodynamic studies of the heat storage process and heating system efficiency at different times and ambient temperatures. The basis for these studies is daily variations in heating demand that is higher during the night than during the day. The results show the scope of the utilization of phase change material for low ambient temperature conditions. Under proper conditions a sufficient amount of exergy is stored during the charging period at a low ambient temperature to fulfill the daytime heat load requirement. Under these conditions the cost flow rate of exergy storage is found to be lower than the radiator heating cost flow rate. Thus, the use of exergy storage at low ambient temperatures for heating at higher ambient temperatures makes a significant contribution to cost savings.

  1. Research of Operation Modes of Heat Storage Tank in CHP Plant Using Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streckiene, Giedre; Miseviciute, Violeta

    2011-01-01

    The installation of a heat storage tank is a very cost-effective way to improve the performance and flexibility of a CHP plant. Such a heat storage tank usually accumulates heat by thermal stratification. This phenomenon is caused by the thermal buoyancy because of the difference in temperature between cold and hot water. The heat storage tank may have three operating modes, i. e. charge, discharge and storage in a CHP plant. When CHP units, which charge the heat storage tank, operate at full load, usually only two operation modes occur in the tank, i.e. charge and discharge. The paper presents numerical simulation of heat storage tank operation modes in a CHP plant using PHOENICS - a multi-purpose computation fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional transient models were created and solved numerically. Three domain grids were tested. Several charging and discharging processes with different flow rates were simulated. The influence of flow rate on the degree of thermal stratification during charging and discharging processes is analyzed. The computation possibilities and limitations of the numerical experiments are pointed out. Special attention is given to the validation of the numerical solutions. The validation of simulated results is made by comparison with the real data from the heat storage installed in the Hvide Sande CHP plant.

  2. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, J.; Haslett, R.

    1980-01-01

    Various active heat exchange concepts were identified from among three generic categories: scrapers, agitators/vibrators and slurries. The more practical ones were given a more detailed technical evaluation and an economic comparison with a passive tube-shell design for a reference application. Two concepts selected for hardware development are a direct contact heat exchanger in which molten salt droplets are injected into a cooler counterflowing stream of liquid metal carrier fluid, and a rotating drum scraper in which molten salt is sprayed onto the circumference of a rotating drum, which contains the fluid heat sink in an internal annulus near the surface. A fixed scraper blade removes the solidified salt from the surface which has been nickel plated to decrease adhesion forces. Suitable phase change material (PCM) storage media with melting points in the temperature range of interest (250 C to 400 C) were investigated. The specific salt recommended for laboratory tests was a chloride eutectic (20.5KCl-24/5 NaCl-55.0MgCl 2% by wt.), with a nominal melting point of 385 C.

  3. Effects of storage medium and UV photofunctionalization on time-related changes of titanium surface characteristics and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jian-Wei; Chen, Yun; Yang, Guo-Li; Wang, Xiao-Xiang; He, Fu-Ming; Wang, Hui-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Storage in aqueous solution and ultraviolet (UV) photofunctionalization are two applicable methods to overcome the biological aging and increase the bioactivity of titanium. As information regarding the combined effects of storage medium and UV photofunctionalization has never been found in published literatures, this study focused on whether appropriate storage methods and UV photofunctionalization have synergistic effects on the biological properties of aged titanium surfaces. Titanium plates and discs were sandblasted and acid etched and then further prepared in five different modes as using different storage mediums (air or dH2 O) for 4 weeks and then with or without UV treatment. The surface characteristics were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy, contact angle measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured on the surfaces, and cellular morphology, proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, and osteocalcin release were evaluated. The results showed that nanostructures were observed on water-stored titanium surfaces with a size of about 15 × 20 nm(2) . UV treatment was effective to remove the hydrocarbon contamination on titanium surfaces stored in either air or water. UV photofunctionalization further enhanced the already increased bioactivity of modSLA on initial cell attachment, proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, and osteocalcin release. Overall, UV photofunctionalization was effective in further enhancing the already increased bioactivity by using dH2 O as storage medium, and the effect of UV treatment was much more overwhelming than that of the storage medium. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 932-940, 2016. PMID:25969950

  4. Natural convection on a vertical plate in a saturated porous medium with internal heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedda, M.; Sriti, M.; Achemlal, D.

    2014-08-01

    The main goal of this paper is to re-exam a class of exact solutions for the two-dimensional free convection boundary layers induced by a heated vertical plate embedded in a saturated porous medium with an exponential decaying heat generation. The temperature distribution of the plate has been assumed to vary as a power of the axial coordinate measured from the leading edge of the plate and subjected to an applied lateral mass flux. The boundary layer equations are solved analytically and numerically using a fifth-order Runge-Kutta scheme coupled with the shooting iteration method. As for the classical problem without internal heat generation, it is proved that multiple (unbounded) solutions arise for any and for any suction/injection parameter. For such solutions, the asymptotic behavior as the similarity variable approaches infinity is determined.

  5. Localized heating of nickel nitride/aluminum nitride nanocomposite films for data storage

    SciTech Connect

    Maya, L.; Thundat, T.; Thompson, J.R.; Stevenson, R.J.

    1995-11-13

    Nickel--aluminum nitride films were prepared by reactive sputtering of a nickel aluminide plate in a nitrogen plasma. The initial product is a nanocomposite containing the nickel as the nitride, Ni{sub 3}N, in aluminum nitride. Heating in vacuum to 500 {degree}C causes selective decomposition of the thermally labile nickel nitride leaving the aluminum nitride unaffected. The nickel nanocomposite is of interest for potential applications as recording media, as are other finely divided dispersions of ferromagnetic metals in insulating matrices. The nickel--aluminum nitride nanocomposite shows a moderate coercive field of 35 Oe at 300 K and, in common with ultrafine particles of ferromagnetic materials, shows superparamagnetic behavior. The Ni{sub 3}N/AlN nanocomposite was subjected to localized heating with the focused beam of an argon-ion laser; this created features several microns in width that could be imaged with a magnetic force microscope, thus confirming its potential as a high density data storage medium. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  6. Heat storage rate and acute fatigue in rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, L O C; Oliveira, A; Lima, N R V; Machado-Moreira, C A

