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Sample records for heat transport header

  1. Large variable conductance heat pipe. Transverse header

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.

    1975-01-01

    The characteristics of gas-loaded, variable conductance heat pipes (VCHP) are discussed. The difficulties involved in developing a large VCHP header are analyzed. The construction of the large capacity VCHP is described. A research project to eliminate some of the problems involved in large capacity VCHP operation is explained.

  2. Study of flow distribution and its improvement on the header of plate-fin heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jian; Li, Yanzhong

    2004-11-01

    In order to enhance the uniformity of flow distribution, an improved header configuration of plate-fin heat exchanger is put forward in this paper. Based on the analysis of the fluid flow maldistribution for the conventional header used in industry, a baffle with small holes of three different kinds of diameters is recommended to install in the header. The flow maldistribution parameter S is obtained under different header configuration. When the baffle is properly installed with an optimum length, with stagger arranged and suitably distributed holes from axial line to baffle boundary, the ratio of the maximum flow velocity to the minimum flow velocity drops from 3.44-3.04 to 1.57-1.68 for various Reynolds numbers. The numerical results indicate that the improved header configuration can effectively improve the performance. The conclusion of this paper is of great significance in the improvement of plate-fin heat exchanger.

  3. Deployable heat-pipe radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.

    1978-01-01

    Loop temperatures are controlled effectively under varying load conditions. Radiator has four separate pieces of hardware: heat-pipe panel, flexible heat-pipe leader, heat exchanger, fluid header. Single-fluid transport capacities of about 850 watts, corresponding to 51,000 watt-inches, have been achieved in 90 degree bend orientation of heat-pipe header.

  4. Optimal heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Andre; Doering, Charles R.

    2015-11-01

    The transport of heat by buoyancy driven flows, i.e., thermal convection plays a central role in many natural phenomena and an understanding of how to control its mechanisms is relevant to many engineering applications. In this talk we will consider a variational formulation of optimal heat transport in simple geometries. Numerical results, limits on heat transport, and a comparison to Rayleigh-Bénard convection will be presented. Research supported by NSF Awards PHY-1205219, PHY-1338407, PHY-1443836, PHY-1533555 and DMS-1515161.

  5. Heat transport system

    DOEpatents

    Pierce, Bill L.

    1978-01-01

    A heat transport system of small size which can be operated in any orientation consists of a coolant loop containing a vaporizable liquid as working fluid and includes in series a vaporizer, a condenser and two one-way valves and a pressurizer connected to the loop between the two valves. The pressurizer may be divided into two chambers by a flexible diaphragm, an inert gas in one chamber acting as a pneumatic spring for the system.

  6. Heat transport system

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, Samuel D.

    1982-01-01

    A falling bed of ceramic particles receives neutron irradiation from a neutron-producing plasma and thereby transports energy as heat from the plasma to a heat exchange location where the ceramic particles are cooled by a gas flow. The cooled ceramic particles are elevated to a location from which they may again pass by gravity through the region where they are exposed to neutron radiation. Ceramic particles of alumina, magnesia, silica and combinations of these materials are contemplated as high-temperature materials that will accept energy from neutron irradiation. Separate containers of material incorporating lithium are exposed to the neutron flux for the breeding of tritium that may subsequently be used in neutron-producing reactions. The falling bed of ceramic particles includes velocity partitioning between compartments near to the neutron-producing plasma and compartments away from the plasma to moderate the maximum temperature in the bed.

  7. Heat transport system

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, S.D.

    A falling bed of ceramic particles receives neutron irradiation from a neutron-producing plasma and thereby transports energy as heat from the plasma to a heat exchange location where the ceramic particles are cooled by a gas flow. The cooled ceramic particles are elevated to a location from which they may again pass by gravity through the region where they are exposed to neutron radiation. Ceramic particles of alumina, magnesia, silica and combinations of these materials are contemplated as high-temperature materials that will accept energy from neutron irradiation. Separate containers of material incorporating lithium are exposed to the neutron flux for the breeding of tritium that may subsequently be used in neutron-producing reactions. The falling bed of ceramic particles includes velocity partitioning between compartments near to the neutron-producing plasma and compartments away from the plasma to moderate the maximum temperature in the bed.

  8. Heat transport in nonuniform superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Caroline; Vorontsov, Anton B.

    2016-08-01

    We calculate electronic energy transport in inhomogeneous superconductors using a fully self-consistent nonequilibrium quasiclassical Keldysh approach. We develop a general theory and apply it to a superconductor with an order parameter that forms domain walls of the type encountered in the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov state. The heat transport in the presence of a domain wall is inherently anisotropic and nonlocal. The bound states in the nonuniform region play a crucial role and control heat transport in several ways: (i) they modify the spectrum of quasiparticle states and result in Andreev reflection processes and (ii) they hybridize with the impurity band and produce a local transport environment with properties very different from those in a uniform superconductor. As a result of this interplay, heat transport becomes highly sensitive to temperature, magnetic field, and disorder. For strongly scattering impurities, we find that the transport across domain walls at low temperatures is considerably more efficient than in the uniform superconducting state.

  9. Solar heat transport fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The progress made in the development and delivery of noncorrosive fluid subsystems is discussed. These subsystems are to be compatible with closed-loop solar heating or combined heating and hot water systems. They are also to be compatible with both metallic and non-metallic plumbing systems. The performance testing of a number of fluids is described.

  10. Acoustically enhanced heat transport.

    PubMed

    Ang, Kar M; Yeo, Leslie Y; Friend, James R; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10(6) Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ∼ 10(-9) m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ∼ 10(-8) m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10(-8) m with 10(6) Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation. PMID:26827343

  11. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Kar M.; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ˜ 106 Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ˜ 10-9 m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ˜ 10-8 m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10-8 m with 106 Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  12. Solar heat transport fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The progress made on the development and delivery of noncorrosive fluid subsystems is reported. These subsystems are to be compatible with closed-loop solar heating or combined heating and hot water systems. They are also to be compatible with both metallic and non-metallic plumbing systems. At least 100 gallons of each type of fluid recommended by the contractor will be delivered under the contract. The performance testing of a number of fluids is described.

  13. Survey of Header Compression Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishac, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    This report provides a summary of several different header compression techniques. The different techniques included are: (1) Van Jacobson's header compression (RFC 1144); (2) SCPS (Space Communications Protocol Standards) header compression (SCPS-TP, SCPS-NP); (3) Robust header compression (ROHC); and (4) The header compression techniques in RFC2507 and RFC2508. The methodology for compression and error correction for these schemes are described in the remainder of this document. All of the header compression schemes support compression over simplex links, provided that the end receiver has some means of sending data back to the sender. However, if that return path does not exist, then neither Van Jacobson's nor SCPS can be used, since both rely on TCP (Transmission Control Protocol). In addition, under link conditions of low delay and low error, all of the schemes perform as expected. However, based on the methodology of the schemes, each scheme is likely to behave differently as conditions degrade. Van Jacobson's header compression relies heavily on the TCP retransmission timer and would suffer an increase in loss propagation should the link possess a high delay and/or bit error rate (BER). The SCPS header compression scheme protects against high delay environments by avoiding delta encoding between packets. Thus, loss propagation is avoided. However, SCPS is still affected by an increased BER (bit-error-rate) since the lack of delta encoding results in larger header sizes. Next, the schemes found in RFC2507 and RFC2508 perform well for non-TCP connections in poor conditions. RFC2507 performance with TCP connections is improved by various techniques over Van Jacobson's, but still suffers a performance hit with poor link properties. Also, RFC2507 offers the ability to send TCP data without delta encoding, similar to what SCPS offers. ROHC is similar to the previous two schemes, but adds additional CRCs (cyclic redundancy check) into headers and improves

  14. Heat transport through ion crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Nahuel; Martinez, Esteban A.; Paz, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    We study the thermodynamical properties of crystals of trapped ions which are laser cooled to two different temperatures in two separate regions. We show that these properties strongly depend on the structure of the ion crystal. Such structure can be changed by varying the trap parameters and undergoes a series of phase transitions from linear to zig-zag or helicoidal configurations. Thus, we show that these systems are ideal candidates to observe and control the transition from anomalous to normal heat transport. All structures behave as ‘heat superconductors’, with a thermal conductivity increasing linearly with system size and a vanishing thermal gradient inside the system. However, zig-zag and helicoidal crystals turn out to be hyper sensitive to disorder having a linear temperature profile and a length independent conductivity. Interestingly, disordered 2D ion crystals are heat insulators. Sensitivity to disorder is much smaller in the 1D case.

  15. Header design evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubenhofer, R.L.

    1993-08-01

    An evaluation was conducted of two new six-pin header designs. This evaluation consisted of designing, evaluating, procuring, and building contact module subassemblies with each of the two designs. The study was initiated as a result of the high scrap costs associated with the current product design. Two new designs were found to be feasible alternative to the current design.

  16. Heat transport system, method and material

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    A heat transport system, method and composite material in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure.

  17. A 2.2 sq m /24 sq ft/ self-controlled deployable heat pipe radiator - Design and test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.

    1975-01-01

    An all heat pipe, deployable radiator has been developed which can effectively control pumped fluid loop temperatures under varying loads using variable conductance panel heat pipes. The 2.2 sq m (24 sq ft) aluminum panel can be coupled to either a fluid header or a flexible heat pipe header capable of transporting 850 watts in a 90-deg bent configuration. Test results support the feasibility of using this system to passively control Freon-21 loop temperatures.

  18. Fusible pellet transport and storage of heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    A new concept for both transport and storage of heat at high temperatures and heat fluxes is introduced and the first steps in analysis of its feasibility is taken. The concept utilizes the high energy storage capability of materials undergoing change of phase. The phase change material, for example a salt, is encapsulated in corrosion resistant sealed pellets and transported in a carrier fluid to heat source and storage. Calculations for heat transport from a typical solar collector indicate that the pellet mass flow rates are relatively small and that the required pumping power is only a small fraction of the energy transport capability of the system. Salts and eutectic salt mixtures as candidate phase change materials are examined and discussed. Finally, the time periods for melting or solidification of sodium chloride pellets is investigated and reported.

  19. Heat transport system, method and material

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, D.L.

    1987-04-28

    A heat transport system, method and composite material are disclosed in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure. 1 fig.

  20. Best Practices for FITS Headers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hourcle, Joseph

    2012-05-01

    We present recommendations and an example of best practices for FITS headers to improve documentation and usability of solar physics data distributed as FITS files. We built on existing norms and standards, including 'Proposed Keywords for SOHO' and the FITS World Coordinate System (WCS) conventions, and include recommendations on the use of FITS features and extensions to help make data stored and distributed in FITS better suited for both present-day usage and long-term archiving. Our goals include: 1. Allow both solar physicists and non-discipline scientists to easily understand what's in a file from an instrument they've never dealt with before. 2. Allow scientists to quickly determine if the file contains data that is useful for their purposes. 3. Allow scientists to find where to get additional information on how to properly use the data. 4. Reduce the likelihood of keywords or data being misunderstood. 5. Ensure the data is accessible, understandable and usable over the long-term. 6. Reduce barriers to acknowledgement and citation of data. 7. Provide for reliable identification of files and observations that maybe be stored in multiple locations or forms. 8. Provide a framework to denote mission- or instrument-specific keywords. 9. Give data providers a template to work from when designing FITS headers for new missions.

  1. Heat transport in active harmonic chains

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Mei C.; Ellis, Fred M.; Kottos, Tsampikos; Fleischmann, Ragnar; Geisel, Theo; Prosen, Tomaz

    2011-08-15

    We show that a harmonic lattice model with amplifying and attenuating elements, when coupled to two thermal baths, exhibits unique heat transport properties. Some of these novel features include anomalous nonequilibrium steady-state heat currents, negative differential thermal conductance, as well as nonreciprocal heat transport. We find that when these elements are arranged in a PT-symmetric manner, the domain of existence of the nonequilibrium steady state is maximized. We propose an electronic experimental setup based on resistive-inductive-capacitive (RLC) transmission lines, where our predictions can be tested.

  2. Continuous observations of North Atlantic heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-02-01

    The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), which transports warm water northward and cold water back southward, is important in transferring heat to the North Atlantic Ocean. Some models predict that AMOC will slow down as Earth's temperatures rise due to anthropogenic warming, which could have serious climate consequences for the Northern Hemisphere. However, the response of AMOC to global warming is uncertain—different models predict different rates of slowdown—and there have been few continuous observations of AMOC heat transport. Hobbs and Willis used temperature, salinity, and displacement data measured from foats in the Argo array, combined with sea surface heights measured by satellites, to estimate a continuous time series of Atlantic meridional heat transport from 2002 to 2010 at 41°N latitude. They found that the mean heat transport was about 0.5 petawatt. The authors note that this estimate is consistent with previous studies in similar latitudes based on atmospheric flux data but is lower than most hydrographic estimates. Heat transport varied on an annual cycle as well as on shorter time scales, with atmospheric variability explaining most of the short-term variance. The researchers note that the period of study was too short to infer any long-term trends, and they emphasize the need for continued monitoring of AMOC. (Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans, doi:10.1029/2011JC007039, 2012)

  3. Stress analysis of header material sets

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, C.M.; Merten, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    Header design ideology and material selection are described. Current header designs utilize a glass-ceramic insulator which is bonded to a current carrying pin and a metal shell. Residual stresses in the header occur as a result of cooling from the glass softening temperature and are attributable to differences within the header material set in coefficients of thermal expansion. A stress analysis is undertaken to model the residual thermal stresses in glass-ceramic headers. A feature of this model is that it simulates bonding at glass-ceramic to metal interfaces by precluding interfacial sliding. Residual stresses for four material sets are analyzed. These material sets are chosen to illustrate the various stress states which can arise due to differing combinations of coefficients of thermal expansion within a material set. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, Dvira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar

    2016-05-01

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects are factors that combine to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good), and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques that incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with examples illustrating the challenge of reaching control over vibrational heat conduction in molecules.

  5. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Segal, Dvira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar

    2016-05-27

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects are factors that combine to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good), and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques that incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with examples illustrating the challenge of reaching control over vibrational heat conduction in molecules. PMID:27215814

  6. Increased ocean heat transports and warmer climate

    SciTech Connect

    Rind, D. ); Chandler, M. )

    1991-04-20

    The authors investigated the effect of increased ocean heat transports on climate in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM). The warming is driven by the decreased sea ice/planetary albedo, a feedback which would appear to be instrumental for producing extreme high-latitude amplification of temperature changes. Resulting hydrologic and wind stress changes suggest that qualitatively the increased transports might be self-sustaining. As such, they would represent a possible mechanism to help account for the high-latitude warmth of climates in the Mesozoic and Tertiary, and decadal-scale climate fluctuations during the Holocene, as well as a powerful feedback to amplify other climate forcings. It is estimated that ocean transport increases of 50-70% would have been necessary to reproduce the warmth of various Mesozoic (65-230 m.y. ago) climates without changes in atmospheric composition, while the 15% increase used in these experiments would have been sufficient to reproduce the general climatic conditions of the Eocene (40-55 Ma). A companion experiment indicates that increased topography during the Cenozoic (0-65 Ma) might have altered the surface wind stress in a manner that led to reduced heat transports; this effect would then need to be considered in understanding the beginning of ice ages. The large high-latitude amplification associated with ocean heat transport and sea ice changes differs significantly from that forecast for increased trace gases, for which water vapor increase is the primary feedback mechanism. The different signatures might allow for discrimination of these different forcings; e.g., the warming of the 1930s looks more like the altered ocean heat transport signal, while the warming of the 1980s is more like the trace gas effect.

  7. Standardizing Documentation of FITS Headers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hourcle, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Although the FITS file format[1] can be self-documenting, human intervention is often needed to read the headers to write the necessary transformations to make a given instrument team's data compatible with our preferred analysis package. External documentation may be needed to determine what the values are of coded values or unfamiliar acronyms.Different communities have interpreted keywords slightly differently. This has resulted in ambiguous fields such as DATE-OBS, which could be either the start or mid-point of an observation.[2]Conventions for placing units and additional information within the comments of a FITS card exist, but they require re-writing the FITS file. This operation can be quite costly for large archives, and should not be taken lightly when dealing with issues of digital preservation.We present what we believe is needed for a machine-actionable external file describing a given collection of FITS files. We seek comments from data producers, archives, and those writing software to help develop a single, useful, implementable standard.References:[1] Pence, et.al. 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201015362[2] Rots, et.al, (in preparation), http://hea-www.cfa.harvard.edu arots/TimeWCS/

  8. Clustering header categories extracted from web tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, George; Embley, David W.; Krishnamoorthy, Mukkai; Seth, Sharad

    2015-01-01

    Revealing related content among heterogeneous web tables is part of our long term objective of formulating queries over multiple sources of information. Two hundred HTML tables from institutional web sites are segmented and each table cell is classified according to the fundamental indexing property of row and column headers. The categories that correspond to the multi-dimensional data cube view of a table are extracted by factoring the (often multi-row/column) headers. To reveal commonalities between tables from diverse sources, the Jaccard distances between pairs of category headers (and also table titles) are computed. We show how about one third of our heterogeneous collection can be clustered into a dozen groups that exhibit table-title and header similarities that can be exploited for queries.

  9. Increased ocean heat transports and warmer climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rind, D.; Chandler, M.

    1991-04-01

    We investigated the effect of increased ocean heat transports on climate in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM). The increases used were sufficient to melt all sea ice at high latitudes, and amounted to 15% on the global average. The resulting global climate is 2°C warmer, with temperature increases of some 20°C at high latitudes, and 1°C near the equator. The warming is driven by the decreased sea ice/planetary albedo, a feedback which would appear to be instrumental for producing extreme high-latitude amplification of temperature changes. Resulting hydrologic and wind stress changes suggest that qualitatively, for both the wind-driven and thermohaline circulation, the increased transports might be self-sustaining. As such, they would represent a possible mechanism to help account for the high-latitude warmth of climates in the Mesozoic and Tertiary, and decadal-scale climate fluctuations during the Holocene, as well as a powerful feedback to amplify other climate forcings. It is estimated that ocean transport increases of 50-70% would have been necessary to reproduce the warmth of various Mesozoic (65-230 m.y. ago) climates without changes in atmospheric composition, while the 15% increase used in these experiments would have been sufficient to reproduce the general climatic conditions of the Eocene (40-55 Ma). A companion experiment indicates that increased topography during the Cenozoic (0-65 Ma) might have altered the surface wind stress in a manner that led to reduced heat transports; this effect would then need to be considered in understanding the beginning of ice ages. Colder climates, or rapid climate perturbations, might have been generated with the aid of such altered ocean transports. The large high-latitude amplification associated with ocean heat transport and sea ice changes differs significantly from that forecast for increased trace gases, for which water vapor increase is the primary feedback

  10. Tube-to-header joint for bimetallic construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessmann, G. G.; Stoner, D. R.

    1967-01-01

    Design advantages of bimetallic construction enables an all-welded bimetallic joint to be made from the accessible header side of the tube-to-header joint. In the two-piece header design the weld joints completely seal the tube-header plate crevice and prevent crevice and stringer corrosion.

  11. Gathering headers in a distributed environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, Bret D.; Wampler, Steve B.; Hubbard, John R.

    2008-08-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) has implemented a novel method for gathering header information on data products. At the time of data collection, the specific state of the telescope and instrumentation needs to be collected and associated with the saved data. The ATST performs this task by issuing a header request event across the ATST event system. All observatory software components that are registered for the event and are participating in the current experiment or observation report status information to a central header repository. Various types of header request events may be selected for start or stop of individual frames, groups of frames, or entire observations. The final data products are created by combining the data files with all or some of stored header information in the database. The resulting data file may be generated in any possible format, including FITS. Much of the implementation of this approach is integrated into the ATST technical framework, simplifying the development process for component writers and ensuring consistent responses to header request events.

  12. Life assessment of high temperature headers

    SciTech Connect

    Nakoneczny, G.J.; Schultz, C.C.

    1995-08-01

    High temperature superheater and reheater headers have been a necessary focus of any boiler life extension project done by the electric utilities. These headers operate at high temperatures in excess of 900 F and are subject to thermal stresses and pressure stresses that can lead to cracking and failure. Babcock and Wilcox Company`s investigation of these problems began in 1982 focusing on P11 materials (1{1/4}Cr-{1/2}Mo). Early assessment was limited to dimensional analysis methods which were aimed at quantifying swell due to creep. Condition assessment and remaining useful life analysis methods have evolved since these initial studies. Experience coupled with improved inspection methods and analytical techniques has advanced the life assessment of these high temperature headers. In the discussion that follows the authors provide an overview of B and W`s approach to header life assessment including the location and causes for header failures, inspection techniques and analysis methods which are all directed at determining the remaining useful life of these high temperature headers.

  13. Miniature Heat Transport System for Nanosatellite Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Donya M,

    1999-01-01

    The scientific understanding of key physical processes between the Sun and the Earth require simultaneous measurements from many vantage points in space. Nano-satellite technologies will enable a class of constellation missions for the NASA Space Science Sun-Earth Connections. This recent emphasis on the implementation of smaller satellites leads to a requirement for development of smaller subsystems in several areas. Key technologies under development include: advanced miniaturized chemical propulsion; miniaturized sensors; highly integrated, compact electronics; autonomous onboard and ground operations; miniatures low power tracking techniques for orbit determination; onboard RF communications capable of transmitting data to the ground from far distances; lightweight efficient solar array panels; lightweight, high output battery cells; lightweight yet strong composite materials for the nano-spacecraft and deployer-ship structures. These newer smaller systems may have higher power densities and higher thermal transport requirements than seen on previous small satellites. Furthermore, the small satellites may also have a requirement to maintain thermal control through extended earth shadows, possibly up to 8 hours long. Older thermal control technology, such as heaters, thermostats, and heat pipes, may not be sufficient to meet the requirements of these new systems. Conversely, a miniature two-phase heat transport system (Mini-HTS) such as a Capillary Pumped Loop (CPL) or Loop Heat Pipe (LBP) is a viable alternative. A Mini-HTS can provide fine temperature control, thermal diode action, and a highly efficient means of heat transfer. The Mini-HTS would have power capabilities in the range of tens of watts or less and provide thermal control over typical spacecraft ranges. The Mini-HTS would allow the internal portion of the spacecraft to be thermally isolated from the external radiator, thus protecting the internal components from extreme cold temperatures during an

  14. Electron heat transport down steep temperature gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Matte, J.P.; Virmont, J.

    1982-12-27

    Electron heat transport is studied by numerically solving the Fokker-Planck equation, with a spherical harmonic representation of the distribution function. The first two terms (f/sub 0/, f/sub 1/) suffice, even in steep temperature gradients. Deviations from the Spitzer-Haerm law appear for lambda/L/sub T/ ((mean free path)/(temperature gradient length))> or approx. =0.01, as a result of non-Maxwellian f/sub 0/. For lambda/L/sub T/> or approx. =1, the heat flux is (1/3) of the free-streaming value. In intermediate cases, a harmonic law describes well the hottest part of the plasma.

  15. Yields in stripper header vs conventional header in dryland cropping systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in crop residue quality can impact the amount of soil water storage in semi-arid no-till systems of the West Central Great Plains. Using a stripper header as opposed to a conventional-reel type header to harvest small grains impacts the quality of the crop residue left in the field. Pr...

  16. Enabling IP Header Compression in COTS Routers via Frame Relay on a Simplex Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Sam P.; Pang, Jackson; Clare, Loren P.; Cheng, Michael K.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is moving toward a networkcentric communications architecture and, in particular, is building toward use of Internet Protocol (IP) in space. The use of IP is motivated by its ubiquitous application in many communications networks and in available commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) technology. The Constellation Program intends to fit two or more voice (over IP) channels on both the forward link to, and the return link from, the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) during all mission phases. Efficient bandwidth utilization of the links is key for voice applications. In Voice over IP (VoIP), the IP packets are limited to small sizes to keep voice latency at a minimum. The common voice codec used in VoIP is G.729. This new algorithm produces voice audio at 8 kbps and in packets of 10-milliseconds duration. Constellation has designed the VoIP communications stack to use the combination of IP/UDP/RTP protocols where IP carries a 20-byte header, UDP (User Datagram Protocol) carries an 8-byte header, and RTP (Real Time Transport Protocol) carries a 12-byte header. The protocol headers total 40 bytes and are equal in length to a 40-byte G.729 payload, doubling the VoIP latency. Since much of the IP/UDP/RTP header information does not change from IP packet to IP packet, IP/UDP/RTP header compression can avoid transmission of much redundant data as well as reduce VoIP latency. The benefits of IP header compression are more pronounced at low data rate links such as the forward and return links during CEV launch. IP/UDP/RTP header compression codecs are well supported by many COTS routers. A common interface to the COTS routers is through frame relay. However, enabling IP header compression over frame relay, according to industry standard (Frame Relay IP Header Compression Agreement FRF.20), requires a duplex link and negotiations between the compressor router and the decompressor router. In Constellation, each forward to and return link from the CEV in space is treated

  17. Radiative heat transport instability in ICF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozmus, W.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation losses and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic wave instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability. This instability develops in the wide range of angles and wavenumbers with the typical growth rate on the order of cs/LT (cs is the sound speed, LT is the temperature scale length). In addition to radiation dominated systems, a similar thermal transport driven ion acoustic instability was found before in plasmas where the thermal transport coefficient depends on electron density. However, under conditions of indirect drive ICF experiments the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered corresponding to a thermal conductivity coefficient that is inversely proportional to the square of local particle density. In the nonlinear regime this instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation.

  18. Fast atomic transport without vibrational heating

    SciTech Connect

    Torrontegui, E.; Ibanez, S.; Chen Xi; Ruschhaupt, A.; Guery-Odelin, D.; Muga, J. G.

    2011-01-15

    We use the dynamical invariants associated with the Hamiltonian of an atom in a one dimensional moving trap to inverse engineer the trap motion and perform fast atomic transport without final vibrational heating. The atom is driven nonadiabatically through a shortcut to the result of adiabatic, slow trap motion. For harmonic potentials this only requires designing appropriate trap trajectories, whereas perfect transport in anharmonic traps may be achieved by applying an extra field to compensate the forces in the rest frame of the trap. The results can be extended to atom stopping or launching. The limitations due to geometrical constraints, energies, and accelerations involved are analyzed along with the relation to previous approaches based on classical trajectories or ''fast-forward'' and ''bang-bang'' methods, which can be integrated in the invariant-based framework.

  19. Thermal Transport Model for Heat Sink Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, James A.; Kelley, Richard L.; Brown, Ari D.; Smith, Stephen J.; Kilbourne, Caroline a.

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses the development of a finite element model for describing thermal transport through microcalorimeter arrays in order to assist in heat-sinking design. A fabricated multi-absorber transition edge sensor (PoST) was designed in order to reduce device wiring density by a factor of four. The finite element model consists of breaking the microcalorimeter array into separate elements, including the transition edge sensor (TES) and the silicon substrate on which the sensor is deposited. Each element is then broken up into subelements, whose surface area subtends 10 10 microns. The heat capacity per unit temperature, thermal conductance, and thermal diffusivity of each subelement are the model inputs, as are the temperatures of each subelement. Numerical integration using the Finite in Time Centered in Space algorithm of the thermal diffusion equation is then performed in order to obtain a temporal evolution of the subelement temperature. Thermal transport across interfaces is modeled using a thermal boundary resistance obtained using the acoustic mismatch model. The document concludes with a discussion of the PoST fabrication. PoSTs are novel because they enable incident x-ray position sensitivity with good energy resolution and low wiring density.

  20. 2-Phase Fluid Flow & Heat Transport

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-03-13

    GEOTHER is a three-dimensional, geothermal reservoir simulation code. The model describes heat transport and flow of a single component, two-phase fluid in porous media. It is based on the continuity equations for steam and water, which are reduced to two nonlinear partial differential equations in which the dependent variables are fluid pressure and enthalpy. GEOTHER can be used to simulate the fluid-thermal interaction in rock that can be approximated by a porous media representation. Itmore » can simulate heat transport and the flow of compressed water, two-phase mixtures, and superheated steam in porous media over a temperature range of 10 to 300 degrees C. In addition, it can treat the conversion from single to two-phase flow, and vice versa. It can be used for evaluation of a near repository spatial scale and a time scale of a few years to thousands of years. The model can be used to investigate temperature and fluid pressure changes in response to thermal loading by waste materials.« less

  1. Radiation heat transport in disordered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strieder, William

    Radiation heat transport through the internal void spaces of particle beds, fiber beds, packed beds, reactors and porous media with opaque, diffusely reflecting, gray body surfaces and large solid dimensions ( πd/ λth > 100) is considered. A the local particle surface radiosity, differential view factor and solid temperature, permits a rigorous solution of the dependent, long range multiple scattering problem. The conductivity results, applied to a bed of randomly overlapping spheres, agree exactly with pseudohomogeneous results in both the isotropic and anisotropic scattering limits and shed rigorous light on the anisotropic phase function expansion theory. Explicit calculations, performed for several other standard packings, e.g. fiber beds, exhibit a parallll upper and series lower bound over the various particle shapes and dispersion structures. Results show that an empirical equation first suggested by Vortmeyer (German Chem. Engng, 3, (1980) 124-137), but generalized herein from one P to four P0, P1, P2, P3 coefficients, which vary substantially with the various industrial packings, will provide a suitable generalization of the emissivity factor of krad for engineering conductivity modeling of radiation heat transport.

  2. Parameterization of Heat Transport in a Fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossainzadeh, S.; Tulaczyk, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    We aim to improve the coupling in the Regional Arctic System Model (RASM) between the ocean model, Parallel Ocean Program (POP), and the ice sheet model, Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM), by developing a parameterization for the dominant processes in a typical Greenland fjord. The termini of tidewater glaciers and ice shelves may prove to be a critical forcing on outlet glacier mass balance. Recent studies have shown that warm deep water masses have penetrated far up-stream in fjords and sub-ice shelf cavities. We analyze the effects of bottom bathymetry, entrainment rate at the ice face due to freshwater plumes, surface outflow rates, undulating fjord geometries, and open ocean conditions at the fjord mouth on heat transport up-fjord. The fjord is represented as a two-layer (stratified) open channel flow with a substantial and sudden geometric widening at the mouth. Horizontal force balances as well as mass, salt and heat continuity relations of the upper layer provides an analytical solution for the velocity and thickness distribution along-fjord. Subsequently, the sensitivity of the bottom layer's up-fjord flow and heat transport to the ice face is determined and forms the basis of the parameterization of along-fjord processes. Open ocean scenarios (temperature, salinity and velocity profiles), typical of Arctic oceanographic conditions on the Greenland shelf, are prescribed from results of a coupled ocean-sea ice model configured at a regional scale for the pan-Arctic domain. The model was spun up for 48 years and forced by daily averaged atmospheric reanalysis data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. We validate this data from several decades-long time series of in situ data from the Gulf of Alaska and West Greenland. Our results provide ice melt rates which agree with current estimates.

  3. Convective heat transport in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1986-08-01

    Most geothermal systems under exploitation for direct use or electrical power production are of the hydrothermal type, where heat is transferred essentially by convection in the reservoir, conduction being secondary. In geothermal systems, buoyancy effects are generally important, but often the fluid and heat flow patterns are largely controlled by geologic features (e.g., faults, fractures, continuity of layers) and location of recharge and discharge zones. During exploitation, these flow patterns can drastically change in response to pressure and temperature declines, and changes in recharge/discharge patterns. Convective circulation models of several geothermal systems, before and after start of fluid production, are described, with emphasis on different characteristics of the systems and the effects of exploitation on their evolution. Convective heat transport in geothermal fields is discussed, taking into consideration (1) major geologic features; (2) temperature-dependent rock and fluid properties; (3) fracture- versus porous-medium characteristics; (4) single- versus two-phase reservoir systems; and (5) the presence of noncondensible gases.

  4. Glass ceramics for explosive device headers

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, C. P.; Eagan, R. J.; Kjeldgaard, E. A.

    1980-01-01

    The desired features of a header for our advanced explosive devices include small size; 700 Mpa static burst strength; corrosion resistant alloys for electrodes, bridgewire, and housing; integral charge holder; high thermal conductivity (approaching that of alumina ceramic); no braze around the electrodes; design flexibility and quick turnaround time for fabrication of development prototypes; and low cost.

  5. Apparatus for downward transport of heat

    DOEpatents

    Neeper, D.A.; Hedstrom, J.C.

    1985-08-05

    An apparatus for the downward transport of heat by vaporization of a working fluid, usually from a collector which can be powered by the sun to a condenser which drains the condensed working fluid to a lower reservoir, is controled by a control valve which is operationally dependent upon the level of working fluid in either the lower reservoir or an upper reservoir which feeds the collector. Condensed working fluid is driven from the lower to the upper reservoir by vaporized working fluid whose flow is controled by the controll valve. The upper reservoir is in constant communication with the condenser which prevents a buildup in temperature/pressure as the apparatus goes through successive pumping cycles.

  6. Functionalization mediates heat transport in graphene nanoflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Haoxue; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Nan; Samani, Majid Kabiri; Ni, Yuxiang; Mijbil, Zainelabideen Y.; Edwards, Michael; Xiong, Shiyun; Sääskilahti, Kimmo; Murugesan, Murali; Fu, Yifeng; Ye, Lilei; Sadeghi, Hatef; Bailey, Steven; Kosevich, Yuriy A.; Lambert, Colin J.; Liu, Johan; Volz, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The high thermal conductivity of graphene and few-layer graphene undergoes severe degradations through contact with the substrate. Here we show experimentally that the thermal management of a micro heater is substantially improved by introducing alternative heat-escaping channels into a graphene-based film bonded to functionalized graphene oxide through amino-silane molecules. Using a resistance temperature probe for in situ monitoring we demonstrate that the hotspot temperature was lowered by ~28 °C for a chip operating at 1,300 W cm-2. Thermal resistance probed by pulsed photothermal reflectance measurements demonstrated an improved thermal coupling due to functionalization on the graphene-graphene oxide interface. Three functionalization molecules manifest distinct interfacial thermal transport behaviour, corroborating our atomistic calculations in unveiling the role of molecular chain length and functional groups. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the functionalization constrains the cross-plane phonon scattering, which in turn enhances in-plane heat conduction of the bonded graphene film by recovering the long flexural phonon lifetime.

  7. Functionalization mediates heat transport in graphene nanoflakes.

    PubMed

    Han, Haoxue; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Nan; Samani, Majid Kabiri; Ni, Yuxiang; Mijbil, Zainelabideen Y; Edwards, Michael; Xiong, Shiyun; Sääskilahti, Kimmo; Murugesan, Murali; Fu, Yifeng; Ye, Lilei; Sadeghi, Hatef; Bailey, Steven; Kosevich, Yuriy A; Lambert, Colin J; Liu, Johan; Volz, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The high thermal conductivity of graphene and few-layer graphene undergoes severe degradations through contact with the substrate. Here we show experimentally that the thermal management of a micro heater is substantially improved by introducing alternative heat-escaping channels into a graphene-based film bonded to functionalized graphene oxide through amino-silane molecules. Using a resistance temperature probe for in situ monitoring we demonstrate that the hotspot temperature was lowered by ∼28 °C for a chip operating at 1,300 W cm(-2). Thermal resistance probed by pulsed photothermal reflectance measurements demonstrated an improved thermal coupling due to functionalization on the graphene-graphene oxide interface. Three functionalization molecules manifest distinct interfacial thermal transport behaviour, corroborating our atomistic calculations in unveiling the role of molecular chain length and functional groups. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the functionalization constrains the cross-plane phonon scattering, which in turn enhances in-plane heat conduction of the bonded graphene film by recovering the long flexural phonon lifetime. PMID:27125636

  8. Functionalization mediates heat transport in graphene nanoflakes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Haoxue; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Nan; Samani, Majid Kabiri; Ni, Yuxiang; Mijbil, Zainelabideen Y.; Edwards, Michael; Xiong, Shiyun; Sääskilahti, Kimmo; Murugesan, Murali; Fu, Yifeng; Ye, Lilei; Sadeghi, Hatef; Bailey, Steven; Kosevich, Yuriy A.; Lambert, Colin J.; Liu, Johan; Volz, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The high thermal conductivity of graphene and few-layer graphene undergoes severe degradations through contact with the substrate. Here we show experimentally that the thermal management of a micro heater is substantially improved by introducing alternative heat-escaping channels into a graphene-based film bonded to functionalized graphene oxide through amino-silane molecules. Using a resistance temperature probe for in situ monitoring we demonstrate that the hotspot temperature was lowered by ∼28 °C for a chip operating at 1,300 W cm−2. Thermal resistance probed by pulsed photothermal reflectance measurements demonstrated an improved thermal coupling due to functionalization on the graphene–graphene oxide interface. Three functionalization molecules manifest distinct interfacial thermal transport behaviour, corroborating our atomistic calculations in unveiling the role of molecular chain length and functional groups. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the functionalization constrains the cross-plane phonon scattering, which in turn enhances in-plane heat conduction of the bonded graphene film by recovering the long flexural phonon lifetime. PMID:27125636

  9. Implementation and Evaluation of the Enhanced Header Compression (IPHC) for 6LoWPAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludovici, Alessandro; Calveras, Anna; Catalan, Marisa; Gómez, Carles; Paradells, Josep

    6LoWPAN defines how to carry IPv6 packets over IEEE 802.15.4 low power wireless or sensor networks. Limited bandwidth, memory and energy resources require a careful application of IPv6 in a LoWPAN. The IEEE 802.15.4 standard defines a maximum frame size of 127 bytes that decreases to 102 bytes considering the header overhead. A further reduction is due to the security, network and transport protocols header overhead that, in case of IPv6 and UDP, leave only 33 bytes for application data. A compression algorithm is necessary in order to reduce the overhead and save space in data payload. This paper describes and compares the proposed IPv6 header compression mechanisms for 6LoWPAN environments.

  10. Heating and Cooling System Design for a Modern Transportable Container

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Jason E.

    2015-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been tasked with the design of a modern transportable container (MTC) for use in high reliability transportation environments. The container is required to transport cargo capable of generating its own heat and operate under the United States’ climatic extremes. In response to these requirements, active heating and cooling is necessary to maintain a controlled environment inside the container. The following thesis project documents the design of an active heating, active cooling, and combined active heating and cooling system (now referred to as active heating and cooling systems) through computational thermal analyses, scoping of commercial system options, and mechanical integration with the container’s structure.

  11. Possible role of oceanic heat transport in early Eocene climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloan, L. C.; Walker, J. C.; Moore, T. C. Jr

    1995-01-01

    Increased oceanic heat transport has often been cited as a means of maintaining warm high-latitude surface temperatures in many intervals of the geologic past, including the early Eocene. Although the excess amount of oceanic heat transport required by warm high latitude sea surface temperatures can be calculated empirically, determining how additional oceanic heat transport would take place has yet to be accomplished. That the mechanisms of enhanced poleward oceanic heat transport remain undefined in paleoclimate reconstructions is an important point that is often overlooked. Using early Eocene climate as an example, we consider various ways to produce enhanced poleward heat transport and latitudinal energy redistribution of the sign and magnitude required by interpreted early Eocene conditions. Our interpolation of early Eocene paleotemperature data indicate that an approximately 30% increase in poleward heat transport would be required to maintain Eocene high-latitude temperatures. This increased heat transport appears difficult to accomplish by any means of ocean circulation if we use present ocean circulation characteristics to evaluate early Eocene rates. Either oceanic processes were very different from those of the present to produce the early Eocene climate conditions or oceanic heat transport was not the primary cause of that climate. We believe that atmospheric processes, with contributions from other factors, such as clouds, were the most likely primary cause of early Eocene climate.

  12. Development and testing of heat transport fluids for use in active solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Work on heat transport fluids for use with active solar heating and cooling systems is described. Program objectives and how they were accomplished including problems encountered during testing are discussed.

  13. Experimental Study of Heat Transport in Fractured Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Nicola; Cherubini, Claudia; Giasi, Concetta I.; Allegretti, Nicoletta M.; Redondo, Jose M.; Tarquis, Ana Maria

    2015-04-01

    Fractured rocks play an important role in transport of natural resources or contaminants transport through subsurface systems. In recent years, interest has grown in investigating heat transport by means of tracer tests, driven by the important current development of geothermal applications. In literature different methods are available for predicting thermal breakthrough in fractured reservoirs based on the information coming from tracer tests. Geothermal energy is one of the largest sources of renewable energies that are extracted from the earth. The growing interest in this new energy source has stimulated attempts to develop methods and technologies for extracting energy also from ground resource at low temperature. An example is the exploitation of low enthalpy geothermal energy that can be obtained at any place with the aid of ground-source heat pump system from the soil, rock and groundwater. In such geothermal systems the fluid movement and thermal behavior in the fractured porous media is very important and critical. Existing theory of fluid flow and heat transport through porous media is of limited usefulness when applied to fractured rocks. Many field and laboratory tracer tests in fractured media show that fracture -matrix exchange is more significant for heat than mass tracers, thus thermal breakthrough curves (BTCs) are strongly controlled by matrix thermal diffusivity. In this study the behaviour of heat transport in a fractured network at bench scale has been investigated. Heat tracer tests on an artificially created fractured rock sample have been carried out. The observed thermal BTCs obtained with six thermocouple probes located at different locations in the fractured medium have been modeled with the Explicit Network Model (ENM) based an adaptation of Tang's solution for solute transport in a semi-infinite single fracture embedded in a porous matrix. The ENM model is able to represent the behavior of observed heat transport except where the

  14. Heat transport model within the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzadri, Alessandra; Tonina, Daniele; Bellin, Alberto

    2010-05-01

    Temperature is a key quantity in controlling water quality, aquatic habitats and the distribution of aquatic invertebrates within the hyporheic zone. Despite its importance in all processes (e.g., biogeochemical reactions and organism metabolism, growth, movement and migration) occurring within the streambed sediment, only few experimental and numerical works analyzed temperature distribution within the hyporheic zone, while little is known on the control that river morphology exerts on temperature dynamics. In the present work, we analyze the effects of river morphology on the thermal regime of the hyporheic zone from a modelling perspective. Our goal is to identify the dominant processes that affect the hyporheic thermal regime and gradients, which influence the rates of microbial and biogeochemical processes. With this objective in mind, we developed a simplified process-based model, which predicts the temperature pattern within the streambed sediment taking into account the external forcing due to the daily temperature variations of the in-stream water and the hyporheic exchange due to streambed morphology. To simplify the analysis the hydraulic conductivity of the streambed sediment is assumed homogeneous and isotropic, and the hyporheic velocity field is obtained analytically by solving the flow equation with the near-bed piezometric head of the stream flow as the linkage between surface and subsurface flows. Furthermore, we solved the heat transport equation with a Lagrangian approach and by neglecting transverse dispersivity. Our model results show a complex near-bed hyporheic temperature distributions, which vary temporally and are strongly related to the in-stream water residence time into the hyporheic zone and consequently to the bed morphology and flow discharge. We compared the temperature dynamics within the hyporheic zone of both large low-gradient and small steep streams to investigate the effect of stream morphology. Results show that the

  15. An Overview of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transport Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2010-01-01

    Liquid fluoride salts are a leading candidate heat transport medium for high-temperature applications. This report provides an overview of the current status of liquid salt heat transport technology. The report includes a high-level, parametric evaluation of liquid fluoride salt heat transport loop performance to allow intercomparisons between heat-transport fluid options as well as providing an overview of the properties and requirements for a representative loop. Much of the information presented here derives from the earlier molten salt reactor program and a significant advantage of fluoride salts, as high temperature heat transport media is their consequent relative technological maturity. The report also includes a compilation of relevant thermophysical properties of useful heat transport fluoride salts. Fluoride salts are both thermally stable and with proper chemistry control can be relatively chemically inert. Fluoride salts can, however, be highly corrosive depending on the container materials selected, the salt chemistry, and the operating procedures used. The report also provides an overview of the state-of-the-art in reduction-oxidation chemistry control methodologies employed to minimize salt corrosion as well as providing a general discussion of heat transfer loop operational issues such as start-up procedures and freeze-up vulnerability.

  16. Heat generation and transport in the heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beek, Johannes H. G. M.

    1996-05-01

    During contraction of the heart, a large part of the energy in energy metabolism is converted to heat. The article presents the results of measurements of mechanical stresses in the myocardium and blood vessels, temperatures and rate of heat generation. Experimental data correlate well with the numerical solutions of the biothermal problem.

  17. SEAWAT-based simulation of axisymmetric heat transport.

    PubMed

    Vandenbohede, Alexander; Louwyck, Andy; Vlamynck, Nele

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of heat transport has its applications in geothermal exploitation of aquifers and the analysis of temperature dependent chemical reactions. Under homogeneous conditions and in the absence of a regional hydraulic gradient, groundwater flow and heat transport from or to a well exhibit radial symmetry, and governing equations are reduced by one dimension (1D) which increases computational efficiency importantly. Solute transport codes can simulate heat transport and input parameters may be modified such that the Cartesian geometry can handle radial flow. In this article, SEAWAT is evaluated as simulator for heat transport under radial flow conditions. The 1971, 1D analytical solution of Gelhar and Collins is used to compare axisymmetric transport with retardation (i.e., as a result of thermal equilibrium between fluid and solid) and a large diffusion (conduction). It is shown that an axisymmetric simulation compares well with a fully three dimensional (3D) simulation of an aquifer thermal energy storage systems. The influence of grid discretization, solver parameters, and advection solution is illustrated. Because of the high diffusion to simulate conduction, convergence criterion for heat transport must be set much smaller (10(-10) ) than for solute transport (10(-6) ). Grid discretization should be considered carefully, in particular the subdivision of the screen interval. On the other hand, different methods to calculate the pumping or injection rate distribution over different nodes of a multilayer well lead to small differences only. PMID:24571415

  18. Meridional heat transport at the onset of winter stratospheric warming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conte, M.

    1981-01-01

    A continuous vertical flow of energy toward high altitude was verified. This process produced a dynamic instability of the stratospheric polar vortex. A meridional heat transport ws primed toward the north, which generated a warming trend.

  19. Total heat transport data for plastic honeycomb-type structures

    SciTech Connect

    Platzer, W.J. )

    1992-11-01

    The total heat transport within honeycomb-type structures consists mainly of radiation and conduction heat transport, as convection is usually suppressed. For surface emissivities larger than 0.7, independent mode analysis may be used, and a splitting of the measured total heat transport into parts is possible. Only a few parameters used in simple modeling equations are needed to describe the heat transport in this approximation. They have been obtained by fitting the functions to experimental results and are presented in tabular form for 11 different materials. The thickness and temperature dependence is included in the results. The presented data may be used as input parameters either for simple calculations in an independent mode analysis (IMA) or for a dependent mode analysis (DMA). Thus even selective flat-plate honeycomb collectors may be modeled reliably.

  20. Thaw flow control for liquid heat transport systems

    DOEpatents

    Kirpich, Aaron S.

    1989-01-01

    In a liquid metal heat transport system including a source of thaw heat for use in a space reactor power system, the thaw flow throttle or control comprises a fluid passage having forward and reverse flow sections and a partition having a plurality of bleed holes therein to enable fluid flow between the forward and reverse sections. The flow throttle is positioned in the system relatively far from the source of thaw heat.

  1. ONE MILLION GALLON WATER TANK, PUMP HEADER PIPE (AT LEFT), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ONE MILLION GALLON WATER TANK, PUMP HEADER PIPE (AT LEFT), HEADER BYPASS PIPE (AT RIGHT), AND PUMPHOUSE FOUNDATIONS. Looking northeast - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Flame Deflector Water System, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  2. An Overview of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transport Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Eugene; Cetiner, Sacit M

    2010-09-01

    Heat transport is central to all thermal-based forms of electricity generation. The ever increasing demand for higher thermal efficiency necessitates power generation cycles transitioning to progressively higher temperatures. Similarly, the desire to provide direct thermal coupling between heat sources and higher temperature chemical processes provides the underlying incentive to move toward higher temperature heat transfer loops. As the system temperature rises, the available materials and technology choices become progressively more limited. Superficially, fluoride salts at {approx}700 C resemble water at room temperature being optically transparent and having similar heat capacity, roughly three times the viscosity, and about twice the density. Fluoride salts are a leading candidate heat-transport material at high temperatures. Fluoride salts have been extensively used in specialized industrial processes for decades, yet they have not entered widespread deployment for general heat transport purposes. This report does not provide an exhaustive screening of potential heat transfer media and other high temperature liquids such as alkali metal carbonate eutectics or chloride salts may have economic or technological advantages. A particular advantage of fluoride salts is that the technology for their use is relatively mature as they were extensively studied during the 1940s-1970s as part of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's program to develop molten salt reactors (MSRs). However, the instrumentation, components, and practices for use of fluoride salts are not yet developed sufficiently for commercial implementation. This report provides an overview of the current understanding of the technologies involved in liquid salt heat transport (LSHT) along with providing references to the more detailed primary information resources. Much of the information presented here derives from the earlier MSR program. However, technology has evolved over the intervening years, and

  3. An oceanic heat transport pathway to the Amundsen Sea Embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Angelica R.; Mazloff, Matthew R.; Gille, Sarah T.

    2016-05-01

    The Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE) on the West Antarctic coastline has been identified as a region of accelerated glacial melting. A Southern Ocean State Estimate (SOSE) is analyzed over the 2005-2010 time period in the Amundsen Sea region. The SOSE oceanic heat budget reveals that the contribution of parameterized small-scale mixing to the heat content of the ASE waters is small compared to advection and local air-sea heat flux, both of which contribute significantly to the heat content of the ASE waters. Above the permanent pycnocline, the local air-sea flux dominates the heat budget and is controlled by seasonal changes in sea ice coverage. Overall, between 2005 and 2010, the model shows a net heating in the surface above the pycnocline within the ASE. Sea water below the permanent pycnocline is isolated from the influence of air-sea heat fluxes, and thus, the divergence of heat advection is the major contributor to increased oceanic heat content of these waters. Oceanic transport of mass and heat into the ASE is dominated by the cross-shelf input and is primarily geostrophic below the permanent pycnocline. Diagnosis of the time-mean SOSE vorticity budget along the continental shelf slope indicates that the cross-shelf transport is sustained by vorticity input from the localized wind-stress curl over the shelf break.

  4. Helicity and transport in electron MHD heat pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R.L.; Urrutia, J.M.

    1996-02-01

    Electrons are heated locally and temporally in a uniform magnetoplasma by applying a short current pulse to a loop antenna. The resultant heat pulse, satisfying electron MHD conditions ({omega}{sub {ital ce}}{sup {minus}1}{lt}{Delta}{ital t}{lt}{omega}{sub {ital ci}}{sup {minus}1}), generates helicity due to twisting of field lines by diamagnetic drifts. Heat convection and diffusion cool the pulse, which reduces its propagation to zero. The stationary temperature profile decays by cross-field transport conserving volume-integrated heat. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  5. Heat transport measurements in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-Benard convection

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Robert E; Liu, Yuanming

    2008-01-01

    We present experimental heat transport measurements of turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection with rotation about a vertical axis. The fluid, water with Prandtl number ({sigma}) about 6, was confined in a cell which had a square cross section of 7.3 cm x 7.3 cm and a height of 9.4 cm. Heat transport was measured for Rayleigh numbers 2 x 10{sup 5} < Ra < 5 x 10{sup 8} and Taylor numbers 0 < Ta < 5 x 10{sup 9}. We show the variation of normalized heat transport, the Nusselt number, at fixed dimensional rotation rate {Omega}{sub D}, at fixed Ra varying Ta, at fixed Ta varying Ra, and at fixed Rossby number Ro. The scaling of heat transport in the range 10{sup 7} to about 10{sup 9} is roughly 0.29 with a Ro dependent coefficient or equivalently is also well fit by a combination of power laws of the form a Ra{sup 1/5} + b Ra{sup 1/3} . The range of Ra is not sufficient to differentiate single power law or combined power law scaling. The overall impact of rotation on heat transport in turbulent convection is assessed.

  6. The Importance of Planetary Rotation Period for Ocean Heat Transport

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, D.; Joshi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The climate and, hence, potential habitability of a planet crucially depends on how its atmospheric and ocean circulation transports heat from warmer to cooler regions. However, previous studies of planetary climate have concentrated on modeling the dynamics of atmospheres, while dramatically simplifying the treatment of oceans, which neglects or misrepresents the effect of the ocean in the total heat transport. Even the majority of studies with a dynamic ocean have used a simple so-called aquaplanet that has no continental barriers, which is a configuration that dramatically changes the ocean dynamics. Here, the significance of the response of poleward ocean heat transport to planetary rotation period is shown with a simple meridional barrier—the simplest representation of any continental configuration. The poleward ocean heat transport increases significantly as the planetary rotation period is increased. The peak heat transport more than doubles when the rotation period is increased by a factor of ten. There are also significant changes to ocean temperature at depth, with implications for the carbon cycle. There is strong agreement between the model results and a scale analysis of the governing equations. This result highlights the importance of both planetary rotation period and the ocean circulation when considering planetary habitability. Key Words: Exoplanet—Oceans—Rotation—Climate—Habitability. Astrobiology 14, 645–650. PMID:25041658

  7. The importance of planetary rotation period for ocean heat transport.

    PubMed

    Cullum, J; Stevens, D; Joshi, M

    2014-08-01

    The climate and, hence, potential habitability of a planet crucially depends on how its atmospheric and ocean circulation transports heat from warmer to cooler regions. However, previous studies of planetary climate have concentrated on modeling the dynamics of atmospheres, while dramatically simplifying the treatment of oceans, which neglects or misrepresents the effect of the ocean in the total heat transport. Even the majority of studies with a dynamic ocean have used a simple so-called aquaplanet that has no continental barriers, which is a configuration that dramatically changes the ocean dynamics. Here, the significance of the response of poleward ocean heat transport to planetary rotation period is shown with a simple meridional barrier--the simplest representation of any continental configuration. The poleward ocean heat transport increases significantly as the planetary rotation period is increased. The peak heat transport more than doubles when the rotation period is increased by a factor of ten. There are also significant changes to ocean temperature at depth, with implications for the carbon cycle. There is strong agreement between the model results and a scale analysis of the governing equations. This result highlights the importance of both planetary rotation period and the ocean circulation when considering planetary habitability. PMID:25041658

  8. The impact of oceanic heat transport on the atmospheric circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knietzsch, M.-A.; Schröder, A.; Lucarini, V.; Lunkeit, F.

    2015-09-01

    A general circulation model of intermediate complexity with an idealized Earth-like aquaplanet setup is used to study the impact of changes in the oceanic heat transport on the global atmospheric circulation. Focus is on the atmospheric mean meridional circulation and global thermodynamic properties. The atmosphere counterbalances to a large extent the imposed changes in the oceanic heat transport, but, nonetheless, significant modifications to the atmospheric general circulation are found. Increasing the strength of the oceanic heat transport up to 2.5 PW leads to an increase in the global mean near-surface temperature and to a decrease in its equator-to-pole gradient. For stronger transports, the gradient is reduced further, but the global mean remains approximately constant. This is linked to a cooling and a reversal of the temperature gradient in the tropics. Additionally, a stronger oceanic heat transport leads to a decline in the intensity and a poleward shift of the maxima of both the Hadley and Ferrel cells. Changes in zonal mean diabatic heating and friction impact the properties of the Hadley cell, while the behavior of the Ferrel cell is mostly controlled by friction. The efficiency of the climate machine, the intensity of the Lorenz energy cycle and the material entropy production of the system decline with increased oceanic heat transport. This suggests that the climate system becomes less efficient and turns into a state of reduced entropy production as the enhanced oceanic transport performs a stronger large-scale mixing between geophysical fluids with different temperatures, thus reducing the available energy in the climate system and bringing it closer to a state of thermal equilibrium.

  9. Heat transport in bubbling turbulent convection.

    PubMed

    Lakkaraju, Rajaram; Stevens, Richard J A M; Oresta, Paolo; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2013-06-01

    Boiling is an extremely effective way to promote heat transfer from a hot surface to a liquid due to numerous mechanisms, many of which are not understood in quantitative detail. An important component of the overall process is that the buoyancy of the bubble compounds with that of the liquid to give rise to a much-enhanced natural convection. In this article, we focus specifically on this enhancement and present a numerical study of the resulting two-phase Rayleigh-Bénard convection process in a cylindrical cell with a diameter equal to its height. We make no attempt to model other aspects of the boiling process such as bubble nucleation and detachment. The cell base and top are held at temperatures above and below the boiling point of the liquid, respectively. By keeping this difference constant, we study the effect of the liquid superheat in a Rayleigh number range that, in the absence of boiling, would be between 2 × 10(6) and 5 × 10(9). We find a considerable enhancement of the heat transfer and study its dependence on the number of bubbles, the degree of superheat of the hot cell bottom, and the Rayleigh number. The increased buoyancy provided by the bubbles leads to more energetic hot plumes detaching from the cell bottom, and the strength of the circulation in the cell is significantly increased. Our results are in general agreement with recent experiments on boiling Rayleigh-Bénard convection. PMID:23696657

  10. Freshwater and heat transports from global ocean synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivieso, M.; Haines, K.; Zuo, H.; Lea, D.

    2014-01-01

    An eddy-permitting ¼° global ocean reanalysis based on the Operational Met Office FOAM data assimilation system has been run for 1989-2010 forced by ERA-Interim meteorology. Freshwater and heat transports are compared with published estimates globally and in each basin, with special focus on the Atlantic. The meridional transports agree with observations within errors at most locations, but where eddies are active the transports by the mean flow are nearly always in better agreement than the total transports. Eddy transports are down gradient and are enhanced relative to a free run. They may oppose or reinforce mean transports and provide 40-50% of the total transport near midlatitude fronts, where eddies with time scales <1 month provide up to 15%. Basin-scale freshwater convergences are calculated with the Arctic/Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific oceans north of 32°S, all implying net evaporation of 0.33 ± 0.04 Sv, 0.65 ± 0.07 Sv, and 0.09 ± 0.04 Sv, respectively, within the uncertainty of observations in the Atlantic and Pacific. The Indian is more evaporative and the Southern Ocean has more precipitation (1.07 Sv). Air-sea fluxes are modified by assimilation influencing turbulent heat fluxes and evaporation. Generally, surface and assimilation fluxes together match the meridional transports, indicating that the reanalysis is close to a steady state. Atlantic overturning and gyre transports are assessed with overturning freshwater transports southward at all latitudes. At 26°N eddy transports are negligible, overturning transport is 0.67 ± 0.19 Sv southward and gyre transport is 0.44 ± 0.17 Sv northward, with divergence between 26°N and the Bering Strait of 0.13 ± 0.23 Sv over 2004-2010.

  11. Dual-Byte-Marker Algorithm for Detecting JFIF Header

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad, Kamaruddin Malik; Herawan, Tutut; Deris, Mustafa Mat

    The use of efficient algorithm to detect JPEG file is vital to reduce time taken for analyzing ever increasing data in hard drive or physical memory. In the previous paper, single-byte-marker algorithm is proposed for header detection. In this paper, another novel header detection algorithm called dual-byte-marker is proposed. Based on the experiments done on images from hard disk, physical memory and data set from DFRWS 2006 Challenge, results showed that dual-byte-marker algorithm gives better performance with better execution time for header detection as compared to single-byte-marker.

  12. High thermal-transport capacity heat pipes for space radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Albert W.; Gustafson, Eric; Roukis, Susan L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the results of performance tests of several dual-slot heat pipe test articles. The dual-slot configuration has a very high thermal transport capability and has been identified as a very promising candidate for the radiator system for the NASA Space Station solar dynamic power modules. Two six-foot long aluminum heat pipes were built and tested with ammonia and acetone. A 20-ft long heat pipe was also built and tested with ammonia. The test results have been compared with performance predictions. A thermal transport capacity of 2000 W at an adverse tilt of 1 in. and a 1000 W capacity at an adverse tilt of 2 in. were achieved on the 20-ft long heat pipe. These values are in close agreement with the predicted performance limits.

  13. Nonlocal heat transport in a stochastic magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Rax, J.M.; White, R.B.

    1991-12-01

    Heat transport in a stochastic magnetic field configuration is shown to be nonlocal. Collisional transport processes, in such a disordered media, cannot always be reduced to a standard diffusion process, and the concept of a diffusion coefficient is meaningless for a wide range of typical tokamak parameters. In the nonlocal regime the relaxation of a gradient is described by an integral equation, involving a nonlocal propagator. This propagator is calculated, and the relation to previous results is elucidated. 15 refs.

  14. Miniature Heat Transport System for Spacecraft Thermal Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochterbeck, Jay M.; Ku, Jentung (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Loop heat pipes (LHP) are efficient devices for heat transfer and use the basic principle of a closed evaporation-condensation cycle. The advantage of using a loop heat pipe over other conventional methods is that large quantities of heat can be transported through a small cross-sectional area over a considerable distance with no additional power input to the system. By using LHPs, it seems possible to meet the growing demand for high-power cooling devices. Although they are somewhat similar to conventional heat pipes, LHPs have a whole set of unique properties, such as low pressure drops and flexible lines between condenser and evaporator, that make them rather promising. LHPs are capable of providing a means of transporting heat over long distances with no input power other than the heat being transported because of the specially designed evaporator and the separation of liquid and vapor lines. For LHP design and fabrication, preliminary analysis on the basis of dimensionless criteria is necessary because of certain complicated phenomena that take place in the heat pipe. Modeling the performance of the LHP and miniaturizing its size are tasks and objectives of current research. In the course of h s work, the LHP and its components, including the evaporator (the most critical and complex part of the LHP), were modeled with the corresponding dimensionless groups also being investigated. Next, analysis of heat and mass transfer processes in the LHP, selection of the most weighted criteria from known dimensionless groups (thermal-fluid sciences), heat transfer rate limits, (heat pipe theory), and experimental ratios which are unique to a given heat pipe class are discussed. In the third part of the report, two-phase flow heat and mass transfer performances inside the LHP condenser are analyzed and calculated for Earth-normal gravity and microgravity conditions. On the basis of recent models and experimental databanks, an analysis for condensing two-phase flow regimes

  15. Heat transport in the Hadean mantle: From heat pipes to plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankanamge, Duminda G. J.; Moore, William B.

    2016-04-01

    Plate tectonics is a unique feature of Earth, and it plays a dominant role in transporting Earth's internally generated heat. It also governs the nature, shape, and the motion of the surface of Earth. The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth has been difficult to establish observationally, and modeling of the plate breaking process has not consistently accounted for the nature of the preplate tectonic Earth. We have performed numerical simulations of heat transport in the preplate tectonic Earth to understand the transition to plate tectonic behavior. This period of time is dominated by volcanic heat transport called the heat pipe mode of planetary cooling. These simulations of Earth's mantle include heat transport by melting and melt segregation (volcanism), Newtonian temperature-dependent viscosity, and internal heating. We show that when heat pipes are active, the lithosphere thickens and lithospheric isotherms are kept flat by the solidus. Both of these effects act to suppress plate tectonics. As volcanism wanes, conduction begins to control lithospheric thickness, and large slopes arise at the base of the lithosphere. This produces large lithospheric stress and focuses it on the thinner regions of the lithosphere resulting in plate breaking events.

  16. Heat pipe heat transport system for the Stirling Space Power Converter (SSPC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, Donald L.

    1992-01-01

    Life issues relating to a sodium heat pipe heat transport system are described. The heat pipe system provides heat, at a temperature of 1050 K, to a 50 kWe Stirling engine/linear alternator power converter called the Stirling Space Power Converter (SSPC). The converter is being developed under a National Aeronautics and Space Administration program. Since corrosion of heat pipe materials in contact with sodium can impact the life of the heat pipe, a literature review of sodium corrosion processes was performed. It was found that the impurity reactions, primarily oxygen, and dissolution of alloy elements were the two corrosion process likely to be operative in the heat pipe. Approaches that are being taken to minimize these corrosion processes are discussed.

