Science.gov

Sample records for heated vertical natural

  1. MHD natural convection flow along a vertical wavy surface with heat generation and pressure work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, M. A.; Kabir, K. H.; Andallah, L. S.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the influence of pressure work on MHD natural convection flow of viscous incompressible fluid along a uniformly heated vertical wavy surface with heat generation has been investigated. The governing boundary layer equations are first transformed into a non-dimensional form using suitable set of dimensionless variables. The resulting nonlinear system of partial differential equations are mapped into the domain of a vertical flat plate and then solved numerically employing the implicit finite difference method, known as Keller-box scheme. The numerical results for the velocity profiles, temperature profiles, skin friction coefficient, the rate of heat transfers, the streamlines and the isotherms are shown graphically and skin friction coefficient and rate of heat transfer have been shown in tabular form for different values of the selective set of parameters consisting of pressure work parameter Ge, the magnetic parameter M, Prandtl number Pr, heat generation parameter Q and the amplitude of the wavy surface.

  2. Heat transfer to water from a vertical tube bundle under natural-circulation conditions. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszczynski, M.J.; Viskanta, R.

    1983-01-01

    The natural circulation heat transfer data for longitudinal flow of water outside a vertical rod bundle are needed for developing correlations which can be used in best estimate computer codes to model thermal-hydraulic behavior of nuclear reactor cores under accident or shutdown conditions. The heat transfer coefficient between the fuel rod surface and the coolant is the key parameter required to predict the fuel temperature. Because of the absence of the required heat transfer coefficient data base under natural circulation conditions, experiments have been performed in a natural circulation loop. A seven-tube bundle having a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.25 was used as a test heat exchanger. A circulating flow was established in the loop, because of buoyancy differences between its two vertical legs. Steady-state and transient heat transfer measurements have been made over as wide a range of thermal conditions as possible with the system. Steady state heat transfer data were correlated in terms of relevant dimensionless parameters. Empirical correlations for the average Nusselt number, in terms of Reynolds number, Rayleigh number and the ratio of Grashof to Reynolds number are given.

  3. Natural convection heat transfer of nanofluids along a vertical plate embedded in porous medium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The unsteady natural convection heat transfer of nanofluid along a vertical plate embedded in porous medium is investigated. The Darcy-Forchheimer model is used to formulate the problem. Thermal conductivity and viscosity models based on a wide range of experimental data of nanofluids and incorporating the velocity-slip effect of the nanoparticle with respect to the base fluid, i.e., Brownian diffusion is used. The effective thermal conductivity of nanofluid in porous media is calculated using copper powder as porous media. The nonlinear governing equations are solved using an unconditionally stable implicit finite difference scheme. In this study, six different types of nanofluids have been compared with respect to the heat transfer enhancement, and the effects of particle concentration, particle size, temperature of the plate, and porosity of the medium on the heat transfer enhancement and skin friction coefficient have been studied in detail. It is found that heat transfer rate increases with the increase in particle concentration up to an optimal level, but on the further increase in particle concentration, the heat transfer rate decreases. For a particular value of particle concentration, small-sized particles enhance the heat transfer rates. On the other hand, skin friction coefficients always increase with the increase in particle concentration and decrease in nanoparticle size. PMID:23391481

  4. Natural convection heat transfer of nanofluids along a vertical plate embedded in porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Ziya; Harmand, Souad

    2013-02-01

    The unsteady natural convection heat transfer of nanofluid along a vertical plate embedded in porous medium is investigated. The Darcy-Forchheimer model is used to formulate the problem. Thermal conductivity and viscosity models based on a wide range of experimental data of nanofluids and incorporating the velocity-slip effect of the nanoparticle with respect to the base fluid, i.e., Brownian diffusion is used. The effective thermal conductivity of nanofluid in porous media is calculated using copper powder as porous media. The nonlinear governing equations are solved using an unconditionally stable implicit finite difference scheme. In this study, six different types of nanofluids have been compared with respect to the heat transfer enhancement, and the effects of particle concentration, particle size, temperature of the plate, and porosity of the medium on the heat transfer enhancement and skin friction coefficient have been studied in detail. It is found that heat transfer rate increases with the increase in particle concentration up to an optimal level, but on the further increase in particle concentration, the heat transfer rate decreases. For a particular value of particle concentration, small-sized particles enhance the heat transfer rates. On the other hand, skin friction coefficients always increase with the increase in particle concentration and decrease in nanoparticle size.

  5. The study and development of the empirical correlations equation of natural convection heat transfer on vertical rectangular sub-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamajaya, Ketut; Umar, Efrizon; Sudjatmi, K. S.

    2012-06-01

    This study focused on natural convection heat transfer using a vertical rectangular sub-channel and water as the coolant fluid. To conduct this study has been made pipe heaters are equipped with thermocouples. Each heater is equipped with five thermocouples along the heating pipes. The diameter of each heater is 2.54 cm and 45 cm in length. The distance between the central heating and the pitch is 29.5 cm. Test equipment is equipped with a primary cooling system, a secondary cooling system and a heat exchanger. The purpose of this study is to obtain new empirical correlations equations of the vertical rectangular sub-channel, especially for the natural convection heat transfer within a bundle of vertical cylinders rectangular arrangement sub-channels. The empirical correlation equation can support the thermo-hydraulic analysis of research nuclear reactors that utilize cylindrical fuel rods, and also can be used in designing of baffle-free vertical shell and tube heat exchangers. The results of this study that the empirical correlation equations of natural convection heat transfer coefficients with rectangular arrangement is Nu = 6.3357 (Ra.Dh/x)0.0740.

  6. Natural convection on a vertical plate in a saturated porous medium with internal heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedda, M.; Sriti, M.; Achemlal, D.

    2014-08-01

    The main goal of this paper is to re-exam a class of exact solutions for the two-dimensional free convection boundary layers induced by a heated vertical plate embedded in a saturated porous medium with an exponential decaying heat generation. The temperature distribution of the plate has been assumed to vary as a power of the axial coordinate measured from the leading edge of the plate and subjected to an applied lateral mass flux. The boundary layer equations are solved analytically and numerically using a fifth-order Runge-Kutta scheme coupled with the shooting iteration method. As for the classical problem without internal heat generation, it is proved that multiple (unbounded) solutions arise for any and for any suction/injection parameter. For such solutions, the asymptotic behavior as the similarity variable approaches infinity is determined.

  7. Natural convection flow of Cu-H2O nanofluid along a vertical wavy surface with uniform heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habiba, Farjana; Molla, Md. Mamun; Khan, M. A. Hakim

    2016-07-01

    A numerical study on natural convection flow of Cu-Water nanofluid along a vertical wavy surface with uniform heat flux has been carried out. The governing boundary layer equations are transformed into parabolic partial differential equations by applying a suitable set of variables. The resulting nonlinear system of equations are then mapped into a regular rectangular computational domain and solved numerically by using an implicit finite difference method. Numerical results are thoroughly discussed in terms of velocity and temperature distributions, surface temperature distribution, skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number coefficient for selected key parameters such as solid volume fraction of nanofluid (ϕ) and amplitude (α) of surface waviness. In addition, velocity vectors, streamlines and isotherms are plotted to visualize momentum and thermal flow pattern within the boundary layer region.

  8. Nonlinear Radiation Heat Transfer Effects in the Natural Convective Boundary Layer Flow of Nanofluid Past a Vertical Plate: A Numerical Study

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Meraj; Mushtaq, Ammar; Hayat, Tasawar; Ahmad, Bashir

    2014-01-01

    The problem of natural convective boundary layer flow of nanofluid past a vertical plate is discussed in the presence of nonlinear radiative heat flux. The effects of magnetic field, Joule heating and viscous dissipation are also taken into consideration. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations via similarity transformations and then solved numerically using the Runge–Kutta fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The results reveal an existence of point of inflection for the temperature distribution for sufficiently large wall to ambient temperature ratio. Temperature and thermal boundary layer thickness increase as Brownian motion and thermophoretic effects intensify. Moreover temperature increases and heat transfer from the plate decreases with an increase in the radiation parameter. PMID:25251242

  9. Nonlinear radiation heat transfer effects in the natural convective boundary layer flow of nanofluid past a vertical plate: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Meraj; Mushtaq, Ammar; Hayat, Tasawar; Ahmad, Bashir

    2014-01-01

    The problem of natural convective boundary layer flow of nanofluid past a vertical plate is discussed in the presence of nonlinear radiative heat flux. The effects of magnetic field, Joule heating and viscous dissipation are also taken into consideration. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations via similarity transformations and then solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The results reveal an existence of point of inflection for the temperature distribution for sufficiently large wall to ambient temperature ratio. Temperature and thermal boundary layer thickness increase as Brownian motion and thermophoretic effects intensify. Moreover temperature increases and heat transfer from the plate decreases with an increase in the radiation parameter. PMID:25251242

  10. Steady state boiling crisis in a helium vertically heated natural circulation loop - Part 1: Critical heat flux, boiling crisis onset and hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furci, H.; Baudouy, B.; Four, A.; Meuris, C.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on a 2-m high two-phase helium natural circulation loop operating at 4.2 K and 1 atm. The same loop was used in two experiments with different heated section internal diameter (10 and 6 mm). The power applied on the heated section wall was controlled in increasing and decreasing sequences, and temperature along the section, mass flow rate and pressure drop evolutions were recorded. The values of critical heat flux (CHF) were found at different positions of the test section, and the post-CHF regime was studied. The predictions of CHF by existing correlations were good in the downstream portion of the section, however CHF anomalies have been observed near the entrance, in the low quality region. In resonance with this, the re-wetting of the surface has distinct hysteresis behavior in each of the two CHF regions. Furthermore, hydraulics effects of crisis, namely on friction, were studied (Part 2). This research is the starting point to future works addressing transients conducing to boiling crisis in helium natural circulation loops.

  11. Vertical integration of thermally activated heat pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.C.

    1985-01-01

    Many thermally activated heat pump systems are being developed along technology lines, such as, engine-driven and absorption heat pumps. Their thermal performances are temperature dependent. Based on the temperature-dependent behavior of heat pump cycle performance and the energy cascading idea, the concept of vertically integrating various thermally activated heat pump technologies to maximize resources utilization is explored. Based on a preliminary analysis, it is found that integrating a desiccant dehumidification subsystem to an engine-driven heat pump could improve its cooling performance by 36% and integrating an ejector to it could improve its cooling performance by 20%. The added advantage of an ejector-coupled engine-driven heat pump is its system simplicity which should result in equipment cost savings.

  12. Thermally optimum spacing of vertical, natural convection cooled, parallel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, A.; Rohsenow, W. M.

    Vertical two-dimensional channels formed by parallel plates or fins are a frequently encountered configuration in natural convection cooling in air of electronic equipment. In connection with the complexity of heat dissipation in vertical parallel plate arrays, little theoretical effort is devoted to thermal optimization of the relevant packaging configurations. The present investigation is concerned with the establishment of an analytical structure for analyses of such arrays, giving attention to useful relations for heat distribution patterns. The limiting relations for fully-developed laminar flow, in a symmetric isothermal or isoflux channel as well as in a channel with an insulated wall, are derived by use of a straightforward integral formulation.

  13. Heat transfer in vertically aligned phase change energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    El-Dessouky, H.T.; Bouhamra, W.S.; Ettouney, H.M.; Akbar, M.

    1999-05-01

    Convection effects on heat transfer are analyzed in low temperature and vertically aligned phase change energy storage systems. This is performed by detailed temperature measurements in the phase change material (PCM) in eighteen locations forming a grid of six radial and three axial positions. The system constitutes a double pipe configuration, where commercial grade paraffin wax is stored in the annular space between the two pipes and water flows inside the inner pipe. Vertical alignment of the system allowed for reverse of the flow direction of the heat transfer fluid (HTF), which is water. Therefore, the PCM is heated from the bottom for HTF flow from bottom to top and from the top as the HTF flow direction is reversed. For the former case, natural convection affects the melting process. Collected data are used to study variations in the transient temperature distribution at axial and radial positions as well as for the two-dimensional temperature field. The data are used to calculate the PCM heat transfer coefficient and to develop correlations for the melting Fourier number. Results indicate that the PCM heat transfer coefficient is higher for the case of PCM heating from bottom to top. Nusselt number correlations are developed as a function of Rayleigh, Stefan, and Fourier numbers for the HTF flow from bottom to top and as a function of Stefan and Fourier numbers for HTF flow from top to bottom. The enhancement ratio for heat transfer caused by natural convection increases and then levels off as the inlet temperature of the HTF is increased.

  14. Natural convection immersion cooling of an array of vertically oriented heated protrusions in an enclosure filled with a dielectric liquid: Effects of enclosure width, Prandtl number and component orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Scott T.

    1991-12-01

    The natural convection heat transfer characteristics of a 3 x 3 array of vertically oriented heated protrusions, immersed in a dielectric liquid, were investigated. Aluminum blocks, 24 x 8 x 6 mm, were used to simulate 20 pin dual in-line packages. Surface temperature measurements of the components were made by imbedding copper-constantan thermocouples below the surface of each component face. A constant heat flux was provided to each component using an Inconel foil heating element. Power supplied to each component varied from 0.115 to 2.90 W. The aluminum blocks were mounted on a plexiglass substrate to form a 3 x 3 array of simulated electronic components. The circuit board containing the components was placed in a rectangular, plexiglass enclosure with inner dimensions: L = 203.2 mm H = 152.0 mm W = 82.6 mm, and a wall thickness of 25.4 mm. The upper boundary was maintained at 10 C, while all other exterior surfaces were insulated. The chamber width, measured from the surface of the circuit board to the opposite, inner wall of the enclosure, was varied from 42 to 7 mm by inserting plexiglass spacers into the enclosure. Two dielectric liquids, FC-75 and FC-43, were used as working fluids. Nondimensional data from this study was combined with the data obtained for a horizontal component orientation, to develop an empirical correlation which predicts the Nusselt number as a function of Rayleigh number, Prandtl number, component orientation, and chamber width.

  15. Nature's Heat Exchangers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, George

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the heat-transfer systems of different animals. Systems include heat conduction into the ground, heat transferred by convection, heat exchange in lizards, fish and polar animals, the carotid rete system, electromagnetic radiation from animals and people, and plant and animal fiber optics. (MDH)

  16. Heat distribution by natural convection

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Natural convection can provide adequate heat distribution in many situtations that arise in buildings. This is appropriate, for example, in passive solar buildings where some rooms tend to be more strongly solar heated than others or to reduce the number of heating units required in a building. Natural airflow and heat transport through doorways and other internal building apertures is predictable and can be accounted for in the design. The nature of natural convection is described, and a design chart is presented appropriate to a simple, single-doorway situation. Natural convective loops that can occur in buildings are described and a few design guidelines are presented.

  17. Heat transfer in porous medium embedded with vertical plate: Non-equilibrium approach - Part A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badruddin, Irfan Anjum; Quadir, G. A.

    2016-06-01

    Heat transfer in a porous medium embedded with vertical flat plate is investigated by using thermal non-equilibrium model. Darcy model is employed to simulate the flow inside porous medium. It is assumed that the heat transfer takes place by natural convection and radiation. The vertical plate is maintained at isothermal temperature. The governing partial differential equations are converted into non-dimensional form and solved numerically using finite element method. Results are presented in terms of isotherms and streamlines for various parameters such as heat transfer coefficient parameter, thermal conductivity ratio, and radiation parameter

  18. Studies of heat source driven natural convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulacki, F. A.; Nagle, M. E.; Cassen, P.

    1974-01-01

    Natural convection energy transport in a horizontal layer of internally heated fluid with a zero heat flux lower boundary, and an isothermal upper boundary, has been studied. Quantitative information on the time-mean temperature distribution and the fluctuating component of temperature about the mean temperature in steady turbulent convection are obtained from a small thermocouple inserted into the layer through the upper bounding plate. Data are also presented on the development of temperature at several vertical positions when the layer is subject to both a sudden increase and to a sudden decrease in power input. For changes of power input from zero to a value corresponding to a Rayleigh number much greater than the critical linear stability theory value, a slight hysteresis in temperature profiles near the upper boundary is observed between the heat-up and cool-down modes.

  19. Transient natural convection in heated inclined tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEligot, Donald M.; Denbow, David A.; Murphy, Hugh D.

    1990-05-01

    To simulate natural convection flow patterns in directionally drilled wellbores, experiments and analyses were conducted for a circular tube with length-to-diameter (L/D) ratio of 36 at angles of 0, 20, and 35 degrees from the vertical. The tube was heated at the bottom and cooled at the top, and the insulation was adjusted so that approximately one- to two-thirds of the power dissipated was transferred through the tube wall to the surroundings. An aqueous solution of polyvinyl alcohol was employed as the working fluid in order to obtain low Rayleigh numbers corresponding to conditions in geothermal wellbores. Results were primarily qualitative but were useful in providing insight into the phenomena occurring. Steady-state temperature distributions were measured for the three orientations and for several heating rates to demonstrate the effects of tube angle and Rayleigh number. Transient measurements of the temperature distribution were obtained during cooling from a higher temperature without a heat source to calibrate the heat losses. With the electrical heat source, temporal data were taken during heating to examine the approach to steady state. Quasi-steady flow conditions were approached rapidly, but the overall time constant of the apparatus was of the order of one-third of a day. Predictions with the three-dimensional TEMPEST code were first tested by comparison with simple conduction analyses. Comparison with actual data showed good agreement of the predicted temperature levels for the maximum inclination, 35 degrees, and slightly poorer agreement for the other limit, a vertical tube. Trends of temperature level and Nusselt number with heating rate or Rayleigh number were reasonable, but the predicted variation of the end Nusselt number versus inclination was in the opposite direction from the experiment.

  20. Transient natural convection in heated inclined tubes

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, D.M. . Oceanic Div.); Denbow, D.A. ); Murphy, H.D. )

    1990-05-01

    To simulate natural convection flow patterns in directionally drilled wellbores, experiments and analyses were conducted for a circular tube with length-to-diameter (L/D) ratio of 36 at angles of 0{degree}, 20{degree}, and 35{degree} from the vertical. The tube was heated at the bottom and cooled at the top, and the insulation was adjusted so that approximately one- to two-thirds of the power dissipated was transferred through the tube wall to the surroundings. An aqueous solution of polyvinyl alcohol was employed as the working fluid in order to obtain low Rayleigh numbers corresponding to conditions in geothermal wellbores. Results were primarily qualitative but were useful in providing insight into the phenomena occurring. Steady-state temperature distributions were measured for the three orientations and for several heating rates to demonstrate the effects of tube angle and Rayleigh number. transient measurements of the temperature distribution were obtained during cooling from a higher temperature without a heat source to calibrate the heat losses. With the electrical heat source, temporal data were taken during heating to examine the approach to steady state. Quasi-steady flow conditions were approached rapidly, but the overall time constant of the apparatus was of the order of one-third of a day. Predictions with the three-dimensional TEMPEST code were first tested by comparison with simple conduction analyses. Comparison with actual data showed good agreement of the predicted temperature levels for the maximum inclination, 35{degree}, and slightly poorer agreement for the other limit, a vertical tube. Trends of temperature level and Nusselt number with heating rate or Rayleigh number were reasonable, but the predicted variation of the end Nusselt number versus inclination was in the opposite direction from the experiment. 75 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. Natural convection of ferrofluids in partially heated square enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selimefendigil, Fatih; Öztop, Hakan F.; Al-Salem, Khaled

    2014-12-01

    In this study, natural convection of ferrofluid in a partially heated square cavity is numerically investigated. The heater is located to the left vertical wall and the right vertical wall is kept at constant temperature lower than that of the heater. Other walls of the square enclosure are assumed to be adiabatic. Finite element method is utilized to solve the governing equations. The influence of the Rayleigh number (104≤Ra≤5×105), heater location (0.25H≤yh≤0.75H), strength of the magnetic dipole (0≤γ≤2), horizontal and vertical location of the magnetic dipole (-2H≤a≤-0.5H, 0.2H≤b≤0.8H) on the fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics are investigated. It is observed that different velocity components within the square cavity are sensitive to the magnetic dipole source strength and its position. The length and size of the recirculation zones adjacent to the heater can be controlled with magnetic dipole strength. Averaged heat transfer increases with decreasing values of horizontal position of the magnetic dipole source. Averaged heat transfer value increases from middle towards both ends of the vertical wall when the vertical location of the dipole source is varied. When the heater location is changed, a symmetrical behavior in the averaged heat transfer plot is observed and the minimum value of the averaged heat transfer is attained when the heater is located at the mid of vertical wall.

  2. Heat transfer in vertical Bridgman growth of oxides - Effects of conduction, convection, and internal radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, S.; Derby, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    In the present investigation of crystalline phase internal radiation and heat conduction during the vertical Bridgman growth of a YAG-like oxide crystal, where transport through the melt is dominated by convection and conduction, heat is also noted to be conducted through ampoule walls via natural convection and enclosure radiation. The results of a quasi-steady-state axisymmetric Galerkin FEM indicate that heat transfer through the system is powerfully affected by the optical absorption coefficient of the crystal. The coupling of internal radiation through the crystal with conduction through the ampoule walls promotes melt/crystal interface shapes that are highly reflected near the ampoule wall.

  3. Conjugate natural convection flow over a vertical surface with radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqa, Sadia; Hossain, Md. Anwar; Gorla, Rama Subba Reddy

    2016-06-01

    Numerical study of conjugate natural convection flow over a finite vertical surface with radiation is reported in this article. Rosseland diffusion approximation is used to express the radiative heat flux term. The governing boundary-layer equations are made dimensionless by means of a suitable form of non-similarity transformation. These equations are obtained in three regimes: (1) upstream (when ξ → 0), (2) downstream (when ξ → ∞ ) and (3) entire regime and are solved numerically. The solutions in the upstream and downstream regimes are obtained via shooting method whereas two-point implicit finite difference method is used to get the solutions for the entire regime. It is seen that asymptotic solutions give accurate results when compared with the numerical solution of the entire regime. The results indicate that the flow field and the temperature distributions are greatly influenced by thermal radiation parameter , R_d, surface temperature parameter, θ _w and Prandtl number Pr. It is established from the analysis that recirculation occurs in the flow specifically for R_d=1.5.