    2003-01-01

    Thermal environmental stress can anticipate acute fatigue during exercise at a fixed intensity (%VO2max). Controversy exists about whether this anticipation is caused by the absolute internal temperature (Tint, degrees C), by the heat storage rate (HSR, cal/min) or by both mechanisms. The aim of the present study was to study acute fatigue (total exercise time, TET) during thermal stress by determining Tint and HSR from abdominal temperature. Thermal environmental stress was controlled in an environmental chamber and determined as wet bulb globe temperature ( degrees C), with three environmental temperatures being studied: cold (18 degrees C), thermoneutral (23.1 degrees C) or hot (29.4 degrees C). Six untrained male Wistar rats weighing 260-360 g were used. The animals were submitted to exercise at the same time of day in the three environments and at two treadmill velocities (21 and 24 m/min) until exhaustion. After implantation of a temperature sensor and treadmill adaptation, the animals were submitted to a Latin square experimental design using a 2 x 3 factorial scheme (velocity and environment), with the level of significance set at P<0.05. The results showed that the higher the velocity and the ambient temperature, the lower was the TET, with these two factors being independent. This result indicated that fatigue was independently affected by both the increase in exercise intensity and the thermal environmental stress. Fatigue developed at different Tint and HSR showed the best inverse relationship with TET. We conclude that HSR was the main anticipating factor of fatigue. PMID:12532237

  7. Experimental Analysis of Thermal Stratification in a Heat Storage Tank Using Stratification Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boloņina, A.; Rochas, C.; Blumberga, D.

    2009-01-01

    The heat storage tank is an important element in any heating system where the heat source is not able to provide heat accordingly to consumer demand (for example solar collector systems, solid fuel boilers etc). Better heat storage efficiency can be achieved by providing good thermal stratification in the heat storage tanks. One of the best methods of increasing the degree of thermal stratification is the stratification pipes. In the Environmental monitoring laboratory of the Institute of Energy Systems and Environment (Riga Technical University, an experimental heat storage system has been developed and used for testing and studying stratification devices under different thermodynamic and hydraulic conditions. The experimental study carried out on the efficiency of the stratification pipe produced by German company SOLVIS Solar Systeme GmbH under different flow parameters, has been analyzed. The main aim of the experimental study was to define optimal heating system operation parameters to achieve good performance of the stratification pipe and a high degree of thermal stratification in the heat storage tank.

  8. Experimental investigation on performance of ice storage air-conditioning system with separate heat pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Guiyin; Liu, Xu; Wu, Shuangmao

    2009-11-15

    An experimental study on operation performance of ice storage air-conditioning system with separate helical heat pipe is conducted in this paper. The experimental system of ice storage air-conditioning system with separate heat pipe is set up. The performance parameters such as the evaporation pressure and the condensation pressure of refrigeration system, the refrigeration capacity and the COP (coefficient of performance) of the system, the IPF (ice packing factor) and the cool storage capacity in the cool storage tank during charging period, and the cool discharge rate and the cool discharge capacity in the cool storage tank, the outlet water temperature in the cool storage tank and the outlet air temperature in room unit during discharging period are investigated. The experimental results show that the ice storage air-conditioning system with separate helical heat pipe can stably work during charging and discharging period. This indicates that the ice storage air-conditioning system with separate helical heat pipe is well adapted to cool storage air-conditioning systems in building. (author)

  9. Performance analysis of a latent heat storage system with phase change material for new designed solar collectors in greenhouse heating

    SciTech Connect

    Benli, Hueseyin; Durmus, Aydin

    2009-12-15

    The continuous increase in the level of greenhouse gas emissions and the rise in fuel prices are the main driving forces behind the efforts for more effectively utilize various sources of renewable energy. In many parts of the world, direct solar radiation is considered to be one of the most prospective sources of energy. In this study, the thermal performance of a phase change thermal storage unit is analyzed and discussed. The storage unit is a component of ten pieced solar air collectors heating system being developed for space heating of a greenhouse and charging of PCM. CaCl{sub 2}6H{sub 2}O was used as PCM in thermal energy storage with a melting temperature of 29 C. Hot air delivered by ten pieced solar air collector is passed through the PCM to charge the storage unit. The stored heat is utilized to heat ambient air before being admitted to a greenhouse. This study is based on experimental results of the PCM employed to analyze the transient thermal behavior of the storage unit during the charge and discharge periods. The proposed size of collectors integrated PCM provided about 18-23% of total daily thermal energy requirements of the greenhouse for 3-4 h, in comparison with the conventional heating device. (author)

  10. Magneto-rotatory compressible couple-stress fluid heated from below in porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Chander Bhan

    2016-03-01

    The study is aimed at analysing thermal convection in a compressible couple stress fluid in a porous medium in the presence of rotation and magnetic field. After linearizing the relevant equations, the perturbation equations are analysed in terms of normal modes. A dispersion relation governing the effects of rotation, magnetic field, couple stress parameter and medium permeability have been examined. For a stationary convection, the rotation postpones the onset of convection in a couple stress fluid heated from below in a porous medium in the presence of a magnetic field. Whereas, the magnetic field and couple stress postpones and hastens the onset of convection in the presence of rotation and the medium permeability hastens and postpones the onset of convection with conditions on Taylor number. Further the oscillatory modes are introduced due to the presence of rotation and the magnetic field which were non-existent in their absence, and hence the principle of exchange stands valid. The sufficient conditions for nonexistence of over stability are also obtained.

  11. Natural element method for radiative heat transfer in a semitransparent medium with irregular geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2013-05-01

    This paper develops a numerical solution to the radiative heat transfer problem coupled with conduction in an absorbing, emitting and isotropically scattering medium with the irregular geometries using the natural element method (NEM). The walls of the enclosures, having temperature and mixed boundary conditions, are considered to be opaque, diffuse as well as gray. The NEM as a meshless method is a new numerical scheme in the field of computational mechanics. Different from most of other meshless methods such as element-free Galerkin method or those based on radial basis functions, the shape functions used in NEM are constructed by the natural neighbor interpolations, which are strictly interpolant and the essential boundary conditions can be imposed directly. The natural element solutions in dealing with the coupled heat transfer problem for the mixed boundary conditions have been validated by comparison with those from Monte Carlo method (MCM) generated by the authors. For the validation of the NEM solution to radiative heat transfer in the semicircular medium with an inner circle, the results by NEM have been compared with those reported in the literatures. For pure radiative transfer, the upwind scheme is employed to overcome the oscillatory behavior of the solutions in some conditions. The steady state and transient heat transfer problem combined with radiation and conduction in the semicircular enclosure with an inner circle are studied. Effects of various parameters such as the extinction coefficient, the scattering albedo, the conduction-radiation parameter and the boundary emissivity are analyzed on the radiative and conductive heat fluxes and transient temperature distributions.