  17. 111. AIR CONDENSATE PUMP. NOTE MAIN DISCHARGE HEADER ABOVE STEAMEND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    111. AIR CONDENSATE PUMP. NOTE MAIN DISCHARGE HEADER ABOVE STEAM-END CYLINDER. NOTE ALSO, THE 30' DISCHARGE VALVE AND ACTUATER TO THE LEFT OF THE PUMP. - Lakeview Pumping Station, Clarendon & Montrose Avenues, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  18. Fundamental Limits in Combine Harvester Header Height Control.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangmin; Alleyne, Andrew G; Greer, Ashley; Deneault, Dustin

    2013-05-01

    This paper investigates fundamental performance limitations in the control of a combine harvester's header height control system. There are two primary subsystem characteristics that influence the achievable bandwidth by affecting the open loop transfer function. The first subsystem is the mechanical configuration of the combine and header while the second subsystem is the electrohydraulic actuation for the header. The mechanical combine + header subsystem results in an input-output representation that is underactuated and has a noncollocated sensor/actuator pair. The electrohydraulic subsystem introduces a significant time delay. In combination, they each reinforce the effect of the other thereby exacerbating the overall system limitation of the closed loop bandwidth. Experimental results are provided to validate the model and existence of the closed loop bandwidth limitations that stem from specific system design configurations. PMID:23904647

  19. Detail of second floor window with splayed brick header, east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of second floor window with splayed brick header, east elevation; camera facing west. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Rubber Shop, California Avenue, west side across from Dry Dock 1 near Ninth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  20. Phonon hydrodynamics and its applications in nanoscale heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yangyu; Wang, Moran

    2015-09-01

    Phonon hydrodynamics is an effective macroscopic method to study heat transport in dielectric solid and semiconductor. It has a clear and intuitive physical picture, transforming the abstract and ambiguous heat transport process into a concrete and evident process of phonon gas flow. Furthermore, with the aid of the abundant models and methods developed in classical hydrodynamics, phonon hydrodynamics becomes much easier to implement in comparison to the current popular approaches based on the first-principle method and kinetic theories involving complicated computations. Therefore, it is a promising tool for studying micro- and nanoscale heat transport in rapidly developing micro and nano science and technology. However, there still lacks a comprehensive account of the theoretical foundations, development and implementation of this approach. This work represents such an attempt in providing a full landscape, from physical fundamental and kinetic theory of phonons to phonon hydrodynamics in view of descriptions of phonon systems at microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic levels. Thus a systematical kinetic framework, summing up so far scattered theoretical models and methods in phonon hydrodynamics as individual cases, is established through a frame of a Chapman-Enskog solution to phonon Boltzmann equation. Then the basic tenets and procedures in implementing phonon hydrodynamics in nanoscale heat transport are presented through a review of its recent wide applications in modeling thermal transport properties of nanostructures. Finally, we discuss some pending questions and perspectives highlighted by a novel concept of generalized phonon hydrodynamics and possible applications in micro/nano phononics, which will shed more light on more profound understanding and credible applications of this new approach in micro- and nanoscale heat transport science.

  1. Effect of nanofluid on the heat transport capability in an oscillating heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, H. B.; Wilson, C.; Borgmeyer, B.; Park, K.; Yu, Q.; Choi, S. U. S.; Tirumala, Murli

    2006-04-01

    By combining nanofluids with thermally excited oscillating motion in an oscillating heat pipe (OHP), we developed an ultrahigh-performance cooling device, called the nanofluid oscillating heat pipe. Experimental results show that when the OHP is charged with nanofluid, heat transport capability significantly increases. For example, at the input power of 80.0W, diamond nanofluid can reduce the temperature difference between the evaporator and the condenser from 40.9to24.3°C. This study will accelerate the development of a highly efficient cooling device for ultrahigh-heat-flux electronic systems.

  2. Modeling for Convective Heat Transport Based on Mixing Length Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Y.; Yanagisawa, T.

    2002-12-01

    Convection is the most important mechanism for the Earth's internal dynamics, and plays a substantial role on its evolution. On investigating the thermal history of the Earth, convective heat transport should be taken into account. However, it is difficult to treat full convective flow throughout the Earth's entire history. Therefore, the parameterized convection has been developed and widely used. Convection occurring in the Earth's interior has some complicated aspects. It has large variation of viscosity, internal heating, phase boundaries, etc. Especially, the viscosity contrast has significant effect on the efficiency of the heat transport of the convection. The parameterized convection treats viscosity variation artificially, so it has many limitations. We developed an alternative method based on the concept of "mixing length theory". We can relate local thermal gradient with local convective velocity of fluid parcel. Convective heat transport is identified with effective thermal diffusivity, and we can calculate horizontally averaged temperature profile and heat flux by solving a thermal conduction problem. On estimating the parcel's velocity, we can include such as the effect of variable viscosity. In this study, we confirm that the temperature profile can be calculated correctly by this method, on comparing the experimental and 2D calculation results. We further show the effect of the viscosity contrast on the thermal structure of the convective fluid, and calculate the relationship between Nusselt number and modified Rayleigh number.

  3. Studies of local electron heat transport on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E.D.; Chang, Z.Y.; Janos, A.; McGuire, K.M.; Scott, S.; Taylor, G.

    1993-08-16

    The anomalously fast relaxation of the perturbations to the electron temperature profile caused by a sawtooth crash has been studied extensively on TFTR. We will show that on a short timescale the heat pulse is not simply diffusive as has been generally assumed, but that modeling of the heat pulse requires a transient enhancement in {chi}{sub e} following the sawtooth crash. It will be shown that the time-dependent enhancement in {chi}{sub e} predicted by non-linear thermal transport models, i.e., incremental {chi} models or the Rebut-Lallia-Watkins transport model, is much smaller than that required to explain the anomalies in the heat pulse propagation.

  4. Conservative bounds on heat transport in turbulent convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittenberg, Ralf; Whitehead, Jared

    2012-11-01

    The scaling dependence of the Nusselt number measuring heat transport in turbulent convection with the driving force remains incompletely understood, despite considerable effort in experiment, direct numerical simulation and theory. Variational upper bounds derived systematically from the governing partial differential equations provide a constraint on the possible scaling behaviors. We survey conservative analytical bounds on turbulent heat transport derived via the background flow method, both those obtained rigorously and semi-optimal upper bounds computed by numerical solution of the variational problem over a restricted class of backgrounds. We consider a range of scenarios, including the effects of plate conductivity, velocity boundary conditions and/or infinite Prandtl number in Rayleigh-Bénard convection, as well as related problems such as internal-heating-driven and porous medium convection.

  5. Changes in ocean vertical heat transport with global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zika, Jan D.; Laliberté, Frédéric; Mudryk, Lawrence R.; Sijp, Willem P.; Nurser, A. J. G.

    2015-06-01

    Heat transport between the surface and deep ocean strongly influences transient climate change. Mechanisms setting this transport are investigated using coupled climate models and by projecting ocean circulation into the temperature-depth diagram. In this diagram, a "cold cell" cools the deep ocean through the downwelling of Antarctic waters and upwelling of warmer waters and is balanced by warming due to a "warm cell," coincident with the interhemispheric overturning and previously linked to wind and haline forcing. With anthropogenic warming, the cold cell collapses while the warm cell continues to warm the deep ocean. Simulations with increasingly strong warm cells, set by their mean Southern Hemisphere winds, exhibit increasing deep-ocean warming in response to the same anthropogenic forcing. It is argued that the partition between components of the circulation which cool and warm the deep ocean in the preindustrial climate is a key determinant of ocean vertical heat transport with global warming.

  6. Nanoscale mechanisms for the reduction of heat transport in bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, Maxime; Sjakste, Jelena; Fugallo, Giorgia; Paulatto, Lorenzo; Lazzeri, Michele; Mauri, Francesco; Vast, Nathalie

    2016-02-01

    Hand-on routes to reduce lattice thermal conductivity (LTC) in bismuth have been explored by employing a combination of Boltzmann's transport equation and ab initio calculations of phonon-phonon interaction within the density functional perturbation theory. We have first obtained the temperature dependence of the bulk LTC in excellent agreement with available experiments. A very accurate microscopic description of heat transport has been achieved and the electronic contribution to thermal conductivity has been determined. By controlling the interplay between phonon-phonon interaction and phonon scattering by sample boundaries, we predict the effect of size reduction for various temperatures and nanostructure shapes. The largest heat transport reduction is obtained in polycrystals with grain sizes smaller than 100 nm.

  7. Thermodynamic description of heat and spin transport in magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravier, Laurent; Serrano-Guisan, Santiago; Reuse, François; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Spin-dependent heat and charge transport perpendicular to the plane of magnetic Co/Cu multilayers was studied experimentally and interpreted in the framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. The thermogalvanic voltage(TGV) is introduced. It measures the ac voltage response to a small temperature oscillation while a dc current is driven through the sample. TGV presents a magnetic response (MTGV) of 50%, much larger than magnetoresistance (GMR) and the magneto-thermoelectrical power (MTEP). The linear equations for transport of heat, charge, and spin-polarized currents in magnetic and nonmagnetic mediums are applied to a multilayer structure. The role of spin mixing in GMR, MTEP, and MTGV is shown. In particular, the asymmetry of the spin-mixing gives rise to spin-dependent effective Peltier coefficients. The three measurements can be accounted for with two parameters expressing the spin dependence of the transport coefficients.

  8. Effects of nonlocal heat transport on laser implosion

    SciTech Connect

    Mima, K.; Honda, M.; Miyamoto, S.; Kato, S.

    1996-05-01

    A numerical simulation code describing the spherically symmetric implosion hydrodynamics has been developed to investigate the nonlocal heat transport effects on stable high velocity implosion and fast ignition. In the implosion simulation code HIMICO, the Fokker Planck equation for electron transport is solved to describe the nonlocal effects. For high ablation pressure implosion with a pressure higher than 200 Mbar, the isentrope is found higher by a factor 2 in the nonlocal transport model than in the Spitzer Harm model. As for the fast ignition simulation, the neutron yield for the high density compression with 10 KJ laser increases to be 20 times by injecting an additional heating pulse of 10 KJ with 1 psec. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Coupling of volatile transport and internal heat flow on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert H.; Kirk, Randolph L.

    1994-01-01

    Recently Brown et al. (1991) showed that Triton's internal heat source could amount to 5-20% of the absorbed insolation on Triton, thus significantly affecting volatile transport and atmospheric pressure. Subsequently, Kirk and Brown (1991a) used simple analytical models of the effect of internal heat on the distribution of volatiles on Triton's surface, confirming the speculation of Brown et al. that Triton's internal heat flow could strongly couple to the surface volatile distribution. To further explore this idea, we present numerical models of the permanent distribution of nitrogen ice on Triton that include the effects of sunlight, the two-dimensional distribution of internal heat flow, the coupling of internal heat flow to the surface distribution of nitrogen ice, and the finite viscosity of nitrogen ice. From these models we conclude that: (1) The strong vertical thermal gradient induced in Triton's polar caps by internal heat-flow facilitates viscous spreading to lower latitudes, thus opposing the poleward transport of volatiles by sunlight, and, for plausible viscosities and nitrogen inventories, producing permanent caps of considerable latitudinal extent; (2) It is probable that there is a strong coupling between the surface distribution of nitrogen ice on Triton and internal heat flow; (3) Asymmetries in the spatial distribution of Triton's heat flow, possibly driven by large-scale, volcanic activity or convection in Triton's interior, can result in permanent polar caps of unequal latitudinal extent, including the case of only one permanent polar cap; (4) Melting at the base of a permanent polar cap on Triton caused by internal heat flow can significantly enhance viscous spreading, and, as an alternative to the solid-state greenhouse mechanism proposed by Brown et al. (1990), could provide the necessary energy, fluids, and/or gases to drive Triton's geyser-like plumes; (5) The atmospheric collapse predicted to occur on Triton in the next 20 years

  10. Advanced simulation of electron heat transport in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhihong; Xiao, Y.; Klasky, Scott A; Lofstead, J.

    2009-01-01

    Electron transport in burning plasmas is more important since fusion products first heat electrons. First-principles simulations of electron turbulence are much more challenging due to the multi-scale dynamics of the electron turbulence, and have been made possible by close collaborations between plasma physicists and computational scientists. The GTC simulations of collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM) turbulence show that the electron heat transport exhibits a gradual transition from Bohm to gyroBohm scaling when the device size is increased. The deviation from the gyroBohm scaling can be induced by large turbulence eddies, turbulence spreading, and non-diffusive transport processes. Analysis of radial correlation function shows that CTEM turbulence eddies are predominantly microscopic but with a significant tail in the mesoscale. A comprehensive analysis of kinetic and fluid time scales shows that zonal flow shearing is the dominant decorrelation mechanism. The mesoscale eddies result from a dynamical process of linear streamers breaking by zonal flows and merging of microscopic eddies. The radial profile of the electron heat conductivity only follows the profile of fluctuation intensity on a global scale, whereas the ion transport tracks more sensitively the local fluctuation intensity. This suggests the existence of a nondiffusive component in the electron heat flux, which arises from the ballistic radial E x B drift of trapped electrons due to a combination of the presence of mesoscale eddies and the weak de-tuning of the toroidal precessional resonance that drives the CTEM instability. On the other hand, the ion radial excursion is not affected by the mesoscale eddies due to a parallel decorrelation, which is not operational for the trapped electrons because of a bounce averaging process associated with the electron fast motion along magnetic field lines. The presence of the nondiffusive component raises question on the applicability of the usual

  11. Advanced Simulation of Electron Heat Transport in Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.; Xiao, Y.; Holod, I.; Zhang, W. L.; Deng, Wenjun; Klasky, Scott A; Lofstead, J.; Kamath, Chandrika; Wichmann, Nathan

    2009-01-01

    Electron transport in burning plasmas is more important since fusion products first heat electrons. First-principles simulations of electron turbulence are much more challenging due to the multi-scale dynamics of the electron turbulence, and have been made possible by close collaborations between plasma physicists and computational scientists. The GTC simulations of collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM) turbulence show that the electron heat transport exhibits a gradual transition from Bohm to gyroBohm scaling when the device size is increased. The deviation from the gyroBohm scaling can be induced by large turbulence eddies, turbulence spreading, and non-diffusive transport processes. Analysis of radial correlation function shows that CTEM turbulence eddies are predominantly microscopic but with a significant tail in the mesoscale. A comprehensive analysis of kinetic and fluid time scales shows that zonal flow shearing is the dominant decorrelation mechanism. The mesoscale eddies result from a dynamical process of linear streamers breaking by zonal flows and merging of microscopic eddies. The radial profile of the electron heat conductivity only follows the profile of fluctuation intensity on a global scale, whereas the ion transport tracks more sensitively the local fluctuation intensity. This suggests the existence of a nondiffusive component in the electron heat flux, which arises from the ballistic radial E x B drift of trapped electrons due to a combination of the presence of mesoscale eddies and the weak de-tuning of the toroidal precessional resonance that drives the CTEM instability. On the other hand, the ion radial excursion is not affected by the mesoscale eddies due to a parallel decorrelation, which is not operational for the trapped electrons because of a bounce averaging process associated with the electron fast motion along magnetic field lines. The presence of the nondiffusive component raises question on the applicability of the usual

  12. Deployable Heat Pipe Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.

    1975-01-01

    A 1.2- by 1.8-m variable conductance heat pipe radiator was designed, built, and tested. The radiator has deployment capability and can passively control Freon-21 fluid loop temperatures under varying loads and environments. It consists of six grooved variable conductance heat pipes attached to a 0.032-in. aluminum panel. Heat is supplied to the radiator via a fluid header or a single-fluid flexible heat pipe header. The heat pipe header is an artery design that has a flexible section capable of bending up to 90 degrees. Radiator loads as high as 850 watts were successfully tested. Over a load variation of 200 watts, the outlet temperature of the Freon-21 fluid varied by 7 F. An alternate control system was also investigated which used a variable conductance heat pipe header attached to the heat pipe radiator panel.

  13. On mobile element transport in heated Abee. [chondrite thermal metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikramuddin, M.; Lipschutz, M. E.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Abee chondrite samples were heated at 700 C for one week at 0.00001 to 0.001 atm Ne or at 0.00001 atm H2. Samples heated in Ne showed greater loss of Bi and Se and greater retention of Zn than those heated in H2. An inverse relationship between Zn retention and ambient Ne pressure was found. Seven trace elements (Ag, Co, Cs, Ga, In, Te, and Tl) were retained or lost to the same extent regardless of the heating conditions. Variations in the apparent activation energy for C above and below 700 C suggest that diffusive loss from different hosts and/or different mobile transport processes over the temperature range may have been in effect.

  14. A simple Boltzmann transport equation for ballistic to diffusive transient heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maassen, Jesse; Lundstrom, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Developing simplified, but accurate, theoretical approaches to treat heat transport on all length and time scales is needed to further enable scientific insight and technology innovation. Using a simplified form of the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE), originally developed for electron transport, we demonstrate how ballistic phonon effects and finite-velocity propagation are easily and naturally captured. We show how this approach compares well to the phonon BTE, and readily handles a full phonon dispersion and energy-dependent mean-free-path. This study of transient heat transport shows (i) how fundamental temperature jumps at the contacts depend simply on the ballistic thermal resistance, (ii) that phonon transport at early times approach the ballistic limit in samples of any length, and (iii) perceived reductions in heat conduction, when ballistic effects are present, originate from reductions in temperature gradient. Importantly, this framework can be recast exactly as the Cattaneo and hyperbolic heat equations, and we discuss how the key to capturing ballistic heat effects is to use the correct physical boundary conditions.

  15. A simple Boltzmann transport equation for ballistic to diffusive transient heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    Maassen, Jesse Lundstrom, Mark

    2015-04-07

    Developing simplified, but accurate, theoretical approaches to treat heat transport on all length and time scales is needed to further enable scientific insight and technology innovation. Using a simplified form of the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE), originally developed for electron transport, we demonstrate how ballistic phonon effects and finite-velocity propagation are easily and naturally captured. We show how this approach compares well to the phonon BTE, and readily handles a full phonon dispersion and energy-dependent mean-free-path. This study of transient heat transport shows (i) how fundamental temperature jumps at the contacts depend simply on the ballistic thermal resistance, (ii) that phonon transport at early times approach the ballistic limit in samples of any length, and (iii) perceived reductions in heat conduction, when ballistic effects are present, originate from reductions in temperature gradient. Importantly, this framework can be recast exactly as the Cattaneo and hyperbolic heat equations, and we discuss how the key to capturing ballistic heat effects is to use the correct physical boundary conditions.

  16. Radiation Transport through cylindrical foams with heated walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Kevin; MacLaren, Steve; Kallman, Joshua; Heinz, Ken; Hsing, Warren

    2012-10-01

    Radiation transport through low density SiO2 foams has been experimentally studied on the Omega laser. In particular these experiments examined the effects on radiation transport when the boundaries of the SiO2 foam are heated such that energy loss to the boundaries is minimized. The initial density of the SiO2 foams was determined by taking an x-ray radiograph of the foams using a monochromatic Henke source at multiple x-ray energies. The radiation drive used to both study the transport in the SiO2 foam as well as to heat the higher density CRF wall was generated in a laser-heated gold hohlraum using ˜7.5 kJ of the laser energy. The time-dependent spatial profile of the heat wave breaking out of the SiO2 foam was detected with an x-ray streak camera coupled with a soft x-ray transmission grating. The Omega DANTE diagnostic measured the radiation drive in the hohlraum and the Omega VISAR diagnostic monitored the spatial temperature gradient in the foam section of the hohlraum.

  17. Self-pumping solar heating system with geyser pumping action

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, E.L.; Bartera, R.E.

    1984-10-23

    A self-pumping solar heating system having a collector including a multitude of small diameter riser tubes from which heated liquid is pumped into a header by a geyser action. A vapor condenser assures a header pressure conducive to bubble nucleation in the riser tube upper end segments. The level of liquid within the header or its outlet is higher than the liquid level in the riser tubes to produce a gravity imbalance capable of circulating heated liquid past a storage heat exchanger, below the header, and then upwardly through the closed vapor condenser in the header prior to return to a collector inlet manifold. A modified header utilizes an open vapor condenser in vapor communication with the collector header.

  18. HEAT AND WATER TRANSPORT IN A POLYMER ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Partha P

    2010-01-01

    In the present scenario of a global initiative toward a sustainable energy future, the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) has emerged as one of the most promising alternative energy conversion devices for various applications. Despite tremendous progress in recent years, a pivotal performance limitation in the PEFC comes from liquid water transport and the resulting flooding phenomena. Liquid water blocks the open pore space in the electrode and the fibrous diffusion layer leading to hindered oxygen transport. The electrode is also the only component in the entire PEFC sandwich which produces waste heat from the electrochemical reaction. The cathode electrode, being the host to several competing transport mechanisms, plays a crucial role in the overall PEFC performance limitation. In this work, an electrode model is presented in order to elucidate the coupled heat and water transport mechanisms. Two scenarios are specifically considered: (1) conventional, Nafion impregnated, three-phase electrode with the hydrated polymeric membrane phase as the conveyer of protons where local electro-neutrality prevails; and (2) ultra-thin, two-phase, nano-structured electrode without the presence of ionomeric phase where charge accumulation due to electro-statics in the vicinity of the membrane-CL interface becomes important. The electrode model includes a physical description of heat and water balance along with electrochemical performance analysis in order to study the influence of electro-statics/electro-migration and phase change on the PEFC electrode performance.

  19. Linear delta-f simulations of nonlocal electron heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, S.; Valeo, E.; Krommes, J.A.

    2000-01-27

    Nonlocal electron heat transport calculations are carried out by making use of some of the techniques developed previously for extending the delta f method to transport time scale simulations. By considering the relaxation of small amplitude temperature perturbations of a homogeneous Maxwellian background, only the linearized Fokker-Planck equation has to be solved, and direct comparisons can be made with the equivalent, nonlocal hydrodynamic approach. A quasineutrality-conserving algorithm is derived for computing the self-consistent electric fields driving the return currents. In the low-collisionality regime, results illustrate the importance of taking account of nonlocality in both space and time.

  20. Local and nonlocal parallel heat transport in general magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Chacon, Luis

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach for the study of parallel transport in magnetized plasmas is presented. The method avoids numerical pollution issues of grid-based formulations and applies to integrable and chaotic magnetic fields with local or nonlocal parallel closures. In weakly chaotic fields, the method gives the fractal structure of the devil's staircase radial temperature profile. In fully chaotic fields, the temperature exhibits self-similar spatiotemporal evolution with a stretched-exponential scaling function for local closures and an algebraically decaying one for nonlocal closures. It is shown that, for both closures, the effective radial heat transport is incompatible with the quasilinear diffusion model.

  1. Non-local heat transport in static solar coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciaravella, A.; Peres, G.; Serio, S.

    1991-04-01

    The limits of applicability of the Spitzer-Harm thermal conductivity in solar coronal loops is investigated, and it is shown that the ratio of electron mean-free path to temperature scale height in large-scale structures can approach the limits of the Spitzer-Harm theory. A nonlocal formulation of heat transport is used to compute a grid of loop models: the effects of nonlocal transport on the distribution of differential emission measure are particularly important in the coronal part of loops longer than the pressure scale height.

  2. Radiant heat test of Perforated Metal Air Transportable Package (PMATP).

    SciTech Connect

    Gronewald, Patrick James; Oneto, Robert; Mould, John; Pierce, Jim Dwight

    2003-08-01

    A conceptual design for a plutonium air transport package capable of surviving a 'worst case' airplane crash has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). A full-scale prototype, designated as the Perforated Metal Air Transport Package (PMATP) was thermally tested in the SNL Radiant Heat Test Facility. This testing, conducted on an undamaged package, simulated a regulation one-hour aviation fuel pool fire test. Finite element thermal predictions compared well with the test results. The package performed as designed, with peak containment package temperatures less than 80 C after exposure to a one-hour test in a 1000 C environment.

  3. Upper bound for heat transport due to ion temperature gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.; Choi, K.

    1996-12-01

    Turbulent transport due to an ion temperature gradient is studied in the context of a fluid description in slab geometry. An upper bound on the heat transport is obtained through the use of a variational principle. The physical constraint of energy conservation that is included in the principle keeps the bound finite. Additional constraint is needed and employed for the magnetic shear effect to be accounted for. The bounding curve of the heat flux versus the ion temperature gradient, {eta}{sub {ital i}}, is presented along with the profiles of the fluctuations. The bound, after an extrapolation, is argued to be in the neighborhood of what numerical simulation predicts. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Solar coronal loop heating by cross-field wave transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amendt, Peter; Benford, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    Solar coronal arches heated by turbulent ion-cyclotron waves may suffer significant cross-field transport by these waves. Nonlinear processes fix the wave-propagation speed at about a tenth of the ion thermal velocity, which seems sufficient to spread heat from a central core into a large cool surrounding cocoon. Waves heat cocoon ions both through classical ion-electron collisions and by turbulent stochastic ion motions. Plausible cocoon sizes set by wave damping are in roughly kilometers, although the wave-emitting core may be only 100 m wide. Detailed study of nonlinear stabilization and energy-deposition rates predicts that nearby regions can heat to values intermediate between the roughly electron volt foot-point temperatures and the about 100 eV core, which is heated by anomalous Ohmic losses. A volume of 100 times the core volume may be affected. This qualitative result may solve a persistent problem with current-driven coronal heating; that it affects only small volumes and provides no way to produce the extended warm structures perceptible to existing instruments.

  5. Dynamics of heat and mass transport in a quantum insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łącki, Mateusz; Delande, Dominique; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2015-04-01

    The real-time evolution of two pieces of quantum insulators, initially at different temperatures, is studied when they are glued together. Specifically, each subsystem is taken as a Bose-Hubbard model in a Mott insulator state. The process of temperature equilibration via heat transfer is simulated in real time using the minimally entangled typical thermal states algorithm. The analytic theory based on quasiparticle transport is also given.

  6. Climate in the Absence of Ocean Heat Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, B. E. J.

    2015-12-01

    The energy transported by the oceans to mid- and high latitudes is small compared to the atmosphere, yet exerts an outsized influence on the climate. A key reason is the strong interaction between ocean heat transport (OHT) and sea ice extent. I quantify this by comparing a realistic control climate simulation with a slab ocean simulation in which OHT is disabled. Using the state-of-the-art CESM with a realistic present-day continental configuration, I show that the absence of OHT leads to a 23 K global cooling and massive expansion of sea ice to near 30º latitude in both hemisphere. The ice expansion is asymmetric, with greatest extent in the South Pacific and South Indian ocean basins. I discuss implications of this enormous and asymmetric climate change for atmospheric circulation, heat transport, and tropical precipitation. Parameter sensitivity studies show that the simulated climate is far more sensitive to small changes in ice surface albedo in the absence of OHT, with some perturbations sufficient to cause a runaway Snowball Earth glaciation. I conclude that the oceans are responsible for an enormous global warming by mitigating an otherwise very potent sea ice albedo feedback, but that the magnitude of this effect is still rather uncertain. I will also present some ideas on adapting the simple energy balance model to account for the enhanced sensitivity of sea ice to heating from the ocean.

  7. Finite element analysis of heat transport in a hydrothermal zone

    SciTech Connect

    Bixler, N.E.; Carrigan, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Two-phase heat transport in the vicinity of a heated, subsurface zone is important for evaluation of nuclear waste repository design and estimation of geothermal energy recovery, as well as prediction of magma solidification rates. Finite element analyses of steady, two-phase, heat and mass transport have been performed to determine the relative importance of conduction and convection in a permeable medium adjacent to a hot, impermeable, vertical surface. The model includes the effects of liquid flow due to capillarity and buoyancy and vapor flow due to pressure gradients. Change of phase, with its associated latent heat effects, is also modeled. The mechanism of capillarity allows for the presence of two-phase zones, where both liquid and vapor can coexist, which has not been considered in previous investigations. The numerical method employs the standard Galerkin/finite element method, using eight-node, subparametric or isoparametric quadrilateral elements. In order to handle the extreme nonlinearities inherent in two-phase, nonisothermal, porous-flow problems, steady-state results are computed by integrating transients out to a long time (a method that is highly robust).

  8. Distribution of air-water mixtures in parallel vertical channels as an effect of the header geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Marchitto, Annalisa; Fossa, Marco; Guglielmini, Giovanni

    2009-07-15

    Uneven phase distribution in heat exchangers is a cause of severe reductions in thermal performances of refrigeration equipment. To date, no general design rules are available to avoid phase separation in manifolds with several outlet channels, and even predicting the phase and mass distribution in parallel channels is a demanding task. In the present paper, measurements of two-phase air-water distributions are reported with reference to a horizontal header supplying 16 vertical upward channels. The effects of the operating conditions, the header geometry and the inlet port nozzle were investigated in the ranges of liquid and gas superficial velocities of 0.2-1.2 and 1.5-16.5 m/s, respectively. Among the fitting devices used, the insertion of a co-axial, multi-hole distributor inside the header confirmed the possibility of greatly improving the liquid and gas flow distribution by the proper selection of position, diameter and number of the flow openings between the supplying distributor and the system of parallel channels connected to the header. (author)

  9. Effects of anomalous transport on lower hybrid electron heating

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, M.G.; Harvey, R.W.

    1981-02-01

    The transport of electron energy out of tokamaks is known to be far greater than that calculated using classical and neoclassical theory. However, low levels of non-axisymmetric magnetic field turbulence can couple the fast transport of electrons parallel to the magnetic field lines to radial transport, thus providing a plausible explanation for observed energy confinement. These models further predict that the electron loss rate is proportional to v/sub parallel bars/. This has subsequently been found to be consistent with data for runaway electrons in PLT, at energies up to 1 MeV. Recently it has been pointed out by Chan, Chiu and Ohkawa that anomalous transport processes should be taken into account in attempting to determine steady state electron distribution functions for cases involving RF electron tail heating, particularly in view of the v/sub parallel bars/ dependence of the loss rate. In this work these physical processes are modeled through a 2-D nonlinear program which describes the evolution of the electron distribution function in velocity magnitude; (v) and plasma radius (r), and which studies the efficiency of tail electron heating.

  10. Why convective heat transport in the solar nebula was inefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassen, P.

    1993-01-01

    The radial distributions of the effective temperatures of circumstellar disks associated with pre-main sequence (T Tauri) stars are relatively well-constrained by ground-based and spacecraft infrared photometry and radio continuum observations. If the mechanisms by which energy is transported vertically in the disks are understood, these data can be used to constrain models of the thermal structure and evolution of solar nebula. Several studies of the evolution of the solar nebula have included the calculation of the vertical transport of heat by convection. Such calculations rely on a mixing length theory of transport and some assumption regarding the vertical distribution of internal dissipation. In all cases, the results of these calculations indicate that transport by radiation dominates that by convection, even when the nebula is convectively unstable. A simple argument that demonstrates the generality (and limits) of this result, regardless of the details of mixing length theory or the precise distribution of internal heating is presented. It is based on the idea that the radiative gradient in an optically thick nebula generally does not greatly exceed the adiabatic gradient.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Heat Transport in Metals and Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S.; Kim, K.

    2010-01-01

    Interfacial thermal transport is of great importance in a number of practical applications where interfacial resistance between layers is frequently a major bottleneck to effective heat dissipation. For example, efficient heat transfer at silicon/aluminum and silicon/copper interfaces is very critical in power electronics packages used in hybrid electric vehicle applications. It is therefore important to understand the factors that govern and impact thermal transport at semiconductor/metal interfaces. Hence, in this study, we use classical molecular dynamics modeling to understand and study thermal transport in silicon and aluminum, and some preliminary modeling to study thermal transport at the interface between silicon and aluminum. A good match is shown between our modeling results for thermal conductivity in silicon and aluminum and the experimental data. The modeling results from this study also match well with relevant numerical studies in the literature for thermal conductivity. In addition, preliminary modeling results indicate that the interfacial thermal conductance for a perfect silicon/aluminum interface is of the same order as experimental data in the literature as well as diffuse mismatch model results accounting for realistic phonon dispersion curves.

  12. Thermophysical and heat transfer properties of phase change material candidate for waste heat transportation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaizawa, Akihide; Maruoka, Nobuhiro; Kawai, Atsushi; Kamano, Hiroomi; Jozuka, Tetsuji; Senda, Takeshi; Akiyama, Tomohiro

    2008-05-01

    A waste heat transportation system trans-heat (TH) system is quite attractive that uses the latent heat of a phase change material (PCM). The purpose of this paper is to study the thermophysical properties of various sugars and sodium acetate trihydrate (SAT) as PCMs for a practical TH system and the heat transfer property between PCM selected and heat transfer oil, by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) and a heat storage tube. As a result, erythritol, with a large latent heat of 344 kJ/kg at melting point of 117°C, high decomposition point of 160°C and excellent chemical stability under repeated phase change cycles was found to be the best PCM among them for the practical TH system. In the heat release experiments between liquid erythritol and flowing cold oil, we observed foaming phenomena of encapsulated oil, in which oil droplet was coated by solidification of PCM.

  13. Heat transport along domain walls and surfaces of superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorontsov, Anton; Richard, Caroline

    2015-03-01

    We calculate thermal transport in non-uniform states of unconventional superconductors, that appear near pairbreaking surfaces, or due to formation of domain walls in the order parameter. The spectrum of the quasiparticles states in these regions is dominated by the Andreev bound states, including topologically protected modes. We investigate how these states contribute to the heat transport, using non-equilibrium quasiclassical theory in linear response. We report self-consistent calculation of the order parameter, impurity self-energies, density of states and vertex corrections. Particular attention is paid to the non-local nature of the response. We show differences and similarities between domain walls in d-wave materials, and surfaces of multi-component chiral superconducting states. We describe results for Born and unitary impurity scattering limits, and effects of the Zeeman magnetic field on thermal transport. Supported by NSF Grants DMR-0954342.

  14. Theoretical analysis of the maximum heat transport in triangular grooves: A study of idealized micro heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, G.P.; Ma, H.B.

    1995-12-31

    A mathematical model for predicting the minimum meniscus radius and the maximum heat transport in micro heat pipes is presented. In this model, a theoretical minimum meniscus radius was found and used to calculate the capillary heat transport limit based on the physical characteristics and geometry. A control volume technique was employed to determine the flow characteristics of wickless micro heat pipes, and incorporate the effects of the frictional vapor-liquid interaction on the liquid flow. Unlike previous models, this model for the first time considers the true characteristics of micro heat pipes to determine the minimum meniscus radius and the maximum heat transport capacity. In order to compare the heat transport and flow characteristics, an effective hydraulic diameter was defined and the resulting model was solved numerically. The results indicate that the heat transport capacity of micro heat pipes is strongly dependent on the apex channel angle of the liquid arteries, the contact angle of the liquid flow, the length of the heat pipe, the vapor flow velocity and characteristics, and the tilt angle. In addition, the analysis presented here provides a mechanism, which for a given set of conditions, allows the geometry to be optimized and a micro heat pipe designed with a maximum heat transport capacity. This investigation will help optimize the design of micro heat pipes, making them capable of operating at increased power levels with greater reliability.

  15. Development and evaluation of a clinical note section header terminology.

    PubMed

    Denny, Joshua C; Miller, Randolph A; Johnson, Kevin B; Spickard, Anderson

    2008-01-01

    Clinical documentation is often expressed in natural language text, yet providers often use common organizations that segment these notes in sections, such as history of present illness or physical examination. We developed a hierarchical section header terminology, supporting mappings to LOINC and other vocabularies; it contained 1109 concepts and 4332 synonyms. Physicians evaluated it compared to LOINC and the Evaluation and Management billing schema using a randomly selected corpus of history and physical notes. Evaluated documents contained a median of 54 sections and 27 major sections. There were 16,196 total sections in the evaluation note corpus. The terminology contained 99.9% of the clinical sections; LOINC matched 77% of section header concepts and 20% of section header strings in those documents. The section terminology may enable better clinical note understanding and interoperability. Future development and integration into natural language processing systems is needed. PMID:18999303

  16. Transport in JET H-mode Plasmas with Beam and Ion Cyclotron Heating

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny, et. al.

    2012-07-13

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) Range of Frequency waves and neutral beam (NB) injection are planned for heating in ITER and other future tokamaks. It is important to understand transport in plasmas with NB and IC to plan, predict, and improve transport and confinement. Transport predictions require simulations of the heating profiles, and for this, accurate modeling of the IC and NB heating is needed.

  17. On the mechanisms of heat transport across vacuum gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaev, Bair V.; Bogy, David B.

    2011-12-01

    Heat exchange between closely positioned bodies has become an important issue for many areas of modern technology including, but not limited to, integrated circuits, atomic force microscopy, and high-density magnetic recording, which deal with bodies separated by gaps as narrow as a few nanometers. It is now recognized that heat transport across a gap of sub-micron width does not follow the Stefan-Boltzmann law, which is based on a conventional theory developed for sufficiently wide gaps. This paper describes the structure of thermally excited electromagnetic fields in arbitrarily narrow gaps, and it also shows that heat can be carried across narrow vacuum gaps by acoustic waves. The structure of the acoustic wave fields is also described, and it is shown that they become the dominant heat carriers in gaps narrower than a certain critical width, which is estimated to be a few nanometers. For example, consider a vacuum gap between silicon half-spaces. When the gap's width is below a critical value, which is about 7.5 nm, the contribution of acoustic waves must be taken into account. Assuming that the wavelength of thermally excited acoustic waves is of order 1 nm, it may be possible to estimate the contribution of acoustic waves to heat transport across gaps with 4 nm < h < 7.5 nm by the kinetic theory, but for narrower gaps with h < 4 nm, this approximation is not valid, and then the full wave theory must be used. Also for gaps narrower than about 2.5 nm, there is no need to take into account electromagnetic radiation because its contribution is negligible compared to that of acoustic waves.

  18. Thermal balance and quantum heat transport in nanostructures thermalized by local Langevin heat baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sääskilahti, K.; Oksanen, J.; Tulkki, J.

    2013-07-01

    Modeling of thermal transport in practical nanostructures requires making tradeoffs between the size of the system and the completeness of the model. We study quantum heat transfer in a self-consistent thermal bath setup consisting of two lead regions connected by a center region. Atoms both in the leads and in the center region are coupled to quantum Langevin heat baths that mimic the damping and dephasing of phonon waves by anharmonic scattering. This approach treats the leads and the center region on the same footing and thereby allows for a simple and physically transparent thermalization of the system, enabling also perfect acoustic matching between the leads and the center region. Increasing the strength of the coupling reduces the mean-free path of phonons and gradually shifts phonon transport from ballistic regime to diffusive regime. In the center region, the bath temperatures are determined self-consistently from the requirement of zero net energy exchange between the local heat bath and each atom. By solving the stochastic equations of motion in frequency space and averaging over noise using the general fluctuation-dissipation relation derived by Dhar and Roy [J. Stat. Phys.JSTPBS0022-471510.1007/s10955-006-9235-3 125, 801 (2006)], we derive the formula for thermal current, which contains the Caroli formula for phonon transmission function and reduces to the Landauer-Büttiker formula in the limit of vanishing coupling to local heat baths. We prove that the bath temperatures measure local kinetic energy and can, therefore, be interpreted as true atomic temperatures. In a setup where phonon reflections are eliminated, the Boltzmann transport equation under gray approximation with full phonon dispersion is shown to be equivalent to the self-consistent heat bath model. We also study thermal transport through two-dimensional constrictions in square lattice and graphene and discuss the differences between the exact solution and linear approximations.

  19. Parallel heat transport in integrable and chaotic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo-Negrete, D. del; Chacon, L.

    2012-05-15

    The study of transport in magnetized plasmas is a problem of fundamental interest in controlled fusion, space plasmas, and astrophysics research. Three issues make this problem particularly challenging: (i) The extreme anisotropy between the parallel (i.e., along the magnetic field), {chi}{sub ||} , and the perpendicular, {chi}{sub Up-Tack }, conductivities ({chi}{sub ||} /{chi}{sub Up-Tack} may exceed 10{sup 10} in fusion plasmas); (ii) Nonlocal parallel transport in the limit of small collisionality; and (iii) Magnetic field lines chaos which in general complicates (and may preclude) the construction of magnetic field line coordinates. Motivated by these issues, we present a Lagrangian Green's function method to solve the local and non-local parallel transport equation applicable to integrable and chaotic magnetic fields in arbitrary geometry. The method avoids by construction the numerical pollution issues of grid-based algorithms. The potential of the approach is demonstrated with nontrivial applications to integrable (magnetic island), weakly chaotic (Devil's staircase), and fully chaotic magnetic field configurations. For the latter, numerical solutions of the parallel heat transport equation show that the effective radial transport, with local and non-local parallel closures, is non-diffusive, thus casting doubts on the applicability of quasilinear diffusion descriptions. General conditions for the existence of non-diffusive, multivalued flux-gradient relations in the temperature evolution are derived.

  20. Parallel heat transport in integrable and chaotic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Chacon, Luis

    2012-01-01

    The study of transport in magnetized plasmas is a problem of fundamental interest in controlled fusion, space plasmas, and astrophysics research. Three issues make this problem particularly chal- lenging: (i) The extreme anisotropy between the parallel (i.e., along the magnetic field), , and the perpendicular, , conductivities ( / may exceed 1010 in fusion plasmas); (ii) Magnetic field lines chaos which in general complicates (and may preclude) the construction of magnetic field line coordinates; and (iii) Nonlocal parallel transport in the limit of small collisionality. Motivated by these issues, we present a Lagrangian Green s function method to solve the local and non-local parallel transport equation applicable to integrable and chaotic magnetic fields in arbitrary geom- etry. The method avoids by construction the numerical pollution issues of grid-based algorithms. The potential of the approach is demonstrated with nontrivial applications to integrable (magnetic island chain), weakly chaotic (devil s staircase), and fully chaotic magnetic field configurations. For the latter, numerical solutions of the parallel heat transport equation show that the effective radial transport, with local and non-local closures, is non-diffusive, thus casting doubts on the appropriateness of the applicability of quasilinear diffusion descriptions. General conditions for the existence of non-diffusive, multivalued flux-gradient relations in the temperature evolution are derived.

  1. Heat and salt transport throughout the North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lina; Yuan, Dongliang

    2016-03-01

    Absolute geostrophic currents in the North Pacific Ocean are calculated using the P-vector method and gridded Argo profiling data from January 2004 to December 2012. Three-dimensional structures and seasonal variability of meridional heat transport (MHT) and meridional salt transport (MST) are analyzed. The results show that geostrophic and Ekman components are generally opposite in sign, with the southward geostrophic component dominating in the subtropics and the northward Ekman component dominating in the tropics. In combination with the net surface heat flux and the MST through the Bering Strait, the MHT and MST of the western boundary currents (WBCs) are estimated for the first time. The results suggest that the WBCs are of great importance in maintaining the heat and salt balance of the North Pacific. The total interior MHT and MST in the tropics show nearly the same seasonal variability as that of the Ekman components, consistent with the variability of zonal wind stress. The geostrophic MHT in the tropics is mainly concentrated in the upper layers, while MST with large amplitude and annual variation can extend much deeper. This suggests that shallow processes dominate MHT in the North Pacific, while MST can be affected by deep ocean circulation. In the extratropical ocean, both MHT and MST are weak. However, there is relatively large and irregular seasonal variability of geostrophic MST, suggesting the importance of the geostrophic circulation in the MST of that area.

  2. Cascade: a review of heat transport and plant design issues

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, K.A.; McDowell, M.W.

    1984-07-31

    A conceptual heat transfer loop for Cascade, a centrifugal-action solid-breeder reaction chamber, has been investigated and results are presented. The Cascade concept, a double-cone-shaped reaction chamber, rotates along its horizontal axis. Solid Li/sub 2/O or other lithium-ceramic granules are injected tangentially through each end of the chamber. The granules cascade axially from the smaller radii at the ends to the larger radius at the center, where they are ejected into a stationary granule catcher. Heat and tritium are then removed from the granules and the granules are reinjected into the chamber. A 50% dense Li/sub 2/O granule throughput of 2.8 m/sup 3//s is transferred from the reaction chamber to the steam generators via continuous bucket elevators. The granules then fall by gravity through 4 vertical steam generators. The entire transport system is maintained at the same vacuum conditions present inside the reaction chamber.

  3. Cracks in glass electrical connector headers removed by dry blasting with fine abrasive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, R. W.

    1967-01-01

    Cracking that causes pressure leakage in glass connector headers can be alleviated by manipulating the pin bridgewire connectors. This initiates the surface and meniscus cracks. Dry blasting the header surface with a fine abrasive then removes the cracks.

  4. Heat Transport in Graphene Ferromagnet-Insulator-Superconductor Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Wei

    2011-04-01

    We study heat transport in a graphene ferromagnet-insulator-superconducting junction. It is found that the thermal conductance of the graphene ferromagnet-insulator-superconductor (FIS) junction is an oscillatory function of the barrier strength χ in the thin-barrier limit. The gate potential U0 decreases the amplitude of thermal conductance oscillation. Both the amplitude and phase of the thermal conductance oscillation varies with the exchange energy Eh. The thermal conductance of a graphene FIS junction displays the usual exponential dependence on temperature, reflecting the s-wave symmetry of superconducting graphene.

  5. Electron heat transport from stochastic fields in gyrokinetic simulationsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, E.; Nevins, W. M.; Candy, J.; Hatch, D.; Terry, P.; Guttenfelder, W.

    2011-05-01

    GYRO is used to examine the perturbed magnetic field structure generated by electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulations of the CYCLONE base case as βe is varied from 0.1% to 0.7%, as investigated by J. Candy [Phys. Plasmas 12, 072307 (2005)]. Poincare surface of section plots obtained from integrating the self-consistent magnetic field demonstrates widespread stochasticity for all nonzero values of βe. Despite widespread stochasticity of the perturbed magnetic fields, no significant increase in electron transport is observed. The magnetic diffusion, dm [A. B. Rechester and M. N. Rosenbluth, Phys. Rev. Lett 40, 38 (1978)], is used to quantify the degree of stochasticity and related to the electron heat transport for hundreds of time slices in each simulation.

  6. Electron heat transport from stochastic fields in gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Nevins, W. M.; Candy, J.; Hatch, D.; Terry, P.; Guttenfelder, W.

    2011-05-15

    GYRO is used to examine the perturbed magnetic field structure generated by electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulations of the CYCLONE base case as {beta}{sub e} is varied from 0.1% to 0.7%, as investigated by J. Candy [Phys. Plasmas 12, 072307 (2005)]. Poincare surface of section plots obtained from integrating the self-consistent magnetic field demonstrates widespread stochasticity for all nonzero values of {beta}{sub e}. Despite widespread stochasticity of the perturbed magnetic fields, no significant increase in electron transport is observed. The magnetic diffusion, d{sub m}[A. B. Rechester and M. N. Rosenbluth, Phys. Rev. Lett 40, 38 (1978)], is used to quantify the degree of stochasticity and related to the electron heat transport for hundreds of time slices in each simulation.

  7. Experimental determination of soil heat storage for the simulation of heat transport in a coastal wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Michael; Swain, Matthew; Lohmann, Melinda; Swain, Eric

    2012-02-01

    SummaryTwo physical experiments were developed to better define the thermal interaction of wetland water and the underlying soil layer. This information is important to numerical models of flow and heat transport that have been developed to support biological studies in the South Florida coastal wetland areas. The experimental apparatus consists of two 1.32 m diameter by 0.99 m tall, trailer-mounted, well-insulated tanks filled with soil and water. A peat-sand-soil mixture was used to represent the wetland soil, and artificial plants were used as a surrogate for emergent wetland vegetation based on size and density observed in the field. The tanks are instrumented with thermocouples to measure vertical and horizontal temperature variations and were placed in an outdoor environment subject to solar radiation, wind, and other factors affecting the heat transfer. Instruments also measure solar radiation, relative humidity, and wind speed. Tests indicate that heat transfer through the sides and bottoms of the tanks is negligible, so the experiments represent vertical heat transfer effects only. The temperature fluctuations measured in the vertical profile through the soil and water are used to calibrate a one-dimensional heat-transport model. The model was used to calculate the thermal conductivity of the soil. Additionally, the model was used to calculate the total heat stored in the soil. This information was then used in a lumped parameter model to calculate an effective depth of soil which provides the appropriate heat storage to be combined with the heat storage in the water column. An effective depth, in the model, of 5.1 cm of wetland soil represents the heat storage needed to match the data taken in the tank containing 55.9 cm of peat/sand/soil mix. The artificial low-density laboratory sawgrass reduced the solar energy absorbed by the 35.6 cm of water and 55.9 cm of soil at midday by less than 5%. The maximum heat transfer into the underlying peat

  8. Experimental determination of soil heat storage for the simulation of heat transport in a coastal wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, Michael; Swain, Matthew; Lohmann, Melinda; Swain, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Two physical experiments were developed to better define the thermal interaction of wetland water and the underlying soil layer. This information is important to numerical models of flow and heat transport that have been developed to support biological studies in the South Florida coastal wetland areas. The experimental apparatus consists of two 1.32. m diameter by 0.99. m tall, trailer-mounted, well-insulated tanks filled with soil and water. A peat-sand-soil mixture was used to represent the wetland soil, and artificial plants were used as a surrogate for emergent wetland vegetation based on size and density observed in the field. The tanks are instrumented with thermocouples to measure vertical and horizontal temperature variations and were placed in an outdoor environment subject to solar radiation, wind, and other factors affecting the heat transfer. Instruments also measure solar radiation, relative humidity, and wind speed.Tests indicate that heat transfer through the sides and bottoms of the tanks is negligible, so the experiments represent vertical heat transfer effects only. The temperature fluctuations measured in the vertical profile through the soil and water are used to calibrate a one-dimensional heat-transport model. The model was used to calculate the thermal conductivity of the soil. Additionally, the model was used to calculate the total heat stored in the soil. This information was then used in a lumped parameter model to calculate an effective depth of soil which provides the appropriate heat storage to be combined with the heat storage in the water column. An effective depth, in the model, of 5.1. cm of wetland soil represents the heat storage needed to match the data taken in the tank containing 55.9. cm of peat/sand/soil mix. The artificial low-density laboratory sawgrass reduced the solar energy absorbed by the 35.6. cm of water and 55.9. cm of soil at midday by less than 5%. The maximum heat transfer into the underlying peat-sand-soil mix

  9. Radiation transport in ultrafast heated high Z solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraschiv, Ioana; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Mancini, Roberto; Johzaki, Tomoyuki

    2013-10-01

    Ultra-intense laser-target interactions generate hot, dense, and radiating plasmas, especially in the case of high-Z target materials. In order to evaluate the effect of radiation and its transport on the laser-produced plasmas we have developed a radiation transport (RT) code and implemented it in a collisional particle-in-cell code, PICLS. The code uses a database of emissivities and opacities as functions of photon frequency, created for given densities and temperatures by the non-equilibrium, collisional-radiative atomic kinetics 0-D code FLYCHK together with its postprocessor FLYSPECTRA. Using the two-dimensional RT-PICLS code we have studied the X-ray transport in an ultrafast heated copper target, the X-ray conversion efficiency, and the exchange of energy between the radiation field and the target. The details of these results obtained from the implementation of the radiation transport model into the PICLS calculations will be reported in this presentation. Work supported by the DOE Office of Science grant no. DE-SC0008827 and by the NNSA/DOE grant no. DE-FC52-06NA27616.

  10. Non-diffusive heat transport during electron cyclotron heating on the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, C.C.; Luce, T.C.; Lohr, J.; Matsuda, K.; Prater, R.; Stockdale, R. ); Hass, J.C.M. de; James, R.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Of central importance to magnetic confinement fusion is the understanding of cross-field heat transport, which is usually modeled as a diffusive process down a temperature gradient with a small additional convective term due to particle transport. This paper reports results from off-axis electron cyclotron heating (ECH) experiments which cannot be adequately described in this framework. In particular, net heat appears to be flowing up the temperature gradient in the electron channel. Electron cyclotron heating experiments at 60 GHz have been carried out in the DIII-D tokamak with launched power levels up to 1.4 MW. The ECH launch system, located on the inside wall at z = +13 cm, launches the extraordinary X-mode in a Gaussian pattern with a 12{degrees} half width. Eight antennas direct their power at 15{degrees} and two antennas direct their power at {plus minus}30{degrees} with respect to the major radius. The orientation is such to drive current aiding the Ohmic current for normal operation. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Simulation of fluid, heat transport to estimate desert stream infiltration.

    PubMed

    Kulongoski, Justin T; Izbicki, John A

    2008-01-01

    In semiarid regions, the contribution of infiltration from intermittent streamflow to ground water recharge may be quantified by comparing simulations of fluid and heat transport beneath stream channels to observed ground temperatures. In addition to quantifying natural recharge, streamflow infiltration estimates provide a means to characterize the physical properties of stream channel sediments and to identify suitable locations for artificial recharge sites. Rates of winter streamflow infiltration along stream channels are estimated based on the cooling effect of infiltrated water on streambed sediments, combined with the simulation of two-dimensional fluid and heat transport using the computer program VS2DH. The cooling effect of ground water is determined by measuring ground temperatures at regular intervals beneath stream channels and nearby channel banks in order to calculate temperature-depth profiles. Additional data inputs included the physical, hydraulic, and thermal properties of unsaturated alluvium, and monthly ground temperatures measurements over an annual cycle. Observed temperatures and simulation results can provide estimates of the minimum threshold for deep infiltration, the variability of infiltration along stream channels, and also the frequency of infiltration events. PMID:18194325

  12. Simulation of fluid, heat transport to estimate desert stream infiltration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulongoski, J.T.; Izbicki, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    In semiarid regions, the contribution of infiltration from intermittent streamflow to ground water recharge may be quantified by comparing simulations of fluid and heat transport beneath stream channels to observed ground temperatures. In addition to quantifying natural recharge, streamflow infiltration estimates provide a means to characterize the physical properties of stream channel sediments and to identify suitable locations for artificial recharge sites. Rates of winter streamflow infiltration along stream channels are estimated based on the cooling effect of infiltrated water on streambed sediments, combined with the simulation of two-dimensional fluid and heat transport using the computer program VS2DH. The cooling effect of ground water is determined by measuring ground temperatures at regular intervals beneath stream channels and nearby channel banks in order to calculate temperature-depth profiles. Additional data inputs included the physical, hydraulic, and thermal properties of unsaturated alluvium, and monthly ground temperatures measurements over an annual cycle. Observed temperatures and simulation results can provide estimates of the minimum threshold for deep infiltration, the variability of infiltration along stream channels, and also the frequency of infiltration events.

  13. Transport simulations of ITER with empirical heat diffusivity scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, G.

    1998-02-01

    Radiative mantle scenarios of the ignited ITER Engineering Design Activity (EDA) with argon and neon influxing are explored by computer experiments using special versions of the 1.5 dimensional (1.5-D) BALDUR predictive transport code. An empirical scaling law for the effective heat diffusivity, compatible with the ITERH92-P ELMy H mode scaling and validated against experiments, is applied. The prescribed flat density profiles, conductive heat loss across the separatrix of 200 MW and ratio τ*He/ τE,r of 10 are reached in the simulations. Self-sustained thermonuclear burn is achieved for at least 485 s. The helium ash concentrations of up to 9.5% are found to cause significant fuel dilution. Owing to the high electron density, only small argon and neon fractions of 0.07 and 0.27%, respectively, are needed. In the argon scenario, the required radiation corrected thermal energy confinement time τE,r is 4.8 s. The confinement time predicted by the local scaling law is 1.4 times longer and agrees with the global scaling prediction. With argon, the design parameters are reached by radiating 128 MW within the separatrix, thus reducing the energy flow to the divertor to 73 MW. In the neon case with its more peripheral radiation, the radiative loss within the separatrix has to be diminished. Owing to the flat profile of the fuel ion density, the neoclassical drift velocities of argon and neon are directed outwards in the whole plasma. In the argon scenario, the sensitivity of transport to the density profile shape is studied. It is found that τE,r remains almost unchanged, varying between 4.5 and 4.8 s, which is explained by an analytic expression for the thermal energy. Peaking of the electron and impurity densities does not alter the required argon concentration but causes a peaking of the radiation profiles and reduction in the temperatures. Sufficiently narrow fuel ion density profiles are shown to cause inward directed neoclassical drift velocities of argon in the

  14. Heat transport by phonons in crystalline materials and nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Yee Kan

    This dissertation presents experimental studies of heat transport by phonons in crystalline materials and nanostructures, and across solid-solid interfaces. Particularly, this dissertation emphasizes advancing understanding of the mean-free-paths (i.e., the distance phonons propagate without being scattered) of acoustic phonons, which are the dominant heat carriers in most crystalline semiconductor nanostructures. Two primary tools for the studies presented in this dissertation are time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) for measurements of thermal conductivity of nanostructures and thermal conductance of interfaces; and frequency-domain thermoreflectance (FDTR), which I developed as a direct probe of the mean-free-paths of dominant heat-carrying phonons in crystalline solids. The foundation of FDTR is the dependence of the apparent thermal conductivity on the frequency of periodic heat sources. I find that the thermal conductivity of semiconductor alloys (InGaP, InGaAs, and SiGe) measured by TDTR depends on the modulation frequency, 0.1 ≤ f ≤ 10 MHz, used in TDTR measurements. Reduction in the thermal conductivity of the semiconductor alloys at high f compares well to the reduction in the thermal conductivity of epitaxial thin films, indicating that frequency dependence and thickness dependence of thermal conductivity are fundamentally equivalent. I developed the frequency dependence of thermal conductivity into a convenient probe of phonon mean-free-paths, a technique which I call frequency-domain thermoreflectance (FDTR). In FDTR, I monitor the changes in the intensity of the reflected probe beam as a function of the modulation frequency. To facilitate the analysis of FDTR measurements, I developed a nonlocal theory for heat conduction by phonons at high heating frequencies. Calculations of the nonlocal theory confirm my experimental findings that phonons with mean-free-paths longer than two times the penetration depth do not contribute to the apparent thermal

  15. Anisotropic heat transport in reversed shear configurations: shearless Cantori barriers and nonlocal transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasevski, D.; Del-Castillo-Negrete, D.

    2012-10-01

    Heat transport in magnetized plasmas is a problem of fundamental interest in controlled fusion. In Ref.footnotetext D. del-Castillo-Negrete, and L. Chac'on, Phys. Rev. Lett., 106, 195004 (2011); Phys. Plasmas 19, 056112 (2012). we proposed a Lagrangian-Green's function (LG) method to study this problem in the strongly anisotropic (χ=0) regime. The LG method bypasses the need to discretize the transport operators on a grid and it is applicable to general parallel flux closures and 3-D magnetic fields. Here we apply the LG method to parallel transport (with local and nonlocal parallel flux closures) in reversed shear magnetic field configurations known to exhibit robust transport barriers in the vicinity of the extrema of the q-profile. By shearless Cantori (SC) we mean the invariant Cantor sets remaining after the destruction of toroidal flux surfaces with zero magnetic shear, q^'=0. We provide numerical evidence of the role of SC in the anomalously slow relaxation of radial temperature gradients in chaotic magnetic fields with no transport barriers. The spatio-temporal evolution of temperature pulses localized in the reversed shear region exhibits non-diffusive self-similar evolution and nonlocal effective radial transport.

  16. Recent experience in condition assessment of boiler header components and supports

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.P.

    1996-12-01

    This paper provides recent experience in the condition assessment of boiler header components and supports in fossil fired power plants. Condition assessment programs for boiler headers are now scheduled more frequently due to the current practices of cyclic operation and extended life for older boilers. Typical assessment tasks as applicable to all boiler headers, are described herein. Examples of common problems, with recommended actions, for each type of header are presented. This includes internal bore hole and ligament cracking, and external tube connector weld cracking. Emphasis will be focused on the historical cracking problems associated with economizer inlet and secondary superheater/reheater outlet headers.

  17. Heat- and mass-transport in aqueous silica nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turanov, A. N.; Tolmachev, Yuriy V.

    2009-10-01

    Using the transient hot wire and pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance methods we determined the thermal conductivity and the solvent self-diffusion coefficient (SDC) in aqueous suspensions of quasi-monodisperse spherical silica nanoparticles. The thermal conductivity was found to increase at higher volume fraction of nanoparticles in accordance with the effective medium theory albeit with a smaller slope. On the other hand, the SDC was found to decrease with nanoparticle volume fraction faster than predicted by the effective medium theory. These deviations can be explained by the presence of an interfacial heat-transfer resistance and water retention by the nanoparticles, respectively. We found no evidence for anomalous enhancement in the transport properties of nanofluids reported earlier by other groups.

  18. Nuclear reactor heat transport system component low friction support system

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1980-01-01

    A support column for a heavy component of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor heat transport system which will deflect when the pipes leading coolant to and from the heavy component expand or contract due to temperature changes includes a vertically disposed pipe, the pipe being connected to the heavy component by two longitudinally spaced cycloidal dovetail joints wherein the distal end of each of the dovetails constitutes a part of the surface of a large diameter cylinder and the centerlines of these large diameter cylinders intersect at right angles and the pipe being supported through two longitudinally spaced cycloidal dovetail joints wherein the distal end of each of the dovetails constitutes a part of the surface of a large diameter cylinder and the centerlines of these large diameter cylinders intersect at right angles, each of the cylindrical surfaces bearing on a flat and horizontal surface.

  19. Phononic heat transport in the transient regime: An analytic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuovinen, Riku; Säkkinen, Niko; Karlsson, Daniel; Stefanucci, Gianluca; van Leeuwen, Robert

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the time-resolved quantum transport properties of phonons in arbitrary harmonic systems connected to phonon baths at different temperatures. We obtain a closed analytic expression of the time-dependent one-particle reduced density matrix by explicitly solving the equations of motion for the nonequilibrium Green's function. This is achieved through a well-controlled approximation of the frequency-dependent bath self-energy. Our result allows for exploring transient oscillations and relaxation times of local heat currents, and correctly reduces to an earlier known result in the steady-state limit. We apply the formalism to atomic chains, and benchmark the validity of the approximation against full numerical solutions of the bosonic Kadanoff-Baym equations for the Green's function. We find good agreement between the analytic and numerical solutions for weak contacts and baths with a wide energy dispersion. We further analyze relaxation times from low to high temperature gradients.

  20. Heat conduction in multifunctional nanotrusses studied using Boltzmann transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Nicholas G.; Minnich, Austin J.

    2016-01-01

    Materials that possess low density, low thermal conductivity, and high stiffness are desirable for engineering applications, but most materials cannot realize these properties simultaneously due to the coupling between them. Nanotrusses, which consist of hollow nanoscale beams architected into a periodic truss structure, can potentially break these couplings due to their lattice architecture and nanoscale features. In this work, we study heat conduction in the exact nanotruss geometry by solving the frequency-dependent Boltzmann transport equation using a variance-reduced Monte Carlo algorithm. We show that their thermal conductivity can be described with only two parameters, solid fraction and wall thickness. Our simulations predict that nanotrusses can realize unique combinations of mechanical and thermal properties that are challenging to achieve in typical materials.

  1. Energy Conversion Advanced Heat Transport Loop and Power Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, C. H.

    2006-08-01

    The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold 1) efficient low cost energy generation and 2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual-purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in its early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor, electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. Many aspects of the NGNP must be researched and developed in order to make recommendations on the final design of the plant. Parameters such as working conditions, cycle components, working fluids, and power conversion unit configurations must be understood. Three configurations of the power conversion unit were demonstrated in this study. A three-shaft design with 3 turbines and 4 compressors, a combined cycle with a Brayton top cycle and a Rankine bottoming cycle, and a reheated cycle with 3 stages of reheat were investigated. An intermediate heat transport loop for transporting process heat to a High Temperature Steam Electrolysis (HTSE) hydrogen production plant was used. Helium, CO2, and an 80% nitrogen, 20% helium mixture (by weight) were studied to determine the best working fluid in terms cycle efficiency and development cost. In each of these configurations the relative component size were estimated for the different working fluids. The relative size of the turbomachinery was measured by comparing the power input/output of the component. For heat exchangers the volume was computed and compared. Parametric studies away from the baseline values of the three-shaft and combined cycles were performed to determine the effect of varying conditions in the cycle. This gives some insight into the sensitivity of these cycles to various

  2. Impact of slowdown of Atlantic overturning circulation on heat and freshwater transports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Kathryn A.; Drushka, Kyla; Thompson, LuAnne; Le Bars, Dewi; McDonagh, Elaine L.

    2016-07-01

    Recent measurements of the strength of the Atlantic overturning circulation at 26°N show a 1 year drop and partial recovery amid a gradual weakening. To examine the extent and impact of the slowdown on basin wide heat and freshwater transports for 2004-2012, a box model that assimilates hydrographic and satellite observations is used to estimate heat transport and freshwater convergence as residuals of the heat and freshwater budgets. Using an independent transport estimate, convergences are converted to transports, which show a high level of spatial coherence. The similarity between Atlantic heat transport and the Agulhas Leakage suggests that it is the source of the surface heat transport anomalies. The freshwater budget in the North Atlantic is dominated by a decrease in freshwater flux. The increasing salinity during the slowdown supports modeling studies that show that heat, not freshwater, drives trends in the overturning circulation in a warming climate.

  3. WCSTools: Catalogs, Headers, and FITS Files, Oh My!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mink, J.

    2014-05-01

    WCSTools is a package of tasks written in very portable C, the main purpose of which is to assign world coordinate systems to images of astronomical fields. These tools, which access source and manipulate image headers, compute transformations between pixels and spatial coordinates, and convert times, use a self-contained library of subroutines which have been combined into command-line executable tasks. Separate use of the various catalog searching tasks as well as the variety of ways in which the header and file reading and writing tasks can aid astronomical work will be discussed. Access to the USNO UCAC3 and UCAC4 catalogs as well as implementation of the IRAF ZPX polynomial projection and the SCAMP image distortion model will be described, as will other major fixes and upgrades, ending with brief note as to the advantages and disadvantages of distributing understandable, open source code.

  4. Noise and fluctuation statistics in mesoscopic heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averin, Dmitri

    2012-02-01

    Fluctuations play important role in thermodynamics of small systems. In the talk, I will discuss two recent results on fluctuations in mesosopic heat transport. One is the demonstration [1] that the fluctuation-dissipation theorem for thermal conductance of a mesocopic junction is not valid at non-zero frequencies φ. Finite relaxation energy creates fluctuations of the energy flux in the junction even at vanishing temperature, T=0, when the conductance vanishes. This suggest that in contract to electrical conductance, there is no ``Kubo-Green formula'' for equilibrium thermal conductance at φ 0. Non-equilibrium heat transfer satisfies general ``fluctuation relations'' of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. Recently, we have established the conditions of applicability of these relations to single-electron tunneling (SET), and calculated explicitly the statistics of dissipated energy in driven SET transitions [2], which gives an example of general statistics of energy dissipation in reversible information processing. An interesting consequence of this statistics is the possibility of implementing the electronic version of Maxwell's demon in the SET structures [3]. [4pt] [1] D.V. Averin and J.P. Pekola, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 220601 (2010). [0pt] [2] D.V. Averin and J.P. Pekola, arXiv:1105.041. [0pt] [3] D.V. Averin, M. Mottonen, and J.P. Pekola, arXiv:1108.5435.

