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Sample records for heat-shock protein synthesis

  1. Synthesis of the low molecular weight heat shock proteins in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, M.A.; Key, J.L. )

    1987-08-01

    Heat shock of living tissue induces the synthesis of a unique group of proteins, the heat shock proteins. In plants, the major group of heat shock proteins has a molecular mass of 15 to 25 kilodaltons. Accumulation to these proteins to stainable levels has been reported in only a few species. To examine accumulation of the low molecular weight heat shock proteins in a broader range of species, two-dimensional electrophoresis was used to resolve total protein from the following species: soybean (Glycine max L. Merr., var Wayne), pea (Pisum sativum L., var Early Alaska), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), wheat (Triticum asetivum L.), rice (Oryza sativa L., cv IR-36), maize (Zea mays L.), pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum L. Leeke, line 23DB), and Panicum miliaceum L. When identified by both silver staining and incorporation of radiolabel, a diverse array of low molecular weight heat shock proteins was synthesized in each of these species. These proteins accumulated to significant levels after three hours of heat shock but exhibited considerable heterogeneity in isoelectric point, molecular weight, stainability, and radiolabel incorporation. Although most appeared to be synthesized only during heat shock, some were detectable at low levels in control tissue. Compared to the monocots, a higher proportion of low molecular weight heat shock proteins was detectable in control tissues from dicots.

  2. Synthesis of Early Heat Shock Proteins in Young Leaves of Barley and Sorghum

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Adrian K.; Critchley, Christa

    1990-01-01

    The in vivo synthesis of early heat-shock proteins in young leaves of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) was studied by one- and two-dimensional electrophoresis. Analysis of whole leaf protein patterns demonstrated clearly the enhanced resolution of heat-shock proteins, especially those of low molecular weight, when separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Comparison between the two cereals showed that a greater number and diversity of heat-shock proteins were induced in the subtropical C4 (sorghum) species compared to the temperate C3 (barley) species. Fractionation of whole leaf proteins into soluble and membrane fractions showed the majority of heat-shock proteins to be associated with the soluble fraction in both sorghum and barley. However, several low molecular mass (17-24 kilodalton) heat-shock proteins were clearly identified in the membrane fractions, indicating a likely association with thylakoid membranes in vivo during the early stages of a heat-shock response in both species. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:16667750

  3. Heat shock proteins of higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Key, Joe L.; Lin, C. Y.; Chen, Y. M.

    1981-01-01

    The pattern of protein synthesis changes rapidly and dramatically when the growth temperature of soybean seedling tissue is increased from 28°C (normal) to about 40°C (heat shock). The synthesis of normal proteins is greatly decreased and a new set of proteins, “heat shock proteins,” is induced. The heat shock proteins of soybean consist of 10 new bands on one-dimensional NaDodSO4 gels; a more complex pattern is observed on two-dimensional gels. When the tissue is returned to 28°C after 4 hr at 40°C, there is progressive decline in the synthesis of heat shock proteins and reappearance of a normal pattern of synthesis by 3 or 4 hr. In vitro translation of poly(A)+RNAs isolated from tissues grown at 28 and 40°C shows that the heat shock proteins are translated from a new set of mRNAs induced at 40°C; furthermore, the abundant class mRNAs for many of the normal proteins persist even though they are translated weakly (or not at all) in vivo at 40 or 42.5°C. The heat shock response in soybean appears similar to the much-studied heat shock phenomenon in Drosophila. Images PMID:16593032

  4. Heat shock triggers rapid protein phosphorylation in soybean seedings

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, H.B.; Pueppke, S.G.

    1987-10-29

    Heat shock arrests the synthesis of many cellular proteins and simultaneously initiates expression of a unique set of proteins, termed heat shock proteins. We have found that heat shock rapidly triggers phosphorylation of a set of proteins in soybean seedlings. Although the kinetics of phosphorylation and the heat shock response are similar, the major identified phosphorylation products do not comigrate with heat shock proteins on polyacrylamide gels. Cadmium, which is known to induce the heat shock response, stimulates phosphorylation of the same set of proteins. The rapidity of phosphorylation suggests that it may play a pivotal role in sensing and transducing elevated temperature stress in plants.

  5. Differential expression of heat-shock proteins and spontaneous synthesis of HSP70 during the life cycle of Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    Bonato, M C; Silva, A M; Gomes, S L; Maia, J C; Juliani, M H

    1987-02-16

    The heat-shock response in Blastocladiella emersonii is dependent on the developmental stage. Cells exposed to elevated temperatures at different stages of the life cycle (sporulation, germination or growth) show a differential synthesis of heat-shock proteins (hsps). Of a total of 22 polypeptides induced, particular subsets of hsps appear in each phase, demonstrating a non-coordinate heat-shock gene expression. In contrast, heat-shock-related proteins (hsp76, hsp70, hsp39a) are spontaneously expressed at a high level during sporulation. By the criteria of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and partial proteolysis mapping, the 70,000-Da protein, whose synthesis is induced spontaneously during sporulation, is indistinguishable from the heat-inducible hsp70. The techniques of in vitro translation, and Northern analysis using a Drosophila hsp70 probe, demonstrated that enhanced synthesis of hsp70, which occurs during heat-shock treatment and spontaneously during sporulation, is associated with an accumulation of hsp70 mRNA. These observations suggest that hsp70 gene expression is induced during sporulation. PMID:3816799

  6. Heat shock protein synthesis and thermotolerance in Cataglyphis, an ant from the Sahara desert.

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, W J; Wehner, R

    1995-01-01

    The ant Cataglyphis lives in the Sahara desert and is one of the most thermotolerant land animals known. It forages at body temperatures above 50 degrees C, and the critical thermal maxima are at 53.6 +/- 0.8 degrees C for Cataglyphis bombycina and 55.1 +/- 1.1 degrees C for Cataglyphis bicolor. The synthesis and accumulation of heat shock proteins (HSPs) were analyzed in Cataglyphis and compared to Formica, an ant living in more moderate climates, and to two Drosophila species. In Cataglyphis, protein synthesis continues at temperatures up to 45 degrees C as compared to 39 degrees C for Formica and Drosophila. The two Drosophila species, Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila ambigua, differ with respect to their maximal induction of HSP synthesis and accumulation by 3-4 degrees C. In contrast, the two ant species accumulate HSPs prior to their exposure to heat, and in Cataglyphis the temperature of maximal HSP induction by de novo protein synthesis is only 2 degrees C higher than in Formica. These findings are interpreted as preadaption of the ants prior to exposure to high temperatures. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7708762

  7. Bacterial Heat Shock Protein Activity

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Farajollah; Khosravi, Afra; Nasser, Ahmad; Taghinejad, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria are exposed to different types of stress in their growth conditions. They have developed appropriate responses, modulated by the re-modeling of protein complexes and by phosphorylation dependent signal transduction systems, to adapt and to survive in a variety range of nature. Proteins are essential components for biologic activity in the eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell. Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) have been identified from various organisms and have critical role in cell hemostasis. Chaperone can sense environment and have different potential role in the organism evolution. PMID:27134861

  8. Influence of temperature stress on in vitro fertilization and heat shock protein synthesis in maize (Zea mays L. ) reproductive tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, I.; Dumas, C. )

    1990-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the response of maize (Zea mays) male and female mature reproductive tissues to temperature stress. We have tested the fertilization abilities of the stressed spikelets and pollen using in vitro pollination-fertilization to determine their respective tolerance to stress. The synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs) was also analyzed in male and female tissues using electrophoresis of {sup 35}S-labeled proteins and fluorography, to establish a relationship between the physiological and molecular responses. Pollen, spikelets, and pollinated spikelets were exposed to selected temperatures (4, 28, 32, 36, or 40{degree}C) and tested using an in vitro fertilization system. The fertilization rate is highly reduced when pollinated spikelets are exposed to temperatures over 36{degree}C. When pollen and spikelets are exposed separately to temperature stress, the female tissues appear resistant to 4 hours of cold stress (4{degree}C) or heat stress (40{degree}C). Under heat shock conditions, the synthesis of a typical set of HSPs is induced in the female tissues. In contrast, the mature pollen is sensitive to heat stress and is responsible for the failure of fertilization at high temperatures. At the molecular level, no heat shock response is detected in the mature pollen.

  9. Heat-shock Proteins and Photodynamic Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylis, Joanne; Downs, Craig A.; Jones, Linda R.; Heckathorn, Scott A.

    1998-11-01

    Many cancer treatments, such as photodynamic therapy, generate active oxygen species, often in the mitochondria. These oxygen species adversely react with cellular processes, thereby destroying cancer cells and tissue. Heat-shock proteins are up-regulated in response to heat stress or other environmental stresses and are known to protect cells from active oxygen species. In tumor cells, heat-shock proteins accumulate in the mitochondria under non-stress conditions at higher levels than in normal cells. The objective of our work is to determine whether specific mitochondrial heat-shock proteins are responsible for the increased resistance of cancer cells to oxidative-based anti-cancer therapies. We will first determine which heat-shock proteins accumulate in the mitochondria of cancer cells (lung carcinomas). We will determine if the over-expression of specific heat-shock proteins in the mitochondria can protect cells from Photofrin®-mediated photodynamic therapy through protection of mitochondrial electron transport.

  10. Synthesis of 19-substituted geldanamycins with altered conformations and their binding to heat shock protein Hsp90

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitson, Russell R. A.; Chang, Chuan-Hsin; Xiong, Rui; Williams, Huw E. L.; Davis, Adrienne L.; Lewis, William; Dehn, Donna L.; Siegel, David; Roe, S. Mark; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Ross, David; Moody, Christopher J.

    2013-04-01

    The benzoquinone ansamycin geldanamycin and its derivatives are inhibitors of heat shock protein Hsp90, an emerging target for novel therapeutic agents both in cancer and in neurodegeneration. However, the toxicity of these compounds to normal cells has been ascribed to reaction with thiol nucleophiles at the quinone 19-position. We reasoned that blocking this position would ameliorate toxicity, and that it might also enforce a favourable conformational switch of the trans-amide group into the cis-form required for protein binding. Here, we report an efficient synthesis of such 19-substituted compounds and realization of our hypotheses. Protein crystallography established that the new compounds bind to Hsp90 with, as expected, a cis-amide conformation. Studies on Hsp90 inhibition in cells demonstrated the molecular signature of Hsp90 inhibitors: decreases in client proteins with compensatory increases in other heat shock proteins in both human breast cancer and dopaminergic neural cells, demonstrating their potential for use in the therapy of cancer or neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Stimulation of glycogen synthesis by heat shock in L6 skeletal-muscle cells: regulatory role of site-specific phosphorylation of glycogen-associated protein phosphatase 1.

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Byoung; Duddy, Noreen; Ragolia, Louis; Begum, Najma

    2003-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that glycogen-associated protein phosphatase 1 (PP-1(G)) is essential for basal and exercise-induced glycogen synthesis, which is mediated in part by dephosphorylation and activation of glycogen synthase (GS). In the present study, we examined the potential role of site-specific phosphorylation of PP-1(G) in heat-shock-induced glycogen synthesis. L6 rat skeletal-muscle cells were stably transfected with wild-type PP-1(G) or with PP-1(G) mutants in which site-1 (S1) Ser(48) and site-2 (S2) Ser(67) residues were substituted with Ala. Cells expressing wild-type and PP-1(G) mutants, S1, S2 and S1/S2, were examined for potential alterations in glycogen synthesis after a 60 min heat shock at 45 degrees C, followed by analysis of [(14)C]glucose incorporation into glycogen at 37 degrees C. PP-1(G) S1 mutation caused a 90% increase in glycogen synthesis on heat-shock treatment, whereas the PP-1(G) S2 mutant was not sensitive to heat stress. The S1/S2 double mutant was comparable with wild-type, which showed a 30% increase over basal. Heat-shock-induced glycogen synthesis was accompanied by increased PP-1 and GS activities. The highest activation was observed in S1 mutant. Heat shock also resulted in a rapid and sustained Akt/ glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3 beta) phosphorylation. Wortmannin blocked heat-shock-induced Akt/GSK-3 beta phosphorylation, prevented 2-deoxyglucose uptake and abolished the heat-shock-induced glycogen synthesis. Muscle glycogen levels regulate GS activity and glycogen synthesis and were found to be markedly depleted in S1 mutant on heat-shock treatment, suggesting that PP-1(G) S1 Ser phosphorylation may inhibit glycogen degradation during thermal stimulation, as S1 mutation resulted in excessive glycogen synthesis on heat-shock treatment. In contrast, PP-1(G) S2 Ser phosphorylation may promote glycogen breakdown under stressful conditions. Heat-shock-induced glycogenesis appears to be mediated via phosphoinositide 3

  12. Acquisition of thermotolerance in soybean seedlings: synthesis and accumulation of heat shock proteins and their cellular localization

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.Y.; Roberts, J.K.; Key, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    When soybean Glycine max var Wayne seedlings are shifted from a normal growth temperature of 28/sup 0/C up to 40/sup 0/C (heat shock or HS), there is a dramatic change in protein synthesis. A new set of proteins known as shock proteins (HSPs) is produced and normal protein synthesis is greatly reduced. However, a pretreatmemt at 40/sup 0/C or a brief (10 minute) pulse treatment at 45/sup 0/C followed by a 28/sup 0/C incubation provide protection (thermal tolerance) to a subsequent exposure at 45/sup 0/C. During 40/sup 0/C HS, some HSPs become localized and stably associated with purified organelle fractions while others do not. A chase at 28/sup 0/C results in the gradual loss over a 4-hour period of the HSPs from the organelle fractions, but the HSPs remain selectively localized during a 40/sup 0/C chase period. The relative amount of HSPs which relocalize during a second HS increases with higher temperatures from 40/sup 0/C to 45/sup 0/C. Proteins induced by arsenite treatment are not selectively localized with organelle fractions at 28/sup 0/C but become organelle-associated during a subsequent HS at 40/sup 0/C.

  13. Heat shock proteins in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Fok, Jacqueline H.L.; Davies, Faith E.

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins are molecular chaperones with a central role in protein folding and cellular protein homeostasis. They also play major roles in the development of cancer and in recent years have emerged as promising therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the known molecular mechanisms of various heat shock protein families and their involvement in cancer and in particular, multiple myeloma. In addition, we address the current progress and challenges in pharmacologically targeting these proteins as anti-cancer therapeutic strategies PMID:24675290

  14. [Synthesis of heat shock proteins following amino acid or oxygen limitation in Bacillus subtilis relA+ and relA strains].

    PubMed

    Hecker, M; Richter, A; Schroeter, A; Wölfel, L; Mach, F

    1987-01-01

    Some of the presumable heat shock proteins will be produced in Bacillus subtilis in response to different environmental conditions, e.g. heat shock, amino acid limitation or oxygen limitation. During amino acid limitation or during oxygen limitation the relA+ strain is able of synthesizing this set of proteins but the relA strain is not. We suggest that the accelerated rate of the synthesis of some heat shock proteins depends on the induction of the stringent response because the (p)ppGpp production does not occur in the relA strain during amino acid or oxygen limitation. On the other hand the relA strain can produce heat shock proteins under heat stress. Therefore different mechanisms must be responsible for the expression of this set of genes during heat and other stress stimuli. It can be supposed that in B. subtilis the (p)ppGpp-dependent stringent control is a central defense reaction against different adverse environmental conditions and furthermore, that the synthesis of "stress" proteins as an essential component of the stringent response is part of a general adaptation mechanism under non-growing conditions. PMID:2961154

  15. High hydrostatic pressure induces synthesis of heat-shock proteins and trehalose-6-phosphate synthase in Anastrepha ludens larvae.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Ortiz, Manuel A; Quintana-Castro, Rodolfo; Oliart-Ros, Rosa M; De la Cruz-Medina, Javier; Ramírez de León, José A; Garcia, Hugo S

    2013-04-01

    The Mexican fruit fly (Anastrepha ludens) is responsible for losses of up to 25% of crops such as mango and citrus fruits in Central America and México. The larval life cycle of A. ludens comprises three stages with a duration ranging from 3 to 8 days. Because of the damage caused by A. ludens, several methods of control have been studied and implemented. High hydrostatic pressures (HHP) are currently applied to foods and it is now proposed to be employed to inactivate eggs and larvae of A. ludens. Originally HHP was designed to inactivate microorganisms, since it exerts marked effects on cell morphology, and can affect enzymatic reactions and genetic mechanisms of microbial cells, with no major changes altering the sensory or nutritional quality of the foodstuff. In this study, A. ludens in two larval stages (5- and 8-day-old) were subjected to HHP treatments. The biochemical response of the larvae of A. ludens was dependent on their stage of development. The third larval stage (L3) developed a better protection mechanism based on the synthesis of stress proteins or heat-shock proteins (HSPs) and the enzyme trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, which are linked and possibly act together to achieve greater survivability to stress caused by hydrostatic pressure. PMID:23361865

  16. Phorbol ester tumor promoter induced the synthesis of two major cytoplasmic proteins: identity with two proteins induced under heat-shocked and glucose-starved conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Chen, K.Y.; Liu, A.Y.C.

    1987-05-01

    The regulation of specific protein synthesis by the phorbol ester tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), was evaluated using the L-8 and C-2 myoblast and the 3T3-L1 fibroblast cell cultures. TPA increased, by 2-4 fold, the synthesis rates of two cytoplasmic proteins with apparent molecular weights of 89,000 and 74,000 as determined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. The concentration of TPA and the time of incubation needed to elicit this induction was determined to be 10 ..mu..g/ml and 20 hrs, respectively. Increasing the concentration of TPA to 100, 200, and 500 ng/ml did not result in a greater magnitude of induction. The possibility that these two TPA-induced proteins may be identical to proteins with similar molecular weights induced under heat-shocked or glucose-starved conditions was evaluated by 1-D and 2-D gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Results provided evidence that the TPA-induced 89,000- and 74,000-dalton proteins were identical to hsp 89 and hsp 74, 2 out of a set of 8-9 proteins induced under heat shocked conditions. Furthermore, they are identical to two of the set of glucose-regulated proteins induced under a glucose-starved condition.

  17. Alpha subunit of eukaryotic translational initiation factor-2 is a heat-shock protein.

    PubMed

    Colbert, R A; Hucul, J A; Scorsone, K A; Young, D A

    1987-12-15

    The use of ultra high resolution giant two-dimensional gel electrophoresis has expanded the number of recognizable heat-shock proteins to 68 inductions in rat thymic lymphocytes, many of which are among the less abundant cellular proteins (Maytin, E. V., Colbert, R. A., and Young, D. A. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 2384-2392). Previous studies also show that cells receiving a prior heat shock recover more rapidly from the inhibition of protein synthesis induced by a second heat shock. In this report we use a monoclonal antibody to identify the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor-2 (eIF-2 alpha) as a heat-shock protein. Its relative rate of synthesis increases approximately 40% in the 2nd h and 5-fold in the 4th h of a continuous heat shock and is stimulated more dramatically, 15-fold, in the 3rd h of recovery from a 1-h heat shock. These results suggest that the induction of eIF-2 alpha in the heat-shock response may be important for restoring the cell's ability to initiate protein synthesis. In addition to identifying a function for one of the heat-shock proteins, our findings draw attention to the likelihood that other low-abundance heat-shock proteins may play critical roles in the heat-shock response. PMID:3500171

  18. Time course and magnitude of synthesis of heat-shock proteins in congeneric marine snails (Genus tegula) from different tidal heights.

    PubMed

    Tomanek, L; Somero, G N

    2000-01-01

    The time course and magnitude of the heat-shock response in relation to severity of thermal stress are important, yet poorly understood, aspects of thermotolerance. We examined patterns of protein synthesis in congeneric marine snails (genus Tegula) that occur at different heights along the subtidal to intertidal gradient after a thermal exposure (30 degrees C for 2.5 h, followed by 50 h recovery at 13 degrees C) that induced the heat-shock response. We monitored the kinetics and magnitudes of protein synthesis by quantifying incorporation of 35S-labeled methionine and cysteine into newly synthesized proteins and observed synthesis of putative heat-shock proteins (hsp's) of size classes 90, 77, 70, and 38 kDa. In the low- to mid-intertidal species, Tegula funebralis, whose body temperature frequently exceeds 30 degrees C during emersion, synthesis of hsp's commenced immediately after heat stress, reached maximal levels 1-3 h into recovery, and returned to prestress levels by 6 h, except for hsp90 (14 h). In contrast, in the low-intertidal to subtidal species, Tegula brunnea, for which 2.5 h at 30 degrees C represents a near lethal heat stress, synthesis of hsp's commenced 2-14 h after heat stress; reached maximal levels after 15-30 h, which exceeded magnitudes of synthesis in T. funebralis; and returned to prestress levels in the case of hsp90 (50 h) and hsp77 (30 h) but not in the case of hsp70 and hsp38. Exposures to 30 degrees C under aerial (emersion) and aquatic (immersion) conditions resulted in differences in hsp synthesis in T. brunnea but not in T. funebralis. The different time courses and magnitudes of hsp synthesis in these congeners suggest that the vertical limits of their distributions may be set in part by thermal stress. PMID:10801403

  19. Localization of small heat shock proteins to the higher plant endomembrane system. [Low-molecular-weight heat shock proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Helm, K.W.; Vierling, E. ); LaFayette, P.R.; Nagao, R.T.; Key, J.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Most eukaryotic cells respond to high temperature and other stresses with the production of heat shock proteins, which aid in cell survival. There are four major classes of heat shock proteins HSP90, HSP70, HSP60 and low-molecular weight HSP. The data from this research indicate that members of the low-molecular weight heat shock proteins are most likely resident endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteins and may be similar in function to related low-molecular weight heat shock proteins in the cytoplasm. The low-molecular weight heat shock proteins, the HSP90 and the HSP70 all appear to localize to the endoplasmic reticulum. Since the ER-localized low-molecular weight heat shock proteins are physically separated from their counterparts in other cell compartments, investigations of the ER-localized heat shock proteins provides a simplified model system for determining the functions of low-molecular weight heat shock proteins in eukaryotes.

  20. Heat shock proteins in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Sreedharan, Rajasree; Van Why, Scott K

    2016-10-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are essential to cell survival through their function as protein chaperones. The role they play in kidney health and disease is varied. Hsp induction may be either beneficial or detrimental to the kidney, depending on the specific Hsp, type of cell, and context. This review addresses the role of Hsps in the kidney, including during development, as osmoprotectants, and in various kidney disease models. Heat shock transcription factor, activated by a stress on renal cells, induces Hsp elaboration and separately regulates immune responses that can contribute to renal injury. Induced Hsps in the intracellular compartment are mostly beneficial in the kidney by stabilizing and restoring cell architecture and function through acting as protein chaperones. Intracellular Hsps also inhibit apoptosis and facilitate cell proliferation, preserving renal tubule viability after acute injury, but enhancing progression of cystic kidney disease and malignancy. Induced Hsps in the extracellular compartment, either circulating or located on outer cell membranes, are mainly detrimental through enhancing inflammation pathways to injury. Correctly harnessing these stress proteins promises the opportunity to alter the course of acute and chronic kidney disease. PMID:26913726

  1. Modulation of Alloimmunity by Heat Shock Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Thiago J.; Lang, Benjamin J.; Lopes, Rafael L.; Bonorino, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The immunological mechanisms that evolved for host defense against pathogens and injury are also responsible for transplant rejection. Host rejection of foreign tissue was originally thought to be mediated mainly by T cell recognition of foreign MHC alleles. Management of solid organ transplant rejection has thus focused mainly on inhibition of T cell function and matching MHC alleles between donor and host. Recently, however, it has been demonstrated that the magnitude of the initial innate immune responses upon transplantation has a decisive impact on rejection. The exact mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have yet to be characterized. Ischemic cell death and inflammation that occur upon transplantation are synonymous with extracellular release of various heat shock proteins (Hsps), many of which have been shown to have immune-modulatory properties. Here, we review the impact of Hsps upon alloimmunity and discuss the potential use of Hsps as accessory agents to improve solid organ transplant outcomes. PMID:27555846

  2. The identification of a heat-shock protein complex in chloroplasts of barley leaves.

    PubMed

    Clarke, A K; Critchley, C

    1992-12-01

    In vivo radiolabeling of chloroplast proteins in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Corvette) leaves and their separation by one-dimensional electrophoresis revealed at least seven heat-shock proteins between 24 and 94 kD, of which most have not been previously identified in this C(3) species. Fractionation into stromal and thylakoid membrane components showed that all chloroplast heat-shock proteins were synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes, translocated into the chloroplast, and located in the stroma. Examination of stromal preparations by native (nondissociating) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of a high-molecular mass heat-shock protein complex in barley. This complex was estimated to be 250 to 265 kD in size. Dissociation by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a single protein component, a 32-kD heat-shock protein. The synthesis of this protein and the formation of the heat-shock protein complex were dependent on functional cytoplasmic ribosomes. Immunological studies showed that the heat-shock protein complex did not contain any proteins homologous to the alpha-subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase subunit-binding protein. Other features about the complex included the absence of nucleic acid (RNA or DNA) and its nondissociation in the presence of Mg(2+)/ATP. These results suggest that the heat-shock protein complex in barley chloroplasts is a homogeneous octamer of 32-kD subunits. PMID:16653243

  3. The Identification of a Heat-Shock Protein Complex in Chloroplasts of Barley Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Adrian K.; Critchley, Christa

    1992-01-01

    In vivo radiolabeling of chloroplast proteins in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Corvette) leaves and their separation by one-dimensional electrophoresis revealed at least seven heat-shock proteins between 24 and 94 kD, of which most have not been previously identified in this C3 species. Fractionation into stromal and thylakoid membrane components showed that all chloroplast heat-shock proteins were synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes, translocated into the chloroplast, and located in the stroma. Examination of stromal preparations by native (nondissociating) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of a high-molecular mass heat-shock protein complex in barley. This complex was estimated to be 250 to 265 kD in size. Dissociation by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a single protein component, a 32-kD heat-shock protein. The synthesis of this protein and the formation of the heat-shock protein complex were dependent on functional cytoplasmic ribosomes. Immunological studies showed that the heat-shock protein complex did not contain any proteins homologous to the α-subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase subunit-binding protein. Other features about the complex included the absence of nucleic acid (RNA or DNA) and its nondissociation in the presence of Mg2+/ATP. These results suggest that the heat-shock protein complex in barley chloroplasts is a homogeneous octamer of 32-kD subunits. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:16653243

  4. Heat shock proteins: molecular chaperones of protein biogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Craig, E A; Gambill, B D; Nelson, R J

    1993-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) were first identified as proteins whose synthesis was enhanced by stresses such as an increase in temperature. Recently, several of the major Hsps have been shown to be intimately involved in protein biogenesis through a direct interaction with a wide variety of proteins. As a reflection of this role, these Hsps have been referred to as molecular chaperones. Hsp70s interact with incompletely folded proteins, such as nascent chains on ribosomes and proteins in the process of translocation from the cytosol into mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum. Hsp60 also binds to unfolded proteins, preventing aggregation and facilitating protein folding. Although less well defined, other Hsps such as Hsp90 also play important roles in modulating the activity of a number of proteins. The function of the proteolytic system is intertwined with that of molecular chaperones. Several components of this system, encoded by heat-inducible genes, are responsible for the degradation of abnormal or misfolded proteins. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven very useful in the analysis of the role of molecular chaperones in protein maturation, translocation, and degradation. In this review, results of experiments are discussed within the context of experiments with other organisms in an attempt to describe the current state of understanding of these ubiquitous and important proteins. PMID:8336673

  5. c-myc and c-myb protein degradation: effect of metabolic inhibitors and heat shock.

    PubMed Central

    Lüscher, B; Eisenman, R N

    1988-01-01

    The proteins encoded by both viral and cellular forms of the c-myc oncogene have been previously demonstrated to have exceptionally short in vivo half-lives. In this paper we report a comparative study on the parameters affecting turnover of nuclear oncoproteins c-myc, c-myb, and the rapidly metabolized cytoplasmic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase. The degradation of all three proteins required metabolic energy, did not result in production of cleavage intermediates, and did not involve lysosomes or ubiquitin. A five- to eightfold increase in the half-life of c-myc proteins, and a twofold increase in the half-life of c-myb proteins was detected after heat-shock treatment at 46 degrees C. In contrast, heat shock had no effect on the turnover of ornithine decarboxylase. Heat shock also had the effect of increasing the rate of c-myc protein synthesis twofold, whereas c-myb protein synthesis was decreased nearly fourfold. The increased stability and synthesis of c-myc proteins led to an overall increase in the total level of c-myc proteins in response to heat-shock treatment. Furthermore, treatments which reduced c-myc and c-myb protein turnover, such as heat shock and exposure to inhibitors of metabolic energy production, resulted in reduced detergent solubility of both proteins. The recovery from heat shock, as measured by increased turnover and solubility, was energy dependent and considerably more rapid in thermotolerant cells. Images PMID:3043180

  6. The effect of heat stress on gene expression and synthesis of heat-shock and milk proteins in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Han; Zhang, Yangdong; Zheng, Nan; Cheng, Jianbo; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, bovine mammary epithelial cells were used to study stress responses after cells were exposed to 42°C for 0.5, 1, 3, 5, 8 or 12 h, and 38°C as control. The transcription of the genes (HSP27, HSP70 and HSP90) of heat shock protein (Hsp) was significantly enhanced under heat stress (HS). The peak transcription of HSP70 was 14 times the control at 1 h. Expression of proteins Hsp27 and Hsp70 was gradually increased under HS, with rapid deposition of Hsp70 in epithelial cells. The major milk protein genes of β-casein (CSN2) and butyrophilin (BTN1A1) were down-regulated and the synthesis of total caseins was decreased. After the cells were under HS (42°C) for 1 or 5 h, the cells were cultured at 38°C for 1, 6, 12 or 24 h for recovery. When the cells were cultured at 38°C for 24 h after HS for 1 h, the transcription of HSP70, HSP90, CSN2 and BTN reached normal levels. Our results suggest that HS initiated Hsp synthesis and decreased the milk protein synthesis. Hsp70 is extremely sensitive to HS and mainly responsible for mammary cell protection from HS. PMID:26467738

  7. Heat shock stimulation of a tilapia heat shock protein 70 promoter is mediated by a distal element.

    PubMed Central

    Molina, A; Di Martino, E; Martial, J A; Muller, M

    2001-01-01

    We reported previously that a tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) promoter is able to confer heat shock response on a reporter gene after transient expression both in cell culture and in microinjected zebrafish embryos. Here we present the first functional analysis of a fish HSP70 promoter, the tiHSP70 promoter. Using transient expression experiments in carp EPC (epithelioma papulosum cyprini) cells and in microinjected zebrafish embryos, we show that a distal heat shock response element (HSE1) at approx. -800 is predominantly responsible for the heat shock response of the tiHSP70 promoter. This element specifically binds an inducible transcription factor, most probably heat shock factor, and a constitutive factor. The constitutive complex is not observed with the non-functional, proximal HSE3 sequence, suggesting that both factors are required for the heat shock response mediated by HSE1. PMID:11368761

  8. Aging results in an unusual expression of Drosophila heat shock proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, J.E.; Walton, J.K.; Dubitsky, R.; Bensch, K.G. )

    1988-06-01

    The authors used high-resolution two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to evaluate the effect of aging on the heat shock response in Drosophila melanogaster. Although the aging process is not well understood at the molecular level, recent observations suggest that quantitative changes in gene expression occur as these fruit flies approach senescence. Such genetic alterations are in accord with our present data, which clearly show marked differences in the synthesis of heat shock proteins between young and old fruit flies. In 10-day-old flies, a heat shock of 20 min results in the expression of 14 new proteins as detectable by two-dimensional electrophoresis of ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled polypeptides, whereas identical treatment of 45-day-old flies leads to the expression of at least 50 new or highly up-regulated proteins. In addition, there is also a concomitant increase in the rate of synthesis of a number of the normal proteins in the older animals. Microdensitometric determinations of the low molecular weight heat shock polypeptides on autoradiographs of five age groups revealed that their maximum expression occurs at 47 days for a population of flies with a mean life span of 33.7 days. Moreover, a heat shock effect similar to that observed in senescent flies occurs in young flies fed canavanine, an arginine analogue, before heat shock.

  9. Heat shock disassembles the nucleolus and inhibits nuclear protein import and poly(A)+ RNA export.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y; Liang, S; Tartakoff, A M

    1996-01-01

    Heat shock causes major positive and negative changes in gene expression, drastically alters the appearance of the nucleolus and inhibits rRNA synthesis. We here show that it causes many yeast nucleolar proteins, including the fibrillarin homolog Nop1p, to relocate to the cytoplasm. Relocation depends on several proteins implicated in mRNA transport (Mtrps) and is reversible. Two observations indicate, surprisingly, that disassembly results from a reduction in Ssa protein (Hsp70) levels: (i) selective depletion of Ssa1p leads to disassembly of the nucleolus; (ii) preincubation at 37 degrees C protects the nucleolus against disassembly by heat shock, unless expression of Ssa proteins is specifically inhibited. We observed that heat shock or reduction of Ssa1p levels inhibits protein import into the nucleus and therefore we propose that inhibition of import leads to disassembly of the nucleolus. These observations provide a simple explanation of the effects of heat shock on the anatomy of the nucleolus and rRNA transcription. They also extend understanding of the path of nuclear export. Since a number of nucleoplasmic proteins also relocate upon heat shock, these observations can provide a general mechanism for regulation of gene expression. Relocation of the hnRNP-like protein Mtr13p (= Npl3p, Nop3p), explains the heat shock sensitivity of export of average poly(A)+ RNA. Strikingly, Hsp mRNA export appears not to be affected. Images PMID:8978700

  10. Synthesis of Reblastatin, Autolytimycin, Non-Benzoquinone Analogs: Potent Inhibitors of Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90)

    PubMed Central

    Wrona, Iwona E.; Gozman, Alexander; Taldone, Tony; Chiosis, Gabriela; Panek, James S.