  12. Natural element method for radiative heat transfer in a semitransparent medium with irregular geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2013-05-15

    This paper develops a numerical solution to the radiative heat transfer problem coupled with conduction in an absorbing, emitting and isotropically scattering medium with the irregular geometries using the natural element method (NEM). The walls of the enclosures, having temperature and mixed boundary conditions, are considered to be opaque, diffuse as well as gray. The NEM as a meshless method is a new numerical scheme in the field of computational mechanics. Different from most of other meshless methods such as element-free Galerkin method or those based on radial basis functions, the shape functions used in NEM are constructed by the natural neighbor interpolations, which are strictly interpolant and the essential boundary conditions can be imposed directly. The natural element solutions in dealing with the coupled heat transfer problem for the mixed boundary conditions have been validated by comparison with those from Monte Carlo method (MCM) generated by the authors. For the validation of the NEM solution to radiative heat transfer in the semicircular medium with an inner circle, the results by NEM have been compared with those reported in the literatures. For pure radiative transfer, the upwind scheme is employed to overcome the oscillatory behavior of the solutions in some conditions. The steady state and transient heat transfer problem combined with radiation and conduction in the semicircular enclosure with an inner circle are studied. Effects of various parameters such as the extinction coefficient, the scattering albedo, the conduction–radiation parameter and the boundary emissivity are analyzed on the radiative and conductive heat fluxes and transient temperature distributions.

  13. Theoretical analysis of screened heat pipes for medium and high temperature solar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Marco, P.; Filippeschi, S.; Franco, A.; Jafari, D.

    2014-11-01

    A mathematical model is applied to study the cylindrical heat pipes (HPs) behaviour when it is exposed to higher heat input at the evaporator for solar collector applications. The steady state analytical model includes two-dimensional heat conduction in the wall, the liquid flow in the wick and vapour hydrodynamics, and can be used to evaluate the working limits and to optimize the HP. The results of the analytical model are compared with numerical and experimental results available in literature, with good agreement. The effects of heat transfer coefficient, power input, evaporator length, pipe diameter, wick thickness and effective pore radius on the vapour temperature, maximum pressure drop and maximum heat transfer capability (HTC) of the HP are studied. The analysis shows that wick thickness plays an important role in the enhancement of HTC. Results show that it is possible to improve HTC of a HP by selecting the appropriate wick thickness, effective pore radius, and evaporator length. The parametric investigations are aimed to determine working limits and thermal performance of HP for medium temperature solar collector application.

  14. NaOH-based high temperature heat-of-fusion thermal energy storage device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, B. M.; Rice, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    A material called Thermkeep, developed as a low-cost method for the storage of thermal energy for solar electric power generating systems is discussed. The storage device consists of an insulated cylinder containing Thermkeep in which coiled tubular heat exchangers are immersed. A one-tenth scale model of the design contains 25 heat-exchanger tubes and 1500 kg of Thermkeep. Its instrumentation includes thermocouples to measure internal Thermkeep temperatures, vessel surface, heated shroud surface, and pressure gauges to indicate heat-exchanger pressure drops. The test-circuit design is presented and experimental results are discussed.

  15. Solar powered absorption cycle heat pump using phase change materials for energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Solar powered heating and cooling system with possible application to residential homes is described. Operating principles of system are defined and illustration of typical energy storage and exchange system is provided.

  16. Application of thermal energy storage to process heat recovery in the aluminum industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccabe, J.

    1980-01-01

    The economic viability and the institutional compatibility of a district heating system in the city of Bellingham, Washington are assessed and the technical and economic advantages of using thermal energy storage methods are determined.

  17. Cold Heat Storage Characteristics of O/W-type Latent Heat Emulsion Including Continuum Phase of Water Treated with a Freezing Point Depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Morita, Shin-Ichi

    This paper deals with flow and cold heat storage characteristics of the oil (tetradecane, C14H30, freezing point 278.9 K, Latent heat 229 kJ/kg)/water emulsion as a latent heat storage material having a low melting point. The test emulsion includes a water-urea solution as a continuum phase. The freezing point depression of the continuum phase permits enhancement of the heat transfer rate of the emulison, due to the large temperature difference between the latent heat storage material and water-urea solution. The velocity of emulsion flow and the inlet temperature of coolant in a coiled double tube heat exchanger are chosen as the experimental parameters. The pressure drop, the heat transfer coefficient of the emulsion in the coiled tube are measured in the temperture region over solid and liquid phase of the latent heat storage material. The finishing time of the cold heat storage is defined experimentally in the range of sensible and latent heat storage. It is clarified that the flow behavior of the emulsion as a non-Newtonian fluid has an important role in cold heat storage. The useful nondimentional correlation equations for the additional pressure loss coefficient, the heat transfer coefficient and the finishing time of the cold heat storage are derived in terms of Dean number and heat capacity ratio.

  18. Energy-Storage Modules for Active Solar Heating and Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    34 page report describes a melting salt hydrate that stores 12 times as much heat as rocks and other heavy materials. Energy is stored mostly as latent heat; that is, heat that can be stored and recovered without any significant change in temperature. Report also describes development, evaluation and testing of permanently sealed modules containing salt hydrate mixture.