  4. Convective heat transfer around vertical jet fires: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Kozanoglu, Bulent; Zárate, Luis; Gómez-Mares, Mercedes; Casal, Joaquim

    2011-12-15

    The convection heat transfer phenomenon in vertical jet fires was experimentally analyzed. In these experiments, turbulent propane flames were generated in subsonic as well as sonic regimes. The experimental data demonstrated that the rate of convection heat transfer increases by increasing the length of the flame. Assuming the solid flame model, the convection heat transfer coefficient was calculated. Two equations in terms of adimensional numbers were developed. It was found out that the Nusselt number attains greater values for higher values of the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers. On the other hand, the Froude number was analyzed only for the subsonic flames where the Nusselt number grows by this number and the diameter of the orifice. PMID:21962859

  5. Momentum and heat transport scalings in laminar vertical convection.

    PubMed

    Shishkina, Olga

    2016-05-01

    We derive the dependence of the Reynolds number Re and the Nusselt number Nu on the Rayleigh number Ra and the Prandtl number Pr in laminar vertical convection (VC), where a fluid is confined between two differently heated isothermal vertical walls. The boundary layer equations in laminar VC yield two limiting scaling regimes: Nu∼Pr^{1/4}Ra^{1/4}, Re∼Pr^{-1/2}Ra^{1/2} for Pr≪1 and Nu∼Pr^{0}Ra^{1/4}, Re∼Pr^{-1}Ra^{1/2} for Pr≫1. These theoretical results are in excellent agreement with direct numerical simulations for Ra from 10^{5} to 10^{10} and Pr from 10^{-2} to 30. The transition between the regimes takes place for Pr around 10^{-1}. PMID:27300823

  6. Momentum and heat transport scalings in laminar vertical convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkina, Olga

    2016-05-01

    We derive the dependence of the Reynolds number Re and the Nusselt number Nu on the Rayleigh number Ra and the Prandtl number Pr in laminar vertical convection (VC), where a fluid is confined between two differently heated isothermal vertical walls. The boundary layer equations in laminar VC yield two limiting scaling regimes: Nu˜Pr1/4Ra1/4 , Re˜Pr-1/2Ra1/2 for Pr≪1 and Nu˜Pr0Ra1/4 , Re˜Pr-1Ra1/2 for Pr≫1 . These theoretical results are in excellent agreement with direct numerical simulations for Ra from 105 to 1010 and Pr from 10-2 to 30. The transition between the regimes takes place for Pr around 10-1.

  7. Flow regimes and heat transfer in vertical narrow annuli

    SciTech Connect

    Ulke, A.; Goldberg, I.

    1993-11-01

    In shell side boiling heat exchangers narrow crevices that are formed between the tubes and the tube support structure provide areas for local thermal-hydraulic conditions which differ significantly from bulk fluid conditions. Understanding of the processes of boiling and dryout in flow restricted crevices can help in designing of tube support geometries to minimize the likelihood of tube support plate and tube corrosion observed in commercial power plant steam generators. This paper describes a one dimensional thermal-hydraulic model of a vertical crevice between a tube and a support plate with cylindrical holes. The annulus formed by the support plate hole and an eccentrically located tube has been represented by vertical strips. The formation, growth and collapse of a steam bubble in each strip has been determined. Based on the bubble history, and flow regimes characterized by ``isolated`` bubbles, ``coalesced`` bubbles and liquid deficient regions have been defined.

  8. Vertical extension of the urban heat island above Moscow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokoshchenko, M. A.; Korneva, I. A.; Kochin, A. V.; Dubovetsky, A. Z.; Novitsky, M. A.; Razin, P. Ye.

    2016-01-01

    The vertical extension of the urban "heat island" (UHI) has been studied on the basis of long-term data of contact air temperature measurements at three places for the example of Moscow. The existence of steady thermal anomaly related to the city in the form of a UHI in the surface layer at any time of the day and also the existence of a cold layer over it at heights higher than 100 m at night were confirmed. The mean daily altitudinal extension of this anomaly is approximately 300 m.

  9. Experimental study on flow boiling heat transfer of LNG in a vertical smooth tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongsheng; Shi, Yumei

    2013-10-01

    An experimental apparatus is set up in this work to study the upward flow boiling heat transfer characteristics of LNG (liquefied natural gas) in vertical smooth tubes with inner diameters of 8 mm and 14 mm. The experiments were performed at various inlet pressures from 0.3 to 0.7 MPa. The results were obtained over the mass flux range from 16 to 200 kg m-2 s-1 and heat fluxes ranging from 8.0 to 32 kW m-2. The influences of quality, heat flux and mass flux, tube diameter on the heat transfer characteristic are examined and discussed. The comparisons of the experimental heat transfer coefficients with the predicted values from the existing correlations are analyzed. The correlation by Zou et al. [16] shows the best accuracy with the RMS deviation of 31.7% in comparison with the experimental data.

  10. Changes in ocean vertical heat transport with global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zika, Jan D.; Laliberté, Frédéric; Mudryk, Lawrence R.; Sijp, Willem P.; Nurser, A. J. G.

    2015-06-01

    Heat transport between the surface and deep ocean strongly influences transient climate change. Mechanisms setting this transport are investigated using coupled climate models and by projecting ocean circulation into the temperature-depth diagram. In this diagram, a "cold cell" cools the deep ocean through the downwelling of Antarctic waters and upwelling of warmer waters and is balanced by warming due to a "warm cell," coincident with the interhemispheric overturning and previously linked to wind and haline forcing. With anthropogenic warming, the cold cell collapses while the warm cell continues to warm the deep ocean. Simulations with increasingly strong warm cells, set by their mean Southern Hemisphere winds, exhibit increasing deep-ocean warming in response to the same anthropogenic forcing. It is argued that the partition between components of the circulation which cool and warm the deep ocean in the preindustrial climate is a key determinant of ocean vertical heat transport with global warming.

  11. Effects of confining walls on heat transfer from a vertical array of isothermal horizontal elliptic cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Yousefi, T.; Paknezhad, M.; Ashjaee, M.; Yazdani, S.

    2009-09-15

    Steady state two-dimensional natural convection heat transfer from the vertical array of five horizontal isothermal elliptic cylinders with vertical major axis which confined between two adiabatic walls has been studied experimentally. Experiments were carried out using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The Rayleigh number based on cylinder major axis was in the range 10{sup 3}{<=}Ra{<=}2.5 x 10{sup 3}, and dimensionless wall spacing 1.5{<=} t/b{<=}9 and infinity. The effect of wall spacing and Rayleigh number on the heat transfer from the individual cylinder and the array were investigated. Experiments are performed for ratio wall spacing to major diameter t/b = 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and infinity. A correlation based on the experimental data for the average Nusselt number of the array as a function of Ra and t/b is presented in the aforementioned ranges. A relation has been derived for optimum wall spacing at which the Nusselt number of the array attains its maximum value. At optimum wall spacing, approximately 10% increase in the heat transfer from the confined array of elliptic cylinders has been observed as compared to the unconfined case. Also, a heat transfer correlation has been proposed for a single elliptic cylinder with vertical major axis and has been compared with earlier works. (author)

  12. Vortex ring head-on collision with a heated vertical plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo, G.; Hernández, R. H.; Nicot, C.; Plaza, F.

    2007-08-01

    We report experimental results of the normal impact of a vortex ring in air on a vertical heated plate at constant temperature. We address the case in which the natural convection boundary layer is laminar and the vortex ring is stable. Vortex rings are created by pushing air through a circular exit orifice of a cavity, using a piston-cylinder system. The impinging vortex ring perturbs both the thermal and dynamical boundary layers where we measure the total heat flux exchanged by the heated plate and visualize the vortex motion during the impact. This unsteady impingement process is investigated for different vortex sizes and self-induced velocities, characterized by the Reynolds number of the ring. As a result, a localized heat transfer enhancement is originated by the ring impingement, which increases with the Reynolds number.

  13. The effect of asymmetric heating on flow stability and heat transfer for flow in a vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Tappan, C.H.

    1987-11-01

    This study presents experimental results of combined free and forced convection heat transfer in a vertical tube with a circumferentially nonuniform constant wall heat flux. The effect of an asymmetric wall heat flux on flow stability and on the rate of heat transfer for water flowing downward in a vertical tube was investigated. Experimental results were used to develop two stability maps which identify various flow regimes, corresponding to different thermal and hydraulic conditions. Heat transfer coefficients were also determined. Experimental results in the present investigation were compared to those with uniform heating in horizontal and vertical tube flow situations discussed in the literature. 23 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Effect of the heating surface enhancement on the heat transfer coefficient for a vertical minichannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecka, Magdalena; Strąk, Kinga

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the paper is to estimate effect of the heating surface enhancement on FC-72 flow boiling heat transfer for a vertical minichannel 1.7 mm deep, 24 mm wide and 360 mm long. Two types of enhanced heating surfaces were used: one with minicavities distributed unevenly, and the other with capillary metal fibrous structure. It was to measure temperature field on the plain side of the heating surface by means of the infrared thermography and to observe the two-phase flow patterns on the enhanced foil side. The paper analyses mainly the impact of the microstructured heating surface on the heat transfer coefficient. The results are presented as heat transfer coefficient dependences on the distance along the minichannel length. The data obtained using two types of enhanced heating surfaces in experiments was compared with the data when smooth foil as the heating surface was used. The highest local values of heat transfer coefficient were obtained using enhanced foil with minicavities - in comparison to other cases. Local values of heat transfer coefficient received for capillary fibrous structure were the lowest, even compared with data obtained for smooth foil. Probably this porous structure caused local flow disturbances.

  15. Forced convection heat transfer of saturated liquid hydrogen in vertically-mounted heated pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumoto, Hideki; Shirai, Yasuyuki; Shiotsu, Masahiro; Hata, Koichi; Naruo, Yoshihiro; Kobayasi, Hiroaki; Inatani, Yoshifumi

    2014-01-01

    Heat transfer from the inner side of vertically-mounted heated pipes to forced flow of saturated liquid hydrogen was measured with a quasi-steady increase of a heat generation rate for wide ranges of flow rate and saturated pressure. The tube heaters have lengths L of 100 mm and 167 mm with the diameter D of 4 mm and lengths of 150 mm and 250 mm with the diameter of 6 mm. The heat fluxes at departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) were higher for higher flow velocity, lower pressures and shorter L/D. The effect of L/D on the DNB heat flux was clarified. It is confirmed that our DNB correlation can describe the experimental data.

  16. Augmentation of heat transfer in a bubble agitated vertical rectangular channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Asish; Dutta, Tapas Kumar; Ghosh, Dibyendu Narayan

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of convective heat transfer between three parallel vertical plates symmetrically spaced with and without bubble agitation to ascertain the degree of augmentation of the heat transfer coefficients due to agitation. The centre plate was electrically heated, while the other side plates were water-cooled forming two successive parallel vertical rectangular channels of dimensions 20 cm × 3.5 cm × 35 cm (length W, gap L, height H) each. At the bottom of the hot and cold plates air spargers were fitted. Water/ethylene glycol (100%) was used to fill the channels. The superficial gas velocity ranged from 0.0016 to 0.01 m/s. Top, bottom and sides of the channels were open to the water/ethylene glycol in the chamber which is the novel aspect of this study. Experimental data have been correlated as under: Natural convective heat transfer: Nu = 0.60 Gr 0.29, r = 0.96, σ = 0.186, 1.17 E6 < Gr < 1.48 E7; Bubble agitated heat transfer: St = 0.11( ReFrPr 2)-0.23, r = 0.82, σ = 0.002, 1.20 E-2 < ( ReFrPr 2) < 1.36 E2.

  17. Turbulent natural convection in vertical parallel-plate channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badr, H. M.; Habib, M. A.; Anwar, S.; Ben-Mansour, R.; Said, S. A. M.

    2006-11-01

    The problem of buoyancy driven turbulent flow in parallel-plate channels is investigated. The investigation is limited to vertical channels of uniform cross-section with different modes of heating. The details of the flow and thermal fields are obtained from the solution of the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy in addition to equations of the low Reynolds number turbulence model. The study covers Rayleigh number ranging from 105 to 107 and focuses on the effect of channel geometry on the characteristic of the flow and thermal fields as well as the local and average Nusselt number variation. A Nusselt number correlation has been developed in terms of a modified Rayleigh number and channel aspect ratio for the cases of symmetrically heated isothermal and isoflux conditions.

  18. Heat and mass transfer in a vertical channel under heat-gravitational convection conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrichenko, Michail; Nemova, Darya; Reich, Elisaveta; Subbotina, Svetlana; Khayrutdinova, Faina

    2016-03-01

    Heat-gravitational motion of an air flow in a vertical channel with one-sided heating in an area with low Reynolds number is stated in Boussinesq approximation. Hydraulic variables field in a heat-gravitational motion is modeled with the application of ANSYS-FLUENT. It is converted to average velocity and temperature values in a cross section of the channel. The value of an average velocity is determined by rate of heat supply in a barotropic flow with a polytropic coefficient nvertical channel with free air access and in the absence of gaps. In a channel with closed air access inleakage of the cold air through gaps on an unheated side leads to decrease in an average speed at least twice in comparison to channel with free air access.

  19. Effect of horizontal heat and fluid flow on the vertical temperature distribution in a semiconfining layer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, N.; Ge, S.

    1996-01-01

    By including the constant flow of heat and fluid in the horizontal direction, we develop an analytical solution for the vertical temperature distribution within the semiconfining layer of a typical aquifer system. The solution is an extension of the previous one-dimensional theory by Bredehoeft and Papadopulos [1965]. It provides a quantitative tool for analyzing the uncertainty of the horizontal heat and fluid flow. The analytical results demonstrate that horizontal flow of heat and fluid, if at values much smaller than those of the vertical, has a negligible effect on the vertical temperature distribution but becomes significant when it is comparable to the vertical.

  20. Pulse-Heated Vertical Electron Cyclotron Emission Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Keith Edward

    1995-01-01

    Determination of plasma parameters in tokamak experiments is of primary importance for learning to control and optimize fusion plasmas. Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics play an important role in these experiments and are planned for future test reactors, since they require only simple collecting optics in the harsh reactor environment. A novel diagnostic system, which extracts information about plasma parameters by examining the ECE resulting from a perturbation of the plasma, was examined and applied on the PBX-M tokamak. This diagnostic uses a brief pulse of power from the lower hybrid current drive system to create a population of superthermal electrons. These electrons evolve according to the Fokker-Planck equation, which involves dependences on the magnetic field pitch, ion charge state, background density, and electric field. Coincident with the evolution of the electrons is the evolution of their ECE radiation. The diagnostic exploits the fact that the temporal changes in the radiation are dependent upon those parameters which affect the electrons. The analysis method, which compares measured experimental signal with simulated radiation (as functions of frequency and time) and determines most probable plasma parameter values, was computationally tested for effectiveness and robustness. The method was extended to include determination of parameters of the lower hybrid current drive power deposition. A measurement system, based on a grating polychromator, was assembled, tested, and calibrated, and pulse-heated vertical ECE data were collected from the PBX-M tokamak. A proof-of-principle test of the diagnostic yielded positive results, resulting in information about the lower hybrid current drive deposition location.

  1. Transient natural convection of cold water in a vertical channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Ryoichi

    2016-05-01

    The two-dimensional differential transform method (DTM) is applied to analyse the transient natural convection of cold water in a vertical channel. The cold water gives rise to a density variation with temperature that may not be linearized. The vertical channel is composed of doubly infinite parallel plates, one of which has a constant prescribed temperature and the other of which is insulated. Considering the temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity of the water, approximate analytical (series) solutions for the temperature and flow velocity are derived. The transformed functions included in the solutions are obtained through a simple recursive procedure. Numerical computation is performed for the entire range of water temperature conditions around the temperature at the density extremum point, i.e. 4°C. Numerical results illustrate the effects of the temperature-dependent properties on the transient temperature and flow velocity profiles, volumetric flow rate, and skin friction. The DTM is a powerful tool for solving nonlinear transient problems as well as steady problems.

  2. A traceable physical calibration of the vertical advection-diffusion equation for modeling ocean heat uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Markus; Tailleux, Remi; Ferreira, David; Kuhlbrodt, Till; Gregory, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    The classic vertical advection-diffusion (VAD) balance is a central concept in studying the ocean heat budget, in particular in simple climate models (SCMs). Here we present a new framework to calibrate the parameters of the VAD equation to the vertical ocean heat balance of two fully-coupled climate models that is traceable to the models' circulation as well as to vertical mixing and diffusion processes. Based on temperature diagnostics, we derive an effective vertical velocity w∗ and turbulent diffusivity kν∗ for each individual physical process. In steady state, we find that the residual vertical velocity and diffusivity change sign in middepth, highlighting the different regional contributions of isopycnal and diapycnal diffusion in balancing the models' residual advection and vertical mixing. We quantify the impacts of the time evolution of the effective quantities under a transient 1% CO2 simulation and make the link to the parameters of currently employed SCMs.

  3. Natural convective heat transfer from square cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novomestský, Marcel; Smatanová, Helena; Kapjor, Andrej

    2016-06-01

    This article is concerned with natural convective heat transfer from square cylinder mounted on a plane adiabatic base, the cylinders having an exposed cylinder surface according to different horizontal angle. The cylinder receives heat from a radiating heater which results in a buoyant flow. There are many industrial applications, including refrigeration, ventilation and the cooling of electrical components, for which the present study may be applicable

  4. Residential vertical geothermal heat pump system models: Calibration to data

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, J.W.; McDowell, T.P.; Shonder, J.A.; Hughes, P.J.; Pahud, D.; Hellstroem, G.A.J.

    1997-12-31

    A detailed component-based simulation model of a geothermal heat pump system has been calibrated to monitored data taken from a family housing unit located at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The simulation model represents the housing unit, geothermal heat pump, ground heat exchanger, thermostat, blower, and ground-loop pump. Each of these component models was tuned to better match the measured data from the site. These tuned models were then interconnected to form the system model. The system model was then exercised in order to demonstrate its capabilities.

  5. Residential Vertical Geothermal Heat Pump System Models: Calibration to Data:

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, Jeff W.; McDowell, T. P.; Shonder, John A; Hughes, Patrick; Pahud, D.; Hellstrom, G.

    1997-06-01

    A detailed component-based simulation model of a geothermal heat pump system has been calibrated to monitored data taken from a family housing unit located at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The simulation model represents the housing unit, geothermal heat pump, ground heat exchanger, thermostat, blower, and ground-loop pump. Each of these component models was 'tuned' to better match the measured data from the site. These tuned models were then interconnect to form the system model. The system model was then exercised in order to demonatrate its capabilities.

  6. Solar Hot Water Heating by Natural Convection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate laboratory experiment in which a solar collector is used to heat water for domestic use. The working fluid is moved by natural convection so no pumps are required. Experimental apparatus is simple in design and operation so that data can be collected quickly and easily. (Author/JN)

  7. Method and apparatus for determining vertical heat flux of geothermal field

    DOEpatents

    Poppendiek, Heinz F.

    1982-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining vertical heat flux of a geothermal field, and mapping the entire field, is based upon an elongated heat-flux transducer (10) comprised of a length of tubing (12) of relatively low thermal conductivity with a thermopile (20) inside for measuring the thermal gradient between the ends of the transducer after it has been positioned in a borehole for a period sufficient for the tube to reach thermal equilibrium. The transducer is thermally coupled to the surrounding earth by a fluid annulus, preferably water or mud. A second transducer comprised of a length of tubing of relatively high thermal conductivity is used for a second thermal gradient measurement. The ratio of the first measurement to the second is then used to determine the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., from a precalculated graph, and using the value of thermal conductivity thus determined, then determining the vertical earth temperature gradient, b, from predetermined steady state heat balance equations which relate the undisturbed vertical earth temperature distributions at some distance from the borehole and earth thermal conductivity to the temperature gradients in the transducers and their thermal conductivity. The product of the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., and the earth's undisturbed vertical temperature gradient, b, then determines the earth's vertical heat flux. The process can be repeated many times for boreholes of a geothermal field to map vertical heat flux.

  8. Emissivity measurements in support of experiments on natural convection between a vertical cylinder and a surrounding array

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, J.E.

    1991-12-01

    Experimental measurements of surface emissivities of three metallic samples have been obtained in support of an experiment aimed at determining natural convection and total heat transfer for a heated vertical cylinder surrounded by an array of cooled vertical tubes. In some cases, the heated stainless steel cylinder was shrouded by a perforated aluminum outer cylinder. The surrounding cooled tubes were also aluminum. In this experiment, heat transfer from the heated tube and the surrounding outer cylinder will occur by a combination of natural convection and radiation. At temperatures near the melting point of aluminum, the radiant contribution is particularly important, accounting for 50% or more of the total heat transfer. Consequently, accurate knowledge of surface emissivities of the heated rods, outer cylinders and surrounding structures is needed in order to predict the system thermal response during the transient. Direct measurements of surface emissivities have been obtained for one stainless steel and two aluminum samples. The measurements were obtained using an infrared pyrometer sensitive to the 8--14 {mu}m wavelength range. A procedure for estimating total hemispherical emissivities based on the measured spectral, normal results is also provided.

  9. Emissivity measurements in support of experiments on natural convection between a vertical cylinder and a surrounding array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrien, J. E.

    1991-12-01

    Experimental measurements of surface emissivities of three metallic samples have been obtained in support of an experiment aimed at determining natural convection and total heat transfer for a heated vertical cylinder surrounded by an array of cooled vertical tubes. In some cases, the heated stainless steel cylinder was shrouded by a perforated aluminum outer cylinder. The surrounding cooled tubes were also aluminum. In this experiment, heat transfer from the heated tube and the surrounding outer cylinder will occur by a combination of natural convection and radiation. At temperatures near the melting point of aluminum, the radiant contribution is particularly important, accounting for 50 percent or more of the total heat transfer. Consequently, accurate knowledge of surface emissivities of the heated rods, outer cylinders and surrounding structures is needed in order to predict the system thermal response during the transient. Direct measurements of surface emissivities have been obtained for one stainless steel and two aluminum samples. The measurements were obtained using an infrared pyrometer sensitive to the 8-14 micron wavelength range. A procedure for estimating total hemispherical emissivities based on the measured spectral, normal results is also provided.

  10. Vertical heat flux in the ocean: Estimates from observations and from a coupled general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummins, Patrick F.; Masson, Diane; Saenko, Oleg A.

    2016-06-01

    The net heat uptake by the ocean in a changing climate involves small imbalances between the advective and diffusive processes that transport heat vertically. Generally, it is necessary to rely on global climate models to study these processes in detail. In the present study, it is shown that a key component of the vertical heat flux, namely that associated with the large-scale mean vertical circulation, can be diagnosed over extra-tropical regions from global observational data sets. This component is estimated based on the vertical velocity obtained from the geostrophic vorticity balance, combined with estimates of absolute geostrophic flow. Results are compared with the output of a non-eddy resolving, coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model. Reasonable agreement is found in the latitudinal distribution of the vertical heat flux, as well as in the area-integrated flux below about 250 m depth. The correspondence with the coupled model deteriorates sharply at depths shallower than 250 m due to the omission of equatorial regions from the calculation. The vertical heat flux due to the mean circulation is found to be dominated globally by the downward contribution from the Southern Hemisphere, in particular the Southern Ocean. This is driven by the Ekman vertical velocity which induces an upward transport of seawater that is cold relative to the horizontal average at a given depth. The results indicate that the dominant characteristics of the vertical transport of heat due to the mean circulation can be inferred from simple linear vorticity dynamics over much of the ocean.