  5. Ambipolar magnetic fluctuation-induced heat transport in toroidal devices

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P.W.; Fiksel, G.; Ji, H.; Almagri, A.F.; Cekic, M.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Diamond, P.H.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Shen, W.; Stoneking, M.; Ware, A.S.

    1996-05-01

    The total magnetic fluctuation-induced electron thermal flux has been determined in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch [Fusion Technol. {bold 19}, 131 (1991)] from the measured correlation of the heat flux along perturbed fields with the radial component of the perturbed field. In the edge region the total flux is convective and intrinsically ambipolar constrained, as evidenced by the magnitude of the thermal diffusivity, which is well approximated by the product of ion thermal velocity and the magnetic diffusivity. A self-consistent theory is formulated and shown to reproduce the experimental results, provided nonlinear charge aggregation in streaming electrons is accounted for in the theory. For general toroidal configurations, it is shown that ambipolar constrained transport applies when remote magnetic fluctuations (i.e., global modes resonant at distant rational surfaces) dominate the flux. Near locations where the dominant modes are resonant, the transport is nonambipolar. This agrees with the radial variation of diffusivity in MST. Expectations for the tokamak are also discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Photothermal heating in metal-embedded microtools for material transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villangca, Mark; Palima, Darwin; Bañas, Andrew; Glückstad, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    Material transport is an important mechanism in microfluidics and drug delivery. The methods and solutions found in literature involve passively diffusing structures, microneedles and chemically fueled structures. In this work, we make use of optically actuated microtools with embedded metal layer as heating element for controlled loading and release. The new microtools take advantage of the photothermal-induced convection current to load and unload cargo. We also discuss some challenges encountered in realizing a self-contained polymerized microtool. Microfluidic mixing, fluid flow control and convection currents have been demonstrated both experimentally and numerically for static metal thin films or passively floating nanoparticles. Here we show an integration of aforementioned functionalities in an optically fabricated and actuated microtool. As proof of concept, we demonstrate loading and unloading of beads. This can be extended to controlled transport and release of genetic material, bio-molecules, fluorescent dyes. We envisioned these microtools to be an important addition to the portfolio of structure-mediated contemporary biophotonics.

  7. Experimental simulation of latent heat thermal energy storage and heat pipe thermal transport for dish concentrator solar receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, R.; Zimmerman, W. F.; Poon, P. T. Y.

    1981-01-01

    Test results on a modular simulation of the thermal transport and heat storage characteristics of a heat pipe solar receiver (HPSR) with thermal energy storage (TES) are presented. The HPSR features a 15-25 kWe Stirling engine power conversion system at the focal point of a parabolic dish concentrator operating at 827 C. The system collects and retrieves solar heat with sodium pipes and stores the heat in NaF-MgF2 latent heat storage material. The trials were run with a single full scale heat pipe, three full scale TES containers, and an air-cooled heat extraction coil to replace the Stirling engine heat exchanger. Charging and discharging, constant temperature operation, mixed mode operation, thermal inertial, etc. were studied. The heat pipe performance was verified, as were the thermal energy storage and discharge rates and isothermal discharges.

  8. A non-equilibrium model for soil heating and moisture transport during extreme surface heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massman, William

    2016-04-01

    The increasing use of prescribed fire by land managers and increasing likelihood of wildfires due to climate change requires an improved modeling capability of extreme heating of soils during fires. This study describes a new model of soil evaporation and transport of heat, soil moisture, and water vapor, for use during fires. The model is based on conservation equations of energy and mass and its performance is evaluated against dynamic soil temperature and moisture observations obtained during laboratory experiments on soil samples exposed to surface heat fluxes ranging between 10,000 and 50,000 Wm2. In general, the model simulates the observed temperature dynamics quite well, but is less precise (but still good) at capturing the moisture dynamics. The model emulates the observed increase in soil moisture ahead of the drying front and the hiatus in the soil temperature rise during the strongly evaporative stage of drying. It also captures the observed rapid evaporation of soil moisture that occurs at relatively low temperatures (50-90 C), and can provide quite accurate predictions of the total amount of soil moisture evaporated during the laboratory experiments. Overall, this new model provides a much more physically realistic simulation over all previous models developed for the same purpose.

  9. DOS-HEATING6: A general conduction code with nuclear heat generation derived from DOT-IV transport calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.L.; Yuecel, A.; Nadkarny, S.

    1988-05-01

    The HEATING6 heat conduction code is modified to (a) read the multigroup particle fluxes from a two-dimensional DOT-IV neutron- photon transport calculation, (b) interpolate the fluxes from the DOT-IV variable (optional) mesh to the HEATING6 control volume mesh, and (c) fold the interpolated fluxes with kerma factors to obtain a nuclear heating source for the heat conduction equation. The modified HEATING6 is placed as a module in the ORNL discrete ordinates system (DOS), and has been renamed DOS-HEATING6. DOS-HEATING6 provides the capability for determining temperature distributions due to nuclear heating in complex, multi-dimensional systems. All of the original capabilities of HEATING6 are retained for the nuclear heating calculation; e.g., generalized boundary conditions (convective, radiative, finned, fixed temperature or heat flux), temperature and space dependent thermal properties, steady-state or transient analysis, general geometry description, etc. The numerical techniques used in the code are reviewed and the user input instructions and JCL to perform DOS-HEATING6 calculations are presented. Finally a sample problem involving coupled DOT-IV and DOS-HEATING6 calculations of a complex space-reactor configurations described, and the input and output of the calculations are listed. 10 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. 3D multi-scale analysis of coupled heat and moisture transport and its parallel implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruis, Jaroslav

    2016-06-01

    Parallel implementation of two-scale model of coupled heat and moisture transport is described. The coupled heat and moisture transport is based on the Künzel model. Motivation for the two-scale analysis comes from the requirement to describe distribution of the relative humidity and temperature in historical masonry structures.

  11. Nonlinear heat transport between the stack and the heat-exchangers of standing-wave thermoacoustic refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Benon, Ph.; Berson, A.

    2008-06-01

    The development of high performance thermoacoustic refrigerators requires an efficient heat transport between the stack and the heat exchangers. A 1D nonlinear model for the thermal coupling of these two components is proposed in the case of a standing-wave thermaocoustic refrigerator. It shows the generation of temperature harmonics close to the edges of the plates that affects heat transport. In order to validate the model, the nonlinear temperature field close to the stack edges is measured using cold-wire anemometry.

  12. Interface Exchange as an Indicator for Eddy Heat Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Mark R.; Williams, Sean J.; Hecht, Matthew W.; Maltrud, Mathew E.; Hamann, Bernd; Patchett, John M.; Ahrens, James P.

    2012-06-12

    The ocean contains many large-scale, long-lived vortices, called mesoscale eddies, that are believed to have a role in the transport and redistribution of salt, heat, and nutrients throughout the ocean. Determining this role, however, has proven to be a challenge, since the mechanics of eddies are only partly understood; a standard definition for these ocean eddies does not exist and, therefore, scientifically meaningful, robust methods for eddy extraction, characterization, tracking and visualization remain a challenge. In order to shed light on the nature and potential roles of eddies, we have combined our previous research on eddy identification and tracking, and have used those approaches as the basis for analysis-driven computational experiments on the nature of eddies. Based on the resulting visualizations of eddy behavior, we have devised a new metric to characterize the transfer of water into and out of eddies across their boundary, and have developed visualization methods for this new metric to provide clues about the role eddies play in the global ocean and, potentially, climate change.

  13. SOLAR WIND MODELING WITH TURBULENCE TRANSPORT AND HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Matthaeus, William H.; Breech, Benjamin A.

    2011-02-01

    We have developed an axisymmetric steady-state solar wind model that describes properties of the large-scale solar wind, interplanetary magnetic field, and turbulence throughout the heliosphere from 0.3 AU to 100 AU. The model is based on numerical solutions of large-scale Reynolds-averaged magnetohydrodynamic equations coupled with a set of small-scale transport equations for the turbulence energy, normalized cross helicity, and correlation scale. The combined set of time-dependent equations is solved in the frame of reference corotating with the Sun using a time-relaxation method. We use the model to study the self-consistent interaction between the large-scale solar wind and smaller-scale turbulence and the role of the turbulence in the large-scale structure and temperature distribution in the solar wind. To illuminate the roles of the turbulent cascade and the pickup protons in heating the solar wind depending on the heliocentric distance, we compare the model results with and without turbulence/pickup protons. The variations of plasma temperature in the outer heliosphere are compared with Ulysses and Voyager 2 observations.

  14. Optomechanical design of the grating laser beam combiner (GLBC) laser diode header

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rall, Jonathan A. R.; Spadin, Paul L.

    1989-01-01

    A laser diode header has been fabricated for a grating laser beam combiner (GLBC). The laser diode header provides the thermal control, the drive electronics, and the optical system necessary for proper operation of the beam combiner. The diode header is required to provide diffraction limited optical performance while providing correction for worst case defocus aberration, 0.6 mrad excess divergence, and worst case decenter aberration, 1.0 mrad pointing error. The design of the header considered the mechanical design and the optical design together resulting in a small, self-contained header with 0.7 mrad range for focus correction and +/- 2.5 mrad of beam steering. The complete diode header is currently undergoing optical and mechanical performance testing.

  15. Enhanced heat transport in environmental systems using microencapsulated phase change materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colvin, D. P.; Mulligan, J. C.; Bryant, Y. G.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology for enhanced heat transport and storage that uses a new two-component fluid mixture consisting of a microencapsulated phase change material (microPCM) for enhanced latent heat transport is outlined. SBIR investigations for NASA, USAF, SDIO, and NSF since 1983 have demonstrated the ability of the two-component microPCM coolants to provide enhancements in heat transport up to 40 times over that of the carrier fluid alone, enhancements of 50 to 100 percent in the heat transfer coefficient, practically isothermal operation when the coolant flow is circulated in an optimal manner, and significant reductions in pump work.

  16. Using Sea Level to Probe Linkages Between Heat Transport Convergence, Heat Storage Rate, and Air-Sea Heat Exchange in the Subtropical North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, L.; Kelly, K. A.; Booth, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Annual mean surface heat fluxes from the ocean to the atmosphere in midlatitudes are maximum in the Gulf Stream and that surface flux is driven by geostrophic heat transport convergence. Evidence is mounting that on interannual times scales, the surface flux of heat in the Gulf Stream region is controlled by the amount of heat that is stored in the region and that the heat storage rate is in turn controlled by geostrophic heat transport convergence. In addition, variations in meridional heat transport have been linked to the meridional overturning circulation just to the south of the Gulf Stream at the RAPID/MOCHA array at 26.5N, suggesting that changes in the meridional overturning circulation might be linked to surface heat exchange in the Gulf Stream. The twenty-year record of satellite sea level (SSH) along with high quality surface heat fluxes allow a detailed evaluation of the interaction between stored oceanic heat in this region and surface heat fluxes on interannual times scales. Using gridded sea level from AVISO as a proxy for upper ocean heat content along with surface turbulent heat flux from OAFlux, we evaluate the lagged correlations between interannual surface turbulent heat fluxes and SSH variability. Previous work has shown that where advection is small lagged correlations between SST (sea surface temperature) and surface turbulent heat flux are generally antisymmetric about zero lag with negative correlations when SST leads and positive correlations when SST lags. This indicates that surface heat fluxes force SST anomalies that at later times are damped by surface fluxes. In contrast, the lagged correlation between SSH anomalies and the turbulent flux of heat in the Gulf Stream region show a distinctly asymmetric relationship about zero-lag. The correlations are negative when SSH leads but are not significant when SSH lags indicating the dominant role in heat transport convergence in driving heat content changes, and that the heat content

  17. Numerical modeling for energy transport and isochoric heating in ultra-fast heated high Z target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rohini; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Hakel, Peter; Mancini, Roberto C.

    2010-11-01

    Collisional Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code is an effective tool to study extreme energy density conditions achieved in intense laser-solid interactions. In the continuous process of developing PIC code, we have recently implemented models to incorporate dynamic ionizations, namely Saha and Thomas Fermi, and radiation cooling (due to Bremsstrahlung and line emissions). We have also revised the existing collision model to take into account bounded electrons in dynamically ionizing target (partially ionized target). One-dimensional PIC simulation of a gold target with new collision model shows strong local heating in a micron distance due to shorter stopping range of fast electrons, which reflects the increased collision frequency due to bound electrons. The peak temperature in the heated region drops significantly due to the radiation cooling to a level of a few hundred eV from keV. We also discuss the target Z dependence on radiation loss and two-dimensional effects such as the resistive magnetic fields in the hot electron transport in metal targets.

  18. Generalized parallel heat transport equations in collisional to weakly collisional plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawaideh, Emad; Kim, N. S.; Najmabadi, Farrokh

    1988-11-01

    A new set of two-fluid heat-transport equations for heat conduction in collisional to weakly collisional plasmas was derived on the basis of gyrokinetic equations in flux coordinates. In these equations, no restrictions on the anisotropy of the ion distribution function or the collisionality are imposed. In the highly collisional limit, these equations reduce to the classical heat conduction equation of Spitzer and Haerm (1953), while in the weakly collisional limit, they describe a saturated heat flux. Numerical examples comparing these equations with conventional heat transport equations are presented.

  19. Demonstration of optical header recognition for BPSK data using novel design of logic gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakarla, Ravikiran; Venkitesh, Deepa

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate the experimental implementation of an all-optical header recognition system for phase modulated data using logic gates, realized with the least number of active elements compared to conventional demonstrations. We experimentally implement the individual optical AND, XNOR/XOR logic gates and optimize their performances. We integrate these logic gates to build an all-optical header recognition system. We verify the working of the header recognition system for different combinations of header and local address bits. We also discuss the implementation challenges of the demonstrated system.

  20. Strong eddy compensation for the Gulf Stream heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenko, Oleg A.

    2015-12-01

    Using a high-resolution ocean model forced with high-resolution atmospheric fields, a 5 year mean heat budget of the upper ocean in the Gulf Stream (GS) region is analyzed. The heat brought to the region with the mean flows along the GS path is 2-3 times larger than the heat loss to the atmosphere, with the difference being balanced by a strong cooling effect due to lateral eddy heat fluxes. However, over a broad area off the Grand Banks, the eddies warm the uppermost ocean layers, partly compensating for the loss of heat to the atmosphere. The upward eddy heat flux, which brings heat from the deeper ocean to the upper layers, is 30-80% of the surface heat loss.

  1. Anomalous heat transport and condensation in convection of cryogenic helium

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Pavel; Schmoranzer, David; Hanzelka, Pavel; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Skrbek, Ladislav

    2013-01-01

    When a hot body A is thermally connected to a cold body B, the textbook knowledge is that heat flows from A to B. Here, we describe the opposite case in which heat flows from a colder but constantly heated body B to a hotter but constantly cooled body A through a two-phase liquid–vapor system. Specifically, we provide experimental evidence that heat flows through liquid and vapor phases of cryogenic helium from the constantly heated, but cooler, bottom plate of a Rayleigh–Bénard convection cell to its hotter, but constantly cooled, top plate. The bottom plate is heated uniformly, and the top plate is cooled by heat exchange with liquid helium maintained at 4.2 K. Additionally, for certain experimental conditions, a rain of helium droplets is detected by small sensors placed in the cell at about one-half of its height. PMID:23576759

  2. Simulating water, solute, and heat transport in the subsurface with the VS2DI software package

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    The software package VS2DI was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for simulating water, solute, and heat transport in variably saturated porous media. The package consists of a graphical preprocessor to facilitate construction of a simulation, a postprocessor for visualizing simulation results, and two numerical models that solve for flow and solute transport (VS2DT) and flow and heat transport (VS2DH). The finite-difference method is used to solve the Richards equation for flow and the advection-dispersion equation for solute or heat transport. This study presents a brief description of the VS2DI package, an overview of the various types of problems that have been addressed with the package, and an analysis of the advantages and limitations of the package. A review of other models and modeling approaches for studying water, solute, and heat transport also is provided. ?? Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of local and regional heat transport processes into the subsurface urban heat island of Karlsruhe, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Susanne; Bayer, Peter; Menberg, Kathrin; Blum, Philipp

    2014-05-01

    Temperatures in shallow urban ground are typically elevated. They manifest as subsurface urban heat islands, which are observed worldwide in different metropolitan areas and which have a site-specific areal extent and intensity. As of right now the governing heat transport processes accumulating heat in the subsurface of cities are insufficiently understood. Based on a spatial assessment of groundwater temperatures, six individual heat flux processes could be identified: (1) heat flux from elevated ground surface temperatures (GST), (2) heat flux from basements of buildings, (3) reinjection of thermal waste water, (4) sewage drains, (5) sewage leakage, and (6) district heating. In this study, the contributions of these processes are quantified on local and regional scales for the city of Karlsruhe in Germany. For the regional scale, the Regionalized Monte Carlo (RMC) method is used. This method applies a single Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for the entire study area. At relatively low data demand, the RMC method provides basic insights into the heat contribution for the entire city. For the local scale, the Local Monte Carlo (LMC) method was developed and applied. This method analyzes all dominant heat fluxes spatially dependent by performing an MC simulation for each arbitrary sized pixel of the study area (here 10 x 10 m). This more intricate approach allows for a spatial representation of all heat flux processes, which is necessary for the local planning of geothermal energy use. In order to evaluate the heat transport processes on a regional scale, we compared the mean annual thermal energies that result from the individual heat flux processes. Both methods identify the heat flux from elevated GST and the heat flux from buildings as the dominant regional processes. However, reinjection of thermal wastewater is by far the most dominant local heat flux processes with an average heat flux of 16 ± 2 W/m2 in the affected areas. Although being dominant on the regional

  4. Modulated heat pulse propagation and partial transport barriers in chaotic magnetic fields

    DOE PAGESBeta

    del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Blazevski, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Direct numerical simulations of the time dependent parallel heat transport equation modeling heat pulses driven by power modulation in 3-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields are presented. The numerical method is based on the Fourier formulation of a Lagrangian-Green's function method that provides an accurate and efficient technique for the solution of the parallel heat transport equation in the presence of harmonic power modulation. The numerical results presented provide conclusive evidence that even in the absence of magnetic flux surfaces, chaotic magnetic field configurations with intermediate levels of stochasticity exhibit transport barriers to modulated heat pulse propagation. In particular, high-order islands and remnants of destroyed flux surfaces (Cantori) act as partial barriers that slow down or even stop the propagation of heat waves at places where the magnetic field connection length exhibits a strong gradient. The key parameter ismore » $$\\gamma=\\sqrt{\\omega/2 \\chi_\\parallel}$$ that determines the length scale, $$1/\\gamma$$, of the heat wave penetration along the magnetic field line. For large perturbation frequencies, $$\\omega \\gg 1$$, or small parallel thermal conductivities, $$\\chi_\\parallel \\ll 1$$, parallel heat transport is strongly damped and the magnetic field partial barriers act as robust barriers where the heat wave amplitude vanishes and its phase speed slows down to a halt. On the other hand, in the limit of small $$\\gamma$$, parallel heat transport is largely unimpeded, global transport is observed and the radial amplitude and phase speed of the heat wave remain finite. Results on modulated heat pulse propagation in fully stochastic fields and across magnetic islands are also presented. In qualitative agreement with recent experiments in LHD and DIII-D, it is shown that the elliptic (O) and hyperbolic (X) points of magnetic islands have a direct impact on the spatio-temporal dependence of the amplitude and the time delay

  5. Heat Transport Near the Lambda Line in a Channel Containing He II

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, M.; Sato, A.; Dantsuka, T.; Yuyama, M.; Kamioka, Y.

    2006-04-27

    We proposed a normalized representation of the thermal conductivity function for heat transport in He II in the previous work. In order to check its validity, steady state heat transport characteristics of He II was investigated near T{lambda}. The temperature profiles along the channels were measured at various pressures of 0.1, 1.0 and 1.5 MPa. The measured temperature profiles were analyzed to get the thermal conductivity function near T{lambda}. The validity of the universal heat transport formula was confirmed up to T / T{lambda} = 0.99.

  6. A non-equilibrium model for soil heating and moisture transport during extreme surface heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massman, W. J.

    2015-03-01

    With increasing use of prescribed fire by land managers and increasing likelihood of wildfires due to climate change comes the need to improve modeling capability of extreme heating of soils during fires. This issue is addressed here by developing a one-dimensional non-equilibrium model of soil evaporation and transport of heat, soil moisture, and water vapor, for use with surface forcing ranging from daily solar cycles to extreme conditions encountered during fires. The model employs a linearized Crank-Nicolson scheme for the conservation equations of energy and mass and its performance is evaluated against dynamic soil temperature and moisture observations obtained during laboratory experiments on soil samples exposed to surface heat fluxes ranging between 10 000 and 50 000 W m-2. The Hertz-Knudsen equation is the basis for constructing the model's non-equilibrium evaporative source term. The model includes a dynamic residual soil moisture as a function of temperature and soil water potential, which allows the model to capture some of the dynamic aspects of the strongly bound soil moisture that seems to require temperatures well beyond 150 °C to fully evaporate. Furthermore, the model emulates the observed increase in soil moisture ahead of the drying front and the hiatus in the soil temperature rise during the strongly evaporative stage of drying. It also captures the observed rapid evaporation of soil moisture that occurs at relatively low temperatures (50-90 °C). Sensitivity analyses indicate that the model's success results primarily from the use of a temperature and moisture potential dependent condensation coefficient in the evaporative source term. The model's solution for water vapor density (and vapor pressure), which can exceed one standard atmosphere, cannot be experimentally verified, but they are supported by results from (earlier and very different) models developed for somewhat different purposes and for different porous media. Overall, this non

  7. Investigation of ion and electron heat transport of high-Te ECH heated discharges in the large helical device

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pablant, N. A.; Satake, S.; Yokoyama, M.; Gates, D. A.; Bitter, M.; Bertelli, N.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Dinklage, A.; Goto, M.; Hill, K. W.; et al

    2016-01-28

    An analysis of the radial electric field and heat transport, both for ions and electrons, is presented for a high-more » $${{T}_{\\text{e}}}$$ electron cyclotron heated (ECH) discharge on the large helical device (LHD). Transport analysis is done using the task3d transport suite utilizing experimentally measured profiles for both ions and electrons. Ion temperature and perpendicular flow profiles are measured using the recently installed x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer diagnostic (XICS), while electron temperature and density profiles are measured using Thomson scattering. The analysis also includes calculated ECH power deposition profiles as determined through the travis ray-tracing code. This is the first time on LHD that this type of integrated transport analysis with measured ion temperature profiles has been performed without NBI, allowing the heat transport properties of plasmas with only ECH heating to be more clearly examined. For this study, a plasma discharge is chosen which develops a high central electron temperature ($${{T}_{\\text{eo}}}=9$$ keV) at moderately low densities ($${{n}_{\\text{eo}}}=1.5\\times {{10}^{19}}$$ m-3). The experimentally determined transport properties from task3d are compared to neoclassical predictions as calculated by the gsrake and fortec-3d codes. The predicted electron fluxes are seen to be an order of magnitude less than the measured fluxes, indicating that electron transport is largely anomalous, while the neoclassical and measured ion heat fluxes are of the same magnitude. Neoclassical predictions of a strong positive ambipolar electric field ($${{E}_{\\text{r}}}$$ ) in the plasma core are validated through comparisons to perpendicular flow measurements from the XICS diagnostic. Furthermore, this provides confidence that the predictions are producing physically meaningful results for the particle fluxes and radial electric field, which are a key component in correctly predicting plasma confinement.« less

  8. Investigation of ion and electron heat transport of high-T e ECH heated discharges in the large helical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pablant, N. A.; Satake, S.; Yokoyama, M.; Gates, D. A.; Bitter, M.; Bertelli, N.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Dinklage, A.; Goto, M.; Hill, K. W.; Igamai, S.; Kubo, S.; Lazerson, S.; Matsuoka, S.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Morita, S.; Oishi, T.; Seki, R.; Shimozuma, T.; Suzuki, C.; Suzuki, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Yamada, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; the LHD Experiment Group

    2016-04-01

    An analysis of the radial electric field and heat transport, both for ions and electrons, is presented for a high-{{T}\\text{e}} electron cyclotron heated (ECH) discharge on the large helical device (LHD). Transport analysis is done using the task3d transport suite utilizing experimentally measured profiles for both ions and electrons. Ion temperature and perpendicular flow profiles are measured using the recently installed x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer diagnostic (XICS), while electron temperature and density profiles are measured using Thomson scattering. The analysis also includes calculated ECH power deposition profiles as determined through the travis ray-tracing code. This is the first time on LHD that this type of integrated transport analysis with measured ion temperature profiles has been performed without NBI, allowing the heat transport properties of plasmas with only ECH heating to be more clearly examined. For this study, a plasma discharge is chosen which develops a high central electron temperature ({{T}\\text{eo}}=9 keV) at moderately low densities ({{n}\\text{eo}}=1.5× {{10}19} m-3). The experimentally determined transport properties from task3d are compared to neoclassical predictions as calculated by the gsrake and fortec-3d codes. The predicted electron fluxes are seen to be an order of magnitude less than the measured fluxes, indicating that electron transport is largely anomalous, while the neoclassical and measured ion heat fluxes are of the same magnitude. Neoclassical predictions of a strong positive ambipolar electric field ({{E}\\text{r}} ) in the plasma core are validated through comparisons to perpendicular flow measurements from the XICS diagnostic. This provides confidence that the predictions are producing physically meaningful results for the particle fluxes and radial electric field, which are a key component in correctly predicting plasma confinement.

  9. Investigation of ion and electron heat transport of high- T e ECH heated discharges in the large helical device

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pablant, N. A.; Satake, S.; Yokoyama, M.; Gates, D. A.; Bitter, M.; Bertelli, N.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Dinklage, A.; Goto, M.; Hill, K. W.; et al

    2016-01-28

    An analysis of the radial electric field and heat transport, both for ions and electrons, is presented for a high-more » $${{T}_{\\text{e}}}$$ electron cyclotron heated (ECH) discharge on the large helical device (LHD). Transport analysis is done using the task3d transport suite utilizing experimentally measured profiles for both ions and electrons. Ion temperature and perpendicular flow profiles are measured using the recently installed x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer diagnostic (XICS), while electron temperature and density profiles are measured using Thomson scattering. The analysis also includes calculated ECH power deposition profiles as determined through the travis ray-tracing code. This is the first time on LHD that this type of integrated transport analysis with measured ion temperature profiles has been performed without NBI, allowing the heat transport properties of plasmas with only ECH heating to be more clearly examined. For this study, a plasma discharge is chosen which develops a high central electron temperature ($${{T}_{\\text{eo}}}=9$$ keV) at moderately low densities ($${{n}_{\\text{eo}}}=1.5\\times {{10}^{19}}$$ m-3). The experimentally determined transport properties from task3d are compared to neoclassical predictions as calculated by the gsrake and fortec-3d codes. The predicted electron fluxes are seen to be an order of magnitude less than the measured fluxes, indicating that electron transport is largely anomalous, while the neoclassical and measured ion heat fluxes are of the same magnitude. Neoclassical predictions of a strong positive ambipolar electric field ($${{E}_{\\text{r}}}$$ ) in the plasma core are validated through comparisons to perpendicular flow measurements from the XICS diagnostic. This provides confidence that the predictions are producing physically meaningful results for the particle fluxes and radial electric field, which are a key component in correctly predicting plasma confinement.« less

  10. ANALYZING NUMERICAL ERRORS IN DOMAIN HEAT TRANSPORT MODELS USING THE CVBEM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hromadka, T.V., II

    1987-01-01

    Besides providing an exact solution for steady-state heat conduction processes (Laplace-Poisson equations), the CVBEM (complex variable boundary element method) can be used for the numerical error analysis of domain model solutions. For problems where soil-water phase change latent heat effects dominate the thermal regime, heat transport can be approximately modeled as a time-stepped steady-state condition in the thawed and frozen regions, respectively. The CVBEM provides an exact solution of the two-dimensional steady-state heat transport problem, and also provides the error in matching the prescribed boundary conditions by the development of a modeling error distribution or an approximate boundary generation.

  11. General circulation driven by baroclinic forcing due to cloud layer heating: Significance of planetary rotation and polar eddy heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masaru; Takahashi, Masaaki

    2016-04-01

    A high significance of planetary rotation and poleward eddy heat fluxes is determined for general circulation driven by baroclinic forcing due to cloud layer heating. In a high-resolution simplified Venus general circulation model, a planetary-scale mixed Rossby-gravity wave with meridional winds across the poles produces strong poleward heat flux and indirect circulation. This strong poleward heat transport induces downward momentum transport of indirect cells in the regions of weak high-latitude jets. It also reduces the meridional temperature gradient and vertical shear of the high-latitude jets in accordance with the thermal wind relation below the cloud layer. In contrast, strong equatorial superrotation and midlatitude jets form in the cloud layer in the absence of polar indirect cells in an experiment involving Titan's rotation. Both the strong midlatitude jet and meridional temperature gradient are maintained in the situation that eddy horizontal heat fluxes are weak. The presence or absence of strong poleward eddy heat flux is one of the important factors determining the slow or fast superrotation state in the cloud layer through the downward angular momentum transport and the thermal wind relation. For fast Earth rotation, a weak global-scale Hadley circulation of the low-density upper atmosphere maintains equatorial superrotation and midlatitude jets above the cloud layer, whereas multiple meridional circulations suppress the zonal wind speed below the cloud layer.

  12. Phishtest: Measuring the Impact of Email Headers on the Predictive Accuracy of Machine Learning Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tout, Hicham

    2013-01-01

    The majority of documented phishing attacks have been carried by email, yet few studies have measured the impact of email headers on the predictive accuracy of machine learning techniques in detecting email phishing attacks. Research has shown that the inclusion of a limited subset of email headers as features in training machine learning…

  13. Notes on Operations. The Documentation of Electronic Texts Using Text Encoding Initiative Headers: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giordano, Richard

    1994-01-01

    Describes the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) project and the TEI header, which documents electronic text in a standard interchange format understandable to both librarian catalogers and nonlibrarian text encoders. The form and function of the TEI header is introduced, and its relationship to the MARC record is explained. (10 references) (KRN)

  14. Proso Millet Harvest: A Comparison of Conventional Harvest and Direct Harvest with a Stripper Header

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research was conducted to determine if proso millet can be harvested with a stripper header. Stripper headers use extremely fast rotating metal teeth to rip the seed off the plant and leave the majority of residue standing in the field as opposed to cutting off the entire plant and running tha...

  15. Partial barriers to heat transport in monotonic- q and reversed shear 3-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Blazevski, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    The quantitative understanding of the role of magnetic field stochasticity on transport in 3-D configurations is of paramount importance for the magnetic confinement of fusion plasmas. Problems of interest include the control of ELMs by RMPs and the assessment of heat fluxes at the divertor. In this contribution we present numerical solutions of the time dependent parallel heat transport equation describing transport of heat pulses in 3-D chaotic magnetic fields. To overcome the limitations of standard approaches, we use a Lagrangian-Green's function (LG) method that allows the efficient and accurate integration of the anisotropic heat transport equation with local and non-local parallel heat flux closures in integrable and chaotic B fields. The results provide conclusive evidence that even in the absence of flux surfaces, chaotic magnetic field configurations exhibit partial barriers to heat transport. In particular, high-order islands and remnants of destroyed flux surfaces (Cantori) act as partial ``leaky'' barriers that slow down or even stop the inward propagation of heat pulses. The magnetic field connection length, < lB > , exhibits a strong gradient where the partial barriers form, and it reaches a plateau whose value determines the ``porosity'' of the barrier. Heat pulses are shown to slow down considerably in the shear reversal region and, as a result, the time delay of the temperature response in chaotic reversed shear configurations is about an order of magnitude larger than the time delay in monotonic q-profiles.

  16. Is the Standard Definition of Poleward Heat Transport Appropriate in Climate Research?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Minyi; Czaja, Arnaud; Graversen, Rune; Tailleux, Remi

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a problem with the standard definition of poleward heat transport is highlighted. This, we argue, arises because of the dependence of the standard definition on an arbitrary reference state for moist static energy. This dependence may result in large uncertainty in the estimates of ocean-atmosphere coupling, the signature in heat transport of the atmospheric storm track and annular modes of variability. A new definition is proposed to address the problem, which removes unrealistically large fluctuations (4PW) found when using the standard definition. A practical way to implement the new formulation is also discussed. The new heat transport definition is shown to lead to better correlations with climate indices compared to the traditional definition. In particular a clear relationship between the AO, El Niño and heat transport emerges in our analysis. In addition, it also produces different time sequence of event with large/weak poleward heat transport. It is hoped that the new heat transport definition may shed light on studies exploring the link between energy transport and climate variability.

  17. Corrosion protected reversing heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Zawierucha, R.

    1984-09-25

    A reversing heat exchanger of the plate and fin type having multiple aluminum parting sheets in a stacked arrangement with corrugated fins separating the sheets to form multiple flow paths, means for closing the ends of the sheets, an input manifold arrangement of headers for the warm end of of the exchanger and an output manifold arrangement for the cold end of the exchanger with the input air feed stream header and the waste gas exhaust header having an alloy of zinc and aluminum coated on the inside surface for providing corrosion protection to the stack.

  18. Determining the Cause of a Header Failure in a Natural Gas Production Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Matthes, S.A.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Holcomb, G.R.

    2007-03-01

    An investigation was made into the premature failure of a gas-header at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) natural gas production facility. A wide variety of possible failure mechanisms were considered: design of the header, deviation from normal pipe alloy composition, physical orientation of the header, gas composition and flow rate, type of corrosion, protectiveness of the interior oxide film, time of wetness, and erosion-corrosion. The failed header was examined using metallographic techniques, scanning electron microscopy, and microanalysis. A comparison of the failure site and an analogous site that had not failed, but exhibited similar metal thinning was also performed. From these studies it was concluded that failure resulted from erosion-corrosion, and that design elements of the header and orientation with respect to gas flow contributed to the mass loss at the failure point.

  19. Intestinal transport of hexoses in the rat following chronic heat exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1979-01-01

    The study examines intestinal transport of sugars (D-glucose and D-galactose) in vitro and assesses organ maintenance in chronically heat-exposed rats. The results suggest that the response of intestinal absorption to heat exposure in the rat involves changes in intestinal weight and in glucose utilization. Despite the reduction in total intestinal weight, the ability of intestinal tissue to transport hexose per unit weight remains stable. Differences in intestinal weight and glucose utilization between pair-fed and heat-exposed animals suggest that the intestinal response to chronic heat exposure is not solely a function of the amount of food consumed. Alterations of hexose transport appear to be related to altered glucose metabolism and not altered transport capacity.

  20. Main Modes of Heat Transport in Rayleigh-Bénard Convection Analyzed by a POD approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luelff, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Rayleigh-Bénard convection, i.e. the buoyancy-induced movement of a fluid enclosed between two horizontal plates, is the definite setup to study thermal convection. We are interested in the heat transport of the main modes that are found in the convection cell. To this end, we apply the technique of proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) to obtain a set of empirical basis modes from simulation data. Usually the POD method results in modes that are optimal in describing the generalized energy, i.e. kinetic energy plus temperature variance. We extend the technique so that instead it gives the optimal modes with respect to the heat transport, measured in terms of the Nusselt number. We then demonstrate at numerical simulations of different RB setups and geometries that the proposed ansatz performs consistently better than the standard approach in describing the heat transport. Furthermore, the coherent structures that are connected to the biggest heat transport are examined.

  1. Development and Analysis of Advanced High-Temperature Technology for Nuclear Heat Transport and Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Per F. Peterson

    2010-03-01

    This project by the Thermal Hydraulics Research Laboratory at U.C. Berkeley Studied advanced high-temperature heat transport and power conversion technology, in support of the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative and Generation IV.

  2. ANALYZING NUMERICAL ERRORS IN DOMAIN HEAT TRANSPORT MODELS USING THE CVBEM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hromadka, T.V., II

    1985-01-01

    Besides providing an exact solution for steady-state heat conduction processes (Laplace Poisson equations), the CVBEM (complex variable boundary element method) can be used for the numerical error analysis of domain model solutions. For problems where soil water phase change latent heat effects dominate the thermal regime, heat transport can be approximately modeled as a time-stepped steady-state condition in the thawed and frozen regions, respectively. The CVBEM provides an exact solution of the two-dimensional steady-state heat transport problem, and also provides the error in matching the prescribed boundary conditions by the development of a modeling error distribution or an approximative boundary generation. This error evaluation can be used to develop highly accurate CVBEM models of the heat transport process, and the resulting model can be used as a test case for evaluating the precision of domain models based on finite elements or finite differences.

  3. Radiative heat transport instability in a laser produced inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Rozmus, W.

    2015-08-15

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation emission and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived, and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability [R. G. Evans, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 27, 751 (1985)]. Under conditions of indirect drive fusion experiments, the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and, in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered. This instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation, thus affecting inertial confinement fusion related experiments.

  4. Pyrolysis of epoxies used for thermal-battery headers

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, R.A.; Thornberg, S.M.; Campbell-Domme, B.

    1995-08-01

    Thermally activated batteries use an epoxy for encapsulation of the electrical feedthroughs in the header of the battery. When the thermal battery is thermally abused, the encapsulant can pyrolyze and generate large internal pressures. This causes the battery to vent in extreme cases. The nature of these gases has never been adequately documented. Therefore, a study was undertaken to address this deficiency. The pyrolysis of various encapsulants that have been used, or are being considered for use, in thermally activated batteries was studied over a temperature range of 155 to 455 C. The composition of the pyrolysis decomposition products was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GS/MS). This determination is helpful in assessing the potential environmental and health effect for personnel exposed to such gases. In addition, the thermal stability of the various epoxies was measured by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

  5. Shape optimized headers and methods of manufacture thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin, Ian James

    2013-11-05

    Disclosed herein is a shape optimized header comprising a shell that is operative for collecting a fluid; wherein an internal diameter and/or a wall thickness of the shell vary with a change in pressure and/or a change in a fluid flow rate in the shell; and tubes; wherein the tubes are in communication with the shell and are operative to transfer fluid into the shell. Disclosed herein is a method comprising fixedly attaching tubes to a shell; wherein the shell is operative for collecting a fluid; wherein an internal diameter and/or a wall thickness of the shell vary with a change in pressure and/or a change in a fluid flow rate in the shell; and wherein the tubes are in communication with the shell and are operative to transfer fluid into the shell.

  6. Evaluating two process scale chromatography column header designs using CFD.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Chris; Natarajan, Venkatesh; Antoniou, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Chromatography is an indispensable unit operation in the downstream processing of biomolecules. Scaling of chromatographic operations typically involves a significant increase in the column diameter. At this scale, the flow distribution within a packed bed could be severely affected by the distributor design in process scale columns. Different vendors offer process scale columns with varying design features. The effect of these design features on the flow distribution in packed beds and the resultant effect on column efficiency and cleanability needs to be properly understood in order to prevent unpleasant surprises on scale-up. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) provides a cost-effective means to explore the effect of various distributor designs on process scale performance. In this work, we present a CFD tool that was developed and validated against experimental dye traces and tracer injections. Subsequently, the tool was employed to compare and contrast two commercially available header designs. PMID:24616438

  7. Economizer recirculation for low-load stability in heat recovery steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Cuscino, R.T.; Shade, R.L. Jr.

    1986-04-15

    An economizer system is described for heating feedwater in a heat recovery steam generator which consists of: at least first and second economizer tube planes; each of the economizer tube planes including a plurality of generally parallel tubes; the tubes being generally vertically disposed; each of the economizer tube planes including a top header and a bottom header; all of the plurality of tubes in each economizer tube plane being connected in parallel to their top and bottom headers whereby parallel feedwater flow through the plurality of tubes between the top and bottom headers is enabled; one of the top and bottom headers being an inlet header; a second of the top and bottom headers being an outlet header; a boiler feed pump; the boiler feed pump being effective for applying a flow of feedwater to the inlet header; means for serially interconnecting the economizer tube planes; the means for serially interconnecting including means for flowing the feedwater upward and downward in tubes of alternating ones of the economizer tube planes between the inlet header and the outlet header; means for conveying heated feedwater from the outlet header to a using process; means for recirculating at least a portion of the heated feedwater from the outlet header to an inlet of the boiler feed pump; and the means for recirculating including means for relating the portion to a steam load in the using process whereby an increased flow is produced through all of the economizer tube planes at values of the steam load below a predetermined value and a condition permitting initiation of reverse flow in any of the tubes is substantially reduced.

  8. Operating atmospheric vent collection headers using methane gas enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, L.G.

    1996-12-31

    Tests at 60{degrees}C and 16psia using ethylene, hydrogen and methyl alcohol {open_quote}fuel vapors{open_quotes} showed that if an atmospheric vent collection header contains 25 vol% of methane and the only source of oxygen is the air, no possible mixture of fuel vapor, nitrogen and residual oxygen is flammable. Addition of these fuel vapors to a header containing 25% by volume of methane in all cases increases the 3.8 vol% oxygen safety factor that exists with zero fuel vapor in the gas stream. It is irrelevant that the fuel vapor has an upper flammable limit (VFL) greater than the methane enrichment gas. The minimum oxygen concentration to sustain a flame (MOC) increases with increased methane:nitrogen ratio in the gas stream, so that the {open_quote}listed{close_quotes} MOC has no relevance under methane enriched conditions. These findings have important ramifications when applying Coast Guard Regulations in 33CFR.154 for Marine Vapor Control Systems, which implies the need to operate at 170% of the combined gas stream UFL and requires operation at less than the MOC ({le} 8% oxygen) when tanks have been partly inerted with nitrogen. Large reductions of enrichment gas usage with attendant environmental benefits are technically possible using flow control of methane rather than gas analysis down-stream of the enrichment station. Operation above the UFL rather than below the MOC can cut enrichment gas usage by 50% or more while actually increasing the assumed 2 vol% oxygen safety factor. A negative flow control error of 7 vol% methane ({minus} 280% of target) is required to achieve flammability under worst case assumptions. 18 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Nonlocal heat transport by non-Maxwellian electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, K.; Short, R.W.

    1984-03-30

    The generalization of the Spitzer-Harm solution to steep density and temperature gradients requires the computation of the appropriate non-Maxwellian isotropic part of the electron distribution. We develop analytic solutions for a steady state, high-Z plasma, employing the diffusion approximation. Applications of our solution include computation of the resulting heat flux, thermal smoothing of transverse temperature perturbations, and modification of linear heat flow instabilities.

  10. Heat transport in the vicinity of an artificial recharge site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbohede, Alexander; van Houtte, Emmanuel; Lebbe, Luc

    2010-05-01

    observation well with reference to the ponds increases with depth (for instance from 28 days 4.1 m below surface to 154 days 10 m below surface for an observation well at 10 m from the ponds). This confirms previous flow modelling which showed that groundwater flows relatively rapidly laterally from the recharge ponds towards the extraction wells. Additionally, part of the recharge water flows in a deeper flow cycle towards the extraction wells. Residence times in this deeper flow cycle are evidently larger than in the direct lateral flow cycle from the ponds towards the wells. This explains the increase with depth. The 154 days (with respect to a mean time of 90 days) points to the fact that the extracted water contains a large spectrum of residence times with mean of 90 days for the heat transport, as was also derived by the flow modelling previously

  11. Anomalous ion heating from ambipolar-constrained magnetic fluctuation-induced transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gatto, R.; Terry, P. W.

    2001-01-01

    A kinetic theory for the anomalous heating of ions from energy stored in magnetic turbulence is presented. Imposing self consistency through the constitutive relations between particle distributions and fields, a turbulent Kirchhoff's law is derived that expresses a direct connection between rates of ion heating and electron thermal transport. This connection arises from the kinematics of electron motion along turbulent fields, which results in granular structures in the electron distribution. The drag exerted on these structures through emission into collective modes mediates ambipolar-constrained transport. Resonant damping of the collective modes by ions produces the heating. In collisionless plasmas the rate of ion damping controls the rate of emission, and hence the ambipolar-constrained electron heat flux. The heating rate is calculated for both a resonant and non-resonant magnetic fluctuation spectrum and compared with observations. The theoretical heating rate is sufficient to account for the observed two-fold rise in ion temperature during sawtooth events in experimental discharges.

  12. Development of a Two-Phase Capillary Pumped Heat Transport for Spacecraft Central Thermal Bus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Triem; Brown, Michael; Baldauff, Robert; Cummings, Sheila

    2003-01-01

    Thermal requirements of future spacecraft and satellites will certainly outgrow the capability of conventional heat pipes in terms of heat transport, heat density, and temperature control. Emerging passive heat transport technologies such as Capillary Pumped Loop (CPL) and Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) have demonstrated in both ground testing and micro-gravity flight experiments that they have the potential to replace heat pipes as primary heat transport devices in next generation thermal control technology. Like heat pipes, CPLs and LHPs are completely passive systems which have no mechanical moving part to wear out or to introduce unwanted vibration to the spacecraft. However, the heat transport capabilities of CPLs and LHPs are at least one order of magnitude higher than those of heat pipes. Despite sharing many operational characteristics. CPLs and LHPs do have differences. CPLs require a lengthy and tedious start-up procedure to prime the wicks before heat is applied to the evaporator plate. Even with the start-up procedure, start-ups are not always successful. LHPs, on the other hand, do not require a wick pre-conditioning process. But the LHP effective thermal conductance is not as high as that of a CPL. Temperature control of a LHP is not easily achieved. A novel concept, which combined a CPL and a LHP into one loop, was proposed to take advantage of selective features of each system without inheriting their shortcomings. The resultant loop was called Advanced Loop Heat Pipe (A-LHP). A proof-of-concept testbed was put together and tested at the Naval Research Laboratory. Test results showed that the A-LHP performed like a CPL without start-up problems associated with CPLs.

  13. Parallel heat transport in reversed shear magnetic field configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazevski, D.; Del-Castillo-Negrete, D.

    2012-03-01

    Transport in magnetized plasmas is a key problem in controlled fusion, space plasmas, and astrophysics. Three issues make this problem particularly challenging: (i) The extreme anisotropy between the parallel (i.e., along the magnetic field), χ, and the perpendicular, χ, conductivities (χ/χ may exceed 10^10 in fusion plasmas); (ii) Magnetic field lines chaos; and (iii) Nonlocal parallel transport. We have recently developed a Lagrangian Green's function (LG) method to solve the local and non-local parallel (χ/χ->∞) transport equation applicable to integrable and chaotic magnetic fields. footnotetext D. del-Castillo-Negrete, L. Chac'on, PRL, 106, 195004 (2011); D. del-Castillo-Negrete, L. Chac'on, Phys. Plasmas, APS Invited paper, submitted (2011). The proposed method overcomes many of the difficulties faced by standard finite different methods related to the three issues mentioned above. Here we apply the LG method to study transport in reversed shear configurations. We focus on the following problems: (i) separatrix reconnection of magnetic islands and transport; (ii) robustness of shearless, q'=0, transport barriers; (iii) leaky barriers and shearless Cantori.

  14. DYNAMICS OF WATER TRANSPORT AND STORAGE IN CONIFERS STUDIED WITH DEUTERIUM AND HEAT TRACING TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The volume and complexity of their vascular systems make the dynamics of long-distance water transport difficult to study. We used heat and deuterated water (D2O) as tracers to characterize whole-tree water transport and storage properties in individual trees belonging to the co...

  15. Transports and budgets of volume, heat, and salt from a global eddy-resolving ocean model

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, M.P.; Semtner, A.J. Jr.; Chervin, R.M.

    1994-07-01

    The results from an integration of a global ocean circulation model have been condensed into an analysis of the volume, heat, and salt transports among the major ocean basins. Transports are also broken down between the model`s Ekman, thermocline, and deep layers. Overall, the model does well. Horizontal exchanges of mass, heat, and salt between ocean basins have reasonable values: and the volume of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) transport is in general agreement with what limited observations exist. On a global basis the zonally integrated meridional heat transport is poleward at all latitudes except for the latitude band 30{degrees}S to 45{degrees}S. This anomalous transport is most likely a signature of the model`s inability to form Antarctic Intermediate (AAIW) and Antarctic bottom water (AABW) properly. Eddy heat transport is strong at the equator where its convergence heats the equatorial Pacific about twice as much as it heats the equatorial Atlantic. The greater heating in the Pacific suggests that mesoscale eddies may be a vital mechanism for warming and maintaining an upwelling portion of the global conveyor-belt circulation. The model`s fresh water transport compares well with observations. However, in the Atlantic there is an excessive southward transport of fresh water due to the absence of the Mediterranean outflow and weak northward flow of AAIW. Perhaps the model`s greatest weakness is the lack of strong AAIW and AABW circulation cells. Accurate thermohaline forcing in the North Atlantic (based on numerous hydrographic observations) helps the model adequately produce NADW. In contrast, the southern ocean is an area of sparse observation. Better thermohaline observations in this area may be needed if models such as this are to produce the deep convection that will achieve more accurate simulations of the global 3-dimensional circulation. 41 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  16. A statistical analysis of avalanching heat transport in stationary enhanced core confinement regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, S.; Jhang, Hogun; Kim, S. S.; Diamond, P. H.

    2012-09-15

    We present a statistical analysis of heat transport in stationary enhanced confinement regimes obtained from flux-driven gyrofluid simulations. The probability density functions of heat flux in improved confinement regimes, characterized by the Nusselt number, show significant deviation from Gaussian, with a markedly fat tail, implying the existence of heat avalanches. Two types of avalanching transport are found to be relevant to stationary states, depending on the degree of turbulence suppression. In the weakly suppressed regime, heat avalanches occur in the form of quasi-periodic (QP) heat pulses. Collisional relaxation of zonal flow is likely to be the origin of these QP heat pulses. This phenomenon is similar to transient limit cycle oscillations observed prior to edge pedestal formation in recent experiments. On the other hand, a spectral analysis of heat flux in the strongly suppressed regime shows the emergence of a 1/f (f is the frequency) band, suggesting the presence of self-organized criticality (SOC)-like episodic heat avalanches. This episodic 1/f heat avalanches have a long temporal correlation and constitute the dominant transport process in this regime.

  17. Transition between ballistic and diffusive heat transport regimes in silicon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldovan, Martin

    2012-09-01

    We study the extent of ballistic and diffusive thermal transport and the range of application of the Casimir and Fourier theories in semiconductor materials by using a theoretical model based on the Boltzmann transport equation. We show that combined effects of length scale, temperature, and boundary roughness are responsible for thermal transport transitions in silicon nanowires and thin films. We also introduce a more accurate principle for ballistic transport that considers the balance between internal and surface scattering. Phonon quantum confinement effects as well as the conditions for phonon wave interference in nanoscale heat transport are discussed.

  18. Seasonal Cycles of Meridional Overturning and Heat Transport of the Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Tong; Marotzke, Jochem

    1998-01-01

    A general circulation model of the Indian Ocean is fitted to monthly averaged climatological temperatures, salinities, and surface fluxes using the adjoint method. Interannual variability is minimized by penalizing the temporal drift from one seasonal cycle to another during a two-year integration. The resultant meridional overturning and heat transport display large seasonal variations, with maximum amplitudes of 18 and 22 (x 10(exp 6) cubic m/s) for the overturning and 1.8 and 1.4 (x 10(exp 15) W) for heat transport near 10 S and 10 N, respectively. A dynamical decomposition of the overturning and heat transport shows that the time-varying Ekman How plus its barotropic compensation can explain a large part of the seasonal variations in overturning and heat transport. The maximum variations at 10 deg N and 10 deg S are associated with monsoon reversal over the northern Indian Ocean and changes of the easterlies over the southern Indian Ocean. An external mode with variable topography has a moderate contribution where the Somali Current and the corresponding gyre reverse direction seasonally. Contribution front vertical shear (thermal wind and ageostrophic shear) is dominant near the southern boundary and large near the Somali Current latitudes. The dominant balance in the zonally integrated heat budget is between heat storage change and heat transport convergence except south of 15 S. Optimization with seasonal forcings improves estimates of sea surface temperatures, but the annual average overturning and heat transport are very similar to previous results with annual mean forcings. The annual average heat transport consists of roughly equal contributions from time-mean and time-varying fields of meridional velocities and temperatures in the northern Indian Ocean. indicating a significant rectification to the heat transport due to the time-varying fields. The time-mean and time-varying contributions are primarily due to the overturning and horizontal gyre

  19. Operational demonstration of a field of high performance flat plate collectors with isothermal heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merges, V.; Klippel, E.

    1983-12-01

    A solar plant with 21 sq m of highly efficient flat plate collectors and which requires no electricity is described. Heat transport is provided by saturated steam that condenses in a four cubic meter storage tank. The operation temperature is set by the buffer gas pressure between 100 and 140 C, and an absorption chiller is simulated as a heat consumer. The solar collectors were observed to exhibit high performance. Heat transport and temperature control offered high reliability and the thermal stratification in the tank was satisfactory. The positive result permits the design and construction of larger solar plants following the same technical principles.

  20. The role of polar regions in global climate, and a new parameterization of global heat transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindzen, R. S.; Farrell, B.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of the transport of heat between polar regions and other latitudes on climate sensitivity and stability are examined within the framework of simple energy balance models. New heat transport parameterizations adjust radiative equilibrium distributions of temperature with latitude on the basis of Hadley cells and baroclinically unstable eddies; including the effects of static stability changes with latitude eliminates the possible error in estimating the pole-equator temperature difference. It is found that climate sensitivity and stability for the new transport parameterizations can differ from other models, and is capable of simulating the sensitivity required by existing climate data.

  1. Role of ocean heat transport in climates of tidally locked exoplanets around M dwarf stars

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yongyun; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The distinctive feature of tidally locked exoplanets is the very uneven heating by stellar radiation between the dayside and nightside. Previous work has focused on the role of atmospheric heat transport in preventing atmospheric collapse on the nightside for terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zone around M dwarfs. In the present paper, we carry out simulations with a fully coupled atmosphere–ocean general circulation model to investigate the role of ocean heat transport in climate states of tidally locked habitable exoplanets around M dwarfs. Our simulation results demonstrate that ocean heat transport substantially extends the area of open water along the equator, showing a lobster-like spatial pattern of open water, instead of an “eyeball.” For sufficiently high-level greenhouse gases or strong stellar radiation, ocean heat transport can even lead to complete deglaciation of the nightside. Our simulations also suggest that ocean heat transport likely narrows the width of M dwarfs’ habitable zone. This study provides a demonstration of the importance of exooceanography in determining climate states and habitability of exoplanets. PMID:24379386

  2. Role of ocean heat transport in climates of tidally locked exoplanets around M dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongyun; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-14

    The distinctive feature of tidally locked exoplanets is the very uneven heating by stellar radiation between the dayside and nightside. Previous work has focused on the role of atmospheric heat transport in preventing atmospheric collapse on the nightside for terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zone around M dwarfs. In the present paper, we carry out simulations with a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model to investigate the role of ocean heat transport in climate states of tidally locked habitable exoplanets around M dwarfs. Our simulation results demonstrate that ocean heat transport substantially extends the area of open water along the equator, showing a lobster-like spatial pattern of open water, instead of an "eyeball." For sufficiently high-level greenhouse gases or strong stellar radiation, ocean heat transport can even lead to complete deglaciation of the nightside. Our simulations also suggest that ocean heat transport likely narrows the width of M dwarfs' habitable zone. This study provides a demonstration of the importance of exooceanography in determining climate states and habitability of exoplanets. PMID:24379386

  3. Heat transport in the Red Lake Bog, Glacial Lake Agassiz Peatlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, J.M.; Siegel, D.I.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Glaser, P.H.; Voss, C.I.

    2007-01-01

    We report the results of an investigation on the processes controlling heat transport in peat under a large bog in the Glacial Lake Agassiz Peatlands. For 2 years, starting in July 1998, we recorded temperature at 12 depth intervals from 0 to 400 cm within a vertical peat profile at the crest of the bog at sub-daily intervals. We also recorded air temperature 1 m above the peat surface. We calculate a peat thermal conductivity of 0.5 W m-1 ??C-1 and model vertical heat transport through the peat using the SUTRA model. The model was calibrated to the first year of data, and then evaluated against the second year of collected heat data. The model results suggest that advective pore-water flow is not necessary to transport heat within the peat profile and most of the heat is transferred by thermal conduction alone in these waterlogged soils. In the spring season, a zero-curtain effect controls the transport of heat through shallow depths of the peat. Changes in local climate and the resulting changes in thermal transport still may cause non-linear feedbacks in methane emissions related to the generation of methane deeper within the peat profile as regional temperatures increase. Copyright ?? 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Modification of the finite element heat and mass transfer code (FEHMN) to model multicomponent reactive transport

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, H.S.

    1995-12-31

    The finite element code FEHMN is a three-dimensional finite element heat and mass transport simulator that can handle complex stratigraphy and nonlinear processes such as vadose zone flow, heat flow and solute transport. Scientists at LANL have been developed hydrologic flow and transport models of the Yucca Mountain site using FEHMN. Previous FEHMN simulations have used an equivalent K{sub d} model to model solute transport. In this thesis, FEHMN is modified making it possible to simulate the transport of a species with a rigorous chemical model. Including the rigorous chemical equations into FEHMN simulations should provide for more representative transport models for highly reactive chemical species. A fully kinetic formulation is chosen for the FEHMN reactive transport model. Several methods are available to computationally implement a fully kinetic formulation. Different numerical algorithms are investigated in order to optimize computational efficiency and memory requirements of the reactive transport model. The best algorithm of those investigated is then incorporated into FEHMN. The algorithm chosen requires for the user to place strongly coupled species into groups which are then solved for simultaneously using FEHMN. The complete reactive transport model is verified over a wide variety of problems and is shown to be working properly. The simulations demonstrate that gas flow and carbonate chemistry can significantly affect {sup 14}C transport at Yucca Mountain. The simulations also provide that the new capabilities of FEHMN can be used to refine and buttress already existing Yucca Mountain radionuclide transport studies.

  5. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M; Kromer, Brian R; Litwin, Michael M; Rosen, Lee J; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R; Kosowski, Lawrence W; Robinson, Charles

    2014-01-07

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the stream reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5.

  6. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M.; Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Rosen, Lee J.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R.; Kosowski, Lawrence W.; Robinson, Charles

    2016-01-19

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production process is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the steam reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5

  7. Comparison of transient electron heat transport in LHD helical and JT-60U tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, S.; Takenaga, H.; Ida, K.; Isayama, A.; Tamura, N.; Takizuka, T.; Shimozuma, T.; Kamada, Y.; Kubo, S.; Miura, Y.; Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Sudo, S.; Ohkubo, K.; LHD Experimental Group; JT-60 Team

    2006-01-01

    Transient transport experiments are performed in plasmas with and without internal transport barriers (ITB) on LHD and JT-60U. The dependence of χe on the electron temperature, Te, and on the electron temperature gradient, ∇Te, is analysed with an empirical non-linear heat transport model. In plasmas without an ITB, two different types of non-linearity of the electron heat transport are observed from cold/heat pulse propagation: the χe depends on Te and ∇Te in JT-60U, while the ∇Te dependence is weak in LHD. Inside the ITB region, there is none or weak ∇Te dependence both in LHD and JT-60U. Growth of the cold pulse driven by the negative Te dependence of χe is observed inside the ITB region (LHD) and near the boundary of the ITB region (JT-60U).

  8. Possibility of long-distance heat transport in weightlessness using supercritical fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beysens, D.; Chatain, D.; Nikolayev, V. S.; Ouazzani, J.; Garrabos, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Heat transport over large distances is classically performed with gravity or capillarity driven heat pipes. We investigate here whether the “piston effect,” a thermalization process that is very efficient in weightlessness in compressible fluids, could also be used to perform long-distance heat transfer. Experiments are performed in a modeling heat pipe (16.5 mm long, 3 mm inner diameter closed cylinder), with nearly adiabatic polymethylmethacrylate walls and two copper base plates. The cell is filled with H2 near its gas-liquid critical point (critical temperature: 33 K). Weightlessness is achieved by submitting the fluid to a magnetic force that compensates gravity. Initially the fluid is isothermal. Then heat is sent to one of the bases with an electrical resistance. The instantaneous amount of heat transported by the fluid is measured at the other end. The data are analyzed and compared with a two-dimensional numerical simulation that allows an extrapolation to be made to other fluids (e.g., CO2 , with critical temperature of 300 K). The major result is concerned with the existence of a very fast response at early times that is only limited by the thermal properties of the cell materials. The yield in terms of ratio, injected or transported heat power, does not exceed 10-30% and is limited by the heat capacity of the pipe. These results are valid in a large temperature domain around the critical temperature.

  9. Heat Treatments of ZnSe Starting Materials for Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Palosz, W.; Feth, S.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of different heat treatments on stoichiometry and residual gas pressure in ZnSe physical vapor transport system was investigated. The dependence of the amount and composition of the residual gas on various heat treatment procedures is reported. Heat treatment of ZnSe starting materials by baking under the condition of dynamic vacuum to adjust its stoichiometry was performed and the effectiveness of the treatment was confirmed by the measurements of the partial pressure of Se2, P(sub Se2), in equilibrium with the heat treated samples. Optimum heat treatment procedures on the ZnSe starting material for the physical vapor transport process are discussed and verified experimentally.

  10. Absorption of intense microwaves and ion acoustic turbulence due to heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    De Groot, J.S.; Liu, J.M.; Matte, J.P.

    1994-02-04

    Measurements and calculations of the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of intense microwaves are presented. The isotropic component of the electron distribution becomes flat-topped in agreement with detailed Fokker-Planck calculations. The plasma heating is reduced due to the flat-topped distributions in agreement with calculations. The calculations show that the heat flux at high microwave powers is very large, q{sub max} {approx} 0.3 n{sub e}v{sub e}T{sub e}. A new particle model to, calculate the heat transport inhibition due to ion acoustic turbulence in ICF plasmas is also presented. One-dimensional PIC calculations of ion acoustic turbulence excited due to heat transport are presented. The 2-D PIC code is presently being used to perform calculations of heat flux inhibition due to ion acoustic turbulence.

  11. Heat Treatments of ZnSe Starting Materials for Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Palosz, W.; Feth, S.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of different heat treatments on stoichiometry and residual gas pressure in ZnSe physical vapor transport system was investigated. The dependence of the amount and composition of the residual gas on various heat treatment procedures is reported. Heat treatment of ZnSe starting materials by baking under the condition of dynamic vacuum to adjust its stoichiometry was performed and the effectiveness of the treatment was confirmed by the measurements of the partial pressure of Se2, P(sub Se2), in equilibrium with the heat treated samples. Optimum heat treatment procedures on the ZnSe starting material for the physical vapor transport process are discussed and verified experimentally.

  12. All-optical packet header and payload separation for un-slotted optical packet switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Zhang, Min; Ye, Peida

    2005-11-01

    A novel all-optical header and payload separation technique that can be utilized in un-slotted optical packet switched networks is presented. The technique uses a modified TOAD for packet header extraction with differential modulation scheme and two SOAs that perform a simple XOR operation between the packet and its self-derived header to get the separated payload. The main virtue of this system is simple structure and need not any additional continuous pulses. Through numerical simulations, the operating characteristics of the scheme are illustrated. In addition, the parameters of the system are discussed and designed to optimize the operation performance.

  13. Effect of wind forcing on the meridional heat transport in a coupled climate model: equilibrium response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haijun; Dai, Haijin

    2015-09-01

    The effect of the ocean surface winds on the meridional heat transports is studied in a coupled model. Shutting down the global surface winds causes significant reductions in both wind-driven and thermohaline ocean circulations, resulting in a remarkable decrease in the poleward oceanic heat transport (OHT). The sea surface temperature responds with significant warming in the equator and cooling off the equator, causing an enhancement and equatorward shift in the Hadley cell. This increases the poleward atmospheric heat transport (AHT), which in turn compensates the decrease in the OHT. This compensation implies a fundamental constraint in changes of ocean-atmosphere energy transports. Several other compensation changes are also identified. For the OHT components, the changes in the Eulerian mean and bolus OHT are compensated with each other in the Southern Ocean, since a stronger wind driven Ekman transport is associated with a stronger meridional density gradient (stronger bolus circulation) and vice versa. For the AHT components, the changes in the dry static energy (DSE) and latent energy transports are compensated within the tropics (30°N/S), because a stronger Hadley cell causes a stronger equatorward convergence of moisture. In the extratropics, the changes in the mean and eddy DSE transports show perfect compensation, as a result of the equatorward shift of the Ferrell Cell and enhancement of atmospheric baroclinicity in mid-high latitudes, particularly over the North Atlantic. This work also shows how the Earth's climate is trying to maintain the balance between two hemispheres: the ocean in the Northern Hemisphere is colder than that in the Southern Hemisphere due to much reduced northward heat transports cross the Equator in the Atlantic, therefore, the atmosphere responds to the ocean with temperature colder in the Southern Hemisphere than in the Northern Hemisphere by transporting more heat northward cross the equator over the Pacific, in association

  14. The general circulation and meridional heat transport of the subtropical South Atlantic determined by inverse methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L.-L.