  19. Metal glass vacuum tube solar collectors are approaching lower-medium temperature heat application.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinian

    2010-04-26

    Solar thermal collectors are widely used worldwide mainly for hot water preparation at a low temperature (less than 80 degrees C). Applications including many industrial processes and central air conditioning with absorption chillers, instead require lower-medium temperature heat (between 90 degrees C and 150 degrees C) to be driven when using solar thermal energy. The metal absorber glass vacuum tube collectors (MGVT) are developed for this type of applications. Current state-of-art and possible future technology development of MGVT are presented. PMID:20607893

  20. Metal glass vacuum tube solar collectors are approaching lower-medium temperature heat application.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinian

    2010-04-26

    Solar thermal collectors are widely used worldwide mainly for hot water preparation at a low temperature (less than 80?C). Applications including many industrial processes and central air conditioning with absorption chillers, instead require lower-medium temperature heat (between 90 degrees C and 150 degrees C) to be driven when using solar thermal energy. The metal absorber glass vacuum tube collectors (MGVT) are developed for this type of applications. Current state-of-art and possible future technology development of MGVT are presented. PMID:20588568

  1. Experimental investigation on the thermal performance of heat storage walls coupled with active solar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chunyu; You, Shijun; Zhu, Chunying; Yu, Wei

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of the performance of a system combining a low-temperature water wall radiant heating system and phase change energy storage technology with an active solar system. This system uses a thermal storage wall that is designed with multilayer thermal storage plates. The heat storage material is expanded graphite that absorbs a mixture of capric acid and lauric acid. An experiment is performed to study the actual effect. The following are studied under winter conditions: (1) the temperature of the radiation wall surface, (2) the melting status of the thermal storage material in the internal plate, (3) the density of the heat flux, and (4) the temperature distribution of the indoor space. The results reveal that the room temperature is controlled between 16 and 20 °C, and the thermal storage wall meets the heating and temperature requirements. The following are also studied under summer conditions: (1) the internal relationship between the indoor temperature distribution and the heat transfer within the regenerative plates during the day and (2) the relationship between the outlet air temperature and inlet air temperature in the thermal storage wall in cooling mode at night. The results indicate that the indoor temperature is approximately 27 °C, which satisfies the summer air-conditioning requirements.

  2. Longterm solar heat storage in an underground water cistern retrofitted with thermal insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borst, W. L.

    1980-10-01

    The performance of the cistern was tested by measuring storage and surrounding soil temperatures over extended periods of time as heat was added from a solar collector (summer, fall, and winter) or environmental coolness was added (via cold air blown into the cistern) in winter. From these measurements, storage time-constants of the order of 6 months were inferred and verified.

  3. Low, medium and high heat tolerant strains of Listeria monocytogenes and increased heat stress resistance after exposure to sublethal heat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes exhibits sophisticated adaptive mechanisms to counteract higher levels of lethal acid, heat, salt or oxidative stresses after pre-exposure to sublethal concentrations of homogenous stress. A group of 37 strains representing all 13 serotypes of Listeria monocytogenes with initi...

  4. Heat transfer analysis of the geologic disposal of spent fuel and high level waste storage canisters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, G. K.

    1980-08-01

    Near-field temperatures resulting from the storage of high-level waste canisters and spent unreprocessed fuel assembly canisters in geologic formations were determined. Preliminary design of the repository was modeled for a heat transfer computer code, HEATING5, which used the finite difference method to evaluate transient heat transfer. The heat transfer system was evaluated with several two and three dimensional models which transfer heat by a combination of conduction, natural convention, and radiation. Physical properties of the materials in the model were based upon experimental values for the various geologic formations. The effects of canister spacing, fuel age, and use of an overpack were studied for the analysis of the spent fuel canisters; salt, granite, and basalt were considered as the storage media. The effects of canister diameter and use of an overpack were studied for the analysis of the high-level waste canisters; salt was considered as the only storage media for high-level waste canisters.

  5. Simulation of Porous Medium Hydrogen Storage - Estimation of Storage Capacity and Deliverability for a North German anticlinal Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Bauer, S.; Pfeiffer, W. T.

    2015-12-01

    Large scale energy storage will be required to mitigate offsets between electric energy demand and the fluctuating electric energy production from renewable sources like wind farms, if renewables dominate energy supply. Porous formations in the subsurface could provide the large storage capacities required if chemical energy carriers such as hydrogen gas produced during phases of energy surplus are stored. This work assesses the behavior of a porous media hydrogen storage operation through numerical scenario simulation of a synthetic, heterogeneous sandstone formation formed by an anticlinal structure. The structural model is parameterized using data available for the North German Basin as well as data given for formations with similar characteristics. Based on the geological setting at the storage site a total of 15 facies distributions is generated and the hydrological parameters are assigned accordingly. Hydraulic parameters are spatially distributed according to the facies present and include permeability, porosity relative permeability and capillary pressure. The storage is designed to supply energy in times of deficiency on the order of seven days, which represents the typical time span of weather conditions with no wind. It is found that using five injection/extraction wells 21.3 mio sm³ of hydrogen gas can be stored and retrieved to supply 62,688 MWh of energy within 7 days. This requires a ratio of working to cushion gas of 0.59. The retrievable energy within this time represents the demand of about 450000 people. Furthermore it is found that for longer storage times, larger gas volumes have to be used, for higher delivery rates additionally the number of wells has to be increased. The formation investigated here thus seems to offer sufficient capacity and deliverability to be used for a large scale hydrogen gas storage operation.

  6. Process Integrated Heat Treatment of a Microalloyed Medium Carbon Steel: Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, Sebastian; Schledorn, Mareike; Maier, Hans Jürgen; Milenin, Andrij; Nürnberger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Air-water spray cooling was employed during a heat treatment to enhance the mechanical properties of microalloyed medium carbon steel test cylinders (38MnVS6, 88 mm diameter). Using appropriate cooling times and intensities, the test cylinders' surfaces could be quenched and subsequently self-tempered by the residual heat of the core. Simultaneously, it was possible to keep the core regions of the cylinders in the bainitic regime and carry out a quasi-isothermal holding. The resulting microstructures consisted of tempered martensite (near-surface) and bainite with pearlite and ferrite (core). Compared to the standard heat treatment (controlled air cooling), the tensile properties (proof stress and ultimate tensile strength) could be improved for both near-surface and core regions with the adapted spray cooling. A hardness profile with 450 HV10 surface hardness and a hardening depth of more than 11 mm could be realized. In addition, an increase of the impact toughness for the core was achieved, resulting in approximately 25 J charpy impact energy. This is a substantial improvement compared to standard heat treatment procedure and values reported in the literature and can be attributed to the reduced pearlite volume fraction and the increased amount of fine bainite.

  7. Photoionization and heating of a supernova-driven turbulent interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, J. E.; Wood, Kenneth; Hill, Alex S.; Haffner, L. M.