  11. Instabilities and pattern evolution in a vertically heated annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, BoFu; Guo, ZhiWei; Ma, DongJun; Sun, DeJun

    2013-02-01

    The convection in an annular container with heated bottom, cooled top and insulated side walls are studied by both linear instability analysis and direct numerical simulation. The onset of convection is investigated by linear stability analysis and corresponding pattern selection mechanisms are discussed. The nonlinear evolution of different flow patterns and the convective heat transfer are simulated. The transition to oscillatory flow is also given by stability analysis where the base flow is a steady three dimensional flow. The stability predictions are in good agreement with the numerical simulations, including both the growth rate and the dimensionless frequency.

  12. Effect of viscous dissipation on natural convection flow between vertical parallel plates with time-periodic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Basant K.; Ajibade, Abiodun O.

    2012-04-01

    This article investigates the natural convection flow of viscous incompressible fluid in a channel formed by two infinite vertical parallel plates. Fully developed laminar flow is considered in a vertical channel with steady-periodic temperature regime on the boundaries. The effect of internal heating by viscous dissipation is taken into consideration. Separating the velocity and temperature fields into steady and periodic parts, the resulting second order ordinary differential equations are solved to obtain the expressions for velocity, and temperature. The amplitudes and phases of temperature and velocity are also obtained as well as the rate of heat transfer and the skin-friction on the plates. In presence of viscous dissipation, fluids of relatively small Prandtl number has higher temperature than the channel plates and as such, heat is being transferred from the fluid to the plate.

  13. Effect of viscous dissipation on natural convection flow between vertical parallel plates with time-periodic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, B. K.; Ajibade, A. O.

    2011-12-01

    This article investigates the natural convection flow of viscous incompressible fluid in a channel formed by two infinite vertical parallel plates. Fully developed laminar flow is considered in a vertical channel with steady-periodic temperature regime on the boundaries. The effect of internal heating by viscous dissipation is taken into consideration. Separating the velocity and temperature fields into steady and periodic parts, the resulting second order ordinary differential equations are solved to obtain the expressions for velocity, and temperature. The amplitudes and phases of temperature and velocity are also obtained as well as the rate of heat transfer and the skin friction on the plates. In presence of viscous dissipation, fluids of relatively small Prandtl number has higher temperature than the channel plates and as such, heat is being transferred from the fluid to the plate.

  14. Estimation of the average surface heat flux over an inhomogeneous terrain from the vertical velocity variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eilts, M. D.; Sundara-Rajan, A.; Evans, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    An indirect method of estimating the surface heat flux from observations of vertical velocity variance at the lower mid-levels of the convective atmospheric boundary layer is described. Comparison of surface heat flux estimates with those from boundary-layer heating rates is good, and this method seems to be especially suitable for inhomogeneous terrain for which the surface-layer profile method cannot be used.

  15. Computer cooling using a two phase minichannel thermosyphon loop heated from horizontal and vertical sides and cooled from vertical side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieliński, Henryk; Mikielewicz, Jarosław

    2010-10-01

    In the present paper it is proposed to consider the computer cooling capacity using the thermosyphon loop. A closed thermosyphon loop consists of combined two heaters and a cooler connected to each other by tubes. The first heater may be a CPU processor located on the motherboard of the personal computer. The second heater may be a chip of a graphic card placed perpendicular to the motherboard of personal computer. The cooler can be placed above the heaters on the computer chassis. The thermosyphon cooling system on the use of computer can be modeled using the rectangular thermosyphon loop with minichannels heated at the bottom horizontal side and the bottom vertical side and cooled at the upper vertical side. The riser and a downcomer connect these parts. A one-dimensional model of two-phase flow and heat transfer in a closed thermosyphon loop is based on mass, momentum, and energy balances in the evaporators, rising tube, condenser and the falling tube. The separate two-phase flow model is used in calculations. A numerical investigation for the analysis of the mass flux rate and heat transfer coefficient in the steady state has been accomplished.

  16. Natural Thermoelectric Heat Pump in Social Wasps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishay, Jacob S.; Pertsis, Vitaly; Rave, Eran; Goren, Alon; Bergman, David J.

    2003-05-01

    Photographs of wasps or hornets, taken with different temperature sensitive infrared cameras, reveal body temperatures that are sometimes significantly lower than the ambient temperature. This suggests that the hornets possess an intrinsic biological heat pump mechanism which can be used to achieve such cooling. Evidence is presented to substantiate this novel suggestion and to argue that the heat pump is most likely implemented by exploiting a thermoelectric effect in the hornet cuticle. Such a natural heat pump can conceivably also serve to cool the active hornet, engaged in daytime activities outside the nest at ambient temperatures exceeding 40 °C, to a body temperature that is low enough to allow its survival in extreme thermal conditions. It might also function as a means of raising the body temperature up to a level that enables the hornet to remain active even when the ambient temperature is as low as 10 °C.

  17. Pool boiling heat transfer from vertical heater array in liquid nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Chui, C.J.; Sehmbey, M.S.; Chow, L.C.; Hahn, O.J.

    1995-04-01

    The heat transfer from an array of discrete sources is expected to differ from the behavior of a single heat source due to the interaction between the flow induced by individual heat sources. This study details the results from experiments conducted to study the pool boiling heat transfer characteristics from a vertical heater array with flush-mounted heat sources. The lower heaters were found to enhance the heat transfer from upper heaters. The bubble pumped convection due to the lower heaters enhanced the preboiling heat transfer coefficient at the upper heater by as much as 700%. The critical heat flux from the upper heaters was also enhanced up to 15%. Correlations are presented for both these effects. 21 refs.

  18. Interaction of radiation and free convection on a heated vertical plate - Experiment and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, B. W.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study has been conducted in order to explore the interaction between laminar free convective and radiative transport from an isolated vertical plate with isoflux heating. The analysis focuses on buoyancy-driven free convection from this vertical plate which is coupled to radiation through the thermal boundary condition. Model predictions are compared with both experimental results and the analysis conducted by Cess (1964), in order to illustrate those areas where the perturbation technique deviated from the present solution.

  19. Transient conjugated mixed-convective heat transfer in a vertical plate channel with one wall heated discretely

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsay, Y. L.

    This study presents a numerical solution of the unsteady conjugated mixed-convection heat transfer in a vertical plate channel with one wall suddenly subjected to either isoflux or isothermal discrete heat sources. The effects of the dimensionless heat source length H1, the dimensionless spacing between heat sources H2, the dimensionless channel length L, the dimensionless heated-plate thickness Bl, the wall-to-fluid conductivity ratio K and the ratio of Grashof number to Reynolds number Gr/Re on the interface heat flux, Nusselt number and bulk fluid temperature are discussed in detail. Results show that the discrete heating can cause the heat transfer direction conversely from the fluid to the heated plate during the transient period, which is more significant for the cases with larger L and H2. For the system with isoflux discrete heat sources, the time required to reach the steady-state is shorter for larger H2. While the trend is reverse for system with isothermal discrete heat sources. Additionally, a higher ratio of the input energy is axially conducted through the plate wall from heated sections to unheated regions for a larger H2 and Bl or smaller L.

  20. Vertical heat fluxes through the Beaufort Sea Thermohaline staircase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padman, Laurie; Dillon, Thomas M.

    1987-09-01

    Microstructure profiles of temperature, conductivity, and velocity shear during the Arctic Internal Wave Experiment (AIWEX) in March-April 1985 in the Beaufort Sea are used to investigate the thermodynamic processes in a diffusive thermohaline staircase. The staircase occurs between depths of about 320 and 430 m, above the core of the relatively warm, salty Atlantic water, where the mean temperature and salinity are increasing with depth. Individual isothermal layers can be tracked for at least several hours, suggesting a horizontal length scale of several hundred meters or more, assuming a typical relative velocity of 0.01 m s-1 at this time. Over the depth range 320-430 m the mean (average over several steps) density ratio = β varies between 4 and 6, while the typical temperature difference between layers decreases from 0.012° to 0.004°C. The mean thickness of the layers also varies, from 1 m at 320 m depth to 2 m at 430 m. The relationship proposed by Kelley (1984), relating layer height to , , and molecular properties of the fluid, overestimates the mean layer thickness by about a factor of 2. The variability of staircase characteristics suggests that oceanic staircases may rarely, if ever, be steady state, but in general be slowly evolving from previous perturbations. Heat fluxes estimated from laboratory-based flux laws, involving Rρ and ΔT, are in the range 0.02 heat fluxes through the maximum interfacial temperature gradients. There are no interfaces where the kinetic energy dissipation rate (averaged over 0.5 m) exceeds the lower limit for diapycnal mixing, 24.5νN2.

  1. Schlieren visualization of water natural convection in a vertical ribbed channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossa, M.; Misale, M.; Tanda, G.

    2015-11-01

    Schlieren techniques are valuable tools for the qualitative and quantitative visualizations of flows in a wide range of scientific and engineering disciplines. A large number of schlieren systems have been developed and documented in the literature; majority of applications involve flows of gases, typically air. In this work, a schlieren technique is applied to visualize the buoyancy-induced flow inside vertical ribbed channels using water as convective fluid. The test section consists of a vertical plate made of two thin sheets of chrome-plated copper with a foil heater sandwiched between them; the external sides of the plate are roughened with transverse, square-cross-sectioned ribs. Two parallel vertical walls, smooth and unheated, form with the heated ribbed plate two adjacent, identical and asymmetrically heated, vertical channels. Results include flow schlieren visualizations with colour-band filters, reconstructions of the local heat transfer coefficient distributions along the ribbed surfaces and comparisons with past experiments performed using air as working fluid.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Free-Convection Heat Transfer in Vertical Tube at Large Grashof Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R G; Diaguila, A J

    1955-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation conducted to study free-convection heat transfer in a stationary vertical tube closed at the bottom. The walls of the tube were heated, and heated air in the tube was continuously replaced by fresh cool air at the top. The tube was designed to provide a gravitational field with Grashof numbers of a magnitude comparable with those generated by the centrifugal field in rotating-blade coolant passages (10(8) to 10(13)). Local heat-transfer coefficients in the turbulent-flow range and the temperature field within the fluid were obtained.

  3. Experimental study on condensation heat transfer characteristics of R410A in short vertical tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenyun; Jia, Li; Tan, Zetao

    2015-06-01

    An experimental study on condensation heat transfer of R410A in short vertical tubes (8.02 mm ID and 10.7mm ID) was presented. Experiments were performed in eight short copper tubes length varied from 300mm to 600mm at mass fluxes range of 58-246 kg m-2s-1 and saturation temperature of 38°C. Effects of mass flux, tube length on condensation heat transfer coefficient were investigated. The distribution of temperature, thickness of condensate film and local condensation heat transfer coefficient along the tube were also analyzed. It is indicated that the entrance effect played an important role in condensation heat transfer of vertical tube, and the influence of entrance effect on average condensation heat transfer coefficients will weaken with the length of tube in the experimental condensation. The experimental results were compared with four well known correlations available in literatures, and the Chen correlation shows good agreement with the experimental data but with ±40% deviation. A new modified condensation heat transfer correlation with 12.7% mean deviation was developed to predict the condensation heat transfer coefficients in short vertical tube based on the experimental data.

  4. Heterogeneous nanofluids: natural convection heat transfer enhancement

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Convective heat transfer using different nanofluid types is investigated. The domain is differentially heated and nanofluids are treated as heterogeneous mixtures with weak solutal diffusivity and possible Soret separation. Owing to the pronounced Soret effect of these materials in combination with a considerable solutal expansion, the resulting solutal buoyancy forces could be significant and interact with the initial thermal convection. A modified formulation taking into account the thermal conductivity, viscosity versus nanofluids type and concentration and the spatial heterogeneous concentration induced by the Soret effect is presented. The obtained results, by solving numerically the full governing equations, are found to be in good agreement with the developed solution based on the scale analysis approach. The resulting convective flows are found to be dependent on the local particle concentration φ and the corresponding solutal to thermal buoyancy ratio N. The induced nanofluid heterogeneity showed a significant heat transfer modification. The heat transfer in natural convection increases with nanoparticle concentration but remains less than the enhancement previously underlined in forced convection case. PMID:21711755

  5. Heterogeneous nanofluids: natural convection heat transfer enhancement.

    PubMed

    Oueslati, Fakhreddine Segni; Bennacer, Rachid

    2011-01-01

    Convective heat transfer using different nanofluid types is investigated. The domain is differentially heated and nanofluids are treated as heterogeneous mixtures with weak solutal diffusivity and possible Soret separation. Owing to the pronounced Soret effect of these materials in combination with a considerable solutal expansion, the resulting solutal buoyancy forces could be significant and interact with the initial thermal convection. A modified formulation taking into account the thermal conductivity, viscosity versus nanofluids type and concentration and the spatial heterogeneous concentration induced by the Soret effect is presented. The obtained results, by solving numerically the full governing equations, are found to be in good agreement with the developed solution based on the scale analysis approach. The resulting convective flows are found to be dependent on the local particle concentration φ and the corresponding solutal to thermal buoyancy ratio N. The induced nanofluid heterogeneity showed a significant heat transfer modification. The heat transfer in natural convection increases with nanoparticle concentration but remains less than the enhancement previously underlined in forced convection case. PMID:21711755

  6. Heterogeneous nanofluids: natural convection heat transfer enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oueslati, Fakhreddine Segni; Bennacer, Rachid

    2011-12-01

    Convective heat transfer using different nanofluid types is investigated. The domain is differentially heated and nanofluids are treated as heterogeneous mixtures with weak solutal diffusivity and possible Soret separation. Owing to the pronounced Soret effect of these materials in combination with a considerable solutal expansion, the resulting solutal buoyancy forces could be significant and interact with the initial thermal convection. A modified formulation taking into account the thermal conductivity, viscosity versus nanofluids type and concentration and the spatial heterogeneous concentration induced by the Soret effect is presented. The obtained results, by solving numerically the full governing equations, are found to be in good agreement with the developed solution based on the scale analysis approach. The resulting convective flows are found to be dependent on the local particle concentration φ and the corresponding solutal to thermal buoyancy ratio N. The induced nanofluid heterogeneity showed a significant heat transfer modification. The heat transfer in natural convection increases with nanoparticle concentration but remains less than the enhancement previously underlined in forced convection case.

  7. Natural convection within a vertical finite-length channel in free space

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.C.; Chang, K.P.; Hung, Y.H. )

    1994-04-01

    Natural convection within a vertical finite length channel in free space is studied in this article to remove assumptions that need to be made on velocity and temperature profiles at the channel entrance. For small channel aspect ratios and low Rayleigh numbers, significant deviations of the Nusselt number and temperature distributions exist due to the effects of vertical thermal diffusion and free space stratification in the channel. A new correlation was proposed on induced Reynolds number for vertical finite length channel. 8 refs.

  8. Plasma break-down and re-build: same functional vertical graphenes from diverse natural precursors.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong Han; Rider, Amanda Evelyn; Han, Zhao Jun; Kumar, Shailesh; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2013-10-18

    Plasmas, the 4(th) state of matter, uniformly transform natural precursors with different chemical composition in solid, liquid, and gas states into the same functional vertical graphenes in a single-step process within a few minutes. Functional vertical graphenes show reliable biosensing properties, strong binding with proteins, and improved adhesion to substrates. PMID:24002820

  9. Heat-transfer characteristics of climbing film evaporation in a vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Luopeng; Chen, Xue; Shen, Shengqiang

    2010-09-15

    Heat-transfer characteristics of climbing film evaporation were experimentally investigated on a vertical climbing film evaporator heated by tube-outside hot water. The experimental setup was designed for determining the effect of the height of feed water inside a vertical tube and the range of temperature difference on local heat transfer coefficient inside a vertical tube (h{sub i}). In this setup, the height of feed water was successfully controlled and the polypropylene shell effectively impedes the heat loss to the ground. The results indicated that a reduction in the height of feed water contributed to a significant increase in h{sub i} if no dry patches around the wall of the heated tube appeared inside the tube. The height ratio of feed water R{sub h} = 0.3 was proposed as the optimal one as dry patches destroyed the continuous climbing film when R{sub h} is under 0.3. It was found that the minimum temperature difference driving climbing film evaporation is suggested as 5 C due to a sharp reduction in h{sub i} for temperature difference below 5 C. The experiment also showed that h{sub i} increased with an increase in temperature difference, which proved the superiority of climbing film evaporation in utilizing low-grade surplus heating source due to its wide range of driving temperature difference. The experimental results were compared with the previous literature and demonstrated a satisfactory agreement. (author)

  10. Heat transfer analysis in a two-side heated smooth square vertical channel with adverse and favorable mixed convection

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.; Zhang, X.; Khan, J.A.; Bell, D.

    1997-07-01

    Experimental heat transfer measurements and analysis for mixed convection in a vertical square channel are presented. The flow direction is changed with respect to the earth's gravity field by selectively opening and closing the flow control valves. Desired flow directions are selected such that buoyancy assists or opposes the bulk flow direction pressure gradient. The heating condition is asymmetric. Most previous experiments used symmetrically heated circular tubes. Present configuration shows significant increase in the Nusselt number in both assisted and opposed flow conditions. In general, opposed flow shows higher heat transfer coefficients. Unlike symmetric heating conditions, Nusselt number ratio is observed to be increasing with increasing Gr/Re or Gr/Re{sup 2} ratios for both assisted and opposed flow conditions.

  11. The Reynolds analogy for the mixed convection over a vertical surface with prescribed heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magyari, E.; Pop, I.

    2009-03-01

    The steady mixed convection boundary layer flow over a vertical surface with prescribed heat flux is revisited in this Note. The subset of solutions which can be obtained with the aid of the Reynolds analogy is discussed in a close relationship with the dual solutions reported by Merkin and Mahmood [1] for impermeable, and more recently by Ishak et al. [2], for permeable surfaces.

  12. Heat transfer effects in vertically emplaced high level nuclear waste container

    SciTech Connect

    Moujaes, S.F.; Lei, Y.M.

    1994-05-01

    Modeling free convection heat transfer in an cylindrical annular enclosure is still an active area of research and an important problem to be addressed in the high level nuclear waste repository. For the vertically emplaced waste container, the air gap which is between the container shell and the rock borehole, have an important role of dissipating heat to surrounding rack. These waste containers are vertically emplaced in the borehole 300 meters below ground, and in a horizontal grid of 30 {times} 8 meters apart. The borehole will be capped after the container emplacement. The expected initial heat generated is between 3--4.74 kW per container depending on the type of waste. The goal of this study is to use a computer simulation model to find the borehole wall, air-gap and the container outer wall temperature distributions.

  13. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer inside a vertical channel in evaporating a heated falling glycols liquid film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nait Alla, Abderrahman; Feddaoui, M'barek; Meftah, Hicham

    2015-12-01

    The interactive effects of heat and mass transfer in the evaporation of ethylene and propylene glycol flowing as falling films on vertical channel was investigated. The liquid film falls along a left plate which is externally subjected to a uniform heat flux while the right plate is the dry wall and is kept thermally insulated. The model solves the coupled governing equations in both phases together with the boundary and interfacial conditions. The systems of equations obtained by using an implicit finite difference method are solved by Tridiagonal Matrix Algorithm. The influence of the inlet liquid flow, Reynolds number in the gas flow and the wall heat flux on the intensity of heat and mass transfers are examined. A comparison between the results obtained for studied glycols and water in the same conditions is made. The results indicate that water evaporates in more intense way in comparison to glycols and the increase of gas flow rate tends to improve slightly the evaporation.

  14. Fundamental Study of Local Heat Transfer in Forced Convective Boiling of Ammonia on Vertical Flat Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Hun; Arima, Hirofumi; Ikegami, Yasuyuki

    In the present study, the fundamental experiments that investigate characteristics of local heat transfer in forced convective boiling on vertical flat plate with 2-mm channel height are taken to realize plate type compact evaporator for OTEC or STEC. The experiments are performed with ammonia as the working fluid. The experiments are also carried out with the following test conditions; saturated pressure = 0.7, 0.8, 0.9 MPa, mass flux = 7.5, 10, 15 kg/(m2•s), heat flux = 15, 20, 25 kW/m2 and inlet quality = 0.1 ~ 0.4 [-]. The result shows that the wall superheated temperature of forced convective boiling is lower than that of pool boiling. And the heat transfer coefficient increases with an increase in quality and the decrease in the local heat flux and saturated pressure for prescribed experimental conditions. However, local heat transfer coefficients are not affected by mass fluxes in the prescribed experimental conditions. An empirical correlation that can predict the local heat transfer coefficient on vertical flat plate within experimental conditions is also proposed.

  15. Impact of cosmological satellites on the vertical heating of the Milky Way disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moetazedian, R.; Just, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a high-resolution study of the impact of realistic satellite galaxies, extracted from cosmological simulations of Milky Way haloes including 6 Aquarius suites and Via Lactea II, on the dynamics of the Galactic disc. The initial conditions for the multicomponent Milky Way galaxy were generated using the GALIC code, to ensure a system in dynamical equilibrium state prior to addition of satellites. Candidate subhaloes that came closer than 25 kpc to the centre of the host dark matter haloes with initial mass enclosed within the tidal radius, Mtid ≥ 108 M⊙ = 0.003 Mdisc, were identified, inserted into our high-resolution N-body simulations and evolved for 2 Gyr. We quantified the vertical heating due to such impacts by measuring the disc thickness and squared vertical velocity dispersion σ z2 across the disc. According to our analysis, the strength of heating is strongly dependent on the high-mass end of the subhalo distribution from cosmological simulations. The mean increase of the vertical dispersion is ˜20 km2 s-2 Gyr-1 for R > 4 kpc with a flat radial profile while, excluding Aq-F2 results, the mean heating is < 12 km2 s-2 Gyr-1, corresponding to 28 and 17 per cent of the observed vertical heating rate in the solar neighbourhood. Taking into account the statistical dispersion around the mean, we miss the observed heating rate by more than 3σ. We observed a general flaring of the disc height in the case of all seven simulations in the outer disc.