    2010-01-01

    A full account of an asymmetric synthesis of reblastatin (1), the first total synthesis of autolytimycin (2) and related structural compounds is described. The syntheses expand the utility of a highly regio-and diastereoselective hydrometalation aldehyde addition sequence to assemble the fully functionalized ansa chain of the natural products. Also documented is an intramolecular copper-mediated amidation reaction to close the 19-membered macrolactams. The amidation reaction was also employed for the generation of structural derivatives (6–9) of phenolic ansamycins. Ansamycin natural products and selected structural analogs were evaluated in a competitive binding assay to breast cancer cell lysate and a cytotoxicity assay. Both reblastatin (1) and autolytimycin (2) were shown to bind the Hsp90 protein with enhanced binding activity (~25 nM) than 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG, 4), a geldanamycin (3) derivative currently under evaluation for treatment of cancer (~100 nM). PMID:20392070

  11. Heat shock proteins and heat shock factor 1 in carcinogenesis and tumor development: an update

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) are a subset of the molecular chaperones, best known for their rapid and abundant induction by stress. HSP genes are activated at the transcriptional level by heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1). During the progression of many types of cancer, this heat shock transcriptional regulon becomes co-opted by mechanisms that are currently unclear, although evidently triggered in the emerging tumor cell. Concerted activation of HSF1 and the accumulation of HSPs then participates in many of the traits that permit the malignant phenotype. Thus cancers of many histologies exhibit activated HSF1 and increased HSP levels that may help to deter tumor suppression and evade therapy in the clinic. We review here the extensive work that has been carried out and is still in progress aimed at: (1) understanding the oncogenic mechanisms by which HSP genes are switched on, (2) determining the roles of HSF1 / HSP in malignant transformation and, (3) discovering approaches to therapy based on disrupting the influence of the HSF1 controlled transcriptome in cancer. PMID:22885793

  12. The second metal-binding site of 70 kDa heat-shock protein is essential for ADP binding, ATP hydrolysis and ATP synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xueji; Yano, Mihiro; Washida, Hiroyo; Kido, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    The chaperone activity of Hsp70 (70 kDa heat-shock protein) in protein folding and its conformational switch, including oligomeric and monomeric interconversion, are regulated by the hydrolysis of ATP and the ATP-ADP exchange cycle. The crystal structure of human ATPase domain shows two metal-binding sites, the first for ATP binding and a second, in close proximity to the first, whose function remains unknown [Sriram, Osipiuk, Freeman, Morimoto and Joachimiak (1997) Structure 5, 403-414]. In this study, we have characterized the second metal-binding motif by site-directed mutagenesis and the kinetics of ATP and ADP binding, and found that the second metal-binding site, comprising a loop co-ordinated by His-227, Glu-231 and Asp-232, participates both in ATP hydrolysis and ATP-synthetic activities, in co-operation with the first metal-binding site. The first metal-binding site, a catalytic centre, is essential for ATP binding and the second site for ADP binding in the reactions of ATP hydrolysis and ATP synthesis. PMID:14664695

  13. Heat shock protein hsp70 accelerates the recovery of heat-shocked mammalian cells through its modulation of heat shock transcription factor HSF1.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, D; Ouyang, H; Li, G C

    1995-01-01

    The role of mammalian 70-kDa heat shock protein (hsp70) in regulating cellular response to heat shock was examined by using three closely related rat cells: control Rat-1 cells, thermotolerant Rat-1 (TT Rat-1) cells, and heat-resistant M21 cells, a derivative of Rat-1 cells that constitutively overexpress human hsp70. In all these cells, after a prescribed heat shock, the level of the phosphorylated form of heat shock transcription factor HSF1 and that of HSF1 capable of binding to its cognitive DNA sequence heat shock element (HSE) exhibit similar time dependence. The amount of a constitutive HSE-binding activity (CHBA), on the other hand, inversely correlates with those of the two aforementioned forms of HSF1. The recovery kinetics from heat shock are different for the three cell lines, with the thermal-resistant TT Rat-1 and M21 cells showing faster recovery in terms of the state of phosphorylation of HSF1 and its ability to bind HSE or in terms of the reappearance of CHBA. Treatment with okadaic acid, a serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor, delays the recovery kinetics of Rat-1 cells but not that of thermal-resistant M21 cells. These results are interpreted in terms of a role for hsp70 in the recovery of heat-shocked mammalian cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7892235

  14. Multiple oligomeric structures of a bacterial small heat shock protein

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Nandini; Bhandari, Spraha; Moreno, Rodolfo; Hu, Liya; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; Suguna, Kaza

    2016-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins are ubiquitous molecular chaperones that form the first line of defence against the detrimental effects of cellular stress. Under conditions of stress they undergo drastic conformational rearrangements in order to bind to misfolded substrate proteins and prevent cellular protein aggregation. Owing to the dynamic nature of small heat shock protein oligomers, elucidating the structural basis of chaperone action and oligomerization still remains a challenge. In order to understand the organization of sHSP oligomers, we have determined crystal structures of a small heat shock protein from Salmonella typhimurium in a dimeric form and two higher oligomeric forms: an 18-mer and a 24-mer. Though the core dimer structure is conserved in all the forms, structural heterogeneity arises due to variation in the terminal regions. PMID:27053150

  15. Heat shock proteins, end effectors of myocardium ischemic preconditioning?

    PubMed Central

    Guisasola, María Concepcion; Desco, Maria del Mar; Gonzalez, Fernanda Silvana; Asensio, Fernando; Dulin, Elena; Suarez, Antonio; Garcia Barreno, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate (1) whether ischemia-reperfusion increased the content of heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) transcripts and (2) whether myocardial content of Hsp72 is increased by ischemic preconditioning so that they can be considered as end effectors of preconditioning. Twelve male minipigs (8 protocol, 4 sham) were used, with the following ischemic preconditioning protocol: 3 ischemia and reperfusion 5-minute alternative cycles and last reperfusion cycle of 3 hours. Initial and final transmural biopsies (both in healthy and ischemic areas) were taken in all animals. Heat shock protein 72 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression was measured by a semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method using complementary DNA normalized against the housekeeping gene cyclophilin. The identification of heat shock protein 72 was performed by immunoblot. In our “classic” preconditioning model, we found no changes in mRNA hsp72 levels or heat shock protein 72 content in the myocardium after 3 hours of reperfusion. Our experimental model is valid and the experimental techniques are appropriate, but the induction of heat shock proteins 72 as end effectors of cardioprotection in ischemic preconditioning does not occur in the first hours after ischemia, but probably at least 24 hours after it, in the so-called “second protection window.” PMID:17009598

  16. Exposure of gnotobiotic Artemia franciscana larvae to abiotic stress promotes heat shock protein 70 synthesis and enhances resistance to pathogenic Vibrio campbellii

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, Carlos; MacRae, Thomas H.; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Larvae of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana serve as important feed in fish and shellfish larviculture; however, they are subject to bacterial diseases that devastate entire populations and consequently hinder their use in aquaculture. Exposure to abiotic stress was shown previously to shield Artemia larvae against infection by pathogenic Vibrio, with the results suggesting a mechanistic role for heat shock protein 70. In the current report, combined hypothermic/hyperthermic shock followed by recovery at ambient temperature induced Hsp70 synthesis in Artemia larvae. Thermotolerance was also increased as was protection against infection by Vibrio campbellii, the latter indicated by reduced mortality and lower bacterial load in challenge tests. Resistance to Vibrio improved in the face of declining body mass as demonstrated by measurement of ash-free dry weight. Hypothermic stress only and acute osmotic insult did not promote Hsp70 expression and thermotolerance in Artemia larvae nor was resistance to Vibrio challenge augmented. The data support a causal link between Hsp70 accumulation induced by abiotic stress and enhanced resistance to infection by V. campbellii, perhaps via stimulation of the Artemia immune system. This possibility is now under investigation, and the work may reveal fundamental properties of crustacean immunity. Additionally, the findings are important in aquaculture where development of procedures to prevent bacterial infection of feed stock such as Artemia larvae is a priority. PMID:18347942

  17. Celastrol Analogs as Inducers of the Heat Shock Response. Design and Synthesis of Affinity Probes for the Identification of Protein Targets

    PubMed Central

    Klaić, Lada; Morimoto, Richard I.; Silverman, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    The natural product celastrol (1) possesses numerous beneficial therapeutic properties and affects numerous cellular pathways. The mechanism of action and cellular target(s) of celastrol, however, remain unresolved. While a number of studies have proposed that the activity of celastrol is mediated through reaction with cysteine residues, these observations have been based on studies with specific proteins or by in vitro analysis of a small fraction of the proteome. In this study, we have investigated the spatial and structural requirements of celastrol for the design of suitable affinity probes to identify cellular binding partners of celastrol. Although celastrol has several potential sites for modification, some of these were not synthetically amenable or yielded unstable analogs. Conversion of the carboxylic acid functionality to amides and long-chain analogs, however, yielded bioactive compounds that induced the heat shock response (HSR) and antioxidant response and inhibited Hsp90 activity. This led to the synthesis of biotinylated celastrols (23 and 24) that were used as affinity reagents in extracts of human Panc-1 cells to identify Annexin II, eEF1A, and β-tubulin as potential targets of celastrol. PMID:22380712

  18. Barcoding heat shock proteins to human diseases: looking beyond the heat shock response

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Vaishali; Meister-Broekema, Melanie; Minoia, Melania; Carra, Serena; Kampinga, Harm H.

    2014-01-01

    There are numerous human diseases that are associated with protein misfolding and the formation of toxic protein aggregates. Activating the heat shock response (HSR) – and thus generally restoring the disturbed protein homeostasis associated with such diseases – has often been suggested as a therapeutic strategy. However, most data on activating the HSR or its downstream targets in mouse models of diseases associated with aggregate formation have been rather disappointing. The human chaperonome consists of many more heat shock proteins (HSPs) that are not regulated by the HSR, however, and researchers are now focusing on these as potential therapeutic targets. In this Review, we summarize the existing literature on a set of aggregation diseases and propose that each of them can be characterized or ‘barcoded’ by a different set of HSPs that can rescue specific types of aggregation. Some of these ‘non-canonical’ HSPs have demonstrated effectiveness in vivo, in mouse models of protein-aggregation disease. Interestingly, several of these HSPs also cause diseases when mutated – so-called chaperonopathies – which are also discussed in this Review. PMID:24719117

  19. The small heat shock proteins family: the long forgotten chaperones.

    PubMed

    Garrido, C; Paul, C; Seigneuric, R; Kampinga, H H

    2012-10-01

    Small heat shock proteins are a rather heterogeneous family of ATP-independent chaperones, some of which have been proven to block protein aggregation and help the cells to survive stressful conditions. Although much less studied than high molecular weight HSPs like HSP70/HSPA or HSP90/HSPC, their implication in physio-pathological processes and human diseases is now well evidenced, as it will be discussed in the different reviews of this special issue. In this mini-review we will just present a general introduction about the small heat shock proteins family. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Small HSPs in physiology and pathology. PMID:22449631

  20. Synergistic Effects of Toxic Elements on Heat Shock Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mahmood, Qaisar; Irshad, Muhammad; Hussain, Jamshaid

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins show remarkable variations in their expression levels under a variety of toxic conditions. A research span expanded over five decades has revealed their molecular characterization, gene regulation, expression patterns, vast similarity in diverse groups, and broad range of functional capabilities. Their functions include protection and tolerance against cytotoxic conditions through their molecular chaperoning activity, maintaining cytoskeleton stability, and assisting in cell signaling. However, their role as biomarkers for monitoring the environmental risk assessment is controversial due to a number of conflicting, validating, and nonvalidating reports. The current knowledge regarding the interpretation of HSPs expression levels has been discussed in the present review. The candidature of heat shock proteins as biomarkers of toxicity is thus far unreliable due to synergistic effects of toxicants and other environmental factors. The adoption of heat shock proteins as “suit of biomarkers in a set of organisms” requires further investigation. PMID:25136596

  1. Synthesis and SAR study of 4-hydroxy-3-(2-hydroxynapthalene-1-yl)phenyl)-arylsulfonamides: Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors with submicromolar activity in an in vitro assay

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Thota; Thepchatri, Pahk; Li, Lian; Du, Yuhong; Fu, Haian; Snyder, James P.; Sun, Aiming

    2008-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 is emerging as an important target in cancer chemotherapy. In a program directed towards identifying novel chemical probes for Hsp90, we found 4-hydroxy-3-(2-hydroxynapthalene-1-yl)phenyl)benzene sulfonamide as an Hsp90 inhibitor with very weak activity. In this report we present a new and general method for the synthesis of variety of analogs around this scaffold and discuss their structure activity relationships. PMID:18762423

  2. HEAT SHOCK PROTEINS IN DIABETES AND WOUND HEALING

    PubMed Central

    Atalay, Mustafa; Oksala, Niku; Lappalainen, Jani; Laaksonen, David E.; Sen, Chandan K.; Roy, Sashwati

    2009-01-01

    The heat shock proteins (HSPs), originally identified as heat-inducible gene products, are a highly conserved family of proteins that respond to a wide variety of stress. Although HSPs are among the most abundant intracellular proteins, they are expressed at low levels under normal physiological conditions, and show marked induction in response to various stressors. HSPs function primarily as molecular chaperones, facilitating the folding of other cellular proteins, preventing protein aggregation, or targeting improperly folded proteins to specific pathways for degradation. By modulating inflammation, wound debris clearance, cell proliferation, migration and collagen synthesis, HSPs are essential for normal wound healing of the skin. In this review, our goal is to discuss the role and clinical implications of HSP with respect to skin wound healing and diabetes. The numerous defects in the function of HSPs associated with diabetes could contribute to the commonly observed complications and delayed wound healing in diabetics. Several physical, pharmacological and genetic approaches may be considered to address HSP-directed therapies both in the laboratory and in the clinics. PMID:19275675

  3. Expression of heat shock protein genes in insect stress responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The heat shock proteins (HSPs) that are abundantly expressed in insects are important modulators of insect survival. Expression of HSP genes in insects is not only developmentally regulated, but also induced by various stressors in order to confer protection against such stressors. The expression o...

  4. Protein disorder reduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to survive heat shock.

    PubMed

    Vicedo, Esmeralda; Gasik, Zofia; Dong, Yu-An; Goldberg, Tatyana; Rost, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments established that a culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) survives sudden high temperatures by specifically duplicating the entire chromosome III and two chromosomal fragments (from IV and XII). Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are not significantly over-abundant in the duplication. In contrast, we suggest a simple algorithm to " postdict " the experimental results: Find a small enough chromosome with minimal protein disorder and duplicate this region. This algorithm largely explains all observed duplications. In particular, all regions duplicated in the experiment reduced the overall content of protein disorder. The differential analysis of the functional makeup of the duplication remained inconclusive. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment suggested over-representation in processes related to reproduction and nutrient uptake. Analyzing the protein-protein interaction network (PPI) revealed that few network-central proteins were duplicated. The predictive hypothesis hinges upon the concept of reducing proteins with long regions of disorder in order to become less sensitive to heat shock attack. PMID:26673203

  5. The Role of Heat Shock Proteins in Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kliková, K; Pilchova, I; Stefanikova, A; Hatok, J; Dobrota, D; Racay, P

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) HSP27, HSP70 and HSP90 are molecular chaperones; their expression is increased after exposure of cells to conditions of environmental stress, including heat shock, heavy metals, oxidative stress, or pathologic conditions, such as ischemia, infection, and inflammation. Their protective function is to help the cell cope with lethal conditions. The HSPs are a class of proteins which, in normal cells, are responsible for maintaining homeostasis, interacting with diverse protein substrates to assist in their folding, and preventing the appearance of folding intermediates that lead to misfolded or damaged molecules. They have been shown to interact with different key apoptotic proteins and play a crucial role in regulating apoptosis. Several HSPs have been demonstrated to directly interact with various components of tightly regulated caspase-dependent programmed cell death. These proteins also affect caspase-independent apoptosis by interacting with apoptogenic factors. Heat shock proteins are aberrantly expressed in hematological malignancies. Because of their prognostic implications and functional role in leukemias, HSPs represent an interesting target for antileukemic therapy. This review will describe different molecules interacting with anti-apoptotic proteins HSP70 and HSP90, which can be used in cancer therapy based on their inhibition. PMID:26879061

  6. Heat shock inhibits. alpha. -amylase synthesis in barley aleurone without inhibiting the activity of endoplasmic reticulum marker enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Sticher, L.; Biswas, A.K.; Bush, D.S.; Jones, R.L. )

    1990-02-01

    The effects of heat shock on the synthesis of {alpha}-amylase and on the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone were studied. Heat shock, imposed by raising the temperature of incubation from 25{degree}C to 40{degree}C for 3 hours, inhibits the accumulation of {alpha}-amylase and other proteins in the incubation medium of barley aleurone layers treated with gibberellic acid and Ca{sup 2+}. When ER is isolated from heat-shocked aleurone layers, less newly synthesized {alpha}-amylase is found associated with this membrane system. ER membranes, as indicated by the activities of NADH cytochrome c reductase and ATP-dependent Ca{sup 2+} transport, are not destroyed by heat stress, however. Although heat shock did not reduce the activity of ER membrane marker enzymes, it altered the buoyant density of these membranes. Whereas ER from control tissue showed a peak of marker enzyme activity at 27% to 28% sucrose (1.113-1.120 grams per cubic centimeter), ER from heat-shocked tissue peaked at 30% to 32% sucrose (1.127-1.137 grams per cubic centimeter). The synthesis of a group of proteins designated as heat-shock proteins (HSPs) was stimulated by heat shock. These HSPs were localized to different compartments of the aleurone cell. Several proteins ranging from 15 to 30 kilodaltons were found in the ER and the mitochondrial/plasma membrane fractions of heat-shocked cells, but none of the HSPs accumulated in the incubation medium of heat-shocked aleurone layers.

  7. Detection of secreted and temporarily inducible heat shock responsive proteins in mouse testicular tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Lemaire, L.; Heinlein, U.A.O. )

    1991-01-01

    Temperature-induced effects on the synthesis of murine testicular proteins were investigated by one- and two-dimensional SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Newly synthesized proteins were monitored by incorporation of {sup 35}S-methionine and autoradiography. Three heat shock responsive proteins, which are differently affected by elevated temperatures, are described. These proteins represent special examples for how testicular cells respond to environmental stress. One of these proteins, HS136, is synthesized and secreted at 38{degree}C, whereas at lower, scrotal temperatures it is not detectable. HSID74 protein is synthesized at elevated temperatures, but only in prepuberal testis, not in adult. Synthesis of the third example, HSR28, is decreased within the seminiferous tubules, but only in those regions which bear cell associations of the elongation stage. These results indicate that the use of DNA probes of the heat shock-gene family might not be sufficient to describe the molecular reasons for impaired spermatogenesis following hyperthermia.

  8. Inhibition of Heat Shock Protein 90 Prevents HIV Rebound.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Pheroze; Maidji, Ekaterina; Stoddart, Cheryl A

    2016-05-01

    HIV evades eradication because transcriptionally dormant proviral genomes persist in long-lived reservoirs of resting CD4(+) T cells and myeloid cells, which are the source of viral rebound after cessation of antiretroviral therapy. Dormant HIV genomes readily produce infectious virus upon cellular activation because host transcription factors activated specifically by cell stress and heat shock mediate full-length HIV transcription. The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is overexpressed during heat shock and activates inducible cellular transcription factors. Here we show that heat shock accelerates HIV transcription through induction of Hsp90 activity, which activates essential HIV-specific cellular transcription factors (NF-κB, NFAT, and STAT5), and that inhibition of Hsp90 greatly reduces gene expression mediated by these factors. More importantly, we show that Hsp90 controls virus transcription in vivo by specific Hsp90 inhibitors in clinical development, tanespimycin (17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin) and AUY922, which durably prevented viral rebound in HIV-infected humanized NOD scid IL-2Rγ(-/-) bone marrow-liver-thymus mice up to 11 weeks after treatment cessation. Despite the absence of rebound viremia, we were able to recover infectious HIV from PBMC with heat shock. Replication-competent virus was detected in spleen cells from these nonviremic Hsp90 inhibitor-treated mice, indicating the presence of a tissue reservoir of persistent infection. Our novel findings provide in vivo evidence that inhibition of Hsp90 activity prevents HIV gene expression in replication-competent cellular reservoirs that would typically cause rebound in plasma viremia after antiretroviral therapy cessation. Alternating or supplementing Hsp90 inhibitors with current antiretroviral therapy regimens could conceivably suppress rebound viremia from persistent HIV reservoirs. PMID:26957545

  9. Inhibition of Heat Shock Protein 90 Prevents HIV Rebound*

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Pheroze; Maidji, Ekaterina; Stoddart, Cheryl A.

    2016-01-01

    HIV evades eradication because transcriptionally dormant proviral genomes persist in long-lived reservoirs of resting CD4+ T cells and myeloid cells, which are the source of viral rebound after cessation of antiretroviral therapy. Dormant HIV genomes readily produce infectious virus upon cellular activation because host transcription factors activated specifically by cell stress and heat shock mediate full-length HIV transcription. The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is overexpressed during heat shock and activates inducible cellular transcription factors. Here we show that heat shock accelerates HIV transcription through induction of Hsp90 activity, which activates essential HIV-specific cellular transcription factors (NF-κB, NFAT, and STAT5), and that inhibition of Hsp90 greatly reduces gene expression mediated by these factors. More importantly, we show that Hsp90 controls virus transcription in vivo by specific Hsp90 inhibitors in clinical development, tanespimycin (17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin) and AUY922, which durably prevented viral rebound in HIV-infected humanized NOD scid IL-2Rγ−/− bone marrow-liver-thymus mice up to 11 weeks after treatment cessation. Despite the absence of rebound viremia, we were able to recover infectious HIV from PBMC with heat shock. Replication-competent virus was detected in spleen cells from these nonviremic Hsp90 inhibitor-treated mice, indicating the presence of a tissue reservoir of persistent infection. Our novel findings provide in vivo evidence that inhibition of Hsp90 activity prevents HIV gene expression in replication-competent cellular reservoirs that would typically cause rebound in plasma viremia after antiretroviral therapy cessation. Alternating or supplementing Hsp90 inhibitors with current antiretroviral therapy regimens could conceivably suppress rebound viremia from persistent HIV reservoirs. PMID:26957545

  10. A Review of Acquired Thermotolerance, Heat Shock Proteins, and Molecular Chaperones in Archaea: Heat Shock in Archaea

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Trent, J. D.

    1996-02-09

    Acquired thermotolerance, the associated synthesis of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) under stress conditions, and the role of HSPs as molecular chaperones under normal growth conditions have been studied extensively in eukaryotes and bacteria, whereas research in these areas in archaea is only beginning. All organisms have evolved a variety of strategies for coping with high-temperature stress, and among these strategies is the increased synthesis of HSPs. The facts that both high temperatures and chemical stresses induce the HSPs and that some of the HSPs recognize and bind to unfolded proteins in vitro have led to the theory that the function of HSPs is to prevent protein aggregation in vivo. The facts that some HSPs are abundant under normal growth conditions and that they assist in protein folding in vitro have led to the theory that they assist protein folding in vivo; in this role, they are referred to as molecular chaperones. The limited research on acquired thermotolerance, HSPs, and molecular chaperones in archaea, particularly the hyperthermophilic archaea, suggests that these extremophiles provide a new perspective in these areas of research, both because they are members of a separate phylogenetic domain and because they have evolved to live under extreme conditions.

  11. Guidelines for the nomenclature of the human heat shock proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hageman, Jurre; Vos, Michel J.; Kubota, Hiroshi; Tanguay, Robert M.; Bruford, Elspeth A.; Cheetham, Michael E.; Chen, Bin; Hightower, Lawrence E.

    2008-01-01

    The expanding number of members in the various human heat shock protein (HSP) families and the inconsistencies in their nomenclature have often led to confusion. Here, we propose new guidelines for the nomenclature of the human HSP families, HSPH (HSP110), HSPC (HSP90), HSPA (HSP70), DNAJ (HSP40), and HSPB (small HSP) as well as for the human chaperonin families HSPD/E (HSP60/HSP10) and CCT (TRiC). The nomenclature is based largely on the more consistent nomenclature assigned by the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee and used in the National Center of Biotechnology Information Entrez Gene database for the heat shock genes. In addition to this nomenclature, we provide a list of the human Entrez Gene IDs and the corresponding Entrez Gene IDs for the mouse orthologs. PMID:18663603

  12. Crowding Activates Heat Shock Protein 90.

    PubMed

    Halpin, Jackson C; Huang, Bin; Sun, Ming; Street, Timothy O

    2016-03-18

    Hsp90 is a dimeric ATP-dependent chaperone involved in the folding, maturation, and activation of diverse target proteins. Extensive in vitro structural analysis has led to a working model of Hsp90's ATP-driven conformational cycle. An implicit assumption is that dilute experimental conditions do not significantly perturb Hsp90 structure and function. However, Hsp90 undergoes a dramatic open/closed conformational change, which raises the possibility that this assumption may not be valid for this chaperone. Indeed, here we show that the ATPase activity of Hsp90 is highly sensitive to molecular crowding, whereas the ATPase activities of Hsp60 and Hsp70 chaperones are insensitive to crowding conditions. Polymer crowders activate Hsp90 in a non-saturable manner, with increasing efficacy at increasing concentration. Crowders exhibit a non-linear relationship between their radius of gyration and the extent to which they activate Hsp90. This experimental relationship can be qualitatively recapitulated with simple structure-based volume calculations comparing open/closed configurations of Hsp90. Thermodynamic analysis indicates that crowding activation of Hsp90 is entropically driven, which is consistent with a model in which excluded volume provides a driving force that favors the closed active state of Hsp90. Multiple Hsp90 homologs are activated by crowders, with the endoplasmic reticulum-specific Hsp90, Grp94, exhibiting the highest sensitivity. Finally, we find that crowding activation works by a different mechanism than co-chaperone activation and that these mechanisms are independent. We hypothesize that Hsp90 has a higher intrinsic activity in the cell than in vitro. PMID:26797120

  13. Heat-shock Treatment-mediated Increase in Transduction by Recombinant Adeno-associated Virus 2 Vectors Is Independent of the Cellular Heat-shock Protein 90*

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Li; Qing, Keyun; Si, Yue; Chen, Linyuan; Tan, Mengqun; Srivastava, Arun

    2007-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV) vectors transduction efficiency varies greatly in different cell types. We have described that a cellular protein, FKBP52, in its phosphorylated form interacts with the D-sequence in the viral inverted terminal repeat, inhibits viral second strand DNA synthesis, and limits transgene expression. Here we investigated the role of cellular heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) in AAV transduction because FKBP52 forms a complex with HSP90, and because heat-shock treatment augments AAV transduction efficiency. Heat-shock treatment of HeLa cells resulted in tyrosine dephosphorylation of FKBP52, led to stabilization of the FKBP52-HSP90 complex, and resulted in ∼6-fold increase in AAV transduction. However, when HeLa cells were pre-treated with tyrphostin 23, a specific inhibitor of cellular epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase, which phosphorylates FKBP52 at tyrosine residues, heat-shock treatment resulted in a further 18-fold increase in AAV transduction. HSP90 was shown to be a part of the FKBP52-AAV D-sequence complex, but HSP90 by itself did not bind to the D-sequence. Geldanamycin treatment, which disrupts the HSP90-FKBP52 complex, resulted in >22-fold increase in AAV transduction in heat-shock-treated cells compared with heat shock alone. Deliberate overexpression of the human HSP90 gene resulted in a significant decrease in AAV-mediated transduction in tyrphostin 23-treated cells, whereas down-modulation of HSP90 levels led to a decrease in HSP90-FKBP52-AAV D-sequence complex formation, resulting in a significant increase in AAV transduction following pre-treatment with tyrphostin 23. These studies suggest that the observed increase in AAV transduction efficiency following heat-shock treatment is unlikely to be mediated by HSP90 alone and that increased levels of HSP90, in the absence of heat shock, facilitate binding of FKBP52 to the AAV D-sequence, thereby leading to inhibition of AAV-mediated transgene expression

  14. Complexity and Genetic Variability of Heat-Shock Protein Expression in Isolated Maize Microspores.

    PubMed Central

    Magnard, J. L.; Vergne, P.; Dumas, C.

    1996-01-01

    The expression of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) in isolated maize (Zea mays L.) microspores has been investigated using high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled to immunodetection and fluorography of in vivo synthesized proteins. To this end, homogeneous and viable populations of microspores have been purified in sufficient amounts for molecular analysis from plants grown in controlled conditions. Appropriate conditions for thermal stress application have been defined. The analysis revealed that isolated microspores from maize display a classical heat-shock response characterized by the repression of the normal protein synthesis and the expression of a set of HSPs. A high complexity of the response was demonstrated, with numerous different HSPs being resolved in each known major HSP molecular weight class. However, the extent of this heat-shock response is limited in that some of these HSPs do not accumulate at high levels following temperature elevation. Comparative analysis of the heat-shock responses of microspores isolated from five genotypes demonstrated high levels of genetic variability. Furthermore, many HSPs were detected in microspores at control temperature, indicating a possible involvement of these proteins in pollen development at stages close to first pollen mitosis. PMID:12226349

  15. Microinjection of ubiquitin: changes in protein degradation in HeLa cells subjected to heat-shock

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, N.; Rogers, S.; Rechsteiner, M.

    1987-03-01

    Ubiquitin was radiolabeled by reaction with /sup 125/I-Bolton-Hunter reagent and introduced into HeLa cells using erythrocyte-mediated microinjection. The injected cells were then incubated at 45 degrees C for 5 min (reversible heat-shock) or for 30 min (lethal heat-shock). After either treatment, there were dramatic changes in the levels of ubiquitin conjugates. Under normal culture conditions, approximately 10% of the injected ubiquitin is linked to histones, 40% is found in conjugates with molecular weights greater than 25,000, and the rest is unconjugated. After heat-shock, the free ubiquitin pool and the level of histone-ubiquitin conjugates decreased rapidly, and high molecular weight conjugates predominated. Formation of large conjugates did not require protein synthesis; when analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis, the major conjugates did not co-migrate with heat-shock proteins before or after thermal stress. Concomitant with the loss of free ubiquitin, the degradation of endogenous proteins, injected hemoglobin, BSA, and ubiquitin was reduced in heat-shocked HeLa cells. After reversible heat-shock, the decrease in proteolysis was small, and both the rate of proteolysis and the size of the free ubiquitin pool returned to control levels upon incubation at 37 degrees C. In contrast, neither proteolysis nor free ubiquitin pools returned to control levels after lethal heat-shock. However, lethally heat-shocked cells degraded denatured hemoglobin more rapidly than native hemoglobin and ubiquitin-globin conjugates formed within them. Therefore, stabilization of proteins after heat-shock cannot be due to the loss of ubiquitin conjugation or inability to degrade proteins that form conjugates with ubiquitin.

  16. Heat shock response improves heterologous protein secretion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jin; Osterlund, Tobias; Liu, Zihe; Petranovic, Dina; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-04-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used platform for the production of heterologous proteins of medical or industrial interest. However, heterologous protein productivity is often low due to limitations of the host strain. Heat shock response (HSR) is an inducible, global, cellular stress response, which facilitates the cell recovery from many forms of stress, e.g., heat stress. In S. cerevisiae, HSR is regulated mainly by the transcription factor heat shock factor (Hsf1p) and many of its targets are genes coding for molecular chaperones that promote protein folding and prevent the accumulation of mis-folded or aggregated proteins. In this work, we over-expressed a mutant HSF1 gene HSF1-R206S which can constitutively activate HSR, so the heat shock response was induced at different levels, and we studied the impact of HSR on heterologous protein secretion. We found that moderate and high level over-expression of HSF1-R206S increased heterologous α-amylase yield 25 and 70 % when glucose was fully consumed, and 37 and 62 % at the end of the ethanol phase, respectively. Moderate and high level over-expression also improved endogenous invertase yield 118 and 94 %, respectively. However, human insulin precursor was only improved slightly and this only by high level over-expression of HSF1-R206S, supporting our previous findings that the production of this protein in S. cerevisiae is not limited by secretion. Our results provide an effective strategy to improve protein secretion and demonstrated an approach that can induce ER and cytosolic chaperones simultaneously. PMID:23208612

  17. Heat Shock Proteins in Association with Heat Tolerance in Grasses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Zhan, Chenyang; Huang, Bingru

    2011-01-01

    The grass family Poaceae includes annual species cultivated as major grain crops and perennial species cultivated as forage or turf grasses. Heat stress is a primary factor limiting growth and productivity of cool-season grass species and is becoming a more significant problem in the context of global warming. Plants have developed various mechanisms in heat-stress adaptation, including changes in protein metabolism such as the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs). This paper summarizes the structure and function of major HSPs, recent research progress on the association of HSPs with grass tolerance to heat stress, and incorporation of HSPs in heat-tolerant grass breeding. PMID:22084689

  18. Heat shock protein 90 is required for sexual and asexual development, virulence, and heat shock response in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Bui, Duc-Cuong; Lee, Yoonji; Lim, Jae Yun; Fu, Minmin; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Choi, Gyung Ja; Son, Hokyoung; Lee, Yin-Won

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells repress global translation and selectively upregulate stress response proteins by altering multiple steps in gene expression. In this study, genome-wide transcriptome analysis of cellular adaptation to thermal stress was performed on the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum. The results revealed that profound alterations in gene expression were required for heat shock responses in F. graminearum. Among these proteins, heat shock protein 90 (FgHsp90) was revealed to play a central role in heat shock stress responses in this fungus. FgHsp90 was highly expressed and exclusively localised to nuclei in response to heat stress. Moreover, our comprehensive functional characterisation of FgHsp90 provides clear genetic evidence supporting its crucial roles in the vegetative growth, reproduction, and virulence of F. graminearum. In particular, FgHsp90 performs multiple functions as a transcriptional regulator of conidiation. Our findings provide new insight into the mechanisms underlying adaptation to heat shock and the roles of Hsp90 in fungal development. PMID:27306495

  19. Heat shock protein 90 is required for sexual and asexual development, virulence, and heat shock response in Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Duc-Cuong; Lee, Yoonji; Lim, Jae Yun; Fu, Minmin; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Choi, Gyung Ja; Son, Hokyoung; Lee, Yin-Won

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells repress global translation and selectively upregulate stress response proteins by altering multiple steps in gene expression. In this study, genome-wide transcriptome analysis of cellular adaptation to thermal stress was performed on the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum. The results revealed that profound alterations in gene expression were required for heat shock responses in F. graminearum. Among these proteins, heat shock protein 90 (FgHsp90) was revealed to play a central role in heat shock stress responses in this fungus. FgHsp90 was highly expressed and exclusively localised to nuclei in response to heat stress. Moreover, our comprehensive functional characterisation of FgHsp90 provides clear genetic evidence supporting its crucial roles in the vegetative growth, reproduction, and virulence of F. graminearum. In particular, FgHsp90 performs multiple functions as a transcriptional regulator of conidiation. Our findings provide new insight into the mechanisms underlying adaptation to heat shock and the roles of Hsp90 in fungal development. PMID:27306495

  20. The Molecular Evolution of the Small Heat-Shock Proteins in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Waters, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    The small heat-shock proteins have undergone a tremendous diversification in plants; whereas only a single small heat-shock protein is found in fungi and many animals, over 20 different small heat-shock proteins are found in higher plants. The small heat-shock proteins in plants have diversified in both sequence and cellular localization and are encoded by at least five gene families. In this study, 44 small heat-shock protein DNA and amino acid sequences were examined, using both phylogenetic analysis and analysis of nucleotide substitution patterns to elucidate the evolutionary history of the small heat-shock proteins. The phylogenetic relationships of the small heat-shock proteins, estimated using parsimony and distance methods, reveal that gene duplication, sequence divergence and gene conversion have all played a role in the evolution of the small heat-shock proteins. Analysis of nonsynonymous substitutions and conservative and radical replacement substitutions (in relation to hydrophobicity) indicates that the small heat-shock protein gene families are evolving at different rates. This suggests that the small heat-shock proteins may have diversified in function as well as in sequence and cellular localization. PMID:8647410

  1. Inhibition of Heat Shock Induction of Heat Shock Protein 70 and Enhancement of Heat Shock Protein 27 Phosphorylation by Quercetin Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongsheng E.; Kao, Jeffrey L.-F.; Hilliard, Carolyn A.; Pandita, Raj K.; Roti, Joseph L. Roti; Hunt, Clayton R.; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of heat-induced heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)a expression have the potential to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of heat induced radiosensitization of tumors. Among known small molecule inhibitors, quercetin has the advantage of being easily modified for structure-activity studies. Herein, we report the ability of five mono-methyl and five carbomethoxymethyl derivatives of quercetin to inhibit heat-induced HSP70 expression and enhance HSP27 phosphorylation in human cells. While quercetin and several derivatives inhibit HSP70 induction and enhance HSP27 phosphorylation at Ser78, other analogs selectively inhibit HSP70 induction without enhancing HSP27 phosphorylation that would otherwise aid in cell survival. We also show that good inhibitors of HSP70 induction are also good inhibitors of both CK2 and CamKII, kinases that are known to activate HSP70 expression by phosphorylation of heat shock transcription factor 1. Derivatives that show poor inhibition of either or both kinases are not good inhibitors of HSP70 induction, suggesting that quercetin’s effectiveness is due to its ability to inhibit both kinases. PMID:19296652

  2. Heat shock proteins and the heat shock response during hyperthermia and its modulation by altered physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Michal; Robinson, Sharon D M

    2007-01-01

    The fundamental functions of heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperoning and cellular repair. There is little literature on the association between the numerous functions of HSPs and systemic integrative responses, particularly those controlled by the central nervous system. This chapter focuses on the role played by members of the HSP70 superfamily, universally recognized as cytoprotectants during heat stress, within the physiological context of hyperthermia and with its superimposition on situations of chronic stress. In the nucleus tractus solitarius, HSP70 levels enhance the sensitivity of sympathetic and parasympathetic arms of the autonomic nervous system to attenuate heat stroke-induced cerebral ischemia and hypotension. Chronic stressors that alter the heat shock response may affect the physiological profile during hyperthermic conditions. Upon aging, significantly lower HSP70 production is noted in the ventral paraventricular and lateral magnocellular nuclei. Likewise, results from cultured cells suggest that the age-related decline in HSP70 expression is constitutive and is due to decreased binding of the heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) to the heat shock element (HSE) and diminished HSP70 transcription. These changes may be associated with decreased thermotolerance upon aging, although HSP70 production in response to other stressors is not affected. Heat acclimation (AC), in contrast, increases tissue reserves of HSP70 and accelerates the heat shock response. AC protects epithelial integrity, vascular reactivity and interactions with cellular signaling networks, enhancing protection and delaying thermal injury. The link between HSP70 and the immune system is discussed with respect to exercise. Exercise enhances the immune response via production of HSP72 in central and peripheral structures. At least in part, the effects of HSP72 in the brain are mediated via eHSP72-circulating HSPs providing a "danger signal" to activate the immune response. In

  3. Synthesis and Evaluation of a Novel Deguelin Derivative, L80, which Disrupts ATP Binding to the C-terminal Domain of Heat Shock Protein 90.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Chan; Min, Hye-Young; Choi, Hoon; Kim, Ho Shin; Kim, Kyong-Cheol; Park, So-Jung; Seong, Myeong A; Seo, Ji Hae; Park, Hyun-Ju; Suh, Young-Ger; Kim, Kyu-Won; Hong, Hyun-Seok; Kim, Hee; Lee, Min-Young; Lee, Jeewoo; Lee, Ho-Young

    2015-08-01

    The clinical benefit of current anticancer regimens for lung cancer therapy is still limited due to moderate efficacy, drug resistance, and recurrence. Therefore, the development of effective anticancer drugs for first-line therapy and for optimal second-line treatment is necessary. Because the 90-kDa molecular chaperone heat shock protein (Hsp90) contributes to the maturation of numerous mutated or overexpressed oncogenic proteins, targeting Hsp90 may offer an effective anticancer therapy. Here, we investigated antitumor activities and toxicity of a novel deguelin-derived C-terminal Hsp90 inhibitor, designated L80. L80 displayed significant inhibitory effects on the viability, colony formation, angiogenesis-stimulating activity, migration, and invasion of a panel of non-small cell lung cancer cell lines and their sublines with acquired resistance to paclitaxel with minimal toxicity to normal lung epithelial cells, hippocampal cells, vascular endothelial cells, and ocular cells. Biochemical analyses and molecular docking simulation revealed that L80 disrupted Hsp90 function by binding to the C-terminal ATP-binding pocket of Hsp90, leading to the disruption of the interaction between hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and Hsp90, downregulation of HIF-1α and its target genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2), and decreased the expression of various Hsp90 client proteins. Consistent with these in vitro findings, L80 exhibited significant antitumor and antiangiogenic activities in H1299 xenograft tumors. These results suggest that L80 represents a novel C-terminal Hsp90 inhibitor with effective anticancer activities with minimal toxicities. PMID:25976766

  4. A heat shock protein 90 β isoform involved in immune response to bacteria challenge and heat shock from Miichthys miiuy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tao; Gao, Yunhang; Wang, Rixin; Xu, Tianjun

    2013-08-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is highly conserved molecular chaperone that plays a critical role in cellular stress response. In this study, we reported the identification and functional analysis of a heat shock protein 90 gene from miiuy croaker (designated Mimi-HSP90). Mimi-HSP90 contained five conserved HSP90 protein family signatures and shared 89.6%-99.5% similarity with other known HSP90 β isoform. Homology analysis and structure comparison further indicated that Mimi-HSP90 should be β isoform member of the HSP90 family. The molecular evolutionary analysis showed that HSP90 was under an overall strong purifying select pressure among fish species. Mimi-HSP90 gene was constitutively expressed in ten examined tissues, and the expression level of liver was higher than in other tissues. The expression level of Mimi-HSP90 gene under bacterial infection and heat shock were analyzed by real-time quantitative RT-PCR, resulted in significant changes in liver, spleen, and kidney tissues. The purified recombinant pET-HSP90 protein was used to produce the polyclonal antibody in mice. The specificity of the antibody was determined by Western blot analysis. All results suggested that Mimi-HSP90 was involved in thermal stress and immune response in miiuy croaker. PMID:23684810

