Science.gov

Sample records for heated air flow

  1. Computation of flow and heat transfer in rotating cavities with peripheral flow of cooling air.

    PubMed

    Kiliç, M

    2001-05-01

    Numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations have been used to model the flow and the heat transfer that occurs in the internal cooling-air systems of gas turbines. Computations are performed to study the effect of gap ratio, Reynolds number and the mass flow rate on the flow and the heat transfer structure inside isothermal and heated rotating cavities with peripheral flow of cooling air. Computations are compared with some of the recent experimental work on flow and heat transfer in rotating-cavities. The agreement between the computed and the available experimental data is reasonably good. PMID:11460668

  2. Air-side flow and heat transfer in compact heat exchangers: A discussion of enhancement mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobi, A.M.; Shah, R.K.

    1998-10-01

    The behavior of air flows in complex heat exchanger passages is reviewed with a focus on the heat transfer effects of boundary-layer development, turbulence, spanwise and streamwise vortices, and wake management. Each of these flow features is discussed for the plain, wavy, and interrupted passages found in contemporary compact heat exchanger designs. Results from the literature are used to help explain the role of these mechanisms in heat transfer enhancement strategies.

  3. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Air Flow, Heat Transfer and Thermal Comfort in Buildings with Different Heating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabanskis, A.; Virbulis, J.

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of temperature, humidity and air flow velocity is performed in 5 experimental buildings with the inner size of 3×3×3 m3 located in Riga, Latvia. The buildings are equipped with different heating systems, such as an air-air heat pump, air-water heat pump, capillary heating mat on the ceiling and electric heater. Numerical simulation of air flow and heat transfer by convection, conduction and radiation is carried out using OpenFOAM software and compared with experimental data. Results are analysed regarding the temperature and air flow distribution as well as thermal comfort.

  4. Convective heat transfer characteristics of laminar pulsating pipe air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, M. A.; Attya, A. M.; Eid, A. I.; Aly, A. Z.

    Heat transfer characteristics to laminar pulsating pipe flow under different conditions of Reynolds number and pulsation frequency were experimentally investigated. The tube wall of uniform heat flux condition was considered. Reynolds number was varied from 780 to 1987 while the frequency of pulsation ranged from 1 to 29.5Hz. The results showed that the relative mean Nusselt number is strongly affected by pulsation frequency while it is slightly affected by Reynolds number. The results showed enhancements in the relative mean Nusselt number. In the frequency range of 1-4Hz, an enhancement up to 30% (at Reynolds number of 1366 and pulsation frequency of 1.4Hz) was obtained. In the frequency range of 17-25Hz, an enhancement up to 9% (at Reynolds number of 1366 and pulsation frequency of 17.5Hz) was indicated. The rate of enhancement of the relative mean Nusselt number decreased as pulsation frequency increased or as Reynolds number increased. A reduction in relative mean Nusselt number occurred outside these ranges of pulsation frequencies. A reduction in relative mean Nusselt number up to 40% for pulsation frequency range of 4.1-17Hz and a reduction up to 20% for pulsation frequency range of 25-29.5Hz for Reynolds numbers range of 780-1987 were considered. This reduction is directly proportional to the pulsation frequency. Empirical dimensionless equations have been developed for the relative mean Nusselt number that related to Reynolds number (750

  5. Experimental study on corrugated cross-flow air-cooled plate heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Minsung; Baik, Young-Jin; Park, Seong-Ryong; Ra, Ho-Sang; Lim, Hyug

    2010-11-15

    Experimental study on cross-flow air-cooled plate heat exchangers (PHEs) was performed. The two prototype PHEs were manufactured in a stack of single-wave plates and double-wave plates in parallel. Cooling air flows through the PHEs in a crosswise direction against internal cooling water. The heat exchanger aims to substitute open-loop cooling towers with closed-loop water circulation, which guarantees cleanliness and compactness. In this study, the prototype PHEs were tested in a laboratory scale experiments. From the tests, double-wave PHE shows approximately 50% enhanced heat transfer performance compared to single-wave PHE. However, double-wave PHE costs 30% additional pressure drop. For commercialization, a wide channel design for air flow would be essential for reliable performance. (author)

  6. Heat transfer and pressure drop for air flow through enhanced passages

    SciTech Connect

    Obot, N.T.; Esen, E.B.

    1992-06-01

    An extensive experimental investigation was carried out to determine the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics for laminar, transitional and turbulent flow of air through a smooth passage and twenty-three enhanced passages. The internal surfaces of all enhanced passages had spirally shaped geometries; these included fluted, finned/ribbed and indented surfaces. The Reynolds number (Re) was varied between 400 and 50000. The effect of heat transfer (wall cooling or fluid heating) on pressure drop is most significant within the transition region; the recorded pressure drop with heat transfer is much higher than that without heat transfer. The magnitude of this effect depends markedly on the average surface temperature and, to a lesser extent, on the geometric characteristics of the enhanced surfaces. When the pressure drop data are reduced as values of the Fanning friction factor(f), the results are about the same with and without heat transfer for turbulent flow, with moderate differences in the laminar and transition regions.

  7. Heat transfer and pressure drop for air flow through enhanced passages. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Obot, N.T.; Esen, E.B.

    1992-06-01

    An extensive experimental investigation was carried out to determine the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics for laminar, transitional and turbulent flow of air through a smooth passage and twenty-three enhanced passages. The internal surfaces of all enhanced passages had spirally shaped geometries; these included fluted, finned/ribbed and indented surfaces. The Reynolds number (Re) was varied between 400 and 50000. The effect of heat transfer (wall cooling or fluid heating) on pressure drop is most significant within the transition region; the recorded pressure drop with heat transfer is much higher than that without heat transfer. The magnitude of this effect depends markedly on the average surface temperature and, to a lesser extent, on the geometric characteristics of the enhanced surfaces. When the pressure drop data are reduced as values of the Fanning friction factor(f), the results are about the same with and without heat transfer for turbulent flow, with moderate differences in the laminar and transition regions.

  8. Investigation of Flow in an Axially Symmetrical Heated Jet of Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrsin, Stanley

    1943-01-01

    The work done under this contract falls essentially into two parts: the first part was the design and construction of the equipment and the running of preliminary tests on the 3-inch jet, carried out by Mr. Carl Thiele in 1940; the second part consisting in the measurement in the 1-inch jet flow in an axially symmetrical heated jet of air. (author)

  9. Performance evaluation on an air-cooled heat exchanger for alumina nanofluid under laminar flow

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the characteristics of alumina (Al2O3)/water nanofluid to determine the feasibility of its application in an air-cooled heat exchanger for heat dissipation for PEMFC or electronic chip cooling. The experimental sample was Al2O3/water nanofluid produced by the direct synthesis method at three different concentrations (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 wt.%). The experiments in this study measured the thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluid with weight fractions and sample temperatures (20-60°C), and then used the nanofluid in an actual air-cooled heat exchanger to assess its heat exchange capacity and pressure drop under laminar flow. Experimental results show that the nanofluid has a higher heat exchange capacity than water, and a higher concentration of nanoparticles provides an even better ratio of the heat exchange. The maximum enhanced ratio of heat exchange and pressure drop for all the experimental parameters in this study was about 39% and 5.6%, respectively. In addition to nanoparticle concentration, the temperature and mass flow rates of the working fluid can affect the enhanced ratio of heat exchange and pressure drop of nanofluid. The cross-section aspect ratio of tube in the heat exchanger is another important factor to be taken into consideration. PMID:21827644

  10. Performance evaluation on an air-cooled heat exchanger for alumina nanofluid under laminar flow.

    PubMed

    Teng, Tun-Ping; Hung, Yi-Hsuan; Teng, Tun-Chien; Chen, Jyun-Hong

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the characteristics of alumina (Al2O3)/water nanofluid to determine the feasibility of its application in an air-cooled heat exchanger for heat dissipation for PEMFC or electronic chip cooling. The experimental sample was Al2O3/water nanofluid produced by the direct synthesis method at three different concentrations (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 wt.%). The experiments in this study measured the thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluid with weight fractions and sample temperatures (20-60°C), and then used the nanofluid in an actual air-cooled heat exchanger to assess its heat exchange capacity and pressure drop under laminar flow. Experimental results show that the nanofluid has a higher heat exchange capacity than water, and a higher concentration of nanoparticles provides an even better ratio of the heat exchange. The maximum enhanced ratio of heat exchange and pressure drop for all the experimental parameters in this study was about 39% and 5.6%, respectively. In addition to nanoparticle concentration, the temperature and mass flow rates of the working fluid can affect the enhanced ratio of heat exchange and pressure drop of nanofluid. The cross-section aspect ratio of tube in the heat exchanger is another important factor to be taken into consideration. PMID:21827644

  11. Vortex generator induced heat transfer augmentation past a rib in a heated duct air flow

    SciTech Connect

    Myrum, T.A.; Acharya, S.; Inamdar, S.; Mehrotra, A. )

    1992-02-01

    The present investigation represents the initial phase of a comprehensive experimental program designed to study the potential for increasing the heat transfer per unit pressure drop in a ribbed duct by positioning vortex generators at key locations in the flow. In particular, the present investigation consists of a rib positioned at the inlet to a rectangular test section with uniform heating at its bottom wall. Local and average Nusselt number results are obtained for a circular rod positioned either immediately above or just downstream of the rib.

  12. Investigation of the motion and heat transfer of water droplets in the swirling air flow in weightlessness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubaidullin, D. A.; Fedyaev, V. L.; Morenko, I. V.; Snigerev, B. A.; Galimov, E. R.

    2016-06-01

    The motion and heat transfer of water droplets with a swirling air flow is investigated. Flow was considered in a cylindrical chamber in the absence of gravity. We created a mathematical model of this problem and made appropriate calculations. The features of the air flow at a tangential feeding it into the chamber, and the motion of the drops, their thermal behaviour are founded. We presented the recommendations for the rational choice of parameters of the apparatus and rational operation regime.

  13. Influence mechanism on flow and heat transfer characteristics for air-cooled steam condenser cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei Feng; Dai, Yi Ping; Li, Mao Qing; Ma, Qing Zhong

    2012-09-01

    Air-cooled steam condensers (ACSCs) have been extensively utilized to reject waste heat in power industry to save water resources. However, ACSC performance is so sensitive to ambient wind that almost all the air-cooled power plants in China are less efficient compared to design conditions. It is shown from previous research that the influence of ambient wind on the cell performance differs from its location in the condenser. As a result, a numerical model including two identical ACSC cells are established, and the different influence on the performance of the cells is demonstrated and analyzed through the computational fluid dynamics method. Despite the great influence from the wind speeds, similar cell performance is obtained for the two cells under both windless and wind speed conditions when the wind parallels to the steam duct. Fan volumetric effectiveness which characterizes the fan performance, as well as the exchanger heat transfer rate, drops obviously with the increasing wind speed, and performance difference between the exchanger pair in the same A-frame also rises continuously. Furthermore, different flow and heat transfer characteristics of the windward and leeward cell are obtained at different wind angles, and ambient wind enhances the performance of the leeward cell, while that of the windward one changes little.

  14. Heat transfer measurements on biconics at incidence in hypersonic high enthalpy air and nitrogen flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gai, S. L.; Cain, T.; Joe, W. S.; Sandeman, R. J.; Miller, C. G.

    1988-01-01

    Heat transfer rate measurements have been obtained at 0, 5, 15, and 21 deg angles-of-attack for a straight biconic scale model of an aeroassisted orbital vehicle proposed for planetary probe missions. Heat-transfer distributions were measured using palladium thin-film resistance gauges deposited on a glass-ceramic substrate. The windward heat transfer correlations were based on equilibrium flow in the shock layer of the model, although the flow may depart from equilibrium in the flow-field.

  15. Laminar natural convection heat transfer and air flow in three-dimensional cubic enclosures with a partially heated wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellah, S.; Ben-Cheikh, N.; Ben-Beya, B.; Lili, T.

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, a finite volume computational procedure and a full multigrid technique are used to investigate laminar natural convection in partially heated cubic enclosures. Effects of heated strip disposition in the enclosure on the heat transfer rate are studied. Results are presented in the form of flow lines, isotherms plots, average Nusselt numbers, and average temperature on the heat source surface. Statistical distributions of temperature and average velocity fields and their root-mean-square values are presented and discussed.

  16. An experimental and numerical investigation of air side heat transfer and flow characteristics on finned plate configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Lihao; Ling, Xiang; Peng, Hao

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a new type of finned plate heat exchanger (FPHE) is presented to recover the waste heat from exhaust flue gases. A finned plate configuration causes low pressure drop and it is especially appropriate for heat transfer at the flue gas side. Meanwhile, this paper presents a detailed experimental and numerical study of convection heat transfer and pressure drop of the new structure. Three-dimensional numerical simulation results using the CFD code FLUENT6.3 were compared with experimental data to select the best model. The heat transfer and pressure drop with different geometry pattern was then studied numerically using the selected model. And the velocity field and temperature distribution of air flow in the finned plate channel are presented with different geometry patterns. These results provide insight into improved designs of FPHEs.

  17. Exploiting zone trapping to avoid liberation of air bubbles in flow-based analytical procedures requiring heating.

    PubMed

    Vida, Ana C F; Zagatto, Elias A G

    2014-01-01

    In flow-based analytical procedures requiring heating, liberation of air bubbles is avoided by trapping a sample selected portion into a heated hermetic environment. The flow-through cuvette is maintained into a temperature-controlled aluminium block, thus acting as the trapping element and allowing real-time monitoring. The feasibility of the innovation was demonstrated in the spectrophotometric catalytic determination of vanadium in mineral waters. Air bubbles were not released even for temperatures as high as 95°C. The proposed system handles about 25 samples per hour, requires only 3 mg p-anisidine per determination and yields precise results (r.s.d. = 2.1%), in agreement with ICP-MS. Detection limit was evaluated (3.3 σ criterion) as 0.1 μg L(-1) V. PMID:25109646

  18. Correlation formulas for the frost thickness and heat transfer coefficient on a cylinder in humid air cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, S.; Sherif, S.A.; Wong, K.V.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reports on results of an experimental investigation where the emphasis was placed on obtaining empirical correlations for the frost thickness-time history and the heat transfer coefficient-time history for a cylinder in humid air cross flow. The facility employed for the investigation consisted of a low velocity wind tunnel comprised of a rectangular test section, a transition section and a honeycomb placed at the tunnel entrance. An external refrigerator was used to cool an antifreeze solution having a mixture of 90% methanol and 10% ethylene glycol. Measured parameters included, among other things, the heat transfer coefficient as well as the frost thickness.

  19. Rotor cavity flow and heat transfer with inlet swirl and radial outflow of cooling air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staub, F. W.

    1992-06-01

    To enhance the reliability of turbine disk life prediction, experimental verification is necessary for analytical tools which calculate the heat transfer and flow field coefficients in turbine-stator cavities. A full-scale model of the forward cavity of a typical aircraft gas turbine is utilized employing a high-molecular-weight gas (Refrigerant-12) at ambient temperature and pressure conditions to match the dimensionless parameters at engine conditions. A first-order comparison is given of the velocity distribution and disk heat transfer coefficients calculated by the measured values and a CFD code.

  20. Numerical simulation of a turbulent flow with droplets injection in annular heated air tube using the Reynolds stress model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merouane, H.; Bounif, A.; Abidat, M.

    2013-12-01

    This work presents computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of single-phase and two-phase flow. The droplets are injected in annular heated air tube. The numerical simulation is performed by using a commercial CFD code witch uses the finite-volume method to discretize the equations of fluid flow. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with Reynolds stress model were used in the computation. The governing equations are solved by using a SIMPLE algorithm to treat the pressure terms in the momentum equations. The results of prediction are compared with the experimental data.

  1. An experimental investigation of heat transfer to pulsating pipe air flow with different amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohir, A. E.; Habib, M. A.; Attya, A. M.; Eid, A. I.

    2006-05-01

    Heat transfer characteristics to both laminar and turbulent pulsating pipe flows under different conditions of Reynolds number, pulsation frequency, pulsator location and tube diameter were experimentally investigated. The tube wall of uniform heat flux condition was considered for both cases. Reynolds number varied from 750 to 12,320 while the frequency of pulsation ranged from 1 to 10 Hz. With locating the pulsator upstream of the inlet of the test section tube, results showed an increase in heat transfer rate due to pulsation by as much as 30% with flow Reynolds number of 1,643 and pulsation frequency of 1 Hz, depending on the upstream location of the pulsator valve. Closer the valve to the tested section inlet, the better improvement in the heat transfer coefficient is achieved. Upon comparing the heat transfer results of the upstream and the downstream pulsation, at Reynolds number of 1,366 and 1,643, low values of the relative mean Nusselt number were obtained with the upstream pulsation. Comparing the heat transfer results of the two studied test sections tubes for Reynolds number range from 8,000 to 12,000 and pulsation frequency range from 1.0 to 10 Hz showed that more improvement in heat transfer rate was observed with a larger tube diameter. For Reynolds number ranging from 8,000 to 12,000 and pulsation frequency of 10 Hz, an improvement in the relative mean Nusselt number of about 50% was obtained at Reynolds number of 8,000 for the large test section diameter of 50 mm. While, for the small test section diameter of 15 mm, at same conditions of Reynolds number and frequency, a reduction in the relative mean Nusselt number of up to 10% was obtained.

  2. The Impact of Refrigerant Charge, Air Flow and Expansion Devices on the Measured Performance of an Air-Source Heat Pump Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes extensive tests performed on a 3-ton R-22 split heat pump in heating mode. The tests contain 150 steady-state performance tests, 18 cyclic tests and 18 defrost tests. During the testing work, the refrigerant charge level was varied from 70 % to 130% relative to the nominal value; the outdoor temperature was altered by three levels at 17 F (-8.3 C), 35 F (1.7 C) and 47 F (8.3 C); indoor air flow rates ranged from 60% to 150% of the rated air flow rate; and the expansion device was switched from a fixed-orifice to a thermal expansion value. Detailed performance data from the extensive steady state cyclic and defrost testing performed were presented and compared.

  3. The effect of different inlet conditions of air in a rectangular channel on convection heat transfer: Turbulence flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtbas, Irfan

    2008-10-15

    Theoretical and empirical correlations for duct flow are given for hydrodynamically and thermally developed flow in most of previous studies. However, this is commonly not a realistic inlet configuration for heat exchanger, in which coolant flow generally turns through a serpentine shaped passage before entering heat sinks. Accordingly, an experimental investigation was carried out to determine average heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated rectangular channel with 45 and 90 turned flow, and with wall mounted a baffle. The channel was heated through bottom side with the baffle. In present work, a detailed study was conducted for three different height of entry channel (named as the ratio of the height of entry channel to the height of test section (anti H{sub c}=h{sub c}/H)) by varying Reynolds number (Re{sub Dh}). Another variable parameter was the ratio of the baffle height to the channel height (anti H{sub b}=h{sub b}/H). Only one baffle was attached on the bottom (heating) surface. The experimental procedure was validated by comparing the data for the straight channel with no baffle. Reynolds number (Re{sub Dh}) was varied from 2800 to 30,000, so the flow was considered as only turbulent regime. All experiments were conduced with air accordingly; Prandtl number (Pr) was approximately fixed at 0.71. The results showed that average Nusselt number for {theta}=45 and {theta}=90 were 9% and 30% higher, respectively, than that of the straight channel without baffle. Likewise, the pressure drop increased up to 4.4 to 5.3 times compare to the straight channel. (author)

  4. 3-Dimensional numerical study of cooling performance of a heat sink with air-water flow through mini-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Sambit; Majumder, Abhik; Bhaumik, Swapan

    2016-07-01

    The present microelectronics market demands devices with high power dissipation capabilities having enhanced cooling per unit area. The drive for miniaturizing the devices to even micro level dimensions is shooting up the applied heat flux on such devices, resulting in complexity in heat transfer and cooling management. In this paper, a method of CPU processor cooling is introduced where active and passive cooling techniques are incorporated simultaneously. A heat sink consisting of fins is designed, where water flows internally through the mini-channel fins and air flows externally. Three dimensional numerical simulations are performed for large set of Reynolds number in laminar region using finite volume method for both developing flows. The dimensions of mini-channel fins are varied for several aspect ratios such as 1, 1.33, 2 and 4. Constant temperature (T) boundary condition is applied at heat sink base. Channel fluid temperature, pressure drop are analyzed to obtain best cooling option in the present study. It has been observed that as the aspect ratio of the channel decreases Nusselt number decreases while pressure drop increases. However, Nusselt number increases with increase in Reynolds number.

  5. Analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in a rib grit roughened surface solar air heater using CFD

    SciTech Connect

    Karmare, S.V.; Tikekar, A.N.

    2010-03-15

    This paper presents the study of fluid flow and heat transfer in a solar air heater by using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) which reduces time and cost. Lower side of collector plate is made rough with metal ribs of circular, square and triangular cross-section, having 60 inclinations to the air flow. The grit rib elements are fixed on the surface in staggered manner to form defined grid. The system and operating parameters studied are: e/D{sub h} = 0.044, p/e = 17.5 and l/s = 1.72, for the Reynolds number range 3600-17,000. To validate CFD results, experimental investigations were carried out in the laboratory. It is found that experimental and CFD analysis results give the good agreement. The optimization of rib geometry and its angle of attack is also done. The square cross-section ribs with 58 angle of attack give maximum heat transfer. The percentage enhancement in the heat transfer for square plate over smooth surface is 30%. (author)

  6. Air heating system

    DOEpatents

    Primeau, John J.

    1983-03-01

    A self-starting, fuel-fired, air heating system including a vapor generator, a turbine, and a condenser connected in a closed circuit such that the vapor output from the vapor generator is conducted to the turbine and then to the condenser where it is condensed for return to the vapor generator. The turbine drives an air blower which passes air over the condenser for cooling the condenser. Also, a condensate pump is driven by the turbine. The disclosure is particularly concerned with the provision of heat exchanger and circuitry for cooling the condensed fluid output from the pump prior to its return to the vapor generator.

  7. Heat-transfer distributions on biconics at incidence in hypersonic-hypervelocity He, N2, air, and CO2 flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Micol, J. R.; Gnoffo, P. A.; Wilder, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Laminar heat transfer rates were measured on spherically blunted, 13 deg/7 deg on axis and bent biconics (fore cone bent 7 deg upward relative to aft cone) at hypersonic hypervelocity flow conditions in the Langley Expansion Tube. Freestream velocities from 4.5 to 6.9 km/sec and Mach numbers from 6 to 9 were generated using helium, nitrogen, air, and carbon dioxide test gases, resulting in normal shock density ratios from 4 to 19. Angle of attack, referenced to the axis of the aft cone, was varied from 0 to 20 deg in 4 deg increments. The effect of nose bend, angle of attack, and real gas phenomena on heating distributions are presented along with comparisons of measurement to prediction from a code which solves the three dimensional parabolized Navier-Stokes equations.

  8. A mathematical model for two-phase water, air, and heat flow around a linear heat source emplaced in a permeable medium

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, C.; Pruess, K.

    1991-03-01

    A semianalytical solution for transient two-phase water, air, and heat flow in a uniform porous medium surrounding a constant-strength linear heat source has been developed, using a similarity variable {eta}=r/{radical}t (r is radial distance, t is time). Although the similarity transformation requires a simplified radial geometry, all the physical mechanisms involved in two-phase fluid and heat flow may be taken into account in a rigorous way. The solution includes nonlinear thermophysical fluid and material properties, such as relative permeability and capillary pressure variations with saturation, and density and viscosity variations with temperature and pressure. The resulting governing equations form a set of coupled nonlinear ODEs, necessitating numerical integration. The solution has been applied to a partially saturated porous medium initially at a temperature well below the saturation temperature, which is the setting for the potential nuclear waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The resulting heat and fluid flows provide a stringent test of many of the capabilities of numerical simulation models, making the similarity solution a useful tool for model verification. Comparisons to date have shown excellent agreement between the TOUGH2 simulator and the similarity solution for a variety of conditions. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. A heat flow calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, W. V.

    1973-01-01

    Reaction mechanism for nickel-cadmium cell is not known well enough to allow calculation of heat effects. Calorimeter can measure heat absorbed or evolved in cell, by determining amount of external heat that must be supplied to calorimeter to maintain constant flow isothermal heat sink.

  10. Measurements of average heat-transfer and friction coefficients for subsonic flow of air in smooth tubes at high surface and fluid temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humble, Leroy V; Lowdermilk, Warren H; Desmon, Leland G

    1951-01-01

    An investigation of forced-convection heat transfer and associated pressure drops was conducted with air flowing through smooth tubes for an over-all range of surface temperature from 535 degrees to 3050 degrees r, inlet-air temperature from 535 degrees to 1500 degrees r, Reynolds number up to 500,000, exit Mach number up to 1, heat flux up to 150,000 btu per hour per square foot, length-diameter ratio from 30 to 120, and three entrance configurations. Most of the data are for heat addition to the air; a few results are included for cooling of the air. The over-all range of surface-to-air temperature ratio was from 0.46 to 3.5.

  11. Analysis of heat and mass transfer between air and falling film desiccant for different flow configurations in the presence of ultrafine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ahmad A.