  16. The effect of conjugate heat transfer on MHD mixed convection about a vertical slender hollow cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Ahmet

    2011-04-01

    The problem of steady laminar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mixed convection heat transfer about a vertical slender hollow cylinder is studied numerically, under the effect of wall conduction. A uniform magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the cylinder. The non-similar solutions using the Keller box method are obtained. The wall conduction parameter, the magnetic parameter and the Richardson number are the main parameters. For various values of these parameters the local skin friction and local heat transfer parameters are determined. The validity of the methodology is checked by comparing the results with those available in the open literature and a fairly good agreement is observed. Finally, it is determined that the local skin friction and the local heat transfer coefficients increase with an increase the magnetic parameter Mn and buoyancy parameter Ri and decrease with conjugate heat transfer parameter p.

  17. Unsteady Boundary Layer Flow and Heat Transfer of a Casson Fluid past an Oscillating Vertical Plate with Newtonian Heating

    PubMed Central

    Hussanan, Abid; Zuki Salleh, Mohd; Tahar, Razman Mat; Khan, Ilyas

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the heat transfer effect on the unsteady boundary layer flow of a Casson fluid past an infinite oscillating vertical plate with Newtonian heating is investigated. The governing equations are transformed to a systems of linear partial differential equations using appropriate non-dimensional variables. The resulting equations are solved analytically by using the Laplace transform method and the expressions for velocity and temperature are obtained. They satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions and reduce to some well-known solutions for Newtonian fluids. Numerical results for velocity, temperature, skin friction and Nusselt number are shown in various graphs and discussed for embedded flow parameters. It is found that velocity decreases as Casson parameters increases and thermal boundary layer thickness increases with increasing Newtonian heating parameter. PMID:25302782

  18. Experimental study on condensation heat transfer of steam on vertical titanium plates with different surface energies

    SciTech Connect

    Baojin, Qi; Li, Zhang; Hong, Xu; Yan, Sun

    2011-01-15

    Visual experiments were employed to investigate heat transfer characteristics of steam on vertical titanium plates with/without surface modifications for different surface energies. Stable dropwise condensation and filmwise condensation were achieved on two surface modification titanium plates, respectively. Dropwise and rivulet filmwise co-existing condensation form of steam was observed on unmodified titanium surfaces. With increase in the surface subcooling, the ratio of area ({eta}) covered by drops decreased and departure diameter of droplets increased, resulting in a decrease in condensation heat transfer coefficient. Condensation heat transfer coefficient decreased sharply with the values of {eta} decreasing when the fraction of the surface area covered by drops was greater than that covered by rivulets. Otherwise, the value of {eta} had little effect on the heat transfer performance. Based on the experimental phenomena observed, the heat flux through the surface was proposed to express as the sum of the heat flux through the dropwise region and rivulet filmwise region. The heat flux through the whole surface was the weighted mean value of the two regions mentioned above. The model presented explains the gradual change of heat transfer coefficient for transition condensation with the ratio of area covered by drops. The simulation results agreed well with the present experimental data when the subcooling temperature is lower than 10 C. (author)

  19. Role of Induced Magnetic Field on Transient Natural Convection Flow in a Vertical Channel: The Riemann Sum Approximation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, B. K.; Sani, I.

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigates the role of induced magnetic field on a transient natural convection flow of an electrically conducting, incompressible and viscous fluid in a vertical channel formed by two infinite vertical parallel plates. The transient flow formation inside the channel is due to sudden asymmetric heating of channel walls. The time dependent momentum, energy and magnetic induction equations are solved semi-analytically using the Laplace transform technique along with the Riemann-sum approximation method. The solutions obtained are validated by comparisons with the closed form solutions obtained for the steady states which have been derived separately and also by the implicit finite difference method. Graphical results for the temperature, velocity, induced magnetic field, current density, and skin-friction based on the semi-analytical solutions are presented and discussed.

  20. Vertical disc heating in Milky Way-sized galaxies in a cosmological context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand, Robert J. J.; Springel, Volker; Gómez, Facundo A.; Marinacci, Federico; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Campbell, David J. R.; Jenkins, Adrian

    2016-06-01

    Vertically extended, high velocity dispersion stellar distributions appear to be a ubiquitous feature of disc galaxies, and both internal and external mechanisms have been proposed to be the major driver of their formation. However, it is unclear to what extent each mechanism can generate such a distribution, which is likely to depend on the assembly history of the galaxy. To this end, we perform 16 high-resolution cosmological-zoom simulations of Milky Way-sized galaxies using the state-of-the-art cosmological magnetohydrodynamical code AREPO, and analyse the evolution of the vertical kinematics of the stellar disc in connection with various heating mechanisms. We find that the bar is the dominant heating mechanism in most cases, whereas spiral arms, radial migration and adiabatic heating from mid-plane density growth are all subdominant. The strongest source, though less prevalent than bars, originates from external perturbations from satellites/subhaloes of masses log10(M/M⊙) ≳ 10. However, in many simulations the orbits of newborn star particles become cooler with time, such that they dominate the shape of the age-velocity dispersion relation and overall vertical disc structure unless a strong external perturbation takes place.

  1. Numerical study of mixed convection around a sphere rotating about its vertical axis in a Newtonian fluid at rest and subject to a heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Hatem, N.; Philippe, C.; Mbow, C.; Kabdi, Z.; Najoua, S.; Daguenet, M.

    1996-03-01

    The authors study numerically the steady state laminar mixed convection around a sphere heated by a nonuniform flux in a Newtonian fluid. The sphere rotates around its vertical axis. The governing transfer equations in this three-dimensional problem are solved by using the method of Cebeci-Keller. Three types of convection are considered: pure rotation, pure natural convection, and mixed convection. The profiles of the coefficients of heat transfer and local friction, as well as the profiles of temperature, will be determined for various distributions of a heat flux. In the case of a two-dimensional problem, the results agree with those in the literature.

  2. Natural convection in enclosures. Proceedings of the nineteenth national heat transfer conference, Orlando, FL, July 27-30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Torrance, K.E.; Catton, I.

    1980-01-01

    Natural convection in low aspect ratio rectangular enclosures is considered along with three-dimensional convection within rectangular boxes, natural convection flow visualization in irradiated water cooled by air flow over the surface, free convection in vertical slots, the stratification in natural convection in vertical enclosures, the flow structure with natural convection in inclined air-filled enclosures, and natural convection across tilted, rectangular enclosures of small aspect ratio. Attention is given to the effect of wall conduction and radiation on natural convection in a vertical slot with uniform heat generation of the heated wall, a numerical study of thermal insulation enclosure, free convection in a piston-cylinder enclosure with sinusoidal piston motion, natural convection heat transfer between bodies and their spherical enclosure, an experimental study of the steady natural convection in a horizontal annulus with irregular boundaries, three-dimensional natural convection in a porous medium between concentric inclined cylinders, a numerical solution for natural convection in concentric spherical annuli, and heat transfer by natural convection in porous media between two concentric spheres.

  3. The global response to vertical diabatic heating structures associated with the Madden-Julian oscillation derived from TRMM estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J.; Woolnough, S.; Inness, P.

    2013-12-01

    The anomalous global atmospheric circulation associated with the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is examined using composite vertical anomalous diabatic heating structures based on Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) estimates and reanalysis datasets and integrating a primitive equations model. Variations in the dynamical response from the observational and reanalysis products are investigated in relation to the detailed structure of the vertical structure of heating of the MJO, with specific focus of the role of the westward tilting with altitude in the heating, clearly evident in three reanalysis heating structures but is less well pronounced in the TRMM heating structures. It was found that the atmospheric response to the reanalysis heatings were far more consistent compared to the responses from the TRMM heating estimates. Examination of the moisture flux during the main active phase of the MJO revealed a surplus in moisture convergence ahead of the anomalous heating from each of the reanalysis integrations, which was found to be directly attributed to the vertical tilt in heating structure. In contrast, the response to the TRMM heatings showed no phase shift in moisture convergence in relation to the convective heating and was understood to be a consequence of the weaker representation of vertical tilting in heating structure. It was suggested that the westward tilt in heating could therefore play an important role in promoting convection east of the main heating region. The dynamical response to composite vertical diabatic heating structures associated with the MJO from simulations with Unified Model (UM) HadGEM3 with standard and enhanced (x1.5) entrainment rates are also examined to investigate the relationship between the dynamical response to the heating profile and quality of MJO simulations.

  4. Application of a Differential Transform Method to the Transient Natural Convection Problem in a Vertical Tube with Variable Fluid Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Ryoichi

    2016-02-01

    The transient natural convection of a viscous fluid in a heated vertical tube is studied using the two-dimensional differential transform method (DTM). A time-dependent Dirichlet boundary condition is imposed for tube wall temperature. The partial differential equations for the velocity and temperature fields within the tube are solved by the DTM while considering temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity of the fluid. As a result, tractable solutions in double-series form are derived for the temperature and flow velocity. The transformed functions included in the solutions are obtained through a simple recursive procedure. Numerical results illustrate the effects of temperature-dependent properties on transient temperature and flow behaviour, including the Nusselt number and volumetric flow rate. The DTM gives accurate series solutions without any special functions for nonlinear transient heat transfer problems which are advantageous in finding the derivative or integral.

  5. Buoyant instabilities in downward flow in a symmetrically heated vertical channel

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, G.; Greif, R.

    1996-07-01

    This study of the downward flow of nitrogen in a tall, partially heated vertical channel (upstream isothermal at T{sub in}*, heated region isothermal at T{sub s}* downstream adiabatic) shows the strong effects of buoyancy even for small temperature differences. Time-dependent oscillations including periodic flow reversals occur along the channel walls. Although the flow and heat transfer are asymmetric, the temperature and axial component of velocity show symmetric reflections at two times that are half a period apart and the lateral component of velocity shows antisymmetric reflections at the two times. There is strong interaction between the downward flow in the central region of the channel and the upward flow along the heated channel walls. At the top of the heated region, the upward buoyant flow turns toward the center of the channel and is incorporated into the downward flow. Along the channel centerline there are nonmonotonic variations of the axial component of velocity and temperature and a large lateral component of velocity that reverses direction periodically. Results are presented for Re = 219.7 and Gr/Re{sup 2} = 1.83, 8.0, and 13.7. The heat transfer and the frequency of the oscillations increases and the flow and temperature fields become more complex as Gr/Re{sup 2} increases. The results have applications to fiber drying, food processing, crystal growth, solar energy collection, cooling of electronic circuits, ventilation, etc.

  6. Experimental investigation on the heat transfer characteristics and flow pattern in vertical narrow channels heated from one side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lihao; Li, Gang; Tao, Leren

    2016-07-01

    Experimental investigation for the flow boiling of water in a vertical rectangular channel was conducted to reveal the boiling heat transfer mechanism and flow patterns map aspects. The onset of nucleate boiling went upward with the increasing of the working fluid mass flow rate or the decreasing of the inlet working fluid temperature. As the vapour quality was increased, the local heat transfer coefficient increased first, then decreased, followed by various flow patterns. The test data from other researchers had a similar pattern transition for the bubble-slug flow and the slug-annular flow. Flow pattern transition model analysis was performed to make the comparison with current test data. The slug-annular and churn-annular transition models showed a close trend with current data except that the vapor phase superficial velocity of flow pattern transition was much higher than that of experimental data.

  7. Heat Transfer in MHD Mixed Convection Flow of a Ferrofluid along a Vertical Channel.

    PubMed

    Gul, Aaiza; Khan, Ilyas; Shafie, Sharidan; Khalid, Asma; Khan, Arshad

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated heat transfer in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mixed convection flow of ferrofluid along a vertical channel. The channel with non-uniform wall temperatures was taken in a vertical direction with transverse magnetic field. Water with nanoparticles of magnetite (Fe3O4) was selected as a conventional base fluid. In addition, non-magnetic (Al2O3) aluminium oxide nanoparticles were also used. Comparison between magnetic and magnetite nanoparticles were also conducted. Fluid motion was originated due to buoyancy force together with applied pressure gradient. The problem was modelled in terms of partial differential equations with physical boundary conditions. Analytical solutions were obtained for velocity and temperature. Graphical results were plotted and discussed. It was found that temperature and velocity of ferrofluids depend strongly on viscosity and thermal conductivity together with magnetic field. The results of the present study when compared concurred with published work. PMID:26550837

  8. Heat Transfer in MHD Mixed Convection Flow of a Ferrofluid along a Vertical Channel

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Aaiza; Khan, Ilyas; Shafie, Sharidan; Khalid, Asma; Khan, Arshad

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated heat transfer in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mixed convection flow of ferrofluid along a vertical channel. The channel with non-uniform wall temperatures was taken in a vertical direction with transverse magnetic field. Water with nanoparticles of magnetite (Fe3O4) was selected as a conventional base fluid. In addition, non-magnetic (Al2O3) aluminium oxide nanoparticles were also used. Comparison between magnetic and magnetite nanoparticles were also conducted. Fluid motion was originated due to buoyancy force together with applied pressure gradient. The problem was modelled in terms of partial differential equations with physical boundary conditions. Analytical solutions were obtained for velocity and temperature. Graphical results were plotted and discussed. It was found that temperature and velocity of ferrofluids depend strongly on viscosity and thermal conductivity together with magnetic field. The results of the present study when compared concurred with published work. PMID:26550837

  9. Two-phase distribution in the vertical flow line of a domestic wet central heating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fsadni, A.-M.; Ge, Y. T.

    2013-04-01

    The theoretical and experimental aspects of bubble distribution in bubbly two-phase flow are reviewed in the context of the micro bubbles present in a domestic gas fired wet central heating system. The latter systems are mostly operated through the circulation of heated standard tap water through a closed loop circuit which often results in water supersaturated with dissolved air. This leads to micro bubble nucleation at the primary heat exchanger wall, followed by detachment along the flow. Consequently, a bubbly two-phase flow characterises the flow line of such systems. The two-phase distribution across the vertical and horizontal pipes was measured through a consideration of the volumetric void fraction, quantified through photographic techniques. The bubble distribution in the vertical pipe in down flow conditions was measured to be quasi homogenous across the pipe section with a negligible reduction in the void fraction at close proximity to the pipe wall. Such a reduction was more evident at lower bulk fluid velocities.

  10. A rigorous bound on the vertical transport of heat in Rayleigh-Bénard convection at infinite Prandtl number with mixed thermal boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, Jared P.; Wittenberg, Ralf W.

    2014-09-01

    A rigorous upper bound on the Nusselt number is derived for infinite Prandtl number Rayleigh-Bénard convection for a fluid constrained between no-slip, mixed thermal vertical boundaries. The result suggests that the thermal boundary condition does not affect the qualitative nature of the heat transport. The bound is obtained with the use of a nonlinear, stably stratified background temperature profile in the bulk, notwithstanding the lack of boundary control of the temperature due to the Robin boundary conditions.

  11. Potential vertical movement of large heat-generating waste packages in salt.

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Daniel James; Martinez, Mario J.; Hardin, Ernest L.

    2013-05-01

    With renewed interest in disposal of heat-generating waste in bedded or domal salt formations, scoping analyses were conducted to estimate rates of waste package vertical movement. Vertical movement is found to result from thermal expansion, from upward creep or heave of the near-field salt, and from downward buoyant forces on the waste package. A two-pronged analysis approach was used, with thermal-mechanical creep modeling, and coupled thermal-viscous flow modeling. The thermal-mechanical approach used well-studied salt constitutive models, while the thermal-viscous approach represented the salt as a highly viscous fluid. The Sierra suite of coupled simulation codes was used for both approaches. The waste package in all simulations was a right-circular cylinder with the density of steel, in horizontal orientation. A time-decaying heat generation function was used to represent commercial spent fuel with typical burnup and 50-year age. Results from the thermal-mechanical base case showed approximately 27 cm initial uplift of the package, followed by gradual relaxation closely following the calculated temperature history. A similar displacement history was obtained with the package density set equal to that of salt. The slight difference in these runs is attributable to buoyant displacement (sinking) and is on the order of 1 mm in 2,000 years. Without heat generation the displacement stabilizes at a fraction of millimeter after a few hundred years. Results from thermal-viscous model were similar, except that the rate of sinking was constant after cooldown, at approximately 0.15 mm per 1,000 yr. In summary, all calculations showed vertical movement on the order of 1 mm or less in 2,000 yr, including calculations using well-established constitutive models for temperature-dependent salt deformation. Based on this finding, displacement of waste packages in a salt repository is not a significant repository performance issue.

  12. Characterization of heat loads from mitigated and unmitigated vertical displacement events in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Hollmann, E. M.; Moyer, R. A.; Commaux, N.; Jernigan, T. J.; Eidietis, N. W.; Humphreys, D. A.; Strait, E. J.; Wesley, J. C.; Lasnier, C. J.; Pitts, R. A.; Sugihara, M.; Watkins, J.

    2013-06-15

    Experiments have been conducted on the DIII-D tokamak to study the distribution and repeatability of heat loads and vessel currents resulting from vertical displacement events (VDEs). For unmitigated VDEs, the radiated power fraction appears to be of order 50%, with the remaining power dominantly conducted to the vessel walls. Shot-to-shot scatter in heat loads measured at one toroidal location is not large (<±50%), suggesting that toroidal asymmetries in conducted heat loads are not large. Conducted heat loads are clearly observed during the current quench (CQ) of both mitigated and unmitigated disruptions. Significant poloidal asymmetries in heat loads and radiated power are often observed in the experiments but are not yet understood. Energy dissipated resistively in the conducting walls during the CQ appears to be small (<5%). The mitigating effect of neon massive gas injection (MGI) as a function of MGI trigger delay has also been studied. Improved mitigation is observed as the MGI trigger delay is decreased. For sufficiently early MGI mitigation, close to 100% radiated energy and a reduction of roughly a factor 2 in vessel forces is achieved.

  13. An analytical model for particulate deposition on vertical heat transfer surfaces in a boiling environment

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, R.H.; Rider, J.L.; Waldman, L.A.

    1993-10-01

    A frequent problem in heat exchange equipment is the deposition of particulates entrained in the working fluid onto heat transfer surfaces. These deposits increase the overall heat transfer resistance and can significantly degrade the performance of the heat exchanger. Accurate prediction of the deposition rate is necessary to ensure that the design and specified operating conditions of the heat exchanger adequately address the effects of this deposit layer. Although the deposition process has been studied in considerable detail, much of the work has focused on investigating individual aspects of the deposition process. This paper consolidates this previous research into a mechanistically based analytical prediction model for particulate deposition from a boiling liquid onto vertical heat transfer surfaces. Consistent with the well known Kern-Seaton approach, the model postulates net particulate accumulation to depend on the relative contributions of deposition and reentrainment processes. Mechanisms for deposition include boiling, momentum, and diffusion effects. Reentrainment is presumed to occur via an intermittent erosion process, with the energy for particle removal being supplied by turbulent flow instabilities. The contributions of these individual mechanisms are integrated to obtain a single equation for the deposit thickness versus time. The validity of the resulting model is demonstrated by comparison with data published in the open literature. Model estimates show good agreement with data obtained over a range of thermal-hydraulic conditions in both flow and pool boiling environments. The utility of the model in performing parametric studies (e.g. to determine the effect of flow velocity on net deposition) is also demonstrated. The initial success of the model suggests that it could prove useful in establishing a range of heat exchanger. operating conditions to minimize deposition.

  14. Vertical and Horizontal Vegetation Structure across Natural and Modified Habitat Types at Mount Kilimanjaro.

    PubMed

    Rutten, Gemma; Ensslin, Andreas; Hemp, Andreas; Fischer, Markus

    2015-01-01

    In most habitats, vegetation provides the main structure of the environment. This complexity can facilitate biodiversity and ecosystem services. Therefore, measures of vegetation structure can serve as indicators in ecosystem management. However, many structural measures are laborious and require expert knowledge. Here, we used consistent and convenient measures to assess vegetation structure over an exceptionally broad elevation gradient of 866-4550 m above sea level at Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. Additionally, we compared (human)-modified habitats, including maize fields, traditionally managed home gardens, grasslands, commercial coffee farms and logged and burned forests with natural habitats along this elevation gradient. We distinguished vertical and horizontal vegetation structure to account for habitat complexity and heterogeneity. Vertical vegetation structure (assessed as number, width and density of vegetation layers, maximum canopy height, leaf area index and vegetation cover) displayed a unimodal elevation pattern, peaking at intermediate elevations in montane forests, whereas horizontal structure (assessed as coefficient of variation of number, width and density of vegetation layers, maximum canopy height, leaf area index and vegetation cover) was lowest at intermediate altitudes. Overall, vertical structure was consistently lower in modified than in natural habitat types, whereas horizontal structure was inconsistently different in modified than in natural habitat types, depending on the specific structural measure and habitat type. Our study shows how vertical and horizontal vegetation structure can be assessed efficiently in various habitat types in tropical mountain regions, and we suggest to apply this as a tool for informing future biodiversity and ecosystem service studies. PMID:26406985

  15. Vertical and Horizontal Vegetation Structure across Natural and Modified Habitat Types at Mount Kilimanjaro

    PubMed Central

    Rutten, Gemma; Ensslin, Andreas; Hemp, Andreas; Fischer, Markus

    2015-01-01

    In most habitats, vegetation provides the main structure of the environment. This complexity can facilitate biodiversity and ecosystem services. Therefore, measures of vegetation structure can serve as indicators in ecosystem management. However, many structural measures are laborious and require expert knowledge. Here, we used consistent and convenient measures to assess vegetation structure over an exceptionally broad elevation gradient of 866–4550m above sea level at Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. Additionally, we compared (human)-modified habitats, including maize fields, traditionally managed home gardens, grasslands, commercial coffee farms and logged and burned forests with natural habitats along this elevation gradient. We distinguished vertical and horizontal vegetation structure to account for habitat complexity and heterogeneity. Vertical vegetation structure (assessed as number, width and density of vegetation layers, maximum canopy height, leaf area index and vegetation cover) displayed a unimodal elevation pattern, peaking at intermediate elevations in montane forests, whereas horizontal structure (assessed as coefficient of variation of number, width and density of vegetation layers, maximum canopy height, leaf area index and vegetation cover) was lowest at intermediate altitudes. Overall, vertical structure was consistently lower in modified than in natural habitat types, whereas horizontal structure was inconsistently different in modified than in natural habitat types, depending on the specific structural measure and habitat type. Our study shows how vertical and horizontal vegetation structure can be assessed efficiently in various habitat types in tropical mountain regions, and we suggest to apply this as a tool for informing future biodiversity and ecosystem service studies. PMID:26406985

  16. An Algorithm to Estimate the Heating Budget from Vertical Hydrometeor Profiles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne; Lang, Stephen; McCumber, Michael; Adler, Robert; Penc, Richard

    1990-12-01

    A simple algorithm to estimate the latent heating of cloud systems from their vertical hydrometer profiles is proposed. The derivation as well as the validation of the algorithm is based on output generated by a non-hydrostatic cloud model with parameterized microphysical processes. Mature and decaying stages of a GATE squall-type convective system have been tested. The algorithm-derived heating budget is in reasonable agreement with the budget predicted by the cloud model. The input to the proposed algorithm can be obtained from either a rain retrieval technique based on information from multichannel passive microwave signals or a kinematic cloud model based on information from Doppler radar wind fields and radar reflectivity patterns. Such an application would have significant implications for spaceborne remote sensing and the large-scale weather prediction data assimilation problem.