    2014-06-01

    The diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in galaxies traces photoionization feedback from massive stars. Through three-dimensional photoionization simulations, we study the propagation of ionizing photons, photoionization heating and the resulting distribution of ionized and neutral gas within snapshots of magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a supernova-driven turbulent interstellar medium. We also investigate the impact of non-photoionization heating on observed optical emission line ratios. Inclusion of a heating term which scales less steeply with electron density than photoionization is required to produce diagnostic emission line ratios similar to those observed with the Wisconsin Hα Mapper. Once such heating terms have been included, we are also able to produce temperatures similar to those inferred from observations of the DIG, with temperatures increasing to above 15 000 K at heights |z| ≳ 1 kpc. We find that ionizing photons travel through low-density regions close to the mid-plane of the simulations, while travelling through diffuse low-density regions at large heights. The majority of photons travel small distances (≲100 pc); however some travel kiloparsecs and ionize the DIG.

  8. Occupational exposure in small and medium scale industry with specific reference to heat and noise.

    PubMed

    Singh, Lakhwinder Pal; Bhardwaj, Arvind; Deepak, Kishore Kumar

    2010-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess heat and noise exposure and occupational safety practices in small and medium scale casting and forging units (SMEs) of Northern India. We conducted personal interviews of 350 male workers of these units through a comprehensive questionnaire and collected information on heat and noise exposure, use of protective equipment, sweat loss and water intake, working hour. The ambient wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT index) was measured using quest temp 34/36o area heat stress monitor. A-weighted Leq ambient noise was measured using a quest sound level meter "ANSI SI. 43-1997 (R 2002) type-1 model SOUNDPRO SE/DL". We also incorporated OSHA norms for hearing conservation which include - an exchange rate of 5dB(A), criterion level at 90dB(A), criterion time of eight hours, threshold level is equal to 80dB(A), upper limit is equal to 140dB(A) and with F/S response rate. Results of the study revealed that occupational heat exposure in melting, casting, forging and punching sections is high compared to ACGIH/NIOSH norms. Ambience noise in various sections like casting / molding, drop forging, cutting presses, punching, grinding and barreling process was found to be more than 90dB(A). About 95% of the workers suffered speech interference where as high noise annoyance was reported by only 20%. Overall, 68% workers were not using any personal protective equipment (PPE). The study concluded that the proportion of SME workers exposed to high level heat stress and noise (60 - 72 hrs/week) is high. The workers engaged in forging and grinding sections are more prone to noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) at higher frequencies as compared to workers of other sections. It is recommended that there is a strong need to implement the standard of working hours as well as heat stress and noise control measures. PMID:20160389

  9. Dynamics of slow light and light storage in a Doppler-broadened electromagnetically-induced-transparency medium: A numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shih-Wei; Chen, Yi-Hsin; Gou, Shih-Chuan; Horng, Tzyy-Leng; Yu, Ite A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a numerical scheme to study the dynamics of slow light and light storage in an electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT) medium at finite temperatures. Allowing for the motional coupling, we derive a set of coupled Schrödinger equations describing a boosted closed three-level EIT system according to the principle of Galilean relativity. The dynamics of a uniformly moving EIT medium can thus be determined by numerically integrating the coupled Schrödinger equations for atoms plus one ancillary Maxwell-Schrödinger equation for the probe pulse. The central idea of this work rests on the assumption that the loss of ground-state coherence at finite temperatures can be ascribed to the incoherent superposition of density matrices representing the EIT systems with various velocities. Close agreements are demonstrated in comparing the numerical results with the experimental data for both slow light and light storage. In particular, the distinct characters featuring the decay of ground-state coherence can be well verified for slow light and light storage. This warrants that the current scheme can be applied to determine the decaying profile of the ground-state coherence as well as the temperature of the EIT medium.

  10. Effect of storage and subsequent re-heating on viability of Listeria monocytogenes on pork scrapple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the fate of Listeria monocytogenes on pork scrapple, a regionally-popular, ready-to-eat (RTE) meat product, both during storage and following re-heating. We also conducted an informal survey to address consumer practices for storing and re-heating scrapple. Regarding the survey, of some...

  11. Importance of Salinity Measurements in the Heat Storage Estimation from Topex/Poseidon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, O.; Polito, P.; Liu, W.

    1999-01-01

    Sea surface height anomaly signals from satellite altimeter data are used to estimate heat storage. Since variability in sea surface height is mostly due to expansion and contraction of the water column it can be correlated with variations in the heat and salt content.

  12. Fundamental Research on Heat Transfer Characteristics in Shell & Tube Type Ice Forming Cold Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Akio; Utaka, Yoshio; Okawa, Seiji; Ishibashi, Hiroaki

    Investigation of heat transfer characteristics in an ice making cold energy storage using a set of horizontal cooling pipes was carried out experimentally. Cooling pipe arrangement, number of pipes used and initial water temperature were varied, and temperature distribution in the tank and the volume of ice formed around the pipe were measured. Natural convection was also observed visually. During the experiment, two kinds of layers were observed. One is the layer where ice forming is interfered by natural convection and its temperature decreases rapidly with an almost uniform temperature distribution, and the other is the layer where ice forms steadily under a stagnant water condition. The former was called that the layer is under a cooling process and the latter that the layer is under an ice forming process. The effect of the experimental parameters, such as the arrangement of the cooling pipes, the number of pipes, the initial water temperature and the flow rate of the cooling medium, on the cooling process and the ice forming process were discussed. Approximate analysis was also carried out and compared with the experimental results. Finally, the relationship between the ice packing factor, which is significant in preventing the blockade, and experimental parameters was discussed.

  13. An integrated heat pipe-thermal storage design for a solar receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keddy, E.; Sena, J. T.; Woloshun, K.; Merrigan, M. A.; Heidenreich, G.

    Light-weight heat pipe wall elements that incorporate a thermal storage subassembly within the vapor space are being developed as part of the Organic Rankine Cycle Solar Dynamic Power System (ORC-SDPS) receiver for the Space Station application. The operating temperature of the heat pipe elements is in the 770 to 810 K range with a design power throughput of 4.8 kW per pipe. The total heat pipe length is 1.9 M. The Rankine cycle boiler heat transfer surfaces are positioned within the heat pipe vapor space, providing a relatively constant temperature input to the vaporizer. The heat pipe design employs axial arteries and distribution wicked thermal storage units with potassium as the working fluid. Performance predictions for this configuration have been conducted and the design characterized as a function of artery geometry, distribution wick thickness, porosity, pore size, and permeability.