    This work focuses on the enhancement of heat and mass transfer between air and falling desiccant film for different flow channel configurations. Cu-Ultrafine particles are added to the desiccant film to investigate the enhancement in heat and mass transfer between air and desiccant film for dehumidification and cooling processes of the air and regeneration of desiccant film. A detailed comparative study between parallel and counter flow channels is performed using a parametric study to investigate the enhancements in dehumidification, cooling, and regeneration processes in terms of the pertinent parameters. The results reveal that the parallel flow arrangement provides better dehumidification and cooling for the air than the counter flow channel for a wide range of parameters. Next, the inclined parallel and counter flow configurations are investigated using an Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) and successive over-relaxation methods to discretize the vorticity and stream-function equations, respectively. A parametric study is employed to investigate the inclination angle effects in enhancing the heat and mass transfer in terms of the controlling parameters. It is shown that inclination angle plays a significant role in enhancing the dehumidification, cooling, and regeneration processes. Finally, the enhancements in heat and mass transfer in cross flow channel between air and desiccant film is examined based on a parametric study to investigate the dehumidification and cooling processes of the air in terms of the pertinent controlling parameters. These parameters are air and desiccant Reynolds numbers, dimensions of the channel, volume fraction of Cu-ultrafine particles, and thermal dispersion effects. It is found that an increase in the Cu-volume fraction increases dehumidification and cooling capabilities and produce more stable Cu-desiccant film.

  12. Air circuit with heating pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holik, H.; Bauder, H. J.; Brugger, H.; Reinhart, A.; Spott, K. H.

    1980-12-01

    A pump which draws energy from exhaust air from a paper drying process to heat up the blow air was studied. The use of a heat pump instead of a steam heated exchanger can reduce primary energy consumption for blown air heating by more than half and the costs for air heating up to half. The amortization times for the heat pump extend from 5 to 10 years. Since in the pulp and paper industry, amortization times of less than two years are required for such relatively small investments, the heat pump so far is only used to heat blown air under highly favorable conditions. The rising energy prices shorten the heat pump amortization time. The 100% fuel price increase brought the heat pump with diesel engine drive already to very favorable amortization times of 2 to 5 years. A 20% increase will make the heat pump economically advantageous with an amortization time between 1 and 2 years.

  13. Forced air heat sink apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A high efficiency forced air heat sink assembly employs a split feed transverse flow configuration to minimize the length of the air flow path through at least two separated fin structures. Different embodiments use different fin structure material configurations including honeycomb, corrugated and serpentine. Each such embodiment uses a thermally conductive plate having opposed exterior surfaces; one for receiving a component to be cooled and one for receiving the fin structures. The serpentine structured fin embodiment employs a plurality of fin supports extending from the plate and forming a plurality of channels for receiving the fin structures. A high thermal conductivity bondant, such as metal-filled epoxy, may be used to bond the fin structures to either the plate or the fin supports. Dip brazing and soldering may also be employed depending upon the materials selected.

  14. Natural Flow Air Cooled Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanagnostopoulos, Y.; Themelis, P.

    2010-01-01

    Our experimental study aims to investigate the improvement in the electrical performance of a photovoltaic installation on buildings through cooling of the photovoltaic panels with natural air flow. Our experimental study aims to investigate the improvement in the electrical performance of a photovoltaic installation on buildings through cooling of the photovoltaic panels with natural air flow. We performed experiments using a prototype based on three silicon photovoltaic modules placed in series to simulate a typical sloping building roof with photovoltaic installation. In this system the air flows through a channel on the rear side of PV panels. The potential for increasing the heat exchange from the photovoltaic panel to the circulating air by the addition of a thin metal sheet (TMS) in the middle of air channel or metal fins (FIN) along the air duct was examined. The operation of the device was studied with the air duct closed tightly to avoid air circulation (CLOSED) and the air duct open (REF), with the thin metal sheet (TMS) and with metal fins (FIN). In each case the experiments were performed under sunlight and the operating parameters of the experimental device determining the electrical and thermal performance of the system were observed and recorded during a whole day and for several days. We collected the data and form PV panels from the comparative diagrams of the experimental results regarding the temperature of solar cells, the electrical efficiency of the installation, the temperature of the back wall of the air duct and the temperature difference in the entrance and exit of the air duct. The comparative results from the measurements determine the improvement in electrical performance of the photovoltaic cells because of the reduction of their temperature, which is achieved by the naturally circulating air.

  15. Planetary heat flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Hagermann, Axel

    2005-12-15

    The year 2005 marks the 35th anniversary of the Apollo 13 mission, probably the most successful failure in the history of manned spaceflight. Naturally, Apollo 13's scientific payload is far less known than the spectacular accident and subsequent rescue of its crew. Among other instruments, it carried the first instrument designed to measure the flux of heat on a planetary body other than Earth. The year 2005 also should have marked the launch of the Japanese LUNAR-A mission, and ESA's Rosetta mission is slowly approaching comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Both missions carry penetrators to study the heat flow from their target bodies. What is so interesting about planetary heat flow? What can we learn from it and how do we measure it?Not only the Sun, but all planets in the Solar System are essentially heat engines. Various heat sources or heat reservoirs drive intrinsic and surface processes, causing 'dead balls of rock, ice or gas' to evolve dynamically over time, driving convection that powers tectonic processes and spawns magnetic fields. The heat flow constrains models of the thermal evolution of a planet and also its composition because it provides an upper limit for the bulk abundance of radioactive elements. On Earth, the global variation of heat flow also reflects the tectonic activity: heat flow increases towards the young ocean ridges, whereas it is rather low on the old continental shields. It is not surprising that surface heat flow measurements, or even estimates, where performed, contributed greatly to our understanding of what happens inside the planets. In this article, I will review the results and the methods used in past heat flow measurements and speculate on the targets and design of future experiments. PMID:16286290

  16. The effectiveness of a heated air curtain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Daria

    2014-11-01

    Air curtains are high-velocity plane turbulent jets which are installed in the doorway in order to reduce the heat and the mass exchange between two environments. The air curtain effectiveness E is defined as the fraction of the exchange flow prevented by the air curtain compared to the open-door situation. In the present study, we investigate the effects of an opposing buoyancy force on the air curtain effectiveness. Such an opposing buoyancy force arises for example if a downwards blowing air curtain is heated. We conducted small-scale experiments using water as the working fluid with density differences created by salt and sugar. The effectiveness of a downwards blowing air curtain was measured for situations in which the initial density of the air curtain was less than both the indoor and the outdoor fluid density, which corresponds to the case of a heated air curtain. We compare the effectiveness of the heated air curtain to the case of the neutrally buoyant air curtain. It is found that the effectiveness starts to decrease if the air curtain is heated beyond a critical temperature. Furthermore, we propose a theoretical model to describe the dynamics of the buoyant air curtain. Numerical results obtained from solving this model corroborate our experimental findings.

  17. Terminal Air Flow Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denery, Dallas G.; Erzberger, Heinz; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS) will be the basis for air traffic planning and control in the terminal area. The system accepts arriving traffic within an extended terminal area and optimizes the flow based on current traffic and airport conditions. The operational use of CTAS will be presented together with results from current operations.

  18. Method for Calculation of Laminar Heat Transfer in Air Flow Around Cylinders of Arbitrary Cross Section (including Large Temperature Differences and Transpiration Cooling)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R; Livingood, John N B

    1953-01-01

    The solution of heat-transfer problems has become vital for many aeronautical applications. The shapes of objects to be cooled can often be approximated by cylinders of various cross sections with flow normal to the axis as, for instance heat transfer on gas-turbine blades and on air foils heated for deicing purposes. A laminar region always exists near the stagnation point of such objects. A method previously presented by E. R. G. Eckert permits the calculation of local heat transfer around the periphery of cylinders of arbitrary cross section in the laminar region for flow of a fluid with constant property values with an accuracy sufficient for engineering purposes. The method is based on exact solutions of the boundary-layer equations for incompressible wedge-type flow and on the postulate that at any point on the cylinder the boundary-layer growth is the same as that on a wedge with comparable flow conditions. This method is extended herein to take into account the influence of large temperature differences between the cylinder wall and the flow as well as the influence of transpiration cooling when the same medium as the outside flow is used as coolant.

  19. Two-dimensional model of the air flow and temperature distribution in a cavity-type heat receiver of a solar stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Makhkamov, K.K.; Ingham, D.B.

    1999-11-01

    A theoretical study on the air flow and temperature in the heat receiver, affected by free convection, of a Stirling Engine for a Dish/Stirling Engine Power System is presented. The standard {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model for the fluid flow has been used and the boundary conditions employed were obtained using a second level mathematical model of the Stirling Engine working cycle. Physical models for the distribution of the solar insolation from the Concentrator on the bottom and side walls of the cavity-type heat receiver have been taken into account. The numerical results show that most of the heat losses in the receiver are due to re-radiation from the cavity and conduction through the walls of the cavity. It is in the region of the boundary of the input window of the heat receiver where there is a sensible reduction in the temperature in the shell of the heat exchangers and this is due to the free convection of the air. Further, the numerical results show that convective heat losses increase with decreasing tilt angle.

  20. Enceladus' Enigmatic Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howett, C.; Spencer, J. R.; Spencer, D.; Verbiscer, A.; Hurford, T.; Segura, M.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of Enceladus' heat flow is important because it provides a vital constraint on Enceladus' tidal dissipation mechanisms, orbital evolution, and the physical processes that generate the plumes. In 2011 we published an estimate of the current heat flow from Enceladus' active south polar terrain: 15.8 +/- 3.1 GW (Howett et al., 2011). This value was calculated by first estimating by modeling, and then removing, the passive component from 17 to 1000 micron observations made of the entire south polar terrain by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS). The heat flow was then directly calculated from the residual, assumed endogenic, component. The derived heat flow of 15.8 GW was surprisingly high, about 10 times greater than that predicted by steady-state tidal heating (Meyer and Wisdom, 2007). CIRS has also returned high spatial resolution observations of Enceladus' active south polar terrain. Two separate observations are used: 9 to 16 micron observations taken over nearly the complete south polar terrain and a single 17 to 1000 micron scan over Damascus, Baghdad and Cairo. The shorter wavelength observations are only sensitive to high temperature emission (>70 K), and so longer wavelength observations are required (despite their limited spatial coverage) to estimate the low temperature emission from the stripes. Analysis of these higher resolution observations tells a different story of Enceladus' endogenic heat flow: the preliminary estimate of the heat flow from the active tiger stripes using these observations is 4.2 GW. An additional 0.5 GW must be added to this number to account for the latent heat release by the plumes (Ingersoll and Pankine 2009), giving a total preliminary estimate of 4.9 GW. The discrepancy in these two numbers is significant and we are currently investigating the cause. One possible reason is that there is significantly higher endogenic emission from the regions between the tiger stripes than we currently estimate

  1. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  2. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, James C.; Hardee, Harry C.; Striker, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  3. Surface flow and heating distributions on a cylinder in near wake of Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) configuration at incidence in Mach 10 Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, William L.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental heat transfer distributions and surface streamline directions are presented for a cylinder in the near wake of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment forebody configuration. Tests were conducted in air at a nominal free stream Mach number of 10, with post shock Reynolds numbers based on model base height of 6,450 to 50,770, and angles of attack of 5, 0, -5, and -10 degrees. Heat transfer data were obtained with thin film resistance gage and surface streamline directions by the oil flow technique. Comparisons between measured values and predicted values were made by using a Navier-Stokes computer code.

  4. Heat transfer to two-phase air/water mixtures flowing in small tubes with inlet disequilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janssen, J. M.; Florschuetz, L. W.; Fiszdon, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    The cooling of gas turbine components was the subject of considerable research. The problem is difficult because the available coolant, compressor bleed air, is itself quite hot and has relatively poor thermophysical properties for a coolant. Injecting liquid water to evaporatively cool the air prior to its contact with the hot components was proposed and studied, particularly as a method of cooling for contingency power applications. Injection of a small quantity of cold liquid water into a relatively hot coolant air stream such that evaporation of the liquid is still in process when the coolant contacts the hot component was studied. No approach was found whereby heat transfer characteristics could be confidently predicted for such a case based solely on prior studies. It was not clear whether disequilibrium between phases at the inlet to the hot component section would improve cooling relative to that obtained where equilibrium was established prior to contact with the hot surface.

  5. A new flooding correlation development and its critical heat flux predictions under low air-water flow conditions in Savannah River Site assembly channels

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y. )

    1993-10-01

    The upper limit to countercurrent flow, namely, flooding, is important to analyze the reactor coolability during an emergency cooling system (ECS) phase as a result of a large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) such as a double-ended guillotine break in the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactor system. During normal operation, the reactor coolant system utilizes downward flow through concentric heated tubes with ribs, which subdivided each annular channel into four subchannels. In this paper, a new flooding correlation has been developed based on the analytical models and literature data for adiabatic, steady-state, one-dimensional, air-water flow to predict flooding phenomenon in the SRS reactor assembly channel, which may have a counter-current air-water flow pattern during the ECS phase. In addition, the correlation was benchmarked against the experimental data conducted under the Oak Ridge National Laboratory multislit channel, which is close to the SRS assembly geometry. Furthermore, the correlation has also been used as a constitutive relationship in a new two-component two-phase thermal-hydraulics code FLOWTRAN-TF, which has been developed for a detailed analysis of SRS reactor assembly behavior during LOCA scenarios. Finally, the flooding correlation was applied to the predictions of critical heat flux, and the results were compared with the data taken by the SRS heat transfer laboratory under a single annular channel with ribs and a multiannular prototypic test rig.

  6. Radial flow heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Valenzuela, Javier

    2001-01-01

    A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

  7. Experimental Investigation of Average Heat-Transfer and Friction Coefficients for Air Flowing in Circular Tubes Having Square-Thread-Type Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, E. W.

    1952-01-01

    An investigation of forced-convection heat transfer and associated pressure drops was conducted with air flowing through electrically heated Inconel tubes having various degrees of square-thread-type roughness, an inside diameter of 1/2 inch, and a length of 24 inches. were obtained for tubes having conventional roughness ratios (height of thread/radius of tube) of 0 (smooth tube), 0.016, 0.025, and 0.037 over ranges of bulk Reynolds numbers up to 350,000, average inside-tube-wall temperatures up to 1950deg R, and heat-flux densities up to 115,000 Btu per hour per square foot. Data The experimental data showed that both heat transfer and friction increased with increase in surface roughness, becoming more pronounced with increase in Reynolds number; for a given roughness, both heat transfer and friction were also influenced by the tube wall-to-bulk temperature ratio. Good correlation of the heat-transfer data for all the tubes investigated was obtained by use of a modification of the conventional Nusselt correlation parameters wherein the mass velocity in the Reynolds number was replaced by the product of air density evaluated at the average film temperature and the so-called friction velocity; in addition, the physical properties of air were evaluated at the average film temperature. The isothermal friction data for the rough tubes, when plotted in the conventional manner, resulted in curves similar to those obtained by other investigators; that is, the curve for a given roughness breaks away from the Blasius line (representing turbulent flow in smooth tubes) at some value of Reynolds number, which decreases with increase in surface roughness, and then becomes a horizontal line (friction coefficient independent of Reynolds number). A comparison of the friction data for the rough tubes used herein indicated that the conventional roughness ratio is not an adequate measure of relative roughness for tubes having a square-thread-type element. The present data, as well

  8. Heat Pipe Blocks Return Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eninger, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Metal-foil reed valve in conventional slab-wick heat pipe limits heat flow to one direction only. With sink warmer than source, reed is forced closed and fluid returns to source side through annular transfer wick. When this occurs, wick slab on sink side of valve dries out and heat pipe ceases to conduct heat.

  9. Magnetic heat pump flow director

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Frank S. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A fluid flow director is disclosed. The director comprises a handle body and combed-teeth extending from one side of the body. The body can be formed of a clear plastic such as acrylic. The director can be used with heat exchangers such as a magnetic heat pump and can minimize the undesired mixing of fluid flows. The types of heat exchangers can encompass both heat pumps and refrigerators. The director can adjust the fluid flow of liquid or gas along desired flow directions. A method of applying the flow director within a magnetic heat pump application is also disclosed where the comb-teeth portions of the director are inserted into the fluid flow paths of the heat pump.

  10. Study and development of an air conditioning system operating on a magnetic heat pump cycle (design and testing of flow directors)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pao-Lien

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the fabrication, design of flow director, fluid flow direction analysis and testing of flow director of a magnetic heat pump. The objectives of the project are: (1) to fabricate a demonstration magnetic heat pump prototype with flow directors installed; and (2) analysis and testing of flow director and to make sure working fluid loops flow through correct directions with minor mixing. The prototype was fabricated and tested at the Development Testing Laboratory of Kennedy Space Center. The magnetic heat pump uses rear earth metal plates rotate in and out of a magnetic field in a clear plastic housing with water flowing through the rotor plates to provide temperature lift. Obtaining the proper water flow direction has been a problem. Flow directors were installed as flow barriers between separating point of two parallel loops. Function of flow directors were proven to be excellent both analytically and experimentally.

  11. Heat Transfer from Finned Metal Cylinders in an Air Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, Arnold, E; Pinkel, Benjamin

    1935-01-01

    This report presents the results of tests made to supply design information for the construction of metal fins for the cooling of heated cylindrical surfaces by an air stream. A method is given for determining fin dimensions for a maximum heat transfer with the expenditure of a given amount of material for a variety of conditions of air flow and metals.

  12. Combustor air flow control method for fuel cell apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Clingerman, Bruce J.; Mowery, Kenneth D.; Ripley, Eugene V.

    2001-01-01

    A method for controlling the heat output of a combustor in a fuel cell apparatus to a fuel processor where the combustor has dual air inlet streams including atmospheric air and fuel cell cathode effluent containing oxygen depleted air. In all operating modes, an enthalpy balance is provided by regulating the quantity of the air flow stream to the combustor to support fuel cell processor heat requirements. A control provides a quick fast forward change in an air valve orifice cross section in response to a calculated predetermined air flow, the molar constituents of the air stream to the combustor, the pressure drop across the air valve, and a look up table of the orifice cross sectional area and valve steps. A feedback loop fine tunes any error between the measured air flow to the combustor and the predetermined air flow.

  13. Heat exchanger with oscillating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Various heat exchange apparatuses are described in which an oscillating flow of primary coolant is used to dissipate an incident heat flux. The oscillating flow may be imparted by a reciprocating piston, a double action twin reciprocating piston, fluidic oscillators, or electromagnetic pumps. The oscillating fluid flows through at least one conduit in either an open loop or a closed loop. A secondary flow of coolant may be used to flow over the outer walls of at least one conduit to remove heat transferred from the primary coolant to the walls of the conduit.

  14. Heat exchanger with oscillating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Various heat exchange apparatuses are described in which an oscillating flow of primary coolant is used to dissipate an incident heat flux. The oscillating flow may be imparted by a reciprocating piston, a double action twin reciprocating piston, fluidic oscillators or electromagnetic pumps. The oscillating fluid flows through at least one conduit in either an open loop or a closed loop. A secondary flow of coolant may be used to flow over the outer walls of at least one conduit to remove heat transferred from the primary coolant to the walls of the conduit.

  15. Simulation model air-to-air plate heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Wetter, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A simple simulation model of an air-to-air plate heat exchanger is presented. The model belongs to a collection of simulation models that allows the eflcient computer simulation of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. The main emphasis of the models is to shorten computation time and to use only input data that are known in the design process of an HVAC system. The target of the models is to describe the behavior of HVAC components in the part-load operation mode, which is becoming increasingly important in energy eficient HVAC systems. The models are intended to be used for yearly energy calculations or load calculations with time steps of about 10 minutes or larger. Short- time dynamic effects, which are of interest for different aspects of control theory, are neglected. The part-load behavior is expressed in terms of the nominal condition and the dimensionless variation of the heat transfer with change of mass flow and temperature. The effectiveness- NTU relations are used to parametrize the convective heat transfer at nominal conditions and to compute the part-load condition. If the heat transfer coefficients on the two exchanger sides are not equal (i. e. due to partial bypassing of air), their ratio can be easily calculated and set as a parameter. The model is static and uses explicit equations only. The explicit model formulation ensures short computation time and numerical stability, which allows using the model with sophisticated engineering methods like automatic system optimization. This paper fully outlines the algorithm description and its simplifications. It is not tailored for any particular simulation program to ensure easy implementation in any simulation program.

  16. Maximum heat loss potential is lower in football linemen during an NCAA summer training camp because of lower self-generated air flow.

    PubMed

    Deren, Tomasz M; Coris, Eric E; Casa, Douglas J; DeMartini, Julie K; Bain, Anthony R; Walz, Steve M; Jay, Ollie

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the maximum potential for heat loss of football linemen (L) and non-linemen (NL) during a National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) summer training camp. It was hypothesized that heat loss potential in L would be lower than NL because of differences in self-generated air flow during position-specific activities. Fourteen NCAA division 1 football players {7 L (mass: 126 ± 6 kg; body surface area [BSA]: 2.51 ± 0.19 m(2)) and 7 NL (mass: 88 ± 13 kg; BSA: 2.09 ± 0.18 m(2))} participated over 6 days in southern Florida (Tdb: 31.2 ± 1.6 °C, T(wb): 27.0 ± 0.7 °C, Tr: 38.4 ± 2.8° C). Simultaneous on-field measurements of self-generated air velocities (v(self)) and mean skin temperatures (Tsk) were performed throughout practice, which included 4 drill categories (special teams, wind sprints, individual drills, and team drills). The resultant net potential for heat loss through convection, radiation, and evaporation (H(total)) was calculated. Values for Tsk were similar between L and NL for all drills (L: 35.4 ± 0.8 °C; NL: 35.4 ± 0.4 °C; p = 0.92). However, v(self) was greater in NL during wind sprints, individual drills, and team drills (p ≤ 0.05). Consequently H(total) was significantly greater in NL for all drills except special teams (p ≤ 0.05). The mean estimated rate of oxygen consumption needed to exceed H(total) was 8.6 ± 1.3 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1) (2.5 ± 0.4 METs) for NL but only 5.6 ± 1.4 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1) (1.6 ± 0.4 METs) for L. A lower heat loss potential occurs in L because of the more static nature of their position-related activities and not because of differences in Tsk. The practical relevance of these findings is that potential interventions that increase convective and evaporative heat loss (i.e., mechanical fans) should specifically target L, particularly while they are participating in static on-field drills and during rest intervals. PMID:24552793

  17. Heat Recovery Ventilation for Housing: Air-to-Air Heat Exchangers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Robert J.; Miller, Barbara

    The air-to-air heat exchanger (a fan powered ventilation device that recovers heat from stale outgoing air) is explained in this six-part publication. Topic areas addressed are: (1) the nature of air-to-air heat exchangers and how they work; (2) choosing and sizing the system; (3) installation, control, and maintenance of the system; (4) heat…

  18. Heat Pipe Precools and Reheats Dehumidified Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koning, R. C.; Boggs, W. H.; Barnett, U. R.; Dinh, K.

    1986-01-01

    Precooling and reheating by heat pipe reduces operating costs of air-conditioning. Warm air returned from air-conditioned space and cooled air supplied are precooled and reheated, respectively, by each other through a heat pipe. Heat-pipe technology brought to bear on problem of conserving airconditioning energy in hot, humid environments. Any increase in the cost of equipment due to installation of heat-pipe heat exchangers expected to be recovered in energy savings during service period of 2 years or less.

  19. Stress and heat flow

    SciTech Connect

    Lachenbrunch, A.H.; McGarr, A.

    1990-01-01

    As the Pacific plate slides northward past the North American plate along the San Andreas fault, the frictional stress that resists plate motion there is overcome to cause earthquakes. However, the frictional heating predicted for the process has never been detected. Thus, in spite of its importance to an understanding of both plate motion and earthquakes, the size of this frictional stress is still uncertain, even in order of magnitude.

  20. Lunar heat-flow experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langseth, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    The principal components of the experiment were probes, each with twelve thermometers of exceptional accuracy and stability, that recorded temperature variations at the surface and in the regolith down to 2.5 m. The Apollo 15 experiment and the Apollo 17 probes recorded lunar surface and subsurface temperatures. These data provided a unique and valuable history of the interaction of solar energy with lunar surface and the effects of heat flowing from the deep interior out through the surface of the moon. The interpretation of these data resulted in a clearer definition of the thermal and mechanical properties of the upper two meters of lunar regolith, direct measurements of the gradient in mean temperature due to heat flow from the interior and a determination of the heat flow at the Apollo 15 and Apollo 17 sites.

  1. HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennox Industries, Inc., Marshalltown, IA.

    INCREASED MOTIVATION, INCREASED INITIAL COMPREHENSION, AND INCREASED RETENTION ARE THE PRIME GOALS OF THE LENNOX HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING EDUCATION PROGRAM. IT IS A COMPLETE PROGRAM WITH ALL THE TEACHING TOOLS REQUIRED TO PRODUCE A KNOWLEDGEABLE HEATING AND AIR-CONDITIONING INSTALLER OR SERVICE MAN. THIS INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM IS DESIGNED…

  2. Air Conditioning and Heating Technology--II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gattone, Felix

    Twenty-eight chapters and numerous drawings provide information for instructors and students of air conditioning and heating technology. Chapter 1 lists the occupational opportunities in the field. Chapter 2 covers the background or development of the industry of air conditioning and heating technology. Chapter 3 includes some of the principle…

  3. Maintenance requirements in solar air heating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lof, G.O.G.; Junk, J.P.