  17. An algorithm to estimate the heating budget from vertical hydrometeor profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne; Mccumber, Michael; Adler, Robert; Lang, Stephen

    1990-01-01

    A simple algorithm to estimate the latent heating of cloud systems from their vertical hydrometeor profiles is proposed. The derivation as well as the validation of the algorithm is based on output generated by a nonhydrostatic cloud model with parameterized microphysical processes. Mature and decaying stages of a GATE squall-type convective system have been tested. The algorithm-derived heating budget is in reasonable agreement with the budget predicted by the cloud model. The input to the proposed algoritm can be obtained from either a rain retrieval technique based on information from multichannel passive microwave signals or a kinematic cloud model based on information from Doppler radar wind fields and radar reflectivity patterns. Such an application would have significant implications for spaceborne remote sensing and the large-scale weather prediction data assimilation problem.

  18. Effect of segmental heating on mixed convection aiding flow in a vertical porous annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Ahmed N. J.; Al-Rashed, Abdullah A. A. A.; Kamangar, Sarfaraz; Khan, T. M. Yunus; Khaleed, H. M. T.

    2016-06-01

    Mixed convection flow in a vertical porous annulus embedded with fluid saturated porous medium for aiding is investigated. The annulus is imposed by 20%, 35% and 50% heater length at the bottom, mid and top sections of the annulus respectively. Darcy law with thermal non-equilibrium approach is considered. The governing partial differential equations are converted to simple algebraic equations using Finite Element Method (FEM). The effects of Peclet number Pe and conductivity ratio Kr on heat transfer and fluid flow behaviour are examined and it is found that for lower conductivity ratio, the heat transfer rate was higher with the increase in the Peclet number Pe, whereas this trend reversed when thermal conductivity ratio Kr is increased.

  19. Heat and mass transfer in two-component film evaporation in a vertical tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, W. W.; Thiele, F.

    An elaborate physical model is developed for the problem of two-component film evaporation. Special attention is drawn to the accurate modeling of the two-phase multicomponent flow. This includes separate description of each phase, turbulent gas flow, and thermophysical properties depending on temperature and species concentrations. Whereas the basic equations for the film flow can be treated analytically those for the gas flow have to be solved numerically by means of an accurate finite difference method. An efficient overall iteration procedure links the solutions in both phases. The evaporation of benzene-methyl alcohol mixtures in vertical tube flows for various thermal flow conditions is investigated. Results are presented in terms of local temperature, heat and mass fluxes, and Stanton numbers for heat and mass transfer. They indicate a strong influence of the mixture composition.

  20. Flow reversal and heat transfer of fully developed mixed convection in vertical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chin-Hsiang; Kou, Hong-Sen; Huang, Wen-Hsiung

    1990-07-01

    The present analysis is concerned with flow reversal phenomena and heat transfer characteristics of the fully developed laminar combined free and forced convection in the heated vertical channels. Three fundamental combinations of thermal boundary conditions on the respective wall surface (namely isoflux-isoflux, isoflux-isothermal, and isothermal-isothermal) are considered separately so as to investigate extensively their distinct influence on the flow pattern. Results of the velocity distribution and temperature distribution as well as the Nusselt number in terms of bulk mean temperature are carried out. Based on the analytical solutions obtained, flow reversal adjacent to the relatively colder wall is found to exist within the channel as Re/Gr is below a threshold value related to the thermal boundary conditions. Parameter zones for the occurrence of reversed flow are presented. Comparisons and verification are made using the existing numerical solutions at locations far downstream of developing flow.

  1. The vertical structure of cloud radiative heating over the Indian subcontinent during summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, E.; Devasthale, A.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Tjernström, M.

    2015-10-01

    Clouds forming during the summer monsoon over the Indian subcontinent affect its evolution through their radiative impact as well as the release of latent heat. While the latter is previously studied to some extent, comparatively little is known about the radiative impact of different cloud types and the vertical structure of their radiative heating/cooling effects. Therefore, the main aim of this study is to partly fill this knowledge gap by investigating and documenting the vertical distributions of the different cloud types associated with the Indian monsoon and their radiative heating/cooling using the active radar and lidar sensors onboard CloudSat and CALIPSO. The intraseasonal evolution of clouds from May to October is also investigated to understand pre-to-post monsoon transitioning of their radiative heating/cooling effects. The vertical structure of cloud radiative heating (CRH) follows the northward migration and retreat of the monsoon from May to October. Throughout this time period, stratiform clouds radiatively warm the middle troposphere and cool the upper troposphere by more than ±0.2 K day-1 (after weighing by cloud fraction), with the largest impacts observed in June, July and August. During these months, the fraction of high thin cloud remains high in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). Deep convective towers cause considerable radiative warming in the middle and upper troposphere, but strongly cool the base and inside of the TTL. This cooling is stronger during active (-1.23 K day-1) monsoon periods compared to break periods (-0.36 K day-1). The contrasting radiative warming effect of high clouds in the TTL is twice as large during active periods than in break periods. These results highlight the increasing importance of CRH with altitude, especially in the TTL. Stratiform (made up of alto- and nimbostratus clouds) and deep convection clouds radiatively cool the surface by approximately -100 and -400 W m-2 respectively while warming the

  2. Effect of rolling motion on critical heat flux for subcooled flow boiling in vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J. S.; Park, I. U.; Park, M. Y.; Park, G. C.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents defining characteristics of the critical heat flux (CHF) for the boiling of R-134a in vertical tube operation under rolling motion in marine reactor. It is important to predict CHF of marine reactor having the rolling motion in order to increase the safety of the reactor. Marine Reactor Moving Simulator (MARMS) tests are conducted to measure the critical heat flux using R-134a flowing upward in a uniformly heated vertical tube under rolling motion. MARMS was rotated by motor and mechanical power transmission gear. The CHF tests were performed in a 9.5 mm I.D. test section with heated length of 1 m. Mass fluxes range from 285 to 1300 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1}, inlet subcooling from 3 to 38 deg. C and outlet pressures from 13 to 24 bar. Amplitudes of rolling range from 15 to 40 degrees and periods from 6 to 12 sec. To convert the test conditions of CHF test using R-134a in water, Katto's fluid-to-fluid modeling was used in present investigation. A CHF correlation is presented which accounts for the effects of pressure, mass flux, inlet subcooling and rolling angle over all conditions tested. Unlike existing transient CHF experiments, CHF ratio of certain mass flux and pressure are different in rolling motion. For the mass fluxes below 500 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1} at 13, 16 (region of relative low mass flux), CHF ratio was decreased but was increased above that mass flux (region of relative high mass flux). Moreover, CHF tend to enhance in entire mass flux at 24 bar. (authors)

  3. The vertical structure of cloud radiative heating over the Indian subcontinent during summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, E.; Devasthale, A.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Tjernström, M.

    2015-02-01

    Every year the monsoonal circulation over the Indian subcontinent gives rise to a variety of cloud types that differ considerably in their ability to heat or cool the atmosphere. These clouds in turn affect monsoon dynamics via their radiative impacts, both at the surface and in the atmosphere. New generation of satellites carrying active radar and lidar sensors are allowing realistic quantification of cloud radiative heating (CRH) by resolving the vertical structure of the atmosphere in an unprecedented detail. Obtaining this information is a first step in closing the knowledge gap in our understanding of the role that different clouds play as regulators of the monsoon and vice versa. Here, we use collocated CloudSat-CALIPSO data sets to understand following aspects of cloud-radiation interactions associated with Indian monsoon circulation. (1) How does the vertical distribution of CRH evolve over the Indian continent throughout monsoon season? (2) What is the absolute contribution of different clouds types to the total CRH? (3) How do active and break periods of monsoon affect the distribution of CRH? And finally, (4) what are the net radiative effects of different cloud types on surface heating? In general, the vertical structure of CRH follows the northward migration and the retreat of monsoon from May to October. It is found that the alto- and nimbostratus clouds intensely warm the middle troposphere and equally strongly cool the upper troposphere. Their warming/cooling consistently exceeds ±0.2 K day-1 (after weighing by vertical cloud fraction) in monthly mean composites throughout the middle and upper troposphere respectively, with largest impact observed in June, July and August. Deep convective towers cause considerable warming in the middle and upper troposphere, but strongly cool the base and inside of the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). Such cooling is stronger during active (-1.23 K day-1) monsoon conditions compared to break periods (-0.36 K day-1

  4. Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties and the solar heating rate estimated by combining sky radiometer and lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Rei; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Aoyagi, Toshinori

    2016-07-01

    The SKYLIDAR algorithm was developed to estimate vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties from sky radiometer (SKYNET) and lidar (AD-Net) measurements. The solar heating rate was also estimated from the SKYLIDAR retrievals. The algorithm consists of two retrieval steps: (1) columnar properties are retrieved from the sky radiometer measurements and the vertically mean depolarization ratio obtained from the lidar measurements and (2) vertical profiles are retrieved from the lidar measurements and the results of the first step. The derived parameters are the vertical profiles of the size distribution, refractive index (real and imaginary parts), extinction coefficient, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor. Sensitivity tests were conducted by applying the SKYLIDAR algorithm to the simulated sky radiometer and lidar data for vertical profiles of three different aerosols, continental average, transported dust, and pollution aerosols. The vertical profiles of the size distribution, extinction coefficient, and asymmetry factor were well estimated in all cases. The vertical profiles of the refractive index and single-scattering albedo of transported dust, but not those of transported pollution aerosol, were well estimated. To demonstrate the performance and validity of the SKYLIDAR algorithm, we applied the SKYLIDAR algorithm to the actual measurements at Tsukuba, Japan. The detailed vertical structures of the aerosol optical properties and solar heating rate of transported dust and smoke were investigated. Examination of the relationship between the solar heating rate and the aerosol optical properties showed that the vertical profile of the asymmetry factor played an important role in creating vertical variation in the solar heating rate. We then compared the columnar optical properties retrieved with the SKYLIDAR algorithm to those produced with the more established scheme SKYRAD.PACK, and the surface solar irradiance calculated from the SKYLIDAR

  5. The effect of water subcooling on film boiling heat transfer from vertical cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Irvine, T.F. Jr.

    1994-03-01

    The effect of subcooling on the film boiling heat transfer of water from vertical copper cylinders has been investigated experimentally using a transient quench technique. A lumped parameter model was utilized since the Blot numbers were always less than 0.05. The amount of subcooling varied from 0 K to 70 K and the initial cylinder wall temperatures were of the order of 1100 K. Heat transfer coefficient were measured at the midpoint of the cylinders and were obtained over quench times in which they were verified to be constant. Subcooling had a significant effect on both the film boiling heat transfer coefficient and the minimum film boiling temperature. As the subcooling varied from 0 K to 70 K, the h transfer coefficient increased by a factor of five. As the subcooling varied from 0 K to 60 K, the minimum film boiling temperature increased from approximately 600 K to 1000 K. An attempt to correlate the heat transfer coefficient data with a method recently proposed by Sakurai et al. was only successful at subcooled temperature differences less than 10 K. A modified correlation is presented using the Sakurai et al. parameters which better represents the data over the complete subcooling range.

  6. On the vertical exchange of heat, mass and momentum over complex, mountainous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotach, Mathias; Gohm, Alexander; Lang, Moritz; Leukauf, Daniel; Stiperski, Ivana; Wagner, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    The role of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in the atmosphere-climate system is the exchange of heat, mass and momentum between 'the earth's surface' and the atmosphere. Traditionally, it is understood that turbulent transport is responsible for this exchange and hence the understanding and physical description of the turbulence structure of the boundary layer is key to assess the effectiveness of earth-atmosphere exchange. This understanding is rooted in the (implicit) assumption of a scale separation or spectral gap between turbulence and mean atmospheric motions, which in turn leads to the assumption of a horizontally homogeneous and flat (HHF) surface as a reference, for which both physical understanding and model parameterizations have successfully been developed over the years. Over mountainous terrain, however, the ABL is generically inhomogeneous due to both thermal (radiative) and dynamic forcing. This inhomogeneity leads to meso-scale and even sub-meso-scale flows such as slope and valley winds or wake effects. It is argued here that these (sub)meso-scale motions can significantly contribute to the vertical structure of the boundary layer and hence vertical exchange of heat and mass between the surface and the atmosphere. If model grid resolution is not high enough the latter will have to be parameterized (in a similar fashion as gravity wave drag parameterizations take into account the momentum transport due to gravity waves in large-scale models). In this contribution we summarize the available evidence of the contribution of (sub)meso-scale motions to vertical exchange in mountainous terrain from observational and numerical modeling studies. In particular, a number of recent simulation studies using idealized topography will be summarized and put into perspective – so as to identify possible limitations and areas of necessary future research.

  7. Joule heating of the ITER TF cold structure: Effects of vertical control coil currents and ELMS

    SciTech Connect

    Radovinsky, A.; Pillsbury, R.D. Jr.

    1993-11-09

    The toroidal field coil and support structures for ITER are maintained at cryogenic temperatures. The time-varying currents in the poloidal field coil system will induce eddy currents in these structures. The associated Joule dissipation will cause local heating and require heat removal which will show up as a load on the cryogenic system. Studies of Joule heating of the ITER TF cold structure (TFCS) due to the currents in the poloidal field coil system are presented. The two regimes considered in this study are the plasma vertical stability control and the Edge Loss Mode (ELM) events. The 3-D, thin-shell, eddy current program, EDDYCUFF was used to analyze the eddy currents and Joule losses in the cold structure. The current versus time scenarios were defined. Four control coil options were studied. All schemes use coils external to the TF cold structure. Analyses of power depositions during the plasma vertical stability control were performed for each of the four options. For each of these options three different recovery times were assumed. The times were 3, 1, and 1/3 seconds. Sets of four sequential ELMs, as well as isolated ELMs have been studied for various sets of active PF coils. The results showed that the lowest average power dissipation in the TF cold structure occurs when a subset of PF2 and PF7 are active, and all the other PF coils are passive. The general conclusion is that to minimize power dissipation in the TF cold structure it is preferable that only coils PF2 and PF7 are active. The other coils (PF3-PF6) should be passive and driven by a condition of constant flux. It is recommended in particular, that coils PF3 and PF5 be allowed to change currents to conserve flux, since they provide the maximum shielding of the TFCS from the fields caused by the active coils.

  8. Thermoelectric harvesting of low temperature natural/waste heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, David Michael

    2012-06-01

    Apart from specialized space requirements current development in applications of thermoelectric generation mainly relate to reducing harmful carbon emissions and decreasing costly fuel consumption through the recovery of exhaust heat from fossil fuel powered engines and emissions from industrial utilities. Focus on these applications is to the detriment of the wider exploitations of thermoelectrics with other sources of heat energy, and in particular natural occurring and waste low temperature heat, receiving little, if any, attention. In this presentation thermoelectric generation applications, both potential and real in harvesting low temperature waste/natural heat are reviewed. The use of thermoelectrics to harvest solar energy, ocean thermal energy, geothermal heat and waste heat are discussed and their credibility as future large-scale sources of electrical power assessed.

  9. Heat transfer correlations for low Reynolds number flows of water in vertical annuli

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Rao, D.V.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents heat transfer correlations for both buoyancy assisted and opposed laminar and transition flows of water in vertical annuli for Reynolds numbers ranging from 150 to 10/sup 4/ and Rayleigh numbers up to 10/sup 7/. The correlations are based on more than 800 data points collected for two annuli (diameter ratio of 1.17 and 2.0) with an isoflux inner wall and an adiabatic outer wall. Results demonstrated that the buoyancy assisted flow data could be divided into four regimes based on the values of Reynolds number: Laminar (Re < 800), Combined Laminar (800 < Re > 2100), Laminar/ Transition (2100 < Re < 5000), and Transition ( 5000 < Re 10,000). This data, except for transition flow, was correlated in terms of Gz to account for the effect on the Nusselt number of the axial distance from the bottom of the heated section. For buoyancy opposed flow, however, Richardson number more accurately classified the data. The data for this flow was correlated in three regions: Ri < 0.06, 0.06 < Ri < 0.47, and 0.47 < Ri < 3.0. The heat transfer correlations for both buoyancy assisted and opposed flows were within +-10 percent of the experimental data.

  10. Eutectic Bonding Utilizing Radio Frequency Induction Heating for Fabricating Vertical Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunmi; Kim, Areum; Cui, Yinhua; Chae, Su Jin; Nam, Minwoo; Kwon, Soon Hyeong; Cha, Yong Won; Pyo, Sung Gyu

    2015-11-01

    Vertical light-emitting diodes (VLEDs) have attracted considerable attention owing to their improved thermal, electrical, and optical performance compared to conventional LEDs. To fabricate VLEDs, a bonding technique is required following laser lift-off. Eutectic bonding techniques are preferred owing to their low-heat mechanism and production safety. However, the conventional resistance heating method for eutectic bonding process, the extremely longer process time becomes a problem such as cost rise, wapage. In this study, the thermal efficiency was measured according to the diameter of the coil in order to optimize the eutectic bonding of the RF induction heating method in order to solve this problem. We confirmed that successful eutectic bonding is possible with less than 30 min processing using Sn-Glass. In addition, Au (20 wt%)/Sn (80 wt%) alloy, a mainly used the eutectic bonding interlayer material for VLEDs, can also be used as an interlayer to provide void-free eutectic bonding in less than 30 min. PMID:26726547

  11. Numerical simulation of supercritical heat transfer under severe axial density gradient in a narrow vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Y. Y.; Hong, S. D.; Kim, Y. W.

    2012-07-01

    A number of computational works have been performed so far for the simulation of heat transfer in a supercritical fluid. The simulations, however, faced a lot of difficulties when heat transfer deteriorates due either to buoyancy or by acceleration. When the bulk temperature approaches the pseudo-critical temperature the fluid experiences a severe axial density gradient on top of a severe radial one. Earlier numerical calculations showed, without exception, unrealistic over-predictions, as soon as the bulk temperature exceeded the pseudo-critical temperature. The over-predictions might have been resulted from an inapplicability of widely-used turbulence models. One of the major causes for the difficulties may probably be an assumption of a constant turbulent Prandtl number. Recent research, both numerical and experimental, indicates that the turbulent Prandtl number is never a constant when the gradient of physical properties is significant. This paper describes the applicability of a variable turbulent Prandtl number to the numerical simulation of heat transfer in supercritical fluids flowing in narrow vertical tubes. (authors)

  12. Performance prediction between horizontal and vertical source heat pump systems for greenhouse heating with the use of artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benli, Hüseyin

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the suitability of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to predict the performance and comparison between a horizontal and a vertical ground source heat pump system. Performance forecasting is the precondition for the optimal control and energy saving operation of heat pump systems. In this study, performance parameters such as air temperature entering condenser fan-coil unit, air temperature leaving condenser fan-coil unit, and ground temperatures (2 and 60 m) obtained experimental studies are input data; coefficient of performance of system (COPsys) is in output layer. The back propagation learning algorithm with three different variants such as Levenberg-Marguardt, Pola-Ribiere conjugate gradient, and scaled conjugate gradient, and also tangent sigmoid transfer function were used in the network so that the best approach can be found. The results showed that LM with three neurons in the hidden layer is the most suitable algorithm with maximum correlation coefficients R2 of 0.999, minimum root mean square RMS value and low coefficient variance COV. The reported results confirmed that the use of ANN for performance prediction of COPsys,H-V is acceptable in these studies.

  13. Performance prediction between horizontal and vertical source heat pump systems for greenhouse heating with the use of artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benli, Hüseyin

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the suitability of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to predict the performance and comparison between a horizontal and a vertical ground source heat pump system. Performance forecasting is the precondition for the optimal control and energy saving operation of heat pump systems. In this study, performance parameters such as air temperature entering condenser fan-coil unit, air temperature leaving condenser fan-coil unit, and ground temperatures (2 and 60 m) obtained experimental studies are input data; coefficient of performance of system (COPsys) is in output layer. The back propagation learning algorithm with three different variants such as Levenberg-Marguardt, Pola-Ribiere conjugate gradient, and scaled conjugate gradient, and also tangent sigmoid transfer function were used in the network so that the best approach can be found. The results showed that LM with three neurons in the hidden layer is the most suitable algorithm with maximum correlation coefficients R2 of 0.999, minimum root mean square RMS value and low coefficient variance COV. The reported results confirmed that the use of ANN for performance prediction of COPsys,H-V is acceptable in these studies.

  14. Numerical investigation of the thermal behavior of heated natural composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasim, S. M.; Mohammed, F. Abbas; Hashim, R.

    2015-11-01

    In the present work numerical investigation was carried out for laminar natural convection heat transfer from natural composite material (NCM). Three types of natural materials such as seed dates, egg shells, and feathers are mixed separately with polyester resin. Natural materials are added with different volume fraction (10%, 20%, and 30%) are heated with different heat flux (1078W/m2, 928W/m2, 750W/m2, 608W/m2, and 457W/m2) at (vertical, inclined, and horizontal) position. Continuity and Navier-Stocks equations are solved numerically in three dimensions using ANSYS FLUENT package 12.1 software commercial program. Numerical results showed the temperature distribution was affected for all types at volume fraction 30% and heat flux is 1078 W/m2, for different position. So, shows that the plumes and temperature behavior are affected by the air and the distance from heat source. Numerical results showed acceptable agreement with the experimental previous results.

  15. Scaling of the turbulent natural convection flow in a heated square cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkes, R. A. W. M.; Hoogendoorn, C. J.

    1994-05-01

    By numerically solving the Reynolds equations for air and water in a square cavity, with differentially heated vertical walls, at Rayleigh numbers up to 10(exp 20) the scalings of the turbulent natural convection flow are derived. Turbulence is modeled by the standard k-epsilon model and by the low-Reynolds-number k-epsilon models of Chien and of Jones and Launder. Both the scalings with respect to the Rayleigh number (based on the cavity size H) and with respect to the local height (y/H) are considered. The scalings are derived for the inner layer, outer layer, and core region. The Rayleigh number scalings are almost the same as the scalings for the natural convection boundary layer along a hot vertical plate. The scalings found are almost independent of the k-epsilon model used.