    1981-01-01

    The circulation and meridional heat transport of the subtropical South Atlantic Ocean are determined through the application of the inverse method of Wunsch (1978) to hydrographic data from the IGY and METEOR expeditions. Meridional circulation results of the two data sets agree on a northward mass transport of about 20 million metric tons/sec for waters above the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW), and a comparable southward transport of deep waters. Additional gross features held in common are the Benguela, South Equatorial and North Brazilian Coastal currents' northward transport of the Surface Water, and the deflection of the southward-flowing NADW from the South American Coast into the mid ocean by a seamount chain near 20 deg S. Total heat transport is equatorward, with a magnitude of 0.8 X 10 to the 15th W near 30 deg S and indistinguishable from zero near 8 deg S.

  15. Water and heat transport in boreal soils: Implications for soil response to climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fan, Z.; Neff, J.C.; Harden, J.W.; Zhang, T.; Veldhuis, H.; Czimczik, C.I.; Winston, G.C.; O'Donnell, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Soil water content strongly affects permafrost dynamics by changing the soil thermal properties. However, the movement of liquid water, which plays an important role in the heat transport of temperate soils, has been under-represented in boreal studies. Two different heat transport models with and without convective heat transport were compared to measurements of soil temperatures in four boreal sites with different stand ages and drainage classes. Overall, soil temperatures during the growing season tended to be over-estimated by 2-4??C when movement of liquid water and water vapor was not represented in the model. The role of heat transport in water has broad implications for site responses to warming and suggests reduced vulnerability of permafrost to thaw at drier sites. This result is consistent with field observations of faster thaw in response to warming in wet sites compared to drier sites over the past 30. years in Canadian boreal forests. These results highlight that representation of water flow in heat transport models is important to simulate future soil thermal or permafrost dynamics under a changing climate. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Pump, and earth-testable spacecraft capillary heat transport loop using augmentation pump and check valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, David (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spacecraft includes heat-generating payload equipment, and a heat transport system with a cold plate thermally coupled to the equipment and a capillary-wick evaporator, for evaporating coolant liquid to cool the equipment. The coolant vapor is coupled to a condenser and in a loop back to the evaporator. A heated coolant reservoir is coupled to the loop for pressure control. If the wick is not wetted, heat transfer will not begin or continue. A pair of check valves are coupled in the loop, and the heater is cycled for augmentation pumping of coolant to and from the reservoir. This augmentation pumping, in conjunction with the check valves, wets the wick. The wick liquid storage capacity allows the augmentation pump to provide continuous pulsed liquid flow to assure continuous vapor transport and a continuously operating heat transport system. The check valves are of the ball type to assure maximum reliability. However, any type of check valve can be used, including designs which are preloaded in the closed position. The check valve may use any ball or poppet material which resists corrosion. For optimum performance during testing on Earth, the ball or poppet would have neutral buoyancy or be configured in a closed position when the heat transport system is not operating. The ball may be porous to allow passage of coolant vapor.

  17. Automatic computed tomography patient dose calculation using DICOM header metadata.

    PubMed

    Jahnen, A; Kohler, S; Hermen, J; Tack, D; Back, C

    2011-09-01

    The present work describes a method that calculates the patient dose values in computed tomography (CT) based on metadata contained in DICOM images in support of patient dose studies. The DICOM metadata is preprocessed to extract necessary calculation parameters. Vendor-specific DICOM header information is harmonized using vendor translation tables and unavailable DICOM tags can be completed with a graphical user interface. CT-Expo, an MS Excel application for calculating the radiation dose, is used to calculate the patient doses. All relevant data and calculation results are stored for further analysis in a relational database. Final results are compiled by utilizing data mining tools. This solution was successfully used for the 2009 CT dose study in Luxembourg. National diagnostic reference levels for standard examinations were calculated based on each of the countries' hospitals. The benefits using this new automatic system saved time as well as resources during the data acquisition and the evaluation when compared with earlier questionnaire-based surveys. PMID:21831868

  18. Modulated heat pulse propagation and partial transport barriers in chaotic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Blazevski, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Direct numerical simulations of the time dependent parallel heat transport equation modeling heat pulses driven by power modulation in three-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields are presented. The numerical method is based on the Fourier formulation of a Lagrangian-Green's function method that provides an accurate and efficient technique for the solution of the parallel heat transport equation in the presence of harmonic power modulation. The numerical results presented provide conclusive evidence that even in the absence of magnetic flux surfaces, chaotic magnetic field configurations with intermediate levels of stochasticity exhibit transport barriers to modulated heat pulse propagation. In particular, high-order islands and remnants of destroyed flux surfaces (Cantori) act as partial barriers that slow down or even stop the propagation of heat waves at places where the magnetic field connection length exhibits a strong gradient. Results on modulated heat pulse propagation in fully stochastic fields and across magnetic islands are also presented. In qualitative agreement with recent experiments in large helical device and DIII-D, it is shown that the elliptic (O) and hyperbolic (X) points of magnetic islands have a direct impact on the spatio-temporal dependence of the amplitude of modulated heat pulses.

  19. All-optical 2-bit header recognition and packet switching using polarization bistable VCSELs.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Daisuke; Nakao, Kazuya; Katayama, Takeo; Kawaguchi, Hitoshi

    2015-04-01

    We propose and evaluate an all-optical 2-bit header recognition and packet switching method using two 1.55-µm polarization bistable vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and three optical switches. Polarization bistable VCSELs acted as flip-flop devices by using AND-gate operations of the header and set pulses, together with the reset pulses. Optical packets including 40-Gb/s non-return-to-zero pseudo-random bit-sequence payloads were successfully sent to one of four ports according to the state of two bits in the headers with a 4-bit 500-Mb/s return-to-zero format. The input pulse powers were 17.2 to 31.8 dB lower than the VCSEL output power. We also examined an extension of this method to multi-bit header recognition and packet switching. PMID:25968674

  20. Analysis for Heat Transfer in a High Current-Passing Carbon Nanosphere Using Nontraditional Thermal Transport Model.

    PubMed

    Hol C Y; Chen, B C; Tsai, Y H; Ma, C; Wen, M Y

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates the thermal transport in hollow microscale and nanoscale spheres subject to electrical heat source using nontraditional thermal transport model. Working as supercapacitor electrodes, carbon hollow micrometer- and nanometer-sized spheres needs excellent heat transfer characteristics to maintain high specific capacitance, long cycle life, and high power density. In the nanoscale regime, the prediction of heat transfer from the traditional heat conduction equation based on Fourier's law deviates from the measured data. Consequently, the electrical heat source-induced heat transfer characteristics in hollow micrometer- and nanometer-sized spheres are studied using nontraditional thermal transport model. The effects of parameters on heat transfer in the hollow micrometer- and nanometer-sized spheres are discussed in this study. The results reveal that the heat transferred into the spherical interior, temperature and heat flux in the hollow sphere decrease with the increasing Knudsen number when the radius of sphere is comparable to the mean free path of heat carriers. PMID:26726687

  1. Analysis of heat transfer and contaminant transport in fume hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Pathanjali, C.; Rahman, M.M.

    1996-12-31

    The paper presents the analysis of three-dimensional flow patterns and the associated heat and mass transfer mechanisms in a fume hood enclosure. The flow enters the hood through the front window opening (positive x-direction) and leaves the cupboard through an opening on the top of the hood (positive z-direction). The flow was assumed to be fully turbulent. The flow pattern for different sash openings were studied. The flow pattern around an object located at the bottom of the hood was studied for different locations of the object. It was found that air entering the hood proceeds directly to the back wall, impinges it and turns upward toward the top wall and exits through the outlet. The flow finds its way around any object forming a recirculating region at its training surface. With an increase in the sash opening, the velocity becomes higher and the fluid traces the path to the outlet more quickly. The volume occupied by recirculating flow decreases with increase in sash opening. Both temperature and concentration were found to be maximum near the source and gradually decreased as the heated air or gaseous contaminant entrained with incoming air. The local concentration decreased with increase in sash opening area. The results will be very useful to design experiments with optimum sash opening providing adequate disposal of contaminants with minimum use of conditioned air inside the room.

  2. Dynamical transition of heat transport in a physical gel near the sol-gel transition

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kazuya U.; Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally study heat transport in a gelatin solution near a reversible sol-gel transition point where viscosity strongly depends on temperature. We visualize the temperature field and velocity field using thermochromic liquid crystals and polystyrene latex particles, respectively. During the initial stages of heating, we find that heat transport undergoes a dynamical transition from conductive to convective. Subsequently, during later stages, we observe that the transport dynamics are much more complex than conventional thermal convections. At the sample’s surface we observe the formation of stagnant domains, which lack fluid flow. Their formation is not due to the effects of local cooling. We determine that it is the dynamics of these stagnant domains that induce convective-conductive-convective transitions. PMID:26690696

  3. Dynamical transition of heat transport in a physical gel near the sol-gel transition.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuya U; Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally study heat transport in a gelatin solution near a reversible sol-gel transition point where viscosity strongly depends on temperature. We visualize the temperature field and velocity field using thermochromic liquid crystals and polystyrene latex particles, respectively. During the initial stages of heating, we find that heat transport undergoes a dynamical transition from conductive to convective. Subsequently, during later stages, we observe that the transport dynamics are much more complex than conventional thermal convections. At the sample's surface we observe the formation of stagnant domains, which lack fluid flow. Their formation is not due to the effects of local cooling. We determine that it is the dynamics of these stagnant domains that induce convective-conductive-convective transitions. PMID:26690696

  4. Dynamical transition of heat transport in a physical gel near the sol-gel transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kazuya U.; Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2015-12-01

    We experimentally study heat transport in a gelatin solution near a reversible sol-gel transition point where viscosity strongly depends on temperature. We visualize the temperature field and velocity field using thermochromic liquid crystals and polystyrene latex particles, respectively. During the initial stages of heating, we find that heat transport undergoes a dynamical transition from conductive to convective. Subsequently, during later stages, we observe that the transport dynamics are much more complex than conventional thermal convections. At the sample’s surface we observe the formation of stagnant domains, which lack fluid flow. Their formation is not due to the effects of local cooling. We determine that it is the dynamics of these stagnant domains that induce convective-conductive-convective transitions.

  5. Constraints on oceanic meridional heat transport from combined measurements of oxygen and carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resplandy, L.; Keeling, R. F.; Stephens, B. B.; Bent, J. D.; Jacobson, A.; Rödenbeck, C.; Khatiwala, S.

    2016-02-01

    Despite its importance to the climate system, the ocean meridional heat transport is still poorly quantified. We identify a strong link between the northern hemisphere deficit in atmospheric potential oxygen (APO = O_2 + 1.1 × CO_2 ) and the asymmetry in meridional heat transport between northern and southern hemispheres. The recent aircraft observations from the HIPPO campaign reveal a northern APO deficit in the tropospheric column of - 10.4 ± 1.0 per meg, double the value at the surface and more representative of large-scale air-sea fluxes. The global northward ocean heat transport asymmetry necessary to explain the observed APO deficit is about 0.7-1.1 PW, which corresponds to the upper range of estimates from hydrographic sections and atmospheric reanalyses.

  6. Nanoscale heat transport via electrons and phonons by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Keng-Hua

    Nanoscale heat transport has become a crucial research topic due to the growing importance of nanotechnology for manufacturing, energy conversion, medicine and electronics. Thermal transport properties at the nanoscale are distinct from the macroscopic ones since the sizes of nanoscale features, such as free surfaces and interfaces, are comparable to the wavelengths and mean free paths of the heat carriers (electrons and phonons), and lead to changes in thermal transport properties. Therefore, understanding how the nanoscale features and energy exchange between the heat carriers affect thermal transport characteristics are the goals of this research. Molecular dynamics (MD) is applied in this research to understand the details of nanoscale heat transport. The advantage of MD is that the size effect, anharmonicity, atomistic structure, and non-equilibrium behavior of the system can all be captured since the dynamics of atoms are described explicitly in MD. However, MD neglects the thermal role of electrons and therefore it is unable to describe heat transport in metal or metal-semiconductor systems accurately. To address this limitation of MD, we develop a method to simulate electronic heat transport by implementing electronic degrees of freedom to MD. In this research, nanoscale heat transport in semiconductor, metal, and metal-semiconductor systems is studied. Size effects on phonon thermal transport in SiGe superlattice thin films and nanowires are studied by MD. We find that, opposite to the macroscopic trend, superlattice thin films can achieve lower thermal conductivity than nanowires at small scales due to the change of phonon nature caused by adjusting the superlattice periodic length and specimen length. Effects of size and electron-phonon coupling rate on thermal conductivity and thermal interface resistivity in Al and model metal-semiconductor systems are studied by MD with electronic degrees of freedom. The results show that increasing the specimen

  7. Unified model of tectonics and heat transport in a frigid Enceladus.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki; Marshak, Stephen; Kieffer, Susan W

    2007-08-21

    Recent data from the Cassini spacecraft have revealed that Enceladus, the 500-km-diameter moon of Saturn, has a southern hemisphere with a distinct arrangement of tectonic features, intense heat flux, and geyser-like plumes. How did the tectonic features form? How is the heat transported from depth? To address these questions, we formulate a simple model that couples the mechanics and thermodynamics of Enceladus and gives a unified explanation of the salient tectonic features, the plumes, and the transport of heat from a source at a depth of tens of kilometers to the surface. Our findings imply that tiny, icy moons can develop complex surficial geomorphologies, high heat fluxes, and geyser-like activity even if they do not have hot, liquid, and/or convecting interiors. PMID:17699628

  8. Unified model of tectonics and heat transport in a frigid Enceladus

    PubMed Central

    Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki; Marshak, Stephen; Kieffer, Susan W.

    2007-01-01

    Recent data from the Cassini spacecraft have revealed that Enceladus, the 500-km-diameter moon of Saturn, has a southern hemisphere with a distinct arrangement of tectonic features, intense heat flux, and geyser-like plumes. How did the tectonic features form? How is the heat transported from depth? To address these questions, we formulate a simple model that couples the mechanics and thermodynamics of Enceladus and gives a unified explanation of the salient tectonic features, the plumes, and the transport of heat from a source at a depth of tens of kilometers to the surface. Our findings imply that tiny, icy moons can develop complex surficial geomorphologies, high heat fluxes, and geyser-like activity even if they do not have hot, liquid, and/or convecting interiors. PMID:17699628

  9. Screening for heat transport by groundwater in closed geothermal systems.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Heat transfer due to groundwater flow can significantly affect closed geothermal systems. Here, a screening method is developed, based on Peclet numbers for these systems and Darcy's law. Conduction-only conditions should not be expected where specific discharges exceed 10(-8)  m/s. Constraints on hydraulic gradients allow for preliminary screening for advection based on rock or soil types. Identification of materials with very low hydraulic conductivity, such as shale and intact igneous and metamorphic rock, allow for analysis with considering conduction only. Variability in known hydraulic conductivity allows for the possibility of advection in most other rocks and soil types. Further screening relies on refinement of estimates of hydraulic gradients and hydraulic conductivity through site investigations and modeling until the presence or absence of conduction can be confirmed. PMID:24438345

  10. Heat-driven spin transport in a ferromagnetic metal

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yadong; Yang, Bowen; Tang, Chi; Jiang, Zilong; Shi, Jing; Schneider, Michael; Whig, Renu

    2014-12-15

    As a non-magnetic heavy metal is attached to a ferromagnet, a vertically flowing heat-driven spin current is converted to a transverse electric voltage, which is known as the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (SSE). If the ferromagnet is a metal, this voltage is also accompanied by voltages from two other sources, i.e., the anomalous Nernst effect in both the ferromagnet and the proximity-induced ferromagnetic boundary layer. By properly identifying and carefully separating those different effects, we find that in this pure spin current circuit the additional spin current drawn by the heavy metal generates another significant voltage by the ferromagnetic metal itself which should be present in all relevant experiments.

  11. Particle transport and heat loads in NIO1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonnesu, N.; Cavenago, M.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P.

    2016-02-01

    NIO1 is a compact radio frequency ion source designed to generate a 60 kV-135 mA hydrogen negative ion beam and it aims at continuous operation, which implies a detailed thermo-mechanical analysis of the beam-facing components, in particular, the accelerator grids. A 3D analysis of the entire NIO1 beam has been performed for the first time with a fully 3D version of EAMCC, a relativistic particle tracking code for the calculation of the grid power deposition induced by particle impacts. According to the results presented in this paper, secondary and co-extracted electrons cause a non-negligible heat load on the grids, where different high-power density regions, within reasonable sustainable standard limits, are calculated.

  12. Momentum and heat transport scalings in laminar vertical convection.

    PubMed

    Shishkina, Olga

    2016-05-01

    We derive the dependence of the Reynolds number Re and the Nusselt number Nu on the Rayleigh number Ra and the Prandtl number Pr in laminar vertical convection (VC), where a fluid is confined between two differently heated isothermal vertical walls. The boundary layer equations in laminar VC yield two limiting scaling regimes: Nu∼Pr^{1/4}Ra^{1/4}, Re∼Pr^{-1/2}Ra^{1/2} for Pr≪1 and Nu∼Pr^{0}Ra^{1/4}, Re∼Pr^{-1}Ra^{1/2} for Pr≫1. These theoretical results are in excellent agreement with direct numerical simulations for Ra from 10^{5} to 10^{10} and Pr from 10^{-2} to 30. The transition between the regimes takes place for Pr around 10^{-1}. PMID:27300823

  13. Momentum and heat transport scalings in laminar vertical convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkina, Olga

    2016-05-01

    We derive the dependence of the Reynolds number Re and the Nusselt number Nu on the Rayleigh number Ra and the Prandtl number Pr in laminar vertical convection (VC), where a fluid is confined between two differently heated isothermal vertical walls. The boundary layer equations in laminar VC yield two limiting scaling regimes: Nu˜Pr1/4Ra1/4 , Re˜Pr-1/2Ra1/2 for Pr≪1 and Nu˜Pr0Ra1/4 , Re˜Pr-1Ra1/2 for Pr≫1 . These theoretical results are in excellent agreement with direct numerical simulations for Ra from 105 to 1010 and Pr from 10-2 to 30. The transition between the regimes takes place for Pr around 10-1.

  14. Ballistic heat transport in laser generated nano-bubbles.

    PubMed

    Lombard, Julien; Biben, Thierry; Merabia, Samy

    2016-08-01

    Nanobubbles generated by laser heated plasmonic nanoparticles are of interest for biomedical and energy harvesting applications. Of utmost importance is the maximal size of these transient bubbles. Here, we report hydrodynamic phase field simulations of the dynamics of laser induced nanobubbles, with the aim to understand which physical processes govern their maximal size. We show that the nanobubble maximal size and lifetime are to a large extent controlled by the ballistic thermal flux which is present inside the bubble. Taking into account this thermal flux, we can reproduce the fluence dependence of the maximal nanobubble radius as reported experimentally. We also discuss the influence of the laser pulse duration on the number of nanobubbles generated and their maximal size. These studies represent a significant step toward the optimization of the nanobubble size, which is of crucial importance for photothermal cancer therapy applications. PMID:27461058

  15. A predictive transport modeling code for ICRF-heated tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Hwang, D.Q. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Houlberg, W.; Attenberger, S.; Tolliver, J.; Hively, L. )

    1992-02-01

    In this report, a detailed description of the physic included in the WHIST/RAZE package as well as a few illustrative examples of the capabilities of the package will be presented. An in depth analysis of ICRF heating experiments using WHIST/RAZE will be discussed in a forthcoming report. A general overview of philosophy behind the structure of the WHIST/RAZE package, a summary of the features of the WHIST code, and a description of the interface to the RAZE subroutines are presented in section 2 of this report. Details of the physics contained in the RAZE code are examined in section 3. Sample results from the package follow in section 4, with concluding remarks and a discussion of possible improvements to the package discussed in section 5.

  16. Particle transport and heat loads in NIO1.

    PubMed

    Fonnesu, N; Cavenago, M; Serianni, G; Veltri, P

    2016-02-01

    NIO1 is a compact radio frequency ion source designed to generate a 60 kV-135 mA hydrogen negative ion beam and it aims at continuous operation, which implies a detailed thermo-mechanical analysis of the beam-facing components, in particular, the accelerator grids. A 3D analysis of the entire NIO1 beam has been performed for the first time with a fully 3D version of EAMCC, a relativistic particle tracking code for the calculation of the grid power deposition induced by particle impacts. According to the results presented in this paper, secondary and co-extracted electrons cause a non-negligible heat load on the grids, where different high-power density regions, within reasonable sustainable standard limits, are calculated. PMID:26932077

  17. Heat transport in laminar flow of erythrocyte suspensions.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, A S

    1975-07-01

    Measurements of thermal conductivity were made in laminar flow of dog and turkey erythrocyte suspensions in a stainless stell tube of about 1 mm ID. These measurements were independent of the shear rate, showing that the red cell motion relative to plasma in flowing blood had no effect on the heat transfer. Measurements of thermal conductivity were further made in suspensions of polystyrene spheres of 100 mum and were found to be dependent upon the shear rate. The Graetz solution corresponding to uniform wall temperature was used for determining the value of thermal conductivity in an apparatus calibrated with tap water. The overall accuracy of the results is within 10%. A model based on the particle rotation with the entrained fluid is proposed. It is pointed out that the diffusion of platelets, red cells, and possibly plasma proteins (such as fibrinogen) will be augmented if they happen to be in the hydrodynamic field of rotating erythrocytes. PMID:1150598

  18. Ballistic heat transport in laser generated nano-bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombard, Julien; Biben, Thierry; Merabia, Samy

    2016-08-01

    Nanobubbles generated by laser heated plasmonic nanoparticles are of interest for biomedical and energy harvesting applications. Of utmost importance is the maximal size of these transient bubbles. Here, we report hydrodynamic phase field simulations of the dynamics of laser induced nanobubbles, with the aim to understand which physical processes govern their maximal size. We show that the nanobubble maximal size and lifetime are to a large extent controlled by the ballistic thermal flux which is present inside the bubble. Taking into account this thermal flux, we can reproduce the fluence dependence of the maximal nanobubble radius as reported experimentally. We also discuss the influence of the laser pulse duration on the number of nanobubbles generated and their maximal size. These studies represent a significant step toward the optimization of the nanobubble size, which is of crucial importance for photothermal cancer therapy applications.Nanobubbles generated by laser heated plasmonic nanoparticles are of interest for biomedical and energy harvesting applications. Of utmost importance is the maximal size of these transient bubbles. Here, we report hydrodynamic phase field simulations of the dynamics of laser induced nanobubbles, with the aim to understand which physical processes govern their maximal size. We show that the nanobubble maximal size and lifetime are to a large extent controlled by the ballistic thermal flux which is present inside the bubble. Taking into account this thermal flux, we can reproduce the fluence dependence of the maximal nanobubble radius as reported experimentally. We also discuss the influence of the laser pulse duration on the number of nanobubbles generated and their maximal size. These studies represent a significant step toward the optimization of the nanobubble size, which is of crucial importance for photothermal cancer therapy applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C6NR02144A

  19. Effluent versus inlet header break analysis for SRS-reactor LOPA scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, P.K.; Barbour, K.L.; Herman, D.T.

    1992-01-01

    The Loss-of-Pumping Accident (LOPA) is a design basis accident for the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors. The LOPA is defined as a Double Ended Guillotine Break (DEGB) in a secondary cooling water pipe. The secondary cooling line break is termed inlet or effluent depending on break location. Upon break detection emergency shut down procedure begins, the reactor scrams, secondary cooling pump motors trip off, primary cooling pump AC motors switch off, and DC motor drive engages. Secondary cooling gravity flow continues flooding the building after secondary cooling pumps are off. The Emergency Cooling System (ECS) activates before the DC motors flood out. Break detection time, header flooding rate, and flooding locations are different for the inlet and effluent header breaks due to different break locations. Inlet and effluent header break primary coolant temperature transients differ because primary and secondary cooling pumps continue during a break detection and reactor scram time delay for the effluent header case, whereas the pumps trip off almost immediately for the inlet header case. Design basis accident reactor core power limits are calculated for both the inlet and effluent header breaks.

  20. Comparison of effluent and inlet header breaks for an SRS reactor LOPA

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, P.K.; Barbour, K.L.; Herman, D.T. )

    1992-01-01

    The loss-of-pumping accident (LOPA) is a design-basis accident for Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors. The LOPA is defined as a double-ended guillotine break in a secondary cooling water pipe. The secondary cooling line break is termed inlet or effluent depending on break location. Upon break detection, the emergency shutdown procedure begins, the reactor scrams, the secondary cooling pump motors trip, the primary cooling pump alternating-current motors switch off, and the direct-current motor drive engages. Secondary cooling gravity flow continues flooding the building after the secondary cooling pumps are off. The emergency cooling system (ECS) activates before the dc motors flood out. Break detection time, header flooding rate, and flooding locations are different for the inlet and effluent header breaks because of different break locations. Inlet and effluent header break primary coolant temperature transients differ because primary and secondary cooling pumps continue during a break detection and reactor scram time delay for the effluent header case, whereas the pumps trip off almost immediately for the inlet header case. Design-basis accident reactor core power limits are calculated for both the inlet and effluent header breaks.

  1. Effluent versus inlet header break analysis for SRS-reactor LOPA scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, P.K.; Barbour, K.L.; Herman, D.T.

    1992-07-01

    The Loss-of-Pumping Accident (LOPA) is a design basis accident for the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors. The LOPA is defined as a Double Ended Guillotine Break (DEGB) in a secondary cooling water pipe. The secondary cooling line break is termed inlet or effluent depending on break location. Upon break detection emergency shut down procedure begins, the reactor scrams, secondary cooling pump motors trip off, primary cooling pump AC motors switch off, and DC motor drive engages. Secondary cooling gravity flow continues flooding the building after secondary cooling pumps are off. The Emergency Cooling System (ECS) activates before the DC motors flood out. Break detection time, header flooding rate, and flooding locations are different for the inlet and effluent header breaks due to different break locations. Inlet and effluent header break primary coolant temperature transients differ because primary and secondary cooling pumps continue during a break detection and reactor scram time delay for the effluent header case, whereas the pumps trip off almost immediately for the inlet header case. Design basis accident reactor core power limits are calculated for both the inlet and effluent header breaks.

  2. Analyzing Operative Note Structure in Development of a Section Header Resource.

    PubMed

    Melton, Genevieve B; Wang, Yan; Arsoniadis, Elliot; Pakhomov, Serguei V S; Adam, Terrence J; Kwaan, Mary R; Rothenberger, David A; Chen, Elizabeth S

    2015-01-01

    Operative notes contain essential details of surgical procedures and are an important form of clinical documentation. Sections within operative notes segment provide high level note structure. We evaluated the HL7 Implementation Guide for Clinical Document Architecture Release 2.0 Operative Note Draft Standard for Trial Use (HL7-ON DSTU) Release 1 as well as Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINC®) section names on 384 unique section headers from 362,311 operative notes. Overall, HL7-ON DSTU alone and HL7-ON DSTU with LOINC® section headers covered 66% and 79% of sections headers (93% and 98% of header instances), respectively. Section headers contained large numbers of synonyms, formatting variation, and variation of word forms, as well as smaller numbers of compound sections and issues with mismatches in header granularity. Robust operative note section mapping is important for clinical note interoperability and effective use of operative notes by natural language processing systems. The resulting operative note section resource is made publicly available. PMID:26262166

  3. Solar-energy heats a transportation test center--Pueblo, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Petroleum-base, thermal energy transport fluid circulating through 583 square feet of flat-plate solar collectors accumulates majority of energy for space heating and domestic hot-water of large Test Center. Report describes operation, maintenance, and performance of system which is suitable for warehouses and similar buildings. For test period from February 1979 to January 1980, solar-heating fraction was 31 percent, solar hot-water fraction 79 percent.

  4. Advective heat transport associated to regional Earth degassing in central Apennine (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardellini, Carlo; Chiodini, Giovanni; Caliro, Stefano; Chiarabba, Claudio; Frondini, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    The main springs of central Italy Apennines were investigated, in order to compute the amount of heat transported by groundwaters and to compute the fraction of heat due to the geothermal heat flux. The 46 investigated springs represent a significant portion of the permeable structures of the Apennine being characterised by a cumulative flow rate of 130 m3/s, i.e. ~ 50% of the water discharged in this sector of the Apennines. The groundwaters are characterised by relatively low temperatures, but the occurrence of an heat anomaly is evident when the differences between the temperatures of springs and recharge waters are compared with the corresponding altitude difference. A total amount of heat of ~ 2.1 × 109 J/s has been estimated to be transported by these groundwaters. Most of this heat (57%) is given by geothermal warming while the remaining 43% is due to gravitational potential energy dissipation. The computed geothermal warming implies very high heat flux, with values higher than 300 mW/m2, in a large sector of the Apennines which was considered to date be characterised by normal to low conductive heat flux. The same area is affected by high fluxes of CO2 from a deep source and the strict correlation between the geothermal warming and the input of deep CO2-rich fluids is testified by the fact that all the thermally anomalous groundwaters are also affected by the input of deeply derived CO2 contrary to those not thermally anomalous which display any input of deeply derived CO2. This correspondence reasonably suggest the geothermal heat is transported from depth by CO2 rich fluids, which enter the aquifers and mix with infiltrating waters. The amount of geothermal heat transported by central Apennine cold groundwaters is in absolute very high. It results the double than the hydrothermal heat discharge of the US Cascade Range (~1×103 MW) and is about the half of the total heat discharged at Yellowstone, one of the largest hydrothermal system of the world (5-6

  5. Estimating the effect of shallow groundwater on diurnal heat transport in a vadose zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jianmei; Zhao, Lin; Zhai, Zhe

    2016-09-01

    The influence of shallow groundwater on the diurnal heat transport of the soil profile was analyzed using a soil sensor automatic monitoring system that continuously measures temperature and water content of soil profiles to simulate heat transport based on the Philip and de Vries (PDV) model. Three experiments were conducted to measure soil properties at depths of 5 cm, 10 cm, 20 cm, and 30 cm when groundwater tables reached 10 cm, 30 cm, and 60 cm (Experiments I, II, and III). Results show that both the soil temperature near shallow groundwater and the soil water content were effectively simulated by the PDV model. The root mean square errors of the temperature at depths of 5 cm, 10 cm, and 20 cm were 1.018°C, 0.909°C, and 0.255°C, respectively. The total heat flux generated the convergent and divergent planes in space-time fields with valley values of-161.5W•m-2 at 7:30 and-234.6W•m-2 at 11:10 in Experiments II and III, respectively. The diurnal heat transport of the saturated soil occurred in five stages, while that of saturated-unsaturated and unsaturated soil profiles occurred in four stages because high moisture content led to high thermal conductivity, which hastened the heat transport.

  6. Heat and mass transport during a groundwater replenishment trial in a highly heterogeneous aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibert, Simone; Prommer, Henning; Siade, Adam; Harris, Brett; Trefry, Mike; Martin, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Changes in subsurface temperature distribution resulting from the injection of fluids into aquifers may impact physiochemical and microbial processes as well as basin resource management strategies. We have completed a 2 year field trial in a hydrogeologically and geochemically heterogeneous aquifer below Perth, Western Australia in which highly treated wastewater was injected for large-scale groundwater replenishment. During the trial, chloride and temperature data were collected from conventional monitoring wells and by time-lapse temperature logging. We used a joint inversion of these solute tracer and temperature data to parameterize a numerical flow and multispecies transport model and to analyze the solute and heat propagation characteristics that prevailed during the trial. The simulation results illustrate that while solute transport is largely confined to the most permeable lithological units, heat transport was also affected by heat exchange with lithological units that have a much lower hydraulic conductivity. Heat transfer by heat conduction was found to significantly influence the complex temporal and spatial temperature distribution, especially with growing radial distance and in aquifer sequences with a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution. We attempted to estimate spatially varying thermal transport parameters during the data inversion to illustrate the anticipated correlations of these parameters with lithological heterogeneities, but estimates could not be uniquely determined on the basis of the collected data.

  7. Pore-Scale Simulations Of Flow And Heat Transport In Saturated Permeable Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zegers, G. R., Sr.; Herrera, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The study of heat transport in porous media is important for applications such as the use of temperature as environmental tracer, geothermal energy, fuel cells, etc. In recent years, there have been several advances in computational techniques that have allowed to investigate different processes in porous media at the pore-scale through detailed numerical simulations that considered synthetic porous media formed by regular grains and pore bodies arranged in different geometrical configurations. The main objective of this research is to investigate the influence of pore configurations on flow velocity and heat transport in 2D saturated porous media. We use OpenFOAM to solve flow and heat transport equations at the pore-scale. We performed detailed pore-scale numerical simulations in synthetic 2D porous media generated from regularly placed and randomly distributed circular solid grains. For each geometrical configuration we performed numerical simulations to compute the flow field in order to calculate properties such as as tortuosity, mean velocity and hydraulic conductivity, and to identify Lagrangian coherent structures to charaterize the velocity fields. We then perform heat transport simulations to relate the properties of the velocity fields and the main heat transport mechanisms. The analysis of the simulations results showed that in all the simulated configurations effective flow properties become valid at scales of 10 to 15 pore bodies. For the same porosity and boundary conditions we obtained that as expected tortuosity in the random structure is higher than in the regular configurations, while hydraulic conductivity is smaller for the random case. The results of heat transport simulations show significant differences in temperature distribution for the regular and random pore structures. For the simulated boundary and initial conditions, heat transport is more efficient in the random structure than in the regular geometry. This result indicates that the

  8. LES of turbulent heat transfer: proper convection numerical schemes for temperature transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Châtelain, A.; Ducros, F.; Métais, O.

    2004-03-01

    Large eddy simulations of two basic configurations (decay of isotropic turbulence, and the academic plane channel flow) with heat transfer have been performed comparing several convection numerical schemes, in order to discuss their ability to evaluate temperature fluctuations properly. Results are compared with the available incompressible heat transfer direct numerical simulation data. It is shown that the use of regularizing schemes (such as high order upwind type schemes) for the temperature transport equation in combination with centered schemes for momentum transport equation gives better results than the use of centred schemes for both equations.

  9. Evidences for and the Models of Fast Nonlocal Transport of Heat in Magnetic Fusion Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, A. B.; Cherepanov, K. V.

    2009-07-01

    The paper gives a short survey of (i) recent evidences for fast nonlocal transport of the heat in magnetically confined plasmas (above all, the "cold/heat pulse" experiments), (ii) interpretations of such phenomena in terms of nonlocal transport formalisms, based on the dominance of long mean-free-path energy carriers, including the interpretations of "cold pulse" experiments, and gives (iii) quantitative evidence for the domination of nonlocality in the spatial profile of electron cyclotron net radiated power in fusion reactor-grade tokamak (strong toroidal magnetic field, BT>5 T, highly reflecting walls, Rwall>0.5, and hot electron plasma, >10 keV).

  10. On the optimum fields and bounds for heat and mass transport in two turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitanov, Nikolay

    2011-12-01

    The optimum theory of turbulence is one of the few tools for obtaining analytical results for transport of heat, mass or momentum by turbulent flows. This is achieved by asymptotic theory which is valid for large values of the characteristic numbers of the investigated fluid system. For small and intermediate values of the Reynolds, Rayleigh or Taylor numbers we have to solve numerically the Euler-Lagrange equations of the corresponding variational problems. Below we discuss numerical results from the application of the Howard-Busse method of the optimum theory of turbulence to two problems: convective heat transport in non-rotating and rotating fluid layer and mass transport in pipe flow. We obtain profiles of the optimum fields and discuss the evolution of the thickness of the boundary layers as well as present our first results about the lower bound on the mass transport in a pipe flow.

  11. Broadcast/multicast MPEG-2 video over wireless channels using header redundancy FEC strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hairuo; El Zarki, Magda

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we address the issue of error control in transmitting MPEG-2 encoded video streams over broadband fixed wireless access networks for broadcast or multicast services. Because of the error-prone nature of wireless channels, error control is mandatory when MPEG-2 video streams are transported over wireless access networks to end user. To prevent overloading the reliable wireline networks error control has to be applied locally. FEC is a must for broadcast or multicast services. Because of the important role of MPEG-2 control information in the decoding process, it must be given priority service in the form of excess error protection in order to achieve the desired QoS. In this paper, a header redundancy FEC (HRFEC) strategy is introduced and an implementation of it (type-I HRFEC scheme) is described. The overhead and delay jitter associated with the type-I HRFEC is also estimated. Simulation results on the performance of type-I HRFEC indicates that it improves the reception statistics of MPEG-2 control. As a direct, the quality, measured in terms of objective grade point and PSNR of the reconstructed video sequence, is improved.

  12. Modification of the finite element heat and mass transfer code (FEHM) to model multicomponent reactive transport

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, H.S.

    1996-08-01

    The finite element code FEHMN, developed by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), is a three-dimensional finite element heat and mass transport simulator that can handle complex stratigraphy and nonlinear processes such as vadose zone flow, heat flow and solute transport. Scientists at LANL have been developing hydrologic flow and transport models of the Yucca Mountain site using FEHMN. Previous FEHMN simulations have used an equivalent Kd model to model solute transport. In this thesis, FEHMN is modified making it possible to simulate the transport of a species with a rigorous chemical model. Including the rigorous chemical equations into FEHMN simulations should provide for more representative transport models for highly reactive chemical species. A fully kinetic formulation is chosen for the FEHMN reactive transport model. Several methods are available to computationally implement a fully kinetic formulation. Different numerical algorithms are investigated in order to optimize computational efficiency and memory requirements of the reactive transport model. The best algorithm of those investigated is then incorporated into FEHMN. The algorithm chosen requires for the user to place strongly coupled species into groups which are then solved for simultaneously using FEHMN. The complete reactive transport model is verified over a wide variety of problems and is shown to be working properly. The new chemical capabilities of FEHMN are illustrated by using Los Alamos National Laboratory`s site scale model of Yucca Mountain to model two-dimensional, vadose zone {sup 14}C transport. The simulations demonstrate that gas flow and carbonate chemistry can significantly affect {sup 14}C transport at Yucca Mountain. The simulations also prove that the new capabilities of FEHMN can be used to refine and buttress already existing Yucca Mountain radionuclide transport studies.

  13. Investigation of heat and momentum transport in turbulent flows via numerical simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, John

    1988-01-01

    Turbulent transport of heat is studied by examining the flow fields obtained from a direct simulation of a turbulent channel flow. The turbulence structures associated with the velocity and scalar fields are presented using air (Pr = 0.71) as the medium. A comparison is made between the wall-layer structures identified by the temperature field and the structures found in the velocity field. Consideration is also given to the role of the organized turbulence structures in scalar transport.

  14. Modeling of diagenesis in relation to coupled mass and heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ondrak, R.

    1996-12-31

    Pore fluid flow is an important factor influencing the diagenetic evolution of rocks, as has been shown by various diagenetic studies, especially in connection with fluid inclusion measurements. A 3D- computer model is presented, which allows to simulate coupled mass and heat transport in porous rocks. The model is used to study the interaction of heat and mass transport with respect to the temporal and spatial evolution of sandstones. Mineral dissolution or precipitation change the mineralogical composition of rocks, and modify the physical properties at the same time. Altering the permeability of the rock affects the fluid flow system in the rock which determines the mass transport of the entire system. In addition to mass transport, fluid flow transports thermal energy, which may modify the temperature evolution of the rock. The model will be used to examine the effect of convective heat and mass transport on temperature and diagenetic evolution of clastic rocks. Although the model cannot claim to simulate nature, it can be used to study the effect of different mechanisms, and their interaction within the coupled system. For practical applications, the model may be used to determine possible flow rates, which are necessary to explain the observed diagenetic and thermal history of sandstones.

  15. A passive solar system for downward heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    Stacy, W.D.

    1982-01-01

    This paper discusses the development and testing of a unique passive solar DHW system employing roof mounted conventional flat plate collectors and a conventional coil-in-tank hot water heater located 20 feet below the collectors. The system operates as an intermittent heat pipe in a two stroke cycle involving day time boil down/night time condensate return. System concept, construction details, and test results are presented for the 40 ft/sup 2/, 40 gpd workhorse prototype DHW system. Passive system cycling was experimentally confirmed to be completely reliable under both design and off-design conditions of usage, isolation, and weather. Day long system efficiency averaged 35% to 40% between July and December in northern New England and reached 45% under favorable ambient conditions. System attributes regarding performance, reliability, and site/installation flexibility are described and discussed. Key advantages of boiling/condensing fluid systems in solar applications are noted, and the need for further development of appropriate working fluids is discussed in the context of evolving codes.

  16. Salt loaded heat pipes: steady-state operation and related heat and mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakin, A.; Ghassemi, A.

    2003-10-01

    Fluids in the deep-seated zones (3.5-4.5 km) of active geothermal zones are known to have increased salinity and acidity that can enhance interaction with surrounding porous rocks. A possible mechanism for brine generation is the separation of the rising magmatic fluid into a gas-like and a liquid-like component. This work illustrates the main features of this mechanism by investigating the conditions for heat pipe convection of natural brines in hydrothermal systems. The well-established heat pipe regime for convection of two-phase pure water (vapor-liquid) in a porous column is extended to the case of boiling brines. In particular, the NaCl-H 2O system is used to model the 1-D reactive flow with dissolution-precipitation in geothermal reservoirs. The quasi steady-state equations of the conservation of matter, Darcy's law for the gas and liquid phases, and the heat balance equation have been examined while neglecting the temporal variation of porosity. A semi-analytical procedure is used to solve these equations for a two-phase fluid in equilibrium with a solid salt. The solution is in the form of the dependence of liquid volume fraction as a function of temperature for different heat fluxes. The solution is separated into two isolated regions by the temperature T=596°C, at the maximum fluid pressure for three-phase (H-L-V) equilibrium. In the case of unsaturated two-phase flow at the reference permeability of porous rocks (3·10 -16 m 2), the maximum heat flux that can be transferred through the porous column via convection is analytically estimated to be 4.3 W/m 2. This is close to the corresponding value for the three-phase case that is numerically calculated to be 6 W/m 2. Due to dissolution (partial leaching of oxide components by acid condensates) and precipitation of salt at the boiling front, heat transfer in a heat pipe in soluble media occurs in a direction opposite to the associated mass transfer. This can cause deep hydrothermal karsting that is

  17. An alternative treatment of heat flow for charge transport in semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Grupen, Matt

    2009-12-15

    A unique thermodynamic model of Fermi gases suitable for semiconductor device simulation is presented. Like other models, such as drift diffusion and hydrodynamics, it employs moments of the Boltzmann transport equation derived using the Fermi-Dirac distribution function. However, unlike other approaches, it replaces the concept of an electron thermal conductivity with the heat capacity of an ideal Fermi gas to determine heat flow. The model is used to simulate a field-effect transistor and show that the external current-voltage characteristics are strong functions of the state space available to the heated Fermi distribution.

  18. Transport of volume, heat, and salt towards the Arctic in the Faroe Current 1993-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B.; Larsen, K. M. H.; Hátún, H.; Kristiansen, R.; Mortensen, E.; Østerhus, S.

    2015-09-01

    The flow of warm and saline water from the Atlantic Ocean, across the Greenland-Scotland Ridge, into the Nordic Seas - the Atlantic inflow - is split into three separate branches. The most intense of these branches is the inflow between Iceland and the Faroe Islands (Faroes), which is focused into the Faroe Current, north of the Faroes. The Atlantic inflow is an integral part of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC), which is projected to weaken during the 21st century and might conceivably reduce the oceanic heat and salt transports towards the Arctic. Since the mid-1990s, hydrographic properties and current velocities of the Faroe Current have been monitored along a section extending north from the Faroe shelf. From these in situ observations, time series of volume, heat, and salt transport have previously been reported, but the high variability of the transport has made it difficult to establish whether there are trends. Here, we present results from a new analysis of the Faroe Current where the in situ observations have been combined with satellite altimetry. For the period 1993 to 2013, we find the average volume transport of Atlantic water in the Faroe Current to be 3.8 ± 0.5 Sv (1 Sv = 106 m3 s-1) with a heat transport relative to 0 °C of 124 ± 15 TW (1 TW = 1012 W). Consistent with other results for the Northeast Atlantic component of the THC, we find no indication of weakening. The transports of the Faroe Current, on the contrary, increased. The overall increase over the 2 decades of observation was 9 ± 8 % for volume transport and 18 ± 9 % for heat transport (95 % confidence intervals). During the same period, the salt transport relative to the salinity of the deep Faroe Bank Channel overflow (34.93) more than doubled, potentially strengthening the feedback on thermohaline intensity. The increased heat and salt transports are partly caused by the increased volume transport and partly by increased temperatures and salinities of the

  19. Turbulent anomalous transport and anisotropic electron heating in a return current system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kuang Wu; Buechner, Joerg

    2011-02-15

    Anisotropic electron heating due to self-generated electromagnetic turbulences is observed in collisionless return current plasmas. The corresponding energy conversion, electron heating, and associated anomalous momentum transport are investigated by means of a two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation code. The return current model consists of two counterstreaming electron beams with different temperatures and a stationary ion background. First, a general multifluid dispersion analyzer is presented in a clear matrix form that allows to study electron streaming instabilities. The numerical simulation confirms the predicted electrostatic electron-electron acoustic instability. Generating electromagnetic waves, the system evolves into a nonlinear stage. As a result, the electron drifts are slowed down due to turbulence-induced anomalous momentum exchange. Localized electric and magnetic field fluctuations play major roles in the energy conversion. Perpendicular electron heating follows the growth of magnetic field perturbations and the slowing of the electron drifts. Parallel and perpendicular electron heating occurs at different time scales. It is shown that the longer lasting perpendicular electron heating is caused by preheated parallel electron flows. The deflection of the preheated parallel electron flows in the localized turbulences, which is essentially a two-dimensional effect, leads to perpendicular electron heating even after the saturation of parallel electron heating. We conclude that the self-generated magnetic turbulence dominates the anomalous transport process in the late stage of return current system evolution.

  20. A pumped, two-phase flow heat transport system for orbiting instrument payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowle, A. A.

    1981-01-01

    A pumped two-phase (heat absorption/heat rejection) thermal transport system for orbiting instrument payloads is investigated. The thermofluid characteristics necessary for the system design are discussed. A preliminary design with a series arrangement of four instrument heat stations and six radiators in a single loop is described in detail, and the total mass is estimated to be 134 kg, with the radiators, instrument heat stations, and fluid reservoir accounting for approximately 86, 24, and 12 kg, respectively. The evaluation of preliminary test results shows that the system has potential advantages; however, further research is necessary in the areas of one-g and zero-g heat transfer coefficients/fluid regimes, fluid by-pass temperature control, and reliability of small pumps.

  1. Dissection of Photosynthetic Electron Transport Process in Sweet Sorghum under Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Kun; Chen, Peng; Shao, Hongbo; Shao, Chuyang; Zhao, Shijie; Brestic, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Plant photosynthesis and photosystem II (PSII) are susceptible to high temperature. However, photosynthetic electron transport process under heat stress remains unclear. To reveal this issue, chlorophyll a fluorescence and modulated 820 nm reflection were simultaneously detected in sweet sorghum. At 43°C, J step in the chlorophyll a fluorescence transient was significantly elevated, suggesting that electron transport beyond primary quinone of PSII (QA) (primary quinone electron acceptor of PSII) was inhibited. PSI (Photosystem I) photochemical capacity was not influenced even under severe heat stress at 48°C. Thus, PSI oxidation was prolonged and PSI re-reduction did not reach normal level. The inhibition of electron transport between PSII and PSI can reduce the possibility of PSI photoinhibition under heat stress. PSII function recovered entirely one day after heat stress at 43°C, implying that sweet sorghum has certain self-remediation capacity. When the temperature reached 48°C, the maximum quantum yield for primary photochemistry and the electron transport from PSII donor side were remarkably decreased, which greatly limited the electron flow to PSI, and PSI re-reduction suspended. The efficiency of an electron transferred from the intersystem electron carrier (plastoquinol, PQH2) to the end electron acceptors at the PSI acceptor side increased significantly at 48°C, and the reason was the greater inhibition of electron transport before PQH2. Thus, the fragment from QA to PQH2 is the most heat sensitive in the electron transport chain between PSII and PSI in sweet sorghum. PMID:23717388

  2. Competing orders in LSCO probed by heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shiyan; Hawthorn, D. G.; Taillefer, Louis; Yamada, K.

    2006-03-01

    We elucidate the nature of the thermal metal-to-insulator transition in La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) [1] through measurements of the thermal conductivity κ performed very close to the transition, down to temperatures as low as 50 mK and in magnetic fields H up to 17 T. For a single crystal with x = 0.15, a monotonic increase in the residual linear term κ0/T is observed up to 17 T, as expected for a d-wave superconductor. For a crystal with x = 0.144, however, we observe an initial increase in κ0/T at low field, followed by a decrease when H exceeds a critical field H^*. This result is consistent with recent neutron scattering measurements on a similar sample [2], which show that static spin-density-wave (SDW) order is not present in zero field, but sets in at a critical magnetic field H^*, and then co-exists/competes with superconductivity (SC) for H > H^*. Taken together, these two measurements reveal that the SC phase gives way to a phase which is both magnetic and insulating, whether by increasing magnetic field or by decreasing doping. Using low-energy quasiparticle transport, we map out the T = 0 field-doping (H-x) phase diagram of LSCO. [1] D.G. Hawthorn et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 197004 (2003); X.F. Sun et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 117004 (2003). [2] B. Khaykovich et al., Phys. Rev. B 71, 220508(R) (2005).

  3. Heat transport by phonons and the generation of heat by fast phonon processes in ferroelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, X.; Salje, E. K. H.

    2015-05-01

    Thermal conductivity of ferroelastic device materials can be reversibly controlled by strain. The nucleation and growth of twin boundaries reduces thermal conductivity if the heat flow is perpendicular to the twin wall. The twin walls act as phonon barriers whereby the thermal conductivity decreases linearly with the number of such phonon barriers. Ferroelastic materials also show elasto-caloric properties with a high frequency dynamics. The upper frequency limit is determined by heat generation on a time scale, which is some 5 orders of magnitude below the typical bulk phonon times. Some of these nano-structural processes are irreversible under stress release (but remain reversible under temperature cycling), in particular the annihilation of needle domains that are a key indicator for ferroelastic behaviour in multiferroic materials.

  4. Performance and heat transfer characteristics of the laser-heated rocket - A future space transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, J. M.; Larson, V. R.

    1976-01-01

    The application of advanced liquid-bipropellant rocket engine analysis techniques has been utilized for prediction of the potential delivered performance and the design of thruster wall cooling schemes for laser-heated rocket thrusters. Delivered specific impulse values greater than 1000 lbf-sec/lbm are potentially achievable based on calculations for thrusters designed for 10-kW and 5000-kW laser beam power levels. A thruster wall-cooling technique utilizing a combination of regenerative cooling and a carbon-seeded hydrogen boundary layer is presented. The flowing carbon-seeded hydrogen boundary layer provides radiation absorption of the heat radiated from the high-temperature plasma. Also described is a forced convection thruster wall cooling design for an experimental test thruster.

  5. Measurements of Combined Axial Mass and Heat Transport in He II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Warren W.; Jones, Michael C.

    An experiment was performed that allowed measurements of both axial mass and heat transport of He-II (the superfluid phase of helium 4) in a long tube. The apparatus allowed the pressure difference and the temperature difference across the flow tube to each be independently adjusted, and the resulting steady-state values of net fluid velocity and…

  6. Micropaleontological evidence for increased meridional heat transport in the North Atlantic Ocean during the pliocene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.J.; Cronin, T. M.; Poore, R.Z.; Thompson, R.S.; Whatley, R.C.; Wood, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    The Middle Pliocene (???3 million years ago) has been identified as the last time the Earth was significantly warmer than it was during the Last Interglacial and Holocene. A quantitative micropaleontological paleotemperature transect from equator to high latitudes in the North Atlantic indicates that Middle Pliocene warmth involved increased meridional oceanic heat transport.

  7. 3D Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Buoyant Flow and Heat Transport in a Curved Open Channel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-dimensional buoyancy-extended version of kappa-epsilon turbulence model was developed for simulating the turbulent flow and heat transport in a curved open channel. The density- induced buoyant force was included in the model, and the influence of temperature stratification on flow field was...

  8. Influence of geologic layering on heat transport and storage in an aquifer thermal energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridger, D. W.; Allen, D. M.

    2013-09-01

    A modeling study was carried out to evaluate the influence of aquifer heterogeneity, as represented by geologic layering, on heat transport and storage in an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system in Agassiz, British Columbia, Canada. Two 3D heat transport models were developed and calibrated using the flow and heat transport code FEFLOW including: a "non-layered" model domain with homogeneous hydraulic and thermal properties; and, a "layered" model domain with variable hydraulic and thermal properties assigned to discrete geological units to represent aquifer heterogeneity. The base model (non-layered) shows limited sensitivity for the ranges of all thermal and hydraulic properties expected at the site; the model is most sensitive to vertical anisotropy and hydraulic gradient. Simulated and observed temperatures within the wells reflect a combination of screen placement and layering, with inconsistencies largely explained by the lateral continuity of high permeability layers represented in the model. Simulation of heat injection, storage and recovery show preferential transport along high permeability layers, resulting in longitudinal plume distortion, and overall higher short-term storage efficiencies.

  9. Phonon and magnon heat transport and drag effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heremans, Joseph P.

    2014-03-01

    Thermoelectric generators and coolers constitute today's solid-state energy converters. The two goals in thermoelectrics research are to enhance the thermopower while simultaneously maintaining a high electrical conductivity of the same material, and to minimize its lattice thermal conductivity without affecting its electronic properties. Up to now the lattice thermal conductivity has been minimized by using alloy scattering and, more recently, nanostructuring. In the first part of the talk, a new approach to minimize the lattice thermal conductivity is described that affects phonon scattering much more than electron scattering. This can be done by selecting potential thermoelectric materials that have a very high anharmonicity, because this property governs phonon-phonon interaction probability. Several possible types of chemical bonds will be described that exhibit such high anharmonicity, and particular emphasis will be put on solids with highly-polarizable lone-pair electrons, such as the rock salt I-V-VI2 compounds (e.g. NaSbSe2). The second part of the talk will give an introduction to a completely new class of solid-state thermal energy converters based on spin transport. One configuration for such energy converters is based on the recently discovered spin-Seebeck effect (SSE). This quantity is expressed in the same units as the conventional thermopower, and we have recently shown that it can be of the same order of magnitude. The main advantage of SSE converters is that the problem of optimization is now distributed over two different materials, a ferromagnet in which a flux of magnetization is generated by a thermal gradient, and a normal metal where the flux of magnetization is converted into electrical power. The talk will focus on the basic physics behind the spin-Seebeck effect. Recent developments will then be described based on phonon-drag of spin polarized electrons. This mechanism has made it possible to reach magnitudes of SSE that are comparable

  10. Analysis of simulation methodology for calculation of the heat of transport for vacancy thermodiffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, William C.; Schelling, Patrick K.

    2014-07-01

    Computation of the heat of transport Q a * in monatomic crystalline solids is investigated using the methodology first developed by Gillan [J. Phys. C: Solid State Phys. 11, 4469 (1978)] and further developed by Grout and coworkers [Philos. Mag. Lett. 74, 217 (1996)], referred to as the Grout-Gillan method. In the case of pair potentials, the hopping of a vacancy results in a heat wave that persists for up to 10 ps, consistent with previous studies. This leads to generally positive values for Q a * which can be quite large and are strongly dependent on the specific details of the pair potential. By contrast, when the interactions are described using the embedded atom model, there is no evidence of a heat wave, and Q a * is found to be negative. This demonstrates that the dynamics of vacancy hopping depends strongly on the details of the empirical potential. However, the results obtained here are in strong disagreement with experiment. Arguments are presented which demonstrate that there is a fundamental error made in the Grout-Gillan method due to the fact that the ensemble of states only includes successful atom hops and hence does not represent an equilibrium ensemble. This places the interpretation of the quantity computed in the Grout-Gillan method as the heat of transport in doubt. It is demonstrated that trajectories which do not yield hopping events are nevertheless relevant to computation of the heat of transport Q a *.

  11. Dissolved gas exsolution to enhance gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegele, P. R.; Mumford, K. G.

    2015-05-01

    Condensation of volatile organic compounds in colder zones can be detrimental to the performance of an in situ thermal treatment application for the remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones. A novel method to increase gas production and limit convective heat loss in more permeable, potentially colder, zones involves the injection and liberation of dissolved gas from solution during heating. Bench-scale electrical resistance heating experiments were performed with a dissolved carbon dioxide and sodium chloride solution to investigate exsolved gas saturations and transport regimes at elevated, but sub-boiling, temperatures. At sub-boiling temperatures, maximum exsolved gas saturations of Sg = 0.12 were attained, and could be sustained when the carbon dioxide solution was injected during heating rather than emplaced prior to heating. This gas saturation was estimated to decrease groundwater relative permeability to krw = 0.64. Discontinuous gas transport was observed above saturations of Sg = 0.07, demonstrating the potential of exsolved CO2 to bridge vertical gas transport through colder zones.

  12. Steady-State Thermodynamics for Crossed Transport Phenomena of Heat and Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Kimie; Takeyama, Naokata

    1992-08-01

    Crossed transport phenomena of heat and matter are thermodynamically discussed by using transported enthalpy and entropy, and those of transport, without using linear kinetic equations. The steady-state thermodynamics developed here is effective in dealing with thermo-osmosis, thermal diffusion and thermoelectricity. It is important to distinguish between transported thermal quantities and those of transport in any case. All of the results obtained agree exactly with corresponding expressions of linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics based on the Onsager theorem of reciprocity. Quasithermodynamic ambiguities are consistently eliminated by introducing entropy generated internally, diS, in harmony with the second law of thermodynamics. At the same time, a few points confused by many authors are corrected.

  13. Heat transport in the quasi-single-helicity islands of EXTRAP T2R

    SciTech Connect

    Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J.

    2009-03-15

    The heat transport inside the magnetic island generated in a quasi-single-helicity regime of a reversed-field pinch device is studied by using a numerical code that simulates the electron temperature and the soft x-ray emissivity. The heat diffusivity {chi}{sub e} inside the island is determined by matching the simulated signals with the experimental ones. Inside the island, {chi}{sub e} turns out to be from one to two orders of magnitude lower than the diffusivity in the surrounding plasma, where the magnetic field is stochastic. Furthermore, the heat transport properties inside the island are studied in correlation with the plasma current and with the amplitude of the magnetic fluctuations.

  14. [The design of heat dissipation of the field low temperature box for storage and transportation].

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiancang; Suin, Jianjun; Wu, Jian

    2013-02-01

    Because of the compact structure of the field low temperature box for storage and transportation, which is due to the same small space where the compressor, the condenser, the control circuit, the battery and the power supply device are all placed in, the design for heat dissipation and ventilation is of critical importance for the stability and reliability of the box. Several design schemes of the heat dissipation design of the box were simulated using the FLOEFD hot fluid analysis software in this study. Different distributions of the temperature field in every design scheme were constructed intimately in the present study. It is well concluded that according to the result of the simulation analysis, the optimal heat dissipation design is decent for the field low temperature box for storage and transportation, and the box can operate smoothly for a long time using the results of the design. PMID:23488142

  15. Heat transport in a two-dimensional complex (dusty) plasma at melting conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosenko, V.; Ivlev, A. V.; Zhdanov, S.; Morfill, G.; Goree, J.; Piel, A.

    2007-11-01

    The heat transport in a two-dimensional complex (dusty) plasma undergoing a phase transition was studied experimentally. A single layer of highly charged polymer microspheres was suspended in a plasma sheath. In the absence of manipulation, the suspension forms a 2D triangular lattice. To melt this lattice and form a liquid, we used a laser-heating method. Two focused laser beams were moved rapidly around in the monolayer. The kinetic temperature of the particles increased with the laser power applied, and above a threshold a melting transition occurred. We used video microscopy for direct imaging and particle tracking. The spatial profiles of the particle kinetic temperature were calculated. Using the heat transport equation with an additional term to account for the energy dissipation due to the gas drag, we analyzed the temperature profiles to find a thermal conductivity, which did not depend on temperature.

  16. Gyrokinetic simulations of momentum transport and fluctuation spectra for ICRF-heated L-Mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierchio, J. M.; White, A. E.; Howard, N. T.; Sung, C.; Ennever, P.; Porkolab, M.; Candy, J.

    2014-10-01

    We examine ICRF-heated L-mode plasmas in Alcator C-Mod, with differing momentum transport (hollow vs. peaked radial profiles of intrinsic toroidal rotation) but similar heat and particle transport. Nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of heat and particle transport with GYRO [Candy and Waltz, J. Comp. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] have previously been compared with these experiments [White et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056106 (2013); Howard et al. PPCF submitted (2014)] as part of an effort to validate the gyrokinetic model for core turbulent transport in C-Mod plasmas. To further test the model for these plasmas, predicted core turbulence characteristics such as fluctuation spectra will be compared with experiment. Using synthetic diagnostics for the CECE, reflectometry, and PCI systems at C-Mod, synthetic spectra and, when applicable, fluctuation amplitudes, are generated. We compare these generated results with fluctuation measurements from the experiment. We also report the momentum transport results from simulations of these plasmas and compare them to experiment. Supported by USDoE award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  17. Analyses of core heat transport in plasmas with different toroidal rotation profiles in JT-60U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Emi; Honda, Mitsuru; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Urano, Hajime; Ide, Shunsuke; Fukuda, Takeshi

    2013-10-01

    It has been reported that in H-mode plasmas, toroidal rotation in the co direction with respect to the plasma current is more favorable for energy confinement than that in the counter direction. Effects of toroidal rotation on core temperature profiles have been pointed out, whereas the improved confinement has been found to be due to an increase in the pedestal temperature with co-toroidal rotation and profile resilience. In JT-60U, roles of toroidal rotation have been studied using neutral beam injection changes. In this study, core heat transport of these plasmas with different toroidal rotation profiles is investigated with several transport models implemented in the transport code TOPICS. These transport models give the anomalous heat diffusivity and are tested against conventional H-mode plasmas in JT-60U. The calculations are performed with the E × B shear effect. The relationship between heat transport and toroidal rotation is examined with a flux-tube gyrokinetic code, which we will present in the paper. Work supported by JSPS Research Fellowships for Young Scientists.

  18. Skylab and solar exploration. [chromosphere-corona structure, energy production and heat transport processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Puttkamer, J.

    1973-01-01

    Review of some of the findings concerning solar structure, energy production, and heat transport obtained with the aid of the manned Skylab space station observatory launched on May 14, 1973. Among the topics discussed are the observation of thermonuclear fusion processes which cannot be simulated on earth, the observation of short-wave solar radiation not visible to observers on earth, and the investigation of energy-transport processes occurring in the photosphere, chromosphere, and corona. An apparent paradox is noted in that the cooler chromosphere is heating the hotter corona, seemingly in defiance of the second law of thermodynamics, thus suggesting that a nonthermal mechanism underlies the energy transport. Understanding of this nonthermal mechanism is regarded as an indispensable prerequisite for future development of plasma systems for terrestrial applications.

  19. Vapor transport of zirconium and silicon during heat-treatment of Zircaloy in silica

    SciTech Connect

    Knittel, D.R.; Cubicciotti, D.

    1980-01-01

    When pieces of Zircaloy are heated above 600/sup 0/C in sealed silica capsules, silicon is deposited on the Zircaloy surface as zirconium silicides and zirconium is deposited on the silica in two forms: as an oxide layer in the high temperature region and as a metallic mirror on lower temperature surfaces. Samples of Zircaloy were heated in silica capsules under various conditions and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that the deposits resulted from vapor transport processes involving volatile zirconium and silicon fluorides. Residual fluoride on Zircaloy surfaces, remaining from acid pickling treatments, was observed by Auger electron spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy in amounts sufficient to cause the transport. The thermodynamics of the vapor transport reactions are in accord with the fluoride mechanism. 4 figures.