  5. Heat Shock Protein 70: Roles in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mansilla, María José; Montalban, Xavier; Espejo, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) have long been considered intracellular chaperones that possess housekeeping and cytoprotective functions. Consequently, HSP overexpression was proposed as a potential therapy for neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the accumulation or aggregation of abnormal proteins. Recently, the discovery that cells release HSP with the capacity to trigger proinflammatory as well as immunoregulatory responses has focused attention on investigating the role of HSP in chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). To date, the most relevant HSP is the inducible Hsp70, which exhibits both cytoprotectant and immunoregulatory functions. Several studies have presented contradictory evidence concerning the involvement of Hsp70 in MS or experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the MS animal model. In this review, we dissect the functions of Hsp70 and discuss the controversial data concerning the role of Hsp70 in MS and EAE. PMID:22669475

  6. Small Heat Shock Proteins Can Release Light Dependence of Tobacco Seed during Germination1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hyun Jo; Park, Soo Min; Kim, Keun Pill; Suh, Mi Chung; Lee, Mi Ok; Lee, Seong-Kon; Xinli, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) function as ATP-independent molecular chaperones, and although the production and function of sHSPs have often been described under heat stress, the expression and function of sHSPs in fundamental developmental processes, such as pollen and seed development, have also been confirmed. Seed germination involves the breaking of dormancy and the resumption of embryo growth that accompany global changes in transcription, translation, and metabolism. In many plants, germination is triggered simply by imbibition of water; however, different seeds require different conditions in addition to water. For small-seeded plants, like Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), light is an important regulator of seed germination. The facts that sHSPs accumulate during seed development, sHSPs interact with various client proteins, and seed germination accompanies synthesis and/or activation of diverse proteins led us to investigate the role of sHSPs in seed germination, especially in the context of light dependence. In this study, we have built transgenic tobacco plants that ectopically express sHSP, and the effect was germination of the seeds in the dark. Administering heat shock to the seeds also resulted in the alleviation of light dependence during seed germination. Subcellular localization of ectopically expressed sHSP was mainly observed in the cytoplasm, whereas heat shock-induced sHSPs were transported to the nucleus. We hypothesize that ectopically expressed sHSPs in the cytoplasm led the status of cytoplasmic proteins involved in seed germination to function during germination without additional stimulus and that heat shock can be another signal that induces seed germination. PMID:25604531

  7. Involvement of heat shock protein 47 in Schistosoma japonicum-induced hepatic fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jia-Quan; Tao, Ran; Li, Lan; Ma, Ke; Xu, Lei; Ai, Guo; Fan, Xiang-Xue; Jiao, Yun-Tao; Ning, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Chronic infection with the blood fluke Schistosoma japonicum is associated with both liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. Previously, heat shock protein 47, a collagen-specific molecular chaperone, was shown to play a critical role in the maturation of procollagen. However, less is known about the role of heat shock protein 47 in S. japonicum-induced hepatic fibrosis. We therefore investigated the expression of heat shock protein 47 in S. japonicum-induced liver fibrosis and attempted to determine whether inhibition of heat shock protein 47 could have beneficial effects on fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we found that the expression of heat shock protein 47 was significantly increased in patients with Schistosoma-induced fibrosis, as well as in rodent models. Immunohistochemistry revealed heat shock protein 47-positive cells were found in the periphery of egg granulomas. Administration of heat shock protein 47-targeted short hairpin (sh)RNA remarkably reduced heat shock protein 47 expression and collagen deposition in NIH3T3 cells and liver tissue of S. japonicum-infected mice. Life-table analysis revealed a dose-dependent prolongation of survival rates with the treatment of heat shock protein 47-shRNA in murine fibrosis models. Moreover, serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate transaminase activity, splenomegaly, spleen weight index and portal hypertension were also measured, which showed improvement with the anti-fibrosis treatment. The fibrosis-related parameters assessed were expressions of Col1a1, Col3a1, TGF-β1, CTGF, IL-13, IL-17, MMP-9, TIMP-1 and PAI-1 in the liver. This study demonstrated that heat shock protein 47-targeted shRNA directly reduced collagen production of mouse liver fibrosis associated with S. japonicum. We conclude that heat shock protein 47 plays an essential role in S. japonicum-induced hepatic fibrosis in mice and may be a potential target for ameliorating the hepatic fibrosis caused by this parasite. PMID:24295791

  8. Heat Shock Protein 90 regulates encystation in Entamoeba

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Meetali; Sharma, Shalini; Bhattacharya, Alok; Tatu, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    Enteric protozoan Entamoeba histolytica is a major cause of debilitating diarrheal infection worldwide with high morbidity and mortality. Even though the clinical burden of this parasite is very high, this infection is categorized as a neglected disease. Parasite is transmitted through feco-oral route and exhibit two distinct stages namely – trophozoites and cysts. Mechanism and regulation of encystation is not clearly understood. Previous studies have established the role of Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) in regulating stage transition in various protozoan parasites like Giardia, Plasmodium, Leishmania, and Toxoplasma. Our study for the first time reports that Hsp90 plays a crucial role in life cycle of Entamoeba as well. We identify Hsp90 to be a negative regulator of encystation in Entamoeba. We also show that Hsp90 inhibition interferes with the process of phagocytosis in Entamoeba. Overall, we show that Hsp90 plays an important role in virulence and transmission of Entamoeba. PMID:26528271

  9. Immunity to heat shock proteins and arthritic disorders.

    PubMed Central

    van Eden, W

    1999-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) is a frequently used model of experimental arthritis. Because of its histopathology, which is reminiscent of rheumatoid arthritis in humans, AA is used as a model for the development of novel anti-inflammatory drugs. Recently, it has become evident that AA is a typical T-cell-mediated autoimmune condition. Therefore, novel immunotherapies targeted to T cells can be developed in this model. Analysis of responding T cells in AA have now led to the definition of various antigens with potential relevance to arthritis, including human arthritic conditions. One such antigen defined in AA is the 60kD heat shock protein. Both T-cell vaccination approaches and active antigen immunizations and antigen toleration approaches have turned out to be effective in suppressing AA. PMID:10231009

  10. Heat Shock Proteins Promote Cancer: It's a Protection Racket.

    PubMed

    Calderwood, Stuart K; Gong, Jianlin

    2016-04-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) are expressed at high levels in cancer and form a fostering environment that is essential for tumor development. Here, we review the recent data in this area, concentrating mainly on Hsp27, Hsp70, and Hsp90. The overriding role of HSPs in cancer is to stabilize the active functions of overexpressed and mutated cancer genes. Thus, elevated HSPs are required for many of the traits that underlie the morbidity of cancer, including increased growth, survival, and formation of secondary cancers. In addition, HSPs participate in the evolution of cancer treatment resistance. HSPs are also released from cancer cells and influence malignant properties by receptor-mediated signaling. Current data strongly support efforts to target HSPs in cancer treatment. PMID:26874923

  11. Heat shock proteins: possible biomarkers in pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Seema D; Jain, Ruchika K; Gaherwar, Hari M; Purohit, Hemant J; Taori, Girdhar M; Daginawala, Hatim F; Kashyap, Rajpal S

    2014-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) and Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) continue to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Therefore there is a need to explore potential biomarkers and heat shock proteins [Hsp(s)] could be one such candidate. We found that host (Hsp 25, Hsp 60, Hsp 70 and Hsp 90) and MTB Hsp(s) (Hsp 16, Hsp 65 and Hsp 71) to be an important feature of the immune response in human clinical samples of pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB patients and in MTB infected monocytes. Notably, the host (Hsp 25, Hsp 70 and Hsp 90) and MTB (Hsp 16, Hsp 65 and Hsp 71) Hsp(s) increases significantly in the clinical samples as well as in cell line model after TB infection. Collectively, results revealed that alteration in immune response leads to a change in the both host and MTB Hsp profile, highlighting them as possible biomarkers for the disease. PMID:24269695

  12. Modification of tooth development by heat shock protein 60.

    PubMed

    Papp, Tamas; Polyak, Angela; Papp, Krisztina; Meszar, Zoltan; Zakany, Roza; Meszar-Katona, Eva; Tünde, Palne Terdik; Ham, Chang Hwa; Felszeghy, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    Although several heat shock proteins have been investigated in relation to tooth development, no available information is available about the spatial and temporal expression pattern of heat shock protein 60 (Hsp 60). To characterize Hsp 60 expression in the structures of the developing tooth germ, we used Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Hsp 60 was present in high amounts in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, enamel knot (EK) and stratum intermedium (SI). Hsp 60 also appeared in odontoblasts beginning in the bell stage. To obtain data on the possible effect of Hsp 60 on isolated lower incisors from mice, we performed in vitro culturing. To investigate the effect of exogenous Hsp 60 on the cell cycle during culturing, we used the 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation test on dental cells. Exogenously administered Hsp 60 caused bluntness at the apical part of the 16.5-day-old tooth germs, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of dental cells. We identified the expression of Hsp 60 in the developing tooth germ, which was present in high concentrations in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, EK, SI and odontoblasts. High concentration of exogenous Hsp 60 can cause abnormal morphology of the tooth germ, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of the dental cells. Our results suggest that increased levels of Hsp 60 may cause abnormalities in the morphological development of the tooth germ and support the data on the significance of Hsp during the developmental processes. PMID:27025262

  13. Modification of tooth development by heat shock protein 60

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Tamas; Polyak, Angela; Papp, Krisztina; Meszar, Zoltan; Zakany, Roza; Meszar-Katona, Eva; Tünde, Palne Terdik; Ham, Chang Hwa; Felszeghy, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    Although several heat shock proteins have been investigated in relation to tooth development, no available information is available about the spatial and temporal expression pattern of heat shock protein 60 (Hsp 60). To characterize Hsp 60 expression in the structures of the developing tooth germ, we used Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Hsp 60 was present in high amounts in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, enamel knot (EK) and stratum intermedium (SI). Hsp 60 also appeared in odontoblasts beginning in the bell stage. To obtain data on the possible effect of Hsp 60 on isolated lower incisors from mice, we performed in vitro culturing. To investigate the effect of exogenous Hsp 60 on the cell cycle during culturing, we used the 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation test on dental cells. Exogenously administered Hsp 60 caused bluntness at the apical part of the 16.5-day-old tooth germs, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of dental cells. We identified the expression of Hsp 60 in the developing tooth germ, which was present in high concentrations in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, EK, SI and odontoblasts. High concentration of exogenous Hsp 60 can cause abnormal morphology of the tooth germ, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of the dental cells. Our results suggest that increased levels of Hsp 60 may cause abnormalities in the morphological development of the tooth germ and support the data on the significance of Hsp during the developmental processes. PMID:27025262

  14. Characterization of the 70,000 dalton heat shock proteins of Euglena gracilis

    SciTech Connect

    Leustek, T.; Amir-Shapira, D.; Dalie, B.; Weissbach, H.; Brot, N. ); Welch, W. )

    1989-04-01

    The heat shock response of Euglena gracilis was studied and the proteins synthesized were identified. Cells were pulse-labeled with ({sup 35}S) sulfate at 21{degrees}C or 36{degrees}C and the proteins synthesized were analyzed by acrylamide gel analysis. The rate of synthesis of at least 4 major and 6 minor polypeptides, ranging from 25 Kd to 116 Kd increased in both light and dark grown cultures. Two polypeptides, 68 Kd and 69 Kd, were found to cross-react by immunoblot analysis with monoclonal antibodies raised against human 72 and 73 Kd heat shock proteins. Both the 68 Kd and 69 Kd proteins were expressed at 21{degrees}C; however, the synthesis of only the 68 Kd protein increased at 36{degrees}C. The 68 Kd heat inducible protein was present in the cytoplasm and nucleus, but not the chloroplast, in cells grown at 21{degrees}C or exposed to 36{degrees}C. Both 68 Kd and 69 Kd proteins copurified during ATP-agarose affinity chromatography. Preliminary evidence indicates that the 68 Kd protein is phosphorylated in the presence of Ca{sup ++} and these proteins exhibit ATPase activity.

  15. Urease-associated heat shock protein of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D J; Evans, D G; Engstrand, L; Graham, D Y

    1992-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori urease is an extracellular, cell-bound enzyme with a molecular weight of approximately 600,000 (600K enzyme) comprising six 66K and six 31K subunits. A 62K protein is closely associated with the H. pylori urease, both in crude preparations and after gel filtration; this protein can be removed from the urease by ion-exchange chromatography without inactivating the enzyme. We purified this urease-associated protein and determined its N-terminal amino acid sequence. The sequence is 80% homologous (identical plus conserved amino acid residues) to the Escherichia coli GroEL heat shock protein (HSP), 75% homologous to the human homolog, and 84% homologous to the HSP homolog found in species of Chlamydia. Thus, the 62K urease-associated protein of H. pylori belongs to the HSP60 family of stress proteins known as chaperonins. Evidently this protein, HSP62, participates in the extracellular assembly and/or protection of the urease against inactivation in the hostile environment of the stomach. Images PMID:1348725

  16. The Hexameric Structures of Human Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Chung; Lin, Ta-Wei; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Wang, Andrew H.-J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The human 90-kDa heat shock protein (HSP90) functions as a dimeric molecular chaperone. HSP90 identified on the cell surface has been found to play a crucial role in cancer invasion and metastasis, and has become a validated anti-cancer target for drug development. It has been shown to self-assemble into oligomers upon heat shock or divalent cations treatment, but the functional role of the oligomeric states in the chaperone cycle is not fully understood. Principal Findings Here we report the crystal structure of a truncated HSP90 that contains the middle segment and the carboxy-terminal domain, termed MC-HSP90. The structure reveals an architecture with triangular bipyramid geometry, in which the building block of the hexameric assembly is a dimer. In solution, MC-HSP90 exists in three major oligomer states, namely dimer, tetramer and hexamer, which were elucidated by size exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation. The newly discovered HSP90 isoform HSP90N that lacks the N-terminal ATPase domain also exhibited similar oligomerization states as did MC-HSP90. Conclusions While lacking the ATPase domain, both MC-HSP90 and HSP90N can self-assemble into a hexameric structure, spontaneously. The crystal structure of MC-HSP90 reveals that, in addition to the C-terminal dimerization domain, the residue W320 in the M domain plays a critical role in its oligomerization. This study not only demonstrates how the human MC-HSP90 forms a hexamer, but also justifies the similar formation of HSP90N by using 3D modeling analysis. PMID:21647436

  17. Heat Shock Proteins: Cellular and molecular mechanisms in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Stetler, R. Anne; Gan, Yu; Zhang, Wenting; Liou, Anthony K.; Gao, Yanqin; Cao, Guodong; Chen, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Emerging evidence describe heat shock proteins (HSPs) as critical regulators in normal neural physiological function as well as in cell stress responses. The functions of HSPs represent an enormous and diverse range of cellular activities, far beyond the originally identified role in protein folding and chaperoning. Now understood to be involved in processes such as synaptic transmission, autophagy, ER stress response, protein kinase and cell death signaling as well as protein chaperone and folding, manipulation of HSPs have robust effects on the fate of cells in neurological injury and disease states. The ongoing exploration of multiple HSP superfamilies has underscored the pluripotent nature of HSPs in the cellular context, and demanded the recent restructuring of the nomenclature referring to these families to reflect a re-organization based on structure and function. In keeping with this re-organization, we have first discussed the HSP superfamilies in terms of protein structure, regulation and expression and distribution in the brain. We then explore major cellular functions of HSPs that are relevant to neural physiological states, and from there discuss known and proposed HSP impact on major neurological disease states. This review article presents a three-part discussion on the array of HSPs families relevant to neuronal tissue, their cellular functions, and the exploration of therapeutic targets of these proteins in the context of neurological diseases. PMID:20685377

  18. Associations between heat shock protein 70 genetic polymorphisms and calving traits in crossbred Brahman cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stressors such as heat, cold, toxins, and oxygen deprivation are known to induce heat shock proteins. Genetic polymorphisms associated with heat shock protein genes have been associated with decreased male and female fertility. Our objectives were to 1) confirm single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) ...

  19. Exercise-induced ROS in heat shock proteins response.

    PubMed

    Dimauro, Ivan; Mercatelli, Neri; Caporossi, Daniela

    2016-09-01

    Cells have evolved multiple and sophisticated stress response mechanisms aiming to prevent macromolecular (including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids) damage and to maintain or re-establish cellular homeostasis. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are among the most highly conserved, ubiquitous, and abundant proteins in all organisms. Originally discovered more than 50 years ago through heat shock stress, they display multiple, remarkable roles inside and outside cells under a variety of stresses, including also oxidative stress and radiation, recognizing unfolded or misfolded proteins and facilitating their restructuring. Exercise consists in a combination of physiological stresses, such as metabolic disturbances, changes in circulating levels of hormones, increased temperature, induction of mild to severe inflammatory state, increased production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS). As a consequence, exercise is one of the main stimuli associated with a robust increase in different HSPs in several tissues, which appears to be also fundamental in facilitating the cellular remodeling processes related to the training regime. Among all factors involved in the exercise-related modulation of HSPs level, the ROS production in the contracting muscle or in other tissues represents one of the most attracting, but still under discussion, mechanism. Following exhaustive or damaging muscle exercise, major oxidative damage to proteins and lipids is likely involved in HSP expression, together with mechanically induced damage to muscle proteins and the inflammatory response occurring several days into the recovery period. Instead, the transient and reversible oxidation of proteins by physiological concentrations of ROS seems to be involved in the activation of stress response following non-damaging muscle exercise. This review aims to provide a critical update on the role of HSPs response in exercise-induced adaptation or damage in humans, focusing on experimental

  20. Induction of mycobacterial proteins during phagocytosis and heat shock: a time interval analysis.

    PubMed

    Alavi, M R; Affronti, L F

    1994-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis survives macrophage bactericidal activities by mechanisms that may include induction of stress proteins. We sought to determine whether the synthesis of any mycobacterial proteins is increased during phagocytosis and whether any of these proteins are also up-regulated during heat shock. Protein synthesis by M. tuberculosis H37Ra during phagocytosis by the mouse macrophage cell line IC-21, and during heat shock at 45 and 48 degrees C, was monitored at various time intervals using 35S-labeled methionine/cysteine and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Our data suggest the existence of certain common elements in the stress response of mycobacteria to the three stress stimuli. This apparent similarity was best characterized by the up-regulation of a 25-kDa protein after exposure to each of the stress conditions. Furthermore, this 25-kDa protein and a 37-kDa protein that was also synthesized during phagocytosis appeared to be extracellular because they were preferentially solubilized when infected macrophages were lysed with 0.5% NP-40. PMID:8182341

  1. Molecular chaperones and heat shock proteins in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingbo; Metzler, Bernhard; Jahangiri, Marjan

    2012-01-01

    In response to stress stimuli, mammalian cells activate an ancient signaling pathway leading to the transient expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs). HSPs are a family of proteins serving as molecular chaperones that prevent the formation of nonspecific protein aggregates and assist proteins in the acquisition of their native structures. Physiologically, HSPs play a protective role in the homeostasis of the vessel wall but have an impact on immunoinflammatory processes in pathological conditions involved in the development of atherosclerosis. For instance, some members of HSPs have been shown to have immunoregulatory properties and modification of innate and adaptive response to HSPs, and can protect the vessel wall from the disease. On the other hand, a high degree of sequence homology between microbial and mammalian HSPs, due to evolutionary conservation, carries a risk of misdirected autoimmunity against HSPs expressed on the stressed cells of vascular endothelium. Furthermore, HSPs and anti-HSP antibodies have been shown to elicit production of proinflammatory cytokines. Potential therapeutic use of HSP in prevention of atherosclerosis involves achieving optimal balance between protective and immunogenic effects of HSPs and in the progress of research on vaccination. In this review, we update the progress of studies on HSPs and the integrity of the vessel wall, discuss the mechanism by which HSPs exert their role in the disease development, and highlight the potential clinic translation in the research field. PMID:22058161

  2. Involvement of heat shock proteins in gluten-sensitive enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sziksz, Erna; Pap, Domonkos; Veres, Gábor; Fekete, Andrea; Tulassay, Tivadar; Vannay, Ádám

    2014-01-01

    Gluten-sensitive enteropathy, also known as coeliac disease (CD), is an autoimmune disorder occurring in genetically susceptible individuals that damages the small intestine and interferes with the absorption of other nutrients. As it is triggered by dietary gluten and related prolamins present in wheat, rye and barley, the accepted treatment for CD is a strict gluten-free diet. However, a complete exclusion of gluten-containing cereals from the diet is often difficult, and new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. A class of proteins that have already emerged as drug targets for other autoimmune diseases are the heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are highly conserved stress-induced chaperones that protect cells against harmful extracellular factors. HSPs are expressed in several tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract, and their levels are significantly increased under stress circumstances. HSPs exert immunomodulatory effects, and also play a crucial role in the maintenance of epithelial cell structure and function, as they are responsible for adequate protein folding, influence the degradation of proteins and cell repair processes after damage, and modulate cell signalling, cell proliferation and apoptosis. The present review discusses the involvement of HSPs in the pathophysiology of CD. Furthermore, HSPs may represent a useful therapeutic target for the treatment of CD due to the cytoprotective, immunomodulatory, and anti-apoptotic effects in the intestinal mucosal barrier. PMID:24914370

  3. Constitutive heat shock protein 70 (HSC70) expression in rainbow trout hepatocytes: effect of heat shock and heavy metal exposure.

    PubMed

    Boone, Adrienne N; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2002-06-01

    The 70-kDa family of heat shock proteins plays an important role as molecular chaperones in unstressed and stressed cells. The constitutive member of the 70 family (hsc70) is crucial for the chaperoning function of unstressed cells, whereas the inducible form (hsp70) is important for allowing cells to cope with acute stressor insult, especially those affecting the protein machinery. In fish, the role of hsc70 in the cellular stress response process is less clear primarily because of the lack of a fish-specific antibody for hsc70 detection. In this study, we purified hsc70 to homogeneity from trout liver using a three-step purification protocol with differential centrifugation, ATP-agarose affinity chromatography and electroelution. Polyclonal antibodies to trout hsc70 generated in rabbits cross-reacted strongly with both purified trout hsc70 protein and also purified recombinant bovine hsc70. Two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by Western blotting confirmed that the isoelectric point of rainbow trout hsc70 was more acidic than hsp70. Using this antibody, we detected hsc70 content in the liver, heart, gill and skeletal muscle of unstressed rainbow trout. Primary cultures of trout hepatocytes subjected to a heat shock (+15 degrees C for 1 h) or exposed to either CuSO(4) (200 microM for 24 h), CdCl(2) (10 microM for 24 h) or NaAsO(2) (50 microM for 1 h) resulted in higher hsp70 accumulation over a 24-h period. However, hsc70 content showed no change with either heat shock or heavy metal exposure suggesting that hsc70 is not modulated by sublethal acute stressors in trout hepatocytes. Taken together, we have for the first time generated polyclonal antibodies specific to rainbow trout hsc70 and this antibody will allow for the characterization of the role of hsc70 in the cellular stress response process in fish. PMID:12106899

  4. EXTRACELLULAR HEAT SHOCK PROTEINS: A NEW LOCATION, A NEW FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    De Maio, Antonio; Vazquez, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The expression of heat shock proteins (hsp) is a basic and well conserved cellular response to an array of stresses. These proteins are involved in the repair of cellular damage induced by the stress, which is necessary for the salutary resolution from the insult. Moreover, they confer protection from subsequent insults, which has been coined stress tolerance. Since these proteins are expressed in subcellular compartments, it was thought that their function during stress conditions was circumscribed to the intracellular environment. However, it is now well established that hsp can also be present outside cells where they appear to display a function different than the well understood chaperone role. Extracellular hsp act as alert stress signals priming other cells, particularly of the immune system, to avoid the propagation of the insult and favor resolution. Since the majority of hsp do not possess a secretory peptide signal, they are likely be exported by a non-classical secretory pathway. Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the export of hsp, including translocation across the plasma membrane and release associated with lipid vesicles, as well as the passive release after cell death by necrosis. Extracellular hsp appear in various flavors, including membrane-bound and membrane-free forms. All of these variants of extracellular hsp suggest that their interactions with cells may be quite diverse, both in target cell types and the activation signaling pathways. This review addresses some of our current knowledge about the release and relevance of extracellular hsp. PMID:23807250

  5. Facets of heat shock protein 70 show immunotherapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Todryk, Stephen M; Gough, Michael J; Pockley, A Graham

    2003-01-01

    Amongst the families of intracellular molecules that chaperone and assist with the trafficking of other proteins, notably during conditions of cellular stress, heat shock protein (hsp) 70 is one of the most studied. Although its name suggests that expression is exclusively induced during cellular hyperthermia, members of the hsp70 family of proteins can be constitutively expressed and/or induced by a range of other cellular insults. The ubiquitous presence of hsp70 in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, combined with its high degree of sequence homology and intrinsic immunogenicity, have prompted the suggestion that inappropriate immune reactivity to hsp70 might lead to pro-inflammatory responses and the development of autoimmune disease. Indeed, hsp70 has been shown to be a potent activator of innate immunity and aberrant expression of hsp70 in certain organs promotes immunopathology. However, studies also suggest that hsp70 might have immunotherapeutic potential, as hsp70 purified from malignant and virally infected cells can transfer and deliver antigenic peptides to antigen-presenting cells to elicit peptide-specific immunity and, in contrast to its reported pro-inflammatory effects, the administration of recombinant hsp70 can attenuate experimental autoimmune disease. This review focuses on the immunoregulatory capacity of hsp70 and its potential therapeutic value. PMID:12941135

  6. The role of heat shock proteins in gastrointestinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dudeja, V; Vickers, S M; Saluja, A K

    2009-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are a highly conserved family of proteins which inhabit almost all subcellular locations and cellular membranes. Depending on their location, these proteins perform a variety of chaperoning functions including folding of newly synthesised polypeptides. HSPs also play a major role in the protection of cells against stressful and injury-inciting stimuli. By virtue of this protective function, HSPs have been shown to prevent acinar cell injury in acute pancreatitis. Also, the levels of HSPs have been shown to be markedly elevated in various forms of cancers when compared with non-transformed cells. Further, inhibition of HSPs has been shown to induce apoptotic cell death in cancer cells suggesting that inhibition of HSPs has a potential to emerge as novel anti-cancer therapy, either as monotherapy or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. Several studies have suggested that HSPs can interact with and inhibit both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis at multiple sites. Besides the anti-apoptotic role of HSPs, recent studies suggest that they play a role in the generation of anti-cancer immunity, and attempts have been made to utilise this property of HSPs in the generation of anti-cancer vaccines. The anti-apoptotic function and mechanism of various subtypes of HSPs as well as the current status of anti-HSP therapy are discussed in this review. PMID:19520890

  7. Riboflavin protects mice against liposaccharide-induced shock through expression of heat shock protein 25

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is a water-soluble vitamin essential for normal cellular functions, growth and development. The study was aimed at investigating the effects of vitamin B2 on the survival rate, and expressions of tissue heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) and heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) in mice und...

  8. Report on the VIIth International Symposium on Heat Shock Proteins in Biology & Medicine.

    PubMed

    Calderwood, Stuart K; Hightower, Lawrence E

    2015-03-01

    This seventh symposium in a series on heat shock proteins in biology and medicine was held November 1-5, 2014, at the Hilton Hotel in Old Town Alexandria, Virginia. Approximately 70 participants including principal investigators, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students were in attendance. The major themes were: new properties of heat shock proteins (HSPs) and heat shock factor (HSF) and role in the etiology of cancer, molecular chaperones in aging, extracellular HSPs in inflammation and immunity, role of heat shock and the heat shock response in immunity and cancer, protein aggregation disorders and HSP expression, and Hsp70 in blood cell differentiation. The next meeting is planned for the fall of 2016 in the same venue. PMID:25542250

  9. Aerobic heat shock activates trehalose synthesis in embryos of Artemia franciscana.

    PubMed

    Clegg, J S; Jackson, S A

    1992-05-25

    Encysted embryos (cysts) of the brine shrimp, Artemia franciscana, contain large amounts of trehalose which they use as a major substrate for energy metabolism and biosynthesis for development under aerobic conditions at 25 degrees C. When cysts are placed at 42 degrees C (heat shock) these pathways stop, and the cysts re-synthesize the trehalose that was utilized during the previous incubation at 25 degrees C. Glycogen and glycerol, produced from trehalose at 25 degrees C, appear to be substrates for trehalose synthesis during heat shock. Anoxia prevents trehalose synthesis in cysts undergoing heat shock. These results are consistent with the view that trehalose may play a protective role in cells exposed to heat shock, and other environmental insults, in addition to being a storage form of energy and organic carbon for development. PMID:1592115

  10. Heat Shock Proteins in Dermatophytes: Current Advances and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rossi, Nilce M; Jacob, Tiago R; Sanches, Pablo R; Peres, Nalu T A; Lang, Elza A S; Martins, Maíra P; Rossi, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are proteins whose transcription responds rapidly to temperature shifts. They constitute a family of molecular chaperones, involved in the proper folding and stabilisation of proteins under physiological and adverse conditions. HSPs also assist in the protection and recovery of cells exposed to a variety of stressful conditions, including heat. The role of HSPs extends beyond chaperoning proteins, as they also participate in diverse cellular functions, such as the assembly of macromolecular complexes, protein transport and sorting, dissociation of denatured protein aggregates, cell cycle control, and programmed cell death. They are also important antigens from a variety of pathogens, are able to stimulate innate immune cells, and are implicated in acquired immunity. In fungi, HSPs have been implicated in virulence, dimorphic transition, and drug resistance. Some HSPs are potential targets for therapeutic strategies. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of HSPs in dermatophytes, which are a group of keratinophilic fungi responsible for superficial mycoses in humans and animals. Computational analyses were performed to characterise the group of proteins in these dermatophytes, as well as to assess their conservation and to identify DNA-binding domains (5'-nGAAn-3') in the promoter regions of the hsp genes. In addition, the quantification of the transcript levels of few genes in a pacC background helped in the development of an extended model for the regulation of the expression of the hsp genes, which supports the participation of the pH-responsive transcriptional regulator PacC in this process. PMID:27226766

  11. Multi-Level Interactions Between Heat Shock Factors, Heat Shock Proteins, and the Redox System Regulate Acclimation to Heat.

    PubMed

    Driedonks, Nicky; Xu, Jiemeng; Peters, Janny L; Park, Sunghun; Rieu, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    High temperature has become a global concern because it seriously affects the growth and reproduction of plants. Exposure of plant cells to high temperatures result in cellular damage and can even lead to cell death. Part of the damage can be ascribed to the action of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which accumulate during abiotic stresses such as heat stress. ROS are toxic and can modify other biomacromolecules including membrane lipids, DNA, and proteins. In order to protect the cells, ROS scavenging is essential. In contrast with their inherent harms, ROS also function as signaling molecules, inducing stress tolerance mechanisms. This review examines the evidence for crosstalk between the classical heat stress response, which consists of heat shock factors (HSFs) and heat shock proteins (HSPs), with the ROS network at multiple levels in the heat response process. Heat stimulates HSF activity directly, but also indirectly via ROS. HSFs in turn stimulate the expression of HSP chaperones and also affect ROS scavenger gene expression. In the short term, HSFs repress expression of superoxide dismutase scavenger genes via induction of miRNA398, while they also activate scavenger gene expression and stabilize scavenger protein activity via HSP induction. We propose that these contrasting effects allow for the boosting of the heat stress response at the very onset of the stress, while preventing subsequent oxidative damage. The described model on HSFs, HSPs, ROS, and ROS scavenger interactions seems applicable to responses to stresses other than heat and may explain the phenomenon of crossacclimation. PMID:26635827

  12. Translation of some maize small heat shock proteins is initiated from internal in-frame AUGs.

    PubMed Central

    Frappier, J R; Walden, D B; Atkinson, B G

    1998-01-01

    Etiolated maize radicles (inbred Oh43) subjected to a brief heat shock synthesize a family of small heat shock proteins (approximately 18 kD) that is composed of at least 12 members. We previously described the cDNA-derived sequence of three maize shsp mRNAs (cMHSP18-1, cMHSP18-3, and cMHSP18-9). In this report, we demonstrate that the mRNA transcribed in vitro from one of these cDNAs (cMHSP18-9) is responsible for the synthesis of three members of the shsp family, and we suggest that cMHSP18-3 may be responsible for the synthesis of three additional members and cMHSP18-1 for the synthesis of two other members of this family. The fact that these genes do not contain introns, coupled with the observations reported herein, suggest that maize may have established another method of using a single gene to produce a number of different proteins. PMID:9475756

  13. Decrease in penicillin susceptibility due to heat shock protein ClpL in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thao Dang-Hien; Kwon, Hyog-Young; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Ki-Woo; Briles, David E; Pyo, Suhkneung; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2011-06-01

    Antibiotic resistance and tolerance are increasing threats to global health as antibiotic-resistant bacteria can cause severe morbidity and mortality and can increase treatment cost 10-fold. Although several genes contributing to antibiotic tolerance among pneumococci have been identified, we report here that ClpL, a major heat shock protein, could modulate cell wall biosynthetic enzymes and lead to decreased penicillin susceptibility. On capsular type 1, 2, and 19 genetic backgrounds, mutants lacking ClpL were more susceptible to penicillin and had thinner cell walls than the parental strains, whereas a ClpL-overexpressing strain showed a higher resistance to penicillin and a thicker cell wall. Although exposure of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 to penicillin inhibited expression of the major cell wall synthesis gene pbp2x, heat shock induced a ClpL-dependent increase in the mRNA levels and protein synthesized by pbp2x. Inducible ClpL expression correlated with PBP2x expression and penicillin susceptibility. Fractionation and electron micrograph data revealed that ClpL induced by heat shock is localized at the cell wall, and the ΔclpL showed significantly reduced net translocation of PBP2x into the cell wall. Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation with either ClpL or PBP2x antibody followed by reprobing with ClpL or PBP2x antibody showed an interaction between ClpL and PBP2x after heat stress. This interaction was confirmed by His tag pulldown assay with either ClpLHis₆ or PBP2xHis₆. Thus, ClpL stabilized pbp2x expression, interacted with PBP2x, and facilitated translocation of PBP2x, a key protein of cell wall synthesis process, contributing to the decrease of antibiotic susceptibility in S. pneumoniae. PMID:21422206

  14. Heat-Shock Protein 90-Targeted Nano Anticancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Rochani, Ankit K; Ravindran Girija, Aswathy; Borah, Ankita; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthi Kumar, D

    2016-04-01

    Suboptimal chemotherapy of anticancer drugs may be attributed to a variety of cellular mechanisms, which synergize to dodge the drug responses. Nearly 2 decades of heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90)-targeted drug discovery has shown that the mono-therapy with Hsp90 inhibitors seems to be relatively ineffective compared with combination treatment due to several cellular dodging mechanisms. In this article, we have tried to analyze and review the Hsp90 and mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR)-mediated drug resistance mechanisms. By using this information we have discussed about the rationale behind use of drug combinations that includes both or any one of these inhibitors for cancer therapy. Currently, biodegradable nano vector (NV)-loaded novel drug delivery systems have shown to resolve the problems of poor bioavailability. NVs of drugs such as paclitaxel, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, and others have been successfully introduced for medicinal use. Hence, looking at the success of NVs, in this article we have also discussed the progress made in the delivery of biodegradable NV-loaded Hsp90 and m-TOR-targeted inhibitors in multiple drug combinations. We have also discussed the possible ways by which the market success of biodegradable NVs can positively impact the clinical trials of anti-Hsp90 and m-TOR combination strategy. PMID:26886301

  15. [Small heat shock proteins and adaptation to hypertermia in various Drosophila species].