  16. Prandtl Number Dependent Natural Convection with Internal Heat Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kang Hee Lee; Seung Dong Lee; Kune Y. Suh; Joy L. Rempe; Fan-Bill Cheung; Sang B. Kim

    2004-06-01

    Natural convection plays an important role in determining the thermal load from debris accumulated in the reactor vessel lower head during a severe accident. Recently, attention is being paid to the feasibility of external vessel flooding as a severe accident management strategy and to the phenomena affecting the success path for retaining the molten core material inside the vessel. The heat transfer inside the molten core material can be characterized by the strong buoyancy-induced flows resulting from internal heating due to decay of fission products. The thermo-fluid dynamic characteristics of such flow depend strongly on the thermal boundary conditions. The spatial and temporal variation of heat flux on the pool wall boundaries and the pool superheat are mainly characterized by the natural convection flow inside the molten pool. In general, the natural convection heat transfer phenomena involving the internal heat generation are represented by the modified Rayleigh number (Ra’), which quantifies the internal heat source and hence the strength of the buoyancy force. In this study, tests were conducted in a rectangular section 250 mm high, 500 mm long and 160 mm wide. Twenty-four T-type thermocouples were installed in the test section to measure temperatures. Four T-type thermocouples were used to measure the boundary temperatures. The thermocouples were placed in designated locations after calibration. A direct heating method was adopted in this test to simulate the uniform heat generation. The experiments covered a range of Ra' between 1.5x106 and 7.42x1015 and the Prandtl number (Pr) between 0.7 and 6.5. Tests were conducted with water and air as simulant. The upper and lower boundary conditions were maintained uniform. The results demonstrated feasibility of the direct heating method to simulate uniform volumetric heat generation. Particular attentions were paid to the effect of Pr on natural convection heat transfer within the rectangular pool.

  17. Comparative measurements of natural convection heat transfer in channels by holographic interferometry and schlieren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosini, Dario; Tanda, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    In this work, natural convection heat transfer in vertical channels is experimentally investigated by applying different optical techniques, namely holographic interferometry and schlieren. Both these techniques are based on the temperature dependence of the air refractive index but they detect different optical quantities and their use involves different instrumentation and optical components. Optical methods, non-intrusive in nature, are particularly suitable for the visualization of flow and thermal fields as witnessed by their increasing use in a range of scientific and engineering disciplines; for this reason, the introduction of these experimental tools into a laboratory course can be of high value. Physics and engineering students can get familiarized with optical techniques, grasp the basics of thermal phenomena, usually elusive, which can be more easily understood if they are made visible, and begin to master digital image analysis, a key skill in laboratory activities. A didactic description of holographic interferometry and schlieren is provided and experimental results obtained for vertical, smooth and rib-roughened channels with asymmetrical heating are presented. A comparison between distributions of the local heat transfer coefficient (or its dimensionless counterpart, the Nusselt number) revealed good agreement between the results separately obtained by the two techniques, thus proving their suitability for investigating free convection heat transfer in channels.

  18. Boiling Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop of a Refrigerant Flowing Vertically Downward in a Small Diameter Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kazushi; Mori, Hideo; Ohishi, Katsumi; Tanaka, Hirokazu

    Experiments were performed on boiling heat transfer and pressure drop of a refrigerant R410A flowing vertically downward in a copper smooth tube of 1.0 mm inside diameter for the development of a high-performance heat exchanger using small diameter tubes for air conditioning systems. Local heat transfer coefficients were measured in a range of mass fluxes from 30 to 200 kg/(m2•s), heat fluxes from 1 to 16 kW/m2 and quality from 0.1 to over 1 at evaporation temperature of 10°C. Pressure drops were measured and flow patterns were observed at mass fluxes from 30 to 200 kg/(m2•s) and quality from 0.1 to 0.9. The characteristics of frictional pressure drop, heat transfer coefficient and dryout qualities were clarified by comparing the measurements with the data for the vertically upward flow previously obtained.

  19. Impact of enhanced vertical mixing on marine biogeochemistry: lessons for geo-engineering and natural variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutreuil, S.; Bopp, L.; Tagliabue, A.

    2009-01-01

    Artificially enhanced vertical mixing has been suggested as a means by which to fertilize the biological pump with subsurface nutrients and thus increase the oceanic CO2 sink. We use an ocean general circulation and biogeochemistry model (OGCBM) to examine the impact of artificially enhanced vertical mixing on biological productivity and atmospheric CO2, as well as the climatically significant gases nitrous oxide (N2O) and dimethyl sulphide (DMS) during simulations between 2000 and 2020. Overall, we find a large increase in the amount of organic carbon exported from surface waters, but an overall increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations by 2020. We quantified the individual effect of changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), alkalinity and biological production on the change in pCO2 at characteristic sites and found the increased vertical supply of carbon rich subsurface water to be primarily responsible for the enhanced CO2 outgassing, although increased alkalinity and, to a lesser degree, biological production can compensate in some regions. While ocean-atmosphere fluxes of DMS do increase slightly, which might reduce radiative forcing, the oceanic N2O source also expands. Our study has implications for understanding how natural variability in vertical mixing in different ocean regions (such as that observed recently in the Southern Ocean) can impact the ocean CO2 sink via changes in DIC, alkalinity and carbon export.

  20. Impact of enhanced vertical mixing on marine biogeochemistry: lessons for geo-engineering and natural variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutreuil, S.; Bopp, L.; Tagliabue, A.

    2009-05-01

    Artificially enhanced vertical mixing has been suggested as a means by which to fertilize the biological pump with subsurface nutrients and thus increase the oceanic CO2 sink. We use an ocean general circulation and biogeochemistry model (OGCBM) to examine the impact of artificially enhanced vertical mixing on biological productivity and atmospheric CO2, as well as the climatically significant gases nitrous oxide (N2O) and dimethyl sulphide (DMS) during simulations between 2000 and 2020. Overall, we find a large increase in the amount of organic carbon exported from surface waters, but an overall increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations by 2020. We quantified the individual effect of changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), alkalinity and biological production on the change in pCO2 at characteristic sites and found the increased vertical supply of carbon rich subsurface water to be primarily responsible for the enhanced CO2 outgassing, although increased alkalinity and, to a lesser degree, biological production can compensate in some regions. While ocean-atmosphere fluxes of DMS do increase slightly, which might reduce radiative forcing, the oceanic N2O source also expands. Our study has implications for understanding how natural variability in vertical mixing in different ocean regions (such as that observed recently in the Southern Ocean) can impact the ocean CO2 sink via changes in DIC, alkalinity and carbon export.

  1. Scalings for unsteady natural convection boundary layers on an evenly heated plate with time-dependent heating flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wenxian; Armfield, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    It is of fundamental significance, especially with regard to application, to fully understand the flow behavior of unsteady natural convection boundary layers on a vertical plate heated by a time-dependent heat flux. Such an understanding is currently scarce. In this paper, the scaling analysis by Lin et al. [Phys. Rev. E 79, 066313 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevE.79.066313] using a simple three-region structure for the unsteady natural convection boundary layer of a homogeneous Newtonian fluid with Pr >1 under isothermal heating was substantially extended for the case when the heating is due to a time-varying sinusoidal heat flux. A series of scalings was developed for the thermal boundary thickness, the plate temperature, the viscous boundary thicknesses, and the maximum vertical velocity within the boundary layer, which are the major parameters representing the flow behavior, in terms of the governing parameters of the flow, i.e., the Rayleigh number Ra, the Prandtl number Pr, and the dimensionless natural frequency fn of the time-varying sinusoidal heat flux, at the start-up stage, at the transition time scale which represents the ending of the start-up stage and the beginning of the transitional stage of the boundary-layer development, and at the quasi-steady stage. These scalings were validated by comparison to 10 full numerical solutions of the governing equations with Ra, Pr, and fn in the ranges 106≤Ra≤109, 3≤Pr≤100, and 0.01≤fn≤0.1 and were shown in general to provide an accurate description of the flow at different development stages, except for high-Pr runs in which a further, although weak, Pr dependence is present, which cannot be accurately predicted by the current scaling analysis using the simple three-region structure, attributed to the non-boundary-layer nature of the velocity field with high-Pr fluids. Some scalings at the transition time scale and at the quasi-steady stage also produce noticeable deviations from the numerical results when

  2. Ramp temperature and Dufour effects on transient MHD natural convection flow past an infinite vertical plate in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marneni, Narahari; Tippa, Sowmya; Pendyala, Rajashekhar

    2015-12-01

    Analytical investigation of the unsteady natural convection flow along an infinite vertical plate embedded in a porous medium subjected to a ramped temperature boundary condition has been performed in the presence of magnetic field, thermal radiation, heat generation or absorption, chemical reaction and Dufour effect. The governing equations for momentum, energy and concentration have been solved using the Laplace transform technique. The closed-form exact solutions for the velocity, temperature and concentration fields as well as the skin-friction, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are obtained without any restrictions. The influence of pertinent parameters on the fluid velocity, temperature, skin-friction and Nusselt number have been discussed in detailed through graphs. The natural convection due to ramped wall temperature (RWT) has also been compared with that of the constant wall temperature (CWT). It is observed that the fluid velocity and temperature profiles are greater in case of CWT than the case of RWT. Also it is noticed that the flow accelerates with increasing values of heat source parameter, permeability parameter and Dufour number while the flow retardation is observed with increasing values of radiation parameter, magnetic field parameter and Schmidt number.

  3. Soret and chemical reaction effects on unsteady two-dimensional natural convection along a vertical plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, S. Suresh Kumar; Narahari, M.; Pendyala, Rajashekhar

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a numerical solution of the unsteady two-dimensional natural convection along a vertical plate in the presence of Soret and chemical reaction effects is presented. The governing non-dimensional coupled non-linear partial differential equations have been evaluated by using an implicit finite-difference technique of Crank-Nicolson scheme. Numerical predictions for the velocity, concentration, local and average skin-friction and Sherwood number for distinct values of chemical reaction parameter and Soret number are plotted graphically. It is found that the fluid velocity and concentration decreases while increasing chemical reaction parameter whereas an increase in the Soret number increases the fluid velocity and concentration.

  4. Natural substrate lift-off technique for vertical light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chia-Yu; Lan, Yu-Pin; Tu, Po-Min; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Lin, Chien-Chung; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Chi, Gou-Chung; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2014-04-01

    Hexagonal inverted pyramid (HIP) structures and the natural substrate lift-off (NSLO) technique were demonstrated on a GaN-based vertical light-emitting diode (VLED). The HIP structures were formed at the interface between GaN and the sapphire substrate by molten KOH wet etching. The threading dislocation density (TDD) estimated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was reduced to 1 × 108 cm-2. Raman spectroscopy indicated that the compressive strain from the bottom GaN/sapphire was effectively released through the HIP structure. With the adoption of the HIP structure and NSLO, the light output power and yield performance of leakage current could be further improved.

  5. First report of venereal and vertical transmission of canine leishmaniosis from naturally infected dogs in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Canine leishmaniosis (CanL) is a zoonotic disease caused by Leishmania (L.) infantum. It is endemic to several tropical and subtropical countries but also to the Mediterranean region. It is transmitted by phlebotomine sandflies but occasional non-vector transmissions have been reported, including vertical and horizontal transmission. Findings The authors report a case of CanL in a female boxer dog from Dusseldorf, Germany, that had never been in an endemic region. A serum sample from the bitch was tested positive for antibodies against Leishmania (IFAT 1:2,000, ELISA 72). The bitch had whelped three litters, and one puppy from the third litter was also found to be seropositive for Leishmania antibodies (IFAT 1:4,000, ELISA 78). Conclusions Up to now, despite intensive searching, the occurrence of sandflies could not be proved in the bitch's region of origin. Thus, vertical and horizontal transmission are to be discussed as possible ways of infection. This may be the first report of venereal and vertical transmission of L. infantum in naturally infected dogs in Germany. PMID:22463789

  6. Turbulent natural convection between a perforated vertical cylinder and a surrounding array

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, D.M.; Stoots, C.M.; Christenson, W.A.; O'Brien, J.E.; Mecham, D.C.; Lussie, W.G.

    1992-01-01

    A number of situations can be hypothesized to occur in an advanced or special purpose nuclear reactor such that the core is filled with a gas but there is no forced flow to remove the thermal energy evolved. Experiments were conducted by resistively hearing a vertical circular cylinder of length-to-diameter ratio of about 160 centered inside a concentric perforated tube which was, in turn, surrounded by three larger diameter tubes cooled internally with water flow. The ratio of the test section temperature to the cooling tube temperature was varied up to 2.6; and the Rayleigh number, based on tube diameter and properties evaluated at the cooling tube temperature, ranged from 2.9 x 10{sup 4} to 9.2 x 10{sup 5}. Results indicate that the convective heat transfer parameters for the perforated tube are about fifteen per cent higher than for the smooth bare tube centered in the same position relative to the array. The Nusselt number for convective heat transfer across the annulus between the heated test section and the perforated tube corresponded to parallel laminar flow.

  7. Turbulent natural convection between a perforated vertical cylinder and a surrounding array

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, D.M.; Stoots, C.M.; Christenson, W.A.; O`Brien, J.E.; Mecham, D.C.; Lussie, W.G.

    1992-09-01

    A number of situations can be hypothesized to occur in an advanced or special purpose nuclear reactor such that the core is filled with a gas but there is no forced flow to remove the thermal energy evolved. Experiments were conducted by resistively hearing a vertical circular cylinder of length-to-diameter ratio of about 160 centered inside a concentric perforated tube which was, in turn, surrounded by three larger diameter tubes cooled internally with water flow. The ratio of the test section temperature to the cooling tube temperature was varied up to 2.6; and the Rayleigh number, based on tube diameter and properties evaluated at the cooling tube temperature, ranged from 2.9 x 10{sup 4} to 9.2 x 10{sup 5}. Results indicate that the convective heat transfer parameters for the perforated tube are about fifteen per cent higher than for the smooth bare tube centered in the same position relative to the array. The Nusselt number for convective heat transfer across the annulus between the heated test section and the perforated tube corresponded to parallel laminar flow.

  8. Buoyancy and Pressure Induced Flow of Hot Gases in Vertical Shafts with Natural and Forced Ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaluria, Yogesh; Tamm, Gunnar Olavi

    2014-11-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study buoyancy and pressure induced flow of hot gases in vertical shafts to model smoke propagation in elevator and ventilation shafts of high rise building fires. Various configurations were tested with regard to natural and forced ventilation imposed at the upper and lower surfaces of the vertical shaft. The aspect ratio was taken at a typical value of 6. From a lower vent, the inlet conditions for smoke and hot gases were varied in terms of the Reynolds and Grashof numbers. The forced ventilation at the upper or lower boundary was of the same order as the bulk shaft flow. Measurements were taken within the shaft to allow a detailed study of the steady state flow and thermal fields established for various shaft configurations and inlet conditions, from which optimal means for smoke alleviation in high rise building fires may be developed. Results indicated a wall plume as the primary transport mechanism for smoke propagating from the inlet towards the exhaust region. Recirculation and entrainment dominated at high inlet Grashof number flows, while increased inlet Reynolds numbers allowed greater mixing in the shaft. The development and stability of these flow patterns and their effects on the smoke behavior were assessed for several shaft configurations with different inlet conditions. The comparisons indicated that the fastest smoke removal and lowest overall shaft temperatures occur for a configuration with natural ventilation at the top surface and forced ventilation up from the shaft bottom.

  9. Unsteady convection flow and heat transfer over a vertical stretching surface.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wenli; Su, Ning; Liu, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of thermal radiation on unsteady convection flow and heat transfer over a vertical permeable stretching surface in porous medium, where the effects of temperature dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity are also considered. By using a similarity transformation, the governing time-dependent boundary layer equations for momentum and thermal energy are first transformed into coupled, non-linear ordinary differential equations with variable coefficients. Numerical solutions to these equations subject to appropriate boundary conditions are obtained by the numerical shooting technique with fourth-fifth order Runge-Kutta scheme. Numerical results show that as viscosity variation parameter increases both the absolute value of the surface friction coefficient and the absolute value of the surface temperature gradient increase whereas the temperature decreases slightly. With the increase of viscosity variation parameter, the velocity decreases near the sheet surface but increases far away from the surface of the sheet in the boundary layer. The increase in permeability parameter leads to the decrease in both the temperature and the absolute value of the surface friction coefficient, and the increase in both the velocity and the absolute value of the surface temperature gradient. PMID:25264737

  10. Unsteady Convection Flow and Heat Transfer over a Vertical Stretching Surface

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wenli; Su, Ning; Liu, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of thermal radiation on unsteady convection flow and heat transfer over a vertical permeable stretching surface in porous medium, where the effects of temperature dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity are also considered. By using a similarity transformation, the governing time-dependent boundary layer equations for momentum and thermal energy are first transformed into coupled, non-linear ordinary differential equations with variable coefficients. Numerical solutions to these equations subject to appropriate boundary conditions are obtained by the numerical shooting technique with fourth-fifth order Runge-Kutta scheme. Numerical results show that as viscosity variation parameter increases both the absolute value of the surface friction coefficient and the absolute value of the surface temperature gradient increase whereas the temperature decreases slightly. With the increase of viscosity variation parameter, the velocity decreases near the sheet surface but increases far away from the surface of the sheet in the boundary layer. The increase in permeability parameter leads to the decrease in both the temperature and the absolute value of the surface friction coefficient, and the increase in both the velocity and the absolute value of the surface temperature gradient. PMID:25264737

  11. Vertical characteristics of PM2.5 during the heating season in Tianjin, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Zhang, Yu-fen; Han, Su-qin; Wu, Jian-hui; Bi, Xiao-hui; Shi, Guo-liang; Wang, Jiao; Yao, Qing; Cai, Zi-ying; Liu, Jing-le; Feng, Yin-chang

    2015-08-01

    In this study, PM2.5 samples were collected at four heights (10m, 40m, 120m and 220m) at a meteorological tower in the daytime and nighttime during the heating season in Tianjin, China. The vertical variation and diurnal variability of the concentrations of PM2.5 and main chemical compositions were analyzed in clear days and heavy pollution days. Generally, mass concentrations of PM2.5 and the chemical compositions showed a decreasing trend with increasing height, while mass percentages of SO4(2-), NO3(-) and OC showed an increasing trend with increasing height. Concentrations of ion species and carbon compound in PM2.5 samples in the daytime were higher than those collected at night, which was due to intense human activities and suitable meteorological condition in the daytime. The ratios of NO3(-)/SO4(2-) and OC/EC were also considered, and we have observed that their levels on heavy pollution days were higher than those on clear days. In addition, source apportionments were identified quantitatively using the CMB-iteration model. The results indicated that contributions of secondary ion species increased with increasing height, while contributions of other pollutant sources decreased, and contributions of vehicle exhaust were relatively high on clear days. PMID:25863506

  12. The role of heat source area on the transition from displacement to mixing flow in natural ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, Nigel; Hunt, Gary

    2007-11-01

    We present a theoretical model for the role of heat source area on the transition from displacement to mixing flow for a naturally ventilated room. We examine the relationship between the existing standard models for natural ventilation of a room with floor and ceiling level vents (Linden et al. 1990 and Gladstone & Woods 2001). We show that the uniform heat distribution model of Gladstone & Woods is the limit of an infinite number of localized heat sources based on the Linden et al. model. We then examine the transition from localized to distributed heat source behaviour as a function of the horizontal extent of the heat source. Our model is based on recent measurements of the plume flow above large area heat sources that suggests the flow rate increases linearly with height. The flow transition is a function of the room vent area scaled on the ceiling height squared and the ratio of the ceiling height to heat source radius. As the heat source radius increases there is a rapid transition from displacement ventilation, driven by localized heat sources, toward mixing ventilation, driven by distributed heat sources. This transition is independent of the floor area of the room implying that for displacement ventilation to be established the heat source(s) need to be small compared to the vertical, as well as horizontal scale of the room.

  13. A new thermo-hydrodynamic method for estimating convective heat flux associated with vertical fluid migration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialko, O.; Kovalchuk, L.

    2002-12-01

    Ample field observations in areas of known oil and gas deposists reveal an existence of excess temperature anomalies associated with the hydrocarbon-bearing structures. These observations are explained in terms of upward migration of heated fluids. In this case there is a deviation from a linear temperature distribution with depth due to a convective component of the heat flux. We propose a new method based on in situ measurements of the thermal field that allows one to take into account both conductive and convective components of the heat flow. In addition to the usual measurements of temperature, we determine the the curvature of the geothermograms, which characterizes the degree of deviation of the heat transfer from a conductive regime. Correspondingly, in addition to the commonly used geothermal gradient, we introduce new parameters, such as the radius of curvature of the geotherms (R), the coefficient of curvature of the geotherms (K), the Knudsen criterion (Kn), and parameter F. We present analytic expressions for the determination of these parameters, and evaluate these parameters for several natural objects. We demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed method for 1) forecasts of the presence of the deep-seated hydrocarbon deposits; 2) estimates of the abnornally elevated gas content in the deep-seated coal deposits, and determination of zones with high risk of methane bursts; 3) studies of the hydro-geothermal conditions of the geothermal areas; 4) determination and localization of leaks along the buried industrial pipelines. We present examples illustrating the application of our method for the abovementioned tasks.

  14. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer inside a vertical tube in evaporating a heated falling alcohols liquid film into a stream of dry air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senhaji, S.; Feddaoui, M.; Mediouni, T.; Mir, A.

    2009-03-01

    A numerical study of the evaporation in mixed convection of a pure alcohol liquid film: ethanol and methanol was investigated. It is a turbulent liquid film falling on the internal face of a vertical tube. A laminar flow of dry air enters the vertical tube at constant temperature in the downward direction. The wall of the tube is subjected to a constant and uniform heat flux. The model solves the coupled parabolic governing equations in both phases including turbulent liquid film together with the boundary and interfacial conditions. The systems of equations obtained by using an implicit finite difference method are solved by TDMA method. A Van Driest model is adopted to simulate the turbulent liquid film flow. The influence of the inlet liquid flow, Reynolds number in the gas flow and the wall heat flux on the intensity of heat and mass transfers are examined. A comparison between the results obtained for studied alcohols and water in the same conditions is made.

  15. The numerical calculation of heat transfer performance for annular flow of liquid nitrogen in a vertical annular channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shufeng; Wu, Yuyuan; Zhao, Rongyi

    2001-04-01

    According to a separated phase flow model for vertical annular two-phase flow in an annular channel, the liquid film thickness, distributions of velocities and temperatures in the liquid layer are predicted in the range of heat fluxes: 6000-12000 W/m 2, mass flux: 500-1100 kg/m2 s. The pressure drop along the flow channel and heat transfer coefficient are also calculated. The liquid film thickness is in the order of micrometers and heat transfer coefficient is 2800-7800 W/m2 K of liquid nitrogen boiling in narrow annular channels. The measured heat transfer coefficient is 29% higher than the calculated values. With the mass flux increasing and the gap of the annular channel decreasing, pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient increase.

