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Sample records for heat-activated persulfate oxidation

  1. Kinetic and mechanistic investigations of the degradation of sulfamethazine in heat-activated persulfate oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yan; Ji, Yuefei; Kong, Deyang; Lu, Junhe; Zhou, Quansuo

    2015-12-30

    Sulfamethazine (SMZ) is widely used in livestock feeding and aquaculture as an antibiotic agent and growth promoter. Widespread occurrence of SMZ in surface water, groundwater, soil and sediment has been reported. In this study, degradation of SMZ by heat-activated persulfate (PS) oxidation was investigated in aqueous solution. Experimental results demonstrated that SMZ degradation followed pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics. The pseudo-first-order rate constant (kobs) was increased markedly with increasing concentration of PS and temperature. Radical scavenging tests revealed that the predominant oxidizing species was SO4(-) with HO playing a less important role. Aniline moiety in SMZ molecule was confirmed to be the reactive site for SO4(-) attack by comparison with substructural analogs. Nontarget natural water constituents affected SMZ removal significantly, e.g., Cl(-) and HCO3(-) improved the degradation while fulvic acid reduced it. Reaction products were enriched by solid phase extraction (SPE) and analyzed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). 6 products derived from sulfonamide SN bond cleavage, aniline moiety oxidation and Smiles-type rearrangement were identified, and transformation pathways of SMZ oxidation were proposed. Results reveal that heat-activated PS oxidation could be an efficient approach for remediation of water contaminated by SMZ and related sulfonamides. PMID:26151383

  2. Persulfate Oxidation of Gasoline Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sra, K.; Thomson, N.; Barker, J.

    2009-05-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) using persulfate is a promising remediation technology that can be potentially applied to a wide range of organic contaminants. Gasoline compounds are of particular interest because they extensively impact the soil and groundwater, and are highly persistent and toxic. In this investigation, destruction of specific gasoline compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzenes, xylenes, trimethylbenzenes (TMBs) and naphthalene), and fractions (F1 and F2) by activated and inactivated persulfate was studied at the bench-scale. Aqueous phase batch reactors (25 mL) for inactivated systems employed persulfate at two concentrations (1 or 20 g/L), and activated systems were conducted with a persulfate concentration of 20 g/L. In the activated systems, the ability of hydrogen peroxide or chelated-ferrous as an activator was examined at two experimental conditions (peroxide molar ratio 0.1 and 1.0 with respect to persulfate; and citric acid chelated ferrous at 150 and 600 mg/L). All treatments and controls contained an initial gasoline concentration of approximately 25 mg/L and were run in triplicate. Sampling for gasoline compounds was conducted over <28 day reaction period. The controls showed insignificant degradation for all the gasoline compounds and fractions examined while inactivated persulfate at 1 g/L showed little (<10%) decrease in the concentration of gasoline compounds over the 28 day reaction period. Inactivated persulfate at 20 g/L demonstrated a significant decrease in the aqueous concentration of BTEX (>99%), TMB (>94%) and naphthalene (>71%). Oxidation of the F1 fraction (>94%) was more pronounced than the F2 fraction (>80%), and >93% TPH was oxidized. Use of peroxide as an activator at a molar ratio of 0.1 improved the destruction of TMBs (>99%) and naphthalene (>85%) while maintaining the high removal of BTEX (>99%) compounds. Increase in activator strength (molar ratio 1.0) decreased the destruction of xylenes (>86%) and TMBs (>81%). The decrease in concentration of all the compounds was higher for a molar ratio of 1.0 (<27%) as compared with a molar ratio of 0.1 (<11%). The activation by ferrous concentration resulted in higher oxidation of compounds (except naphthalene) as compared with unactivated or peroxide activated persulfate. 1,3,5-TMB was completed oxidized after 4 days using higher chelated ferrous concentration and after 12 days using lower chelated ferrous concentration for persulfate activation. In general, increase in chelated ferrous concentration resulted in higher oxidation of the gasoline compounds. While oxidation of F1 fraction was similar for two ferrous activation conditions, the oxidation of F2 fraction was lower when ferrous activation at 600 mg/L was employed. Use of persulfate at high dosages by itself or in combination with higher doses of chelated ferrous or optimum doses of peroxide as an activator seems to be a viable option for remediation of gasoline compounds examined in this study. Persulfate appears to be particularly effective in the oxidation of BTEX compounds, but may require ferrous activation for a complete oxidation of TMBs and peroxide activation for oxidation of naphthalene.

  3. Degradation of toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene using heat and chelated-ferrous iron activated persulfate oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, P.; Sleep, B.

    2014-12-01

    Toluene, ethylbenze, and xylene (TEX) are common contaminants in the subsurface. Activated persulfate has shown promise for degrading a wide variety of organic compounds. However, studies of persulfate application for in situ degradation of TEX and effects on the subsequent bioremediation are limited. In this work, degradation studies of TEX in aqueous media and soil are being conducted using heat activated and chelated-ferrous iron activated persulfate oxidation in batch and flow-through column experiments. In the batch experiments, sodium persulfate is being used at different concentrations to provide an initial persulfate to TEX molar ratios between 10:1 and 100:1. Sodium persulfate solutions are being activated at 20, 37, 60, and 80 oC temperatures for the heat activated oxidation. For the chelated-ferrous iron activated oxidation, ferrous iron and citric acid, both are being used at concentration of 5 mM. In the experiments with soil slurry, a soil to water ratio of 1 to 5 is being used. Flow through water saturated column experiments are being conducted with glass columns (45 cm in length and 4 cm in diameter) uniformly packed with soils, and equilibrated with water containing TEX at the target concentrations. Both the heat activation and chelated-ferrous iron activation of persulfate are being employed in the column experiments. Future experiments are planned to determine the suitability of persulfate oxidation of TEX on the subsequent biodegradation using batch microcosms containing TEX degrading microbial cultures. In these experiments, the microbial biomass will be monitored using total phospholipids, and the microbial community will be determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) on the extracted DNA. This study is expected to provide suitable operating conditions for in situ chemical oxidation of TEX with activated persulfate followed by bioremediation.

  4. Lipid extraction from microalgae cell using persulfate-based oxidation.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yeong Hwan; Sung, Mina; Oh, You-Kwan; Han, Jong-In

    2016-01-01

    In this study, persulfate, a solid-type oxidant, was adopted as a substitute for hydrogen peroxide in extracting lipid from microalgae biomass. Microalgae cells were concentrated at pH 3 and with 200mg/L of ferric chloride, conditions which can activate oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide and persulfate. At a persulfate concentration of 2mM and a reaction temperature of 90°C, exceedingly high extraction efficiency over 95% was obtained, which was higher than with 0.5% hydrogen peroxide at the same temperature. This result showed that persulfate is sufficiently powerful and incomparably cheap enough to replace the potent yet expensive oxidant. It appears that combining iron-based coagulation and persulfate-based lipid extraction is indeed a competitive approach that can possibly lighten the process burden for the microalgae-derived biodiesel production. PMID:26614226

  5. Release of chromium from soils with persulfate chemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Kawalpreet; Crimi, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    An important part of the evaluation of the effectiveness of persulfate in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) for treating organic contaminants is to identify and understand its potential impact on metal co-contaminants in the subsurface. Chromium is a redox-sensitive and toxic metal the release of which poses considerable risk to human health. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of persulfate chemical oxidation on the release of chromium from three soils varying in physical-chemical properties. Soils were treated with unactivated and activated persulfate [activated with Fe(II), Fe(II)-EDTA, and alkaline pH] at two different concentrations (i.e., 41 mM and 2.1 mM persulfate) for 48 h and 6 months and were analyzed for release of chromium. Results show that release of chromium with persulfate chemical oxidation depends on the soil type and the activation method. Sandy soil with low oxidant demand released more chromium compared to soils with high oxidant demand. More chromium was released with alkaline pH activation. Alkaline pH and high Eh conditions favor oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI), which is the main mechanism of release of chromium with persulfate chemical oxidation. Unactivated and Fe(II)-activated persulfate decreased pH and at low pH in absence of EDTA chromium release is not a concern. These results indicate that chromium release can be anticipated based on the given site and treatment conditions, and ISCO system can be designed to minimize potential chromium release when treating soils and groundwater contaminated with both organic and metal contaminants. PMID:24028318

  6. Microwave-enhanced persulfate oxidation to treat mature landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yu-Chieh; Lo, Shang-Lien; Kuo, Jeff; Yeh, Chih-Jung

    2015-03-01

    Microwave oxidation process (MOP) was evaluated for treatment of landfill leachate. Kinetics of persulfate oxidation in MOP, effects of pH and persulfate doses on fates of derivative organic acids, and the energy cost of MOP were evaluated. The results showed that total organic carbon (TOC) removal of 79.4%, color removal of 88.4%, and UV254 removal of 77.1% were reached at MOP 550 W/85 °C within 30 min. The kinetics of oxidation by MOP followed the first-order reaction. For a given persulfate dose, the reaction rate increased with the microwave power setting (775 W>550 W>325 W>128 W) with reaction rate constants ranging from 10(-5) to 10(-2) min(-1). The adverse effects on reaction rates under higher microwave power settings and high persulfate doses are plausibly caused by excessive persulfate oxidation and self-scavenging termination of free radicals. During the MOP treatment, TOC/COD ratio dropped with time and an 86.7% reduction in TOC/COD ratio after 120 min at pH 7. Oxalic acid was the major derivative and its concentrations were higher under acidic conditions. Malic, lactic, and acetic acids were formed and soon degraded, and the solution pH has an insignificant effect on their fates. The energy cost of MOP (USD$6.03/m(3)) is essentially similar to that of conventional heating oxidation (CHO) (USD$6.10/m(3)). PMID:25463221

  7. Degradation of 1,4-dioxane in water with heat- and Fe(2+)-activated persulfate oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Long; Hou, Hong; Fujii, Ayuko; Hosomi, Masaaki; Li, Fasheng

    2014-06-01

    This research investigated the 1,4-dioxane (1,4-D) degradation efficiency and rate during persulfate oxidation at different temperatures, with and without Fe(2+) addition, also considering the effect of pH and persulfate concentration on the oxidation of 1,4-D. Degradation pathways for 1,4-D have also been proposed based on the decomposition intermediates and by-products. The results indicate that 1,4-D was completely degraded with heat-activated persulfate oxidation within 3-80 h. The kinetics of the 1,4-D degradation process fitted well to a pseudo-first-order reaction model. Temperature was identified as the most important factor influencing the 1,4-D degradation rate during the oxidation process. As the temperature increased from 40 to 60 °C, the degradation rate improved significantly. At 40 °C, the addition of Fe(2+) also increased the 1,4-D degradation rate. Interestingly, at 50 and 60 °C, the 1,4-D degradation rate decreased slightly with the addition of Fe(2+). This reduced degradation rate may be attributed to the rapid conversion of Fe(2+) to Fe(3+) and the production of an Fe(OH)3 precipitate which limited the ultimate oxidizing capability of persulfate with Fe(2+) under higher temperatures. Higher persulfate concentrations led to higher 1,4-D degradation rates, but pH adjustment had no significant effect on the 1,4-D degradation rate. The identification of intermediates and by-products in the aqueous and gas phases showed that acetaldehyde, acetic acid, glycolaldehyde, glycolic acid, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen ion were generated during the persulfate oxidation process. A carbon balance analysis showed that 96 and 93% of the carbon from the 1,4-D degradation were recovered as by-products with and without Fe(2+) addition, respectively. Overall, persulfate oxidation of 1,4-D is promising as an economical and highly efficient technology for treatment of 1,4-D-contaminated water. PMID:24590601

  8. Identification of persulfate oxidation products of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon during remediation of contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaoyong; Zhao, Dan; Yan, Xiulan; Huling, Scott G

    2014-07-15

    The extent of PAH transformation, the formation and transformation of reaction byproducts during persulfate oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coking plant soil was investigated. Pre-oxidation analyses indicated that oxygen-containing PAHs (oxy-PAHs) existed in the soil. Oxy-PAHs including 1H-phenalen-1-one, 9H-fluoren-9-one, and 1,8-naphthalic anhydride were also produced during persulfate oxidation of PAHs. Concentration of 1,8-naphthalic anhydride at 4h in thermally activated (50°C) persulfate oxidation (TAPO) treatment increased 12.7 times relative to the oxidant-free control. Additionally, the oxy-PAHs originally present and those generated during oxidation can be oxidized by unactivated or thermally activated persulfate oxidation. For example, 9H-fluoren-9-one concentration decreased 99% at 4h in TAPO treatment relative to the control. Thermally activated persulfate resulted in greater oxy-PAHs removal than unactivated persulfate. Overall, both unactivated and thermally activated persulfate oxidation of PAH-contaminated soil reduced PAH mass, and oxidized most of the reaction byproducts. Consequently, this treatment process could limit environmental risk related to the parent compound and associated reaction byproducts. PMID:24862467

  9. Defluorination of Aqueous Perfluorooctanesulfonate by Activated Persulfate Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shewei; Cheng, Jianhua; Sun, Jian; Hu, Yongyou; Liang, Xiaoyan

    2013-01-01

    Activated persulfate oxidation technologies based on sulfate radicals were first evaluated for defluorination of aqueous perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS). The influences of catalytic method, time, pH and K2S2O8 amounts on PFOS defluorination were investigated. The intermediate products during PFOS defluorination were detected by using LC/MS/MS. The results showed that the S2O82? had weak effect on the defluorination of PFOS, while the PFOS was oxidatively defluorinated by sulfate radicals in water. The defluorination efficiency of PFOS under various treatment was followed the order: HT (hydrothermal)/K2S2O8 > UV (ultraviolet)/K2S2O8 > Fe2+/K2S2O8 > US (ultrasound)/K2S2O8. Low pH was favorable for the PFOS defluorination with sulfate radicals. Increase in the amount of S2O82? had positive effect on PFOS defluorination. However, further increase in amounts of S2O82? caused insignificant improvement in PFOS defluorination due to elimination of sulfate radicals under high concentration of S2O82?. CF3(CF2)nCOOH (n?=?0–6) were detected as intermediates during PFOS defluorination. Sulfate radicals oxidation and hydrolysis were the main mechanisms involved in defluorination process of PFOS. PMID:24116016

  10. Green mechanochemical oxidative decomposition of powdery decabromodiphenyl ether with persulfate.

    PubMed

    Huang, Aizhen; Zhang, Zhimin; Wang, Nan; Zhu, Lihua; Zou, Jing

    2016-01-25

    A method was developed for efficiently degrading powdery decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209) by using mechanochemical (MC) activation of persulfate (PS). Characteristic Raman spectra of BDE209 corresponding to CBr and CO bonds were decreased in intensity and finally disappeared as the MC reaction proceeded. The BDE209 removal was influenced by the molar ratio of PS to BDE209, the mass ratio of milling ball to reaction mixtures, the ball size, and the ball rotation speed. Under optimal conditions, the new method could achieve a complete degradation, debromination and mineralization of BDE209 within 3h of milling. However, the degradation removal (or debromination efficiency) was decreased to only 51.7% (15.6%) and 67.8% (31.5%) for the use of CaO and peroxymonosulfate, respectively. The analyses of products demonstrated that once the degradation was initiated, BDE209 molecules were deeply debrominated and fully mineralized in the MC-PS system. The strong oxidizing ability of this system was due to the reactive sulfate radicals generated from the MC-enhanced activation of PS, which was confirmed with electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Because no toxic low brominated polybrominated diphenyl ethers were accumulated as byproducts, the proposed MC oxidative degradation method will have promising applications in the treatment of solid BDE209 at high concentrations. PMID:26474378

  11. Oxidative degradation of propachlor by ferrous and copper ion activated persulfate.

    PubMed

    Liu, C S; Shih, K; Sun, C X; Wang, F

    2012-02-01

    The process of in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) by persulfate (S(2)O(8)(2-)) can be accelerated by metal ion activation, which more effectively degrades subsurface pollutants by enhancing sulfate radical (SO(4)(-)) generation. This study compared the results of propachlor degradation by Cu(2+) and Fe(2+) activated persulfate and revealed differing degradation kinetics and mechanisms between the two types of activation system. The activation of persulfate by Fe(2+) ions generally resulted in rapid degradation in the early stage, but was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in efficiency due to the rapid depletion of Fe(2+) by the sulfate radicals generated. In contrast, the Cu(2+) activated persulfate had a longer lasting degradation effect and a proportionally greater degradation enhancement at elevated Cu(2+) concentrations. An optimal Fe(2+) concentration should be sought to activate the persulfate, as a high Fe(2+) concentration of 2.5mM or above, as was used in this study, may inhibit propachlor degradation due to the competitive consumption of sulfate radicals by the excess Fe(2+) ions. Higher temperatures (55°C compared with 30°C) resulted in enhanced metal activation, particularly with the Cu(2+) activated system. Furthermore, acidic conditions were found to be more favorable for propachlor degradation by metal activated persulfate. The ecotoxicity of degraded propachlor samples, which was indicated by average well color development (AWCD) for its microbial community activity, was confirmed to be decreased during the degradation processes with these two ions activated persulfate. PMID:22226398

  12. Activation of Persulfate by Iron Filings and Oxidation of 1,4-Dioxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Zhong, H.; Yan, N.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    The use of iron filings to promote in-situ activation of persulfate for permeable reactive barrier systems is investigated with batch and column experiments. The application of the approach was illustrated for oxidation of 1,4-dioxane. The results of the batch experiments showed that in the absence of the iron filings both persulfate decomposition and dioxane degradation were slow, with pseudo first-order half-lives of 160 d-1 and 6.3 d-1, respectively. In the presence of the iron filings, persulfate decomposition and dioxane degradation was much faster, with reductions in concentrations of 86% and 34% in the first 30 minutes, respectively. Approximately 10% of the dioxane injected into a column packed with iron filings was degraded. Analysis of persulfate and sulfate concentrations in the column effluent produced balanced total sulfur. The rate coefficient obtained from the column experiments was similar to the value obtained from the batch experiments.

  13. Persulfate Oxidation Regeneration of Granular Activated Carbon: Reversible Impacts on Sorption Behavior

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical oxidation regeneration of granular activated carbon (GAC) is a developing technology that can be carried out utilizing thermally-activated persulfate. During chemical regeneration of GAC, aggressive oxidative conditions lead to high acidity (pH < 2) and the accumulation ...

  14. Comparative Study on Oxidative Treatments of NAPL Containing Chlorinated Ethanes and Ethenes using Hydrogen Peroxide and Persulfate in Soils

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this study was to assess the oxidation of NAPL in soil, 30% of which were composed of chlorinated ethanes and ethenes, using catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (CHP), activated persulfate (AP), and H2O2–persulfate (HP) co-amendment systems. Citrate, a buffer and iron ligand,...

  15. Carbon isotope fractionation of chlorinated ethenes during oxidation by Fe2+ activated persulfate.

    PubMed

    Marchesi, Massimo; Aravena, Ramon; Sra, Kanwartej S; Thomson, Neil R; Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert; Mancini, Silvia

    2012-09-01

    The increased use of persulfate (S(2)O(8)(2-)) for in situ chemical oxidation to treat groundwater and soils contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds (CHCs) requires unbiased methods to assess treatment performance. Stable carbon isotope analysis offers a potential tool for assessing the in situ treatment performance of persulfate at sites contaminated with CHCs. This study investigated the extent of C isotope fractionation during oxidation of tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE) and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) by persulfate activated by ferrous ion (Fe(2+)). An average carbon isotope enrichment factor ?(bulk) of -4.9‰ for PCE, -3.6‰ for TCE and -7.6‰ for cis-DCE were obtained in batch experiments. Variations in the initial S(2)O(8)(2-)/Fe(2+)/CHC molar ratios did not result in any significant differences in carbon isotope fractionation. The occurrence of carbon isotope fractionation during oxidation and the lack of dependence of enrichment factors upon the S(2)O(8)(2-)/Fe(2+)/CHC molar ratio demonstrate that carbon isotope analysis can potentially be used at contaminated sites as an additional technique to estimate treatment efficacy during oxidation of CHCs by Fe(2+) activated persulfate. PMID:22814410

  16. Influences of carbonate and chloride ions on persulfate oxidation of trichloroethylene at 20 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chenju; Wang, Zih-Sin; Mohanty, Nihar

    2006-11-01

    Application of in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) involves application of oxidants to contaminants such as trichloroethylene (TCE) in soil or groundwater in place. Successful application of ISCO at a hazardous waste site requires understanding the scavenging reactions that could take place at the site to better optimize the oxidation of target contaminants and identification of site conditions where ISCO using persulfate may not be applicable. Additionally, estimation of the oxidant dose at a site would need identification of groundwater constituents such as alkalinity and chlorides that may scavenge radicals and therefore use up the oxidant that is targeted for the contaminant(s). The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of various levels of chloride and carbonates on persulfate oxidation of TCE at 20 degrees C under controlled conditions in a laboratory. Based on the results of the laboratory experiments, both chloride and alkalinity were shown to have scavenging effects on the rate of oxidation of TCE. It was found that at a neutral pH, persulfate oxidation of TCE was not affected by the presence of bicarbonate/carbonate concentrations within the range of 0-9.20 mM. However, the TCE degradation rate was seen to reduce with an increase in the level of carbonate species and at elevated pHs. TCE degradation in the presence of chlorides revealed no effect on the degradation rate especially at chloride levels below 0.2 M. However, at chloride levels greater than 0.2 M, TCE degradation rate was seen to reduce with an increase in the chloride ion concentration. Prior to application of persulfate as an oxidant, a site should be screened for the presence of scavengers to evaluate the potential of meeting target cleanup goals within a desirable timeframe at the site. PMID:17014891

  17. Remediation of Nitrobenzene Contaminated Soil by Combining Surfactant Enhanced Soil Washing and Effluent Oxidation with Persulfate

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jingchun; Gao, Weiguo; Qian, Linbo; Han, Lu; Chen, Yun; Chen, Mengfang

    2015-01-01

    The combination of surfactant enhanced soil washing and degradation of nitrobenzene (NB) in effluent with persulfate was investigated to remediate NB contaminated soil. Aqueous solution of sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS, 24.0 mmol L-1) was used at a given mass ratio of solution to soil (20:1) to extract NB contaminated soil (47.3 mg kg-1), resulting in NB desorption removal efficient of 76.8%. The washing effluent was treated in Fe2+/persulfate and Fe2+/H2O2 systems successively. The degradation removal of NB was 97.9%, being much higher than that of SDBS (51.6%) with addition of 40.0 mmol L-1 Fe2+ and 40.0 mmol L-1 persulfate after 15 min reaction. The preferential degradation was related to the lone pair electron of generated SO4•?, which preferably removes electrons from aromatic parts of NB over long alkyl chains of SDBS through hydrogen abstraction reactions. No preferential degradation was observed in •OH based oxidation because of its hydrogen abstraction or addition mechanism. The sustained SDBS could be reused for washing the contaminated soil. The combination of the effective surfactant-enhanced washing and the preferential degradation of NB with Fe2+/persulfate provide a useful option to remediate NB contaminated soil. PMID:26266532

  18. In Situ Chemical Oxidation of Contaminated Groundwater by Persulfate: Decomposition by Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-Containing Oxides and Aquifer Materials

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Persulfate (S2O82–) is being used increasingly for in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) of organic contaminants in groundwater, despite an incomplete understanding of the mechanism through which it is converted into reactive species. In particular, the decomposition of persulfate by naturally occurring mineral surfaces has not been studied in detail. To gain insight into the reaction rates and mechanism of persulfate decomposition in the subsurface, and to identify possible approaches for improving its efficacy, the decomposition of persulfate was investigated in the presence of pure metal oxides, clays, and representative aquifer solids collected from field sites in the presence and absence of benzene. Under conditions typical of groundwater, Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-oxides catalytically converted persulfate into sulfate radical (SO4•–) and hydroxyl radical (HO•) over time scales of several weeks at rates that were 2–20 times faster than those observed in metal-free systems. Amorphous ferrihydrite was the most reactive iron mineral with respect to persulfate decomposition, with reaction rates proportional to solid mass and surface area. As a result of radical chain reactions, the rate of persulfate decomposition increased by as much as 100 times when benzene concentrations exceeded 0.1 mM. Due to its relatively slow rate of decomposition in the subsurface, it can be advantageous to inject persulfate into groundwater, allowing it to migrate to zones of low hydraulic conductivity where clays, metal oxides, and contaminants will accelerate its conversion into reactive oxidants. PMID:25133603

  19. Enhanced dewaterability of sewage sludge in the presence of Fe(II)-activated persulfate oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Guangyin; Lu, Xueqin; Zhao, Youcai; Chai, Xiaoli; Niu, Dongjie

    2012-07-01

    The potential benefits of Fe(II)-activated persulfate oxidation on sludge dewatering and its mechanisms were investigated in this study. Capillary suction time (CST) was used to evaluate sludge dewaterability. Both extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and viscosity were determined in an attempt to explain the observed changes in sludge dewaterability. The optimal conditions to give preferable dewaterability characteristics were found to be persulfate (S(2)O(8)(2-)) 1.2 mmol/gVSS, Fe(II) 1.5 mmol/gVSS, and pH 3.0-8.5, which demonstrated a very high CST reduction efficiency (88.8% reduction within 1 min). It was further observed that both soluble EPS and viscosity played relatively negative roles in sludge dewatering, whereas no correlation was established between sludge dewaterability and bound EPS. Three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectra also revealed that soluble EPS of sludge were degraded and sludge flocs were ruptured by persulfate oxidation, which caused the release of water in the intracellular pace and subsequent improvement of its dewaterability. PMID:22542138

  20. Bioavailability evaluation of naphthalene in soil using persulfate oxidation and ultrasonic extraction method.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jui-Min; Liu, Hsiang-Chao; Hwu, Ching-Shyung; Chih-Hsing; Lai, Tsao Hung-Yu; Lu, Chih-Jen

    2011-05-01

    Bioavailability is defined as the fraction of a soil contaminant readily available for microbial degradation and for naphthalene it could be estimated by conventional exhaustive extraction methods. In this study, a novel method that employed persulfate oxidation in combination with ultrasonic extraction (POUSE) was developed. Three parameters, temperature, duration of persulfate oxidation, and the ratio of persulfate to soil organic matter (2S,082 /SOM; g g-1), were investigated to obtain an optimum operating conditions. Under the condition, naphthalene bioavailability estimated by the POUSE method was verified and compared with other three exhaustive methods i.e. sonicator, supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), and soxhlet extraction (SE). When the S2,O(8)2-/SOM ratio was controlled at 11.6 g g-1, the optimum operating conditions of the POUSE method were 70 degreesC and 3 hr, for the temperature and duration. Under these conditions, the residual naphthalene concentrations were correlated well with the residual naphthalene concentrations for both the cases of freshly spiked and aged soils. By contrast, the sonicator, SFE, and the SE overestimated the naphthalene bioavailability since these three methods extracted naphthalene much more than that of biodegradation test. These results demonstrated that the POUSE could estimate more precisely the naphthalene bioavailability. PMID:22167937

  1. Chemical Oxidation of Complex PAH Mixtures by Base-activated Sodium Persulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauswirth, S.; Miller, C. T.

    2013-12-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is an attractive approach for the remediation of recalcitrant soil and groundwater contaminants. One oxidant that has received significant recent attention is sodium persulfate, which has several advantages, including a relatively long lifetime in porous media, the ability to destroy a wide-range of chemical contaminants, and a high oxidation potential. In this study, we investigated the chemical mechanisms associated with base-activated persulfate oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and assessed the applicability of persulfate to the remediation of porous media contaminated with non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) PAH mixtures. Batch experiments were conducted to determine the oxidation kinetics for individual PAH compounds, synthetic PAH mixtures, and manufactured gas plant (MGP) tars. Additional experiments were conducted with added surfactants (Triton X-100, Triton X-45, and Tween 80) to increase PAH mass transfer from the NAPL to the aqueous phase, and with radical scavengers (ethanol and tert-butyl alcohol) to identify the reactive species responsible for degradation. Degradation of total PAHs in the NAPL experiments was as high as 70%. The addition of surfactant increased initial PAH degradation rates, but also greatly increased the rate of base consumption, thereby reducing the overall fraction degraded. The degradation of individual PAHs within the NAPLs varied significantly, with the masses of some compounds remaining largely unchanged. The results of the radical scavenger and single PAH experiments suggest that the observed pattern of degradation in PAH mixtures is the result of a combination of mass transfer considerations and competition for radical species.

  2. Optimization of stabilized leachate treatment using ozone/persulfate in the advanced oxidation process

    SciTech Connect

    Abu Amr, Salem S.; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Adlan, Mohd Nordin

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ? Ozone and persulfate reagent (O{sub 3}/S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-}) was used to treat stabilized leachate. ? Central composite design (CCD) with response surface methodology (RSM) was applied. ? Operating variables including ozone and persulfate dosage, pH variance, and reaction time. ? Optimum removal of COD, color, and NH{sub 3}–N was 72%, 96%, and 76%, respectively. ? A good value of ozone consumption (OC) obtained with 0.60 (kg O{sub 3}/kg COD). - Abstract: The objective of this study was to investigate the performance of employing persulfate reagent in the advanced oxidation of ozone to treat stabilized landfill leachate in an ozone reactor. A central composite design (CCD) with response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to evaluate the relationships between operating variables, such as ozone and persulfate dosages, pH, and reaction time, to identify the optimum operating conditions. Quadratic models for the following four responses proved to be significant with very low probabilities (<0.0001): COD, color, NH{sub 3}–N, and ozone consumption (OC). The obtained optimum conditions included a reaction time of 210 min, 30 g/m{sup 3} ozone, 1 g/1 g COD{sub 0}/S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-} ratio, and pH 10. The experimental results were corresponded well with predicted models (COD, color, and NH{sub 3}–N removal rates of 72%, 96%, and 76%, respectively, and 0.60 (kg O{sub 3}/kg COD OC). The results obtained in the stabilized leachate treatment were compared with those from other treatment processes, such as ozone only and persulfate S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-} only, to evaluate its effectiveness. The combined method (i.e., O{sub 3}/S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-}) achieved higher removal efficiencies for COD, color, and NH{sub 3}–N compared with other studied applications. Furthermore, the new method is more efficient than ozone/Fenton in advanced oxidation process in the treatment of the same studied leachate.

  3. Ultrasonic-assisted chemical oxidative cutting of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with ammonium persulfate in neutral media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Wang, Tingmei

    2009-12-01

    A new, facile, and mild approach was developed to cut the conventional long and entangled multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to short and dispersed ones with length of less than 1 ?m by ultrasonic-assisted chemical oxidation with ammonium persulfate (APS) in neutral aqueous solution at room temperature. The resulting products were characterized with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Raman, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and transmission electron microscope (TEM) techniques. The shortened MWCNTs formed stable dispersion state in water without the help of surfactants that provided possibility for further functionalizations and applications.

  4. Persulfate Oxidation of MTBE- and Chloroform-Spent Granular Activated Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Activated persulfate (Na2S2O8) regeneration of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and chloroform-spent GAC was evaluated in this study. Thermal-activation of persulfate was effective and resulted in greater MTBE removal than either alkaline-activation or H2O2–persulfate binary mixtur...

  5. Ferrous-activated persulfate oxidation of arsenic(III) and diuron in aquatic system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Zheng, Wei; Ji, Yuefei; Zhang, Jinfeng; Zeng, Chao; Zhang, Ya; Wang, Qi; Yang, Xi

    2013-12-15

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) can be an effective technology for the remediation of soil and groundwater polluted by organic and inorganic contaminants. This study investigated the oxidation of arsenic(III) (As(III)) and diuron using ferrous activated persulfate-based ISCO. The results indicated that Fe(II)/persulfate oxidation could be an effective method to oxidize As(III) and diuron. Effects of pH, S2O8(2-) and Fe(II) amounts on the destruction of As(III) and diuron were examined in batch experiments. Acidic conditions favored the removal of As(III) and diuron. Four chelating agents, citric acid (CA), Na2S2O3, diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid disodium (EDTA-Na2) were used in attempt to maintain the quantity of ferrous ion in solution. In our experiments, CA and Na2S2O3 were found to be more effective than DTPA and EDTA-Na2. Our results also revealed a widely practical prospect of inorganic chelating agent Na2S2O3. Hydroxyl and sulfate radical were determined to play key roles in the oxidation process by using ethanol and tertiary butanol as molecular probes. Oxidation of As(III) yielded As(V) via the electron-transfer reaction. In the oxidation process of diuron, a stepwise nucleophilic substitution of chlorine by hydroxyl and a stepwise oxidation process of the methyl on the dimethylurea group by hydroxyl and sulfate radical were proposed. PMID:24220194

  6. Efficient degradation of trichloroethylene in water using persulfate activated by reduced graphene oxide-iron nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ayyaz; Gu, Xiaogang; Li, Li; Lv, Shuguang; Xu, Yisheng; Guo, Xuhong

    2015-11-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) and nano-sized zero-valent iron-reduced graphene oxide (nZVI-rGO) composite were prepared. The GO and nZVI-rGO composite were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and Raman spectroscopy. The size of nZVI was about 6 nm as observed by TEM. The system of nZVI-rGO and persulfate (PS) was used for the degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in water, and showed 26.5 % more efficiency as compared to nZVI/PS system. The different parameters were studied to determine the efficiency of nZVI-rGO to activate the PS system for the TCE degradation. By increasing the PS amount, TCE removal was also improved while no obvious effect was observed by varying the catalyst loading. Degradation was decreased as the TCE initial concentration was increased from 20 to 100 mg/L. Moreover, when initial solution pH was increased, efficiency deteriorated to 80 %. Bicarbonate showed more negative effect on TCE removal among the solution matrix. To better understand the effects of radical species in the system, the scavenger tests were performed. The •SO4 (-) and •O2 (-) were predominant species responsible for TCE removal. The nZVI-rGO-activated PS process shows potential applications in remediation of highly toxic organic contaminants such as TCE present in the groundwater. Graphical abstract Persulfate activated by reduced graphene oxide and nano-sized zero-valent iron composite can be used for efficient degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in water. PMID:26162447

  7. Contaminated Groundwater Remediation by Catalyzed Hydrogen Peroxide and Persulfate Oxidants System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, N.; Wang, Y.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    A binary oxidant system, catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) coupled with persulfate (S2O82-), was investigated for use in in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) applications. Trichloroethene (TCE) and 1,4-dioxane were used as target contaminants. Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the catalytic efficiency between ferrous ion (Fe2+) and base (NaOH), oxidant decomposition rates, and contaminant degradation efficiency. For the base-catalyzed H2O2-S2O82- system, oxidant release was moderate and sustained over the entire test period of 96 hours. Conversely, the oxidants were depleted within 24 hours for the Fe2+-catalyzed system. Solution pH decreased slightly for the Fe2+-catalyzed system, whereas the pH increased for the base-catalyzed system. The rates of degradation for TCE and 1,4-dioxane are compared as a function of system conditions. The results of this study indicate that the binary H2O2-S2O82- oxidant system is effective for oxidation of the tested contaminants.

  8. Increased formation of halomethanes during chlorination of chloramphenicol in drinking water by UV irradiation, persulfate oxidation, and combined UV/persulfate pre-treatments.

    PubMed

    Wenhai, Chu; Tengfei, Chu; Erdeng, Du; Deng, Yang; Yingqing, Guo; Naiyun, Gao

    2016-02-01

    Ultraviolet/persulfate (UV/PS) has been widely used to generate sulfate radicals for degradation of water organic pollutants in previous studies. However, its impacts on disinfection byproduct formation during post-chlorination of degraded compounds is unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impacts of UV irradiation, PS oxidation, and the combined UV/PS advanced oxidation process (AOP) pre-treatments on halomethane formation during the following chlorination of chloramphenicol (CAP), a model antibiotic commonly found in wastewater-impacted water. Results showed that CAP could be transformed to more trichloromethane (TCM) than monochloromethane (MCM) and dichloromethane (DCM) in the presence of excess chlorine. UV photolysis, PS oxidation and UV/PS AOP all directly decomposed CAP to produce halomethanes (HMs) before post-chlorination. Moreover, UV and UV/PS pre-treatments both enhanced the formation of all the HMs in the subsequent chlorination. PS pre-oxidation decreased the TCM formation during post-chlorination, but increased the yields of MCM, DCM and total HMs. UV pre-irradiation significantly increased the bromide utilization of HMs, whereas UV/PS pre-oxidation decreased the bromine incorporation and utilization of HMs from the chlorination of CAP in a low-bromide water. UV irradiation, PS oxidation, and UV/PS AOP can inactivate pathogens and degrade organic pollutants, but this benefit should be weighed against a potential risk of the increased halomethane formation from degraded organic pollutants with and without post-chlorination. PMID:26513530

  9. Performance of combined sodium persulfate/H2O2 based advanced oxidation process in stabilized landfill leachate treatment.

    PubMed

    Hilles, Ahmed H; Abu Amr, Salem S; Hussein, Rim A; El-Sebaie, Olfat D; Arafa, Anwaar I

    2016-01-15

    A combination of persulfate and hydrogen peroxide (S2O8(2-)/H2O2) was used to oxidizelandfill leachate. The reaction was performed under varying S2O8(2-)/H2O2 ratio (g/g), S2O8(2-)/H2O2 dosages (g/g), pH, and reaction time (minutes), so as to determine the optimum operational conditions. Results indicated that under optimum operational conditions (i.e. 120 min of oxidation using a S2O8(2-)/H2O2 ratio of 1 g/1.47 g at a persulfate and hydrogen peroxide dosage of 5.88 g/50 ml and8.63 g/50 ml respectively, at pH 11) removal of 81% COD and 83% NH3-N was achieved. In addition, the biodegradability (BOD5/COD ratio) of the leachate was improved from 0.09 to 0.17. The results obtained from the combined use of (S2O8(2-)/H2O2) were compared with those obtained with sodium persulfate only, hydrogen peroxide only and sodium persulfate followed by hydrogen peroxide. The combined method (S2O8(2-)/H2O2) achieved higher removal efficiencies for COD and NH3-N compared with the other methods using a single oxidizing agent. Additionally, the study has proved that the combination of S2O8(2-)/H2O2 is more efficient than the sequential use of sodium persulfate followed by hydrogen peroxide in advanced oxidation processes aiming at treatingstabilizedlandfill leachate. PMID:26580899

  10. Thermo activated persulfate oxidation of antibiotic sulfamethoxazole and structurally related compounds.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yuefei; Fan, Yan; Liu, Kuo; Kong, Deyang; Lu, Junhe

    2015-12-15

    The widespread occurrence of sulfonamides (e.g., sulfamethoxazole) in natural environment has raised growing concerns due to their potential to induce antibiotic-resistant genes. In this study, the degradation of SMX and related sulfonamides by thermo activated persulfate (PS) oxidation was investigated. Experimental results demonstrated that SMX degradation followed pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics. The pseudo-first-order rate constant (kobs) was increased markedly with increasing temperature and pH. The presence of bicarbonate manifested promoting effect on SMX degradation while fulvic acid reduced it. Radical scavenging tests revealed that the predominant oxidizing species was SO4(•-) at neutral pH. Aniline moiety in SMX molecule was confirmed to be the primary reactive site for SO4(•-) attack by comparison with substructural analogues. Reaction products were enriched by solid phase extraction (SPE) and analyzed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). A total of 7 products derived from hydroxylation, sulfonamide S-N bond cleavage, aniline moiety oxidation and coupling reaction were identified, and transformation pathways of SMX oxidation were proposed. Degradation of sulfonamides was appreciably influenced by the heterocyclic ring present in the molecules. Results reveal that thermo activated PS oxidation could be an efficient approach for remediation of water contaminated by SMX and related sulfonamides. PMID:26378726

  11. Degradation efficiencies of azo dye Acid Orange 7 by the interaction of heat, UV and anions with common oxidants: persulfate, peroxymonosulfate and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shiying; Wang, Ping; Yang, Xin; Shan, Liang; Zhang, Wenyi; Shao, Xueting; Niu, Rui

    2010-07-15

    In this paper, the degradation of azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) by three common peroxides (persulfate (PS), peroxymonosulfate (PMS) or hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))) under various activation conditions, i.e., heat (25-80 degrees C), UV light (254 nm), or anions (SO(4)(2-), NO(3)(-), CO(3)(2-), HCO(3)(-), HPO(4)(2-), and Cl(-)), was investigated. The order of AO7 degradation efficiencies by heat activation is PS>PMS>H(2)O(2). PS oxidation activated by heat (>50 degrees C) is an effective degradation technology, while PMS and H(2)O(2) are hardly activated. When assisted by UV, peroxides could all be activated and degrade AO7 quickly. The order is PS>H(2)O(2)>PMS. We activated peroxides, for the first time, by using some anions and compared the subsequently degradation efficiencies of AO7. It was found that PMS could be activated by some anions, but PS and H(2)O(2) cannot. The activation efficiencies of PMS by SO(4)(2-) and NO(3)(-) are negligible, whereas remarkable by HCO(3)(-), HPO(4)(2-), Cl(-) and CO(3)(2-). For HCO(3)(-), HPO(4)(2-) and Cl(-), the activation efficiencies become higher with the increase of anion concentration. For CO(3)(2-), however, the activation efficiency is higher at lower concentration. PMID:20371151

  12. Synergetic pretreatment of waste activated sludge by Fe(II)-activated persulfate oxidation under mild temperature for enhanced dewaterability.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Guangyin; Lu, Xueqin; Wang, Baoying; Zhao, Youcai; Chai, Xiaoli; Niu, Dongjie; Zhao, Aihua; Li, Yuyou; Song, Yu; Cao, Xianyan

    2012-11-01

    The potential benefits of Fe(II)-activated persulfate (S(2)O(8)(2-)) oxidation under mild temperature in enhancing the dewaterability of waste activated sludge were investigated. Capillary suction time (CST) was used to characterize sludge dewatering. Zeta potential, particle size distribution, three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy, fourier-transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) were employed to explore influencing mechanisms. The results indicated that the dewaterability was deteriorated with single thermal treatment, but significantly enhanced in the presence of Fe(II)-S(2)O(8)(2-) oxidation and further advanced together with thermal treatment. EEM and FT-IR analysis indicated that combined thermal and Fe(II)-S(2)O(8)(2-) oxidation pretreatment led to degrading of tyrosine and tryptophan protein-like substances in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and cleavage of linkages in polymeric backbone. SEM images further revealed the rupture of sludge flocs at the colloidal scale, which contributed to the release of EPS-bound water and interstitial water trapped between flocs, and subsequent enhanced dewaterability. PMID:22989633

  13. The Feasibility Study of Persulfate Oxidation to Regenerating of Spent Granular Activated Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical oxidation is a developing technology used to regenerate contaminant-spent GAC. Chemical regeneration of GAC represents a viable option to thermal regeneration methods that are energy intensive resulting in significant consumption of fossil fuels and production of greenho...

  14. Thermally activated persulfate oxidation regeneration of NOM- and MTBE- spent granular activated carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical oxidation is a developing technology used to regenerate contaminant-spent GAC. Chemical regeneration of GAC represents a viable option to thermal regeneration methods that are energy intensive resulting in significant consumption of fossil fuels and production of greenho...

  15. Persistence of persulfate in uncontaminated aquifer materials.

    PubMed

    Sra, Kanwartej S; Thomson, Neil R; Barker, Jim F

    2010-04-15

    Batch and stop-flow column experiments were performed to estimate persulfate decomposition kinetic parameters in the presence of seven well-characterized aquifer materials. Push-pull tests were conducted in a sandy aquifer to represent persulfate decomposition under in situ conditions. The decomposition of persulfate followed a first-order rate law for all aquifer materials investigated. Reaction rate coefficients (k(obs)) increased by an order of magnitude when persulfate concentration was reduced from 20 g/L to 1 g/L, due to ionic strength effects. The column experiments yielded higher k(obs) than batch experiments due to the lower oxidant to solids mass ratio. The kinetic model developed from the batch test data was able to reproduce the observed persulfate temporal profiles from the push-pull tests. The estimated k(obs) indicate that unactivated persulfate is a persistent oxidant for the range of aquifer materials explored with half-lives ranging from 2 to 600 d. PMID:20205387

  16. Persulfate injection into a gasoline source zone.

    PubMed

    Sra, Kanwartej S; Thomson, Neil R; Barker, Jim F

    2013-07-01

    One pore volume of unactivated sodium persulfate was delivered into an emplaced gasoline residual source zone at CFB Borden. Concentrations of inorganic species (S2O8(2-), SO4(2-), Na(+), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC)) and selected gasoline compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, trimethylbenzenes and naphthalene) were monitored across a transect equipped with 90 multilevel sampling points for >10months post-injection. Mass loading (M?) of compounds constructed from the transect data was used for assessment purposes. Breakthrough of inorganic species was observed when the injection slug crossed the monitoring transect. An increase in [Formula: see text] indicated persulfate consumption during oxidation of gasoline compounds or degradation due to the interaction with aquifer materials. M?DIC increased by >100% suggesting some mineralization of gasoline compounds during treatment. Mass loading for all the monitored gasoline compounds reduced by 46 to 86% as the inorganic slug crossed the monitoring transect. The cumulative mass discharge across the monitoring transect was 19 to 58% lower than that expected without persulfate injection. After the inorganic injection slug was flushed from the source zone a partial rebound (40 to 80% of baseline levels) of mass discharge of the monitored gasoline compounds was observed. The ensemble of data collected provides insight into the fate and transport of the injected persulfate solution, and the accompanying treatment of a gasoline the source zone. PMID:23660235

  17. Persulfate injection into a gasoline source zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sra, Kanwartej S.; Thomson, Neil R.; Barker, Jim F.

    2013-07-01

    One pore volume of unactivated sodium persulfate was delivered into an emplaced gasoline residual source zone at CFB Borden. Concentrations of inorganic species (S2O82 -, SO42 -, Na+, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC)) and selected gasoline compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, trimethylbenzenes and naphthalene) were monitored across a transect equipped with 90 multilevel sampling points for > 10 months post-injection. Mass loading (M?) of compounds constructed from the transect data was used for assessment purposes. Breakthrough of inorganic species was observed when the injection slug crossed the monitoring transect. An increase in M indicated persulfate consumption during oxidation of gasoline compounds or degradation due to the interaction with aquifer materials. M increased by > 100% suggesting some mineralization of gasoline compounds during treatment. Mass loading for all the monitored gasoline compounds reduced by 46 to 86% as the inorganic slug crossed the monitoring transect. The cumulative mass discharge across the monitoring transect was 19 to 58% lower than that expected without persulfate injection. After the inorganic injection slug was flushed from the source zone a partial rebound (40 to 80% of baseline levels) of mass discharge of the monitored gasoline compounds was observed. The ensemble of data collected provides insight into the fate and transport of the injected persulfate solution, and the accompanying treatment of a gasoline the source zone.

  18. Mechanistic study of photo-oxidation of Bisphenol-A (BPA) with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and sodium persulfate (SPS).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Jyoti; Mishra, I M; Kumar, Vineet

    2016-01-15

    The removal of Bisphenol-A (BPA) from contaminated water using advanced oxidation methods such as UV-C assisted oxidation by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and sodium persulfate (SPS) has been reported by the authors earlier (Sharma et al., 2015a). In the present study, the authors report the removal of BPA from aqueous solution by the above two methods and its degradation mechanism. UV-C light (254 nm wavelength, 40 W power) was applied to BPA contaminated water at natural pH (pHN) under room temperature conditions. Experiments were carried out with the initial BPA concentration in the range of 0.04 mM-0.31 mM and the oxidant/BPA molar ratio in the range of 294:1-38:1 for UV-C/H2O2 and 31.5-4.06:1 for UV-C/SPS systems. The removal of BPA enhanced with decreasing BPA concentration. The total organic carbon also decreased with the UV-C irradiation time under optimum conditions ([H2O2]0 = 11.76 mM; [SPS]0 = 1.26 mM; temperature (29 ± 3 °C). Competition of BPA for reaction with HO or [Formula: see text] radicals at its higher concentrations results in a decrease in the removal of BPA. The intermediates with smaller and higher molecular weights than that of BPA were found in the treated water. Based on GC-MS and FTIR spectra of the reaction mixture, the formation of hydroxylated by-products testified the HO mediated oxidation pathway in the BPA degradation, while the formation of quinones and phenoxy phenols pointed to the [Formula: see text] dominating pathway through the formation of hydroxycyclohexadienyl (HCHD) and BPA phenoxyl radicals. The main route of BPA degradation is the hydroxylation followed by dehydration, coupling and ring opening reactions. PMID:26468603

  19. pH dependence of persulfate activation by EDTA/Fe(III) for degradation of trichloroethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chenju; Liang, Ching-Ping; Chen, Chi-Chin

    2009-05-01

    The ability of free ferrous ion activated persulfate (S 2O 82-) to generate sulfate radicals (SO 4- rad ) for the oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE) is limited by the scavenging of SO 4- rad with excess Fe 2+ and a quick conversion of Fe 2+ to Fe 3+. This study investigated the applicability of ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) chelated Fe 3+ in activating persulfate for the destruction of TCE in aqueous phase under pH 3, 7 and 10. Fe 3+ and EDTA alone did not appreciably degrade persulfate. The presence of TCE in the EDTA/Fe 3+ activated persulfate system can induce faster persulfate and EDTA degradation due to iron recycling to activate persulfate under a higher pH condition. Increasing the pH leads to increases in pseudo-first-order-rate constants for TCE, S 2O 82- and EDTA degradations, and Cl generation. Accordingly, the experiments at pH 10 with different EDTA/Fe 3+ molar ratios indicated that a 1/1 ratio resulted in a remarkably higher degradation rate at the early stage of reaction as compared to results by other ratios. Higher persulfate dosage under the EDTA/Fe 3+ molar ratio of 1/1 resulted in greater TCE degradation rates. However, increases in persulfate concentration may also lead to an increase in the rate of persulfate consumption.

  20. Ultrasound and heat enhanced persulfate oxidation activated with Fe(0) aggregate for the decolorization of C.I. Direct Red 23.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chih-Huang; Tsai, Kuen-Lung

    2016-03-01

    Effluents from the paper printing and textile industries are often heavily contaminated with azo dyes. Azo dyes are difficult to oxidize biologically. This work investigated the decolorization of an azo dye, C.I. Direct Red 23 (DR23), by persulfate (PS) activated with Fe(0) aggregates (PS/Fe(0)). Ultrasound (US) and heat were used as enhancement tools in the PS oxidation system. Neither US-activated PS nor thermally activated PS was effective in oxidizing DR23. However, the decolorization was significantly enhanced by PS/Fe(0) combined with US (PS/Fe(0)/US) or heat (PS/Fe(0)/55°C). Approximately 95% decolorization of 1×10(-4)M DR23 was achieved within 15min in the PS/Fe(0)/US system at an initial pH of 6.0, PS of 5×10(-3)M, Fe(0) of 0.5g/L and US irradiation of 106W/cm(2) (60kHz). Complete decolorization was achieved within 10min in the Fe(0)/PS/55°C system. The rate of decolorization doubled when US was introduced in the PS/Fe(0) system during the treatment of different initial dye concentrations. The dependence of dye and true color (ADMI) depletion on PS concentration has been discussed. DR23 was completely degraded based on the disappearance of aromatic groups of UV-vis spectra and the variation of TOC mineralization. The observed pseudo-first-order decolorization rate was substantially enhanced by increasing temperature. The Arrhenius activation energy for the PS activated with Fe(0) was estimated as 8.98kcal/mol, implying that higher temperature is beneficial for the DR23 decolorization. The addition of US into the PS/Fe(0) system did not incur a substantial increase in electricity, whereas the mineralization of DR23 occurred quickly. Thus, both PS/Fe(0)/US and heated PS/Fe(0) systems are practically feasible for the effective degradation of the direct azo dye in textile wastewater. PMID:26584979

  1. Fenton- and Persulfate-driven Regeneration of Contaminant-spent Granular Activated Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton- or persulfate-driven chemical oxidation regeneration of spent granular activated carbon (GAC) involves the combined, synergistic use of two treatment technologies: adsorption of organic chemicals onto GAC and chemical oxidation regeneration of the spent-GAC. Environmental...