    1983-06-01

    The maintenance requirements of a well designed and constructed solar air-heating system are comparable to those of conventional, forced warm air heating systems. One of the major reasons for this low maintenance is the absence of problems associated with corrosion, freezing, boiling, and leakage often encountered in solar liquid systems. Experience shows that most problems are due to overly complex designs, control problems, faulty installation, and adjustment of the moving parts in the system. Operational histories show negligible requirements for maintenance of air collectors, pebble-bed heat-storage bins, and system ducts and connections. Good quality control in the manufacture and installation of airtight collectors, heat-storage bins, and interconnecting ductwork is essential, however. The paper includes a description of solar air-heating systems and their characteristics, an evaluation of the various maintenance requirements, and several case histories illustrating the handling of solar air system maintenance.

  4. Air leakage in residential solar heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingleton, J. G.; Cassel, D. E.; Overton, R. L.

    1981-02-01

    A series of computer simulations was performed to evaluate the effects of component air leakage on system thermal performance for a typical residential solar heating system, located in Madison, Wisconsin. Auxiliary energy required to supplement solar energy for space heating was determined using the TRNSYS computer program, for a range of air leakage rates at the solar collector and pebble bed storage unit. The effects of heat transfer and mass transfer between the solar equipment room and the heated building were investigated. The effect of reduced air infiltration into the building due to pressurized by the solar air heating system were determined. A simple method of estimating the effect of collector array air leakage on system thermal performance was evaluated, using the f CHART method.

  5. Correlation of Forced-convection Heat-transfer Data for Air Flowing in Smooth Platinum Tube with Long-approach Entrance at High Surface and Inlet-air Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmon, Leland G; Sams, Eldon W

    1950-01-01

    A heat-transfer investigation was conducted with air in an electrically heated platinum tube with long-approach entrance, inside diameter of 0.525 inch, and effective heat-transfer length of 24 inches over ranges of Reynolds number up to 320,000, average inside-tube-wall temperature up to 3053 degrees R, and inlet-air temperature up to 1165 degrees R. Correlation of data by the conventional Nusselt relation resulted in separation of data with tube-wall temperature. Good correlation was obtained, however, by use of a modified Reynolds number.

  6. Heat flow in a pyroelectric converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, R. B.; Butler, W. F.; Drummond, J. E.; Bruno, D. A.; Briscoe, J. M.

    1985-12-01

    A simulated pyroelectric converter has been constructed. The heat flow and temperature profiles within the converter have been measured. Computer simulations of the heat flow compare well with the measurements and predict an efficiency of 12 percent of the Carnot limit for a real pyroelectric converter with the operating configuration of the simulation. These heat flow results are useful in considerations of heat engines using active materials other than pyroelectrics, such as Nitinol, when these engines utilize similar heat flow management.

  7. Polar Heat Flow on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D. L.; Johnson, T. V.; Davies, A. G.; Blaney, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, Galileo spacecraft data have revealed Io's polar regions to be much warmer than previously expected. This unexpected development came from Photo-Polarimeter Radiometer (PPR) data which show that the minimum night temperatures are in the range of 90-95 K virtually everywhere on Io. The minimum night temperatures show no dependence upon latitude and, when away from the sunset terminator, they show no dependence upon time of night. This is indeed bizarre behavior for surface units which generally had been assumed to be passive with respect to Io's pervasive volcanism. Night temperatures of 90-95 K at high, polar latitudes are particularly hard to explain. Even assuming infinite thermal inertia, at these latitudes there is insufficient sunlight to support these warm night temperatures. Thus, through the process of elimination of other possibilities, we come to the conclusion that these surfaces are volcanically heated. Taking previously passive units and turning them into new sources of heat flow is a radical departure from previous thermophysical model paradigms. However, the geological interpretation is straight forward. We are simply seeing the effect of old, cool lava flows which cover most of the surface of Io but yet have some heat to radiate. Under these new constraints, we have taken on the challenge of formulating a physical model which quantitatively reproduces all of the observations of Io's thermal emission. In the following we introduce a new parametric model which suffices to identify a previously unrecognized polar component of Io's heat flow.

  8. High frequency-heated air turbojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miron, J. H. D.

    1986-01-01

    A description is given of a method to heat air coming from a turbojet compressor to a temperature necessary to produce required expansion without requiring fuel. This is done by high frequency heating, which heats the walls corresponding to the combustion chamber in existing jets, by mounting high frequency coils in them. The current transformer and high frequency generator to be used are discussed.

  9. Role of radiogenic heat generation in surface heat flow formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutorskoi, M. D.; Polyak, B. G.

    2016-03-01

    Heat generation due to decay of long-lived radioactive isotopes is considered in the Earth's crust of the Archean-Proterozoic and Paleozoic provinces of Eurasia and North America. The heat flow that forms in the mantle is calculated as the difference between the heat flow observed at the boundary of the solid Earth and radiogenic heat flow produced in the crust. The heat regime in regions with anomalously high radiogenic heat generation is discussed. The relationship between various heat flow components in the Precambrian and Phanerozoic provinces has been comparatively analyzed, and the role of erosion of the surfaceheat- generating layer has been estimated.

  10. Position paper -- Tank ventilation system design air flow rates

    SciTech Connect

    Goolsby, G.K.

    1995-01-04

    The purpose of this paper is to document a project position on required ventilation system design air flow rates for the waste storage tanks currently being designed by project W-236A, the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF). The Title 1 design primary tank heat removal system consists of two systems: a primary tank vapor space ventilation system; and an annulus ventilation system. At the conclusion of Title 1 design, air flow rates for the primary and annulus ventilation systems were 960 scfm and 4,400 scfm, respectively, per tank. These design flow rates were capable of removing 1,250,000 Btu/hr from each tank. However, recently completed and ongoing studies have resulted in a design change to reduce the extreme case heat load to 700,000 Btu/hr. This revision of the extreme case heat load, coupled with results of scale model evaporative testing performed by WHC Thermal Hydraulics, allow for a reduction of the design air flow rates for both primary and annulus ventilation systems. Based on the preceding discussion, ICF Kaiser Hanford Co. concludes that the design should incorporate the following design air flow rates: Primary ventilation system--500 scfm maximum and Annulus ventilation system--1,100 scfm maximum. In addition, the minimum air flow rates in the primary and annulus ventilation systems will be investigated during Title 2 design. The results of the Title 2 investigation will determine the range of available temperature control using variable air flows to both ventilation systems.

  11. Heat transfer to air from a yawed cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraabel, J. S.; McKillop, A. A.; Baughn, J. W.

    1982-03-01

    An experimental study designed to investigate heat transfer to air from a yawed cylinder is described. Measurements were made at Reynolds numbers of 34,000 and 106,000, and yaws varied from cross flow (beta = 0 deg) to 60 deg. The independence principle is found to be valid for heat transfer at the stagnation line and in the laminar boundary layer. Although this principle would not be expected to extend to the wake, the local heat transfer to the wake is not greatly affected by yaw for beta not greater than 40 deg. The heat transfer results can be explained in terms of a secondary vortex located downstream of an initial separation point and followed by a primary eddy. For high yaws and high normal Reynolds numbers, the heat transfer is similar to that which occurs in cross flow approaching critical flow.

  12. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry and humid air in the same forced convection cooling scheme and were compared using appropriate nondimensional parameters (Nusselt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers). A forced convection scheme with a complex flow field, two dimensional arrays of circular jets with crossflow, was utilized with humidity ratios (mass ratio of water vapor to air) up to 0.23. The dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat of air, steam and air/steam mixtures are examined. Methods for determining gaseous mixture properties from the properties of their pure components are reviewed as well as methods for determining these properties with good confidence. The need for more experimentally determined property data for humid air is discussed. It is concluded that dimensionless forms of forced convection heat transfer data and empirical correlations based on measurements with dry air may be applied to conditions involving humid air with the same confidence as for the dry air case itself, provided that the thermophysical properties of the humid air mixtures are known with the same confidence as their dry air counterparts.

  13. Entropy flow in quantum heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Mohammad; Nazarov, Yuli

    2015-03-01

    We evaluate Shannon and Renyi entropy flows from generic quantum heat engines (QHE) to a weakly-coupled probe environment kept in thermal equilibrium. We show the flows are determined by two quantities: heat flow and fictitious dissipation that manifest the quantum coherence in the engine. Our theory leads to novel physics in quantum heat engines.

  14. Mathematical modeling of heat exchange between mine air and rock mass during fire

    SciTech Connect

    A.E. Krasnoshtein; B.P. Kazakov; A.V. Shalimov

    2006-05-15

    Solution of problems on heat exchange between ventilating air and rock mass and on gas admixture propagation in mine workings serve as a base for considering changes in heat-gas-air state at a mine after inflammation. The presented mathematical relations allow calculation of a varied velocity and movement direction of air flows, their temperatures and smoking conditions during fire.

  15. REGIONAL AIR POLLUTION STUDY: HEAT EMISSION INVENTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the St. Louis Regional Air Pollution Study (RAPS), a heat emission inventory has been assembled. Heat emissions to the atmosphere originate, directly or indirectly, from the combustion of fossil fuels (there are no nuclear plants in the St. Louis AQCR). With the except...

  16. Study on the Heat-Flow Controllable Heat Exchanger-3rd report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Osamu; Hamano, Masayoshi; Yanadori, Michio

    The heat-flow controllable heat exchanger for the purpose of heat recovery through the waste hot water at the bathroom and the washing room has been developed. The system is especially available at the house of cold area and the recovery heat is used to warm the suction air conducted from ventilation device. As the result of field test, it is clarified that the heat recovery rate by the system is very large. Also, the exchanger is possible to control the amount of recorery heat. Therefore, it is considered that the exchanger is applicable in the ventilation systems used the waste hot water.

  17. Heat Transfer and Flow Structure Evaluation of a Synthetic Jet Emanating from a Planar Heat Sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Paul; Persoons, Tim; Murray, Darina

    2014-07-01

    Direct impinging synthetic jets are a proven method for heat transfer enhancement, and have been subject to extensive research. However, despite the vast amount of research into direct synthetic jet impingement, there has been little research investigating the effects of a synthetic jet emanating from a heated surface, this forms the basis of the current research investigation. Both single and multiple orifices are integrated into a planar heat sink forming a synthetic jet, thus allowing the heat transfer enhancement and flow structures to be assessed. The heat transfer analysis highlighted that the multiple orifice synthetic jet resulted in the greatest heat transfer enhancements. The flow structures responsible for these enhancements were identified using a combination of flow visualisation, thermal imaging and thermal boundary layer analysis. The flow structure analysis identified that the synthetic jets decreased the thermal boundary layer thickness resulting in a more effective convective heat transfer process. Flow visualisation revealed entrainment of local air adjacent to the heated surface; this occurred from vortex roll-up at the surface of the heat sink and from the highly sheared jet flow. Furthermore, a secondary entrainment was identified which created a surface impingement effect. It is proposed that all three flow features enhance the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  18. Axial flow heat exchanger devices and methods for heat transfer using axial flow devices

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2016-02-16

    Systems and methods described herein are directed to rotary heat exchangers configured to transfer heat to a heat transfer medium flowing in substantially axial direction within the heat exchangers. Exemplary heat exchangers include a heat conducting structure which is configured to be in thermal contact with a thermal load or a thermal sink, and a heat transfer structure rotatably coupled to the heat conducting structure to form a gap region between the heat conducting structure and the heat transfer structure, the heat transfer structure being configured to rotate during operation of the device. In example devices heat may be transferred across the gap region from a heated axial flow of the heat transfer medium to a cool stationary heat conducting structure, or from a heated stationary conducting structure to a cool axial flow of the heat transfer medium.

  19. 5. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF ORIGINAL DRAWINGS, ELECTRIC AIR AND HEATING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF ORIGINAL DRAWINGS, ELECTRIC AIR AND HEATING UNIT, PLAN AND ELEVATION - Wyoming Air National Guard Base, Electric, Air & Heating Plant, Cheyenne Airport, Cheyenne, Laramie County, WY

  20. A fundamentally new approach to air-cooled heat exchangers.

    SciTech Connect

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2010-01-01

    We describe breakthrough results obtained in a feasibility study of a fundamentally new architecture for air-cooled heat exchangers. A longstanding but largely unrealized opportunity in energy efficiency concerns the performance of air-cooled heat exchangers used in air conditioners, heat pumps, and refrigeration equipment. In the case of residential air conditioners, for example, the typical performance of the air cooled heat exchangers used for condensers and evaporators is at best marginal from the standpoint the of achieving maximum the possible coefficient of performance (COP). If by some means it were possible to reduce the thermal resistance of these heat exchangers to a negligible level, a typical energy savings of order 30% could be immediately realized. It has long been known that a several-fold increase in heat exchanger size, in conjunction with the use of much higher volumetric flow rates, provides a straight-forward path to this goal but is not practical from the standpoint of real world applications. The tension in the market place between the need for energy efficiency and logistical considerations such as equipment size, cost and operating noise has resulted in a compromise that is far from ideal. This is the reason that a typical residential air conditioner exhibits significant sensitivity to reductions in fan speed and/or fouling of the heat exchanger surface. The prevailing wisdom is that little can be done to improve this situation; the 'fan-plus-finned-heat-sink' heat exchanger architecture used throughout the energy sector represents an extremely mature technology for which there is little opportunity for further optimization. But the fact remains that conventional fan-plus-finned-heat-sink technology simply doesn't work that well. Their primary physical limitation to performance (i.e. low thermal resistance) is the boundary layer of motionless air that adheres to and envelops all surfaces of the heat exchanger. Within this boundary layer

  1. Map of Io's volcanic heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard; Veeder, Glenn J.; Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence V.

    2015-12-01

    We present a map of Io's volcanic heat flow. Io's high heat flow is a result of intense tidal heating, which generates widespread volcanic activity. The surface expression of ongoing volcanic activity constrains the location and magnitude of tidal dissipation within Io. Tidal heating models place heating either at relatively shallow (aesthenosphere) levels, or deep in the mantle. It was thought that actual tidal heating could be approximated using a combination of these end-member models. Io's volcanic heat flow has now been mapped in sufficient detail to compare with the models. Our maps show that the distribution of heat flow is not matched by current models of deep nor shallow tidal heating, nor by any combination of these two models. We find relatively low heat flow at sub-jovian (0°W) and anti-jovian (180°W) longitudes, at odds with the pure aesthenospheric heating model. Furthermore, there are large swaths of Io's surface where there is poor correlation between the number of hot spots in an area and the power emitted. We have previously accounted for ≈54% of Io's observed heat flow. We now show that Io's anomalously warm poles, possibly the result of heat flow from deep-mantle heating, would yield the "missing" energy (48 TW) if the polar surfaces are at temperatures of ∼90 K to ∼95 K and cover latitudes above ∼43° to ∼48° respectively. This possibility implies a ratio of deep to shallow heating of about 1:1. However, explaining regional variations in surface volcanic activity requires more detailed modeling of the location and magnitude of the internal tidal dissipation and the consequences of mantle convection and advection within Io. Future model predictions can be compared to our heat flow map.

  2. Buoyancy driven flow in counter flow heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, C. O.

    2012-11-01

    The temperature distribution, the buoyancy head and the flow rate have been studied in a counter flow heat exchanger having buoyancy driven flow on at least one side. The assumptions made for heat flux distribution are varied and the resulting effects on the flow rate and fluid temperatures are studied. A network model is used to simulate the temperature distribution and oil flow rates in an oil-filled power transformer cooled by radiators. It is found that for operating conditions normally found for mineral oil the counter flow assumptions for heat flux distribution gives approximately the same results as assuming uniform heat flux. When a more viscous oil type is used or the radiators are placed lower than normal relative to the heat generating parts, the counter flow assumptions give more reliable results.

  3. Minnesota Heat Flow and Geothermal Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosnold, W. D.; Crowell, J.; Bubach, B.; Wahl, P.; Crowell, A. M.; Mcdonald, M. R.

    2011-12-01

    Radiogenic heat production, bedrock geology, gravity, magnetics, and heat flow were combined to study heat flow and geothermal energy potential in Minnesota. Heat production was determined from one-hundred 800 kg samples collected at outcrops and from drill cores by gamma ray spectrometry. Small splits of the samples were also analyzed by chemical methods for K, U, and Th. Heat production averaged 2.6 W m-1 K-1 ± 2.0 for 42 felsic samples and 0.9 W m-1 K-1 ± 0.6 for 58 mafic samples. Areal variation in heat production measured with a portable gamma ray spectrometer was compared to bedrock geology and gravity and magnetic anomaly patterns. Gravity lows and magnetic highs correlate with higher heat production and vice versa. Prior to this study heat flow was reported for only four borehole sites in Minnesota. Those sites were located in Keweenawan mafic rocks of the mid-continent rift and heat flow values averaged 39 ± 6 mW m-2. These low heat flows are consistent with a heat flow study conducted in Lake Superior that showed a trough of low heat flow (19.2 - 41.0 mW m-2) along the northern edge of the lake. Thirty-one new heat flow determinations in the mafic rocks obtained from borehole temperature measurements in mining holes average (34.1 mW m-2 ± 1.9 mW m-2). However, paleoclimate signals evident in the temperature vs. depth profiles indicate that the temperature gradients are at least 27 percent low and heat flow is likely 46.7 mW m-2. Based on a reduced heat flow of 32 mW m-2 and a depth parameter of 10 km, the heat flow heat production relation yields a heat flow value of 58 mW m-2 in the felsic regions in Minnesota. These heat flow values suggest that EGS with a binary power plant would be achievable in the felsic regions.

  4. Development of an air flow thermal balance calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherfey, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    An air flow calorimeter, based on the idea of balancing an unknown rate of heat evolution with a known rate of heat evolution, was developed. Under restricted conditions, the prototype system is capable of measuring thermal wattages from 10 milliwatts to 1 watt, with an error no greater than 1 percent. Data were obtained which reveal system weaknesses and point to modifications which would effect significant improvements.

  5. Analysis of the Hydrodynamics and Heat Transfer Aspects of Microgravity Two-Phase Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rezkallah, Kamiel S.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental results for void fractions, flow regimes, and heat transfer rates in two-phase, liquid-gas flows are summarized in this paper. The data was collected on-board NASA's KC-135 reduced gravity aircraft in a 9.525 mm circular tube (i.d.), uniformly heated at the outer surface. Water and air flows were examined as well as three glycerol/water solutions and air. Results are reported for the water-air data.

  6. Metrics for Air Conditioning & Refrigeration, Heating, Ventilating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Gloria S., Ed.; Magisos, Joel H., Ed.

    Designed to meet the job-related metric measurement needs of the air conditioning and refrigeration, heating and ventilating student, this instructional package is one of three for the construction occupations cluster, part of a set of 55 packages for metric instruction in different occupations. The package is intended for students who already…

  7. Standardized Curriculum for Heating and Air Conditioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Office of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    Standardized vocational education course titles and core contents for two courses in Mississippi are provided: heating and air conditioning I and II. The first course contains the following units: (1) orientation; (2) safety; (3) refrigeration gauges and charging cylinder; (4) vacuum pump service operations; (5) locating refrigerant leaks; (6)…

  8. Meteorological insights from planetary heat flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2015-04-01

    Planetary heat flow measurements are made with a series of high-precision temperature sensors deployed in a column of regolith to determine the geothermal gradient. Such sensors may, however, be susceptible to other influences, especially on worlds with atmospheres. First, pressure fluctuations at the surface may pump air in and out of pore space leading to observable, and otherwise unexpected, temperature fluctuations at depth. Such pumping is important in subsurface radon and methane transport on Earth: evidence of such pumping may inform understanding of methane or water vapor transport on Mars. Second, the subsurface profile contains a muted record of surface temperature history, and such measurements on other worlds may help constrain the extent to which Earth's Little Ice Age was directly solar-forced, versus volcanic-driven and/or amplified by climate feedbacks.

  9. Heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle, D.M.; Sullivan, R.A.

    1993-02-01

    A study is made of several outstanding issues concerning the commercial development of environmental control systems for electric vehicles (EVs). Engineering design constraints such as federal regulations and consumer requirements are first identified. Next, heating and cooling loads in a sample automobile are calculated using a computer model available from the literature. The heating and cooling loads are then used as a basis for estimating the electrical consumption that is to be expected for heat pumps installed in EVs. The heat pump performance is evaluated using an automobile heat pump computer model which has been developed recently at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The heat pump design used as input to the model consists of typical finned-tube heat exchangers and a hermetic compressor driven by a variable-speed brushless dc motor. The simulations suggest that to attain reasonable system efficiencies, the interior heat exchangers that are currently installed as automobile air conditioning will need to be enlarged. Regarding the thermal envelope of the automobile itself, calculations are made which show that considerable energy savings will result if steps are taken to reduce {open_quote}hot soak{close_quote} temperatures and if the outdoor air ventilation rate is well controlled. When these changes are made, heating and cooling should consume less than 10% of the total stored electrical energy for steady driving in most U.S. climates. However, this result depends strongly upon the type of driving: The fraction of total power for heating and cooling ({open_quote}range penalty{close_quote}) increases sharply for driving scenarios having low average propulsion power, such as stop-and-go driving.

  10. Effect of air flow on tubular solar still efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An experimental work was reported to estimate the increase in distillate yield for a compound parabolic concentrator-concentric tubular solar still (CPC-CTSS). The CPC dramatically increases the heating of the saline water. A novel idea was proposed to study the characteristic features of CPC for desalination to produce a large quantity of distillate yield. A rectangular basin of dimension 2 m × 0.025 m × 0.02 m was fabricated of copper and was placed at the focus of the CPC. This basin is covered by two cylindrical glass tubes of length 2 m with two different diameters of 0.02 m and 0.03 m. The experimental study was operated with two modes: without and with air flow between inner and outer tubes. The rate of air flow was fixed throughout the experiment at 4.5 m/s. On the basis of performance results, the water collection rate was 1445 ml/day without air flow and 2020 ml/day with air flow and the efficiencies were 16.2% and 18.9%, respectively. Findings The experimental study was operated with two modes: without and with air flow between inner and outer tubes. The rate of air flow was fixed throughout the experiment at 4.5 m/s. Conclusions On the basis of performance results, the water collection rate was 1445 ml/day without air flow and 2020 ml/day with air flow and the efficiencies were 16.2% and 18.9%, respectively. PMID:23587020

  11. Numerical Simulation of the Convective Heat Exchange in the Separation air and Oil Flows in a Staggered Bank of Round Tubes in a Wide Range of Change in the Reynolds Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, S. A.; Zhukova, Yu. V.; Malyshkin, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    An analysis of the convective heat exchange in the separation air and oil flows in banks of heated round tubes and their hydraulic losses at Reynolds numbers changing in a wide range from 100 to 400 for the laminar flow and from 103 to 8·103 for the turbulent fl ow has been performed. For solving the Navier-Stokes and energy equations, multiblock computational technologies realized in the VP2/3 package and original procedures for correction of the pressure gradient in a fl ow and its mean-mass temperature were used. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations were closed using the Menter shear-stress transfer model modified with account for the curvature of streamlines within the framework of the Leshtsiner-Rody approach with an Isaev-Kharchenko-Usachov constant equal to 0.2. The results of numerical simulation were compared with the corresponding experimental data of A. Zhukaukas. The dependence of the local and integral characteristics of a fl ow of a heat-transfer agent in a staggered bank of round tubes on the properties of this agent was determined.

  12. Determination of air side heat transfer coefficient in a mini-channel heat exchanger using Wilson Plot method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoo, K. K.; Chin, W. M.; Heikal, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the air side heat transfer coefficient of an aluminium mini-channel heat exchanger was investigated for single-phase flow in the mini-channel, with water in the tubes and air on the outside. Research methods included hydraulic tests on a single mini-channel tube, Wilson Plot experiments and experiment validation. Results obtained from the hydraulic test showed that turbulent flow occurred in the tube at a Reynolds number of 830. Wilson Plot experiments were conducted to determine air side heat transfer coefficient of the heat exchanger. The tube side Reynolds number was maintained above 1000 to ensure turbulent flow and tube side heat transfer coefficient was calculated using Gnielinski equation for turbulent flow. The air side heat transfer coefficients obtained from the Wilson Plot experiments were in good agreement with known correlations. The outcome of this study is to use the air side heat transfer coefficient to calculate the performance of refrigerant condensers for different tube pass ratios and flow pass configurations.

  13. Simulator Of Rain In Flowing Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Richard M.; Cho, Young I.; Shakkottai, Parthasarathy; Back, Lloyd H.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes relatively inexpensive apparatus that creates simulated precipitation from drizzle to heavy rain in flowing air. Small, positive-displacement pump and water-injecting device positioned at low-airspeed end of converging section of wind tunnel 10 in. in diameter. Drops injected by array entrained in flow of air as it accelerates toward narrower outlet, 15 in. downstream. Outlet 5 in. in diameter.