  20. 1D momentum-conserving systems: the conundrum of anomalous versus normal heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunyun; Liu, Sha; Li, Nianbei; Hänggi, Peter; Li, Baowen

    2015-04-01

    Transport and the spread of heat in Hamiltonian one dimensional momentum conserving nonlinear systems is commonly thought to proceed anomalously. Notable exceptions, however, do exist of which the coupled rotator model is a prominent case. Therefore, the quest arises to identify the origin of manifest anomalous energy and momentum transport in those low dimensional systems. We develop the theory for both, the statistical densities for momentum- and energy-spread and particularly its momentum-/heat-diffusion behavior, as well as its corresponding momentum/heat transport features. We demonstrate that the second temporal derivative of the mean squared deviation of the momentum spread is proportional to the equilibrium correlation of the total momentum flux. Subtracting the part which corresponds to a ballistic momentum spread relates (via this integrated, subleading momentum flux correlation) to an effective viscosity, or equivalently, to the underlying momentum diffusivity. We next put forward the intriguing hypothesis: normal spread of this so adjusted excess momentum density causes normal energy spread and alike normal heat transport (Fourier Law). Its corollary being that an anomalous, superdiffusive broadening of this adjusted excess momentum density in turn implies an anomalous energy spread and correspondingly anomalous, superdiffusive heat transport. This hypothesis is successfully corroborated within extensive molecular dynamics simulations over large extended time scales. Our numerical validation of the hypothesis involves four distinct archetype classes of nonlinear pair-interaction potentials: (i) a globally bounded pair interaction (the noted coupled rotator model), (ii) unbounded interactions acting at large distances (the coupled rotator model amended with harmonic pair interactions), (iii) the case of a hard point gas with unbounded square-well interactions and (iv) a pair interaction potential being unbounded at short distances while displaying an

  1. Construction of the adjoint MIT ocean general circulation model and application to Atlantic heat transport sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marotzke, Jochem; Giering, Ralf; Zhang, Kate Q.; Stammer, Detlef; Hill, Chris; Lee, Tong

    1999-12-01

    We first describe the principles and practical considerations behind the computer generation of the adjoint to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology ocean general circulation model (GCM) using R. Giering's software tool Tangent-Linear and Adjoint Model Compiler (TAMC). The TAMC's recipe for (FORTRAN-) line-by-line generation of adjoint code is explained by interpreting an adjoint model strictly as the operator that gives the sensitivity of the output of a model to its input. Then, the sensitivity of 1993 annual mean heat transport across 29°N in the Atlantic, to the hydrography on January 1, 1993, is calculated from a global solution of the GCM. The "kinematic sensitivity" to initial temperature variations is isolated, showing how the latter would influence heat transport if they did not affect the density and hence the flow. Over 1 year the heat transport at 29°N is influenced kinematically from regions up to 20° upstream in the western boundary current and up to 5° upstream in the interior. In contrast, the dynamical influences of initial temperature (and salinity) perturbations spread from as far as the rim of the Labrador Sea to the 29°N section along the western boundary. The sensitivities calculated with the adjoint compare excellently to those from a perturbation calculation with the dynamical model. Perturbations in initial interior salinity influence meridional overturning and heat transport when they have propagated to the western boundary and can thus influence the integrated east-west density difference. Our results support the notion that boundary monitoring of meridional mass and heat transports is feasible.

  2. Estimating uncertainty caused by ocean heat transport to the North Sea: experiments downscaling EC-Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, T.; Su, J.; Boberg, F.; Yang, S.; Schmith, T.

    2016-01-01

    The heat content of the North Sea is determined by the surface heat flux and the ocean heat transport into the region. The uncertainty in the projected warming in the North Sea caused by ocean heat transport has rarely been quantified. The difference in the estimates using regional ocean models is known to arise from the poorly prescribed temperature boundary forcing, either provided by global models at coarse grid resolutions, or from anomaly correction (using difference of the simulation from observed climatology) without interannual variation. In this study, two marine downscaling experiments were performed using boundary temperature forcings prepared with the two above mentioned strategies: one interpolated from a global model simulation (MI: model incl. interannual variation), and the other from observed climatology with warming trends in the future ocean derived from the global model simulation (OT: observed climatol. plus trend). The comparative experiments allowed us to estimate the uncertainty caused by ocean heat transport to the North Sea. The global climate model EC-Earth CMIP5 simulations of historical and future scenarios were used to provide lateral boundary forcing for regional models. The OT boundary was found to affect deep water temperatures (below 50 m) in the North Sea because of reduced interannual variability. The difference of mean temperature changes by 2100 (MI - OT) was up to 0.5 °C near the bottom across 58°N. While the deep water temperature in the North Sea did not directly link to the large-scale atmospheric circulation, the Norwegian outflow was highly correlated with the NAO index and heat transport of the Atlantic inflow provided by EC-Earth. It was found that model uncertainty due to the choice of lateral boundary forcing could be significant in the interannual variation of thermal stratification in the northern North Sea in a long-term simulation.

  3. Generalized parallel heat transport equations in collisional to weakly collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zawaideh, E.; Kim, N.S.; Najmabadi, F.

    1988-11-01

    A new set of two-fluid heat transport equations that is valid from collisional to weakly collisional limits is derived. Starting from gyrokinetic equations in flux coordinates, a set of moment equations describing plasma energy transport along the field lines of a space- and time-dependent magnetic field is derived. No restrictions on the anisotropy of the ion distribution function or collisionality are imposed. In the highly collisional limit, these equations reduce to the classical heat conduction equation (e.g., Spitzer and Haerm or Braginskii), while in the weakly collisional limit, they describe a saturated heat flux (flux limited). Numerical examples comparing these equations with conventional heat transport equations show that in the limit where the ratio of the mean free path lambda to the scale length of the temperature gradient L/sub T/ approaches zero, there is no significant difference between the solutions of the new and conventional heat transport equations. As lambda/L/sub T/..-->..1, the conventional heat conduction equation contains a significantly larger error than (lambda/L/sub T/)/sup 2/. The error is found to be O(lambda/L)/sup 2/, where L is the smallest of the scale lengths of the gradient in the magnetic field, or the macroscopic plasma parameters (e.g., velocity scale length, temperature scale length, and density scale length). The accuracy of the flux-limited model depends significantly on the value of the flux limit parameter which, in general, is not known. The new set of equations shows that the flux-limited parameter is a function of the magnetic field and plasma parameter profiles.

  4. Thermal transport in shock wave-compressed solids using pulsed laser heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Lone, B. M.; Capelle, G.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L. R.

    2014-07-01

    A pulsed laser heating method was developed for determining thermal transport properties of solids under shock-wave compression. While the solid is compressed, a laser deposits a known amount of heat onto the sample surface, which is held in the shocked state by a transparent window. The heat from the laser briefly elevates the surface temperature and then diffuses into the interior via one-dimensional heat conduction. The thermal effusivity is determined from the time history of the resulting surface temperature pulse, which is recorded with optical pyrometry. Thermal effusivity is the square root of the product of thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity and is the key thermal transport parameter for relating the surface temperature to the interior temperature of the sample in a dynamic compression experiment. Therefore, this method provides information that is needed to determine the thermodynamic state of the interior of a compressed metal sample from a temperature measurement at the surface. The laser heat method was successfully demonstrated on tin that was shock compressed with explosives to a stress and temperature of ˜25 GPa and ˜1300 K. In this state, tin was observed to have a thermal effusivity of close to twice its ambient value. The implications on determining the interior shock wave temperature of tin are discussed.

  5. Thermal transport in shock wave–compressed solids using pulsed laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    La Lone, B. M. Capelle, G.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L. R.

    2014-07-15

    A pulsed laser heating method was developed for determining thermal transport properties of solids under shock-wave compression. While the solid is compressed, a laser deposits a known amount of heat onto the sample surface, which is held in the shocked state by a transparent window. The heat from the laser briefly elevates the surface temperature and then diffuses into the interior via one-dimensional heat conduction. The thermal effusivity is determined from the time history of the resulting surface temperature pulse, which is recorded with optical pyrometry. Thermal effusivity is the square root of the product of thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity and is the key thermal transport parameter for relating the surface temperature to the interior temperature of the sample in a dynamic compression experiment. Therefore, this method provides information that is needed to determine the thermodynamic state of the interior of a compressed metal sample from a temperature measurement at the surface. The laser heat method was successfully demonstrated on tin that was shock compressed with explosives to a stress and temperature of ∼25 GPa and ∼1300 K. In this state, tin was observed to have a thermal effusivity of close to twice its ambient value. The implications on determining the interior shock wave temperature of tin are discussed.

  6. Cross-Field Electron Heat Transport in a Magnetoplasma, in the Presence of Ion Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needelman, David Dore

    Cross-field heat transport through a cylindrical pulsed argon afterglow magnetoplasma, (B_0 = 48-300G, rm T_{e} ~ 0.5-7 eV, n_{e} ~ 10^{11} cm^{ -3}, Phi_{s } ~ 2V, radius = 5 cm), is investigated. The study of heat flow is relevant to the fields of fusion engineering and space physics. A BaO-coated dispenser cathode is used to produce a pulsed electron beam, (V_{b}=750 V, I_{b} = 1A, radius = 1.27 cm, tau_{b} = 5 - 10mus, fired 300 mus into the afterglow), propagating down the central axis of the plasma. The beam heats the background electrons within some centimeters of the beam launching point (Whe85); heat diffuses along field lines, forming a "flux tube" of hot plasma. Biased grids, (radius = 5 cm, V_{g} = -200V), are used to retard the axial heat flow through the tube. A radially inserted Langmuir probe is used to map T_{e}, n_ {e}, and Phi_{s } as a function of position and time. There profiles are used to deduce the electron cross-field thermal conductivity coefficient, kappa_| . Anomalous heat transport is found for all cases studied; kappa_| is found to be up to two orders of magnitude above classical predictions. Such transport is attributed to quasilinear effects; collisions of the background electrons with radial ion acoustic waves created indirectly by the beam, through action of the beam/plasma and oscillating two-stream instabilities (Whe85), and with azimuthal ion acoustic waves, created by the pressure-gradient instability(All74). An enhanced collision frequency leads to faster cross-field particle and heat diffusion. Measurements of wave amplitudes are presented, as are correlation measurements proving the waves are ion acoustic. Comparisons of experimental measurements with quasilinear theory predictions (Man78) are shown to be quite close.

  7. Topics in quantum transport of charge and heat in solid state systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yunjin

    In the thesis, we present a series of investigations for quantum transport of charge and heat in solid state systems. The first topic of the thesis focuses on the fundamental quantum problems which can be studied with electron transport along with the correlations of detectors to measure physical properties. We theoretically describe a generalized ``which-path'' measurement using a pair of coupled electronic Mach-Zehnder Interferometers. In the second topic of thesis, we investigate an operational approach to measure the tunneling time based on the Larmor clock. To handle the cases of indirect measurement from the first and second topics, we introduce the contextual values formalism. The form of the contextual values provides direct physical insight into the measurement being performed, providing information about the correlation strength between system and detector, the measurement inefficiency, the proper background removal, and the conditioned average value of the system operator. Additionally, the weak interaction limit of these conditioned averages produces weak values of the system operator and an additional detector dependent disturbance term for both cases. In our treatment of the third topic of the thesis, we propose a three terminal heat engine based on semiconductor superlattices for energy harvesting. The periodicity of the superlattice structure creates an energy miniband, giving an energy window to allow electron transport. We find that this device delivers a large amount of power, nearly twice that produced by the heat engine based on quantum wells, with a small reduction of efficiency. This engine also works as a refrigerator in a different regime of the system's parameters. The thermoelectric performance of the refrigerator is analyzed, including the cooling power and coefficient of performance in the optimized condition. We also calculate phonon heat current through the system and explore the reduction of phonon heat current compared to the bulk

  8. Numerical Modeling of Mantle Convection with Heat-pipe Melt Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, Sebastian; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Tosi, Nicola; Breuer, Doris

    2015-04-01

    During the early evolution of terrestrial bodies, a large amount of mantle melting is expected to affect significantly the energy budget of the interior through heat transport by volcanism. Partial melt, generated when the mantle temperature exceeds the solidus, can propagate to the surface through dikes, thereby advecting upwards a large amount of heat. This so-called heat-pipe mechanism is an effective way to transport thermal energy from the meltregion to the planetary surface. Indeed, recent studies suggest that this mechanism may have shaped the Earth's earliest evolution by controlling interior heat loss until the onset of plate tectonics [1]. Furthermore, heat-piping is likely the primary mechanism through which Jupiter's moon Io loses its tidally generated heat, leading to massive volcanism able to cause a present-day heat-flux about 40 times higher than the Earth's average heat-flux [2]. However, despite its obvious importance, heat-piping is often neglected in mantle convection models of terrestrial planets because of its additional complexity and vaguely defined parameterization. In this study, adopting the approach of [1] we model mantle convection in a generic stagnant lid planet and study heat-piping effects in a systematic way. Assuming that melt is instantaneously extracted to the surface and melting regions are refilled by downward advection of cold mantle material in order to ensure mass conservation, we investigate the influence of heat-pipes on the mantle temperature and stagnant lid thickness using the numerical code Gaia [3]. To this end, we run a large set of simulations in 2D Cartesian geometry spanning a wide parameter space. Our results are consistent with [1] and show that in systems with strongly temperature-dependent viscosity the heat-pipe mechanism sets in at a Rayleigh number Ra ~ 2 × 107. Upon increasing Ra up to ~ 6 × 107

  9. Ocean heat transport into the Arctic in the twentieth and twenty-first century in EC-Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenigk, Torben; Brodeau, Laurent

    2014-06-01

    The ocean heat transport into the Arctic and the heat budget of the Barents Sea are analyzed in an ensemble of historical and future climate simulations performed with the global coupled climate model EC-Earth. The zonally integrated northward heat flux in the ocean at 70°N is strongly enhanced and compensates for a reduction of its atmospheric counterpart in the twenty first century. Although an increase in the northward heat transport occurs through all of Fram Strait, Canadian Archipelago, Bering Strait and Barents Sea Opening, it is the latter which dominates the increase in ocean heat transport into the Arctic. Increased temperature of the northward transported Atlantic water masses are the main reason for the enhancement of the ocean heat transport. The natural variability in the heat transport into the Barents Sea is caused to the same extent by variations in temperature and volume transport. Large ocean heat transports lead to reduced ice and higher atmospheric temperature in the Barents Sea area and are related to the positive phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation. The net ocean heat transport into the Barents Sea grows until about year 2050. Thereafter, both heat and volume fluxes out of the Barents Sea through the section between Franz Josef Land and Novaya Zemlya are strongly enhanced and compensate for all further increase in the inflow through the Barents Sea Opening. Most of the heat transported by the ocean into the Barents Sea is passed to the atmosphere and contributes to warming of the atmosphere and Arctic temperature amplification. Latent and sensible heat fluxes are enhanced. Net surface long-wave and solar radiation are enhanced upward and downward, respectively and are almost compensating each other. We find that the changes in the surface heat fluxes are mainly caused by the vanishing sea ice in the twenty first century. The increasing ocean heat transport leads to enhanced bottom ice melt and to an extension of the area with bottom ice

  10. Carbon transport in a bimetallic sodium loop simulating the intermediate heat transport system of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hampton, L.V.; Spalaris, C.N.; Roy, P.

    1980-04-01

    Carbon transport data from a bimetallic sodium loop simulating the intermediate heat transport system of a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor are discussed. The results of bulk carbon analyses after 15,000 hours' exposure indicate a pattern of carburization of Type 304 stainless steel foils which is independent of loop sodium temperature. A model based on carbon activity gradients accounting for this behavior is proposed. Data also indicate that carburization of Type 304 stainless steel is a diffusion-controlled process; however, decarburization of the ferritic 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo steel is not. It is proposed that the decarburization of the ferritic steel is controlled by the dissolution of carbides in the steel matrix. The differences in the sodium decarburization behavior of electroslag remelted and vacuum-arc remelted 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo steel are also highlighted.

  11. Effects of Pr on Optimal Heat Transport in Rayleigh-Bénard Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondak, David; Budišić, Marko; Waleffe, Fabian; Smith, Leslie

    2015-11-01

    Steady flows that optimize heat transport are obtained for two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection with no-slip horizontal walls for a variety of Prandtl numbers Pr and Rayleigh number up to Ra ~109 . The presence of two local maxima of Nu with different horizontal wavenumbers at the same Ra leads to the emergence of two different flow structures as candidates for optimizing the heat transport where the Nusselt number Nu is a non-dimensional measure of the vertical heat transport. For Pr <= 7 , optimal transport is achieved at the smaller maximal wavenumber whereas for Pr > 7 at high-enough Ra the optimal structure occurs at the larger maximal wavenumber. Three regions are observed in the optimal mean temperature profiles, T y : 1.) d T / dy < 0 in the boundary layers, 2.) d T / dy > 0 (Pr <= 7) or d T / dy < 0 (Pr > 7) in the central region, and 3.) d T / dy > 0 between the boundary layers and central region. We also search for a signature of these optimal structures in a fully-developed turbulent flow by employing modal decompositions such as the proper orthogonal decomposition and the Koopman mode decomposition. Partial support from NSF-DMS grant 1147523 is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Gravity Wave and Turbulence Transport of Heat and Na in the Mesopause Region over the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yafang; Liu, Alan Z.

    2016-07-01

    The vertical heat and Na fluxes induced by gravity waves and turbulence are derived based on over 600 hours of observations from the Na wind/temperature lidar located at Andes lidar Observatory (ALO), Cerro Pachón, Chile. In the 85-100 km region, the annual mean vertical fluxes by gravity waves show downward heat transport with a maximum of 0.78K m/s at 90 km, and downward Na transport with a maximum of 210 m/s/cm3 at 94km. The maximum cooing rate reaches -24 K/d at 94km. The vertical fluxes have strong seasonal variations, with large differences in magnitudes and altitudes of maximum fluxes between winter and summer. The vertical fluxes due to turbulence eddies are also derived with a novel method that relates turbulence fluctuations of temperature and vertical wind with photon count fluctuations at very high resolution (25 m, 6 s). The results show that the vertical transports are comparable to those by gravity waves and they both play significant roles in the atmospheric thermal structure and constituent distribution. This direct measure of turbulence transport also enables estimate of the eddy diffusivity for heat and constituent in the mesopause region.

  13. Basin-scale transport of heat and fluid induced by earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Manga, M.; Wang, L.; Chen, C.

    2013-12-01

    Large earthquakes are known to cause widespread changes in groundwater flow at distances thousands of kilometers away from the epicenter, yet their relation to subsurface transport is unknown. Since groundwater flow is effective in transporting subsurface heat, studies of earthquake-induced changes in groundwater temperature may be useful for better understanding earthquake-induced heat transport. Here we report systematic changes in groundwater temperature after the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake in central Taiwan, recorded by a dense network of monitoring wells over a large (1,800 km2) alluvial fan near the epicenter. The data documented a clear trend of increase from negative changes (temperature decrease) near the upper rim of the fan near the ruptured fault to positive changes (temperature increase) near the coast. Analysis of the data reveals a hitherto unknown system of earthquake-triggered basin-wide groundwater flow, which scavenges geothermal heat from depths, changing groundwater temperature across the basin. The newly identified earthquake-triggered groundwater flow may have significant implications on post-seismic groundwater supply and quality, contaminant transport, underground repository safety, and hydrocarbon production.

  14. Heat and water transport in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Partha P; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rod L; Ranjan, Devesh

    2010-01-01

    In the present scenario of a global initiative toward a sustainable energy future, the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) has emerged as one of the most promising alternative energy conversion devices for various applications. Despite tremendous progress in recent years, a pivotal performance limitation in the PEFC comes from liquid water transport and the resulting flooding phenomena. Liquid water blocks the open pore space in the electrode and the fibrous diffusion layer leading to hindered oxygen transport. The electrode is also the only component in the entire PEFC sandwich which produces waste heat from the electrochemical reaction. The cathode electrode, being the host to several competing transport mechanisms, plays a crucial role in the overall PEFC performance limitation. In this work, an electrode model is presented in order to elucidate the coupled heat and water transport mechanisms. Two scenarios are specifically considered: (1) conventional, Nafion{reg_sign} impregnated, three-phase electrode with the hydrated polymeric membrane phase as the conveyer of protons where local electro-neutrality prevails; and (2) ultra-thin, two-phase, nano-structured electrode without the presence of ionomeric phase where charge accumulation due to electro-statics in the vicinity of the membrane-CL interface becomes important. The electrode model includes a physical description of heat and water balance along with electrochemical performance analysis in order to study the influence of electro-statics/electro-migration and phase change on the PEFC electrode performance.

  15. Graphene transport properties upon exposure to PMMA processing and heat treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammelgaard, Lene; Caridad, José M.; Cagliani, Alberto; Mackenzie, David M. A.; Petersen, Dirch H.; Booth, Timothy J.; Bøggild, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of graphene's electrical transport properties due to processing with the polymer polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and heat are examined in this study. The use of stencil (shadow mask) lithography enables fabrication of graphene devices without the usage of polymers, chemicals or heat, allowing us to measure the evolution of the electrical transport properties during individual processing steps from the initial as-exfoliated to the PMMA-processed graphene. Heating generally promotes the conformation of graphene to SiO2 and is found to play a major role for the electrical properties of graphene while PMMA residues are found to be surprisingly benign. In accordance with this picture, graphene devices with initially high carrier mobility tend to suffer a decrease in carrier mobility, while in contrast an improvement is observed for low carrier mobility devices. We explain this by noting that flakes conforming poorly to the substrate will have a higher carrier mobility which will however be reduced as heat treatment enhance the conformation. We finally show the electrical properties of graphene to be reversible upon heat treatments in air up to 200 °C.

  16. Effects of tropical cyclones on large-scale circulation and ocean heat transport in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xidong; Wang, Chunzai; Han, Guijun; Li, Wei; Wu, Xinrong

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we investigate the influence of tropical cyclones (TCs) on large-scale circulation and ocean heat transport in the South China Sea (SCS) by using an ocean general circulation model at a 1/8° resolution during 2000-2008. The model uses a data assimilation system to assimilate observations in order to improve the representation of SCS circulation. The results reveal an unexpected deep SCS circulation anomaly induced by TCs, which suggests that effects of TC can penetrate deeper into the ocean. This deep effect may result from the near inertial oscillations excited by TCs. The inertial oscillations can propagate downward to the oceanic interior. The analyses confirm that TCs have two effects on ocean heat transport of the SCS. Firstly, the wind stress curl induced by TCs affects the structure of SCS circulation, and then changes heat transport. Secondly, TCs pump surface heat downward to the thermocline, increasing the heat injection from the atmosphere to the ocean. Two effects together amplify the outflow of the surface heat southward away the SCS through the Mindoro and Karimata Straits. The TC-induced heat transports through the Mindoro, Balabac and Karimata Straits account for 20 % of the total heat transport through three straits. An implication of this study is that ocean models need to simulate the TC effect on heat transport in order to correctly evaluate the role of the SCS through flow in regulating upper ocean circulation and climate in the Indonesian maritime continent and its adjacent regions.

  17. Underlying mechanisms for normal heat transport in one-dimensional anharmonic oscillator systems with a double-well interparticle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Daxing

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies have suggested a crossover from superdiffusive to normal heat transport in one-dimensional (1D) anharmonic oscillator systems with a double-well type interatomic interaction like V(ξ )=-{ξ2}/2+{ξ4}/4 , when the system temperature is varied. In order to better understand this unusual manner of thermal transport, here we perform a direct dynamics simulation to examine how the spreading processes of the three physical quantities, i.e. the heat, the total energy and the momentum, would depend on temperature. We find three main points that are worth noting. (i) The crossover from superdiffusive to normal heat transport is well verified from a new perspective of heat spread. (ii) The spreading of the total energy is found to be very distinct from heat diffusion, especially under some temperature regimes, energy is strongly localized, while heat can be superdiffusive. So one should take care to derive a general connection between the heat conduction and energy diffusion. (iii) In a narrow range of temperatures, the spreading of momentum implies clear unusual non-ballistic behaviors; however, such unusual transport of momentum cannot be directly related to the normal transport of heat. An analysis of phonon spectra suggests that one should also take the effects of phonon softening into account. All of these results may provide insights into establishing the connection between the macroscopic heat transport and the underlying dynamics in 1D systems.

  18. Working fluid selection for space-based two-phase heat transport systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclinden, Mark O.

    1988-01-01

    The working fluid for externally-mounted, space-based two-phase heat transport systems is considered. A sequence of screening criteria involving freezing and critical point temperatures and latent heat of vaporization and vapor density are applied to a data base of 860 fluids. The thermal performance of the 52 fluids which pass this preliminary screening are then ranked according to their impact on the weight of a reference system. Upon considering other nonthermal criteria (flammability, toxicity, and chemical stability) a final set of 10 preferred fluids is obtained. The effects of variations in system parameters is investigated for these 10 fluids by means of a factorial design.

  19. Steady-state heat transport: Ballistic-to-diffusive with Fourier's law

    SciTech Connect

    Maassen, Jesse Lundstrom, Mark

    2015-01-21

    It is generally understood that Fourier's law does not describe ballistic phonon transport, which is important when the length of a material is similar to the phonon mean-free-path. Using an approach adapted from electron transport, we demonstrate that Fourier's law and the heat equation do capture ballistic effects, including temperature jumps at ideal contacts, and are thus applicable on all length scales. Local thermal equilibrium is not assumed, because allowing the phonon distribution to be out-of-equilibrium is important for ballistic and quasi-ballistic transport. The key to including the non-equilibrium nature of the phonon population is to apply the proper boundary conditions to the heat equation. Simple analytical solutions are derived, showing that (i) the magnitude of the temperature jumps is simply related to the material properties and (ii) the observation of reduced apparent thermal conductivity physically stems from a reduction in the temperature gradient and not from a reduction in actual thermal conductivity. We demonstrate how our approach, equivalent to Fourier's law, easily reproduces results of the Boltzmann transport equation, in all transport regimes, even when using a full phonon dispersion and mean-free-path distribution.

  20. Atmospheric Compensation of Variations in Tropical Ocean Heat Transport: Understanding Mechanisms and Implications on Tectonic Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rencurrel, M. C.; Rose, B. E. J.

    2015-12-01

    The poleward transport of energy is a key aspect of the climate system, with surface ocean currents presently dominating the transport out of deep tropics. A classic study by Stone (1978) proposed that the total heat transport is determined by astronomical parameters and is highly insensitive to the detailed atmosphere-ocean dynamics. On the other hand, previous modeling work has shown that past continental configurations could have produced substantially different tropical ocean heat transport (OHT). How thoroughly does the atmosphere compensate for changes in ocean transport in terms of the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative budget, what are the relevant mechanisms, and what are the consequences for surface temperature and climate on tectonic timescales? We examine these issues in a suite of aquaplanet GCM simulations subject to large prescribed variations in OHT. We find substantial but incomplete compensation, in which adjustment of the atmospheric Hadley circulation plays a key role. We then separate out the dynamical and thermodynamical components of the adjustment mechanism. Increased OHT tends to warm the mid- to high latitudes without cooling the tropics due asymmetries in radiative feedback processes. The warming is accompanied by hydrological cycle changes that are completely different from those driven by greenhouse gases, suggesting that drivers of past global change might be detectable from combinations of hydroclimate and temperature proxies.

  1. The effects of size, configuration and distribution of continents on the efficiency of heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C. M.; Moresi, L. N.; Lenardic, A.

    2011-12-01

    The addition of continents to the surface of a planet alters its interior dynamics; understanding this alteration is critical to understanding the thermal evolution of the Earth. Specifically, the increase in temperature induced by continental insulation can be compensated by an increase in the heat loss through the overturn of the oceanic lithosphere, thus contradicting the predicted reduction of global heat loss due to presence of continents (e.g., Lenardic et al, 2005; Cooper et al, 2006; Lenardic et al, 2011). We reconfirm this counterintuitive result with three-dimensional simulations. In addition, we explore variations in the configuration of continents on the surface. Within simulations with equivalent continental coverage, but varying configuration, there is a competition between the lateral size of the blocks and the natural horizontal scale of the convection pattern which influences the stability of the models over time, and the efficiency of heat transport. Smaller continental blocks tend to induce a stable planform with upwellings permanently avoiding the blocks. However, in cases with larger continental blocks, the imposed scale is larger than the preferred scale of the convection pattern and upwellings are unable to avoid the blocks altogether. The dependency on stability and efficiency of heat transport within the Earth on continental coverage and configuration suggests continents can play a significant role in the Earth's heat budget and thermal history. Cooper, C.M., A. Lenardic, and L.-N. Moresi "Effects of continental insulation and the partioning of heat producing elements on the Earth's heat loss." Geophys. Res. Lett., 33 ,10.1029, 2006; Lenardic, A., C.M. Cooper, and L.-N. Moresi "A note on continents and the Earth's Urey ratio", Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 2011; Lenardic, A., L.-N. Moresi, A.M. Jellinek, and M. Manga "Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents." Earth Planet. Sci

  2. An asymptotic-preserving Lagrangian algorithm for the time-dependent anisotropic heat transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Chacon, Luis; del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Hauck, Cory D.

    2014-09-01

    We propose a Lagrangian numerical algorithm for a time-dependent, anisotropic temperature transport equation in magnetized plasmas in the large guide field regime. The approach is based on an analytical integral formal solution of the parallel (i.e., along the magnetic field) transport equation with sources, and it is able to accommodate both local and non-local parallel heat flux closures. The numerical implementation is based on an operator-split formulation, with two straightforward steps: a perpendicular transport step (including sources), and a Lagrangian (field-line integral) parallel transport step. Algorithmically, the first step is amenable to the use of modern iterative methods, while the second step has a fixed cost per degree of freedom (and is therefore scalable). Accuracy-wise, the approach is free from the numerical pollution introduced by the discrete parallel transport term when the perpendicular to parallel transport coefficient ratio X /X becomes arbitrarily small, and is shown to capture the correct limiting solution when ε = X⊥L2/X1L2 → 0 (with L∥∙ L⊥ , the parallel and perpendicular diffusion length scales, respectively). Therefore, the approach is asymptotic-preserving. We demonstrate the capabilities of the scheme with several numerical experiments with varying magnetic field complexity in two dimensions, including the case of transport across a magnetic island.

  3. Optimization of creep properties of welded header-stub tube connection for lif extension

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, R.; Cunningham, G.; Roberts, B.

    1996-12-31

    The failure of boiler tubes is the predominant cause of boiler outages. From a life-extension point of view, the critical components are large diameter thick-wall high-temperature headers. The primary aim of this research is to numerically analyze the stresses in the boiler tube-header weld connection and study the behavior of the material as it creeps. The focus is on the initial thermoelastic stresses at the beginning of operation and the distribution of stresses after approximately twenty years of operation when the stresses have relaxed. The study calculates creep life fractions of the assembly after twenty years of service.

  4. Thermal transport of carbon nanotubes and graphene under optical and electrical heating measured by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, I.-Kai

    This thesis presents systematic studies of thermal transport in individual single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene by optical and electrical approaches using Raman spectroscopy. In the work presented from Chapter 2 to Chapter 6, individual suspended CNTs are preferentially measured in order to explore their intrinsic thermal properties. Moreover, the Raman thermometry is developed to detect the temperature of the carbon nanotube (CNT). A parabolic temperature profile is observed in the suspended region of the CNT while a heating laser scans across it, providing a direct evidence of diffusive thermal transport in an individual suspended CNT. Based on the curvature of the temperature profile, we can solve for the ratio of thermal contact resistance to the thermal resistance of the CNT, which spans the range from 0.02 to 17. The influence of thermal contact resistance on the thermal transport in an individual suspended CNT is also studied. The Raman thermometry is carried out in the center of a CNT, while its contact length is successively shortened by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip cutting technique. By investigating the dependence of the CNT temperature on its thermal contact length, the temperature of a CNT is found to increase dramatically as the contact length is made shorter. This work reveals the importance of manipulating the CNT thermal contact length when adopting CNT as a thermal management material. In using a focused laser to induce heating in a suspended CNT, one open question that remains unanswered is how many of the incident photons are absorbed by the CNT of interest. To address this question, micro-fabricated platinum thermometers, together with micro-Raman spectroscopy are used to quantify the optical absorption of an individual CNT. The absorbed power in the CNT is equal to the power detected by two thermometers at the end of the CNT. Our result shows that the optical absorption lies in the range between 0.03 to 0.44%. In

  5. Modeling heat and moisture transport in firefighter protective clothing during flash fire exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitrphiromsri, Patirop; Kuznetsov, Andrey V.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a model of heat and moisture transport in firefighter protective clothing during a flash fire exposure is presented. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of coupled heat and moisture transport on the protective performance of the garment. Computational results show the distribution of temperature and moisture content in the fabric during the exposure to the flash fire as well as during the cool-down period. Moreover, the duration of the exposure during which the garment protects the firefighter from getting second and third degree burns from the flash fire exposure is numerically predicted. A complete model for the fire-fabric-air gap-skin system is presented.

  6. SEAWAT Version 4: A Computer Program for Simulation of Multi-Species Solute and Heat Transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langevin, Christian D.; Thorne, Daniel T., Jr.; Dausman, Alyssa M.; Sukop, Michael C.; Guo, Weixing

    2008-01-01

    The SEAWAT program is a coupled version of MODFLOW and MT3DMS designed to simulate three-dimensional, variable-density, saturated ground-water flow. Flexible equations were added to the program to allow fluid density to be calculated as a function of one or more MT3DMS species. Fluid density may also be calculated as a function of fluid pressure. The effect of fluid viscosity variations on ground-water flow was included as an option. Fluid viscosity can be calculated as a function of one or more MT3DMS species, and the program includes additional functions for representing the dependence on temperature. Although MT3DMS and SEAWAT are not explicitly designed to simulate heat transport, temperature can be simulated as one of the species by entering appropriate transport coefficients. For example, the process of heat conduction is mathematically analogous to Fickian diffusion. Heat conduction can be represented in SEAWAT by assigning a thermal diffusivity for the temperature species (instead of a molecular diffusion coefficient for a solute species). Heat exchange with the solid matrix can be treated in a similar manner by using the mathematically equivalent process of solute sorption. By combining flexible equations for fluid density and viscosity with multi-species transport, SEAWAT Version 4 represents variable-density ground-water flow coupled with multi-species solute and heat transport. SEAWAT Version 4 is based on MODFLOW-2000 and MT3DMS and retains all of the functionality of SEAWAT-2000. SEAWAT Version 4 also supports new simulation options for coupling flow and transport, and for representing constant-head boundaries. In previous versions of SEAWAT, the flow equation was solved for every transport timestep, regardless of whether or not there was a large change in fluid density. A new option was implemented in SEAWAT Version 4 that allows users to control how often the flow field is updated. New options were also implemented for representing constant

  7. On the glacial and interglacial thermohaline circulation and the associated transports of heat and freshwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarotta, M.; Falahat, S.; Brodeau, L.; Döös, K.

    2014-11-01

    The thermohaline circulation (THC) and the oceanic heat and freshwater transports are essential for understanding the global climate system. Streamfunctions are widely used in oceanography to represent the THC and estimate the transport of heat and freshwater. In the present study, the regional and global changes of the THC, the transports of heat and freshwater and the timescale of the circulation between the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ≈ 21 kyr ago) and the present-day climate are explored using an Ocean General Circulation Model and streamfunctions projected in various coordinate systems. We found that the LGM tropical circulation is about 10% stronger than under modern conditions due to stronger wind stress. Consequently, the maximum tropical transport of heat is about 20% larger during the LGM. In the North Atlantic basin, the large sea-ice extent during the LGM constrains the Gulf Stream to propagate in a more zonal direction, reducing the transport of heat towards high latitudes by almost 50% and reorganising the freshwater transport. The strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation depends strongly on the coordinate system. It varies between 9 and 16 Sv during the LGM, and between 12 to 19 Sv for the present day. Similar to paleo-proxy reconstructions, a large intrusion of saline Antarctic Bottom Water takes place into the Northern Hemisphere basins and squeezes most of the Conveyor Belt circulation into a shallower part of the ocean. These different haline regimes between the glacial and interglacial period are illustrated by the streamfunctions in latitude-salinity coordinates and thermohaline coordinates. From these diagnostics, we found that the LGM Conveyor Belt circulation is driven by an enhanced salinity contrast between the Atlantic and the Pacific basin. The LGM abyssal circulation lifts and makes the Conveyor Belt cell deviate from the abyssal region, resulting in a ventilated upper layer above a deep stagnant layer, and an

  8. Convective Heat Transfer in the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor of the Space Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Rashid A.; Cash, Stephen F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This simulation involved a two-dimensional axisymmetric model of a full motor initial grain of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) of the Space Transportation System (STS). It was conducted with CFD (computational fluid dynamics) commercial code FLUENT. This analysis was performed to: a) maintain continuity with most related previous analyses, b) serve as a non-vectored baseline for any three-dimensional vectored nozzles, c) provide a relatively simple application and checkout for various CFD solution schemes, grid sensitivity studies, turbulence modeling and heat transfer, and d) calculate nozzle convective heat transfer coefficients. The accuracy of the present results and the selection of the numerical schemes and turbulence models were based on matching the rocket ballistic predictions of mass flow rate, head end pressure, vacuum thrust and specific impulse, and measured chamber pressure drop. Matching these ballistic predictions was found to be good. This study was limited to convective heat transfer and the results compared favorably with existing theory. On the other hand, qualitative comparison with backed-out data of the ratio of the convective heat transfer coefficient to the specific heat at constant pressure was made in a relative manner. This backed-out data was devised to match nozzle erosion that was a result of heat transfer (convective, radiative and conductive), chemical (transpirating), and mechanical (shear and particle impingement forces) effects combined.

  9. The Arctic Mediterranean Sea - Deep convection, oceanic heat transport and freshwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudels, Bert

    2014-05-01

    The speculations about the driving forces behind the oceanic meridional circulation and the importance of the northward transports of oceanic heat for the ice conditions in the Arctic Ocean have a long history, but only after the Fram expedition 1893-1896 and from the studies by Nansen, Helland-Hansen and Sandström in the early 1900s did these speculations attain observational substance. In the late 1970s and onward these questions have again risen to prominence. A study of deep convection in the Greenland Sea, then assumed to drive the global thermohaline circulation, started with the Greenland Sea Project (GSP), while the investigation of the exchanges of volume and heat through Fram Strait had a more hesitant start in the Fram Strait Project (FSP). Not until 1997 with the EC project VEINS (Variation of Exchanges in the Northern Seas) was a mooring array deployed across Fram Strait. This array has been maintained and has measured the exchanges ever since. Eberhard Fahrbach was closely involved in these studies, as a secretary for the GSP and as the major driving force behind the Fram Strait array. Here we shall examine the legacy of these projects; How our understanding of these themes has evolved in recent years. After the 1980s no convective bottom water renewal has been observed in the Greenland Sea, and the Greenland Sea deep waters have gradually been replaced by warmer, more saline deep water from the Arctic Ocean passing through Fram Strait. Small-scale convective events penetrating deeper than 2500m but there less dense than their surroundings were, however, observed in the early 2000s. The Fram Strait exchanges have proven difficult to estimate due to strong variability, high barotropic and baroclinic eddy activity and short lateral coherence scales. The fact that the mass transports through Fram Strait do not balance complicates the assessment of the heat transport through Fram Strait into the Arctic Ocean and mass (volume) and salt (freshwater

  10. Bounds on heat transport in Rayleigh's and related models of Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doering, Charles R.; Souza, Andre N.; Wen, Baole; Chini, Gregory P.; Kerswell, Richard R.

    2015-11-01

    We present new upper limits on convective heat transport in both the full and several low-dimensional Galerkin truncations of Rayleigh's 1916 model of buoyancy-driven Bénard convection using both the so-called background method as well as optimal control variational techniques. Research supported in part by by NSF Awards PHY-1205219, PHY-1338407, PHY-1443836, PHY-1533555 and DMS-1515161.

  11. The development of a high-capacity instrument module heat transport system, appendixes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Data sheets provide temperature requirements for 82 individual instruments that are under development or planned for grouping on a space platform or pallet. The scientific objectives of these instrument packages are related to solar physics, space plasma physics, astronomy, high energy astrophysics, resources observations, environmental observations, materials processing, and life sciences. System specifications are given for a high capacity instrument module heat transport system to be used with future payloads.

  12. Heat Exchanger Design Options and Tritium Transport Study for the VHTR System

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim

    2008-09-01

    This report presents the results of a study conducted to consider heat exchanger options and tritium transport in a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) system for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The heat exchanger options include types, arrangements, channel patterns in printed circuit heat exchangers (PCHE), coolant flow direction, and pipe configuration in shell-and-tube designs. Study considerations include: three types of heat exchanger designs (PCHE, shell-and-tube, and helical coil); single- and two-stage unit arrangements; counter-current and cross flow configurations; and straight pipes and U-tube designs in shell-and-tube type heat exchangers. Thermal designs and simple stress analyses were performed to estimate the heat exchanger options, and the Finite Element Method was applied for more detailed calculations, especially for PCHE designs. Results of the options study show that the PCHE design has the smallest volume and heat transfer area, resulting in the least tritium permeation and greatest cost savings. It is theoretically the most reliable mechanically, leading to a longer lifetime. The two-stage heat exchanger arrangement appears to be safer and more cost effective. The recommended separation temperature between first and second stages in a serial configuration is 800oC, at which the high temperature unit is about one-half the size of the total heat exchanger core volume. Based on simplified stress analyses, the high temperature unit will need to be replaced two or three times during the plant’s lifetime. Stress analysis results recommend the off-set channel pattern configuration for the PCHE because stress reduction was estimated at up to 50% in this configuration, resulting in a longer lifetime. The tritium transport study resulted in the development of a tritium behavior analysis code using the MATLAB Simulink code. In parallel, the THYTAN code, previously performed by Ohashi and Sherman (2007) on the Peach Bottom data, was revived

  13. The role of radiation transport in the thermal response of semitransparent materials to localized laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, Jeffrey; Shestakov, Aleksei; Stolken, James; Vignes, Ryan

    2011-03-09

    Lasers are widely used to modify the internal structure of semitransparent materials for a wide variety of applications, including waveguide fabrication and laser glass damage healing. The gray diffusion approximation used in past models to describe radiation cooling is not adequate for these materials, particularly near the heated surface layer. In this paper we describe a computational model based upon solving the radiation transport equation in 1D by the Pn method with ~500 photon energy bands, and by multi-group radiationdiffusion in 2D with fourteen photon energy bands. The model accounts for the temperature-dependent absorption of infrared laser light and subsequent redistribution of the deposited heat by both radiation and conductive transport. We present representative results for fused silica irradiated with 2–12 W of 4.6 or 10.6 µm laser light for 5–10 s pulse durations in a 1 mm spot, which is small compared to the diameter and thickness of the silica slab. Furthermore, we show that, unlike the case for bulk heating, in localized infrared laser heatingradiation transport plays only a very small role in the thermal response of silica.

  14. Is the oceanic heat transport with Atlantic water towards the Arctic changing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Østerhus, Svein

    2013-04-01

    The flow of Atlantic water (Atlantic inflow) across the Greenland-Scotland Ridge (GSR) is critical for conditions in the Nordic Seas and Arctic Ocean by importing heat and salt. All three branches crossing the GSR have been monitored since the mid-1990ies and the transports of water and heat have been estimated. The Atlantic inflow, that forms the surface part of the thermohaline circulation in the North Atlantic, is affected by wind forcing and freshwater input but the most important driving appears to be the cooling of the ocean by the atmosphere in the subarctic seas and increasing of salinity in the Arctic Ocean through freezing of seawater. This results in the sinking of the surface waters that subsequently flow out of the area close to the bottom over the GSR. This removal of water from the Arctic region by the overflow generates sea level slopes that drive a northward transport of water and heat. With global climate change, the Arctic atmosphere is expected to warm and freshwater input to the Arctic to increase, both of which may act to slow the mechanism that drives these flows, and climate models predict a weakening of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation. This presentation addresses the question, whether the weakening has already been initiated and what regions may have been affected. Based on observations and model results, we conclude that the volume transport of the Atlantic inflow has not weakened consistently whereas the temperature has increased.

  15. A one-dimensional heat-transport model for conduit flow in karst aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, A.J.; Gilcrease, P.C.

    2009-01-01

    A one-dimensional heat-transport model for conduit flow in karst aquifers is presented as an alternative to two or three-dimensional distributed-parameter models, which are data intensive and require knowledge of conduit locations. This model can be applied for cases where water temperature in a well or spring receives all or part of its water from a phreatic conduit. Heat transport in the conduit is simulated by using a physically-based heat-transport equation that accounts for inflow of diffuse flow from smaller openings and fissures in the surrounding aquifer during periods of low recharge. Additional diffuse flow that is within the zone of influence of the well or spring but has not interacted with the conduit is accounted for with a binary mixing equation to proportion these different water sources. The estimation of this proportion through inverse modeling is useful for the assessment of contaminant vulnerability and well-head or spring protection. The model was applied to 7 months of continuous temperature data for a sinking stream that recharges a conduit and a pumped well open to the Madison aquifer in western South Dakota. The simulated conduit-flow fraction to the well ranged from 2% to 31% of total flow, and simulated conduit velocity ranged from 44 to 353 m/d.

  16. Icing Protection for a Turbojet Transport Airplane: Heating Requirements, Methods of Protection, and Performance Penalties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelder, Thomas F.; Lewis, James P.; Koutz, Stanley L.

    1953-01-01

    The problems associated with providing icing protection for the critical components of a typical turbojet transport airplane operating over a range of probable icing conditions are analyzed and discussed. Heating requirements for several thermal methods of protection are evaluated and the airplane performance penalties associated with providing this protection from various energy sources are assessed. The continuous heating requirements for icing protection and the associated airplane performance penalties for the turbojet transport are considerably increased over those associated with lower-speed aircraft. Experimental results show that the heating requirements can be substantially reduced by the deve1opment of a satisfactory cyclic deicing system. The problem of providing protection can be minimized by employing a proper energy source since the airplane performance penalties vary considerably with the source of energy employed. The optimum icing protection system for the turbojet transport or for any other particular aircraft cannot be generally specified; the choice of the optimum system is dependent upon the specific characteristics of the airplane and engine, the flight plan, the probable icing conditions, and the performance requirements of the aircraft.

  17. Anomalous eddy heat and freshwater transport in the Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, John M.; Johnson, Gregory C.

    2015-02-01

    Characteristics of eddies in the Gulf of Alaska are assessed from January 2003 through April 2012. Ensemble statistics for eddy subsurface water properties on isopycnals are computed using temperature and salinity profiles from Argo profiling floats located within eddies, which are identified in sea-surface height using objective techniques. Ninety cyclonic and 154 anticyclonic eddies are identified during this period. The anticyclonic eddies are strongly nonlinear and exhibit significant warm subsurface temperature anomalies and associated salty anomalies on isopycnals while no clear distinguishing subsurface anomalies on isopycnals are detected in association with the cyclonic eddies. Heat and freshwater fluxes for the eddies are estimated from integrations in depth coordinates. The anticyclonic eddies transport heat both westward off the continental shelf into the Subarctic Gyre and westward within the Alaskan Stream. However, they transport salt into the Subarctic Gyre and freshwater within the Alaskan Stream. In both pathways eddy heat and freshwater transport show possible year-to-year fluctuations, varying from 0 to 50.4 × 1018 J a-1 and -16.8 to +7.4 km3 a-1, respectively. The anticyclonic eddies are capped by relatively fresh water year-round.

  18. Gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating of water and trichloroethene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegele, P. R.; Mumford, K. G.

    2014-09-01

    The effective remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones using in situ thermal treatment requires successful capture of gas that is produced. Replicate electrical resistance heating experiments were performed in a thin bench-scale apparatus, where water was boiled and pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) trichloroethene (TCE) and water were co-boiled in unconsolidated silica sand. Quantitative light transmission visualization was used to assess gas production and transport mechanisms. In the water boiling experiments, nucleation, growth and coalescence of the gas phase into connected channels were observed at critical gas saturations of Sgc = 0.233 ± 0.017, which allowed for continuous gas transport out of the sand. In experiments containing a colder region above a target heated zone, condensation prevented the formation of steam channels and discrete gas clusters that mobilized into colder regions were trapped soon after discontinuous transport began. In the TCE-water experiments, co-boiling at immiscible fluid interfaces resulted in discontinuous gas transport above the DNAPL pool. Redistribution of DNAPL was also observed above the pool and at the edge of the vapor front that propagated upwards through colder regions. These results suggest that the subsurface should be heated to water boiling temperatures to facilitate gas transport from specific locations of DNAPL to extraction points and reduce the potential for DNAPL redistribution. Decreases in electric current were observed at the onset of gas phase production, which suggests that coupled electrical current and temperature measurements may provide a reliable metric to assess gas phase development.

  19. Fingerprint of topological Andreev bound states in phase-dependent heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sothmann, Björn; Hankiewicz, Ewelina M.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate that phase-dependent heat currents through superconductor-topological insulator Josephson junctions provide a useful tool to probe the existence of topological Andreev bound states, even for multichannel surface states. We predict that in the tunneling regime topological Andreev bound states lead to a minimum of the thermal conductance for a phase difference ϕ =π , in clear contrast to a maximum of the thermal conductance at ϕ =π that occurs for trivial Andreev bound states in superconductor-normal-metal tunnel junctions. This opens up the possibility that phase-dependent heat transport can distinguish between topologically trivial and nontrivial 4 π modes. Furthermore, we propose a superconducting quantum interference device geometry where phase-dependent heat currents can be measured using available experimental technology.

  20. Mass transport, corrosion, plugging, and their reduction in solar dish/Stirling heat pipe receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, D.R.; Andraka, C.E.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Goods, S.H.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.

    1996-07-01

    Solar dish/Stirling systems using sodium heat pipe receivers are being developed by industry and government laboratories here and abroad. The unique demands of this application lead to heat pipe wicks with very large surface areas and complex three-dimensional flow patterns. These characteristics can enhance the mass transport and concentration of constituents of the wick material, resulting in wick corrosion and plugging. As the test times for heat pipe receivers lengthen, we are beginning to see these effects both indirectly, as they affect performance, and directly in post-test examinations. We are also beginning to develop corrective measures. In this paper, we report on our test experiences, our post-test examinations, and on our initial effort to ameliorate various problems.

  1. Anomalous quantum heat transport in a one-dimensional harmonic chain with random couplings.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yonghong; Zhao, Hui

    2012-07-11

    We investigate quantum heat transport in a one-dimensional harmonic system with random couplings. In the presence of randomness, phonon modes may normally be classified as ballistic, diffusive or localized. We show that these modes can roughly be characterized by the local nearest-neighbor level spacing distribution, similarly to their electronic counterparts. We also show that the thermal conductance G(th) through the system decays rapidly with the system size (G(th) ∼ L(-α)). The exponent α strongly depends on the system size and can change from α < 1 to α > 1 with increasing system size, indicating that the system undergoes a transition from a heat conductor to a heat insulator. This result could be useful in thermal control of low-dimensional systems. PMID:22713930

  2. Turbulent transport regimes and the scrape-off layer heat flux width

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Russell, D. A.

    2015-04-15

    Understanding the responsible mechanisms and resulting scaling of the scrape-off layer (SOL) heat flux width is important for predicting viable operating regimes in future tokamaks and for seeking possible mitigation schemes. In this paper, we present a qualitative and conceptual framework for understanding various regimes of edge/SOL turbulence and the role of turbulent transport as the mechanism for establishing the SOL heat flux width. Relevant considerations include the type and spectral characteristics of underlying instabilities, the location of the gradient drive relative to the SOL, the nonlinear saturation mechanism, and the parallel heat transport regime. We find a heat flux width scaling with major radius R that is generally positive, consistent with the previous findings [Connor et al., Nucl. Fusion 39, 169 (1999)]. The possible relationship of turbulence mechanisms to the neoclassical orbit width or heuristic drift mechanism in core energy confinement regimes known as low (L) mode and high (H) mode is considered, together with implications for the future experiments.

  3. Solute and heat transport model of the Henry and Hilleke laboratory experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langevin, C.D.; Dausman, A.M.; Sukop, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    SEAWAT is a coupled version of MODFLOW and MT3DMS designed to simulate variable-density ground water flow and solute transport. The most recent version of SEAWAT, called SEAWAT Version 4, includes new capabilities to represent simultaneous multispecies solute and heat transport. To test the new features in SEAWAT, the laboratory experiment of Henry and Hilleke (1972) was simulated. Henry and Hilleke used warm fresh water to recharge a large sand-filled glass tank. A cold salt water boundary was represented on one side. Adjustable heating pads were used to heat the bottom and left sides of the tank. In the laboratory experiment, Henry and Hilleke observed both salt water and fresh water flow systems separated by a narrow transition zone. After minor tuning of several input parameters with a parameter estimation program, results from the SEAWAT simulation show good agreement with the experiment. SEAWAT results suggest that heat loss to the room was more than expected by Henry and Hilleke, and that multiple thermal convection cells are the likely cause of the widened transition zone near the hot end of the tank. Other computer programs with similar capabilities may benefit from benchmark testing with the Henry and Hilleke laboratory experiment. Journal Compilation ?? 2009 National Ground Water Association.

  4. Pulsed currents carried by whistlers. VII. Helicity and transport in heat pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R.L.; Urrutia, J.M.

    1996-07-01

    In a uniform magnetoplasma ({ital n}{approx_equal}10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}3}, {ital kT}{sub {ital e}}{ge}0.5 eV, {ital B}{sub 0}{ge}15 G, 1 m {times} 2.5 m), electrons are heated locally and temporally by applying a short current pulse to a loop antenna or disk electrode. Electron magnetohydrodynamics characterize the experimental conditions. After the end of the applied current pulse and whistler wave transients, a current system driven by temperature gradients remains embedded in the plasma. The current system exhibits helicity. The associated electron drifts convect heat out of the flux tube. From diamagnetic field measurements, the decay of the electron temperature is obtained with high sensitivity ({Delta}{ital kT}{sub {ital e}}{approx_equal}0.001 eV). The heat transport is inferred from the space{endash}time dependence of the electron temperature. The temperature enhancement is confined to a channel whose length depends on heat input since the transport coefficients are temperature-dependent. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Solute and heat transport model of the Henry and hilleke laboratory experiment.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Christian D; Dausman, Alyssa M; Sukop, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    SEAWAT is a coupled version of MODFLOW and MT3DMS designed to simulate variable-density ground water flow and solute transport. The most recent version of SEAWAT, called SEAWAT Version 4, includes new capabilities to represent simultaneous multispecies solute and heat transport. To test the new features in SEAWAT, the laboratory experiment of Henry and Hilleke (1972) was simulated. Henry and Hilleke used warm fresh water to recharge a large sand-filled glass tank. A cold salt water boundary was represented on one side. Adjustable heating pads were used to heat the bottom and left sides of the tank. In the laboratory experiment, Henry and Hilleke observed both salt water and fresh water flow systems separated by a narrow transition zone. After minor tuning of several input parameters with a parameter estimation program, results from the SEAWAT simulation show good agreement with the experiment. SEAWAT results suggest that heat loss to the room was more than expected by Henry and Hilleke, and that multiple thermal convection cells are the likely cause of the widened transition zone near the hot end of the tank. Other computer programs with similar capabilities may benefit from benchmark testing with the Henry and Hilleke laboratory experiment. PMID:19563419

  6. Patterns and mechanisms of heat transport in the northern Denver Basin: Nebraska, South Dakota and Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochsner, Aaron Thomas

    Finite difference simulations of the hydrothermal system of the northern Denver Basin are suggestive of a correlation between anomalous heat flux and the presence of faults and structural lineaments mapped in the region. Geothermal, hydrogeological, lithological, and structural data available for the northern Denver Basin were compiled and analyzed in an effort to determine the hydrothermal mechanisms responsible for observed heat flow anomalies in the study area. Measurement of thermal conductivity was conducted for 82 solid core samples and 60 unconsolidated samples from drill cuttings, yielding a harmonic mean thermal conductivity value of 1.52 +/- 0.91W m-1 K -1 for the stratigraphic column of the study area. A total of 929 thermal gradient values compiled from several databases were incorporated with thermal conductivity data to produce a heat flow map of the study area, delineating prominent areas of anomalous heat flux. Data was processed using finite difference simulation software (Hydrotherm Interactive) developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for the purposes of modeling and predicting heat and fluid transport in porous media. Two-dimensional cross-sectional models were calibrated using heat flow profiles and available potentiometric surface data for the Madison and Dakota aquifers in the region. Although calibrated models resulted in accurate simulations of non-anomalous heat flow profiles, anomalous heat flow highs were not reproduced. Acknowledging the existence of several major faults and numerous structural lineaments documented in the study area, vertical pathways of fluid flow were added to simulations to recreate the effect of such structural features. Models which incorporated a hypothetical linear fracture sufficiently accounted for previous discrepancies, and indicate probable upward advective flow through existing vertical fractures.

  7. Modelling subglacial discharge and its influence on ocean heat transport in Arctic fjords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendtsen, Jørgen; Mortensen, John; Rysgaard, Søren

    2015-11-01

    Tidewater outlet glaciers are directly connected to the ocean via ice walls or floating shelves. Melting and freezing of ice, runoff, englacial, and subglacial discharge of freshwater and ocean heat transport are therefore potential feedback processes between glacial ice flow and ocean circulation. Subglacial discharge occurs at the base of tidewater glacier outlets where out-flowing freshwater forms a convective buoyant plume ascending close to the glacier face and, due to entrainment, transports relatively warm and saline ambient bottom water up towards the surface. Plume dynamics, typically occurring at sub-grid scales in regional ocean models, therefore has to be parameterized in areas where ice-ocean interactions occur, as for example in Arctic fjords. Here, we develop and analyze a new simple boundary condition of subglacial discharge where entrainment-induced transport between the subsurface and surface layer is described. A sensitivity study showed that subglacial discharge increased ocean heat transport near the glacier whereas the impact from plume-entrainment became relatively small further from the glacier. Subglacial discharge was shown to have a significant influence on surface concentrations. The impact from subglacial discharge was demonstrated in a regional model of Godthåbsfjord (64°N), located at the west coast of Greenland, where surface concentrations near the glacier were shown to be sensitive to subglacial discharge in accordance with observations.

  8. Addition of simultaneous heat and solute transport and variable fluid viscosity to SEAWAT

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorne, D.; Langevin, C.D.; Sukop, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    SEAWAT is a finite-difference computer code designed to simulate coupled variable-density ground water flow and solute transport. This paper describes a new version of SEAWAT that adds the ability to simultaneously model energy and solute transport. This is necessary for simulating the transport of heat and salinity in coastal aquifers for example. This work extends the equation of state for fluid density to vary as a function of temperature and/or solute concentration. The program has also been modified to represent the effects of variable fluid viscosity as a function of temperature and/or concentration. The viscosity mechanism is verified against an analytical solution, and a test of temperature-dependent viscosity is provided. Finally, the classic Henry-Hilleke problem is solved with the new code. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Parameterization of eddy sensible heat transports in a zonally averaged dynamic model of the atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genthon, C.; Le Treut, H.; Sadourny, R.; Jouzel, J.

    1990-11-01

    A Charney-Branscome based parameterization has been tested as a way of representing the eddy sensible heat transports missing in a zonally averaged dynamic model (ZADM) of the atmosphere. The ZADM used is a zonally averaged version of a General Circulation Model (GCM). The parameterized transports in the ZADM are gaged against the corresponding fluxes explicitly simulated in the GCM, using the same zonally averaged boundary conditions in both models. The Charney-Branscome approach neglects stationary eddies and transient barotropic disturbances and relies on a set of simplifying assumptions, including the linear approximation, to describe growing transient baroclinic eddies. Nevertheless, fairly satisfactory results are obtained when the parameterization is performed interactively with the model. Compared with noninteractive tests, a very efficient restoring feedback effect between the modeled zonal-mean climate and the parameterized meridional eddy transport is identified.

  10. Parameterization of eddy sensible heat transports in a zonally averaged dynamic model of the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genthon, Christophe; Le Treut, Herve; Sadourny, Robert; Jouzel, Jean

    1990-01-01

    A Charney-Branscome based parameterization has been tested as a way of representing the eddy sensible heat transports missing in a zonally averaged dynamic model (ZADM) of the atmosphere. The ZADM used is a zonally averaged version of a general circulation model (GCM). The parameterized transports in the ZADM are gaged against the corresponding fluxes explicitly simulated in the GCM, using the same zonally averaged boundary conditions in both models. The Charney-Branscome approach neglects stationary eddies and transient barotropic disturbances and relies on a set of simplifying assumptions, including the linear appoximation, to describe growing transient baroclinic eddies. Nevertheless, fairly satisfactory results are obtained when the parameterization is performed interactively with the model. Compared with noninteractive tests, a very efficient restoring feedback effect between the modeled zonal-mean climate and the parameterized meridional eddy transport is identified.

  11. Impact of building facades and ground heating on wind flow and pollutant transport in street canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaomin; Liu, Chun-Ho; Leung, Dennis Y. C.

    This paper investigates the impacts of building facades and ground heating on the wind flow and pollutant transport in street canyons using the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) technique. Street canyons of H/ W ( H representing the building height and W the street width) varied from 0.1 to 2, which covered the basic flow regimes of skimming flow ( H/ W=1 or 2), wake interference flow ( H/ W=0.5), and isolated roughness flow ( H/ W=0.1), were examined in a series of sensitivity tests. Heating that occurred on different surfaces, including ground surface and building façades, posed considerable effects on the street canyon wind flow and pollutant transport compared with those under isothermal conditions. The CFD results showed that the mechanically induced wind flow and pollutant transport were complicated by the buoyancy under temperature stratification. Individual street canyons of different H/ W and surface-heating scenarios exhibited their unique wind flow structure and pollutant transport behaviors. Two counter-rotating vortices were calculated in the street canyons of H/ W=1, in which the zone of higher pollutant concentration under isothermal conditions was switched from the leeward side to the windward side. In the street canyon of H/ W=2, the recirculating wind pattern was perturbed by surface heating that led to the development of either one primary vortex or three closely coupled vortices. Because of the complicated wind structure, the zones of higher pollutant concentration located either on the leeward or windward ground level were subjected to the surface-heating scenarios. Only two vortices were developed inside the street canyon of H/ W=0.5. The large primary vortex, centered inside the street canyon, extended above the roof level of the street canyon. Meanwhile, a small secondary vortex was found at the ground-level windward corner whose size results as a function of surface-heating configurations. Finally, in the street canyon of H/ W=0.1, an

  12. Evidence for increased latent heat transport during the Cretaceous (Albian) greenhouse warming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ufnar, David F.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Brenner, Richard L.; Witzke, B.J.

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative estimates of increased heat transfer by atmospheric H 2O vapor during the Albian greenhouse warming suggest that the intensified hydrologic cycle played a greater role in warming high latitudes than at present and thus represents a viable alternative to oceanic heat transport. Sphaerosiderite ??18O values in paleosols of the North American Cretaceous Western Interior Basin are a proxy for meteoric ??18O values, and mass-balance modeling results suggest that Albian precipitation rates exceeded modern rates at both mid and high latitudes. Comparison of modeled Albian and modern precipitation minus evaporation values suggests amplification of the Albian moisture deficit in the tropics and moisture surplus in the mid to high latitudes. The tropical moisture deficit represents an average heat loss of ???75 W/m2 at 10??N paleolatitude (at present, 21 W/m2). The increased precipitation at higher latitudes implies an average heat gain of ???83 W/m2 at 45??N (at present, 23 W/m2) and of 19 W/m2 at 75??N (at present, 4 W/m2). These estimates of increased poleward heat transfer by H2O vapor during the Albian may help to explain the reduced equator-to-pole temperature gradients. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  13. Impact of ocean heat transport variations on the zonal mean circulation in an idealized moist GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, T.; Schneider, T.

    2012-12-01

    We study how equatorial surface heat sources affect the strength and width of the Hadley circulation to elucidate the dynamics of tropical-extratropical interactions. The well-known atmospheric response to El Niño-like forcings includes an equatorward shift in the Hadley circulation terminus and the subtropical jets. One proposed mechanisms for this response involves changes in subtropical baroclinicity and associated equatorward shifts in critical latitudes. Here we use an idealized aquaplanet general circulation model with a hydrological cycle and a time-independent, zonally symmetric background ocean heat transport to investigate systematically how the zonal mean climate responds to imposed equatorial ocean heating anomalies. This approach allows for dynamically adjusted surface temperatures and closed surface energy budgets. We study the sensitivity to the equatorial heating anomalies for different imposed longwave optical thickness profiles representing cold, Earth-like and warm climates. Consistent with previous studies, we find a shift of the Hadley circulation terminus towards the equator and a concomitant increase in subtropical baroclinicity for equatorial warming, and vice versa for an equatorial cooling. Together with the Hadley circulation terminus, the subtropical jets, regions of poleward eddy momentum and heat fluxes as well as storm tracks, shift towards (away from) the equator for simulations with imposed equatorial warming (cooling). We account for the circulation response with theoretical arguments for the structure of baroclinic eddies.

  14. Numerical modeling of diffusive heat transport across magnetic islands and highly stochastic layers

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelzl, M.; Guenter, S.; Yu, Q.; Lackner, K.

    2007-05-15

    Diffusive heat transport across magnetic islands and highly stochastic layers is studied numerically for realistic values of {chi}{sub parallel}/{chi}{sub perpendicular} in cylindrical geometry, where {chi}{sub parallel} denotes the heat diffusion coefficient parallel and {chi}{sub perpendicular} the one perpendicular to the magnetic field lines. The computations are performed with a second-order finite difference scheme, for which the numerical errors are independent from the value of {chi}{sub parallel}/{chi}{sub perpendicular} [S. Guenter et al., J. Comput. Phys. 209, 354 (2005)]. Sufficient spatial resolution is ensured by using an unsheared helical coordinate system. The heat flux around magnetic islands as well as the effective radial heat diffusivity {chi}{sub r} are examined and compared to analytical theory. The temperature perturbations caused by magnetic islands and the resulting bootstrap current perturbations essential for the stability of neoclassical tearing modes are analyzed and compared to analytical predictions [R. Fitzpatrick, Phys. Plasmas 2, 825 (1995)]. Agreement is found in the 'small' and 'large' island limits, but an enhanced NTM drive is observed in between. A correction factor that can reproduce the numerical results very well is presented. For a highly stochastic layer, produced by five strongly overlapping islands, the radial heat diffusivity {chi}{sub r} is determined and compared to several analytical theories.