  14. Evaluation of the HB&L System for the Microbiological Screening of Storage Medium for Organ-Cultured Corneas

    PubMed Central

    Camposampiero, D.; Grandesso, S.; Zanetti, E.; Mazzucato, S.; Solinas, M.; Parekh, M.; Frigo, A. C.; Gion, M.; Ponzin, D.

    2013-01-01

    Aims. To compare HB&L and BACTEC systems for detecting the microorganisms contaminating the corneal storage liquid preserved at 31°C. Methods. Human donor corneas were stored at 4°C followed by preservation at 31°C. Samples of the storage medium were inoculated in BACTEC Peds Plus/F (aerobic microorganisms), BACTEC Plus Anaerobic/F (anaerobic microorganisms), and HB&L bottles. The tests were performed (a) after six days of storage, (b) end of storage, and (c) after 24 hours of preservation in deturgescent liquid sequentially. 10,655 storage and deturgescent media samples were subjected to microbiological control using BACTEC (6-day incubation) and HB&L (24-hour incubation) systems simultaneously. BACTEC positive/negative refers to both/either aerobic and anaerobic positives/negatives, whereas HB&L can only detect the aerobic microbes, and therefore the positives/negatives depend on the presence/absence of aerobic microorganisms. Results. 147 (1.38%) samples were identified positive with at least one of the two methods. 127 samples (134 identified microorganisms) were positive with both HB&L and BACTEC. 14 HB&L+/BACTEC− and 6 BACTEC+/HB&L− were identified. Sensitivity (95.5%), specificity (99.8%), and positive (90.1%) and negative predictive values (99.9%) were high with HB&L considering a 3.5% annual contamination rate. Conclusion. HB&L is a rapid system for detecting microorganisms in corneal storage medium in addition to the existing methods. PMID:24069532

  15. Evaluation of the HB&L System for the Microbiological Screening of Storage Medium for Organ-Cultured Corneas.

    PubMed

    Camposampiero, D; Grandesso, S; Zanetti, E; Mazzucato, S; Solinas, M; Parekh, M; Frigo, A C; Gion, M; Ponzin, D

    2013-01-01

    Aims. To compare HB&L and BACTEC systems for detecting the microorganisms contaminating the corneal storage liquid preserved at 31°C. Methods. Human donor corneas were stored at 4°C followed by preservation at 31°C. Samples of the storage medium were inoculated in BACTEC Peds Plus/F (aerobic microorganisms), BACTEC Plus Anaerobic/F (anaerobic microorganisms), and HB&L bottles. The tests were performed (a) after six days of storage, (b) end of storage, and (c) after 24 hours of preservation in deturgescent liquid sequentially. 10,655 storage and deturgescent media samples were subjected to microbiological control using BACTEC (6-day incubation) and HB&L (24-hour incubation) systems simultaneously. BACTEC positive/negative refers to both/either aerobic and anaerobic positives/negatives, whereas HB&L can only detect the aerobic microbes, and therefore the positives/negatives depend on the presence/absence of aerobic microorganisms. Results. 147 (1.38%) samples were identified positive with at least one of the two methods. 127 samples (134 identified microorganisms) were positive with both HB&L and BACTEC. 14 HB&L+/BACTEC- and 6 BACTEC+/HB&L- were identified. Sensitivity (95.5%), specificity (99.8%), and positive (90.1%) and negative predictive values (99.9%) were high with HB&L considering a 3.5% annual contamination rate. Conclusion. HB&L is a rapid system for detecting microorganisms in corneal storage medium in addition to the existing methods. PMID:24069532

  16. The Development of Small Solar Concentrating Systems with Heat Storage for Rural Food Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heetkamp, R. R. J.

    A system, consisting of a parabolic reflector mounted on a polar axis tracker, has been designed and built. Air at atmospheric pressure is heated by the concentrated solar radiation to temperatures of up to 400°C as it is sucked through the receiver and into the pebble-bed heat storage unit, by means of a fan at the bottom of the storage. The stored heat is recovered by the reversal of the fan and the resulting hot air can be used in a convection oven and other appliances. This report discusses practical aspects, as well as preliminary test results, of such a system.

  17. Thermal energy storage – overview and specific insight into nitrate salts for sensible and latent heat storage

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Thomas; Martin, Claudia; Eck, Markus; Wörner, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Summary Thermal energy storage (TES) is capable to reduce the demand of conventional energy sources for two reasons: First, they prevent the mismatch between the energy supply and the power demand when generating electricity from renewable energy sources. Second, utilization of waste heat in industrial processes by thermal energy storage reduces the final energy consumption. This review focuses mainly on material aspects of alkali nitrate salts. They include thermal properties, thermal decomposition processes as well as a new method to develop optimized salt systems. PMID:26199853

  18. Numerical heat transfer study in a scattering, absorbing and emitting semi-transparent porous medium in a cylindrical enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoumi, M.; Chérif, B.; Sifaoui, M. S.

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, heat transfer problem through a semi-transparent porous medium in a cylindrical enclosure is investigated. The governing equations for this problem and the boundary conditions are non-linear differential equations depending on the dimensionless radial coordinate, Planck number N, scattering albedo ω, walls emissivity and thermal conductivity ratio kr. The set of differential equations are solved by a numerical technique taken from the IMSL MATH/LIBRARY. Various results are obtained for the dimensionless temperature profiles in the solid and fluid phases and the radiative heat flux. The effects of some radiative properties of the medium on the heat transfer rate are examined.

  19. Small scale changes of geochemistry and flow field due to transient heat storage in aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S.; Boockmeyer, A.; Li, D.; Beyer, C.