  14. Numerical characterization of the hydrodynamics and thermal behavior of air flow in flexible air distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharehdaghi, Samad; Moujaes, Samir

    2013-10-01

    Flexible duct air distribution systems are used in a large percentage of residential and small commercial buildings in the United States . Very few empirical or predictive data are available though to help provide the HVAC design engineer with reliable information . Moreover, because of the ducts flexibility, the shapes of these ducts offer a different set of operating fluid flow and thermal conditions from traditional smooth metal ducts. Hence, both the flow field and heat transfer through this kind of ducts are much more complex and merit to be analyzed from a numerical predictive approach. The aim of this research paper is to compute some of the hydrodynamic and heat transfer characteristics of the air flow inside these ducts over a range of Re numbers commonly used in the flow conditions of these air distribution systems. The information resulting from this CFD simulation, where a κ-ɛ turbulent model is used to predict the flow conditions, provide pressure drop and average convective heat transfer coefficients that exist in these ducts and was compared to previously found data. Circulation zones in the depressions of these ducts are found to exist which are suspected of influencing the pressured drop and heat transfer coefficients as compared to smooth ducts. The results show that fully developed conditions exist much earlier with regard to the inlet for both hydrodynamic and thermal entrance regions than what would be expected in smooth ducts under the same turbulent conditions.

  15. Two-phase flow and heat transfer under low gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, W.

    1981-11-01

    Spacelab experiment to investigate two-phase flow patterns under gravity uses a water-air mixture experiment. Air and water are circulated through the system. The quality or the mixture or air-water is controlled. Photographs of the test section are made and at the same time pressure drop across the test section is measured. The data establishes a flow regime map under reduced gravity conditions with corresponding pressure drop correlations. The test section is also equipped with an electrical resistance heater in order to allow a flow boiling experiment to be carried out using Freon II. High-speed photographs of the test section are used to determine flow patterns. The temperature gradient and pressure drop along the duct can be measured. Thus, quality change can be measured, and heat transfer calculated.

  16. Two-phase flow and heat transfer under low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.

    1981-01-01

    Spacelab experiment to investigate two-phase flow patterns under gravity uses a water-air mixture experiment. Air and water are circulated through the system. The quality or the mixture or air-water is controlled. Photographs of the test section are made and at the same time pressure drop across the test section is measured. The data establishes a flow regime map under reduced gravity conditions with corresponding pressure drop correlations. The test section is also equipped with an electrical resistance heater in order to allow a flow boiling experiment to be carried out using Freon II. High-speed photographs of the test section are used to determine flow patterns. The temperature gradient and pressure drop along the duct can be measured. Thus, quality change can be measured, and heat transfer calculated.

  17. Heat flow from the Liberian precambrian shield

    SciTech Connect

    Sass, J.H.; Behrendt, J.C.

    1980-06-10

    Uncorrected heat flow in iron formation rocks from three areas within the Liberian part of the West African Shield ranges from 50 to more than 80 mW m/sup -2/. When corrections are applied for topography and refraction, the range of heat flow is narrowed to between 38 and 42 mW m/sup -2/. In comparison with heat flows from other parts of the West African Craton, these values are consistent with preliminary results from Ghana (42 +- 8 mW m/sup -2/) and Nigeria (38 +- 2 mW /sup -2/) but are somewhat higher than values from Niger (20 mW m/sup -2/) and neighboring Sierra Leone (26 mW m/sup -2/). The Liberian values are significantly lower than the heat flow offshore in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean (58 +- 8 mW m/sup -2/), suggesting large lateral temperature gradients within the lithosphere near the coast. Values of heat production from outcrops of crystalline basement rocks near the holes are between 2 and 2.3 ..mu..W m/sup -3/. A heat-flow/heat-production relation cannot be established because of the small range of values; however, assuming a 'characteristic depth' of 8 km (similar to the North American Craton) the reduced heat flow of from 20 to 25 mW m/sup -2/ is consistent with that from other Precambrian shields.

  18. New Map of Io's Volcanic Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A. G.; Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D.; Johnson, T. V.

    2014-12-01

    We have created a global map of Io's volcanic heat flow from 245 thermal sources indicative of ongoing or recent volcanic activity, and 8 additional outbursts [1,2]. We incorporate data from both spacecraft and ground-based instruments that have observed Io primarily at infrared wavelengths. This map provides a snapshot of Io's volcanic activity and distribution during the Galileo epoch. Io's volcanic activity, in terms of thermal emission from individual eruptive centres, spans nearly six orders of magnitude, from Surt in 2001 (78 TW) [3] to a faint hot spot in patera P197 (0.2 GW) [1]. We account for ≈54% of Io's yearly volcanic heat flow, which emanates from ≈2% of Io's surface [1]. Averaged heat flow from the non-active surface is 1 ± 0.2 W m2. This quantification of volcanic heat flow map provides constraints for modelling the magnitude and location of the internal heating of Io by tidal dissipation. The observed heat flow distribution is the result of interior heating and volcanic advection, the delivery of magma to the surface regardless of its depth of origin. As noted previously [1, 2] the distribution of heat flow is not uniform, which is not unexpected. The volcanic heat flow does not match the expected distributions from end-member models for both the deep-seated (mantle) heating model (which predicts enhanced polar heating) and the shallow (aesthenospheric) heating model, which predicts enhanced thermal emission at sub-jovian and anti-jovian longitudes. Intriguingly, heat flow curves using a bin size of 30 degrees show a longitudinal offset from the shallow heating model prediction of some tens of degrees [2], suggesting a more complex mixture of deep and shallow heating. Future work includes refinement of thermal emission by including temporal variability of thermal emission at individual volcanoes, and comparing the heat flow map with the Io Geological Map [4] and global topography [5]. We thank the NASA OPR Program for support. Part of this

  19. Pneumatic Proboscis Heat-Flow Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zacny, Kris; Hedlund, Magnus; Mumm, Eric; Shasho, Jeffrey; Chu, Philip; Kumar, Nishant

    2013-01-01

    Heat flow is a fundamental property of a planet, and provides significant constraints on the abundance of radiogenic isotopes, the thermal evolution and differentiation history, and the mechanical properties of the lithosphere. Heat-flow measurements are also essential in achieving at least four of the goals set out by the National Research Council for future lunar exploration. The heat-flow probe therefore directly addresses the goal of the Lunar Geophysical Network, which is to understand the interior structure and composition of the Moon. A key challenge for heat flow measurement is to install thermal sensors to the depths approximately equal to 3 m that are not influenced by the diurnal, annual, and longer-term fluctuations of the surface thermal environment. In addition, once deployed, the heat flow probe should cause little disturbance to the thermal regime of the surrounding regolith. A heat-flow probe system was developed that has two novel features: (1) it utilizes a pneumatic (gas) approach, excavates a hole by lofting the lunar soil out of the hole, and (2) deploys the heat flow probe, which utilizes a coiled up tape as a thermal probe to reach greater than 3-meter depth. The system is a game-changer for small lunar landers as it exhibits extremely low mass, volume, and simple deployment. The pneumatic system takes advantage of the helium gas used for pressurizing liquid propellant of the lander. Normally, helium is vented once the lander is on the surface, but it can be utilized for powering pneumatic systems. Should sufficient helium not be available, a simple gas delivery system may be taken specifically for the heat flow probe. Either way, the pneumatic heat flow probe system would be much lighter than other systems that entirely rely on the electrical power of the lander.

  20. Register Closing Effects on Forced Air Heating System Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.

    2003-11-01

    Closing registers in forced air heating systems and leaving some rooms in a house unconditioned has been suggested as a method of quickly saving energy for California consumers. This study combined laboratory measurements of the changes in duct leakage as registers are closed together with modeling techniques to estimate the changes in energy use attributed to closing registers. The results of this study showed that register closing led to increased energy use for a typical California house over a wide combination of climate, duct leakage and number of closed registers. The reduction in building thermal loads due to conditioning only a part of the house was offset by increased duct system losses; mostly due to increased duct leakage. Therefore, the register closing technique is not recommended as a viable energy saving strategy for California houses with ducts located outside conditioned space. The energy penalty associated with the register closing technique was found to be minimized if registers furthest from the air handler are closed first because this tends to only affect the pressures and air leakage for the closed off branch. Closing registers nearer the air handler tends to increase the pressures and air leakage for the whole system. Closing too many registers (more than 60%) is not recommended because the added flow resistance severely restricts the air flow though the system leading to safety concerns. For example, furnaces may operate on the high-limit switch and cooling systems may suffer from frozen coils.

  1. Air flow cued spatial learning in mice.

    PubMed

    Bouchekioua, Youcef; Mimura, Masaru; Watanabe, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Spatial learning experiments in rodents typically employ visual cues that are associated with a goal place, even though it is now well established that they have poor visual acuity. We assessed here the possibility of spatial learning in mice based on an air flow cue in a dry version of the Morris water maze task. A miniature fan was placed at each of the four cardinal points of the circular maze, but only one blew air towards the centre of the maze. The three other fans were blowing towards their own box. The mice were able to learn the task only if the spatial relationship between the air flow cue and the position of the goal place was kept constant across trials. A change of this spatial relationship resulted in an increase in the time to find the goal place. We report here the first evidence of spatial learning relying on an air flow cue. PMID:25257773

  2. Properties of a constricted-tube air-flow levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, J. E.; Stephens, W. K.; Ethridge, E. C.

    1982-01-01

    The properties of a constricted-tube gas flow levitator first developed by Berge et al. (1981) have been investigated experimentally in order to predict its behavior in a gravity-free environment and at elevated temperatures. The levitator consists of a constricted (quartz) tube fed at one end by a source of heated air or gas. A spherical sample is positioned by the air stream on the downstream side of the constriction, where it can be melted and resolidified without touching the tube. It is shown experimentally that the kinematic viscosity is the important fluid parameter for operation in thermal equilibrium at high temperatures. If air is heated from room temperature to 1200 C, the kinematic viscosity increases by a factor of 14. To maintain a given value of the Reynolds number, the flow rate would have to be increased by the same factor for a specific geometry of tube and sample. Thus, to maintain stable equilibrium, the flow rate should be increased as the air or other gas is heated. The other stability problem discussed is associated with changes in the shape of a cylindrical sample as it melts.

  3. Thermodynamics of Flow Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, F. J.

    2003-05-01

    Convective boiling in sub-cooled water flowing through a heated channel is essential in many engineering applications where high heat flux needs to be accommodated. It has been customary to represent the heat transfer by the boiling curve, which shows the heat flux versus the wall-minus-saturation temperature difference. However it is a rather complicated problem, and recent revisions of two-phase flow and heat transfer note that calculated values of boiling heat transfer coefficients present many uncertainties. Quite recently, the author has shown that the average thermal gap in the heated channel (the wall temperature minus the average temperature of the coolant) was tightly connected with the thermodynamic efficiency of a theoretical reversible engine placed in this thermal gap. In this work, whereas this correlation is checked again with data taken by General Electric (task III) for water at high pressure, a possible connection between this wall efficiency and the reversible-work theorem is explored.

  4. Windage heating of air passing through labyrinth seals

    SciTech Connect

    Millward, J.A.; Edwards, M.F.

    1996-04-01

    The viscous drag on rotating components in gas turbine engines represents both a direct loss of power from the cycle and an input of heat into the secondary (cooling) air system. Hotter cooling air in turn means increased flow requirements. The effects of windage on performance are therefore compounded. To facilitate accurate temperature predictions of highly stressed components, information is needed on windage characteristics of all elements in the secondary cooling system. Much information is available in the literature for disks, cones, cylinders, bolts, etc., but little has been published on windage heating in high-speed seals. Results are presented for experiments carried out (at representative nondimensional conditions) on different designs of labyrinth seals. The results are compared with values calculated from the simple momentum balance theory suggested by McGreeham and Ko and with several values determined from CFD analysis.

  5. Air flow through poppet valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, G W; Nutting, E M

    1920-01-01

    Report discusses the comparative continuous flow characteristics of single and double poppet valves. The experimental data presented affords a direct comparison of valves, single and in pairs of different sizes, tested in a cylinder designed in accordance with current practice in aviation engines.

  6. Laboratory Evaluation of Air Flow Measurement Methods for Residential HVAC Returns

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-07-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The series of tests performed measured air flow using a range of techniques and devices. The measured air flows were compared to reference air flow measurements using inline air flow meters built into the test apparatus. The experimental results showed that some devices had reasonable results (typical errors of 5 percent or less) but others had much bigger errors (up to 25 percent).

  7. Heat Transfer Enhancement in Separated and Vortex Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Richard J. Goldstein

    2004-05-27

    This document summarizes the research performance done at the Heat Transfer Laboratory of the University of Minnesota on heat transfer and energy separation in separated and vortex flow supported by DOE in the period September 1, 1998--August 31, 2003. Unsteady and complicated flow structures in separated or vortex flows are the main reason for a poor understanding of heat transfer under such conditions. The research from the University of Minnesota focused on the following important aspects of understanding such flows: (1) Heat/mass transfer from a circular cylinder; (2) study of energy separation and heat transfer in free jet flows and shear layers; and (3) study of energy separation on the surface and in the wake of a cylinder in crossflow. The current study used three different experimental setups to accomplish these goals. A wind tunnel and a liquid tunnel using water and mixtures of ethylene glycol and water, is used for the study of prandtl number effect with uniform heat flux from the circular cylinder. A high velocity air jet is used to study energy separation in free jets. A high speed wind tunnel, same as used for the first part, is utilized for energy separation effects on the surface and in the wake of the circular cylinder. The final outcome of this study is a substantial advancement in this research area.

  8. Effects of fin pattern on the air side heat transfer coefficient in plate finned tube heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Beecher, D.T.; Fagan, T.J.

    1987-06-01

    The effects of air velocity, heat exchanger geometry and fin pattern on air side heat transfer in plate finned tube heat exchangers were investigated experimentally using a single fin passage model. The geometric parameters considered included tube diameter, transverse tube spacing, longitudinal tube spacing, number of tube rows and fin spacing. The effects of fin pattern depth and number of fin patterns per longitudinal tube row were investigated for a pattern consisting of corrugations of triangular cross section transverse to the direction of air flow. The heat transfer data were correlated in terms of the dimensionless heat transfer coefficient (Nussult number) based on the arithmetic mean temperature difference Nu/sub a/ and the Graetz number Gz, a dimensionless measure of the level of flow development.

  9. Study of Ram-air Heat Exchangers for Reducing Turbine Cooling-air Temperature of a Supersonic Aircraft Turbojet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaguila, Anthony J; Livingood, John N B; Eckert, Ernst R G

    1956-01-01

    The sizes and weights of the cores of heat exchangers were determined analytically for possible application for reducing turbine cooling-air temperatures of an engine designed for a Mach number of 2.5 and an altitude The sizes and weights of the cores of heat exchangers were determined analytically for possible application for reducing turbine cooling-air temperatures of an engine designed for a Mach number of 2.5 and an altitude of 70,000 feet. A compressor-bleed-air weight flow of 2.7 pounds per second was assumed for the coolant; ram air was considered as the other fluid. Pressure drops and inlet states of both fluids were prescribed, and ranges of compressor-bleed-air temperature reductions and of the ratio of compressor-bleed to ram-air weight flows were considered.

  10. Heat flow from the West African shield

    SciTech Connect

    Brigaud, F.; Lucazeau, F.; Ly, S.; Sauvage, J.F.

    1985-09-01

    The heat flow over Precambrian shields is generally lower than over other continental provinces. Previous observations at 9 sites of the West African shield have shown that heat flow ranges from 20 mW m/sup -2/ in Niger to 38-42 mW m/sup -2/ in Liberia, Ghana and Nigeria. Since some of these values are lower than expected for Precambrian shields, it is important to find out whether or not they are representative of the entire shield before trying to derive its thermal structure. In this paper, we present new heat flow determinations from seven sites of the West African shield. These indicate that the surface heat flow is comparable with that of other Precambrian shields in the world.

  11. Flow and heat transfer enhancement in tube heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed Ahmed, Sayed Ahmed E.; Mesalhy, Osama M.; Abdelatief, Mohamed A.

    2015-11-01

    The performance of heat exchangers can be improved to perform a certain heat-transfer duty by heat transfer enhancement techniques. Enhancement techniques can be divided into two categories: passive and active. Active methods require external power, such as electric or acoustic field, mechanical devices, or surface vibration, whereas passive methods do not require external power but make use of a special surface geometry or fluid additive which cause heat transfer enhancement. The majority of commercially interesting enhancement techniques are passive ones. This paper presents a review of published works on the characteristics of heat transfer and flow in finned tube heat exchangers of the existing patterns. The review considers plain, louvered, slit, wavy, annular, longitudinal, and serrated fins. This review can be indicated by the status of the research in this area which is important. The comparison of finned tubes heat exchangers shows that those with slit, plain, and wavy finned tubes have the highest values of area goodness factor while the heat exchanger with annular fin shows the lowest. A better heat transfer coefficient ha is found for a heat exchanger with louvered finned and thus should be regarded as the most efficient one, at fixed pumping power per heat transfer area. This study points out that although numerous studies have been conducted on the characteristics of flow and heat transfer in round, elliptical, and flat tubes, studies on some types of streamlined-tubes shapes are limited, especially on wing-shaped tubes (Sayed Ahmed et al. in Heat Mass Transf 50: 1091-1102, 2014; in Heat Mass Transf 51: 1001-1016, 2015). It is recommended that further detailed studies via numerical simulations and/or experimental investigations should be carried out, in the future, to put further insight to these fin designs.

  12. 21 CFR 211.46 - Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and... Buildings and Facilities § 211.46 Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling. (a) Adequate ventilation shall be provided. (b) Equipment for adequate control over air pressure, micro-organisms,...

  13. 21 CFR 211.46 - Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and... Buildings and Facilities § 211.46 Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling. (a) Adequate ventilation shall be provided. (b) Equipment for adequate control over air pressure, micro-organisms,...

  14. 21 CFR 211.46 - Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and... Buildings and Facilities § 211.46 Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling. (a) Adequate ventilation shall be provided. (b) Equipment for adequate control over air pressure, micro-organisms,...

  15. 21 CFR 211.46 - Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and... Buildings and Facilities § 211.46 Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling. (a) Adequate ventilation shall be provided. (b) Equipment for adequate control over air pressure, micro-organisms,...

  16. Heat transfer intensification by increasing vapor flow rate in flat heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprinceana, Silviu; Mihai, Ioan; Beniuga, Marius; Suciu, Cornel

    2015-02-01

    Flat heat pipes have various technical applications, one of the most important being the cooling of electronic components[9]. Their continuous development is due to the fact that these devices permit heat transfer without external energetic contribution. The practical exploitation of flat heat pipes however is limited by the fact that dissipated power can only reach a few hundred watts. The present paper aims to advance a new method for the intensification of convective heat transfer. A centrifugal mini impeller, driven by a turntable which incorporates four permanent magnets was designed. These magnets are put in motion by another rotor, which in its turn includes two permanent magnets and is driven by a mini electrical motor. Rotation of the centrifugal blades generates speed and pressure increase of the cooling agent brought to vapor state within the flat micro heat pipe. It's well known that the liquid suffers biphasic transformations during heat transfer inside the heat pipe. Over the hotspot (the heat source being the electronic component) generated at one end of the heat pipe, convective heat transfer occurs, leading to sudden vaporization of the liquid. Pressures generated by newly formed vapors push them towards the opposite end of the flat heat pipe, where a finned mini heat sink is usually placed. The mini-heat exchanger is air-cooled, thus creating a cold spot, where vapors condensate. The proposed method contributes to vapor flow intensification by increasing their transport speed and thus leading to more intense cooling of the heat pipe.

  17. Design of Solar Heat Sheet for Air Heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priya, S. Shanmuga; Premalatha, M.; Thirunavukkarasu, I.

    2011-12-01

    The technique of harnessing solar energy for drying offers significant potential to dry agricultural products such as food grains, fruits, vegetables and medicinal plants, thereby eliminating many of the problems experienced with open-sun drying and industrial drying, besides saving huge quantities of fossil fuels. A great deal of experimental work over the last few decades has already demonstrated that agricultural products can be satisfactorily dehydrated using solar energy. Various designs of small scale solar dryers have been developed in the recent past, mainly for drying agricultural products. Major problems experienced with solar dryers are their non-reliability as their operation largely depends on local weather conditions. While back-up heaters and hybrid dryers partly solved this issue, difficulties in controlling the drying air temperature and flow rate remains a problem, and affects the quality of the dried product. This study is aimed at eliminating the fluctuations in the quality of hot air supplied by simple solar air heaters used for drying fruits, vegetables and other applications. It is an attempt to analyse the applicability of the combination of an glazed transpired solar collector (tank), thermal storage and a intake fan(suction fan) to achieve a steady supply of air at a different atmospheric temperature and flow rate for drying fruits and vegetables. Development of an efficient, low-cost and reliable air heating system for drying applications is done.

  18. Cryogenic fluid flow instabilities in heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, R. B.; Staub, F. W.

    1969-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigation determines the nature of oscillations and instabilities that occur in the flow of two-phase cryogenic fluids at both subcritical and supercritical pressures in heat exchangers. Test results with varying system parameters suggest certain design approaches with regard to heat exchanger geometry.

  19. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  20. Heat Flow of the Norwegian Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, C.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial heat flow determination is of prime interest for oil industry because it impacts directly maturation histories and economic potential of oil fields. Published systematic heat flow determinations from major oil provinces are however seldom. Robust heat flow determinations in drillholes require logging of undisturbed temperatures and intensive sampling of core material for petrophysical measurements. Temperature logging in exploration drillholes is traditionally conducted during drill breaks or shortly after drilling, resulting in temperatures severely disturbed by mud circulation and coring is restricted to selected intervals. Alternatively, test temperatures, information from electric logs and lithological descriptions of drill cuttings can be used to overcome these limitations. The present contribution introduces new heat flow determinations based on 63 exploration drillholes from the Norwegian North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin and the Barents Shelf. Our analyses are based on released DST temperatures, precise lithological descriptions of drill cuttings, previously measured rock matrix thermal conductivities and established porosity laws. For the sake of comparison, we carefully review previous heat flow studies carried out both onshore and offshore Norway. Our results suggest median heat flow values of 64 mW/m2, 65 mW/m2 and 72 mW/m2 for the North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin (mainly the Trøndelag Platform) and the SW Barents Shelf respectively. In detail, heat flow increases by ~ 10 mW/m2 from the southern Norwegian North Sea towards the Mid Norway Margin. This result appears to be in very good agreement with seismic tomographic studies suggesting northward thinning of the underlying mantle lithosphere. Our results together with published marine heat flow data from the Mid Norway Margin suggest a gradual decrease in heat flow levels from both the North Sea and the Trøndelag Platform towards the centres of the deep Møre and Vøring basins. This latter

  1. Heat flow and heat generation in greenstone belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drury, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Heat flow has been measured in Precambrian shields in both greenstone belts and crystalline terrains. Values are generally low, reflecting the great age and tectonic stability of the shields; they range typically between 30 and 50 mW/sq m, although extreme values of 18 and 79 mW/sq m have been reported. For large areas of the Earth's surface that are assumed to have been subjected to a common thermotectonic event, plots of heat flow against heat generation appear to be linear, although there may be considerable scatter in the data. The relationship is expressed as: Q = Q sub o + D A sub o in which Q is the observed heat flow, A sub o is the measured heat generation at the surface, Q sub o is the reduced heat flow from the lower crust and mantle, and D, which has the dimension of length, represents a scale depth for the distribution of radiogenic elements. Most authors have not used data from greenstone belts in attempting to define the relationship within shields, considering them unrepresentative and preferring to use data from relatively homogeneous crystalline rocks. A discussion follows.

  2. Heat flow of the Norwegian continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial heat flow influences a large collection of geological processes. Its determination is a requirement to assess the economic potential of deep sedimentary basins. Published heat flow calculations from e.g. major oil provinces are however seldom. Robust heat flow determinations in drillholes require logging of undisturbed temperatures and intensive sampling of core material for petrophysical measurements. Temperature logging in exploration drillholes is traditionally conducted during drill breaks or shortly after drilling, resulting in temperatures severely disturbed by mud circulation and coring is restricted to selected intervals. Alternatively, test temperatures, information from electric logs and lithological descriptions of drill cuttings can be used to overcome these limitations. The present contribution introduces new heat flow determinations based on 63 exploration drillholes from the Norwegian North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin and the Barents Shelf. Our analyses are based on released DST temperatures, precise lithological descriptions of drill cuttings, previously measured rock matrix thermal conductivities and established porosity laws. Our results suggest median heat flow values of 64 mW/m2, 65 mW/m2 and 72 mW/m2 for the North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin (mainly the Trøndelag Platform) and the SW Barents Shelf respectively. The Barents Shelf shows significantly high heat flow, suggesting lateral transfer of heat from the mantle of the adjacent young ocean. In detail, heat flow increases by ~ 10 mW/m2 from the southern Norwegian North Sea towards the Mid Norway Margin. This result appears to be in very good agreement with seismic tomographic studies suggesting northward thinning of the underlying mantle lithosphere. Our results together with published marine heat flow data from the Mid Norway Margin suggest a gradual decrease in heat flow levels from both the North Sea and the Trøndelag Platform towards the centres of the deep Møre and V

  3. Simulation of multistream plate-fin heat exchangers of an air separation unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehme, R.; Parise, J. A. R.; Pitanga Marques, R.