    PubMed

    Shilova, V Iu; Garbuz, D G; Evgen'ev, M B; Zatsepina, O G

    2006-01-01

    Expression level and kinetics of accumulation of small heat shock proteins (21-27 kDa group) have been investigated in three Drosophila species differing significantly by temperature niche and thermosensitivity. It was shown that low-latitude thermotolerant species D. virilis exceeds the high-latitude thermosensitive closely-related species D. lummei as well as distant thermosensitive species D. melanogaster in terms of small heat shock proteins expression and accumulation after temperature elevation. The data obtained enable to postulate an important role of small heat shock proteins in organism basal thermotolerance and general adaptation to adverse conditions of environment. PMID:16637267

  16. Induction of heat shock proteins in B-cell exosomes.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Aled; Turkes, Attilla; Navabi, Hossein; Mason, Malcolm D; Tabi, Zsuzsanna

    2005-08-15

    Exosomes are nanometer-sized vesicles secreted by a diverse range of live cells that probably have physiological roles in modulating cellular immunity. The extracellular factors that regulate the quantity and phenotype of exosomes produced are poorly understood, and the properties of exosomes that dictate their immune functions are not yet clear. We investigated the effect of cellular stress on the exosomes produced by B-lymphoblastoid cell lines. Under steady-state conditions, the exosomes were positive for hsp27, hsc70, hsp70 and hsp90, and other recognised exosome markers such as MHC class I, CD81, and LAMP-2. Exposing cells to heat stress (42 degrees C for up to 3 hours), resulted in a marked increase in these heat shock proteins (hsps), while the expression of other stress proteins such as hsp60 and gp96 remained negative, and other exosome markers remained unchanged. Stress also triggered a small increase in the quantity of exosomes produced [with a ratio of 1.245+/-0.07 to 1 (mean+/-s.e.m., n=20) of 3-hour-stress-exosomes to control-exosomes]. Flow-cytometric analysis of exosome-coated beads and immuno-precipitation of intact exosomes demonstrated that hsps were located within the exosome lumen, and not present at the exosome-surface, suggesting that such exosomes may not interact with target cells through cell-surface hsp-receptors. Functional studies further supported this finding, in that exosomes from control or heat-stressed B cells did not trigger dendritic cell maturation, assessed by analysis of dendritic-cell-surface phenotype, and cytokine secretion profile. Our findings demonstrate that specific alterations in exosome phenotype are a hitherto unknown component of the cellular response to environmental stress and their extracellular function does not involve the direct activation of dendritic cells. PMID:16046478

  17. Tolerization against atherosclerosis using heat shock protein 60.

    PubMed

    Wick, Cecilia

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the artery wall, and both innate and adaptive immunity play important roles in the pathogenesis of this disease. In several experimental and human experiments of early atherosclerotic lesions, it has been shown that the first pathogenic event in atherogenesis is intimal infiltration of T cells at predilection sites. These T cells react to heat shock protein 60 (HSP60), which is a ubiquitous self-antigen expressed on the surface of endothelial cells (ECs) together with adhesion molecules in response to classical risk factors for atherosclerosis. When HSP60 is expressed on the EC surface, it can act as a "danger-signal" for both cellular and humoral immune reactions. Acquired by infection or vaccination, beneficial protective immunity to microbial HSP60 and bona fide autoimmunity to biochemically altered autologous HSP60 is present in all humans. Thus, the development of atherosclerosis during aging is paid by the price for lifelong protective preexisting anti-HSP60 immunity by harmful (auto)immune cross-reactive attack on arterial ECs maltreated by atherosclerosis risk factors. This is supported by experiments, which shows that bacterial HSP60 immunization can lead and accelerate experimental atherosclerosis. This review article presents accumulating proof that supports the idea that tolerization with antigenic HSP60 protein or its peptides may arrest or even prevent atherosclerosis by increased production of regulatory T cells and/or anti-inflammatory cytokines. Recent data indicates that HSP60, or more likely some of its derivative peptides, has immunoregulatory functions. Therefore, these peptides may have important potential for being used as diagnostic agents or therapeutic targets. PMID:26577462

  18. KPNA3-knockdown eliminates the second heat shock protein peak associated with the heat shock response of male silkworm pupae (Bombyx mori) by reducing heat shock factor transport into the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Wei, Guoqing; Wang, Lei; Qian, Cen; Li, Kedong; Zhang, Congfen; Dai, Lishang; Sun, Yu; Liu, Dongran; Zhu, Baojian; Liu, Chaoliang

    2016-01-10

    In this study, we investigated the role of karyopherin alpha 3 in the heat shock response in male silkworm pupae. Karyopherin alpha recognizes the classical nuclear location sequence on proteins and transports them into the nucleus by forming a trimetric complex with karyopherin beta. Three predicted karyopherin alphas (KPNA1, KPNA2 and KPNA3) have been identified from the silkworm Bombyx mori. Pull-down assay result showed that KPNA3 can pull down heat shock transcription factor (HSF) from proteins extracted from tissues using non-denature lysis buffer. After 45 °C heat shock on male B. mori pupae for 30 min, we identified two heat shock protein (HSP) mRNA expression peaks correlating with HSP19.9, HSP20.4 and HSP25.4 at 4 h (peak 1) and 24 h (peak 2). The second peak was eliminated after knockdown of KPNA3. Similar results were obtained following knockdown of HSF, which is the trans-activating factor of heat shock. However, KPNA3 knockdown was not accompanied by the decreased HSF protein levels at 24 h after heat shock which were observed following HSF knockdown. We also expressed recombinant protein GST-KPNA3 and His-HSF in Escherichia coli to perform GST pull-down assay and the result confirmed the interaction between KPNA3 and HSF. We concluded that KPNA3 knockdown eliminates the second heat shock protein peak in the heat shock response of male silkworm pupae by reducing HSF transport into the nucleus. PMID:26367326

  19. Hsp56: A novel heat shock protein associated with untransformed steroid receptor complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, E.R. )

    1990-12-25

    The recently-described p59 protein has been shown to be associated with untransformed steroid receptors present in rabbit uterus and rat liver cytosols while a smaller version of this protein (p56) interacts with glucocorticoid receptors in human IM-9 cell cytosols. In addition to interacting with glucocorticoid receptors, the p56 protein of IM-9 cell cytosol is also found as part of a large heteromeric complex that contains both the 70-kDa and 90-kDa heat shock proteins (hsp70 and hsp90, respectively). Given this association of p56 with the two major stress proteins, I have speculated that p56 may itself be a heat shock protein. In this paper, the effect of heat stress on the rate of synthesis of p56 is determined. Intact IM-9 cells were exposed to 37 or 43 degrees C for 4 h, followed by pulse-labeling with (35S)methionine. Analysis of whole cytosolic extracts by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography reveal an increased rate of radiolabeling for hsp70, hsp90, hsp100, ad hsp110, but no heat-inducible protein of smaller relative molecular mass is detected. However, immune-purification of p56 from normal and heat-stressed cytosols with the EC1 monoclonal antibody results in the presence of a 56-kDa protein that exhibits an increased rate of synthesis in response to heat stress. The results of two-dimensional gel Western blots employing the EC1 antibody demonstrate that this heat-inducible protein is indeed the EC1-reactive p56 protein and that the induction effect is not due to unequal yields of p56 during immune-purification.

  20. Increased proteolysis of diphtheria toxin by human monocytes after heat shock: a subsidiary role for heat-shock protein 70 in antigen processing

    PubMed Central

    Polla, Barbara S; Gabert, Françoise; Peyrusse, Brigitte M-N; Jacquier-Sarlin, Muriel R

    2007-01-01

    The expression of heat-shock proteins (hsp) increases after exposure to various stresses including elevated temperatures, oxidative injury, infection and inflammation. As molecular chaperones, hsp have been shown to participate in antigen processing and presentation, in part through increasing the stability and expression of major histocompatibility complex molecules. Heat shock selectively increases human T-cell responses to processed antigen, but does not affect T-cell proliferation induced by non-processed antigens. Here, we have analysed the mechanisms by which stress such as heat shock, and the ensuing hsp over-expression affect the processing of diphtheria toxin (DT) in peripheral blood monocytes. We found that heat shock increased DT proteolysis in endosomes and lysosomes while the activities of the cathepsins B and D, classically involved in DT proteolysis, were decreased. These effects correlated with the heat-shock-mediated increase in hsp 70 expression observed in endosomes and lysosomes. Actinomycin D or blocking anti-hsp 70 antibodies abolished the heat-shock-mediated increase in DT proteolysis. These data indicate that the increased expression of hsp 70 constitutes a subsidiary mechanism that facilitates antigen proteolysis in stressed cells. Confirming these data, presentation by formaldehyde-fixed cells of DT proteolysates that were obtained with endosomes and lysosomes from heat-shocked peripheral blood monocytes showed higher stimulation of T cells than those generated with endosomes and lysosomes from control peripheral blood monocytes. PMID:17116171

  1. Exploring systems affected by the heat shock response in Plasmodium falciparum via protein association networks

    PubMed Central

    Lilburn, Timothy G.; Cai, Hong; Gu, Jianying; Zhou, Zhan; Wang, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    The heat shock response is a general mechanism by which organisms deal with physical insults such as sudden changes in temperature, osmotic and oxidative stresses, and exposure to toxic substances. Plasmodium falciparum is exposed to drastic temperature changes as a part of its life cycle and maintains an extensive repertoire of heat shock response-related proteins. As these proteins serve to maintain the parasite in the face of anti-malarial drugs as well, better understanding of the heat shock-related systems in the malaria parasite will lead to therapeutic approaches that frustrate these systems, leading to more effective use of anti-malarials. Here we use protein association networks to broaden our understanding of the systems impacted by and/or implicated in the heat shock response. PMID:25539848

  2. 5'-Untranslated region of heat shock protein 70 mRNA drives translation under hypertonic conditions.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Laura; Alfieri, Roberta R; Petronini, Pier Giorgio; Montanaro, Lorenzo; Brigotti, Maurizio

    2013-02-01

    In mammalian cells, adaptation to hypertonic conditions leads to the activation of an array of early (cell shrinkage, regulatory volume increase) and late (accumulation of compatible osmolytes) responses and increased level of HSPs (heat shock proteins). Protein synthesis is strongly inhibited few minutes after the hypertonic challenge as demonstrated in whole cells and as reproduced under controlled conditions in cell-free systems. Different mechanisms known to mediate the accumulation of HSP70, such as mRNA transcription and stabilization, require fully active protein synthesis. We show that the 5'-untranslated region of HSP70 messenger drives a hypertonicity-resistant translation (up to 0.425 osmol/kg of water), whereas cap-dependent protein synthesis is almost totally blocked under the same conditions. The results, obtained in cell-free systems and in whole cells, might help to explain why HSP70 is accumulated in cells when total protein synthesis is impaired. We also observed that translation initiated by viral IRES (from Cricket paralysis virus) is highly efficient in cells exposed to hyperosmolarity, suggesting that the resistance to hypertonic conditions is a more general feature of cap-independent translation. The described mechanism may also play a role in the control of translation of other messengers encoding for proteins involved in the adaptation to hypertonicity. PMID:23291172

  3. The Stress Granule RNA-Binding Protein TIAR-1 Protects Female Germ Cells from Heat Shock in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Huelgas-Morales, Gabriela; Silva-García, Carlos Giovanni; Salinas, Laura S.; Greenstein, David; Navarro, Rosa E.

    2016-01-01

    In response to stressful conditions, eukaryotic cells launch an arsenal of regulatory programs to protect the proteome. One major protective response involves the arrest of protein translation and the formation of stress granules, cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes containing the conserved RNA-binding proteins TIA-1 and TIAR. The stress granule response is thought to preserve mRNA for translation when conditions improve. For cells of the germline—the immortal cell lineage required for sexual reproduction—protection from stress is critically important for perpetuation of the species, yet how stress granule regulatory mechanisms are deployed in animal reproduction is incompletely understood. Here, we show that the stress granule protein TIAR-1 protects the Caenorhabditis elegans germline from the adverse effects of heat shock. Animals containing strong loss-of-function mutations in tiar-1 exhibit significantly reduced fertility compared to the wild type following heat shock. Analysis of a heat-shock protein promoter indicates that tiar-1 mutants display an impaired heat-shock response. We observed that TIAR-1 was associated with granules in the gonad core and oocytes during several stressful conditions. Both gonad core and oocyte granules are dynamic structures that depend on translation; protein synthesis inhibitors altered their formation. Nonetheless, tiar-1 was required for the formation of gonad core granules only. Interestingly, the gonad core granules did not seem to be needed for the germ cells to develop viable embryos after heat shock. This suggests that TIAR-1 is able to protect the germline from heat stress independently of these structures. PMID:26865701

  4. The Stress Granule RNA-Binding Protein TIAR-1 Protects Female Germ Cells from Heat Shock in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Huelgas-Morales, Gabriela; Silva-García, Carlos Giovanni; Salinas, Laura S; Greenstein, David; Navarro, Rosa E

    2016-01-01

    In response to stressful conditions, eukaryotic cells launch an arsenal of regulatory programs to protect the proteome. One major protective response involves the arrest of protein translation and the formation of stress granules, cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes containing the conserved RNA-binding proteins TIA-1 and TIAR. The stress granule response is thought to preserve mRNA for translation when conditions improve. For cells of the germline-the immortal cell lineage required for sexual reproduction-protection from stress is critically important for perpetuation of the species, yet how stress granule regulatory mechanisms are deployed in animal reproduction is incompletely understood. Here, we show that the stress granule protein TIAR-1 protects the Caenorhabditis elegans germline from the adverse effects of heat shock. Animals containing strong loss-of-function mutations in tiar-1 exhibit significantly reduced fertility compared to the wild type following heat shock. Analysis of a heat-shock protein promoter indicates that tiar-1 mutants display an impaired heat-shock response. We observed that TIAR-1 was associated with granules in the gonad core and oocytes during several stressful conditions. Both gonad core and oocyte granules are dynamic structures that depend on translation; protein synthesis inhibitors altered their formation. Nonetheless, tiar-1 was required for the formation of gonad core granules only. Interestingly, the gonad core granules did not seem to be needed for the germ cells to develop viable embryos after heat shock. This suggests that TIAR-1 is able to protect the germline from heat stress independently of these structures. PMID:26865701

  5. Large changes in intracellular pH and calcium observed during heat shock are not responsible for the induction of heat shock proteins in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, I A; McClure, S A; Poenie, M; Tsien, R Y; Steinhardt, R A

    1986-01-01

    Heat shock caused significant changes in intracellular pH (pHi) and intracellular free calcium concentration [( Ca2+]i) which occurred rapidly after temperature elevation. pHi fell from a resting level value at 25 degrees C of 7.38 +/- 0.02 (mean +/- standard error of the mean, n = 15) to 6.91 +/- 0.11 (n = 7) at 35 degrees C. The resting level value of [Ca2+]i in single Drosophila melanogaster larval salivary gland cells was 198 +/- 31 nM (n = 4). It increased approximately 10-fold, to 1,870 +/- 770 nM (n = 4), during a heat shock. When salivary glands were incubated in calcium-free, ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA)-buffered medium, the resting level value of [Ca2+]i was reduced to 80 +/- 7 nM (n = 3), and heat shock resulted in a fourfold increase in [Ca2+]i to 353 +/- 90 nM (n = 3). The intracellular free-ion concentrations of Na+, K+, Cl-, and Mg2+ were 9.6 +/- 0.8, 101.9 +/- 1.7, 36 +/- 1.5, and 2.4 +/- 0.2 mM, respectively, and remained essentially unchanged during a heat shock. Procedures were devised to mimic or block the effects of heat shock on pHi and [Ca2+]i and to assess their role in the induction of heat shock proteins. We report here that the changes in [Ca2+]i and pHi which occur during heat shock are not sufficient, nor are they required, for a complete induction of the heat shock response. Images PMID:3097504

  6. Heat shock protein 70 and anti–heat shock protein 70 antibodies in nasal secretions of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Tsybikov, Namjil N.; Egorova, Elena V.; Kuznik, Boris I.; Fefelova, Elena V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The issue of heat shock protein (HSP) 70 and anti-HSP70 antibodies in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) has never been explored. Objective: To determine the nasal secretion (NS) levels of HSP70 and anti-HSP70 antibodies in patients with CRS with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and patients with CRS without nasal polyps (CRSsNP), and to evaluate their associations with CRS clinical severity and correlation with NS interleukin (IL), IL-5 and interferon λ. Methods: CRS severity was determined by Lund-Mackay scores. Levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE), IL-4, IL-5, interferon λ, HSP70, and anti-HSP70 antibody levels in NS were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Forty-six patients with CRSsNP (25 women [54.3%] and 21 men [45.7%], mean [standard deviation {SD}]) age, 34.1 ± 12.3 years; 54 patients with CRSwNP (24 women [44.4%] and 30 men [55.6%], mean [SD] age, 37.9 ± 17.5 years). A group of 40 healthy subjects served as controls. Compared with the controls (with a mean [SD] NS HSP70 level of 0.05 ± 0.03 μg/mL), mean [SD] NS HSP70 levels in both the CRSsNP group (0.16 ± 0.07 μg/mL) and CRSwNP group (0.21 ± 0.10 μg/mL) were increased (p < 0.001). Similarly, the mean (SD) NS anti-HSP70 antibody levels were significantly higher in patients with CRSwNP (0.25 ± 0.09 optical density value [ODV]) compared with CRSsNP (0.13 ± 0.04 ODV) (p < 0.001) and healthy controls (0.14 ± 0.02 ODV) (p < 0.001). NS HSP70 in subjects with CRSwNP showed a significant positive correlation with the Lund-Mackay score (r = 0.31; p < 0.05). NS levels of either HSP70 or anti-HSP70 antibodies were strongly correlated with NS IL-4 in the CRSwNP group (r = 0.62, p < 0.001; and r = 0.69, p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: NS concentrations of HSP70 and secretory IgA anti HSP70 antibodies are increased in CRSwNP (but not in CRSsNP) and correlate positively with the Lund-Mackay score, NS IL-4, and NS IL-5. PMID:27103555

  7. Effect of acute heat stress on heat shock protein 70 messenger RNA and on heat shock protein expression in the liver of broilers.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, J E; Ferro, J A; Stefani, R M; Ferro, M I; Gomes, S L; Macari, M

    1996-05-01

    1. The synthesis of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) mRNA and the expression of Hsp70 in the liver of broiler chickens submitted to acute heat stress (35 degrees C for 5 h) was investigated. 2. Hsp70 expression was detected by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis using a polyclonal antiserum against Hsp70 of Blastocladiella emersonii. The specific signal of Hsp70 mRNA was analysed by Northern blot using as probe a Hsp70 cDNA of B. emersonii. 3. An increase in the amount of Hsp70 was detected from the first up to the fifth hour of acute heat exposure. This increase in the amount of Hsp70 was accompanied by an increase in Hsp70 mRNA which peaked at 3 h. 4. This study shows that the heat induced increase in Hsp70 mRNA and protein in broiler liver, in vivo, are time dependent, similar to that in mammals. PMID:8773853

  8. The Escherichia coli small heat-shock proteins IbpA and IbpB prevent the aggregation of endogenous proteins denatured in vivo during extreme heat shock.

    PubMed

    Kuczyńska-Wiśnik, Dorota; Kedzierska, Sabina; Matuszewska, Ewelina; Lund, Peter; Taylor, Alina; Lipińska, Barbara; Laskowska, Ewa

    2002-06-01

    The roles of the Escherichia coli IbpA and IbpB chaperones in protection of heat-denatured proteins against irreversible aggregation in vivo were investigated. Overproduction of IbpA and IbpB resulted in stabilization of the denatured and reversibly aggregated proteins (the S fraction), which could be isolated from E. coli cells by sucrose gradient centrifugation. This finding is in agreement with the present model of the small heat-shock proteins' function, based mainly on in vitro studies. Deletion of the ibpAB operon resulted in almost twofold increase in protein aggregation and in inactivation of an enzyme (fructose-1,6-biphosphate aldolase) in cells incubated at 50 degrees C for 4 h, decreased efficiency of the removal of protein aggregates formed during prolonged incubation at 50 degrees C and affected cell viability at this temperature. IbpA/B proteins were not needed for removal of protein aggregates or for the enzyme protection/renaturation in cells heat shocked at 50 degrees C for 15 min. These results show that the IbpA/B proteins are required upon an extreme, long-term heat shock. Overproduction of IbpA but not IbpB caused an increase of the level of beta-lactamase precursor, which was localized in the S fraction, together with the IbpA protein, which suggests that the unfolded precursor binds to IbpA but not to IbpB. Although in the wild-type cells both E. coli small heat-shock proteins are known to localize in the S fraction, only 2% of total IbpB co-localized with the aggregated proteins in the absence of IbpA, while in the absence of IbpB, the majority of IbpA was present in the aggregates fraction. PMID:12055295

  9. Cross-tolerance in the tidepool sculpin: the role of heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Todgham, Anne E; Schulte, Patricia M; Iwama, George K

    2005-01-01

    Cross-tolerance, or the ability of one stressor to transiently increase tolerance to a second heterologous stressor, is thought to involve the induction of heat shock proteins (Hsp). We thus investigated the boundaries of cross-tolerance in tidepool sculpins (Oligocottus maculosus) and their relationship to Hsp70 levels. Survival of sculpins exposed to severe osmotic (90 ppt, 2 h) and hypoxic (0.33 mg O(2)/L, 2 h) stressors increased from 68% to 96%, and from 47% to 76%, respectively, following a +12 degrees C heat shock. The magnitude of this heat shock was critical for protection. A +10 degrees C heat shock did not confer cross-tolerance, while a +15 degrees C heat shock was deleterious. Sculpins required between 8 and 48 h of recovery following the +12 degrees C heat shock to develop cross-tolerance. There was no association between Hsp70 levels before the onset of the secondary stressor and cross-tolerance. However, branchial Hsp70 levels following osmotic shock were highly correlated with the time frame of cross-tolerance. Thus, Hsp70 induction by the priming stressor may be less important than the ability of the cell to mount an Hsp response to subsequent stressors. The time frame of cross-tolerance is similar to the interval between low tides, suggesting the possible relevance of this response in nature. PMID:15778933

  10. Purification and characterization of a heat-shock element binding protein from yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Sorger, P K; Pelham, H R

    1987-01-01

    The promoters of heat shock genes are activated when cells are stressed. Activation is dependent on a specific DNA sequence, the heat-shock element (HSE). We describe the purification to homogeneity of an HSE-binding protein from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), using sequential chromatography of whole cell extracts on heparin-agarose, calf thymus DNA-Sepharose and an affinity column consisting of a repetitive synthetic HSE sequence coupled to Sepharose. The protein runs as a closely spaced doublet of approximately 150 kd on SDS-polyacrylamide gels; mild proteolysis generates a stable 70-kd fragment which retains DNA binding activity. The relative affinities of the protein for a range of variant HSE sequences correlates with the ability of these sequences to support heat-inducible transcription in vivo, suggesting that this polypeptide is involved in the activation of heat-shock promoters. However, the protein was purified from unshocked yeast, and may therefore represent an unactivated form of heat-shock transcription factor. Study of the purified protein should help to define the mechanistic basis of the heat-shock response. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:3319580

  11. Sequence and regulation of a gene encoding a human 89-kilodalton heat shock protein

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, E.; Brandon, S.E.; Weber, L.A.; Lloyd, D.

    1989-06-01

    Vertebrate cells synthesize two forms of the 82- to 90-kilodalton heat shock protein that are encoded by distinct gene families. In HeLa cells, both proteins (hsp89/alpha/ and hspio/beta/) are abundant under normal growth conditions and are synthesized at increased rates in response to heat stress. Only the larger form, hsp89/alpha/, is induced by the adenovirus E1A gene product. The authors have isolated a human hsp89/alpha/ gene that shows complete sequence identity with heat- and E1A-inducible cDNA used as a hybridization probe. The 5'-flanking region contained overlapping and inverted consensus heat shock control elements that can confer heat-inducible expression n a /beta/-globin reporter gene. The gene contained 10 intervening sequences. The first intron was located adjacent to the translation start codon, an arrangement also found in the Drosophila hsp82 gene. The spliced mRNA sequence contained a single open reading frame encoding an 84,564-dalton polypeptide showing high homology with the hsp82 to hsp90 proteins of other organisms. The deduced hsp89/alpha/ protein sequence differed from the human hsp89/beta/ sequence reported elsewhere in at least 99 out of the 732 amino acids. Transcription of the hsp89/alpha/ gene was induced by serum during normal cell growth, but expression did not appear to be restricted to a particular stage of the cell cycles. hsp89/alpha/ mRNA was considerably more stable than the mRNA encoding hsp70, which can account for the higher constitutive rate of hsp89 synthesis in unstressed cells.

  12. Suppression of polyglutamine protein toxicity by co-expression of a heat-shock protein 40 and a heat-shock protein 110.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Y; Ren, S; Lao, U; Edgar, B A; Wang, T

    2013-01-01

    A network of heat-shock proteins mediates cellular protein homeostasis, and has a fundamental role in preventing aggregation-associated neurodegenerative diseases. In a Drosophila model of polyglutamine (polyQ) disease, the HSP40 family protein, DNAJ-1, is a superior suppressor of toxicity caused by the aggregation of polyQ containing proteins. Here, we demonstrate that one specific HSP110 protein, 70 kDa heat-shock cognate protein cb (HSC70cb), interacts physically and genetically with DNAJ-1 in vivo, and that HSC70cb is necessary for DNAJ-1 to suppress polyglutamine-induced cell death in Drosophila. Expression of HSC70cb together with DNAJ-1 significantly enhanced the suppressive effects of DNAJ-1 on polyQ-induced neurodegeneration, whereas expression of HSC70cb alone did not suppress neurodegeneration in Drosophila models of either general polyQ disease or Huntington's disease. Furthermore, expression of a human HSP40, DNAJB1, together with a human HSP110, APG-1, protected cells from polyQ-induced neural degeneration in flies, whereas expression of either component alone had little effect. Our data provide a functional link between HSP40 and HSP110 in suppressing the cytotoxicity of aggregation-prone proteins, and suggest that HSP40 and HSP110 function together in protein homeostasis control. PMID:24091676

  13. Suppression of polyglutamine protein toxicity by co-expression of a heat-shock protein 40 and a heat-shock protein 110

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Y; Ren, S; Lao, U; Edgar, B A; Wang, T

    2013-01-01

    A network of heat-shock proteins mediates cellular protein homeostasis, and has a fundamental role in preventing aggregation-associated neurodegenerative diseases. In a Drosophila model of polyglutamine (polyQ) disease, the HSP40 family protein, DNAJ-1, is a superior suppressor of toxicity caused by the aggregation of polyQ containing proteins. Here, we demonstrate that one specific HSP110 protein, 70 kDa heat-shock cognate protein cb (HSC70cb), interacts physically and genetically with DNAJ-1 in vivo, and that HSC70cb is necessary for DNAJ-1 to suppress polyglutamine-induced cell death in Drosophila. Expression of HSC70cb together with DNAJ-1 significantly enhanced the suppressive effects of DNAJ-1 on polyQ-induced neurodegeneration, whereas expression of HSC70cb alone did not suppress neurodegeneration in Drosophila models of either general polyQ disease or Huntington's disease. Furthermore, expression of a human HSP40, DNAJB1, together with a human HSP110, APG-1, protected cells from polyQ-induced neural degeneration in flies, whereas expression of either component alone had little effect. Our data provide a functional link between HSP40 and HSP110 in suppressing the cytotoxicity of aggregation-prone proteins, and suggest that HSP40 and HSP110 function together in protein homeostasis control. PMID:24091676

  14. A review of acquired thermotolerance, heat shock proteins, and molecular chaperones in archaea

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.D.

    1996-05-01

    Acquired thermotolerance, the associated synthesis of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) under stress conditions, and the role of HSPs as molecular chaperones under normal growth conditions have been studied extensively in eukaryotes and bacteria, whereas research in these areas in archaea is only beginning. All organisms have evolved a variety of strategies for coping with high-temperature stress, and among these strategies is the increased synthesis of HSPs. The facts that both high temperatures and chemical stresses induce the HSPs and that some of the HSPs recognize and bind to unfolded proteins in vitro have led to the theory that the function of HSPs is to prevent protein aggregation in vivo. The facts that some HSPs are abundant under normal growth conditions and that they assist in protein folding in vitro have led to the theory that they assist protein folding in vivo; in this role, they are referred to as molecular chaperones. The limited research on acquired thermotolerance, HSPs, and molecular chaperones in archaea, particularly the hyperthermophilic archaea, suggests that these extremophiles provide a new perspective in these areas of research, both because they are members of a separate phylogenetic domain and because they have evolved to live under extreme conditions.

  15. The influence of salinity on the heat-shock protein response of Potamocorbula amurensis (Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Werner, Ingeborg

    2004-01-01

    For biomarkers to be useful in assessing anthropogenic impacts in field studies involving aquatic organisms, they should not be affected by naturally occurring changes in environmental parameters such as salinity. This is especially important in estuarine environments and for relatively unspecific biomarkers like heat-shock proteins (hsps, stress proteins). In this study, the heat-shock protein response was measured in the euryhaline clam, Potamocorbula amurensis, after exposure to a range of salinities reflecting normal and extreme environmental conditions in Northern San Francisco Bay, California. The ability to raise cellular hsp70 levels in response to heat-shock was significantly impaired in P. amurensis collected from a low (0.5 ppt) salinity field site, and after 14 day exposure to low salinity in the laboratory. PMID:15178117

  16. Oxidized-LDL induce the expression of heat shock protein 70 in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Roma, P; Pellegatta, F; Catapano, A L

    1994-04-15

    Heat shock proteins are detectable in human atherosclerotic plaques, especially in endothelial cells. In this report we show by immunofluorescence that incubation "in vitro" with OxLDL is a stress capable of inducing the expression of heat shock protein 70 in both the EAhy-926 cell line and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). This induction was parallel to the cytotoxicity of oxidized LDL as determined by [3H]adenine release. When cells were confluent, however, both effects were greatly reduced. We speculate that induction of hsp70 is related to the cytotoxicity of oxidized LDL and that the detection of heat shock proteins in human atherosclerotic plaques is a further indication for the presence "in vivo" of oxidized LDL. These observations may be relevant to the understanding of endothelial response to injury in proatherosclerotic events. PMID:8166710

  17. Biology of the Heat Shock Response and Protein Chaperones: Budding Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) as a Model System

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Jacob; Abrams, Jennifer; Wang, Yanyu

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The eukaryotic heat shock response is an ancient and highly conserved transcriptional program that results in the immediate synthesis of a battery of cytoprotective genes in the presence of thermal and other environmental stresses. Many of these genes encode molecular chaperones, powerful protein remodelers with the capacity to shield, fold, or unfold substrates in a context-dependent manner. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae continues to be an invaluable model for driving the discovery of regulatory features of this fundamental stress response. In addition, budding yeast has been an outstanding model system to elucidate the cell biology of protein chaperones and their organization into functional networks. In this review, we evaluate our understanding of the multifaceted response to heat shock. In addition, the chaperone complement of the cytosol is compared to those of mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum, organelles with their own unique protein homeostasis milieus. Finally, we examine recent advances in the understanding of the roles of protein chaperones and the heat shock response in pathogenic fungi, which is being accelerated by the wealth of information gained for budding yeast. PMID:22688810

  18. Isolation and characterization of a small heat shock protein gene from maize.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, P S; Bouchard, R A; Casey, E S; Sinibaldi, R M

    1991-08-01

    A maize (Zea mays L.) genomic clone (Zmempr 9') was isolated on the basis of its homology to a meiotically expressed Lilium sequence. Radiolabeled probe made from the maize genomic clone detected complementary RNA at high fidelity. Furthermore, it hybridized to RNA isolated from staged (an interval that is coincident with meiotic prophase) maize tassel spikelets. Complimentary RNA was strongly (at least 50-fold) induced during heat shock of maize somatic tissue and appeared as a single size class in Northern blot hybridizations. Sequencing of the complete coding region of Zmempr 9' confirmed the homology of the inferred amino acid sequence to other small heat shock proteins. Consensus sequences found in the flanking regions corresponded to the usual signals for initiation of RNA transcription, polyadenylate addition, and the induction of heat shock genes. The latter sequences conferred heat shock-specific transient expression in electroporated protoplasts when cloned into promoterless reporter gene plasmid constructs. Hybrid-selected translations revealed specific translation products ranging from 15 to 18 kilodaltons, providing evidence that this gene is a member of a related multigene family. We therefore conclude that this maize genomic DNA clone, recovered through its homology to clones for meiotic transcripts in lily, represents a genuine maize small heat shock protein gene. PMID:16668329

  19. Heat Shock Proteins and Their mRNAs in Dry and Early Imbibing Embryos of Wheat 1

    PubMed Central

    Helm, Kenneth W.; Abernethy, Rollin H.

    1990-01-01

    Two-dimensional gels of in vitro translation products of mRNAs isolated from quiescent wheat (Triticum aestivum) embryos demonstrate the presence of mRNAs encoding heat shock proteins (hsps). There were no detectable differences in the mRNAs found in mature embryos from field grown, from 25°C growth chamber cultivated, or from plants given 38°C heat stresses at different stages of seed development. The mRNAs encoding several developmentally dependent (dd) hsps were among those found in the dry embryos. Stained two-dimensional gels of proteins extracted from 25°C growth chamber cultivated wheat embryos demonstrated the presence of hsps, including dd hsps. A study of the relationship of preexisting hsp mRNAs and the heat shock response during early imbibition was undertaken. Heat shocks (42°C, 90 minutes) were administered following 1.5, 16, and 24 hours of 25°C imbibition. While the mRNAs encoding the low molecular weight hsps decayed rapidly upon imbibition, the mRNAs for dd hsps persisted longer and were still detectable following 16 hours of imbibition. After 1.5 hours of imbibition, the mRNAs for the dd hsps did not accumulate in response to heat shock, even though the synthesis of the proteins was enhanced. Thus, an applied heat shock appeared to lead to the preferential translation of preexisting dd hsp mRNAs. The mRNAs for the other hsps, except hsp 70, were newly transcribed at all of the imbibition times examined. The behavior of the hsp 70 group of proteins during early imbibition was examined by RNA gel blot analysis. The mRNAs for the hsp 70 group were detectable at moderate levels in the quiescent embryo. The relative level of hsp 70 mRNA increased after the onset of imbibition at 25°C and remained high through 25.5 hours of prior imbibition. The maximal levels of these mRNAs at 25°C was reached at 17.5 hours of imbibition. Heat shock caused modest additional accumulation of hsp70 mRNA at later imbibition times. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3

  20. Baculovirus replication induces the expression of heat shock proteins in vivo and in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recent handful of studies have linked baculovirus infection with the induction of heat shock proteins, a highly conserved family of cytoprotective proteins. Here, we demonstrate baculovirus-stimulated upregulation of hsp70 transcription in the natural host, Helicoverpa zea. Larvae lethally infec...

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of heat shock proteins in Glassy-winged sharpshooter (Homalodisca vitripennis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat shock proteins were identified in the glassy-winged sharpshooter, GWSS, Homalodisca vitripennis. The overall importance and function of HSPs lie in their ability to maintain protein integrity and activity during stressful conditions, such as extreme heat, cold, drought, or other stresses. The G...

  2. Genes for Drosophila small heat shock proteins are regulated differently by ecdysterone

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, J.; Voellmy, R. ); Mestril, R. )

    1991-12-01

    Genes for small heat shock proteins (hsp27 to hsp22) are activated in late third-instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster in the absence of heat stress. This regulation has been stimulated in cultured Drosophila cells in which the genes are activated by the addition of ecdysterone. Sequence elements (HERE) involved in ecdysterone regulation of the hsp27 and hsp23 genes have been defined by transfection studies and have recently been identified as binding sites for ecdysterone receptor. The authors report here that the shp27 and hsp23 genes are regulated differently by ecdysterone. The hsp27 gene is activated rapidly by ecdysterone, even in the absence of protein synthesis. In contrast, high-level expression of the hsp23 gene begins only after a lag of about 6 h, is dependent on the continuous presence of ecdysterone, and is sensitive to low concentrations of protein synthesis inhibitors. Transfection experiments with reported constructs show that this difference in regulation is at the transcriptional level. Synthetic hsp27 or hsp23 HERE sequences confer hsp27- or hsp23-type ecdysterone regulation on a basal promoter. These findings indicate that the hsp27 gene is primary, and the hsp23 gene is mainly a secondary, hormone-responsive gene. Ecdysterone receptor is implied to play a role in the regulation of both genes.

  3. Isolation of a novel inducible rat heat-shock protein (HSP70) gene and its expression during ischaemia/hypoxia and heat shock.