  2. Electrokinetic delivery of persulfate to remediate PCBs polluted soils: Effect of different activation methods.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guangping; Cang, Long; Gomes, Helena I; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-02-01

    Persulfate-based in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) for the remediation of organic polluted soils has gained much interest in last decade. However, the transportation of persulfate in low-permeability soil is very low, which limits its efficiency in degrading soil pollutants. Additionally, the oxidation-reduction process of persulfate with organic contaminants takes place slowly, while, the reaction will be greatly accelerated by the production of more powerful radicals once it is activated. Electrokinetic remediation (EK) is a good way for transporting persulfate in low-permeability soil. In this study, different activation methods, using zero-valent iron, citric acid chelated Fe(2+), iron electrode, alkaline pH and peroxide, were evaluated to enhance the activity of persulfate delivered by EK. All the activators and the persulfate were added in the anolyte. The results indicated that zero-valent iron, alkaline, and peroxide enhanced the transportation of persulfate at the first stage of EK test, and the longest delivery distance reached sections S4 or S5 (near the cathode) on the 6th day. The addition of activators accelerated decomposition of persulfate, which resulted in the decreasing soil pH. The mass of persulfate delivered into the soil declined with the continuous decomposition of persulfate by activation. The removal efficiency of PCBs in soil followed the order of alkaline activation > peroxide activation > citric acid chelated Fe(2+) activation > zero-valent iron activation > without activation > iron electrode activation, and the values were 40.5%, 35.6%, 34.1%, 32.4%, 30.8% and 30.5%, respectively. The activation effect was highly dependent on the ratio of activator and persulfate. PMID:26347936

  3. Effect and mechanism of persulfate activated by different methods for PAHs removal in soil.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dan; Liao, Xiaoyong; Yan, Xiulan; Huling, Scott G; Chai, Tuanyao; Tao, Huan

    2013-06-15

    The influence of persulfate activation methods on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) degradation was investigated and included thermal, citrate chelated iron, and alkaline, and a hydrogen peroxide (H?O?)-persulfate binary mixture. Thermal activation (60 °C) resulted in the highest removal of PAHs (99.1%) and persulfate consumption during thermal activation varied (0.45-1.38 g/kg soil). Persulfate consumption (0.91-1.22 g/kg soil) and PAHs removal (73.3-82.9%) varied using citrate chelated iron. No significant differences in oxidant consumption and PAH removal was measured in the H?O?-persulfate binary mixture and alkaline activated treatment systems, relative to the unactivated control. Greater removal of high molecular weight PAHs was measured with persulfate activation. Electron spin resonance spectra indicated the presence of hydroxyl radicals in thermally activated systems; weak hydroxyl radical activity in the H?O?-persulfate system; and superoxide radicals were predominant in alkaline activated systems. Differences in oxidative ability of the activated persulfate were related to different radicals generated during activation. PMID:23618659

  4. In-situ activation of persulfate by iron filings and degradation of 1,4-dioxane.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hua; Brusseau, Mark L; Wang, Yake; Yan, Ni; Quig, Lauren; Johnson, Gwynn R

    2015-10-15

    Activation of persulfate by iron filings and subsequent degradation of 1,4-dioxane (dioxane) was studied in both batch-reactor and column systems to evaluate the potential of a persulfate-enhanced permeable reactive barrier (PRB) system for combined oxidative-reductive removal of organic contaminants from groundwater. In batch experiments, decomposition of persulfate to sulfate and degradation of dioxane both occurred rapidly in the presence of iron filings. Conversely, dioxane degradation by persulfate was considerably slower in the absence of iron filings. For the column experiments, decomposition and retardation of persulfate was observed for transport in the columns packed with iron filings, whereas no decomposition or retardation was observed for transport in columns packed with a reference quartz sand. Both sulfate production and dioxane degradation were observed for the iron-filings columns, but not for the sand column. The pH of the column effluent increased temporarily before persulfate breakthrough, and significant increases in both ferrous and ferric iron coincided with persulfate breakthrough. Multiple species of free radicals were produced from persulfate activation as determined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The impact of the oxidation process on solution composition and iron-filings surface chemistry was examined using ICP-MS, SEM-EDS, and XRD analyses. A two-stage reaction mechanism is proposed to describe the oxidation process, consisting of a first stage of rapid, solution-based, radical-driven decomposition of dioxane and a second stage governed by rate-limited surface reaction. The results of this study show successful persulfate activation using iron filings, and the potential to apply an enhanced PRB method for improving in-situ removal of organic contaminants from groundwater. PMID:26141426

  5. Electrolysis cell for the manufacture of persulfates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cueto, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A cell for the electrolytic generation of persulfates, characterized by the fact that a housing acts as cathode, is made of metal, and consists of a lower electrolytically active section and an upper electrolytically inactive section. It is designed so that there is produced the greatest possible current density suited to produce the desired electrolysis effect. This invention, compared to the devices used until now, exhibits considerable advantages whereby it is particularly suited for the production of potassium persulfate.

  6. Leaching of Calcareous Bornite Ore in Ammoniacal Solution Containing Ammonium Persulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi-xiong; Yin, Zhou-lan; Chen, Yi-guang; Xiong, Li-zhi

    2014-12-01

    The leaching process of copper from calcareous bornite ore using ammonium persulfate as an oxidant in ammoniacal solution was investigated. The effects of stirring speed, temperature, initial concentration of ammonia and ammonium persulfate, and liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio on the extraction percentage of copper from bornite ore were studied. The results show that the optimum leaching conditions for bornite ore with a maximum extraction of copper 88.9 pct are temperature 313.15 K (40 °C), reaction time 4 hours, stirring speed 600 r /min, L/S ratio 7/1 cm3/g, initial concentration of ammonia 2.0 mol/dm3, and ammonium persulfate 3.0 mol/dm3.

  7. Advanced oxidation of the commercial nonionic surfactant octylphenol polyethoxylate TritonTM X-45 by the persulfate/UV-C process: effect of operating parameters and kinetic evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan-Alaton, Idil; Olmez-Hanci, Tugba; Genc, Bora; Dursun, Duygu

    2013-03-01

    This study explored the potential use of a sulfate radical (SO4?-)-based photochemical oxidation process to treat the commercial nonionic surfactant octylphenol polyethoxylate (OPPE) TritonTMX-45. For this purpose, the effect of initial S2O82- (0-5.0 mM) and OPPE (10-100 mg/L) concentrations on OPPE and its organic carbon content (TOC) removal were investigated at an initial reaction pH of 6.5. Results indicated that very fast OPPE degradation (100%) accompanied with high TOC abatement rates (90%) could be achieved for 10 and 20 mg/L aqueous OPPE at elevated S2O82- concentrations (>2.5 mM). S2O82-/UV-C treatment was still capable of complete OPPE removal up to an initial concentration of 40 mg/L in the presence of 2.5 mM S2O82-. On the other hand, TOC removal efficiencies dropped down to only 40% under the same reaction conditions. S2O82-/UV-C oxidation of OPPE was also compared with the relatively well-known and established H2O2/UV-C oxidation process. Treatment results showed that the performance of S2O82-/UV-C was comparable to that of H2O2/UV-C oxidation for the degradation and mineralization of OPPE. In order to elucidate the relative reactivity and selectivity of SO4?- and HO?, bimolecular reaction rate coefficients of OPPE with SO4?- and HO? were determined by employing competition kinetics with aqueous phenol (47 ?M) selected as the reference compound. The first-order abatement rate coefficient obtained for OPPE during S2O82-/UV-C oxidation (0.044 min-1) was found to be significantly lower than that calculated for phenol (0.397 min-1). In the case of H2O2/UV-C oxidation however, similar first-order abatement rate coefficients were obtained for both OPPE (0.087 min-1) and phenol (0.140 min-1). Second-order reaction rate coefficients for OPPE with SO4?- and HO? were determined as 9.8?108 M-1s-1 and 4.1?109 M-1s-1, respectively. The kinetic study also revealed that the selectivity of SO4?- was found to be significantly higher than that of HO?.

  8. Removal of carbamazepine from aqueous solution using sono-activated persulfate process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songlin; Zhou, Ning

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated systematically the removal of carbamazepine (CBZ) in solution using the combination of ultrasound and persulfate anions to identify the factors affecting the kinetics of the process. The effects of reaction time, initial persulfate anion concentration, initial CBZ concentration, ultrasonic power input, solution pH and temperature on CBZ removal efficiency were examined. The sulfate radical oxidation of CBZ in the presence of ultrasonic irradiation showed a significant synergistic effect on CBZ removal. It is found that up to 89.4% CBZ removal efficiency was achieved after 120min reaction. The removal process of CBZ in solution could be described using pseudo-first-order kinetics. In this system, sulfate radicals (SO4(-)) were considered to be the mainly oxidant to remove CBZ while ultrasound power input could affect CBZ removal efficiency significantly. Changing solution pH influenced the CBZ removal efficiency and the best performance would be achieved at pH 5.0. PMID:26584993

  9. Persulfate hair bleach reactions. Cutaneous and respiratory manifestations.

    PubMed

    Fisher, A A; Dooms-Goossens, A

    1976-10-01

    Ammonium persulfate is widely used to "boost" peroxide hair bleaches. These persulfates can produce a variety of cutaneous and respiratory responses, including allergic eczematous contact dermatitis, irritant dermatitis, localized edema, generalized urticaria, rhinitis, asthma, and syncope. Some of these reactions appear to be truly allergic while others appear to be due to the release of histamine on a nonallergic basis. Patch tests may be performed with 2% to 5% aqueous solution of ammonium persulfate. Scratch tests may result in asthma and syncope. In some patients, merely rubbing a saturated solution of ammonium persulfate into the skin will evoke a large urticarial wheal. Hairdressers should be made aware that these ammonium persulfate hair bleach preparations may provoke severe reactions and should seek medical attention if the client complains of severe itching, tingling, a burning sensation, hives, dizziness, or weakness. PMID:962335

  10. Transformation of [M+2H]2+ Peptide Cations to [M - H]+, [M+H+O]+, and M+• Cations via Ion/Ion Reactions: Reagent Anions Derived from Persulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilo, Alice L.; Bu, Jiexun; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-07-01

    The gas-phase oxidation of doubly protonated peptides is demonstrated here using ion/ion reactions with a suite of reagents derived from persulfate. Intact persulfate anion (HS2O8 -), peroxymonosulfate anion (HSO5 -), and sulfate radical anion (SO4 -•) are all either observed directly upon negative nanoelectrospray ionization (nESI) or easily obtained via beam-type collisional activation of persulfate into the mass spectrometer. Ion/ion reactions between each of these reagents and doubly protonated peptides result in the formation of a long-lived complex. Collisional activation of the complex containing a peroxymonosulfate anion results in oxygen transfer from the reagent to the peptide to generate the [M+H+O]+ species. Activation of the complex containing intact persulfate anion either results in oxygen transfer to generate the [M+H+O]+ species or abstraction of two hydrogen atoms and a proton to generate the [M - H]+ species. Activation of the complex containing sulfate radical anion results in abstraction of one hydrogen atom and a proton to form the peptide radical cation, [M]+•. This suite of reagents allows for the facile transformation of the multiply protonated peptides obtained via nESI into a variety of oxidized species capable of providing complementary information about the sequence and structure of the peptide.

  11. Peroxone activated persulfate treatment of 1,4-dioxane in the presence of chlorinated solvent co-contaminants.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Dylan; Ball, Raymond; Boving, Thomas B

    2016-02-01

    1,4-dioxane is often found as a co-contaminant with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at solvent release sites such as landfills, solvent recycling facilities, or fire training areas. Historically, soil and groundwater samples were not routinely analyzed for 1,4-dioxane and therefore the number of known 1,4-dioxane sites is still increasing. Due to its co-occurrence with chlorinated compounds, remediation strategies are needed that simultaneously treat both 1,4-dioxane as well as chlorinated VOC co-contaminants. In this proof of concept laboratory study, the fate of 1,4-dioxane was examined during the targeted destruction of aqueous phase VOC, using a peroxone activated persulfate (PAP) chemical oxidation method. Bench-scale experiments were carried out to evaluate the treatability of 1,4-dioxane as both a single-contaminant and in the presence of trichloroethene (TCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA). Possible dependencies on oxidant concentration and reaction kinetics were studied. The oxidative destruction of 1,4-dioxane, TCE and 1,1,1-TCA in single-contaminant batch systems followed pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics and even at the most dilute oxidant concentration lasted for at least 13 days. The rate of oxidation for each contaminant increased linearly with increasing persulfate concentration over the range of oxidant concentrations tested. The rate of oxidative destruction, from most easily degraded to least, was: TCE > 1,4-dioxane > 1,1,1-TCA. Oxidation rates were up to 87% slower in a mixture of these three compounds. Although additional tests are necessary, our data suggest that PAP oxidation of 1,4-dioxane might aid in the cleanup of VOC contaminated sites. PMID:26408980

  12. Determination of an Effective Perfluorinated Compounds (PFCs) Oxidation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siriwardena, D. P.; Crimi, M.; Holsen, T.; Bellona, C.

    2014-12-01

    Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are a stable synthetic class of chemicals ubiquitously spread in environmental media (i.e. air, soil, biota, surface water and groundwater). The substances' strong polar carbon-fluorine bonds and their high thermal and chemical stability make them resistant to biological, chemical, and physical degradation. The purpose of this research is to identify the most effective oxidation method to treat perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) and their by-products that is suitable for in situ application. The laboratory oxidation study focuses on the more commonly detected and studied long-chain (C-8) PFAS; perfluorooctanoic acids (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS). Existing research evaluating oxidizing treatment effectiveness on perfluoroalkyl sulfoinoic acids (PFSAs) is limited. A review of the literature and results from preliminary studies indicate that activated persulfate and catalyzed hydrogen peroxide propagation (CHP) reactions appear to be promising oxidants for PFOA. It has been demonstrated that the reactivity of superoxide in water increases in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and solids. Superoxide generated in CHP reactions degrades PFOA seemingly similar to superoxide-mediated destruction of the perhalogenated compounds.The goal of this study is to look at conditions that promote generation of superoxide and look at PFASs treatment effectiveness and byproduct generation. CHP reactions are conducted with varying amount of H2O2 and Fe(III) to determine the optimum conditions for PFC degradation. Results will be compared to those of another experiment using manganese dioxide as a CHP catalyst with varied H2O2 concentration to generate superoxide to degrade PFASs. Activated persulfate conditions to be compared include alkaline pH activation, heat activation, and dual oxidation (combined H2O2 and persulfate ). This presentation will focus on a comparison of oxidation effectiveness under the varied reaction conditions as well as on the oxidation intermediates and byproducts generated toward improved understanding of the potential for and limitations of in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) for treatment of PFCs.

  13. Degradation and dechlorination of pentachlorophenol by microwave-activated persulfate.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chengdu; Liu, Xitao; Zhao, Wei; Lin, Chunye; Ma, Jun; Shi, Wenxiao; Sun, Qu; Xiao, Hao

    2015-03-01

    The degradation performance of pentachlorophenol (PCP) by the microwave-activated persulfate (MW/PS) process was investigated in this study. The results indicated that degradation efficiency of PCP in the MW/PS process followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, and compared with conventional heating, microwave heating has a special effect of increasing the reaction rate and reducing the process time. A higher persulfate concentration and reaction temperature accelerated the PCP degradation rate. Meanwhile, increasing the pH value and ionic strength of the phosphate buffer slowed down the degradation rate. The addition of ethanol and tert-butyl alcohol as hydroxyl radical and sulfate radical scavengers proved that the sulfate radicals were the dominant active species in the MW/PS process. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was employed to identify the intermediate products, and then a plausible degradation pathway involving dechlorination, hydrolysis, and mineralization was proposed. The acute toxicity of PCP, as tested with Photobacterium phosphoreum, Vibrio fischeri, and Vibrio qinghaiensis, was negated quickly during the MW/PS process, which was in agreement with the nearly complete mineralization of PCP. These results showed that the MW/PS process could achieve a high mineralization level in a short time, which provided an efficient way for PCP elimination from wastewater. PMID:25328098

  14. Effect of persulfate and persulfate/H?O? on biodegradability of an anaerobic stabilized landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Hilles, Ahmed H; Abu Amr, Salem S; Hussein, Rim A; Arafa, Anwar I; El-Sebaie, Olfat D

    2015-10-01

    The current study investigated the effects of S2O8(2-) and S2O8(2-)/H2O2 oxidation processes on the biodegradable characteristics of an anaerobic stabilized leachate. Total COD removal efficiency was found to be 46% after S2O8(2-) oxidation (using 4.2 g S2O8(2-)/1g COD0, at pH 7, for 60 min reaction time and at 350 rpm shaking speed), and improved to 81% following S2O8(2-)/H2O2 oxidation process (using 5.88 g S2O8(2-) dosage, 8.63 g H2O2 dosage, at pH 11 and for 120 min reaction time at 350 rpm). Biodegradability in terms of BOD5/COD ratio of the leachate enhanced from 0.09 to 0.1 and to 0.17 following S2O8(2-) and S2O8(2-)/H2O2 oxidation processes, respectively. The fractions of COD were determined before and after each oxidation processes (S2O8(2-) and S2O8(2-)/H2O2). The fraction of biodegradable COD(bi) increased from 36% in raw leachate to 57% and 68% after applying S2O8(2-) and S2O8(2-)/H2O2 oxidation, respectively. As for soluble COD(s), its removal efficiency was 39% and 78% following S2O8(2-) and S2O8(2-)/H2O2 oxidation, respectively. The maximum removal for particulate COD was 94% and was obtained after 120 min of S2O8(2-)/H2O2 oxidation. As a conclusion, S2O8(2-)/H2O2 oxidation could be an efficient method for improving the biodegradability of anaerobic stabilized leachate. PMID:26248486

  15. Activated Persulfate Treatment of 1,4-Dioxane in the Presence of Chlorinated Solvent Co-contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boving, T. T.; Eberle, D. E. H.; Ball, R.

    2014-12-01

    1,4-dioxane is an emerging groundwater contaminant and a likely human carcinogen. Due to its history as a stabilizer in chlorinated solvents, 1,4-dioxane is often found as a co-contaminant at solvent releases sites such as landfills, solvent recycling facilities, vapor decreasing operations, and fire-training areas. Historically, 1,4-dioxane was not routinely analyzed for at solvent release sites. The lack of analyses and the limitations of the analyses that were performed (i.e. high reporting limits) means that the scale of 1,4-dioxane subsurface contamination is still emerging. With the number of known 1,4-dioxane sites increasing, the need for cost effective 1,4-dioxane remediation technologies is rising as well. Remediation strategies that are capable of treating both 1,4-dioxane as well as chlorinated co-contaminants are of particular importance, especially when treating mixed-waste source zones. In the present study, we examined the fate of 1,4-dioxane during the targeted remediation of aqueous phase volatile organic compounds (VOC) using an activated persulfate based ISCO method (OxyZone®). Bench scale laboratory experiments are used to evaluate the treatability of 1,4-dioxane both as a single compound and in the presence of trichloroethene (TCE) and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA). Possible dependencies on oxidant concentration and reaction kinetics were studied. Preliminary results are promising and show that OxyZone® is persistent and long lived, with oxidation of 1,4-dioxane continuing more than 12 days after initial dosage, even at dilute oxidant concentrations. The oxidative destruction of 1,4-dioxane, TCE and 1,1,1-TCA in single compound batch systems followed pseudo first order reaction kinetics. The rate of oxidation for each contaminant increased linearly with increasing persulfate concentration over the range of oxidant concentrations tested. The rate of oxidative destruction, from most easily degraded to least was: TCE > 1,4-Dioxane > 1,1,1-TCA. Experiments examining the destruction of 1,4-dioxane in the presence of TCE and 1,1,1-TCA are ongoing. The final results of this study will be presented.

  16. 78 FR 13891 - Persulfates From China; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-01

    ... amended at 74 FR 2847 (January 16, 2009). \\1\\ No response to this request for information is required if a... (``Commerce'') issued an antidumping duty order on imports of persulfates from China (62 FR 36259). Following... continuation of the antidumping duty order on imports of persulfates from China (67 FR 78415). Following...

  17. Is it possible to remediate a BTEX contaminated chalky aquifer by in situ chemical oxidation?

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Julien; Croze, Véronique; Maier, Joachim; Simonnot, Marie-Odile

    2011-08-01

    An industrial coating site in activity located on a chalky plateau, contaminated by BTEX (mainly xylenes, no benzene), is currently remediated by in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). We present the bench scale study that was conducted to select the most appropriate oxidant. Ozone and catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (Fenton's reaction) were discarded since they were incompatible with plant activity. Permanganate, activated percarbonate and activated persulfate were tested. Batch experiments were run with groundwater and groundwater-chalk slurries with these three oxidants. Total BTEX degradation in groundwater was reached with all the oxidants. The molar ratios [oxidant]:[Fe(2+)]:[BTEX] were 100:0:1 with permanganate, 100:100:1 with persulfate and 25:100:1 with percarbonate. Precipitation of either manganese dioxide or iron carbonate (siderite) occurred. The best results with chalk slurries were obtained with permanganate at the molar ratio 110:0:1 and activated persulfate at the molar ratio 110:110:1. To avoid precipitation, persulfate was also used without activation at the molar ratio 140:1. Natural Oxidant Demand measured with both oxidants was lower than 5% of initial oxidant contents. Activated percarbonate was not appropriate because of radical scavenging by carbonated media. Permanganate and persulfate were both effective at oxidant concentrations of ca 1 g kg(-1) with permanganate and 1.8 g kg(-1) with persulfate and adapted to site conditions. Activation of persulfate was not mandatory. This bench scale study proved that ISCO remediation of a chalky aquifer contaminated by mainly xylenes was possible with permanganate and activated or unactivated persulfate. PMID:21733544

  18. Oxidation of Aromatic Aldehydes Using Oxone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandhari, Rajani; Maddukuri, Padma P.; Thottumkara, Vinod K.

    2007-01-01

    The experiment demonstrating the feasibility of using water as a solvent for organic reactions which highlights the cost and environmental benefits of its use is presented. The experiment encourages students to think in terms of the reaction mechanism of the oxidation of aldehydes knowing that potassium persulfate is the active oxidant in Oxone…

  19. Development of crosslinked methylcellulose hydrogels for soft tissue augmentation using an ammonium persulfate-ascorbic acid redox system.

    PubMed

    Gold, Gittel T; Varma, Devika M; Taub, Peter J; Nicoll, Steven B

    2015-12-10

    Hydrogels composed of methylcellulose are candidate materials for soft tissue reconstruction. Although photocrosslinked methylcellulose hydrogels have shown promise for such applications, gels crosslinked using reduction-oxidation (redox) initiators may be more clinically viable. In this study, methylcellulose modified with functional methacrylate groups was polymerized using an ammonium persulfate (APS)-ascorbic acid (AA) redox initiation system to produce injectable hydrogels with tunable properties. By varying macromer concentration from 2% to 4% (w/v), the equilibrium moduli of the hydrogels ranged from 1.47±0.33 to 5.31±0.71kPa, on par with human adipose tissue. Gelation time was found to conform to the ISO standard for injectable materials. Cellulase treatment resulted in complete degradation of the hydrogels within 24h, providing a reversible corrective feature. Co-culture with human dermal fibroblasts confirmed the cytocompatibility of the gels based on DNA measurements and Live/Dead imaging. Taken together, this evidence indicates that APS-AA redox-polymerized methylcellulose hydrogels possess properties beneficial for use as soft tissue fillers. PMID:26428151

  20. Heat-activated cooling devices: A guidebook for general audiences

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltsee, G.

    1994-02-01

    Heat-activated cooling is refrigeration or air conditioning driven by heat instead of electricity. A mill or processing facility can us its waste fuel to air condition its offices or plant; using waste fuel in this way can save money. The four basic types of heat-activated cooling systems available today are absorption cycle, desiccant system, steam jet ejector, and steam turbine drive. Each is discussed, along with cool storage and biomass boilers. Steps in determining the feasibility of heat-activated cooling are discussed, as are biomass conversion, system cost and integration, permits, and contractor selection. Case studies are given.

  1. Persistence of Asthmatic Response after Ammonium Persulfate-Induced Occupational Asthma in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ollé-Monge, Marta; Muñoz, Xavier; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen A. J.; Gómez-Ollés, Susana; Morell, Ferran; Cruz, María-Jesus

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Since persulfate salts are an important cause of occupational asthma (OA), we aimed to study the persistence of respiratory symptoms after a single exposure to ammonium persulfate (AP) in AP-sensitized mice. Material and Methods BALB/c mice received dermal applications of AP or dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) on days 1 and 8. On day 15, they received a single nasal instillation of AP or saline. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) was assessed using methacholine provocation, while pulmonary inflammation was evaluated in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and total serum immunoglobulin E (IgE), IgG1 and IgG2a were measured in blood at 1, 4, 8, 24 hours and 4, 8, 15 days after the single exposure to the causal agent. Histological studies of lungs were assessed. Results AP-treated mice showed a sustained increase in AHR, lasting up to 4 days after the challenge. There was a significant increase in the percentage of neutrophils 8 hours after the challenge, which persisted for 24 hours in AP-treated mice. The extent of airway inflammation was also seen in the histological analysis of the lungs from challenged mice. Slight increases in total serum IgE 4 days after the challenge were found, while IgG gradually increased further 4 to 15 days after the AP challenge in AP-sensitized mice. Conclusions In AP-sensitized mice, an Ig-independent response is induced after AP challenge. AHR appears immediately, but airway neutrophil inflammation appears later. This response decreases in time; at early stages only respiratory and inflammatory responses decrease, but later on immunological response decreases as well. PMID:25303285

  2. Combining in situ chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to reduce contaminant mass and leachability in soil.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Daniel P; Srivastava, Vipul J; Dombrowski, Frank J; Lingle, James W

    2015-10-30

    Laboratory batch reactors were maintained for 32 weeks to test the potential for an in situ remedy that combines chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to treat soil from a manufactured gas plant, contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Portland cement and slaked lime were used to activate the persulfate and to stabilize/encapsulate the contaminants that were not chemically oxidized. Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded residual contaminants using the sulfate left after persulfate activation. The ability of the combined remedy to reduce contaminant mass and leachability was compared with NaOH-activated persulfate, stabilization, and sulfate-reducing bioremediation as stand-alone technologies. The stabilization amendments increased pH and temperature sufficiently to activate the persulfate within 1 week. Activation with both stabilization amendments and NaOH removed between 55% and 70% of PAH and BTEX. However, combined persulfate and stabilization significantly reduced the leachability of residual BTEX and PAH compared with NaOH activation. Sulfide, 2-naphthoic acid, and the abundance of subunit A of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA) were used to monitor native sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were negatively impacted by activated persulfate, but recovered completely within weeks. PMID:26093352

  3. Friedel-Crafts Amidoalkylation via Thermolysis and Oxidative Photocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chunhui; Meschini, Francesco; Narayanam, Jagan M. R.; Stephenson, Corey R. J.

    2012-01-01

    Friedel-Crafts amidoalkylation was achieved by oxidation of dialkylamides using persulfate (S2O82?) in the presence of the visible light catalyst, Ru(bpy)3Cl2, at room temperature, via a reactive N-acyliminium intermediate. Alternatively, mild heating of the dialkylamides and persulfate afforded a metal and Lewis acid-free Friedel-Crafts amidoalkylation. Alcohols and electron–rich arenes served as effective nucleophiles, forming new C–O or C–C bonds. In general, photocatalysis provided higher yields and better selectivities. PMID:22458307

  4. PERFORMANCE OF A STIRLING ENGINE POWERED HEAT ACTIVATED HEAT PUMP

    E-print Network

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    PERFORMANCE OF A STIRLING ENGINE POWERED HEAT ACTIVATED HEAT PUMP W. D. C. Richards and W. L. Auxer) which employs a natural gas fired Stirling engine to drive a Rankine cycle vapor compressor is presently by the heat pump effect. The Stirling engine/Rankine cycle refrigeration loop heat pump being developed would

  5. Kinetics and mechanism investigation on the destruction of oxytetracycline by UV-254nm activation of persulfate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiqing; He, Xuexiang; Fu, Yongsheng; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2016-03-15

    Oxytetracycline (OTC), an important broad-spectrum antibiotic, has been detected extensively in various environmental systems, which may have a detrimental impact on ecosystem and human health through the development of drug resistant bacteria and pathogens. In this study, the degradation of OTC was evaluated by UV-254nm activated persulfate (PS). The observed UV fluence based pseudo first-order rate constant (kobs) was found to be the highest at near neutral pH conditions (pH 5.5-8.5). Presence of various natural water constituents had different effects on OTC degradation, with a significant enhancement in the presence of bicarbonate or Cu(2+). Limited elimination of total organic carbon (TOC) and PS was observed during the mineralization of OTC. Transformation byproducts in the presence and absence of hydroxyl radical scavenging agent tert-butanol (t-BuOH) were identified using ultra-high definition accurate-mass quadrupole time-of-flight liquid chromatography/mass spectrometer (LC-QTOF/MS). Potential OTC degradation mechanism was subsequently proposed revealing four different reaction pathways by SO4(-) reaction including hydroxylation (+16Da), demethylation (-14Da), decarbonylation (-28Da) and dehydration (-18Da). This study suggests that UV-254nm/PS is a promising treatment technology for the control of water pollution caused by emerging contaminants such as OTC. PMID:26686482

  6. Investigation of the toxicity of common oxidants used in advanced oxidation processes and their quenching agents.

    PubMed

    Olmez-Hanci, Tugba; Arslan-Alaton, Idil; Dursun, Duygu

    2014-08-15

    The inhibitory effect of commonly known oxidants and their quenching agents was investigated by employing a battery of toxicity tests. Hydrogen peroxide toxicity could be effectively eliminated by the enzyme catalase, whereas sodium thiosulfate and ascorbic acid were recommended as suitable quenching agents for the removal of the oxidants persulfate and peroxymonosulfate in the Vibrio fischeri bioassays. None of the studied quenching agents was found to be suitable for persulfate and peroxymonosulfate in the Daphnia magna bioassays since high inhibitory effects were obtained for both oxidants. In the case of Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, manganese dioxide powder should be used as an alternative quenching agent to catalase, since this enzyme exhibited a highly toxic effect towards these microalgae. Sodium sulfite, which is extensively used as a quenching agent, was not appropriate for quenching peroxymonosulfate in all studied bioassays. PMID:24996151

  7. Degradation of flumequine in aqueous solution by persulfate activated with common methods and polyhydroquinone-coated magnetite/multi-walled carbon nanotubes catalysts.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mingbao; Qu, Ruijuan; Zhang, Xiaoling; Sun, Ping; Sui, Yunxia; Wang, Liansheng; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-11-15

    In recent years, flumequine (FLU) has been ubiquitously detected in surface waters and municipal wastewaters. In light of its potential negative impacts to aquatic species, growing concern has been arisen for the removal of this antibiotic from natural waters. In this study, the kinetics, degradation mechanisms and pathways of aqueous FLU by persulfate (PS) oxidation were systematically determined. Three common activation methods, including heat, Fe(2+) and Cu(2+), and a novel heterogeneous catalyst, namely, polyhydroquinone-coated magnetite/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Fe3O4/MWCNTs/PHQ), were investigated to activate PS for FLU removal. It was found that these three common activators enhanced FLU degradation obviously, while several influencing factors, such as solution pH, inorganic ions (especially HCO3(-) at 5 mmol/L) and dissolved organic matter extracts, exerted their different effects on FLU removal. The catalysts were characterized, and an efficient catalytic degradation performance, high stability and excellent reusability were observed. The measured total organic carbon levels suggested that FLU can be effectively mineralized by using the catalysts. Radical mechanism was studied by combination of the quenching tests and electron paramagnetic resonance analysis. It was assumed that sulfate radicals predominated in the activation of PS with Fe3O4/MWCNTs/PHQ for FLU removal, while hydroxyl radicals also contributed to the catalytic oxidation process. In addition, a total of fifteen reaction intermediates of FLU were identified, from which two possible pathways were proposed involving hydroxylation, decarbonylation and ring opening. Overall, this study represented a systematical evaluation regarding the transformation process of FLU by PS, and showed that the heterogeneous catalysts can efficiently activate PS for FLU removal from the water environment. PMID:26281959

  8. Photocatalytic Synthesis of Dihydrobenzofurans by Oxidative [3+2] Cycloaddition of Phenols**

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Travis R.; Zhu, Ye; Nordeen, Sarah A.; Yoon, Tehshik P.

    2014-01-01

    We report a protocol for oxidative [3+2] cycloadditions of phenols and alkenes applicable to the modular synthesis of a large family of dihydrobenzofuran natural products. Visible light-activated transition metal photocatalysis enables the use of ammonium persulfate as an easily handled, benign terminal oxidant. The broad range of organic substrates that are readily oxidized by photoredox catalysis suggests that this strategy may be applicable to a variety of useful oxidative transformations. PMID:25155300

  9. In-Situ Chemical Reduction and Oxidation of VOCs in Groundwater: Groundwater Treatability Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Amy; Glasgow, Jason; McCaleh, Rececca C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's treatability studies for volatile organic compounds in groundwater. In-Situ groundwater treatment technologies include: 1) Chemical Reduction(Ferox); 2) Chemical Oxidation (Fenton Reagents, Permanganate, and Persulfate); and 3) Thermal (Dynamic Underground Stripping, Six-Phase Heating). This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  10. Groundwater Sampling at ISCO Sites: Binary Mixtures of Volatile Organic Compounds and Persulfate

    EPA Science Inventory

    In-situ chemical oxidation involves the introduction of a chemical oxidant into the subsurface for the purpose of transforming ground-water contaminants into less harmful byproducts. Due to oxidant persistence, ground water samples collected at hazardous waste sites may contain o...

  11. Potential for in situ chemical oxidation of acid extractable organics in oil sands process affected groundwater.

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, V; Ross, M S; Martin, J W; Barker, J F

    2013-11-01

    The process of bitumen extraction from oil sands in Alberta, Canada leads to an accumulation of toxic acid-extractable organics (AEOs) in oil sands process water (OSPW). Infiltration of OSPW from tailings ponds and from their retaining sand dykes and subsequent transport towards surface water has occurred. Given the apparent lack of significant natural attenuation of AEOs in groundwater, remediation may be required. This laboratory study evaluates the potential use of unactivated persulfate and permanganate as in situ oxidation agents for remediation of AEOs in groundwater. Naphthenic acids (NAs; CnH2n+zO2), which are a component of the acutely toxic AEOs, were degraded by both oxidants in OSPW samples. Permanganate oxidation yielded some residual dissolved organic carbon (DOC) whereas persulfate mineralized the AEO compounds with less residual DOC. Acid-extractable organics from oxidized OSPW had essentially no Microtox toxicity. PMID:24054134

  12. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory : evaluation of alkaline persulfate digestion as an alternative to Kjeldahl digestion for determination of total and dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, Charles J.; Kryskalla, Jennifer R.

    2003-01-01

    Alkaline persulfate digestion was evaluated and validated as a more sensitive, accurate, and less toxic alternative to Kjeldahl digestion for routine determination of nitrogen and phosphorus in surface- and ground-water samples in a large-scale and geographically diverse study conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) between October 1, 2001, and September 30, 2002. Data for this study were obtained from about 2,100 surface- and ground-water samples that were analyzed for Kjeldahl nitrogen and Kjeldahl phosphorus in the course of routine operations at the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL). These samples were analyzed independently for total nitrogen and total phosphorus using an alkaline persulfate digestion method developed by the NWQL Methods Research and Development Program. About half of these samples were collected during nominally high-flow (April-June) conditions and the other half were collected during nominally low-flow (August-September) conditions. The number of filtered and whole-water samples analyzed from each flow regime was about equal.By operational definition, Kjeldahl nitrogen (ammonium + organic nitrogen) and alkaline persulfate digestion total nitrogen (ammonium + nitrite + nitrate + organic nitrogen) are not equivalent. It was necessary, therefore, to reconcile this operational difference by subtracting nitrate + nitrite concentra-tions from alkaline persulfate dissolved and total nitrogen concentrations prior to graphical and statistical comparisons with dissolved and total Kjeldahl nitrogen concentrations. On the basis of two-population paired t-test statistics, the means of all nitrate-corrected alkaline persulfate nitrogen and Kjeldahl nitrogen concentrations (2,066 paired results) were significantly different from zero at the p = 0.05 level. Statistically, the means of Kjeldahl nitrogen concentrations were greater than those of nitrate-corrected alkaline persulfate nitrogen concentrations. Experimental evidence strongly suggests, however, that this apparent low bias resulted from nitrate interference in the Kjeldahl digestion method rather than low nitrogen recovery by the alkaline persulfate digestion method. Typically, differences between means of Kjeldahl nitrogen and nitrate-corrected alkaline persulfate nitrogen in low-nitrate concentration (< 0.1 milligram nitrate nitrogen per liter) subsets of filtered surface- and ground-water samples were statistically equivalent to zero at the p =level.Paired analytical results for dissolved and total phosphorus in Kjeldahl and alkaline persulfate digests were directly comparable because both digestion methods convert all forms of phosphorus in water samples to orthophosphate. On the basis of two-population paired t-test statistics, the means of all Kjeldahl phosphorus and alkaline persulfate phosphorus concentrations (2,093 paired results) were not significantly different from zero at the p = 0.05 level. For some subsets of these data, which were grouped according to water type and flow conditions at the time of sample collection, differences between means of Kjeldahl phosphorus and alkaline persulfate phosphorus concentrations were not equivalent to zero at the p = 0.05 level. Differences between means of these subsets, however, were less than the method detection limit for phosphorus (0.007 milligram phosphorus per liter) by the alkaline persulfate digestion method, and were therefore analytically insignificant.This report provides details of the alkaline persulfate digestion procedure, interference studies, recovery of various nitrogen- and phosphorus-containing compounds, and other analytical figures of merit. The automated air-segmented continuous flow methods developed to determine nitrate and orthophosphate in the alkaline persulfate digests also are described. About 125 microliters of digested sample are required to determine nitrogen and phosphorus in parallel at a rate of about 100 samples per hour with less than 1-percent sample in

  13. Pentachlorophenol removal from aqueous solutions by microwave/persulfate and microwave/H2O2: a comparative kinetic study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is one of the most fungicides and pesticides used in wood protection. Poisoning from PCP may be happened in dermal absorption, and respiration or ingestion. With regard to health and environmental effects of PCP, many methods were studied for its removal. Microwave assisted other methods are environmental friendly, safety, and economical method, therefore, in this study; a modified domestic microwave assisted hydrogen peroxide (MW/H2O2) and sodium persulfate (MW/SPS) was used for PCP removal from aqueous solutions. PCP removal rate was measured under different factors such as pH, energy intensity, SPS, H2O2 concentration, Tert- butyl alcohol (TBA) and chemical oxygen demand (COD). The concentration changes of PCP were determined using spectrophotometer and HPLC spectra, respectively. The best removal PCP rate obtained in condition of pH of 11, 0.02 mol L?1 of SPS, 0.2 mol L?1 of H2O2 and energy intensity of 600 W. Moreover, COD removals in MW/H2O2 and MW/SPS process were 83% and 94%, respectively, also TBA test decreased 15% and 3% of PCP removal in MW/SPS and MW/H2O2 processes respectively. Experimental results indicated that sulfate radical was stronger than hydroxyl radical and examinations order reaction was in first order. In this study, was cleared that MW/SPS process was more effective than MW/H2O2 process in PCP removal. PMID:25018879

  14. Oxidative Alkaline leaching of Americium from simulated high-level nuclear waste sludges

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Wendy A.; Garnov, Alexander Yu.; Rao, Linfeng; Nash, Kenneth L.; Bond, Andrew H.

    2004-01-23

    Oxidative alkaline leaching has been proposed to pre-treat the high-level nuclear waste sludges to remove some of the problematic (e.g., Cr) and/or non-radioactive (e.g., Na, Al) constituents before vitrification. It is critical to understand the behavior of actinides, americium and plutonium in particular, in oxidative alkaline leaching. We have studied the leaching behavior of americium from four different sludge simulants (BiPO{sub 4}, BiPO{sub 4 modified}, Redox, PUREX) using potassium permanganate and potassium persulfate in alkaline solutions. Up to 60% of americium sorbed onto the simulants is leached from the sludges by alkaline persulfate and permanganate. The percentage of americium leached increases with [NaOH] (between 1.0 and 5.0 M). The initial rate of americium leaching by potassium persulfate increases in the order BiPO{sub 4} sludge < Redox sludge < PUREX sludge. The data are most consistent with oxidation of Am{sup 3+} in the sludge to either AmO{sub 2}{sup +} or AmO{sub 2}{sup 2+} in solution. Though neither of these species is expected to exhibit long-term stability in solution, the potential for mobilization of americium from sludge samples would have to be accommodated in the design of any oxidative leaching process for real sludge samples.

  15. Demonstration of the Enhanced Disinfection of E. coli Water Contamination by Associated Solar Irradiation with Potassium Persulfate

    PubMed Central

    GHANIZADEH, Ghader; NASERI ARA, Ali; ESMAILI, Davoud; MASOUMBEIGI, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tremendous amount of researches have investigated the issue of water photodisnfection. The aim of this research is to illustrate the influences of bacterial density, turbidity, exposure time and potassium persulfate (KPS) dosage on the efficacy of associated solar disinfection (SODIS) with KPS for E. coli (ATCC: 25922) eradication as an efficient and inexpensive process. Methods: Desired bacterial density and turbidity was achieved by spiking of 0.5 Mc Farland (1.5×108 cell/ml) and sterile soil slurry in 1 liter of the commercially bottled water. Results: The highest value of UVA solar irradiation measured at 13.30 p.m was 5510 ?W/Cm2. Increase of bacterial density from 1000 to 1500 cell/ml led to an increase in disinfection lapse time, except in 2 mMol/l KPS. Spiking of 0.1 mMol/l of KPS was not effective; however, increase of KPS dosage from 0.1 mMol/l to 0.7, 1.5 and 2 mMol/l led to the enhancement of disinfection time from 4 h to 3 h and 1 h, respectively. For bacterial density of 1000 cell/ml, increasing KPS dosage up to 0.7 mMol/l had no improved effect; however, beyond this dosage the disinfection time decreased to 1 h. Without KPS and up to 150 NTU within 4 h exposure time, E. coli disinfection was completed. In 2 mMol/l KPS and 1000 and 1500 cell/ml, the 2 h contact time was sufficient up to 150 and 100 NTU, respectively; moreover, complete disinfection was not achieved at higher turbidity. Conclusion: Association of KPS with SODIS can lead to decreasing of water disinfection time. PMID:26576351

  16. A pain-inducing centipede toxin targets the heat activation machinery of nociceptor TRPV1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shilong; Yang, Fan; Wei, Ningning; Hong, Jing; Li, Bowen; Luo, Lei; Rong, Mingqiang; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Zheng, Jie; Wang, Kewei; Lai, Ren

    2015-09-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 ion channel is a polymodal nociceptor that responds to heat with exquisite sensitivity through an unknown mechanism. Here we report the identification of a novel toxin, RhTx, from the venom of the Chinese red-headed centipede that potently activates TRPV1 to produce excruciating pain. RhTx is a 27-amino-acid small peptide that forms a compact polarized molecule with very rapid binding kinetics and high affinity for TRPV1. We show that RhTx targets the channel's heat activation machinery to cause powerful heat activation at body temperature. The RhTx-TRPV1 interaction is mediated by the toxin's highly charged C terminus, which associates tightly to the charge-rich outer pore region of the channel where it can directly interact with the pore helix and turret. These findings demonstrate that RhTx binding to the outer pore can induce TRPV1 heat activation, therefore providing crucial new structural information on the heat activation machinery.

  17. A pain-inducing centipede toxin targets the heat activation machinery of nociceptor TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shilong; Yang, Fan; Wei, Ningning; Hong, Jing; Li, Bowen; Luo, Lei; Rong, Mingqiang; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Zheng, Jie; Wang, KeWei; Lai, Ren

    2015-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 ion channel is a polymodal nociceptor that responds to heat with exquisite sensitivity through an unknown mechanism. Here we report the identification of a novel toxin, RhTx, from the venom of the Chinese red-headed centipede that potently activates TRPV1 to produce excruciating pain. RhTx is a 27-amino-acid small peptide that forms a compact polarized molecule with very rapid binding kinetics and high affinity for TRPV1. We show that RhTx targets the channel's heat activation machinery to cause powerful heat activation at body temperature. The RhTx-TRPV1 interaction is mediated by the toxin's highly charged C terminus, which associates tightly to the charge-rich outer pore region of the channel where it can directly interact with the pore helix and turret. These findings demonstrate that RhTx binding to the outer pore can induce TRPV1 heat activation, therefore providing crucial new structural information on the heat activation machinery. PMID:26420335

  18. A pain-inducing centipede toxin targets the heat activation machinery of nociceptor TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shilong; Yang, Fan; Wei, Ningning; Hong, Jing; Li, Bowen; Luo, Lei; Rong, Mingqiang; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Zheng, Jie; Wang, KeWei; Lai, Ren

    2015-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 ion channel is a polymodal nociceptor that responds to heat with exquisite sensitivity through an unknown mechanism. Here we report the identification of a novel toxin, RhTx, from the venom of the Chinese red-headed centipede that potently activates TRPV1 to produce excruciating pain. RhTx is a 27-amino-acid small peptide that forms a compact polarized molecule with very rapid binding kinetics and high affinity for TRPV1. We show that RhTx targets the channel's heat activation machinery to cause powerful heat activation at body temperature. The RhTx–TRPV1 interaction is mediated by the toxin's highly charged C terminus, which associates tightly to the charge-rich outer pore region of the channel where it can directly interact with the pore helix and turret. These findings demonstrate that RhTx binding to the outer pore can induce TRPV1 heat activation, therefore providing crucial new structural information on the heat activation machinery. PMID:26420335

  19. SYSTEM PERFORMANCE OF A STIRLING ENGINE POWERED HEAT ACTIVATED HEAT PUMP

    E-print Network

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    AUG 1979 SYSTEM PERFORMANCE OF A STIRLING ENGINE POWERED HEAT ACTIVATED HEAT PUMP W. D. Richards W of the subsystem compo- nents, especially between the free piston Stirling engine and the free piston linear),* and a decision was made to proceed with the Prototype Development. Superiority of a Stirling engine over other

  20. [Persulfate asthma in hairdressers].

    PubMed

    Pankow, W; Hein, H; Bittner, K; Wichert, P

    1989-03-01

    At the a two-year apprenticeship, a young female hairdresser developed rhinoconjunctivitis and bronchial asthma, induced by a hair bleach containing the substance persulphate. On each occasion, her symptoms occurred in the form of an immediate reaction. The causative role of the bleach was demonstrated with the aid of an inhalation challenge test. In addition, the prick test produced a positive reaction vis-a-vis persulphate. The long latency period and the positive prick test might militate in favour of an allergic pathomechanism. PMID:2710769

  1. Exploration of the Role of Heat Activation in Enhancing Serpentine Carbon Sequestration Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    McKelvy, M.J.; Chizmeshya, A.V.G.; Diefenbacher, J.; Bearat, H.; Wolf, G.

    2005-03-29

    As compared with other candidate carbon sequestration technologies, mineral carbonation offers the unique advantage of permanent disposal via geologically stable and environmentally benign carbonates. The primary challenge is the development of an economically viable process. Enhancing feedstock carbonation reactivity is key. Heat activation dramatically enhances aqueous serpentine carbonation reactivity. Although the present process is too expensive to implement, the materials characteristics and mechanisms that enhance carbonation are of keen interest for further reducing cost. Simultaneous thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA) of the serpentine mineral lizardite was used to isolate a series of heat-activated materials as a function of residual hydroxide content at progressively higher temperatures. Their structure and composition are evaluated via TGA/DTA, X-ray powder diffraction (including phase analysis), and infrared analysis. The meta-serpentine materials that were observed to form ranged from those with longer range ordering, consistent with diffuse stage-2 like interlamellar order, to an amorphous component that preferentially forms at higher temperatures. The aqueous carbonation reaction process was investigated for representative materials via in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Magnesite was observed to form directly at 15 MPa CO{sub 2} and at temperatures ranging from 100 to 125 C. Carbonation reactivity is generally correlated with the extent of meta-serpentine formation and structural disorder.