  15. The role of atmospheric heat transport in the seasonal carbon dioxide cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, James B.; Haberle, R. M.; Murphy, James R.; Schaeffer, J.

    1993-01-01

    We have carried out numerical experiments with a general circulations model (GCM) and energy balance model of the martian atmosphere to define the importance of heat transported to the polar regions in determining the amount of CO2 condensed on the surface during the fall and winter seasons and the amount sublimated during the spring and summer seasons. In so doing, we performed both sensitivity experiments, in which the dust opacity was varied over the full range of its observed values, and annual simulations, in which the dust opacity varied continuously with seasonal data, in accord with measurements taken at the Viking landers. Dust opacity represents the key variable for determining the contribution of atmospheric heat advection to the energy budget in the polar regions. The amount of heat advected to the winter polar regions increases monotonically as the dust opacity at low and middle latitudes increases. However, the increase is sharpest between optical depths of 0 and 1 tends to level off at still higher optical depths. Heat advection is more important at times of CO2 condensation than CO2 sublimation, since the temperature gradients are much steeper in the winter hemisphere than in the summer hemisphere. Because dust opacity is much higher during northern winter than during southern winter, atmospheric heat advection reduces the amount of CO2 that condenses in the north by a much larger factor than it does in the south.

  16. Advective heat transport associated with regional Earth degassing in central Apennine (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiodini, G.; Cardellini, C.; Caliro, S.; Chiarabba, C.; Frondini, F.

    2013-07-01

    In this work we show that the main springs of the central Apennine transport a total amount of heat of ˜2.2×109 J s-1. Most of this heat (57%) is the result of geothermal warming while the remaining 43% is due to gravitational potential energy dissipation. This result indicates that a large area of the central Apennines is very hot with heat flux values >300 mW m-2. These values are higher than those measured in the magmatic and famously geothermal provinces of Tuscany and Latium and about 1/3 of the total heat discharged at Yellowstone. This finding is surprising because the central Apennines have been thought to be a relatively cold area. Translated by CO2 rich fluids, this heat anomaly suggests the existence of a thermal source such as a large magmatic intrusion at depth. Recent tomographic images of the area support the presence of such an intrusion visible as a broad negative velocity anomaly in seismic waves. Our results indicate that the thermal regime of tectonically active areas of the Earth, where meteoric waters infiltrate and deeply circulate, should be revised on the basis of mass and energy balances of the groundwater systems.

  17. Demonstration of an optical packet add/drop with wavelength-coded header

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsushima, H.; Shabeer, M.; Barnsley, P.; Pitcher, D.

    1995-02-01

    An optical self-routing add/drop packet network using wavelength coded header control signals is described. Experimental results for 2.5 Gbit/s 53-byte data packets transmitted through 50 km of standard step-index single-mode fiber are presented.

  18. 46 CFR 52.05-45 - Circumferential joints in pipes, tubes and headers (modifies PW-41).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., tubes and headers shall be as required by PW-41 of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 52.01-1) except as noted otherwise in this section. (b) (Modifies PW-41.1...) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Requirements for Boilers Fabricated by Welding §...

  19. Providing integrity, authenticity, and confidentiality for header and pixel data of DICOM images.

    PubMed

    Al-Haj, Ali

    2015-04-01

    Exchange of medical images over public networks is subjected to different types of security threats. This has triggered persisting demands for secured telemedicine implementations that will provide confidentiality, authenticity, and integrity for the transmitted images. The medical image exchange standard (DICOM) offers mechanisms to provide confidentiality for the header data of the image but not for the pixel data. On the other hand, it offers mechanisms to achieve authenticity and integrity for the pixel data but not for the header data. In this paper, we propose a crypto-based algorithm that provides confidentially, authenticity, and integrity for the pixel data, as well as for the header data. This is achieved by applying strong cryptographic primitives utilizing internally generated security data, such as encryption keys, hashing codes, and digital signatures. The security data are generated internally from the header and the pixel data, thus a strong bond is established between the DICOM data and the corresponding security data. The proposed algorithm has been evaluated extensively using DICOM images of different modalities. Simulation experiments show that confidentiality, authenticity, and integrity have been achieved as reflected by the results we obtained for normalized correlation, entropy, PSNR, histogram analysis, and robustness. PMID:25266442

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of DNA Capture and Transport in Heated Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The integration of local heat sources with solid-state nanopores offers new means for controlling the transmembrane transport of charged biomacromolecules. In the case of electrophoretic transport of DNA, recent experimental studies revealed unexpected temperature dependences of the DNA capture rate, the DNA translocation velocity, and the ionic current blockades produced by the presence of DNA in the nanopore. Here, we report the results of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations that elucidated the effect of temperature on the key microscopic processes governing electric field-driven transport of DNA through nanopores. Mimicking the experimental setup, we simulated the capture and subsequent translocation of short DNA duplexes through a locally heated nanopore at several temperatures and electrolyte conditions. The temperature dependence of ion mobility at the DNA surface was found to cause the dependence of the relative conductance blockades on temperature. To the first order, the effective force on DNA in the nanopore was found to be independent of temperature, despite a considerable reduction of solution viscosity. The temperature dependence of the solution viscosity was found to make DNA translocations faster for a uniformly heated system but not in the case of local heating that does not affect viscosity of solution surrounding the untranslocated part of the molecule. Increasing solution temperature was also found to reduce the lifetime of bonds formed between cations and DNA. Using a flow suppression algorithm, we were able to separate the effects of electro-osmotic flow and direct ion binding, finding the reduced durations of DNA–ion bonds to increase, albeit weakly, the effective force experienced by DNA in an electric field. Unexpectedly, our simulations revealed a considerable temperature dependence of solvent velocity at the DNA surface—slip velocity, an effect that can alter hydrodynamic coupling between the motion of DNA and the surrounding fluid

  1. Estimating the health benefits from natural gas use in transport and heating in Santiago, Chile.

    PubMed

    Mena-Carrasco, Marcelo; Oliva, Estefania; Saide, Pablo; Spak, Scott N; de la Maza, Cristóbal; Osses, Mauricio; Tolvett, Sebastián; Campbell, J Elliott; Tsao, Tsao Es Chi-Chung; Molina, Luisa T

    2012-07-01

    Chilean law requires the assessment of air pollution control strategies for their costs and benefits. Here we employ an online weather and chemical transport model, WRF-Chem, and a gridded population density map, LANDSCAN, to estimate changes in fine particle pollution exposure, health benefits, and economic valuation for two emission reduction strategies based on increasing the use of compressed natural gas (CNG) in Santiago, Chile. The first scenario, switching to a CNG public transportation system, would reduce urban PM2.5 emissions by 229 t/year. The second scenario would reduce wood burning emissions by 671 t/year, with unique hourly emission reductions distributed from daily heating demand. The CNG bus scenario reduces annual PM2.5 by 0.33 μg/m³ and up to 2 μg/m³ during winter months, while the residential heating scenario reduces annual PM2.5 by 2.07 μg/m³, with peaks exceeding 8 μg/m³ during strong air pollution episodes in winter months. These ambient pollution reductions lead to 36 avoided premature mortalities for the CNG bus scenario, and 229 for the CNG heating scenario. Both policies are shown to be cost-effective ways of reducing air pollution, as they target high-emitting area pollution sources and reduce concentrations over densely populated urban areas as well as less dense areas outside the city limits. Unlike the concentration rollback methods commonly used in public policy analyses, which assume homogeneous reductions across a whole city (including homogeneous population densities), and without accounting for the seasonality of certain emissions, this approach accounts for both seasonality and diurnal emission profiles for both the transportation and residential heating sectors. PMID:22595553

  2. Water and heat transport in hilly red soil of southern China: I. Experiment and analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jun; Huang, Zhi-zhen; Han, Xiao-fei

    2005-01-01

    Studies on coupled transfer of soil moisture and heat have been widely carried out for decades. However, little work has been done on red soils, widespread in southern China. The simultaneous transfer of soil moisture and heat depends on soil physical properties and the climate conditions. Red soil is heavy clay and high content of free iron and aluminum oxide. The climate conditions are characterized by the clear four seasons and the serious seasonal drought. The great annual and diurnal air temperature differences result in significant fluctuation in soil temperature in top layer. The closed and evaporating columns experiments with red soil were conducted to simulate the coupled transfer of soil water and heat under the overlaying and opening fields’ conditions, and to analyze the effects of soil temperature gradient on the water transfer and the effects of initial soil water contents on the transfer of soil water and heat. The closed and evaporating columns were designed similarly with about 18 °C temperatures differences between the top and bottom boundary, except of the upper end closed or exposed to the air, respectively. Results showed that in the closed column, water moved towards the cold end driven by temperature gradient, while the transported water decreased with the increasing initial soil water content until the initial soil water content reached to field capacity equivalent, when almost no changes for the soil moisture profile. In the evaporating column, the net transport of soil water was simultaneously driven by evaporation and temperature gradients, and the drier soil was more influenced by temperature gradient than by evaporation. In drier soil, it took a longer time for the temperature to reach equilibrium, because of more net amount of transported water. PMID:15822143

  3. Water and heat transport in hilly red soil of southern China: I. Experiment and analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Huang, Zhi-Zhen; Han, Xiao-Fei

    2005-05-01

    Studies on coupled transfer of soil moisture and heat have been widely carried out for decades. However, little work has been done on red soils, widespread in southern China. The simultaneous transfer of soil moisture and heat depended on soil physical properties and the climate conditions. Red soil is heavy clay and high content of free iron and aluminum oxide. The climate conditions are characterized by the clear four seasons and the serious seasonal drought. The great air temperature differences annually and diurnally result in significant fluctuation in soil temperature in top layer. The closed and evaporating columns experiments with red soil were conducted to simulate the coupled transfer of soil water and heat under the overlaying and opening fields' conditions, and to analyze the effects of soil temperature gradient on the water transfer and the effects of initial soil water contents on the transfer of soil water and heat. The closed and evaporating columns were designed similarly with about 18 degrees C temperatures differences between the top and bottom boundary, except of the upper end closed or exposed to the air, respectively. Results showed that in the closed column, water moved towards the cold end driven by temperature gradient, while the transported water decreased with the increasing initial soil water content until the initial soil water content reached to field capacity equivalent, when almost no changes for the soil moisture profile. In the evaporating column, the net transport of soil water was simultaneously driven by evaporation and temperature gradients, and the drier soil was more influenced by temperature gradient than by evaporation. In drier soil, it took a longer time for the temperature to reach equilibrium, because of more net amount of transported water. PMID:15822143

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of DNA Capture and Transport in Heated Nanopores.

    PubMed

    Belkin, Maxim; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2016-05-25

    The integration of local heat sources with solid-state nanopores offers new means for controlling the transmembrane transport of charged biomacromolecules. In the case of electrophoretic transport of DNA, recent experimental studies revealed unexpected temperature dependences of the DNA capture rate, the DNA translocation velocity, and the ionic current blockades produced by the presence of DNA in the nanopore. Here, we report the results of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations that elucidated the effect of temperature on the key microscopic processes governing electric field-driven transport of DNA through nanopores. Mimicking the experimental setup, we simulated the capture and subsequent translocation of short DNA duplexes through a locally heated nanopore at several temperatures and electrolyte conditions. The temperature dependence of ion mobility at the DNA surface was found to cause the dependence of the relative conductance blockades on temperature. To the first order, the effective force on DNA in the nanopore was found to be independent of temperature, despite a considerable reduction of solution viscosity. The temperature dependence of the solution viscosity was found to make DNA translocations faster for a uniformly heated system but not in the case of local heating that does not affect viscosity of solution surrounding the untranslocated part of the molecule. Increasing solution temperature was also found to reduce the lifetime of bonds formed between cations and DNA. Using a flow suppression algorithm, we were able to separate the effects of electro-osmotic flow and direct ion binding, finding the reduced durations of DNA-ion bonds to increase, albeit weakly, the effective force experienced by DNA in an electric field. Unexpectedly, our simulations revealed a considerable temperature dependence of solvent velocity at the DNA surface-slip velocity, an effect that can alter hydrodynamic coupling between the motion of DNA and the surrounding fluid

  5. Increased oceanic heat transport in the main Atlantic inflow branch to the Nordic Seas 1993-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Bogi; Margretha Larsen, Karin; Østerhus, Svein

    2015-04-01

    The flow of warm and saline water from the Atlantic Ocean, across the Greenland-Scotland Ridge, into the Nordic Seas - the Atlantic inflow - is split into three separate branches. The most intensive of these branches is the flow between Iceland and Faroes - the IF-inflow - which according to the latest estimates accounts for about half the total volume transport of the Atlantic inflow. The Atlantic inflow transports heat and salt into the Arctic region and is an integral part of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation, projected to weaken during the 21st century, which might conceivably reduce the oceanic heat transport towards the Arctic. Since the late 1980s, the hydrographic properties of the IF-inflow have been monitored on regular CTD cruises along a section north from the Faroes and ADCPs have been moored on the section since the mid-1990s. From these in situ observations, time series of volume and heat transport have previously been reported, but the high variability of the heat transport has made identification of trends difficult. Here, we present the results from a new analysis of the IF-inflow where the in situ observations have been combined with data from satellite altimetry. The new time series show no indication of reduced volume transport and show a clear trend in heat transport. From 1993 to 2013, the heat transport relative to 0°C of the IF-inflow increased by more than 10%. This increase was mainly caused by increased temperatures of the inflow, which has been attributed to the weakening of the subpolar gyre, but small variations in the volume transport delayed the increase in heat transport so that it mainly occurred between 2003 and 2005.

  6. An experimental test plan for the characterization of molten salt thermochemical properties in heat transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pattrick Calderoni

    2010-09-01

    Molten salts are considered within the Very High Temperature Reactor program as heat transfer media because of their intrinsically favorable thermo-physical properties at temperatures starting from 300 C and extending up to 1200 C. In this context two main applications of molten salt are considered, both involving fluoride-based materials: as primary coolants for a heterogeneous fuel reactor core and as secondary heat transport medium to a helium power cycle for electricity generation or other processing plants, such as hydrogen production. The reference design concept here considered is the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), which is a large passively safe reactor that uses solid graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel (similar to that used in gas-cooled reactors) and a molten salt primary and secondary coolant with peak temperatures between 700 and 1000 C, depending upon the application. However, the considerations included in this report apply to any high temperature system employing fluoride salts as heat transfer fluid, including intermediate heat exchangers for gas-cooled reactor concepts and homogenous molten salt concepts, and extending also to fast reactors, accelerator-driven systems and fusion energy systems. The purpose of this report is to identify the technical issues related to the thermo-physical and thermo-chemical properties of the molten salts that would require experimental characterization in order to proceed with a credible design of heat transfer systems and their subsequent safety evaluation and licensing. In particular, the report outlines an experimental R&D test plan that would have to be incorporated as part of the design and operation of an engineering scaled facility aimed at validating molten salt heat transfer components, such as Intermediate Heat Exchangers. This report builds on a previous review of thermo-physical properties and thermo-chemical characteristics of candidate molten salt coolants that was generated as part of the

  7. Flow structure, momentum and heat transport in a two-tandem-cylinder wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Yiu, M. W.

    2006-02-01

    Flow structure, momentum and heat transport in the wake of two tandem circular cylinders have been experimentally investigated. Measurements were conducted at x/d = 10, 20 and 30 (d is the cylinder diameter) at a Reynolds number of 7000 using a three-wire (one cross-wire plus a cold wire) probe, in conjunction with a cross-wire. The upstream cylinder was slightly heated. The flow behind two tandem cylinders is conventionally divided into three regimes based on whether the shear layers separated from the upstream cylinder overshoot or reattach on the downstream cylinder before forming a vortex street, or form vortices between the cylinders. The present investigation uncovers two remarkably different flow structures in the reattachment regime, depending on whether the shear layers from the upstream cylinder reattach on the downstream or upstream side of the downstream cylinder. As such, four cylinder centre-to-centre spacing ratios, i.e. L/d = 1.3, 2.5, 4.0 and 6.0, were examined, each representing one distinct flow structure. The phase-averaged sectional streamlines and vorticity contours display a single vortex street, irrespective of different regimes. However, the detailed flow structure, in particular, the vortex strength, and its downstream development depend upon L/d. The cross-stream distributions of the Reynolds stresses and heat fluxes at a given x/d vary from one to another. Such variation is also evident in the coherent contributions to the Reynolds stresses and heat fluxes. The results are connected to different initial conditions for the four flow structures. The momentum and heat transport characteristics are summarized for each flow structure.

  8. The Role of Greenland on Heat and Moisture Transports Into the Arctic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindig, D.; Tsukernik, M.; Serreze, M. C.

    2006-12-01

    The region between Greenland and northern Scandinavia is a primary gateway for the transport of moist static energy into the Arctic. Much of this transport is via eddies, namely synoptic scale cyclones associated with the North Atlantic storm track and Icelandic Low. The orography of Greenland strongly influences the evolution, track and behavior of cyclones in the region. Here we examine how Greenland helps to control moist static energy transports into the Arctic through experiments with the Polar MM5 regional model (MM5), forced at the boundaries by NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis data. The focus is on the winter season. Sensitivity studies are run comparing transports under control simulations (CONTROL) with those for which the orography of Greenland is removed (NO_GREEN). Monthly climatologies are built comparing CONTROL and NO_GREEN simulations for positive, negative and neutral phases of the North Atlantic Oscillation. In most NO_GREEN simulations, there are substantial changes in the longitude of peak pole-ward transports of latent and sensible heat, which can in turn be related to shifts in storm tracks and the location/intensity of the Icelandic Low. In global climate simulations with no Greenland orography, the Icelandic Low tends to shift eastward. By contrast, the MM5 NO_GREEN simulations show a westward shift in the storm track.

  9. Design of a pool boiler heat transport system for a 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. G.; Rosenfeld, J. H.; Noble, J.; Kesseli, J.

    The overall operating temperature and efficiency of solar-powered Stirling engines can be improved by adding a heat transport system to more uniformly supply heat to the heater head tubes. One heat transport system with favorable characteristics is an alkali metal pool boiler. An alkali metal pool boiler heat transport system was designed for a 25-kW advanced Stirling conversion system (ASCS). Solar energy concentrated on the absorber dome boils a eutectic mixture of sodium and potassium. The alkali metal vapors condense on the heater head tubes, supplying the Stirling engine with a uniform heat flux at a constant temperature. Boiling stability is achieved with the use of an enhanced boiling surface and noncondensible gas.

  10. Design of a pool boiler heat transport system for a 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. G.; Rosenfeld, J. H.; Noble, J.; Kesseli, J.

    1991-01-01

    The overall operating temperature and efficiency of solar-powered Stirling engines can be improved by adding a heat transport system to more uniformly supply heat to the heater head tubes. One heat transport system with favorable characteristics is an alkali metal pool boiler. An alkali metal pool boiler heat transport system was designed for a 25-kW advanced Stirling conversion system (ASCS). Solar energy concentrated on the absorber dome boils a eutectic mixture of sodium and potassium. The alkali metal vapors condense on the heater head tubes, supplying the Stirling engine with a uniform heat flux at a constant temperature. Boiling stability is achieved with the use of an enhanced boiling surface and noncondensible gas.

  11. Heat transport analysis of the improved confinement discharge with LHW in the HT-7 tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. M.; Shen, X.; Wan, B. N.; Wu, Z. W.; Fu, J.; Fu

    2010-04-01

    In the HT-7 tokamak, heat transport analysis is carried out for the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments. Electrons and ions are coupled and good confinement can be obtained by properly optimizating LHCD and plasma parameters. Under the conditions that the plasma current is about 220 kA, the lower hybrid wave (LHW) power is about 300 kW and the central line-averaged density is about 1.5×1013 cm-3, lower hybrid wave power deposition is off-axis. Local transport analysis illustrated that both electron and ion thermal diffusivities are decreased during the LHW phase, and the electron internal transport barriers (eITBs) are formed while been accompanied by the ion internal transport barriers (iITBs) during LHW phase. Ions are heated by electron-ion collision in the region of the barriers although the ohmic power and the LHW power were absorbed by the electrons. Both electron temperature and ion temperature are increased during the LHW phase, and in the confinement region, the electron-to-ion temperature ratio, Te/Ti varies from 2.0 ~ 2.5 during OH phase to 1.3 ~ 1.6 during LHW injected into the plasma, which shows that electron confinement is not degraded by the electron-ion collisions meanwhile ions are also confined. The energy confinement is increased from 13 ms to 25 ms due to the formation of electron and ion internal transport barries after the LHW is injected into the plasma. LHW driven current and bootstrap current contribute to 60% of the total current.

  12. Heat transfer enhancement in a lithium-ion cell through improved material-level thermal transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwakarma, Vivek; Waghela, Chirag; Wei, Zi; Prasher, Ravi; Nagpure, Shrikant C.; Li, Jianlin; Liu, Fuqiang; Daniel, Claus; Jain, Ankur

    2015-12-01

    While Li-ion cells offer excellent electrochemical performance for several applications including electric vehicles, they also exhibit poor thermal transport characteristics, resulting in reduced performance, overheating and thermal runaway. Inadequate heat removal from Li-ion cells originates from poor thermal conductivity within the cell. This paper identifies the rate-limiting material-level process that dominates overall thermal conduction in a Li-ion cell. Results indicate that thermal characteristics of a Li-ion cell are largely dominated by heat transfer across the cathode-separator interface rather than heat transfer through the materials themselves. This interfacial thermal resistance contributes around 88% of total thermal resistance in the cell. Measured value of interfacial resistance is close to that obtained from theoretical models that account for weak adhesion and large acoustic mismatch between cathode and separator. Further, to address this problem, an amine-based chemical bridging of the interface is carried out. This is shown to result in in four-times lower interfacial thermal resistance without deterioration in electrochemical performance, thereby increasing effective thermal conductivity by three-fold. This improvement is expected to reduce peak temperature rise during operation by 60%. By identifying and addressing the material-level root cause of poor thermal transport in Li-ion cells, this work may contributes towards improved thermal performance of Li-ion cells.

  13. Impact of the background toroidal rotation on particle and heat turbulent transport in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Camenen, Y.; Peeters, A. G.; Casson, F. J.; Hornsby, W. A.; Snodin, A. P.; Angioni, C.; Strintzi, D.

    2009-01-15

    Recent developments in the gyrokinetic theory have shown that, in a toroidal device, the Coriolis drift associated with the background plasma rotation significantly affects the small scale instabilities [A. G. Peeters et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 265003 (2007)]. The later study, which focuses on the effect of the Coriolis drift on toroidal momentum transport is extended in the present paper to heat and particle transport. It is shown numerically using the gyrokinetic flux-tube code GKW[A. G. Peeters and D. Strintzi, Phys. Plasmas 11, 3748 (2004)], and supported analytically, that the Coriolis drift and the parallel dynamics play a similar role in the coupling of density, temperature, and velocity perturbations. The effect on particle and heat fluxes increases with the toroidal rotation (directly) and with the toroidal rotation gradient (through the parallel mode structure), depends on the direction of propagation of the perturbation, increases with the impurity charge number and with the impurity mass to charge number ratio. The case of very high toroidal rotation, relevant to spherical tokamaks, is investigated by including the effect of the centrifugal force in a fluid model. The main effect of the centrifugal force is to decrease the local density gradient at the low field side midplane and to add an extra contribution to the fluxes. The conditions for which the inertial terms significantly affect the heat and particle fluxes are evidenced.

  14. Enhancement of binding kinetics on affinity substrates by laser point heating induced transport.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bu; Cheng, Xuanhong

    2016-03-01

    Enhancing the time response and detection limit of affinity-binding based biosensors is an area of active research. For diffusion limited reactions, introducing active mass transport is an effective strategy to reduce the equilibration time and improve surface binding. Here, a laser is focused on the ceiling of a microchamber to generate point heating, which introduces natural advection and thermophoresis to promote mass transport to the reactive floor. We first used the COMSOL simulation to study how the kinetics of ligand binding is influenced by the optothermal effect. Afterwards, binding of biotinylated nanoparticles to NeutrAvidin-treated substrates is quantitatively measured with and without laser heating. It is discovered that laser induced point heating reduces the reaction half-life locally, and the reduction improves with the natural advection velocity. In addition, non-uniform ligand binding on the substrate is induced by the laser with predictable binding patterns. This optothermal strategy holds promise to improve the time-response and sensitivity of biosensors and microarrays. PMID:26898559

  15. Evidence for deep groundwater flow and convective heat transport in mountainous terrain, Delta County, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazear, Gregory D.

    2006-12-01

    The Tongue Creek watershed lies on the south flank of Grand Mesa in western Colorado, USA and is a site with 1.5 km of topographic relief, heat flow of 100 mW/m2, thermal conductivity of 3.3 W m-1 °C-1, hydraulic conductivity of 10-8 m/s, a water table that closely follows surface topography, and groundwater temperatures 3-15°C above mean surface temperatures. These data suggest that convective heat transport by groundwater flow has modified the thermal regime of the site. Steady state three-dimensional numerical simulations of heat flow, groundwater flow, and convective transport were used to model these thermal and hydrological data. The simulations provided estimates for the scale of hydraulic conductivity and bedrock base flow discharge within the watershed. The numerical models show that (1) complex three-dimensional flow systems develop with a range of scales from tens of meters to tens of kilometers; (2) mapped springs are frequently found at locations where contours of hydraulic head indicate strong vertical flow at the water table, and; (3) the distribution of groundwater temperatures in water wells as a function of surface elevation is predicted by the model.

  16. Influence of root-water-uptake parameterization on simulated heat transport in a structured forest soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votrubova, Jana; Vogel, Tomas; Dohnal, Michal; Dusek, Jaromir

    2015-04-01

    Coupled simulations of soil water flow and associated transport of substances have become a useful and increasingly popular tool of subsurface hydrology. Quality of such simulations is directly affected by correctness of its hydraulic part. When near-surface processes under vegetation cover are of interest, appropriate representation of the root water uptake becomes essential. Simulation study of coupled water and heat transport in soil profile under natural conditions was conducted. One-dimensional dual-continuum model (S1D code) with semi-separate flow domains representing the soil matrix and the network of preferential pathways was used. A simple root water uptake model based on water-potential-gradient (WPG) formulation was applied. As demonstrated before [1], the WPG formulation - capable of simulating both the compensatory root water uptake (in situations when reduced uptake from dry layers is compensated by increased uptake from wetter layers), and the root-mediated hydraulic redistribution of soil water - enables simulation of more natural soil moisture distribution throughout the root zone. The potential effect on heat transport in a soil profile is the subject of the present study. [1] Vogel T., M. Dohnal, J. Dusek, J. Votrubova, and M. Tesar. 2013. Macroscopic modeling of plant water uptake in a forest stand involving root-mediated soil-water redistribution. Vadose Zone Journal, 12, 10.2136/vzj2012.0154. The research was supported by the Czech Science Foundation Project No. 14-15201J.

  17. Post-scram Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) heat transport system dynamics and steam generator control: Figures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brukx, J. F. L. M.

    1982-06-01

    Dynamic modeling of LMFBR heat transport system is discussed. Uncontrolled transient behavior of individual components and of the integrated heat transport system are considered. For each component, results showing specific dynamic features of the component and/or model capability were generated. Controlled dynamic behavior for alternative steam generator control systems during forced and natural sodium coolant circulation was analyzed. Combined free and forced convection of laminar and turbulent vertical pipe flow of liquid metals was investigated.

  18. Heat transport in steep temperature gradients. I - Small flaring solar loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    Results on nonlocal heat transport which properly takes into account the presence of fast electrons with mean free paths much longer than the temperature scale height L are reviewed. In terms of the mean free path for the slow bulk electrons, lambda(s), the nonlocal effects are important whenever lambda(s)/L greater than 0.001, with the following consequences. The heat flux in the hot part of the gradient is reduced relative to the Spitzer-Haerm value q(SH) which does not take into account the heat carried away by the fast electrons. The heat flux in the cold part of the gradient is enhanced relative to the value q(SH) which does not take into account the heat deposited by the fast electrons. These quite general results, which should have several applications in astrophysics, are applied to the problem of thermal hard X-ray burst models. It is shown that heat is not bottled up as effectively as in some past models, and temperatures achieved for realistic energy input rates are consequently not as high. As a result such sources can be effective only in the soft part (10-30 keV) of the hard X-ray range for energy input rates up to 6,400 ergs/cu cm s. The analysis is based on a fluid model and does not consider the X-ray signature of fast electrons which escape to distances far beyond the conduction fronts formed. It is shown that such electrons could at most be effective in the soft part of the hard X-ray range.

  19. Modular heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Culver, Donald W.

    1978-01-01

    A heat exchanger for use in nuclear reactors includes a heat exchange tube bundle formed from similar modules each having a hexagonal shroud containing a large number of thermally conductive tubes which are connected with inlet and outlet headers at opposite ends of each module, the respective headers being adapted for interconnection with suitable inlet and outlet manifold means. In order to adapt the heat exchanger for operation in a high temperature and high pressure environment and to provide access to all tube ports at opposite ends of the tube bundle, a spherical tube sheet is arranged in sealed relation across the chamber with an elongated duct extending outwardly therefrom to provide manifold means for interconnection with the opposite end of the tube bundle.

  20. Energy transport in short-pulse-laser-heated targets measured using extreme ultraviolet laser backlighting.

    PubMed

    Wilson, L A; Tallents, G J; Pasley, J; Whittaker, D S; Rose, S J; Guilbaud, O; Cassou, K; Kazamias, S; Daboussi, S; Pittman, M; Delmas, O; Demailly, J; Neveu, O; Ros, D

    2012-08-01

    The accurate characterization of thermal electron transport and the determination of heating by suprathermal electrons in laser driven solid targets are both issues of great importance to the current experiments being performed at the National Ignition Facility, which aims to achieve thermonuclear fusion ignition using lasers. Ionization, induced by electronic heat conduction, can cause the opacity of a material to drop significantly once bound-free photoionization is no longer energetically possible. We show that this drop in opacity enables measurements of the transmission of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) laser pulses at 13.9 nm to act as a signature of the heating of thin (50 nm) iron layers with a 50-nm thick parylene-N (CH) overlay irradiated by 35-fs pulses at irradiance 3×10(16) Wcm(-2). Comparing EUV transmission measurements at different times after irradiation to fluid code simulations shows that the target is instantaneously heated by hot electrons (with approximately 10% of the laser energy), followed by thermal conduction with a flux limiter of ≈0.05. PMID:23005868

  1. Nanoscale phase engineering of thermal transport with a Josephson heat modulator.

    PubMed

    Fornieri, Antonio; Blanc, Christophe; Bosisio, Riccardo; D'Ambrosio, Sophie; Giazotto, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Macroscopic quantum phase coherence has one of its pivotal expressions in the Josephson effect, which manifests itself both in charge and energy transport. The ability to master the amount of heat transferred through two tunnel-coupled superconductors by tuning their phase difference is the core of coherent caloritronics, and is expected to be a key tool in a number of nanoscience fields, including solid-state cooling, thermal isolation, radiation detection, quantum information and thermal logic. Here, we show the realization of the first balanced Josephson heat modulator designed to offer full control at the nanoscale over the phase-coherent component of thermal currents. Our device provides magnetic-flux-dependent temperature modulations up to 40 mK in amplitude with a maximum of the flux-to-temperature transfer coefficient reaching 200 mK per flux quantum at a bath temperature of 25 mK. Foremost, it demonstrates the exact correspondence in the phase engineering of charge and heat currents, breaking ground for advanced caloritronic nanodevices such as thermal splitters, heat pumps and time-dependent electronic engines. PMID:26641530

  2. Nanoscale phase engineering of thermal transport with a Josephson heat modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornieri, Antonio; Blanc, Christophe; Bosisio, Riccardo; D'Ambrosio, Sophie; Giazotto, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Macroscopic quantum phase coherence has one of its pivotal expressions in the Josephson effect, which manifests itself both in charge and energy transport. The ability to master the amount of heat transferred through two tunnel-coupled superconductors by tuning their phase difference is the core of coherent caloritronics, and is expected to be a key tool in a number of nanoscience fields, including solid-state cooling, thermal isolation, radiation detection, quantum information and thermal logic. Here, we show the realization of the first balanced Josephson heat modulator designed to offer full control at the nanoscale over the phase-coherent component of thermal currents. Our device provides magnetic-flux-dependent temperature modulations up to 40 mK in amplitude with a maximum of the flux-to-temperature transfer coefficient reaching 200 mK per flux quantum at a bath temperature of 25 mK. Foremost, it demonstrates the exact correspondence in the phase engineering of charge and heat currents, breaking ground for advanced caloritronic nanodevices such as thermal splitters, heat pumps and time-dependent electronic engines.

  3. Modeling of limiter heat loads and impurity transport in Wendelstein 7-X startup plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Effenberg, Florian; Feng, Y.; Frerichs, H.; Schmitz, O.; Hoelbe, H.; Koenig, R.; Krychowiak, M.; Pedersen, T. S.; Bozhenkov, S.; Reiter, D.

    2015-11-01

    The quasi-isodynamic stellarator Wendelstein 7-X starts plasma operation in a limiter configuration. The field consists of closed magnetic flux surfaces avoiding magnetic islands in the plasma boundary. Because of the small size of the limiters and the absence of wall-protecting elements in this phase, limiter heat loads and impurity generation due to plasma surface interaction become a concern. These issues are studied with the 3D fluid plasma edge and kinetic neutral transport code EMC3-Eirene. It is shown that the 3D SOL consists of three separate helical magnetic flux bundles of different field line connection lengths. A density scan at input power of 4MW reveals a strong modulation of the plasma paramters with the connection length. The limiter peak heat fluxes drop from 14 MWm-2 down to 10 MWm-2 with raising the density from 1 ×1018m-3 to 1.9 ×1019m-3, accompanied by an increase of the heat flux channel widths λq. Radiative power losses can help to avoid thermal overloads of the limiters at the upper margin of the heating power. The power removal feasibility of the intrinsic carbon and other extrinsic light impurities via active gas injection is discussed as a preparation of this method for island divertor operation. Work supported in part by start up funds of the Department of Engineering Physics at the University of Wisconsin - Madison, USA and by the U.S. Department of Energy under grant DE-SC0013911.

  4. Remote plasmon-induced heat transfer probed by the electronic transport of a gold nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennemanteuil, M.-M.; Buret, M.; Cazier, N.; Colas-Des-Francs, G.; Bouhelier, A.; Besbes, M.; Ben-Abdallah, P.

    2016-07-01

    We show in this paper that the heat generated by the optical excitation of resonant plasmonic antennas and diffusing along a simple glass/air interface disturbs the electron transport of a nearby conductive element. By probing the temperature-dependent resistance of a gold nanowire Rnw(T ) , we quantitatively analyze the impact of a resonant absorption of the laser by the antennas. We find that the temperature rise at the nanowire induced by the laser absorption of a distant nanoparticle may exceed that of a direct illumination of the nanowire itself. We also find that a global calibration of the temperature-dependent resistance underestimates the heat generated locally by the laser. The local temperatures deduced from resistance variations are verified by numerical simulations with a very satisfactory agreement.

  5. Heat transport in polymer-dispersed liquid crystals under electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadj Sahraoui, Abdelhak; Delenclos, Sylvain; Longuemart, Stéphane; Dadarlat, Dorin

    2011-08-01

    The concepts of effective thermal conductivity and interfacial thermal contact resistance in composite media are applied to study heat transport in polymer-dispersed liquid crystals (PDLC). In these systems, the thermal properties of liquid crystal inclusions are changed by an imposed electric field. The photopyroelectric (PPE) technique with a cell allowing the application of an electric field to the sample is used to measure the thermal parameters. A model based on effective medium approximation is used to assess the impact of interfaces on the flow of heat through the determination of the Kapitza radius. It was found that the effect of interfaces becomes dominant compared to the volume conduction of the droplet when the liquid crystal (LC) droplet radius becomes smaller than 1 micron. The comparison of the thermal behavior of LC in the droplets with that of bulk liquid crystal allowed to evaluate the effect of confinement on the LC nematic phase.

  6. Scaling of high-field transport and localized heating in graphene transistors.

    PubMed

    Bae, Myung-Ho; Islam, Sharnali; Dorgan, Vincent E; Pop, Eric

    2011-10-25

    We use infrared thermal imaging and electrothermal simulations to find that localized Joule heating in graphene field-effect transistors on SiO(2) is primarily governed by device electrostatics. Hot spots become more localized (i.e., sharper) as the underlying oxide thickness is reduced, such that the average and peak device temperatures scale differently, with significant long-term reliability implications. The average temperature is proportional to oxide thickness, but the peak temperature is minimized at an oxide thickness of ∼90 nm due to competing electrostatic and thermal effects. We also find that careful comparison of high-field transport models with thermal imaging can be used to shed light on velocity saturation effects. The results shed light on optimizing heat dissipation and reliability of graphene devices and interconnects. PMID:21913673

  7. Ion internal transport barrier in neutral beam heated plasmas on HL-2A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, D. L.; Wei, Y. L.; Liu, L.; Dong, J. Q.; Ida, K.; Itoh, K.; Sun, A. P.; Cao, J. Y.; Shi, Z. B.; Wang, Z. X.; Xiao, Y.; Yuan, B. S.; Du, H. R.; He, X. X.; Chen, W. J.; Ma, Q.; Itoh, S.-I.; Zhao, K. J.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, J.; Ji, X. Q.; Zhong, W. L.; Li, Y. G.; Gao, J. M.; Deng, W.; Liu, Yi; Xu, Y.; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Ding, X. T.; Duan, X. R.; Liu, Yong; HL-2A Team

    2016-05-01

    Ion internal transport barriers (iITBs) are first observed in neutral beam injection (NBI) heated plasmas at the HL-2A tokamak. The position of the barrier foot, in the stationary state, coincides with the q  =  1 surface within its uncertainty of measurement. iITBs can develop more easily at the beginning of NBI heating. Also, iITBs are unstable for the sawtooth plasma. Simulations reveal that the thermal diffusivity of ions (χ i) inside the barrier can be as low as the neoclassical level. It is observed that the flow shear in the stationary iITB state reaches the level required for suppressing the ion temperature gradient mode instability, which indicates the important role of flow shear in sustaining the iITB.

  8. A possible closure relation for heat transport in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, W. C.; Asbridge, J. R.; Bame, S. J.; Gosling, J. T.; Lemons, D. S.

    1979-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to search for an empirical closure relation for solar wind heat transport that applies to a microscopic scale. This task is approached by using the quasi-linear wave-particle formalism proposed by Perkins (1973) as a guide to derive an equation relating the relative drift speed between core-electron and proton populations to local bulk flow conditions. The resulting relationship, containing one free parameter, is found to provide a good characterization of Los Alamos Imp electron data measuring during the period from March 1971 through August 1974. An empirical closure relation is implied by this result because of the observed proportionality between heat flux and relative drift speed.

  9. Nuclear winter - Three-dimensional simulations including interactive transport, scavenging, and solar heating of smoke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, R. C.; Auer, L. H.; Glatzmaier, G. A.; Wood, M. C.; Toon, O. B.

    1986-01-01

    A reexamination is conducted of the 'nuclear winter' hypothesis with a three-dimensional global model modified to allow for localized injection of smoke, its transport by the simulated winds, its absorption of sunlight, and its removal by model-simulated precipitation. Smoke injected into the troposphere is driven upward by solar heating. The tropopause, initially above the smoke, reforms below the heat smoke layer and separates it from precipitation below. Although much smoke is scavenged while the thermal structure is being altered, the residence time of the remaining smoke is greatly increased. Particularly for July conditions, a longer-lasting 'nuclear winter' effect is observed than was found in earlier modeling studies in which normal tropospheric residence times were assumed. In January the smaller solar flux in the northern hemisphere allows faster removal of smoke than in July. Significant cooling of the northern hemisphere continents is predicted; its dependence on season and injected smoke mass is described.

  10. An Integrated Approach on Groundwater Flow and Heat/Solute Transport for Sustainable Groundwater Source Heat Pump (GWHP) System Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, D. K.; Bae, G. O.; Joun, W.; Park, B. H.; Park, J.; Park, I.; Lee, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    The GWHP system uses a stable temperature of groundwater for cooling and heating in buildings and thus has been known as one of the most energy-saving and cost-efficient renewable energy techniques. A GWHP facility was installed at an island located at the confluence of North Han and South Han rivers, Korea. Because of well-developed alluvium, the aquifer is suitable for application of this system, extracting and injecting a large amount of groundwater. However, the numerical experiments under various operational conditions showed that it could be vulnerable to thermal interference due to the highly permeable gravel layer, as a preferential path of thermal plume migration, and limited space for well installation. Thus, regional groundwater flow must be an important factor of consideration for the efficient operation under these conditions but was found to be not simple in this site. While the groundwater level in this site totally depends on the river stage control of Paldang dam, the direction and velocity of the regional groundwater flow, observed using the colloidal borescope, have been changed hour by hour with the combined flows of both the rivers. During the pumping and injection tests, the water discharges in Cheongpyeong dam affected their respective results. Moreover, the measured NO3-N concentrations might imply the effect of agricultural activities around the facility on the groundwater quality along the regional flow. It is obvious that the extraction and injection of groundwater during the facility operation will affect the fate of the agricultural contaminants. Particularly, the gravel layer must also be a main path for contaminant migration. The simulations for contaminant transport during the facility operation showed that the operation strategy for only thermal efficiency could be unsafe and unstable in respect of groundwater quality. All these results concluded that the integrated approach on groundwater flow and heat/solute transport is necessary

  11. Warm-Core Intensification Through Horizontal Eddy Heat Transports into the Eye

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Scott A.; Montgomery, Michael T.; Fulton, John; Nolan, David S.; Starr, David OC (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A simulation of Hurricane Bob (1991) using the PSU/NCAR MM5 mesoscale model with a finest mesh spacing of 1.3 km is used to diagnose the heat budget of the hurricane. Heat budget terms, including latent and radiative heating, boundary layer forcing, and advection terms were output directly from the model for a 6-h period with 2-min frequency. Previous studies of warm core formation have emphasized the warming associated with gentle subsidence within the eye. The simulation of Hurricane Bob confirms subsidence warming as a major factor for eye warming, but also shows a significant contribution from horizontal advective terms. When averaged over the area of the eye, subsidence is found to strongly warm the mid-troposphere (2-9 km) while horizontal advection warms the mid to upper troposphere (5-13 km) with about equal magnitude. Partitioning of the horizontal advective terms into azimuthal mean and eddy components shows that the mean radial circulation does not, as expected, generally contribute to this warming, but that it is produced almost entirely by the horizontal eddy transport of heat into the eye. A further breakdown of the eddy components into azimuthal wave numbers 1, 2, and higher indicates that the warming is dominated by wave number 1 asymmetries, with smaller coming from higher wave numbers. Warming by horizontal eddy transport is consistent with idealized modeling of vortex Rossby waves and work is in progress to identify and clarify the role of vortex Rossby waves in warm-core intensification in both the full-physics model and idealized models.

  12. Rotation drive and momentum transport with electron cyclotron heating in tokamak plasmas.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, M; Sakamoto, Y; Takenaga, H; Ide, S; Oyama, N; Kobayashi, T; Kamada, Y

    2009-08-01

    The role of electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) on the toroidal rotation velocity profile has been investigated in the JT-60U tokamak device by separating the effects of the change in momentum transport, the intrinsic rotation by pressure gradient, and the intrinsic rotation by ECRH. It is found that ECRH increases the toroidal momentum diffusivity and the convection velocity. It is also found that ECRH drives the codirection (co) intrinsic rotation inside the EC deposition radius and the counterdirection (ctr) intrinsic rotation outside the EC deposition radius. This ctr rotation starts from the EC deposition radius and propagates to the edge region. PMID:19792576

  13. Fast electron transport and heating in ultraintense laser pulse interaction with solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Michel; Amiranoff, Francois; Baton, Sophie; Gremillet, Laurent; Martinolli, Emanuele; Batani, Dimitri; Bernardinello, Andrea; Greison, Gabriella; Hall, Tom; Rabec Le Gloahec, Marc; Rousseaux, Christophe; Santos, Joao

    2000-10-01

    In the context of the fast electron transport in solid matter and the fast ignitor scheme, we report on results from ultraintense laser pulse interaction with thick targets. Experiments have been performed at LULI with the 100 TW CPA Nd:glass laser, at intensities up to a few 10^19 W/cm^2. Images obtained from classical and chirped-pulse time-resolved reflectometry diagnostics of the back-side target give evidence of the rear surface heating; the geometry and the dynamics of the energy deposition of the relativistic electrons flux into matter are also inferred.

  14. Development of nontoxic heat transport fluids for habitat two-phase thermal control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F.; Grzyll, Lawrence R.

    1992-01-01

    A computational chemistry approach based on pattern recognition techniques is used to correlate molecules thermodynamic and chemical properties with its molecular structure. The potential to develop a suitable two-phase nontoxic heat transport working fluid for the spacecraft habitat environment is discussed. It is concluded that the perfluorocarbons represent a potentially useful class to consider as a source of the working fluids because of their low toxicity, thermal stability, and chemical inertness. The ADAPT software program is considered to be adequate to make structural and property predictions.

  15. The effect of transportation suit induced heat stress on helicopter underwater escape preparation and task performance.

    PubMed

    Taber, Michael J; Dies, Natalie F; Cheung, Stephen S

    2011-11-01

    Although essential in an emergency such as a helicopter ditching, mandatory survival suits worn by civilian personnel may lead to heat strain during a normal flight. To explore the possibility that wearing a helicopter transportation suit impairs emergency performance, 11 individuals completed underwater escape procedures immediately following a pre-recorded emergency announcement (randomly played between 50 and 90 min) in two ambient temperature conditions (Thermoneutral = 21 °C and Hot = 34 °C). Mean skin and rectal temperatures were recorded throughout the trials, while situation awareness and thermal sensation/comfort were recorded on completion of trials. Results indicate that although mean skin and rectal temperatures were significantly higher at the end of both trials, escape procedures were not impaired. It can therefore be concluded that although conditions inside an offshore transport helicopter are perceived as being hot and uncomfortable, no deficits in escape performance should be expected in the first 90 min of flight. PMID:21439548

  16. Heat and mass transport resistances in vacuum membrane distillation per drop

    SciTech Connect

    Bandini, S.; Sarti, G.C.

    1999-07-01

    Vacuum membrane distillation (VMD) is a separation process based on the use of microporous hydrophobic membranes. The membrane is located between an aqueous phase and a permeate, which is kept under vacuum at pressure values below the equilibrium vapor pressure of the feed. The liquid stream vaporizes at one side of the membrane, and the vapors diffuse through the gas phase inside the membrane pores. The process rate and performance are affected highly by the transport phenomena both in the liquid phase and through the membrane. Heat- and mass-transfer resistance in the liquid phase, as well as mass-transfer resistance through the membrane, play an important role in determining the process performance. Based on VMD experimental data for several binary aqueous mixtures containing volatile organic compounds, a simple criterion to investigate the role of each transport resistance on the separation efficiency is discussed.

  17. Review of energy confinement and local transport scaling results in neutral-beam-heated tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S.M.

    1985-05-01

    Over the past several years, tokamak neutral beam injection experiments have evolved from the brute force study of the effects of global discharge characteristics (I/sub p/, anti n/sub e/, P/sub heat/, etc.) on energy confinement to the appreciation that there are effects more subtle, yet controllable, that may influence confinement dramatically. While this evolution from first to second generation experiments is derived from an empirical understanding of low and high energy confinement modes and how to achieve them operationally, the underlying physics is still unknown. Several theories with different physical bases appear to describe the global scaling of the low confinement mode discharges quite well. On the other hand, little agreement has been found between theoretical and experimentally deduced values of local transport coefficients. While it is known operationally how to achieve any one of several types of high confinement mode discharges, here too, the underlying physics of the transport associated with these modes is poorly understood.

  18. Coupled light transport-heat diffusion model for laser dosimetry with dynamic optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.; Glinsky, M.E.; Zimmerman, G.B.; Eder, D.C.; Jacques, S.L.

    1995-03-01

    The effect of dynamic optical properties on the spatial distribution of light in laser therapy is studied via numerical simulations. A two-dimensional, time dependent computer program called LATIS is used. Laser light transport is simulated with a Monte Carlo technique including anisotropic scattering and absorption. Thermal heat transport is calculated with a finite difference algorithm. Material properties are specified on a 2-D mesh and can be arbitrary functions of space and time. Arrhenius rate equations are solved for tissue damage caused by elevated temperatures. Optical properties are functions of tissue damage, as determined by previous measurements. Results are presented for the time variation of the light distribution and damage within the tissue as the optical properties of the tissue are altered.

  19. Basin-scale transport of heat and fluid induced by earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chi-Yuen; Wang, Lee-Ping; Manga, Michael; Wang, Chung-Ho; Chen, Chieh-Hung

    2013-08-01

    Large earthquakes are known to cause widespread changes in groundwater flow, yet their relation to subsurface transport is unknown. Here we report systematic changes in groundwater temperature after the 1999 Mw7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake in central Taiwan, documented by a dense network of monitoring wells over a large (17,000 km2) alluvial fan near the epicenter. Analysis of the data reveals a hitherto unknown system of earthquake-triggered basin-wide groundwater flow, which scavenges geothermal heat from depths, changing groundwater temperature across the basin. The newly identified earthquake-triggered groundwater flow may have significant implications on postseismic groundwater supply and quality, contaminant transport, underground repository safety, and hydrocarbon production.

  20. All-optical packet header and payload separation based on two TOADs for optical packet switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Zhang, Min; Ye, Peida

    2006-09-01

    We present a novel all-optical header and payload separation technique that can be utilized in Un-Slotted optical packet switched networks. The technique uses two modified TOADs, one is for packet header extraction with differential modulation scheme and the other performs a simple XOR operation between the packet and its self-derived header to get the separated payload. The main virtue of this system is simple structure and low power consumption. Through numerical simulations, the operating characteristics of the scheme are illustrated. In addition, the system parameters are discussed and designed to optimize the performance of the proposed scheme.

  1. The role of ocean heat transport in the habitaility of tidal-locking exoplanets around M dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Yang, J.

    2013-12-01

    The distinctive feature of tidally locked exoplanets is the very uneven heating by stellar radiation between the dayside and nightside. Previous work has focused on the role of atmospheric heat transport in preventing atmospheric collapse on the nightside for terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zone (HZ) around M dwarfs. In the present paper, we carry out the first simulation with a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) to investigate the role of ocean heat transport in climate states of tidally locked habitable exoplanets around M dwarfs. Our simulation results demonstrate that ocean heat transport substantially extends the area of open water along the equator, showing a lobster-like spatial pattern of open water, instead of an 'eyeball'. For sufficiently high-level greenhouse gases or strong stellar radiation, ocean heat transport can even lead to complete deglaciation of the nightside. Our simulations also suggest that ocean heat transport likely narrows the width of M dwarfs' HZ. This study provides the first demonstration of the importance of exo-oceanography in determining climate states and habitability of exoplanets.

  2. Measurement of quasi-ballistic heat transport across nanoscale interfaces using ultrafast coherent soft x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens, M.; Li, Q.; Yang, R.; Nelson, K.; Anderson, E.; Murnane, M.; Kapteyn, H.

    2009-03-02

    Understanding heat transport on nanoscale dimensions is important for fundamental advances in nanoscience, as well as for practical applications such as thermal management in nano-electronics, thermoelectric devices, photovoltaics, nanomanufacturing, as well as nanoparticle thermal therapy. Here we report the first time-resolved measurements of heat transport across nanostructured interfaces. We observe the transition from a diffusive to a ballistic thermal transport regime, with a corresponding increase in the interface resistivity for line widths smaller than the phonon mean free path in the substrate. Resistivities more than three times higher than the bulk value are measured for the smallest line widths of 65 nm. Our findings are relevant to the modeling and design of heat transport in nanoscale engineered systems, including nanoelectronics, photovoltaics and thermoelectric devices.

  3. Lattice Boltzmann modeling for fluid flow and heat and mass transport applied to geothermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelaziz, Ramadan; Sussumu Komori, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    Recently, Lattice Boltzmann Modelling (LBM) techniques attract many scientists in various fields of research. This work shows the capability for LBM to simulate the fluid flow and solute transport in porous and fracture media, additionally, how to study behavior of nanofluids submitted to a temperature gradient, which it is an important process in natural aquatic environments, water treatment, and other water related technologies. LBSim is used in this work as Lattice Boltzmann Model simulator software. In this article, a series of cases using the lattice Boltzmann method are presented, showing the capability of the method in simulating phenomena with fluid flow and heat transfer in porous media. Results show that the lattice Boltzmann method delivers reliable and helpful simulations for the analyses of processes in water related technologies. Thus, LBSim is a recommended tool for simulating fluid flow at laminar and turbulent condition, and heat and mass transport under complex geometry and boundary condition. parameter values. Keywords: Lattice Boltzmann Model, LBSim, Fractures Media, Porous Media, nanofluids

  4. Current & Heat Transport in Graphene Nanoribbons: Role of Non-Equilibrium Phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, Gary; Finkenstadt, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    The conducting channel of a graphitic nanoscale device is expected to experience a larger degree of thermal isolation when compared to traditional inversion channels of electronic devices. This leads to enhanced non-equilibrium phonon populations which are likely to adversely affect the mobility of graphene-based nanoribbons due to enhanced phonon scattering. Recent reports indicating the importance of carrier scattering with substrate surface polar optical phonons in carbon nanotubes^1 and graphene^2,3 show that this mechanism may allow enhanced heat removal from the nanoribbon channel. To investigate the effects of hot phonon populations on current and heat conduction, we solve the graphene nanoribbon multiband Boltzmann transport equation. Monte Carlo transport techniques are used since phonon populations may be tracked and updated temporally.^4 The electronic structure is solved using the NRL Tight-Binding method,^5 where carriers are scattered by confined acoustic, optical, edge and substrate polar optical phonons. [1] S. V. Rotkin et al., Nano Lett. 9, 1850 (2009). [2] J. H. Chen, C. Jang, S. Xiao, M. Ishigami and M. S. Fuhrer, Nature Nanotech. 3, 206 (2008). [3] V. Perebeinos and P. Avouris, arXiv:0910.4665v1 [cond-mat.mes-hall] (2009). [4] P. Lugli et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 50, 1251 (1987). [5] D. Finkenstadt, G. Pennington & M.J. Mehl, Phys. Rev. B 76, 121405(R) (2007).

  5. Monitoring of the Heat and Moisture Transport through Walls of St. Martin Cathedral Tower in Bratislava

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubičár, Ľudovít; Hudec, Ján; Fidríková, Danica; Štofanik, Vladimír; Dieška, Peter; Vretenár, Viliam

    2014-05-01

    Historic monuments are subject to degradation due to exposition to surrounding meteorological conditions and groundwater. Construction of buildings consists of the plaster and material components that have porous structure. Processes like heat transport, moisture diffusion, moisturizing and drying; freezing and thawing can be found in such structures depending on environmental conditions. Monitoring of the temperature - moisture regime gives a picture on the processes running in the structure. Long term monitoring of the tower of St. Martin Cathedral in Bratislava have been performed under window sill of the belfry in exterior in south orientation. Principle of the hot-ball method is used for monitoring of the temperature and thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of the porous system depends on the pore content. Moisture sensors are constructed from the parent material in a form of cylinder. Sensors are calibrated for dry and water saturated stage prior installation in the walls. Monitoring has been carried out in plaster and in the masonry in a distance about 10 cm from the wall surface, where sensors are installed. Information on temperature, moisture and thermal conductivity can be gained from measured signal. Use of two sensors allows estimation on heat and moisture transport through the wall. Monitoring has been performed in the period from April 2013 up to July 2013. Monitored data are correlated to the meteorological data. Details of various effects will be discussed.

  6. Different spatial discretization methods of fault systems on heat transport processes in hard rock aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruppa, Lisa; König, Christoph M.; Becker, Martin; Seidel, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    Most hard rock aquifers, which are important for geothermal use, contain fractures of different type and scale. These fault systems are of major significance for heat flow in the groundwater. The hydrogeological characterization of fault systems must therefore be part of any site investigation in hard rock aquifers and hydraulically important fault systems need to be appropriately represented in associated numerical models. This contribution discusses different spatial discretization methods of fault systems in three-dimensional groundwater models and their impact on the simulated groundwater flow field as well as density and viscosity dependent heat transport. The analysis includes a comparison of the convergence behavior and numerical stability of the different discretization methods. To ensure defendable results, the utilized numerical model SPRING was first verified against data from the Hydrocoin Level 1 Case 2 project. After verification, the software was used to evaluate the impact of different discretization strategies on steady-state and transient groundwater flow and transport model results. The results show a significant influence of the spatial discretization strategy on predicted flow rates and subsequent mass fluxes as well as energy balances.

  7. Heat Transport and Long-Term Change in the Southern Ocean: Assessing the Role of Eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwiazda, R.; Paull, C. K.; Dallimore, S.; Melling, H.; Jin, Y. K.

    2014-12-01

    Long-term change in the Southern Ocean can be difficult to evaluate because of both the paucity of historic observations and the magnitude of eddy variability. The low stratification of the Southern Ocean means that eddies detected by altimetry at the ocean surface extend through the top 2 km of the ocean. Sea surface height anomalies are more strongly correlated with sub-surface variability at depths between about 600 and 1400 dbars than they are with variability in the upper 200 dbars. Altimetric variability can thus be used to remove eddy-related anomalies from individual Argo profiles, resulting in a smoother estimate of mean temperature and salinity. This "eddy-free" mean field serves as a benchmark against which to assess decadal-scale changes in the Southern Ocean, and we use historic hydrographic data to evaluate temperature and salinity changes through the second half of the 20th century. We also evaluate the behavior of Southern Ocean eddies themselves: Although in most parts of the ocean closed oceanic eddies appear to result in thermally indirect heat transport, eddies that are carried eastward by the ACC tend to propagate in the opposite direction, resulting in thermally direct, poleward heat transport across the ACC. Evidence suggests that this cell is maintained by the effective eastward propagation of eddies relative to the mean flow at deep levels.

  8. New insights into self-heating in double-gate transistors by solving Boltzmann transport equations

    SciTech Connect

    Thu Trang Nghiêm, T.; Saint-Martin, J.; Dollfus, P.

    2014-08-21

    Electro-thermal effects become one of the most critical issues for continuing the downscaling of electron devices. To study this problem, a new efficient self-consistent electron-phonon transport model has been developed. Our model of phonon Boltzmann transport equation (pBTE) includes the decay of optical phonons into acoustic modes and a generation term given by electron-Monte Carlo simulation. The solution of pBTE uses an analytic phonon dispersion and the relaxation time approximation for acoustic and optical phonons. This coupled simulation is applied to investigate the self-heating effects in a 20 nm-long double gate MOSFET. The temperature profile per mode and the comparison between Fourier temperature and the effective temperature are discussed. Some significant differences occur mainly in the hot spot region. It is shown that under the influence of self-heating effects, the potential profile is modified and both the drain current and the electron ballisticity are reduced because of enhanced electron-phonon scattering rates.

  9. Coupled Water Flow and Heat Transport in Seasonally Frozen Soils with Snow Accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kelleners, T.

    2013-12-01

    A numerical model is developed to calculate coupled water flow and heat transport in seasonally frozen soil and snow. Separate equations are used to describe both unsaturated and saturated soil water flow. The effect of dissolved ions on soil water freezing point depression is included by combining an expression for osmotic head with the Clapeyron equation and the van Genuchten soil water retention function. The coupled water flow and heat transport equations are solved using the Thomas algorithm and Picard iteration. Ice pressure is always assumed zero and frost heave is neglected. The new model is tested using data from an existing laboratory soil column freezing experiment and an ongoing field experiment in a high-elevation rangeland soil. A dimensionless impedance factor describing the effect of ice pore blocking on soil hydraulic conductivity is treated as a calibration parameter for both cases. Calculated values of total water content for the laboratory soil column freezing experiment compare well with measured values, especially during the early stages of the experiment, as is also found by others. Modeling statistics for the rangeland field experiment show varied performance for soil water content and excellent performance for soil temperature, in accordance with earlier results with an older version of the model.

  10. Modeling anisotropic flow and heat transport by using mimetic finite differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tao; Clauser, Christoph; Marquart, Gabriele; Willbrand, Karen; Büsing, Henrik

    2016-08-01

    Modeling anisotropic flow in porous or fractured rock often assumes that the permeability tensor is diagonal, which means that its principle directions are always aligned with the coordinate axes. However, the permeability of a heterogeneous anisotropic medium usually is a full tensor. For overcoming this shortcoming, we use the mimetic finite difference method (mFD) for discretizing the flow equation in a hydrothermal reservoir simulation code, SHEMAT-Suite, which couples this equation with the heat transport equation. We verify SHEMAT-Suite-mFD against analytical solutions of pumping tests, using both diagonal and full permeability tensors. We compare results from three benchmarks for testing the capability of SHEMAT-Suite-mFD to handle anisotropic flow in porous and fractured media. The benchmarks include coupled flow and heat transport problems, three-dimensional problems and flow through a fractured porous medium with full equivalent permeability tensor. It shows firstly that the mimetic finite difference method can model anisotropic flow both in porous and in fractured media accurately and its results are better than those obtained by the multi-point flux approximation method in highly anisotropic models, secondly that the asymmetric permeability tensor can be included and leads to improved results compared the symmetric permeability tensor in the equivalent fracture models, and thirdly that the method can be easily implemented in existing finite volume or finite difference codes, which has been demonstrated successfully for SHEMAT-Suite.

  11. Numerical Modeling of Coupled Water Flow and Heat Transport in Soil and Snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelleners, T.

    2015-12-01

    A numerical model is developed to calculate coupled water flow and heat transport in seasonally frozen soil and snow. Both liquid water flow and water vapor flow are included. The effect of dissolved ions on soil water freezing point depression is included by combining an expression for osmotic head with the Clapeyron equation and the van Genuchten soil water retention function. The coupled water flow and heat transport equations are solved using the Thomas algorithm and Picard iteration. Ice pressure is always assumed zero and frost heave is neglected. The new model is tested using data from a high-elevation rangeland soil that is subject to significant soil freezing and a mountainous forest soil that is snow-covered for about 8 months of the year. Soil hydraulic parameters are mostly based on measurements and only vegetation parameters are fine-tuned to match measured and calculated soil water content, soil & snow temperature, and snow height. Modeling statistics for both systems show good performance for temperature, intermediate performance for snow height, and relatively low performance for soil water content, in accordance with earlier results with an older version of the model.

  12. Heat Transport Compensation in Atmosphere and Ocean over the Past 22,000 Years

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haijun; Zhao, Yingying; Liu, Zhengyu; Li, Qing; He, Feng; Zhang, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    The Earth’s climate has experienced dramatic changes over the past 22,000 years; however, the total meridional heat transport (MHT) of the climate system remains stable. A 22,000-year-long simulation using an ocean-atmosphere coupled model shows that the changes in atmosphere and ocean MHT are significant but tend to be out of phase in most regions, mitigating the total MHT change, which helps to maintain the stability of the Earth’s overall climate. A simple conceptual model is used to understand the compensation mechanism. The simple model can reproduce qualitatively the evolution and compensation features of the MHT over the past 22,000 years. We find that the global energy conservation requires the compensation changes in the atmosphere and ocean heat transports. The degree of compensation is mainly determined by the local climate feedback between surface temperature and net radiation flux at the top of the atmosphere. This study suggests that an internal mechanism may exist in the climate system, which might have played a role in constraining the global climate change over the past 22,000 years. PMID:26567710

  13. Heat Transport Compensation in Atmosphere and Ocean over the Past 22,000 Years.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haijun; Zhao, Yingying; Liu, Zhengyu; Li, Qing; He, Feng; Zhang, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's climate has experienced dramatic changes over the past 22,000 years; however, the total meridional heat transport (MHT) of the climate system remains stable. A 22,000-year-long simulation using an ocean-atmosphere coupled model shows that the changes in atmosphere and ocean MHT are significant but tend to be out of phase in most regions, mitigating the total MHT change, which helps to maintain the stability of the Earth's overall climate. A simple conceptual model is used to understand the compensation mechanism. The simple model can reproduce qualitatively the evolution and compensation features of the MHT over the past 22,000 years. We find that the global energy conservation requires the compensation changes in the atmosphere and ocean heat transports. The degree of compensation is mainly determined by the local climate feedback between surface temperature and net radiation flux at the top of the atmosphere. This study suggests that an internal mechanism may exist in the climate system, which might have played a role in constraining the global climate change over the past 22,000 years. PMID:26567710

  14. A fully coupled model for water-gas-heat reactive transport with methane oxidation in landfill covers.

    PubMed

    Ng, C W W; Feng, S; Liu, H W

    2015-03-01

    Methane oxidation in landfill covers is a complex process involving water, gas and heat transfer as well as microbial oxidation. The coupled phenomena of microbial oxidation, water, gas, and heat transfer are not fully understood. In this study, a new model is developed that incorporates water-gas-heat coupled reactive transport in unsaturated soil with methane oxidation. Effects of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat are included. The model is calibrated using published data from a laboratory soil column test. Moreover, a series of parametric studies are carried out to investigate the influence of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat, initial water content on methane oxidation efficiency. Computed and measured results of gas concentration and methane oxidation rate are consistent. It is found that the coupling effects between water-gas-heat transfer and methane oxidation are significant. Ignoring microbial oxidation-generated water and heat can result in a significant difference in methane oxidation efficiency by 100%. PMID:25489976

  15. Solute transport modelling in a coupled water and heat flow system applied to cold regions hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Andrew; Destouni, Georgia

    2016-04-01

    In cold regions, flow in the unsaturated zone is highly dynamic with seasonal variability and changes in temperature, moisture, and heat and water fluxes, all of which affect ground freeze-thaw processes and influence transport of inert and reactive waterborne substances. In arctic permafrost environments, near-surface groundwater flow is further restricted to a relatively shallow and seasonally variable active layer, confined by perennially frozen ground below. The active layer is typically partially saturated with ice, liquid water and air, and is strongly dependent on seasonal temperature fluctuations, thermal forcing and infiltration patterns. Here there is a need for improved understanding of the mechanisms controlling subsurface solute transport in the partially saturated active layer zone. Studying solute transport in cold regions is relevant to improve the understanding of how natural and anthropogenic pollution may change as activities in arctic and sub-arctic regions increase. It is also particularly relevant for understanding how dissolved carbon is transported in coupled surface and subsurface hydrological systems under climate change, in order to better understand the permafrost-hydrological-carbon climate feedback. In this contribution subsurface solute transport under surface warming and degrading permafrost conditions is studied using a physically based model of coupled cryotic and hydrogeological flow processes combined with a particle tracking method. Changes in subsurface water flows and solute transport travel times are analysed for different modelled geological configurations during a 100-year warming period. Results show that for all simulated cases, the minimum and mean travel times increase non-linearly with warming irrespective of geological configuration and heterogeneity structure. The travel time changes are shown to depend on combined warming effects of increase in pathway length due to deepening of the active layer, reduced transport

  16. Magnetic and transport properties of heat-treated polyparaphenylene-based carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, M.J.; Kobayashi, N.; Dresselhaus, M.S.; Endo, M.; Enoki, T.; Karaki, T.