    PubMed Central

    Mestril, R; Chi, S H; Sayen, M R; Dillmann, W H

    1994-01-01

    Most of the members of the mammalian heat-shock protein (HSP) gene family have been studied and isolated from human and mouse cells. Few studies have concentrated on the HSPs of rat, a commonly used experimental animal. We have isolated and characterized a novel inducible rat HSP70 gene using an HSP70 cDNA sequence obtained from an ischaemic rat heart cDNA library. The isolated rat HSP70 gene was found to be a functional gene, as indicated by RNAase-protection and Northern-blot analysis. The deduced amino acid sequence of the inducible rat HSP70 exhibits a high degree of similarity to previously isolated mammalian inducible HSP70 gene products. Expression of the inducible HSP70 gene in rat myogenic cells (H9c2) is markedly increased after relatively short periods of hypoxia as well as by heat shock. Two heat-shock elements (HSE) are present in the rat HSP70 promoter. Transient transfection of rat HSP70 promoter/chloramphenicol acetyltransferase constructs into H9c2 cells shows that the presence of either of the two HSEs is sufficient for heat-shock inducibility. In contrast, induction of the rat HSP70/chloramphenicol acetyltransferase constructs by hypoxia is only detectable when both HSEs are present. This leads us to conclude that the induction of HSP70 by hypoxia and heat shock occurs through the same regulatory HSEs but the activation of the inducible HSP70 gene by heat shock is several-fold higher than by hypoxia. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:8141767

  4. Absolute protein quantification of the yeast chaperome under conditions of heat shock.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Rebecca J; Lawless, Craig; Holman, Stephen W; Lanthaler, Karin; Beynon, Robert J; Grant, Chris M; Hubbard, Simon J; Eyers, Claire E

    2016-08-01

    Chaperones are fundamental to regulating the heat shock response, mediating protein recovery from thermal-induced misfolding and aggregation. Using the QconCAT strategy and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) for absolute protein quantification, we have determined copy per cell values for 49 key chaperones in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under conditions of normal growth and heat shock. This work extends a previous chemostat quantification study by including up to five Q-peptides per protein to improve confidence in protein quantification. In contrast to the global proteome profile of S. cerevisiae in response to heat shock, which remains largely unchanged as determined by label-free quantification, many of the chaperones are upregulated with an average two-fold increase in protein abundance. Interestingly, eight of the significantly upregulated chaperones are direct gene targets of heat shock transcription factor-1. By performing absolute quantification of chaperones under heat stress for the first time, we were able to evaluate the individual protein-level response. Furthermore, this SRM data was used to calibrate label-free quantification values for the proteome in absolute terms, thus improving relative quantification between the two conditions. This study significantly enhances the largely transcriptomic data available in the field and illustrates a more nuanced response at the protein level. PMID:27252046

  5. A screen for enhancers of clearance identifies huntingtin as a heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) client protein.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Barbara; Weiss, Andreas; Parker, Christian N; Bibel, Miriam; Paganetti, Paolo; Kaupmann, Klemens

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms to reduce the cellular levels of mutant huntingtin (mHtt) provide promising strategies for treating Huntington disease (HD). To identify compounds enhancing the degradation of mHtt, we performed a high throughput screen using a hippocampal HN10 cell line expressing a 573-amino acid mHtt fragment. Several hit structures were identified as heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors. Cell treatment with these compounds reduced levels of mHtt without overt toxic effects as measured by time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer assays and Western blots. To characterize the mechanism of mHtt degradation, we used the potent and selective Hsp90 inhibitor NVP-AUY922. In HdhQ150 embryonic stem (ES) cells and in ES cell-derived neurons, NVP-AUY922 treatment substantially reduced soluble full-length mHtt levels. In HN10 cells, Hsp90 inhibition by NVP-AUY922 enhanced mHtt clearance in the absence of any detectable Hsp70 induction. Furthermore, inhibition of protein synthesis with cycloheximide or overexpression of dominant negative heat shock factor 1 (Hsf1) in HdhQ150 ES cells attenuated Hsp70 induction but did not affect NVP-AUY922-mediated mHtt clearance. Together, these data provided evidence that direct inhibition of Hsp90 chaperone function was crucial for mHtt degradation rather than heat shock response induction and Hsp70 up-regulation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical interaction of mutant and wild-type Htt with the Hsp90 chaperone. Hsp90 inhibition disrupted the interaction and induced clearance of Htt through the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Our data suggest that Htt is an Hsp90 client protein and that Hsp90 inhibition may provide a means to reduce mHtt in HD. PMID:22123826

  6. Heat induction of heat shock protein 25 requires cellular glutamine in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Phanvijhitsiri, Kittiporn; Musch, Mark W; Ropeleski, Mark J; Chang, Eugene B

    2006-08-01

    Glutamine is considered a nonessential amino acid; however, it becomes conditionally essential during critical illness when consumption exceeds production. Glutamine may modulate the heat shock/stress response, an important adaptive cellular response for survival. Glutamine increases heat induction of heat shock protein (Hsp) 25 in both intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-18) and mesenchymal NIH/3T3 cells, an effect that is neither glucose nor serum dependent. Neither arginine, histidine, proline, leucine, asparagine, nor tyrosine acts as physiological substitutes for glutamine for heat induction of Hsp25. The lack of effect of these amino acids was not caused by deficient transport, although some amino acids, including glutamate (a major direct metabolite of glutamine), were transported poorly by IEC-18 cells. Glutamate uptake could be augmented in a concentration- and time-dependent manner by increasing either media concentration and/or duration of exposure. Under these conditions, glutamate promoted heat induction of Hsp25, albeit not as efficiently as glutamine. Further evidence for the role of glutamine conversion to glutamate was obtained with the glutaminase inhibitor 6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine (DON), which inhibited the effect of glutamine on heat-induced Hsp25. DON inhibited phosphate-dependent glutaminase by 75% after 3 h, decreasing cell glutamate. Increased glutamine/glutamate conversion to glutathione was not involved, since the glutathione synthesis inhibitor, buthionine sulfoximine, did not block glutamine's effect on heat induction of Hsp25. A large drop in ATP levels did not appear to account for the diminished Hsp25 induction during glutamine deficiency. In summary, glutamine is an important amino acid, and its requirement for heat-induced Hsp25 supports a role for glutamine supplementation to optimize cellular responses to pathophysiological stress. PMID:16554407

  7. Absolute protein quantification of the yeast chaperome under conditions of heat shock

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Rebecca J.; Lawless, Craig; Holman, Stephen W.; Lanthaler, Karin; Beynon, Robert J.; Grant, Chris M.; Hubbard, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones are fundamental to regulating the heat shock response, mediating protein recovery from thermal‐induced misfolding and aggregation. Using the QconCAT strategy and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) for absolute protein quantification, we have determined copy per cell values for 49 key chaperones in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under conditions of normal growth and heat shock. This work extends a previous chemostat quantification study by including up to five Q‐peptides per protein to improve confidence in protein quantification. In contrast to the global proteome profile of S. cerevisiae in response to heat shock, which remains largely unchanged as determined by label‐free quantification, many of the chaperones are upregulated with an average two‐fold increase in protein abundance. Interestingly, eight of the significantly upregulated chaperones are direct gene targets of heat shock transcription factor‐1. By performing absolute quantification of chaperones under heat stress for the first time, we were able to evaluate the individual protein‐level response. Furthermore, this SRM data was used to calibrate label‐free quantification values for the proteome in absolute terms, thus improving relative quantification between the two conditions. This study significantly enhances the largely transcriptomic data available in the field and illustrates a more nuanced response at the protein level. PMID:27252046

  8. The role of heat shock proteins in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: The therapeutic potential of Arimoclomol.

    PubMed

    Kalmar, Bernadett; Lu, Ching-Hua; Greensmith, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Arimoclomol is a hydroxylamine derivative, a group of compounds which have unique properties as co-inducers of heat shock protein expression, but only under conditions of cellular stress. Arimoclomol has been found to be neuroprotective in a number of neurodegenerative disease models, including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), and in mutant Superoxide Dismutase 1 (SOD1) mice that model ALS, Arimoclomol rescues motor neurons, improves neuromuscular function and extends lifespan. The therapeutic potential of Arimoclomol is currently under investigation in a Phase II clinical trial for ALS patients with SOD1 mutations. In this review we summarize the evidence for the neuroprotective effects of enhanced heat shock protein expression by Arimoclomol and other inducers of the Heat Shock Response. ALS is a complex, multifactorial disease affecting a number of cell types and intracellular pathways. Cells and pathways affected by ALS pathology and which may be targeted by a heat shock protein-based therapy are also discussed in this review. For example, protein aggregation is a characteristic pathological feature of neurodegenerative diseases including ALS. Enhanced heat shock protein expression not only affects protein aggregation directly, but can also lead to more effective clearance of protein aggregates via the unfolded protein response, the proteasome-ubiquitin system or by autophagy. However, compounds such as Arimoclomol have effects beyond targeting protein mis-handling and can also affect additional pathological mechanisms such as oxidative stress. Therefore, by targeting multiple pathological mechanisms, compounds such as Arimoclomol may be particularly effective in the development of a disease-modifying therapy for ALS and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23978556

  9. Discovery of NMS-E973 as novel, selective and potent inhibitor of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90).

    PubMed

    Brasca, Maria Gabriella; Mantegani, Sergio; Amboldi, Nadia; Bindi, Simona; Caronni, Dannica; Casale, Elena; Ceccarelli, Walter; Colombo, Nicoletta; De Ponti, Anna; Donati, Daniele; Ermoli, Antonella; Fachin, Gabriele; Felder, Eduard R; Ferguson, Ronald D; Fiorelli, Claudio; Guanci, Marco; Isacchi, Antonella; Pesenti, Enrico; Polucci, Paolo; Riceputi, Laura; Sola, Francesco; Visco, Carlo; Zuccotto, Fabio; Fogliatto, Gianpaolo

    2013-11-15

    Novel small molecule inhibitors of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) were discovered with the help of a fragment based drug discovery approach (FBDD) and subsequent optimization with a combination of structure guided design, parallel synthesis and application of medicinal chemistry principles. These efforts led to the identification of compound 18 (NMS-E973), which displayed significant efficacy in a human ovarian A2780 xenograft tumor model, with a mechanism of action confirmed in vivo by typical modulation of known Hsp90 client proteins, and with a favorable pharmacokinetic and safety profile. PMID:24100158

  10. Immunohistochemical evaluation of expression of heat shock proteins HSP70 and HSP90 in mammary gland neoplasms in bitches.

    PubMed

    Badowska-Kozakiewicz, A M; Malicka, E

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock proteins have essential roles in a number of pathophysiologic conditions including carcinogenesis and represent a group of novel molecular markers in cancer management. The aim of this study was to investigate heat shock protein expression in correlation with other neoplasm traits such as: histological type, differentiation grade, proliferative activity, estrogenic receptor expression, and cyclooxygenase-2 and p53 proteins. Material for the investigation comprised 133 tumors of the mammary gland collected from bitches. In total 14 adenomas, 66 complex carcinomas, 47 simple carcinomas and 6 solid carcinomas were collected. Evaluations were conducted with histopathological and immunohistochemical methods using suitable antibodies. Expression of heat shock protein 70 was observed in all types of evaluated neoplasms. A higher average number of cells undergoing expression of heat shock protein 70, which was statistically insignificant, was established in complex and simple cancers and in cancers with the 1st and the 2nd degree of histological malignancy. Expression of heat shock protein 90 was observed in all studied neoplasms; it was very insignificant in adenomas, compared to cancers, and the highest expression was established in the solid cancers, as well as in cancers with the 2nd degree of histological malignancy. This high expression of heat shock protein 90 was correlated with proliferative activity. The results suggest that heat shock protein 90 is involved in canine mammary gland carcinogenesis. The results also suggest that heat shock protein 90 may be a prognostic factor, but this requires detailed clinical confirmation. PMID:22844695

  11. EFFECT OF EXPOSURE PROTOCOL AND HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN EXPRESSION ON ARSENITE INDUCED GENOTOXICITY IN MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Effect of exposure protocol and heat shock protein expression on arsenite induced genotoxicity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    The genotoxic effects of arsenic (As) are well accepted, yet its mechanism of action is not clearly defined. Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) protect...

  12. Calving traits of crossbred Brahman Cows are Associated with Heat Shock Protein 70 Genetic Polymorphisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives were to: 1) identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) located in the promoter region of the bovine heat shock protein 70 gene, and 2) evaluate associations between Hsp70 SNP and calving rates of Brahman-influenced cows. Specific primers were designed for PCR amplification of a 539 b...

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of heat shock proteins in Glassy-winged sharpshooter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four heat shock protein transcripts were produced from the glassy-winged sharpshooter Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) which is the major vector of Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of Pierce’s disease of grapes. As genomic information has continued to be produced resea...

  14. Heat shock proteins as a target for phylogenetic analysis of Homalodisca vitripennis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production of genomic data from the glassy-winged sharpshooter has identified a set of heat shock proteins which may be used to further the understanding of leafhopper biology and genetics. The glassy-winged sharpshooter, GWSS, Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar)(Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), is the major ...

  15. THE EFFECTS OF HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 (HSP70) AND EXPOSURE PROTOCOL ON ARSENITE INDUCED GENOTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Effects of Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) and Exposure Protocol on Arsenite Induced Genotoxicity

    Barnes, J.A.1,2, Collins, B.W.2, Dix, D.J.3 and Allen J.W2.
    1National Research Council, 2Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, 3Reproductive Toxicology Division, Office...

  16. CHEMOSENSITIZATION BY A NON-APOPTOGENIC HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70-BINDING APOPTOSIS INDUCING FACTOR MUTANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemosensitization by a non-apoptogenic heat shock protein 70-binding apoptosis inducing factor mutant

    Abstract
    HSP70 inhibits apoptosis by neutralizing the caspase activator Apaf-1 and by interacting with apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), a mitochondrial flavoprotein wh...

  17. Upregulation of Heat Shock Proteins is Essential for Cold Survival during Insect Diapause

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diapause, the dormancy common to overwintering insects, evokes a unique pattern of gene expression. In the flesh fly most, but not all, of the fly’s heat shock proteins (Hsps) are upregulated. The diapause upregulated Hsps include two members of the Hsp70 family, one member of the Hsp60 family (TC...

  18. Axonal maintenance, glia, exosomes, and heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Tytell, Michael; Lasek, Raymond J; Gainer, Harold

    2016-01-01

    Of all cellular specializations, the axon is especially distinctive because it is a narrow cylinder of specialized cytoplasm called axoplasm with a length that may be orders of magnitude greater than the diameter of the cell body from which it originates. Thus, the volume of axoplasm can be much greater than the cytoplasm in the cell body. This fact raises a logistical problem with regard to axonal maintenance. Many of the components of axoplasm, such as soluble proteins and cytoskeleton, are slowly transported, taking weeks to months to travel the length of axons longer than a few millimeters after being synthesized in the cell body. Furthermore, this slow rate of supply suggests that the axon itself might not have the capacity to respond fast enough to compensate for damage to transported macromolecules. Such damage is likely in view of the mechanical fragility of an axon, especially those innervating the limbs, as rapid limb motion with high impact, like running, subjects the axons in the limbs to considerable mechanical force. Some researchers have suggested that local, intra-axonal protein synthesis is the answer to this problem. However, the translational state of axonal RNAs remains controversial. We suggest that glial cells, which envelop all axons, whether myelinated or not, are the local sources of replacement and repair macromolecules for long axons. The plausibility of this hypothesis is reinforced by reviewing several decades of work on glia-axon macromolecular transfer, together with recent investigations of exosomes and other extracellular vesicles, as vehicles for the transmission of membrane and cytoplasmic components from one cell to another. PMID:26962444

  19. Axonal maintenance, glia, exosomes, and heat shock proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tytell, Michael; Lasek, Raymond J.; Gainer, Harold

    2016-01-01

    Of all cellular specializations, the axon is especially distinctive because it is a narrow cylinder of specialized cytoplasm called axoplasm with a length that may be orders of magnitude greater than the diameter of the cell body from which it originates. Thus, the volume of axoplasm can be much greater than the cytoplasm in the cell body. This fact raises a logistical problem with regard to axonal maintenance. Many of the components of axoplasm, such as soluble proteins and cytoskeleton, are slowly transported, taking weeks to months to travel the length of axons longer than a few millimeters after being synthesized in the cell body. Furthermore, this slow rate of supply suggests that the axon itself might not have the capacity to respond fast enough to compensate for damage to transported macromolecules. Such damage is likely in view of the mechanical fragility of an axon, especially those innervating the limbs, as rapid limb motion with high impact, like running, subjects the axons in the limbs to considerable mechanical force. Some researchers have suggested that local, intra-axonal protein synthesis is the answer to this problem. However, the translational state of axonal RNAs remains controversial. We suggest that glial cells, which envelop all axons, whether myelinated or not, are the local sources of replacement and repair macromolecules for long axons. The plausibility of this hypothesis is reinforced by reviewing several decades of work on glia-axon macromolecular transfer, together with recent investigations of exosomes and other extracellular vesicles, as vehicles for the transmission of membrane and cytoplasmic components from one cell to another. PMID:26962444

  20. Specific Binding of Tetratricopeptide Repeat Proteins to Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) and Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) Is Regulated by Affinity and Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Assimon, Victoria A; Southworth, Daniel R; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2015-12-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) require the help of tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain-containing cochaperones for many of their functions. Each monomer of Hsp70 or Hsp90 can interact with only a single TPR cochaperone at a time, and each member of the TPR cochaperone family brings distinct functions to the complex. Thus, competition for TPR binding sites on Hsp70 and Hsp90 appears to shape chaperone activity. Recent structural and biophysical efforts have improved our understanding of chaperone-TPR contacts, focusing on the C-terminal EEVD motif that is present in both chaperones. To better understand these important protein-protein interactions on a wider scale, we measured the affinity of five TPR cochaperones, CHIP, Hop, DnaJC7, FKBP51, and FKBP52, for the C-termini of four members of the chaperone family, Hsc70, Hsp72, Hsp90α, and Hsp90β, in vitro. These studies identified some surprising selectivity among the chaperone-TPR pairs, including the selective binding of FKBP51/52 to Hsp90α/β. These results also revealed that other TPR cochaperones are only able to weakly discriminate between the chaperones or between their paralogs. We also explored whether mimicking phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues near the EEVD motif might impact affinity and found that pseudophosphorylation had selective effects on binding to CHIP but not other cochaperones. Together, these findings suggest that both intrinsic affinity and post-translational modifications tune the interactions between the Hsp70 and Hsp90 proteins and the TPR cochaperones. PMID:26565746

  1. Recruitment of phosphorylated small heat shock protein Hsp27 to nuclear speckles without stress

    SciTech Connect

    Bryantsev, A.L.; Chechenova, M.B.; Shelden, E.A. . E-mail: eshelden@wsu.edu

    2007-01-01

    During stress, the mammalian small heat shock protein Hsp27 enters cell nuclei. The present study examines the requirements for entry of Hsp27 into nuclei of normal rat kidney (NRK) renal epithelial cells, and for its interactions with specific nuclear structures. We find that phosphorylation of Hsp27 is necessary for the efficient entry into nuclei during heat shock but not sufficient for efficient nuclear entry under control conditions. We further report that Hsp27 is recruited to an RNAse sensitive fraction of SC35 positive nuclear speckles, but not other intranuclear structures, in response to heat shock. Intriguingly, Hsp27 phosphorylation, in the absence of stress, is sufficient for recruitment to speckles found in post-anaphase stage mitotic cells. Additionally, pseudophosphorylated Hsp27 fused to a nuclear localization peptide (NLS) is recruited to nuclear speckles in unstressed interphase cells, but wildtype and nonphosphorylatable Hsp27 NLS fusion proteins are not. The expression of NLS-Hsp27 mutants does not enhance colony forming abilities of cells subjected to severe heat shock, but does regulate nuclear speckle morphology. These data demonstrate that phosphorylation, but not stress, mediates Hsp27 recruitment to an RNAse soluble fraction of nuclear speckles and support a site-specific role for Hsp27 within the nucleus.

  2. Heat Shock Protein 72 Antagonizes STAT3 Signaling to Inhibit Fibroblast Accumulation in Renal Fibrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Cao, Shirong; Li, Huiyan; Peng, Xuan; Wang, Yating; Fan, Jinjin; Wang, Yihan; Zhuang, Shougang; Yu, Xueqing; Mao, Haiping

    2016-04-01

    Heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) has been shown to attenuate unilateral ureteral obstruction-induced kidney fibrosis. It remains unknown whether HSP72 has direct effects on fibroblast proliferation in the renal fibrotic evolution. Herein, we first confirmed that increased HSP72 expression occurred in fibrotic human kidneys. Using three different animal models of kidney fibrosis, pharmacological down-regulation or genetic deletion of endogenous HSP72 expression exacerbated STAT3 phosphorylation, fibroblast proliferation, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. In contrast, treatment with geranylgeranyl acetone, a specific inducer of HSP72, reduced phosphorylated STAT3 and protected animals from kidney fibrosis. In cultured renal interstitial fibroblasts, overexpression of HSP72 blocked transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced cell activation and proliferation, as evidenced by inhibiting expression of α-smooth muscle actin, fibronectin, and collagen I/III, as well as by reducing cell numbers and DNA synthesis. Mechanical studies showed that overexpressed HSP72 attenuated TGF-β-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of STAT3 and its downstream protein expression. However, siRNA knockdown of HSP72 increased TGF-β-induced STAT3 activity and fibroblast proliferation. Ectopic expression of a constitutively active STAT3 conferred resistance to HSP72 inhibition of fibroblast proliferation. Thus, HSP72 blocks fibroblast activation and proliferation in renal fibrosis via targeting the STAT3 pathway and may serve as a novel therapeutic agent for chronic kidney disease regardless of the etiology. PMID:26851345

  3. Small Heat Shock Protein Responses Differ between Chaparral Shrubs from Contrasting Microclimates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Knight, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Smore » mall heat shock protein (sHsp) responses were studied for two evergreen perennial shrubs in the northern California chaparral; one common on warm, south-facing slopes ( Ceanothus cuneatus ), and the other on cooler, north-facing slopes ( Prunus ilicifolia ).mall Hsp expression was induced experimentally for field collected leaves. Leaf collections were made where the species co-occur.mall Hsp expression was quantified using two antibodies, one specific to a chloroplast 22 kD sHsp and another that detects a broad range of sHsps. Differences between chloroplast sHsp accumulation, which protects thermally labile proteins in PSII, and the general sHsp response were examined. The species from the cooler microclimate, Prunus , had a lower induction temperature and accumulated greater levels of sHsps at low temperatures. Both Prunus and Ceanothus reached peak sHsp expression at 42 ∘ C . The species from the warmer microclimate, Ceanothus , had greater sHsp expression at higher temperatures. Chloroplast sHsp expression generally tracked sHsp expression in Ceanothus , but in Prunus general Hsps were elevated before chloroplast sHsps. Variation between species for sHsp expression (induction temperatures, accumulation levels, and the duration of expression) coupled with the costs of Hsp synthesis, may contribute to differences in the abundance and distribution of plants across environmental gradients.« less

  4. Role of Heat Shock Proteins in Protection from and Pathogenesis of Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zügel, Ulrich; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.

    1999-01-01

    Increased synthesis of heat shock proteins (hsp) occurs in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells when they are exposed to stress. By increasing their hsp content, cells protect themselves from lethal assaults, primarily because hsp interfere with the uncontrolled protein unfolding that occurs under stress. However, hsp are not produced only by stressed cells; some hsp are synthesized constitutively and perform important housekeeping functions. Accordingly, hsp are involved in the assembly of molecules which play important roles in the immune system. It is not surprising that due to their wide distribution and their homology among different species, hsp represent target antigens of the immune response. Frequent confrontation of the immune system with conserved regions of hsp which are shared by various microbial pathogens can potentiate antimicrobial immunity. However, long-term confrontation of the immune system with hsp antigens which are similar in the host and invaders may convert the immune response against these host antigens and promote autoimmune disease. This review provides an overview of the role of hsp in immunity with a focus on infectious and autoimmune diseases. PMID:9880473

  5. Role of Heat-Shock Proteins in Cellular Function and in the Biology of Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Shraddha; Thakur, Raman; Shankar, Jata

    2015-01-01

    Stress (biotic or abiotic) is an unfavourable condition for an organism including fungus. To overcome stress, organism expresses heat-shock proteins (Hsps) or chaperons to perform biological function. Hsps are involved in various routine biological processes such as transcription, translation and posttranslational modifications, protein folding, and aggregation and disaggregation of proteins. Thus, it is important to understand holistic role of Hsps in response to stress and other biological conditions in fungi. Hsp104, Hsp70, and Hsp40 are found predominant in replication and Hsp90 is found in transcriptional and posttranscriptional process. Hsp90 and Hsp70 in combination or alone play a major role in morphogenesis and dimorphism. Heat stress in fungi expresses Hsp60, Hsp90, Hsp104, Hsp30, and Hsp10 proteins, whereas expression of Hsp12 protein was observed in response to cold stress. Hsp30, Hsp70, and Hsp90 proteins showed expression in response to pH stress. Osmotic stress is controlled by small heat-shock proteins and Hsp60. Expression of Hsp104 is observed under high pressure conditions. Out of these heat-shock proteins, Hsp90 has been predicted as a potential antifungal target due to its role in morphogenesis. Thus, current review focuses on role of Hsps in fungi during morphogenesis and various stress conditions (temperature, pH, and osmotic pressure) and in antifungal drug tolerance. PMID:26881084

  6. Purification of heat shock protein 90 from calf uterus and rat liver and characterization of the highly hydrophobic region.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, M; Saito, H; Yamamoto, M; Korach, K S; Hirogome, T; Sugano, H

    1989-07-21

    Heat shock protein 90 was purified from calf uterus and rat liver. Both heat shock protein 90s had similar molecular weights, as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, of Mr 87,000 and 88,000, isoelectric points of 5.2, and Stokes radii of 6.7 and 6.5 nm, respectively. Heat shock protein 90 bound to phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B even at low ionic strength, and also bound to butyl-Toyopearl at high ionic strength. Heat shock protein 90 bound to phenyl-Sepharose could be eluted with a buffer containing organic solvents or detergents such as 2-propanol, dioxane, dimethylformamide, methyl cellosolve, 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate or Triton X-100, but not with ionic salts such as 1 M KCl. These results suggest that heat shock protein 90 possesses a significant hydrophobic region on the surface of the molecule. Hydrophobicities of heat shock protein 90 and 4S calf uterine estrogen receptor were both decreased by formation of a 8 S estrogen receptor complex. The role of the hydrophobic region of heat shock protein 90 in the interaction with estrogen receptor and other proteins is discussed. PMID:2752033

  7. Discovery of Benzisoxazoles as Potent Inhibitors of Chaperone Heat Shock Protein 90

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsamy, Ariamala; Shi, Mengxiao; Golas, Jennifer; Vogan, Erik; Jacob, Jaison; Johnson, Mark; Lee, Frederick; Nilakantan, Ramaswamy; Petersen, Roseann; Svenson, Kristin; Chopra, Rajiv; Tam, May S.; Wen, Yingxia; Ellingboe, John; Arndt, Kim; Boschelli, Frank

    2008-08-11

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone that is responsible for activating many signaling proteins and is a promising target in tumor biology. We have identified small-molecule benzisoxazole derivatives as Hsp90 inhibitors. Crystallographic studies show that these compounds bind in the ATP binding pocket interacting with the Asp93. Structure based optimization led to the identification of potent analogues, such as 13, with good biochemical profiles.

  8. Heat shock proteins in relation to heat stress tolerance of creeping bentgrass at different N levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kehua; Zhang, Xunzhong; Goatley, Mike; Ervin, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is a primary factor causing summer bentgrass decline. Changes in gene expression at the transcriptional and/or translational level are thought to be a fundamental mechanism in plant response to environmental stresses. Heat stress redirects protein synthesis in higher plants and results in stress protein synthesis, particularly heat shock proteins (HSPs). The goal of this work was to analyze the expression pattern of major HSPs in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) during different heat stress periods and to study the influence of nitrogen (N) on the HSP expression patterns. A growth chamber study on 'Penn-A4' creeping bentgrass subjected to 38/28°C day/night for 50 days, was conducted with four nitrate rates (no N-0, low N-2.5, medium N-7.5, and high N-12.5 kg N ha-1) applied biweekly. Visual turfgrass quality (TQ), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), shoot electrolyte leakage (ShEL), and root viability (RV) were monitored, along with the expression pattern of HSPs. There was no difference in measured parameters between treatments until week seven, except TQ at week five. At week seven, grass at medium N had better TQ, NDVI, and Fv/Fm accompanied by lower ShEL and higher RV, suggesting a major role in improved heat tolerance. All the investigated HSPs (HSP101, HSP90, HSP70, and sHSPs) were up-regulated by heat stress. Their expression patterns indicated cooperation between different HSPs and their roles in bentgrass thermotolerance. In addition, their production seems to be resource dependent. This study could further improve our understanding about how different N levels affect bentgrass thermotolerance. PMID:25050702

  9. Reactive oxygen species promote heat shock protein 90-mediated HBV capsid assembly.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Sik; Seo, Hyun Wook; Jung, Guhung

    2015-02-13

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and has been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). ROS are also an important factor in HCC because the accumulated ROS leads to abnormal cell proliferation and chromosome mutation. In oxidative stress, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and glutathione (GSH) function as part of the defense mechanism. Hsp90 prevents cellular component from oxidative stress, and GSH acts as antioxidants scavenging ROS in the cell. However, it is not known whether molecules regulated by oxidative stress are involved in HBV capsid assembly. Based on the previous study that Hsp90 facilitates HBV capsid assembly, which is an important step for the packing of viral particles, here, we show that ROS enrich Hsp90-driven HBV capsid formation. In cell-free system, HBV capsid assembly was facilitated by ROS with Hsp90, whereas it was decreased without Hsp90. In addition, GSH inhibited the function of Hsp90 to decrease HBV capsid assembly. Consistent with the result of cell-free system, ROS and buthionine sulfoximine (BS), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, increased HBV capsid formation in HepG2.2.15 cells. Thus, our study uncovers the interplay between ROS and Hsp90 during HBV capsid assembly. PMID:25576869

  10. Heat shock protein inhibitors, 17-DMAG and KNK437, enhance arsenic trioxide-induced mitotic apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yichen; Yen Wenyen; Lee, T.-C. Yih, L.-H.

    2009-04-15

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has recently emerged as a promising therapeutic agent in leukemia because of its ability to induce apoptosis. However, there is no sufficient evidence to support its therapeutic use for other types of cancers. In this study, we investigated if, and how, 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin (17-DMAG), an antagonist of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), and KNK437, a HSP synthesis inhibitor, potentiated the cytotoxic effect of ATO. Our results showed that cotreatment with ATO and either 17-DMAG or KNK437 significantly increased ATO-induced cell death and apoptosis. siRNA-mediated attenuation of the expression of the inducible isoform of HSP70 (HSP70i) or HSP90{alpha}/{beta} also enhanced ATO-induced apoptosis. In addition, cotreatment with ATO and 17-DMAG or KNK437 significantly increased ATO-induced mitotic arrest and ATO-induced BUBR1 phosphorylation and PDS1 accumulation. Cotreatment also significantly increased the percentage of mitotic cells with abnormal mitotic spindles and promoted metaphase arrest as compared to ATO treatment alone. These results indicated that 17-DMAG or KNK437 may enhance ATO cytotoxicity by potentiating mitotic arrest and mitotic apoptosis possibly through increased activation of the spindle checkpoint.

  11. Nucleopolyhedroviruses (NPV) induce the expression of small heat shock protein 25.4 in Antheraea pernyi.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Congfen; Zhu, Baojian; Dai, Li Shang; Liu, Chaoliang; Luo, Xuegang

    2016-10-15

    Nucleopolyhedroviruses (NPVs) is one group of Baculoviruses. The infection of NPV in silkworm is often lethal. To investigate the effective measures to stop the infection of NPV, we cloned cDNA encoding small heat shock protein 25.4 in Antheraea pernyi (Ap-HSP25.4). The translated amino acid sequence consisted of 223 residues with a calculated molecular mass of 25.4kDa and an isoelectronic point (pI) of 4.93. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to investigate the expression patterns and distribution profiles of Ap-sHSP25.4 before and after challenged with NPV. We found that the inhibitors of eicosanoid synthesis could suppress the transcription of Ap-sHSP25.4 in the fat body in a dose dependent manner. And arachidonic acid induced the expression of Ap-sHSP25.4. Thus, we concluded that sHSPs may be promising candidates to boost insect immunity in practice. PMID:27265031

  12. Protein Folding in the Cytoplasm and the Heat Shock Response

    PubMed Central

    Vabulas, R. Martin; Raychaudhuri, Swasti; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit; Hartl, F. Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Proteins generally must fold into precise three-dimensional conformations to fulfill their biological functions. In the cell, this fundamental process is aided by molecular chaperones, which act in preventing protein misfolding and aggregation. How this machinery assists newly synthesized polypeptide chains in navigating the complex folding energy landscape is now being understood in considerable detail. The mechanisms that ensure the maintenance of a functional proteome under normal and stress conditions are also of great medical relevance, as the aggregation of proteins that escape the cellular quality control underlies a range of debilitating diseases, including many age-of-onset neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:21123396

  13. FTSJ2, a Heat Shock-Inducible Mitochondrial Protein, Suppresses Cell Invasion and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ken-Yo; Liu, Fang-Chueh; Chong, Kowit-Yu; Cheng, Winston T. K.; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA large subunit methyltransferase J (RrmJ), an Escherichia coli heat shock protein, is responsible for 2′-O-ribose methylation in 23S rRNA. In mammals, three close homologs of RrmJ have been identified and have been designated as FTSJ1, FTSJ2 and FTSJ3; however, little is known about these genes. In this study, we characterized the mammalian FTSJ2, which was the most related protein to RrmJ in a phylogenetic analysis that had similar amino acid sequence features and tertiary protein structures of RrmJ. FTSJ2 was first identified in this study as a nucleus encoded mitochondrial protein that preserves the heat shock protein character in mammals in which the mRNA expressions was increased in porcine lung tissues and A549 cells after heat shock treatment. In addition, a recent study in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) suggested that the FTSJ2 gene is located in a novel oncogenic locus. However, our results demonstrate that the expression of FTSJ2 mRNA was decreased in the more invasive subline (CL1-5) of the lung adenocarcinoma cells (CL1) compared with the less invasive subline (CL1-0), and overexpression of FTSJ2 resulted in the inhibition of cell invasion and migration in the rhabdomyosarcoma cell (TE671). In conclusion, our findings indicate that mammalian FTSJ2 is a mitochondrial ortholog of E. coli RrmJ and conserves the heat shock protein properties. Moreover, FTSJ2 possesses suppressive effects on the invasion and migration of cancer cells. PMID:24595062

  14. Hsp42 is the general small heat shock protein in the cytosol of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Haslbeck, Martin; Braun, Nathalie; Stromer, Thusnelda; Richter, Bettina; Model, Natascha; Weinkauf, Sevil; Buchner, Johannes

    2004-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are ubiquitous molecular chaperones that prevent the unspecific aggregation of proteins. So far, Hsp26 was the only unambiguously identified member of the sHsp family in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show here that the sHsp system in the cytosol of S. cerevisiae consists of two proteins, Hsp26 and Hsp42. Hsp42 forms large dynamic oligomers with a barrel-like structure. In contrast to Hsp26, which functions predominantly at heat shock temperatures, Hsp42 is active as a chaperone under all conditions tested in vivo and in vitro. Under heat shock conditions, both Hsp42 and Hsp26 suppress the aggregation of one-third of the cytosolic proteins. This subset is about 90% overlapping for Hsp42 and Hsp26. The sHsp substrates belong to different biochemical pathways. This indicates a general protective function of sHsps for proteome stability in S. cerevisiae. Consistent with this observation, sHsp knockout strains show phenotypical defects. Taken together, our results define Hsp42 as an important player for protein homeostasis at physiological and under stress conditions. PMID:14749732

  15. Heat Shock Proteins: Intestinal Gatekeepers that Are Influenced by Dietary Components and the Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haoyu; Dicksved, Johan; Lundh, Torbjörn; Lindberg, Jan Erik

    2014-01-01

    Trillions of microorganisms that inhabit the intestinal tract form a diverse and intricate ecosystem with a deeply embedded symbiotic relationship with their hosts. As more detailed information on gut microbiota complexity and functional diversity accumulates, we are learning more about how diet-microbiota interactions can influence the immune system within and outside the gut and host health in general. Heat shock proteins are a set of highly conserved proteins that are present in all types of cells, from microbes to mammals. These proteins carry out crucial intracellular housekeeping functions and unexpected extracellular immuno-regulatory features in order to maintain the mucosal barrier integrity and gut homeostasis. It is becoming evident that the enteric microbiota is one of the major determinants of heat shock protein production in intestinal epithelial cells. This review will focus on the interactions between diet, gut microbiota and their role for regulating heat shock protein production and, furthermore, how these interactions influence the immune system and the integrity of the mucosal barrier. PMID:25437614

  16. Anti-heat shock protein autoantibody profiling in breast cancer using customized protein microarray.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liu; Gehin, Thomas; Chevolot, Yann; Souteyrand, Eliane; Mangé, Alain; Solassol, Jérôme; Laurenceau, Emmanuelle

    2016-02-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are over-expressed in a wide range of human cancers. It results in the stimulation of the immune system and consequently in elevated concentration of anti-HSP autoantibodies. Elevated anti-HSP autoantibodies were found in breast cancer patients, and they are associated with tumor metastasis. Therefore, screening these autoantibodies could be of diagnostic and prognostic values. Protein microarrays have already demonstrated their great potential as a diagnostic tool. However, protein diversity requires optimization of the microarray fabrication to achieve high sensitivity and specificity. In this study, seven HSPs were immobilized on six different surface chemistries. After evaluation and optimization with purified antibodies of the six surface chemistries, two surfaces were selected to detect anti-HSP autoantibodies in breast cancer sera. Multiplex detection of anti-HSP autoantibodies allowed discrimination of breast cancer patients (50) from healthy controls (26) with a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 100%. PMID:26715250

  17. Altered phosphorylation of. tau. protein in heat-shocked rats and patients with Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Papasozomenos, S.C.; Yuan Su Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX )

    1991-05-15

    Six hours after heat shocking 2- to 3-month-old male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at 42C for 15 min, the authors analyzed {tau} protein immunoreactivity in SDS extracts of cerebrums and peripheral nerves by using immunoblot analysis and immunohistochemistry with the anti-{tau} monoclonal antibody Tau-1, which recognizes a phosphate-dependent nonphosphorylated epitope, and with {sup 125}I-labeled protein A. In the cerebal extracts, the authors found altered phosphorylation of {tau} in heat-shocked females, characterized by a marked reduction in the amount of nonphosphorylated {tau}, a doubling of the ratio of total (phosphorylated plus nonphosphorylated) {tau} to nonphosphorylated {tau}, and the appearance of the slowest moving phosphorylated {tau} polypeptide (68 kDa). Similar, but milder, changes were observed in male rats. Quantitative immunoblot analysis of cortex and the underlying white matter with Tau-1 and {sup 125}I-labeled protein A showed that the amount of phosphorylated {tau} progressively increased in the Alzheimer disease-affected cerebral cortex, while concurrently a proportionally lesser amount of {tau} entered the white matter axons. The similar findings for the rat heat-shock model and Alzheimer disease suggest that life stressors may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Uptake of non-pathogenic E. coli by Arabidopsis induces downregulation of heat shock proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Susanne; Lonhienne, Thierry GA

    2010-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that non-pathogenic and non-symbiotic microbes E. coli and yeast are taken up by roots and used as a source of nutrients by the plant. Although this process appears to be beneficial for the plant, the nutritional gain of microbe incorporation has to exceed the energy expense of microbe uptake and digestion, and the question remains whether the presence of microbes triggers pathogen- and other stress-induced responses. Here, we present evidence that digesting microbes is accompanied by strong downregulation of genes linked to stress response in Arabidopsis. Genome-wide transcription analysis shows that uptake of E. coli by Arabidopsis roots is accompanied by a pronounced downregulation of heat shock proteins. Plants upregulate heat shock proteins in response to environmental stresses including temperature, salt, light and disease agents including microbial pathogens. The pronounced downregulation of heat shock proteins in the presence of E. coli indicates that uptake and subsequent digestion of microbes does not induce stress. Additionally it suggests that resources devoted to stress resistance in control plants may be re-allocated to the process of microbe uptake and digestion. This observation adds evidences to the notion that uptake of microbes is an active, purposeful and intentional behavior of the plant. PMID:21139429