  2. Direct trifluoromethylthiolation of unactivated C(sp(3))-H using silver(I) trifluoromethanethiolate and potassium persulfate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Xiao, Zhiwei; Wu, Junhui; Guo, Yong; Xiao, Ji-Chang; Liu, Chao; Chen, Qing-Yun

    2015-03-23

    A practical and efficient method for the direct trifluoromethylthiolation of unactivated C(sp(3) )?H bonds by AgSCF3 /K2 S2 O8 under mild conditions is described. The reaction has a good functional-group tolerance and good selectivity. Initial mechanistic investigations indicate that the reaction may involve a radical process in which K2 S2 O8 plays key roles in both the activation of the C(sp(3) )?H bond and the oxidation of AgSCF3 . PMID:25707945

  3. Hg(0) oxidative absorption by K(2)S(2)O(8) solution catalyzed by Ag(+) and Cu(2+).

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinhua; Ye, Qunfeng; Tang, Tingmei; Wang, Dahui

    2008-10-30

    The aqueous phase oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg(0)) by potassium persulfate (K(2)S(2)O(8), KPS) catalyzed by Ag(+) and Cu(2+) was investigated using a glass bubble column reactor. Concentrations of gaseous Hg(0) and aqueous Hg(2+) were measured by cold vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). The effects of several experimental parameters on the oxidation were studied; these include different types of catalysts, pHs and concentrations of potassium persulfate, temperatures, Hg(0) inlet concentrations and tertiary butanol (TBA). The results showed that the removal efficiency of Hg(0) increased with increasing concentration of potassium persulfate and catalysts Ag(+), Cu(2+) and Ag(+) provided better catalytic effect than Cu(2+). For example, in the presence of 5.0 mmol l(-1) KPS, the mercury removal efficiency could reach 75.4 and 97.0% for an Ag(+) concentration of 0.1 and 0.3 mmol l(-1), respectively, and 69.8 and 81.9% for 0.1 and 0.3 mmol l(-1) Cu(2+). On the other hand, high temperature and the introduction of TBA negatively affect the oxidation. Furthermore, the removal efficiency of Hg(0) was much greater in neutral solution than in either acidic or alkaline solution. But the influence of pH was almost eliminated upon the addition of Ag(+) and Cu(2+), and high Hg(0) inlet concentration also has positive impact on the removal efficiency of Hg(0). The possible catalytic oxidation mechanism of gaseous mercury by KPS was also proposed. PMID:18353543

  4. The Effects of Heat Activation on Bacillus Spore Germination, with Nutrients or under High Pressure, with or without Various Germination Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Stephanie; Cruz-Mora, Jose; Setlow, Barbara; Feeherry, Florence E.; Doona, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient germination of spores of Bacillus species occurs through germinant receptors (GRs) in spores' inner membrane (IM) in a process stimulated by sublethal heat activation. Bacillus subtilis spores maximum germination rates via different GRs required different 75°C heat activation times: 15 min for l-valine germination via the GerA GR and 4 h for germination with the l-asparagine–glucose–fructose–K+ mixture via the GerB and GerK GRs, with GerK requiring the most heat activation. In some cases, optimal heat activation decreased nutrient concentrations for half-maximal germination rates. Germination of spores via various GRs by high pressure (HP) of 150 MPa exhibited heat activation requirements similar to those of nutrient germination, and the loss of the GerD protein, required for optimal GR function, did not eliminate heat activation requirements for maximal germination rates. These results are consistent with heat activation acting primarily on GRs. However, (i) heat activation had no effects on GR or GerD protein conformation, as probed by biotinylation by an external reagent; (ii) spores prepared at low and high temperatures that affect spores' IM properties exhibited large differences in heat activation requirements for nutrient germination; and (iii) spore germination by 550 MPa of HP was also affected by heat activation, but the effects were relatively GR independent. The last results are consistent with heat activation affecting spores' IM and only indirectly affecting GRs. The 150- and 550-MPa HP germinations of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores, a potential surrogate for Clostridium botulinum spores in HP treatments of foods, were also stimulated by heat activation. PMID:25681191

  5. The effects of heat activation on Bacillus spore germination, with nutrients or under high pressure, with or without various germination proteins.

    PubMed

    Luu, Stephanie; Cruz-Mora, Jose; Setlow, Barbara; Feeherry, Florence E; Doona, Christopher J; Setlow, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Nutrient germination of spores of Bacillus species occurs through germinant receptors (GRs) in spores' inner membrane (IM) in a process stimulated by sublethal heat activation. Bacillus subtilis spores maximum germination rates via different GRs required different 75 °C heat activation times: 15 min for l-valine germination via the GerA GR and 4 h for germination with the L-asparagine-glucose-fructose-K(+) mixture via the GerB and GerK GRs, with GerK requiring the most heat activation. In some cases, optimal heat activation decreased nutrient concentrations for half-maximal germination rates. Germination of spores via various GRs by high pressure (HP) of 150 MPa exhibited heat activation requirements similar to those of nutrient germination, and the loss of the GerD protein, required for optimal GR function, did not eliminate heat activation requirements for maximal germination rates. These results are consistent with heat activation acting primarily on GRs. However, (i) heat activation had no effects on GR or GerD protein conformation, as probed by biotinylation by an external reagent; (ii) spores prepared at low and high temperatures that affect spores' IM properties exhibited large differences in heat activation requirements for nutrient germination; and (iii) spore germination by 550 MPa of HP was also affected by heat activation, but the effects were relatively GR independent. The last results are consistent with heat activation affecting spores' IM and only indirectly affecting GRs. The 150- and 550-MPa HP germinations of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores, a potential surrogate for Clostridium botulinum spores in HP treatments of foods, were also stimulated by heat activation. PMID:25681191

  6. Innovative Protocols for in SITU MTBE Degradation by Using Molecular Probes-An Enhanced Chemical-Bio Oxidation Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Fallgren

    2009-02-20

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a common technology to cleanup petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and groundwater. Sodium percarbonate (SPC) is an oxidant which is activated by iron (Fe) to produce Fenton-like reactions. Western Research Institute, in conjunction with Regenesis and the U.S. Department of Energy, conducted a study that investigated the performance of a 'safe' oxidant, SPC, to cleanup groundwater and soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons and associated contaminants (e.g., MTBE). Results from a field pilot test in Frenchglen, Oregon showed VOC concentrations in groundwater decreased substantially within 2 weeks after injecting activated SPC (RegenOx). A protocol was established for determining RegenOx TOD in soils and groundwater. Total oxidant demand tests were necessary to determine the correct dosage of RegenOx to apply in the field and sufficiently degrade the contaminants of concern. Bench studies with RegenOx showed this technology was effective in degrading diesel fuel and 1,4-dioxane. The Fe-silica activator (RegenOx Part B) was tested with another oxidant, sodium persulfate. Bench tests results showed the combination of sodium persulfate and RegenOx Part B was effective in reducing PCE, MTBE, benzene, and n-heptane concentrations in water. Overall, the results of this project indicated that most petroleum contaminants in soil and groundwater can be sufficiently degraded using the RegenOx technology.

  7. Heterogeneous Degradation of Organic Pollutants by Persulfate Activated by CuO-Fe3O4: Mechanism, Stability, and Effects of pH and Bicarbonate Ions.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yang; Chen, Chuh-Shun; Tu, Yao-Jen; Huang, Yao-Hui; Zhang, Hui

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic CuO-Fe3O4 composite was fabricated by a simple hydrothermal method and characterized as a heterogeneous catalyst for phenol degradation. The effects of pH and bicarbonate ions on catalytic activity were extensively evaluated in view of the practical applications. The results indicated that an increase of solution pH and the presence of bicarbonate ions were beneficial for the removal of phenol in the CuO-Fe3O4 coupled with persulfate (PS) process. Almost 100% mineralization of 0.1 mM phenol can be achieved in 120 min by using 0.3 g/L CuO-Fe3O4 and 5.0 mM PS at pH 11.0 or in the presence of 3.0 mM bicarbonate. The positive effect of bicarbonate ion is probably due to the suppression of copper leaching as well as the formation of Cu(III). The reuse of catalyst at pH0 11.0 and 5.6 showed that the catalyst remains a high level of stability at alkaline condition (e.g., pH0 11.0). On the basis of the characterization of catalyst, the results of metal leaching and EPR studies, it is suggested that phenol is mainly destroyed by the surface-adsorbed radicals and Cu(III) resulting from the reaction between PS and Cu(II) on the catalyst. Taking into account the widespread presence of bicarbonate ions in waste streams, the CuO-Fe3O4/PS system may provide some new insights for contaminant removal from wastewater. PMID:25955238

  8. Selective disruption of high sensitivity heat activation but not capsaicin activation of TRPV1 channels by pore turret mutations.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuanyuan; Yang, Fan; Cao, Xu; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Wang, KeWei; Zheng, Jie

    2012-04-01

    The capsaicin receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV)1 is a highly heat-sensitive ion channel. Although chemical activation and heat activation of TRPV1 elicit similar pungent, painful sensation, the molecular mechanism underlying synergistic activation remains mysterious. In particular, where the temperature sensor is located and whether heat and capsaicin share a common activation pathway are debated. To address these fundamental issues, we searched for channel mutations that selectively affected one form of activation. We found that deletion of the first 10 amino acids of the pore turret significantly reduced the heat response amplitude and shifted the heat activation threshold, whereas capsaicin activation remained unchanged. Removing larger portions of the turret disrupted channel function. Introducing an artificial sequence to replace the deleted region restored sensitive capsaicin activation in these nonfunctional channels. The heat activation, however, remained significantly impaired, with the current exhibiting diminishing heat sensitivity to a level indistinguishable from that of a voltage-gated potassium channel, Kv7.4. Our results demonstrate that heat and capsaicin activation of TRPV1 are structurally and mechanistically distinct processes, and the pore turret is an indispensible channel structure involved in the heat activation process but is not part of the capsaicin activation pathway. Synergistic effect of heat and capsaicin on TRPV1 activation may originate from convergence of the two pathways on a common activation gate. PMID:22412190

  9. Process for the oxidation of materials in water at supercritical temperatures utilizing reaction rate enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    Swallow, K.C.; Killilea, W.R.; Hong, G.T.; Bourhis, A.L.

    1993-08-03

    A method is described for substantially completely oxidizing combustible materials in which an aqueous stream bearing the combustible materials is reacted in the presence of an oxidant comprising diatomic oxygen and at a temperature greater than the critical temperature of water and at a pressure greater than about 25 bar, within a reactor for a period of less than about 5 minutes to produce a reaction product stream, wherein the reaction is initiated in the presence of a rate enhancer comprising at least one oxidizing agent in addition to said oxidant selected from the group consisting of ozone, hydrogen peroxide, salts containing persulfate, salts containing permanganate, nitric acid, salts containing nitrate, oxyacids of chlorine and their corresponding salts, hypochlorous acid, salts containing hypochlorite, chlorous acid, salts containing chlorite, chloric acid, salts containing chlorate, perchloric acid, and salts containing perchlorate.

  10. Effects of chemical oxidants on perfluoroalkyl acid transport in one-dimensional porous media columns.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Erica R; Siegrist, Robert L; McCray, John E; Higgins, Christopher P

    2015-02-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a remediation approach that is often used to remediate soil and groundwater contaminated with fuels and chlorinated solvents. At many aqueous film-forming foam-impacted sites, perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) can also be present at concentrations warranting concern. Laboratory experiments were completed using flow-through one-dimensional columns to improve our understanding of how ISCO (i.e., activated persulfate, permanganate, or catalyzed hydrogen peroxide) could affect the fate and transport of PFAAs in saturated porous media. While the resultant data suggest that standard ISCO is not a viable remediation strategy for PFAA decomposition, substantial changes in PFAA transport were observed upon and following the application of ISCO. In general, activated persulfate decreased PFAA transport, while permanganate and catalyzed hydrogen peroxide increased PFAA transport. PFAA sorption increased in the presence of increased aqueous polyvalent cation concentrations or decreased pH. The changes in contaminant mobility were greater than what would be predicted on the basis of aqueous chemistry considerations alone, suggesting that the application of ISCO results in changes to the porous media matrix (e.g., soil organic matter quality) that also influence transport. The application of ISCO is likely to result in changes in PFAA transport, where the direction (increased or decreased transport) and magnitude are dependent on PFAA characteristics, oxidant characteristics, and site-specific factors. PMID:25621878

  11. Catalytic-Oxidative Leaching of Low-Grade Complex Zinc Ore by Cu (II) Ions Produced from Copper Ore in Ammonia-Ammonium Sulfate Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi Xiong; Yin, Zhou Lan; Hu, Hui Ping; Chen, Qi Yuan

    2012-10-01

    The catalytic-oxidative leaching of a mixed ore, which consists of low-grade oxide copper ore and oxide zinc ore containing ZnS, was investigated in ammonia-ammonium sulfate solution. The effect of the main parameters, such as mass ratio of copper ore to zinc ore, liquid-to-solid ratio, concentration of lixivant, leaching time, and temperature, was studied. The optimal leaching conditions with a maximum extraction of Cu 92.6 pct and Zn 85.5 pct were determined as follows: the mass ratio of copper ore to zinc ore 4/10 g/g, temperature 323.15 K (50 °C), leaching time 6 hours, stirring speed 500 r/min, liquid-to-solid ratio 3.6/1 cm3/g, concentration of lixivant including ammonia 2.0 mol/dm3, ammonium sulfate 1.0 mol/dm3, and ammonium persulfate 0.3 mol/dm3. It was found that ZnS in the oxide zinc ore could be extracted with Cu(II) ion, which was produced from copper ore and was used as the catalyst in the presence of ammonium persulfate.

  12. Treatment of aqueous wastes contaminated with Congo Red dye by electrochemical oxidation and ozonation processes.

    PubMed

    Faouzi Elahmadi, Mohammed; Bensalah, Nasr; Gadri, Abdellatif

    2009-09-15

    Synthetic aqueous wastes polluted with Congo Red (CR) have been treated by two advanced oxidation processes: electrochemical oxidation on boron doped diamond anodes (BDD-EO) and ozonation under alkaline conditions. For same concentrations, galvanostatic electrolyses have led to total COD and TOC removals but ozonation process can reach only 85% and 81% of COD and TOC removals, respectively. UV-vis qualitative analyses have shown different behaviors of CR molecules towards ozonation and electrochemical oxidation. Rapid discoloration has been observed during ozonation, whereas color persistence till the end of galvanostatic electrolyses has been seen during BDD-EO process. It seems that the oxidation mechanisms involved in the two processes are different: simultaneous destruction of azoic groups is suggested during ozonation process but consecutive destruction of these groups is proposed during BDD-EO. However, energetic study has evidenced that BDD-EO appears more efficient and more economic than ozonation in terms of TOC removals. These results have been explained by the fact that during BDD-EO, other strong oxidants electrogenerated from the electrolyte oxidation such as persulfates and direct-oxidation of CR and its byproducts on BDD anodes complement the hydroxyl radicals mediated oxidation to accomplish the total mineralization of organics. PMID:19394762

  13. Miniaturized dielectric barrier discharge carbon atomic emission spectrometry with online microwave-assisted oxidation for determination of total organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Han, Bingjun; Jiang, Xiaoming; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin

    2014-07-01

    A simple, rapid, and portable system consisted of a laboratory-built miniaturized dielectric barrier discharge atomic emission spectrometer and a microwave-assisted persulfate oxidation reactor was developed for sensitive flow injection analysis or continuous monitoring of total organic carbon (TOC) in environmental water samples. The standard/sample solution together with persulfate was pumped to the reactor to convert organic compounds to CO2, which was separated from liquid phase and transported to the spectrometer for detection of the elemental specific carbon atomic emission at 193.0 nm. The experimental parameters were systematically investigated. A limit of detection of 0.01 mg L(-1) (as C) was obtained based on a 10 mL sample injection volume, and the precision was better than 6.5% (relative standard deviation, RSD) at 0.1 mg L(-1). The system was successfully applied for TOC analysis of real environmental water samples. The obtained TOC value of 30 test samples agreed well with those by the standard high-temperature combustion coupled nondispersive infrared absorption method. Most importantly, the system showed good capability of in situ continuous monitoring of total organic carbon in environmental water. PMID:24862626

  14. Destruction of cyanobacterial toxin cylindrospermopsin by hydroxyl radicals and sulfate radicals using UV-254 nm activation of hydrogen peroxide, persulfate and peroxymonosulfate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: With increasing worldwide incidence of toxic cyanobacterial blooms in bodies of water, cylindrospermopsin (CYN) has become a significant concern to public health and water management officials. In this study, the removal of CYN by UV-254 nm-mediated advanced oxidation ...

  15. In-situ Spectroscopy of Water Oxidation at Ir Oxide Nanocluster Drivenby Visible TiOCr Charge-Transfer Chromophore in Mesoporous Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, Heinz; Han, Hongxian; Frei, Heinz

    2008-06-03

    An all-inorganic photocatalytic unit consisting of a binuclear TiOCr charge-transfer chromophore coupled to an Ir oxide nanocluster has been assembled on the pore surface of mesoporous silica AlMCM-41. In situ FT-Raman and EPR spectroscopy of an aqueous suspension of the resulting IrxOy-TiCr-AlMCM-41 powder reveal the formation of superoxide species when exciting the Ti(IV)OCr(III) --> Ti(III)OCr(IV) metal-to-metal charge-transfer chromophore with visible light. Use of H218O confirms that the superoxide species originates from oxidation of water. Photolysis in the absence of persulfate acceptor leads to accumulation of Ti(III) instead. The results are explained by photocatalytic oxidation of water at Ir oxide nanoclusters followed by trapping of the evolving O2 by transient Ti(III) centers to yield superoxide. Given the flexibility to select donor metals with appropriate redox potential, photocatalytic units consisting of a binuclear charge-transfer chromophore coupled to a water oxidation catalyst shown here constitute a step towards thermodynamically efficient visible light water oxidation units.

  16. Solid-liquid separation of oxidized americium from fission product lanthanides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehee, T. C.; Martin, L. R.; Nash, K. L.

    2010-03-01

    The separation of americium from the lanthanides and curium is a requirement if transmutation of americium is to be performed in advanced nuclear fuel cycles. Oxidation of Am3+ to AmO2+ or AmO22+ may allow separation of Am from Ln and Cm in one step, since the lanthanides and curium do not have higher oxidation states as accessible. Two possible solid-liquid separation methods have been developed to address this difficult separation. Under acidic conditions using oxone or persulfate, the oxidation and retention of tracer Am in the aqueous phase has been observed with a separation factor of 11 ± 1. Most of these studies have been conducted using 237NpO2(NO3), 233UO2(NO3)2, 238Pu(NO3)4 and 241Am(NO3)3 at radiotracer concentrations. Lanthanides precipitate as the sodium or potassium europium double sulfate salt. Under basic conditions, ozone oxidation of Am(CO3)OH(s) solubilizes Am from a lanthanide carbonate hydroxide solid phase to the aqueous phase as the AmO2(CO3)34-or AmO2(CO3)35- species. For the ozone oxidation of the americium tracer a separation factor of 1.6 ± 0.8 and 47 ± 2 for the oxidation/separation in Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 respectively.

  17. Self-flocculated powdered activated carbon with different oxidation methods and their influence on adsorption behavior.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zailin; Li, Shujin; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2016-03-01

    The commercial powdered activated carbon (PAC) has been selectively oxidized by two methods. The two oxidized methods are wet oxidation with ammonium persulfate and thermal treatment after acidification with hydrochloride acid, respectively. The two oxidized PAC were then functionalized with thermoresponsive poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) in aqueous solution at ambient temperature. Comparing the two oxidized PAC products and their grafted derivatives, the oxidized PAC modified with thermal treatment after acidification shows larger surface area of 1184m(2)/g and better adsorption of bisphenol A. Its derivative also exhibits relatively large surface area and adsorption capacity after grafted with PNIPAM. The maximum surface adsorption capacity simulated under Langmuir Models reached 156mg/g. In addition, the grafted PAC products show self-flocculation behaviors with rapid response to temperature because of the thermal phase transition and entanglement behaviors of PNIPAM. The present study provides a new way to obtain carboxyl-rich activated carbon with large surface area and better adsorption capacity. The retrievable grafted PAC with good self-flocculation effect responsive to temperature will have high potential application in water remediation which requires pre-heating and emergency water treatment in the wild. PMID:26551226

  18. A combined coarse-grained and all-atom simulation of TRPV1 channel gating and heat activation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) channels act as key sensors of various chemical and physical stimuli in eukaryotic cells. Despite years of study, the molecular mechanisms of TRP channel activation remain unclear. To elucidate the structural, dynamic, and energetic basis of gating in TRPV1 (a founding member of the TRPV subfamily), we performed coarse-grained modeling and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based on the recently solved high resolution structures of the open and closed form of TRPV1. Our coarse-grained normal mode analysis captures two key modes of collective motions involved in the TRPV1 gating transition, featuring a quaternary twist motion of the transmembrane domains (TMDs) relative to the intracellular domains (ICDs). Our transition pathway modeling predicts a sequence of structural movements that propagate from the ICDs to the TMDs via key interface domains (including the membrane proximal domain and the C-terminal domain), leading to sequential opening of the selectivity filter followed by the lower gate in the channel pore (confirmed by modeling conformational changes induced by the activation of ICDs). The above findings of coarse-grained modeling are robust to perturbation by lipids. Finally, our MD simulation of the ICD identifies key residues that contribute differently to the nonpolar energy of the open and closed state, and these residues are predicted to control the temperature sensitivity of TRPV1 gating. These computational predictions offer new insights to the mechanism for heat activation of TRPV1 gating, and will guide our future electrophysiology and mutagenesis studies. PMID:25918362

  19. A combined coarse-grained and all-atom simulation of TRPV1 channel gating and heat activation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjun; Qin, Feng

    2015-05-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) channels act as key sensors of various chemical and physical stimuli in eukaryotic cells. Despite years of study, the molecular mechanisms of TRP channel activation remain unclear. To elucidate the structural, dynamic, and energetic basis of gating in TRPV1 (a founding member of the TRPV subfamily), we performed coarse-grained modeling and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based on the recently solved high resolution structures of the open and closed form of TRPV1. Our coarse-grained normal mode analysis captures two key modes of collective motions involved in the TRPV1 gating transition, featuring a quaternary twist motion of the transmembrane domains (TMDs) relative to the intracellular domains (ICDs). Our transition pathway modeling predicts a sequence of structural movements that propagate from the ICDs to the TMDs via key interface domains (including the membrane proximal domain and the C-terminal domain), leading to sequential opening of the selectivity filter followed by the lower gate in the channel pore (confirmed by modeling conformational changes induced by the activation of ICDs). The above findings of coarse-grained modeling are robust to perturbation by lipids. Finally, our MD simulation of the ICD identifies key residues that contribute differently to the nonpolar energy of the open and closed state, and these residues are predicted to control the temperature sensitivity of TRPV1 gating. These computational predictions offer new insights to the mechanism for heat activation of TRPV1 gating, and will guide our future electrophysiology and mutagenesis studies. PMID:25918362

  20. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory : determination of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon by wet-chemical oxidation and infrared spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkhardt, Mark R.; Kammer, James A.; Jha, Virendra K.; O'Mara-Lopez, Peggy G.; Woodworth, Mark T.

    1997-01-01

    Precision and accuracy results are described for the determination of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon (SOC) by silver-filter filtration, wet-chemical oxidation, and infrared determination of hte resulting carbon dioxide (CO2) used at the U.S. Geological Survey's nationalWater Quality Laboratory. An aliquot of raw water isfiltered through a 0.45-micrometer silver filter. The trapped organic material is oxidized using phosphoric acid and potassium persulfate in a scaled glass ampule,and the rseulting CO2 is measured by an infrared CO2 detector. The amount of CO3 is proportional to the concentration of chemically oxidizable nonpurgeable organic carbon in the sample. The SOC method detection limit for routine analysis is 0.2 milligram per liter. The average percent recovery is 97.1 percent and the average standard deviation is 11 percent.

  1. Component analysis of dyads designed for light-driven water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Lars; Kaveevivitchai, Nattawut; Zong, Ruifa; Thummel, Randolph P

    2014-01-21

    A series of seven dyad molecules have been prepared utilizing a [Ru(tpy)(NN)I](+) type oxidation catalyst (NN = 2,5-di(pyrid-2'-yl) pyrazine (1), 2,5-di-(1',8'-dinaphthyrid-2'-yl) pyrazine (2), or 4,6-di-(1',8'-dinaphthyrid-2'-yl) pyrimidine (3). The other bidentate site of the bridging ligand was coordinated with 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), or a substituted derivative. These dinuclear complexes were characterized by their (1)H NMR spectra paying special attention to protons held in the vicinity of the electronegative iodide. In one case, 10a, the complex was also analyzed by single crystal X-ray analysis. The electronic absorption spectra of all the complexes were measured and reported as well as emission properties for the sensitizers. Oxidation and reduction potentials were measured and excited state redox properties were calculated from this data. Turnover numbers, initial rates, and induction periods for oxygen production in the presence of a blue LED light and sodium persulfate as a sacrificial oxidant were measured. Similar experiments were run without irradiation. Dyad performance correlated well with the difference between the excited state reduction potential of the photosensitizer and the ground state oxidation potential of the water oxidation dyad. The most active system was one having 5,6-dibromophen as the auxiliary ligand, and the least active system was the one having 4,4'-dimethylbpy as the auxiliary ligand. PMID:24364791

  2. NF-TiO? photocatalysis of amitrole and atrazine with addition of oxidants under simulated solar light: emerging synergies, degradation intermediates, and reusable attributes.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Joel; Pelaez, Miguel; Guay, Lisa; Zhang, Zhaohong; O'Shea, Kevin; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2013-09-15

    In order to investigate sustainable alternatives to current water treatment methods, the effect of NF-titania film thickness and subsequent photocatalysis in combination with oxidants was examined under simulated solar light. Such a combination presents a theoretical possibility for a synergistic interaction between the photocatalyst and the oxidant (activation of the oxidant by the catalyst under conditions under which it may not conventionally be activated). To investigate, peroxymonosulfate (PMS) and persulfate (PS) were used as oxidants, and two pesticides, amitrole and atrazine, were used as target contaminants. In the absence of a film, activation of PMS under simulated solar conditions is demonstrated by removal of atrazine, whereas PS provided minimal removal, suggesting inefficient activation. Combining photocatalytic films with PMS and PS manifested synergies for both oxidants. The effect was most pronounced for PS since PMS already underwent significant activation without the photocatalyst. Amitrole degradation results indicated a lack of removal of amitrole by activated PS alone, suggesting that this sulfate radical-based treatment technology may be ineffective for the removal of amitrole. The NF-TiO? films demonstrated reusability under solar light both with and without oxidants. Finally, the degradation intermediates were analyzed, and a new intermediate appeared upon incorporating oxidants into the system. PMID:23811632

  3. Siderite, oxidation, and neutralization potential determination 

    E-print Network

    Porter, Elizabeth Brooke

    2001-01-01

    reactions of FeCO? under various testing conditions as related to NP determination as well as accuracy of the NP method. The effects of hydrogen peroxide (H?O?), potassium persulfate (K?S?O?), and potassium permanganate (KMnO?) on the NP of mixed overburden...

  4. Erythromycin oxidation and ERY-resistant Escherichia coli inactivation in urban wastewater by sulfate radical-based oxidation process under UV-C irradiation.

    PubMed

    Michael-Kordatou, I; Iacovou, M; Frontistis, Z; Hapeshi, E; Dionysiou, D D; Fatta-Kassinos, D

    2015-11-15

    This study evaluates the feasibility of UV-C-driven advanced oxidation process induced by sulfate radicals [Formula: see text] in degrading erythromycin (ERY) in secondary treated wastewater. The results revealed that 10 mg L(-1) of sodium persulfate (SPS) can result in rapid and complete antibiotic degradation within 90 min of irradiation, while ERY decay exhibited a pseudo-first-order kinetics pattern under the different experimental conditions applied. ERY degradation rate was strongly affected by the chemical composition of the aqueous matrix and it decreased in the order of: ultrapure water (kapp = 0.55 min(-1)) > bottled water (kapp = 0.26 min(-1)) > humic acid solution (kapp = 0.05 min(-1)) > wastewater effluents (kapp = 0.03 min(-1)). Inherent pH conditions (i.e. pH 8) yielded an increased ERY degradation rate, compared to that observed at pH 3 and 5. The contribution of hydroxyl and sulfate radicals (HO and [Formula: see text] ) on ERY degradation was found to be ca. 37% and 63%, respectively. Seven transformation products (TPs) were tentatively elucidated during ERY oxidation, with the 14-membered lactone ring of the ERY molecule being intact in all cases. The observed phytotoxicity against the tested plant species can potentially be attributed to the dissolved effluent organic matter (dEfOM) present in wastewater effluents and its associated-oxidation products and not to the TPs generated from the oxidation of ERY. This study evidences the potential use of the UV-C/SPS process in producing a final treated effluent with lower phytotoxicity (<10%) compared to the untreated wastewater. Finally, under the optimum experimental conditions, the UV-C/SPS process resulted in total inactivation of ERY-resistant Escherichia coli within 90 min. PMID:26360228

  5. Magnesium Oxide

    MedlinePLUS

    Magnesium is an element your body needs to function normally. Magnesium oxide may be used for different reasons. Some ... to relieve heartburn, sour stomach, or acid indigestion. Magnesium oxide also may be used as a laxative ...

  6. Ethylene Oxide

    Cancer.gov

    At room temperature, ethylene oxide is a flammable colorless gas with a sweet odor. It is used primarily to produce other chemicals, including antifreeze. In smaller amounts, ethylene oxide is used as a pesticide and a sterilizing agent. The ability of ethylene oxide to damage DNA makes it an effective sterilizing agent but also accounts for its cancer-causing activity.

  7. Identification and cleavage of breakable single bonds by selective oxidation, reduction, and hydrolysis. Annual report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Zevely, J.; Mayo, F.R.

    1981-11-12

    The objective of this project is to determine the structure of bituminous coal by determining the proportions of the various kinds of connecting bonds and how they can best be broken. Results obtained during the past quarter are presented for the following tasks: (1) extractions and fractionations of coal products which covers pyridine extraction, fractionation of TIPS fractions, EDA extraction of Illinois No. 6 coal and swelling ratios of coal samples; (2) experiments on breakable single bonds which cover reactions of ethylenediamine and model ethers, reaction of pyridine-extracted coal with Me/sub 3/SiI, Baeyer-Villiger oxidations, reaction to diphenylmethane with 15% HNO/sub 3/, cleavage of TIPS with ZnI/sub 2/, and cleavage of black acids; and (3) oxygen oxidation No. 18. Some of the highlights of these studies are: (1) some model ethers are not cleaved by EDA under extraction conditions; (2) oxidation of diaryl ketones with m-chloroperbenzoic acid and saponification of the resulting esters in promising for identifying ketones, (3) treatment of a black acid with pyridine hydroiodide reduced the acid's molecular weight and increased its solubility in pyridine, but treatment with ZnI/sub 2/ was ineffective; (4) in comparison with 0.1 M K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/, 0.01 M persulfate is relatively ineffective in accelerating oxidation of BnNH/sub 2/-extracted coal in water suspension. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Sulfate radical-advanced oxidation process (SR-AOP) for simultaneous removal of refractory organic contaminants and ammonia in landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yang; Ezyske, Casey M

    2011-11-15

    Typically, a mature landfill leachate contains high levels of non-biodegradable organics and ammonia nitrogen. Simultaneous removal of the both persistent leachate pollutants is a significant challenge. This paper reports the first scientific study to apply a sulfate radical (SO(4)(·-)) - based advanced oxidation process (SR-AOP) to treat a mature leachate, with an emphasis of concurrent removal of refractory organics and ammonia. In this study, all the experiments were run in a batch reactor with temperature control. In the thermal persulfate oxidation (TPO) process, persulfate (S(2)O(8)(2-)) was activated by heat to produce powerful oxidants, SO(4)(·-) (E(o) = 2.6 V). Three factors affecting the removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia nitrogen were investigated, including initial solution pH (3-8.3), temperature (27-50 °C), and chemical dose (S(2)O(8)(2-):12COD(0) = 0.25-2.0). Typically, acidic pH (3-4), higher temperature, and higher dose favored the removal of COD and ammonia. At S(2)O(8)(2-):12COD(0) = 2 and 50 °C, the COD removal rates were 79% and 91% at pH 8.3 (no pH adjustment) and 4, respectively; and the ammonia nitrogen removal reached 100% at pH 8.3 or 4. SR-AOP appears to be more advantageous over hydroxyl radical (OH?)-based advanced oxidation processes (HR-AOPs) because OH? almost does not oxidize ammonia. Furthermore, compared with Fenton treatment of the same batch leachate sample, the TPO could achieve a higher COD removal at an identical chemical dose. For example, COD removal was 40% at H(2)O(2):2.125COD(0) = 2 during Fenton treatment (pH 3), but 91% at S(2)O(8)(2-):12COD(0) = 2 during TPO (pH 4). These findings demonstrate that SR-AOP is a promising landfill leachate treatment method. PMID:21959093

  9. Design, synthesis, and characterization of materials for controlled line deposition, environmental remediation, and doping of porous manganese oxide material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, Craig A.

    This thesis covers three topics: (1) coatings formed from sol-gel phases, (2) environmental remediation, and (3) doping of a porous manganese oxide. Synthesis, characterization, and application were investigated for each topic. Line-formations were formed spontaneously by self-assembly from vanadium sol-gels and other metal containing solutions on glass substrates. The solutions were prepared by the dissolution of metal oxide or salt in water. A more straightforward method is proposed than used in previous work. Analyses using optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and infrared spectroscopy showed discreet lines whose deposition could be controlled by varying the concentration. A mechanism was developed from the observed results. Microwave heating, the addition of graphite rods, and oxidants, can enhance HCB remediation from soil. To achieve remediation, a TeflonRTM vessel open to the atmosphere along with an oxidant, potassium persulfate (PerS) or potassium hydroxide, along with uncoated or aluminum oxide coated, graphite rods were heated in a research grade microwave oven. Microwave heating was used to decrease the heating time, and graphite rods were used to increase the absorption of the microwave energy by providing thermal centers. The results showed that the percent HCB removed was increased by adding graphite rods and oxidants. Tungsten, silver, and sulfur were investigated as doping agents for K--OMS-2. The synthesis of these materials was carried out with a reflux method. The doping of K--OMS-2 led to changes in the properties of a tungsten doped K--OMS-2 had an increased resistivity, the silver doped material showed improved epoxidation of trans-stilbene, and the addition of sulfur produced a paper-like material. Rietveld refinement of the tungsten doped K--OMS-2 showed that the tungsten was doped into the framework.

  10. Improved method for the determination of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon in natural water by silver filter filtration, wet chemical oxidation, and infrared spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkhardt, M.R.; Brenton, R.W.; Kammer, J.A.; Jha, V.K.; O'Mara-Lopez, P. G.; Woodworth, M.T.

    1999-01-01

    Precision and accuracy are reported for the first time for the analysis of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon by silver membrane filtration followed by wet chemical oxidation. A water sample is pressure filtered through a 0.45-??m-pore-size, 47-mm-diameter silver membrane filter. The silver membrane filter then is cut into ribbons and placed in a flame-sealable glass ampule. The organic material trapped on the membrane filter strips is acidified, purged with oxygen to remove inorganic carbonates and volatile organic compounds, and oxidized to carbon dioxide (CO2) using phosphoric acid and potassium persulfate in the sealed glass ampule. The resulting CO2 is measured by a nondispersive infrared CO2 detector. The amount of CO2 is proportional to the concentration of chemically oxidizable nonpurgeable organic carbon in the environmental water sample. The quantitation and method detection limit for routine analysis is 0.2 mg/L. The average percent recovery in five representative matrices was 97 ?? 11%. The errors associated with sampling and sample preparation of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon are also described.Precision and accuracy are reported for the first time for the analysis of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon by silver membrane filtration followed by wet chemical oxidation. A water sample is pressure filtered through a 0.45-??m-pore-size, 47-mm-diameter silver membrane filter. The silver membrane filter then is cut into ribbons and placed in a flame-sealable glass ampule. The organic material trapped on the membrane filter strips is acidified, purged with oxygen to remove inorganic carbonates and volatile organic compounds, and oxidized to carbon dioxide (CO2) using phosphoric acid and potassium persulfate in the sealed glass ampule. The resulting CO2 is measured by a nondispersive infrared CO2 detector. The amount of CO2 is proportional to the concentration of chemically oxidizable nonpurgeable organic carbon in the environmental water sample. The quantitation and method detection limit for routine analysis is 0.2 mg/L. The average percent recovery in five representative matrices was 97??11%. The errors associated with sampling and sample preparation of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon are also described.

  11. Treating organic pollutants in urban runoff using slow-release oxidants and storm pipes: A field investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyerdom, T. J.; Lee, E.; Kim, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Non-point source (NPS) contamination is a major concern for urban aquatic environments. This study tested the efficacy of using slow-release oxidants emplaced in storm pipes for treating organic pollutants in urban storm runoff through proof-of-concept laboratory tests and a field demonstration test in Athens, OH. Release rates of slow-release persulfate (SR-PS), slow-release hydrogen pyroxide (SR-HP), and slow-release iron (SR-Fe) were estimated through column tests. Runoff samples were collected at a storm pipe discharge point in the study area for 3 storm events having different prior drought periods to establish baseline concentrations of organic pollutants. Samples were analyzed for Methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE), Naphthalene, and total organic carbon contents. The proof-of-concept flow-through test demonstrated that up 90% of pollutants can be removed by the SR-PS/Fe within 20 minutes of reaction time. The SR-PS/HP/Fe forms are emplaced in several storm drains where the pollutants would have ~15 minutes of reaction with the oxidants released from the slow-release forms. Preliminary results suggest that the SR-PS/HP/Fe forms installed in the storm pipes can reduce NPS pollutants in the urban storm runoff in a sustainable manner.

  12. PEGylated liposomes with NGR ligand and heat-activable cell-penetrating peptide-doxorubicin conjugate for tumor-specific therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanfang; Yang, Yang; Xie, Xiangyang; Cai, Xingshi; Zhang, Hui; Gong, Wei; Wang, Zhiyuan; Mei, Xingguo

    2014-05-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) mediated tumor-oriented nanocarriers have been widely studied by researchers recently. However, applications of CPPs in vivo were usually hampered by their loss in untargeted tissues and enzymatic degradation. These shortfalls required strategies to camouflage CPPs before their arrival at the targeted site. In this work, we constructed a thermosensitive liposome (TSL) containing Asparagines-Glycine-Arginine (NGR) peptide as the targeting moiety and heat-activable cell-penetrating peptide-doxorubicin conjugate for enhancing specific cancer therapy. Different to the masking strategies of CPPs reported, CPPs existing in conjugation form of CPPs and doxorubicin (CPP-Dox) were hidden in TSL to cloak and protect CPPs. Meanwhile, NGR moiety and local tumor hyperthermia were utilized to achieve specific targeting of CPPs to the tumor. The nanocarrier (CPP-Dox/NGR-TSL) prepared in this work possessed suitable physiochemical properties such as small particle size of about 90 nm, high drug encapsulation efficiency of approximately 95%, good stability in the medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) and so on. In vitro experiments on Human fibrosarcoma cells (HT-1080) and human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF-7) verified the specific targeting ability and enhanced intracellular drug delivery of the liposomes to HT-1080 cells. Furthermore, comparing with NGR-targeted TSL containing Dox (Dox/NGR-TSL), the results of intravenous administration showed CPP-Dox/NGR-TSL significantly inhibited tumor growth in nude mice xenografted HT-1080 tumors and excellent body safety. In conclusion, the nanocarrier constructed in this study would be a safe and efficiently drug delivery system for specific cancer treatment. PMID:24565519

  13. Development of Alkaline Oxidative Dissolution Methods for Chromium (III) Compounds Present in Hanford Site Tank Sludges

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Krot, N N.; Shilov, V P.; Fedoseev, A M.; Budantseva, N A.; Nikonov, M V.; Yusov, A B.; Garnov, A Y.; Charushnikova, I A.; Perminov, V P.; Astafurova, L N.; Lapitskaya, T S.; Makarenkov, V I.

    1999-07-02

    The high-level radioactive waste sludge in the underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site contains various chromium solid phases. Dissolution and removal of chromium from tank waste sludges is desirable prior to high-level waste vitrification because increased volume is required to incorporate the residual chromium. Unfortunately, dissolution of chromium from the sludge to form Cr(OH){sub 4}{sup -} through treatment with heated NaOH solution (also used to dissolve aluminum phases and metathesize phosphates to sodium salts) generally has been unsuccessful in tests with both simulated and genuine Hanford waste sludges. Oxidative dissolution of the Cr(III) compounds to form soluble chromate has been proposed as an alternative chromium solid phase dissolution method and results of limited prior testing have been reported. The present systematic tests investigated oxygen gas, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium persulfate oxidants to dissolve Cr(III) under alkaline conditions to form soluble chromate. Permanganate and ozone also were considered for testing but were thought to be of secondary interest because of the insoluble residue (MnO{sub 2} from permanganate) and complex equipment (necessary to generate ozone) implicit with use of these reagents. The oxygen and hydrogen peroxide reagents leave no condensable residue and sodium persulfate only leaves soluble sodium sulfate. Crystalline Cr(OH){sub 3}, various hydrothermally aged amorphous Cr(III) oxide hydrates, mixed Fe(III)/Cr(III) oxide hydrates, and nickel and iron Cr(III) spinels, all of which have been identified or are likely constituents in Hanford tank wastes, were prepared and characterized for the dissolution tests. The effects of reagent and hydroxide concentrations, reaction temperature, and transition metal catalysts on reaction progress were investigated for each reagent as functions of reaction time. Reaction progress was measured by monitoring chromate concentration. Oxidation of chromium compounds by dissolved oxygen was found to increase linearly with oxygen partial pressure and NaOH concentration. The rate also increased with temperature at low activation energy, 26-36 kJ/mol, reflecting the opposing influences of decreasing oxygen volubility and increasing underlying chemical reaction rate. The reaction apparently proceeds by way of dissolved Cr(III) species, is catalyzed by Ni(II), and is slower for the hydrothermally aged materials. Dissolution rates ranged from about 7 x 10{sup -5} to 2.4 x 10{sup -4} moles Cr(III)/liter-hour in 80 C, 3-M NaOH with one atmosphere pure oxygen for the various Cr(III) compounds tested. These low dissolution rates commend the use of oxygen reagent to waste tank processing where extended residence times maybe practical. Oxidative dissolution of Cr(III) compounds by hydrogen peroxide was hampered in the presence of greater than 0.5 g Fe(III)/liter and other catalysts for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition and was less effective for materials that had undergone prolonged aging at high temperatures. Leaching was optimized at low excess NaOH and high temperatures (activation energy of {approx}82 kJ/mol). To prevent excessive loss of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to catalytic decomposition, the peroxide reagent must be added slowly and with intense stirring. Treatment of waste solids with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} may only be attractive for freshly formed Cr(III) hydroxides [formed, for example, by alkaline metathesis of Cr(III)-bearing sludges] in the absence of decomposition catalysts such as Fe(III).

  14. Use of Advanced Oxidation and Aerobic Degradation for Remediation of Various Hydrocarbon Contaminates

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Fallgren

    2009-03-06

    Western Research Institute in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., Tetra Tech, Inc., and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted laboratory and field studies to test different approaches to enhance degradation of hydrocarbons and associated contaminants. WRI in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., conducted a laboratory and field study for using ozone to treat a site contaminated with MTBE and other hydrocarbons. Results from this study demonstrate that a TOD test can be used to resolve the O{sub 3} dosage problem by establishing a site-specific benchmark dosage for field ozone applications. The follow-up testing of the laboratory samples provided indications that intrinsic biodegradation could be stimulated by adding oxygen. Laboratory studies also suggests that O3 dosage in the full-scale field implementation could be dialed lower than stoichiometrically designed to eliminate the formation of Cr(VI). WRI conducted a study involving a series of different ISCO oxidant applications to diesel-contaminated soil and determined the effects on enhancing biodegradation to degrade the residual hydrocarbons. Soils treated with permanganate followed by nutrients and with persulfate followed by nutrients resulted in the largest decrease in TPH. The possible intermediates and conditions formed from NOM and TPH oxidation by permanganate and activated persulfate favors microbial TPH degrading activity. A 'passive-oxidation' method using microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology was conducted by WRI in conjunction with Tetra Tech, Inc., to degrade MTBE in groundwater. These experiments have demonstrated that a working MFC (i.e., one generating power) could be established in the laboratory using contaminated site water or buffered media inoculated with site water and spiked with MTBE, benzene, or toluene. Electrochemical methods were studied by WRI with goal of utilizing low voltage and amperage electrical sources for 'geo-oxidation' of organic contaminants. The results from a study with TCE contaminated-clay indicate that electrochemically inducing reductive dechlorination of TCE in a saturated matrix may offer an effective and viable alternative to remediation TCE and other contaminants with potential of being reduced. Another study focused on steel wool oxidation to electrochemically increase population of hydrocarbon-degrading denitrifying bacteria. Significantly larger denitrifying activity was observed in the cathode chamber of a treatment unit setup like an MFC with steel wool as the anode. This enhanced nitrate reduction could be due to direct electron utilization by denitrifying bacteria on the cathode, thereby stimulating microbial denitrification or a combination of electron transfer directly to NO{sub 3}{sup -} and electron transfer to nitrate reducing bacteria, which may serve as a type of bio-catalyst on the cathode for nitrate reduction. Overall, the studies conducted under Task 72 demonstrated different innovative methods to enhance petroleum hydrocarbon degradation and associated contaminants.

  15. Chemical Conversion of PON to Nitrous Oxide for Nitrogen Isotopic Analysis : High- Sensitivity Tracer Assay for Nitrogen Fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunogai, U.; Kido, T.; Hirota, A.; Ohkubo, S.; Komatsu, D. D.; Nakagawa, F.

    2006-12-01

    We present a method for high-sensitivity nitrogen isotopic analysis of particulate organic nitrogen (PON) in seawater and freshwater, for the aim of measuring the rate of nitrogen fixation through 15N2 tracer technique for samples that contain low numeric abundance of organisms. The method composed of the traditional oxidation/reduction methods: such as oxidation of PON to nitrate using persulfate, the reduction of nitrate to nitrite using spongy cadmium, and further reduction of nitrite to nitrous oxide using sodium azide in an acetic acid buffer. Then, Nitrous oxide is purged from the water and trapped cryogenically with subsequent release into a gas chromatography column to analyze stable nitrogen isotopic compositions using a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer. A standard deviation less than 0.3 ‰ for nitrogen was found for PON samples containing more than 80 nmolN, with a blank nitrogen of 20 nmolN. Nitrogen isotopic fractionation were consistent within each batch of analysis. Besides, we found that we can also determine nitrogen isotopic compositions of total dissolved nitrogen (TDN, sum of NO3-, NO2-, ammonium, and DON), by applying the method for filtrate samples. Our method may prove to obtain isotopic information for lower quantities of PON and TDN than other methods, so that we can reduce quantities of water samples needed for incubation to determine the nitrogen fixation rate in both seawater and freshwater. Besides, the method is also useful to determine the rate of nitrogen fixation by the small size fraction in ocean. We will also present the results obtained at western subtropical North Pacific to support our conclusions.

  16. Oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ceyer, Sylvia T. (Cambridge, MA); Lahr, David L. (Cambridge, MA)

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  17. Oxide Thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, David J

    2008-01-01

    Thermoelectricity in oxides, especially NaxCoO2 and related materials, is discussed from the point of view of first principles calculations and Boltzmann transport theory. The electronic structure of this material is exceptional in that it has a combination of very narrow bands and strong hybridization between metal d states and ligand p states. As shown within the framework of conventional Boltzmann transport theory, this leads to high Seebeck coefficients even at metallic carrier densities. This suggests a strategy of searching for other narrow band oxides that can be doped metallic with mobile carriers. Some possible avenues for finding such materials are suggested.

  18. Merphos oxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Merphos oxide ; CASRN 78 - 48 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effe

  19. Propylene oxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Propylene oxide ; CASRN 75 - 56 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  20. Thallium oxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Thallium oxide ; CASRN 1314 - 32 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  1. Nitric oxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitric oxide ; CASRN 10102 - 43 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  2. NITROGEN OXIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is a review of current knowledge of the environmental health basis for control of manmade sources of nitrogen oxide emissions. The literature review covered the period through 1974. The principal subject areas considered in the report include: sources and control of a...

  3. Fluorescent graphene oxide via polymer grafting: an efficient nanocarrier for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Aniruddha; Nandi, Sudipta; Das, Pradip; Nandi, Arun K

    2015-02-18

    Functionalized graphene-based drug delivery vehicles have conquered a significant position because functionalization improves its biocompatibility and stability in cell medium, leaving sufficient graphitic basal plane for drug loading through ?-? stacking. In this study, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) is covalently grafted from the surface of graphene oxide (GO) via a facile, eco-friendly and an easy procedure of free radical polymerization (FRP) using ammonium persulfate initiator. Various spectroscopic and microscopic studies confirm the successful grafting of PNIPAM from GO surface. PNIPAM-grafted GO (GPNM) exhibits enhanced thermal stability, improved dispersibility both in aqueous and cell medium, and better biocompatibility and cell viability compared to GO. Interestingly, GPNM displays an exciting fluorescence property in aqueous medium, which is a hike of intensity at 36 °C due to the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of PNIPAM chains (32 °C). Moreover both hydrophilic (doxorubicin (DOX)) and hydrophobic (indomethacin (IMC)) drugs loaded on the surface of GPNM hybrid exhibits its efficacy as an efficient carrier for both types of drugs. Cellular uptakes of free DOX and DOX-loaded GPNM (GPNM-DOX) are evidenced both from optical and fluorescence imaging of live cells, and the efficiency of drug is significantly improved in the loaded system. The release of DOX from GPNM-DOX was achieved at pH 4, relevant to the environment of cancer cells. The pH-triggered release of hydrophobic drug was also studied using UV-vis spectroscopy via alginate encapsulation, showing a great enhancement at pH = 7.4. The IMC is also found to be released by human serum albumin using dialysis technique. The GPNM nanomaterial shows the property of simultaneous loading of DOX and IMC as well as pH-triggered simultaneous release of both of the drugs. PMID:25612470

  4. Oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Willmott, Phil

    2008-07-01

    Although the history of metal oxides and their surfaces goes back several decades to landmark studies, such as Mott and Peierls' explanation of electrical insulation in materials that are predicted in band theory to be conducting, or the observation by Morin of the superfast metal-to-insulator transition in vanadium dioxide, it is only in the last two decades that the world of condensed matter physics has become increasingly dominated by research into complex metal oxides. This has been driven most notably by an attempt to better understand and describe the fundamental physical processes behind their seemingly endless spectrum of properties, which in turn has also led to the discovery of novel phenomena, most prominently demonstrated by the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in 1986, colossal magnetoresistance in 1994, and most recently, the formation of a two-dimensional conducting layer at the interface between two band insulators in 2004. One important reason why metal oxides, particularly in the form of thin films, have become such a popular subject for basic condensed matter research is that they offer a uniquely versatile materials base for the development of novel technologies. They owe this versatility both to the many different elemental combinations that lead to structurally similar forms, and also to the fact that in many cases, the strong interaction between the valence electrons means that there is a subtle interplay between structure and magnetic and electronic properties. This aspect has led in recent years to the birth or renaissance of research fields such as spintronics, orbital ordering, and multiferroics. Surfaces and interfaces are especially interesting in these strongly-correlated electron systems, where the rearrangement of electrical charge resulting from a minimization of surface or interfacial energy can have unexpected and often exciting consequences. Indeed, as the drive to miniaturize devices well below the micron size continues, the fraction of material constituting `non-bulklike' properties is becoming increasingly significant. On the other hand, the degree of sophistication needed to understand and predict these complex systems has driven a complementary thrust in theoretical modelling, beginning as long ago as 1963, with Hubbard's addition to the tight-binding model of the formulation of conduction in terms of a hopping integral. The present level of understanding is now so advanced that theory and experiment are no longer so distinct, both gaining further insights from one another. The aim of this special issue in the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter is to convey to the reader the most up-to-date understanding of the physics of the surfaces, interfaces, and thin films of complex metal oxides, in a clear and accessible manner. The order of the 16 contributions reflects the broad range of disciplines within this field, beginning with general considerations and theoretical models, continuing with film growth techniques and characterization, and concluding with material types and devices. It is fairly safe to assume that research in this area will enjoy as illustrious and long-lived a future as it has had a past. As such, it is hoped that this contribution will accurately reflect this status in the first decade of the 21st Century and long provide a reference for physicists continuing on this exciting Odyssey. PMID:21694334

  5. Asphalt Oxidation Kinetics and Pavement Oxidation Modeling 

    E-print Network

    Jin, Xin

    2012-07-16

    Most paved roads in the United States are surfaced with asphalt. These asphalt pavements suffer from fatigue cracking and thermal cracking, aggravated by the oxidation and hardening of asphalt. This negative impact of asphalt oxidation on pavement...