    2003-06-01

    Hot and cold reversible heat exchangers of an air separation unit are simulated. Five fluid streams exchange heat with six fluid streams in parallel and counter flow. The numerical method employed divides the heat exchanger in a number of sections, for which fluid properties, capacity rates and heat transfer coefficients are considered constant. Single and two-phase streams are taken into account. Results obtained from the model are compared with field data.

  4. Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. Subba

    1993-01-01

    Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic space vehicles is an important factor to be considered in their design. Therefore the designers of such vehicles need reliable heat transfer data in this respect for a successful design. Such data is usually produced by testing the models of hypersonic surfaces in wind tunnels. Most of the hypersonic test facilities at present are conventional blow-down tunnels whose run times are of the order of several seconds. The surface temperatures on such models are obtained using standard techniques such as thin-film resistance gages, thin-skin transient calorimeter gages and coaxial thermocouple or video acquisition systems such as phosphor thermography and infrared thermography. The data are usually reduced assuming that the model behaves like a semi-infinite solid (SIS) with constant properties and that heat transfer is by one-dimensional conduction only. This simplifying assumption may be valid in cases where models are thick, run-times short, and thermal diffusivities small. In many instances, however, when these conditions are not met, the assumption may lead to significant errors in the heat transfer results. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate this aspect. Specifically, the objectives are as follows: (1) to determine the limiting conditions under which a model can be considered a semi-infinite body; (2) to estimate the extent of errors involved in the reduction of the data if the models violate the assumption; and (3) to come up with correlation factors which when multiplied by the results obtained under the SIS assumption will provide the results under the actual conditions.

  5. Solar assisted heat pump on air collectors: A simulation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiorgas, Michalis; Galatis, Kostas; Tsagouri, Manolis; Tsoutsos, Theocharis; Botzios-Valaskakis, Aristotelis

    2010-01-15

    The heating system of the bioclimatic building of the Greek National Centre for Renewable Energy Sources (CRES) comprises two heating plants: the first one includes an air source heat pump, Solar Air Collectors (SACs) and a heat distribution system (comprising a fan coil unit network); the second one is, mainly, a geothermal heat pump unit to cover the ground floor thermal needs. The SAC configuration as well as the fraction of the building heating load covered by the heating plant are assessed in two operation modes; the direct (hot air from the collectors is supplied directly to the heated space) and the indirect mode (warm air from the SAC or its mixture with ambient air is not supplied directly to the heated space but indirectly into the evaporator of the air source heat pump). The technique of the indirect mode of heating aims at maximizing the efficiency of the SAC, saving electrical power consumed by the compressor of the heat pump, and therefore, at optimizing the coefficient of performance (COP) of the heat pump due to the increased intake of ambient thermal energy by means of the SAC. Results are given for three research objectives: assessment of the heat pump efficiency whether in direct or indirect heating mode; Assessment of the overall heating plant efficiency on a daily or hourly basis; Assessment of the credibility of the suggested simulation model TSAGAIR by comparing its results with the TRNSYS ones. (author)

  6. Refrigeration, Heating & Air Conditioning. Post Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Joe C.; And Others

    This curriculum guide was designed for use in postsecondary refrigeration, heating and air conditioning education programs in Georgia. Its purpose is to provide for the development of entry level skills in refrigeration, heating, and air conditioning in the areas of air conditioning knowledge, theoretical structure, tool usage, diagnostic ability,…

  7. The heat transfer of cooling fins on moving air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doetsch, Hans

    1935-01-01

    The present report is a comparison of the experimentally defined temperature and heat output of cooling fins in the air stream with theory. The agreement is close on the basis of a mean coefficient of heat transfer with respect to the total surface. A relationship is established between the mean coefficient of heat transfer, the dimensions of the fin arrangement, and the air velocity.

  8. Nitric oxide flow tagging in unseeded air.

    PubMed

    Dam, N; Klein-Douwel, R J; Sijtsema, N M; Meulen, J J

    2001-01-01

    A scheme for molecular tagging velocimetry is presented that can be used in air flows without any kind of seeding. The method is based on the local and instantaneous creation of nitric oxide (NO) molecules from N(2) and O(2) in the waist region of a focused ArF excimer laser beam. This NO distribution is advected by the flow and can be visualized any time later by laser-induced fluorescence in the gamma bands. The creation of NO is confirmed by use of an excitation spectrum. Two examples of the application of the new scheme for air-flow velocimetry are given in which single laser pulses are used for creation and visualization of NO. PMID:18033499

  9. Ionospheric Heating Rates Associated with Solar Wind Forcing: Ejecta flow, High Speed Flow and Slow Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipp, D. J.; Kasprzak, B.; Richardson, I.; Paige, T.; Evans, D.

    2001-12-01

    We present estimates of global ionospheric Joule and particle heating as a function of solar wind flow types over solar cycles 21, 22 and the first half of solar cycle 23. Richardson et al., [JGR, 2000] used a variety of techniques to categorize the solar wind flow as ejecta, high-speed stream or slow flow. Their work provides the basis for our catigorization of heating by flow type. The estimates of Joule heating are based on output of the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) procedure, and fits to the Polar Cap Index [Chun et al., GRL, 1999]. Estimates of particle heating are derived from polar orbiting satellites. Although ejecta only account for 19% of the solar wind flow, they account for 27% of the Joule heating. High-speed stream flow accounts for 47% of the flow occurrence and 44% of the Joule heating. We will show similar comparisons for particle heating. Our solar cycle statistics indicate that Joule heating produces a yearly average hemispheric heating rate of 53 GW while particles produce a hemispheric heating rate of 38 GW. Joule heating exhibits more variability than particle heating. During solar cycle maximum years Joule heating accounts for twice the heating associated with particles heating.

  10. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications. 89.414 Section 89.414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement...

  11. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications. 89.414 Section 89.414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement...

  12. Method for identifying anomalous terrestrial heat flows

    DOEpatents

    Del Grande, Nancy Kerr

    1977-01-25

    A method for locating and mapping the magnitude and extent of terrestrial heat-flow anomalies from 5 to 50 times average with a tenfold improved sensitivity over orthodox applications of aerial temperature-sensing surveys as used for geothermal reconnaissance. The method remotely senses surface temperature anomalies such as occur from geothermal resources or oxidizing ore bodies by: measuring the spectral, spatial, statistical, thermal, and temporal features characterizing infrared radiation emitted by natural terrestrial surfaces; deriving from these measurements the true surface temperature with uncertainties as small as 0.05 to 0.5 K; removing effects related to natural temperature variations of topographic, hydrologic, or meteoric origin, the surface composition, detector noise, and atmospheric conditions; factoring out the ambient normal-surface temperature for non-thermally enhanced areas surveyed under otherwise identical environmental conditions; distinguishing significant residual temperature enhancements characteristic of anomalous heat flows and mapping the extent and magnitude of anomalous heat flows where they occur.

  13. Colorado Heat Flow Data from IHFC

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: The International Heat Flow Commission (IHFC) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado IHFC Data Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: Abstract: This layer contains the heat flow sites and data of the State of Colorado compiled from the International Heat Flow Commission (IHFC) of the International Association of Seismology and Physics of the Earth's Interior (IASPEI) global heat flow database (www.heatflow.und.edu/index2.html). The data include different items: Item number, descriptive code, name of site, latitude and longitude, elevation, depth interval, number of temperature data, temperature gradient, number of conductivity measurement, average conductivity, number of heat generation measurements, average heat production, heat flow, number of individual sites, references, and date of publication. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4522121.800672 m Left: 165356.134075 m Right: 621836.776246 m Bottom: 4097833.419676 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude Of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich

  14. Automotive absorption air conditioner utilizing solar and motor waste heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popinski, Z. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    In combination with the ground vehicles powered by a waste heat generating electric motor, a cooling system including a generator for driving off refrigerant vapor from a strong refrigerant absorbant solution is described. A solar collector, an air-cooled condenser connected with the generator for converting the refrigerant vapor to its liquid state, an air cooled evaporator connected with the condenser for returning the liquid refrigerant to its vapor state, and an absorber is connected to the generator and to the evaporator for dissolving the refrigerant vapor in the weak refrigerant absorbant solution, for providing a strong refrigerant solution. A pump is used to establish a pressurized flow of strong refrigerant absorbant solution from the absorber through the electric motor, and to the collector.

  15. Stirling Engine With Radial Flow Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitale, N.; Yarr, George

    1993-01-01

    Conflict between thermodynamical and structural requirements resolved. In Stirling engine of new cylindrical configuration, regenerator and acceptor and rejector heat exchangers channel flow of working gas in radial direction. Isotherms in regenerator ideally concentric cylinders, and gradient of temperature across regenerator radial rather than axial. Acceptor and rejector heat exchangers located radially inward and outward of regenerator, respectively. Enables substantial increase in power of engine without corresponding increase in diameter of pressure vessel.

  16. Heat transfer peculiarities in supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovoi, V. Ia.; Brazhko, V. N.; Maikapar, G. I.; Skuratov, A. S.; Struminskaia, I. V.

    1992-12-01

    A method of heat transfer and gas flow investigation based on the application of thermal sensitive coatings or thermocouple sensors and various visualization techniques is described. The thermal sensitive coatings and visualization reveal heat transfer peculiarities, and the complex nature of the method contributes to understanding the processes and generalization of quantitative results. Data concerning heat transfer on the leeward side of a blunt cone in the regions of the shock-wave boundary layer and bow wave interaction, in gaps and cavities of the orbiter's thermal insulation, and in the vicinity of them, are presented.

  17. An Engineering Aerodynamic Heating Method for Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.; DeJarnette, Fred R.

    1992-01-01

    A capability to calculate surface heating rates has been incorporated in an approximate three-dimensional inviscid technique. Surface streamlines are calculated from the inviscid solution, and the axisymmetric analog is then used along with a set of approximate convective-heating equations to compute the surface heat transfer. The method is applied to blunted axisymmetric and three-dimensional ellipsoidal cones at angle of attack for the laminar flow of a perfect gas. The method is also applicable to turbulent and equilibrium-air conditions. The present technique predicts surface heating rates that compare favorably with experimental (ground-test and flight) data and numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes (NS) and viscous shock-layer (VSL) equations. The new technique represents a significant improvement over current engineering aerothermal methods with only a modest increase in computational effort.

  18. Heat Waves, Urban Vegetation, and Air Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churkina, G.; Grote, R.; Butler, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Fast-track programs to plant millions of trees in cities around the world aim at the reduction of summer temperatures, increase carbon storage, storm water control, provision of space for recreation, as well as poverty alleviation. Although these multiple benefits speak positively for urban greening programs, the programs do not take into account how close human and natural systems are coupled in urban areas. Elevated temperatures together with anthropogenic emissions of air and water pollutants distinguish the urban system. Urban and sub-urban vegetation responds to ambient changes and reacts with pollutants. Neglecting the existence of this coupling may lead to unforeseen drawbacks of urban greening programs. The potential for emissions from urban vegetation combined with anthropogenic emissions to produce ozone has long been recognized. This potential increases under rising temperatures. Here we investigate how global change induced heat waves affect emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from urban vegetation and corresponding ground-level ozone levels. We also quantify other ecosystem services provided by urban vegetation (e.g., cooling and carbon storage) and their sensitivity to climate change. In this study we use Weather Research and Forecasting Model with coupled atmospheric chemistry (WRF-CHEM) to quantify these feedbacks in Berlin, Germany during the heat waves in 2003 and 2006. We highlight the importance of the vegetation for urban areas under changing climate and discuss associated tradeoffs.

  19. Thermistor based, low velocity isothermal, air flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrita, Admésio A. C. M.; Mendes, Ricardo; Quintela, Divo A.

    2016-03-01

    The semiconductor thermistor technology is applied as a flow sensor to measure low isothermal air velocities (<2 ms-1). The sensor is subjected to heating and cooling cycles controlled by a multifunctional timer. In the heating stage, the alternating current of a main AC power supply source guarantees a uniform thermistor temperature distribution. The conditioning circuit assures an adequate increase of the sensors temperature and avoids the thermal disturbance of the flow. The power supply interruption reduces the consumption from the source and extends the sensors life time. In the cooling stage, the resistance variation of the flow sensor is recorded by the measuring chain. The resistive sensor parameters proposed vary significantly and feature a high sensitivity to the flow velocity. With the aid of a computer, the data transfer, storage and analysis provides a great advantage over the traditional local anemometer readings. The data acquisition chain has a good repeatability and low standard uncertainties. The proposed method measures isothermal air mean velocities from 0.1 ms-1 to 2 ms-1 with a standard uncertainty error less than 4%.

  20. Selection of the air heat exchanger operating in a gas turbine air bottoming cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielniak, Tadeusz; Czaja, Daniel; Lepszy, Sebastian

    2013-12-01

    A gas turbine air bottoming cycle consists of a gas turbine unit and the air turbine part. The air part includes a compressor, air expander and air heat exchanger. The air heat exchanger couples the gas turbine to the air cycle. Due to the low specific heat of air and of the gas turbine exhaust gases, the air heat exchanger features a considerable size. The bigger the air heat exchanger, the higher its effectiveness, which results in the improvement of the efficiency of the gas turbine air bottoming cycle. On the other hand, a device with large dimensions weighs more, which may limit its use in specific locations, such as oil platforms. The thermodynamic calculations of the air heat exchanger and a preliminary selection of the device are presented. The installation used in the calculation process is a plate heat exchanger, which is characterized by a smaller size and lower values of the pressure drop compared to the shell and tube heat exchanger. Structurally, this type of the heat exchanger is quite similar to the gas turbine regenerator. The method on which the calculation procedure may be based for real installations is also presented, which have to satisfy the economic criteria of financial profitability and cost-effectiveness apart from the thermodynamic criteria.

  1. Notes on heat flow at Ririwai, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukwueke, C.

    Heat flow measurements carried out in the Ririwai ring complexes gave an average temperature gradient of 16.0 ± 0.5°C km -1 and thermal conductivity of the granites measured in the laboratory varied from 3.007 to 3.672 W/m°C. The laboratory results conforms with the estimated thermal conductivities from mineralogical compositions: modal analysis 3.13 W/m°C, C.I.P.W. norm 3.06 W/m°C and the content of oxides SiO 2 3.17 W/m°C. The calculated average heat flow is 50.72 ± 2.54 mWm -2 which is higher than those from the West African Craton: 20 mWm -2 in Niger, (Chapman and Pollack, 1974), 26 mWm -2 in Ghana (Beck and Mustonen, 1972) and 38.5 ± 1.7 mWm -2 from the same complex (Verheijen and Ajakaiye, 1979). The heat flow value of 50.72 ± 2.54 mWm -2 is considered normal for post PreCambrian orogenic provinces and also in agreement with the relation between heat flow and age.

  2. Numberical Solution to Transient Heat Flow Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobiske, Ronald A.; Hock, Jeffrey L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the reduction of the one- and three-dimensional diffusion equation to the difference equation and its stability, convergence, and heat-flow applications under different boundary conditions. Indicates the usefulness of this presentation for beginning students of physics and engineering as well as college teachers. (CC)

  3. Review of air flow measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams, Jennifer

    2002-12-01

    Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: ''Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?'' This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and outdoors, and those through mechanical air distribution systems. Techniques that are highlighted include particle streak velocimetry, hot wire anemometry, fan pressurization (measuring flow at a given pressure), tracer gas, acoustic methods for leak size determination, the Delta Q test to determine duct leakage flows, and flow hood measurements. Because tracer gas techniques are widely used to measure airflow, this topic is broken down into sections as follows: decay, pulse injection, constant injection, constant concentration, passive sampling, and single and multiple gas measurements for multiple zones.

  4. Vehicle cabin cooling system for capturing and exhausting heated boundary layer air from inner surfaces of solar heated windows

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, Robert B.; Anderson, Ren

    2001-01-01

    The cabin cooling system includes a cooling duct positioned proximate and above upper edges of one or more windows of a vehicle to exhaust hot air as the air is heated by inner surfaces of the windows and forms thin boundary layers of heated air adjacent the heated windows. The cabin cooling system includes at least one fan to draw the hot air into the cooling duct at a flow rate that captures the hot air in the boundary layer without capturing a significant portion of the cooler cabin interior air and to discharge the hot air at a point outside the vehicle cabin, such as the vehicle trunk. In a preferred embodiment, the cooling duct has a cross-sectional area that gradually increases from a distal point to a proximal point to the fan inlet to develop a substantially uniform pressure drop along the length of the cooling duct. Correspondingly, this cross-sectional configuration develops a uniform suction pressure and uniform flow rate at the upper edge of the window to capture the hot air in the boundary layer adjacent each window.

  5. Optical Air Flow Measurements for Flight Tests and Flight Testing Optical Air Flow Meters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentink, Henk W.; Bogue, Rodney K.

    2005-01-01

    Optical air flow measurements can support the testing of aircraft and can be instrumental to in-flight investigations of the atmosphere or atmospheric phenomena. Furthermore, optical air flow meters potentially contribute as avionics systems to flight safety and as air data systems. The qualification of these instruments for the flight environment is where we encounter the systems in flight testing. An overview is presented of different optical air flow measurement techniques applied in flight and what can be achieved with the techniques for flight test purposes is reviewed. All in-flight optical airflow velocity measurements use light scattering. Light is scattered on both air molecules and aerosols entrained in the air. Basic principles of making optical measurements in flight, some basic optical concepts, electronic concepts, optoelectronic interfaces, and some atmospheric processes associated with natural aerosols are reviewed. Safety aspects in applying the technique are shortly addressed. The different applications of the technique are listed and some typical examples are presented. Recently NASA acquired new data on mountain rotors, mountain induced turbulence, with the ACLAIM system. Rotor position was identified using the lidar system and the potentially hazardous air flow profile was monitored by the ACLAIM system.

  6. Heat flow-heat production relationship not found: what drives heat flow variability of the Western Canadian foreland basin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majorowicz, Jacek A.

    2016-06-01

    Heat flow high -80 ± 10 mW/m2 in the northern western parts of the Western Canadian foreland basin is in large contrast to low heat flow to the south and east (50 ± 7 mW/m2) of the same basin with the same old 2E09 year's Precambrian basement and some 200-km-thick lithosphere. Over-thrusted and flat-laying sedimentary units are heated from below by heat flow from the old craton' crust and low 15 ± 5 mW/m2 mantle contribution. The heat flow vs. radiogenic heat production statistical relationship is not found for this area. To account for this large heat flow contrast and to have 200-km-thick lithosphere, we would need to assume that high heat production layer of the upper crust varies in thickness as much as factor of 2 and/or that the measured heat production at top of Precambrian basement is not representative for deeper rocks. The other explanation proposed before that heat in the basin is redistributed by the regional fluid flow systems driven from high hydraulic head areas close to the foothills of the Rocky Mountains toward low elevation areas to the east and north cannot be explained by observed low Darcy fluid velocities and the geometry of the basin.

  7. Laboratory Evaluation of Air Flow Measurement Methods for Residential HVAC Returns for New Instrument Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-08-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The study team prepared a draft test method through ASTM International to determine the uncertainty of air flow measurements at residential heating ventilation and air conditioning returns and other terminals. This test method, when finalized, can be used by the Energy Commission and other entities to specify required accuracy of measurement devices used to show compliance with standards.

  8. Characteristics of exhaust air facades as solar absorbers for saving of heating energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voncube, H. L.; Ludwig, E.

    1982-12-01

    The solar radiation exploited by solar exhaust air windows was measured at a building facing four main directions. The windows were not constructed as optimal radiation absorbers and the heat gain stood in a range of 3 to 10% of the heat consumption, depending on time of year. Optimal windows (chiefly clear glass with Venetian blinds) were found by a computer program simulating the process of radiation in an exhaust air-window and heat gains up to 50% can be obtained. Relation to air flow rate and others were found. The calculated results were proved by measurements. With a suitable heating systems in the building (heat transport form south side to north side, heat storage) up to 50% of the annual consumption can be saved.

  9. Rényi entropy flows from quantum heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Mohammad H.; Nazarov, Yuli V.

    2015-03-01

    We evaluate Rényi entropy flows from generic quantum heat engines (QHE) to a weakly coupled probe environment kept in thermal equilibrium. We show that the flows are determined not only by heat flow but also by a quantum coherent flow that can be separately measured in experiment apart from the heat flow measurement. The same pertains to Shannon entropy flow. This appeals for a revision of the concept of entropy flows in quantum nonequlibrium thermodynamics.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Wall Heat Load in Combustor Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panara, D.; Hase, M.; Krebs, W.; Noll, B.

    2007-09-01

    Due to the major mechanism of NOx generation, there is generally a temperature trade off between improved cycle efficiency, material constraints and low NOx emission. The cycle efficiency is proportional to the highest cycle temperature, but unfortunately also the NOx production increases with increasing combustion temperature. For this reason, the modern combustion chamber design has been oriented towards lean premixed combustion system and more and more attention must be focused on the cooling air management. The challenge is to ensure sufficiently low temperature of the combustion liner with very low amount of film or effusion cooling air. Correct numerical prediction of temperature fields and wall heat load are therefore of critical interest in the modern combustion chamber design. Moreover, lean combustion technology has shown the appearance of thermo-acoustic instabilities which have to be taken into account in the simulation and, more in general, in the design of reliable combustion systems. In this framework, the present investigation addresses the capability of a commercial multiphysics code (ANSYS CFX) to correctly predict the wall heat load and the core flow temperature field in a scaled power generation combustion chamber with a simplified ceramic liner. Comparison are made with the experimental results from the ITS test rig at the University of Karlsruhe [1] and with a previous numerical campaign from [2]. In addition the effect of flow unsteadyness on the wall heat load is discussed showing some limitations of the traditional steady state flow thermal design.

  11. The Oak Ridge Heat Pump Models: I. A Steady-State Computer Design Model of Air-to-Air Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, S.K. Rice, C.K.

    1999-12-10

    The ORNL Heat Pump Design Model is a FORTRAN-IV computer program to predict the steady-state performance of conventional, vapor compression, electrically-driven, air-to-air heat pumps in both heating and cooling modes. This model is intended to serve as an analytical design tool for use by heat pump manufacturers, consulting engineers, research institutions, and universities in studies directed toward the improvement of heat pump performance. The Heat Pump Design Model allows the user to specify: system operating conditions, compressor characteristics, refrigerant flow control devices, fin-and-tube heat exchanger parameters, fan and indoor duct characteristics, and any of ten refrigerants. The model will compute: system capacity and COP (or EER), compressor and fan motor power consumptions, coil outlet air dry- and wet-bulb temperatures, air- and refrigerant-side pressure drops, a summary of the refrigerant-side states throughout the cycle, and overall compressor efficiencies and heat exchanger effectiveness. This report provides thorough documentation of how to use and/or modify the model. This is a revision of an earlier report containing miscellaneous corrections and information on availability and distribution of the model--including an interactive version.

  12. Regional heat flow variations in the northern Michigan and Lake Superior region determined using the silica heat flow estimator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vugrinovich, R.

    1987-01-01

    Conventional heat flow data are sparse for northern Michigan. The groundwater silica heat flow estimator expands the database sufficiently to allow regional variations in heat flow to be examined. Heat flow shows a pattern of alternating highs and lows trending ESE across the Upper Peninsula and Lake Superior. The informal names given to these features, their characteristic heat flow and inferred causes are listed: {A table is presented} The results suggest that, for the study area, regional variations in heat flow cannot be interpreted solely in terms of regional variations of the heat generation rate of basement rocks. ?? 1987.

  13. Dynamic Performance of a Residential Air-to-Air Heat Pump.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, George E.; Bean, John

    This publication is a study of the dynamic performance of a 5-ton air-to-air heat pump in a residence in Washington, D.C. The effect of part-load operation on the heat pump's cooling and heating coefficients of performance was determined. Discrepancies between measured performance and manufacturer-supplied performance data were found when the unit…

  14. Cold Climate and Retrofit Applications for Air-to-Air Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Van D

    2015-01-01

    Air source heat pumps (ASHP) including air-to-air ASHPs are easily applied to buildings almost anywhere for new construction as well as retrofits or renovations. They are widespread in milder climate regions but their use in cold regions is hampered due to low heating efficiency and capacity at cold outdoor temperatures. Retrofitting air-to-air ASHPs to existing buildings is relatively easy if the building already has an air distribution system. For buildings without such systems alternative approaches are necessary. Examples are ductless, minisplit heat pumps or central heat pumps coupled to small diameter, high velocity (SDHV) air distribution systems. This article presents two subjects: 1) a summary of R&D investigations aimed at improving the cold weather performance of ASHPs, and 2) a brief discussion of building retrofit options using air-to-air ASHP systems.

  15. Heat flow in the Keweenawan rift system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, C.; Mareschal, J.; Jaupart, C. P.