  19. Dendritic-Tumor Fusion Cells Derived Heat Shock Protein70-Peptide Complex Has Enhanced Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Liu, Yunyan; Luo, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-derived heat shock protein70-peptide complexes (HSP70.PC-Tu) have shown great promise in tumor immunotherapy due to numerous advantages. However, large-scale phase III clinical trials showed that the limited immunogenicity remained to be enhanced. In previous research, we demonstrated that heat shock protein 70-peptide complexes (HSP70.PC-Fc) derived from dendritic cell (DC)-tumor fusions exhibit enhanced immunogenicity compared with HSP70.PCs from tumor cells. However, the DCs used in our previous research were obtained from healthy donors and not from the patient population. In order to promote the clinical application of these complexes, HSP70.PC-Fc was prepared from patient-derived DC fused directly with patient-derived tumor cells in the current study. Our results showed that compared with HSP70.PC-Tu, HSP70.PC-Fc elicited much more powerful immune responses against the tumor from which the HSP70 was derived, including enhanced T cell activation, and CTL responses that were shown to be antigen specific and HLA restricted. Our results further indicated that the enhanced immunogenicity is related to the activation of CD4+ T cells and increased association with other heat shock proteins, such as HSP90. Therefore, the current study confirms the enhanced immunogenicity of HSP70.PC derived from DC-tumor fusions and may provide direct evidence promoting their future clinical use. PMID:25961716

  20. Overexpression of heat shock factor 1 maintains TAR DNA binding protein 43 solubility via induction of inducible heat shock protein 70 in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Yi; Folorunso, Oluwarotimi; Taglialatela, Giulio; Pierce, Anson

    2016-07-01

    TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is a nuclear protein that has been shown to have altered homeostasis in the form of neuronal nuclear and cytoplasmic aggregates in some familial and almost all cases of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as well as 51% of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and 57% of Alzheimer's disease cases. Heat shock proteins (HSPs), such as HSP70, recognize misfolded or aggregated proteins and refold, disaggregate, or turn them over and are upregulated by the master transcription factor heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). Here, we explore the effect of HSF1 overexpression on proteotoxic stress-related alterations in TDP-43 solubility, proteolytic processing, and cytotoxicity. HSF1 overexpression reduced TDP-43-positive puncta concomitantly with upregulating HSP70 and HSP90 protein levels. HSF1 overexpression or pharmacological activation sustained TDP-43 solubility and significantly reduced truncation of TDP-43 in response to inhibition of the proteasome with Z-Leu-Leu-Leu-al, and this was reversed by HSF1 inhibition. HSF1 activation conferred protection against toxicity associated with TDP-43 C-terminal fragments without globally increasing the activity of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) while concomitantly reducing the induction of autophagy, suggesting that HSF1 protection is an early event. In support of this, inhibition of HSP70 ATPase activity further reduced TDP-43 solubility. HSF1 knockout significantly increased TDP-43 insolubility and accelerated TDP-43 fragmentation in response to proteotoxic stress. Overall, this study shows that HSF1 overexpression protects against TDP-43 pathology by upregulation of chaperones, especially HSP70, rather than enhancing autophagy or the UPS during times of proteotoxic stress. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26994698

  1. Antimyeloma activity of heat shock protein-90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mitsiades, Constantine S; Mitsiades, Nicholas S; McMullan, Ciaran J; Poulaki, Vassiliki; Kung, Andrew L; Davies, Faith E; Morgan, Gareth; Akiyama, Masaharu; Shringarpure, Reshma; Munshi, Nikhil C; Richardson, Paul G; Hideshima, Teru; Chauhan, Dharminder; Gu, Xuesong; Bailey, Charles; Joseph, Marie; Libermann, Towia A; Rosen, Neal S; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2006-02-01

    We show that multiple myeloma (MM), the second most commonly diagnosed hematologic malignancy, is responsive to hsp90 inhibitors in vitro and in a clinically relevant orthotopic in vivo model, even though this disease does not depend on HER2/neu, bcr/abl, androgen or estrogen receptors, or other hsp90 chaperoning clients which are hallmarks of tumor types traditionally viewed as attractive clinical settings for use of hsp90 inhibitors, such as the geldanamycin analog 17-AAG. This class of agents simultaneously suppresses in MM cells the expression and/or function of multiple levels of insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) and interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) signaling (eg, IKK/NF-kappaB, PI-3K/Akt, and Raf/MAPK) and downstream effectors (eg, proteasome, telomerase, and HIF-1alpha activities). These pleiotropic proapoptotic effects allow hsp90 inhibitors to abrogate bone marrow stromal cell-derived protection on MM tumor cells, and sensitize them to other anticancer agents, including cytotoxic chemotherapy and the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. These results indicate that hsp90 can be targeted therapeutically in neoplasias that may not express or depend on molecules previously considered to be the main hsp90 client proteins. This suggests a more general role for hsp90 in chaperoning tumor- or tissue-type-specific constellations of client proteins with critical involvement in proliferative and antiapoptotic cellular responses, and paves the way for more extensive future therapeutic applications of hsp90 inhibition in diverse neoplasias, including MM. PMID:16234364

  2. Hypothesis to explain poor outcomes in the ALLHAT and V-HeFT trials: decreased expression of heat shock proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Philip L

    2001-01-01

    An explanation for the higher incidence of cardiovascular disease and heart failure in the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) with doxazosin and the Vasodilator Heart Failure Trial (V-HeFT) with prazosin might be decreased expression of heat shock proteins. Heat shock proteins help to protect cells from ischemic injury by decreasing oxidation, suppressing cytokine action, refolding damaged proteins, and decreasing apoptosis. I hypothesize that α-adrenergic blockade decreases heat shock protein levels, thus making the heart and vascular system vulnerable to injury from pathologic processes such as ischemia, hypertension, oxidation or inflammation. Similarly, poor cardiovascular outcomes with calcium-channel blockers might be due to decreased expression of heat shock proteins. PMID:11806806

  3. Heat Shock Factor 1 Is a Substrate for p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases.

    PubMed

    Dayalan Naidu, Sharadha; Sutherland, Calum; Zhang, Ying; Risco, Ana; de la Vega, Laureano; Caunt, Christopher J; Hastie, C James; Lamont, Douglas J; Torrente, Laura; Chowdhry, Sudhir; Benjamin, Ivor J; Keyse, Stephen M; Cuenda, Ana; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T

    2016-09-15

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) monitors the structural integrity of the proteome. Phosphorylation at S326 is a hallmark for HSF1 activation, but the identity of the kinase(s) phosphorylating this site has remained elusive. We show here that the dietary agent phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) inhibits heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), the main negative regulator of HSF1; activates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK); and increases S326 phosphorylation, trimerization, and nuclear translocation of HSF1, and the transcription of a luciferase reporter, as well as the endogenous prototypic HSF1 target Hsp70. In vitro, all members of the p38 MAPK family rapidly and stoichiometrically catalyze the S326 phosphorylation. The use of stable knockdown cell lines and inhibitors indicated that among the p38 MAPKs, p38γ is the principal isoform responsible for the phosphorylation of HSF1 at S326 in cells. A protease-mass spectrometry approach confirmed S326 phosphorylation and unexpectedly revealed that p38 MAPK also catalyzes the phosphorylation of HSF1 at S303/307, previously known repressive posttranslational modifications. Thus, we have identified p38 MAPKs as highly efficient catalysts for the phosphorylation of HSF1. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the magnitude and persistence of activation of p38 MAPK are important determinants of the extent and duration of the heat shock response. PMID:27354066

  4. Heat Shock Factor 1 Is a Substrate for p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Dayalan Naidu, Sharadha; Sutherland, Calum; Zhang, Ying; Risco, Ana; de la Vega, Laureano; Caunt, Christopher J.; Hastie, C. James; Lamont, Douglas J.; Torrente, Laura; Chowdhry, Sudhir; Benjamin, Ivor J.; Keyse, Stephen M.; Cuenda, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) monitors the structural integrity of the proteome. Phosphorylation at S326 is a hallmark for HSF1 activation, but the identity of the kinase(s) phosphorylating this site has remained elusive. We show here that the dietary agent phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) inhibits heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), the main negative regulator of HSF1; activates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK); and increases S326 phosphorylation, trimerization, and nuclear translocation of HSF1, and the transcription of a luciferase reporter, as well as the endogenous prototypic HSF1 target Hsp70. In vitro, all members of the p38 MAPK family rapidly and stoichiometrically catalyze the S326 phosphorylation. The use of stable knockdown cell lines and inhibitors indicated that among the p38 MAPKs, p38γ is the principal isoform responsible for the phosphorylation of HSF1 at S326 in cells. A protease-mass spectrometry approach confirmed S326 phosphorylation and unexpectedly revealed that p38 MAPK also catalyzes the phosphorylation of HSF1 at S303/307, previously known repressive posttranslational modifications. Thus, we have identified p38 MAPKs as highly efficient catalysts for the phosphorylation of HSF1. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the magnitude and persistence of activation of p38 MAPK are important determinants of the extent and duration of the heat shock response. PMID:27354066

  5. Small Heat Shock Proteins Are Novel Common Determinants of Alcohol and Nicotine Sensitivity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, James R.; Rajamanoharan, Dayani; McCue, Hannah V.; Rankin, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Addiction to drugs is strongly determined by multiple genetic factors. Alcohol and nicotine produce distinct pharmacological effects within the nervous system through discrete molecular targets; yet, data from family and twin analyses support the existence of common genetic factors for addiction in general. The mechanisms underlying addiction, however, are poorly described and common genetic factors for alcohol and nicotine remain unidentified. We investigated the role that the heat shock transcription factor, HSF-1, and its downstream effectors played as common genetic modulators of sensitivity to addictive substances. Using Caenorhabditis elegans, an exemplary model organism with substance dose-dependent responses similar to mammals, we demonstrate that HSF-1 altered sensitivity to both alcohol and nicotine. Using a combination of a targeted RNAi screen of downstream factors and transgenic approaches we identified that these effects were contingent upon the constitutive neuronal expression of HSP-16.48, a small heat shock protein (HSP) homolog of human α-crystallin. Furthermore we demonstrated that the function of HSP-16.48 in drug sensitivity surprisingly was independent of chaperone activity during the heat shock stress response. Instead we identified a distinct domain within the N-terminal region of the HSP-16.48 protein that specified its function in comparison to related small HSPs. Our findings establish and characterize a novel genetic determinant underlying sensitivity to diverse addictive substances. PMID:26773049

  6. Small Heat Shock Proteins Are Novel Common Determinants of Alcohol and Nicotine Sensitivity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Johnson, James R; Rajamanoharan, Dayani; McCue, Hannah V; Rankin, Kim; Barclay, Jeff W

    2016-03-01

    Addiction to drugs is strongly determined by multiple genetic factors. Alcohol and nicotine produce distinct pharmacological effects within the nervous system through discrete molecular targets; yet, data from family and twin analyses support the existence of common genetic factors for addiction in general. The mechanisms underlying addiction, however, are poorly described and common genetic factors for alcohol and nicotine remain unidentified. We investigated the role that the heat shock transcription factor, HSF-1, and its downstream effectors played as common genetic modulators of sensitivity to addictive substances. Using Caenorhabditis elegans, an exemplary model organism with substance dose-dependent responses similar to mammals, we demonstrate that HSF-1 altered sensitivity to both alcohol and nicotine. Using a combination of a targeted RNAi screen of downstream factors and transgenic approaches we identified that these effects were contingent upon the constitutive neuronal expression of HSP-16.48, a small heat shock protein (HSP) homolog of human α-crystallin. Furthermore we demonstrated that the function of HSP-16.48 in drug sensitivity surprisingly was independent of chaperone activity during the heat shock stress response. Instead we identified a distinct domain within the N-terminal region of the HSP-16.48 protein that specified its function in comparison to related small HSPs. Our findings establish and characterize a novel genetic determinant underlying sensitivity to diverse addictive substances. PMID:26773049

  7. Heat shock protein-mediated protection against Cisplatin-induced hair cell death.

    PubMed

    Baker, Tiffany G; Roy, Soumen; Brandon, Carlene S; Kramarenko, Inga K; Francis, Shimon P; Taleb, Mona; Marshall, Keely M; Schwendener, Reto; Lee, Fu-Shing; Cunningham, Lisa L

    2015-02-01

    Cisplatin is a highly successful and widely used chemotherapy for the treatment of various solid malignancies in both adult and pediatric patients. Side effects of cisplatin treatment include nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity. Cisplatin ototoxicity results from damage to and death of cells in the inner ear, including sensory hair cells. We showed previously that heat shock inhibits cisplatin-induced hair cell death in whole-organ cultures of utricles from adult mice. Since heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is the most upregulated HSP in response to heat shock, we investigated the role of HSP70 as a potential protectant against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Our data using utricles from HSP70 (-/-) mice indicate that HSP70 is necessary for the protective effect of heat shock against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. In addition, constitutive expression of inducible HSP70 offered modest protection against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. We also examined a second heat-inducible protein, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, also called HSP32). HO-1 is an enzyme responsible for the catabolism of free heme. We previously showed that induction of HO-1 using cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX) inhibits aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. Here, we show that HO-1 also offers significant protection against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. HO-1 induction occurred primarily in resident macrophages, with no detectable expression in hair cells or supporting cells. Depletion of macrophages from utricles abolished the protective effect of HO-1 induction. Together, our data indicate that HSP induction protects against cisplatin-induced hair cell death, and they suggest that resident macrophages mediate the protective effect of HO-1 induction. PMID:25261194

  8. Two small heat shock protein genes in Apis cerana cerana: characterization, regulation, and developmental expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaohua; Yao, Pengbo; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2014-07-25

    In the present study, we identified and characterized two small heat shock protein genes from Apis cerana cerana, named AccHsp24.2 and AccHsp23.0. An alignment analysis showed that AccHsp24.2 and AccHsp23.0 share high similarity with other members of the α-crystallin/sHSP family, all of which contain the conserved α-crystallin domain. The recombinant AccHsp24.2 and AccHsp23.0 proteins were shown to have molecular chaperone activity by the malate dehydrogenase thermal aggregation assay. Three heat shock elements were detected in the 5'-flanking region of AccHsp24.2 and eleven in AccHsp23.0, and two Drosophila Broad-Complex genes for ecdysone steroid response sites were found in each of the genes. The presence of these elements suggests that the expression of these genes might be regulated by heat shock and ecdysone, which was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). The results revealed that the expression of the two genes could be induced by cold shock (4°C) and heat shock (37°C and 43°C) in an analogous manner, and AccHsp24.2 was more susceptible than AccHsp23.0. In addition, the expression of the two genes was induced by high concentrations of ecdysone in vitro and in vivo. The accumulation of AccHsp24.2 and AccHsp23.0 mRNA was also detected in different developmental stages and tissues. In spite of the differential expression at the same stage, these genes shared similar developmental patterns, suggesting that they are regulated by similar mechanisms. PMID:24835315

  9. Relationship between heat shock protein 70 expression and life span in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Schumpert, Charles; Handy, Indhira; Dudycha, Jeffry L; Patel, Rekha C

    2014-07-01

    The longevity of an organism is directly related to its ability to effectively cope with cellular stress. Heat shock response (HSR) protects the cells against accumulation of damaged proteins after exposure to elevated temperatures and also in aging cells. To understand the role of Hsp70 in regulating life span of Daphnia, we examined the expression of Hsp70 in two ecotypes that exhibit strikingly different life spans. Daphnia pulicaria, the long lived ecotype, showed a robust Hsp70 induction as compared to the shorter lived Daphnia pulex. Interestingly, the short-lived D. pulex isolates showed no induction of Hsp70 at the mid point in their life span. In contrast to this, the long-lived D. pulicaria continued to induce Hsp70 expression at an equivalent age. We further show that the Hsp70 expression was induced at transcriptional level in response to heat shock. The transcription factor responsible for Hsp70 induction, heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1), although present in aged organisms did not exhibit DNA-binding capability. Thus, the decline of Hsp70 induction in old organisms could be attributed to a decline in HSF-1's DNA-binding activity. These results for the first time, present a molecular analysis of the relationship between HSR and life span in Daphnia. PMID:24814302

  10. Relationship between heat shock protein 70 expression and life span in Daphnia

    PubMed Central

    Schumpert, Charles; Handy, Indhira; Dudycha, Jeffry L.; Patel, Rekha C.

    2014-01-01

    The longevity of an organism is directly related to its ability to effectively cope with cellular stress. Heat shock response (HSR) protects the cells against accumulation of damaged proteins after exposure to elevated temperatures and also in ageing cells. To understand the role of Hsp70 in regulating life span of Daphnia, we examined the expression of Hsp70 in two ecotypes that exhibit strikingly different life spans. D. pulicaria, the long lived ecotype, showed a robust Hsp70 induction as compared to the shorter lived D. pulex. Interestingly, the short-lived D. pulex isolates showed no induction of Hsp70 at the mid point in their life span. In contrast to this, the long-lived D. pulicaria continued to induce Hsp70 expression at an equivalent age. We further show that the Hsp70 expression was induced at transcriptional level in response to heat shock. The transcription factor responsible for Hsp70 induction, heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1), although present in aged organisms did not exhibit DNA-binding capability. Thus, the decline of Hsp70 induction in old organisms could be attributed to a decline in HSF-1’s DNA-binding activity. These results for the first time, present a molecular analysis of the relationship between HSR and life span in Daphnia. PMID:24814302

  11. Synthesis and Initial Evaluation of YM-08, a Blood-Brain Barrier Permeable Derivative of the Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) Inhibitor MKT-077, Which Reduces Tau Levels

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The molecular chaperone, heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), is an emerging drug target for treating neurodegenerative tauopathies. We recently found that one promising Hsp70 inhibitor, MKT-077, reduces tau levels in cellular models. However, MKT-077 does not penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB), limiting its use as either a clinical candidate or probe for exploring Hsp70 as a drug target in the central nervous system (CNS). We hypothesized that replacing the cationic pyridinium moiety in MKT-077 with a neutral pyridine might improve its clogP and enhance its BBB penetrance. To test this idea, we designed and synthesized YM-08, a neutral analogue of MKT-077. Like the parent compound, YM-08 bound to Hsp70 in vitro and reduced phosphorylated tau levels in cultured brain slices. Pharmacokinetic evaluation in CD1 mice showed that YM-08 crossed the BBB and maintained a brain/plasma (B/P) value of ∼0.25 for at least 18 h. Together, these studies suggest that YM-08 is a promising scaffold for the development of Hsp70 inhibitors suitable for use in the CNS. PMID:23472668

  12. Heat shock protein induction by certain chemical stressors is correlated with their cytotoxicity, lipophilicity and protein-denaturing capacity.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus-Steinmetz, U; Rensing, L

    1997-12-01

    Seven agents were analyzed with respect to their ability to induce heat shock protein (HSP) synthesis in C6 rat glioma cells. Induction of HSP synthesis was correlated with cytotoxicity and lipophilicity of the substances. In addition to the first four n-alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol and butanol) and phenol, whose capacity to induce HSP was analyzed earlier (Neuhaus-Steinmetz et al., 1994. Mol. Pharmacol. 45, 36-41), isopropanol, 1,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), diethylstilbestrol (DES), carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), rotenone, paracetamol and acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) induced HSP synthesis after a 1-h incubation at a substance-specific concentration. The maximal induction of HSPs was closely correlated with the cytotoxicity of all substances and occurred when cell viability was reduced to 75 +/- 11% of the controls. Cytotoxicity and the ability to induce HSP were correlated with the lipophilicity of the alcohols, phenol, rotenone and paracetamol. Calculation of the hypothetical membrane concentrations of these compounds yielded a nearly equal value (0.54 +/- 0.13 M), indicating that interaction of substances with lipophilic cellular compounds, such as membranes or lipophilic core regions of proteins, is a critical step leading to HSP induction. This assumption is supported by a correlation between HSP induction and protein denaturation by the different alcohols (Herskovits et al., 1970. J. Biol. Chem. 245, 2588-2598). We assume that the amount of misfolded proteins induced by these lipophilic agents is responsible for the induction of HSP synthesis. ASA, DNP and CCCP induced HSP at lower concentrations than substances with a similar lipophilicity, which may be due to effects which add to the misfolding of proteins or to other signal pathways. PMID:9355937

  13. Mitochondrial heat shock protein 70, a molecular chaperone for proteins encoded by mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrial heat shock protein 70 (mt-Hsp70) has been shown to play an important role in facilitating import into, as well as folding and assembly of nuclear-encoded proteins in the mitochondrial matrix. Here, we describe a role for mt-Hsp70 in chaperoning proteins encoded by mitochondrial DNA and synthesized within mitochondria. The availability of mt-Hsp70 function influences the pattern of proteins synthesized in mitochondria of yeast both in vivo and in vitro. In particular, we show that mt-Hsp70 acts in maintaining the var1 protein, the only mitochondrially encoded subunit of mitochondrial ribosomes, in an assembly competent state, especially under heat stress conditions. Furthermore, mt-Hsp70 helps to facilitate assembly of mitochondrially encoded subunits of the ATP synthase complex. By interacting with the ATP-ase 9 oligomer, mt-Hsp70 promotes assembly of ATP-ase 6, and thereby protects the latter protein from proteolytic degradation. Thus mt-Hsp70 by acting as a chaperone for proteins encoded by the mitochondrial DNA, has a critical role in the assembly of supra- molecular complexes. PMID:7962074

  14. Reactive oxygen species promote heat shock protein 90-mediated HBV capsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoon Sik Seo, Hyun Wook Jung, Guhung

    2015-02-13

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and has been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). ROS are also an important factor in HCC because the accumulated ROS leads to abnormal cell proliferation and chromosome mutation. In oxidative stress, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and glutathione (GSH) function as part of the defense mechanism. Hsp90 prevents cellular component from oxidative stress, and GSH acts as antioxidants scavenging ROS in the cell. However, it is not known whether molecules regulated by oxidative stress are involved in HBV capsid assembly. Based on the previous study that Hsp90 facilitates HBV capsid assembly, which is an important step for the packing of viral particles, here, we show that ROS enrich Hsp90-driven HBV capsid formation. In cell-free system, HBV capsid assembly was facilitated by ROS with Hsp90, whereas it was decreased without Hsp90. In addition, GSH inhibited the function of Hsp90 to decrease HBV capsid assembly. Consistent with the result of cell-free system, ROS and buthionine sulfoximine (BS), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, increased HBV capsid formation in HepG2.2.15 cells. Thus, our study uncovers the interplay between ROS and Hsp90 during HBV capsid assembly. - Highlights: • We examined H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH modulate HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates HBV capsid assembly in the presence of Hsp90. • GSH inhibits function of Hsp90 in facilitating HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH induce conformation change of Hsp90.

  15. Heat-shock protein 90 promotes nuclear transport of herpes simplex virus 1 capsid protein by interacting with acetylated tubulin.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Meigong; Zheng, Kai; Chen, Maoyun; Xiang, Yangfei; Jin, Fujun; Ma, Kaiqi; Qiu, Xianxiu; Wang, Qiaoli; Peng, Tao; Kitazato, Kaio; Wang, Yifei

    2014-01-01

    Although it is known that inhibitors of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) can inhibit herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection, the role of Hsp90 in HSV-1 entry and the antiviral mechanisms of Hsp90 inhibitors remain unclear. In this study, we found that Hsp90 inhibitors have potent antiviral activity against standard or drug-resistant HSV-1 strains and viral gene and protein synthesis are inhibited in an early phase. More detailed studies demonstrated that Hsp90 is upregulated by virus entry and it interacts with virus. Hsp90 knockdown by siRNA or treatment with Hsp90 inhibitors significantly inhibited the nuclear transport of viral capsid protein (ICP5) at the early stage of HSV-1 infection. In contrast, overexpression of Hsp90 restored the nuclear transport that was prevented by the Hsp90 inhibitors, suggesting that Hsp90 is required for nuclear transport of viral capsid protein. Furthermore, HSV-1 infection enhanced acetylation of α-tubulin and Hsp90 interacted with the acetylated α-tubulin, which is suppressed by Hsp90 inhibition. These results demonstrate that Hsp90, by interacting with acetylated α-tubulin, plays a crucial role in viral capsid protein nuclear transport and may provide novel insight into the role of Hsp90 in HSV-1 infection and offer a promising strategy to overcome drug-resistance. PMID:24901434

  16. Oligomers of Heat-Shock Proteins: Structures That Don’t Imply Function

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, William M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Frenkel, Daan

    2016-01-01

    Most proteins must remain soluble in the cytosol in order to perform their biological functions. To protect against undesired protein aggregation, living cells maintain a population of molecular chaperones that ensure the solubility of the proteome. Here we report simulations of a lattice model of interacting proteins to understand how low concentrations of passive molecular chaperones, such as small heat-shock proteins, suppress thermodynamic instabilities in protein solutions. Given fixed concentrations of chaperones and client proteins, the solubility of the proteome can be increased by tuning the chaperone–client binding strength. Surprisingly, we find that the binding strength that optimizes solubility while preventing irreversible chaperone binding also promotes the formation of weakly bound chaperone oligomers, although the presence of these oligomers does not significantly affect the thermodynamic stability of the solution. Such oligomers are commonly observed in experiments on small heat-shock proteins, but their connection to the biological function of these chaperones has remained unclear. Our simulations suggest that this clustering may not have any essential biological function, but rather emerges as a natural side-effect of optimizing the thermodynamic stability of the proteome. PMID:26928170

  17. Small heat shock proteins protect against {alpha}-synuclein-induced toxicity and aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Outeiro, Tiago Fleming; Klucken, Jochen; Strathearn, Katherine E.; Liu Fang; Nguyen, Paul; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Hyman, Bradley T.; McLean, Pamela J. . E-mail: touteiro@partners.org

    2006-12-22

    Protein misfolding and inclusion formation are common events in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Huntington's disease (HD). {alpha}-Synuclein (aSyn) is the main protein component of inclusions called Lewy bodies (LB) which are pathognomic of PD, Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and other diseases collectively known as LB diseases. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are one class of the cellular quality control system that mediate protein folding, remodeling, and even disaggregation. Here, we investigated the role of the small heat shock proteins Hsp27 and {alpha}B-crystallin, in LB diseases. We demonstrate, via quantitative PCR, that Hsp27 messenger RNA levels are {approx}2-3-fold higher in DLB cases compared to control. We also show a corresponding increase in Hsp27 protein levels. Furthermore, we found that Hsp27 reduces aSyn-induced toxicity by {approx}80% in a culture model while {alpha}B-crystallin reduces toxicity by {approx}20%. In addition, intracellular inclusions were immunopositive for endogenous Hsp27, and overexpression of this protein reduced aSyn aggregation in a cell culture model.

  18. Heat shock protein 70, heat shock protein 32, and vascular endothelial growth factor production and their effects on lipopolysaccharide-induced apoptosis in porcine aortic endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bernardini, Chiara; Zannoni, Augusta; Turba, Maria Elena; Fantinati, Paolo; Tamanini, Carlo; Bacci, Maria Laura; Forni, Monica

    2005-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a highly proactive molecule that causes in vivo a systemic inflammatory response syndrome and activates in vitro the inflammatory pathway in different cellular types, including endothelial cells (EC). Because the proinflammatory status could lead to EC injury and apoptosis, the expression of proinflammatory genes must be finely regulated through the induction of protective genes. This study aimed at determining whether an LPS exposure is effective in inducing apoptosis in primary cultures of porcine aortic endothelial cells and in stimulating heat shock protein (Hsp)70 and Hsp32 production as well as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion. Cells between third and eighth passage were exposed to 10 μg/mL LPS for 1, 7, 15, and 24 hours (time-course experiments) or to 1, 10, and 100 μg/mL LPS for 7 and 15 hours (dose-response experiments). Apoptosis was not affected by 1 μg/mL LPS but significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner with the highest LPS doses. Furthermore, apoptosis rate increased only till 15 hours of LPS exposure. LPS stimulated VEGF secretion in a dose-dependent manner; its effect became significant after 7 hours and reached a plateau after 15 hours. Both Hsp70 and Hsp32 expressions were induced by LPS in a dose-dependent manner after 7 hours. Subsequent studies were addressed to evaluate the protective role of Hsp32, Hsp70, and VEGF. Hemin, an Hsp32 inducer (5, 20, 50 μM), and recombinant VEGF (100 and 200 ng/mL), were added to the culture 2 hours before LPS (10 μg/mL for 24 hours); to induce Hsp70 expression, cells were heat shocked (42°C for 1 hour) 15 hours before LPS (10 μg/mL for 24 hours). Hemin exposure upregulated Hsp32 expression in a dose-dependent manner and protected cells against LPS-induced apoptosis. Heat shock (HS) stimulated Hsp70 expression but failed to reduce LPS-induced apoptosis; VEGF addition did not protect cells against LPS-induced apoptosis at any dose tested. Nevertheless

  19. Heat-shock protein-25/27 phosphorylation by the delta isoform of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Maizels, E T; Peters, C A; Kline, M; Cutler, R E; Shanmugam, M; Hunzicker-Dunn, M

    1998-01-01

    Small heat-shock proteins (sHSPs) are widely expressed 25-28 kDa proteins whose functions are dynamically regulated by phosphorylation. While recent efforts have clearly delineated a stress-responsive p38 mitogen-activated protein-kinase (MAPK)-dependent kinase pathway culminating in activation of the heat-shock (HSP)-kinases, mitogen-activated protein-kinase-activated protein kinase-2 and -3, not all sHSP phosphorylation events can be explained by the p38 MAPK-dependent pathway. The contribution of protein kinase C (PKC) to sHSP phosphorylation was suggested by early studies but later questioned on the basis of the reported poor ability of purified PKC to phosphorylate sHSP in vitro. The current study re-evaluates the role of PKC in sHSP phosphorylation in the light of the isoform complexity of the PKC family. We evaluated the sHSP phosphorylation status in rat corpora lutea obtained from two stages of pregnancy, mid-pregnancy and late-pregnancy, which express different levels of the novel PKC isoform, PKC-delta. Two-dimensional Western blot analysis showed that HSP-27 was more highly phosphorylated in vivo in corpora lutea of late pregnancy, corresponding to the developmental stage in which PKC-delta is abundant and active. Late-pregnant luteal extracts contained a lipid-sensitive HSP-kinase activity which exactly co-purified with PKC-delta using hydroxyapatite and S-Sepharose column chromatography. To determine whether there might be preferential phosphorylation of sHSP by a particular PKC isoform, purified recombinant PKC isoforms corresponding to those PKC isoforms detected in rat corpora lutea were evaluated for HSP-kinase activity in vitro. Recombinant PKC-delta effectively catalysed the phosphorylation of sHSP in vitro, and PKC-alpha was 30-50% as effective as an HSP-kinase; other PKCs tested (beta1, beta2, epsilon and zeta) were poor HSP-kinases. These results show that select PKC family members can function as direct HSP-kinases in vitro. Moreover, the

  20. Heat Shock Gene Expression Is Controlled Primarily at the Translational Level in Carrot Cells and Somatic Embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Apuya, NR; Zimmerman, JL

    1992-01-01

    We have determined that the synthesis of heat shock proteins is regulated ultimately at the translational level in heat-shocked carrot callus cells and somatic embryos. Polysome analysis revealed that heat-shocked callus cells do not translate most heat shock transcripts, which they abundantly synthesize and accumulate. By contrast, heat-shocked globular embryos accumulate low levels of heat shock mRNA but selectively translate more of the heat shock mRNA molecules compared to callus cells and embryos of later stages. The overall result of these different translational control schemes is that undifferentiated callus cells and globular embryos synthesize comparable levels of heat shock proteins even though they have large differences in heat shock transcript levels. PMID:12297657

  1. Effect of heat shock on S6 phosphorylation during the development of Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    da Silva, A M; Juliani, M H; Bonato, M C

    1987-11-01

    Changes in phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 during heat shock, induction of thermotolerance and recovery from heat shock at different stages of Blastocladiella emersonii development were investigated. Independently of the initial state of S6 phosphorylation (maximal or intermediate), a rapid and complete dephosphorylation of S6 is induced by heat shock and S6 remains unphosphorylated during the acquired thermotolerance. During recovery from heat shock rephosphorylation of S6 occurs always to the levels characteristic of that particular stage, coincidently with the turn off of heat shock protein synthesis. PMID:3454866

  2. Plasmodium falciparum heat shock protein 110 stabilizes the asparagine repeatrich parasite proteome during malarial fevers

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Vasant; Oksman, Anna; Pal, Priya; Lindquist, Susan; E. Goldberg, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    One-fourth of Plasmodium falciparum proteins have asparagine repeats that increase the propensity for aggregation, especially at elevated temperatures that occur routinely in malaria-infected patients. We report that a Plasmodium Asn repeat-containing protein (PFI1155w) formed aggregates in mammalian cells at febrile temperatures, as did a yeast Asn/Gln-rich protein (Sup35). Co-expression of the cytoplasmic P. falciparum heat shock protein 110 (PfHsp110c) prevented aggregation. Human or yeast orthologs were much less effective. All-Asn and all-Gln versions of Sup35 were protected from aggregation by PfHsp110c, suggesting that this chaperone is not limited to handling runs of Asn. PfHsp110c gene knockout parasites were not viable and conditional knockdown parasites died slowly in the absence of protein-stabilizing ligand. When exposed to brief heat shock, these knockdowns were unable to prevent aggregation of PFI1155w or Sup35 and died rapidly. We conclude that PfHsp110c protects the parasite from harmful effects of its asparagine repeat-rich proteome during febrile episodes. PMID:23250440

  3. Heat-shock protein 70 expression in shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis during thermal and immune-challenged stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhenyu; Jiao, Chuanzhen; Xiang, Jianhai

    2004-12-01

    Using western immunoblotting we obtained heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) induction data and distribution in different tissues from shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis during thermal and immune-challenged stresses. This is probably the first report of the effects of various stressors on the expression of HSP70 in shrimp. HSP70 was prominently induced in hepatopancreas and gills, but not in muscle, eyestalk and hemolymph, when the shrimp were exposed to heat shock and Vibrio anguillavium-challenged stresses. Cold shock and WSSV treatment had no significant effects on the levels of HSP70 expression in all tissues examined. HSP70 induction was greatest after 2 h exposure to heat shock stress, which was elevated after acute heat shock exposure of 10°C above ambient temperature.

  4. Role of TRP channels in the induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) by heating skin

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wen-Li; Yoshioka, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in skin are crucial for achieving temperature sensitivity to maintain internal temperature balance and thermal homeostasis, as well as to protect skin cells from environmental stresses such as infrared (IR) or near-infrared (NIR) radiation via heat shock protein (Hsp) production. However, the mechanisms by which IR and NIR activate TRP channels and produce Hsps intracellularly have been independently reported. In this review, we discuss the relationship between TRP channel activation and Hsp production, and introduce the roles of several skin TRP channels in the regulation of HSP production by IR and NIR exposure. PMID:27493511

  5. Levels of heat shock protein transcripts in normal follicles and ovarian follicular cysts.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Melisa M L; Alfaro, Natalia S; Salvetti, Natalia R; Stangaferro, Matías L; Rey, Florencia; Panzani, Carolina G; Ortega, Hugo H

    2011-11-01

    In the study, the gene expression of several heat shock proteins (HSPs) was determined in normal follicles and cystic follicles from cattle. A lower expression of HSP10 and HSP40 was observed in granulosa and theca cells of cysts compared to normal follicles. HSP27 was significantly less expressed in granulosa cells in cystic and large antral follicles than in other follicular categories. HSP60 and HSP90a expressions were highest in theca cells of cysts. However, HSP70 and HSP90b exhibited a lower expression in cysts than in healthy follicles. PMID:22139340

  6. Exogenous heat shock protein HSP70 reduces response of human neuroblastoma cells to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Yurinskaya, M M; Funikov, S Y; Evgen'ev, M B; Vinokurov, M G

    2016-07-01

    The effect of exogenous heat shock protein HSP70 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), TNFα secretion, and mRNA expression by human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. It was shown that exogenous HSP70 protects neuroblastoma cells from the action of LPS. The protection mechanism of HSP70 includes a reduction in the production of ROS and TNFα and a decrease in the expression of TLR4 and IL-1β mRNA in SK-N-SH cells induced by LPS. PMID:27599502

  7. M. paratuberculosis Heat Shock Protein 65 and Human Diseases: Bridging Infection and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Dow, Coad Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is the known infectious cause of Johne's disease, an enteric inflammatory disease mostly studied in ruminant animals. MAP has also been implicated in the very similar Crohn's disease of humans as well as sarcoidosis. Recently, MAP has been associated with juvenile sarcoidosis (Blau syndrome), autoimmune diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis, and multiple sclerosis. While it is intuitive to implicate MAP in granulomatous diseases where the microbe participates in the granuloma, it is more difficult to assign a role for MAP in diseases where autoantibodies are a primary feature. MAP may trigger autoimmune antibodies via its heat shock proteins. Mycobacterial heat shock protein 65 (HSP65) is an immunodominant protein that shares sequential and conformational elements with several human host proteins. This molecular mimicry is the proposed etiopathology by which MAP stimulates autoantibodies associated with autoimmune (type 1) diabetes, autoimmune (Hashimoto's) thyroiditis, and multiple sclerosis. This paper proposes that MAP is a source of mycobacterial HSP65 and acts as a trigger of autoimmune disease. PMID:23056923

  8. The role of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in radiation-induced immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Multhoff, Gabriele; Pockley, Alan G; Schmid, Thomas E; Schilling, Daniela

    2015-11-28

    Despite enormous progress in radiation technologies (high precision image-guided irradiation, proton irradiation, heavy ion irradiation) and radiotherapeutic concepts (hypofractionated irradiation schemes), the clinical outcome of radiotherapy in locally advanced and metastasized tumors and in hypoxic tumors which are radiation-resistant remains unsatisfactory. Given their key influence on a number of biological and immunological parameters, this article considers the influence of irradiation-induced stress proteins on radiation-induced immunomodulation. Depending on its location, the major stress-inducible Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) has been found to fulfill multiple roles. On the one hand, increased intracellular Hsp70 levels have been found to play a key role in the recovery from stress such as radio(chemo)therapy, and on the other hand extracellular Hsp70 proteins are potent stimulators of the innate immune system and mediators of anti-tumor immunity. Furthermore, if loaded with tumor-derived peptides, members of the Heat Shock Protein 70 (HSP70) and 90 (HSP90) families can stimulate the adaptive immune system via antigen cross-presentation. An irradiation-induced enhancement of the selective expression of a membrane form of Hsp70 on the surface of tumor cells which can act as a recognition structure for activated NK cells might have significant clinical relevance, in that the outcome of irradiation therapy for advanced tumors could be improved by combining it with cell-based and other immunotherapies that target this membrane form of Hsp70. PMID:25681671

  9. Heat shock proteins in hepatocellular carcinoma: Molecular mechanism and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cun; Zhang, Yurong; Guo, Kun; Wang, Ning; Jin, Haojie; Liu, Yinkun; Qin, Wenxin

    2016-04-15

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are highly conserved proteins, which are expressed at low levels under normal conditions, but significantly induced in response to cellular stresses. As molecular chaperones, HSPs play crucial roles in protein homeostasis, apoptosis, invasion and cellular signaling transduction. The induction of HSPs is an important part of heat shock response, which could help cancer cells to adapt to stress conditions. Because of the constant stress condition in tumor microenvironment, HSPs overexpression is widely reported in many human cancers. In light of the significance of HSPs for cancer cells to survive and obtain invasive phenotype under stress condition, HSPs are often associated with poor prognosis and treatment resistance in many types of human cancers. It has been described that upregulation of HSPs may serve as diagnostic and prognostic markers in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Targeting HSPs with specific inhibitor alone or in combination with chemotherapy regimens holds promise for the improvement of outcomes for HCC patients. In this review, we summarize the expression profiles, functions and molecular mechanisms of HSPs (HSP27, HSP70 and HSP90) as well as a HSP-like protein (clusterin) in HCC. In addition, we address progression and challenges in targeting these HSPs as novel therapeutic strategies in HCC. PMID:26853533

  10. Small heat shock protein message in etiolated Pea seedlings under altered gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talalaiev, O.