  6. PREFACE: Semiconducting oxides Semiconducting oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catlow, Richard; Walsh, Aron

    2011-08-01

    Semiconducting oxides are amongst the most widely studied and topical materials in contemporary condensed matter science, with interest being driven both by the fundamental challenges posed by their electronic and magnetic structures and properties, and by the wide range of applications, including those in catalysis and electronic devices. This special section aims to highlight recent developments in the physics of these materials, and to show the link between developing fundamental understanding and key application areas of oxide semiconductors. Several aspects of the physics of this wide and expanding range of materials are explored in this special section. Transparent semiconducting oxides have a growing role in several technologies, but challenges remain in understanding their electronic structure and the physics of charge carriers. A related problem concerns the nature of redox processes and the reactions which interconvert defects and charge carriers—a key issue which may limit the extent to which doping strategies may be used to alter electronic properties. The magnetic structures of the materials pose several challenges, while surface structures and properties are vital in controlling catalytic properties, including photochemical processes. The field profits from and exploits a wide range of contemporary physical techniques—both experimental and theoretical. Indeed, the interplay between experiment and computation is a key aspect of contemporary work. A number of articles describe applications of computational methods whose use, especially in modelling properties of defects in these materials, has a long and successful history. Several papers in this special section relate to work presented at a symposium within the European Materials Research Society (EMRS) meeting held in Warsaw in September 2010, and we are grateful to the EMRS for supporting this symposium. We would also like to thank the editorial staff of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for their help in producing this special section. We hope that it conveys some of the excitement and significance of the field. Semiconducting oxides contents Chemical bonding in copper-based transparent conducting oxides: CuMO2 (M = In, Ga, Sc) K G Godinho, B J Morgan, J P Allen, D O Scanlon and G W Watson Electrical properties of (Ba, Sr)TiO3 thin films with Pt and ITO electrodes: dielectric and rectifying behaviourShunyi Li, Cosmina Ghinea, Thorsten J M Bayer, Markus Motzko, Robert Schafranek and Andreas Klein Orientation dependent ionization potential of In2O3: a natural source for inhomogeneous barrier formation at electrode interfaces in organic electronicsMareike V Hohmann, Péter Ágoston, André Wachau, Thorsten J M Bayer, Joachim Brötz, Karsten Albe and Andreas Klein Cathodoluminescence studies of electron irradiation effects in n-type ZnOCasey Schwarz, Yuqing Lin, Max Shathkin, Elena Flitsiyan and Leonid Chernyak Resonant Raman scattering in ZnO:Mn and ZnO:Mn:Al thin films grown by RF sputteringM F Cerqueira, M I Vasilevskiy, F Oliveira, A G Rolo, T Viseu, J Ayres de Campos, E Alves and R Correia Structure and electrical properties of nanoparticulate tungsten oxide prepared by microwave plasma synthesisM Sagmeister, M Postl, U Brossmann, E J W List, A Klug, I Letofsky-Papst, D V Szabó and R Würschum Charge compensation in trivalent cation doped bulk rutile TiO2Anna Iwaszuk and Michael Nolan Deep level transient spectroscopy studies of n-type ZnO single crystals grown by different techniquesL Scheffler, Vl Kolkovsky, E V Lavrov and J Weber Microstructural and conductivity changes induced by annealing of ZnO:B thin films deposited by chemical vapour depositionC David, T Girardeau, F Paumier, D Eyidi, B Lacroix, N Papathanasiou, B P Tinkham, P Guérin and M Marteau Multi-component transparent conducting oxides: progress in materials modellingAron Walsh, Juarez L F Da Silva and Su-Huai Wei Thickness dependence of the strain, band gap and transport properties of epitaxial In2O3 thin films grown on Y-stabilised ZrO2(111) K H L Zhang, V K Lazarov, T D Veal, F

  7. Oxidation resistance of silicon ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasutoshi, H.; Hirota, K.

    1984-01-01

    Oxidation resistance, and examples of oxidation of SiC, Si3N4 and sialon are reviewed. A description is given of the oxidation mechanism, including the oxidation product, oxidation reaction and the bubble size. The oxidation reactions are represented graphically. An assessment is made of the oxidation process, and an oxidation example of silicon ceramics is given.

  8. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  9. Nitric oxide inhibition strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Vivian (Wai Chong); Lerner, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide is involved in many physiologic processes. There are efforts, described elsewhere in this volume, to deliver nitric oxide to tissues as a therapy. Nitric oxide also contributes to pathophysiologic processes. Inhibiting nitric oxide or its production can thus also be of therapeutic benefit. This article addresses such inhibitory strategies. PMID:26634146

  10. Electrochemical oxidation of cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Indirect cholesterol electrochemical oxidation in the presence of various mediators leads to electrophilic addition to the double bond, oxidation at the allylic position, oxidation of the hydroxy group, or functionalization of the side chain. Recent studies have proven that direct electrochemical oxidation of cholesterol is also possible and affords different products depending on the reaction conditions. PMID:25977713

  11. Photo-oxidation catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Liu, Ping (Irvine, CA); Smith, R. Davis (Golden, CO)

    2009-07-14

    Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

  12. Oxidative stress and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Rammal, Hassan; Soulimani, Rachid

    2009-01-01

    High O2 consumption, modest antioxidant defenses and a lipid-rich constitution make the brain highly vulnerable to redox imbalances. Oxidative damage in the brain causes nervous system impairment. Recently, oxidative stress has also been implicated in depression, anxiety disorders and high anxiety levels. The findings which establish a link between oxidative stress and pathological anxiety have inspired a number of other recent studies focusing on the link between oxidative status and normal anxiety and also on a possible causal relationship between cellular oxidative stress and emotional stress. This review examines the recent discoveries made on the link between oxidative status and normal anxiety levels and the putative role of oxidative stress in genesis of anxiety. We discuss the different opinions and questions that exist in the field and review the methodological approaches that are being used to determine a causal relationship between oxidative and emotional stress. PMID:20357926

  13. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  14. Oxide nanomaterials Selbach, Inorganic

    E-print Network

    Oxide nanomaterials Selbach, Inorganic Materials and Ceramics Research Group · Ferroelectrics & mulAferroics · Thermoelectrics · Transparent conducAng oxide · Quantum dotsAvity within ceramic engineering, solid state chemistry, nanoparAcles, thin films

  15. Zinc oxide overdose

    MedlinePLUS

    Zinc oxide is an ingredient in many products, including certain creams and ointments used to prevent or treat minor skin burns and irritation. Zinc oxide overdose occurs when someone accidentally or intentionally ...

  16. Interfacial Bonding Stabilizes Rhodium and Rhodium Oxide Nanoparticles on Layered Nb Oxide and Ta Oxide Supports

    E-print Network

    Interfacial Bonding Stabilizes Rhodium and Rhodium Oxide Nanoparticles on Layered Nb Oxide and Ta temperatures. Rhodium oxide and rhodium metal nanoparticles on niobate and tantalate supports are anomalously

  17. Jeff Koebbe Nitrous Oxide

    E-print Network

    Toohey, Darin W.

    % of human caused nitrous oxide emissions from streams and rivers Atmospheric N2O increased by 20% over is thawing because of global warming and gives off large levels of nitrous oxide gas Permafrost in warm-12/nsf-gre122010.php Triplepundit.com/2010/04/nitrous-oxides-global-warming

  18. Rhodium oxides in unusual oxidation states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisner, Barbara Alice

    Mixed valence RhIII/RhIV oxides have been proposed as a promising class of candidate compounds for superconductivity. Unfortunately, it is difficult to stabilize rhodates with a formal oxidation state approaching RhIV, as other techniques used for the synthesis of rhodium. oxides favor the most commonly observed formal oxidation state, RhIII. One technique which has been used to stabilize metal oxides in high formal oxidation states is crystallization from molten hydroxides. This thesis explores the use of molten hydroxides to enhance the reactivity of rhodium oxides in order to synthesize rhodates with high formal oxidation states. K0.5RhO2, Rb0.2RhO2, and CsxRhO2 were synthesized from pure alkali metal hydroxides. All crystallized with a previously unobserved polytype in the alkali metal rhodate system. Due to the low activity of dissolved oxygen species in LiOH and NaOH, LiRhO2 and NaRhO2 cannot be crystallized. The formal oxidation state of rhodium in AxRhO2 (A = K, Rb, Cs) is a function of the alkali metal hydroxide used to synthesize these oxides. These materials exhibit remarkable stability for layered metal oxides containing the heavier alkali metals, but all phases are susceptible to intercalation by water. The synthesis, structural characterization, magnetic susceptibility, and reactivity of these oxides are reported. Sr2RhO4 and a new rhodate were crystallized from a KOH-Sr(OH)2 flux. The synthesis and characterization of these materials is reported. Efforts to substitute platinum for rhodium in Sr 2RhO4 are also discussed. Mixed alkali metal-alkaline earth metal hydroxide fluxes were used to crystallize LiSr3RhO6, and NaSr3RhO 6. The synthesis of LiSr3RhO6 and NaSr3RhO 6 represents the first example of the stabilization of a rhodium oxide with a formal oxidation state approaching RhV. X-ray diffraction, electron beam microprobe analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, potentiometric titrations, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility measurements were used to verify this formal oxidation state. The synthetic methodology developed for the synthesis of rhodium oxides in high formal oxidation states has also been applied to the synthesis of other members of the platinum group metals. LiSr3RuO6, NaSr3RuO6, LiSr3IrO6, NaSr 3IrO6, LiSr3PtO6,and NaSr3PtO 6 were crystallized from mixed alkali metal-alkaline earth metal hydroxide fluxes. The synthesis and structural characterization of these materials is presented.

  19. Partial oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Ahmed, Shabbir (Bolingbrook, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL); Doshi, Rajiv (Downers Grove, IL)

    2000-01-01

    A two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion. The dehydrogenation portion is a group VIII metal and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure. There is also disclosed a method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  20. ZIRCONIUM OXIDE NANOSTRUCTURES PREPARED BY ANODIC OXIDATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Y. Y.; Bhuiyan, M.S.; Paranthaman, M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Zirconium oxide is an advanced ceramic material highly useful for structural and electrical applications because of its high strength, fracture toughness, chemical and thermal stability, and biocompatibility. If highly-ordered porous zirconium oxide membranes can be successfully formed, this will expand its real-world applications, such as further enhancing solid-oxide fuel cell technology. Recent studies have achieved various morphologies of porous zirconium oxide via anodization, but they have yet to create a porous layer where nanoholes are formed in a highly ordered array. In this study, electrochemical methods were used for zirconium oxide synthesis due to its advantages over other coating techniques, and because the thickness and morphology of the ceramic fi lms can be easily tuned by the electrochemical parameters, such as electrolyte solutions and processing conditions, such as pH, voltage, and duration. The effects of additional steps such as pre-annealing and post-annealing were also examined. Results demonstrate the formation of anodic porous zirconium oxide with diverse morphologies, such as sponge-like layers, porous arrays with nanoholes ranging from 40 to 75 nm, and nanotube layers. X-ray powder diffraction analysis indicates a cubic crystallographic structure in the zirconium oxide. It was noted that increased voltage improved the ability of the membrane to stay adhered to the zirconium substrate, whereas lower voltages caused a propensity for the oxide fi lm to fl ake off. Further studies are needed to defi ne the parameters windows that create these morphologies and to investigate other important characteristics such as ionic conductivity.

  1. Zirconium Oxide Nanostructures Prepared by Anodic Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Ying Yi; Bhuiyan, Md S; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans

    2008-01-01

    Zirconium oxide is an advanced ceramic material highly useful for structural and electrical applications because of its high strength, fracture toughness, chemical and thermal stability, and biocompatibility. If highly-ordered porous zirconium oxide membranes can be successfully formed, this will expand its real-world applications, such as further enhancing solid-oxide fuel cell technology. Recent studies have achieved various morphologies of porous zirconium oxide via anodization, but they have yet to create a porous layer where nanoholes are formed in a highly ordered array. In this study, electrochemical methods were used for zirconium oxide synthesis due to its advantages over other coating techniques, and because the thickness and morphology of the ceramic films can be easily tuned by the electrochemical parameters, such as electrolyte solutions and processing conditions, such as pH, voltage, and duration. The effects of additional steps such as pre-annealing and post-annealing were also examined. Results demonstrate the formation of anodic porous zirconium oxide with diverse morphologies, such as sponge-like layers, porous arrays with nanoholes ranging from 40 to 75 nm, and nanotube layers. X-ray powder diffraction analysis indicates a cubic crystallographic structure in the zirconium oxide. It was noted that increased voltage improved the ability of the membrane to stay adhered to the zirconium substrate, whereas lower voltages caused a propensity for the oxide film to flake off. Further studies are needed to define the parameters windows that create these morphologies and to investigate other important characteristics such as ionic conductivity.

  2. Mechanism of N(5)-ethyl-flavinium cation formation upon electrochemical oxidation of N(5)-ethyl-4a-hydroxyflavin pseudobase.

    PubMed

    Sichula, Vincent; Hu, Ying; Mirzakulova, Ekaterina; Manzer, Samuel F; Vyas, Shubham; Hadad, Christopher M; Glusac, Ksenija D

    2010-07-29

    We investigated the oxidation behavior of 5-ethyl-4a-hydroxy-3-methyl-4a,5-dihydrolumiflavin (pseudobase Et-FlOH) in acetonitrile with the aim of determining if the two-electron oxidized Et-FlOH(2+) undergoes a release of hydroxyl cation and the production of 5-ethyl-3methyllumiflavinium cation (Et-Fl(+)). The focus of this work is to investigate the possibility of using Et-FlOH as a catalyst for water oxidation. The cyclic voltammetry demonstrates that Et-FlOH exhibits two one-electron oxidation potentials at +0.95 and +1.4 V versus normal hydrogen electrode (NHE), with the second oxidation potential being irreversible. The production of Et-Fl(+) is observed in the cyclic voltammetry of Et-FlOH and has been previously assigned to the release of OH(+) from the two-electron oxidized Et-FlOH(2+). The results of our study show that this is not the case: (i) we performed bulk electrolysis of the electrolyte solution at +2 V and then added Et-FlOH to the electrolyzed solution. We found that Et-Fl(+) is produced from this solution, even though Et-FlOH itself was not oxidized; (ii) reactions of Et-FlOH with chemical oxidants (ceric ammonium nitrate, nitrosyl tetrafluoroborate, and tetrabutylammonium persulfate) demonstrate that Et-Fl(+) production occurs only in the presence of strong Lewis acids, such as Ce(4+) and NO(+) ions. On the basis of these results, we propose that the production of Et-Fl(+) in the electrochemistry of Et-FlOH occurs because of the shift in the Et-FlOH/Et-Fl(+) acid-base equilibrium in the presence of protons released during anodic oxidation. We identified two sources of protons: (i) oxidation of traces of water present in the acetonitrile releases oxygen and protons and (ii) two-electron oxidized Et-FlOH(2+) releases protons located on the N(5)-alkyl chain. The release of protons from Et-FlOH(2+) was confirmed by cyclic voltammetry of Et-FlOH in the presence of pyridine as a base. The first oxidation peak of Et-FlOH at +0.95 V is reversible in the absence of pyridine. The addition of pyridine leads to the shift of the oxidation potential to a less positive value, which is consistent with a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET). Furthermore, the anodic current increases, and the cathodic peak becomes irreversible, giving rise to two additional reduction peaks at -0.2 and -1 V. The same reduction peaks were observed in the high scan rate cyclic voltammogram of Et-FlOH in the absence of pyridine, implying that the release of protons indeed occurs from Et-FlOH(2+). To determine which functional group of Et-FlOH(.+) is the source of protons, we performed DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level of theory for a reaction of Et-FlOH(.+) with pyridine and identified two proton sources: (i) the >N-CH(2)- group of the N(5) alkyl chain and (ii) the -OH group in the 4a-position of the radical cation. Because the appearance of new reduction peaks at -0.2 and -1.0 V occurs in the model compound that lacks -OH protons (Et-FlOMe), we conclude that the proton removal occurs predominantly from the >N-CH(2)- moiety. PMID:20597524

  3. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    SciTech Connect

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  4. Biomimetic Water-Oxidation Catalysts: Manganese Oxides.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation of water to molecular oxygen is a key process for the production of solar fuels. Inspired by the biological manganese-based active site for this reaction in the enzyme Photosystem II, researchers have made impressive progress in the last decades regarding the development of synthetic manganese catalysts for water oxidation. For this, it has been especially fruitful to explore the many different types of known manganese oxides MnO x .This chapter first offers an overview of the structural, thermodynamic, and mechanistic aspects of water-oxidation catalysis by MnO x . The different test systems used for catalytic studies are then presented together with general reactivity trends. As a result, it has been possible to identify layered, mixed Mn (III/IV) -oxides as an especially promising class of bio-inspired catalysts and an attempt is made to give structure-based reasons for the good performances of these materials.In the outlook, the challenges of catalyst screenings (and hence the identification of a "best MnO x catalyst") are discussed. There is a great variety of reaction conditions which might be relevant for the application of manganese oxide catalysts in technological solar fuel-producing devices, and thus catalyst improvements are currently still addressing a very large parameter space. Nonetheless, detailed knowledge about the biological catalyst and a solid experimental basis concerning the syntheses and water-oxidation reactivities of MnO x materials have been established in the last decade and thus this research field is well positioned to make important contributions to solar fuel research in the future. PMID:25980320

  5. METAL OXIDE NANOPARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    FERNANDEZ-GARCIA,M.; RODGRIGUEZ, J.A.

    2007-10-01

    This chapter covers the fundamental science, synthesis, characterization, physicochemical properties and applications of oxide nanomaterials. Explains fundamental aspects that determine the growth and behavior of these systems, briefly examines synthetic procedures using bottom-up and top-down fabrication technologies, discusses the sophisticated experimental techniques and state of the art theory results used to characterize the physico-chemical properties of oxide solids and describe the current knowledge concerning key oxide materials with important technological applications.

  6. Barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide free glass

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Peizhen Kathy; Mahapatra, Manoj Kumar

    2013-09-24

    A glass composition consisting essentially of about 10-45 mole percent of SrO; about 35-75 mole percent SiO.sub.2; one or more compounds from the group of compounds consisting of La.sub.2O.sub.3, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, B.sub.2O.sub.3, and Ni; the La.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 20 mole percent; the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 25 mole percent; the B.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 15 mole percent; and the Ni less than about 5 mole percent. Preferably, the glass is substantially free of barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide. Preferably, the glass is used as a seal in a solid oxide fuel/electrolyzer cell (SOFC) stack. The SOFC stack comprises a plurality of SOFCs connected by one or more interconnect and manifold materials and sealed by the glass. Preferably, each SOFC comprises an anode, a cathode, and a solid electrolyte.

  7. Mixed oxide solid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Magno, Scott (Dublin, CA); Wang, Ruiping (Fremont, CA); Derouane, Eric (Liverpool, GB)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is a mixed oxide solid solution containing a tetravalent and a pentavalent cation that can be used as a support for a metal combustion catalyst. The invention is furthermore a combustion catalyst containing the mixed oxide solid solution and a method of making the mixed oxide solid solution. The tetravalent cation is zirconium(+4), hafnium(+4) or thorium(+4). In one embodiment, the pentavalent cation is tantalum(+5), niobium(+5) or bismuth(+5). Mixed oxide solid solutions of the present invention exhibit enhanced thermal stability, maintaining relatively high surface areas at high temperatures in the presence of water vapor.

  8. Acute in vivo toxicity mitigation of PEI-coated maghemite nanoparticles using controlled oxidation and surface modifications toward siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Israel, Liron Limor; Lellouche, Emmanuel; Ostrovsky, Stella; Yarmiayev, Valeria; Bechor, Moshe; Michaeli, Shulamit; Lellouche, Jean-Paul Moshe

    2015-07-22

    A ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN)-based doping step was used for the fabrication of core maghemite nanoparticles (NPs) that enabled the obtainment of colloid particles with a view to a high-level nanoparticle (NP) surface doping by Ce(III/IV). Such doping of Ce(III/IV) cations enables one to exploit their quite rich coordination chemistry for ligand coordinative binding. In fact, they were shown to act as powerful Lewis acid centers for attaching any organic (Lewis base) ligand such as a 25 kDa branched PEI polymer. Resulting conPEI25-CAN-?-Fe2O3 NPs have been fully characterized before a successful implementation of siRNA loading and cell delivery/gene silencing using a well-known dual luciferase system. This attractive result emphasized their significant potential as an NP platform technology toward additional MRI and/or drug delivery (peptide)-relating end applications. However, due to their high positive charge, PEI polymers can cause severe in vivo toxicity due to their interaction with negatively charged red blood cells (RBC), resulting in RBC aggregation and lysis, leading to thrombosis and, finally, to animal death. In order to mitigate these acute toxic effects, two different types of surface modifications were performed. One modification included the controlled oxidation of 0.1-5% of the PEI amines before or after conjugation to the NPs, using hydrogen peroxide or potassium persulfate. The other type of modification was the addition of a second biocompatible polyanionic polymer to the PEI grafted NPs, based on the concept of a layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. This modification is based on the coordination of another polyanionic polymer on the NPs surface in order to create a combined hybrid PEI and polyanionic polymer nanosystem. In both cases, the surface modification successfully mitigated the NP acute in vivo toxicity, without compromising the silencing efficiency. PMID:26120905

  9. Oxidants and oxidation in the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The 1994 BOC Priestley Conference was held at Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, from June 24 through June 27, 1994. This conference, managed by the American Chemical Society (ACS), was a joint celebration with the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) commemorating Joseph Priestley's arrival in the U.S. and his discovery of oxygen. The basic theme of the conference was 'Oxidants and Oxidation in the Earth's Atmosphere,' with a keynote lecture on the history of ozone. A distinguished group of U.S. and international atmospheric chemists addressed the issues dominating current research and policy agendas. Topics crucial to the atmospheric chemistry of global change and local and regional air pollution were discussed. The program for the conference included four technical sessions on the following topics: (1) Oxidative Fate of Atmospheric Pollutants; (2) Photochemical Smog and Ozone; (3) Stratospheric Ozone; and (4) Global Tropospheric Ozone.

  10. Oxidation characteristics of molybdenum-zirconium oxide cermets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heitzinger, B.

    1984-01-01

    The oxidation of molybdenum is affected by the factors of temperature, the oxygen pressure in the oxidizing atmosphere, and the time of exposure. Studies of the oxidation characteristics of Mo show that the oxidation rate increases strongly when the temperature exceeds 600 C. Investigations of the behavior of cermets with various percentages of zirconium oxide are discussed, taking into account oxidation conditions at temperatures under and above the melting point of molybdenum trioxide.

  11. Oxide dispersion strengthened superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, T. K.; Kim, Y. G.; Curwick, L. R.; Merrick, H. F.

    1981-01-01

    MA6000E alloy is strengthened at high temperatures by dispersion of yttrium oxide. Strength properties are about twice those of conventional nickel base alloys. Good thermal fatigue, intermediate temperature strength, and good oxidation resistance give alloy unique combination of benefits. Application in aircraft gas turbine is improved.

  12. Lagoons and Oxidation Ponds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. This review covers lagoons and oxidation ponds, and it includes some areas such as improving the effluents from ponds, stabilization ponds, aerated lagoons, and oxidation ditches. A list of 36 references is also presented. (HM)

  13. OXIDATION OF CHLORINATED ETHANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The oxidation products of seven chlorinated ethanes were identified using Fourier Transform Spectroscopy and long path infrared techniques. Photo-oxidation of each chlorinated ethane was initiated by chlorine atoms in one atmosphere of dry air. The chlorinated reaction products i...

  14. High dielectric constant oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J.

    2004-12-01

    The scaling of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) transistors has led to the silicon dioxide layer used as a gate dielectric becoming so thin (1.4 nm) that its leakage current is too large. It is necessary to replace the SiO{2} with a physically thicker layer of oxides of higher dielectric constant (kappa) or `high K' gate oxides such as hafnium oxide and hafnium silicate. Little was known about such oxides, and it was soon found that in many respects they have inferior electronic properties to SiO{2}, such as a tendency to crystallise and a high concentration of electronic defects. Intensive research is underway to develop these oxides into new high quality electronic materials. This review covers the choice of oxides, their structural and metallurgical behaviour, atomic diffusion, their deposition, interface structure and reactions, their electronic structure, bonding, band offsets, mobility degradation, flat band voltage shifts and electronic defects. The use of high K oxides in capacitors of dynamic random access memories is also covered.

  15. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  16. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    DOEpatents

    Nyaiesh, A.R.; Garwin, E.L.

    1986-08-04

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150A are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  17. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    DOEpatents

    Garwin, Edward L. (Los Altos, CA); Nyaiesh, Ali R. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1988-01-01

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150.ANG. are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  18. Oxidative damage and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wiczkowski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen is an essential element to conduct life processes but some of the metabolic byproducts e.g. reactive oxygen species (ROS), are toxic for living organisms. Endogenous ROS are produced e.g. reduction of dioxygen; some exogenous sources of radicals also exist, including nicotine and ionizing radiation. Reactive oxygen species include superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical, singlet oxygen, hydrogen peroxide and hypochlorous acid. Carcinogenesis is a multistep process. The exact reasons for the development of cancer are still unknown. Many factors contribute to the development of carcinogenesis, one of which is oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is defined as an imbalance between oxidizing agents (pro-oxidants) and antioxidants, agents that protect biomolecules against injury by pro-oxidants. When reactive oxygen species are overproduced it can damage nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. ROS are considered as a significant class of carcinogens participating in cancer initiation, promotion and progression. PMID:23788885

  19. Organic Oxidations Using Geomimicry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ziming; Hartnett, Hilairy E; Shock, Everett L; Gould, Ian R

    2015-12-18

    Oxidations of phenylacetic acid to benzaldehyde, benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde, and benzaldehyde to benzoic acid have been observed, in water as the solvent and using only copper(II) chloride as the oxidant. The reactions are performed at 250 °C and 40 bar, conditions that mimic hydrothermal reactions that are geochemically relevant. Speciation calculations show that the oxidizing agent is not freely solvated copper(II) ions, but complexes of copper(II) with chloride and carboxylate anions. Measurements of the reaction stoichiometries and also of substituent effects on reactivity allow plausible mechanisms to be proposed. These oxidation reactions are relevant to green chemistry in that they proceed in high chemical yield in water as the solvent and avoid the use of toxic heavy metal oxidizing reagents. PMID:26561976

  20. Biocompatibility of Graphene Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kan; Ruan, Jing; Song, Hua; Zhang, Jiali; Wo, Yan; Guo, Shouwu; Cui, Daxiang

    2011-12-01

    Herein, we report the effects of graphene oxides on human fibroblast cells and mice with the aim of investigating graphene oxides' biocompatibility. The graphene oxides were prepared by the modified Hummers method and characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscope and atomic force microscopy. The human fibroblast cells were cultured with different doses of graphene oxides for day 1 to day 5. Thirty mice divided into three test groups (low, middle, high dose) and one control group were injected with 0.1, 0.25, and 0.4 mg graphene oxides, respectively, and were raised for 1 day, 7 days, and 30 days, respectively. Results showed that the water-soluble graphene oxides were successfully prepared; graphene oxides with dose less than 20 ?g/mL did not exhibit toxicity to human fibroblast cells, and the dose of more than 50 ?g/mL exhibits obvious cytotoxicity such as decreasing cell adhesion, inducing cell apoptosis, entering into lysosomes, mitochondrion, endoplasm, and cell nucleus. Graphene oxides under low dose (0.1 mg) and middle dose (0.25 mg) did not exhibit obvious toxicity to mice and under high dose (0.4 mg) exhibited chronic toxicity, such as 4/9 mice death and lung granuloma formation, mainly located in lung, liver, spleen, and kidney, almost could not be cleaned by kidney. In conclusion, graphene oxides exhibit dose-dependent toxicity to cells and animals, such as inducing cell apoptosis and lung granuloma formation, and cannot be cleaned by kidney. When graphene oxides are explored for in vivo applications in animal or human body, its biocompatibility must be considered.

  1. Oxidative stress in COPD.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Paul A; Barnes, Peter J

    2013-07-01

    Oxidative stress is now recognized as a major predisposing factor in the pathogenesis of COPD. Existing therapies for COPD are ineffective at halting disease progression, with bronchodilators being the mainstay of pharmacotherapy, providing symptomatic relief only. It is, therefore, important for a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms by which oxidative stress drives disease pathogenesis to develop novel and more effective therapies. Antioxidant capacity in COPD is substantially reduced as a result of cigarette smoking and exacerbations, with oxidative stress persisting long after the cessation of cigarette smoking or exacerbation, due to the continued production of reactive oxygen species from endogenous sources. We discuss (1) how oxidative stress arises in the lung, (2) how it is neutralized, (3) what genetic factors may predispose to the development of COPD, and (4) how this impacts inflammation and autoimmunity in the development of emphysema and small airways disease. Finally, various strategies have been considered to neutralize the increased oxidative burden present in COPD. This review highlights why current antioxidant strategies have so far failed and what promising alternatives are on the horizon. Moreover, a number of studies have shown that there is no single "magic bullet" to combat oxidative stress, but instead a combination therapy, targeting oxidative stress in the various subcellular compartments, may prove to be more effective in COPD. PMID:23880677

  2. Transpassive oxidation of pyrite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Ximeng; Bodily, D.M.; Wadsworth, M.E. . College of Mines and Earth Sciences)

    1993-07-01

    The electrochemical behavior of mineral and coal pyrites in basic borate/sulfate solutions was investigated using cyclic voltammetry with both stationary and rotating disk electrode. Emphasis was centered on transpassive oxidation. In the transpassive region, 0.4 to 0.8 V (SCE), aggressive oxidation of pyrite occurred. The reaction products in this region are Fe(III) oxides, sulfate ion, and partially oxidized sulfur intermediates. The formation of sulfur and polysulfides was identified by in situ Raman spectroscopy. Exposure of pyrite to anodic potentials higher than the transpassive region resulted in rapid oxidation of sulfur intermediates to sulfate ion. The effect of electrode rotation speed, electrode precondition time, and upper potential of the scan in the transpassive region was observed to be critical to the formation of sulfur intermediates. Sulfur intermediates, formed in the transpassive region, dramatically affected subsequent oxidation reactions occurring in the lower potential region. The magnitude of two dominant oxidation peaks, a ferrous hydroxide peak and an iron sulfide peak, observed in this region correlated directly with the quantity of sulfur intermediates formed in the transpassive region. This effect was less pronounced for coal pyrites compared to mineral pyrite.

  3. Simulation and comparative study on the oxidation kinetics of atrazine by UV/H?O?, UV/HSO?? and UV/S?O?²?.

    PubMed

    Luo, Congwei; Ma, Jun; Jiang, Jin; Liu, Yongze; Song, Yang; Yang, Yi; Guan, Yinghong; Wu, Daoji

    2015-09-01

    This study comparatively investigated atrazine (ATZ) degradation by irradiation at the wavelength of 254 nm in the presence of peroxides including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), peroxymonosulfate (HSO5(-)), and persulfate (S2O8(2-)) at various initial ATZ concentrations and oxidant dosages. The effects of water matrix, such as carbonate/bicarbonate (HCO3(-)/CO3(2-)), chloride ions (Cl(-)), and natural organic matter (NOM), were evaluated on these three advanced oxidation processes. A simple steady-state kinetic model was developed based on the initial rates of ATZ destruction, which could well describe the apparent pseudo-first-order rate constants (k(app), s(-1)) of ATZ degradation in these three processes. The specific roles of reactive species (i.e., HO·, SO4(-·), CO3(-·), and Cl2(-·)) under various experimental conditions were quantitatively evaluated based on their steady-state concentrations obtained from this model. Modeling results showed that the steady-state concentrations of HO· and SO4(-·) decreased with the increase of CO3(2-)/HCO3(-) concentration, and the relative contribution of HO· to ATZ degradation significantly decreased in UV/H2O2 and UV/HSO5(-) systems. On the other hand, the scavenging effect of HCO3(-)/CO3(2-) on the relative contribution of SO4(-·) to ATZ degradation was lower than that on HO·. The presence of Cl(-) (0.5-10 mM) significantly scavenged SO4(-·) but had slightly scavenging effect on HO· at the present experimental pH, resulting in greater decrease of k(app) in the UV/S2O8(2-) than UV/H2O2 and UV/HSO5(-) systems. Higher levels of Cl2(-·) were generated in the UV/S2O8(2-) than those in the UV/H2O2 and UV/HSO5(-) systems at the same Cl(-) concentrations. NOM significantly decreased k(app) due to its effects of competitive UV absorption and radical scavenging with the latter one being dominant. These results improve the understanding of the effects of water constituents for ATZ degradation in the UV-based oxidation processes. PMID:25996757

  4. Lipid oxidation induced oxidative degradation of cereal beta-glucan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Jie; Mäkelä, Noora; Maina, Ndegwa Henry; Lampi, Anna-Maija; Sontag-Strohm, Tuula

    2016-04-15

    In food systems, lipid oxidation can cause oxidation of other molecules. This research for the first time investigated oxidative degradation of ?-glucan induced by lipid oxidation using an oil-in-water emulsion system which simulated a multi-phased aqueous food system containing oil and ?-glucan. Lipid oxidation was monitored using peroxide value and hexanal production while ?-glucan degradation was evaluated by viscosity and molecular weight measurements. The study showed that while lipid oxidation proceeded, ?-glucan degradation occurred. Emulsions containing ?-glucan, oil and ferrous ion showed significant viscosity and molecular weight decrease after 1week of oxidation at room temperature. Elevated temperature (40°C) enhanced the oxidation reactions causing higher viscosity drop. In addition, the presence of ?-glucan appeared to retard the hexanal production in lipid oxidation. The study revealed that lipid oxidation may induce the degradation of ?-glucan in aqueous food systems where ?-glucan and lipids co-exist. PMID:26675874

  5. Oxidative acylation using thioacids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1997-01-01

    Several important prebiotic reactions, including the coupling of amino acids into polypeptides by the formation of amide linkages, involve acylation. Theae reactions present a challenge to the understanding of prebiotic synthesis. Condensation reactions relying on dehydrating agents are either inefficient in aqueous solution or require strongly acidic conditions and high temperatures. Activated amino acids such as thioester derivatives have therefore been suggested as likely substrates for prebiotic peptide synthesis. Here we propose a closely related route to amide bond formation involving oxidative acylation by thioacids. We find that phenylalanine, leucine and phenylphosphate are acylated efficiently in aqueous solution by thioacetic acid and an oxidizing agent. From a prebiotic point of view, oxidative acylation has the advantage of proceeding efficiently in solution and under mild conditions. We anticipate that oxidative acylation should prove to be a general method for activating carboxylic acids, including amino acids.

  6. Mercuric oxide poisoning

    MedlinePLUS

    Mercuric oxide may be found in some: Button batteries (batteries containing mercury are no longer sold in the ... long-term injury Any person who swallowed a battery will need immediate x-rays to make sure ...

  7. Oxidative Stress in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sahiner, Umit M; Birben, Esra; Erzurum, Serpil; Sackesen, Cansin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Asthma is a chronic inflammatory lung disease that results in airflow limitation, hyperreactivity, and airway remodeling. There is strong evidence that an imbalance between the reducing and oxidizing systems favoring a more oxidative state is present in asthma. Endogenous and exogenous reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical, hypohalite radical, and hydrogen peroxide, and reactive nitrogen species, such as nitric oxide, peroxynitrite, and nitrite, play a major role in the airway inflammation and are determinants of asthma severity. Asthma is also associated with decreased antioxidant defenses, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge and discuss the current and future strategies for the modulation of oxidative stress in asthma. PMID:23268432

  8. Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System

    DOEpatents

    Gentile, Charles A. (Plainsboro, NJ), Guttadora, Gregory L. (Highland Park, NJ), Parker, John J. (Medford, NJ)

    2006-02-07

    The Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System, OTDS, provides a method and apparatus for reduction of tritium surface contamination on various items. The OTDS employs ozone gas as oxidizing agent to convert elemental tritium to tritium oxide. Tritium oxide vapor and excess ozone gas is purged from the OTDS, for discharge to atmosphere or transport to further process. An effluent stream is subjected to a catalytic process for the decomposition of excess ozone to diatomic oxygen. One of two configurations of the OTDS is employed: dynamic apparatus equipped with agitation mechanism and large volumetric capacity for decontamination of light items, or static apparatus equipped with pressurization and evacuation capability for decontamination of heavier, delicate, and/or valuable items.

  9. Alkane oxidation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Myers, H.K. Jr.; Suld, G.; Langdale, W.A

    1989-02-07

    This invention involves HPA and POA catalyzed, selective oxidation of alkanes with oxygen in the liquid phase at relatively mild conditions (usually under 200/sup 0/C) to a product rich in alcohol and with little or no burn of alkane to carbon oxides. The HPAs and POAs are promoted with certain metals and/or with an azide and may possess certain other modifications from a conventional HPA or POA.

  10. Controlled CO preferential oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, M.A.; Hoch, M.M.

    1997-06-10

    Method is described for controlling the supply of air to a PROX (PReferential OXidation for CO cleanup) reactor for the preferential oxidation in the presence of hydrogen wherein the concentration of the hydrogen entering and exiting the PROX reactor is monitored, the difference there between correlated to the amount of air needed to minimize such difference, and based thereon the air supply to the PROX reactor adjusted to provide such amount and minimize such difference. 2 figs.

  11. Silver(II) Oxide or Silver(I,III) Oxide?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudela, David

    2008-01-01

    The often called silver peroxide and silver(II) oxide, AgO or Ag[subscript 2]O[subscript 2], is actually a mixed oxidation state silver(I,III) oxide. A thermochemical cycle, with lattice energies calculated within the "volume-based" thermodynamic approach, explain why the silver(I,III) oxide is more stable than the hypothetical silver(II) oxide.…

  12. Staphylococcal response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Gaupp, Rosmarie; Ledala, Nagender; Somerville, Greg A.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococci are a versatile genus of bacteria that are capable of causing acute and chronic infections in diverse host species. The success of staphylococci as pathogens is due in part to their ability to mitigate endogenous and exogenous oxidative and nitrosative stress. Endogenous oxidative stress is a consequence of life in an aerobic environment; whereas, exogenous oxidative and nitrosative stress are often due to the bacteria's interaction with host immune systems. To overcome the deleterious effects of oxidative and nitrosative stress, staphylococci have evolved protection, detoxification, and repair mechanisms that are controlled by a network of regulators. In this review, we summarize the cellular targets of oxidative stress, the mechanisms by which staphylococci sense oxidative stress and damage, oxidative stress protection and repair mechanisms, and regulation of the oxidative stress response. When possible, special attention is given to how the oxidative stress defense mechanisms help staphylococci control oxidative stress in the host. PMID:22919625

  13. Metal oxide-polymer composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellinghoff, Stephen T. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method of making metal oxide clusters in a single stage by reacting a metal oxide with a substoichiometric amount of an acid in the presence of an oxide particle growth terminator and solubilizer. A method of making a ceramer is also disclosed in which the metal oxide clusters are reacted with a functionalized polymer. The resultant metal oxide clusters and ceramers are also disclosed.

  14. Metal oxide-polymer composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellinghoff, Stephen T. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method of making metal oxide clusters in a single stage by reacting a metal oxide with a substoichiometric amount of an acid in the presence of an oxide particle growth terminator and solubilizer. A method of making a ceramer is also disclosed in which the metal oxide clusters are reacted with a functionalized polymer. The resultant metal oxide clusters and ceramers are also disclosed.

  15. Stabilized tin-oxide-based oxidation/reduction catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Leighty, Bradley D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Schryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor); Gulati, Suresh T. (Inventor); Summers, Jerry C. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The invention described herein involves a novel approach to the production of oxidation/reduction catalytic systems. The present invention serves to stabilize the tin oxide reducible metal-oxide coating by co-incorporating at least another metal-oxide species, such as zirconium. In one embodiment, a third metal-oxide species is incorporated, selected from the group consisting of cerium, lanthanum, hafnium, and ruthenium. The incorporation of the additional metal oxide components serves to stabilize the active tin-oxide layer in the catalytic process during high-temperature operation in a reducing environment (e.g., automobile exhaust). Moreover, the additional metal oxides are active components due to their oxygen-retention capabilities. Together, these features provide a mechanism to extend the range of operation of the tin-oxide-based catalyst system for automotive applications, while maintaining the existing advantages.

  16. Aging and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Virginia B C; Barros, Silvia B M; Chan, Sandra S; Rodrigues, Luciano; Giavarotti, Leandro; Abud, Ronaldo L; Deucher, Guilherme P

    2004-01-01

    The scientific establishment has been discussing the relationship between aging and oxidative stress for quite some time now. While we are still far from a general agreement about this subject, there is an impressive amount of data collected that can be used to draw a compelling picture of the events that take place during the human aging process and their correlation with the oxidant status of the organism. In this review, we bring forth the results of some key studies that can help to elucidate the aging-oxidative stress puzzle, as well as to explain which are the fundamental events in this interplay and why their causal relationships remain so elusive. We also put forward here data on the systemic oxidative stress status of a group of 503 healthy human subjects. The data consist of the plasma levels of TBARS and of the nutritional antioxidants, alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene and ascorbic acid, and of the activity of the antioxidant enzymes, Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase, of red blood cells. The data indicate that a moderate situation of oxidative stress gradually develops during human aging. PMID:15051312

  17. Nonaqueous Catalytic Water Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zuofeng; Concepcion, Javier J.; Luo, Hanlin; Hull, Jonathan F.; Paul, Amit; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2010-11-23

    The complex [Ru(Mebimpy)(bpy)(OH2)]2+ [Mebimpy = 2,6-bis(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine] and its 4,4'-(PO3H2CH2)2bpy derivative on oxide electrodes are water oxidation catalysts in propylene carbonate and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) to which water has been added as a limiting reagent. The rate of water oxidation is greatly enhanced relative to that with water as the solvent and occurs by a pathway that is first-order in H2O; an additional pathway that is first-order in acetate appears when TFE is used as the solvent.

  18. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-24

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  19. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir (Bolingbrook, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  20. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-17

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  1. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir (Bolingbrook, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL)

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  2. Ethylene Oxide Gaseous Sterilization

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Robert R.; Shull, James J.

    1962-01-01

    The duration of the equilibration period between admission of water vapor and subsequent introduction of gaseous ethylene oxide to an evacuated sterilizer chamber was studied with respect to its effect on the inactivation of spores of Bacillus subtilis var. niger under simulated practical conditions. Introduction of a water-adsorbing cotton barrier between the spores and an incoming gas mixture of water vapor and ethylene oxide caused a marked increase in the observed thermochemical death time of the spore populations. This effect was negated by admission of water vapor one or more minutes prior to introduction of ethylene oxide gas. Increases in temperature and relative humidity of the system promoted passage of water vapor through the cotton barriers and diminished their effect. PMID:13890660

  3. Ultra-thin titanium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareiß, M.; Kälblein, D.; Jirauschek, C.; Exner, A.; Pavlichenko, I.; Lotsch, B.; Zschieschang, U.; Klauk, H.; Scarpa, G.; Fabel, B.; Porod, W.; Lugli, P.

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of ultra-thin titanium oxide films by plasma-induced surface oxidation. Ellipsometry measurements indicate an oxide thickness of about 2 nm. Electrical characterization was performed on microscale and nanoscale metal-insulator-metal tunneling diodes. Electrical fields up to 22 MV/cm were applied without destroying the titanium oxide films. The current-voltage-characteristic of the diodes are found to be asymmetric with respect to zero bias when employing electrodes with different work functions. The permittivity of the ultra-thin titanium oxide was determined to be less than 6, which is the smallest permittivity that has been reported for titanium oxide.

  4. Low temperature oxidation of plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Art J.; Roussel, Paul

    2013-05-15

    The initial oxidation of gallium stabilized {delta}-plutonium metal at 193 K has been followed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. On exposure to Langmuir quantities of oxygen, plutonium rapidly forms a trivalent oxide followed by a tetravalent plutonium oxide. The growth modes of both oxides have been determined. Warming the sample in vacuum, the tetravalent oxide reduces to the trivalent oxide. The kinetics of this reduction reaction have followed and the activation energy has been determined to be 38.8 kJ mol{sup -1}.

  5. Molecular water oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gratzel, Michael (St. Sulpice, CH); Munavalli, Shekhar (Bel Air, MD); Pern, Fu-Jann (Lakewood, CO); Frank, Arthur J. (Lakewood, CO)

    1993-01-01

    A dimeric composition of the formula: ##STR1## wherein L', L", L'", and L"" are each a bidentate ligand having at least one functional substituent, the ligand selected from bipyridine, phenanthroline, 2-phenylpyridine, bipyrimidine, and bipyrazyl and the functional substituent selected from carboxylic acid, ester, amide, halogenide, anhydride, acyl ketone, alkyl ketone, acid chloride, sulfonic acid, phosphonic acid, and nitro and nitroso groups. An electrochemical oxidation process for the production of the above functionally substituted bidentate ligand diaqua oxo-bridged ruthenium dimers and their use as water oxidation catalysts is described.

  6. Tetraalklylammonium polyoxoanionic oxidation catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E.; Lyons, J.E.; Myers, H.K. Jr.; Shaikh, S.N.

    1998-10-06

    Alkanes are catalytically oxidized in air or oxygen using iron-substituted polyoxoanions (POAs) of the formula: H{sub e{minus}z}[(n-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}){sub 4}N]{sub z}(XM{sub 11}M{prime}O{sub 39}){sup {minus}e}. The M{prime} (e.g., iron(III)/iron(II)) reduction potential of the POAs is affected by selection of the central atom X and the framework metal M, and by the number of tetrabutyl-ammonium groups. Decreased Fe(III)/Fe(II) reduction potential has been found to correlate to increased oxidation activity.

  7. Tetraalykylammonium polyoxoanionic oxidation catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Myers, Jr., Harry K. (Cochranville, PA); Shaikh, Shahid N. (Media, PA)

    1998-01-01

    Alkanes are catalytically oxidized in air or oxygen using iron-substituted polyoxoanions (POAs) of the formula: H.sub.e-z ›(n-C.sub.4 H.sub.9).sub.4 N!.sub.z (XM.sub.11 M'O.sub.39).sup.-e The M' (e.g., iron(III)/iron(II)) reduction potential of the POAs is affected by selection of the central atom X and the framework metal M, and by the number of tetrabutyl-ammonium groups. Decreased Fe(III)/Fe(II) reduction potential has been found to correlate to increased oxidation activity.

  8. Uranium oxidation: characterization of oxides formed by reaction with water

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, E.L. Jr.; Smyrl, N.R.; Condon, J.B.; Eager, M.H.

    1983-04-27

    Three different uranium oxide samples have been characterized with respect to the different preparation techniques. Results show that the water reaction with uranium metal occurs cyclically forming laminar layers of oxide which spall off due to the strain at the oxide/metal interface. Single laminae are released if liquid water is present due to the prizing penetration at the reaction zone. The rate of reaction of water with uranium is directly proportional to the amount of adsorbed water on the oxide product. Rapid transport is effected through the open hydrous oxide product. Dehydration of the hydrous oxide irreversibly forms a more inert oxide which cannot be rehydrated to the degree that prevails in the original hydrous product of uranium oxidation with water. 27 figures.

  9. Nanostructured transition metal oxides useful for water oxidation catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz M; Jiao, Feng

    2013-12-24

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising a nanostructured transition metal oxide capable of oxidizing two H.sub.2O molecules to obtain four protons. In some embodiments of the invention, the composition further comprises a porous matrix wherein the nanocluster of the transition metal oxide is embedded on and/or in the porous matrix.

  10. Oxidative Stress in Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Bosch-Morell; Salvador, Mérida; Amparo, Navea

    2015-01-01

    Myopia affected approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide in 2000, and it is expected to increase to 2.5 billion by 2020. Although optical problems can be corrected by optics or surgical procedures, normal myopia and high myopia are still an unsolved medical problem. They frequently predispose people who have them to suffer from other eye pathologies: retinal detachment, glaucoma, macular hemorrhage, cataracts, and so on being one of the main causes of visual deterioration and blindness. Genetic and environmental factors have been associated with myopia. Nevertheless, lack of knowledge in the underlying physiopathological molecular mechanisms has not permitted an adequate diagnosis, prevention, or treatment to be found. Nowadays several pieces of evidence indicate that oxidative stress may help explain the altered regulatory pathways in myopia and the appearance of associated eye diseases. On the one hand, oxidative damage associated with hypoxia myopic can alter the neuromodulation that nitric oxide and dopamine have in eye growth. On the other hand, radical superoxide or peroxynitrite production damage retina, vitreous, lens, and so on contributing to the appearance of retinopathies, retinal detachment, cataracts and so on. The objective of this review is to suggest that oxidative stress is one of the key pieces that can help solve this complex eye problem. PMID:25922643

  11. Highly oxidized superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Morris, D.E.

    1994-09-20

    Novel superconducting materials in the form of compounds, structures or phases are formed by performing otherwise known synthesis in a highly oxidizing atmosphere rather than that created by molecular oxygen at atmospheric pressure or below. This leads to the successful synthesis of novel superconducting compounds which are thermodynamically stable at the conditions under which they are formed. 16 figs.

  12. Conformations of organophosphine oxides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    De Silva, Nuwan; Zahariev, Federico; Hay, Benjamin P.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2015-07-17

    The conformations of a series of organophosphine oxides, OP(CH3)2R, where R = methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, tert-butyl, vinyl, and phenyl, are predicted using the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Comparison of potential energy surfaces for rotation about P–C bonds with crystal structure data reveals a strong correlation between predicted location and energetics of minima and histograms of dihedral angle distributions observed in the solid state. In addition, the most stable conformers are those that minimize the extent of steric repulsion between adjacent rotor substituents, and the torsional barriers tend to increase with the steric bulk of the rotating alkyl group. MM3 forcemore »field parameters were adjusted to fit the MP2 results, providing a fast and accurate model for predicting organophosphine oxides shapes—an essential part of understanding the chemistry of these compounds. As a result, the predictive power of the modified MM3 model was tested against MP2/cc-pVTZ conformations for triethylphosphine oxide, OP(CH2CH3)3, and triphenylphosphine oxide, OP(Ph)3.« less

  13. Conformations of organophosphine oxides

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Nuwan; Zahariev, Federico; Hay, Benjamin P.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2015-07-17

    The conformations of a series of organophosphine oxides, OP(CH3)2R, where R = methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, tert-butyl, vinyl, and phenyl, are predicted using the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Comparison of potential energy surfaces for rotation about P–C bonds with crystal structure data reveals a strong correlation between predicted location and energetics of minima and histograms of dihedral angle distributions observed in the solid state. In addition, the most stable conformers are those that minimize the extent of steric repulsion between adjacent rotor substituents, and the torsional barriers tend to increase with the steric bulk of the rotating alkyl group. MM3 force field parameters were adjusted to fit the MP2 results, providing a fast and accurate model for predicting organophosphine oxides shapes—an essential part of understanding the chemistry of these compounds. As a result, the predictive power of the modified MM3 model was tested against MP2/cc-pVTZ conformations for triethylphosphine oxide, OP(CH2CH3)3, and triphenylphosphine oxide, OP(Ph)3.