    1998-07-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR), magnetic susceptibility, and transport measurements were recently performed on a set of heat-treated polyparaphenylene (PPP)-based carbon samples, which are of significant interest as novel carbon-based anode electrodes in Li-ion batteries. Attention is focused on the evolution of the carbonaceous structures formed at low heat-treatment temperatures (T{sub HT}) in the regime of 600 C {le} T{sub HT} {le} 800 C, where percolative transport behavior is observed. At the percolation threshold, T{sub HT}{sup c} {approx} 700 C the coexistence of two spin centers with peak-to-peak Lorentzian linewidths of {Delta}H{sub pp}(300K) = 0.5 and 5.0 G is observed. The relatively high ratio of hydrogen carbon (H/C) near T{sub HT}{sup c} is believed to influence the ESR results through an unresolved hyperfine interaction. Curie-Weiss temperatures are found from measurements of [I{sub pp}({Delta}H{sub pp}){sup 2}]{sup {minus}1}, where I{sub pp} is the peak-to-peak lineheight, yielding results that are in agreement with static susceptibility, {chi}(T), measurements. At low T{sub HT}, PPP-based materials exhibit a large amount of disorder and this is evidenced by the high density of localized spins, N{sub C}, which is obtained from a Curie-Weiss fit to {chi}(T), assuming a spin quantum number of S = {1/2}. A model explaining the microstructure and high electrochemical doping capacity of PPP samples heat-treated to 700 C can be related to Li-ion battery performance.

  17. Observations of Fire-Atmosphere Interactions and Near-Surface Heat Transport on a Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Craig B.; Seto, Daisuke

    2015-03-01

    A simple field experiment was conducted to measure and quantify fire-atmosphere interactions during a grass fire spreading up a hill under a moderate cross-slope wind. The observed fire intensity measured by passive radiometers and calculated sensible heat fluxes ranged between 90 and 120 kW m. Observations from this experiment showed that convective heat generated from the fire front was transported downwind in the lowest 2 m and the highest plume temperatures remained in this shallow layer, suggesting the fire spread was driven primarily by the advection of near-ignition temperature gases, rather than by radiation of the tilted flame. Fire-induced circulations were present with upslope flows occurring during the fire-front passage helping to transport heat up the slope and perpendicular to the fire front. A decrease in atmospheric pressure of 0.4 hPa occurred at the fire front and coincided with a strong updraft core of nearly 8 m s. These observations provide evidence that, even under moderately windy conditions, the pressure minimum in the fire remains rather close to the combustion zone and plume. The turbulence associated with the fire front was characterized by isotropic behaviour at 12.0 m above the ground, while less isotropic conditions were found closer to the ground due to higher horizontal variances associated with fire-induced flow at the fire front. From analysis of the turbulence kinetic energy budget terms, it was found that buoyancy production, rather than shear generation, had a larger contribution to the generation of turbulence kinetic energy, even during a highly sheared and moderate ambient wind.

  18. Integrated simulations of implosion, electron transport, and heating for direct-drive fast-ignition targetsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, A. A.; Anderson, K. S.; Betti, R.; Gotcheva, V.; Myatt, J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Skupsky, S.; Theobald, W.; Stoeckl, C.

    2009-05-01

    A thorough understanding of future integrated fast-ignition experiments combining compression and heating of high-density thermonuclear fuel requires hybrid (fluid+particle) simulations of the implosion and ignition process. Different spatial and temporal scales need to be resolved to model the entire fast-ignition experiment. The two-dimensional (2D) axisymmetric hydrocode DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056307 (2005)] and the 2D/three-dimensional hybrid particle-in-cell code LSP [D. R. Welch et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 464, 134 (2001)] have been integrated to simulate the implosion and heating of direct-drive, fast-ignition fusion targets. DRACO includes the physics required to simulate compression, ignition, and burn of fast-ignition targets. LSP simulates the transport of hot electrons from the place where they are generated to the dense fuel core where their energy is absorbed. The results from integrated simulations of cone-in-shell CD targets designed for fast-ignition experiments on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997); C. Stoeckl et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 49, 367 (2006)] are presented. Target heating and neutron yields are computed. The results from LSP simulations of electron transport in solid-density plastic targets are also presented. They confirm an increase in the electron divergence angle with the laser intensity in the current experiments. The self-generated resistive magnetic field is found to collimate the hot-electron beam and increase the coupling efficiency of hot electrons with the target. Resistive filamentation of the hot-electron beam is also observed.

  19. Pool boiler heat transport system for a 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. G.; Rosenfeld, J. H.; Saaski, E. L.; Noble, J.; Tower, L.

    Experiments to determine alkali metal/enhanced surface combinations that have stable boiling at the temperatures and heat fluxes that occur in the Stirling engine are reported. Two enhanced surfaces and two alkali metal working fluids were evaluated. The enhanced surfaces were an EDM hole covered surface and a sintered-powder-metal porous layer surface. The working fluids tested were potassium and eutectic sodium-potasium alloy (NaK), both with and without undissolved noncondensible gas. Noncondensible gas (He and Xe) was added to the system to provide gas in the nucleation sites, preventing quenching of the sites. The experiments demonstrated the potential of an alkali metal pool boiler heat transport system for use in a solar-powered Stirling engine. The most favorable fluid/surface combination tested was NaK boiling on a -100 +140 mesh 304L stainless steel sintered porous layer with no undissolved noncondensible gas. This combination provided stable, high-performance boiling at the operating temperature of 700 C. Heat fluxes into the system ranged from 10 to 50 W/sq cm. The transition from free convection to nucleate boiling occurred at temperatures near 540 C. Based on these experiments, a pool boiler was designed for a full-scale 25-kWe Stirling system.

  20. Heat transport through plasmonic interactions in closely spaced metallic nanoparticle chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe; Joulain, Karl; Drevillon, Jérémie; Le Goff, Clément

    2008-02-01

    We report a numerical investigation on the heat transfer through one-dimensional arrays of metallic nanoparticles closely spaced in a host material. Our simulations show that the multipolar interactions play a crucial role in the heat transport via collective plasmons. Calculations of the plasmonic thermal conductance and of the thermal conductivity in ballistic and diffusive regimes, respectively, have been carried out. (a) Using the Landauer-Buttiker formalism, we have found that, when the host material dielectric constant takes positive values, the multipolar interactions drastically enhance by several orders of magnitude the ballistic thermal conductance of collective plasmons compared with that of a classical dipolar chain. On the contrary, when the host material dielectric constant takes negative values, we have demonstrated the existence of nonballistic multipolar modes which annihilate the heat transfer through the chains. (b) Using the kinetic theory, we have also examined the thermal behavior of chains in the diffusion approximation. We have shown that the plasmonic thermal conductivity of metallic nanoparticle chains can reach 1% of the bulk metal thermal conductivity. This result could explain the anomalously high thermal conductivity observed in many colloidal suspensions, the so-called nanofluids.

  1. Investigation of scrape-off layer and divertor heat transport in ASDEX Upgrade L-mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieglin, B.; Eich, T.; Faitsch, M.; Herrmann, A.; Scarabosio, A.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-05-01

    Power exhaust is one of the major challenges for the development of a fusion power plant. Predictions based upon a multimachine database give a scrape-off layer power fall-off length {λq}≤slant 1 mm for large fusion devices such as ITER. The power deposition profile on the target is broadened in the divertor by heat transport perpendicular to the magnetic field lines. This profile broadening is described by the power spreading S. Hence both {λq} and S need to be understood in order to estimate the expected divertor heat load for future fusion devices. For the investigation of S and {λq} L-Mode discharges with stable divertor conditions in hydrogen and deuterium were conducted in ASDEX Upgrade. A strong dependence of S on the divertor electron temperature and density is found which is the result of the competition between parallel electron heat conductivity and perpendicular diffusion in the divertor region. For high divertor temperatures it is found that the ion gyro radius at the divertor target needs to be considered. The dependence of the in/out asymmetry of the divertor power load on the electron density is investigated. The influence of the main ion species on the asymmetric behaviour is shown for hydrogen, deuterium and helium. A possible explanation for the observed asymmetry behaviour based on vertical drifts is proposed.

  2. Effects of molecular structure on microscopic heat transport in chain polymer liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, Hiroki Kikugawa, Gota; Ohara, Taku; Bessho, Takeshi; Yamashita, Seiji

    2015-04-28

    In this paper, we discuss the molecular mechanism of the heat conduction in a liquid, based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of a systematic series of linear- and branched alkane liquids, as a continuation of our previous study on linear alkane [T. Ohara et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034507 (2011)]. The thermal conductivities for these alkanes in a saturated liquid state at the same reduced temperature (0.7T{sub c}) obtained from the simulations are compared in relation to the structural difference of the liquids. In order to connect the thermal energy transport characteristics with molecular structures, we introduce the new concept of the interatomic path of heat transfer (atomistic heat path, AHP), which is defined for each type of inter- and intramolecular interaction. It is found that the efficiency of intermolecular AHP is sensitive to the structure of the first neighbor shell, whereas that of intramolecular AHP is similar for different alkane species. The dependence of thermal conductivity on different lengths of the main and side chain can be understood from the natures of these inter- and intramolecular AHPs.

  3. Effects of molecular structure on microscopic heat transport in chain polymer liquids.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Hiroki; Kikugawa, Gota; Bessho, Takeshi; Yamashita, Seiji; Ohara, Taku

    2015-04-28

    In this paper, we discuss the molecular mechanism of the heat conduction in a liquid, based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of a systematic series of linear- and branched alkane liquids, as a continuation of our previous study on linear alkane [T. Ohara et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034507 (2011)]. The thermal conductivities for these alkanes in a saturated liquid state at the same reduced temperature (0.7Tc) obtained from the simulations are compared in relation to the structural difference of the liquids. In order to connect the thermal energy transport characteristics with molecular structures, we introduce the new concept of the interatomic path of heat transfer (atomistic heat path, AHP), which is defined for each type of inter- and intramolecular interaction. It is found that the efficiency of intermolecular AHP is sensitive to the structure of the first neighbor shell, whereas that of intramolecular AHP is similar for different alkane species. The dependence of thermal conductivity on different lengths of the main and side chain can be understood from the natures of these inter- and intramolecular AHPs. PMID:25933776

  4. Heating Rate Distributions at Mach 10 on a Circular Body Earth-to-Orbit Transport Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, William L.; MacConochie, Ian O.; Helms, Vernon T., III; Raney, David

    1985-01-01

    Among the concepts being considered for future Earth-to-orbit transport vehicles are fully reusable single-stage systems which take off vertically and land horizontally. Because these vehicles carry their own propellant internally, they are much larger than the present Space Shuttle Orbiter. One such single-stage vehicle under study is the circular body configuration which has the advantages of simple structural design and large volume-to-weight ratio. As part of an overall evaluation of this configuration, a series of heat transfer and surface flow tests were conducted. The phase-change paint and oil-flow tests were performed in the Langley 31-Inch Mach-10 Tunnel at angles of attack from 20 through 40 degrees in 5-degree increments. Heat-transfer coefficient data are presented for all angles of attack and detailed oil-flow photographs are shown for windward and leeward surfaces at 25 and 40 degrees angle of attack. In many ways, heating was similar to that previously determined for the Shuttle Orbiter so that, in a cursory sense, existing thermal protection systems would appear to be adequate for the proposed circular-body configurations.

  5. Pool boiler heat transport system for a 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. G.; Rosenfeld, J. H.; Saaski, E. L.; Noble, J.; Tower, L.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments to determine alkali metal/enhanced surface combinations that have stable boiling at the temperatures and heat fluxes that occur in the Stirling engine are reported. Two enhanced surfaces and two alkali metal working fluids were evaluated. The enhanced surfaces were an EDM hole covered surface and a sintered-powder-metal porous layer surface. The working fluids tested were potassium and eutectic sodium-potasium alloy (NaK), both with and without undissolved noncondensible gas. Noncondensible gas (He and Xe) was added to the system to provide gas in the nucleation sites, preventing quenching of the sites. The experiments demonstrated the potential of an alkali metal pool boiler heat transport system for use in a solar-powered Stirling engine. The most favorable fluid/surface combination tested was NaK boiling on a -100 +140 mesh 304L stainless steel sintered porous layer with no undissolved noncondensible gas. This combination provided stable, high-performance boiling at the operating temperature of 700 C. Heat fluxes into the system ranged from 10 to 50 W/sq cm. The transition from free convection to nucleate boiling occurred at temperatures near 540 C. Based on these experiments, a pool boiler was designed for a full-scale 25-kWe Stirling system.

  6. Transport properties, specific heat and thermal conductivity of GaN nanocrystalline ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkowski, Czeslaw; ChuchmaLa, Andrzej; Zaleski, Andrzej J.; Matusiak, Marcin; Mucha, Jan; GLuchowski, PaweL; Strek, WiesLaw

    2010-10-15

    The structural and transport properties (resistivity, thermopower and Hall effect), specific heat and thermal conductivity have been measured for GaN nanocrystalline ceramic prepared by hot pressing. It was found that the temperature dependence of resistivity in temperature range 10-300 K shows the very low activation energy, which is ascribed to the shallow donor doping originating in amorphous phase of sample. The major charge carriers are electrons, what is indicated by negative sign of Hall constant and Seebeck coefficient. The thermopower attains large values (-58 {mu}V/K at 300 K) and was characterized by linear temperature dependence which suggests the diffusion as a major contribution to Seebeck effect. The high electron concentration of 1.3x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} and high electronic specific heat coefficient determined to be 2.4 mJ/molK{sup 2} allow to conclude that GaN ceramic demonstrates the semimetallic-like behavior accompanied by very small mobility of electrons ({approx}0.1 cm{sup 2}/V s) which is responsible for its high resistivity. A low heat conductivity of GaN ceramics is associated with partial amorphous phase of GaN grains due to high pressure sintering. - Graphical Abstract: Thermal resistivity and thermopower measurements indicates the high phonon scattering and lack of phonon-drag contribution to thermopower in GaN nanoceramics pressed under 4 GPa at 800 {sup o}C.

  7. Bjerknes-like Compensation Between Eddy Components of Meridional Heat Transport in the Wintertime North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, S. P.; Bryan, F.; Small, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Observational and model evidence has been mounting that mesoscale eddies play an important role in air-sea interaction in the vicinity of Western Boundary Currents. What has been less clear is the interplay between oceanic and atmospheric meridional eddy heat transport (MEHT). It is first shown using a high-resolution fully-coupled climate simulation of the Community Earth System Model (CESM) that variability in the North Pacific, particularly in the Kuroshio Extension region, matches observations with similar mechanisms; the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) leads Kuroshio Extension variability with a ~3-4 year lag. It is then shown that there is a compensation of ~0.1 PW between wintertime atmospheric and oceanic MEHT on decadal time scales in the North Pacific. This compensation has characteristics of Bjerknes compensation and is tied to the mesoscale eddy activity in Kuroshio Extension region. During weakly meandering ("stable") states there is the persistence of equatorward oceanic MEHT south of the jet and enhanced wintertime surface heat fluxes (SHFs). The atmospheric vertically-integrated meridional eddy heat flux is 22% larger compared to the mean with a maximum increase in MEHT of 0.11+/-0.03 PW. When the Kuroshio Extension is in a strongly meandering ("unstable") state oceanic MEHT is enhanced by a maximum of 0.07+/-0.02 PW with a subsequent reduction in wintertime ocean-to-atmosphere SHFs and atmospheric MEHT.

  8. Effects of heat stress on the gene expression of nutrient transporters in the jejunum of broiler chickens ( Gallus gallus domesticus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaolei; Zhang, Haichao; Sheikhahmadi, Ardashir; Wang, Yufeng; Jiao, Hongchao; Lin, Hai; Song, Zhigang

    2015-02-01

    In broiler chickens, heat stress disrupts nutrient digestion and absorption. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is not clearly understood. Hence, to investigate the effects of high ambient temperatures on the expression levels of nutrient transporters in the jejunum of broiler chickens, seventy-two 35-day-old male broiler chickens with similar body weights were randomly allocated into two groups: control (24 ± 1 °C) and heat-stressed (32 ± 1 °C). The chickens in the heat-stressed group were exposed to 10 h of heat daily from 08:00 to 18:00 and then raised at 24 ± 1 °C. The rectal temperature and feed intake of the chickens were recorded daily. After 7 days, nine chickens per group were sacrificed by exsanguination, and the jejunum was collected. The results show that heat exposure significantly decreased the feed intake and increased the rectal temperature of the broiler chickens. The plasma concentrations of uric acid and triglyceride significantly increased and decreased, respectively, in the heat-stressed group. No significant differences in the levels of plasma glucose, total amino acids, and very low-density lipoprotein were observed between the heat-stressed and control groups. However, the plasma concentration of glucose tended to be higher ( P = 0.09) in the heat-stressed group than in the control group. Heat exposure did not significantly affect the mRNA levels of Na+-dependent glucose transporter 1 and amino acid transporters y + LAT1, CAT1, r-BAT, and PePT-1. However, the expression levels of GLUT-2, FABP1, and CD36 were significantly decreased by heat exposure. The results of this study provide new insights into the mechanisms by which heat stress affects nutrient absorption in broiler chickens. Our findings suggest that periodic heat exposure might alter the jejunal glucose and lipid transport rather than amino acid transport. However, intestinal epithelial damage and cell loss should be considered when interpreting the effects of heat

  9. Energy Transport Effects in Flaring Atmospheres Heated by Mixed Particle Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, Valentina; Zharkov, Sergei; Macrae, Connor; Druett, Malcolm; Scullion, Eamon

    2016-07-01

    We investigate energy and particle transport in the whole flaring atmosphere from the corona to the photosphere and interior for the flaring events on the 1st July 2012, 6 and 7 September 2011 by using the RHESSI and SDO instruments as well as high-resolution observations from the Swedish 1-metre Solar Telescope (SST3) CRISP4 (CRisp Imaging Spectro-polarimeter). The observations include hard and soft X-ray emission, chromospheric emission in both H-alpha 656.3 nm core and continuum, as well as, in the near infra-red triplet Ca II 854.2 nm core and continuum channels and local helioseismic responses (sunquakes). The observations are compared with the simulations of hard X-ray emission and tested by hydrodynamic simulations of flaring atmospheres of the Sun heated by mixed particle beams. The temperature, density and macro-velocity variations of the ambient atmospheres are calculated for heating by mixed beams and the seismic response of the solar interior to generation of supersonic shocks moving into the solar interior. We investigate the termination depths of these shocks beneath the quiet photosphere levels and compare them with the parameters of seismic responses in the interior, or sunquakes (Zharkova and Zharkov, 2015). We also present an investigation of radiative conditions modelled in a full non-LTE approach for hydrogen during flare onsets with particular focus on Balmer and Paschen emission in the visible, near UV and near IR ranges and compare them with observations. The links between different observational features derived from HXR, optical and seismic emission are interpreted by different particle transport models that will allow independent evaluation of the particle transport scenarios.

  10. 2-D numerical simulations of groundwater flow, heat transfer and 4He transport — implications for the He terrestrial budget and the mantle helium heat imbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Maria Clara; Patriarche, Delphine; Goblet, Patrick

    2005-09-01

    Because helium and heat production results from a common source, a continental 4He crustal flux of 4.65 * 10 - 14 mol m - 2 s - 1 has been estimated based on heat flow considerations. In addition, because the observed mantle He / heat flux ratio at the proximity of mid-ocean ridges (6.6 * 10 - 14 mol J - 1 ) is significantly lower than the radiogenic production ratio (1.5 * 10 - 12 mol J - 1 ), the presence of a terrestrial helium-heat imbalance was suggested. The latter could be explained by the presence of a layered mantle in which removal of He is impeded from the lower mantle [R.K. O'Nions, E.R. Oxburgh, Heat and helium in the Earth, Nature 306 (1983) 429-431; E.R. Oxburgh, R.K. O'Nions, Helium loss, tectonics, and the terrestrial heat budget, Science 237 (1987) 1583-1588]. van Keken et al. [P.E. van Keken, C.J. Ballentine, D. Porcelli, A dynamical investigation of the heat and helium imbalance, Earth Planet, Sci. Lett. 188 (2001) 421-434] have recently claimed that the helium-heat imbalance remains a robust observation. Such conclusions, however, were reached under the assumption that a steady-state regime was in place for both tracers and that their transport properties are similar at least in the upper portion of the crust. Here, through 2-D simulations of groundwater flow, heat transfer and 4He transport carried out simultaneously in the Carrizo aquifer and surrounding formations in southwest Texas, we assess the legitimacy of earlier assumptions. Specifically, we show that the driving transport mechanisms for He and heat are of a fundamentally different nature for a high range of permeabilities ( k ≤ 10 - 16 m 2) found in metamorphic and volcanic rocks at all depths in the crust. The assumption that transport properties for these two tracers are similar in the crust is thus unsound. We also show that total 4He / heat flux ratios lower than radiogenic production ratios do not reflect a He deficit in the crust or mantle original reservoir. Instead, they

  11. MHD Modeling of the Solar Wind with Turbulence Transport and Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Usmanov, A. V.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Breech, B.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a magnetohydrodynamic model that describes the global axisymmetric steady-state structure of the solar wind near solar minimum with account for transport of small-scale turbulence associated heating. The Reynolds-averaged mass, momentum, induction, and energy equations for the large-scale solar wind flow are solved simultaneously with the turbulence transport equations in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU. The large-scale equations include subgrid-scale terms due to turbulence and the turbulence (small-scale) equations describe the effects of transport and (phenomenologically) dissipation of the MHD turbulence based on a few statistical parameters (turbulence energy, normalized cross-helicity, and correlation scale). The coupled set of equations is integrated numerically for a source dipole field on the Sun by a time-relaxation method in the corotating frame of reference. We present results on the plasma, magnetic field, and turbulence distributions throughout the heliosphere and on the role of the turbulence in the large-scale structure and temperature distribution in the solar wind.

  12. Heat pipe radiators for space. [vacuum tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    An optimized flight-weight prototype fluid-header panel (heatpipe radiator system) was tested in a vacuum environment over a wide range of coolant inlet temperatures, coolant flow rates, and environmental absorbed heat fluxes. The maximum performance of the system was determined. Results are compared with earlier data obtained on a smaller fluid-header feasibility panel, and computer predictions. Freeze-thaw tests are described and the change in thaw recovery time due to the addition of a low-freezing point feeder heat pipe is evaluated. Experimental panel fin-temperature distributions are compared with calculated results.

  13. Experimental and numerical analysis of coupled interfacial kinetics and heat transport during the axial heat flux close to the phase interface growth of BGO single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykova, S. V.; Golyshev, V. D.; Gonik, M. A.; Tsvetovsky, V. B.; Deshko, V. I.; Karvatskii, A. Ya.; Lenkin, A. V.; Brandon, S.; Weinstein, O.; Virozub, A.; Derby, J. J.; Yeckel, A.; Sonda, P.

    2004-05-01

    Combined experimental and numerical tools are used to analyze the effect of convective and radiative heat transport, faceting phenomena, and the optical thickness of the Bi 4Ge 3O 12 (BGO) crystal on the measurement and calculation of melt/crystal interface kinetics during the axial heat flux close to the phase interface growth of BGO single crystals. Results show that, in the general case, accurate determination of growth kinetic relations requires the application of models which account for all of the above phenomena (radiative and convective heat transport, faceting phenomena, etc.). Failure to take these into account may result not only in quantitative errors, but also even in qualitatively wrong determination of interfacial kinetic mechanisms.

  14. Effect of heat stress and feeding phosphorus levels on pig electron transport chain gene expression.

    PubMed

    Weller, M M D C A; Alebrante, L; Campos, P H R F; Saraiva, A; Silva, B A N; Donzele, J L; Oliveira, R F M; Silva, F F; Gasparino, E; Lopes, P S; Guimarães, S E F

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of temperature and different levels of available phosphorus (aP) on the expression of nine genes encoding electron transport chain proteins in the Longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle of pigs. Two trials were carried out using 48 high-lean growth pigs from two different growth phases: from 15 to 30 kg (phase 1) and from 30 to 60 kg (phase 2). Pigs from growth phase 1 were fed with three different levels of dietary aP (0.107%, 0.321% or 0.535%) and submitted either to a thermoneutral (24°C and RH at 76%) or to a heat stress (34°C and RH at 70%) environment. Pigs from growth phase 2 were fed with three different levels of dietary aP (0.116%, 0.306% or 0.496%) and submitted either to a thermoneutral (22ºC and RH at 77%) or to a heat stress (32ºC and RH at 73%) environment. Heat stress decreased (P<0.001) average daily feed intake at both growth phases. At 24°C, pigs in phase 1 fed the 0.321% aP diet had greater average daily gain and feed conversion (P<0.05) than those fed the 0.107% or 0.535% while, at 34°C pigs fed the 0.535% aP had the best performance (P<0.05). Pigs from phase 2 fed the 0.306% aP had best performance in both thermal environments. Gene expression profile was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Irrespective of growing phase, the expression of six genes was lower (P<0.05) at high temperature than at thermoneutrality. The lower expression of these genes under high temperatures evidences the effects of heat stress by decreasing oxidative metabolism, through adaptive physiological mechanisms in order to reduce heat production. In pigs from phase 1, six genes were differentially expressed across aP levels (P<0.05) in the thermoneutral and one gene in the heat stress. In pigs from phase 2, two genes were differentially expressed across aP levels (P<0.05) in both thermal environments. These data revealed strong evidence that phosphorus and thermal environments are key factors to

  15. Influence of Aerosol Heating on the Stratospheric Transport of the Mt. Pinatubo Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aquila, Valentina; Oman, Luke D.; Stolarski, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    On June 15th, 1991 the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo (15.1 deg. N, 120.3 Deg. E) in the Philippines injected about 20 Tg of sulfur dioxide in the stratosphere, which was transformed into sulfuric acid aerosol. The large perturbation of the background aerosol caused an increase in temperature in the lower stratosphere of 2-3 K. Even though stratospheric winds climatological]y tend to hinder the air mixing between the two hemispheres, observations have shown that a large part of the SO2 emitted by Mt. Pinatubo have been transported from the Northern to the Southern Hemisphere. We simulate the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo with the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) version 5 global climate model, coupled to the aerosol module GOCART and the stratospheric chemistry module StratChem, to investigate the influence of the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo on the stratospheric transport pattern. We perform two ensembles of simulations: the first ensemble consists of runs without coupling between aerosol and radiation. In these simulations the plume of aerosols is treated as a passive tracer and the atmosphere is unperturbed. In the second ensemble of simulations aerosols and radiation are coupled. We show that the set of runs with interactive aerosol produces a larger cross-equatorial transport of the Pinatubo cloud. In our simulations the local heating perturbation caused by the sudden injection of volcanic aerosol changes the pattern of the stratospheric winds causing more intrusion of air from the Northern into the Southern Hemisphere. Furthermore, we perform simulations changing the injection height of the cloud, and study the transport of the plume resulting from the different scenarios. Comparisons of model results with SAGE II and AVHRR satellite observations will be shown.

  16. Characterization of Single Phase and Two Phase Heat and Momentum Transport in a Spiraling Radial Inow Microchannel Heat Sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Maritza

    Thermal management of systems under high heat fluxes on the order of hundreds of W/cm2 is important for the safety, performance and lifetime of devices, with innovative cooling technologies leading to improved performance of electronics or concentrating solar photovoltaics. A novel, spiraling radial inflow microchannel heat sink for high flux cooling applications, using a single phase or vaporizing coolant, has demonstrated enhanced heat transfer capabilities. The design of the heat sink provides an inward swirl flow between parallel, coaxial disks that form a microchannel of 1 cm radius and 300 micron channel height with a single inlet and a single outlet. The channel is heated on one side through a conducting copper surface, and is essentially adiabatic on the opposite side to simulate a heat sink scenario for electronics or concentrated photovoltaics cooling. Experimental results on the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics in the heat sink, using single phase water as a working fluid, revealed heat transfer enhancements due to flow acceleration and induced secondary flows when compared to unidirectional laminar fully developed flow between parallel plates. Additionally, thermal gradients on the surface are small relative to the bulk fluid temperature gain, a beneficial feature for high heat flux cooling applications. Heat flux levels of 113 W/cm2 at a surface temperature of 77 deg C were reached with a ratio of pumping power to heat rate of 0.03%. Analytical models on single phase flow are used to explore the parametric trends of the flow rate and passage geometry on the streamlines and pressure drop through the device. Flow boiling heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics were obtained for this heat sink using water at near atmospheric pressure as the working fluid for inlet subcooling levels ranging from 20 to 80 deg C and mean mass flux levels ranging from 184-716 kg/m. 2s. Flow enhancements similar to singlephase flow were expected, as well

  17. Transport of radial heat flux and second sound in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Guercan, Oe. D.; Berionni, V.; Hennequin, P.; Morel, P.; Vermare, L.; Diamond, P. H.; Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Kosuga, Y.

    2013-02-15

    Simple flux-gradient relations that involve time delay and radial coupling are discussed. Such a formulation leads to a rather simple description of avalanches and may explain breaking of gyroBohm transport scaling. The generalization of the flux-gradient relation (i.e., constitutive relation), which involve both time delay and spatial coupling, is derived from drift-kinetic equation, leading to kinetic definitions of constitutive elements such as the flux of radial heat flux. This allows numerical simulations to compute these cubic quantities directly. The formulation introduced here can be viewed as an extension of turbulence spreading to include the effect of spreading of cross-phase as well as turbulence intensity, combined in such a way to give the flux. The link between turbulence spreading and entropy production is highlighted. An extension of this formulation to general quasi-linear theory for the distribution function in the phase space of radial position and parallel velocity is also discussed.

  18. Two-scale approach for the coupled heat and moisture transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruis, Jaroslav; Krejčí, Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes two-level approach for coupled heat and moisture transport in masonry structures. Motivation for two-level description comes from two major difficulties connected with masonry. First, the size of stone blocks is much larger than the size of mortar layers and very fine mesh has to be used. Second, the masonry composition is always random and therefore the concept of representative volume is reasonable. In two-level approach, the macro-scale level deals with a structure while the meso-scale level is concentrated on detailed composition of the masonry. Connection between the macro and meso level will be described. This two-level approach is suitable for parallel computers.

  19. Coupled heat and vapor transport: The thermostat effect of a freely evaporating land surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szilagyi, Jozsef; Schepers, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Analytical solutions of the 2-D heat and vapor transport equations for a surface moisture jump are often based on a constant streamwise temperature (Tws) assumption over the wet vegetated surface. By analyzing 90 thermal infrared images taken over center-pivot irrigated areas in Nebraska, it has been demonstrated for the first time that such an assumption is realistic. Average temperature difference between the perimeter and core of the irrigated full or half circles stayed between -0.11 and 0.09°C (standard deviation of 0.25-0.41°C). It was further demonstrated that wet-bulb temperatures (a proxy of Tws) remain near constant during drying of the environment when net radiation and wind conditions stay largely unchanged, enabling estimation of Tws at any stage of drying, thus improving evaporation estimates of the Priestley-Taylor equation in arid and semiarid environments.

  20. Material transport in laser-heated diamond anvil cell melting experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Andrew J.; Heinz, Dion L.; Davis, Andrew M.

    1992-01-01

    A previously undocumented effect in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell, namely, the transport of molten species through the sample chamber, over distances large compared to the laser beam diameter, is presented. This effect is exploited to determine the melting behavior of high-pressure silicate assemblages of olivine composition. At pressures where beta-spinel is the phase melted, relative strengths of partitioning can be estimated for the incompatible elements studied. Iron was found to partition into the melt from beta-spinel less strongly than calcium, and slightly more strongly than manganese. At higher pressures, where a silicate perovskite/magnesiowuestite assemblage is melted, it is determined that silicate perovskite is the liquidus phase, with iron-rich magnesiowuestite accumulating at the end of the laser-melted stripe.

  1. Lattice Boltzmann technique for heat transport phenomena coupled with melting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahem, A. M.; El-Amin, M. F.; Mohammadein, A. A.; Gorla, Rama Subba Reddy

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the heat transport phenomena coupled with melting process are studied by using the enthalpy-based lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The proposed model is a modified version of thermal LB model, where could avoid iteration steps and ensures high accuracy. The Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) approximation with a D1Q2 lattice was used to determine the temperature field for one-dimensional melting by conduction and multi-distribution functions (MDF) with D2Q9 lattice was used to determine the density, velocity and temperature fields for two-dimensional melting by natural convection. Different boundary conditions including Dirichlet, adiabatic and bounce-back boundary conditions were used. The influence of increasing Rayleigh number (from 103 to 105) on temperature distribution and melting process is studied. The obtained results show that a good agreement with the analytical solution for melting by conduction case and with the benchmark solution for melting by convection.

  2. Current and heat transport in the cannon-caliber electromagnetic gun armature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, John D.; Zielinski, Alexander E.

    1995-08-01

    A numerical model which we previously developed is extended and used to solve the equations which predict current and heat transport in a series-augmented, solid-armature railgun. The model is two-dimensional and fully time dependent. Specific calculations are carried out to analyze the armature recently designed and developed in the Cannon-Caliber Electromagnetic Launcher (CCEML) Program. The most extensive computations are for a situation in which the projectile is started at rest and accelerated to nearly 2 km/s in a time of 2 ms. Results of the calculations can be used to infer, for example, where melting in the armature is most likely to occur and where the electromagnetic stresses are largest. For comparison, calculations are also presented for a situation in which the projectile is held fixed. These calculations are intended to demonstrate the importance of velocity effects in the design of solid-armature railguns.

  3. Heat Transport in Spin Chains with Weak Spin-Phonon Coupling.

    PubMed

    Chernyshev, A L; Rozhkov, A V

    2016-01-01

    The heat transport in a system of S=1/2 large-J Heisenberg spin chains, describing closely Sr(2)CuO(3) and SrCuO(2) cuprates, is studied theoretically at T≪J by considering interactions of the bosonized spin excitations with optical phonons and defects. Treating rigorously the multiboson processes, we derive a microscopic spin-phonon scattering rate that adheres to an intuitive picture of phonons acting as thermally populated defects for the fast spin excitations. The mean-free path of the latter exhibits a distinctive T dependence reflecting a critical nature of spin chains and gives a close description of experiments. By the naturalness criterion of realistically small spin-phonon interaction, our approach stands out from previous considerations that require large coupling constants to explain the data and thus imply a spin-Peierls transition, absent in real materials. PMID:26799043

  4. An examination of the proposition to use membrane transport in an aqueous solution absorption heat pump cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J. S.; Haskin, W. L.; Chang, W. S.

    1990-06-01

    A thermal transfer cycle utilizing membrane osmotic transport of water against a pressure rise is investigated from the viewpoint of the operation of a conventional absorption heat pump using an aqueous solution as the working fluid. Physical sorption, similar or equivalent to condensation, of water vapor in the membrane material is considered to be an essential step in the overall process of water transport. The thermal nature of this step during which the heat of sorption similar in amount to the heat of condensation for water vapor must evolve at the evaporator temperature or lower disqualifies the system in performance as a heat pump. Simple flow relations for the aqueous sugar solution are derived under simplifying assumptions. A set of numerical calculations is given as an illustration to show that the inferred steps are well within the limits of thermodynamics.

  5. A Comprehensive Flow, Heat and Mass Transport Uncertainty Quantification in Discrete Fracture Network Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzedine, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    Fractures and fracture networks are the principle pathways for migration of water, heat and mass in enhanced geothermal systems, oil and gas reservoirs, CO2 leakage from saline aquifers, and radioactive and toxic industrial wastes from underground storage repositories. A major issue to overcome when characterizing a fractured reservoir is that of data limitation due to accessibility and affordability. Moreover, the ability to map discontinuities in the rock with available geological and geophysical tools tends to decrease particularly as the scale of the discontinuity goes down. Geological characterization data include measurements of fracture density, orientation, extent, and aperture, and are based on analysis of outcrops, borehole optical and acoustic televiewer logs, aerial photographs, and core samples among others. All of these measurements are taken at the field scale through a very sparse limited number of deep boreholes. These types of data are often reduced to probability distributions function for predictive modeling and simulation in a stochastic framework such as stochastic discrete fracture network. Stochastic discrete fracture network models enable, through Monte Carlo realizations and simulations, for probabilistic assessment of flow and transport phenomena that are not adequately captured using continuum models. Despite the fundamental uncertainties inherited within the probabilistic reduction of the sparse data collected, very little work has been conducted on quantifying uncertainty on the reduced probabilistic distribution functions. In the current study, using nested Monte Carlo simulations, we present the impact of parameter uncertainties of the distribution functions that characterize discrete fracture networks on the flow, heat and mass transport. Numerical results of first, second and third moments, normalized to a base case scenario, are presented and compared to theoretical results extended from percolation theory.

  6. Water, solute and heat transport in the soil: the Australian connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, John

    2016-04-01

    The interest of Peter Raats in water, solute and heat transport in the soil has led to scientific and/or personal interactions with several Australian scientists such as John Philip, David Smiles, Greg Davis and John Knight. Along with John Philip and Robin Wooding, Peter was an early user of the Gardner (1958) linearised model of soil water flow, which brought him into competition with John Philip. I will discuss some of Peter's solutions relevant to infiltration from line and point sources, cavities and basins. A visit to Canberra, Australia in the early 1980s led to joint work on soil water flow, and on combined water and solute movement with David Smiles and others. In 1983 Peter was on the PhD committee for Greg Davis at the University of Wollongong, and some of the methods in his thesis 'Mathematical modelling of rate-limiting mechanisms of pyritic oxidation in overburden dumps' were later used by Peter's student Sjoerd van der Zee. David Smiles and Peter wrote a survey article 'Hydrology of swelling clay soils' in 2005. In the last decade Peter has been investigating the history of groundwater and vadose zone hydrology, and recently he and I have been bringing to light the largely forgotten work of Lewis Fry Richardson on finite difference solution of the heat equation, drainage theory, soil physics, and the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum.

  7. A Satellite Perspective on Continental-Scale Energy Balance and Heat Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'Ecuyer, Tristan

    2015-04-01

    Recent efforts to balance the surface and atmospheric energy budgets on global and regional scales using satellite-derived observation or observation-integrating datasets will be highlighted. In the absence of closure constraints, unrealistically large imbalances are found between net radiation into the surface and corresponding turbulent heat fluxes, particularly over the global oceans. These imbalances can be traced, in part, to the fact that component fluxes tend to be estimated independently with no explicit reliance on closure constraints. A new approach for simultaneously introducing energy and water cycle balance constraints will be described that adjusts all component fluxes based on their relative uncertainties. The method yields estimates of all components of the energy and water cycles and provides explicit metrics for assessing the extent to which global and regional budgets can be balanced within assumed error bounds. This presentation will provide an overview of the resulting continental-scale energy budgets and their annual cycles. The behavior of fluxes in land and oceanic regions will be contrasted in the context of understanding the annual cycle of heat transport between the oceans and continents.

  8. The role of magnetic islands in modifying long range temporal correlations of density fluctuations and local heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Milligen, B. Ph.; Estrada, T.; García, L.; López Bruna, D.; Carreras, B. A.; Xu, Y.; Ochando, M.; Hidalgo, C.; Reynolds-Barredo, J. M.; López Fraguas, A.; the TJ-II Team

    2016-01-01

    This work explores the relation between magnetic islands, long range temporal correlations and heat transport. A low order rational surface ({\\rlap- \\iota}=3/2 ) was purposely scanned outward through an electron cyclotron resonance heated (ECRH) plasma in the TJ-II stellarator. Density turbulence and the poloidal flow velocity were characterized using a two channel Doppler reflectometer. Simultaneously, the ECRH power was modulated to characterize heat transport, using measurements from a 12 channel electron cyclotron emission diagnostic. A systematic variation of the poloidal velocity was found to be associated with the {\\rlap- \\iota}=3/2 rational surface. Near the rational surface, the Hurst exponent, quantifying the nature of long-range correlations, was reduced below 0.5 (indicating subdiffusion), while at radii smaller than that of the rational surface, it was found to be significantly enhanced (superdiffusion). In the latter region, heat transport was enhanced as well, thus establishing a link between density fluctuations and anomalous heat transport. The observed variation of the Hurst exponent was consistent with a magnetohydrodynamic turbulence simulation.

  9. An Assessment of Transport Property Estimation Methods for Ammonia-Water Mixtures and Their Influence on Heat Exchanger Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kærn, M. R.; Modi, A.; Jensen, J. K.; Haglind, F.

    2015-07-01

    Transport properties of fluids are indispensable for heat exchanger design. The methods for estimating the transport properties of ammonia-water mixtures are not well established in the literature. The few existent methods are developed from none or limited, sometimes inconsistent experimental datasets, conducted for the liquid phase only. These datasets are usually confined to low concentrations and temperatures, which are much less than those occurring in Kalina cycle boilers. This paper presents a comparison of various methods used to estimate the viscosity and the thermal conductivity of ammonia-water mixtures. Firstly, the different methods are introduced and compared at various temperatures and pressures. Secondly, their individual influence on the required heat exchanger size (surface area) is investigated. For this purpose, two case studies related to the use of the Kalina cycle are considered: a flue-gas-based heat recovery boiler for a combined cycle power plant and a hot-oil-based boiler for a solar thermal power plant. The different transport property methods resulted in larger differences at high pressures and temperatures, and a possible discontinuous first derivative, when using the interpolative methods in contrast to the corresponding state methods. Nevertheless, all possible mixture transport property combinations used herein resulted in a heat exchanger size within 4.3 % difference for the flue-gas heat recovery boiler, and within 12.3 % difference for the oil-based boiler.

  10. Onsager heat of transport of carbon dioxide at the surface of aqueous ammonia: The remarkable effect of carbamate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packwood, Daniel M.; Phillips, Leon F.

    2010-11-01

    The Onsager heat of transport Q∗ has been measured for CO 2 at the surface of aqueous ammonia. The heat of transport incorporates the enthalpy of reaction of gaseous CO 2 with ammonia, adsorbed on the liquid surface, to form adsorbed ammonium carbamate, with the result that -Q∗ has the unusually large value of 180 kJ mol -1. Measurement of Q∗ for transfer of a reactive species through a surfactant monolayer is proposed as a new method of studying reactions at liquid and quasi-liquid surfaces.

  11. Heat and particle transport in a one-dimensional hard-point gas model with on-site potential

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lei

    2015-05-15

    Heat and particle transport in a one-dimensional hard-point gas of elastically colliding particles are studied. In the nonequal mass case, due to the presence of on-site potential, the heat conduction of the model obeys the Fourier law and all the transport coefficients asymptotically approach constants in the thermodynamic limit. The thermoelectric figure of merit ZT increases slowly with the system length L and is proportional to the height of the potential barriers H in high H regime. These findings may serve as a guide for future theoretical and experimental studies.

  12. Formation and sustainment of internal transport barriers in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor with the baseline heating mix

    SciTech Connect

    Poli, Francesca M.; Kessel, Charles E.

    2013-05-15

    Plasmas with internal transport barriers (ITBs) are a potential and attractive route to steady-state operation in ITER. These plasmas exhibit radially localized regions of improved confinement with steep pressure gradients in the plasma core, which drive large bootstrap current and generate hollow current profiles and negative magnetic shear. This work examines the formation and sustainment of ITBs in ITER with electron cyclotron heating and current drive. The time-dependent transport simulations indicate that, with a trade-off of the power delivered to the equatorial and to the upper launcher, the sustainment of steady-state ITBs can be demonstrated in ITER with the baseline heating configuration.

  13. Metabolic allometric scaling model: combining cellular transportation and heat dissipation constraints.

    PubMed

    Shestopaloff, Yuri K

    2016-08-15

    Living organisms need energy to be 'alive'. Energy is produced by the biochemical processing of nutrients, and the rate of energy production is called the metabolic rate. Metabolism is very important from evolutionary and ecological perspectives, and for organismal development and functioning. It depends on different parameters, of which organism mass is considered to be one of the most important. Simple relationships between the mass of organisms and their metabolic rates were empirically discovered by M. Kleiber in 1932. Such dependence is described by a power function, whose exponent is referred to as the allometric scaling coefficient. With the increase of mass, the metabolic rate usually increases more slowly; if mass increases by two times, the metabolic rate increases less than two times. This fact has far-reaching implications for the organization of life. The fundamental biological and biophysical mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are still not well understood. The present study shows that one such primary mechanism relates to transportation of substances, such as nutrients and waste, at a cellular level. Variations in cell size and associated cellular transportation costs explain the known variance of the allometric exponent. The introduced model also includes heat dissipation constraints. The model agrees with experimental observations and reconciles experimental results across different taxa. It ties metabolic scaling to organismal and environmental characteristics, helps to define perspective directions of future research and allows the prediction of allometric exponents based on characteristics of organisms and the environments they live in. PMID:27284070

  14. Thermal transport in double-wall carbon nanotubes using heat pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang; Kumar, Satish

    2011-10-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are outstanding materials for diverse applications such as electrodes, interconnects, or thermal management. Deep understanding of the underlying thermal transport mechanism in MWCNTs is crucial to engineer their thermal properties for a specific application. This paper investigates the interfacial thermal interaction in double-wall carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) using molecular dynamics simulation and compares the transport in DWCNT with that in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The present study is based on the application of intense heat pulse in the middle of the CNTs and analysis of wavelike responses of energy propagation as well as the kinetic energy corresponding to the velocity components in the radial, tangential, and longitudinal directions of CNTs. The analysis shows that the leading wave packets corresponding to the tangential and longitudinal components propagate ballistically along the tube, while the radial components show diffusive behavior with slow propagation speed. However, the radial components can efficiently transfer energy between tubes of DWCNTs while the fast moving longitudinal components and tangential components are weak in the interfacial energy transfer. An appropriate understanding of the energy exchange between different layers of tubes will pave the path of the future design of MWCNT based pellets and composites.

  15. Application of Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy to Heat and Mass Transport Modeling in Porous Microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Jochen; Milos, Frank; Fredrich, Joanne; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM) has been used to obtain digital images of the complicated 3-D (three-dimensional) microstructures of rigid, fibrous thermal protection system (TPS) materials. These orthotropic materials are comprised of refractory ceramic fibers with diameters in the range of 1 to 10 microns and have open porosities of 0.8 or more. Algorithms are being constructed to extract quantitative microstructural information from the digital data so that it may be applied to specific heat and mass transport modeling efforts; such information includes, for example, the solid and pore volume fractions, the internal surface area per volume, fiber diameter distributions, and fiber orientation distributions. This type of information is difficult to obtain in general, yet it is directly relevant to many computational efforts which seek to model macroscopic thermophysical phenomena in terms of microscopic mechanisms or interactions. Two such computational efforts for fibrous TPS materials are: i) the calculation of radiative transport properties; ii) the modeling of gas permeabilities.

  16. A non-equilibrium model for soil heating and moisture transport during extreme surface heating: the soil (heat-moisture-vapor) HMV-Model Version 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massman, W. J.

    2015-11-01

    Increased use of prescribed fire by land managers and the increasing likelihood of wildfires due to climate change require an improved modeling capability of extreme heating of soils during fires. This issue is addressed here by developing and testing the soil (heat-moisture-vapor) HMV-model, a 1-D (one-dimensional) non-equilibrium (liquid-vapor phase change) model of soil evaporation that simulates the coupled simultaneous transport of heat, soil moisture, and water vapor. This model is intended for use with surface forcing ranging from daily solar cycles to extreme conditions encountered during fires. It employs a linearized Crank-Nicolson scheme for the conservation equations of energy and mass and its performance is evaluated against dynamic soil temperature and moisture observations, which were obtained during laboratory experiments on soil samples exposed to surface heat fluxes ranging between 10 000 and 50 000 W m-2. The Hertz-Knudsen equation is the basis for constructing the model's non-equilibrium evaporative source term. Some unusual aspects of the model that were found to be extremely important to the model's performance include (1) a dynamic (temperature and moisture potential dependent) condensation coefficient associated with the evaporative source term, (2) an infrared radiation component to the soil's thermal conductivity, and (3) a dynamic residual soil moisture. This last term, which is parameterized as a function of temperature and soil water potential, is incorporated into the water retention curve and hydraulic conductivity functions in order to improve the model's ability to capture the evaporative dynamics of the strongly bound soil moisture, which requires temperatures well beyond 150 °C to fully evaporate. The model also includes film flow, although this phenomenon did not contribute much to the model's overall performance. In general, the model simulates the laboratory-observed temperature dynamics quite well, but is less precise (but

  17. Heat and moisture production by broilers during simulated cold weather transport.

    PubMed

    Watts, J M; Graff, L J; Strawford, M L; Crowe, T G; Burlinguette, N A; Classen, H L; Shand, P J

    2011-09-01

    To ensure broiler welfare during winter transport, it is necessary to manage heat and moisture accumulation within the transport vehicles. Hence, it is necessary to determine heat production (HP) and moisture production (MP) rates under representative conditions. An environmental chamber containing a standard transport drawer was used. Cold air was drawn from outside the building, warmed to the desired temperature, and passed through the drawer at 0.35 m(3)/s. Broilers were fasted for 7 h, placed into the drawer, and exposed to test conditions within the chamber for 3 h. Air temperature and RH were measured upstream and downstream of the insulated bird compartment at 1-min intervals. Differences in the paired temperature and RH values were used to calculate sensible HP and MP for each 1 min of confinement. Effects of temperatures between -8 and -18°C and a control (+20°C) were measured for birds in 2 conditions. In condition A, there were 15 birds/drawer. Birds were 32 to 33 d old and weighed 1.8 kg. Packing density was approximately 27 kg/drawer (31 kg/m(2)). In condition B, there were 19 or 22 birds/drawer. The drawers with 19 birds contained birds that were 39 to 40 d old that weighed 2.68 kg. In the drawers with 22 birds, the birds were 35 to 36 d old and weighed 2.29 kg. In either case, the packing density was approximately 50 kg/drawer (59 kg/m(2)). Thus, the birds in condition B were bigger, more numerous, and more tightly packed than the birds in condition A. Drawers were balanced for sex. At +20°C, HP and MP rates were similar to other published values. However, for both conditions, HP and MP rates increased with decreasing exposure temperatures. In condition A, HP was 6.08 ± 0.43 W/kg and MP was 4.46 g/h per kg at 20°C compared with 87.5 ± 10.3 W/kg and 22.08 ± 5.05 g/h per kg at -15°C. In condition B, HP was 8.12 ± 1.24 W/kg and MP was 5.53 ± 1.68 g/h per kg at 20°C compared with 45.92 ± 1.95 W/kg and 12.33 ± 0.22 g/h per kg at -18°C. PMID

  18. Heat-transport enhancement in rotating turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Stephan; Wei, Ping; Ahlers, Guenter

    2016-04-01

    We present new Nusselt-number (Nu) measurements for slowly rotating turbulent thermal convection in cylindrical samples with aspect ratio Γ =1.00 and provide a comprehensive correlation of all available data for that Γ . In the experiment compressed gasses (nitrogen and sulfur hexafluride) as well as the fluorocarbon C6F14 (3M Fluorinert FC72) and isopropanol were used as the convecting fluids. The data span the Prandtl-number (Pr) range 0.74 heat transport Nur(1 /Ro ) ≡Nu (1 /Ro ) /Nu (0 ) as a function of the dimensionless inverse Rossby number 1 /Ro at constant Ra is reported. For Pr ≈0.74 and the smallest Ra =3.6 ×108 the maximum enhancement Nur ,max-1 due to rotation is about 0.02. With increasing Ra, Nur ,max-1 decreased further, and for Ra ≳2 ×109 heat-transport enhancement was no longer observed. For larger Pr the dependence of Nur on 1/Ro is qualitatively similar for all Pr. As noted before, there is a very small increase of Nur for small 1/Ro, followed by a decrease by a percent or so, before, at a critical value 1 /Roc , a sharp transition to enhancement by Ekman pumping takes place. While the data revealed no dependence of 1 /Roc on Ra, 1 /Roc decreased with increasing Pr. This dependence could be described by a power law with an exponent α ≃-0.41 . Power-law dependencies on Pr and Ra could be used to describe the slope SRo+=∂ Nur/∂ (1 /Ro ) just above 1 /Roc . The Pr and Ra exponents were β1=-0.16 ±0.08 and β2=-0.04 ±0.06 , respectively. Further increase of 1/Ro led to further increase of Nur until it reached a maximum value Nur ,max. Beyond the maximum, the Taylor-Proudman (TP) effect, which is expected to lead to reduced vertical fluid transport in the bulk region, lowered Nur. Nur ,max was largest for the largest Pr. For Pr =28.9 , for example, we measured an increase of the heat transport by up to 40% (Nur-1 =0.40 ) for the smallest Ra =2.2

  19. Climate of Earth-Like Planets With and Without Ocean Heat Transport Orbiting a Range of M and K Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiang, N. Y.; Jablonski, Emma R.; Way, Michael J.; Del Genio, Anthony; Roberge, Aki

    2015-01-01

    The mean surface temperature of a planet is now acknowledged as insufficient to surmise its full potential habitability. Advancing our understanding requires exploration with 3D general circulation models (GCMs), which can take into account how gradients and fluxes across a planet's surface influence the distribution of heat, clouds, and the potential for heterogeneous distribution of liquid water. Here we present 3D GCM simulations of the effects of alternative stellar spectra, instellation, model resolution, and ocean heat transport, on the simulated distribution of heat and moisture of an Earth-like planet (ELP).

  20. Increasing transports of volume, heat, and salt towards the Arctic in the Faroe Current 1993-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B.; Larsen, K. M. H.; Hátún, H.; Kristiansen, R.; Mortensen, E.; Østerhus, S.

    2015-06-01

    The flow of warm and saline water from the Atlantic Ocean, across the Greenland-Scotland Ridge, into the Nordic Seas - the Atlantic inflow - is split into three separate branches. The most intensive of these branches is the inflow between Iceland and the Faroe Islands (Faroes), which is focused into the Faroe Current, north of the Faroes. The Atlantic inflow is an integral part of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC), which is projected to weaken during the 21 century and might conceivably reduce the oceanic heat and salt transports towards the Arctic. Since the mid-1990s, hydrographic properties and current velocities of the Faroe Current have been monitored along a section extending north from the Faroe shelf. From these in situ observations, time series of volume, heat, and salt transport have previously been reported, but the high variability of the transport series has made it difficult to identify trends. Here, we present results from a new analysis of the Faroe Current where the in situ observations have been combined with satellite altimetry. For the period 1993 to 2013, we find the average volume transport of Atlantic water in the Faroe Current to be 3.8 ± 0.5 Sv (1 Sv =106 m3 s-1) with a heat transport relative to 0 °C of 124 ± 15 TW (1 TW =1012 W). Consistent with other results for the Northeast Atlantic component of the THC, we find no indication of weakening. The transports of the Faroe Current, on the contrary, increased. The overall trend over the two decades of observation was 9 ± 8% for volume transport and 18 ± 9% for heat transport (95% confidence intervals). During the same period, the salt transport relative to the salinity of the deep Faroe Bank Channel overflow (34.93) more than doubled, potentially strengthening the feedback on thermohaline intensity. The increased heat and salt transports are partly caused by the increased volume transport and partly by increased temperatures and salinities of the Atlantic inflow

  1. The Impact of Multidecadal NAO Variations on Atlantic Ocean Heat Transport and Rapid Changes in Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, F. J.; Delworth, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic and North Atlantic have experienced pronounced changes over the 20th and early 21st centuries, including a rapid loss of Arctic sea ice over the last several decades and prominent multidecadal variability in both ocean temperatures and sea ice. Here we use suites of climate model simulations to probe some of the factors responsible for the multidecadal variability in the Atlantic/Arctic system. We show that multidecadal fluctuations of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) induce multidecadal fluctuations of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). A positive phase of the NAO is associated with strengthened westerly winds over the North Atlantic. These winds extract more heat than normal from the subpolar ocean, thereby increasing upper ocean density, deepwater formation, and the strength of the AMOC and associated poleward ocean heat transport. In model simulations the observed negative phase of the NAO in the 1960s and 1970s led to a weaker than normal AMOC, reduced poleward ocean heat transport, a cold North Atlantic, and an increase in Arctic sea ice extent in both winter and summer. The NAO strengthened from the 1970s to the mid 1990s, leading to an increase of the AMOC and a warming of the North Atlantic. The increased heat transport extended throughout the North Atlantic, into the Barents Sea, and finally into the Arctic, contributing to a rapid reduction of sea ice in the 1990s through the 2000s. Feedbacks involving shortwave radiation are an important component of the overall changes. In these model simulations as much as 1/3 of the recent reduction of Arctic sea ice is associated with the NAO-induced AMOC and heat transport increase. Since the mid 1990s the NAO has changed from a strong positive phase to a more neutral phase. In our model simulations this weakens the AMOC and poleward ocean heat transport, and diminishes the contribution of ocean heat transport to the reduction of Arctic sea ice extent. Considered in isolation

  2. Heat-Pipe Development for Advanced Energy Transport Concepts Final Report Covering the Period January 1999 through September 2001

    SciTech Connect

    R.S.Reid; J.F.Sena; A.L.Martinez

    2002-10-01

    This report summarizes work in the Heat-pipe Technology Development for the Advanced Energy Transport Concepts program for the period January 1999 through September 2001. A gas-loaded molybdenum-sodium heat pipe was built to demonstrate the active pressure-control principle applied to a refractory metal heat pipe. Other work during the period included the development of processing procedures for and fabrication and testing of three types of sodium heat pipes using Haynes 230, MA 754, and MA 956 wall materials to assess the compatibility of these materials with sodium. Also during this period, tests were executed to measure the response of a sodium heat pipe to the penetration of water.

  3. Characterization of heat transport dynamics in laser-produced plasmas using collective Thomson scattering: Simulation and proposed experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, S.M.; Camacho, J.F.

    1995-12-01

    The authors propose an experiment in which the collective Thomson scattering lineshape obtained from ion acoustic waves is used to infer the spatial structure of local heat transport parameters and collisionality in a laser-produced plasma. The peak-height asymmetry in the ion acoustic wave spectrum will be used in conjunction with a recently developed model describing the effects of collisional and Landau damping contributions on the low-frequency electron density fluctuation spectrum to extract the relative electron drift velocity. This drift arises from temperature gradients in the plasma. The local heat flux, which is proportional to the drift, can then be estimated, and the electron thermal conductivity will be inferred from the relationship between the calculated heat flux and the experimentally determined temperature gradient. Damping of the entropy wave component at zero mode frequency is shown to be an estimate of the ion thermal conductivity, and its visibility is a direct measure of the ion-ion mean free path. The authors also propose to measure thermal transport parameters under dynamic conditions in which the plasma is heated impulsively by a laser beam on a fast ({approximately}50 ps) time scale. This technique will enable the authors to study heat transport in the presence of the large temperature gradients that are generated by this local heating mechanism. Deviations of the inferred local thermal conductivity from its Spitzer-Haerm value can be used to study the transition to the nonlocal heat transport regime. The authors have constructed a simple numerical model of this proposed experiment and present the results of a simulation. 41 refs., 9 figs.

  4. Neoclassical transport of energetic minority tail ions generated by ion-cyclotron resonance heating in tokamak geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.S. . Courant Inst. of Mathematical Sciences); Hammett, G.W.; Goldston, R.J. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    Neoclassical transport of energetic minority tail ions, which are generated by high powered electromagnetic waves of the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) at the fundamental harmonic resonance, is studied analytically in tokamak geometry. The effect of Coulomb collisions on the tail ion transport is investigated in the present work. The total tail ion transport will be the sum of the present collision-driven transport and the wave-driven transport, which is due to the ICRF-wave scattering of the tail particles as reported in the literature. The transport coefficients have been calculated kinetically, and it is found that the large tail ion viscosity, driven by the localized ICRF-heating and Coulomb slowing-down collisions, induces purely convective particle transport of the tail species, while the energy transport is both convective and diffusive. The rate of radial particle transport is shown to be usually small, but the rate of radial energy transport is larger and may not be negligible compared to the Coulomb slowing-down rate. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Heat, electricity, or transportation? The optimal use of residual and waste biomass in Europe from an environmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Steubing, Bernhard; Zah, Rainer; Ludwig, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The optimal use of forest energy wood, industrial wood residues, waste wood, agricultural residues, animal manure, biowaste, and sewage sludge in 2010 and 2030 was assessed for Europe. An energy system model was developed comprising 13 principal fossil technologies for the production of heat, electricity, and transport and 173 bioenergy conversion routes. The net environmental benefits of substituting fossil energy with bioenergy were calculated for all approximately 1500 combinations based on life cycle assessment (LCA) results. An optimization model determines the best use of biomass for different environmental indicators within the quantified EU-27 context of biomass availability and fossil energy utilization. Key factors determining the optimal use of biomass are the conversion efficiencies of bioenergy technologies and the kind and quantity of fossil energy technologies that can be substituted. Provided that heat can be used efficiently, optimizations for different environmental indicators almost always indicate that woody biomass is best used for combined heat and power generation, if coal, oil, or fuel oil based technologies can be substituted. The benefits of its conversion to SNG or ethanol are significantly lower. For non-woody biomass electricity generation, transportation, and heating yield almost comparable benefits as long as high conversion efficiencies and optimal substitutions are assured. The shares of fossil heat, electricity, and transportation that could be replaced with bioenergy are also provided. PMID:22091634

  6. Observational Constraints on Atmospheric and Oceanic Cross-Equatorial Heat Transports: Revisiting the Precipitation Asymmetry Problem in Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeb, N. G.; Wang, H.; Cheng, A.; Kato, S.; Fasullo, J.; Xu, K. M.; Allan, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have shown strong linkages between hemispheric asymmetries in atmospheric and oceanic energy budgets, tropical precipitation and the mean position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). The energetics framework has been used to explain why the mean position of the ITCZ is in the Northern Hemisphere and to study large-scale circulation and precipitation responses to changes in the hemispheric distribution of heating. Here, we expand upon these earlier studies by also considering estimates of hemispheric asymmetry in surface and atmospheric radiation budget derived from satellite observations, which enables a decomposition of cross-equatorial heat transport in terms of radiative and non-radiative (i.e., combined latent and sensible heat) components. Satellite observations of top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and surface radiation budget from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiation Budget (CERES) are combined with mass corrected vertically integrated atmospheric energy divergence from reanalysis to infer the regional distribution of the TOA, atmospheric and surface energy budget terms over the globe. Observed radiative and combined sensible and latent heat contributions to atmospheric and oceanic cross-equatorial heat transports are compared with simulations from 30 models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). Results show that most CMIP5 models that overestimate tropical precipitation in the SH have too much net downward surface radiation and combined latent and sensible heat flux in the SH relative to the NH. In addition, many of the models also underestimate atmospheric radiative cooling in the SH compared to the NH. Consequently, the models have excessive heating of the SH atmosphere and anomalous SH to NH cross-equatorial heat transport. The anomalous northward heat transport occurs via the upper branch of the northern Hadley Cell, while anomalous NH to SH moisture transport occurs in the lower branch of the northern

  7. Weak oceanic heat transport as a cause of the instability of glacial climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin de Verdière, Alain; Te Raa, L.