    2013-12-01

    Heat exchangers in the subsurface are increasingly installed for transient heat storage due to the need of heating or cooling of buildings as well as the interim storage of heat to compensate for the temporally fluctuating energy production by wind or solar energy. For heat storage to be efficient, high temperatures must be achieved in the subsurface. Significant temporal changes of the soil and groundwater temperatures however effect both the local flow field by temperature dependent fluid parameters as well as reactive mass transport through temperature dependent diffusion coefficients, geochemical reaction rates and mineral equilibria. As the use of heat storage will be concentrated in urban areas, the use of the subsurface for (drinking) water supply and heat storage will typically coincide and a reliable prognosis of the processes occurring is needed. In the present work, the effects of a temporal variation of the groundwater temperature, as induced by a local heat exchanger introduced into a groundwater aquifer, are studied. For this purpose, the coupled non-isothermal groundwater flow, heat transport and reactive mass transport is simulated in the near filed of such a heat exchanger. By explicitly discretizing and incorporating the borehole, the borehole cementation and the heat exchanger tubes, a realistic geometrical and process representation is obtained. The numerical simulation code OpenGeoSys is used in this work, which incorporates the required processes of coupled groundwater flow, heat and mass transport as well as temperature dependent geochemistry. Due to the use of a Finite Element Method, a close representation of the geometric effects can be achieved. Synthetic scenario simulations for typical settings of salt water formations in northern Germany are used to investigate the geochemical effects arising from a high temperature heat storage by quantifying changes in groundwater chemistry and overall reaction rates. This work presents the

  20. Integrated heat pipe-thermal storage design for a solar receiver. [Constant power source with heat from sun or from storage

    SciTech Connect

    Keddy, E.S.; Sena, J.T.; Woloshun, K.; Merrigan, M.A.; Heidenreich, G.

    1986-01-01

    Light-weight heat pipe wall elements that incorporate a thermal storage subassembly within the vapor space are being developed as part of the Organic Rankine Cycle Solar Dynamic Power Systems (ORC-SDPS) receiver for the space station application. The operating temperature of he heat pipe elements is in the 770 to 810/sup 0/K range with a design power throughput of 4.8 kW per pipe. The total heat pipe length is 1.9 M. The Rankine cycle boiler heat transfer surfaces are positioned within the heat pipe vapor space, providing a relatively constant temperature input to the vaporizer. The heat pipe design employs axial arteries and distribution wicked thermal storage units with potassium as the working fluid. Stainless steel is used as the containment tube and screen material. Performance predictions for this configuration have been conducted and the design characterized as a function of artery geometry, distribution wick thickness, porosity, pore size, and permeability. Details of the analysis and of fabrication and assembly procedures are presented. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Development of an integrated heat pipe-thermal storage system for a solar receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keddy, E.; Sena, J. Tom; Merrigan, M.; Heidenreich, Gary; Johnson, Steve

    1988-01-01

    An integrated heat pipe-thermal storage system was developed as part of the Organic Rankine Cycle Solar Dynamic Power System solar receiver for space station application. The solar receiver incorporates potassium heat pipe elements to absorb and transfer the solar energy within the receiver cavity. The heat pipes contain thermal energy storage (TES) canisters within the vapor space with a toluene heater tube used as the condenser region of the heat pipe. During the insolation period of the earth orbit, solar energy is delivered to the heat pipe. Part of this thermal energy is delivered to the heater tube and the balance is stored in the TES units. During the eclipse period of earth orbit, the stored energy in the TES units is transferred by the potassium vapor to the toluene heater tube. A developmental heat pipe element was constructed that contains axial arteries and a distribution wick connecting the toluene heater and the TES units to the solar insolation surface of the heat pipe. Tests were conducted to demonstrate the heat pipe, TES units, and the heater tube operation. The heat pipe element was operated at design input power of 4.8 kW. Thermal cycle tests were conducted to demonstrate the successful charge and discharge of the TES units. Axial power flux levels up to 15 watts/sq cm were demonstrated and transient tests were conducted on the heat pipe element. Details of the heat pipe development and test procedures are presented.

  2. A chemical heat pump based on the reaction of calcium chloride and methanol for solar heating, cooling and storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offenhartz, P. O.

    1981-03-01

    An engineering development test prototype of the CaCl2-CheOH chemical heat pump was tested. The unit, which has storage capacity in excess of 100,000 BTU, completed over 100 full charge-discharge cycles. Cycling data show that the rate of heat pumping depends strongly on the absorber-evaporator temperature difference. These rates are more than adequate for solar heating or for solar cooling using dry ambient air heat rejection. Performance degradation after 100 cycles, expressed as a contact resistance, was less than 2 C. The heat exchangers showed some warpage due to plastic flow of the salt, producing the contact resistance. The experimental COP for cooling was 0.52, close to the theoretically predicted value.

  3. Scenario Development and Analysis of Hydrogen as a Large-Scale Energy Storage Medium (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, D. M.

    2009-06-10

    The conclusions from this report are: (1) hydrogen has several important advantages over competing technologies, including - very high storage energy density (170 kWh/m{sup 3} vs. 2.4 for CAES and 0.7 for pumped hydro) which allows for potential economic viability of above-ground storage and relatively low environmental impact in comparison with other technologies; and (2) the major disadvantage of hydrogen energy storage is cost but research and deployment of electrolyzers and fuel cells may reduce cost significantly.

  4. Storage of H.sub.2 by absorption and/or mixture within a fluid medium

    DOEpatents

    Berry, Gene David; Aceves, Salvador Martin

    2007-03-20

    For the first time, a hydrogen storage method, apparatus and system having a fluid mixture is provided. At predetermined pressures and/or temperatures within a contained substantially fixed volume, the fluid mixture can store a high density of hydrogen molecules, wherein a predetermined phase of the fluid mixture is capable of being withdrawn from the substantially fixed volume for use as a vehicle fuel or energy storage having reduced and/or eliminated evaporative losses, especially where storage weight, vessel cost, vessel shape, safety, and energy efficiency are beneficial.

  5. Processes of heat and mass transfer in straw bales using flue gasses as a drying medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryl, Wojciech; Szubel, Mateusz; Filipowicz, Mariusz

    2016-03-01

    Moisture content is a main problem of using straw in form of bales for energy production. The paper presents possibility of straw drying in dedicated, innovative and patented in Poland straw dryers which using flue gasses as a drying medium. Paper presents an improved way of drying which proved to be very sufficient. Temperature and humidity of straw during the process of drying were measured. The measurements helped understand and perform numerical model of heat and mass transfer inside the straw bale. By using CFD codes it was possible to perform analysis of phenomenon occurring inside the dried straw bale. Based on the CFD model, proposals of the optimization and improvement process of drying have been discussed. Experimental and computational data have been compared in terms of convergence. A satisfying degree of agreement has been achieved. Applying improved drying method, homogenous field of moisture content and temperature in the straw bale is achieved in a very cost effective way.