  14. Tributyltin oxide (TBTO)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW TRIBUTYLTIN OXIDE ( CAS No . 56 - 35 - 9 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) July 1997 . U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington D.C . TABLE OF CONTENTS Contributors and Reviewers Foreword 1.0 Introduction 1 2.0 Chemica

  15. Highly oxidized superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

    1994-01-01

    Novel superconducting materials in the form of compounds, structures or phases are formed by performing otherwise known syntheses in a highly oxidizing atmosphere rather than that created by molecular oxygen at atmospheric pressure or below. This leads to the successful synthesis of novel superconducting compounds which are thermodynamically stable at the conditions under which they are formed.

  16. CONTROLLING NITROGEN OXIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent research indicates that nitrogen oxides (NOx) could be one of the most troublesome air pollutants of the 1980's. More than 20 million metric tons of NOx are annually polluting our air as a result of the widespread combustion of fossil fuels in power plants, industrial boil...

  17. Doped zinc oxide microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jr., Wesley D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bond, Walter D. (Knoxville, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1993-01-01

    A new composition and method of making same for a doped zinc oxide microsphere and articles made therefrom for use in an electrical surge arrestor which has increased solid content, uniform grain size and is in the form of a gel.

  18. Doped zinc oxide microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Bond, W.D.; Lauf, R.J.

    1993-12-14

    A new composition and method of making same for a doped zinc oxide microsphere and articles made therefrom for use in an electrical surge arrestor which has increased solid content, uniform grain size and is in the form of a gel. 4 figures.

  19. Staged membrane oxidation reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2012-09-11

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

  20. Staged membrane oxidation reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2013-04-16

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

  1. Experiments with Unusual Oxidation States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, G. B.

    1975-01-01

    Describes four synthesis experiments, adapted for the general chemistry laboratory, in which compounds in unusual oxidation are prepared. The abnormal oxidation states involved in the synthesis products are: silver (II), chromium (II), lead (IV), and bromine (I). (MLH)

  2. Staged membrane oxidation reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2014-05-20

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

  3. OXIDATIVE TREATMENT OF INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper defines industrial waste treatment process as falling into categories of oxidative destruction, reductive destruction, and non-destructive, separation operations. The various oxidative approaches, including biological, chemical and thermal methods, are then discussed i...

  4. Active oxide nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicken, Matthew J.

    Materials that can be manipulated electrically or mechanically to induce a change in their intrinsic properties are highly relevant when suitably integrated with current technologies. These "active" materials, such as oxide-based ferroelectrics or materials with easily accessible changes of phase, find extensive use as mechanical resonators, solid-state memories, and optical modulators. Barium titanate, a tetragonal ferroelectric at room temperature, is a prime example of a material both mechanically and optically active. This thesis deals primarily with the deposition of active, oxide-based materials and their integration into device structures where either the mechanical or optical properties are exploited. The technologically interesting paradigms within which these active oxide materials have been investigated are microelectromechanical systems, plasmonics, and metamaterials. Microelectromechanical systems are devices that have been micromachined and rely on an applied voltage to induce a mechanical response. Mechanically active materials, such as piezoelectrics or ferroelectrics, can increase the response of these devices. Plasmonics deals with electromagnetic waves resonantly coupled into free electron oscillations at a metal-dielectric interface or metal nanoparticle. Coupling to these resonant modes allows surface plasmon polaritons to propagate along the metal with a nonlinear dispersion. Metamaterials are ordered, subwavelength, metal inclusions in a dielectric, which respond collectively to electromagnetic radiation. This response can yield a material permittivity or permeability not found in nature. The optical properties of metamaterials lead to effects such as negative index response and super lensing, and can be used to design optical cloaking structures. Here, devices utilizing these effects are investigated with an eye toward tuning or switching their resonant response using optically active oxide thin films. This manuscript follows the evolution of active oxide thin films from deposition, through design of plasmonic devices and active metamaterials, finite difference modeling of these structures, and finally experimental validation. First, deposition and material integration techniques for oxide-based thin films will be discussed. The role of molecular beam epitaxy, pulsed laser deposition, and ion beam assisted deposition as material growth techniques are investigated. Development of a multitude of oxide materials using these techniques including barium titanate, strontium ruthenate, vanadium oxide, and magnesium oxide will be covered. The following two sections deal with the mechanical and optical properties of barium titanate thin films as they are studied and utilized to design and fabricate active devices. Films were characterized mechanically, using nanoindentation and piezoresponse force microscopy, and optically with variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry. The subsequent section deals with the design, fabrication, and experimental validation of an active optical device based on surface plasmon polariton wavevector modulation via electrooptic modulation of a barium titanate thin film. Interferometers based on pairs of parallel slits fabricated in silver films on barium titanate are used to investigate optical modulation due to both domain switching and the electrooptic effect. Finally, active metamaterials are discussed through the investigation of a new material, vanadium oxide, as it is deposited and characterized, and the results used to design and fabricate active, split-ring resonator metamaterial structures.

  5. REVIEW OF PLUTONIUM OXIDATION LITERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.

    2009-11-12

    A brief review of plutonium oxidation literature was conducted. The purpose of the review was to ascertain the effect of oxidation conditions on oxide morphology to support the design and operation of the PDCF direct metal oxidation (DMO) furnace. The interest in the review was due to a new furnace design that resulted in oxide characteristics that are different than those of the original furnace. Very little of the published literature is directly relevant to the DMO furnace operation, which makes assimilation of the literature data with operating conditions and data a convoluted task. The oxidation behavior can be distilled into three regimes, a low temperature regime (RT to 350 C) with a relatively slow oxidation rate that is influenced by moisture, a moderate temperature regime (350-450 C) that is temperature dependent and relies on more or less conventional oxidation growth of a partially protective oxide scale, and high temperature oxidation (> 500 C) where the metal autocatalytically combusts and oxidizes. The particle sizes obtained from these three regimes vary with the finest being from the lowest temperature. It is surmised that the slow growth rate permits significant stress levels to be achieved that help break up the oxides. The intermediate temperatures result in a fairly compact scale that is partially protective and that grows to critical thickness prior to fracturing. The growth rate in this regime may be parabolic or paralinear, depending on the oxidation time and consequently the oxide thickness. The high temperature oxidation is invariant in quiescent or nearly quiescent conditions due to gas blanketing while it accelerates with temperature under flowing conditions. The oxide morphology will generally consist of fine particles (<15 {micro}m), moderately sized particles (15 < x < 250 {micro}m) and large particles (> 250 {micro}m). The particle size ratio is expected to be < 5%, 25%, and 70% for fine, medium and large particles, respectively, for metal temperatures in the 500-600 C range.

  6. Doped palladium containing oxidation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2014-02-18

    A supported oxidation catalyst includes a support having a metal oxide or metal salt, and mixed metal particles thereon. The mixed metal particles include first particles including a palladium compound, and second particles including a precious metal group (PMG) metal or PMG metal compound, wherein the PMG metal is not palladium. The oxidation catalyst may also be used as a gas sensor.

  7. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Sulfur oxidizers dominate carbon fixation

    E-print Network

    Hansell, Dennis

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Sulfur oxidizers dominate carbon fixation at a biogeochemical hot spot in the dark clade of marine gamma-proteobacterial sulfur oxidizers (GSOs) are distributed throughout proteins for sulfur oxidation (adenosine phosphosulfate reductase, sox (sulfur oxidizing system

  8. Coupled mechanical-oxidation modeling during silicon thermal oxidation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Xian-Cheng; Tu, Shan-Tung

    2015-09-01

    This work provided an analytical model to solve the coupled mechanical-oxidation problem during the silicon thermal oxidation process. The silicon thermal oxidation behavior under two different mechanical load conditions, i.e., constant strain and uniaxial stress, were considered. The variations of oxide stress and scale thickness along with oxidation time were predicted. During modeling, all the effects of stress accumulation due to growth strain, stress relaxation due to viscous flow and the external load on the scale growth rate were taken into consideration. Results showed that the existence of external loads had an obvious influence on the oxide stress and scale thickness. Generally, tensile stress or strain accelerated the oxidant diffusion process. However, the reaction rate at the Si/SiO2 interface was retarded under uniaxial stress, which was not found in the case of constant strain load.

  9. Oxides Heterostructures for Nanoelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    C Dubourdieu; I Gelard; O Salicio; G Saint-Girons; B Vilquin; G Hollinger

    2011-12-31

    We summarise in this paper the work of two groups focusing on the synthesis and characterisation of functional oxide for nanoelectronic applications. In the first section, we discuss the growth by liquid-injection MOCVD of oxides heterostructures. Interface engineering for the minimisation of silicate formation during the growth of polycrystalline SrTiO{sub 3} on Si is first presented. It is realised via the change of reactant flow or chemical nature at the Si surface. We then report on the epitaxy on oxide substrates of manganites films and superlattices and on their magnetic and electrical properties. La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.8}MnO{sub 3-{delta}} as well as multiferroic hexagonal ReMnO{sub 3} manganites are considered. We show that the film thickness and related strain may be used to tune the properties. Finally, we demonstrate the growth of MgO nanowires by CVD at a moderate temperature of 600 C, using gold as a catalyst. In the second section, we discuss the growth of epitaxial oxide heterostructures by MBE. First, the direct epitaxy of SrTiO{sub 3} on Si is considered. Issues and control of the SrTiO{sub 3}/Si interface are discussed. An abrupt interface is achieved. We show that SrTiO{sub 3} on Si can be used as a buffer layer for the epitaxy of various perovskite oxides such as LaAlO{sub 3} or La{sub 0.7}Sr0.3MnO{sub 3}. La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} films are ferromagnetic and metallic at room temperature. The epitaxial growth of complex oxides on Si wafers opens up the route to the integration of a wide variety of functionalities in nanoelectronics. Finally, we discuss the monolithic integration of III-V compounds such as InP on Si using epitaxial SrTiO{sub 3} buffer layers for the future integration of optics on Si.

  10. Oxidized Phosphatidylserine: Production and Bioactivities

    PubMed Central

    Matsura, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    Recent development of analytical methods for lipid hydroperoxides and preparation of highly pure lipid hydroperoxides have revealed the important new pathophysiological roles of oxidized phospholipids. Generation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent oxidative stress leads to random oxidation of membrane phospholipids. However, recent studies have reported that anionic phospholipid molecules such as phosphatidylserine (PS) and cardiolipin are preferentially oxidized during apoptosis, resulting in efficient apoptosis execution and apoptotic cell clearance by phagocytes. This review is exclusively focused on selective production of oxidized PS (oxPS) during apoptosis as well as the novel roles of oxPS under pathophysiological conditions. PMID:25901098

  11. Enzymatic Oxidation of Methane

    SciTech Connect

    Sirajuddin, S; Rosenzweig, AC

    2015-04-14

    Methane monooxygenases (MMOs) are enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. As potential targets for new gas-to-liquid methane bioconversion processes, MMOs have attracted intense attention in recent years. There are two distinct types of MMO, a soluble, cytoplasmic MMO (sMMO) and a membrane-bound, particulate MMO (pMMO). Both oxidize methane at metal centers within a complex, multisubunit scaffold, but the structures, active sites, and chemical mechanisms are completely different. This Current Topic review article focuses on the overall architectures, active site structures, substrate reactivities, proteinprotein interactions, and chemical mechanisms of both MMOs, with an emphasis on fundamental aspects. In addition, recent advances, including new details of interactions between the sMMO components, characterization of sMMO intermediates, and progress toward understanding the pMMO metal centers are highlighted. The work summarized here provides a guide for those interested in exploiting MMOs for biotechnological applications.

  12. Entropy-stabilized oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, Christina M.; Sachet, Edward; Borman, Trent; Moballegh, Ali; Dickey, Elizabeth C.; Hou, Dong; Jones, Jacob L.; Curtarolo, Stefano; Maria, Jon-Paul

    2015-09-01

    Configurational disorder can be compositionally engineered into mixed oxide by populating a single sublattice with many distinct cations. The formulations promote novel and entropy-stabilized forms of crystalline matter where metal cations are incorporated in new ways. Here, through rigorous experiments, a simple thermodynamic model, and a five-component oxide formulation, we demonstrate beyond reasonable doubt that entropy predominates the thermodynamic landscape, and drives a reversible solid-state transformation between a multiphase and single-phase state. In the latter, cation distributions are proven to be random and homogeneous. The findings validate the hypothesis that deliberate configurational disorder provides an orthogonal strategy to imagine and discover new phases of crystalline matter and untapped opportunities for property engineering.

  13. Silver oxide cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaura, T.

    1983-09-20

    The silver oxide cell is constructed so as to dispose, at the cathode side, of a cathodic material layer composed of AgO and a reducing layer for reducing AgO and, at the anode side, of an anodic material layer and an electrolyte layer in a container composed of a cathode can an anode cap and a gasket. The cathodic material layer is covered at the surface thereof with a reduced layer formed by the reduction of AgO. The silver oxide cell enables a discharge on the single voltage level as in Ag/sub 2/O cells, and is appropriate for large-scale production and favorable in workability.

  14. Entropy-stabilized oxides

    PubMed Central

    Rost, Christina M.; Sachet, Edward; Borman, Trent; Moballegh, Ali; Dickey, Elizabeth C.; Hou, Dong; Jones, Jacob L.; Curtarolo, Stefano; Maria, Jon-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Configurational disorder can be compositionally engineered into mixed oxide by populating a single sublattice with many distinct cations. The formulations promote novel and entropy-stabilized forms of crystalline matter where metal cations are incorporated in new ways. Here, through rigorous experiments, a simple thermodynamic model, and a five-component oxide formulation, we demonstrate beyond reasonable doubt that entropy predominates the thermodynamic landscape, and drives a reversible solid-state transformation between a multiphase and single-phase state. In the latter, cation distributions are proven to be random and homogeneous. The findings validate the hypothesis that deliberate configurational disorder provides an orthogonal strategy to imagine and discover new phases of crystalline matter and untapped opportunities for property engineering. PMID:26415623

  15. Oxidation, Reduction, and Deoxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Robert

    In this chapter, methods for oxidation, reduction, and deoxygenation of carbohydrates are presented. In most cases, the reactions have been used on aldoses and their derivatives including glycosides, uronic acids, glycals, and other unsaturated monosaccharides. A number of reactions have also been applied to aldonolactones. The methods include both chemical and enzymatic procedures and some of these can be applied for regioselective transformation of unprotected or partially protected carbohydrates.

  16. Chemical oxidizers treat wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, F.A. )

    1992-12-01

    Based on the inherent benefits of these original oxidation systems, a second generation of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) has emerged. These processes combine key features of the first generation technologies with more sophisticated advances in UV technology, such as the new pulsed plasma xenon flash lamp that emits high-energy, high-intensity UV light. Second generation systems can be equipped with a transmittance controller to prevent lamp fouling or scaling. The coupling of the first generation's technology with the new UV sources provides the rapid destruction of chlorinated and nonchlorinated hydrocarbons and humic acids from contaminated water. It also is effective in the treatment of organic laden gases from soil vapor extraction systems. AOPs may promote the oxidation (and subsequent removal) of heavy metals in water, though few data are available to verify the claim. The success of AOPs, including ozonation with UV light, hydrogen peroxide with UV light and advanced photolysis, is linked with their creation of hydroxyl-free radicals (OH[center dot]) that are effective in eliminating contaminants such as formaldehyde, chlorinated hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. Hydroxyl free-radicals are consumed in microsecond reactions and exhibit little substrate selectivity with the exception of halogenated alkanes such as chloroform. They can act as chain carriers. Given their power, hydroxyl free-radicals react with virtually all organic solutes more quickly (especially in water) than any other oxidants, except fluorine. There are projects that have found the combination of some AOPs to be the most efficient organic destruction techniques for the job. For example, one project successfully remediated groundwater contaminated with gasoline and Number 2 diesel through successive treatments of ozone and hydrogen peroxide with ultraviolet light, followed by granular activated carbon. 5 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. Preparation of oxide superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Preparation of bulk superconductors by cold pressing and sintering of metal oxides has been optimized in this study. A knowledge of phase behavior was used in developing a flux method for growing superconducting single crystals of yttrium and gadolinium based superconductors. Means of achieving single-phase, high-density samples of (Rare Earth)-Ba/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7/ with optimal electronic properties are reviewed. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Controlled CO preferential oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, Mark A. (Pittsford, NY); Hoch, Martin M. (Webster, NY)

    1997-01-01

    Method for controlling the supply of air to a PROX reactor for the preferential oxidation in the presence of hydrogen wherein the concentration of the hydrogen entering and exiting the PROX reactor is monitored, the difference therebetween correlated to the amount of air needed to minimize such difference, and based thereon the air supply to the PROX reactor adjusted to provide such amount and minimize such difference.

  19. Nonisostructural complex oxide heteroepitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Franklin J. Ramanathan, Shriram

    2014-07-01

    The authors present an overview of the fundamentals and representative examples of the growth of epitaxial complex oxide thin films on structurally dissimilar substrates. The authors will delineate how the details of particular crystal structures and symmetry of different oxide surfaces can be employed for a rational approach to the synthesis of nonisostructural epitaxial heterostructures. The concept of oxygen eutaxy can be widely applied. Materials combinations will be split into three categories, and in all cases the films and substrates occur in different crystal structures: (1) common translational and rotational symmetry between the film and substrate planes; (2) translational symmetry mismatch between the substrates and films that is distinct from a simple mismatch in lattice parameters; and (3) rotational symmetry mismatch. In case (1), in principle single-crystalline thin films can be attained despite the films and substrates possessing different crystal structures. In case (2), antiphase boundaries will be prevalent in the thin films. In case (3), thin-film rotational variants that are joined by tilt boundaries will be present. Diffraction techniques to determine crystallographic alignment and epitaxial variants are discussed, and transmission electron microscopy studies to investigate extended defects in the thin films will also be reviewed. The authors end with open problems in this field regarding the structure of oxide interfaces that can be topics for future research.

  20. Oxide Ferromagnetic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogale, Satishchandra

    2006-03-01

    The field of oxide ferromagnetic semiconductors has witnessed tremendous interest and activity over the past few years, especially in the context of realization of intrinsic oxide based diluted magnetic semiconductors (O-DMS). In this talk I will review the important developments in this field, highlighting apparent successes, concerns and questions. Research results obtained by various groups on a number of systems such as transition element (especially Co, Mn, Cr) doped TiO2, ZnO, La1-xSrxTiO3, HfO2 will be discussed including some related device efforts involving spin transport and field induced modulation of magnetization. Some cases of undoped or dual doped oxide films will also be addressed. In the light of the potentially serious possibility of extrinsic effects in most systems the significance of the choice and implementation of an appropriate characterization scheme will also be highlighted. Collaborators : T. Venkatesan, Nigel Browning, Y. V. Idzerda, R. Ramesh, D. K. Kundaliya, S. X. Zhang, L. F. Fu, S. Dhar, A. Lussier, S. R. Shinde, Y. Zhao, M. S. R. Rao, T. Zhao.

  1. Hysteresis-free high rate reactive sputtering of niobium oxide, tantalum oxide, and aluminum oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Särhammar, Erik Berg, Sören; Nyberg, Tomas

    2014-07-01

    This work reports on experimental studies of reactive sputtering from targets consisting of a metal and its oxide. The composition of the targets varied from pure metal to pure oxide of Al, Ta, and Nb. This combines features from both the metal target and oxide target in reactive sputtering. If a certain relation between the metal and oxide parts is chosen, it may be possible to obtain a high deposition rate, due to the metal part, and a hysteresis-free process, due to the oxide part. The aim of this work is to quantify the achievable boost in oxide deposition rate from a hysteresis-free process by using a target consisting of segments of a metal and its oxide. Such an increase has been previously demonstrated for Ti using a homogeneous substoichiometric target. The achievable gain in deposition rate depends on transformation mechanisms from oxide to suboxides due to preferential sputtering of oxygen. Such mechanisms are different for different materials and the achievable gain is therefore material dependent. For the investigated materials, the authors have demonstrated oxide deposition rates that are 1.5–10 times higher than what is possible from metal targets in compound mode. However, although the principle is demonstrated for oxides of Al, Ta, and Nb, a similar behavior is expected for most oxides.

  2. The competing oxide and sub-oxide formation in metal-oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, Patrick; Bierwagen, Oliver

    2015-02-23

    The hetero-epitaxial growth of the n-type semiconducting oxides ?-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}, In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and SnO{sub 2} on c- and r-plane sapphire was performed by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The growth-rate and desorbing flux from the substrate were measured in-situ under various oxygen to metal ratios by laser reflectometry and quadrupole mass spectrometry, respectively. These measurements clarified the role of volatile sub-oxide formation (Ga{sub 2}O, In{sub 2}O, and SnO) during growth, the sub-oxide stoichiometry, and the efficiency of oxide formation for the three oxides. As a result, the formation of the sub-oxides decreased the growth-rate under metal-rich growth conditions and resulted in etching of the oxide film by supplying only metal flux. The flux ratio for the exclusive formation of the sub-oxide (e.g., the p-type semiconductor SnO) was determined, and the efficiency of oxide formation was found to be the highest for SnO{sub 2}, somewhat lower for In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and the lowest for Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Our findings can be generalized to further oxides that possess related sub-oxides.

  3. Iridium oxide-polymer nanocomposite electrode materials for water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Lattach, Youssef; Rivera, Juan Francisco; Bamine, Tahya; Deronzier, Alain; Moutet, Jean-Claude

    2014-08-13

    Nanocomposite anode materials for water oxidation have been readily synthesized by electrodeposition of iridium oxide nanoparticles into poly(pyrrole-alkylammonium) films, previously deposited onto carbon electrodes by oxidative electropolymerization of a pyrrole-alkylammonium monomer. The nanocomposite films were characterized by electrochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. They showed an efficient electrocatalytic activity toward the oxygen evolution reaction. Data from Tafel plots have demonstrated that the catalytic activity of the iridium oxide nanoparticles is maintained following their inclusion in the polymer matrix. Bulk electrolysis of water at carbon foam modified electrodes have shown that the iridium oxide-polymer composite presents a higher catalytic activity and a better operational stability than regular oxide films. PMID:25045786

  4. Oxidative stress and oxidative damage in chemical carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Klaunig, James E. Wang Zemin; Pu Xinzhu; Zhou Shaoyu

    2011-07-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are induced through a variety of endogenous and exogenous sources. Overwhelming of antioxidant and DNA repair mechanisms in the cell by ROS may result in oxidative stress and oxidative damage to the cell. This resulting oxidative stress can damage critical cellular macromolecules and/or modulate gene expression pathways. Cancer induction by chemical and physical agents involves a multi-step process. This process includes multiple molecular and cellular events to transform a normal cell to a malignant neoplastic cell. Oxidative damage resulting from ROS generation can participate in all stages of the cancer process. An association of ROS generation and human cancer induction has been shown. It appears that oxidative stress may both cause as well as modify the cancer process. Recently association between polymorphisms in oxidative DNA repair genes and antioxidant genes (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and human cancer susceptibility has been shown.

  5. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S. (Corvallis, OR); Alman, David E. (Salem, OR)

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800.degree. C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800.degree. C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700.degree. C. at a low cost

  6. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

  7. Role of oxidative stress and nitric oxide in atherothrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Lubos, Edith; Handy, Diane E.; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade basic and clinical research has highlighted the central role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiovascular disease. Enhanced production or attenuated degradation of ROS leads to oxidative stress, a process that affects endothelial and vascular function, and contributes to vascular disease. Nitric oxide (NO), a product of the normal endothelium, is a principal determinant of normal endothelial and vascular function. In states of inflammation, NO production by the vasculature increases considerably and, in conjunction with other ROS, contributes to oxidative stress. This review examines the role of oxidative stress and NO in mechanisms of endothelial and vascular dysfunction with an emphasis on atherothrombosis. PMID:18508590

  8. Zinc oxide varistors and/or resistors

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jr., Wesley D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bond, Walter D. (Knoxville, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1993-01-01

    Varistors and/or resistors that includes doped zinc oxide gel microspheres. The doped zinc oxide gel microspheres preferably have from about 60 to about 95% by weight zinc oxide and from about 5 to about 40% by weight dopants based on the weight of the zinc oxide. The dopants are a plurality of dopants selected from silver salts, boron oxide, silicon oxide and hydrons oxides of aluminum, bismuth, cobalt, chromium, manganese, nickel, and antimony.

  9. Zinc oxide varistors and/or resistors

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Bond, W.D.; Lauf, R.J.

    1993-07-27

    Varistors and/or resistors are described that include doped zinc oxide gel microspheres. The doped zinc oxide gel microspheres preferably have from about 60 to about 95% by weight zinc oxide and from about 5 to about 40% by weight dopants based on the weight of the zinc oxide. The dopants are a plurality of dopants selected from silver salts, boron oxide, silicon oxide and hydrons oxides of aluminum, bismuth, cobalt, chromium, manganese, nickel, and antimony.

  10. Oxidative stress and lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Maselli, R; Grembiale, R D; Pelaia, G; Cuda, G

    2002-01-01

    Several different lung diseases are characterized by an oxidant/antioxidant imbalance, which is a major cause of cell damage. Oxidative stress activates a complex network of intracellular signal transduction pathways involved in the regulation of transcription factors such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) and activator protein-1 (AP-1). Within this context, a key role is played by mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), which are highly expressed by pulmonary endothelial and airway epithelial cells. By exposing these cell lines to oxidant agents, our group has shown that oxidative stress leads to a significant MAPK activation, which can be effectively inhibited by corticosteroids. We believe that studies such as ours may contribute to further elucidate the molecular events underlying the therapeutic action of these drugs in many respiratory disorders caused by oxidative/proinflammatory pathogenic mechanisms. In addition, our findings may help to unveil new anti-oxidant treatments based on MAPK modulation. PMID:12619379

  11. Ultra supercritical steamside oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Alman, David A.; Ochs, Thomas L.

    2004-01-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vision 21 goals. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538 C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620 C. Vision 21 goals include steam temperatures of up to 760 C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems. Emphasis is placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

  12. Heterogeneous Oxidation of Catechol.

    PubMed

    Pillar, Elizabeth A; Zhou, Ruixin; Guzman, Marcelo I

    2015-10-15

    Natural and anthropogenic emissions of aromatic hydrocarbons from biomass burning, agro-industrial settings, and fossil fuel combustion contribute precursors to secondary aerosol formation (SOA). How these compounds are processed under humid tropospheric conditions is the focus of current attention to understand their environmental fate. This work shows how catechol thin films, a model for oxygenated aromatic hydrocarbons present in biomass burning and combustion aerosols, undergo heterogeneous oxidation at the air-solid interface under variable relative humidity (RH = 0-90%). The maximum reactive uptake coefficient of O3(g) by catechol ?O3 = (7.49 ± 0.35) × 10(-6) occurs for 90% RH. Upon exposure of ca. 104-?m thick catechol films to O3(g) mixing ratios between 230 ppbv and 25 ppmv, three main reaction pathways are observed. (1) The cleavage of the 1,2 carbon-carbon bond at the air-solid interface resulting in the formation of cis,cis-muconic acid via primary ozonide and hydroperoxide intermediates. Further direct ozonolysis of cis,cis-muconic yields glyoxylic, oxalic, crotonic, and maleic acids. (2) A second pathway is evidenced by the presence of Baeyer-Villiger oxidation products including glutaconic 4-hydroxy-2-butenoic and 5-oxo-2-pentenoic acids during electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (MS) and ion chromatography MS analyses. (3) Finally, indirect oxidation by in situ produced hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) results in the generation of semiquinone radical intermediates toward the synthesis of polyhydoxylated aromatic rings such as tri-, tetra-, and penta-hydroxybenzene. Remarkably, heavier polyhydroxylated biphenyl and terphenyl products present in the extracted oxidized films result from coupling reactions of semiquinones of catechol and its polyhydroxylated rings. The direct ozonolysis of 1,2,3- and 1,2,4-trihydroxybenezene yields 2- and 3-hydroxy-cis,cis-muconic acid, respectively. The production of 2,4- or 3,4-dihdroxyhex-2-enedioic acid is proposed to result from the sequential processing of cis,cis-muconic acid, 2- and 3-hydroxy-cis,cis-muconic acid. Overall, these reactions contribute precursors to form aqueous SOA from aromatics in atmospheric aerosols and brown clouds. PMID:26403273

  13. Electrolytic oxide reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Barnes, Laurel A; Williamson, Mark A; Willit, James L; Berger, John F

    2015-04-28

    An electrolytic oxide reduction system according to a non-limiting embodiment of the present invention may include a plurality of anode assemblies, a plurality of cathode assemblies, and a lift system configured to engage the anode and cathode assemblies. The cathode assemblies may be alternately arranged with the anode assemblies such that each cathode assembly is flanked by two anode assemblies. The lift system may be configured to selectively engage the anode and cathode assemblies so as to allow the simultaneous lifting of any combination of the anode and cathode assemblies (whether adjacent or non-adjacent).

  14. Semiconducting transition metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Lany, Stephan

    2015-07-22

    Open shell transition metal oxides are usually described as Mott or charge transfer insulators, which are often viewed as being disparate from semiconductors. Based on the premise that the presence of a correlated gap and semiconductivity are not mutually exclusive, this work reviews electronic structure calculations on the binary 3d oxides, so to distill trends and design principles for semiconducting transition metal oxides. This class of materials possesses the potential for discovery, design, and development of novel functional semiconducting compounds, e.g. for energy applications. In order to place the 3d orbitals and the sp bands into an integrated picture, band structure calculations should treat both contributions on the same footing and, at the same time, account fully for electron correlation in the 3d shell. Fundamentally, this is a rather daunting task for electronic structure calculations, but quasi-particle energy calculations in GW approximation offer a viable approach for band structure predictions in these materials. Compared to conventional semiconductors, the inherent multivalent nature of transition metal cations is more likely to cause undesirable localization of electron or hole carriers. Therefore, a quantitative prediction of the carrier self-trapping energy is essential for the assessing the semiconducting properties and to determine whether the transport mechanism is a band-like large-polaron conduction or a small-polaron hopping conduction. An overview is given for the binary 3d oxides on how the hybridization between the 3d crystal field symmetries with the O-p orbitals of the ligands affects the effective masses and the likelihood of electron and hole self-trapping, identifying those situations where small masses and band-like conduction are more likely to be expected. The review concludes with an illustration of the implications of the increased electronic complexity of transition metal cations on the defect physics and doping, using as an example the diversity of possible atomic and magnetic configurations of the O vacancy in TiO(2), and the high levels of hole doping in Co(2)ZnO(4) due to a self-doping mechanism that originates from the multivalence of Co. PMID:26126022

  15. Diluted magnetic oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, XiaoLi; Qi, ShiFei; Jiang, FengXian; Quan, ZhiYong; Xu, XiaoHong

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we review the progress of research on ZnO- and In2O3-based diluted magnetic oxides (DMOs). Firstly, we present the preparation and characterization of DMOs. The former includes the preparation methods and conditions, and the latter includes the characterization techniques for measuring microstructures. Secondly, we introduce the magnetic and transport properties of DMOs, as well as the relationship between them. Thirdly, the origin and mechanism of the ferromagnetism are discussed. Fourthly, we introduce other related work, including computational work and pertinent heterogeneous structures, such as multilayers and magnetic tunnel junctions. Finally, we provide an overview and outlook for DMOs.

  16. Semiconducting transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lany, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    Open shell transition metal oxides are usually described as Mott or charge transfer insulators, which are often viewed as being disparate from semiconductors. Based on the premise that the presence of a correlated gap and semiconductivity are not mutually exclusive, this work reviews electronic structure calculations on the binary 3d oxides, so to distill trends and design principles for semiconducting transition metal oxides. This class of materials possesses the potential for discovery, design, and development of novel functional semiconducting compounds, e.g. for energy applications. In order to place the 3d orbitals and the sp bands into an integrated picture, band structure calculations should treat both contributions on the same footing and, at the same time, account fully for electron correlation in the 3d shell. Fundamentally, this is a rather daunting task for electronic structure calculations, but quasi-particle energy calculations in GW approximation offer a viable approach for band structure predictions in these materials. Compared to conventional semiconductors, the inherent multivalent nature of transition metal cations is more likely to cause undesirable localization of electron or hole carriers. Therefore, a quantitative prediction of the carrier self-trapping energy is essential for the assessing the semiconducting properties and to determine whether the transport mechanism is a band-like large-polaron conduction or a small-polaron hopping conduction. An overview is given for the binary 3d oxides on how the hybridization between the 3d crystal field symmetries with the O-p orbitals of the ligands affects the effective masses and the likelihood of electron and hole self-trapping, identifying those situations where small masses and band-like conduction are more likely to be expected. The review concludes with an illustration of the implications of the increased electronic complexity of transition metal cations on the defect physics and doping, using as an example the diversity of possible atomic and magnetic configurations of the O vacancy in TiO2, and the high levels of hole doping in Co2ZnO4 due to a self-doping mechanism that originates from the multivalence of Co.

  17. Mesoporous Mn- and La-doped cerium oxide/cobalt oxide mixed metal catalysts for methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Susan M; Gholami, Rahman; Smith, Kevin J; MacLachlan, Mark J

    2015-06-01

    New precious-metal-free mesoporous materials were investigated as catalysts for the complete oxidation of methane to carbon dioxide. Mesoporous cobalt oxide was first synthesized using KIT-6 mesoporous silica as a hard template. After removal of the silica, the cobalt oxide was itself used as a hard template to construct cerium oxide/cobalt oxide composite materials. Furthermore, cerium oxide/cobalt oxide composite materials doped with manganese and lanthanum were also prepared. All of the new composite materials retained the hierarchical long-range order of the original KIT-6 template. Temperature-programmed oxidation measurements showed that these cerium oxide/cobalt oxide and doped cerium oxide/cobalt oxide materials are effective catalysts for the total oxidation of methane, with a light-off temperature (T50%) of ?400 °C observed for all of the nanostructured materials. PMID:26000732

  18. Enzymes of respiratory iron oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R. II.

    1991-01-01

    This report focuses on the progress made in three areas of research concerned with enzymes involved in respiratory iron oxidation. The three areas are as follows: development of an improved procedure for the routine large scale culture of iron oxidizing chemolithotrophs based on the in-situ electrolysis of the soluble iron in the growth medium; to perform iron oxidation kinetic studies on whole cells using the oxygen electrode; and to identify, separate, purify, and characterize the individual cellular components.

  19. Metabolism of Nitrogen Oxides in Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlowski, J.; Stein, L. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are key microorganisms in the transformation of nitrogen intermediates in most all environments. Until recently there was very little work done to elucidate the physiology of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria cultivated from variable trophic state environments. With a greater variety of ammonia-oxidizers now in pure culture the importance of comparative physiological and genomic analysis is crucial. Nearly all known physiology of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria lies within the Nitrosomonas genus with Nitrosomonas europaea strain ATCC 19718 as the model. To more broadly characterize and understand the nature of obligate ammonia chemolithotrophy and the contribution of AOB to production of nitrogen oxides, Nitrosomonas spp. and Nitrosospira spp. isolated from variable trophic states and with sequenced genomes, were utilized. Instantaneous ammonia- and hydroxylamine-oxidation kinetics as a function of oxygen and substrate concentration were measured using an oxygen micro-sensor. The pathway intermediates nitric oxide and nitrous oxide were measured in real time using substrate-specific micro-sensors to elucidate whether production of these molecules is stoichiometric with rates of substrate oxidation. Genomic inventory was compared among the strains to identify specific pathways and modules to explain physiological differences in kinetic rates and production of N-oxide intermediates as a condition of their adaptation to different ammonium concentrations. This work provides knowledge of how nitrogen metabolism is differentially controlled in AOB that are adapted to different concentrations of ammonium. Overall, this work will provide further insight into the control of ammonia oxidizing chemolithotrophy across representatives of the Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira genus, which can then be applied to examine additional genome-sequenced AOB isolates.

  20. Continuous lengths of oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, Donald M. (Knoxville, TN); List, III, Frederick A. (Andersonville, TN)

    2000-01-01

    A layered oxide superconductor prepared by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon. A continuous length of a second substrate ribbon is overlaid on the first substrate ribbon. Sufficient pressure is applied to form a bound layered superconductor precursor powder between the first substrate ribbon and the second substrate ribbon. The layered superconductor precursor is then heat treated to establish the oxide superconducting phase. The layered oxide superconductor has a smooth interface between the substrate and the oxide superconductor.

  1. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar (Pleasantville, NY); Holland, Orin Wayne (Lenoir, TN)

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  2. [Oxidative stress and atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Stark, Júlia

    2015-07-12

    Atherosclerosis is a leading cause of death in developed countries. Genetic susceptibility and environmental factors play a role in the pathogenesis. Most of these factors lead to endothelial dysfunction and other pro-atherogenic processes by causing oxidative stress. Atherosclerosis typically develops at the curved and branched regions of the arterial tree, where the laminar blood flow is disturbed. This leads to increased permeability of the endothelium to low density lipoprotein molecules, which accumulate in the intima and are oxidised by vascular cells. Oxidised low density lipoprotein takes part in many phases of atherogenesis: stimulates the binding of monocytes to the endothelium, foam cell formation, the development of plaques, plaque destabilization and thrombotic complications. Since oxidative stress plays an important role in atherogenesis, it has been suggested that antioxidant molecules might have anti-atherogenic function. Many clinical investigations have shown that antioxidants such as N-acetylcystein, vitamin E and C, folic acid, and estrogens can prevent atherosclerosis, however, randomized studies failed to confirm this effect. PMID:26149503

  3. Low Temperature Oxidation Catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    One day soon homeowners everywhere may be protected from deadly carbon monoxide fumes, thanks to a device invented at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. It uses a new class of low-temperature oxidation catalysts to convert carbon monoxide to non-toxic carbon dioxide at room temperature. It can also remove formaldehyde from the air. The catalysts initially were developed for research involving carbon dioxide lasers. Industry already has shown an interest. Rochester Gas and Electric Co., of Rochester, N.Y., has an agreement with NASA Langley to develop a product for habitable spaces such as homes, cars and aircraft. The Mantic Corp., of Salt Lake City, Utah, plans to use them in breathing apparatus, such as firefighter masks. The catalysts also have applications as trace-gas detectors, and in cold-engine emission control. To work, the catalysts - tin oxide and platinum - are applied to a surface. Air passing over the surface reacts with the catalysts, transforming carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. The device requires no energy for operation, doesn't need to be plugged in, has no moving parts and lasts a long time.

  4. Transparent conducting oxide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Alivov, Yahya; Singh, Vivek; Ding, Yuchen; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-09-26

    Thin film or porous membranes made of hollow, transparent, conducting oxide (TCO) nanotubes, with high chemical stability, functionalized surfaces and large surface areas, can provide an excellent platform for a wide variety of nanostructured photovoltaic, photodetector, photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic devices. While large-bandgap oxide semiconductors offer transparency for incident light (below their nominal bandgap), their low carrier concentration and poor conductivity makes them unsuitable for charge conduction. Moreover, materials with high conductivity have nominally low bandgaps and hence poor light transmittance. Here, we demonstrate thin films and membranes made from TiO2 nanotubes heavily-doped with shallow Niobium (Nb) donors (up to 10%, without phase segregation), using a modified electrochemical anodization process, to fabricate transparent conducting hollow nanotubes. Temperature dependent current-voltage characteristics revealed that TiO2 TCO nanotubes, doped with 10% Nb, show metal-like behavior with resistivity decreasing from 6.5 × 10(-4) ?cm at T = 300 K (compared to 6.5 × 10(-1) ?cm for nominally undoped nanotubes) to 2.2 × 10(-4) ?cm at T = 20 K. Optical properties, studied by reflectance measurements, showed light transmittance up to 90%, within wavelength range 400 nm-1000 nm. Nb doping also improves the field emission properties of TCO nanotubes demonstrating an order of magnitude increase in field-emitter current, compared to undoped samples. PMID:25180635

  5. Pristine graphite oxide.

    PubMed

    Dimiev, Ayrat; Kosynkin, Dmitry V; Alemany, Lawrence B; Chaguine, Pavel; Tour, James M

    2012-02-01

    Graphite oxide (GO) is a lamellar substance with an ambiguous structure due to material complexity. Recently published GO-related studies employ only one out of several existing models to interpret the experimental data. Because the models are different, this leads to confusion in understanding the nature of the observed phenomena. Lessening the structural ambiguity would lead to further developments in functionalization and use of GO. Here, we show that the structure and properties of GO depend significantly on the quenching and purification procedures, rather than, as is commonly thought, on the type of graphite used or oxidation protocol. We introduce a new purification protocol that produces a product that we refer to as pristine GO (pGO) in contrast to the commonly known material that we will refer to as conventional GO (cGO). We explain the differences between pGO and cGO by transformations caused by reaction with water. We produce ultraviolet-visible spectroscopic, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic, thermogravimetric, and scanning electron microscopic analytical evidence for the structure of pGO. This work provides a new explanation for the acidity of GO solutions and allows us to add critical details to existing GO models. PMID:22239610

  6. CO oxidation on gold-supported iron oxides: New insights into strong oxide–metal interactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Liang; Liu, Yun; Yang, Fan; Evans, Jaime; Rodriguez, José A.; Liu, Ping

    2015-07-14

    Very active FeOx–Au catalysts for CO oxidation are obtained after depositing nanoparticles of FeO, Fe3O4, and Fe2O3 on a Au(111) substrate. Neither FeO nor Fe2O3 is stable under the reaction conditions. Under an environment of CO/O2, they undergo oxidation (FeO) or reduction (Fe2O3) to yield nanoparticles of Fe3O4 that are not formed in a bulk phase. Using a combined experimental and theoretical approach, we show a strong oxide–metal interaction (SOMI) between Fe3O4 nanostructures and Au(111), which gives the oxide special properties, allows the formation of an active phase, and provides a unique interface to facilitate a catalytic reaction. This workmore »highlights the important role that the SOMI can play in enhancing the catalytic performance of the oxide component in metal–oxide catalysts.« less

  7. Operation of staged membrane oxidation reactor systems

    DOEpatents

    Repasky, John Michael

    2012-10-16

    A method of operating a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system. The method comprises providing a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system with at least a first membrane oxidation stage and a second membrane oxidation stage, operating the ion transport membrane oxidation system at operating conditions including a characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and a characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage; and controlling the production capacity and/or the product quality by changing the characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and/or changing the characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage.

  8. HYDROCARBON OXIDATION OVER VANADIUM PHOSPHORUS OXIDE CATALYST USING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selective oxidation of hydrocarbons is one of the very important and challenging areas in industrial chemistry due to the wide ranging utility of the resulting oxygenates in fine chemical synthesis. Most of the existing processes for their oxidations employ toxic and often stoich...

  9. Mechanistic Aspects of Pyrite Oxidation in an Oxidizing Gaseous

    E-print Network

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Mechanistic Aspects of Pyrite Oxidation in an Oxidizing Gaseous Environment: An in Situ HATR Science, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2100 The reaction of FeS2 (pyrite orbital/density functional theory calculations of sulfate-iron hydroxide clusters. Reaction of pyrite

  10. Ceramic oxide powders and the formation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Katz, J.L.; Chenghung Hung.

    1993-12-07

    Ceramic oxide powders and a method for their preparation. Ceramic oxide powders are obtained using a flame process whereby two or more precursors of ceramic oxides are introduced into a counterflow diffusion flame burner wherein said precursors are converted into ceramic oxide powders. The morphology, particle size, and crystalline form of the ceramic oxide powders are determined by process conditions. 14 figures.

  11. Ceramic oxide powders and the formation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Joseph L. (Baltimore, MD); Hung, Cheng-Hung (Baltimore, MD)

    1993-01-01

    Ceramic oxide powders and a method for their preparation. Ceramic oxide powders are obtained using a flame process whereby two or more precursors of ceramic oxides are introduced into a counterflow diffusion flame burner wherein said precursors are converted into ceramic oxide powders. The morphology, particle size, and crystalline form of the ceramic oxide powders are determined by process conditions.

  12. High temperature oxidation resistant cermet compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M. (inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Cermet compositions are designed to provide high temperature resistant refractory coatings on stainless steel or molybdenum substrates. A ceramic mixture of chromium oxide and aluminum oxide form a coating of chromium oxide as an oxidation barrier around the metal particles, to provide oxidation resistance for the metal particles.

  13. Reduced graphene oxide for catalytic oxidation of aqueous organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongqi; Liu, Shizhen; Zhou, Guanliang; Ang, Ha Ming; Tadé, Moses O; Wang, Shaobin

    2012-10-24

    We discovered that chemically reduced graphene oxide, with an I(D)/I(G) >1.4 (defective to graphite) can effectively activate peroxymonosulfate (PMS) to produce active sulfate radicals. The produced sulfate radicals (SO(4)(•-)) are powerful oxidizing species with a high oxidative potential (2.5-3.1 vs 2.7 V of hydroxyl radicals), and can effectively decompose various aqueous contaminants. Graphene demonstrated a higher activity than several carbon allotropes, such as activated carbon (AC), graphite powder (GP), graphene oxide (GO), and multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT). Kinetic study of graphene catalyzed activation of PMS was carried out. It was shown that graphene catalysis is superior to that on transition metal oxide (Co(3)O(4)) in degradation of phenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP) and a dye (methylene blue, MB) in water, therefore providing a novel strategy for environmental remediation. PMID:22967012

  14. Oxidation pathways underlying the pro-oxidant effects of apigenin.

    PubMed

    Andueza, Aitor; García-Garzón, Antonia; Ruiz de Galarreta, Marina; Ansorena, Eduardo; Iraburu, María J; López-Zabalza, María J; Martínez-Irujo, Juan J

    2015-10-01

    Apigenin, a natural flavone, is emerging as a promising compound for the treatment of several diseases. One of the hallmarks of apigenin is the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), as judged by the oxidation of reduced dichlorofluorescein derivatives seen in many cell types. This study aimed to reveal some mechanisms by which apigenin can be oxidized and how apigenin-derived radicals affect the oxidation of 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (H2DCF), a probe usually employed to detect intracellular ROS. Apigenin induced a rapid oxidation of H2DCF in two different immortalized cell lines derived from rat and human hepatic stellate cells. However, apigenin did not generate ROS in these cells, as judged by dihydroethidium oxidation and extracellular hydrogen peroxide production. In cell-free experiments we found that oxidation of apigenin leads to the generation of a phenoxyl radical, which directly oxidizes H2DCF with catalytic amounts of hydrogen peroxide. The net balance of the reaction was the oxidation of the probe by molecular oxygen due to redox cycling of apigenin. This flavonoid was also able to deplete NADH and glutathione by a similar mechanism. Interestingly, H2DCF oxidation was significantly accelerated by apigenin in the presence of horseradish peroxidase and xanthine oxidase, but not with other enzymes showing peroxidase-like activity, such as cytochrome c or catalase. We conclude that in cells treated with apigenin oxidation of reduced dichlorofluorescein derivatives does not measure intracellular ROS and that pro- and antioxidant effects of flavonoids deduced from these experiments are inconclusive and must be confirmed by other techniques. PMID:26119779

  15. Effects of Oxidation on Oxidation-Resistant Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Windes, William; Smith, Rebecca; Carroll, Mark

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades that exhibit oxidation resistance through the formation of protective oxides on the surface of the graphite material. In the unlikely event of an oxygen ingress accident, graphite components within the VHTR core region are anticipated to oxidize so long as the oxygen continues to enter the hot core region and the core temperatures remain above 400°C. For the most serious air-ingress accident which persists over several hours or days the continued oxidation can result in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material during any air-ingress accident would mitigate the structural effects and keep the core intact. Previous air oxidation testing of nuclear-grade graphite doped with varying levels of boron-carbide (B4C) at a nominal 739°C was conducted for a limited number of doped specimens demonstrating a dramatic reduction in oxidation rate for the boronated graphite grade. This report summarizes the conclusions from this small scoping study by determining the effects of oxidation on the mechanical strength resulting from oxidation of boronated and unboronated graphite to a 10% mass loss level. While the B4C additive did reduce mechanical strength loss during oxidation, adding B4C dopants to a level of 3.5% or more reduced the as-fabricated compressive strength nearly 50%. This effectively minimized any benefits realized from the protective film formed on the boronated grades. Future work to infuse different graphite grades with silicon- and boron-doped material as a post-machining conditioning step for nuclear components is discussed as a potential solution for these challenges in this report.

  16. Oxidative Imbalance and Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    R, Krolow; D. M, Arcego; C, Noschang; S. N, Weis; C, Dalmaz

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative imbalance appears to have an important role in anxiety development. Studies in both humans and animals have shown a strong correlation between anxiety and oxidative stress. In humans, for example, the increased malondialdehyde levels and discrepancies in antioxidant enzymes in erythrocytes have been observed. In animals, several studies also show that anxiety-like behavior is related to the oxidative imbalance. Moreover, anxiety-like behavior can be caused by pharmacological-induced oxidative stress. Studies using knockout or overexpression of antioxidant enzymes have shown a relationship between anxiety-like behavior and oxidative stress. Related factors of oxidative stress that could influence anxious behavior are revised, including impaired function of different mitochondrial proteins, inflammatory cytokines, and neurotrophic factors. It has been suggested that a therapy specifically focus in reducing reactive species production may have a beneficial effect in reducing anxiety. However, the neurobiological pathways underlying the effect of oxidative stress on anxiety symptoms are not fully comprehended. The challenge now is to identify the oxidative stress mechanisms likely to be involved in the induction of anxiety symptoms. Understanding these pathways could help to clarify the neurobiology of the anxiety disorder and provide tools for new discovery in therapies and preventive strategies. PMID:24669212

  17. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: CHEMICAL OXIDATION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation destroys hazardous contaminants by chemically converting them to nonhazardous or less toxic compounds that are ideally more stable, less mobile, and/or inert. However, under some conditions, other hazardous compounds may be formed. The oxidizing agents most commonly use...

  18. Oxide formation: reaction details studied,

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Edward A.

    Oxide formation: reaction details studied, reported in brief Sir -- Nineteen years ago, I published-nitrosohydroxylamines undergo an alternative decomposition under very similar reaction conditions to liberate nitrous oxide, N2O (refs 4,5). Moreover, this alternative reaction involves highly electrophilic intermediates analogous

  19. Automated analysis of oxidative metabolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furner, R. L. (inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An automated system for the study of drug metabolism is described. The system monitors the oxidative metabolites of aromatic amines and of compounds which produce formaldehyde on oxidative dealkylation. It includes color developing compositions suitable for detecting hyroxylated aromatic amines and formaldehyde.