  16. Microwave heat treatment of natural ruby and its characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, S.; Pradhan, S. K.; Jeevitha, M.; Acharya, P.; Debata, M.; Dash, T.; Nayak, B. B.; Mishra, B. K.

    2016-03-01

    Natural ruby (in the form of gemstone) collected from Odisha has been heat-treated by microwave (MW). A 3-kW industrial MW furnace with SiC susceptors was used for the heat treatment. The ruby samples showed noticeable improvements (qualitative), may be attributed to account for the improvement in clarity and lustre. Optical absorption in 200-800 nm range and photoluminescence peak at 693 nm (with 400 nm λ ex) clearly show that subtle changes do take place in the ruby after the heat treatment. Further, inorganic compound phases and valence states of elements (impurities) in the ruby were studied by X-ray diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The valence states of the main impurities such as Cr, Fe, and Ti, in the untreated and MW heat-treated ruby, as revealed from XPS, have been discussed in depth. The overall results demonstrate for the first time the effect of fast heating like MW on the microstructural properties of the gemstone and various oxidation states of impurity elements in the natural ruby.

  17. Dry-Heat Inactivation Kinetics of Naturally Occurring Spore Populations

    PubMed Central

    Bond, W. W.; Favero, M. S.; Petersen, N. J.; Marshall, J. H.

    1970-01-01

    Twenty-three soil samples were collected from areas of the United States where major spacecraft assembly and launch facilities are in operation. Soil samples were treated with ethyl alcohol, ultrasonic energy, and gross filtration. The resultant suspensions consisted of viable, naturally occurring bacterial spores and were used to inoculate stainless-steel strips. The strips were suspended in a forced air oven and assays were made at 5-min intervals for the number of viable spores. Most survivor curves were nonlinear. Subsequently, spore crops of heat-sensitive and heat-resistant soil isolates were found to have linear survivor curves at 125 C which were unaffected by the presence or absence of sterile soil particles from the parent sample. When two spore crops, one of which was heat-resistant and the other heat-sensitive, were mixed, the resultant nonlinear curves were unaffected by the presence or absence of sterile parent soil. Therefore, the survivor curves obtained originally with the soils were the result of heterogeneous spore populations rather than of protection afforded by soil particles in our test system. These results question the rationale both of assuming logarithmic death and of using decimal-reduction values obtained with subcultured standard reference spores in the derivation of dry-heat sterilization cycles for items contaminated with naturally occurring spore populations. PMID:5498605

  18. Coupled three-dimensional conduction and natural convection heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolpadi, Anil Kumar

    1987-09-01

    A numerical and experimental investigation of three-dimensional natural convection heat transfer coupled with conduction was performed. This general problem is of great importance because of its widespread applicability in areas such as compact natural convection heat exchangers, cooling of electronic equipment, and porous media flows. The determination of flow patterns and heat transfer coefficients in such situations is necessary because of its practical use in various industries. A vectorized finite difference code was developed for the Cray-2 supercomputer which has the capability of simulating a wide class of three-dimensional coupled conduction-convection problems. This program numerically solves the transient form of the complete laminar Navier-Stokes equations of motion using the vorticity-vector potential methods. Using this program, numerical solutions were obtained for 3-D natural convection from a horizontal isothermal heat exchanger tube with an attached circular cooling fin array. Experiments were performed to measure three-dimensional temperature fields using Mach-Zehnder interferometry. Software was developed to digitize and process fringe patterns and inversion algorithms used to compute the 3-D temperature field.

  19. Circulation, heat exchange and vertical structure of the Hornsund - the Svalbard Archipelago fiord.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakacki, Jaromir; Przyborska, Anna; Kosecki, Szymon; Sundfjord, Arild

    2015-04-01

    The Hornsund fjord is located in the southwestern part of Spitsbergen- the biggest island of the Svalbard Archipelago. The fjord is influenced by two major currents in this area. The first one is the current carrying the cold and less saline waters around the southern Spitsbergen tip, often called the Sørkapp Current or the South Cape Current. The second is the well-known West Spitsbergen Current (WSC), carrying salty and warm Atlantic Waters through Fram Strait into the Arctic Ocean. From a biological point of view, Hornsund can be treated as a young unstable system or cold system, which suggests that it is under an influence of the South Cape Current. Because of limited measurements in this area, the hydrodynamic model MIKE3D has been implemented for this fjord to diagnose which current has the main influence on Hornsund. The fjord domain was extended into the shelf area. At the lateral boundary of the extended domain, data from the ROMS simulation of the Svalbard area made by the Norwegian Institute of Marine Research (IMR) with resolution of 800 m have been used. Atmospheric data from European Centre for Medium Weather Forecast (ECMWF) were employed as well as from the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS, 1 and 0.5 degrees) reanalysis that uses metrological data from Polish Polar Station located in Hornsund. Based on 5 years of simulation (2005-2010) seasonal and annual general circulation in the fjord has been described. Estimation of the heat transport between fjord and ocean, and between fjord and atmosphere will permit to establish the heat budget and help to evaluate the influence of the South Cape Current and WSC on the fjord ecosystem development. An influence of the fresh water fluxes and vertical structure of water masses and their transformations will be also discussed. This work was partially performed in the frame of the projects GAME (DEC-2012/04/A/NZ8/00661) and AWAKE2 (Pol-Nor/198675/17/2013)

  20. Natural convection mass transfer on a vertical steel structure submerged in a molten aluminum pool

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, F.B.; Yang, B.C.; Shiah, S.W.; Cho, D.H.; Tan, M.J.

    1995-02-01

    The process of dissolution mass transport along a vertical steel structure submerged in a large molten aluminum pool is studied theoretically. A mathematical model is developed from the conservation laws and thermodynamic principles, taking full account of the density variation in the dissolution boundary layer due to concentration differences. Also accounted for are the influence of the solubility of the wall material on species transfer and the motion of the solid/liquid interface at the dissolution front. The governing equations are solved by a combined analytical-numerical technique to determine the characteristics of the dissolution boundary layer and the rate of natural convection mass transfer. Based upon the numerical results, a correlation for the average Sherwood number is obtained. It is found that the Sherwood number depends strongly on the saturated concentration of the substrate at the moving dissolution front but is almost independent of the freestream velocity.

  1. Natural convection flow in porous enclosure with localized heating from below with heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiki, Md. Noor-A.-Alam; Molla, Md. Mamun; Saha, Suvash C.

    2016-07-01

    Unsteady natural convection flow in a two dimensional fluid saturated porous enclosure with localized heating from below with heat flux, symmetrical cooling from the sides and the insulated top wall has been investigated numerically. The governing equations are the Darcy's law for the porous media and the energy equation for the temperature field has been considered. The non-dimensional Darcy's law in terms of the stream function is solved by finite difference method using the successive over-relaxation (SOR) scheme and the energy equation is solved by Alternative Direction Alternative (ADI) scheme. The uniform heat flux source is located centrally at the bottom wall. The numerical results are presented in terms of the streamlines and isotherms, as well as the local and average rate of heat transfer for the wide range of the Darcy's Rayleigh number and the length of the heat flux source at the bottom wall.

  2. Dual Nature of Heat Flux in Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, P.; Sharan, M.

    2015-12-01

    The behavior of heat flux (H) with respect to the stability parameter (ζ) in stable surface layer (SSL) is analyzed with in the framework of Monin-Obukhov similarity (MOS) theory. The analytical expressions of H are obtained as functions of wind speed (U) and wind shear (dU/dz) using the linear similarity functions and accordingly two cases, (i) U = δ (constant) and (ii) dU/dz = δ are considered. The mathematical analysis shows that the magnitude of H increases with ζ till it attains a maximum value at ζ =ζc and then starts decreasing with increasing stability suggesting the dual characteristic of heat flux with stability parameter. The point of maximum heat flux is found to be dependent on the roughness length (z0) as well as the height above the surface. An attempt has been made to analyze the sensitivity of this dual characteristic of H with ζ using the non-linear similarity functions. The analysis shows that the dual nature of H persists in the case of linear as well as non-linear similarity functions. However, the point of extremum appears to be dependent on the nature of the similarity functions. Turbulent data over a tropical site Ranchi (India) is analyzed to validate the observed nature of H with the theoretical nature as predicted by MOS. The analysis of observational data reveals the non-existence of any preferred stability state in SSL as speculated by Wang and Bras (2010, 2011) and supports the conclusions of Malhi 1995, Derbyshire 1999, van de Wiel et al. 2007, Basu et al. 2008, and van de Wiel et al. 2011. Thus, the non-uniqueness of MOS equations does not appear to be a mathematical artifact and it is consistent with the observations as far as the nature of heat flux with respect to stability parameter in SSL is concerned.

  3. Comparison of practical vertical ground heat exchanger sizing methods to a Fort Polk data/model benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, J.W.; McDowell, T.P.; Hughes, P.J.

    1997-09-01

    The results of five practical vertical ground heat exchanger sizing programs are compared against a detailed simulation model that has been calibrated to monitored data taken from one military family housing unit at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The calibration of the detailed model to data is described in a companion paper. The assertion that the data/detailed model is a useful benchmark for practical sizing methods is based on this calibration. The results from the comparisons demonstrate the current level of agreement between vertical ground heat exchanger sizing methods in common use. It is recommended that the calibration and comparison exercise be repeated with data sets from additional sites in order to build confidence in the practical sizing methods.

  4. Numerical modeling of a 2K J-T heat exchanger used in Fermilab Vertical Test Stand VTS-1

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Prabhat Kumar; Rabehl, Roger

    2014-07-01

    Fermilab Vertical Test Stand-1 (VTS-1) is in operation since 2007 for testing the superconducting RF cavities at 2 K. This test stand has single layer coiled finned tubes heat exchanger before J-T valve. A finite difference based thermal model has been developed in Engineering Equation Solver (EES) to study its thermal performance during filling and refilling to maintain the constant liquid level of test stand. The model is also useful to predict its performance under other various operating conditions and will be useful to design the similar kind of heat exchanger for future needs. Present paper discusses the different operational modes of this heat exchanger and its thermal characteristics under these operational modes. Results of this model have also been compared with the experimental data gathered from the VTS-1 heat exchanger and they are in good agreement with the present model.

  5. High Rayleigh number convection in rectangular enclosures with differentially heated vertical walls and aspect ratios between zero and unity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, Siavash A.

    1988-01-01

    High Rayleigh number convection in a rectangular cavity with insulated horizontal surfaces and differentially heated vertical walls was analyzed for an arbitrary aspect ratio smaller than or equal to unity. Unlike previous analytical studies, a systematic method of solution based on linearization technique and analytical iteration procedure was developed to obtain approximate closed-form solutions for a wide range of aspect ratios. The predicted velocity and temperature fields are shown to be in excellent agreement with available experimental and numerical data.

  6. MHD free convective boundary layer flow of a nanofluid past a flat vertical plate with Newtonian heating boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammed J; Khan, Waqar A; Ismail, Ahmed I

    2012-01-01

    Steady two dimensional MHD laminar free convective boundary layer flows of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid over a solid stationary vertical plate in a quiescent fluid taking into account the Newtonian heating boundary condition is investigated numerically. A magnetic field can be used to control the motion of an electrically conducting fluid in micro/nano scale systems used for transportation of fluid. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and then using linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The effects of different controlling parameters, namely, Lewis number, Prandtl number, buoyancy ratio, thermophoresis, Brownian motion, magnetic field and Newtonian heating on the flow and heat transfer are investigated. The numerical results for the dimensionless axial velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction as well as the reduced Nusselt and Sherwood number have been presented graphically and discussed. It is found that the rate of heat and mass transfer increase as Newtonian heating parameter increases. The dimensionless velocity and temperature distributions increase with the increase of Newtonian heating parameter. The results of the reduced heat transfer rate is compared for convective heating boundary condition and found an excellent agreement. PMID:23166688

  7. MHD Free Convective Boundary Layer Flow of a Nanofluid past a Flat Vertical Plate with Newtonian Heating Boundary Condition

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Mohammed J.; Khan, Waqar A.; Ismail, Ahmed I.

    2012-01-01

    Steady two dimensional MHD laminar free convective boundary layer flows of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid over a solid stationary vertical plate in a quiescent fluid taking into account the Newtonian heating boundary condition is investigated numerically. A magnetic field can be used to control the motion of an electrically conducting fluid in micro/nano scale systems used for transportation of fluid. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and then using linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The effects of different controlling parameters, namely, Lewis number, Prandtl number, buoyancy ratio, thermophoresis, Brownian motion, magnetic field and Newtonian heating on the flow and heat transfer are investigated. The numerical results for the dimensionless axial velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction as well as the reduced Nusselt and Sherwood number have been presented graphically and discussed. It is found that the rate of heat and mass transfer increase as Newtonian heating parameter increases. The dimensionless velocity and temperature distributions increase with the increase of Newtonian heating parameter. The results of the reduced heat transfer rate is compared for convective heating boundary condition and found an excellent agreement. PMID:23166688

  8. Natural convection of non-Newtonian fluid along a vertical thin cylinder using modified power-law model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thohura, Sharaban; Molla, Md. Mamun; Sarker, M. M. A.

    2016-07-01

    A study on the natural convection flow of non-Newtonian fluid along a vertical thin cylinder with constant wall temperature using modified power law viscosity model has been done. The basic equations are transformed to non dimensional boundary layer equations and the resulting systems of nonlinear partial differential equations are then solved employing marching order implicit finite difference method. The evolution of the surface shear stress in terms of local skin-friction, the rate of heat transfer in terms of local Nusselt number, velocity and temperature profiles for shear thinning as well as shear-thickening fluid considering the different values of Prandtl number have been focused. For the Newtonian fluids the present numerical results are compared with available published results which show a good agreement indeed. From the results it can be concluded that, at the leading edge, a Newtonian-like solution exists as the shear rate is not large enough to trigger non-Newtonian effects. Non-Newtonian effects can be found when the shear-rate increases beyond a threshold value.

  9. Retrieved Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Using TRMM Rainfall Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Olson, W. S.; Meneghini, R.; Yang, S.; Simpson, J.; Kummerow, C.; Smith, E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper represents the first attempt to use TRMM rainfall information to estimate the four dimensional latent heating structure over the global tropics for February 1998. The mean latent heating profiles over six oceanic regions (TOGA COARE IFA, Central Pacific, S. Pacific Convergence Zone, East Pacific, Indian Ocean and Atlantic Ocean) and three continental regions (S. America, Central Africa and Australia) are estimated and studied. The heating profiles obtained from the results of diagnostic budget studies over a broad range of geographic locations are used to provide comparisons and indirect validation for the heating algorithm estimated heating profiles. Three different latent heating algorithms, the Goddard Convective-Stratiform (CSH) heating, the Goddard Profiling (GPROF) heating, and the Hydrometeor heating (HH) are used and their results are intercompared. The horizontal distribution or patterns of latent heat release from the three different heating retrieval methods are quite similar. They all can identify the areas of major convective activity (i.e., a well defined ITCZ in the Pacific, a distinct SPCZ) in the global tropics. The magnitude of their estimated latent heating release is also not in bad agreement with each other and with those determined from diagnostic budget studies. However, the major difference among these three heating retrieval algorithms is the altitude of the maximum heating level. The CSH algorithm estimated heating profiles only show one maximum heating level, and the level varies between convective activity from various geographic locations. These features are in good agreement with diagnostic budget studies. By contrast, two maximum heating levels were found using the GPROF heating and HH algorithms. The latent heating profiles estimated from all three methods can not show cooling between active convective events. We also examined the impact of different TMI (Multi-channel Passive Microwave Sensor) and PR (Precipitation Radar

  10. Free convection flow past an impulsively started infinite vertical porous plate with Newtonian heating in the presence of heat generation and viscous dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamran, M.; Narahari, M.; Jaafar, A.

    2014-10-01

    The effects of heat generation and viscous dissipation on free convective flow past an impulsively started infinite vertical porous plate with Newtonian heating have been investigated. The governing boundary layer equations are solved by using an analytical technique known as Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM). The effects of heat source parameter (Q), suction parameter (s), Eckert number (Ec) and Grashof number (Gr) on the velocity and temperature fields are determined. The study revealed that the fluid temperature increases by increasing heat generation and Eckert number whereas it decreases with increasing suction velocity. The present results are compared with the exact solution results in the absence of viscous dissipation and it is found that the HAM results coincide with the exact solution results.

  11. Instabilities of Natural Convection in a Periodically Heated Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, M. Z.; Floryan, Jerzy M.

    2013-11-01

    Natural convection in a horizontal layer subject to a spatially periodic heating along the lower wall has been investigated. The heating produces sinusoidal temperature variations characterized by the wave number α and the Rayleigh number Rap. The primary response has the form of stationary rolls with axis orthogonal to the heating wave vector. For large α convection is limited to a thin layer adjacent to the lower wall with a uniform conduction above it. Linear stability was used to determine conditions leading to a secondary convection. Two mechanisms of instability have been identified. For α = 0(1), the parametric resonance dominates and leads to the pattern of instability that is locked-in with the pattern of the heating according to the relation δcr = α /2, where δcr denotes the component of the critical disturbance wave vector parallel to the heating wave vector. The second mechanism, Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) mechanism, dominates for large α. Competition between these mechanisms gives rise to non-commensurable states and appearance of soliton lattices, to the formation of distorted transverse rolls, and to the appearance of the wave vector component in the direction perpendicular to the forcing direction.

  12. Inverse conjugate mixed convection in a vertical substrate with protruding heat sources: a combined experimental and numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahamad, Shaik Imran; Balaji, C.

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports the results of a combined numerical and experimental study to estimate the heat inputs of three protruding heat sources of the same size placed on a vertically placed PCB board of height 150 mm, depth 250 mm, and thickness 5 mm. First, limited measurements of temperatures were recorded at eight locations along the height of the back of the PCB board for different (and known) values of heat inputs of the protruding heat sources and different velocities. These were followed by three-dimensional calculations of fluid flow and conjugate heat transfer for various heat transfer coefficients on the backside of the PCB board. The difference between the CFD predicted and experimentally measured temperature distributions on the back of the PCB board was minimized using least squares and the best value of heat transfer coefficient was obtained. Using this `data assimilated' CFD model, detailed CFD simulations were done for various values of heat input values and Reynolds numbers (each of these can be different from one another) of the flow. The temperatures at the same eight locations at the back of the PCB board were noted. An artificial neural network was then developed with ten inputs (eight temperatures together with the input velocity and the ambient temperature) to estimate the three outputs (three heat inputs) after carrying out extensive studies on the architecture of the network. This inverse solution was then tested with experiments for validating the ANN approach to solve the inverse conjugate heat transfer problem. Finally, with the ANN estimated heat inputs, CFD simulations were again run to compare the temperature distribution at the back of the PCB board with measurements.

  13. Experimental investigation of free-convection heat transfer in vertical tube at large Grashof numbers / E. R. G. Eckert, A. J. Diaguila

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R G; Diaguila, A J

    1952-01-01

    Local free-convection heat-transfer coefficients and temperature fields in the turbulent flow range were obtained within a vertical, stationary tube closed at the boom, heated along its walls, and having a length-to-diameter ratio of 5. Convective heat-transfer coefficients were correlated by the general relations for free-convection heat transfer. These coefficients, converted to dimensionless Nusselt numbers were 35 percent below known relations for vertical flat plates. Air temperature measurements within the tube indicated a thin boundary layer along the heated wall surface and unstable conditions in the air flow.

  14. Experimental investigation on heat transfer and frictional characteristics of vertical upward rifled tube in supercritical CFB boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dong; Pan, Jie; Zhu, Xiaojing; Bi, Qincheng; Chen, Tingkuan; Zhou, Chenn Q.

    2011-02-15

    Water wall design is a key issue for supercritical Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) boiler. On account of the good heat transfer performance, rifled tube is applied in the water wall design of a 600 MW supercritical CFB boiler in China. In order to investigate the heat transfer and frictional characteristics of the rifled tube with vertical upward flow, an in-depth experiment was conducted in the range of pressure from 12 to 30 MPa, mass flux from 230 to 1200 kg/(m{sup 2} s), and inner wall heat flux from 130 to 720 kW/m{sup 2}. The wall temperature distribution and pressure drop in the rifled tube were obtained in the experiment. The normal, enhanced and deteriorated heat transfer characteristics were also captured. In this paper, the effects of pressure, inner wall heat flux and mass flux on heat transfer characteristics are analyzed, the heat transfer mechanism and the frictional resistance performance are discussed, and the corresponding empirical correlations are presented. The experimental results show that the rifled tube can effectively prevent the occurrence of departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) and keep the tube wall temperature in a permissible range under the operating condition of supercritical CFB boiler. (author)

  15. Theoretical determination of design parameters for an arrayed heat sink with vertical plate fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shiang-Jiun; Chen, Yi-Jin

    2016-05-01

    This paper employs theoretical approach to determine the adequate design parameters of an arrayed plate-fins heat sink based on maximizing heat flow. According to analyzed results, increasing the dimensions of configurative parameters does not always yield the significant increase in the heat flow. As the fin length and fin space increases until a critical value, the heat flow will significantly reduce the increment or decay, respectively.

  16. Numerical Study of Natural Convection within a Wavy Enclosure Using Meshfree Approach: Effect of Corner Heating

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sonam; Bhargava, R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of natural convection within a wavy enclosure heated via corner heating. The considered enclosure is a square enclosure with left wavy side wall. The vertical wavy wall of the enclosure and both of the corner heaters are maintained at constant temperature, Tc and Th, respectively, with Th > Tc while the remaining horizontal, bottom, top and side walls are insulated. A penalty element-free Galerkin approach with reduced gauss integration scheme for penalty terms is used to solve momentum and energy equations over the complex domain with wide range of parameters, namely, Rayleigh number (Ra), Prandtl number (Pr), and range of heaters in the x- and y-direction. Numerical results are represented in terms of isotherms, streamlines, and Nusselt number. It is observed that the rate of heat transfer depends to a great extent on the Rayleigh number, Prandtl number, length of the corner heaters and the shape of the heat transfer surface. The consistent performance of the adopted numerical procedure is verified by comparison of the results obtained through the present meshless technique with those existing in the literature. PMID:24672383

  17. Natural convection heat transfer for a staggered array of heated, horizontal cylinders within a rectangular enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Triplett, C.E.