  6. Continued development of a semianalytical solution for two-phase fluid and heat flow in a porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, C.; Pruess, K.

    1991-06-01

    Over the past few years the authors have developed a semianalytical solution for transient two-phase water, air, and heat flow in a porous medium surrounding a constant-strength linear heat source, using a similarity variable {eta} = r/{radical}t. Although the similarity transformation approach requires a simplified geometry, all the complex physical mechanisms involved in coupled two-phase fluid and heat flow can be taken into account in a rigorous way, so that the solution may be applied to a variety of problems of current interest. The work was motivated by adverse to predict the thermohydrological response to the proposed geologic repository for heat-generating high-level nuclear wastes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in a partially saturated, highly fractured volcanic formation. The paper describes thermal and hydrologic conditions near the heat source; new features of the model; vapor pressure lowering; and the effective-continuum representation of a fractured/porous medium.

  7. Transient performance evaluation of an integrated heat pipe-thermal storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keddy, E.; Sena, J. T.; Merrigan, M.; Heidenreich, Gary; Johnson, Steve

    1988-01-01

    Transient performance tests of an integrated heat pipe-thermal storage system have been conducted. This system was developed as a part of an Organic Rankine Cycle-Solar Dynamic Power System receiver for future power systems. The integrated system consists of potassium heat pipe elements that incorporate thermal energy storage canisters within the vapor space and an organic fluid (toluene) heater tube used as the condenser region of the heat pipe. The transient performance tests determined the operating characteristics and power input limits of the integrated heat pipe-thermal storage unit under conditions corresponding to re-acquisition of the sun during emergence from eclipse conditions and to the initial start-up of the solar dynamic power system. The tests demonstrated that the heat pipe-thermal storage element is not limited under conditions corresponding to emergence from eclipse during normal orbital operations and the heat pipe will successfully start-up from the frozen condition with full input power at the onset. Details of the test procedures and results of the tests are presented in this paper.

  8. Toxicological effects of particulate emissions - A comparison of oil and wood fuels in small- and medium-scale heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasurinen, Stefanie; Jalava, Pasi I.; Tapanainen, Maija; Uski, Oskari; Happo, Mikko S.; Mäki-Paakkanen, Jorma; Lamberg, Heikki; Koponen, Hanna; Nuutinen, Ilpo; Kortelainen, Miika; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2015-02-01

    The use of wood instead of oil fuels in heating systems is strongly encouraged in many countries. Yet it is unknown to what extent such a large-scale change from oil to wood fuels in heating systems would contribute to any negative health effects from their emissions. We compared the toxicological properties of particulate matter (PM) emissions from wood and oil fuels from two small-scale and two medium-scale heating systems. To assess whether oil or wood combustion emissions cause adverse effects and which PM emissions' effects are more profound, we measured cell viability and proliferation, inflammatory markers, as well as DNA damage in RAW264.7 mouse macrophages. We found that the medium-scale oil-fueled heating system induced a dose-dependent increase of DNA damage, short-term cytotoxic effects, and a cell cycle arrest in the G2/M-phase. We did not detect an induction of DNA damage by the medium-scale wood-fired system. However, we detected significant short-term cytotoxicity. We found that both oil and wood combustion emission samples from the small-scale heating systems induced DNA damage. However, the short-term cytotoxic effects were greater for the PM emissions from the oil-fired heating system. PM mass emissions differed significantly between the tested heating systems. The lowest emissions, 0.1 mg/MJ, were produced by the small-scale oil-fired heating system; the highest emissions, 20.3 mg/MJ, by the medium-scale oil-fired heating system. The wood-fired heating systems' PM mass emissions were in between these concentrations, complicating the direct comparison of the emissions' health related toxic effects. Conclusively, our results indicate that the emissions from both the small- and the medium-scale wood-fueled heating systems cause overall less cytotoxicity and DNA damage in a cell model than the emissions from the corresponding oil-fueled heating systems. Hence, controlled wood-fueled heating systems may be good alternatives to heating systems fired

  9. Same magnetic nanoparticles, different heating behavior: Influence of the arrangement and dispersive medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreu, Irene; Natividad, Eva; Solozábal, Laura; Roubeau, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    The heating ability of the same magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) dispersed in different media has been studied in the 170-310 K temperature range. For this purpose, the biggest non-twinned nanoparticles have been selected among a series of magnetite nanoparticles of increasing sizes synthesized via a seeded growth method. The sample with nanoparticles dispersed in n-tetracosane, thermally quenched from 100 °C and solid in the whole measuring range, follows the linear response theoretical behavior for non-interacting nanoparticles, and displays a remarkably large maximum specific absorption rate (SAR) value comparable to that of magnetosomes at the alternating magnetic fields used in the measurements. The other samples, with nanoparticles dispersed either in alkane solvents of sub-ambient melting temperatures or in epoxy resin, display different thermal behaviors and maximum SAR values ranging between 11 and 65% of that achieved for the sample with n-tetracosane as dispersive medium. These results highlight the importance of the MNPs environment and arrangement to maintain optimal SAR values, and may help to understand the disparity sometimes found between MNPs heating performance measured in a ferrofluid and after injection in an animal model, where MNP arrangement and environment are not the same.

  10. Optimization of magnetic refrigerators by tuning the heat transfer medium and operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghahremani, Mohammadreza; Aslani, Amir; Bennett, Lawrence; Della Torre, Edward

    A new reciprocating Active Magnetic Regenerator (AMR) experimental device has been designed, built and tested to evaluate the effect of the system's parameters on a reciprocating Active Magnetic Regenerator (AMR) near room temperature. Gadolinium turnings were used as the refrigerant, silicon oil as the heat transfer medium, and a magnetic field of 1.3 T was cycled. This study focuses on the methodology of single stage AMR operation conditions to get a higher temperature span near room temperature. Herein, the main objective is not to report the absolute maximum attainable temperature span seen in an AMR system, but rather to find the system's optimal operating conditions to reach that maximum span. The results of this work show that there is an optimal operating frequency, heat transfer fluid flow rate, flow duration, and displaced volume ratio in an AMR system. It is expected that such optimization and the results provided herein will permit the future design and development of more efficient room-temperature magnetic refrigeration systems.