  20. Localized control of oxidized RNA.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yu; Dhaliwal, James S; Adjibade, Pauline; Uniacke, James; Mazroui, Rachid; Zerges, William

    2015-11-15

    The oxidation of biological molecules by reactive oxygen species (ROS) can render them inactive or toxic. This includes the oxidation of RNA, which appears to underlie the detrimental effects of oxidative stress, aging and certain neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we investigate the management of oxidized RNA in the chloroplast of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Our immunofluorescence microscopy results reveal that oxidized RNA (with 8-hydroxyguanine) is localized in the pyrenoid, a chloroplast microcompartment where CO2 is assimilated by the Calvin cycle enzyme Rubisco. Results of genetic analyses support a requirement for the Rubisco large subunit (RBCL), but not Rubisco, in the management of oxidized RNA. An RBCL pool that can carry out such a 'moonlighting' function is revealed by results of biochemical fractionation experiments. We also show that human (HeLa) cells localize oxidized RNA to cytoplasmic foci that are distinct from stress granules, processing bodies and mitochondria. Our results suggest that the compartmentalization of oxidized RNA management is a general phenomenon and therefore has some fundamental significance. PMID:26449969

  1. Metal oxide films on metal

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Xin D. (Los Alamos, NM); Tiwari, Prabhat (Los Alamos, NM)

    1995-01-01

    A structure including a thin film of a conductive alkaline earth metal oxide selected from the group consisting of strontium ruthenium trioxide, calcium ruthenium trioxide, barium ruthenium trioxide, lanthanum-strontium cobalt oxide or mixed alkaline earth ruthenium trioxides thereof upon a thin film of a noble metal such as platinum is provided.

  2. Electrochemical oxidation of pyridine bases

    SciTech Connect

    Toomey, J.E. Jr.

    1984-11-13

    Improved electrochemical oxidations of alkylpyridine bases in which the oxidation is performed by electrolysis in a membrane divided flow cell at a lead dioxide anode and in an aqueous medium comprising sulfuric acid in at least 1:1 equivalent ratio with the alkylpyridine base on solution. Significant advantages of a commercial and industrial nature are reported over prior static, beaker cell technology.

  3. Detection of nitric oxide pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chackerian, C., Jr.; Weisbach, M. F.

    1973-01-01

    Studies of absorption spectra enhancement of certain atomic and molecular species inserter in dye-laser cavities have indicated that nitric oxide can be determined at low concentrations. Absorption coefficient of small amounts of nitric oxide in intra-laser-cavity absorption cell containing helium is enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude.

  4. Ultra Supercritical Steamside Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Malgorzata

    2005-01-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Power Systems Initiatives. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538 C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620 C. Current Advanced Power Systems goals include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which require steam temperatures of up to 760 C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

  5. Main Oxidizer Valve Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addona, Brad; Eddleman, David

    2015-01-01

    A developmental Main Oxidizer Valve (MOV) was designed by NASA-MSFC using additive manufacturing processes. The MOV is a pneumatically actuated poppet valve to control the flow of liquid oxygen to an engine's injector. A compression spring is used to return the valve to the closed state when pneumatic pressure is removed from the valve. The valve internal parts are cylindrical in shape, which lends itself to traditional lathe and milling operations. However, the valve body represents a complicated shape and contains the majority of the mass of the valve. Additive manufacturing techniques were used to produce a part that optimized mass and allowed for design features not practical with traditional machining processes.

  6. Preface: Oxide Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmott, Phil

    2008-07-01

    Although the history of metal oxides and their surfaces goes back several decades to landmark studies, such as Mott and Peierls' explanation of electrical insulation in materials that are predicted in band theory to be conducting, or the observation by Morin of the superfast metal-to-insulator transition in vanadium dioxide, it is only in the last two decades that the world of condensed matter physics has become increasingly dominated by research into complex metal oxides. This has been driven most notably by an attempt to better understand and describe the fundamental physical processes behind their seemingly endless spectrum of properties, which in turn has also led to the discovery of novel phenomena, most prominently demonstrated by the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in 1986, colossal magnetoresistance in 1994, and most recently, the formation of a two-dimensional conducting layer at the interface between two band insulators in 2004. One important reason why metal oxides, particularly in the form of thin films, have become such a popular subject for basic condensed matter research is that they offer a uniquely versatile materials base for the development of novel technologies. They owe this versatility both to the many different elemental combinations that lead to structurally similar forms, and also to the fact that in many cases, the strong interaction between the valence electrons means that there is a subtle interplay between structure and magnetic and electronic properties. This aspect has led in recent years to the birth or renaissance of research fields such as spintronics, orbital ordering, and multiferroics. Surfaces and interfaces are especially interesting in these strongly-correlated electron systems, where the rearrangement of electrical charge resulting from a minimization of surface or interfacial energy can have unexpected and often exciting consequences. Indeed, as the drive to miniaturize devices well below the micron size continues, the fraction of material constituting `non-bulklike' properties is becoming increasingly significant. On the other hand, the degree of sophistication needed to understand and predict these complex systems has driven a complementary thrust in theoretical modelling, beginning as long ago as 1963, with Hubbard's addition to the tight-binding model of the formulation of conduction in terms of a hopping integral. The present level of understanding is now so advanced that theory and experiment are no longer so distinct, both gaining further insights from one another. The aim of this special issue in the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter is to convey to the reader the most up-to-date understanding of the physics of the surfaces, interfaces, and thin films of complex metal oxides, in a clear and accessible manner. The order of the 16 contributions reflects the broad range of disciplines within this field, beginning with general considerations and theoretical models, continuing with film growth techniques and characterization, and concluding with material types and devices. It is fairly safe to assume that research in this area will enjoy as illustrious and long-lived a future as it has had a past. As such, it is hoped that this contribution will accurately reflect this status in the first decade of the 21st Century and long provide a reference for physicists continuing on this exciting Odyssey.

  7. Oxidation and photooxidation of asphalts

    SciTech Connect

    Mill, T.; Tse, D. )

    1990-07-01

    Oxidation of asphalt is a major cause of pavement failure owing to hardening of the asphalt binder with accompanying changes in viscosity, separation of components, embrittlement and loss of cohesion and adhesion of the asphalt in the mix. However oxidation of asphalt-aggregate mixes at high temperature is deliberately done to partly harden the mix prior to laydown; hardening then continues during cooling. Excessive hardening at this point is undesirable because of embrittlement and cracking. Slow oxidation of asphalt continues during the service life of the roadbed at a rate that appears to be partly determined by the void volume of the roadbed, as well as the properties of the asphalt and (possibly) the properties of the aggregate. The authors focused their efforts on understanding the mechanistic basis for slow oxidation of asphalt under service conditions in order to predict how rapidly an asphalt will oxidize, based on its composition, and to find better ways to inhibit the process under service conditions.

  8. Atomistic details of oxide surfaces and surface oxidation: the example of copper and its oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattinoni, Chiara; Michaelides, Angelos

    2015-11-01

    The oxidation and corrosion of metals are fundamental problems in materials science and technology that have been studied using a large variety of experimental and computational techniques. Here we review some of the recent studies that have led to significant advances in our atomic-level understanding of copper oxide, one of the most studied and best understood metal oxides. We show that a good atomistic understanding of the physical characteristics of cuprous (Cu2O) and cupric (CuO) oxide and of some key processes of their formation has been obtained. Indeed, the growth of the oxide has been shown to be epitaxial with the surface and to proceed, in most cases, through the formation of oxide nano-islands which, with continuous oxygen exposure, grow and eventually coalesce. We also show how electronic structure calculations have become increasingly useful in helping to characterise the structures and energetics of various Cu oxide surfaces. However a number of challenges remain. For example, it is not clear under which conditions the oxidation of copper in air at room temperature (known as native oxidation) leads to the formation of a cuprous oxide film only, or also of a cupric overlayer. Moreover, the atomistic details of the nucleation of the oxide islands are still unknown. We close our review with a brief perspective on future work and discuss how recent advances in experimental techniques, bringing greater temporal and spatial resolution, along with improvements in the accuracy, realism and timescales achievable with computational approaches make it possible for these questions to be answered in the near future.

  9. 46 CFR 153.1010 - Alkylene oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...washed away immediately. (c) While alkylene oxides are onboard the vessel, the master shall make sure that the oxygen content...Tankships with independent piping for alkylene oxides must have onboard: (1) Alkylene oxide handling plans approved by the...

  10. Detection of oxidation in human serum lipoproteins 

    E-print Network

    Myers, Christine Lee

    2006-04-12

    A method for the oxidation of lipoproteins in vitro was developed using the free radical initiator, 2,2?-azobis-(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH). Following in vitro oxidation, the susceptibility to oxidation of the serum samples...

  11. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125...CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No....

  12. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125...CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No....

  13. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125...CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No....

  14. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125...CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No....

  15. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125...CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No....

  16. EFFECTS OF PHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDANTS ON PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photochemical oxidants are found in 'photochemical smog' which is a complex mixture of primary and secondary air pollutants. The photochemical oxidants are secondary air pollutants formed by the action of sunlight on nitrogen oxides and reactive hydrocarbons, their precursors. Th...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...the colorless, crystalline mineral periclase. It is produced...relatively dense white powder (heavy) by heating magnesium hydroxide...C for 12 hours) produces heavy magnesium oxide. Light magnesium oxide is converted to heavy magnesium oxide by...

  18. Catalyst for Decomposition of Nitrogen Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Ates (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Jale (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates generally to a platinized tin oxide-based catalyst. It relates particularly to an improved platinized tin oxide-based catalyst able to decompose nitric oxide to nitrogen and oxygen without the necessity of a reducing gas.

  19. Oxidative decarboxylation of diclofenac by manganese oxide bed filter.

    PubMed

    Huguet, Mélissa; Deborde, Marie; Papot, Sébastien; Gallard, Hervé

    2013-09-15

    Diclofenac (DCF) was eliminated by fast chemical oxidation on natural manganese oxide in a column reactor. Identification of transformation by-products of DCF by HPLC-UV-MS(n) gave evidence of decarboxylation, iminoquinone formation and dimerization. The fast oxidation of DCF is also accompanied by a strong adsorption of organic carbon that was explained by the sorption of dimer products on the surface of manganese oxide. Decarboxylation and dimerization increased the hydrophobic interactions with manganese oxide and reduced the presence of potentially toxic by-products in the effluent. The rate of oxidation was first order with respect to DCF and was slowed down by the presence of organic buffer MOPS (3-morpholinopropane-1-sulfonic acid). The first order rate constant in absence of MOPS was extrapolated by considering a surface site-binding model and MOPS as a co-adsorbate. The rate constant was 0.818 min(-1) at pH 7 and 10 mM NaCl corresponding to empty bed residence time of 50 s only for 50% removal of DCF. Rate constants increased when pH decreased from pH 8.0 to 6.5 and when ionic strength increased. Manganese oxide bed filter can be considered as an alternative treatment for polishing waste water effluent or for remediation of contaminated groundwater. PMID:23850215

  20. Lipid oxidation-induced oxidation in emu and ostrich myoglobins.

    PubMed

    Nair, M N; Suman, S P; Li, S; Joseph, P; Beach, C M

    2014-02-01

    Emu and ostrich are ratites gaining increasing popularity as sources of low-fat meats. Secondary products of lipid oxidation, such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), compromise myoglobin redox stability in a species-specific manner. However, the molecular basis of lipid oxidation-induced oxidation in ratite myoglobins has not been investigated. Therefore, our objective was to characterize lipid oxidation-induced oxidation in ratite myoglobins, in comparison with beef myoglobin. At physiological condition (pH7.4, 37 °C) HNE accelerated (P<0.05) oxidation of emu, ostrich, and beef oxymyoglobins. Autoxidation and HNE-induced oxidation were greater (P<0.05) in ostrich oxymyoglobin than in emu and beef oxymyoglobins. Mass spectrometric analyses revealed that HNE formed mono-adduct with both emu and ostrich myoglobins after 6h of incubation. Tandem mass spectrometry demonstrated that HNE adducted histidine 36 in ostrich myoglobin, whereas histidines 34 and 36 were adducted in emu myoglobin. The results indicate that primary structure of ratite myoglobins influences their redox stability in the presence of prooxidants. PMID:24231676

  1. The oxidation and corrosion of ODS alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation and hot corrosion of high temperature oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are reviewed. The environmental resistance of such alloys are classified by oxide growth rate, oxide volatility, oxide spalling, and hot corrosion limitations. Also discussed are environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. It is concluded that ODS NiCrAl and FeCrAl alloys are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant and can probably be used uncoated.

  2. New developments in oxidative fermentation.

    PubMed

    Adachi, O; Moonmangmee, D; Toyama, H; Yamada, M; Shinagawa, E; Matsushita, K

    2003-02-01

    Oxidative fermentations have been well established for a long time, especially in vinegar and in L-sorbose production. Recently, information on the enzyme systems involved in these oxidative fermentations has accumulated and new developments are possible based on these findings. We have recently isolated several thermotolerant acetic acid bacteria, which also seem to be useful for new developments in oxidative fermentation. Two different types of membrane-bound enzymes, quinoproteins and flavoproteins, are involved in oxidative fermentation, and sometimes work with the same substrate but produce different oxidation products. Recently, there have been new developments in two different oxidative fermentations, D-gluconate and D-sorbitol oxidations. Flavoproteins, D-gluconate dehydrogenase, and D-sorbitol dehydrogenase were isolated almost 2 decades ago, while the enzyme involved in the same oxidation reaction for D-gluconate and D-sorbitol has been recently isolated and shown to be a quinoprotein. Thus, these flavoproteins and a quinoprotein have been re-assessed for the oxidation reaction. Flavoprotein D-gluconate dehydrogenase and D-sorbitol dehydrogenase were shown to produce 2-keto- D-gluconate and D-fructose, respectively, whereas the quinoprotein was shown to produce 5-keto- D-gluconate and L-sorbose from D-gluconate and D-sorbitol, respectively. In addition to the quinoproteins described above, a new quinoprotein for quinate oxidation has been recently isolated from Gluconobacter strains. The quinate dehydrogenase is also a membrane-bound quinoprotein that produces 3-dehydroquinate. This enzyme can be useful for the production of shikimate, which is a convenient salvage synthesis system for many antibiotics, herbicides, and aromatic amino acids synthesis. In order to reduce energy costs of oxidative fermentation in industry, several thermotolerant acetic acid bacteria that can grow up to 40 degrees C have been isolated. Of such isolated strains, some thermotolerant Acetobacter species were found to be useful for vinegar fermentation at a high temperature such 38-40 degrees C, where mesophilic strains showed no growth. They oxidized higher concentrations of ethanol up to 9% without any appreciable lag time, while alcohol oxidation with mesophilic strains was delayed or became almost impossible under such conditions. Several useful Gluconobacter species of thermotolerant acetic acid bacteria are also found, especially L-erythrulose-producing strains and cyclic alcohol-oxidizing strains. Gluconobacter frateurii CHM 43 is able to rapidly oxidize meso-erythritol at 37 degrees C leading to the accumulation of L-erythrulose, which may replace dihydroxyacetone in cosmetics. G. frateuriiCHM 9 is able to oxidize cyclic alcohols to their corresponding cyclic ketones or aliphatic ketones, which are known to be useful for preparing many different physiologically active compounds such as oxidized steroids or oxidized bicyclic ketones. The enzymes involved in these meso-erythritol and cyclic alcohol oxidations have been purified and shown to be a similar type of membrane-bound quinoproteins, consisting of a high molecular weight single peptide. This is completely different from another quinoprotein, alcohol dehydrogenase of acetic acid bacteria, which consists of three subunits including hemoproteins. PMID:12664142

  3. The oxidation of carbon monoxide using tin oxide based catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, Christopher F.; Jorgensen, Norman

    1990-01-01

    The preparation conditions for precious metal/tin oxide catalysts were optimized for maximum carbon monoxide/oxygen recombination efficiency. This was achieved by controlling the tin digestion, the peptization to form the sol, the calcination process and the method of adding the precious metals. Extensive studies of the tin oxide structure were carried out over the temperature range 20 to 500 C in air or hydrogen environments using Raman scattering and X ray diffraction. Adsorbed species on tin oxide, generated in an environment containing carbon monoxide, gave rise to a Raman band at about 1600 cm(exp -1) which was assigned to carbonaceous groups, possible carbonate.

  4. Ethanol oxidation on metal oxide-supported platinum catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    L. M. Petkovic 090468; Sergey N. Rashkeev; D. M. Ginosar

    2009-09-01

    Ethanol is a renewable fuel that can be used as an additive to gasoline (or its substitute) with the advantage of octane enhancement and reduced carbon monoxide exhaust emissions. However, on Ethanol is a renewable fuel that can be used as an additive to gasoline (or its substitute) with the advantage of octane enhancement and reduced carbon monoxide exhaust emissions. However, on the standard three-way catalysts, the conversion of unburned ethanol is low because both ethanol and some of its partially oxidized derivatives are highly resistant to oxidation. A combination of first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) based calculations and in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analysis was applied to uncover some of the fundamental phenomena associated with ethanol oxidation on Pt containing catalysts. In particular, the objective was to analyze the role of the oxide (i.e., ?-Al2O3 or SiO2) substrate on the ethanol oxidation activity. The results showed that Pt nanoparticles trap and accumulate oxygen at their surface and perimeter sites and play the role of “stoves” that burn ethanol molecules and their partially oxidized derivatives to the “final” products. The ?-Al2O3 surfaces provided higher mobility of the fragments of ethanol molecules than the SiO2 surface and hence increased the supply rate of these objects to the Pt particles. This will in turn produce a higher conversion rate of unburned ethanol.and some of its partially oxidized derivatives are highly resistant to oxidation. A combination of first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) based calculations and in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analysis was applied to uncover some of the fundamental phenomena associated with ethanol oxidation on Pt containing catalysts. In particular, the objective was to analyze the role of the oxide (i.e., ?-Al2O3 or SiO2) substrate on the ethanol oxidation activity. The results showed that Pt nanoparticles trap and accumulate oxygen at their surface and perimeter sites and play the role of “stoves” that burn ethanol molecules and their partially oxidized derivatives to the “final” products. The ?-Al2O3 surfaces provided higher mobility of the fragments of ethanol molecules than the SiO2 surface and hence increased the supply rate of these objects to the Pt particles. This will in turn produce a higher conversion rate of unburned ethanol.

  5. Uranium Metal to Oxide Conversion by Air Oxidation ?Process Development

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A

    2001-12-31

    Published technical information for the process of metal-to-oxide conversion of uranium components has been reviewed and summarized for the purpose of supporting critical decisions for new processes and facilities for the Y-12 National Security Complex. The science of uranium oxidation under low, intermediate, and high temperature conditions is reviewed. A process and system concept is outlined and process parameters identified for uranium oxide production rates. Recommendations for additional investigations to support a conceptual design of a new facility are outlined.

  6. Manganese oxidation by Leptothrix discophora.

    PubMed Central

    Boogerd, F C; de Vrind, J P

    1987-01-01

    Cells of Leptothrix discophora SS1 released Mn2+-oxidizing factors into the medium during growth in batch culture. Manganese was optimally oxidized when the medium was buffered with HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid) at pH 7.5. Manganese-oxidizing activity in the culture medium in which this strain had been grown previously was sensitive to heat, phosphate, Tris, NaN3, HgCl2 NaCl, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and pronase; 0.5 mol of O2 was consumed per mol of MnO2 formed. During Mn2+ oxidation, protons were liberated. With sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, two protein-containing bands were detected in the spent culture medium. One band had an apparent molecular weight of 110,000 and was predominant in Mn2+-oxidizing activity. The second product (Mr 85,000) was only detected in some cases and probably represents a proteolytic breakdown moiety of the 110,000-Mr protein. The Mn2+-oxidizing factors were associated with the MnO2 aggregates that had been formed in spent culture medium. After solubilization of this MnO2 with ascorbate, Mn2+-oxidizing activity could be recovered. Images PMID:3804969

  7. Status of Graphite Oxidation Work

    SciTech Connect

    Rebecca Smith

    2010-05-01

    Data were developed to compare the extent of structural damage associated with high temperature exposure to an air leak. Two materials, NBG-18 graphite and unpurified PCEA graphite have been tested as of this report. The scope was limited to isothermal oxidation at a single temperature, 750°C. Ambient post-oxidation compression strength testing was performed for three levels of burn off (1%, 5%, and 10% mass loss) for two leak scenarios: 100% air and 10% air in helium. Temperature, gas flow, and dynamic mass loss oxidation conditions were monitored and recorded for each sample. The oxidation period was controlled with flow of inert gas during the thermal ramp and upon cool down with a constant 10 liter per minute flow maintained throughout furnace operation. Compressive strengths of parallel un-oxidized samples were tested to assess the relative mass loss effects. In addition to baseline samples matching the un-oxidized dimensions of the oxidized samples, two sets of mechanically reduced samples were prepared. One set was trimmed to achieve the desired mass loss by removing an effectively uniform depth from the geometric surface of the sample. The other set was cored to produce a full penetration axial hole down the center of each sample.

  8. Oxidation kinetics of aluminum diboride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Michael L.; Sohn, H. Y.; Cutler, Raymond A.

    2013-11-01

    The oxidation characteristics of aluminum diboride (AlB2) and a physical mixture of its constituent elements (Al+2B) were studied in dry air and pure oxygen using thermal gravimetric analysis to obtain non-mechanistic kinetic parameters. Heating in air at a constant linear heating rate of 10 °C/min showed a marked difference between Al+2B and AlB2 in the onset of oxidation and final conversion fraction, with AlB2 beginning to oxidize at higher temperatures but reaching nearly complete conversion by 1500 °C. Kinetic parameters were obtained in both air and oxygen using a model-free isothermal method at temperatures between 500 and 1000 °C. Activation energies were found to decrease, in general, with increasing conversion for AlB2 and Al+2B in both air and oxygen. AlB2 exhibited O2-pressure-independent oxidation behavior at low conversions, while the activation energies of Al+2B were higher in O2 than in air. Differences in the composition and morphology between oxidized Al+2B and AlB2 suggested that Al2O3-B2O3 interactions slowed Al+2B oxidation by converting Al2O3 on aluminum particles into a Al4B2O9 shell, while the same Al4B2O9 developed a needle-like morphology in AlB2 that reduced oxygen diffusion distances and increased conversion. The model-free kinetic analysis was critical for interpreting the complex, multistep oxidation behavior for which a single mechanism could not be assigned. At low temperatures, moisture increased the oxidation rate of Al+2B and AlB2, but both appear to be resistant to oxidation in cool, dry environments.

  9. Oxidative demethylation of 2-picolines on vanadium oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Suvorov, B.V.; Glubokovskikh, L.K.; Demin, V.V.; Kan, I.I.

    1988-07-10

    One of the known methods for the preparation of pyridine is based on the dealkylation of alkylpyridines in the presence of vanadium-containing catalysts, molecular oxygen and steam. By using the oxidative demethylation of 2-picoline in the presence of steam on a fused vanadium(V) oxide, pyridine can be obtained in a yield of up to 88% of theory. To lower the consumption of vanadium(V) oxide and increase the thermostability of the catalyst, they studied the possible use of V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ catalysts on various carriers (diatomite, silica gel, porcelain balls), including the industrially produced brand SVD and SVS catalysts. The SVS brand catalyst has a satisfactory activity and selectivity in the oxidation demethylation of 2-picoline into pyridine. Under optimal conditions, pyridine is formed on this catalyst in a yield of 88% of the theoretical.

  10. Detailed mechanism of benzene oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, David A.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed quantitative mechanism for the oxidation of benzene in both argon and nitrogen diluted systems is presented. Computed ignition delay time for argon diluted mixtures are in satisfactory agreement with experimental results for a wide range of initial conditions. An experimental temperature versus time profile for a nitrogen diluted oxidation was accurately matched and several concentration profiles were matched qualitatively. Application of sensitivity analysis has given approximate rate constant expressions for the two dominant heat release reactions, the oxidation of C6H5 and C5H5 radicals by molecular oxygen.

  11. Investigation of Mixed Oxide Catalysts for NO Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Szanyi, Janos; Karim, Ayman M.; Pederson, Larry R.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Mei, Donghai; Tran, Diana N.; Herling, Darrell R.; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Qi, Gongshin; Li, Wei

    2014-12-09

    The oxidation of engine-generated NO to NO2 is an important step in the reduction of NOx in lean engine exhaust because NO2 is required for the performance of the LNT technology [2], and it enhances the activities of ammonia selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts [1]. In particular, for SCR catalysts an NO:NO2 ratio of 1:1 is most effective for NOx reduction, whereas for LNT catalysts, NO must be oxidized to NO2 before adsorption on the storage components. However, NO2 typically constitutes less than 10% of NOx in lean exhaust, so catalytic oxidation of NO is essential. Platinum has been found to be especially active for NO oxidation, and is widely used in DOC and LNT catalysts. However, because of the high cost and poor thermal durability of Pt-based catalysts, there is substantial interest in the development of alternatives. The objective of this project, in collaboration with partner General Motors, is to develop mixed metal oxide catalysts for NO oxidation, enabling lower precious metal usage in emission control systems. [1] M. Koebel, G. Madia, and M. Elsener, Catalysis Today 73, 239 (2002). [2] C. H. Kim, G. S. Qi, K. Dahlberg, and W. Li, Science 327, 1624 (2010).

  12. Alkali oxide-tantalum, niobium and antimony oxide ionic conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, R. S.; Brower, W. S.; Parker, H. S.; Minor, D. B.; Waring, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    The phase equilibrium relations of four systems were investigated in detail. These consisted of sodium and potassium antimonates with antimony oxide and tantalum and niobium oxide with rubidium oxide as far as the ratio 4Rb2O:llB2O5 (B=Nb, Ta). The ternary system NaSbO3-Sb2O4-NaF was investigated extensively to determine the actual composition of the body centered cubic sodium antimonate. Various other binary and ternary oxide systems involving alkali oxides were examined in lesser detail. The phases synthesized were screened by ion exchange methods to determine mobility of the mobility of the alkali ion within the niobium, tantalum or antimony oxide (fluoride) structural framework. Five structure types warranted further investigation; these structure types are (1) hexagonal tungsten bronze (HTB), (2) pyrochlore, (3) the hybrid HTB-pyrochlore hexagonal ordered phases, (4) body centered cubic antimonates and (5) 2K2O:3Nb2O5. Although all of these phases exhibit good ion exchange properties only the pyrochlore was prepared with Na(+) ions as an equilibrium phase and as a low porosity ceramic. Sb(+3) in the channel interferes with ionic conductivity in this case, although relatively good ionic conductivity was found for the metastable Na(+) ion exchanged analogs of RbTa2O5F and KTaWO6 pyrochlore phases.

  13. Mixed oxide fuel development

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, R.D.; Omberg, R.P.

    1987-05-08

    This paper describes the success of the ongoing mixed-oxide fuel development program in the United States aimed at qualifying an economical fuel system for liquid metal cooled reactors. This development has been the cornerstone of the US program for the past 20 years and has proceeded in a deliberate and highly disciplined fashion with high emphasis on fuel reliability and operational safety as major features of an economical fuel system. The program progresses from feature testing in EBR-II to qualifying full size components in FFTF under fully prototypic conditions to establish a basis for extending allowable lifetimes. The development program started with the one year (300 EFPD) core, which is the FFTF driver fuel, continued with the demonstration of a two year (600 EFPD) core and is presently evaluating a three year (900 EFPD) fuel system. All three of these systems, consistent with other LMR fuel programs around the world, use fuel pellets gas bonded to a cladding tube that is assembled into a bundle and fitted into a wrapper tube or duct for ease of insertion into a core. The materials of construction progressed from austenitic CW 316 SS to lower swelling austenitic D9 to non swelling ferritic/martensitic HT9. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Catalysts for hydrocarbon oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, K.C.; Paffett, M.T.; Earl, W.L.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The focus of this project was elucidating structural aspects of a titanosilicate TS-1 that is an oxidation catalyst. The authors have prepared samples of TS-1 and used scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy to examine the samples of TS-1 for amorphous titanium-containing phases that may confound the analysis of the neutron scattering data. They observed that the volume fraction of titanium-containing impurity phases(s) determined from electron microscopy did not correlate well with that amount determined by ultraviolet-visible diffuse-reflectance spectroscopy. The authors also designed, constructed and tested a flow reactor that can be placed into the neutron flight path at the High Intensity Powder Diffractometer line at the Manual Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center. This reactor will allow for the observation of crystallographic changes of catalysts and other materials under reaction conditions.

  15. Oxidants from Pulverized Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L. M. V.

    2007-06-01

    Joel Hurowitz (previously at State University of New York at Stony Brook and now at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Nick Tosca, Scott McLennan, and Martin Schoonen (SUNY at Stony Brook) studied the production of hydrogen peroxide from freshly pulverized minerals in solution. Their experiments focused on olivine, augite, and labradorite; silicate minerals of basaltic planetary surfaces, such as the Moon and Mars, that are exposed to the intense crushing and grinding of impact cratering processes. The hydrogen peroxide produced in the experiments was enough to adequately explain the oxidizing nature of Martian regolith first determined by the Viking Landers and the results suggest, for the first time, that mechanically activated mineral surfaces may be an important part of the overall explanation for the Viking Lander biology experiment results. Hurowitz and coauthors further showed that when the pulverized minerals are heat-treated to high temperature under vacuum (to cause dehydroxylation) there is almost a 20 times increase in hydrogen peroxide production, a result which may be highly relevant to lunar dust. These careful studies demonstrate the importance of and concern about reactive dusts on planetary surfaces from two standpoints: the health of astronauts on surface maneuvers who may inadvertently breath it and the viability of possible Martian organic species to survive in such a corrosive, antiseptic surface environment.

  16. Preparation and properties of electrically conducting ceramics based on indium oxide-rare Earth oxides-hafnium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Marchant, D.D.; Bates, J.L.

    1983-10-01

    Electrically conducting refractory oxides based on adding indium oxide to rare earth-stabilized hafnium oxide are being studied. The use of indium oxide generally increases the electrical conductivity. The results of measurements of the electrical conductivity and data on corrosion resistance in molten salts are presented.

  17. Oxidation-responsive polymeric vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napoli, Alessandro; Valentini, Massimiliano; Tirelli, Nicola; Müller, Martin; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2004-03-01

    Vesicles formed in water by synthetic macro-amphiphiles have attracted much attention as nanocontainers having properties that extend the physical and chemical limits of liposomes. We sought to develop ABA block copolymeric amphiphiles that self-assemble into unilamellar vesicles that can be further oxidatively destabilized. We selected poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as the hydrophilic A blocks, owing to its resistance to protein adsorption and low toxicity. As hydrophobic B blocks, we selected poly(propylene sulphide) (PPS), owing to its extreme hydrophobicity, its low glass-transition temperature, and most importantly its oxidative conversion from a hydrophobe to a hydrophile, poly(propylene sulphoxide) and ultimately poly(propylene sulphone). This is the first example of the use of oxidative conversions to destabilize such carriers. This new class of oxidation-responsive polymeric vesicles may find applications as nanocontainers in drug delivery, biosensing and biodetection.

  18. Optimizing Biogenic Manganese Oxide Production 

    E-print Network

    Vance, Cherish Christony Ann

    2013-02-15

    . These emerging organic pollutants also may be carcinogenic, mutagenic, and endocrine disruptive in nature. Traditional treatments such as granular activated carbon (GAC), oxidation, and ozonation with sand filtration have not proven to effectively remove...

  19. COPD: balancing oxidants and antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Bernard M; Voynow, Judith A; Ghio, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common chronic illnesses in the world. The disease encompasses emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and small airway obstruction and can be caused by environmental exposures, primarily cigarette smoking. Since only a small subset of smokers develop COPD, it is believed that host factors interact with the environment to increase the propensity to develop disease. The major pathogenic factors causing disease include infection and inflammation, protease and antiprotease imbalance, and oxidative stress overwhelming antioxidant defenses. In this review, we will discuss the major environmental and host sources for oxidative stress; discuss how oxidative stress regulates chronic bronchitis; review the latest information on genetic predisposition to COPD, specifically focusing on oxidant/antioxidant imbalance; and review future antioxidant therapeutic options for COPD. The complexity of COPD will necessitate a multi-target therapeutic approach. It is likely that antioxidant supplementation and dietary antioxidants will have a place in these future combination therapies. PMID:25673984

  20. Oxidative stress in graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Marcocci, Claudio; Leo, Marenza; Altea, Maria Antonietta

    2012-07-01

    Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and the consequent oxidative damage are involved in the development of several diseases, including autoimmune diseases. Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by hyperthyroidism and, less frequently, orbitopathy. Hyperthyroidism is characterized by increased oxidative stress. Untreated hyperthyroidism is associated with an increase of several parameters of oxidative stress and in most studies (but not all) by an increase of antioxidant defense enzymes. Restoration of euthyroidism with antithyroid drug is associated with a reversal of the biochemical abnormalities associated with oxidative stress. Animal and human studies suggest that increased ROS may directly contribute to some clinical manifestation of the disease, including orbitopathy. Antioxidants administered alone improve some clinical signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism and, when associated with antithyroid drugs, induce a more rapid control of clinical manifestations and a faster achievement of euthyroidism. A large randomized clinical trial has shown that antioxidant supplementation (selenium) may also be beneficial for mild Graves' orbitopathy. PMID:24783001

  1. Oxides having high energy densities

    DOEpatents

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Kang, Kisuk

    2013-09-10

    Certain disclosed embodiments generally relate to oxide materials having relatively high energy and/or power densities. Various aspects of the embodiments are directed to oxide materials having a structure B.sub.i(M.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2, for example, a structure Li.sub.j(Ni.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2 such as Li(Ni.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5)O.sub.2. In this structure, Y represents one or more atoms, each independently selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metals, transition metals, Group 14 elements, Group 15, or Group 16 elements. In some embodiments, such an oxide material may have an O3 crystal structure, and/or a layered structure such that the oxide comprises a plurality of first, repeating atomic planes comprising Li, and a plurality of second, repeating atomic planes comprising Ni and/or Y.

  2. Electrostatic doping in oxide heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaekwang; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2008-03-01

    Recent experiments on perovskite heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy or pulsed laser deposition suggest the possibility of creating high mobility two dimensional electron gas at the oxide/oxide interface. However, the origin of charge in these insulating materials is still not clear and deemed controversial. We report a first-principles study of SrTiO3/LaAlO3 heterostructures using density functional theory at the LDA+U level. We consider the energetics and electronic structure of the junction, while focusing on the role of electrostatics. Our results suggest that a complex balance of the crystal filed, Jahn-Teller effect, lattice dynamics and internal electric field result in the robust electrostatic doping for carefully chosen thickness of the polar oxide. We explore the possible uses of this effect in other oxide-based heterostructures.

  3. Activating Nonreducible Oxides via Doping.

    PubMed

    Nilius, Niklas; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2015-05-19

    Nonreducible oxides are characterized by large band gaps and are therefore unable to exchange electrons or to form bonds with surface species, explaining their chemical inertness. The insertion of aliovalent dopants alters this situation, as new electronic states become available in the gap that may be involved in charge-transfer processes. Consequently, the adsorption and reactivity pattern of doped oxides changes with respect to their nondoped counterparts. This Account describes scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) experiments that demonstrate the impact of dopants on the physical and chemical properties of well-defined crystalline oxide films. For this purpose, MgO and CaO as archetypical rocksalt oxides have been loaded either with high-valence (Mo, Cr) or low-valence dopants (Li). While the former generate filled states in the oxide band gap and serve as electron donors, the latter produce valence-band holes and give rise to an acceptor response. The dopant-related electronic states and their polarization effect on the surrounding host material are explored with XPS and STM spectroscopy on nonlocal and local scales. Moreover, charge-compensating defects were found to develop in the oxide lattice, such as Ca and O vacancies in Mo- and Li-doped CaO films, respectively. These native defects are able to trap the excess charges of the impurities and therefore diminish the desired doping effect. If noncompensated dopants reside in the host lattice, electron exchange with surface species is observed. Mo ions in CaO, for example, were found to donate electrons to surface Au atoms. The anionic Au strongly binds to the CaO surface and nucleates in the form of monolayer islands, in contrast to the 3D growth prevailing on pristine oxides. Charge transfer is also revealed for surface O2 that traps one Mo electron by forming a superoxo-species. The activated oxygen is characterized by a reinforced binding to the surface, an elongated O-O bond length, and a reduced barrier for dissociation, and represents an important intermediate for oxidation reactions. The charge-transfer processes described here are quenched if Li is inserted into the oxide lattice, neutralizing the effect of the extra electrons. The specific behavior of doped oxides has been explored on a mechanistic level, i.e. on thin-film model systems at ultrahigh vacuum and low temperature. We believe, however, that our results are transferrable to realistic conditions and doping might thus develop into a powerful method to improve the performance of nonreducible oxides in surface-catalyzed reactions. PMID:25894859

  4. Enzymes of respiratory iron oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R. II.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes experimental progress in characterizing and identifying redox proteins in a number of iron-oxidizing bacteria. Sections of the paper are entitled (1) In Situ electrolysis was explored to achieve enhanced yields of iron-oxidizing bacteria, (2)Structure/function studies were performed on redox-active biomolecules from Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, (3) Novel redox-active biomolecules were demonstrated in other iron autotrophs, and (4) New probes of metalloprotein electron-transfer reactions were synthesized and characterized.

  5. Accelerated oxidation processes is biodiesel

    SciTech Connect

    Canakci, M.; Monyem, A.; Van Gerpen, J.

    1999-12-01

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel for diesel engines that can be produced from renewable feedstocks such as vegetable oil and animal fats. These feedstocks are reacted with an alcohol to produce alkyl monoesters that can be used in conventional diesel engines with little or no modification. Biodiesel, especially if produced from highly unsaturated oils, oxidizes more rapidly than diesel fuel. This article reports the results of experiments to track the chemical and physical changes that occur in biodiesel as it oxidizes. These results show the impact of time, oxygen flow rate, temperature, metals, and feedstock type on the rate of oxidation. Blending with diesel fuel and the addition of antioxidants are explored also. The data indicate that without antioxidants, biodiesel will oxidize very quickly at temperatures typical of diesel engines. This oxidation results in increases in peroxide value, acid value, and viscosity. While the peroxide value generally reaches a plateau of about 350 meq/kg ester, the acid value and viscosity increase monotonically as oxidation proceeds.

  6. Metal oxide nanostructures with hierarchical morphology

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Lao, Jing Yu (Saline, MI); Banerjee, Debasish (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2007-11-13

    The present invention relates generally to metal oxide materials with varied symmetrical nanostructure morphologies. In particular, the present invention provides metal oxide materials comprising one or more metallic oxides with three-dimensionally ordered nanostructural morphologies, including hierarchical morphologies. The present invention also provides methods for producing such metal oxide materials.

  7. The oxidation of metals and alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheil, Erich

    1952-01-01

    This paper reviews the various types of oxidation processes occurring with pure metals and gives explanations for the varying time-temperature-oxidation rate relations that exist for copper, tungsten, zinc, cadmium, and tantalum. The effect of shape and crystal structure on oxidation is discussed. Principles derived are applied to the oxidation of alloys.

  8. Millisecond Oxidation of Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Han

    2011-09-30

    This project was undertaken in response to the Department of Energy's call to research and develop technologies 'that will reduce energy consumption, enhance economic competitiveness, and reduce environmental impacts of the domestic chemical industry.' The current technology at the time for producing 140 billion pounds per year of propylene from naphtha and Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG) relied on energy- and capital-intensive steam crackers and Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) units. The propylene is isolated from the product stream in a costly separation step and subsequently converted to acrylic acid and other derivatives in separate production facilities. This project proposed a Short Contact Time Reactor (SCTR)-based catalytic oxydehydrogenation process that could convert propane to propylene and acrylic acid in a cost-effective and energy-efficient fashion. Full implementation of this technology could lead to sizeable energy, economic and environmental benefits for the U. S. chemical industry by providing up to 45 trillion BTUs/year, cost savings of $1.8 billion/year and a combined 35 million pounds/year reduction in environmental pollutants such as COx, NOx, and SOx. Midway through the project term, the program directive changed, which approval from the DOE and its review panel, from direct propane oxidation to acrylic acid at millisecond contact times to a two-step process for making acrylic acid from propane. The first step was the primary focus, namely the conversion of propane to propylene in high yields assisted by the presence of CO2. The product stream from step one was then to be fed directly into a commercially practiced propylene-to-acrylic acid tandem reactor system.

  9. Inhibiting mitochondrial ?-oxidation selectively reduces levels of nonenzymatic oxidative polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolites in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chuck T; Trépanier, Marc-Olivier; Hopperton, Kathryn E; Domenichiello, Anthony F; Masoodi, Mojgan; Bazinet, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Schönfeld and Reiser recently hypothesized that fatty acid ?-oxidation is a source of oxidative stress in the brain. To test this hypothesis, we inhibited brain mitochondrial ?-oxidation with methyl palmoxirate (MEP) and measured oxidative polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) metabolites in the rat brain. Upon MEP treatment, levels of several nonenzymatic auto-oxidative PUFA metabolites were reduced with few effects on enzymatically derived metabolites. Our finding confirms the hypothesis that reduced fatty acid ?-oxidation decreases oxidative stress in the brain and ?-oxidation inhibitors may be a novel therapeutic approach for brain disorders associated with oxidative stress. PMID:24326387

  10. Depth distribution of ammonia oxidation rates and ammonia-oxidizer community composition in the Sargasso Sea

    E-print Network

    Ward, Bess

    Depth distribution of ammonia oxidation rates and ammonia-oxidizer community composition University, Princeton, New Jersey Abstract Ammonia oxidation rates and ammonia-oxidizer community structure in December 2009. Ammonia oxidation rates, measured from trace additions of 15NHz 4 (12­18 nmol L21), ranged

  11. Method for plating with metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Silver, Gary L. (Centerville, OH); Martin, Frank S. (Farmersville, OH)

    1994-08-23

    A method of plating hydrous metal oxides on at least one substrate, which method is indifferent to the electrochemical properties of the substrate, and comprises reacting metallic ions in aqueous solution with an appropriate oxidizing agent such as sodium hypochlorite or calcium sulfite with oxygen under suitable conditions of pH and concentration such that oxidation and precipitation of metal oxide are sufficiently slow to allow satisfactory plating of metal oxide on the substrate.

  12. Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Gessert, Timothy A; Yoshida, Yuki; Coutts, Timothy J

    2014-05-27

    Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) material may comprise: providing a TCO target (110) doped with either a high-permittivity oxide or a low-permittivity oxide in a process chamber (100). The method may also comprise depositing a metal oxide on the target (110) to form a thin film having enhanced optical properties without substantially decreasing electrical quality.

  13. Method for plating with metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Silver, G.L.; Martin, F.S.

    1994-08-23

    A method is disclosed of plating hydrous metal oxides on at least one substrate, which method is indifferent to the electrochemical properties of the substrate, and comprises reacting metallic ions in aqueous solution with an appropriate oxidizing agent such as sodium hypochlorite or calcium sulfite with oxygen under suitable conditions of pH and concentration such that oxidation and precipitation of metal oxide are sufficiently slow to allow satisfactory plating of metal oxide on the substrate. 1 fig.

  14. Process for fabrication of metal oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.; Svensson, S.

    1990-07-17

    This invention is comprised of a method of fabricating metal oxide films from a plurality of reactants by inducing a reaction by plasma deposition among the reactants. The plasma reaction is effective for consolidating the reactants and producing thin films of metal oxides, e.g. electro-optically active transition metal oxides, at a high deposition rate. The presence of hydrogen during the plasma reaction enhances the deposition rate of the metal oxide. Various types of metal oxide films can be produced.

  15. CO oxidation on gold-supported iron oxides: New insights into strong oxide–metal interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Liang; Liu, Yun; Yang, Fan; Evans, Jaime; Rodriguez, José A.; Liu, Ping

    2015-07-14

    Very active FeOx–Au catalysts for CO oxidation are obtained after depositing nanoparticles of FeO, Fe3O4, and Fe2O3 on a Au(111) substrate. Neither FeO nor Fe2O3 is stable under the reaction conditions. Under an environment of CO/O2, they undergo oxidation (FeO) or reduction (Fe2O3) to yield nanoparticles of Fe3O4 that are not formed in a bulk phase. Using a combined experimental and theoretical approach, we show a strong oxide–metal interaction (SOMI) between Fe3O4 nanostructures and Au(111), which gives the oxide special properties, allows the formation of an active phase, and provides a unique interface to facilitate a catalytic reaction. This work highlights the important role that the SOMI can play in enhancing the catalytic performance of the oxide component in metal–oxide catalysts.

  16. Oxidation of enrofloxacin with conductive-diamond electrochemical oxidation, ozonation and Fenton oxidation: a comparison.

    PubMed

    Guinea, Elena; Brillas, Enric; Centellas, Francesc; Cañizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel A; Sáez, Cristina

    2009-05-01

    The treatment of enrofloxacin synthetic wastewaters using conductive-diamond electrochemical oxidation (CDEO), ozonation and Fenton oxidation has been studied. Results show that the three technologies can reduce the organic content of enrofloxacin synthetic wastewaters but with different performances. CDEO was the most efficient technology in terms of mineralization but not on COD removal, which was more efficiently achieved by ozonation. This indicates that ozonation is efficient in the breakage of the complex molecules but not on the removal of final carboxylic acids. The high initial efficiency in terms of oxidant-use obtained by Fenton oxidation evidences that it is very efficient in the removal of the enrofloxacin, although it rapidly leads to the formation of refractory compounds to the treatment. This indicates the significance of other oxidation mechanisms (e.g. coagulation) that enhance the results obtained by the expected hydroxyl-mediated oxidation. Ammonium ions were the primary product species in CDEO and nitrate ions in ozonation, whereas Fenton effluents contained similar amounts of both nitrogen ionic species. PMID:19282017

  17. 78 FR 64244 - Persulfates From China; Revised Schedule for the Subject Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION... CONTACT: Angela M. W. Newell (202-708-5409), Office of Investigations, U.S. International Trade Commission..., 2013, the Commission established a schedule for the conduct of the subject investigation (78 FR...

  18. Flame generation of ceramic oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    Large quantities of TiO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2}, and mixed TiO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} powders are produced annually by combustion of their chloride precursors for use as catalysts and as paint opacifiers. We have studied the formation of flame synthesized oxides using a counterflow diffusion flame burner. It has enabled us to obtain desired morphologies and crystalline structures by varying process variables such as flame temperature and precursor concentration ratio, and by selecting the appropriate feed stream. For example, over the ranges of TiCl{sub 4} (the TiO{sub 2} precursor) concentrations tested, feeding it only into the oxidizer stream yields mainly anatase TiO{sub 2} powders, while feeding only into the fuel stream yields mainly rutile TiO{sub 2} powders. By adding TiCl{sub 4} and SiCl{sub 4} simultaneously to the same flame and choosing conditions such that the TiO{sub 2} condenses before the SiO{sub 2}, we obtained SiO{sub 2} attached to, or coated onto, TiO{sub 2} particles in a single step process. Oxide particles produced in the counterflow diffusion flame burner are in the 10 to 100 manometer range. Their high surface area makes them potentially useful as catalysts. V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-TiO{sub 2} and V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are well-known catalysts for the selective oxidation of o-xylene to phthalic anhydride, and V-P-O oxides are widely used catalysts for the selective oxidation of butene and n-butane to maleic anhydride. Several V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based mixed oxide powders were produced in the burner. 21 refs.

  19. Highly oxidized graphene nanosheets via the oxidization of detonation carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepal, A.; Chiu, G.; Xie, J.; Singh, G. P.; Ploscariu, N.; Klankowski, S.; Sung, T.; Li, J.; Flanders, B. N.; Hohn, K. L.; Sorensen, C. M.

    2015-08-01

    A unique approach was developed to produce highly oxygenated graphene nanosheets (OGNs) by solution-based oxidation of the pristine graphene nanosheets (GNs) prepared via a controlled detonation of acetylene with oxygen. The produced OGNs are about 250 nm in size and are hydrophilic in nature. The C/O ratio was dramatically reduced from 49:1 in the pristine GNs to about 1:1 in OGNs, as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This C/O in OGNs is the least ever found in all oxidized graphitic materials that have been reported. Thus, the OGNs produced from the detonated GNs with such high degree of oxidation herein yield a novel and promising material for future applications.

  20. EDITORIAL: Oxide semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, M.; Makino, T.

    2005-04-01

    Blue or ultraviolet semiconducting light-emitting diodes have the potential to revolutionize illumination systems in the near-future. Such industrial need has propelled the investigation of several wide-gap semiconducting materials in recent years. Commercial applications include blue lasers for DVD memory and laser printers, while military applications are also expected. Most of the material development has so far been focused on GaN (band gap 3.5 eV at 2 K), and ZnSe (2.9 eV) because these two representative direct transition semiconductors are known to be bright emitting sources. GaN and GaN-based alloys are emerging as the winners in this field because ZnSe is subject to defect formation under high current drive. On the other hand, another II-VI compound, ZnO, has also excited substantial interest in the optoelectronics-oriented research communities because it is the brightest emitter of all, owing to the fact that its excitons have a 60 meV binding energy. This is compared with 26 meV for GaN and 20 meV for ZnSe. The stable excitons could lead to laser action based on their recombination even at temperatures well above room temperature. ZnO has additional major properties that are more advantageous than other wide-gap materials: availability of large area substrates, higher energy radiation stability, environmentally-friendly ingredients, and amenability to wet chemical etching. However, ZnO is not new to the semiconductor field as exemplified by several studies made during the 1960s on structural, vibrational, optical and electrical properties (Mollwo E 1982 Landolt-Boernstein New Series vol 17 (Berlin: Springer) p 35). In terms of devices, the luminescence from light-emitting diode structures was demonstrated in which Cu2O was used as the p-type material (Drapak I T 1968 Semiconductors 2 624). The main obstacle to the development of ZnO has been the lack of reproducible p-type ZnO. The possibility of achieving epitaxial p-type layers with the aid of thermal non-equilibrium growth has rekindled the recent extensive investigation and progress in the field of ZnO epitaxy. In this special issue, Ohtomo and Tsukazaki, Cho et al, and Yi et al, respectively, describe the various fabrication processes such as pulsed laser deposition, molecular-beam epitaxy and metal-organic chemical vapour deposition. It should be noted that the last work among the above-mentioned papers has the potential to pave the way to nano-technology based on ZnO. This material has found other important applications as well, such as transparent conducting oxides (TCO). This field has a long research history, as is reviewed by Minami. Relatively speaking, ZnO was one of the earliest crystals (after Si, Ge, and InSb) to be prepared in a pure form, and the resultant long research history has given rise to the availability of large-area substrates. Recent progress in this topic is explained by two representative groups of authors in this field: Nause and Nemeth at Cermet Inc., and Maeda et al at Tokyo Denpa Co. Ltd. In order to overcome the bottleneck of p-type conduction and control the material's properties, a clear understanding of the physical processes in ZnO is necessary. Look et al are known as the first group to report on the growth and properties of p-type ZnO layers with a valid and reasonable set of experimental data (2002 Appl. Phys. Lett. 81 1830). Here, Look contributes a more comprehensive review to this issue. Optical studies on single crystals were conducted and are reviewed here by Meyer et al and Chichibu et al. Band-gap engineering and fabrication of heterojunction or quantum structures are important technological issues. It should be emphasized that by choosing an appropriate set of concentrations (x and y), perfect lattice-matching between MgxZn1-xO and CdyZn1-yO can be attained (Makino T et al 2001 Appl. Phys. Lett. 78 1237). Exciton properties of multiple quantum well structures are reported by Makino et al in this issue. Other than growth of p-type layers, ferromagnetic behaviour in transition-metal doped oxide is also fuelling

  1. Modeling of surface oxidation and oxidation induced damage in metal matrix composites 

    E-print Network

    Ma, Xinzheng

    1995-01-01

    Surface oxidation in metal matrix composites (MMC's) is modeled by Fickian diffusion of oxygen in both the oxide layer and metal matrix. The oxidation process and the resulting immobilized oxygen at the interface is accounted for by the introduction...