    2012-12-01

    The emplacement of large volumes of mafic volcanic rocks during the Keweenawan rifting has modified the average crustal composition and affects the present steady state heat flux in the region. We have combined new heat flux measurements in the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield and previously published data to characterize the heat flux field around the Keweenawan rift system. For the Nipigon embayment, North of lake Superior in Ontario, mafic intrusions associated with the Keweenawan rifting have resulted in an increase in the volume of mafic rocks in the crust and caused a very small <3mW m-2 decrease in the mean heat flux. There is a very marked decrease in the heat flux (Δ Q ≈ 20mW m-2) beneath the western half of Lake Superior and to the west. The very low values of the surface heat flux (≈ 22mW m-2 correlate with the maximum Bouguer gravity anomaly. The heat flux at the base of the crust in the Canadian Shield has been determined from surface heat flux, heat production, and crustal stucture to be ≈ 15 mW m-2. In the Keweenawan rift, the surface heat flux is only a few mW m-2 higher than the mantle heat flux, which implies that the contribution of the entire crustal column to the surface heat flux is small and that the crust is exclusively made up of depleted mafic volcanic rocks. In the eastern part and northeast of Lake Superior, there is a marked increase in heat flux that correlates with a lower Bouguer anomaly. Local high heat flux anomalies due to intrusions by felsic rocks are superposed with a long wavelength trend of higher heat flow suggesting a more felsic crustal composition in the eastern part of the Keweenawan rift. Simple models suggest that such a thick dense volcanic pile as accumulated in the Keweenawan rift is almost invariably unstable and that very particular conditions were required for it to stabilize in the crust.

  16. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Air flow measurement specifications. 89... Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method used... during the test. Overall measurement accuracy must be ± 2 percent of the maximum engine value for...

  17. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method... during the test. Overall measurement accuracy must be ± 2 percent of the maximum engine value for...

  18. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method... during the test. Overall measurement accuracy must be ± 2 percent of the maximum engine value for...

  19. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW PRESSURE, AIR ATOMIZED OIL BURNER WITH HIGH ATOMIZER AIR FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    BUTCHER,T.A.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes technical advances made to the concept of a low pressure, air atomized oil burner for home heating applications. Currently all oil burners on the market are of the pressure atomized, retention head type. These burners have a lower firing rate limit of about 0.5 gallons per hour of oil, due to reliability problems related to small flow passage sizes. High pressure air atomized burners have been shown to be one route to avoid this problem but air compressor cost and reliability have practically eliminated this approach. With the low pressure air atomized burner the air required for atomization can be provided by a fan at 5--8 inches of water pressure. A burner using this concept, termed the Fan-Atomized Burner or FAB has been developed and is currently being commercialized. In the head of the FAB, the combustion air is divided into three parts, much like a conventional retention head burner. This report describes development work on a new concept in which 100% of the air from the fan goes through the atomizer. The primary advantage of this approach is a great simplification of the head design. A nozzle specifically sized for this concept was built and is described in the report. Basic flow pressure tests, cold air velocity profiles, and atomization performance have been measured. A burner head/flame tube has been developed which promotes a torroidal recirculation zone near the nozzle for flame stability. The burner head has been tested in several furnace and boiler applications over the tiring rate range 0.2 to 0.28 gallons per hour. In all cases the burner can operate with very low excess air levels (under 10%) without producing smoke. Flue gas NO{sub x} concentration varied from 42 to 62 ppm at 3% 0{sub 2}. The concept is seen as having significant potential and planned development efforts are discussed.

  1. Turbulent Heat Transfer in Ribbed Pipe Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Changwoo; Yang, Kyung-Soo

    2012-11-01

    From the view point of heat transfer control, surface roughness is one of the popular ways adopted for enhancing heat transfer in turbulent pipe flow. Such a surface roughness is often modeled with a rib. In the current investigation, Large Eddy Simulation has been performed for turbulent flow in a pipe with periodically-mounted ribs at Reτ=700, Pr=0.71, and p / k =2, 4, and 8. Here, p and k represent the pitch and rib height, respectively. The rib height is fixed as one tenth of the pipe radius. The profiles of mean velocity components, mean temperature, root-mean-squares (rms) of temperature fluctuation are presented at the selected streamwise locations. In comparison with the smooth-pipe case at the same Re and Pr, the effects of the ribs are clearly identified, leading to overall enhancement of turbulent heat transfer in terms of Nu. The budget of temperature variance is presented in the form of contours. The results of an Octant analysis are also given to elucidate the dominant events. Our LES results shed light on a complete understanding of the heat-transfer mechanisms in turbulent ribbed-pipe flow which has numerous applications in engineering. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MEST) (No. 2012013019).

  2. Mountain Plains Learning Experience Guide: Heating, Refrigeration, & Air Conditioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, John

    This Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning course is comprised of eleven individualized units: (1) Refrigeration Tools, Materials, and Refrigerant; (2) Basic Heating and Air Conditioning; (3) Sealed System Repairs; (4) Basic Refrigeration Systems; (5) Compression Systems and Compressors; (6) Refrigeration Controls; (7) Electric Circuit…

  3. Effects of fin pattern on the air-side heat transfer coefficient in plate finned-tube heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Beecher, D.T.; Fagan, T.J.

    1987-06-01

    The effects of air velocity, heat exchanger geometry, and fin patternation on air-side heat transfer in plate finned tube heat exchangers were investigated experimentally using a single-fin passage model. The geometric parameters considered included tube diameter, transverse tube spacing, longitudinal tube spacing, number of tube rows, and fin spacing. The effects of fin pattern depth and number of fin patterns per longitudinal tube row were investigated for a pattern consisting of corrugations of triangular cross-section transverse to the direction of airflow. The heat transfer data were correlated in terms of the dimensionless heat transfer coefficient (Nusselt number) based on the arithmetic mean temperature difference, Nu/sub a/, and the Graetz number, Gz, a dimensionless measure of the level of flow development.

  4. Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Hardee, Harry C.; Reynolds, Gerald D.; Steinfort, Terry D.

    1992-01-01

    A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers arranged in a vertical string. The transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings.

  5. Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, C.R.; Hardee, H.C.; Reynolds, G.D.; Steinfort, T.D.

    1990-01-01

    A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings. 6 figs.

  6. Experimental study of heat transfer and thermal performance with longitudinal fins of solar air heater

    PubMed Central

    Chabane, Foued; Moummi, Noureddine; Benramache, Said

    2013-01-01

    The thermal performance of a single pass solar air heater with five fins attached was investigated experimentally. Longitudinal fins were used inferior the absorber plate to increase the heat exchange and render the flow fluid in the channel uniform. The effect of mass flow rate of air on the outlet temperature, the heat transfer in the thickness of the solar collector, and the thermal efficiency were studied. Experiments were performed for two air mass flow rates of 0.012 and 0.016 kg s−1. Moreover, the maximum efficiency values obtained for the 0.012 and 0.016 kg s−1 with and without fins were 40.02%, 51.50% and 34.92%, 43.94%, respectively. A comparison of the results of the mass flow rates by solar collector with and without fins shows a substantial enhancement in the thermal efficiency. PMID:25685486

  7. Heat transfer in turbulent decaying swirl flow in a circular pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algifri, A. H.; Bhardwaj, R. K.; Rao, Y. V. N.

    1988-08-01

    Heat transfer coefficients for air are measured along a heated pipe for decaying swirl flow, generated by radial blade cascade. The results are compared with an expression proposed for predicting the heat transfer coefficients in swirling flow. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental data, with average and maximum deviations of 7 and 11 percent, respectively. The application of the theoretical approach to the experimental results obtained by other investigators for heat transfer in a decaying swirl flow generated by short-twisted tapes and tangential slots at inlet also give rise to encouraging agreement.

  8. Evaluation of correlations of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in horizontal channels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhanru; Fang, Xiande; Li, Dingkun

    2013-01-01

    The calculation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels is required in a variety of applications, such as chemical process cooling systems, refrigeration, and air conditioning. A number of correlations for flow boiling heat transfer in channels have been proposed. This work evaluates the existing correlations for flow boiling heat transfer coefficient with 1669 experimental data points of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 collected from 18 published papers. The top two correlations for R22 are those of Liu and Winterton (1991) and Fang (2013), with the mean absolute deviation of 32.7% and 32.8%, respectively. More studies should be carried out to develop better ones. Effects of channel dimension and vapor quality on heat transfer are analyzed, and the results provide valuable information for further research in the correlation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels. PMID:23956695

  9. Evaluation of Correlations of Flow Boiling Heat Transfer of R22 in Horizontal Channels

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xiande; Li, Dingkun

    2013-01-01

    The calculation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels is required in a variety of applications, such as chemical process cooling systems, refrigeration, and air conditioning. A number of correlations for flow boiling heat transfer in channels have been proposed. This work evaluates the existing correlations for flow boiling heat transfer coefficient with 1669 experimental data points of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 collected from 18 published papers. The top two correlations for R22 are those of Liu and Winterton (1991) and Fang (2013), with the mean absolute deviation of 32.7% and 32.8%, respectively. More studies should be carried out to develop better ones. Effects of channel dimension and vapor quality on heat transfer are analyzed, and the results provide valuable information for further research in the correlation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels. PMID:23956695

  10. Simulation of air-droplet mixed phase flow in icing wind-tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengyao, Leng; Shinan, Chang; Menglong, Wu; Yunhang, Li

    2013-07-01

    Icing wind-tunnel is the main ground facility for the research of aircraft icing, which is different from normal wind-tunnel for its refrigeration system and spraying system. In stable section of icing wind-tunnel, the original parameters of droplets and air are different, for example, to keep the nozzles from freezing, the droplets are heated while the temperature of air is low. It means that complex mass and heat transfer as well as dynamic interactive force would happen between droplets and air, and the parameters of droplet will acutely change along the passageway. Therefore, the prediction of droplet-air mixed phase flow is necessary in the evaluation of icing researching wind-tunnel. In this paper, a simplified droplet-air mixed phase flow model based on Lagrangian method was built. The variation of temperature, diameter and velocity of droplet, as well as the air flow field, during the flow process were obtained under different condition. With calculating three-dimensional air flow field by FLUENT, the droplet could be traced and the droplet distribution could also be achieved. Furthermore, the patterns about how initial parameters affect the parameters in test section were achieved. The numerical simulation solving the flow and heat and mass transfer characteristics in the mixing process is valuable for the optimization of experimental parameters design and equipment adjustment.

  11. Subsurface heat flow in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Grant; Woodbury, Allan D.

    2004-02-01

    The subsurface temperature field beneath Winnipeg, Canada, is significantly different from that of the surrounding rural areas. Downward heat flow to depths as great as 130 m has been noted in some areas beneath the city and groundwater temperatures in a regional aquifer have risen by as much as 5°C in some areas. Numerical simulation of heat transport supports the conjecture that these temperature changes can be largely attributed to heat loss from buildings and the temperature at any given point is sensitive to the distance from and the age of any buildings. The effect is most noticable when buildings are closely spaced, which is typical of urban areas. Temperature measurements in areas more than a few hundred meters away from any heated structure were only a few tenths of a degree Celsius greater than those observed outside the city, suggesting that other reasons for increases in subsurface temperature, such as changes in surface cover or climate change, may be responsible for some of the some of the observed increase in temperatures. These sources of additional heat to the subsurface make it difficult to resolve information on past climates from temperatures measured in boreholes and monitoring wells. In some areas, the temperature increases may also have an impact on geothermal energy resources. This impact might be in the form of an increase in heat pump efficiency or in the case of the Winnipeg area, a decrease in the efficiency of direct use of groundwater for cooling.

  12. The Impact of Winter Heating on Air Pollution in China

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qingyang; Ma, Zongwei; Li, Shenshen; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Fossil-fuel combustion related winter heating has become a major air quality and public health concern in northern China recently. We analyzed the impact of winter heating on aerosol loadings over China using the MODIS-Aqua Collection 6 aerosol product from 2004–2012. Absolute humidity (AH) and planetary boundary layer height (PBL) -adjusted aerosol optical depth (AOD*) was constructed to reflect ground-level PM2.5 concentrations. GIS analysis, standard statistical tests, and statistical modeling indicate that winter heating is an important factor causing increased PM2.5 levels in more than three-quarters of central and eastern China. The heating season AOD* was more than five times higher as the non-heating season AOD*, and the increase in AOD* in the heating areas was greater than in the non-heating areas. Finally, central heating tend to contribute less to air pollution relative to other means of household heating. PMID:25629878

  13. Critical heat flux in subcooled flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, David Douglas

    The critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon was investigated for water flow in tubes with particular emphasis on the development of methods for predicting CHF in the subcooled flow boiling regime. The Purdue University Boiling and Two-Phase Flow Laboratory (PU-BTPFL) CHF database for water flow in a uniformly heated tube was compiled from the world literature dating back to 1949 and represents the largest CHF database ever assembled with 32,544 data points from over 100 sources. The superiority of this database was proven via a detailed examination of previous databases. The PU-BTPFL CHF database is an invaluable tool for the development of CHF correlations and mechanistic models that are superior to existing ones developed with smaller, less comprehensive CHF databases. In response to the many inaccurate and inordinately complex correlations, two nondimensional, subcooled CHF correlations were formulated, containing only five adjustable constants and whose unique functional forms were determined without using a statistical analysis but rather using the parametric trends observed in less than 10% of the subcooled CHF data. The correlation based on inlet conditions (diameter, heated length, mass velocity, pressure, inlet quality) was by far the most accurate of all known subcooled CHF correlations, having mean absolute and root-mean-square (RMS) errors of 10.3% and 14.3%, respectively. The outlet (local) conditions correlation was the most accurate correlation based on local CHF conditions (diameter, mass velocity, pressure, outlet quality) and may be used with a nonuniform axial heat flux. Both correlations proved more accurate than a recent CHF look-up table commonly employed in nuclear reactor thermal hydraulic computer codes. An interfacial lift-off, subcooled CHF model was developed from a consideration of the instability of the vapor-liquid interface and the fraction of heat required for liquid-vapor conversion as opposed to that for bulk liquid heating. Severe

  14. Heat flow diagnostics for helicon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Berisford, Daniel F.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Raja, Laxminarayan L.; Cassady, Leonard D.; Chancery, William J.

    2008-10-15

    We present experimental studies of power balance in an argon helicon discharge. An infrared camera measures the heating of the dielectric tube containing a helicon discharge based on measurement of temperature profiles of the tube surface before and after a rf pulse. Using this diagnostic, we have measured surface heating trends at a variety of operating conditions on two helicon systems: the 10 kW VASIMR VX-50 experiment and the University of Texas at Austin 1 kW helicon experiment. Power losses downstream from the antenna are measured using thermocouples and probes. The heating of the dielectric tube increases with decreasing magnetic fields, higher gas flow rates, and higher molecular mass of the gas. These preliminary results suggest that cross-field particle diffusion contributes a significant proportion of the energy flux to the wall.

  15. Decentralized and Tactical Air Traffic Flow Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertsimas, Dimitris; Odoni, Amedeo R.

    1997-01-01

    This project dealt with the following topics: 1. Review and description of the existing air traffic flow management system (ATFM) and identification of aspects with potential for improvement. 2. Identification and review of existing models and simulations dealing with all system segments (enroute, terminal area, ground) 3. Formulation of concepts for overall decentralization of the ATFM system, ranging from moderate decentralization to full decentralization 4. Specification of the modifications to the ATFM system required to accommodate each of the alternative concepts. 5. Identification of issues that need to be addressed with regard to: determination of the way the ATFM system would be operating; types of flow management strategies that would be used; and estimation of the effectiveness of ATFM with regard to reducing delay and re-routing costs. 6. Concept evaluation through identification of criteria and methodologies for accommodating the interests of stakeholders and of approaches to optimization of operational procedures for all segments of the ATFM system.

  16. Cold Heat Release Characteristics of Solidified Oil Droplet-Water Solution Latent Heat Emulsion by Air Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Morita, Shin-Ichi

    The present work investigates the cold heat-release characteristics of the solidified oil droplets (tetradecane, C14H30, freezing point 278.9 K)/water solution emulsion as a latent heat-storage material having a low melting point. An air bubbles-emulsion direct-contact heat exchange method is selected for the cold heat-results from the solidified oil droplet-emulsion layer. This type of direct-contact method results in the high thermal efficiency. The diameter of air bubbles in the emulsion increases as compared with that in the pure water. The air bubbles blown from a nozzle show a strong mixing behavior during rising in the emulsion. The temperature effectiveness, the sensible heat release time and the latent heat release time have been measured as experimental parameters. The useful nondimensional emulsion level equations for these parameters have been derived in terms of the nondimensional emalsion level expressed the emulsion layer dimensions, Reynolds number for air flow, Stefan number and heat capacity ratio.

  17. Heat transfer and pressure drop measurements in an air/molten salt direct-contact heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, M.S.

    1988-11-01

    This paper presents a comparison of experimental data with a recently published model of heat exchange in irrigated packed beds. Heat transfer and pressure drop were measured in a 150 mm (ID) column with a 610-mm bed of metal Pall rings. Molten nitrate salt and preheated air were the working fluids with a salt inlet temperature of approximately 440{degree}C and air inlet temperatures of approximately 230{degree}C. A comparison between the experimental data and the heat transfer model is made on the basis of heat transfer from the salt. For the range of air and salt flow rates tested, 0.3 to 1.2 kg/m{sup 2} s air flow and 6 to 18 kg/m{sup 2} s salt flow, the data agree with the model within 22% standard deviation. In addition, a model for the column pressure drop was validated, agreeing with the experimental data within 18% standard deviation over the range of column pressure drop from 40 to 1250 Pa/m. 25 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. AIR EMISSIONS FROM RESIDENTIAL HEATING: THE WOOD HEATING OPTION PUT INTO ENVIRONMENTAL PERSPECTIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper compares the national scale (rather than local) air quality impacts of the various residential space heating options. Specifically, it compares the relative contribution of the space heating options to fine particulate emissions, greenhouse gas emissions, and acid preci...

  19. Visualization of working fluid flow in gravity assisted heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, Milan

    2015-05-01

    Heat pipe is device working with phase changes of working fluid inside hermetically closed pipe at specific pressure. The phase changes of working fluid from fluid to vapor and vice versa help heat pipe to transport high heat flux. The article deal about construction and processes casing in heat pipe during operation. Experiment visualization of working fluid flow is performed with glass heat pipe filed with ethanol. The visualization of working fluid flow explains the phenomena as working fluid boiling, nucleation of bubbles, vapor flow, vapor condensation on the wall, vapor and condensate flow interaction, flow down condensate film thickness on the wall, occurred during the heat pipe operation.

  20. Flow characteristics and heat transfer in wavy walled channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Zachary; Shah, Tapan; Monts, Vontravis; Warey, Alok; Balestrino, Sandro; Alexeev, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    Using lattice Boltzmann simulations, we investigated the effects of wavy channel geometry on the flow and heat transfer within a parallel plate heat exchanger. We observed three distinct flow regimes that include steady flow with and without recirculation and unsteady time-periodic flow. We determined the critical Reynolds numbers at which the flow transitions between different flow regimes. To validate our computational results, we compared the simulated flow structures with the structures observed in a flowing soap film. Furthermore, we examine the effects of the wavy channel geometry on the heat transfer. We find that the unsteady flow regime drastically enhances the rate of heat transfer and show that heat exchangers with wavy walls outperform currently used heat exchangers with similar volume and power characteristics. Results from our study point to a simple and efficient method for increasing performance in compact heat exchangers.

  1. A solar air collector with integrated latent heat thermal storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charvat, Pavel; Ostry, Milan; Mauder, Tomas; Klimes, Lubomir

    2012-04-01

    Simulations of the behaviour of a solar air collector with integrated latent heat thermal storage were performed. The model of the collector was created with the use of coupling between TRNSYS 17 and MATLAB. Latent heat storage (Phase Change Material - PCM) was integrated with the solar absorber. The model of the latent heat storage absorber was created in MATLAB and the model of the solar air collector itself was created in TRNSYS with the use of TYPE 56. The model of the latent heat storage absorber allows specification of the PCM properties as well as other parameters. The simulated air collector was the front and back pass collector with the absorber in the middle of the air cavity. Two variants were considered for comparison; the light-weight absorber made of sheet metal and the heat-storage absorber with the PCM. Simulations were performed for the climatic conditions of the Czech Republic (using TMY weather data).

  2. Development of New Air-Cooled Heat Pump Chiller 'Compact Cube'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ookoshi, Yasushi; Ito, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Kato, Yohei; Ochiai, Yasutaka; Tanaka, Kosuke; Uji, Yoshihiro; Nakayama, Hiroshi

    Further improvement of the performance is requested to air-cooled heat pump chiller from the viewpoint of the global warming prevention. Smaller unit is needed to facilitate the renewal from absorption chiller to air-cooled heat pump chiller. To meet such needs, we developed compact new air-cooled heat pump chiller with high efficiency, 'Compact cube'. The developed machine is side-flow type with U-shaped fin and tube heat exchangers. With this structure, the uniform air velocity, high packed density of the heat exchangers, and the unit miniaturization have been implemented. The refrigeration cycle with two-evaporating temperature has also been implemented. The cooling COP of this cycle is 2% higher compared with conventional one-evaporating temperature cycle because of the rise of average evaporating temperature. In a new model, a new control system, which controls both capacity of compressors and air flow rate corresponding to heat load, has been implemented. As a result, the developed machine achieved IPLV(Integrated Part load Value) to 6.2(MCHV-P1800AE) which is 29% better than the conventional unit.

  3. Dynamic Flow Management Problems in Air Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Sarah Stock

    1997-01-01

    In 1995, over six hundred thousand licensed pilots flew nearly thirty-five million flights into over eighteen thousand U.S. airports, logging more than 519 billion passenger miles. Since demand for air travel has increased by more than 50% in the last decade while capacity has stagnated, congestion is a problem of undeniable practical significance. In this thesis, we will develop optimization techniques that reduce the impact of congestion on the national airspace. We start by determining the optimal release times for flights into the airspace and the optimal speed adjustment while airborne taking into account the capacitated airspace. This is called the Air Traffic Flow Management Problem (TFMP). We address the complexity, showing that it is NP-hard. We build an integer programming formulation that is quite strong as some of the proposed inequalities are facet defining for the convex hull of solutions. For practical problems, the solutions of the LP relaxation of the TFMP are very often integral. In essence, we reduce the problem to efficiently solving large scale linear programming problems. Thus, the computation times are reasonably small for large scale, practical problems involving thousands of flights. Next, we address the problem of determining how to reroute aircraft in the airspace system when faced with dynamically changing weather conditions. This is called the Air Traffic Flow Management Rerouting Problem (TFMRP) We present an integrated mathematical programming approach for the TFMRP, which utilizes several methodologies, in order to minimize delay costs. In order to address the high dimensionality, we present an aggregate model, in which we formulate the TFMRP as a multicommodity, integer, dynamic network flow problem with certain side constraints. Using Lagrangian relaxation, we generate aggregate flows that are decomposed into a collection of flight paths using a randomized rounding heuristic. This collection of paths is used in a packing integer

  4. Flow distribution in unglazed transpired plate solar air heaters of large area

    SciTech Connect

    Gunnewiek, L.H.; Brundrett, E.; Hollands, K.G.T.

    1996-10-01

    Unglazed transpired plate solar air heaters have proven to be effective in heating outside air on a once-through basis for ventilation and drying applications. Outside air is sucked through unglazed plates having uniformly distributed perforations. The air is drawn into a plenum behind the plate and then supplied to the application by fans. Large collectors have been built that cover the sides of sizable buildings, and the problem of designing the system so that the air is sucked uniformly everywhere (or nearly so) has proven to be a challenging one. This article describes an analytical tool that has been developed to predict the flow distribution over the collector. It is based on modelling the flow-field in the plenum by means of a commercial CFD (computational fluid mechanics) code, incorporating a special set of boundary conditions to model the plate and the ambient air. The article presents the 2D version of the code, and applies it to the problem of predicting the flow distribution in still air (no wind) conditions, a situation well treated by a 2D code. Results are presented for a wide range of conditions, and design implications are discussed. An interesting finding of the study is that the heat transfer at the back of the plate can play an important role, and because of this heat transfer, the efficiency of a collector in nonuniform flow can actually be greater than that of the same collector in uniform flow. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Geomechanical Fracturing with Flow and Heat

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-01-01

    The GeoFracFH model is a particle-based discrete element model (DEM) that has been coupled with fluid flow and heat conduction/convection. In this model, the rock matrix material is represented by a network of DEM particles connected by mechanical bonds (elastic beams in this case, see Figure 1, gray particles connected by beams). During the simulation process, the mechanical bonds that have been stretched or bent beyond a critical strain (both tensile and shear failures aremore » simulated) are broken and removed from the network in a progressive manner. Bonds can be removed from the network with rates or probabilities that depend on their stress or strain, or the properties of the discrete elements and bonds can be varied continuously to represent phenomena such as creep, strain hardening, and chemical degradation. The coupling of a DEM geomechanical model with models for Darcy flow and heat transport is also illustrated in Figure 1. Darcy flow and heat transport equations are solved on an underlying fixed finite difference grid with evolving porosity and permeability for each grid cell that depends on the local structure of the discrete element network (such as the DEM particle density). The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which then deforms and fractures the rock matrix. The deformation/fracturing in turn changes the permeability which again changes the evolution of fluid pressure, coupling the two phenomena. The intimate coupling between fracturing, fluid flow, and thermal transport makes the GeoFracFH model, rather than conventional continuum mechanical models, necessary for coupled hydro-thermal-mechanical problems in the subsurface.« less

  6. Two-phase gas-liquid flow characteristics inside a plate heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Nilpueng, Kitti; Wongwises, Somchai

    2010-11-15

    In the present study, the air-water two-phase flow characteristics including flow pattern and pressure drop inside a plate heat exchanger are experimentally investigated. A plate heat exchanger with single pass under the condition of counter flow is operated for the experiment. Three stainless steel commercial plates with a corrugated sinusoidal shape of unsymmetrical chevron angles of 55 and 10 are utilized for the pressure drop measurement. A transparent plate having the same configuration as the stainless steel plates is cast and used as a cover plate in order to observe the flow pattern inside the plate heat exchanger. The air-water mixture flow which is used as a cold stream is tested in vertical downward and upward flow. The results from the present experiment show that the annular-liquid bridge flow pattern appeared in both upward and downward flows. However, the bubbly flow pattern and the slug flow pattern are only found in upward flow and downward flow, respectively. The variation of the water and air velocity has a significant effect on the two-phase pressure drop. Based on the present data, a two-phase multiplier correlation is proposed for practical application. (author)

  7. Apparatus and method for generating large mass flow of high temperature air at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabol, A. P.; Stewart, R. B. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    High temperature, high mass air flow and a high Reynolds number test air flow in the Mach number 8-10 regime of adequate test flow duration is attained by pressurizing a ceramic-lined storage tank with air to a pressure of about 100 to 200 atmospheres. The air is heated to temperatures of 7,000 to 8,000 R prior to introduction into the tank by passing the air over an electric arc heater means. The air cools to 5,500 to 6,000 R while in the tank. A decomposable gas such as nitrous oxide or a combustible gas such as propane is injected into the tank after pressurization and the heated pressurized air in the tank is rapidly released through a Mach number 8-10 nozzle. The injected gas medium upon contact with the heated pressurized air effects an exothermic reaction which maintains the pressure and temperature of the pressurized air during the rapid release.