    Plants are subjected to various environmental changes during their life cycle To protect themselves against unfavorable influences plant cells synthesize several classes of small heat shock proteins sHsp ranging in size from 15 to 30 kDa This proteins are able to enhance the refolding of chemically denatured proteins in an ATP-independent manner in other words they can function as molecular chaperones The potential contribution of effects of space flight at the plant cellular and gene regulation level has not been characterized yet The object of our study is sHsp gene expression in etiolated Pisum sativum seedlings exposed to altered gravity and environmental conditions We designed primers to detect message for two inducible forms of the cytosolic small heat shock proteins sHsp 17 7 and sHsp 18 1 Applying the RT- PCR we explore sHsps mRNA in pea seedling cells subjected to two types of altered gravity achieved by centrifugation from 3 to 8g by clinorotation 2 rpm and temperature elevation 42oC Temperature elevation as the positive control significantly increased PsHspl7 7 PsHspl8 1 expression We investigate the expression of actin it was constant and comparable for unstressed controls for all variants Results are under discussion

  11. Variation in heat shock proteins within tropical and desert species of poeciliid fishes.

    PubMed

    Norris, C E; diIorio, P J; Schultz, R J; Hightower, L E

    1995-11-01

    The 70-kilodalton heat shock protein (hsp70) family of molecular chaperones, which contains both stress-inducible and normally abundant constitutive members, is highly conserved across distantly related taxa. Analysis of this protein family in individuals from an outbred population of tropical topminnows, Poeciliopsis gracilis, showed that while constitutive hsp70 family members showed no variation in protein isoforms, inducibly synthesized hsp70 was polymorphic. Several species of Poeciliopsis adapted to desert environments exhibited lower levels of inducible hsp70 polymorphism than the tropical species, but constitutive forms were identical to those in P. gracilis, as they were in the confamilial species Gambusia affinis. These differences suggest that inducible and constitutive members of this family are under different evolutionary constraints and may indicate differences in their function within the cell. Also, northern desert species of Poeciliopsis synthesize a subset of the inducible hsp70 isoforms seen in tropical species. This distribution supports the theory that ancestral tropical fish migrated northward and colonized desert streams; the subsequent decrease in variation of inducible hsp70 may have been due to genetic drift or a consequence of adaptation to the desert environment. Higher levels of variability were found when the 30-kilodalton heat shock protein (hsp30) family was analyzed within different strains of two desert species of Poeciliopsis and also in wild-caught individuals of Gambusia affinis. In both cases the distribution of hsp30 isoform diversity was similar to that seen previously with allozyme polymorphisms. PMID:8524039

  12. Macrocycles that inhibit the binding between heat shock protein 90 and TPR-containing proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ardi, Veronica C.; Alexander, Leslie D.; Johnson, Victoria; McAlpine, Shelli R.

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) accounts for 1–2% of the total proteins in normal cells and functions as a molecular chaperone that folds, assembles, and stabilizes client proteins. Hsp90 is over-expressed (3–6-fold increase) in stressed cells, including cancer cells, and regulates over 200 client and co-chaperone proteins. Hsp90 client proteins are involved in a plethora of cellular signaling events including numerous growth and apoptotic pathways. Since pathway-specific inhibitors can be problematic in drug-resistant cancers, shutting down multiple pathways at once is a promising approach when developing new therapeutics. Hsp90’s ability to modulate many growth and signaling pathways simultaneously makes this protein an attractive target in the field of cancer therapeutics. Herein we present evidence that a small molecule modulates Hsp90 via binding between the N and middle domain and allosterically inhibiting the binding interaction between Hsp90 and four C-terminal binding client proteins: IP6K2, FKBP38, FKBP52, and HOP. These last three clients contain a tetratricopeptide-repeat (TPR) region, which is known to interact with the MEEVD sequence on the C-terminus of Hsp90. Thus, this small molecule modulates the activity between co-chaperones that contain TPR motifs and Hsp90’s MEEVD region. This mechanism of action is unique from that of all Hsp90 inhibitors currently in clinical trials where these molecules have no effect on proteins that bind to the C-terminus of Hsp90. Further, our small molecule induces a Caspase-3 dependent apoptotic event. Thus, we describe the mechanism of a novel scaffold that is a useful tool for studying cell-signaling events that result when blocking the MEEVD-TPR interaction between Hsp90 and co-chaperone proteins. PMID:21950602

  13. Screening Molecular Chaperones Similar to Small Heat Shock Proteins in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jiyoung; Kim, Kanghwa

    2015-01-01

    To screen molecular chaperones similar to small heat shock proteins (sHsps), but without α-crystalline domain, heat-stable proteins from Schizosaccharomyces pombe were analyzed by 2-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Sixteen proteins were identified, and four recombinant proteins, including cofilin, NTF2, pyridoxin biosynthesis protein (Snz1) and Wos2 that has an α-crystalline domain, were purified. Among these proteins, only Snz1 showed the anti-aggregation activity against thermal denaturation of citrate synthase. However, pre-heating of NTF2 and Wos2 at 70℃ for 30 min, efficiently prevented thermal aggregation of citrate synthase. These results indicate that Snz1 and NTF2 possess molecular chaperone activity similar to sHsps, even though there is no α-crystalline domain in their sequences. PMID:26539043

  14. Heat shock protein expression as guidance for the therapeutic window of retinal laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jenny; Huie, Philip; Dalal, Roopa; Lee, Seungjun; Tan, Gavin; Lee, Daeyoung; Lavinksy, Daniel; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Unlike conventional photocoagulation, non-damaging retinal laser therapy (NRT) limits laser-induced heating to stay below the retinal damage threshold and therefore requires careful dosimetry. Without the adverse effects associated with photocoagulation, NRT can be applied to critical areas of the retina and repeatedly to manage chronic disorders. Although the clinical benefits of NRT have been demonstrated, the mechanism of therapeutic effect and width of the therapeutic window below damage threshold are not well understood. Here, we measure activation of heat shock response via laser-induced hyperthermia as one indication of cellular response. A 577 nm laser is used with the Endpoint Management (EpM) user interface, a titration algorithm, to set experimental pulse energies relative to a barely visible titration lesion. Live/dead staining and histology show that the retinal damage threshold in rabbits is at 40% of titration energy on EpM scale. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) was detected by whole-mount immunohistochemistry after different levels of laser treatment. We show HSP70 expression in the RPE beginning at 25% of titration energy indicating that there is a window for NRT between 25% and 40% with activation of the heat shock protein expression in response to hyperthermia. HSP70 expression is also seen at the perimeter of damaging lesions, as expected based on a computational model of laser heating. Expression area for each pulse energy setting varied between laser spots due to pigmentation changes, indicating the relatively narrow window of non-damaging activation and highlighting the importance of proper titration.

  15. Silver nanoparticles induced heat shock protein 70, oxidative stress and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Posgai, Ryan; Gorey, Timothy J.; Nielsen, Mark; Hussain, Saber M.; Rowe, John J.

    2010-02-01

    Due to the intensive commercial application of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs), risk assessment of this nanoparticle is of great importance. Our previous in vitro study demonstrated that Ag NPs caused DNA damage and apoptosis in mouse embryonic stem cells and fibroblasts. However, toxicity of Ag NPs in vivo is largely lacking. This study was undertaken to examine the toxic effects of well-characterized polysaccharide coated 10 nm Ag NPs on heat shock stress, oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Third instar larvae of D. melanogaster were fed a diet of standard cornmeal media mixed with Ag NPs at the concentrations of 50 and 100 mug/ml for 24 and 48 h. Ag NPs up-regulated the expression of heat shock protein 70 and induced oxidative stress in D. melanogaster. Malondialdehyde level, an end product of lipid peroxidation was significantly higher while antioxidant glutathione content was significantly lower in Ag NPs exposed organisms. Activities of antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase and catalase were also significantly higher in the organisms exposed to Ag NPs. Furthermore, Ag NPs up-regulated the cell cycle checkpoint p53 and cell signaling protein p38 that are involved in the DNA damage repair pathway. Moreover, activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9, markers of apoptosis were significantly higher in Ag NPs exposed organisms. The results indicate that Ag NPs in D. melanogaster induce heat shock stress, oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis. This study suggests that the organism is stressed and thus warrants more careful assessment of Ag NPs using in vivo models to determine if chronic exposure presents developmental and reproductive toxicity.

  16. Extracellular Release and Signaling by Heat Shock Protein 27: Role in Modifying Vascular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Batulan, Zarah; Pulakazhi Venu, Vivek Krishna; Li, Yumei; Koumbadinga, Geremy; Alvarez-Olmedo, Daiana Gisela; Shi, Chunhua; O’Brien, Edward R.

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) is traditionally viewed as an intracellular chaperone protein with anti-apoptotic properties. However, recent data indicate that a number of heat shock proteins, including HSP27, are also found in the extracellular space where they may signal via membrane receptors to alter gene transcription and cellular function. Therefore, there is increasing interest in better understanding how HSP27 is released from cells, its levels and composition in the extracellular space, and the cognate cell membrane receptors involved in effecting cell signaling. In this paper, the knowledge to date, as well as some emerging paradigms about the extracellular function of HSP27 is presented. Of particular interest is the role of HSP27 in attenuating atherogenesis by modifying lipid uptake and inflammation in the plaque. Moreover, the abundance of HSP27 in serum is an emerging new biomarker for ischemic events. Finally, HSP27 replacement therapy may represent a novel therapeutic opportunity for chronic inflammatory disorders, such as atherosclerosis. PMID:27507972

  17. Heat Shock Proteins: Pathogenic Role in Atherosclerosis and Potential Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Arman; Mandal, Kaushik

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are a highly conserved group of proteins that are constitutively expressed and function as molecular chaperones, aiding in protein folding and preventing the accumulation of misfolded proteins. In the arterial wall, HSPs have a protective role under normal physiologic conditions. In disease states, however, HSPs expressed on the vascular endothelial cell surface can act as targets for detrimental autoimmunity due to their highly conserved sequences. Developing therapeutic strategies for atherosclerosis based on HSPs is challenged by the need to balance such physiologic and pathologic roles of these proteins. This paper summarizes the role of HSPs in normal vascular wall processes as well as in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. The potential implications of HSPs in clinical therapies for atherosclerosis are also discussed. PMID:23304456

  18. Heat shock protein 27 promotes cell proliferation through activator protein-1 in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, SAI; HU, YANGMIN; HUANG, YUWEN; XU, HUIMIN; WU, GONGXIONG; DAI, HAIBIN

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) is an important regulator involved in the development of lung cancer. However, limited evidence exists concerning the underlying molecular mechanisms of its action. The results of the present study revealed that HSP27 was highly expressed in the lung cancer tissues of mice. In an in vitro model, the overexpression of HSP27 promoted cell proliferation, while HSP27 knockdown inhibited cell proliferation. HSP27 promoted cell proliferation in vitro by directly upregulating the expression of HSP27 target genes, which required the activation of the activator protein-1 (AP-1) signaling pathway. This was evaluated by the phosphorylation status of an important pathway component, c-Jun in lung cancer tissue and cells. These results suggested that HSP27 has a promotional role in lung cancer, and therefore indicated a novel mechanism involving lung cancer cell proliferation, which may underlie poor responses to therapy. Therefore, HSP27 may be a suitable therapeutic target for the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:26137108

  19. Heat shock protein-based therapy as a potential candidate for treating the sphingolipidoses.

    PubMed

    Kirkegaard, Thomas; Gray, James; Priestman, David A; Wallom, Kerri-Lee; Atkins, Jennifer; Olsen, Ole Dines; Klein, Alexander; Drndarski, Svetlana; Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Ingemann, Linda; Smith, David A; Morris, Lauren; Bornæs, Claus; Jørgensen, Signe Humle; Williams, Ian; Hinsby, Anders; Arenz, Christoph; Begley, David; Jäättelä, Marja; Platt, Frances M

    2016-09-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) often manifest with severe systemic and central nervous system (CNS) symptoms. The existing treatment options are limited and have no or only modest efficacy against neurological manifestations of disease. We demonstrate that recombinant human heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) improves the binding of several sphingolipid-degrading enzymes to their essential cofactor bis(monoacyl)glycerophosphate in vitro. HSP70 treatment reversed lysosomal pathology in primary fibroblasts from 14 patients with eight different LSDs. HSP70 penetrated effectively into murine tissues including the CNS and inhibited glycosphingolipid accumulation in murine models of Fabry disease (Gla(-/-)), Sandhoff disease (Hexb(-/-)), and Niemann-Pick disease type C (Npc1(-/-)) and attenuated a wide spectrum of disease-associated neurological symptoms in Hexb(-/-) and Npc1(-/-) mice. Oral administration of arimoclomol, a small-molecule coinducer of HSPs that is currently in clinical trials for Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC), recapitulated the effects of recombinant human HSP70, suggesting that heat shock protein-based therapies merit clinical evaluation for treating LSDs. PMID:27605553

  20. Emerging Role of Nitric Oxide and Heat Shock Proteins in Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Molina, Marisa Nile; Ferder, León; Manucha, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is present in pathologies such as diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, impaired glucose tolerance, hypertension, inflammation, cardiac disease, and dyslipidemias. Population studies show that IR is multifactorial and has genetic components, such as defects in the insulin-signaling pathway (as serine phosphorylation on insulin substrate or decreased activation of signaling molecules) and RAS/MAPK-dependent pathways. IR is connected to mitochondrial dysfunction, overproduction of oxidants, accumulation of fat, and an over-activation of the renin-angiotensin system linked to the NADPH oxidase activity. In addition, nitric oxide (NO), synthesized by nitric oxide synthases (endothelial and inducible), is also associated with IR when both impaired release and reduced bioavailability of all which lead to inflammation and hypertension. However, increased NO may promote vasculoprotection. Moreover, reduced NO release induces heat shock protein 70 kDa (HSP70) expression in IR and diabetes, mediating beneficial effects against oxidative stress injury, inflammation and apoptosis. HSP70 may be used as biomarker of the chronicity of diabetes. Hsp72 (inducible protein) is linked to vascular complications with a high-fat diet by blocking inflammation signaling (cytoprotective and anti-cytotoxicity intracellular role). Elucidating the IR signaling pathways and the roles of NO and HSPs is relevant to the application of new treatments, such as heat shock and thermal therapy, nitrosylated drugs, chemical chaperones or exercise training. PMID:26694820

  1. Targeting Allosteric Control Mechanisms in Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaokai; Shao, Hao; Taylor, Isabelle R; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is a molecular chaperone that plays critical roles in protein homeostasis. Hsp70's chaperone activity is coordinated by intra-molecular interactions between its two domains, as well as inter-molecular interactions between Hsp70 and its co-chaperones. Each of these contacts represents a potential opportunity for the development of chemical inhibitors. To illustrate this concept, we review three classes of recently identified molecules that bind distinct pockets on Hsp70. Although all three compounds share the ability to interrupt core biochemical functions of Hsp70, they stabilize different conformers. Accordingly, each compound appears to interrupt a specific subset of inter- and intra-molecular interactions. Thus, an accurate definition of an Hsp70 inhibitor may require a particularly detailed understanding of the molecule's binding site and its effects on protein-protein interactions. PMID:27072701

  2. Decreased heat shock protein 27 expression and altered autophagy in human cells harboring A8344G mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Yi; Chen, Hsueh-Fu; Gi, Siao-Jhen; Chi, Tang-Hao; Cheng, Che-Kun; Hsu, Chi-Fu; Ma, Yi-Shing; Wei, Yau-Huei; Liu, Chin-Shan; Hsieh, Mingli

    2011-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are responsible for human neuromuscular diseases caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Myoclonus epilepsy associated with ragged-red fibers (MERRF) is a maternally inherited mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with various syndromes involving both muscular and nervous systems. The most common mutation in MERRF syndrome, A8344G mutation in mtDNA, has been associated with severe defects in protein synthesis. This defect impairs assembly of complexes in electron transport chain and results in decreased respiratory function of mitochondria. In this study, we showed a significant decrease of the heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) in lymphoblastoid cells derived from a MERRF patient and in cybrid cells harboring MERRF A8344G mutation. However, normal cytoplasmic distributions of Hsp27 and normal heat shock responses were observed in both wild type and mutant cybrids. Furthermore, overexpression of wild type Hsp27 in mutant MERRF cybrids significantly decreased cell death under staurosporine (STS) treatment, suggesting a protective function of Hsp27 in cells harboring the A8344G mutation of mtDNA. Meanwhile, reverse transcriptase PCR showed no difference in the mRNA level between normal and mutant cybrids, indicating that alterations may occur at the protein level. Evidenced by the decreased levels of Hsp27 upon treatment with proteasome inhibitor, starvation and rapamycin and the accumulation of Hsp27 upon lysosomal inhibitor treatment; Hsp27 may be degraded by the autophagic pathway. In addition, the increased formation of LC3-II and autophagosomes was found in MERRF cybrids under the basal condition, indicating a constitutively-activated autophagic pathway. It may explain, at least partially, the faster turnover of Hsp27 in MERRF cybrids. This study provides information for us to understand that Hsp27 is degraded through the autophagic pathway and that Hsp27 may have a protective role in MERRF cells. Regulating Hsp27 and the autophagic pathway

  3. Heat-shock protein dysregulation is associated with functional and pathological TDP-43 aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsiang-Yu; Hou, Shin-Chen; Way, Tzong-Der; Wong, Chi-Huey; Wang, I.-Fan

    2013-11-01

    Conformational disorders are involved in various neurodegenerative diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are the major contributors to neurodegenerative disease; however, ROS that affect the structural changes in misfolded disease proteins have yet to be well characterized. Here we demonstrate that the intrinsic propensity of TDP-43 to aggregate drives the assembly of TDP-43-positive stress granules and soluble toxic TDP-43 oligomers in response to a ROS insult via a disulfide crosslinking-independent mechanism. Notably, ROS-induced TDP-43 protein assembly correlates with the dynamics of certain TDP-43-associated chaperones. The heat-shock protein (HSP)-90 inhibitor 17-AAG prevents ROS-induced TDP-43 aggregation, alters the type of TDP-43 multimers and reduces the severity of pathological TDP-43 inclusions. In summary, our study suggests that a common mechanism could be involved in the pathogenesis of conformational diseases that result from HSP dysregulation.

  4. Potent Antitrypanosomal Activities of Heat Shock Protein 90 Inhibitors In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Kirsten J.; Shapiro, Theresa A.

    2013-01-01

    African sleeping sickness, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, is universally fatal if untreated, and current drugs are limited by severe toxicities and difficult administration. New antitrypanosomals are greatly needed. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a conserved and ubiquitously expressed molecular chaperone essential for stress responses and cellular signaling. We investigated Hsp90 inhibitors for their antitrypanosomal activity. Geldanamycin and radicicol had nanomolar potency in vitro against bloodstream-form T. brucei; novobiocin had micromolar activity. In structure-activity studies of geldanamycin analogs, 17-AAG and 17-DMAG were most selective against T. brucei as compared to mammalian cells. 17-AAG treatment sensitized trypanosomes to heat shock and caused severe morphological abnormalities and cell cycle disruption. Both oral and parenteral 17-DMAG cured mice of a normally lethal infection of T. brucei. These promising results support the use of inhibitors to study Hsp90 function in trypanosomes and to expand current clinical development of Hsp90 inhibitors to include T. brucei. PMID:23630365

  5. Cloning of apg-2 encoding a novel member of heat shock protein 110 family.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Y; Kimura, T; Kishishita, M; Noda, Y; Fujita, J

    1997-04-11

    Chinese hamster heat shock protein 110-encoding gene (hsp110), mouse apg-1 and human hsp70RY are structurally related genes, with the first two encoding about 110-kDa HSPs [Yoon et al. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 15725-15733; Kaneko et al. (1997) J. Biol. Chem., in press; Fathallah et al. (1993) J. Immunol. 151, 810-813]. Using apg-1 cDNA as a probe, we isolated a novel cDNA, apg-2 from a mouse testis cDNA library, which was highly homologous to human hsp70RY. However, the predicted amino acid (aa) sequence of APG-2 was longer (841 aa) than that of HSP70RY (701 aa) and comparable to those of HSP110 and APG-1. Northern blot analysis revealed that the expression of apg-2 transcripts was ubiquitous in various mouse tissues, and most abundant in the testis and ovary. While induction of hsp70 transcripts was observed in mouse TAMA26 Sertoli cells and NIH/3T3 fibroblasts on temperature shift from 37 degrees C to 42 degrees C (traditional heat shock) or from 32 degrees C to 39 degrees C, apg-2 transcripts were not induced under either condition. These results suggest that apg-2 is an isoform of mouse homolog of hsp70RY, but that it belongs to the hsp110 family instead of hsp70 family, and that it plays a role under non-stress conditions. PMID:9161406

  6. A novel protein quality control mechanism contributes to heat shock resistance of worldwide-distributed Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone C strains.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changhan; Wigren, Edvard; Trček, Janja; Peters, Verena; Kim, Jihong; Hasni, Muhammad Sharif; Nimtz, Manfred; Lindqvist, Ylva; Park, Chankyu; Curth, Ute; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Römling, Ute

    2015-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly successful nosocomial pathogen capable of causing a wide variety of infections with clone C strains most prevalent worldwide. In this study, we initially characterize a molecular mechanism of survival unique to clone C strains. We identified a P. aeruginosa clone C-specific genomic island (PACGI-1) that contains the highly expressed small heat shock protein sHsp20c, the founding member of a novel subclass of class B bacterial small heat shock proteins. sHsp20c and adjacent gene products are involved in resistance against heat shock. Heat stable sHsp20c is unconventionally expressed in stationary phase in a wide temperature range from 20 to 42°C. Purified sHsp20c has characteristic features of small heat shock protein class B as it is monodisperse, forms sphere-like 24-meric oligomers and exhibits significant chaperone activity. As the P. aeruginosa clone C population is significantly more heat shock resistant than genetically unrelated P. aeruginosa strains without sHsp20c, the horizontally acquired shsp20c operon might contribute to the survival of worldwide-distributed clone C strains. PMID:26014207

  7. Differential expression patterns among heat-shock protein genes and thermal responses in the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (MEAM 1).

    PubMed

    Díaz, Fernando; Orobio, Rony F; Chavarriaga, Paul; Toro-Perea, Nelson

    2015-08-01

    There is convincing evidence that heat-shock proteins (HSP) are upregulated by stress conditions in insects; however, the relative contribution of each HSP gene to the heat-shock response remains unclear. Here we considered the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (MEAM 1), a phloem feeder and invasive species whose molecular stress response is an important mechanism for overcoming heat stress. We assessed the expression of the hsp23, 40, 70 and 90 genes at the mRNA level when submitted to heat shocks of 40 and 44°C/1h (control at 25°C). For this, we evaluated a set of available and suitable reference genes in order to perform data normalization using the real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) technique, and then confirmed the production of HSP70 protein based on Western blot. Results were compared with the hardening capacity of B. tabaci, measured by fitness components as a response to heat shocks, using 40°C as the induction temperature. Three of the four genes (hsp23, 70 and 90) were upregulated by heat stress at mRNA, showing differential expression patterns. Hsp70 expression was confirmed at the protein level. Hardening significantly increased fitness following heat stress, suggesting that HSPs may contribute to hardening capacity in B. tabaci. Potential role of each gene in the heat-shock response for whiteflies is discussed. PMID:26267515

  8. Heat shock protein 70-dependent protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ying; Naito, Yuji; Handa, Osamu; Hayashi, Natsuko; Kuki, Aiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Tanimura, Yuko; Morita, Mayuko; Adachi, Satoko; Fukui, Akifumi; Hirata, Ikuhiro; Kishimoto, Etsuko; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Yagi, Nobuaki; Kokura, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2011-11-01

    Protection of the small intestine from mucosal injury induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including acetylsalicylic acid is a critical issue in the field of gastroenterology. Polaprezinc an anti-ulcer drug, consisting of zinc and L-carnosine, provides gastric mucosal protection against various irritants. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of the RIE1 rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Confluent rat intestinal epithelial cells were incubated with 70 µM polaprezinc for 24 h, and then stimulated with or without 15 mM acetylsalicylic acid for a further 15 h. Subsequent cellular viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining. Acetylsalicylic acid-induced cell death was also qualified by fluorescent microscopy of Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide. Heat shock proteins 70 protein expression after adding polaprezinc or acetylsalicylic acid was assessed by western blotting. To investigate the role of Heat shock protein 70, Heat shock protein 70-specific small interfering RNA was applied. Cell viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining and apoptosis was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We found that acetylsalicylic acid significantly induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Polaprezinc significantly suppressed acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells at its late phase. At the same time, polaprezinc increased Heat shock protein 70 expressions of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a time-dependent manner. However, in Heat shock protein 70-silenced rat intestinal epithelial cells, polaprezinc could not suppress acetylsalicylic acid -induced apoptosis at its late phase. We conclude that polaprezinc-increased Heat shock protein 70 expression might be an important mechanism by which polaprezinc suppresses acetylsalicylic

  9. Two hybrid plasmids with D. melanogaster DNA sequences complementary to mRNA coding for the major heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Schedl, P; Artavanis-Tsakonas, S; Steward, R; Gehring, W J; Mirault, M E; Goldschmidt-Clermont, M; Moran, L; Tissières, A

    1978-08-01

    The isolation and partial characterization of two cloned segments of Drosophila melanogaster DNA containing "heat shock" gene sequences is described. We have inserted sheared embryonic D. melanogaster DNA by the poly(dA-dt) connector method (Lobban and Kaiser, 1973) into the R1 restriction site of the ampicillin-resistant plasmid pSF2124 (So, Gill and Falkow, 1975). A collection of independent hybrid plasmids was screened by colony hybridization (Grunstein and Hogness, 1975) for sequences complementary to in vitro labeled polysomal poly(A)+ heat shock RNA. Two clones were identified which contain sequences complementary to a heat shock mRNA species that directs the in vitro synthesis of the 70,000 dalton heat-induced polypeptide. Both cloned segments hybridize in situ to the heat-induced puff sites located at 87A and 87C of the salivary gland polytene chromosomes. PMID:99246

  10. Association between the 65-kilodalton heat shock protein, Streptococcus sanguis, and the corresponding antibodies in Behçet's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, T; Lavery, E; Smith, R; van der Zee, R; Mizushima, Y; Shinnick, T

    1991-01-01

    The etiology of Behcet's syndrome (BS) is unknown, but a number of streptococcal species have been implicated. A hypothesis was postulated that a shared antigen, such as a stress protein, might account for some of these findings. Indeed, a rabbit antiserum against a 65-kDa heat shock protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed a corresponding 65-kDa band with all six Streptococcus sanguis strains examined and S. pyogenes but not with S. salivarius. By applying a panel of nine monoclonal antibodies to the mycobacterial 65-kDa heat shock protein, an approximately 65-kDa antigen was identified in the uncommon serotypes of S. sanguis ST3 and H.83 and one with a different Mr was identified in KTH-1 and S. pyogenes. Monoclonal antibodies Y1.2, C1.1, II H9, and ML30, which reacted with these streptococci, recognize residues 11 to 27, 88 to 123, 107 to 122, and 276 to 297 of the 65-kDa heat shock protein, respectively, suggesting that these residues are conserved among some uncommon serotypes of S. sanguis and S. pyogenes. Immunoblot analyses of sera from patients with BS for immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG antibodies revealed bands of 65 to 70 kDa with the mycobacterial heat shock protein, S. sanguis strains, and S. pyogenes, although these reactivities were also found to a lesser extent in controls. A 65- to 70-kDa band was found more frequently with S. sanguis KTH-2 or KTH-3 and IgA in serum from patients with BS than with serum from controls (P less than 0.02). Antibodies in serum were then studied by a radioimmunoassay, and in patients with BS this revealed significantly raised IgA antibodies to the recombinant 65-kDa mycobacterial heat shock protein and to soluble protein extracts of S. sanguis ST3, KTH-1, KTH-2, and KTH-3. Whereas significant anti-65-kDa heat shock protein and anti-S. sanguis ST3 antibodies were also found in sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and recurrent oral ulcers, the anti-S. sanguis KTH-1, KTH-2, and KTH-3 antibodies were confined

  11. Heat shock proteins 27, 40, and 70 as combinational and dual therapeutic cancer targets

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Jeanette R.; McAlpine, Shelli R.

    2013-01-01

    The heat shock proteins are essential players in the development of cancer and they are prime therapeutic targets. Targeting multiple hsps in dual therapies decreases the likelihood of drug resistance compared to utilizing mono-therapies. Further, employing an hsp inhibitor in combination with another therapy has proven clinically successful. Examples of efficacious strategies include the inhibition of hsp27, which prevents protein aggregation, controlling hsp40’s role as an ATPase modulator, and inhibiting hsp70 from acting as a molecular chaperone. While hsp40 therapies are just in the beginning stages, hsp27 and hsp70 therapies have been successfully used in dual inhibition treatments with hsp90 inhibitors and in combinational therapy with antineoplastic drugs. Both dual and combinatorial therapies show encouraging results when used in treating chemotherapeutically resistant diseases. PMID:23453837

  12. The Clinical Significance of Phosphorylated Heat Shock Protein 27 (HSPB1) in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Okuno, Mitsuru; Adachi, Seiji; Kozawa, Osamu; Shimizu, Masahito; Yasuda, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of most aggressive forms of cancer. After clinical detection it exhibits fast metastatic growth. Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27; HSPB1) has been characterized as a molecular chaperone which modifies the structures and functions of other proteins in cells when they are exposed to various stresses, such as chemotherapy. While the administration of gemcitabine, an anti-tumor drug, has been the standard treatment for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, accumulating evidence shows that HSP27 plays a key role in the chemosensitivity to gemcitabine. In addition, phosphorylated HSP27 induced by gemcitabine has been associated with the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth. In this review, we summarize the role of phosphorylated HSP27, as well as HSP27, in the regulation of chemosensitivity in pancreatic cancer. PMID:26805817

  13. The Clinical Significance of Phosphorylated Heat Shock Protein 27 (HSPB1) in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Mitsuru; Adachi, Seiji; Kozawa, Osamu; Shimizu, Masahito; Yasuda, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of most aggressive forms of cancer. After clinical detection it exhibits fast metastatic growth. Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27; HSPB1) has been characterized as a molecular chaperone which modifies the structures and functions of other proteins in cells when they are exposed to various stresses, such as chemotherapy. While the administration of gemcitabine, an anti-tumor drug, has been the standard treatment for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, accumulating evidence shows that HSP27 plays a key role in the chemosensitivity to gemcitabine. In addition, phosphorylated HSP27 induced by gemcitabine has been associated with the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth. In this review, we summarize the role of phosphorylated HSP27, as well as HSP27, in the regulation of chemosensitivity in pancreatic cancer. PMID:26805817

  14. Effects of heat shock protein gp96 on human dendritic cell maturation and CTL expansion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxia; Zan, Yanlu; Shan, Ming; Liu, Changmei; Shi, Ming; Li, Wei; Zhang, Zhixin; Liu, Na; Wang, Fusheng; Zhong, Weidong; Liao, Fulian; Gao, George F; Tien, Po

    2006-06-01

    We reported previously that heat shock protein gp96 and its N-terminal fragment were able to stimulate CTL expansion specific for a HBV peptide (SYVNTNMGL) in BALB/c mice. Here we characterized the adjuvant effects of gp96 on human HLA-A2 restricted T cells. Full-length gp96 isolated from healthy human liver and recombinant fragments both from prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic cells were analyzed for their ability to stimulate maturation of human dendritic cells. It was found that in vitro these proteins were capable of maturating human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC) isolated from healthy donors as well as from HBV-positive, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. In HLA-A2.1/Kb transgenic mice, gp96 and the recombinant fragments were found to augment CTL response specific for the HBcAg(18-27) FLPSDFFPSV peptide of hepatitis B virus. PMID:16630554

  15. Specific Genetic Immunotherapy Induced by Recombinant Vaccine Alpha-Fetoprotein-Heat Shock Protein 70 Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Lin, Huanping; Wang, Qiaoxia

    Purposes: To construct a recombinant vaccine alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-heat shock protein (HSP70) complex, and study its ability to induce specific CTL response and its protective effect against AFP-producing tumor. Material/Methods: A recombinant vaccine was constructed by conjugating mouse alpha-fetoprotein to heat shock protein 70. By way of intracutaneous injection, mice were primed and boosted with recombinant vaccine mAFP/HSP70, whereas single mAFP or HSP70 injection as controls. The ELISPOT and ELISA were used to measure the frequency of cells producing the cytokine IFN-γ in splenocytes and the level of anti-AFP antibody of serum from immunized mice respectively. In vivo tumor challenge were carried out to assess the immune effect of the recombinant vaccine. Results: By recombinant mAFP/HSP70 vaccine immunization, the results of ELISPOT and ELISA showed that the number of splenic cells producing IFN-γ and the level of anti-AFP antibody of serum were significantly higher in mAFP/HSP70 group than those in mAFP and HSP70 groups (108.50±11.70 IFN-γ spots/106 cells vs 41.60±10.40 IFN-γ spots/106 cells, 7.32±3.14 IFN-γ spots/106 cells, P<0.01; 156.32±10.42 μg/mL vs 66.52±7.35 μg/mL, 5.73±2.89 μg/mL, P<0.01). The tumor volume in mAFP/HSP70 group was significantly smaller than that in mAFP and HSP70 groups (42.44±7.14 mm3 vs 392.23±12.46 mm3, 838.63±13.84 mm3, P<0.01). Conclusions: The study further confirmed the function of heat shock protein 70's immune adjuvant. Sequential immunization with recombinant mAFP/HSP70 vaccine could generate effective antitumor immunity on AFP-producing tumor. The recombined mAFP/HSP70 vaccine may be suitable for serving as an immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  16. Ecotypic variation in chloroplast small heat-shock proteins and related thermotolerance in Chenopodium album.