  2. In situ reduction and oxidation of nickel from solid oxide fuel cells in a Titan ETEM

    E-print Network

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    In situ reduction and oxidation of nickel from solid oxide fuel cells in a Titan ETEM A. Faes1. The in situ reduction and re-oxidation of the FIB prepared TEM lamellae is performed in a FEI Titan equipped

  3. OXIDATION OF NITROPYRIN TO 6-CHOLORPICOLINIC ACID BY THE AMMONIA-OXIDIZING BACTERIUM NOSTROSOMAS EUROPAEA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Suspensions of Nitrosomonas europaea catalyzed the oxidation of the commercial nitrification inhibitor nitrapyrin [2-chloro-6-(trichloromethyl)-pyridine]. apid oxidation of nitrapyrin (at a concentration of 10 uM) required the concomitant oxidation of ammonia, hydroxylamine, or h...

  4. Rules of Stereoselectivity in Tandem Oxidative Polycyclization Reaction with Rhenium(VII) Oxides

    E-print Network

    Keinan, Ehud

    Rules of Stereoselectivity in Tandem Oxidative Polycyclization Reaction with Rhenium(VII) Oxides, Israel ReceiVed April 17, 1998 The tandem oxidative polycyclization reaction with rhenium- (VII) reagents

  5. Oxidation of low cobalt alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Four high temperature alloys: U-700, Mar M-247, Waspaloy and PM/HIP U-700 were modified with various cobalt levels ranging from 0 percent to their nominal commercial levels. The alloys were then tested in cyclic oxidation in static air at temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1150 C at times from 500 to 100 1 hour cycles. Specific weight change with time and X-ray diffraction analyses of the oxidized samples were used to evaluate the alloys. The alloys tend to be either Al2O3/aluminate spinel or Cr2O3/chromite spinel formers depending on the Cr/Al ratio in the alloy. Waspaloy with a ratio of 15:1 is a strong Cr2O3 former while this U-700 with a ratio of 3.33:1 tends to form mostly Cr2O3 while Mar M-247 with a ratio of 1.53:1 is a strong Al2O3 former. The best cyclic oxidation resistance is associated with the Al2O3 formers. The cobalt levels appear to have little effect on the oxidation resistance of the Al2O3/aluminate spinel formers while any tendency to form Cr2O3 is accelerated with increased cobalt levels and leads to increased oxidation attack.

  6. Space flight and oxidative stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight is associated with an increase in oxidative stress after return to 1g. The effect is more pronounced after long-duration space flight. The effects lasts for several weeks after landing. In humans there is increased lipid peroxidation in erythrocyte membranes, reduction in some blood antioxidants, and increased urinary excretion of 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) and 8-oxo-7,8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine. Isoprostane 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) and 8-oxo-7,8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine are markers for oxidative damage to lipids and DNA, respectively. The changes have been attributed to a combination of the energy deficiency that occurs during flight and substrate competition for amino acids occurring between repleting muscle and other tissues during the recovery phase. The observations in humans have been complemented by rodent studies. Most rodent studies showed increased production of lipid peroxidation products postflight and decreased antioxidant enzyme activity postflight. The rodent observations were attributed to the stress associated with reentry into Earth's gravity. Decreasing the imbalance between the production of endogenous oxidant defenses and oxidant production by increasing the supply of dietary antioxidants may lessen the severity of the postflight increase in oxidative stress.

  7. TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isogai, Akira; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Fukuzumi, Hayaka

    2011-01-01

    Native wood celluloses can be converted to individual nanofibers 3-4 nm wide that are at least several microns in length, i.e. with aspect ratios >100, by TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical)-mediated oxidation and successive mild disintegration in water. Preparation methods and fundamental characteristics of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers (TOCN) are reviewed in this paper. Significant amounts of C6 carboxylate groups are selectively formed on each cellulose microfibril surface by TEMPO-mediated oxidation without any changes to the original crystallinity (~74%) or crystal width of wood celluloses. Electrostatic repulsion and/or osmotic effects working between anionically-charged cellulose microfibrils, the ?-potentials of which are approximately -75 mV in water, cause the formation of completely individualized TOCN dispersed in water by gentle mechanical disintegration treatment of TEMPO-oxidized wood cellulose fibers. Self-standing TOCN films are transparent and flexible, with high tensile strengths of 200-300 MPa and elastic moduli of 6-7 GPa. Moreover, TOCN-coated poly(lactic acid) films have extremely low oxygen permeability. The new cellulose-based nanofibers formed by size reduction process of native cellulose fibers by TEMPO-mediated oxidation have potential application as environmentally friendly and new bio-based nanomaterials in high-tech fields.

  8. Solid oxide electrochemical reactor science.

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Neal P.; Stechel, Ellen Beth; Moyer, Connor J.; Ambrosini, Andrea; Key, Robert J.

    2010-09-01

    Solid-oxide electrochemical cells are an exciting new technology. Development of solid-oxide cells (SOCs) has advanced considerable in recent years and continues to progress rapidly. This thesis studies several aspects of SOCs and contributes useful information to their continued development. This LDRD involved a collaboration between Sandia and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) ins solid-oxide electrochemical reactors targeted at solid oxide electrolyzer cells (SOEC), which are the reverse of solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFC). SOECs complement Sandia's efforts in thermochemical production of alternative fuels. An SOEC technology would co-electrolyze carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with steam at temperatures around 800 C to form synthesis gas (H{sub 2} and CO), which forms the building blocks for a petrochemical substitutes that can be used to power vehicles or in distributed energy platforms. The effort described here concentrates on research concerning catalytic chemistry, charge-transfer chemistry, and optimal cell-architecture. technical scope included computational modeling, materials development, and experimental evaluation. The project engaged the Colorado Fuel Cell Center at CSM through the support of a graduate student (Connor Moyer) at CSM and his advisors (Profs. Robert Kee and Neal Sullivan) in collaboration with Sandia.

  9. Novel Properties in Oxide Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Chen; Jin, Kui-Juan; Lu, Hui-Bin; Wang, Cong

    A brief review of recent investigations in oxide heterostructures is presented. First, experimental results are shown. Positive colossal magnetoresistance with high sensitivities are obtained at low magnetic field (<1000 Oe) nearly at room temperature. Picoseconds photoelectric effects of the rise time ~ 210 ps and the half-maximum ~ 650 ps are also found in some oxide heterostructures. Furthermore, resistance switching characteristic and electric displacement-voltage hysteresis loops have been observed in BaTiO3-?/Si p-n heterostructures. Second, theoretical descriptions are also shown here. A model for the mechanism causing the positive colossal magnetoresistance has been established. Moreover, the transport properties and the important role played by oxygen vacancies are theoretically investigated in oxide heterostructures. In addition, an extended percolation model is well developed, with which the transport characteristic in oxide thin films can be well simulated based on the phase separation scenario. Notably, the interface effects play a crucial role in the multifunctional properties of the oxide heterostructures.

  10. Fast Ferrous Heme-NO Oxidation in Nitric Oxide Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Tejero, Jesús; Santolini, Jérôme; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2009-01-01

    During catalysis, the heme in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) binds NO before releasing it to the environment. Oxidation of the NOS ferrous heme-NO complex by O2 is key for catalytic cycling, but the mechanism is unclear. We utilized stopped-flow methods to study reaction of O2 with ferrous heme-NO complexes of the inducible and neuronal NOS enzymes. We found that the reaction does not involve heme-NO dissociation, but instead proceeds by a rapid, direct reaction of O2 with the ferrous heme-NO complex. This behavior is novel and may distinguish heme-thiolate enzymes like NOS from related heme proteins. PMID:19691141

  11. Volatilization of oxides during oxidation of some superalloys at 1200 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, I.

    1977-01-01

    Volatilization of oxides during cyclic oxidation of commercial Nichrome, Inconel 750, Rene 41, Stellite 6B, and GE-1541 was studied at 1200 C in static air. Quantitative analysis of oxide vapor deposits revealed that oxides of tungsten, molybdenum, niobium, manganese, and chromium volatilized preferentially from the oxide scales. Aluminum and silicon were not detected in vapor deposits. For all the alloys except GE-1541, chromium was found to be the main metallic element in the oxide scales.

  12. Catalyst for Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, George M. (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Kielin, Erik J. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Schyryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); DAmbrosia, Christine M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for oxidizing volatile organic compounds to carbon dioxide and water with the minimal addition of energy. A mixture of the volatile organic compound and an oxidizing agent (e.g. ambient air containing the volatile organic compound) is exposed to a catalyst which includes a noble metal dispersed on a metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state. Especially good results are obtained when the noble metal is platinum, and the metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state is tin oxide. A promoter (i.e., a small amount of an oxide of a transition series metal) may be used in association with the tin oxide to provide very beneficial results.

  13. Method for hot pressing beryllium oxide articles

    DOEpatents

    Ballard, Ambrose H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Godfrey, Jr., Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Mowery, Erb H. (Clinton, TN)

    1988-01-01

    The hot pressing of beryllium oxide powder into high density compacts with little or no density gradients is achieved by employing a homogeneous blend of beryllium oxide powder with a lithium oxide sintering agent. The lithium oxide sintering agent is uniformly dispersed throughout the beryllium oxide powder by mixing lithium hydroxide in an aqueous solution with beryllium oxide powder. The lithium hydroxide is converted in situ to lithium carbonate by contacting or flooding the beryllium oxide-lithium hydroxide blend with a stream of carbon dioxide. The lithium carbonate is converted to lithium oxide while remaining fixed to the beryllium oxide particles during the hot pressing step to assure uniform density throughout the compact.

  14. Copper, silver, gold and zinc, cadmium, mercury oxides and hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Dirkse, T.P.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides a compilation of solubility data published up to 1984, including evaluations of the data. Data are presented on the following: copper (I) oxide; copper (II) oxide and hydroxide; silver (I) oxide; silver (II) oxide; gold (III) hydroxide; zinc oxide and hydroxide; cadmium oxide and hydroxide; and mercury (II) oxide.

  15. Aromatic-radical oxidation kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Research progress in three areas is described. Progress achieved in the extensive experimental investigation of the oxidation and pyrolysis of cyclopentadiene is summarized first. The mechanistic implications of the experimental work are also discussed. An overview is given of the successful research effort devoted to modelling flow reactor toluene and benzene oxidation data. As mentioned above, one of the ultimate goals of this research is to develop a comprehensive, detailed chemical kinetic model of aromatics oxidation. The success already achieved in this effort augurs well for reaching the broader goal. The toluene/benzene model, however, does have a number of shortcomings which suggest the need for further experiments. A description is given of attempts to predict the laminar flame speeds of toluene and benzene. The difficulties encountered and the solutions found highlight the need of an examination of certain chemical steps that impact most the energy release of a burning aromatic fuel.

  16. An electrogenic nitric oxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Al-Attar, Sinan; de Vries, Simon

    2015-07-22

    Nitric oxide reductases (Nors) are members of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily that reduce nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide (N?O). In contrast to the proton-pumping cytochrome oxidases, Nors studied so far have neither been implicated in proton pumping nor have they been experimentally established as electrogenic. The copper-A-dependent Nor from Bacillus azotoformans uses cytochrome c??? as electron donor but lacks menaquinol activity, in contrast to our earlier report (Suharti et al., 2001). Employing reduced phenazine ethosulfate (PESH) as electron donor, the main NO reduction pathway catalyzed by Cu(A)Nor reconstituted in liposomes involves transmembrane cycling of the PES radical. We show that Cu(A)Nor reconstituted in liposomes generates a proton electrochemical gradient across the membrane similar in magnitude to cytochrome aa?, highlighting that bacilli using Cu(A)Nor can exploit NO reduction for increased cellular ATP production compared to organisms using cNor. PMID:26149211

  17. Oxide Fiber Targets at ISOLDE

    E-print Network

    Köster, U; Carminati, D; Catherall, R; Cederkäll, J; Correia, J G; Crepieux, B; Dietrich, M; Elder, K; Fedosseev, V; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Franchoo, S; Fynbo, H O U; Georg, U; Giles, T; Joinet, A; Jonsson, O C; Kirchner, R; Lau, C; Lettry, Jacques; Maier, H J; Mishin, V I; Oinonen, M; Peräjärvi, K; Ravn, H L; Rinaldi, T; Santana-Leitner, M; Wahl, U; Weissman, L

    2003-01-01

    Many elements are rapidly released from oxide matrices. Some oxide powder targets show a fast sintering, thus losing their favorable release characteristics. Loosely packed oxyde fiber targets are less critical since they may maintain their open structure even when starting to fuse together at some contact points. The experience with various oxyde fiber targets (titania, zirconia, ceria and thoria) used in the last years at ISOLDE is reviewed. For short-lived isotopes of Cu, Ga and Xe the zirconia and ceria targets respectively provided significantly higher yields than any other target (metal foils, oxide powders, etc.) tested before. Titania fibers, which were not commercially available, were produced in a relic process by impregnation of a rayon felt in a titanium chloride solution and subsequent calcination by heating the dried felt in air. Thoria fibers were obtained either by the same process or by burning commercial gas lantern mantle cloth. In the future a beryllia fiber target could be used to produce...

  18. Patterning by area selective oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Nam, Chang-Yong; Kamcev, Jovan; Black, Charles T.; Grubbs, Robert

    2015-12-29

    Technologies are described for methods for producing a pattern of a material on a substrate. The methods may comprise receiving a patterned block copolymer on a substrate. The patterned block copolymer may include a first polymer block domain and a second polymer block domain. The method may comprise exposing the patterned block copolymer to a light effective to oxidize the first polymer block domain in the patterned block copolymer. The method may comprise applying a precursor to the block copolymer. The precursor may infuse into the oxidized first polymer block domain and generate the material. The method may comprise applying a removal agent to the block copolymer. The removal agent may be effective to remove the first polymer block domain and the second polymer block domain from the substrate, and may not be effective to remove the material in the oxidized first polymer block domain.

  19. Metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors formed by oxidation of polycrystalline silicon on SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, J.; Das, M. K.; Cooper, J. A., Jr.; Melloch, M. R.

    1997-04-01

    A method to form SiO2/SiC metal-oxide-semiconductor structures by oxidation of a thin polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) layer deposited on SiC is demonstrated. The oxidation time used is sufficient to oxidize all the polysilicon while short enough at 1050 °C to insure insignificant oxidation of the underlying SiC. Since the oxidation of SiC is highly anisotropic, this method allows uniform oxide formation on a nonplanar SiC surface. The SiO2/SiC interface quality is comparable to that obtained with thermal oxidation.

  20. Hydrothermal synthesis of vanadium oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Chirayil, T.; Zavalij, P.Y.; Whittingham, M.S.

    1998-10-01

    The use of mild hydrothermal methods to synthesize vanadium oxides is reviewed, with particular emphasis on those with layer and 3-dimensional structures. A wide range of studies have been performed predominantly in the past decade to grow new materials that might have interesting electrochemical and magnetic properties. Most emphasis has been placed on vanadium oxides that contain organic species or simple cations such as the alkali metals, alkaline earths, zinc and copper. The key parameters determining the structures formed are reviewed, including pH and the organic structure-directing ion. Some initial electrochemical studies are described.

  1. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Draper, R.; George, R.A.; Shockling, L.A.

    1993-04-06

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a pair of spaced apart tubesheets in a housing. At least two intermediate barrier walls are between the tubesheets and define a generator chamber between two intermediate buffer chambers. An array of fuel cells have tubes with open ends engaging the tubesheets. Tubular, axially elongated electrochemical cells are supported on the tubes in the generator chamber. Fuel gas and oxidant gas are preheated in the intermediate chambers by the gases flowing on the other side of the tubes. Gas leakage around the tubes through the tubesheets is permitted. The buffer chambers reentrain the leaked fuel gas for reintroduction to the generator chamber.

  2. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA); George, Raymond A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Shockling, Larry A. (Plum Borough, PA)

    1993-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a pair of spaced apart tubesheets in a housing. At least two intermediate barrier walls are between the tubesheets and define a generator chamber between two intermediate buffer chambers. An array of fuel cells have tubes with open ends engaging the tubesheets. Tubular, axially elongated electrochemical cells are supported on the tubes in the generator chamber. Fuel gas and oxidant gas are preheated in the intermediate chambers by the gases flowing on the other side of the tubes. Gas leakage around the tubes through the tubesheets is permitted. The buffer chambers reentrain the leaked fuel gas for reintroduction to the generator chamber.

  3. Aromatic-radical oxidation chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Glassman, I.; Brezinsky, K.

    1993-12-01

    The research effort has focussed on discovering an explanation for the anomalously high CO{sub 2} concentrations observed early in the reaction sequence of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene. To explain this observation, a number of plausible mechanisms have been developed which now await experimental verification. One experimental technique for verifying mechanisms is to probe the reacting system by perturbing the radical concentrations. Two forms of chemical perturbation of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene were begun during this past year--the addition of NO{sub 2} and CO to the reacting mixture.

  4. Ultrafast graphene oxide humidity sensors.

    PubMed

    Borini, Stefano; White, Richard; Wei, Di; Astley, Michael; Haque, Samiul; Spigone, Elisabetta; Harris, Nadine; Kivioja, Jani; Ryhänen, Tapani

    2013-12-23

    Sensors allow an electronic device to become a gateway between the digital and physical worlds, and sensor materials with unprecedented performance can create new applications and new avenues for user interaction. Graphene oxide can be exploited in humidity and temperature sensors with a number of convenient features such as flexibility, transparency and suitability for large-scale manufacturing. Here we show that the two-dimensional nature of graphene oxide and its superpermeability to water combine to enable humidity sensors with unprecedented response speed (?30 ms response and recovery times). This opens the door to various applications, such as touchless user interfaces, which we demonstrate with a 'whistling' recognition analysis. PMID:24206232

  5. Oxidative Reactions with Nonaqueous Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan S. Dordick; Douglas Clark; Brian H Davison; Alexander Klibanov

    2001-12-30

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate a proof-of-concept of enzymatic oxidative processing in nonaqueous media using alkene epoxidation and phenolic polymerization as relevant targets. This project will provide both the fundamental and applied investigations necessary to initiate the implementation of oxidative biocatalysts as commercially relevant alternatives to chemical processing in general, and to phenolic polymerizations and alkene epoxidation specifically. Thus, this work will address the Bioprocessing Solicitation Area to: (1) makes major improvements to phenolic polymerization and alkene epoxidation technologies; (2) is expected to be cost competitive with competing conventional processes; and (3) produces higher yields with less waste.

  6. Catecholamines oxidation by xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Foppoli, C; Coccia, R; Cini, C; Rosei, M A

    1997-03-15

    Dopamine and structurally related catecholamines in the presence of hydrogen peroxide are oxidized in vitro by xanthine oxidase producing the corresponding melanin pigments. The kinetic parameters of the reaction, measured as aminochrome formation, have been calculated. The rate of peroxidation depends on enzyme and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The optimum pH for the peroxidative activity of the enzyme is around 8.5. Activation of the peroxidative reaction is also elicited by catechol compounds through a redox cycle mechanism. Implications about the possible biochemical relevance of xanthine oxidase activity on catecholamines oxidation are discussed. PMID:9101714

  7. Partial oxidation of sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, M.A.; Suggitt, R.M.; McKeon, R.J.; Brent, A.

    1990-06-12

    This patent describes a process for the partial oxidation of sewage sludge. It comprises: shearing without heating a concentrated aqueous slurry of sewage sludge obtained from sewage.; dewatering the sheared pumpable aqueous slurry of sewage sludge from (1) to a solids content in the rage of about 25 to 50 wt. %; mixing the pumpable sheared aqueous slurry of sewage sludge with a supplemental solid fuel and reacting the pumpable aqueous sewage sludge-coal and/or petroleum coke slurry in the reaction zone of a partial oxidation gas generator at a temperature in the range of about 1800{degrees} F. to 2800{degrees} F.

  8. IRON OXIDE NANOPARTICLE-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS AND INFLAMMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Nanoparticle Physicochemical Characterizations
    2. We first focused on creating NP systems that could be used to test our hypotheses and assessing their stability in aqueous media. The iron oxide NP systems were not stable in cell culture medium o...

    3. Synthesis of Ordered Mesoporous Manganese Oxides with Various Oxidation States.

      PubMed

      Park, Gwi Ok; Shon, Jeong Kuk; Kim, Yong Ho; Kim, Ji Man

      2015-03-01

      Ordered mesoporous MnO, MnO4, Mn2O3 and MnO2 materials with 3-D pore structure were suc- cessfully synthesized via a nano-replication method by using ordered mesoporous silica, KIT-6 (Cubic Ia3d space group mesostructure) as the template under specific oxidation and reduction conditions. Notably, ordered mesoporous MnO with a crystalline wall (rock salt structure) was syn- thesized for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The synthesis of the ordered mesoporous MnO was achieved by reducing the ordered mesoporous Mn3O4 under an H2 atmosphere, while preserving the ordered mesostructure and crystalline wall throughout the solid/solid transformation. All of the ordered mesoporous manganese oxides with different crystal structures and oxidation states demonstrated almost the same spherical-like morphology with several hundred nanometers of particles. The synthesized ordered mesoporous manganese oxides had uniform dual mesopores (2-3 nm, and ~20 nm) and crystalline frameworks with large surface areas (86-140 m2/g) and pore volumes (0.27-0.33 cm3/g). PMID:26413684

    4. Oxidative stress inhibition and oxidant activity by fibrous clays.

      PubMed

      Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia

      2015-09-01

      Fibrous clays (sepiolite, palygorskite) are produced at 1.2m tonnes per year and have a wide range of industrial applications needing to replace long-fibre length asbestos. However, information on the beneficial effects of fibrous clays on health remains scarce. This paper reports on the effect of sepiolite (Vallecas, Spain) and palygorskite (Torrejón El Rubio, Spain) on cell damage via oxidative stress (determined as the progress of lipid peroxidation, LP). The extent of LP was assessed using the Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances assay. The oxidant activity by fibrous clays was quantified using Electron-Paramagnetic Resonance. Sepiolite and palygorskite inhibited LP, whereby corresponding IC50 values were 6557±1024 and 4250±289?gmL(-1). As evidenced by dose-response experiments LP inhibition by palygorskite was surface-controlled. Fibrous clay surfaces did not stabilize HO species, except for suspensions containing 5000?gmL(-1). A strong oxidant (or weak anti-oxidant) activity favours the inhibition of LP by fibrous clays. PMID:26071933

    5. Graphene oxide and H2 production from bioelectrochemical graphite oxidation.

      PubMed

      Lu, Lu; Zeng, Cuiping; Wang, Luda; Yin, Xiaobo; Jin, Song; Lu, Anhuai; Jason Ren, Zhiyong

      2015-01-01

      Graphene oxide (GO) is an emerging material for energy and environmental applications, but it has been primarily produced using chemical processes involving high energy consumption and hazardous chemicals. In this study, we reported a new bioelectrochemical method to produce GO from graphite under ambient conditions without chemical amendments, value-added organic compounds and high rate H2 were also produced. Compared with abiotic electrochemical electrolysis control, the microbial assisted graphite oxidation produced high rate of graphite oxide and graphene oxide (BEGO) sheets, CO2, and current at lower applied voltage. The resultant electrons are transferred to a biocathode, where H2 and organic compounds are produced by microbial reduction of protons and CO2, respectively, a process known as microbial electrosynthesis (MES). Pseudomonas is the dominant population on the anode, while abundant anaerobic solvent-producing bacteria Clostridium carboxidivorans is likely responsible for electrosynthesis on the cathode. Oxygen production through water electrolysis was not detected on the anode due to the presence of facultative and aerobic bacteria as O2 sinkers. This new method provides a sustainable route for producing graphene materials and renewable H2 at low cost, and it may stimulate a new area of research in MES. PMID:26573014

    6. SELECTIVE OXIDATION IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE USING CLEAN OXIDANTS

      EPA Science Inventory

      We have systematically investigated heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of different substrates in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2). Three types of catagysts: a metal complex, 0.5% platinum g-alumina and 0.5% palladium g-alumina were used at a pressure of 200 bar, temperatures...

    7. Graphene oxide and H2 production from bioelectrochemical graphite oxidation

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Lu, Lu; Zeng, Cuiping; Wang, Luda; Yin, Xiaobo; Jin, Song; Lu, Anhuai; Jason Ren, Zhiyong

      2015-11-01

      Graphene oxide (GO) is an emerging material for energy and environmental applications, but it has been primarily produced using chemical processes involving high energy consumption and hazardous chemicals. In this study, we reported a new bioelectrochemical method to produce GO from graphite under ambient conditions without chemical amendments, value-added organic compounds and high rate H2 were also produced. Compared with abiotic electrochemical electrolysis control, the microbial assisted graphite oxidation produced high rate of graphite oxide and graphene oxide (BEGO) sheets, CO2, and current at lower applied voltage. The resultant electrons are transferred to a biocathode, where H2 and organic compounds are produced by microbial reduction of protons and CO2, respectively, a process known as microbial electrosynthesis (MES). Pseudomonas is the dominant population on the anode, while abundant anaerobic solvent-producing bacteria Clostridium carboxidivorans is likely responsible for electrosynthesis on the cathode. Oxygen production through water electrolysis was not detected on the anode due to the presence of facultative and aerobic bacteria as O2 sinkers. This new method provides a sustainable route for producing graphene materials and renewable H2 at low cost, and it may stimulate a new area of research in MES.

    8. Graphene oxide and H2 production from bioelectrochemical graphite oxidation

      PubMed Central

      Lu, Lu; Zeng, Cuiping; Wang, Luda; Yin, Xiaobo; Jin, Song; Lu, Anhuai; Jason Ren, Zhiyong

      2015-01-01

      Graphene oxide (GO) is an emerging material for energy and environmental applications, but it has been primarily produced using chemical processes involving high energy consumption and hazardous chemicals. In this study, we reported a new bioelectrochemical method to produce GO from graphite under ambient conditions without chemical amendments, value-added organic compounds and high rate H2 were also produced. Compared with abiotic electrochemical electrolysis control, the microbial assisted graphite oxidation produced high rate of graphite oxide and graphene oxide (BEGO) sheets, CO2, and current at lower applied voltage. The resultant electrons are transferred to a biocathode, where H2 and organic compounds are produced by microbial reduction of protons and CO2, respectively, a process known as microbial electrosynthesis (MES). Pseudomonas is the dominant population on the anode, while abundant anaerobic solvent-producing bacteria Clostridium carboxidivorans is likely responsible for electrosynthesis on the cathode. Oxygen production through water electrolysis was not detected on the anode due to the presence of facultative and aerobic bacteria as O2 sinkers. This new method provides a sustainable route for producing graphene materials and renewable H2 at low cost, and it may stimulate a new area of research in MES. PMID:26573014

    9. New quinoproteins in oxidative fermentation.

      PubMed

      Adachi, O; Moonmangmee, D; Shinagawa, E; Toyama, H; Yamada, M; Matsushita, K

      2003-04-11

      Several quinoproteins have been newly indicated in acetic acid bacteria, all of which can be applied to fermentative or enzymatic production of useful materials by means of oxidative fermentation. (1) D-Arabitol dehydrogenase from Gluconobacter suboxydans IFO 3257 was purified from the bacterial membrane and found to be a versatile enzyme for oxidation of various substrates to the corresponding oxidation products. It is worthy of notice that the enzyme catalyzes D-gluconate oxidation to 5-keto-D-gluconate, whereas 2-keto-D-gluconate is produced by a flavoprotein D-gluconate dehydrogenase. (2) Membrane-bound cyclic alcohol dehydrogenase was solubilized and purified for the first time from Gluconobacter frateurii CHM 9. When compared with the cytosolic NAD-dependent cyclic alcohol dehydrogenase crystallized from the same strain, the reaction rate in cyclic alcohol oxidation by the membrane enzyme was 100 times stronger than the cytosolic NAD-dependent enzyme. The NAD-dependent enzyme makes no contribution to cyclic alcohol oxidation but contributes to the reduction of cyclic ketones to cyclic alcohols. (3) Meso-erythritol dehydrogenase has been purified from the membrane fraction of G. frateurii CHM 43. The typical properties of quinoproteins were indicated in many respects with the enzyme. It was found that the enzyme, growing cells and also the resting cells of the organism are very effective in producing L-erythrulose. Dihydroxyacetone can be replaced by L-erythrulose for cosmetics for those who are sensitive to dihydroxyacetone. (4) Two different membrane-bound D-sorbitol dehydrogenases were indicated in acetic acid bacteria. One enzyme contributing to L-sorbose production has been identified to be a quinoprotein, while another FAD-containing D-sorbitol dehydrogenase catalyzes D-sorbitol oxidation to D-fructose. D-Fructose production by the oxidative fermentation would be possible by the latter enzyme and it is superior to the well-established D-glucose isomerase, because the oxidative fermentation catalyzes irreversible one-way oxidation of D-sorbitol to D-fructose without any reaction equilibrium, unlike D-glucose isomerase. (5) Quinate dehydrogenase was found in several Gluconobacter strains and other aerobic bacteria like Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter strains. It has become possible to produce dehydroquinate, dehydroshikimate, and shikimate by oxidative fermentation. Quinate dehydrogenase was readily solubilized from the membrane fraction by alkylglucoside in the presence of 0.1 M KCl. A simple purification by hydrophobic chromatography gave a highly purified quinate dehydrogenase that was monodispersed and showed sufficient purity. When quinate dehydrogenase purification was done with Acinetobacter calcoaceticus AC3, which is unable to synthesize PQQ, purified inactive apo-quinate dehydrogenase appeared to be a dimer and it was converted to the monomeric active holo-quinate dehydrogenase by the addition of PQQ. PMID:12686101

    10. Saltstone Oxidation Study: Leaching Method

      SciTech Connect

      Langton, C. A.; Stefanko, D. B.; Burns, H. H.

      2013-02-24

      Cementitious waste forms can be designed to chemically stabilize selected contaminants, such as Tc{sup +7} and Cr{sup +6}, by chemically reduction to lower valance states, Tc{sup +4} and Cr{sup +3}, respectively, and precipitation of these species in alkaline media as low solubility solid phases. Data for oxidation of this type of cementitious waste form cured under field conditions as a function of time is required for predicting the performance of the waste form and disposal facility. The rate of oxidation (oxidation front advancement) is an important parameter for predicting performance because the solubilities of some radionuclide contaminants, e.g., technetium, are a function of the oxidation state. A non-radioactive experiment was designed for quantifying the oxidation front advancement using chromium, as an approximate redox-sensitive surrogate (Cr{sup +6} / Cr{sup +3}) for technetium (Tc{sup +7} / Tc{sup +4}). Nonradioactive cementitious waste forms were prepared in the laboratory and cured under both laboratory and ?field conditions.? Laboratory conditions were ambient temperature and sealed sample containers. Field conditions were approximated by curing samples in open containers which were placed inside a plastic container stored outdoors at SRS. The container had a lid and was instrumented with temperature and humidity probes. Subsamples as thin as 0.2 mm were taken as a function of distance from the exposed surface of the as-cast sample. The subsamples were leached and the leachates were analyzed for chromium, nitrate, nitrite and sodium. Nitrate, nitrite, and sodium concentrations were used to provide baseline data because these species are not chemically retained in the waste form matrix to any significant extent and are not redox sensitive. ?Effective? oxidation fronts for Cr were measured for samples containing 1000, 500 and 20 mg/kg Cr added as soluble sodium chromate, Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}. For a sample cured for 129 days under field conditions, leachable Cr (assumed to be the oxidized form, i.e., Cr{sup +6} was detected in the top 15 to 20 mm of the sample spiked with 1000 mg/kg Cr. Below about 20 mm, the Cr concentrations in leachates were below the detection limit (< 0.010 mg/L) which indicates that the oxidation as the result of exposure to air was limited to the top 20 mm of the sample after exposure for 129 days and that the bulk of the waste form was not affected, i.e., the Cr was stabilized and insoluble. For samples cured in the laboratory, leachable Cr was detected in the top 8 mm of the Cr 1000 sample cured in the laboratory for 37 days. Between 8 and 14 mm, the concentration Cr in the leachate dropped by a factor of about 20 to just above the detection limit. These depth of penetration results indicate that the rate of advancement of the oxidation front for samples spiked with 1000 mg/kg Cr cured under ?field conditions? for 129 days is less than that for the sample cured in the laboratory for 37 days, i.e., 0.156 and 0.216 mm/day, respectively. Additional data are presented for samples spiked with 500 and 20 mg/kg Cr. In summary, cementitious waste forms are porous solids with a network of interconnected pores ranging in diameter from 10E-10 m to greater than a few mm. The oxidation process is assumed to occur as the result of oxygen transport through the interconnected porosity which may be filled with air, aqueous salt solution, or both. Upon oxidation, the Cr becomes soluble and can be transported in solution through aqueous pore fluid or leachate.

    11. Oxidative polycyclization with rhenium(VII) oxides: application of the stereoselectivity rules in the total synthesis of rollidecins

      E-print Network

      Keinan, Ehud

      Oxidative polycyclization with rhenium(VII) oxides: application of the stereoselectivity rules. Introduction The tandem oxidative polycyclization reaction with rhenium(VII) reagents, ®rst reported in 1995

    12. Cerium Oxide and Cerium Compounds

      Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

      EPA / 635 / R - 08 / 002F www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF Cerium Oxide and Cerium Compounds ( CAS No . 1306 - 38 - 3 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) September 2009 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC ii DISCLAIMER Th

    13. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

      DOEpatents

      Di Croce, A. Michael (Murrysville, PA); Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA)

      1993-11-02

      A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plenum containing at least two rows of spaced apart, annular, axially elongated fuel cells. An electrical conductor extending between adjacent rows of fuel cells connects the fuel cells of one row in parallel with each other and in series with the fuel cells of the adjacent row.

    14. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

      DOEpatents

      Di Croce, A.M.; Draper, R.

      1993-11-02

      A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plenum containing at least two rows of spaced apart, annular, axially elongated fuel cells. An electrical conductor extending between adjacent rows of fuel cells connects the fuel cells of one row in parallel with each other and in series with the fuel cells of the adjacent row. 5 figures.

  1. Oxidative stress in obstructive nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dendooven, Amélie; Ishola, David A; Nguyen, Tri Q; Van der Giezen, Dionne M; Kok, Robbert Jan; Goldschmeding, Roel; Joles, Jaap A

    2011-01-01

    Unilateral ureteric obstruction (UUO) is one of the most commonly applied rodent models to study the pathophysiology of renal fibrosis. This model reflects important aspects of inflammation and fibrosis that are prominent in human kidney diseases. In this review, we present an overview of the factors contributing to the pathophysiology of UUO, highlighting the role of oxidative stress. PMID:20804541

  2. Radiolytic oxidation of technetium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.; Fried, S.; Friedman, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    Samples of the insoluble technetium dioxide (TcO/sub 2/) were slurried in distilled water and in seawater and allowed to oxidize under the influence of their own radiation /sup 99/Tc ..-->.. /sup 99/Ru (0.293 keV beta decay). Under these conditions only about 10 to 15% of the Tc was oxidized. When the technetium solutions were subjected to greater radiation fields by addition of /sup 244/Cm the oxidation of the technetium to pertechnetate was virtually complete. In the case of TcO/sub 2/ slurries without added radioactivity it was found that the concentration of pertechnetate ion, TcO/sub 4/, reached a maximum and then declined to about one-half of that maximum value. The practical significance of these results is that technetium does exist in the oxidized form (as soluble pertechenetate) in a radiation field. Repository design, therefore, must include a backfill material which will adsorb or reduce the TcO/sub 4//sup -/ anion to ensure its isolation from the surrounding environment. 1 figure, 1 table.

  3. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, K.D.

    1991-06-25

    Perovskites of the structure A[sub 2]B[sub 2]C[sub 3]O[sub 10] are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

  4. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Kenneth D. (Charleston, WV)

    1991-01-01

    Perovskites of the structure A.sub.2 B.sub.2 C.sub.3 O.sub.10 are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

  5. Synthesis of iron oxide nanoworms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchoudhury, Soubantika; Xu, Yaolin; Goodwin, Johnny; Bao, Yuping

    2011-04-01

    We report on the synthesis of highly crystalline iron oxide nanoworms via a modified "heat-up" method using iron oleate as the precursor. According to a detailed nanoparticle growth study, we proposed that the nanoworms resulted from the aggregation of spherical iron oxide nanoparticles. The aggregation was induced by the high percentage coverage of a weakly bound ligand (trioctylphosphine oxide) on the iron oxide surfaces. A time dependent study clearly demonstrated the evolution of these nanostructures from spheres to one-dimensional nanoworms. The diameter of the nanoworms was similar to the spherical nanoparticles observed at an early stage of the reaction, and the length of the nanoworms changed from 50-200 nm during the reaction. The spheres and the nanoworms were both maghemite crystal structures, but the magnetic properties changed from superparamagnetic for the spheres to ferromagnetic for the elongated nanoworms. These one dimensional structures will offer additional opportunities for biomedical applications because of their high blood circulation time and large surface area for bio-labeling.

  6. Oxidation Mechanism of Copper Selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskinen, Pekka; Patana, Sonja; Kobylin, Petri; Latostenmaa, Petri

    2014-09-01

    The oxidation mechanism of copper selenide was investigated at deselenization temperatures of copper refining anode slimes. The isothermal roasting of synthetic, massive copper selenide in flowing oxygen and oxygen - 20% sulfur dioxide mixtures at 450-550 °C indicate that in both atmospheres the mass of Cu2Se increases as a function of time, due to formation of copper selenite as an intermediate product. Copper selenide oxidises to copper oxides without formation of thick copper selenite scales, and a significant fraction of selenium is vaporized as SeO2(g). The oxidation product scales on Cu2Se are porous which allows transport of atmospheric oxygen to the reaction zone and selenium dioxide vapor to the surrounding gas. Predominance area diagrams of the copper-selenium system, constructed for selenium roasting conditions, indicate that the stable phase of copper in a selenium roaster gas with SO2 is the sulfate CuSO4. The cuprous oxide formed in decomposition of Cu2Se is further sulfated to CuSO4.

  7. Oxidation Numbers and Their Limitations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolf, A. A.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews a method for determining oxidation numbers in covalent compounds and balancing mixed organic-inorganic or purely organic systems. Points out ambiguities presented when adjacent atoms have small or zero electronegativity differences. Presents other limitations that arise when using electronegativity values. (CW)

  8. Ferroelectricity in undoped hafnium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Polakowski, Patrick; Müller, Johannes

    2015-06-08

    We report the observation of ferroelectric characteristics in undoped hafnium oxide thin films in a thickness range of 4–20?nm. The undoped films were fabricated using atomic layer deposition (ALD) and embedded into titanium nitride based metal-insulator-metal (MIM) capacitors for electrical evaluation. Structural as well as electrical evidence for the appearance of a ferroelectric phase in pure hafnium oxide was collected with respect to film thickness and thermal budget applied during titanium nitride electrode formation. Using grazing incidence X-Ray diffraction (GIXRD) analysis, we observed an enhanced suppression of the monoclinic phase fraction in favor of an orthorhombic, potentially, ferroelectric phase with decreasing thickness/grain size and for a titanium nitride electrode formation below crystallization temperature. The electrical presence of ferroelectricity was confirmed using polarization measurements. A remanent polarization P{sub r} of up to 10??C?cm{sup ?2} as well as a read/write endurance of 1.6?×?10{sup 5} cycles was measured for the pure oxide. The experimental results reported here strongly support the intrinsic nature of the ferroelectric phase in hafnium oxide and expand its applicability beyond the doped systems.

  9. Ediacaran oxidation and biotic evolution.

    PubMed

    Grey, Kathleen; Calver, Clive R

    2007-11-29

    The link between the radiation of various lineages of eukaryotes in the latest Proterozoic and massive environmental changes--oxygenation, global ice ages and bolide impact--is the focus of much research interest. Fike et al. use carbon and sulphur isotope-chemostratigraphic data from Oman to propose three stages of oxidation in the Ediacaran oceans, and link the second and third stages to eukaryote diversification. The second stage, signalled by strongly 13C-depleted sedimentary carbonates (the 'Shuram excursion'), is believed to result from oxidation of a large, deep-ocean reservoir of organic carbon. Fike et al. use our data to assert that a correlative carbon isotope excursion in Australia coincided with the initial diversification of acanthomorphic acritarchs. Peak diversity is claimed to have coincided with subsequent deposition of 13C-enriched carbonate and the third oxidation stage. However, the authors seem to have misinterpreted our data, which instead indicate that diversification significantly preceded the Shuram excursion; this weakens their argument for a link between the inferred oxidation events and eukaryote evolution. PMID:18046342

  10. Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; O, Wuliji; Li, Wei; Jiang, Zhi-Gang; Ghanbari, Hossein A.

    2013-01-01

    Living cells continually generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the respiratory chain during energetic metabolism. ROS at low or moderate concentration can play important physiological roles. However, an excessive amount of ROS under oxidative stress would be extremely deleterious. The central nervous system (CNS) is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress due to its high oxygen consumption, weakly antioxidative systems and the terminal-differentiation characteristic of neurons. Thus, oxidative stress elicits various neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, chemotherapy could result in severe side effects on the CNS and peripheral nervous system (PNS) of cancer patients, and a growing body of evidence demonstrates the involvement of ROS in drug-induced neurotoxicities as well. Therefore, development of antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs is a potentially beneficial strategy for clinical therapy. In this review, we summarize the source, balance maintenance and physiologic functions of ROS, oxidative stress and its toxic mechanisms underlying a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and the possible involvement of ROS in chemotherapy-induced toxicity to the CNS and PNS. We ultimately assess the value for antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs and provide our comments on the unmet needs. PMID:24351827

  11. NATURAL EMISSIONS OF OXIDANT PRECURSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper provides an overview of the sources, the estimation methodology, and the relative amounts of natural hydrocarbon and nitrogen oxide emissions. he most recent estimate of natural nonmethane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions for the United States is 28 teragrams per year (Tg/...

  12. Aluminum/cuprous oxide thermite

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Gressmann, R.

    1982-03-03

    Thermite is a generic name applied to a class of metal-metal oxide reactants that undergo a chemical oxidation reduction reaction with the liberation of large amounts of thermal energy. If a mixture of aluminum and cuprous oxide is ignited, the thermitic reaction 2Al + 3Cu/sub 2/O ..-->.. Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ + 6Cu will proceed at such a rapid rate (burn rate of 6 cm/s) and with the evolution of so much heat (580 cal/g) that the temperature will rise to about 2570/sup 0/C. The thermite reaction, accordingly, has been used for sabotaging or destroying military equipment, starting military fires, and welding together large sections of metal. Aluminum/cuprous oxide (Al/Cu/sub 2/O) thermite is discussed in this report with respect to these topics: reactant powder characterization; power contaminant extraction; reactant powder compaction into a consolidated pellet; initiation system; and reaction and reaction product analysis.

  13. Formulations for iron oxides dissolution

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, Earl P. (Argonne, IL); Chiarizia, Renato (Argonne, IL)

    1992-01-01

    A mixture of a di- or polyphosphonic acid and a reductant wherein each is present in a sufficient amount to provide a synergistic effect with respect to the dissolution of metal oxides and optionally containing corrosion inhibitors and pH adjusting agents.

  14. Formaldehyde degradation by catalytic oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Shirey, W N; Hall, T A; Hanel, E; Sansone, E B

    1981-01-01

    Formaldehyde used for the disinfection of a laminar-flow biological safety cabinet was oxidatively degraded by using a catalyst. This technique reduced the formaldehyde concentration in the cabinet from about 5,000 to about 45 mg/m3 in 8 h. This technique should prove useful in other applications. PMID:7224621

  15. Ferroelectricity in undoped hafnium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polakowski, Patrick; Müller, Johannes

    2015-06-01

    We report the observation of ferroelectric characteristics in undoped hafnium oxide thin films in a thickness range of 4-20 nm. The undoped films were fabricated using atomic layer deposition (ALD) and embedded into titanium nitride based metal-insulator-metal (MIM) capacitors for electrical evaluation. Structural as well as electrical evidence for the appearance of a ferroelectric phase in pure hafnium oxide was collected with respect to film thickness and thermal budget applied during titanium nitride electrode formation. Using grazing incidence X-Ray diffraction (GIXRD) analysis, we observed an enhanced suppression of the monoclinic phase fraction in favor of an orthorhombic, potentially, ferroelectric phase with decreasing thickness/grain size and for a titanium nitride electrode formation below crystallization temperature. The electrical presence of ferroelectricity was confirmed using polarization measurements. A remanent polarization Pr of up to 10 ?C cm-2 as well as a read/write endurance of 1.6 × 105 cycles was measured for the pure oxide. The experimental results reported here strongly support the intrinsic nature of the ferroelectric phase in hafnium oxide and expand its applicability beyond the doped systems.

  16. Aromatic-radical oxidation chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Glassman, I.; Brezinsky, K.

    1993-01-01

    There are anomalously high CO[sub 2] concentrations early in the reaction sequence in the oxidation of cyclopentadiene. A number of plausible mechanisms have been developed. NO[sub 2] and CO have been added to the reacting mixture, to assist in selecting the best mechanism. Effects of these chemical perturbations were studied.

  17. 21 CFR 184.1210 - Calcium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....1210 Calcium oxide. (a) Calcium oxide (CaO, CAS Reg. No. 1305-78-8) is also known as lime, quick lime, burnt lime, or calx. It is produced from calcium carbonate, limestone, or oyster shells by...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5464 - Manganous oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5464 Manganous oxide. (a) Product. Manganous oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5464 - Manganous oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5464 Manganous oxide. (a) Product. Manganous oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  20. Complex oxides useful for thermoelectric energy conversion

    DOEpatents

    Majumdar, Arunava (Orinda, CA); Ramesh, Ramamoorthy (Moraga, CA); Yu, Choongho (College Station, TX); Scullin, Matthew L. (Berkeley, CA); Huijben, Mark (Enschede, NL)

    2012-07-17

    The invention provides for a thermoelectric system comprising a substrate comprising a first complex oxide, wherein the substrate is optionally embedded with a second complex oxide. The thermoelectric system can be used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  1. Genomic consequences of DNA oxidation by peroxynitrite

    E-print Network

    Neeley, William Louis

    2006-01-01

    The radicals nitric oxide and superoxide are produced endogenously by activated macrophages and neutrophils and combine in a diffusion-limited reaction to form peroxynitrite, a powerful oxidizing and nitrating agent capable ...

  2. 21 CFR 73.1991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...and suitable in color additive mixtures for coloring...be avoided by good manufacturing practice: Zinc oxide...restrictions. The color additive zinc oxide may be...consistent with good manufacturing practice. (d) Labeling. The color additive and any mixtues...

  3. 21 CFR 73.1991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...and suitable in color additive mixtures for coloring...be avoided by good manufacturing practice: Zinc oxide...restrictions. The color additive zinc oxide may be...consistent with good manufacturing practice. (d) Labeling. The color additive and any mixtues...

  4. 21 CFR 73.1991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...and suitable in color additive mixtures for coloring...be avoided by good manufacturing practice: Zinc oxide...restrictions. The color additive zinc oxide may be...consistent with good manufacturing practice. (d) Labeling. The color additive and any mixtues...

  5. 21 CFR 73.1991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...and suitable in color additive mixtures for coloring...be avoided by good manufacturing practice: Zinc oxide...restrictions. The color additive zinc oxide may be...consistent with good manufacturing practice. (d) Labeling. The color additive and any mixtues...

  6. Kinetic Resolution Palladium-Catalyzed Oxidative Kinetic

    E-print Network

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    Kinetic Resolution Palladium-Catalyzed Oxidative Kinetic Resolution with Ambient Air toward developing enantioselective oxidation reactions in the presence of catalytic palladium, we of secondary alcohols.[1­3] Our system employed a simple protocol involving a commercially available palladium

  7. 46 CFR 153.1010 - Alkylene oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... alkylene oxides are onboard the vessel, the master shall make sure that the oxygen content of the vapor...% by volume. (d) Tankships with independent piping for alkylene oxides must have onboard: (1)...

  8. 46 CFR 153.1010 - Alkylene oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... alkylene oxides are onboard the vessel, the master shall make sure that the oxygen content of the vapor...% by volume. (d) Tankships with independent piping for alkylene oxides must have onboard: (1)...

  9. 46 CFR 153.1010 - Alkylene oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... alkylene oxides are onboard the vessel, the master shall make sure that the oxygen content of the vapor...% by volume. (d) Tankships with independent piping for alkylene oxides must have onboard: (1)...

  10. 46 CFR 153.1010 - Alkylene oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... alkylene oxides are onboard the vessel, the master shall make sure that the oxygen content of the vapor...% by volume. (d) Tankships with independent piping for alkylene oxides must have onboard: (1)...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  12. 21 CFR 582.5464 - Manganous oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5464 Manganous oxide. (a) Product. Manganous oxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  13. 21 CFR 582.5464 - Manganous oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5464 Manganous oxide. (a) Product. Manganous oxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  14. 21 CFR 582.5210 - Calcium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5210 Calcium oxide. (a) Product. Calcium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5210 - Calcium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5210 Calcium oxide. (a) Product. Calcium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5210 - Calcium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5210 Calcium oxide. (a) Product. Calcium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  18. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  19. 21 CFR 582.5991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5991 Zinc oxide. (a) Product. Zinc oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  20. Cellulose nanocrystal reinforced oxidized natural rubber nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Marcos; El Kissi, Nadia; Dufresne, Alain

    2016-02-10

    Natural rubber (NR) latex particles were oxidized using KMnO4 as oxidant to promote the insertion of hydroxyl groups in the surface polyisoprene chains. Different degrees of oxidation were investigated. Both unoxidized and oxidized NR (ONR) latex were used to prepare nanocomposite films reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) by casting/evaporation. The oxidation of NR was carried out to promote chemical interactions between the hydroxyl groups of ONR with those of CNCs through hydrogen bonding. The effect of the degree of oxidation of the NR latex on the rheological behavior of CNC/NR and CNC/ONR suspensions, as well as on the mechanical, swelling and thermal properties of ensuing nanocomposites was investigated. Improved properties were observed for intermediate degrees of oxidation but they were found to degrade for higher oxidation levels. PMID:26686118

  1. 21 CFR 184.1545 - Nitrous oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...with a slightly sweet smell. It does not burn but will support combustion. Nitrous oxide is manufactured by the thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate. Higher oxides of nitrogen are removed by passing the dry gas through a series of scrubbing...