  8. A coupled heat and water flow apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.M.O.; Caporouscio, F.; Yong, R.N. ); Cheung, C.H. ); Kjartanson, B.H. )

    1993-03-01

    Safe and permanent disposal of radioactive waste requires isolation of a number of diverse chemical elements form the environment. The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is assessing the concept of disposing of waste in a vault excavated at a depth of 500 to 1000 m below the ground surface in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The temperatures and hydraulic potential in the buffer and back fill material were investigated. To study the performance of a compacted buffer material under thermal and isothermal conditions, a coupled heat and water flow apparatus is designed and presented. In the preliminary design, a one-dimensional flow of heat and water was not achieved. however, control of temperature gradient, existence of one-dimensional flow, and uniformity of temperature and volumetric water content distributions at any cross section within the specimen are achieved in the modified design. Experimental results have shown that the temperature stabilizes very rapidly after a period of approximately 0. 107 days. The moisture moves away from the hot end along the longitudinal direction of the specimen due to imposed thermal gradient. The time required for moisture to stabilize is in order of days. 17 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. 2-Phase Fluid Flow & Heat Transport

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-03-13

    GEOTHER is a three-dimensional, geothermal reservoir simulation code. The model describes heat transport and flow of a single component, two-phase fluid in porous media. It is based on the continuity equations for steam and water, which are reduced to two nonlinear partial differential equations in which the dependent variables are fluid pressure and enthalpy. GEOTHER can be used to simulate the fluid-thermal interaction in rock that can be approximated by a porous media representation. Itmore » can simulate heat transport and the flow of compressed water, two-phase mixtures, and superheated steam in porous media over a temperature range of 10 to 300 degrees C. In addition, it can treat the conversion from single to two-phase flow, and vice versa. It can be used for evaluation of a near repository spatial scale and a time scale of a few years to thousands of years. The model can be used to investigate temperature and fluid pressure changes in response to thermal loading by waste materials.« less

  10. Changes in air flow patterns using surfactants and thickeners during air sparging: Bench-scale experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Juyoung; Kim, Heonki; Annable, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Air injected into an aquifer during air sparging normally flows upward according to the pressure gradients and buoyancy, and the direction of air flow depends on the natural hydrogeologic setting. In this study, a new method for controlling air flow paths in the saturated zone during air sparging processes is presented. Two hydrodynamic parameters, viscosity and surface tension of the aqueous phase in the aquifer, were altered using appropriate water-soluble reagents distributed before initiating air sparging. Increased viscosity retarded the travel velocity of the air front during air sparging by modifying the viscosity ratio. Using a one-dimensional column packed with water-saturated sand, the velocity of air intrusion into the saturated region under a constant pressure gradient was inversely proportional to the viscosity of the aqueous solution. The air flow direction, and thus the air flux distribution was measured using gaseous flux meters placed at the sand surface during air sparging experiments using both two-, and three-dimensional physical models. Air flow was found to be influenced by the presence of an aqueous patch of high viscosity or suppressed surface tension in the aquifer. Air flow was selective through the low-surface tension (46.5 dyn/cm) region, whereas an aqueous patch of high viscosity (2.77 cP) was as an effective air flow barrier. Formation of a low-surface tension region in the target contaminated zone in the aquifer, before the air sparging process is inaugurated, may induce air flow through the target zone maximizing the contaminant removal efficiency of the injected air. In contrast, a region with high viscosity in the air sparging influence zone may minimize air flow through the region prohibiting the region from de-saturating.

  11. Revised lunar heat-flow values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langseth, M. G.; Keihm, S. J.; Peters, K.

    1976-01-01

    The 3.5- and 2-year subsurface temperature histories at the Apollo 15 and 17 heat-flow sites have been analyzed, and the results yield significantly lower thermal conductivity determinations than the results of previous short-term experiments. The thermal conductivity determined by probes at a depth of about 150 cm and 250 cm lies in the range 0.9-1.3 times 10 to the -4th W/cm K. On the basis of measurements of variations of surface thorium abundance and inferred crustal thicknesses, the average global heat flux is estimated to be about 1.8 microwatts/sq cm. This requires a uranium concentration of 46 ppb.

  12. The contrast model method for the thermodynamical calculation of air-air wet heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiugan; Mei, Fang

    1989-02-01

    The 'contrast model' method thermodynamic calculation of air-air crossflow wet heat exchangers with initial air condensation is presented. Contrast-model equations are derived from the actual heat exchanger equations as well as imaginary ones; it is then possible to proceed to a proof that the enthalpy efficiency of the contrast model equations is similar to the temperature efficiency of the dry heat exchanger. Conditions are noted under which it becomes possible to unify thermodynamic calculations for wet and dry heat exchangers.

  13. Laser ignition of hypersonic air-hydrogen flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brieschenk, S.; Kleine, H.; O'Byrne, S.

    2013-09-01

    An experimental investigation of the behaviour of laser-induced ignition in a hypersonic air-hydrogen flow is presented. A compression-ramp model with port-hole injection, fuelled with hydrogen gas, is used in the study. The experiments were conducted in the T-ADFA shock tunnel using a flow condition with a specific total enthalpy of 2.5 MJ/kg and a freestream velocity of 2 km/s. This study is the first comprehensive laser spark study in a hypersonic flow and demonstrates that laser-induced ignition at the fuel-injection site can be effective in terms of hydroxyl production. A semi-empirical method to estimate the conditions in the laser-heated gas kernel is presented in the paper. This method uses blast-wave theory together with an expansion-wave model to estimate the laser-heated gas conditions. The spatially averaged conditions found with this approach are matched to enthalpy curves generated using a standard chemical equilibrium code (NASA CEA). This allows us to account for differences that are introduced due to the idealised description of the blast wave, the isentropic expansion wave as well as thermochemical effects.

  14. Underworld and multi-basin heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quenette, S. M.; O'Neill, C.; Moresi, L. N.; Danis, C. R.; Mansour, J.

    2011-12-01

    We present an over arching method for non-linear heat flow assessments of large, multi-basin systems. Our example is the Sydney-, Gunnedah-, Bowen basins (Danis et al 2011), which covers an area of 800kms by 1900kms and depth of 5kms, on the east coast of Australia. It is used as a baseline towards further fluid and structural geodynamics oriented analysis. In contrast to reservoir scale geothermal models - basin, multi-basin and towards lithosphere scale models exhibit their own challenges in terms of physical/rheological behaviour and computational tractability. For instance we model a non-linear heat flow by means of temperature dependent conductivity, as indicated by Clauser and Huenges (1995), which allows crystalline basement rocks, such as granites, to show for example a significant decrease in conductivity from ambient temperature up to around 400C, dropping from around 3 mK**(units) to around 2. For this modelling, a specialisation of the geodynamics code 'Underworld' (Moresi et al 2007) called Underworld-GT is used. A toolbox is added to the otherwise un-touched Underworld code adding geothermal workflow and context to Underworld. A particular novel feature is the ability to load stratigraphic layers, and/or GoCAD or GeoModeller voxel sets as the constraining geological geometry, whilst allowing the heat assessment models to scale from 1 process to 1000s. Another is the ability to prescribe synthetic drill holes, and its use in stochastic-oriented assessments of model parameters. Following the Underworld platform's approach and its simple PDE abstraction layer, these model configurations from a baseline for further additions to the governing equations such as fluid flow and structure, enabling a bridge between reservoir and continental scale dynamics, albeit with their own computational challenges.

  15. Self-defrosting recuperative air-to-air heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Drake, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    A heat exchanger includes a stationary spirally or concentrically wound heat exchanger core with rotating baffles on upper and lower ends thereof. The rotating baffles include rotating inlets and outlets which are in communication with respective fixed inlets and outlets via annuli. The rotation of the baffles causes a concurrent rotation of the temperature distribution within the stationary exchanger core, thereby preventing frost build-up in some applications and preventing the formation of hot spots in other applications.

  16. Non-fouling heat exchanger preheats plant make-up air: saves $13,000 in first year

    SciTech Connect

    Goss, J.

    1980-08-01

    Air exchanges to maintain a comfortable working environment at Gates Rubber Company in Denver, Colorado, involves general exhaust from V-belt vulcanization lines. A ventilation system without heat recovery or make-up air heaters had been in use, but the goal of the company was to install a sytem that could handle normal plant exhaust air without filtration and involve little or no mechanization. A counter-flow, air-to-air heat exchanger having no moving parts has been used successfully to recover heat from many dirty industrial process exhausts. Heat recovery efficiencies range from 50 to 80%. Four heat exchangers, arranged in parallel, were installed in one of the 30,000 scfm exhaust/make-up air systems at the Denver plant and savings amounted to $13,000 the first year.

  17. Balloons and Bottles: Activities on Air-Sea Heat Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphree, Tom

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity designed to demonstrate how heating and cooling an air mass affects its temperature, volume, density, and pressure. Illustrates how thermal energy can cause atmospheric motion such as expansion, contraction, and winds. (Author/WRM)

  18. Snow distribution and heat flow in the taiga

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, M. )

    1992-05-01

    The trees of the taiga intercept falling snow and cause it to become distributed in an uneven fashion. Around aspen and birch, cone-shaped accumulations form. Beneath large spruce trees, the snow cover is depleted, forming a bowl-shaped depression called a tree well. Small spruce trees become covered with snow, creating cavities that funnel cold air to the snow/ground interface. The depletion of snow under large spruce trees results in greater heat loss from the ground. A finite difference model suggests that heat flow from tree wells can be more than twice that of undisturbed snow. In forested watersheds, this increase can be a significant percentage of the total winter energy exchange.

  19. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry air and air/water vapor mixtures in the same forced convection cooling test rig (jet array impingement configurations) with mass ratios of water vapor to air up to 0.23. The primary objective was to verify by direct experiment that selected existing methods for evaluation of viscosity and thermal conductivity of air/water vapor mixtures could be used with confidence to predict heat transfer coefficients for such mixtures using as a basis heat transfer data for dry air only. The property evaluation methods deemed most appropriate require as a basis a measured property value at one mixture composition in addition to the property values for the pure components.

  20. CFD numerical simulation of air natural convection over a heated cylindrical surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flori, M.; Vîlceanu, L.

    2015-06-01

    In this study a CFD numerical simulation is used to describe the fluid flow and heat transfer in air surrounding a heated horizontal cylinder. The model is created in 2D space dimension involving a finite element solver of Navier-Stokes equations. As natural convection phenomenon is induced by a variable fluid density field with temperature rising, the Boussinesq approximation was coupled to the model.

  1. Improving Air-Conditioner and Heat Pump Modeling (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, J.

    2012-03-01

    A new approach to modeling residential air conditioners and heat pumps allows users to model systems by specifying only the more readily-available SEER/EER/HSPF-type metrics. Manufacturer data was used to generate full sets of model inputs for over 450 heat pumps and air conditioners. A sensitivity analysis identified which inputs can be safely defaulted 'behind-the-scenes' without negatively impacting the reliability of energy simulations.

  2. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Flow Properties of Supersonic Helium-Air Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven A. E.; Veltin, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Heated high speed subsonic and supersonic jets operating on- or off-design are a source of noise that is not yet fully understood. Helium-air mixtures can be used in the correct ratio to simulate the total temperature ratio of heated air jets and hence have the potential to provide inexpensive and reliable flow and acoustic measurements. This study presents a combination of flow measurements of helium-air high speed jets and numerical simulations of similar helium-air mixture and heated air jets. Jets issuing from axisymmetric convergent and convergent-divergent nozzles are investigated, and the results show very strong similarity with heated air jet measurements found in the literature. This demonstrates the validity of simulating heated high speed jets with helium-air in the laboratory, together with the excellent agreement obtained in the presented data between the numerical predictions and the experiments. The very close match between the numerical and experimental data also validates the frozen chemistry model used in the numerical simulation.

  3. Heat Transfer and Hydraulic Flow Resistance for Streams of High Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lelchuk, V. L.

    1943-01-01

    Problems of hydraulic flow resistance and heat transfer for streams with velocities comparable with acoustic have present great importance for various fields of technical science. Especially, they have great importance for the field of heat transfer in designing and constructing boilers.of the "Velox" type. In this article a description of experiments and their results as regards definition of the laws of heat transfer in differential form for high velocity air streams inside smooth tubes are given.

  4. The effect of asymmetric heating on flow stability and heat transfer for flow in a vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Tappan, C.H.

    1987-11-01

    This study presents experimental results of combined free and forced convection heat transfer in a vertical tube with a circumferentially nonuniform constant wall heat flux. The effect of an asymmetric wall heat flux on flow stability and on the rate of heat transfer for water flowing downward in a vertical tube was investigated. Experimental results were used to develop two stability maps which identify various flow regimes, corresponding to different thermal and hydraulic conditions. Heat transfer coefficients were also determined. Experimental results in the present investigation were compared to those with uniform heating in horizontal and vertical tube flow situations discussed in the literature. 23 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Dry/wet performance of a plate-fin air-cooled heat exchanger with continuous corrugated fins

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, S.G.; Kreid, D.K.; Johnson, B.M.

    1981-01-01

    The performance and operating characteristics of a plate-fin heat exchanger in dry/wet or deluge operations was experimentally determined. Development of the deluge heat/mass transfer model continued. The experiments were conducted in a specially-designed wind tunnel at the PNL. Air that was first heated and humidified to specified conditions was circulated at a controlled rate through a 2 ft x 6 ft heat exchanger module. The heat exchanger used in the tests was a wavy surface, plate fin on tube configuration. Hot water was circulated through the tubes at high flow rates to maintain an essentially isothermal condition on the tube side. Deionized water sprayed on the top of the vertically oriented plate fins was collected at the bottom of the core and recirculated. Instrumentation was provided for measurement of flow rates and thermodynamic conditions in the air, in the core circulation water, and in the deluge water. Measurements of the air side pressure drop and heat rejection rate were made as a function of air flow rate, air inlet temperature and humidity, deluge water flow rate, and the core inclination from the vertical. An overall heat transfer coefficient and an effective deluge film convective coefficient was determined. The deluge model, for predicting heat transfer from a wet finned heat exchanger was further developed and refined, and a major extension of the model was formulated that permits simultaneous calculation of both the heat transfer and evaporation rates from the wetted surface. The experiments showed an increase in the heat rejection rate due to wetting, accompanied by a proportional increase in the air side pressure drop. For operation at the same air side pressure drop, the enhancement ratio Q/sub w//Q/sub d/ varied between 2 and 5 for the conditions tested. Thus, the potential enhancement of heat transfer due to wetting can be substantial.

  6. Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This task list is intended for use in planning and/or evaluating a competency-based course in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. The guide outlines the tasks entailed in eight different duties typically required of employees in the following occupations: residential installer, domestic refrigeration technician, air conditioning and…

  7. Residential Heat and Air Conditioning. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of South Florida, Tampa. Dept. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    The program guide for residential heat and air conditioning courses in Florida identifies primary considerations for the organization, operation, and evaluation of a vocational education program. Following an occupational description for the job title for air-conditioning installer-servicer, window unit, and its Dictionary of Occupational Titles…

  8. Self-defrosting recuperative air-to-air heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Drake, R.L.

    1993-12-28

    A heat exchanger is described which includes a stationary spirally or concentrically wound heat exchanger core with rotating baffles on upper and lower ends thereof. The rotating baffles include rotating inlets and outlets which are in communication with respective fixed inlets and outlets via annuli. The rotation of the baffles causes a concurrent rotation of the temperature distribution within the stationary exchanger core, thereby preventing frost build-up in some applications and preventing the formation of hot spots in other applications. 3 figures.

  9. Thaw flow control for liquid heat transport systems

    DOEpatents

    Kirpich, Aaron S.

    1989-01-01

    In a liquid metal heat transport system including a source of thaw heat for use in a space reactor power system, the thaw flow throttle or control comprises a fluid passage having forward and reverse flow sections and a partition having a plurality of bleed holes therein to enable fluid flow between the forward and reverse sections. The flow throttle is positioned in the system relatively far from the source of thaw heat.

  10. Coupled flow, thermal and structural analysis of aerodynamically heated panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Dechaumphai, Pramote

    1986-01-01

    A finite element approach to coupling flow, thermal and structural analyses of aerodynamically heated panels is presented. The Navier-Stokes equations for laminar compressible flow are solved together with the energy equation and quasi-static structural equations of the panel. Interactions between the flow, panel heat transfer and deformations are studied for thin stainless steel panels aerodynamically heated by Mach 6.6 flow.

  11. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF AIR FLOW MEASUREMENT METHODS FOR RESIDENTIAL HVAC RETURNS

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-02-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The series of tests performed measured air flow using a range of techniques and devices. The measured air flows were compared to reference air flow measurements using inline air flow meters built into the test apparatus. The experimental results showed that some devices had reasonable results (typical errors of 5 percent or less) but others had much bigger errors (up to 25 percent). Because manufacturers’ accuracy estimates for their equipment do not include many of the sources of error found in actual field measurements (and replicated in the laboratory testing in this study) it is essential for a test method that could be used to determine the actual uncertainty in this specific application. The study team prepared a draft test method through ASTM International to determine the uncertainty of air flow measurements at residential heating ventilation and air conditioning returns and other terminals. This test method, when finalized, can be used by the Energy Commission and other entities to specify required accuracy of measurement devices used to show compliance with standards.

  12. Solid oxide fuel cell power plant having a fixed contact oxidation catalyzed section of a multi-section cathode air heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Saito, Kazuo; Lin, Yao

    2015-02-17

    The multi-section cathode air heat exchanger (102) includes at least a first heat exchanger section (104), and a fixed contact oxidation catalyzed section (126) secured adjacent each other in a stack association. Cool cathode inlet air flows through cool air channels (110) of the at least first (104) and oxidation catalyzed sections (126). Hot anode exhaust flows through hot air channels (124) of the oxidation catalyzed section (126) and is combusted therein. The combusted anode exhaust then flows through hot air channels (112) of the first section (104) of the cathode air heat exchanger (102). The cool and hot air channels (110, 112) are secured in direct heat exchange relationship with each other so that temperatures of the heat exchanger (102) do not exceed 800.degree. C. to minimize requirements for using expensive, high-temperature alloys.

  13. Experimental And Analytical Study Of Heat Transfer And Fluid Flow Through Aluminum Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancin, Simone; Zilio, Claudio; Rossetto, Luisa; Cavallini, Alberto

    2010-05-01

    This paper aims at investigating the air heat transfer and fluid flow through eight Aluminum open cell foam samples with different number of pores per linear inch (PPI ranging between 5 and 40), almost constant porosity (around 0.92-0.93) and different foam core heights (20 and 40 mm). The experimental heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop measurements have been collected in a test rig built at Dipartimento di Fisica Tecnica of the University of Padova. Three different heat fluxes have been imposed: 25.0, 32.5 and 40.0 kW m-2 and the air mass flow rate has been varied between 0.005 and 0.025 kg s-1, with air approach velocity between 2 and 5 m s-1. The effect of the foam height on the heat transfer has been experimentally analysed. Finally, the pressure drop measurements have been compared against an analytical model suggested in the open literature.

  14. Femtosecond laser flow tagging in non-air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yibin; Calvert, Nathan

    2015-11-01

    The Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging (FLEET) [Michael, J. B. et al., Applied optics, 50(26), 2011] method is studied in nitrogen-containing gaseous flows. The underlying mechanism behind the FLEET process is the dissociation of molecular nitrogen into atomic nitrogen, which produces long-lived florescence as the nitrogen atoms recombine. Spectra and images of the resulting tagged line provide insight into the effects of different atmospheric gases on the FLEET process. The ionization cross-section, conductivity and energy states of the gaseous particles are each brought into consideration. These experiments demonstrate the feasibility for long-lived flow tagging on the order of hundreds of microseconds in non-air environments. Of particular interest are the enhancement of the FLEET signal with the addition of argon gas, and the non-monotonic quenching effect of oxygen on the length, duration and intensity of the resulting signal and spectra. FLEET is characterized in number of different atmospheric gases, including that simulating Mar's atmospheric composition.

  15. Determination of forced convective heat transfer coefficients for subsonic flows over heated asymmetric NANA 4412 airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dag, Yusuf

    Forced convection over traditional surfaces such as flat plate, cylinder and sphere have been well researched and documented. Data on forced convection over airfoil surfaces, however, remain very scanty in literature. High altitude vehicles that employ airfoils as lifting surfaces often suffer leading edge ice accretions which have tremendous negative consequences on the lifting capabilities and stability of the vehicle. One of the ways of mitigating the effect of ice accretion involves judicious leading edge convective cooling technique which in turn depends on the accuracy of convective heat transfer coefficient used in the analysis. In this study empirical investigation of convective heat transfer measurements on asymmetric airfoil is presented at different angle of attacks ranging from 0° to 20° under subsonic flow regime. The top and bottom surface temperatures are measured at given points using Senflex hot film sensors (Tao System Inc.) and used to determine heat transfer characteristics of the airfoils. The model surfaces are subjected to constant heat fluxes using KP Kapton flexible heating pads. The monitored temperature data are then utilized to determine the heat convection coefficients modelled empirically as the Nusselt Number on the surface of the airfoil. The experimental work is conducted in an open circuit-Eiffel type wind tunnel, powered by a 37 kW electrical motor that is able to generate subsonic air velocities up to around 41 m/s in the 24 square-inch test section. The heat transfer experiments have been carried out under constant heat flux supply to the asymmetric airfoil. The convective heat transfer coefficients are determined from measured surface temperature and free stream temperature and investigated in the form of Nusselt number. The variation of Nusselt number is shown with Reynolds number at various angles of attacks. It is concluded that Nusselt number increases with increasing Reynolds number and increase in angle of attack from 0

  16. Visualization of heat transfer for impinging swirl flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bakirci, K.; Bilen, K.

    2007-10-15

    The objective of the experimental study was to visualize the temperature distribution and evaluate heat transfer rate on the impingement surface kept at a constant wall temperature boundary condition for the swirling (SIJ), multi-channel (MCIJ) and conventional impinging jet (CIJ) using liquid crystal technique. The swirling jet assembly consisted of a housing tube and a solid swirl generator insert which had four narrow slots machined on its surface. The swirl angle, {theta}, was set as 0 , 22.5 , 41 , 50 to change the direction and strength of the swirl in the air flow exiting the housing tube. The local Nusselt numbers of the MCIJ ({theta} = 0 ) were generally much higher than those of CIJ and SIJs. As the swirl angle increased, the radial uniformity of the heat transfer was seen compared to MCIJ and SIJ; the best results were for {theta} = 50 and the jet-to-surface distance of H/D = 14. The location of the distance of the maximum heat transfer for the swirl angles of {theta} = 41 and 50 was shifted away from the stagnation point in a radial distance of nearly r/D = 2.5. Increasing Reynolds number for same swirler angle increased the heat transfer rate on the entire surface, and increased saddle shape heat transfer distribution on the surface, but had no significant effect on the position of the individual impingement regions, but increased saddle shape heat transfer distribution on the surface. The lower Reynolds number (Re = 10 000) and the highest H/D = 14 gave much more uniform local and average heat transfer distribution on the surface, but decreased their values on the entire surface. (author)

  17. A Study on the Air flow outside Ambient Vaporizer Fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, G.; Lee, T.; Jeong, H.; Chung, H.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we interpreted Fog's Fluid that appear in the Ambient Vaporizer and predict the point of change Air to Fog. We interpreted using Analysis working fluid was applied to LNG and Air. We predict air flow when there is chill of LNG in the air Temperature and that makes fog. Also, we interpreted based on Summer and Winter criteria in the air temperature respectively. Finally, we can check the speed of the fog when fog excreted.