    PubMed

    Shakeel, Samina; Haq, Noor Ul; Heckathorn, Scott A; Hamilton, E William; Luthe, Dawn S

    2011-08-01

    Production of chloroplast-localized small heat-shock proteins (Cp-sHSP) is correlated with increased thermotolerance in plants. Ecotypic variation in function and expression of Cp-sHSPs was analyzed in two Chenopodium album ecotypes from cool vs. warm-temperate USA habitats [New York (NY) and Mississippi (MS) respectively]. P(et) was more heat tolerant in the MS than the NY ecotype, and MS ecotype derived proportionally greater protection of P(et) by Cp-sHSP during high temperatures. Four genes encoding Cp-sHSPs were isolated and characterized: CaHSP25.99n (NY-1) and CaHSP26.23n (NY-2) from NY ecotype, and CaHSP26.04m (MS-1) and CaHSP26.26m (MS-2) from MS ecotype. The genes were nearly identical in predicted amino-acid sequence and hydrophobicity. Gene expression analysis indicated that MS-1 and MS-2 transcripts were constitutively expressed at low levels at 25 °C, while no NY-1 and NY-2 transcripts were detected at this temperature. Maximum accumulation of NY-1 and NY-2 transcripts occurred at 33 °C and 40 °C for MS-1 and MS-2. Immunoblot analysis revealed that (1) protein expression was highest at 37 °C in both ecotypes, but was greater in MS than NY ecotype at 40 °C; and (2) import of Cp-sHSP into chloroplasts was more heat-labile in NY ecotype. The higher expression of one isoform in MS ecotype may contribute to its enhanced thermotolerance. Absence of correlation between protein and transcript levels, suggests the post-transcriptional regulation is occurring. Promoter analysis of these genes revealed significant variations in heat-shock elements (HSE), core motifs required for heat-shock-factor binding. We propose a correlation between unique promoter architecture, Cp-sHSP expression and thermotolerance in both ecotypes. PMID:21684754

  17. Heat shock- and alkaline pH-induced proteins of Campylobacter jejuni: characterization and immunological properties.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Y L; Lee, L H; Rollins, D M; Ching, W M

    1994-01-01

    The protein response to physiological stress was characterized in Campylobacter jejuni 81176 after exposure to heat and pH shock and following periods of recovery. Immunoreactivities of major stress-related proteins were determined with anti-Campylobacter immune rabbit serum and intestinal lavage fluid. Distinct proteins with molecular masses ranging from 10 to 120 kDa were induced and/or released by selective heat or pH treatments. The most notable responses were those of two proteins with apparent molecular masses of 45 and 64 kDa that were induced and two other proteins of 10 and 12 kDa that were released by selective heat shock, alkaline pH treatment, or both. On the basis of N-terminal sequence analysis and immunological cross-reactivity data, the 64- and 10-kDa proteins were the C. jejuni homologs of Escherichia coli GroEL and GroES proteins, respectively. Enhanced chemiluminescence Western blotting (immunoblotting) revealed that all four proteins were among the major protein antigens recognized by anti-Campylobacter rabbit serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immune rabbit intestinal lavage IgA (secretory IgA). The results of this investigation suggest that the C. jejuni 10-, 12-, 45-, and 64-kDa proteins and a number of minor stress-related proteins deserve further evaluation of their respective roles in Campylobacter pathogenesis and immunity. Images PMID:7927682

  18. Heat shock response of murine Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed Central

    Engel, J N; Pollack, J; Perara, E; Ganem, D

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the heat shock response in the mouse pneumonitis strain of Chlamydia trachomatis. The kinetics of the chlamydial heat shock response resembled that of other procaryotes: the induction was rapid, occurring over a 5- to 10-min time period, and was regulated at the level of transcription. Immunoblot analysis and immunoprecipitations with heterologous antisera to the heat shock proteins DnaK and GroEL demonstrated that the rate of synthesis, but not the absolute amount of these two proteins, increased after heat shock. Using a general screen for genes whose mRNAs are induced by heat shock, we identified and cloned two of these. DNA sequence analysis demonstrated that one of the genes is a homolog of dnaK. Further sequence analysis of the region upstream of the dnaK gene revealed that the chlamydial homolog of the grpE gene is located just adjacent to the dnaK gene. The second locus encoded three potential nonoverlapping open reading frames. One of the open reading frames was 52% homologous to the ribosomal protein S18 of Escherichia coli and thus presumably encodes the chlamydial homolog. Interestingly, this ribosomal protein is not known to be induced by heat shock in E. coli. S1 nuclease and primer extension analyses located the start site of the dnaK transcript to the last nucleotide of the grpE coding sequence, suggesting that these two genes, although tandemly arranged, are transcribed separately. No promoter sequences resembling the E. coli consensus heat shock promoter could be identified upstream of either the C. trachomatis dnaK, grpE, or S18 gene. The induction of the dnaK and S18 mRNAs by heat shock occurred at a transcriptional level; their induction could be blocked by rifampin. The mechanisms of induction for these two loci were not the same, however; they were differentially sensitive to chloramphenicol. Whereas the induction of dnaK mRNA required de novo protein synthesis, the induction of the S18 mRNA did not. Thus, C. trachomatis

  19. Developmentally regulated expression of APG-1, a member of heat shock protein 110 family in murine male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Y; Kimura, T; Nishiyama, H; Noda, Y; Fujita, J

    1997-04-01

    Apg-1 encodes a heat shock protein belonging to the heat shock protein 110 family, and is inducible by a 32 degrees C to 39 degrees C heat shock. Northern blot analysis of the testis from immature and adult mice, and of the purified germ cells revealed the quantitative change of the apg-1 transcripts during germ cell development. By in situ hybridization histochemistry the expressions of the apg-1 transcripts were detected in germ cells at specific stages of development including spermatocytes and spermatids. Although heat-induction of the apg-1 transcripts was observed in W/Wv mutant testis lacking germ cells, it was not detected in wild-type testis nor in the purified germ cells. Thus, the apg-1 expression is not heat-regulated but developmentally regulated in germ cells, suggesting that APG-1 plays a role in normal development of germ cells. PMID:9144406

  20. Suppression of Heat Shock Protein 27 Using OGX-427 Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Potentiates Heat Shock Protein 90 Inhibitors to Delay Castrate-resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lamoureux, François; Thomas, Christian; Yin, Min-Jean; Fazli, Ladan; Zoubeidi, Amina; Gleave, Martin E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although prostate cancer responds initially to androgen ablation therapies, progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) frequently occurs. Heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 inhibition is a rational therapeutic strategy for CRPC that targets key proteins such as androgen receptor (AR) and protein kinase B (Akt); however, most Hsp90 inhibitors trigger elevation of stress proteins like Hsp27 that confer tumor cell survival and treatment resistance. Objective We hypothesized that cotargeting the cytoprotective chaperone Hsp27 and Hsp90 would amplify endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and treatment-induced cell death in cancer. Design, setting, and participants Inducible and constitutive Hsp27 and other HSPs were measured by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot assays. The combinations of OGX-427 with Hsp90 inhibitors were evaluated in vitro for LNCaP cell growth and apoptosis and in vivo in CRPC LNCaP xenograft models. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis Tumor volumes were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Overall survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier curves, and statistical significance was assessed with the log-rank test. Results and limitations Hsp90 inhibitors induced expression of HSPs in tumor cells and tissues in a dose- and time-dependent manner; in particular, Hsp27 mRNA and protein levels increased threefold. In vitro, OGX-427 synergistically enhanced Hsp90 inhibitor-induced suppression of cell growth and induced apoptosis by 60% as measured by increased sub-G1 fraction and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. These biologic events were accompanied by decreased expression of HSPs, Akt, AR, and prostate-specific antigen, and induction of ER stress markers (cleaved activating transcription factor 6, glucose-regulated protein 78, and DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3). In vivo, OGX-427 potentiated the anticancer effects of Hsp90 inhibitor PF-04929113 (orally, 25 mg/kg) to inhibit tumor

  1. Repression of hsp70 heat shock gene transcription by the suppressor of hairy-wing protein of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, C.; Dorsett, D. )

    1991-04-01

    The suppressor of hairy-wing [su(Hw)] locus of Drosophila melanogaster encodes a zinc finger protein that binds a repeated motif in the gypsy retroposon. Mutations of su(Hw) suppress the phenotypes associated with mutations caused by gypsy insertions. To examine the mechanisms by which su(Hw) alters gene expression, a fragment of gypsy containing multiple su(Hw) protein-binding sites was inserted into various locations in the well-characterized Drosophila hsp70 heat shock gene promoter. The authors found no evidence for activation of basal hsp70 transcription by su(Hw) protein in cultured Drosophila cells but observed that it can repress heat shock-induced transcription. Repression occurred only when su(Hw) protein-binding sites were positioned between binding sites for proteins required for heat shock transcription. They propose that su(Hw) protein interferes nonspecifically with protein-protein interactions required for heat shock transcription, perhaps sterically, or by altering the ability of DNA to bend or twist.

  2. Heat Shock Proteins in Brain: Role of Hsp70, Hsp 27 and HO-1 (Hsp32) and Their Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Frank R; Zhan, Xinhua; Liu, DaZhi

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock proteins are induced by heat shock via HSF proteins binding to heat shock elements in their promoters. Hsp70 is massively induced in response to misfolded proteins following cerebral ischemia in all cell types, but is induced mainly in neurons in the ischemic penumbra. Over expression of Hsp70 via transgenes and viruses or systemic administration of Hsp70 fusion proteins that allow it to cross the blood brain barrier protect brain against ischemia in most reported studies. Hsp27 can exist as unphosphorylated large oligomers that prevent misfolded protein aggregates and improve cell survival. P-Hsp27 small oligomers bind specific protein targets to improve survival. In brain Protein Kinase D phosphorylates Hsp27 following ischemia which then binds ASK1 to prevent MKK4/7, JNK, Jun induced apoptosis and decrease infarct volumes following focal cerebral ischemia. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) metabolizes heme to carbon monoxide, ferrous ion and biliverdin. CO activates cGMP to promote vasodilation, and biliverdin is converted to bilirubin which can serve as an anti-oxidant both of which may contribute to the reported protective role of HO-1 in cerebral ischemia and subarachnoid hemorrhage. However, ferrous ion can react with hydrogen peroxide to produce pro-oxidant hydroxyl radicals which may explain the harmful role of HO-1 in intracerebral hemorrhage. Heat shock proteins as a class have great potential as treatments for cerebrovascular disease and have yet to be tested in the clinic. PMID:24323422

  3. ELEVATED LEVELS OF INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN (HSP70-1) PROTECT MCF-7 CELLS FROM ARSENITE TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) belong to the highly conserved family of stress proteins and are induced following exposure to arsenic. Elevated HSPs protect against cellular damage from heat but it is unclear whether HSP induction alters the damaging effects of environmental chemical...

  4. INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN (HSP70-1) PROTECTS MCF-7 CELLS FROM THE CYTOTOXIC AND GENOTOXIC EFFECTS OF ARSENITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) belong to the highly conserved family of stress proteins and are induced following exposure to arsenic. Elevated HSPs protect against cellular damage from heat but it is unclear wether HSP induction alters the damaging effects of environmental chemical ...

  5. Transcript analysis and expression profiling of three heat shock protein 70 genes in the ectoparasitoid Habrobracon hebetor (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are known as chaperones that help with folding of other proteins when cells are under environmental stresses. The upregulation of HSPs is essential for cold survival during insect diapause. The ectoparasitoid Habrobracon hebetor, a potential biological control agent, can e...

  6. Osmotic stress stimulates phosphorylation and cellular expression of heat shock proteins in rhesus macaque sperm.

    PubMed

    Cole, Julie A; Meyers, Stuart A

    2011-01-01

    The cryosurvival of sperm requires cell signaling mechanisms to adapt to anisotonic conditions during the freezing and thawing process. Chaperone proteins heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) and heat shock protein 90 (HSP 90; recently renamed HSPA and HSPC, respectively) facilitate some of these cell signaling events in somatic cells. Sperm were evaluated for their cellular expression and levels of phosphorylation of both HSP 70 and HSP 90 under anisotonic conditions as a potential model for cell signaling during the cryopreservation of macaque spermatozoa. In order to monitor the level of stress, the motility and viability parameters were evaluated at various time points. Cells were then either prepared for phosphoprotein enrichment or indirect immunocytochemistry. As controls, the phosphoserine, phosphothreonine, and phosphotyrosine levels were measured under capacitation and cryopreservation conditions and were compared with the phosphoprotein levels expressed under osmotic conditions. As expected, there was an increase in the level of tyrosine phosphorylation under capacitation and cryopreservation conditions. There was also a significant increase in the level of all phosphoproteins under hyperosmotic conditions. There was no change in the level of expression of HSP 70 or 90 under osmotic stress conditions as measured by Western blot. The enrichment of phosphoproteins followed by Western immunoblotting revealed an increase in the phosphorylation of HSP 70 but not HSP 90 under osmotic stress conditions. Indirect immunofluorescence localized HSP 70 to the postacrosomal region of sperm, and the level of membrane expression of HSP 70 was significantly affected by anisotonic conditions, as measured by flow cytometry. Taken together, these results suggest a differential role for HSP 70 and HSP 90 during osmotic stress conditions in rhesus macaque sperm. PMID:21088232

  7. Chalcones from Angelica keiskei: Evaluation of Their Heat Shock Protein Inducing Activities.

    PubMed

    Kil, Yun-Seo; Choi, Seul-Ki; Lee, Yun-Sil; Jafari, Mahtab; Seo, Eun-Kyoung

    2015-10-23

    Five new chalcones, 4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(2E,5E)-7-methoxy-3,7-dimethyl-2,5-octadienyl]chalcone (1), (±)-4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(2E)-6-hydroxy-7-methoxy-3,7-dimethyl-2-octenyl]chalcone (2), 4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(2E)-3-methyl-5-(1,3-dioxolan-2-yl)-2-pentenyl]chalcone (3), 2',3'-furano-4-hydroxy-4'-methoxychalcone (4), and (±)-4-hydroxy-2',3'-(2,3-dihydro-2-methoxyfurano)-4'-methoxychalcone (5), were isolated from the aerial parts of Angelica keiskei Koidzumi together with eight known chalcones, 6-13, which were identified as (±)-4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(6E)-2-hydroxy-7-methyl-3-methylene-6-octenyl]chalcone (6), xanthoangelol (7), xanthoangelol F (8), xanthoangelol G (9), 4-hydroxyderricin (10), xanthoangelol D (11), xanthoangelol E (12), and xanthoangelol H (13), respectively. Chalcones 1-13 were evaluated for their promoter activity on heat shock protein 25 (hsp25, murine form of human hsp27). Compounds 1 and 6 activated the hsp25 promoter by 21.9- and 29.2-fold of untreated control at 10 μM, respectively. Further protein expression patterns of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), HSP70, and HSP27 by 1 and 6 were examined. Compound 6 increased the expression of HSF1, HSP70, and HSP27 by 4.3-, 1.5-, and 4.6-fold of untreated control, respectively, without any significant cellular cytotoxicities, whereas 1 did not induce any expression of these proteins. As a result, 6 seems to be a prospective HSP inducer. PMID:26431394

  8. The stress protein heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70) inhibits the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel

    PubMed Central

    Iftinca, Mircea; Flynn, Robyn; Basso, Lilian; Melo, Helvira; Aboushousha, Reem; Taylor, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Background Specialized cellular defense mechanisms prevent damage from chemical, biological, and physical hazards. The heat shock proteins have been recognized as key chaperones that maintain cell survival against a variety of exogenous and endogenous stress signals including noxious temperature. However, the role of heat shock proteins in nociception remains poorly understood. We carried out an expression analysis of the constitutively expressed 70 kDa heat-shock cognate protein, a member of the stress-induced HSP70 family in lumbar dorsal root ganglia from a mouse model of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant-induced chronic inflammatory pain. We used immunolabeling of dorsal root ganglion neurons, behavioral analysis and patch clamp electrophysiology in both dorsal root ganglion neurons and HEK cells transfected with Hsc70 and Transient Receptor Potential Channels to examine their functional interaction in heat shock stress condition. Results We report an increase in protein levels of Hsc70 in mouse dorsal root ganglia, 3 days post Complete Freund’s Adjuvant injection in the hind paw. Immunostaining of Hsc70 was observed in most of the dorsal root ganglion neurons, including the small size nociceptors immunoreactive to the TRPV1 channel. Standard whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 current after exposure to heat shock. We found that capsaicin-evoked currents are inhibited by heat shock in dorsal root ganglion neurons and transfected HEK cells expressing Hsc70 and TRPV1. Blocking Hsc70 with matrine or spergualin compounds prevented heat shock-induced inhibition of the channel. We also found that, in contrast to TRPV1, both the cold sensor channels TRPA1 and TRPM8 were unresponsive to heat shock stress. Finally, we show that inhibition of TRPV1 depends on the ATPase activity of Hsc70 and involves the rho-associated protein kinase. Conclusions Our work identified Hsc70 and its ATPase activity as a central

  9. Binding of non-native protein to Hsp25 during heat shock creates a reservoir of folding intermediates for reactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Ehrnsperger, M; Gräber, S; Gaestel, M; Buchner, J

    1997-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are a conserved and ubiquitous protein family. Their ability to convey thermoresistance suggests their participation in protecting the native conformation of proteins. However, the underlying functional principles of their protective properties and their role in concert with other chaperone families remain enigmatic. Here, we analysed the influence of Hsp25 on the inactivation and subsequent aggregation of a model protein, citrate synthase (CS), under heat shock conditions in vitro. We show that stable binding of several non-native CS molecules to one Hsp25 oligomer leads to an accumulation of CS unfolding intermediates, which are protected from irreversible aggregation. Furthermore, a number of different proteins which bind to Hsp25 can be isolated from heat-shocked extracts of cells. Under permissive folding conditions, CS can be released from Hsp25 and, in cooperation with Hsp70, an ATP-dependent chaperone, the native state can be restored. Taken together, our findings allow us to integrate sHsps functionally in the cellular chaperone system operating under heat shock conditions. The task of sHsps in this context is to efficiently trap a large number of unfolding proteins in a folding-competent state and thus create a reservoir of non-native proteins for an extended period of time, allowing refolding after restoration of physiological conditions in cooperation with other chaperones. PMID:9029143

  10. AuNPs modified, disposable, ITO based biosensor: Early diagnosis of heat shock protein 70.

    PubMed

    Sonuç Karaboğa, Münteha Nur; Şimşek, Çiğdem Sayıklı; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2016-10-15

    This paper describes a novel, simple, and disposable immunosensor based on indium-tin oxide (ITO) sheets modified with gold nanoparticles to sensitively analyze heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), a potential biomarker that could be evaluated in diagnosis of some carcinomas. Disposable ITO coated Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) electrodes were used and modified with gold nanoparticles in order to construct the biosensors. Optimization and characterization steps were analyzed by electrochemical techniques such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Surface morphology of the biosensor was also identified by electrochemical methods, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). To interpret binding characterization of HSP70 to anti-HSP70 single frequency impedance method was successfully operated. Moreover, the proposed HSP70 immunosensor acquired good stability, repeatability, and reproducibility. Ultimately, proposed biosensor was introduced to real human serum samples to determine HSP70 sensitively and accurately. PMID:26318579

  11. Elevation of serum heat-shock protein levels in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Daigo; Nakamura, Akinori; Hineno, Akiyo; Kobayashi, Chinatsu; Kinoshita, Tomomi; Yoshida, Kunihiro; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2016-08-01

    Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In this study, we aimed to examine whether the serum levels of HSPs (HSP27, HSP70, and HSP90) are altered in patients with ALS. We included 58 patients diagnosed with ALS and 85 control individuals. Serum HSP levels of patients and controls were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The serum levels of HSP70 and HSP90 were significantly higher in patients than in controls. In contrast, serum levels of HSP27 did not differ significantly between the patient and control groups. Moreover, serum levels of HSP70 and HSP90 in patients remained high throughout the duration of the disease. Taken together, our findings suggest that HSPs might have a role in ALS progression throughout the course of the disease. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of HSPs in the pathogenesis of ALS. PMID:27112486

  12. The expression patterns of heat shock genes and proteins and their role during vertebrate's development.

    PubMed

    Rupik, Weronika; Jasik, Krzysztof; Bembenek, Jadwiga; Widłak, Wiesława

    2011-08-01

    Highly evolutionary conserved heat shock proteins (HSPs) act as molecular chaperones in regulation of cellular homeostasis and promoting survival. Generally they are induced by a variety of stressors whose effect could be disastrous on the organism, but they are also widely constitutively expressed in the absence of stress. Varied HSP expressions seem to be very essential in the critical steps of embryonic and extra-embryonic structures formation and may correspond to cell movements, proliferation, morphogenesis and apoptosis, which occur during embryonic development. While our knowledge of detailed HSP expression patterns is in constant progress, their functions during embryonic development are not yet fully understood. In the paper, we review available data on HSP expression and discuss their role during vertebrate development. PMID:21527352

  13. Proposal of Dual Inhibitor Targeting ATPase Domains of Topoisomerase II and Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Kyu-Yeon; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2016-01-01

    There is a conserved ATPase domain in topoisomerase II (topo II) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) which belong to the GHKL (gyrase, Hsp90, histidine kinase, and MutL) family. The inhibitors that target each of topo II and Hsp90 are intensively studied as anti-cancer drugs since they play very important roles in cell proliferation and survival. Therefore the development of dual targeting anti-cancer drugs for topo II and Hsp90 is suggested to be a promising area. The topo II and Hsp90 inhibitors, known to bind to their ATP binding site, were searched. All the inhibitors investigated were docked to both topo II and Hsp90. Four candidate compounds as possible dual inhibitors were selected by analyzing the molecular docking study. The pharmacophore model of dual inhibitors for topo II and Hsp90 were generated and the design of novel dual inhibitor was proposed. PMID:27582553

  14. A Novel Mechanism for Small Heat Shock Proteins to Function as Molecular Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kaiming; Ezemaduka, Anastasia N.; Wang, Zhao; Hu, Hongli; Shi, Xiaodong; Liu, Chuang; Lu, Xinping; Fu, Xinmiao; Chang, Zengyi; Yin, Chang-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are molecular chaperones ubiquitously present in all forms of life, but their function mechanisms remain controversial. Here we show by cryo-electron microscopy and single particle 3D reconstruction that, at the low temperatures (4–25°C), CeHSP17 (a sHSP from Caenorhabditis elegans) exists as a 24-subunit spherical oligomer with tetrahedral symmetry. Our studies demonstrate that CeHSP17 forms large sheet-like super-molecular assemblies (SMAs) at the high temperatures (45–60°C), and such SMAs are apparently the form that exhibits chaperone-like activity. Our findings suggest a novel molecular mechanism for sHSPs to function as molecular chaperones. PMID:25744691

  15. Understanding the Role of Heat Shock Protein Isoforms in Male Fertility, Aging and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Purandhar, Kaveri; Jena, Prasant Kumar; Prajapati, Bhumika; Rajput, Parth

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play a role in the homeostasis, apoptosis regulation and the maintenance of the various other physiological processes. Aging is accompanied by a decrease in the resistance to environmental stress, while mitochondria are primary targets in the process of aging, their expression decreasing with age. Mitochondrion also plays a significant role in the process of spermatogenesis. HSPs have been shown to be involved in apoptosis with some of acting as apoptotic inhibitors and are involved in cytoprotection. In this review we discuss the roles of Hsp 27, 60, 70, and 90 in aging and male infertility and have concluded that these particular HSPs can be used as a molecular markers for mitochondrially- mediated apoptosis, aging and male infertility. PMID:25606560

  16. Sequence characterization of heat shock protein gene of Cyclospora cayetanensis isolates from Nepal, Mexico, and Peru.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Irshad M; Torres, Patricia; Simpson, Steven; Kerdahi, Khalil; Ortega, Ynes

    2013-04-01

    We have described the development of a 2-step nested PCR protocol based on the characterization of the 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) gene for rapid detection of the human-pathogenic Cyclospora cayetanensis parasite. We tested and validated these newly designed primer sets by PCR amplification followed by nucleotide sequencing of PCR-amplified HSP70 fragments belonging to 16 human C. cayetanensis isolates from 3 different endemic regions that include Nepal, Mexico, and Peru. No genetic polymorphism was observed among the isolates at the characterized regions of the HSP70 locus. This newly developed HSP70 gene-based nested PCR protocol provides another useful genetic marker for the rapid detection of C. cayetanensis in the future. PMID:22924935

  17. Expression of heat shock protein 72 in atrophied rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oishi, Y.; Ishihara, A.; Talmadge, R. J.; Ohira, Y.; Taniguchi, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in the expression of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) in response to atrophic-inducing perturbations of muscle involving chronic mechanical unloading and denervation were determined. Adult male Wistar rats were assigned randomly to a sedentary cage control (CON), hind limb unloading (HU, via tail suspension), HU plus tenotomy (HU + TEN), HU plus denervation (HU + DEN), or HU + TEN + DEN group. Tenotomy and DEN involved cutting the Achilles tendon and removing a segment of the sciatic nerve, respectively. After 5 days, HSP72 levels in the soleus of the HU + DEN and HU + TEN + DEN groups were 42 (P < 0.05) and 53% (P < 0.01) less than CON, respectively. Soleus weight decreased in both groups. Heat shock protein 72 levels in the plantaris of the HU + TEN, HU + DEN, and HU + TEN + DEN groups were 31, 25, and 30% lower than CON, respectively (P < 0.05). Plantaris weight decreased in the HU + DEN and HU + TEN + DEN, but not in the HU + TEN group. Hind limb unloading alone had little effect on the HSP72 level in either muscle. Reduced levels of HSP72 were associated with a decreased soleus (r=0.62, P < 0.01) and plantaris (r=0.78, P < 0.001) weight. These results indicate that the levels of HSP72 in both a slow and a fast rat plantarflexor are responsive to a chronic decrease in the levels of loading and/or activation and suggest that the neuromuscular activity level and the presence of innervation of a muscle are important factors that induce HSP72 expression.

  18. Crystal Structure of an Activated Variant of Small Heat Shock Protein Hsp16.5

    SciTech Connect

    Mchaourab, Hassane S.; Lin, Yi-Lun; Spiller, Benjamin W.

    2013-04-17

    How does the sequence of a single small heat shock protein (sHSP) assemble into oligomers of different sizes? To gain insight into the underlying structural mechanism, we determined the crystal structure of an engineered variant of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii Hsp16.5 wherein a 14 amino acid peptide from human heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) was inserted at the junction of the N-terminal region and the {alpha}-crystallin domain. In response to this insertion, the oligomer shell expands from 24 to 48 subunits while maintaining octahedral symmetry. Oligomer rearrangement does not alter the fold of the conserved {alpha}-crystallin domain nor does it disturb the interface holding the dimeric building block together. Rather, the flexible C-terminal tail of Hsp16.5 changes its orientation relative to the {alpha}-crystallin domain which enables alternative packing of dimers. This change in orientation preserves a peptide-in-groove interaction of the C-terminal tail with an adjacent {beta}-sandwich, thereby holding the assembly together. The interior of the expanded oligomer, where substrates presumably bind, retains its predominantly nonpolar character relative to the outside surface. New large windows in the outer shell provide increased access to these substrate-binding regions, thus accounting for the higher affinity of this variant to substrates. Oligomer polydispersity regulates sHSPs chaperone activity in vitro and has been implicated in their physiological roles. The structural mechanism of Hsp16.5 oligomer flexibility revealed here, which is likely to be highly conserved across the sHSP superfamily, explains the relationship between oligomer expansion observed in disease-linked mutants and changes in chaperone activity.

  19. Heat shock protein 70 regulates Tcl1 expression in leukemia and lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Gaudio, Eugenio; Paduano, Francesco; Ngankeu, Apollinaire; Lovat, Francesca; Fabbri, Muller; Sun, Hui-Lung; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Efanov, Alexey; Peng, Yong; Zanesi, Nicola; Shuaib, Mohammed A.; Rassenti, Laura Z.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Li, Chenglong; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Lesinski, Gregory B.; Trapasso, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    T-cell leukemia/lymphoma 1 (TCL1) is an oncogene overexpressed in T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia and in B-cell malignancies including B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphomas. To date, only a limited number of Tcl1-interacting proteins that regulate its oncogenic function have been identified. Prior studies used a proteomic approach to identify a novel interaction between Tcl1 with Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated. The association of Tcl1 and Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated leads to activation of the NF-κB pathway. Here, we demonstrate that Tcl1 also interacts with heat shock protein (Hsp) 70. The Tcl1-Hsp70 complex was validated by coimmunoprecipitation experiments. In addition, we report that Hsp70, a protein that plays a critical role in the folding and maturation of several oncogenic proteins, associates with Tcl1 protein and stabilizes its expression. The inhibition of the ATPase activity of Hsp70 results in ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation of Tcl1. The inhibition of Hsp70 significantly reduced the growth of lymphoma xenografts in vivo and down-regulated the expression of Tcl1 protein. Our findings reveal a functional interaction between Tcl1 and Hsp70 and identify Tcl1 as a novel Hsp70 client protein. These findings suggest that inhibition of Hsp70 may represent an alternative effective therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphomas via its ability to inhibit the oncogenic functions of Tcl1. PMID:23160471

  20. Localization of heat shock protein 110 in canine mammary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Okada, Satoru; Furuya, Masaru; Takenaka, Shigeo; Fukui, Ayano; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Tani, Hiroyuki; Sasai, Kazumi

    2015-10-15

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) function as molecular chaperones in the regulation of protein folding, conformation, and assembly; in addition, they also protect cells from protein-protein aggregation resulting from cellular stress. Recently, HSPs were shown to be overexpressed in several human cancer cells compared with normal cells. HSPs are considered to be related to apoptosis-associated proteins, and inhibition of apoptosis promotes tumor growth. Canine mammary gland tumors have received a great deal of attention from researchers due to the many common biological and histological characteristics that they share with human tumors. We previously confirmed that HSP110 is a canine mammary gland tumor antigen and reported that HSP110 mRNA expression significantly increased in tumor tissue. We have now created a functional recombinant canine HSP110 protein and a rabbit anti-HSP110 polyclonal antibody. This recombinant protein can refold heat-denatured firefly luciferase at 42°C. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that HSP110 was mainly localized in the cytoplasm of epithelial and interstitial cells in canine mammary gland tumors. Extensive genomic research has revealed genetic similarities between humans and dogs; comparative oncological studies between these species have made remarkable progress. The results reported here contribute valuable oncological knowledge for the development of novel therapeutic methods in both veterinary science and human medicine. PMID:26292766

  1. Heat Shock Proteins: A Review of the Molecular Chaperones for Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chang-Jin; Seo, Young-Su

    2015-01-01

    As sessile organisms, plants are exposed to persistently changing stresses and have to be able to interpret and respond to them. The stresses, drought, salinity, chemicals, cold and hot temperatures, and various pathogen attacks have interconnected effects on plants, resulting in the disruption of protein homeostasis. Maintenance of proteins in their functional native conformations and preventing aggregation of non-native proteins are important for cell survival under stress. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) functioning as molecular chaperones are the key components responsible for protein folding, assembly, translocation, and degradation under stress conditions and in many normal cellular processes. Plants respond to pathogen invasion using two different innate immune responses mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) or resistance (R) proteins. HSPs play an indispensable role as molecular chaperones in the quality control of plasma membrane-resident PRRs and intracellular R proteins against potential invaders. Here, we specifically discuss the functional involvement of cytosolic and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) HSPs/chaperones in plant immunity to obtain an integrated understanding of the immune responses in plant cells. PMID:26676169

  2. Mitochondrial Heat Shock Protein Machinery Hsp70/Hsp40 Is Indispensable for Proper Mitochondrial DNA Maintenance and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Týč, Jiří; Klingbeil, Michele M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT  Mitochondrial chaperones have multiple functions that are essential for proper functioning of mitochondria. In the human-pathogenic protist Trypanosoma brucei, we demonstrate a novel function of the highly conserved machinery composed of mitochondrial heat shock proteins 70 and 40 (mtHsp70/mtHsp40) and the ATP exchange factor Mge1. The mitochondrial DNA of T. brucei, also known as kinetoplast DNA (kDNA), is represented by a single catenated network composed of thousands of minicircles and dozens of maxicircles packed into an electron-dense kDNA disk. The chaperones mtHsp70 and mtHsp40 and their cofactor Mge1 are uniformly distributed throughout the single mitochondrial network and are all essential for the parasite. Following RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated depletion of each of these proteins, the kDNA network shrinks and eventually disappears. Ultrastructural analysis of cells depleted for mtHsp70 or mtHsp40 revealed that the otherwise compact kDNA network becomes severely compromised, a consequence of decreased maxicircle and minicircle copy numbers. Moreover, we show that the replication of minicircles is impaired, although the lack of these proteins has a bigger impact on the less abundant maxicircles. We provide additional evidence that these chaperones are indispensable for the maintenance and replication of kDNA, in addition to their already known functions in Fe-S cluster synthesis and protein import. PMID:25670781

  3. Prolonged Fasting Identifies Heat Shock Protein 10 as a Sirtuin 3 Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhongping; Chen, Yong; Aponte, Angel M.; Battaglia, Valentina; Gucek, Marjan; Sack, Michael N.

    2015-01-01

    Although Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), a mitochondrially enriched deacetylase and activator of fat oxidation, is down-regulated in response to high fat feeding, the rate of fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial protein acetylation are invariably enhanced in this dietary milieu. These paradoxical data implicate that additional acetylation modification-dependent levels of regulation may be operational under nutrient excess conditions. Because the heat shock protein (Hsp) Hsp10-Hsp60 chaperone complex mediates folding of the fatty acid oxidation enzyme medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, we tested whether acetylation-dependent mitochondrial protein folding contributes to this regulatory discrepancy. We demonstrate that Hsp10 is a functional SIRT3 substrate and that, in response to prolonged fasting, SIRT3 levels modulate mitochondrial protein folding. Acetyl mutagenesis of Hsp10 lysine 56 alters Hsp10-Hsp60 binding, conformation, and protein folding. Consistent with Hsp10-Hsp60 regulation of fatty acid oxidation enzyme integrity, medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity and fat oxidation are elevated by Hsp10 acetylation. These data identify acetyl modification of Hsp10 as a nutrient-sensing regulatory node controlling mitochondrial protein folding and metabolic function. PMID:25505263

  4. Relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms in the bovine heat shock protein 70 gene and milk characteristics of beef cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are induced by various stressors such as heat, cold, toxins, and oxygen deprivation. Our objective was to determine the genetic diversity in a segment of the HSP-70 gene of cattle. Genomic DNA was collected from 157 cows. The cows were Angus (n = 42), Brahman (n = 41), and...

  5. Induction of Heat Shock Proteins and Antioxidant Enzymes in 2,3,7,8-TCDD-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Sook; Park, So-Young; Yoo, Ki-Yeol

    2012-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) is an environmental toxicant with a polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbon structure and is one of the most toxic man-made chemicals. Exposure to 2,3,7,8-TCDD induces reproductive toxicity, immunotoxicity, and hepatotoxicity. In this study, we evaluated how 2,3,7,8-TCDD-induced hepatotoxicity affect the expression of heat shock proteins and antioxidant enzymes using the real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in rat. 2,3,7,8-TCDD increased heat shock protein (Hsp27, α-B-crystallin, Mortalin, Hsp105, and Hsp90s) and antioxidant enzymes (SOD-3, GST and catalase) expression after a 1 day exposure in livers of rats, whereas heat shock protein (α-B-crystallin, Hsp90, and GRP78) and antioxidant enzymes (SOD-1, SOD-3, catalase, GST, and GPXs) expression decreased on day 2 and then slowly recovered back to control levels on day 8. These results suggest that heat shock proteins and antioxidant enzymes were induced as protective mechanisms against 2,3,7,8-TCDD induced hepatotoxicity, and that prolonged exposure depressed their levels, which recovered to control levels due to reduced 2,3,7,8-TCDD induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:23269910

  6. Characterization of three transcripts encoding small heat shock proteins expressed in the codling moth, Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Codling moth is a major pest of apples and pears worldwide. Increasing knowledge of how this insect responds to environmental stress will improve field and postharvest control measures used against it. The small heat shock proteins (sHsps) play a major role in cellular responses to environmental st...

  7. TARGETED DELETION OF INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 ABROGATES THE LATE INFARCT-SPARING EFFECT OF MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIC PRECONDITIONING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract submitted for 82nd annual meeting of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, May 4-8, 2002 in Washington D.C.

    Targeted Deletion of Inducible Heat Shock Protein 70 Abrogates the Late Infarct-Sparing Effect of Myocardial Ischemic Preconditioning

    Craig...

  8. PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70-KILODALTON HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM
    IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70 kDa HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    * Gabor Huszar1, Kathryn Stone2, David Dix3 and Lynne Vigue1
    1The Sperm Physiology Laboratory, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2 W.M. Keck Foundatio...

  9. Sulphoraphane, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells by targeting heat shock proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Ruma; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Biswas, Jaydip; Roy, Madhumita

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HSPs (27, 70 and 90) and HSF1 are overexpressed in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate inhibited HSPs and HSF1 expressions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of HSPs and HSF1 lead to regulation of apoptotic proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins activate of caspases particularly caspase 3 and 9 leading to induction of apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins induce caspases leading to induction of apoptosis. -- Abstract: Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are involved in protein folding, aggregation, transport and/or stabilization by acting as a molecular chaperone, leading to inhibition of apoptosis by both caspase dependent and/or independent pathways. HSPs are overexpressed in a wide range of human cancers and are implicated in tumor cell proliferation, differentiation, invasion and metastasis. HSPs particularly 27, 70, 90 and the transcription factor heat shock factor1 (HSF1) play key roles in the etiology of breast cancer and can be considered as potential therapeutic target. The present study was designed to investigate the role of sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate on HSPs (27, 70, 90) and HSF1 in two different breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells expressing wild type and mutated p53 respectively, vis-a-vis in normal breast epithelial cell line MCF-12F. It was furthermore investigated whether modulation of HSPs and HSF1 could induce apoptosis in these cells by altering the expressions of p53, p21 and some apoptotic proteins like Bcl-2, Bax, Bid, Bad, Apaf-1 and AIF. Sulphoraphane was found to down-regulate the expressions of HSP70, 90 and HSF1, though the effect on HSP27 was not pronounced. Consequences of HSP inhibition was upregulation of p21 irrespective of p53 status. Bax, Bad, Apaf-1, AIF were upregulated followed by down-regulation of Bcl-2 and this effect was prominent

  10. Nucleotide sequence analysis and seroreactivities of the 65K heat shock protein from Mycobacterium paratuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    el-Zaatari, F A; Naser, S A; Engstrand, L; Burch, P E; Hachem, C Y; Whipple, D L; Graham, D Y

    1995-01-01

    Mycobacterium paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease, a chronic enteritis in ruminants. It has also been implicated as a possible cause of Crohn's disease, an inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. The mycobacterial 65K heat shock proteins (hsp-65K) are among the most extensively studied mycobacterial proteins, and their immunogenic characteristics have been suggested to be the basis for autoimmunization in chronic inflammatory diseases. In this context, we isolated and sequenced the hsp-65K-encoding gene from our M. paratuberculosis PTB65K genomic library. A high degree of identity was found between the open reading frame (ORF) of the PTB65K gene and those of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (89.6%), Mycobacterium leprae (86.6%), and Mycobacterium avium 18 (98.8%). The amino acid sequence alignment of the PTB65K protein with the hsp-65K homologs revealed that the M. tuberculosis and M. leprae proteins each differed by 36 amino acid residues and that the M. avium 18 protein differed by 8 residues. We also investigated the humoral immune responses of animals with Johne's disease and patients with Crohn's disease against the recombinant PTB65K antigen. Immunoblot analysis showed that sera from only 3 of 10 clinically ill and 5 of 25 subclinically ill cows reacted with PTB65K. In addition, sera from two of two sheep and one of two goats with clinical symptoms of Johne's disease also reacted with PTB65K; 0 samples from 10 normal cows reacted. In humans, sera from 7 of 13 patients with Crohn's disease, 3 of 4 with tuberculosis, 5 of 6 with leprosy, 5 of 12 with non-inflammatory bowel disease, and 0 of 4 with ulcerative colitis reacted with the recombinant PTB65K antigen. These results indicate that this PTB65K heat shock protein is uninformative when used for serodiagnosis of Johne's disease in animals. However, in humans, the high intensity of antibody reactions of some sera from Crohn's disease patients compared with that from noninflammatory