  2. Characterization of Rhenium Oxides Using ESCA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Binayak; Gentz, Steven J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High melting point and inherent ductility (toughness) over a wide range of temperature has made Rhenium an engineering material of choice for several thrust chambers in propulsion systems. Although the material remains tough at high temperatures, it still can readily transform to several oxides. As many as eight different oxides have been reported in literature. When characterized using ESCA (Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analyses) these oxides show large shifts in the Re 4f line positions. While this unique property could be used as a tool for oxide characterization, literature indicates that only a few of these oxides have been characterized. Current work focuses on characterizing oxides of Rhenium using ESCA. Spectral line Re 4f have been measured for various oxides and the results have been compared with the Re 4f line positions of real-time oxidation products from space hardware.

  3. 21 CFR 73.2991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2991 Zinc oxide. (a) Identity and...restrictions. Zinc oxide may be safely used in cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in...

  4. 21 CFR 73.2991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2991 Zinc oxide. (a) Identity and...restrictions. Zinc oxide may be safely used in cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in...

  5. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity... Iron oxides are safe for use in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  6. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity... Iron oxides are safe for use in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  7. 21 CFR 73.2991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2991 Zinc oxide. (a) Identity and...restrictions. Zinc oxide may be safely used in cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in...

  8. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity... Iron oxides are safe for use in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  9. EFFICIENCY PROBLEMS RELATED TO PERMANGANATE OXIDATION SCHEMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation schemes for the in-situ destruction of chlorinated solvents, using potassium permanganate, are receiving considerable attention. Indication from field studies and from our own work are that permanganate oxidation schemes have inherent problems that could severely limit...

  10. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron (III) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1309-37-1, red-brown to black trigonal crystals). (b) In accordance with §...

  11. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron (III) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1309-37-1, red-brown to black trigonal crystals). (b) In accordance with §...

  12. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron (III) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1309-37-1, red-brown to black trigonal crystals). (b) In accordance with §...

  13. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron (III) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1309-37-1, red-brown to black trigonal crystals). (b) In accordance with §...

  14. Oxidation kinetics of aluminum diboride

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, Michael L.; Sohn, H.Y.; Cutler, Raymond A.

    2013-11-15

    The oxidation characteristics of aluminum diboride (AlB{sub 2}) and a physical mixture of its constituent elements (Al+2B) were studied in dry air and pure oxygen using thermal gravimetric analysis to obtain non-mechanistic kinetic parameters. Heating in air at a constant linear heating rate of 10 °C/min showed a marked difference between Al+2B and AlB{sub 2} in the onset of oxidation and final conversion fraction, with AlB{sub 2} beginning to oxidize at higher temperatures but reaching nearly complete conversion by 1500 °C. Kinetic parameters were obtained in both air and oxygen using a model-free isothermal method at temperatures between 500 and 1000 °C. Activation energies were found to decrease, in general, with increasing conversion for AlB{sub 2} and Al+2B in both air and oxygen. AlB{sub 2} exhibited O{sub 2}-pressure-independent oxidation behavior at low conversions, while the activation energies of Al+2B were higher in O{sub 2} than in air. Differences in the composition and morphology between oxidized Al+2B and AlB{sub 2} suggested that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–B{sub 2}O{sub 3} interactions slowed Al+2B oxidation by converting Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on aluminum particles into a Al{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 9} shell, while the same Al{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 9} developed a needle-like morphology in AlB{sub 2} that reduced oxygen diffusion distances and increased conversion. The model-free kinetic analysis was critical for interpreting the complex, multistep oxidation behavior for which a single mechanism could not be assigned. At low temperatures, moisture increased the oxidation rate of Al+2B and AlB{sub 2}, but both appear to be resistant to oxidation in cool, dry environments. - Graphical abstract: Isothermal kinetic data for AlB{sub 2} in air, showing a constantly decreasing activation energy with increasing conversion. Model-free analysis allowed for the calculation of global kinetic parameters despite many simultaneous mechanisms occurring concurrently. (a) Time–temperature plots, (b) conversion as a function of time, (c) Arrhenius plots used to calculate activation energies, and (d) activation energy as a function of conversion. Display Omitted - Highlights: • First reported kinetic parameters for AlB{sub 2} and Al+2B oxidation in air and O{sub 2}. • Possible mechanism of enhanced boron combustion presented. • Moisture sensitivity shown to be problematic for AlB{sub 2}, less for Al+2B.

  15. Evolution of Oxidative Continental Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konhauser, Kurt; Lalonde, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    The Great Oxidation Event (GOE) is currently viewed as a protracted process during which atmospheric oxygen levels increased above 10-5 times the present atmospheric level. This value is based on the loss of sulphur isotope mass independent fractionation (S-MIF) from the rock record, beginning at 2.45 Ga and disappearing by 2.32 Ga. However, a number of recent papers have pushed back the timing for oxidative continental weathering, and by extension, the onset of atmospheric oxygenation several hundreds of million years earlier despite the presence of S-MIF (e.g., Crowe et al., 2013). This apparent discrepancy can, in part, be resolved by the suggestion that recycling of older sedimentary sulphur bearing S-MIF might have led to this signal's persistence in the rock record for some time after atmospheric oxygenation (Reinhard et al., 2013). Here we suggest another possibility, that the earliest oxidative weathering reactions occurred in environments at profound redox disequilibrium with the atmosphere, such as biological soil crusts, riverbed and estuarine sediments, and lacustrine microbial mats. We calculate that the rate of O2 production via oxygenic photosynthesis in these terrestrial microbial ecosystems provides largely sufficient oxidizing potential to mobilise sulphate and a number of redox-sensitive trace metals from land to the oceans while the atmosphere itself remained anoxic with its attendant S-MIF signature. These findings reconcile geochemical signatures in the rock record for the earliest oxidative continental weathering with the history of atmospheric sulphur chemistry, and demonstrate the plausible antiquity of a terrestrial biosphere populated by cyanobacteria. Crowe, S.A., Dossing, L.N., Beukes, N.J., Bau, M., Kruger, S.J., Frei, R. & Canfield, D.E. Atmospheric oxygenation three billion years ago. Nature 501, 535-539 (2013). Reinhard, C.T., Planavsky, N.J. & Lyons, T.W. Long-term sedimentary recycling of rare sulphur isotope anomalies. Nature 497, 100-104 (2013).

  16. Oxidation events and skin aging.

    PubMed

    Kammeyer, A; Luiten, R M

    2015-05-01

    The rate of skin aging, or that of tissue in general, is determined by a variable predominance of tissue degeneration over tissue regeneration. This review discusses the role of oxidative events of tissue degeneration and aging in general, and for the skin in particular. The mechanisms involved in intrinsic and extrinsic (photo-) aging are described. Since photoaging is recognized as an important extrinsic aging factor, we put special emphasize on the effects of UV exposure on aging, and its variable influence according to global location and skin type. We here summarise direct photochemical effects of UV on DNA, RNA, proteins and vitamin D, the factors contributing to UV-induced immunosuppression, which may delay aging, the nature and origin of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) as indirect contributors for aging, and the consequences of oxidative events for extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation, such as that of collagen. We conclude that conflicting data on studies investigating the validity of the free radical damage theory of aging may reflect variations in the level of ROS induction which is difficult to quantify in vivo, and the lack of targeting of experimental ROS to the relevant cellular compartment. Also mitohormesis, an adaptive response, may arise in vivo to moderate ROS levels, further complicating interpretation of in vivo results. We here describes how skin aging is mediated both directly and indirectly by oxidative degeneration.This review indicates that skin aging events are initiated and often propagated by oxidation events, despite recently recognized adaptive responses to oxidative stress. PMID:25653189

  17. High quality oxide films on substrates

    DOEpatents

    Ruckman, M.W.; Strongin, M.; Gao, Y.L.

    1994-02-01

    A method is described for providing an oxide film of a material on the surface of a substrate using a reactive deposition of the material onto the substrate surface in the presence of a solid or liquid layer of an oxidizing gas. The oxidizing gas is provided on the substrate surface in an amount sufficient to dissipate the latent heat of condensation occurring during deposition as well as creating a favorable oxidizing environment for the material. 4 figures.

  18. Effects of coal oxidation on calorific value

    SciTech Connect

    Uenal, S.; Yalcin, Z.G.; Piskin, S.

    1999-04-01

    A brief investigation of the effects of oxidation on the calorific values of three Turkish lignite samples has been made. The lignite samples have been vacuum dried and oxidized in pure oxygen at 35, 45, and 55 C at 100 kPa for 10 days. The calorific values of the oxidized and unoxidized samples have been measured. A relation has been observed between the extent of oxidation and decrease in calorific value. Various possibilities of modeling the relation have been explored.

  19. High quality oxide films on substrates

    DOEpatents

    Ruckman, Mark W. (Middle Island, NY); Strongin, Myron (Center Moriches, NY); Gao, Yong L. (Henrietta, NY)

    1994-01-01

    A method for providing an oxide film of a material on the surface of a substrate using a reactive deposition of the material onto the substrate surface in the presence of a solid or liquid layer of an oxidizing gas. The oxidizing gas is provided on the substrate surface in an amount sufficient to dissipate the latent heat of condensation occurring during deposition as well as creating a favorable oxidizing environment for the material.

  20. Theoretical study of sequential oxidation of clusters of gallium oxide: Ga3On (n: 48)

    E-print Network

    Pandey, Ravi

    Theoretical study of sequential oxidation of clusters of gallium oxide: Ga3On (n: 4­8) S. Gowtham of gallium oxide clusters from Ga3O4 to Ga3O8. These results, based on density functional theory calculations clusters of gallium oxide can be taken as a model to understand the physics and chemistry of nanostructures

  1. Oxidation reactions on neutral cobalt oxide clusters: experimental and theoretical studies

    E-print Network

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    Oxidation reactions on neutral cobalt oxide clusters: experimental and theoretical studies Yan Xie.1039/b915590b Reactions of neutral cobalt oxide clusters (ComOn, m = 3­9, n = 3­13) with CO, NO, C2H2(III) concentration, the number of the cobalt atoms with high oxidation states, and the presence of an oxygen

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of nitric oxide reductase gene homologues from aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria

    E-print Network

    Ward, Bess

    Phylogenetic analysis of nitric oxide reductase gene homologues from aerobic ammonia). The ammonia-oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea also possesses a functional nitric oxide reductase subunit of nitric oxide reductase (norB) were obtained from eight additional strains of ammonia

  3. Separation medium containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A separation medium, such as a chromatography filling or packing, containing a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m.sup.2/g to 2600 m.sup.2/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide has a surface that has been at least partially functionalized.

  4. Air Quality Criteria for Sulfur Oxides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Air Pollution Control Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Included is a literature review which comprehensively discusses knowledge of the sulfur oxides commonly found in the atmosphere. The subject content is represented by the 10 chapter titles: Physical and Chemical Properties and the Atmospheric Reactions of the Oxides of Sulfur; Sources and Methods of Measurements of Sulfur Oxides in the Atmosphere;…

  5. Oxidation in HVOF-sprayed steel

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.F.; Neiser, R.A.; Dykhuizen, R.C.

    1997-08-01

    It is widely held that most of the oxidation in thermally sprayed coatings occurs on the surface of the droplet after it has flattened. The evidence in this paper suggests that, for the conditions studied here, oxidation of the top surface of flattened droplets is not the dominant oxidation mechanism. In this study, a mild steel wire (AISI 1025) was sprayed using a high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) torch onto copper and aluminum substrates. Ion milling and Auger spectroscopy were used to examine the distribution of oxides within individual splats. Conventional metallographic analysis was also used to study oxide distributions within coatings that were sprayed under the same conditions. An analytical model for oxidation of the exposed surface of a splat is presented. Based on literature data, the model assumes that diffusion of iron through a solid FeO layer is the rate limiting factor in forming the oxide on the top surface of a splat. An FeO layer only a few thousandths of a micron thick is predicted to form on the splat surface as it cools. However, the experimental evidence shows that the oxide layers are typically 100x thicker than the predicted value. These thick, oxide layers are not always observed on the top surface of a splat. Indeed, in some instances the oxide layer is on the bottom, and the metal is on the top. The observed oxide distributions are more consistently explained if most of the oxide formed before the droplets impact the substrate.

  6. Nitrogen Oxidations in Bacterium-Plant Interactions

    E-print Network

    Cohen, Michael F.

    Letters Nitrogen Oxidations in Bacterium-Plant Interactions After reading D. J. Arp and P. J it apropos to point out some note- worthy roles for nitrogen oxidations in bacterium-plant interactions may be related to a central role for nitric oxide (NO) in activating plant systemic acquired

  7. SULFUR DIOXIDE OXIDATION REACTIONS IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is the final report on a three year project to study the kinetics and mechanisms of some 105 reactions involving the aqueous oxidation of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides in mixed catalyst-oxidant systems at low pH (0-3). The 105 systems involve six redox reaction types: S...

  8. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  9. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium oxide (MgO, CAS Reg. No... bulky white powder (light) or a relatively dense white powder (heavy) by heating magnesium hydroxide...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.5431 Section 582.5431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food... GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium oxide (MgO, CAS Reg. No. 1309-48-4) occurs naturally as... a relatively dense white powder (heavy) by heating magnesium hydroxide or carbonate. Heating...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium oxide (MgO, CAS Reg. No... bulky white powder (light) or a relatively dense white powder (heavy) by heating magnesium hydroxide...

  13. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.5431 Section 582.5431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.1431 Section 582.1431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.1431 Section 582.1431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.1431 Section 582.1431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium oxide (MgO, CAS Reg. No. 1309-48-4... powder (light) or a relatively dense white powder (heavy) by heating magnesium hydroxide or...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.5431 Section 582.5431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  19. 21 CFR 582.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.1431 Section 582.1431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium oxide (MgO, CAS Reg. No... bulky white powder (light) or a relatively dense white powder (heavy) by heating magnesium hydroxide...

  1. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.5431 Section 582.5431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  2. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.5431 Section 582.5431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  3. 21 CFR 582.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.1431 Section 582.1431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  4. Laser Photoacoustic Technique Detects Photo-Oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liange, R. H.; Coulter, D. R.; Gupta, A.

    1986-01-01

    Laser photoacoustic instrument detects small amounts of oxidation in polymers. Instrument used to evaluate resistance to oxidation in Sunlight of polymer encapsulants for solar-cell arrays. With instrument, researchers monitor samples for early stages of photooxidation and study primary mechanisms of oxidation and degradation. Effects of these mechanisms masked during later stages.

  5. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.

    1993-10-12

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  6. OXIDANT FORMATION IN THE GENERATION OF OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone samples generated by UV photolysis and silent electric discharge upon air or oxygen were examined to determine if other oxidants were formed. Chemical and physical methods (IR and UV spectroscopy) failed to show the presence of such oxidants. Absence of such oxidants was al...

  7. Reduction of vanadium-oxide monolayer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoiswohl, J.; Surnev, S.; Sock, M.; Eck, S.; Ramsey, M. G.; Netzer, F. P.; Kresse, G.

    2005-04-01

    The reduction of vanadium oxide monolayer structures on Rh(111) has been investigated by variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy, low energy electron diffraction, photoelectron spectroscopy of the core levels, and the valence band, and by probing the phonon spectra of the oxide structures in high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy. A sequence of oxide phases has been observed following the reduction from the highly oxidized (7×7)R19.1° V-oxide monolayer: (5×5) , (5×33)rect , (9×9) , and “wagon-wheel” oxide structures are formed with decreasing chemical potential of oxygen ?O . The structures have been simulated by ab initio density functional theory, and structure models are presented. The various V-oxide structures are interrelated by common V?O coordination units, and the reduction progresses mainly via the removal of V?O vanadyl groups. All oxide structures are stable at the appropriate ?O only in the two-dimensional V-oxide/Rh(111) phase diagram and are thus stabilized by the metal-oxide interface. The results demonstrate that oxides in ultrathin layer form display modified physical and chemical properties as compared to the bulk oxides.

  8. 21 CFR 182.8991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Zinc oxide. 182.8991 Section 182.8991 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8991 Zinc oxide. (a) Product. Zinc oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  9. 21 CFR 182.8991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Zinc oxide. 182.8991 Section 182.8991 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8991 Zinc oxide. (a) Product. Zinc oxide. (b) Conditions of...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Zinc oxide. 582.5991 Section 582.5991 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5991 Zinc oxide. (a) Product. Zinc oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Zinc oxide. 582.5991 Section 582.5991 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5991 Zinc oxide. (a) Product. Zinc oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  12. 21 CFR 73.2991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Zinc oxide. 73.2991 Section 73.2991 Food and Drugs... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2991 Zinc oxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive zinc oxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of §...

  13. 21 CFR 182.8991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Zinc oxide. 182.8991 Section 182.8991 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8991 Zinc oxide. (a) Product. Zinc oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  14. 21 CFR 182.8991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Zinc oxide. 182.8991 Section 182.8991 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8991 Zinc oxide. (a) Product. Zinc oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Zinc oxide. 582.5991 Section 582.5991 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5991 Zinc oxide. (a) Product. Zinc oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Zinc oxide. 582.5991 Section 582.5991 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5991 Zinc oxide. (a) Product. Zinc oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  17. 21 CFR 182.8991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Zinc oxide. 182.8991 Section 182.8991 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8991 Zinc oxide. (a) Product. Zinc oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  18. 21 CFR 73.2991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Zinc oxide. 73.2991 Section 73.2991 Food and Drugs... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2991 Zinc oxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive zinc oxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of §...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Zinc oxide. 582.5991 Section 582.5991 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5991 Zinc oxide. (a) Product. Zinc oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  20. Oxidation and Reduction Reactions in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shibley, Ivan A., Jr.; Amaral, Katie E.; Aurentz, David J.; McCaully, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    A variety of approaches to the concept of oxidation and reduction appear in organic textbooks. The method proposed here is different than most published approaches. The oxidation state is calculated by totaling the number of heterogeneous atoms, [pi]-bonds, and rings. A comparison of the oxidation states of reactant and product determine what type…

  1. Characterization And Dissolution Properties Of Ruthenium Oxides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ruthenium oxides (RuO2•1.10H2O and RuO2) have been synthesized by forced hydrolysis and oxidation of ruthenium chloride. The resulting materials were extensively characterized to determine the crystallinity, surface area, and ruthenium oxidation ...

  2. Literature survey on oxidations and fatigue lives at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.; Oshida, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Nickel-base superalloys are the most complex and the most widely used for high temperature applications such as aircraft engine components. The desirable properties of nickel-base superalloys at high temperatures are tensile strength, thermomechanical fatigue resistance, low thermal expansion, as well as oxidation resistance. At elevated temperature, fatigue cracks are often initiated by grain boundary oxidation, and fatigue cracks often propagate along grain boundaries, where the oxidation rate is higher. Oxidation takes place at the interface between metal and gas. Properties of the metal substrate, the gaseous environment, as well as the oxides formed all interact to make the oxidation behavior of nickel-base superalloys extremely complicated. The important topics include general oxidation, selective oxidation, internal oxidation, grain boundary oxidation, multilayer oxide structure, accelerated oxidation under stress, stress-generation during oxidation, composition and substrate microstructural changes due to prolonged oxidation, fatigue crack initiation at oxidized grain boundaries and the oxidation accelerated fatigue crack propagation along grain boundaries.

  3. Dysprosium oxide and dysprosium-oxide-doped titanium oxide thin films grown by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Tamm, Aile Kozlova, Jekaterina; Aarik, Lauri; Aarik, Jaan; Kukli, Kaupo; Link, Joosep; Stern, Raivo

    2015-01-15

    Dysprosium oxide and dysprosium-oxide-doped titanium oxide thin films were grown by atomic layer deposition on silicon substrates. For depositing dysprosium and titanium oxides Dy(thd){sub 3}-O{sub 3} and TiCl{sub 4}-O{sub 3} were used as precursors combinations. Appropriate parameters for Dy(thd){sub 3}-O{sub 3} growth process were obtained by using a quartz crystal microbalance system. The Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were deposited on planar substrates and on three-dimensional substrates with aspect ratio 1:20. The Dy/Ti ratio of Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped TiO{sub 2} films deposited on a planar silicon substrate ranged from 0.04 to 0.06. Magnetometry studies revealed that saturation of magnetization could not be observed in planar Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} films, but it was observable in Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} films on 3D substrates and in doped TiO{sub 2} films with a Dy/Ti atomic ratio of 0.06. The latter films exhibited saturation magnetization 10{sup ?6} A cm{sup 2} and coercivity 11?kA/m at room temperature.

  4. Structural Imaging of Surface Oxidation and Oxidation Catalysis on Ru(0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Flege, J.; Hrbek, J; Sutter, P

    2008-01-01

    Using simultaneous imaging and structural fingerprinting under reaction conditions, we probe the initial oxidation pathway and CO oxidation catalysis on Ru(0001). Oxidation beyond an initial (1 x 1)-O adlayer phase produces a heterogeneous surface, comprising a disordered trilayerlike surface oxide and an ordered RuO{sub 2}(110) thin-film oxide, which form independently and exhibit similar stability. The surface oxide and RuO{sub 2} phases both show high intrinsic catalytic activity. The oxygen adlayer is inactive in isolation but becomes active due to cooperative effects in close proximity to the surface oxide.

  5. Electronic structure of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Sutar, D. S.; Singh, Gulbagh; Divakar Botcha, V.

    2012-09-03

    Graphene oxide (GO) monolayers obtained by Langmuir Blodgett route and suitably treated to obtain reduced graphene oxide (RGO) monolayers were studied by photoelectron spectroscopy. Upon reduction of GO to form RGO C1s x-ray photoelectron spectra showed increase in graphitic carbon content, while ultraviolet photoelectron spectra showed increase in intensity corresponding to C2p-{pi} electrons ({approx}3.5 eV). X-ray excited Auger transitions C(KVV) and plasmon energy loss of C1s photoelectrons have been analyzed to elucidate the valence band structure. The effective number of ({pi}+{sigma}) electrons as obtained from energy loss spectra was found to increase by {approx}28% on reduction of GO.

  6. Dissolution of Uranium Oxides Under Alkaline Oxidizing Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven C.; Peper, Shane M.; Douglas, Matthew; Ziegelgruber, Kate L.; Finn, Erin C.

    2009-11-01

    Bench scale experiments were conducted to determine the dissolution characteristics of uranium oxide powders (UO2, U3O8, and UO3) in aqueous peroxide-carbonate solutions. Experimental parameters included H2O2 concentration, carbonate counter cation (NH4+, Na+, K+, and Rb+), and pH. Results indicate the dissolution rate of UO2 in 1 M (NH4)2CO3 increases linearly with peroxide concentration ranging from 0.05 – 2 M. The three uranium oxide powders exhibited different dissolution patterns however, UO3 exhibited prompt complete dissolution. Carbonate counter cation affected the dissolution kinetics. There is minimal impact of solution pH, over the range 8.8 to 10.6, on initial dissolution rate.

  7. Oxidation behaviour and electrical properties of cobalt/cerium oxide composite coatings for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harthøj, Anders; Holt, Tobias; Møller, Per

    2015-05-01

    This work evaluates the performance of cobalt/cerium oxide (Co/CeO2) composite coatings and pure Co coatings to be used for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnects. The coatings are electroplated on the ferritic stainless steels Crofer 22 APU and Crofer 22H. Coated and uncoated samples are exposed in air at 800 °C for 3000 h and oxidation rates are measured and oxide scale microstructures are investigated. Area-specific resistances (ASR) in air at 850 °C of coated and uncoated samples are also measured. A dual layered oxide scale formed on all coated samples. The outer layer consisted of Co, Mn, Fe and Cr oxide and the inner layer consisted of Cr oxide. The CeO2 was present as discrete particles in the outer oxide layer after exposure. The Cr oxide layer thicknesses and oxidations rates were significantly reduced for Co/CeO2 coated samples compared to for Co coated and uncoated samples. The ASR of all Crofer 22H samples increased significantly faster than of Crofer 22 APU samples which was likely due to the presence of SiO2 in the oxide/metal interface of Crofer 22H.

  8. Tellurium content of marine manganese oxides and other manganese oxides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lakin, H.W.; Thompson, C.E.; Davidson, D.F.

    1963-01-01

    Tellurium in amounts ranging from 5 to 125 parts per million was present in all of 12 samples of manganese oxide nodules from the floor of the Pacific and Indian oceans. These samples represent the first recognized points of high tellurium concentration in a sedimentary cycle. The analyses may lend support to the theory that the minor-element content of seafloor manganese nodules is derived from volcanic emanations.

  9. Oxidative degradation of phenol in water using copper oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krichevski, O.; Dror, I.; Berkowitz, B.

    2010-12-01

    Phenol is often used as a model molecule for the study of contaminant degradation from polluted wastewater, because it is a common contaminant that originates from a variety of industrial processes. We demonstrate here the use of copper oxide nanoparticles as a catalyst for the degradation of phenol from aqueous solutions, investigating also the effect of sodium fluoride on the reaction. The reaction is performed at room temperature and ambient pressure with hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizing agent. Strong effects of sodium fluoride and hydrogen peroxide concentrations on the reaction rate were found. Results obtained by GC, GC-MS, ESR and 13C NMR measurements show that phenol is degraded completely under different conditions. No organic by-products were identified at the end of the reaction and in several cases, only very small concentrations of intermediates were found during the reaction. The formation of OH radicals was shown to be important for the catalytic oxidation of phenol. However comparison of phenol degradation results to production of OH radicals indicates that the reaction is also driven by one or more additional mechanisms.

  10. Oxidation of coal: a mechanistic puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabartty, S.K.

    1981-03-29

    The mechanism of coal oxidation was investigated by two-phase oxidation of hvb and lvb coals. The oxidants used were commercial bleach, tetrabutylammonium fluoroborate and tetrabutylammonium permanganate. After extraction, the compounds were characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. Coal-oxidation is much more complicated than would be expected from oxidations of standard organic compounds. It is reasonable to assume that aliphatic structures, particularly benzylic methyl, methylene or methine groups, or carbon adjacent to hetero-atoms are the most reactive, and are oxidized to ketones or carboxylic acids. In order to degrade coal to CO/sub 2/ and water-soluble low-molecular-weight compounds by mild oxidants, an abundance of these functional groups must be assumed. However, the stability of ethyl-polyvinylbenzene polymer towards hypochlorite oxidant indicates that activation of coal-carbon for oxidation results from features other than electronegativity of aromatic rings. The uniqueness of the coal-oxidation has to rest on a destabilizing factor which makes even aromatic sites vulnerable. One may speculate that mineral matter in coal is coordinated with aromatic structures, and that the resultant complexes are destabilized by electrophilic attack. If a coal is an entangled interpenetrating macromolecular mixture, the destabilizing effect would decrease with increasing compactness of the physical structure which accompanies increase in rank;higher rank coals would therefore be less reactive. However, if the oxidant can also, like mineral matter, intercalate, it would open the structure up, and produce destabilization. The success of wet oxidation would then depend less on the oxidation potential than on the ability of the oxidant to intercalate. The oxidation of lvb coal with assistance from phase-transfer catalysts in a two-phase system is consistent with this view.

  11. Exfoliation of graphite oxide in propylene carbonate and thermal reduction of the resulting graphene oxide platelets.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanwu; Stoller, Meryl D; Cai, Weiwei; Velamakanni, Aruna; Piner, Richard D; Chen, David; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2010-02-23

    Graphite oxide was exfoliated and dispersed in propylene carbonate (PC) by bath sonication. Heating the graphene oxide suspensions at 150 degrees C significantly reduced the graphene oxide platelets; paper samples comprising such reduced graphene oxide platelets had an electrical conductivity of 5230 S/m. By adding tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEA BF(4)) to the reduced graphene oxide/PC slurry and making a two-cell ultracapacitor, specific capacitance values of about 120 F/g were obtained. PMID:20112929

  12. EURODISPLAY 2002 631 P-64: A Comparative Study of Metal Oxide Coated Indium-tin Oxide Anodes

    E-print Network

    -emitting diodes (OLEDs). The oxides of tin, zinc, praseodymium, yttrium, gallium, terbium and titanium have been. The candidates studied included praseodymium oxide (Pr2O3), yttrium oxide (Y2O3), terbium oxide (Tb4O7), titanium

  13. Arsenic mobilization in the critical zone: Oxidation by hydrous manganese oxide Jason S. Fischel, fischjs06@juniata.edu1

    E-print Network

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Arsenic mobilization in the critical zone: Oxidation by hydrous manganese oxide GEOC 112 Jason S manganese (Mn) oxides, even in low concentrations, to oxidize trace metals such as arsenic from arsenite [As

  14. Oxidation pond for municipal wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Erick; Hung, Yung-Tse; Suleiman Al Ahmad, Mohammed; Yeh, Ruth Yu-Li; Liu, Robert Lian-Huey; Fu, Yen-Pei

    2015-04-01

    This literature review examines process, design, and cost issues related to using oxidation ponds for wastewater treatment. Many of the topics have applications at either full scale or in isolation for laboratory analysis. Oxidation ponds have many advantages. The oxidation pond treatment process is natural, because it uses microorganisms such as bacteria and algae. This makes the method of treatment cost-effective in terms of its construction, maintenance, and energy requirements. Oxidation ponds are also productive, because it generates effluent that can be used for other applications. Finally, oxidation ponds can be considered a sustainable method for treatment of wastewater.

  15. Heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation of atmospheric trace contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollis, David F.; Peral, Jose

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) design and construction of continuous flow photoreactor for study of oxidation of trace atmospheric contaminants; (2) establishment of kinetics of acetone oxidation including adsorption equilibration, variation of oxidation rate with acetone concentration and water (inhibitor), and variation of rate and apparent quantum yield with light intensity; (3) exploration of kinetics of butanol oxidation, including rate variation with concentration of butanol, and lack of inhibition by water; and (4) exploration of kinetics of catalyst deactivation during oxidation of butanol, including deactivation rate, influence of dark conditions, and establishment of photocatalytic regeneration of activity in alcohol-free air.

  16. Molecular Level Coating of Metal Oxide Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDaniel, Patricia R. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Polymer encapsulated metal oxide particles are prepared by combining a polyamide acid in a polar osmotic solvent with a metal alkoxide solution. The polymer was imidized and the metal oxide formed simultaneously in a refluxing organic solvent. The resulting polymer-metal oxide is an intimately mixed commingled blend, possessing, synergistic properties of both the polymer and preceramic metal oxide. The encapsulated metal oxide particles have multiple uses including, being useful in the production of skin lubricating creams, weather resistant paints, as a filler for paper. making ultraviolet light stable filled printing ink, being extruded into fibers or ribbons, and coatings for fibers used in the production of composite structural panels.

  17. Molecular Level Coating for Metal Oxide Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDaniel, Patricia R. (Inventor); Saint Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Polymer encapsulated metal oxide particles are prepared by combining a polyamide acid in a polar aprotic solvent with a metal alkoxide solution. The polymer was imidized and the metal oxide formed simultaneously in a refluxing organic solvent. The resulting polymer-metal oxide is an intimately mixed commingled blend, possessing synergistic properties of both the polymer and preceramic metal oxide. The encapsulated metal oxide particles have multiple uses including, being useful in the production of skin lubricating creams, weather resistant paints, as a filler for paper, making ultraviolet light stable filled printing ink, being extruded into fibers or ribbons, and coatings for fibers used in the production of composite structural panels.

  18. Oxidation-reduction catalyst and its process of use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Schryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    This invention relates generally to a ruthenium stabilized oxidation-reduction catalyst useful for oxidizing carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds, and reducing nitrogen oxide species in oxidizing environments, substantially without the formation of toxic and volatile ruthenium oxide species upon said oxidizing environment being at high temperatures.

  19. Graphene Oxides Show Angiogenic Properties.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sudip; Sriram, Pavithra; Barui, Ayan Kumar; Nethi, Susheel Kumar; Veeriah, Vimal; Chatterjee, Suvro; Suresh, Kattimuttathu Ittara; Patra, Chitta Ranjan

    2015-08-01

    Angiogenesis, a process resulting in the formation of new capillaries from the pre-existing vasculature plays vital role for the development of therapeutic approaches for cancer, atherosclerosis, wound healing, and cardiovascular diseases. In this report, the synthesis, characterization, and angiogenic properties of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) have been demonstrated, observed through several in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis assays. The results here demonstrate that the intracellular formation of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species as well as activation of phospho-eNOS and phospho-Akt might be the plausible mechanisms for GO and rGO induced angiogenesis. The results altogether suggest the possibilities for the development of alternative angiogenic therapeutic approach for the treatment of cardiovascular related diseases where angiogenesis plays a significant role. PMID:26033847

  20. Photosensitized oxidation of unsaturated polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    The photosensitized oxidation or singlet oxygenation of unsaturated hydrocarbon polymers and of their model compounds was reviewed. Emphasis was on cis and trans forms of 1,4-polyisoprene, 1,4-polybutadiene and 1,2-poly(1,4-hexadiene), and on 1,4-poly(2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene). The microstructural changes which occur in these polymers on reaction with O2-1 in solution were investigated by infrared H-1 and C-13 NMR spectroscopy. The polymers were shown to yield allylic hydroperoxides with shifted double bonds according to the ene mechanism established for simple olefins. The photosensitized oxidation of the above unsaturated polymer exhibited zero order kinetics, the relative rates paralleling the reactivities of the corresponding simple olefins towards O2-1.

  1. Magnetotransport Properties of Magnetic Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branford, Will; Liu, Ying Lin; Parames, Maria Luisa; Morrison, Kelly

    2005-03-01

    Hybrid spintronic devices require high Curie temperature ferromagnets with a large transport spin polarization. It has been predicted that efficient spin injection is facilitated by matching the conductance of the ferromagnet to that of the semiconductor and in this respect dilute magnetic semiconductors look to be more attractive for application. Oxide dilute magnetic semiconductors are the only class to date that may offer Curie Temperatures above 300K. Here we review the effect of chemical substitution and/or growth parameters on the magnetic, magnetotransport and spin polarisation of charge carriers of a range of functional ferromagnetic oxides, such as Fe3O4, Nd2Mo2O7, CoxTi1-xO2 and CoxZn1-xO.

  2. Oxidative stress and adrenocortical insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Prasad, R; Kowalczyk, J C; Meimaridou, E; Storr, H L; Metherell, L A

    2014-06-01

    Maintenance of redox balance is essential for normal cellular functions. Any perturbation in this balance due to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) leads to oxidative stress and may lead to cell dysfunction/damage/death. Mitochondria are responsible for the majority of cellular ROS production secondary to electron leakage as a consequence of respiration. Furthermore, electron leakage by the cytochrome P450 enzymes may render steroidogenic tissues acutely vulnerable to redox imbalance. The adrenal cortex, in particular, is well supplied with both enzymatic (glutathione peroxidases and peroxiredoxins) and non-enzymatic (vitamins A, C and E) antioxidants to cope with this increased production of ROS due to steroidogenesis. Nonetheless oxidative stress is implicated in several potentially lethal adrenal disorders including X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, triple A syndrome and most recently familial glucocorticoid deficiency. The finding of mutations in antioxidant defence genes in the latter two conditions highlights how disturbances in redox homeostasis may have an effect on adrenal steroidogenesis. PMID:24623797

  3. Aromatic-radical oxidation kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Glassman, I.; Brezinsky, K.

    1991-01-01

    The detailed experimental study of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene has been continued in the Princeton flow reactor during this year. Experimental problems that plagued the initial effort to study this compound have been solved and have permitted the observation of some surprising trends in intermediate species profiles. There are unique, important differences between some of these profiles and those of previously studied hydrocarbons. Co{sub 2} is produced early in the reaction sequence even before CO has reached its maximum concentration, the point at which rapid CO{sub 2} production is usually seen during the oxidation of hydrocarbons. Even more usual is that the concentration of CO{sub 2} for a given time or extent of reaction increases as the system is made more fuel rich. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Oxidation-assisted ductility of aluminium nanowires.

    PubMed

    Sen, Fatih G; Alpas, Ahmet T; van Duin, Adri C T; Qi, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation can drastically change mechanical properties of nanostructures that typically have large surface-to-volume ratios. However, the underlying mechanisms describing the effect oxidation has on the mechanical properties of nanostructures have yet to be characterized. Here we use reactive molecular dynamics and show that the oxidation enhances the aluminium nanowire ductility, and the oxide shell exhibits superplastic behaviour. The oxide shell decreases the aluminium dislocation nucleation stress by increasing the activation volume and the number of nucleation sites. Superplasticity of the amorphous oxide shell is due to viscous flow as a result of healing of the broken aluminium-oxygen bonds by oxygen diffusion, below a critical strain rate. The interplay between the strain rate and oxidation rate is not only essential for designing nanodevices in ambient environments, but also controls interface properties in large-scale deformation processes. PMID:24887649

  5. Oxidation-assisted ductility of aluminium nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Fatih G.; Alpas, Ahmet T.; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Qi, Yue

    2014-06-01

    Oxidation can drastically change mechanical properties of nanostructures that typically have large surface-to-volume ratios. However, the underlying mechanisms describing the effect oxidation has on the mechanical properties of nanostructures have yet to be characterized. Here we use reactive molecular dynamics and show that the oxidation enhances the aluminium nanowire ductility, and the oxide shell exhibits superplastic behaviour. The oxide shell decreases the aluminium dislocation nucleation stress by increasing the activation volume and the number of nucleation sites. Superplasticity of the amorphous oxide shell is due to viscous flow as a result of healing of the broken aluminium-oxygen bonds by oxygen diffusion, below a critical strain rate. The interplay between the strain rate and oxidation rate is not only essential for designing nanodevices in ambient environments, but also controls interface properties in large-scale deformation processes.

  6. Nanowire-based All Oxide Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang*, Benjamin D. Yuhas and Peidong; Yang, Peidong

    2008-12-07

    We present an all-oxide solar cell fabricated from vertically oriented zinc oxide nanowires and cuprous oxide nanoparticles. Our solar cell consists of vertically oriented n-type zinc oxide nanowires, surrounded by a film constructed from p-type cuprous oxide nanoparticles. Our solution-based synthesis of inexpensive and environmentally benign oxide materials in a solar cell would allow for the facile production of large-scale photovoltaic devices. We found that the solar cell performance is enhanced with the addition of an intermediate oxide insulating layer between the nanowires and the nanoparticles. This observation of the important dependence of the shunt resistance on the photovoltaic performance is widely applicable to any nanowire solar cell constructed with the nanowire array in direct contact with one electrode.

  7. Catalyst for carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T. (inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (inventor); Brown, David R. (inventor); Davis, Patricia (inventor); Schryer, David R. (inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (inventor); Vannorman, John D. (inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A catalyst is disclosed for the combination of CO and O2 to form CO2, which includes a platinum group metal (e.g., platinum); a reducable metal oxide having multiple valence states (e.g., SnO2); and a compound which can bind water to its structure (e.g., silica gel). This catalyst is ideally suited for application to high-powered pulsed, CO2 lasers operating in a sealed or closed-cycle condition.

  8. Pretreatment of CO oxidation catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannorman, John D.

    1988-01-01

    CO oxidation catalysts with high activity in the range of 25 C to 100 C are important for long-life, closed-cycle operation of pulsed carbon dioxide 2 lasers. A reductive pretreatment with either CO or H sub 2 was shown to significantly enhance the activity of a commerically-available platinum on tin (IV) oxide (Pt/SnO2) catalyst relative to an oxidative or inert pretreatment or no pretreatment. Pretreatment at temperatures of 175 C and above caused an initial dip in observed CO or O sub 2 loss or CO sub 2 formation in a test gas mixture of 1 percent CO and 0.5 percent O sub 2 in a He gas matrix before a steady-state yield was obtained. This dip was found to be caused by dehydration of the surface of the catalyst and was readily eliminated by humidifying the catalyst or the test gas mixture. It was also found that too much moisture resulted in a lower overall yield of CO sub 2. Under similar conditions, it is hypothesized that the effect of the humidification is to increase the concentration of OH groups on the surface of the catalyst. The effect of having high concentration of CO sub 2 in the test gas mixture upon the loss of CO and O sub 2 as well as the effect of periods of relaxation of the catalyst under non-test gas conditions was studied. The purpose of these studies was to gain an insight into the mechanism of CO oxidation on this type of catalyst.

  9. Coal combustion by wet oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Bettinger, J.A.; Lamparter, R.A.; McDowell, D.C.

    1980-11-15

    The combustion of coal by wet oxidation was studied by the Center for Waste Management Programs, of Michigan Technological University. In wet oxidation a combustible material, such as coal, is reacted with oxygen in the presence of liquid water. The reaction is typically carried out in the range of 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 353/sup 0/C (650/sup 0/F) with sufficient pressure to maintain the water present in the liquid state, and provide the partial pressure of oxygen in the gas phase necessary to carry out the reaction. Experimental studies to explore the key reaction parameters of temperature, time, oxidant, catalyst, coal type, and mesh size were conducted by running batch tests in a one-gallon stirred autoclave. The factors exhibiting the greatest effect on the extent of reaction were temperature and residence time. The effect of temperature was studied from 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) with a residence time from 600 to 3600 seconds. From this data, the reaction activation energy of 2.7 x 10/sup 4/ calories per mole was determined for a high-volatile-A-Bituminous type coal. The reaction rate constant may be determined at any temperature from the activation energy using the Arrhenius equation. Additional data were generated on the effect of mesh size and different coal types. A sample of peat was also tested. Two catalysts were evaluated, and their effects on reaction rate presented in the report. In addition to the high temperature combustion, low temperature desulfurization is discussed. Desulfurization can improve low grade coal to be used in conventional combustion methods. It was found that 90% of the sulfur can be removed from the coal by wet oxidation with the carbon untouched. Further desulfurization studies are indicated.

  10. Iodine cyanide as volumetric oxidant.

    PubMed

    Paul, R C; Chauhan, R K; Sharma, N C; Parkash, R

    1971-11-01

    Iodine cyanide has been developed as an oxidant for the determination of iodide, sulphite, thiosulphate, thiocyanate, arsenic (III), antimony(III), tin(II), mercury(I), iron(II), ascorbic acid and beta-naphthol in dilute aqueous mineral acids, glacial acetic acid and 1:1 acetic acid-acetic anhydride mixture, with visual and potentiometric methods of end-point detection. PMID:18960997

  11. Catalyzed oxidation for nanowire growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Kaiping; Sun, Ke; Huang, Bo; Dillon, Shen J.

    2014-04-01

    A simple, low-cost and scalable route to substrate-supported nanowire growth is reported based on catalyzed oxidation. The process shares common features with popular catalyzed nanowire growth techniques such as vapor-liquid-solid (VLS), vapor-solid-solid (VSS), or vapor-quasi-solid (VQS) that use catalyst nanoparticles to direct the deposition of reactants from the vapor phase. Catalyzed oxidation for nanowire growth (CONG) utilizes catalyzed anion (e.g. O2) reduction from the vapor phase and metal (e.g. Fe) oxidation from the substrate to produce oxide nanowires (e.g. Fe3O4). The approach represents a new class of nanowire growth methodology that may be applied to a broad range of systems. CONG does not require expensive chemical vapor deposition or physical vapor deposition equipment and can be implemented at intermediate temperatures (400-600?°C) in a standard laboratory furnace. This work also demonstrates a passive approach to catalyst deposition that allows the process to be implemented simply with no lithography or physical vapor deposition steps. This effort validates the general approach by synthesizing MnO, Fe3O4, WO3, MgO, TiO2, ZnO, ReO3, and NiO nanowires via CONG. The process produces single crystalline nanowires that can be grown to high aspect ratio and as high-density nanowire forests. Applications of the as-grown Fe3O4 and ReO3 nanowires for lithium ion battery systems are demonstrated to display high areal energy density and power.

  12. Catalyst for carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T. (inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (inventor); Brown, David R. (inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (inventor); Schryer, David R. (inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (inventor); Vannorman, John D. (inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A catalyst for the combination of CO and O2 to form CO2 which includes a platinum group metal, e.g., platinum; a reducible metal oxide having mulitple valence states, e.g., SnO2; and a compound which can bind water to its structure, e.g., silica gel. This catalyst is ideally suited for application to high powered, pulsed, CO2 lasers operating in a sealed or closed cycle condition.

  13. Graphene oxide based smart fluids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen Ling; Choi, Hyoung Jin

    2014-09-21

    Graphene oxide (GO), a graphene-related material containing oxygen-functional groups, has attracted considerable attention because of its strongly hydrophilic behavior and potential use in GO-hybrid composites. We put our focus on the fabrication and rheological characteristics of GO-based electrorheological and magnetorheological smart fluids under electric and magnetic fields, respectively in this Highlight. A brief perspective on the significant role of GO in tribology and the amphiphilic characteristics of Pickering emulsions are also included. PMID:25068905

  14. Arene oxidation with malonoyl peroxides.

    PubMed

    Dragan, Andrei; Kubczyk, Tomasz M; Rowley, Julian H; Sproules, Stephen; Tomkinson, Nicholas C O

    2015-06-01

    Malonoyl peroxide 7, prepared in a single step from the commercially available diacid, is an effective reagent for the oxidation of aromatics. Reaction of an arene with peroxide 7 at room temperature leads to the corresponding protected phenol which can be unmasked by aminolysis. An ionic mechanism consistent with the experimental findings and supported by isotopic labeling, Hammett analysis, EPR investigations, and reactivity profile studies is proposed. PMID:25966313

  15. Electrochemical oxidation of organic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Almon, A.C.; Buchanan, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    Both silver catalyzed and direct electrochemical oxidation of organic species are examined in analytical detail. This paper describes the mechanisms, reaction rates, products, intermediates, capabilities, limitations, and optimal reaction conditions of the electrochemical destruction of organic waste. A small bench-top electrocell being tested for the treatment of small quantities of laboratory waste is described. The 200-mL electrochemical cell used has a processing capacity of 50 mL per day, and can treat both radioactive and nonradioactive waste. In the silver catalyzed process, Ag(I) is electrochemically oxidized to Ag(II), which attacks organic species such as tributylphosphate (TBP), tetraphenylborate (TPB), and benzene. In direct electrochemical oxidation, the organic species are destroyed at the surface of the working electrode without the use of silver as an electron transfer agent. This paper focuses on the destruction of tributylphosphate (TBP), although several organic species have been destroyed using this process. The organic species are converted to carbon dioxide, water, and inorganic acids.

  16. Electrochemical oxidation of organic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Almon, A.C.; Buchanan, B.R.

    1990-12-31

    Both silver catalyzed and direct electrochemical oxidation of organic species are examined in analytical detail. This paper describes the mechanisms, reaction rates, products, intermediates, capabilities, limitations, and optimal reaction conditions of the electrochemical destruction of organic waste. A small bench-top electrocell being tested for the treatment of small quantities of laboratory waste is described. The 200-mL electrochemical cell used has a processing capacity of 50 mL per day, and can treat both radioactive and nonradioactive waste. In the silver catalyzed process, Ag(I) is electrochemically oxidized to Ag(II), which attacks organic species such as tributylphosphate (TBP), tetraphenylborate (TPB), and benzene. In direct electrochemical oxidation, the organic species are destroyed at the surface of the working electrode without the use of silver as an electron transfer agent. This paper focuses on the destruction of tributylphosphate (TBP), although several organic species have been destroyed using this process. The organic species are converted to carbon dioxide, water, and inorganic acids.

  17. Nitric oxide function in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Matthys, K. E.

    1997-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory process in the intima of conduit arteries, which disturbs the endothelium-dependent regulation of the vascular tone by the labile liposoluble radical nitric oxide (NO) formed by the constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). This defect predisposes to coronary vasospasm and cardiac ischaemia, with anginal pain as the typical clinical manifestation. It is now appreciated that endothelial dysfunction is an early event in atherogenesis and that it may also involve the microcirculation, in which atherosclerotic lesions do not develop. On the other hand, the inflammatory environment in atherosclerotic plaques may result in the expression of the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) isozyme. Whether the dysfunction in endothelial NO production is causal to, or the result of, atherosclerotic lesion formation is still highly debated. Most evidence supports the hypothesis that constitutive endothelial NO release protects against atherogenesis e.g. by preventing smooth muscle cell proliferation and leukocyte adhesion. Nitric oxide generated by the inducible isozyme may be beneficial by replacing the failing endothelial production but excessive release may damage the vascular wall cells, especially in combination with reactive oxygen intermediates. PMID:18472828

  18. Hypoxia, Oxidative Stress and Fat

    PubMed Central

    Netzer, Nikolaus; Gatterer, Hannes; Faulhaber, Martin; Burtscher, Martin; Pramsohler, Stephan; Pesta, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic disturbances in white adipose tissue in obese individuals contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Impaired insulin action in adipocytes is associated with elevated lipolysis and increased free fatty acids leading to ectopic fat deposition in liver and skeletal muscle. Chronic adipose tissue hypoxia has been suggested to be part of pathomechanisms causing dysfunction of adipocytes. Hypoxia can provoke oxidative stress in human and animal adipocytes and reduce the production of beneficial adipokines, such as adiponectin. However, time-dose responses to hypoxia relativize the effects of hypoxic stress. Long-term exposure of fat cells to hypoxia can lead to the production of beneficial substances such as leptin. Knowledge of time-dose responses of hypoxia on white adipose tissue and the time course of generation of oxidative stress in adipocytes is still scarce. This paper reviews the potential links between adipose tissue hypoxia, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and low-grade inflammation caused by adipocyte hypertrophy, macrophage infiltration and production of inflammatory mediators. PMID:26061760

  19. Carbon impurities in oxide dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tailor, Hiral D.; Lyons, John L.; Choi, Minseok; Janotti, Anderson; van de Walle, Chris G.

    2015-03-01

    The high-k oxides ZrO2, and LaAlO3 can be used as dielectrics in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices. Dielectrics are commonly grown with atomic layer deposition (ALD), often leading to unintentional incorporation of impurities such as carbon from the metal-organic precursors. Experiments indicated that carbon can be a significant cause of leakage current. We investigate this problem using density functional theory with a hybrid functional. Our results show that carbon substituting on the cation site undergoes an off-site displacement and forms close sp bonds with three oxygen atoms in ZrO2 and LaAlO3. We calculate the corresponding defect levels, and in order to determine the impact on MOS devices we align the band structures of the dielectrics with those of the semiconductor channel materials (including GaN, Si, and GaAs) . We find that carbon incorporation leads to defect levels near the conduction-band minimum of the channel materials, proving potentially detrimental for n-type devices. Intriguingly, we find that the defect levels of these carbon centers in a variety of oxides and semiconductors are aligned at roughly -3.5 eV below the vacuum level. Work supported by NSF, ONR, and ARO.

  20. 75 FR 20595 - Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ...Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur: First External Review Draft (75 FR...addressing the nitrogen oxides (NO X ) and sulfur oxides (SO X ) secondary...