  18. Flow and heat transfer characteristics of orthogonally rotating channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Hiroshi

    1991-12-01

    Numerical analysis was conducted to predict the centripetal buoyant effect on flow and heat transfer characteristics in a channel rotating about a perpendicular axis. The conditions were assumed to be laminar, fully developed, and uniform heat flux. Calculation were conducted both for radially outward flow from the rotating axis and radially inward flow. The calculated results indicated that for radially outward flow buoyancy decreases the suction side friction and heat transfer while increasing pressure side friction and heat transfer. This trends were reversed for radially inward flow.

  19. One dimensional lunar ash flow with and without heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, S. I.; Hsieh, T.

    1971-01-01

    The characteristics of lunar ash flow are discussed in terms of the two phase flow theory of a mixture of a gas and small solid particles. A model is developed to present the fundamental equations and boundary conditions. Numerical solutions for special ash flow with and without heat transfer are presented. In the case of lunar ash flow with small initial velocity, the effect of the heat transfer makes the whole layer of ash flow more compacted together than the corresponding isothermal case.

  20. Air pollution control and heat recovery system for industrial ovens

    SciTech Connect

    Jamaluddin, A.A.

    1980-12-30

    A system of air pollution control and heat recovery is provided for an arrangement of industrial ovens, especially for drum manufacture. A plurality of paint bake ovens of various capacities, lengths and heat input are provided for multi-stage processing in the manufacture of drums and lids therefor. A supply of high temperature water is provided for multi-stage cleaning and rinsing in the manufacturing operation. The combined exhaust from the oven is preheated in a heat exchanger and then all of the combustible components are burnt off by passing through the flames of an incinerator grid burner. The effluent from the burner first passes through the heat exchanger to preheat said oven exhaust gases and then through hot water coils to provide all of the necessary hot water for the system. High pressure hot water (275/sup 0/) is provided in this heat exchange operation. The hot gasses from the last heat exchanger, completely free of combustible contaminates, are mixed with fresh air to supply hot air for the dryers used in the process. There is a substantially complete recovery of heat and the gasses discharged to atmosphere meet air quality standards.

  1. Performance evaluation of a selected three-ton air-to-air heat pump in the heating mode

    SciTech Connect

    Domingorena, A.A.; Ball, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    An air-to-air split system residential heat pump of nominal three-ton capacity was instrumented and tested in the heating mode under laboratory conditions. This was the second of a planned series of experiments to obtain a data base of system and component performance for heat pumps. The system was evaluated under both steady-state and frosting-defrosting conditions; sensitivity of the system performance to variations in the refrigerant charge was measured. From the steady-state tests, the heating capacity and coefficient of performance were computed, and evaluations were made of the performance parameters of the fan and fan motor units, the heat exchangers and refrigerant metering device, and the compressor. System heat losses were analyzed. The frosting-defrosting tests allowed the observation of system and component performance under dynamic conditions, and measurement of performance degradation under frosting conditions.

  2. Heat Transfer Characteristics of Liquid-Gas Taylor Flows incorporating Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.; Walsh, P. A.

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the heat transfer characteristics associated with liquid-gas Taylor flows in mini channels incorporating microencapsulated phase change materials (MPCM). Taylor flows have been shown to result in heat transfer enhancements due to the fluid recirculation experienced within liquid slugs which is attributable to the alternating liquid slug and gas bubble flow structure. Microencapsulated phase change materials (MPCM) also offer significant potential with increased thermal capacity due to the latent heat required to cause phase change. The primary aim of this work was to examine the overall heat transfer potential associated with combining these two novel liquid cooling technologies. By investigating the local heat transfer characteristics, the augmentation/degradation over single phase liquid cooling was quantified while examining the effects of dimensionless variables, including Reynolds number, liquid slug length and gas void fraction. An experimental test facility was developed which had a heated test section and allowed MPCM-air Taylor flows to be subjected to a constant heat flux boundary condition. Infrared thermography was used to record high resolution experimental wall temperature measurements and determine local heat transfer coefficients from the thermal entrance point. 30.2% mass particle concentration of the MPCM suspension fluid was examined as it provided the maximum latent heat for absorption. Results demonstrate a significant reduction in experimental wall temperatures associated with MPCM-air Taylor flows when compared with the Graetz solution for conventional single phase coolants. Total enhancement in the thermally developed region is observed to be a combination of the individual contributions due to recirculation within the liquid slugs and also absorption of latent heat. Overall, the study highlights the potential heat transfer enhancements that are attainable within heat exchange devices employing MPCM

  3. The transference of heat from a hot plate to an air stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elias, Franz

    1931-01-01

    The object of the present study was to define experimentally the field of temperature and velocity in a heated flat plate when exposed to an air stream whose direction is parallel to it, then calculate therefrom the heat transference and the friction past the flat plate, and lastly, compare the test data with the mathematical theory. To ensure comparable results, we were to actually obtain or else approximate: a) two-dimensional flow; b) constant plate temperature in the direction of the stream. To approximate the flow in two dimensions, we chose a relatively wide plate and measured the velocity and temperature in the median plane.

  4. Heat transfer in serpentine flow passages with rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, S.; Takamura, J.; Yamawaki, S.; Yang, Wen-Jei

    1992-06-01

    Results are reported of an experimental study tracing heat transfer performance in a rotating serpentine flow passage of a square cross section. The test section is preceded by a hydrodynamic calming region. The test model is a blow-up (by seven times) of actual winding flow passages in rotor blades. It is concluded that the flow in the 180-deg bends exhibits strong 3D structure. The heat transfer coefficient in the bend is substantially higher than in the straight flow passages. The average heat transfer characteristics over the entire flow passage is greatly affected by flow at the 180-deg bends. Due to secondary flow induced by the Coriolis force, the heat transfer coefficient in the radially outward flow passages diminish on the leading surface, but increase on the trailing surface, with an increase in rotational speed. The trend is reversed in the radially inward flow passages.

  5. Heat flow in the postquasistatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Mueller, B.; Peralta, C.; Barreto, W.; Rosales, L.

    2010-08-15

    We apply the postquasistatic approximation to study the evolution of spherically symmetric fluid distributions undergoing dissipation in the form of radial heat flow. For a model that corresponds to an incompressible fluid departing from the static equilibrium, it is not possible to go far from the initial state after the emission of a small amount of energy. Initially collapsing distributions of matter are not permitted. Emission of energy can be considered as a mechanism to avoid the collapse. If the distribution collapses initially and emits one hundredth of the initial mass only the outermost layers evolve. For a model that corresponds to a highly compressed Fermi gas, only the outermost shell can evolve with a shorter hydrodynamic time scale.

  6. Heat transfer analysis for high temperature preheated air combustion in furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, H.; Arai, N.; Kudo, K.; Aoki, K.

    1998-07-01

    The high temperature preheated air combustion system has been recently developed and techniques of heat transfer analysis pose important problems in its application to the industrial field. The three-dimensional simulation has to be introduced, therefore, for the above heat transfer analysis with combustion, fluid flow and heat transfer. Another effort may be introduced to reduce the computing time of heat transfer analysis by means of some simplification in software of chemical simulation, etc. If one has introduced the application of the high temperature preheated air combustion technique in natural gas firing, the non-gray radiation should be applied to each radiant gas of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CO or CH{sub 4}, in this analysis. Finally, the authors would like to refer the inverse computation of radiation heat transfer in furnace which has been proposed by one of the authors and another researcher in the United States. If one tries to estimate the performance of an industrial furnace, the heat flux on heating material is the most important factor which has been fixed as input data of computation. Therefore, the heat transfer analysis may be sometimes reversed by fixed data of heat flux and proceeded by trial and error method, in order to obtain the initial condition of heat source and furnace facilities.

  7. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter. 1065.225 Section 1065.225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225...

  8. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter. 1065.225 Section 1065.225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225...

  9. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter. 1065.225 Section 1065.225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225...

  10. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter. 1065.225 Section 1065.225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225...

  11. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter. 1065.225 Section 1065.225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225...

  12. Heat transfer optimization for air-mist cooling between a stack of parallel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, Roy J.

    2010-06-01

    A theoretical model is developed to predict the upper limit heat transfer between a stack of parallel plates subject to multiphase cooling by air-mist flow. The model predicts the optimal separation distance between the plates based on the development of the boundary layers for small and large separation distances, and for dilute mist conditions. Simulation results show the optimal separation distance to be strongly dependent on the liquid-to-air mass flow rate loading ratio, and reach a limit for a critical loading. For these dilute spray conditions, complete evaporation of the droplets takes place. Simulation results also show the optimal separation distance decreases with the increase in the mist flow rate. The proposed theoretical model shall lead to a better understanding of the design of fins spacing in heat exchangers where multiphase spray cooling is used.

  13. Particle displacement tracking applied to air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1991-01-01

    Electronic Particle Image Velocimeter (PIV) techniques offer many advantages over conventional photographic PIV methods such as fast turn around times and simplified data reduction. A new all electronic PIV technique was developed which can measure high speed gas velocities. The Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT) technique employs a single cw laser, small seed particles (1 micron), and a single intensified, gated CCD array frame camera to provide a simple and fast method of obtaining two-dimensional velocity vector maps with unambiguous direction determination. Use of a single CCD camera eliminates registration difficulties encountered when multiple cameras are used to obtain velocity magnitude and direction information. An 80386 PC equipped with a large memory buffer frame-grabber board provides all of the data acquisition and data reduction operations. No array processors of other numerical processing hardware are required. Full video resolution (640x480 pixel) is maintained in the acquired images, providing high resolution video frames of the recorded particle images. The time between data acquisition to display of the velocity vector map is less than 40 sec. The new electronic PDT technique is demonstrated on an air nozzle flow with velocities less than 150 m/s.

  14. Analysis of parameters of air passing through the rain zone in a cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, Lukáš; Čížek, Jan; Nožička, Jiří

    2015-05-01

    The research in the field of cooling towers shows that a rigorous determination of each parameter of air passing through areas with water drops is increasingly important. The transfer of heat, mass and momentum is represented, on the side of the air, as temperature and humidity increase and static pressure decrease due to the interaction between the flowing air and falling drops. The present article focuses on the description of the experimental setup allowing the measurement of these parameters on both the air and the water side, and possible ways to analyze measured values.

  15. Rapid heat-flowing surveying of geothermal areas, utilizing individual snowfalls as calorimeters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Donald E.

    1969-01-01

    Local differences in rate of heat transfer in vapor and by conduction through the ground in hot spring areas are difficult and time-consuming to measure quantitatively. Individual heavy snowfalls provide a rapid low-cost means of measuring total heat flow from such ground. After a favorable snowfall (heavy, brief duration, little wind, air temperature near 0°C), contacts between snow-covered and snow-free ground are mapped on a suitable base. Each mapped contact, as time elapses after a specific snowfall, is a heat-flow contour representing a decreasing rate of flow. Calibration of each mapped contact or snow line is made possible by the fact that snow remains on insulated surfaces (such as the boardwalks of Yellowstone's thermal areas) long after it has melted on adjacent warm ground. Heat-flow contours mapped to date range from 450 to 5500 μcal/cm2 sec, or 300 to 3700 times the world average of conductive heat flow. The very high rates of heat flow (2000 to > 10,000 μcal/cm2 sec) are probably too high, and the lower heat flows determinable by the method (2 sec) may be too low. Values indicated by the method are, however, probably within a factor of 2 of the total conductive and convective heat flow. Thermal anomalies from infrared imagery are similar in shape to heat-flow contours of a test area near Old Faithful geyser. Snowfall calorimetry provides a rapid means for evaluating the imagery and computer-derived products of the infrared data in terms of heat flow.

  16. Method and apparatus for operating a self-starting air heating system

    DOEpatents

    Heinrich, Charles E.

    1983-12-06

    A self-starting, fuel fired, air heating system including a fuel burner fired vapor generator, a turbine, and a condenser connected in a closed circuit such that the vapor output from the vapor generator is conducted to the turbine and then to the condenser where it is condensed for return to the vapor generator. The turbine drives an air blower which passes air over the condenser for cooling the condenser and heating the air. Also, a condensate pump is driven by the turbine. The disclosure is particularly concerned with a method and apparatus which on start-up prevents the vapor generator's vapor output from being conducted to the turbine until a predetermined pressure differential has been achieved. However, after the vapor flow is once permitted, it cannot again be prevented until after the fuel burner has been shut off and restarted.

  17. Integrated turbine-compressor provides air flow for cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferri, A.

    1970-01-01

    Modified supersonic turbine cycle provides cooling air to surrounding structures. Simplified mechanical design assures correct balance of air flow, allows direct issue of cool air to the structure, and assists in matching turbine work output to work input required by the compressor.

  18. Analysis of the transient compressible vapor flow in heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Jong Hoon; Faghri, Amir; Chang, Won Soon

    1989-01-01

    The transient compressible one-dimensional vapor flow dynamics in a heat pipe is modeled. The numerical results are obtained by using the implicit non-iterative Beam-Warming finite difference method. The model is tested for simulated heat pipe vapor flow and actual flow in cylindrical heat pipes. A good comparison of the present transient results for the simulated heat pipe vapor flow with the previous results of a two-dimensional numerical model is achieved and the steady state results are in agreement with the existing experimental data. The transient behavior of the vapor flow under subsonic, sonic, and supersonic speeds and high mass flow rates are successfully predicted. The one-dimensional model also describes the vapor flow dynamics in cylindrical heat pipes at high temperatures.

  19. Upper air teleconnections to Ob River flows and tree rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meko, David; Panyushkina, Irina; Agafonov, Leonid

    2015-04-01

    The Ob River, one of the world's greatest rivers, with a catchment basin about the size of Western Europe, contributes 12% or more of the annual freshwater inflow to the Arctic Ocean. The input of heat and fresh water is important to the global climate system through effects on sea ice, salinity, and the thermohaline circulation of the ocean. As part of a tree-ring project to obtain multi-century long information on variability of Ob River flows, a network of 18 sites of Pinus, Larix, Populus and Salix has been collected along the Ob in the summers of 2013 and 2014. Analysis of collections processed so far indicates a significant relationship of tree-growth to river discharge. Moderation of the floodplain air temperature regime by flooding appears to be an important driver of the tree-ring response. In unraveling the relationship of tree-growth to river flows, it is important to identify atmospheric circulation features directly linked to observed time series variations of flow and tree growth. In this study we examine statistical links between primary teleconnection modes of Northern Hemisphere upper-air (500 mb) circulation, Ob River flow, and tree-ring chronologies. Annual discharge at the mouth of the Ob River is found to be significantly positively related to the phase of the East Atlantic (EA) pattern, the second prominent mode of low-frequency variability over the North Atlantic. The EA pattern, consisting of a north-south dipole of pressure-anomaly centers spanning the North Atlantic from east to west, is associated with a low-pressure anomaly centered over the Ob River Basin, and with a pattern of positive precipitation anomaly of the same region. The positive correlation of discharge and EA is consistent with these know patterns, and is contrasted with generally negative (though smaller) correlations between EA and tree-ring chronologies. The signs of correlations are consistent with a conceptual model of river influence on tree growth through air

  20. Research on Air Flow Measurement and Optimization of Control Algorithm in Air Disinfection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bing-jie, Li; Jia-hong, Zhao; Xu, Wang; Amuer, Mohamode; Zhi-liang, Wang

    2013-01-01

    As the air flow control system has the characteristics of delay and uncertainty, this research designed and achieved a practical air flow control system by using the hydrodynamic theory and the modern control theory. Firstly, the mathematical model of the air flow distribution of the system is analyzed from the hydrodynamics perspective. Then the model of the system is transformed into a lumped parameter state space expression by using the Galerkin method. Finally, the air flow is distributed more evenly through the estimation of the system state and optimal control. The simulation results show that this algorithm has good robustness and anti-interference ability

  1. Laser sheet light flow visualization for evaluating room air flowsfrom Registers

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Claret, Valerie; Smith, Brian

    2006-04-01

    Forced air heating and cooling systems and whole house ventilation systems deliver air to individual rooms in a house via supply registers located on walls ceilings or floors; and occasionally less straightforward locations like toe-kicks below cabinets. Ideally, the air velocity out of the registers combined with the turbulence of the flow, vectoring of air by register vanes and geometry of register placement combine to mix the supply air within the room. A particular issue that has been raised recently is the performance of multiple capacity and air flow HVAC systems. These systems vary the air flow rate through the distribution system depending on the system load, or if operating in a ventilation rather than a space conditioning mode. These systems have been developed to maximize equipment efficiency, however, the high efficiency ratings do not include any room mixing effects. At lower air flow rates, there is the possibility that room air will be poorly mixed, leading to thermal stratification and reduced comfort for occupants. This can lead to increased energy use as the occupants adjust the thermostat settings to compensate and parts of the conditioned space have higher envelope temperature differences than for the well mixed case. In addition, lack of comfort can be a barrier to market acceptance of these higher efficiency systems To investigate the effect on room mixing of reduced air flow rates requires the measurement of mixing of supply air with room air throughout the space to be conditioned. This is a particularly difficult exercise if we want to determine the transient performance of the space conditioning system. Full scale experiments can be done in special test chambers, but the spatial resolution required to fully examine the mixing problem is usually limited by the sheer number of thermal sensors required. Current full-scale laboratory testing is therefore severely limited in its resolution. As an alternative, we used a water-filled scale model

  2. Heat Flow, Climate Change and Advective Heat Transfer Beneath Winnipeg, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, G. A.; Woodbury, A. D.

    2002-12-01

    Winnipeg, Canada is situated in an area of relatively low heat flow, occurring near the eastern edge of the Williston Basin. Temperatures in the carbonate sequence beneath the city are typically between 5.0 and 6.0°C, with geothermal gradients of approximately 0.008 to 0.015°C/m. However, temperatures as high as 11.0°C have been found in the upper reaches of the bedrock beneath certain areas of Winnipeg. Associated with these elevated temperatures are negative geothermal gradients low as -0.060°C/m, indicating downward heat flow. This downward flow of heat has been found to penetrate as deep as 130 metres below ground surface. Elevated temperatures in the bedrock beneath Winnipeg cannot be attributed to climate change alone due to the magnitude of the anomaly. Basement heating and injection of warm water into the aquifers underlying Winnipeg are likely responsible for the temperature anomaly along with mesoclimate change. Basement construction occurring over approximately the last 100 years has altered the heat loading at the surface and in many cases several metres below the surface. Temperatures beneath basements are held constant at approximately 15 to 20°C, rather than fluctuating about the mean annual temperature of 2.14°C. This has played a large role in altering the subsurface temperatures of the region. Temperature profiles beneath central Winnipeg show the greatest impacts of this loading of heat from the surface, with smooth temperature profile and geothermal gradients that increase linearly from the surface. Groundwater use practices have also played a large role in altering the heat flow beneath Winnipeg, Canada. Most groundwater use within the City of Winnipeg is for air conditioning and industrial cooling and much of this use is non-consumptive, with warm water being pumped back into the shallow carbonate rock aquifer, known locally as the Upper Carbonate Aquifer, to maintain aquifer pressures. These injection wells exist throughout the city but

  3. Heat transfer coefficients for drying in pulsating flows

    SciTech Connect

    Fraenkel, S.L.

    1998-05-01

    Pulsating flows generated by a Rijke type combustor are studied for drying of grains and food particles. It is assumed that the velocity fluctuations are the main factor in the enhancement of the drying process. The heat transfer coefficients for drying in vibrating beds are utilized to estimate the heat transfer coefficients of fixed beds in pulsating and permeating flows and are compared to the steady flow heat transfer coefficients obtained for solid porous bodies, after perturbing the main flow. The cases considered are compared to the convective heat transfer coefficients employed in non-pulsating drying.

  4. Heat-flow reconnaissance of the Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; Shannon, S.S. Jr.

    1982-04-01

    Most of the 46 new values of heat flow determined for the Gulf Coastal Plain are in the low to normal range, but heat-flow values averaging 1.8 heat-flow unit (HFU) were obtained in Claiborne, Ouachita, and Union parishes, Louisiana. Moreover, a zone of relatively high heat-flow values and steep thermal gradients (35 to 46/sup 0/C/km) extends from northern Louisiana into southwestern Mississippi. Also near Pensacola, Florida, temperatures of 50/sup 0/C at 1-km depth have been extrapolated from thermal gradients. Future development of low-grade geothermal resources may be warranted in these areas.

  5. Three-dimensional freezing of flowing water in a tube cooled by air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, M.; Komatsu, Y.; Beer, H.

    2015-05-01

    The 3-D freezing of flowing water in a copper tube cooled by air flow is investigated by means of a numerical analysis. The air flows normal to the tube axis. Several parameters as inlet water mean velocity w m , inlet water temperature T iℓ t , air flow temperature T a and air flow velocity u a are selected in the calculations to adapt it to a winter season actually encountered. The numerical results present the development of the ice layer mean thickness and its 3-D morphologies as well as the critical ice layer thickness in the tube choked by the ice layer.

  6. Air-flow regulation system for a coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1984-01-01

    An improved air-flow regulator for a fixed-bed coal gasifier is provided which allows close air-flow regulation from a compressor source even though the pressure variations are too rapid for a single primary control loop to respond. The improved system includes a primary controller to control a valve in the main (large) air supply line to regulate large slow changes in flow. A secondary controller is used to control a smaller, faster acting valve in a secondary (small) air supply line parallel to the main line valve to regulate rapid cyclic deviations in air flow. A low-pass filter with a time constant of from 20 to 50 seconds couples the output of the secondary controller to the input of the primary controller so that the primary controller only responds to slow changes in the air-flow rate, the faster, cyclic deviations in flow rate sensed and corrected by the secondary controller loop do not reach the primary controller due to the high frequency rejection provided by the filter. This control arrangement provides at least a factor of 5 improvement in air-flow regulation for a coal gasifier in which air is supplied by a reciprocating compressor through a surge tank.

  7. Heat transfer between a stationary granular packing and a descending flow of dusty gas

    SciTech Connect

    Dryabin, V.A.; Galershtein, D.M.

    1988-10-01

    The transfer of heat from a stationary granular bed (packing) to a gas-particle flow has been investigated experimentally. Heat transfer experiments were carried out on an apparatus with an open gas-particle flow system. Monodisperse packing comprised of smooth steel balls or round porcelain granules was used. Particles used in the gas flow consisted of grades of sand and electrical corundum. The external heat transfer coefficient was determined by local modeling of heat transfer in the steady temperature field regime. Calorimetry was used for determining this regime as well as the temperature of the air and dusty gas. A correlation was obtained for calculating the heat-transfer coefficient in the system.

  8. Terrestrial heat flow in east and southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyblade, Andrew A.; Pollack, Henry N.; Jones, D. L.; Podmore, Francis; Mushayandebvu, Martin

    1990-10-01

    We report 26 new heat flow and 13 radiogenic heat production measurements from Zimbabwe, Zambia and Tanzania, together with details and some revisions of 18 previous heat flow measurements by other investigators from Kenya and Tanzania. These measurements come from Archean cratons, Proterozoic mobile belts, and Mesozoic and Cenozoic rifts. Heat flow data from eight new sites in the Archean Zimbabwe Craton are consistent with previous measurements in the Archean Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe Craton and Limpopo Belt (Kalahari Craton) and do not change the mean heat flow of 47±2 mW m-2 (standard error of the mean) in the Kalahari Craton based on 53 previous measurements. Eight new sites in the Archean Tanzania Craton give a mean heat flow of 34±4 mW m-2. The mean heat flow from nine sites in the Proterozoic Mozambique Belt to the east of the Tanzania Craton in Kenya and Tanzania is 47±4 mW m-2. Twelve measurements in the Mesozoic rifted continental margin in east Africa give a mean heat flow of 68±4 mW m-2; four measurements in the Mesozoic Luangwa and Zambezi Rifts range from 44 to 110 mW m-2 with a mean of 76±14 mW m-2. In comparing heat flow in east and southern Africa, we observe a common heat flow pattern of increasing heat flow away from the centers of the Archean cratons. This pattern suggests a fundamental difference in lithospheric thermal structure between the Archean cratons and the Proterozoic and early Paleozoic mobile belts which surround them. Superimposed on this common pattern are two regional variations in heat flow. Heat flow in the Tanzania Craton is lower by about 13 mW m-2 than in the Kalahari Craton, and in the Mozambique Belt in east Africa heat flow is somewhat lower than in the southern African mobile belts at similar distances from the Archean cratonic margin. The two regional variations can be explained in several ways, none of which can as yet be elevated to a preferred status: (1) by variations in crustal heat production, (2) by thin

  9. 21 CFR 211.46 - Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling. 211.46 Section 211.46 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Buildings and Facilities § 211.46...

  10. Heat transfer research on supercritical water flow upward in tube

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H. B.; Yang, J.; Gu, H. Y.; Zhao, M.; Lu, D. H.; Zhang, J. M.; Wang, F.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-07-01

    The experimental research of heat transfer on supercritical water has been carried out on the supercritical water multipurpose test loop with a 7.6 mm upright tube. The experimental data of heat transfer is obtained. The experimental results of thermal-hydraulic parameters on flow and heat transfer of supercritical water show that: Heat transfer enhancement occurs when the fluid temperature reaches pseudo-critical point with low mass flow velocity, and peters out when the mass flow velocity increases. The heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number decrease with the heat flux or system pressure increases, and increase with the increasing of mass flow velocity. The wall temperature increases when the mass flow velocity decreases or the system pressure increases. (authors)