    2010-12-01

    The stability of the thermohaline circulation of modern and glacial climates is compared with the help of a two dimensional ocean—atmosphere—sea ice coupled model. It turns out to be more unstable as less freshwater forcing is required to induce a polar halocline catastrophy in glacial climates. The large insulation of the ocean by the extensive sea ice cover changes the temperature boundary condition and the deepwater formation regions moves much further South. The nature of the instability is of oceanic origin, identical to that found in ocean models under mixed boundary conditions. With similar strengths of the oceanic circulation and rates of deep water formation for warm and cold climates, the loss of stability of the cold climate is due to the weak thermal stratification caused by the cooling of surface waters, the deep water temperatures being regulated by the temperature of freezing. Weaker stratification with similar overturning leads to a weakening of the meridional oceanic heat transport which is the major negative feedback stabilizing the oceanic circulation. Within the unstable regime periodic millennial oscillations occur spontaneously. The climate oscillates between a strong convective thermally driven oceanic state and a weak one driven by large salinity gradients. Both states are unstable. The atmosphere of low thermal inertia is carried along by the oceanic overturning while the variation of sea ice is out of phase with the oceanic heat content. During the abrupt warming events that punctuate the course of a millennial oscillation, sea ice variations are shown respectively to damp (amplify) the amplitude of the oceanic (atmospheric) response. This sensitivity of the oceanic circulation to a reduced concentration of greenhouse gases and to freshwater forcing adds support to the hypothesis that the millennial oscillations of the last glacial period, the so called Dansgaard—Oeschger events, may be internal instabilities of the climate system.

  8. Energy and Heat Transport Constraints On Tropical Climates of the Sturtian Snowball Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohl, L. E.; Chandler, M. A.; Jonas, J.; Rind, D. H.

    2014-12-01

    It remains uncertain whether the maximum extent of Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth glaciations involves total sea ice coverage or significant open ocean. Models disagree, and the geologic record is inconclusive, but a resolution to this key question has important ramifications for how climate processes function at extremes, as well as for the distribution of habitable space for nascent multicellular life. Here we report results of new Sturtian (ca 715 Ma) Snowball Earth simulations that explore the response to three primary climate forcings often cited as contributing to Neoproterozoic cold climates: a continent distribution in low to mid-latitudes, a reduction in solar input (-6.19%), and lowered atmospheric CO2 (40 ppm). The simulations use the latest GISS ModelE2-R, with a coupled dynamic ocean using a 2° X 2.5° atmosphere and 1° x 1.25° ocean resolution. The GCM includes dynamic sea ice, an improved ocean mixing scheme, and continental runoff directed via a river drainage scheme. The GCM responds rapidly to the extreme forcings, and within 300 years the sea ice front reaches the subtropics, but after 1000 years the sea ice extent remains stable near 30° latitude, despite global average surface air temperatures dropping to -12°C. Tropical sea surface temperatures are above 5°C and nearly half the ocean surface area remains ice-free. This result differs from published results using CCSM4, but is consistent with previous NASA GCMs. Examining the tropical energy fluxes and heat transports from both atmosphere and oceans shows that for the GISS model, increases in tropical sea ice would require higher surface albedos, stronger poleward heat transports, or a reduced greenhouse effect. Atmospheric composition and cloud forcing are likely sources of this major difference in response amongst the newest versions of these IPCC models. Tropical cloud forcing must be a major suspect, since it also differs dramatically among IPCC models for future climate. We continue

  9. Salt tectonics and shallow subseafloor fluid convection: models of coupled fluid-heat-salt transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, A.; Ruppel, C.

    2007-01-01

    Thermohaline convection associated with salt domes has the potential to drive significant fluid flow and mass and heat transport in continental margins, but previous studies of fluid flow associated with salt structures have focused on continental settings or deep flow systems of importance to petroleum exploration. Motivated by recent geophysical and geochemical observations that suggest a convective pattern to near-seafloor pore fluid flow in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GoMex), we devise numerical models that fully couple thermal and chemical processes to quantify the effects of salt geometry and seafloor relief on fluid flow beneath the seafloor. Steady-state models that ignore halite dissolution demonstrate that seafloor relief plays an important role in the evolution of shallow geothermal convection cells and that salt at depth can contribute a thermal component to this convection. The inclusion of faults causes significant, but highly localized, increases in flow rates at seafloor discharge zones. Transient models that include halite dissolution show the evolution of flow during brine formation from early salt-driven convection to later geothermal convection, characteristics of which are controlled by the interplay of seafloor relief and salt geometry. Predicted flow rates are on the order of a few millimeters per year or less for homogeneous sediments with a permeability of 10−15 m2, comparable to compaction-driven flow rates. Sediment permeabilities likely fall below 10−15 m2 at depth in the GoMex basin, but such thermohaline convection can drive pervasive mass transport across the seafloor, affecting sediment diagenesis in shallow sediments. In more permeable settings, such flow could affect methane hydrate stability, seafloor chemosynthetic communities, and the longevity of fluid seeps.

  10. Guide to the Revised Ground-Water Flow and Heat Transport Simulator: HYDROTHERM - Version 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kipp, Kenneth L.; Hsieh, Paul A.; Charlton, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    The HYDROTHERM computer program simulates multi-phase ground-water flow and associated thermal energy transport in three dimensions. It can handle high fluid pressures, up to 1 ? 109 pascals (104 atmospheres), and high temperatures, up to 1,200 degrees Celsius. This report documents the release of Version 3, which includes various additions, modifications, and corrections that have been made to the original simulator. Primary changes to the simulator include: (1) the ability to simulate unconfined ground-water flow, (2) a precipitation-recharge boundary condition, (3) a seepage-surface boundary condition at the land surface, (4) the removal of the limitation that a specified-pressure boundary also have a specified temperature, (5) a new iterative solver for the linear equations based on a generalized minimum-residual method, (6) the ability to use time- or depth-dependent functions for permeability, (7) the conversion of the program code to Fortran 90 to employ dynamic allocation of arrays, and (8) the incorporation of a graphical user interface (GUI) for input and output. The graphical user interface has been developed for defining a simulation, running the HYDROTHERM simulator interactively, and displaying the results. The combination of the graphical user interface and the HYDROTHERM simulator forms the HYDROTHERM INTERACTIVE (HTI) program. HTI can be used for two-dimensional simulations only. New features in Version 3 of the HYDROTHERM simulator have been verified using four test problems. Three problems come from the published literature and one problem was simulated by another partially saturated flow and thermal transport simulator. The test problems include: transient partially saturated vertical infiltration, transient one-dimensional horizontal infiltration, two-dimensional steady-state drainage with a seepage surface, and two-dimensional drainage with coupled heat transport. An example application to a hypothetical stratovolcano system with unconfined

  11. A Ceramic Heat Exchanger for Solar Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson Jr., C.; Stacy, L.

    1985-01-01

    Design intended for high-temperature service. Proposed ceramic-tube and header heat exchangers used for solar-concentrating collector operating in 25- to 150-KW power range at temperatures between 2,000 degrees and 3,000 degrees F (1,095 degrees and 1,650 degrees C).

  12. Effect of Ion Cyclotron Heating on Fast Ion Transport and Plasma Rotation in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, V. S.; Omelchenko, Y. A.; Chiu, S. C.

    2000-10-01

    Minority ion cyclotron heating can produce energetic ions with banana orbits which are finite compared with the minor radius of a tokamak. The radial transport of the fast ions in the presence of Coulomb collisions results in a radial current and a corresponding JxB torque density on the bulk plasma. Collisions with the bulk ions provides an additional frictional torque that adds to or opposes the magnetic torque. This study clarifies the various mechanisms which can contribute to the torque components including collision-induced finite orbit particle diffusion, wave-induced asymmetry in canonical momentum when doppler resonance is accounted for, and orbit asymmetry created by magnetic geometry. Ion dynamics are calculated with a Monte-Carlo code in which wave-induced energy diffusion is accounted for by a quasilinear operator. The code follows particle drift trajectories in a tokamak geometry under the influence of RF fields and collisions with the background plasma. Questions on the direction of plasma rotation under different conditions and validity of the Green's function approach in modeling RF-induced rotation will be addressed.

  13. Numerical simulation of heat and mass transport during space crystal growth with MEPHISTO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Minwu; Raman, Raghu; Degroh, Henry C., III

    1995-01-01

    The MEPHISTO space experiments are collaborative United States and French investigations aimed at understanding the fundamentals of crystal growth. Microgravity experiments were conducted aboard the USMP-1 and -2 missions on STS-52 and 62 in October 1992 and March 1994 respectively. MEPHISTO is a French designed and built Bridgman type furnace which uses the Seebeck technique to monitor the solid/liquid interface temperature and Peltier pulsing to mark the location and shape of the solid/liquid interface. In this paper the Bridgman growth of Sn-Bi and Bi-Sn under terrestrial and microgravity conditions is modeled using the finite element code, FIDAP*. The numerical model considers fully coupled heat and mass transport, fluid motion and solid/liquid phase changes in the crystal growth process. The primary goals of this work are: to provide a quantitative study of the thermal buoyancy-induced convection in the melt for the two flight experiments; to compare the vertical and horizontal growth configurations and systematically evaluate the effects of various gravity levels on the solute segregation. Numerical results of the vertical and horizontal Bridgman growth configurations are presented.

  14. Heat-transport mechanisms in molecular building blocks of inorganic/organic hybrid superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Ashutosh; Niemelä, Janne-Petteri; Tynell, Tommi; Gaskins, John T.; Donovan, Brian F.; Karppinen, Maarit; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2016-03-01

    Nanomaterial interfaces and concomitant thermal resistances are generally considered as atomic-scale planes that scatter the fundamental energy carriers. Given that the nanoscale structural and chemical properties of solid interfaces can strongly influence this thermal boundary conductance, the ballistic and diffusive nature of phonon transport along with the corresponding phonon wavelengths can affect how energy is scattered and transmitted across an interfacial region between two materials. In hybrid composites composed of atomic layer building blocks of inorganic and organic constituents, the varying interaction between the phononic spectrum in the inorganic crystals and vibronic modes in the molecular films can provide a new avenue to manipulate the energy exchange between the fundamental vibrational energy carriers across interfaces. Here, we systematically study the heat transfer mechanisms in hybrid superlattices of atomic- and molecular-layer-grown zinc oxide and hydroquinone with varying thicknesses of the inorganic and organic layers in the superlattices. We demonstrate ballistic energy transfer of phonons in the zinc oxide that is limited by scattering at the zinc oxide/hydroquinone interface for superlattices with a single monolayer of hydroquinone separating the thicker inorganic layers. The concomitant thermal boundary conductance across the zinc oxide interfacial region approaches the maximal thermal boundary conductance of a zinc oxide phonon flux, indicative of the contribution of long wavelength vibrations across the aromatic molecular monolayers in transmitting energy across the interface. This transmission of energy across the molecular interface decreases considerably as the thickness of the organic layers are increased.

  15. TRANSPORT OF HEAT, WATER VAPOR AND CARBON DOXIDE BY LONG PERIOD EDDIES IN THE STABLE BOUNDARY LAYER

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.

    2010-07-26

    The vertical transport of heat and trace chemicals for a night in April has been studied with a wavelet analysis and conventional one-hour averages. It was found that for the night of April 20, 2009, turbulent kinetic energy, heat and trace chemicals were transported directed downward from the jet core. The most significant periods for this transport were less than 5 minutes and greater than one hour with intermittent transport taking place in the 5 min to 1 hour time frame. The nocturnal boundary layer is characterized by turbulent intermittency, long period oscillations, and a slow approach to equilibrium, (Mahrt, 1999). Although turbulence is usually maintained by surface friction, downward transport from low-level jets can also play an important role in turbulence maintenance and in the transport of scalars, Mahrt (1999), Banta et al. (2006). The eddy covariance flux measurement technique assumes continuous turbulence which is unusual in the stable boundary because significant flux transport occurs via turbulent eddies whose periods are long compared with the averaging time (Goulden et al., 1996). Systematic error in eddy flux measurements is attributed mainly to the neglect of long period eddies. Banta et al. (2006) noted that observations of turbulence below the low level jet suggested that while upward transport of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) is common, downward transport from the jet can also occur. They found that in the CASES 99 experiments that turbulence scaled well with the strength of the low-level jet, and that surface cooling was more important than surface roughness. Because nocturnal turbulence is intermittent and non-stationary, the appropriate averaging time for calculation of TKE and EC fluxes is not obvious. Wavelet analysis is, thus, a more suitable analysis tool than conventional Fourier analysis.

  16. Investigations on the heat transport capability of a cryogenic oscillating heat pipe and its application in achieving ultra-fast cooling rates for cell vitrification cryopreservation☆

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xu; Ma, Hongbin; Jiao, Anjun; Critser, John K.

    2010-01-01

    Theoretically, direct vitrification of cell suspensions with relatively low concentrations (~1 M) of permeating cryoprotective agents (CPA) is suitable for cryopreservation of almost all cell types and can be accomplished by ultra-fast cooling rates that are on the order of 106–7 K/min. However, the methods and devices currently available for cell cryopreservation cannot achieve such high cooling rates. In this study, we constructed a novel cryogenic oscillating heat pipe (COHP) using liquid nitrogen as its working fluid and investigated its heat transport capability to assess its application for achieving ultra-fast cooling rates for cell cryopreservation. The experimental results showed that the apparent heat transfer coefficient of the COHP can reach 2 × 105 W/m2·K, which is two orders of the magnitude higher than traditional heat pipes. Theoretical analyzes showed that the average local heat transfer coefficient in the thin film evaporation region of the COHP can reach 1.2 × 106 W/m2·K, which is approximately 103 times higher than that achievable with standard pool-boiling approaches. Based on these results, a novel device design applying the COHP and microfabrication techniques is proposed and its efficiency for cell vitrification is demonstrated through numerical simulation. The estimated average cooling rates achieved through this approach is 106–7 K/min, which is much faster than the currently available methods and sufficient for achieving vitrification with relatively low concentrations of CPA. PMID:18430413

  17. Evaluation of the vent header crack at Edwin 1. Hatch Unit No. 2 Nuclear Power Station

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    A metallurgical failure analysis was performed on pieces of the cracked vent header pipe from the Edwin I. Hatch Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant. The analysis consisted of optical microscopy, chemical analysis, mechanical Charpy impact testing and fractography. The general conclusions drawn from this analysis were: (1) the material of the vent header met the mechanical and chemical properties of ASTM A516 Gr. 70 material and that the microstructures were consistent with this material; (2) the fracture faces of the cracked pipe were predominantly brittle in appearance with no evidence of fatigue contribution; (3) the NDTT (Nil Ductility Transition Temperature) for this material is approximately -60/sup 0/F (-51/sup 0/C); and (4) the fact that the material's NDTT is significantly out of the normal operating range of the pipe suggests that an impingement of low temperature nitrogen (caused by a faulty torus inerting system) induced a thermal shock in the pipe which, when cooled below its NDTT, cracked in a brittle manner.

  18. Heat Transfer and Fluid Transport of Supercritical CO2 in Enhanced Geothermal System with Local Thermal Non-equilibrium Model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Le; Luo, Feng; Xu, Ruina; Jiang, Peixue; Liu, Huihai

    2014-12-31

    The heat transfer and fluid transport of supercritical CO2 in enhanced geothermal system (EGS) is studied numerically with local thermal non-equilibrium model, which accounts for the temperature difference between solid matrix and fluid components in porous media and uses two energy equations to describe heat transfer in the solid matrix and in the fluid, respectively. As compared with the previous results of our research group, the effect of local thermal non-equilibrium mainly depends on the volumetric heat transfer coefficient ah, which has a significant effect on the production temperature at reservoir outlet and thermal breakthrough time. The uniformity of volumetricmore » heat transfer coefficient ah has little influence on the thermal breakthrough time, but the temperature difference become more obvious with time after thermal breakthrough with this simulation model. The thermal breakthrough time reduces and the effect of local thermal non-equilibrium becomes significant with decreasing ah.« less

  19. MHD thermosolutal marangoni convection heat and mass transport of power law fluid driven by temperature and concentration gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Chengru; Zheng, Liancun; Ma, Lianxi

    2015-08-01

    This paper studies the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) thermosolutal Marangoni convection heat and mass transfer of power-law fluids driven by a power law temperature and a power law concentration which is assumed that the surface tension varies linearly with both the temperature and concentration. Heat and mass transfer constitutive equation is proposed based on N-diffusion proposed by Philip and the abnormal convection-diffusion model proposed by Pascal in which we assume that the heat diffusion depends non-linearly on both the temperature and the temperature gradient and the mass diffusion depends non-linearly on both the concentration and the concentration gradient with modified Fourier heat conduction for power law fluid. The governing equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using suitable similarity transformations. Approximate analytical solution is obtained using homotopy analytical method (HAM). The transport characteristics of velocity, temperature and concentration fields are analyzed in detail.

  20. Asynchronous broadcast for ordered delivery between compute nodes in a parallel computing system where packet header space is limited

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, Sameer

    2010-06-15

    Disclosed is a mechanism on receiving processors in a parallel computing system for providing order to data packets received from a broadcast call and to distinguish data packets received at nodes from several incoming asynchronous broadcast messages where header space is limited. In the present invention, processors at lower leafs of a tree do not need to obtain a broadcast message by directly accessing the data in a root processor's buffer. Instead, each subsequent intermediate node's rank id information is squeezed into the software header of packet headers. In turn, the entire broadcast message is not transferred from the root processor to each processor in a communicator but instead is replicated on several intermediate nodes which then replicated the message to nodes in lower leafs. Hence, the intermediate compute nodes become "virtual root compute nodes" for the purpose of replicating the broadcast message to lower levels of a tree.

  1. Critical temperature gradient length signatures in heat wave propagation across internal transport barriers in the Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Casati, Alessandro; Eester, D. van; Marinoni, A.; Ryter, F.; Salmi, A.; Tala, T.

    2007-09-15

    New results on electron heat wave propagation using ion cyclotron resonance heating power modulation in the Joint European Torus (JET) [P. H. Rebut et al., Nucl. Fusion 25, 1011 (1985)] plasmas characterized by internal transport barriers (ITBs) are presented. The heat wave generated outside the ITB, and traveling across it, always experiences a strong damping in the ITB layer, demonstrating a low level of transport and loss of stiffness. In some cases, however, the heat wave is strongly inflated in the region just outside the ITB, showing features of convective-like behavior. In other cases, a second maximum in the perturbation amplitude is generated close to the ITB foot. Such peculiar types of behavior can be explained on the basis of the existence of a critical temperature gradient length for the onset of turbulent transport. Convective-like features appear close to the threshold (i.e., just outside the ITB foot) when the value of the threshold is sufficiently high, with a good match with the theoretical predictions for the trapped electron mode threshold. The appearance of a second maximum is due to the oscillation of the temperature profile across the threshold in the case of a weak ITB. Simulations with an empirical critical gradient length model and with the theory based GLF23 [R. E. Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas, 4, 2482 (1997)] model are presented. The difference with respect to previous results of cold pulse propagation across JET ITBs is also discussed.

  2. Coupled Soil Water and Heat Transport Near the Land Surface in Arid and Semiarid Regions - Multi-Domain Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Binayak; Yang, Zhenlei

    2016-04-01

    Understanding and simulating coupled water and heat transfer appropriately in the shallow subsurface is of vital significance for accurate prediction of soil evaporation that would improve the coupling between land surface and atmosphere, which consequently could enhance the reliability of weather as well as climate forecast. The theory of Philip and de Vries (1957), accounting for water vapor diffusion only, was considered physically incomplete and consequently extended and improved by several researchers by explicitly taking water vapor convection, dispersion or air flow into account. It is generally believed that the soil moisture is usually low in the near surface layer under highly transient field conditions, particularly in arid and semiarid regions, and that accurate characterization of water vapor transport is critical when modeling simultaneous water and heat transport in the shallow field soils. The first objective of this study is thus mainly to test existing coupled water and heat transport theories and to develop reasonable and simplified numerical models using field experimental data collected under semi-arid and arid hydro-climatic conditions. In addition, more complex multi-domain models are developed for ubiquitous heterogeneous terrestrial surfaces such as horizontal textural contrasts or structured heterogeneity including macropores (fractures, cracks, root channels, etc.). This would make coupled water and heat transfer models applicable in such non-homogeneous soils more meaningful and enhance the skill of land-atmosphere interaction models at a larger context.

  3. Critical temperature gradient length signatures in heat wave propagation across internal transport barriers in the Joint European Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Alessandro; Mantica, P.; Van Eester, D.; Hawkes, N.; Imbeaux, F.; Joffrin, E.; Marinoni, A.; Ryter, F.; Salmi, A.; Tala, T.; De Vries, P.

    2007-09-01

    New results on electron heat wave propagation using ion cyclotron resonance heating power modulation in the Joint European Torus (JET) [P. H. Rebut et al., Nucl. Fusion 25, 1011 (1985)] plasmas characterized by internal transport barriers (ITBs) are presented. The heat wave generated outside the ITB, and traveling across it, always experiences a strong damping in the ITB layer, demonstrating a low level of transport and loss of stiffness. In some cases, however, the heat wave is strongly inflated in the region just outside the ITB, showing features of convective-like behavior. In other cases, a second maximum in the perturbation amplitude is generated close to the ITB foot. Such peculiar types of behavior can be explained on the basis of the existence of a critical temperature gradient length for the onset of turbulent transport. Convective-like features appear close to the threshold (i.e., just outside the ITB foot) when the value of the threshold is sufficiently high, with a good match with the theoretical predictions for the trapped electron mode threshold. The appearance of a second maximum is due to the oscillation of the temperature profile across the threshold in the case of a weak ITB. Simulations with an empirical critical gradient length model and with the theory based GLF23 [R. E. Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas, 4, 2482 (1997)] model are presented. The difference with respect to previous results of cold pulse propagation across JET ITBs is also discussed.

  4. Characteristics, vertical structures, and heat/salt transports of mesoscale eddies in the southeastern tropical Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Yu, Weidong; Yuan, Yeli; Zhao, Xia; Wang, Fan; Chen, Gengxin; Liu, Lin; Duan, Yongliang

    2015-10-01

    Satellite altimetry sea surface height measurements reveal high mesoscale eddy activity in the southeastern tropical Indian Ocean (SETIO). In this study, the characteristics of mesoscale eddies in the SETIO are investigated by analyzing 564 cyclonic eddy (CE) tracks and 695 anticyclonic eddy (AE) tracks identified from a new version of satellite altimetry data with a daily temporal resolution. The mean radius, lifespan, propagation speed, and distance of CEs (AEs) are 149 (153) km, 50 (46) days, 15.3 (16.6) cm s-1, and 651 (648) km, respectively. Some significant differences exist in the eddy statistical characteristics between the new-version daily altimeter data and the former weekly data. Mean vertical structures of anomalous potential temperature, salinity, geostrophic current, as well as heat and salt transports of the composite eddies, are estimated by analyzing Argo profile data matched to altimeter-detected eddies. The composite analysis shows that eddy-induced ocean anomalies are mainly confined in the upper 300 dbar. In the eddy core, CE (AE) could induce a cooling (warming) of 2°C between 60 and 180 dbar and maximum positive (negative) salinity anomalies of 0.1 (-0.3) psu in the upper 50 (110) dbar. The meridional heat transport induced by the composite CE (AE) is southward (northward), whereas the salt transport of CE (AE) is northward (southward). Most of the meridional heat and salt transports are carried in the upper 300 dbar.

  5. Influence of the Prandtl number on the heat transport enhancement in rotating turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Stephan; Wei, Ping; Ahlers, Guenter

    2014-11-01

    We present new Nusselt-number (Nu) measurements for slowly rotating turbulent thermal convection in cylinders with aspect ratio Γ = 1 . By using compressed gasses and various liquids, we now have data in the Prandtl number (Pr) range 0 . 74 < Pr < 35 . 5 and for Rayleigh numbers (Ra) in the range 4 ×108 < Ra < 2 ×1011 . With these data we investigate in detail the effect of Pr and Ra on the heat-transport enhancement close to its onset. This enhancement takes place for rotation rates larger than a critical value, as expressed by the dimensionless inverse Rossby number (1 / Ro), since only then vortices form, in which due to Ekman pumping fluid is transported from the thermal boundary layers into the turbulent bulk. We found that the critical inverse Rossby number (1 / Roc) decreases with increasing Pr, following a power law with exponent α = - 0 . 40 +/- 0 . 02 . For larger rotation rates, the relative heat transport enhancement (Nur) increases first linearly with a slope S = ∂Nur / ∂ (1 / Ro) . We show that also the slope S follows a power law S ~ Prβ Raγ with β = - 0 . 10 +/- 0 . 06 and γ = - 0 . 14 +/- 0 . 04 . We found that the maximum heat transport enhancement (up to 40%) increases with increasing Pr and decreasing Ra. This work was supported by NSF-Grant DMR11-58514. SW thanks the Deutsche Forschungsgesellschaft for financial support.

  6. The role of parallel heat transport in the relation between upstream scrape-off layer widths and target heat flux width in H-mode plasmas of NSTX.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, J W; Boedo, J A; Maingi, R; Soukhanovskii, V A

    2009-01-05

    The physics of parallel heat transport was tested in the Scrape-off Layer (SOL) plasma of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000) and S. M. Kaye, et al., Nucl. Fusion 45, S168 (2005)] tokamak by comparing the upstream electron temperature (T{sub e}) and density (n{sub e}) profiles measured by the mid-plane reciprocating probe to the heat flux (q{sub {perpendicular}}) profile at the divertor plate measured by an infrared (IR) camera. It is found that electron conduction explains the near SOL width data reasonably well while the far SOL, which is in the sheath limited regime, requires an ion heat flux profile broader than the electron one to be consistent with the experimental data. The measured plasma parameters indicate that the SOL energy transport should be in the conduction-limited regime for R-R{sub sep} (radial distance from the separatrix location) < 2-3 cm. The SOL energy transport should transition to the sheath-limited regime for R-R{sub sep} > 2-3cm. The T{sub e}, n{sub e}, and q{sub {perpendicular}} profiles are better described by an offset exponential function instead of a simple exponential. The conventional relation between mid plane electron temperature decay length ({lambda}{sub Te}) and target heat flux decay length ({lambda}{sub q}) is {lambda}{sub Te} = 7/2{lambda}{sub q}, whereas the newly-derived relation, assuming offset exponential functional forms, implies {lambda}{sub Te} = (2-2.5){lambda}{sub q}. The measured values of {lambda}{sub Te}/{lambda}{sub q} differ from the new prediction by 25-30%. The measured {lambda}{sub q} values in the far SOL (R-R{sub sep} > 2-3cm) are 9-10cm, while the expected values are 2.7 < {lambda}{sub q} < 4.9 cm (for sheath-limited regime). We propose that the ion heat flux profile is substantially broader than the electron heat flux profile as an explanation for this discrepancy in the far SOL.

  7. KPNA3-knockdown eliminates the second heat shock protein peak associated with the heat shock response of male silkworm pupae (Bombyx mori) by reducing heat shock factor transport into the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Wei, Guoqing; Wang, Lei; Qian, Cen; Li, Kedong; Zhang, Congfen; Dai, Lishang; Sun, Yu; Liu, Dongran; Zhu, Baojian; Liu, Chaoliang

    2016-01-10

    In this study, we investigated the role of karyopherin alpha 3 in the heat shock response in male silkworm pupae. Karyopherin alpha recognizes the classical nuclear location sequence on proteins and transports them into the nucleus by forming a trimetric complex with karyopherin beta. Three predicted karyopherin alphas (KPNA1, KPNA2 and KPNA3) have been identified from the silkworm Bombyx mori. Pull-down assay result showed that KPNA3 can pull down heat shock transcription factor (HSF) from proteins extracted from tissues using non-denature lysis buffer. After 45 °C heat shock on male B. mori pupae for 30 min, we identified two heat shock protein (HSP) mRNA expression peaks correlating with HSP19.9, HSP20.4 and HSP25.4 at 4 h (peak 1) and 24 h (peak 2). The second peak was eliminated after knockdown of KPNA3. Similar results were obtained following knockdown of HSF, which is the trans-activating factor of heat shock. However, KPNA3 knockdown was not accompanied by the decreased HSF protein levels at 24 h after heat shock which were observed following HSF knockdown. We also expressed recombinant protein GST-KPNA3 and His-HSF in Escherichia coli to perform GST pull-down assay and the result confirmed the interaction between KPNA3 and HSF. We concluded that KPNA3 knockdown eliminates the second heat shock protein peak in the heat shock response of male silkworm pupae by reducing HSF transport into the nucleus. PMID:26367326

  8. Heat and Mass Transport from Thermally Degrading Thin Cellulosic Materials in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kushida, G.; Baum, H. R.; Kashiwagi, T.; Di Blasi, C.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to a theoretical model describing the behavior of a thermally thin cellulosic sheet heated by external thermal radiation in a quiescent microgravity environment. This model describes thermal and oxidative degradation of the sheet and the heat and mass transfer of evolved degradation products from the heated cellulosic surface into the gas phase. Two calculations are carried out: heating without thermal degradation, and heating with thermal degradation of the sheet with endothermic pyrolysis, exothermic thermal oxidative degradation, and highly exothermic char oxidation. It is shown that pyrolysis is the main degradation reaction. Self-sustained smoldering is controlled and severely limited by the reduced oxygen supply.

  9. Predicting the fidelity of JPEG2000 compressed CT images using DICOM header information

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kil Joong; Kim, Bohyoung; Lee, Hyunna; Choi, Hosik; Jeon, Jong-June; Ahn, Jeong-Hwan; Lee, Kyoung Ho

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To propose multiple logistic regression (MLR) and artificial neural network (ANN) models constructed using digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) header information in predicting the fidelity of Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) 2000 compressed abdomen computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: Our institutional review board approved this study and waived informed patient consent. Using a JPEG2000 algorithm, 360 abdomen CT images were compressed reversibly (n = 48, as negative control) or irreversibly (n = 312) to one of different compression ratios (CRs) ranging from 4:1 to 10:1. Five radiologists independently determined whether the original and compressed images were distinguishable or indistinguishable. The 312 irreversibly compressed images were divided randomly into training (n = 156) and testing (n = 156) sets. The MLR and ANN models were constructed regarding the DICOM header information as independent variables and the pooled radiologists' responses as dependent variable. As independent variables, we selected the CR (DICOM tag number: 0028, 2112), effective tube current-time product (0018, 9332), section thickness (0018, 0050), and field of view (0018, 0090) among the DICOM tags. Using the training set, an optimal subset of independent variables was determined by backward stepwise selection in a four-fold cross-validation scheme. The MLR and ANN models were constructed with the determined independent variables using the training set. The models were then evaluated on the testing set by using receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis regarding the radiologists' pooled responses as the reference standard and by measuring Spearman rank correlation between the model prediction and the number of radiologists who rated the two images as distinguishable. Results: The CR and section thickness were determined as the optimal independent variables. The areas under the ROC curve for the MLR and ANN predictions were 0.91 (95% CI; 0

  10. Tracer dye transport from a well fitted with a downhole heat exchanger, Klamath Falls, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Dunstall, M.G.

    1990-02-01

    Low or medium temperature geothermal resources are often used for space and domestic hot water heating. If the resource is located at reasonably shallow depths and adjacent to a major population centre large amounts of relatively cheap, clean heat can be provided. Geothermal fluid is often brought to the surface, either under natural artesian pressure or by pumping, to be used in surface heat exchangers (SHEs). This method generally requires a second well for disposal of the cooled fluid and a substantial capital outlay for pumps and heat exchangers. Large amounts of heat can be extracted from just one or two wells using surface heat exchangers and the method can prove very cost effective in areas with a high density of energy intensive users. For smaller heat loads surface heat exchangers can become expensive and in many instances a downhole heat exchanger (DHE) installed directly in the well bore is capable of supplying cheap heat to a smaller number of users. This report first describes the methods used to carry out the series of dye tests, from well selection to injection of the dye samples. It then discusses the results of these tests in terms of how much dye was recovered, where it was recovered from and how long it took to arrive. The results of the concurrent temperature monitoring work and DHE heat output performance are also presented. Some recommendations are made for any future testing. 13 refs., 42 figs.

  11. An inexact Newton method for fully-coupled solution of the Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, J.N.; Tuminaro, R.S.; Walker, H.F.

    1997-02-01

    The solution of the governing steady transport equations for momentum, heat and mass transfer in flowing fluids can be very difficult. These difficulties arise from the nonlinear, coupled, nonsymmetric nature of the system of algebraic equations that results from spatial discretization of the PDEs. In this manuscript the authors focus on evaluating a proposed nonlinear solution method based on an inexact Newton method with backtracking. In this context they use a particular spatial discretization based on a pressure stabilized Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation of the low Mach number Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport. The discussion considers computational efficiency, robustness and some implementation issues related to the proposed nonlinear solution scheme. Computational results are presented for several challenging CFD benchmark problems as well as two large scale 3D flow simulations.

  12. On the Sensitivity of Atmospheric Model Implied Ocean Heat Transport to the Dominant Terms of the Surface Energy Balance

    SciTech Connect

    Gleckler, P J

    2004-11-03

    The oceanic meridional heat transport (T{sub o}) implied by an atmospheric General Circulation Model (GCM) can help evaluate a model's readiness for coupling with an ocean GCM. In this study we examine the T{sub o} from benchmark experiments of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project, and evaluate the sensitivity of T{sub o} to the dominant terms of the surface energy balance. The implied global ocean TO in the Southern Hemisphere of many models is equatorward, contrary to most observationally-based estimates. By constructing a hybrid (model corrected by observations) T{sub o}, an earlier study demonstrated that the implied heat transport is critically sensitive to the simulated shortwave cloud radiative effects, which have been argued to be principally responsible for the Southern Hemisphere problem. Systematic evaluation of one model in a later study suggested that the implied T{sub o} could be equally as sensitive to a model's ocean surface latent heat flux. In this study we revisit the problem with more recent simulations, making use of estimates of ocean surface fluxes to construct two additional hybrid calculations. The results of the present study demonstrate that indeed the implied T{sub o} of an atmospheric model is very sensitive to problems in not only the surface net shortwave, but the latent heat flux as well. Many models underestimate the shortwave radiation reaching the surface in the low latitudes, and overestimate the latent heat flux in the same region. The additional hybrid transport calculations introduced here could become useful model diagnostic tests as estimates of implied ocean surface fluxes are improved.

  13. In-situ measurement of the heat transport in defect- engineered free-standing single-layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haidong; Kurata, Kosaku; Fukunaga, Takanobu; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; Zhang, Xing; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Koji; Nishiyama, Takashi; Ago, Hiroki; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing nanomachining technologies, it is possible to manipulate the heat transport in graphene by introducing different defects. However, due to the difficulty in suspending large-area single-layer graphene (SLG) and limited temperature sensitivity of the present probing methods, the correlation between the defects and thermal conductivity of SLG is still unclear. In this work, we developed a new method for fabricating micro-sized suspended SLG. Subsequently, a focused ion beam (FIB) was used to create nanohole defects in SLG and tune the heat transport. The thermal conductivity of the same SLG before and after FIB radiation was measured using a novel T-type sensor method on site in a dual-beam system. The nanohole defects decreased the thermal conductivity by about 42%. It was found that the smaller width and edge scrolling also had significant restriction on the thermal conductivity of SLG. Based on the calculation results through a lattice dynamics theory, the increase of edge roughness and stronger scattering on long-wavelength acoustic phonons are the main reasons for the reduction in thermal conductivity. This work provides reliable data for understanding the heat transport in a defective SLG membrane, which could help on the future design of graphene-based electrothermal devices. PMID:26906476

  14. Thermobaric deep convection, baroclinic instability, and their roles in vertical heat transport around Maud Rise in the Weddell Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akitomo, Kazunori

    2006-09-01

    Numerical experiments with two- and three-dimensional nonhydrostatic models in a rotating frame have been executed to investigate thermobaric deep convection, subsequent baroclinic instability, and their roles in vertical heat transport, using hydrographic data around Maud Rise in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. Overturning of the water column due to thermobaric convection is apt to occur on the southern and northern flanks of the rise, and induces upward heat transport. The depth of overturning is two times larger on the northern flank (˜1.5 km) than on the southern flank (˜0.7 km). To the contrary, no overturning occurs over the top of the rise in 90 days. Baroclinic instability develops at a density front formed between the overturned and unoverturned regions since a density contrast at the front is enhanced by thermobaricity. Heat transport due to baroclinic instability is similarly upward, and at peak becomes comparable to that due to the overturning. Applicability of the results to the cooling events previously reported is also discussed.

  15. In-situ measurement of the heat transport in defect- engineered free-standing single-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haidong; Kurata, Kosaku; Fukunaga, Takanobu; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; Zhang, Xing; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Koji; Nishiyama, Takashi; Ago, Hiroki; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2016-02-01

    Utilizing nanomachining technologies, it is possible to manipulate the heat transport in graphene by introducing different defects. However, due to the difficulty in suspending large-area single-layer graphene (SLG) and limited temperature sensitivity of the present probing methods, the correlation between the defects and thermal conductivity of SLG is still unclear. In this work, we developed a new method for fabricating micro-sized suspended SLG. Subsequently, a focused ion beam (FIB) was used to create nanohole defects in SLG and tune the heat transport. The thermal conductivity of the same SLG before and after FIB radiation was measured using a novel T-type sensor method on site in a dual-beam system. The nanohole defects decreased the thermal conductivity by about 42%. It was found that the smaller width and edge scrolling also had significant restriction on the thermal conductivity of SLG. Based on the calculation results through a lattice dynamics theory, the increase of edge roughness and stronger scattering on long-wavelength acoustic phonons are the main reasons for the reduction in thermal conductivity. This work provides reliable data for understanding the heat transport in a defective SLG membrane, which could help on the future design of graphene-based electrothermal devices.

  16. In-situ measurement of the heat transport in defect- engineered free-standing single-layer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haidong; Kurata, Kosaku; Fukunaga, Takanobu; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; Zhang, Xing; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Koji; Nishiyama, Takashi; Ago, Hiroki; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing nanomachining technologies, it is possible to manipulate the heat transport in graphene by introducing different defects. However, due to the difficulty in suspending large-area single-layer graphene (SLG) and limited temperature sensitivity of the present probing methods, the correlation between the defects and thermal conductivity of SLG is still unclear. In this work, we developed a new method for fabricating micro-sized suspended SLG. Subsequently, a focused ion beam (FIB) was used to create nanohole defects in SLG and tune the heat transport. The thermal conductivity of the same SLG before and after FIB radiation was measured using a novel T-type sensor method on site in a dual-beam system. The nanohole defects decreased the thermal conductivity by about 42%. It was found that the smaller width and edge scrolling also had significant restriction on the thermal conductivity of SLG. Based on the calculation results through a lattice dynamics theory, the increase of edge roughness and stronger scattering on long-wavelength acoustic phonons are the main reasons for the reduction in thermal conductivity. This work provides reliable data for understanding the heat transport in a defective SLG membrane, which could help on the future design of graphene-based electrothermal devices. PMID:26906476

  17. Adaptive {delta}f Monte Carlo Method for Simulation of RF-heating and Transport in Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeoek, J.; Hellsten, T.

    2009-11-26

    Essential for modeling heating and transport of fusion plasma is determining the distribution function of the plasma species. Characteristic for RF-heating is creation of particle distributions with a high energy tail. In the high energy region the deviation from a Maxwellian distribution is large while in the low energy region the distribution is close to a Maxwellian due to the velocity dependency of the collision frequency. Because of geometry and orbit topology Monte Carlo methods are frequently used. To avoid simulating the thermal part, {delta}f methods are beneficial. Here we present a new {delta}f Monte Carlo method with an adaptive scheme for reducing the total variance and sources, suitable for calculating the distribution function for RF-heating.

  18. MRC2014: Extensions to the MRC format header for electron cryo-microscopy and tomography

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Anchi; Henderson, Richard; Mastronarde, David; Ludtke, Steven J.; Schoenmakers, Remco H.M.; Short, Judith; Marabini, Roberto; Dallakyan, Sargis; Agard, David; Winn, Martyn

    2015-01-01

    The MRC binary file format is widely used in the three-dimensional electron microscopy field for storing image and volume data. Files contain a header which describes the kind of data held, together with other important metadata. In response to advances in electron microscopy techniques, a number of variants to the file format have emerged which contain useful additional data, but which limit interoperability between different software packages. Following extensive discussions, the authors, who represent leading software packages in the field, propose a set of extensions to the MRC format standard designed to accommodate these variants, while restoring interoperability. The MRC format is equivalent to the map format used in the CCP4 suite for macromolecular crystallography, and the proposal also maintains interoperability with crystallography software. This Technical Note describes the proposed extensions, and serves as a reference for the standard. PMID:25882513

  19. MRC2014: Extensions to the MRC format header for electron cryo-microscopy and tomography.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Anchi; Henderson, Richard; Mastronarde, David; Ludtke, Steven J; Schoenmakers, Remco H M; Short, Judith; Marabini, Roberto; Dallakyan, Sargis; Agard, David; Winn, Martyn

    2015-11-01

    The MRC binary file format is widely used in the three-dimensional electron microscopy field for storing image and volume data. Files contain a header which describes the kind of data held, together with other important metadata. In response to advances in electron microscopy techniques, a number of variants to the file format have emerged which contain useful additional data, but which limit interoperability between different software packages. Following extensive discussions, the authors, who represent leading software packages in the field, propose a set of extensions to the MRC format standard designed to accommodate these variants, while restoring interoperability. The MRC format is equivalent to the map format used in the CCP4 suite for macromolecular crystallography, and the proposal also maintains interoperability with crystallography software. This Technical Note describes the proposed extensions, and serves as a reference for the standard. PMID:25882513

  20. High-R Walls for New Construction Structural Performance: Integrated Rim Header Testing

    SciTech Connect

    DeRenzis, A.; Kochkin, V.; Wiehagen, J.

    2013-01-01

    Two prominent approaches within the Building America Program to construct higher R-value walls have included use of larger dimension framing and exterior rigid foam insulation. These approaches have been met with some success; however for many production builders, where the cost of changing framing systems is expensive, the changes have been slow to be realized. In addition, recent building code changes have raised some performance issues for exterior sheathing and raised heel trusses, for example, that indicates a need for continued performance testing for wall systems. The testing methods presented in this report evaluate structural rim header designs over openings up to 6 ft wide and applicable to one- and two-story homes.

  1. Dual header pulse interval modulation (DH-PIM) in FSO communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Tianping; Peng, Kai; Lu, Yimin; Lu, Gang

    2007-11-01

    Recently, free space optical communication has attracted a considerable amount of interest as an alternative medium to radio for wireless transmission. It has many advantages such as a huge unregulated bandwidth, high data rates, and resistance to multi-path fading relative security against eavesdropping. The work presented in this thesis focuses on modulation schemes. Concerns of eye safety and power consumption limit the average transmitter power, which suggests that modulation techniques possessing a high peak-to-mean power ratio are favorable. This is generally achieved by trading off power efficiency against bandwidth efficiency. A novel dual-header pulse interval modulation (DH-PIM) for optical wireless communications is proposed in this paper. The symbol structure, the spectral properties, and the expression for bandwidth requirement and optical power requirement of DH-PIM in the absence of and in the presence of multi-path dispersion is presented in this paper.

  2. Steady state and modulated heat conduction in layered systems predicted by the analytical solution of the phonon Boltzmann transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordonez-Miranda, Jose; Yang, Ronggui; Volz, Sebastian; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2015-08-01

    Based on the phonon Boltzmann transport equation under the relaxation time approximation, analytical expressions for the temperature profiles of both the steady state and modulated heat conduction inside a thin film deposited on a substrate are derived and analyzed. It is shown that these components of the temperature depend strongly on the ratio between the film thickness and the average phonon mean free path (MFP), and they exhibit the diffusive behavior as predicted by the Fourier's law of heat conduction when this ratio is much larger than unity. In contrast, in the ballistic regime when this ratio is comparable to or smaller than unity, the steady-state temperature tends to be independent of position, while the amplitude and the phase of the modulated temperature appear to be lower than those determined by the Fourier's law. Furthermore, we derive an invariant of heat conduction and a simple formula for the cross-plane thermal conductivity of dielectric thin films, which could be a useful guide for understanding and optimizing the thermal performance of the layered systems. This work represents the Boltzmann transport equation-based extension of the Rosencwaig and Gersho work [J. Appl. Phys. 47, 64 (1976)], which is based on the Fourier's law and has widely been used as the theoretical framework for the development of photoacoustic and photothermal techniques. This work might shed some light on developing a theoretical basis for the determination of the phonon MFP and relaxation time using ultrafast laser-based transient heating techniques.

  3. Observational constraints on atmospheric and oceanic cross-equatorial heat transports: revisiting the precipitation asymmetry problem in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeb, Norman G.; Wang, Hailan; Cheng, Anning; Kato, Seiji; Fasullo, John T.; Xu, Kuan-Man; Allan, Richard P.

    2016-05-01

    Satellite based top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and surface radiation budget observations are combined with mass corrected vertically integrated atmospheric energy divergence and tendency from reanalysis to infer the regional distribution of the TOA, atmospheric and surface energy budget terms over the globe. Hemispheric contrasts in the energy budget terms are used to determine the radiative and combined sensible and latent heat contributions to the cross-equatorial heat transports in the atmosphere (AHTEQ) and ocean (OHTEQ). The contrast in net atmospheric radiation implies an AHTEQ from the northern hemisphere (NH) to the southern hemisphere (SH) (0.75 PW), while the hemispheric difference in sensible and latent heat implies an AHTEQ in the opposite direction (0.51 PW), resulting in a net NH to SH AHTEQ (0.24 PW). At the surface, the hemispheric contrast in the radiative component (0.95 PW) dominates, implying a 0.44 PW SH to NH OHTEQ. Coupled model intercomparison project phase 5 (CMIP5) models with excessive net downward surface radiation and surface-to-atmosphere sensible and latent heat transport in the SH relative to the NH exhibit anomalous northward AHTEQ and overestimate SH tropical precipitation. The hemispheric bias in net surface radiative flux is due to too much longwave surface radiative cooling in the NH tropics in both clear and all-sky conditions and excessive shortwave surface radiation in the SH subtropics and extratropics due to an underestimation in reflection by clouds.

  4. Effect of heat treatment of digestion-resistant fraction from soybean on retarding of bile acid transport in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sung-Hee; Lee, Seog-Won

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the heat effect of digestion-resistant fraction (RF) from soybean on retarding bile acid transport in vitro. The RFs from soybean retarded bile acid transport. A raw, unheated RF of soybean (RRF-SOY) was significantly more effective than the heated RF of soybean (HRF-SOY). The RS1 which physically trapped in milled grains and inaccessible to digestive enzyme after 18 hrs incubation level of content in RRF-SOY was found to be as high as 24.1% and after heating the RS1 of HRF-SOY was significantly reduced to 16.8%. The X-ray diffraction pattern of RF from soybean was altered after heat treatment. The RFs from soybean were characterized by peak at diffraction angles of 12.0° and 20.0° corresponding to RS content. Cellulose contents of RRF-SOY was 5% higher than that of HRF-SOY and pentosan contents of RRF-SOY was 5% higher than that of HRF-SOY, too. Whereas the hemicellulose content of RRF-SOY was 13% lower than HRF-SOY.

  5. Quantum heat transport of a two-qubit system: Interplay between system-bath coherence and qubit-qubit coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Akihito Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2015-08-14

    We consider a system consisting of two interacting qubits that are individually coupled to separate heat baths at different temperatures. The quantum effects in heat transport are investigated in a numerically rigorous manner with a hierarchial equations of motion (HEOM) approach for non-perturbative and non-Markovian system-bath coupling cases under non-equilibrium steady-state conditions. For a weak interqubit interaction, the total system is regarded as two individually thermostatted systems, whereas for a strong interqubit interaction, the two-qubit system is regarded as a single system coupled to two baths. The roles of quantum coherence (or entanglement) between the two qubits (q-q coherence) and between the qubit and bath (q-b coherence) are studied through the heat current calculated for various strengths of the system-bath coupling and interqubit coupling for high and low temperatures. The same current is also studied using the time convolutionless (TCL) Redfield equation and using an expression derived from the Fermi golden rule (FGR). We find that the HEOM results exhibit turnover behavior of the heat current as a function of the system-bath coupling strength for all values of the interqubit coupling strength, while the results obtained with the TCL and FGR approaches do not exhibit such behavior, because they do not possess the capability of treating the q-b and q-q coherences. The maximum current is obtained in the case that the q-q coherence and q-b coherence are balanced in such a manner that coherence of the entire heat transport process is realized. We also find that the heat current does not follow Fourier’s law when the temperature difference is very large, due to the non-perturbative system-bath interactions.

  6. Evaluation of a Method to Identify and Categorize Section Headers in Clinical Documents

    PubMed Central

    Denny, Joshua C.; Spickard, Anderson; Johnson, Kevin B.; Peterson, Neeraja B.; Peterson, Josh F.; Miller, Randolph A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Clinical notes, typically written in natural language, often contain substructure that divides them into sections, such as “History of Present Illness” or “Family Medical History.” The authors designed and evaluated an algorithm (“SecTag”) to identify both labeled and unlabeled (implied) note section headers in “history and physical examination” documents (“H&P notes”). Design The SecTag algorithm uses a combination of natural language processing techniques, word variant recognition with spelling correction, terminology-based rules, and naive Bayesian scoring methods to identify note section headers. Eleven physicians evaluated SecTag's performance on 319 randomly chosen H&P notes. Measurements The primary outcomes were the algorithm's recall and precision in identifying all document sections and a predefined list of twenty-nine major sections. A secondary outcome was to evaluate the algorithm's ability to recognize the correct start and end boundaries of identified sections. Results The SecTag algorithm identified 16,036 total sections and 7,858 major sections. Physician evaluators classified 15,329 as true positives and identified 160 sections omitted by SecTag. The recall and precision of the SecTag algorithm were 99.0 and 95.6% for all sections, 98.6 and 96.2% for major sections, and 96.6 and 86.8% for unlabeled sections. The algorithm determined the correct starting and ending text boundaries for 94.8% of labeled sections and 85.9% of unlabeled sections. Conclusions The SecTag algorithm accurately identified both labeled and unlabeled sections in history and physical documents. This type of algorithm may assist in natural language processing applications, such as clinical decision support systems or competency assessment for medical trainees. PMID:19717800

  7. SODIUM-WATER HEAT EXCHANGER

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, W.R.; Koch, L.J.

    1962-04-17

    A heat exchanger comprising a tank for hot liquid and a plurality of concentric, double tubes for cool liquid extending vertically through the tank is described. These tubes are bonded throughout most of their length but have an unbonded portion at both ends. The inner tubes extend between headers located above and below the tanmk and the outer tubes are welded into tube sheets forming the top and bottom of the tank at locations in the unbonded portions of the tubes. (AEC)

  8. Evaluation of moisture and heat transport in the fast-response building-resolving urban transport code QUIC EnvSim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Kevin A.

    QUIC EnvSim (QES) is a complete building-resolving urban microclimate modeling system developed to rapidly compute mass, momentum, and heat transport for the design of sustainable cities. One of the more computationally intensive components of this type of modeling system is the transport and dispersion of scalars. In this paper, we describe and evaluate QESTransport, a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) scalar transport model. QESTransport makes use of light-weight methods and modeling techniques. It is parallelized for Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), utilizing NVIDIA's OptiX application programming interfaces (APIs). QESTransport is coupled with the well-validated QUIC Dispersion Modeling system. To couple the models, a new methodology was implemented to efficiently prescribe surface flux boundary conditions on both vertical walls and flat surfaces. In addition, a new internal boundary layer parameterization was introduced into QUIC to enable the representation of momentum advection across changing surface conditions. QESTransport is validated against the following three experimental test cases designed to evaluate the model's performance under idealized conditions: (i) flow over a step change in moisture, roughness, and temperature, (ii) flow over an isolated heated building, and (iii) flow through an array of heated buildings. For all three cases, the model is compared against published simulation results. QESTransport produces velocity, temperature, and moisture fields that are comparable to much more complex numerical models for each case. The code execution time performance is evaluated and demonstrates linear scaling on a single GPU for problem sizes up to 4.5 x 4.5 km at 5 m grid resolution, and is found to produce results at much better than real time for a 1.2 x 1.2 km section of downtown Salt Lake City, Utah.

  9. Radiation and gas conduction heat transport across a helium dewer multilayer insulation system

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.

    1995-02-01

    This report describes a method for calculating mixed heat transfer through the multilayer insulation used to insulated a 4K liquid helium cryostat. The method described permits one to estimate the insulation potential for a multilayer insulation system from first principles. The heat transfer regimes included are: radiation, conduction by free molecule gas conduction, and conduction through continuum gas conduction. Heat transfer in the transition region between the two gas conduction regimes is also included.

  10. Formation of core transport barrier and CH-Mode by ion Bernstein wave heating in PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, M.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Gettelfinger, G.; Hatcher, R.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Manickam, J.

    1995-01-01

    Observation of core transport barrier formation (for particles, ion and electron energies, and toroidal momentum) by ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) in PBX-M plasma is reported. The formation of a transport barrier leads to a strong peaking and significant increase of the core pressure (70%) and toroidal momentum (20%), and has been termed the core-high confinement mode (CH-Mode). This formation of a transport barrier is consistent, in terms of the expected barrier location as well as the required threshold power, with a theoretical model based on the poloidal sheared flow generation by the ion Bernstein wave power. The use of ion Bernstein wave (IBW) induced sheared flow as a tool to control plasma pressure and bootstrap current profiles shows a favorable scaling for the use in future reactor grade tokamak plasmas.

  11. Anisotropic heat transport in nanoconfined polyamide-6,6 oligomers: atomistic reverse nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Hossein; Mohammadzadeh, Laila; Mehdipour, Nargess

    2012-03-14

    While polymers are known as thermal insulators, recent studies show that stretched single chains of polymers have a very high thermal conductivity. In this work, our new simulation scheme for simulation of heat flow in nanoconfined fluids [H. Eslami, L. Mohammadzadeh, and N. Mehdipour, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 064703 (2011)] is employed to study the effect of chain ordering (stretching) on the rate of heat transfer in polyamide-6,6 nanoconfined between graphene surfaces. Our results for the heat flow in the parallel direction (the plane of surfaces) show that the coefficient of thermal conductivity depends on the intersurface distance and is much higher than that of the bulk polymer. A comparison of results in this work with our former findings on the heat flow in the perpendicular direction, with the coefficient of heat conductivity less than the bulk sample, reveal that well-organized polymer layers between the confining surfaces show an anisotropic heat conduction; the heat conduction in the direction parallel to the surfaces is much higher than that in the perpendicular direction. The origin of such anisotropy in nanometric heat flow is shown to be the dramatic anisotropy in chain conformations (chain stretching) beside the confining surfaces. The results indicate that the coefficients of heat conductivity in both directions, normal and parallel to the surfaces, depend on the degree of polymer layering between the surfaces and the pore width. PMID:22423855

  12. Effects of water-misting spray combined with forced ventilation on heat induced meat gelation in broiler after summer transport.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Zhao, Yingying; Jiang, Nannan; Li, Ke; Xing, Tong; Chen, Lin; Wang, Xiaoming; Tang, Yong; Xu, Xinglian

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to explore the use of non-chemical addition in improving the functions of meat proteins in broilers transported during summer. The effects of a water-misting spray with forced ventilation on heat induced ground meat gelation in broilers were investigated through rheology, texture, and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses. The facilities of water-misting sprays with forced ventilation characterized with an extremely thin droplet (diameter: approximately 0.05 mm) and supplying updraughting air ventilation in an enclosed space were examined. For comparison, typical processing treatments using sodium bicarbonate or sodium tripolyphosphate were performed to grind the broiler meat which had not undergone water-misting and forced ventilation. Results showed that transport for 45-min followed by application of water-misting spray with forced ventilation for 15-min and resting for 45-min (TWFR) increased water holding capacity (WHC) by 2.51%; this finding was not significantly different from the effect of transport for 45 min followed by 1 h rest and sodium tripolyphosphate treatment (TRT) on meat batter (P > 0.05). TWFR treatment exhibited the highest storage modulus increase among four samples well as significant higher hardness and chewiness values on than those of sample treated with 45-min transport and 1-h rest (TR) (P < 0.05). TWFR, 45 min of transport, 1 h rest, and addition of sodium bicarbonate (TRB) and TRT induced T22 (relaxation time of water trapped within myofibrils) shift to shorter relaxation time and narrower relaxation distribution compared with TR. Overall, TWFR treatment can be a potential non-chemical addition method for improving the heat induced gelation protein function after broiler undergoing summer transport. PMID:27418661

  13. Microgravity Two-phase Flow and Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Kamiel

    2006-12-01

    Multiphase thermal systems (involving more than one phase or one component) have numerous applications in aerospace, heat-exchanger, transport of contaminants in environmental systems, and energy transport and energy conversion systems. Advances in understanding the behaviour of multiphase thermal systems could lead to higher efficiency energy production systems, improved heat-exchanger design, and safer and enhanced treatment of hazardous waste. But such advances have been greatly hindered by the strong effect of gravitational acceleration on the flow. Depending on the flow orientation and the phase velocities, gravitational forces could significantly alter the flow regime, and hence the pressure-drop and heat-transfer coefficients associated with the flow. A reduced gravity environment (or "microgravity"), provides an excellent tool to study the flow without the masking effects of gravity. This book presents for the first time a comprehensive coverage of all aspects of two-phase flow behaviour in the virtual absence of gravity. Link: http://www.springer.com/east/home?SGWID=5-102-22-173662745-0&changeHeader=true

  14. A lead-before-break strategy for primary heat transport piping of 500 MWe Indian PHWR

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, J.; Dutta, B.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    1997-04-01

    Leak-Before-Break (LBB) is being used to design the primary heat transport piping system of 500 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (IPHWR). The work is categorized in three directions to demonstrate three levels of safety against sudden catastrophic break. Level 1 is inherent in the design procedure of piping system as per ASME Sec.III with a well defined factor of safety. Level 2 consists of fatigue crack growth study of a postulated part-through flaw at the inside surface of pipes. Level 3 is stability analysis of a postulated leakage size flaw under the maximum credible loading condition. Developmental work related to demonstration of level 2 and level 3 confidence is described in this paper. In a case study on fatigue crack growth on PHT straight pipes for level 2, negligible crack growth is predicted for the life of the reactor. For level 3 analysis, the R6 method has been adopted. A database to evaluate SIF of elbows with throughwall flaws under combined internal pressure and bending moment has been generated to provide one of the inputs for R6 method. The methodology of safety assessment of elbow using R6 method has been demonstrated for a typical pump discharge elbow. In this analysis, limit load of the cracked elbow has been determined by carrying out elasto-plastic finite element analysis. The limit load results compared well with those given by Miller. However, it requires further study to give a general form of limit load solution. On the experimental front, a set of small diameter pipe fracture experiments have been carried out at room temperature and 300{degrees}C. Two important observations of the experiments are - appreciable drop in maximum load at 300{degrees}C in case of SS pipes and out-of-plane crack growth in case of CS pipes. Experimental load deflection curves are finally compared with five J-estimation schemes predictions. A material database of PHT piping materials is also being generated for use in LBB analysis.

  15. Charge and heat transport in soft nanosystems in the presence of time-dependent perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Perroni, Carmine Antonio; Ramaglia, Vincenzo Marigliano; Cataudella, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background: Soft nanosystems are electronic nanodevices, such as suspended carbon nanotubes or molecular junctions, whose transport properties are modulated by soft internal degrees of freedom, for example slow vibrational modes. Effects of the electron–vibration coupling on the charge and heat transport of soft nanoscopic systems are theoretically investigated in the presence of time-dependent perturbations, such as a forcing antenna or pumping terms between the leads and the nanosystem. A well-established approach valid for non-equilibrium adiabatic regimes is generalized to the case where external time-dependent perturbations are present. Then, a number of relevant applications of the method are reviewed for systems composed by a quantum dot (or molecule) described by a single electronic level coupled to a vibrational mode. Results: Before introducing time-dependent perturbations, the range of validity of the adiabatic approach is discussed showing that a very good agreement with the results of an exact quantum calculation is obtained in the limit of low level occupation. Then, we show that the interplay between the low frequency vibrational modes and the electronic degrees of freedom affects the thermoelectric properties within the linear response regime finding out that the phonon thermal conductance provides an important contribution to the figure of merit at room temperature. Our work has been stimulated by recent experimental results on carbon nanotube electromechanical devices working in the semiclassical regime (resonator frequencies in the megahertz range compared to an electronic hopping frequency of the order of tens of gigahertz) with extremely high quality factors. The nonlinear vibrational regime induced by the external antenna in such systems has been discussed within the non-perturbative adiabatic approach reproducing quantitatively the characteristic asymmetric shape of the current–frequency curves. Within the same set-up, we have

  16. Transport coefficients of a quantum system interacting with a squeezed heat bath

    SciTech Connect

    Kalandarov, Sh. A.; Adamian, G. G.; Kanokov, Z.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2006-07-15

    The analytical expressions for the time-dependent friction and diffusion coefficients are presented for the case of coupling in coordinates between the collective subsystem and a squeezed heat bath. The effects of initial phase-sensitive and -insensitive correlations of the heat bath on the diffusion coefficients, fluctuations, and decoherence are studied. The interplay between friction and decoherence is discussed.

  17. Solar heat transport fluids for solar energy collection systems: A collection of quarterly reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Noncorrosive fluid subsystem is being developed that is compatible with closed-loop solar heating and combined heating and hot water systems. The system is also to be compatible with both metallic and nonmetallic plumbing systems, and any combination of these. At least 100 gallons of each type of fluid recommended by the contractor will be delivered.

  18. Device for plasma confinement and heating by high currents and nonclassical plasma transport properties

    DOEpatents

    Coppi, B.; Montgomery, D.B.

    1973-12-11

    A toroidal plasma containment device having means for inducing high total plasma currents and current densities and at the same time emhanced plasma heating, strong magnetic confinement, high energy density containment, magnetic modulation, microwaveinduced heating, and diagnostic accessibility is described. (Official Gazette)

  19. A simple theoretical model of heat and moisture transport in multi-layer garments in cool ambient air.

    PubMed

    Wissler, Eugene H; Havenith, George

    2009-03-01

    Overall resistances for heat and vapor transport in a multilayer garment depend on the properties of individual layers and the thickness of any air space between layers. Under uncomplicated, steady-state conditions, thermal and mass fluxes are uniform within the garment, and the rate of transport is simply computed as the overall temperature or water concentration difference divided by the appropriate resistance. However, that simple computation is not valid under cool ambient conditions when the vapor permeability of the garment is low, and condensation occurs within the garment. Several recent studies have measured heat and vapor transport when condensation occurs within the garment (Richards et al. in Report on Project ThermProject, Contract No. G6RD-CT-2002-00846, 2002; Havenith et al. in J Appl Physiol 104:142-149, 2008). In addition to measuring cooling rates for ensembles when the skin was either wet or dry, both studies employed a flat-plate apparatus to measure resistances of individual layers. Those data provide information required to define the properties of an ensemble in terms of its individual layers. We have extended the work of previous investigators by developing a rather simple technique for analyzing heat and water vapor transport when condensation occurs within a garment. Computed results agree well with experimental results reported by Richards et al. (Report on Project ThermProject, Contract No. G6RD-CT-2002-00846, 2002) and Havenith et al. (J Appl Physiol 104:142-149, 2008). We discuss application of the method to human subjects for whom the rate of sweat secretion, instead of the partial pressure of water on the skin, is specified. Analysis of a more complicated five-layer system studied by Yoo and Kim (Text Res J 78:189-197, 2008) required an iterative computation based on principles defined in this paper. PMID:19125281

  20. The impact of multidecadal NAO variations on Atlantic ocean heat transport and rapid changes in Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delworth, Thomas; Zeng, Fanrong

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic and North Atlantic have experienced pronounced changes over the 20th and early 21st centuries, including a rapid loss of Arctic sea ice over the last several decades, prominent multidecadal variability in both ocean temperatures and sea ice, and decadal-scale change in tropical storm activity. We use suites of coupled climate model simulations to probe some of the factors responsible for the observed multidecadal variability in the Atlantic/Arctic system. In our models we show that multidecadal fluctuations of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) induce multidecadal fluctuations of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). A positive phase of the NAO is associated with strengthened westerly winds over the North Atlantic. These winds extract more heat than normal from the subpolar ocean, thereby increasing upper ocean density, deepwater formation, and the strength of the AMOC and associated poleward ocean heat transport. In model simulations the observed negative phase of the NAO in the 1960s and 1970s led to a weaker than normal AMOC, reduced poleward ocean heat transport, a cold North Atlantic, and an increase in Arctic sea ice extent in both winter and summer. The NAO strengthened from the 1970s to the mid 1990s, leading to an increase of the AMOC and a warming of the North Atlantic. The increased heat transport extended throughout the North Atlantic, into the Barents Sea, and finally into the Arctic, contributing to a rapid reduction of sea ice in the 1990s through the 2000s. Feedbacks involving shortwave radiation are an important component of the overall changes. The NAO-induced AMOC increase also led to hemispheric-scale atmospheric circulation changes and increased Atlantic hurricane activity, as well as atmospheric teleconnections to the Southern Ocean. Since the mid 1990s the strong positive phase of the NAO has weakened to a more neutral phase. Climate projections for the next decade that take into account recent behavior of the