    1996-12-01

    This thesis presents the results of an experimental investigation of natural convection heat transfer in a staggered array of heated cylinders, oriented horizontally within a rectangular enclosure. The main purpose of this research was to extend the knowledge of heat transfer within enclosed bundles of spent nuclear fuel rods sealed within a shipping or storage container. This research extends Canaan`s investigation of an aligned array of heated cylinders that thermally simulated a boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel assembly sealed within a shipping or storage cask. The results are presented in terms of piecewise Nusselt-Rayleigh number correlations of the form Nu = C(Ra){sup n}, where C and n are constants. Correlations are presented both for individual rods within the array and for the array as a whole. The correlations are based only on the convective component of the heat transfer. The radiative component was calculated with a finite-element code that used measured surface temperatures, rod array geometry, and measured surface emissivities as inputs. The correlation results are compared to Canaan`s aligned array results and to other studies of natural convection in horizontal tube arrays.

  18. Non-Darcy natural convection from a vertical plate with a uniform wall temperature and concentration in a doubly stratified porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasacharya, D.; Surender, O.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, non-similarity solutions for natural convection heat and mass transfer along a vertical plate with a uniform wall temperature and concentration in a doubly stratified porous medium saturated by a fluid are obtained. The Darcy-Forchheimer-based model is employed to describe the flow in the porous medium. The nonlinear governing equations and their associated boundary conditions are initially cast into dimensionless forms by using pseudo-similarity variables. The resulting system of nonlinear partial differential equations is then solved numerically by using the Keller-box method. The effects of the buoyancy parameter, Forchheimer number, and thermal and solutal stratification parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, concentration, and heat and mass transfer coefficients are studied.

  19. Effect of sea-ice melt on inherent optical properties and vertical distribution of solar radiant heating in Arctic surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granskog, Mats A.; Pavlov, Alexey K.; Sagan, Sławomir; Kowalczuk, Piotr; Raczkowska, Anna; Stedmon, Colin A.

    2015-10-01

    The inherent optical properties (IOPs) of Polar Waters (PW) exiting the Arctic Ocean in the East Greenland Current (EGC) and of the inflowing Atlantic waters (AW) in the West Spitsbergen Current (WSC) were studied in late summer when surface freshening due to sea-ice melt was widespread. The absorption and attenuation coefficients in PW were significantly higher than previous observations from the western Arctic. High concentrations of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) resulted in 50-60% more heat deposition in the upper meters relative to clearest natural waters. This demonstrates the influence of terrigenous organic material inputs on the optical properties of waters in the Eurasian basin. Sea-ice melt in CDOM-rich PW decreased CDOM absorption, but an increase in scattering nearly compensated for lower absorption, and total attenuation was nearly identical in the sea-ice meltwater layer. This suggests a source of scattering material associated with sea-ice melt, relative to the PW. In the AW, melting sea-ice forms a stratified surface layer with lower absorption and attenuation, than well-mixed AW waters in late summer. It is likely that phytoplankton in the surface layer influenced by sea-ice melt are nutrient limited. The presence of a more transparent surface layer changes the vertical radiant heat absorption profile to greater depths in late summer both in EGC and WSC waters, shifting accumulation of solar heat to greater depths and thus this heat is not directly available for ice melt during periods of stratification.

  20. Natural Convection Heat Transfer in a Rectangular Liquid Metal Pool With Bottom Heating and Top Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Il S.; Yu, Yong H.; Son, Hyoung M.; Hwang, Jin S.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2006-07-01

    An experimental study is performed to investigate the natural convection heat transfer characteristics with subcooled coolant to create engineering database for basic applications in a lead alloy cooled reactor. Tests are performed in the ALTOS (Applied Liquid-metal Thermal Operation Study) apparatus as part of MITHOS (Metal Integrated Thermo Hydrodynamic Operation System). A relationship is determined between the Nusselt number Nu and the Rayleigh number Ra in the liquid metal rectangular pool. Results are compared with correlations and experimental data in the literature. Given the similar Ra condition, the present test results for Nu of the liquid metal pool with top subcooling are found to be similar to those predicted by the existing correlations or experiments. The current test results are utilized to develop natural convection heat transfer correlations applicable to low Prandtl number Pr fluids that are heated from below and cooled by the external coolant above. Results from this study are slated to be used in designing BORIS (Battery Optimized Reactor Integral System), a small lead cooled modular fast reactor for deployment at remote sites cycled with MOBIS (Modular Optimized Brayton Integral System) for electricity generation, tied with NAVIS (Naval Application Vessel Integral System) for ship propulsion, joined with THAIS (Thermochemical Hydrogen Acquisition Integral System) for hydrogen production, and coupled with DORIS (Desalination Optimized Reactor Integral System) for seawater desalination. Tests are performed with Wood's metal (Pb-Bi-Sn-Cd) filling a rectangular pool whose lower surface is heated and upper surface cooled by forced convection of water. The test section is 20 cm long, 11.3 cm high and 15 cm wide. The simulant has a melting temperature of 78 deg. C. The constant temperature and heat flux condition was realized for the bottom heating once the steady state had been met. The test parameters include the heated bottom surface temperature

  1. Diurnal and vertical variability of the sensible heat and carbon dioxide budgets in the atmospheric surface layer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casso-Torralba, P.; de Arellano, J. V. -G.; Bosveld, F.; Soler, M.R.; Vermeulen, A.; Werner, C.; Moors, E.

    2008-01-01

    The diurnal and vertical variability of heat and carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmospheric surface layer are studied by analyzing measurements from a 213 in tower in Cabauw (Netherlands). Observations of thermodynamic variables and CO2 mixing ratio as well as vertical profiles of the turbulent fluxes are used to retrieve the contribution of the budget terms in the scalar conservation equation. On the basis of the daytime evolution of turbulent fluxes, we calculate the budget terms by assuming that turbulent fluxes follow a linear profile with height. This assumption is carefully tested and the deviation ftom linearity is quantified. The budget calculation allows us to assess the importance of advection of heat and CO2 during day hours for three selected days. It is found that, under nonadvective conditions, the diurnal variability of temperature and CO2 is well reproduced from the flux divergence measurements. Consequently, the vertical transport due to the turbulent flux plays a major role in the daytime evolution of both scalars and the advection is a relatively small contribution. During the analyzed days with a strong contribution of advection of either heat or carbon dioxide, the flux divergence is still an important contribution to the budget. For heat, the quantification of the advection contribution is in close agreement with results from a numerical model. For carbon dioxide, we qualitatively corroborate the results with a Lagrangian transport model. Our estimation of advection is compared with, traditional estimations based on the Net Ecosystem-atmosphere Exchange (NEE). Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Ocean Turbulence. Paper 2; One-Point Closure Model Momentum, Heat and Salt Vertical Diffusivities in the Presence of Shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Howard, A.; Cheng, Y.; Dubovikov, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    We develop and test a 1-point closure turbulence model with the following features: 1) we include the salinity field and derive the expression for the vertical turbulent diffusivities of momentum K(sub m) , heat K(sub h) and salt K(sub s) as a function of two stability parameters: the Richardson number R(sub i) (stratification vs. shear) and the Turner number R(sub rho) (salinity gradient vs. temperature gradient). 2) to describe turbulent mixing below the mixed layer (ML), all previous models have adopted three adjustable "background diffusivities" for momentum, heat and salt. We propose a model that avoids such adjustable diffusivities. We assume that below the ML, the three diffusivities have the same functional dependence on R( sub i) and R(sub rho) as derived from the turbulence model. However, in order to compute R(sub i) below the ML, we use data of vertical shear due to wave-breaking.measured by Gargett et al. The procedure frees the model from adjustable background diffusivities and indeed we employ the same model throughout the entire vertical extent of the ocean. 3) in the local model, the turbulent diffusivities K(sub m,h,s) are given as analytical functions of R(sub i) and R(sub rho). 5) the model is used in an O-GCM and several results are presented to exhibit the effect of double diffusion processes. 6) the code is available upon request.

  3. Seismic-geodynamic constraints on three-dimensional structure, vertical flow, and heat transfer in the mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forte, A.M.; Woodward, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    Joint inversions of seismic and geodynamic data are carried out in which we simultaneously constrain global-scale seismic heterogeneity in the mantle as well as the amplitude of vertical mantle flow across the 670 km seismic discontinuity. These inversions reveal the existence of a family of three-dimensional (3-D) mantle models that satisfy the data while at the same time yielding predictions of layered mantle flow. The new 3-D mantle models we obtain demonstrate that the buoyancy forces due to the undulations of the 670 km phase-change boundary strongly inhibit the vertical flow between the upper and lower mantle. The strong stabilizing effect of the 670 km topography also has an important impact on the predicted dynamic topography of the Earth's solid surface and on the surface gravity anomalies. The new 3-D models that predict strongly or partially layered mantle flow provide essentially identical fits to the global seismic data as previous models that have, until now, predicted only whole-mantle flow. The convective vertical transport of heat across the mantle predicted on the basis of the new 3-D models shows that the heat flow is a minimum at 1000 km depth. This suggests the presence at this depth of a globally defined horizon across which the pattern of lateral heterogeneity changes rapidly. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. The vertical structure of diabatic heating associated with the Madden-Julian oscillation simulated by the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres climate model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Tsing-Chang; Yen, Ming-Cheng; Pfaendtner, James; Sud, Y. C.

    1993-01-01

    The diabatic heating structure of the nine-layer Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres model of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is illustrated with composite charts made for those times when this low-frequency mode reaches its maximum and minimum amplitudes. These composite charts compare the vertically integrated diabatic heating with potential functions, the vertical distribution of diabatic heating with the east-west mass flux function in the tropics, and the vertical profiles of diabatic heating at the centers of maximum and minimum MJO amplitude. Three interesting features of the model MJO's diabatic heating are revealed: (1) the maximum heating rate of this low-frequency mode is located over the Asian monsoon region and its amplitude is about a half of the maximum value of the seasonal mean heating rate in this region, (2) the vertical diabatic heating rate profile has a maximum at 500 mbar and resembles the seasonal mean total heating profile, and (3) the total diabatic heating is for the most part composed of the latent heat released by cumulus convection.

  5. Radial segregation induced by natural convection and melt/solid interface shape in vertical Bridgman growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. J.; Brown, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The roles of natural convection in the melt and the shape of the melt/solid interface on radial dopant segregation are analyzed for a prototype of vertical Bridgman crystal growth system by finite element methods that solve simultaneously for the velocity field in the melt, the shape of the solidification isotherm, and the temperature distribution in both phases. Results are presented for crystal and melt with thermophysical properties similar to those of gallium-doped germanium in Bridgman configurations with melt below (thermally destabilizing) and above (stabilizing) the crystal. Steady axisymmetric flow are classified according to Rayleigh number as either being nearly the growth velocity, having a weak cellular structure or having large amplitude cellular convention. The flows in the two Bridgman configurations are driven by different temperature gradients and are in opposite directions. Finite element calculations for the transport of a dilute dopant by these flow fields reveal radial segregation levels as large as sixty percent of the mean concentration. Segregation is found most severe at an intermediate value of Rayleigh number above which the dopant distribution along the interface levels as the intensity of the flow increases.

  6. Natural flow and vertical heterogeneities in a sedimentary geothermal reservoir (Paris Basin, France): Geochemical investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Criaud, Annie, Fouassier, Philippe; Fouillac, Christian; Brach, Michel

    1988-01-01

    Three geothermal wells tapping the Dogger aquifer were studied in detail for their variations in chemical composition with time or conditions of exploitation. Analytical improvements for the determination of Cl, SO{sub 4}, Ca, Mg, Na and K make it possible to detect variations respectively of 0.15, 0.8, 0.6, 1.8, 1.8 and 1.4 %. Despite the fact that the natural flow may be important in some parts of the basin aquifer, we conclude that this factor is not responsible for the small variations noticed in mineralization within the one year survey period. The results concerning reactive and nonreactive species are best explained if a vertical heterogeneity of the chemistry of the fluid is assumed. A number of calcareous sub-layers, already demonstrated by geological studies, contribute to varying degrees to the production of the hot water. The changes in pumping rates, which are fixed according to external requirements, play a major role in the hydrodynamic and chemical disequilibrium of the wells. The consequences for the geothermal exploitations are emphasized.

  7. Evaporation heat transfer and friction characteristics of R-134a flowing downward in a vertical corrugated tube

    SciTech Connect

    Aroonrat, Kanit; Wongwises, Somchai

    2011-01-15

    Differently from most previous studies, the heat transfer and friction characteristics of the pure refrigerant HFC-134a during evaporation inside a vertical corrugated tube are experimentally investigated. The double tube test sections are 0.5 m long with refrigerant flowing in the inner tube and heating water flowing in the annulus. The inner tubes are one smooth tube and two corrugated tubes, which are constructed from smooth copper tube of 8.7 mm inner diameter. The test runs are performed at evaporating temperatures of 10, 15, and 20 C, heat fluxes of 20, 25, and 30 kW/m{sup 2}, and mass fluxes of 200, 300, and 400 kg/m{sup 2} s. The quality of the refrigerant in the test section is calculated using the temperature and pressure obtained from the experiment. The pressure drop across the test section is measured directly by a differential pressure transducer. The effects of heat flux, mass flux, and evaporation temperature on the heat transfer coefficient and two-phase friction factor are also discussed. It is found that the percentage increases of the heat transfer coefficient and the two-phase friction factor of the corrugated tubes compared with those of the smooth tube are approximately 0-10% and 70-140%, respectively. (author)

  8. Boiling Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop of a Refrigerant Flowing Vertically Upward in a Small Diameter Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kazushi; Mori, Hideo; Ohishi, Katsumi; Tanaka, Hirokazu

    In the present study, experiments were performed to examine characteristics of flow boiling heat transfer and pressure drop of a refrigerant R410A flowing vertically upward in a copper smooth tube with 1.0 mm inside diameter for the development of a high-performance heat exchanger using small diameter tubes for air conditioning systems. Local heat transfer coefficients were measured in a range of mass fluxes from 30 to 200 kg/(m2•s), heat fluxes from 1 to 16 kW/m2 and qualities from 0.1 to over 1 at evaporation temperature of 10°C, and pressure drops were also measured at mass fluxes of 100 and 200 kg/(m2•s) and qualities from 0.1 to 0.9. Three types of flow pattern were observed in the tube: A slug, a slug-annular and an annular flow. Based on the measurements, the characteristics of frictional pressure drop, heat transfer coefficient and dryout qualities were clarified. The measured pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient were compared with correlations.

  9. Natural convection heat transfer within horizontal spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Canaan, R.E.

    1995-12-01

    Natural convection heat transfer is experimentally investigated in an enclosed horizontal rod bundle, which characterizes a spent nuclear fuel assembly during dry storage and/or transport conditions. The basic test section consists of a square array of sixty-four stainless steel tubular heaters enclosed within a water-cooled rectangular copper heat exchanger. The heaters are supplied with a uniform power generation per unit length while the surrounding enclosure is maintained at a uniform temperature. The test section resides within a vacuum/pressure chamber in order to subject the assembly to a range of pressure statepoints and various backfill gases. The objective of this experimental study is to obtain convection correlations which can be used in order to easily incorporate convective effects into analytical models of horizontal spent fuel systems, and also to investigate the physical nature of natural convection in enclosed horizontal rod bundles in general. The resulting data consist of: (1) measured temperatures within the assembly as a function of power, pressure, and backfill gas; (2) the relative radiative contribution for the range of observed temperatures; (3) correlations of convective Nusselt number and Rayleigh number for the rod bundle as a whole; and (4) correlations of convective Nusselt number as a function of Rayleigh number for individual rods within the array.

  10. A study of natural circulation in the evaporator of a horizontal-tube heat recovery steam generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslyakov, P. V.; Pleshanov, K. A.; Sterkhov, K. V.

    2014-07-01

    Results obtained from investigations of stable natural circulation in an intricate circulation circuit with a horizontal layout of the tubes of evaporating surface having a negative useful head are presented. The possibility of making a shift from using multiple forced circulation organized by means of a circulation pump to natural circulation in vertical heat recovery steam generator is estimated. Criteria for characterizing the performance reliability and efficiency of a horizontal evaporator with negative useful head are proposed. The influence of various design solutions on circulation robustness is considered. With due regard of the optimal parameters, the most efficient and least costly methods are proposed for achieving more stable circulation in a vertical heat recovery steam generator when a shift is made from multiple forced to natural circulation. A procedure for calculating the circulation parameters and an algorithm for checking evaporator performance reliability are developed, and recommendations for the design of heat recovery steam generator, nonheated parts of natural circulation circuit, and evaporating surface are suggested.

  11. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, February 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    This progress report describes the thermodynamic testing and modeling of a thermosyphon heat exchanger used in solar water heating systems. Testing of a four tube-in-shell thermosyphon heat exchanger was performed in two parts. The first portion of the test increased the collector fluid while the storage tank remained isothermal. After the collector fluid temperature was raised to 95 C, the second part of the test allowed the storage tank to gain heat. The test was performed for two collector flow rates. Measured values included collector side forced flow rate, temperature differences across the heat exchanger, vertical temperature distribution in the storage tank, vertical water temperature profile in the heat exchanger, and pressure drop on the thermosyphon side of the heat exchanger. The overall heat transfer coefficient-area product (UA) values obtained confirmed that models which assume UA depends solely on thermosyphon flow rate do not adequately characterize thermosyphon heat exchangers. This is because heat transfer in thermosyphon exchangers occurs in the mixed convection, rather than forced flow, regime. A linear regression equation was developed to better predict UA using the Prandtl, Reynolds, and Grashof numbers and dimensionless parameters based on fluid properties calculated for the average hot and cold leg temperatures. 9 figs.

  12. The effect of thermal dispersion on unsteady MHD convective heat transfer through vertical porous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamadien, Ghada F.

    2012-12-01

    The influence of thermal dispersion on unsteady two-dimensional laminar flow is presented. A viscous incompressible conducting fluid in the vicinity of a semi infinite vertical porous through a moving plate in the presence of a magnetic fluid is studied. A cod (FORTRAN) was constructed for numerical computations for the velocity and temperature for various values of the affected parameters were carried out.

  13. Boundary Layer Flow, Heat, and Chemical Transfer near Vertical Heated Boreholes in Water-Saturated Rock: A Mechanism for Developing a Large Scale Underground Hydrothermal Experiment (DUSEL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullally, D. M.; Lowell, R. P.

    2012-12-01

    We investigate a means of developing a large-scale hydrothermal experiment at the DUSEL site in the Homestake Mine, South Dakota, or elsewhere, by considering boundary layer flow, heat, and chemical transfer near an internally heated vertical borehole or borehole array emplaced in a water-saturated porous medium with homogeneous permeability. We use scale analysis to determine the relationships between vertical fluid velocity u, boundary layer thickness δ and the Rayleigh number Ra for both a single borehole maintained at constant temperature and a linear array of boreholes maintained at constant heat flux. For a single borehole, u ~ (a/y)Ra and δ ~ yRa^-1/2, whereas for the borehole array u ~(a/y) Ra^-1/3 and δ ~ yRa^-1/3, where y is the borehole height and a is the thermal diffusivity. We find that for y = 100 m, optimum initial permeability lies between ~ 10^-10 -10^-12 m^2 and the optimum heat flux is ~ 60 W/m^2. We also use scale analysis to determine the permeability change resulting from thermoelastic stresses generated by heating the rock near the boreholes and find that these stresses do not significantly impact the permeability so long as the initial porosity is ~ 5%, or the initial crack aspect ratios are less than or equal to 10^-2. Finally, we use scale analysis to investigate mineral dissolution within the boundary layer flow adjacent to the boreholes. Using the above velocity scaling and assuming linear reaction kinetics, and a crustal porosity of 5%, thermodynamic equilibrium may be obtained at the top of a 100 m high borehole provided reaction rate constants are in the range of ~ 10^-7 - 10^-8 s-1.

  14. Natural vertical transmission of dengue viruses in Aedes aegypti in selected sites in Cebu City, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Edillo, Frances E; Sarcos, Janet R; Sayson, Stephanie L

    2015-12-01

    We attempted to determine the vertical transmission of dengue virus (DENV) in Aedes aegypti in selected sites in Cebu City, Philippines. Mosquito sub-adults were collected monthly from households and the field during the wet-dry-wet season from November, 2011 to July, 2012 and were laboratory-reared to adults. Viral RNA extracts in mosquitoes were assayed by hemi-nested RT-PCR. Results showed that 62 (36.26%; n=679) out of 171 mosquito pools (n=2,871) were DENV+. The minimum infection rate (MIR) of DENV ranged from 0 in wet months to 48.22/1,000 mosquitoes in April, 2012 (mid-dry). DENVs were detected in larvae, pupae, and male and female adults, with DENV-4, DENV-3, and DENV-1, in that rank of prevalence. DENV-1 co-infected with either DENV-3 or -4 or with both in April, 2012; DENV-3 and -4 were present in both seasons. More DENV+ mosquitoes were collected from households than in field premises (p<0.001) and in the dry than in the wet season (p<0.05), with significant interaction (p<0.05) between sites and premises but no interaction between sites and seasons (p>0.05). By Generalized Linear Mixed models, the type of premises nested in sites and monthly total rainfall were significant predictors of monthly dengue cases (p<0.05) and not MIR, season, temperature, and relative humidity. Surveillance of DENV prevalence in Ae. aegypti and detecting their natural foci in the dry season provide an early warning signal of dengue outbreak. PMID:26611963

  15. Major and minor element site occupancies in heated natural forsterite

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, J.R.; Taftoe, J.

    1982-09-01

    Using a new analytical transmission electron microscopic technique known as CHannelling Enhanced X-ray Emission (CHEXE) spectroscopy, the M-site occupancies of Fe, Ni, Mn, and Ca have been determined in a natural forsteritic olivine (Fo/sub 91/) heat treated at different temperatures. The sample was taken as a single olivine grain from a spinel peridotite inclusion in an alkali basalt and contains 0.36 wt% NiO, 0.07 wt% MnO, and 0.09 wt% CaO. In the non-heat-treated sample, 49.6 at % of the Fe, 97 +/- 5 at % of the Mn in the sample occupy the M1 site. In the present study of samples quenched from different temperatures, the fraction of the Ni present at M1 is 87 +/- 5% (6 days at 300/sup 0/C), 83 +/- 5% (48h at 600/sup 0/C), 83 +/- 5% (45h at 900/sup 0/C) and 80 +/- 5% (24h at 1050/sup 0/C). The authors observed a lesser tendency for Ni to order than postulated by previous workers for Ni-rich olivines. For Mn, typically 15% of the atoms occupy M1 in the heat treated samples. No significant deviation from complete ordering into M2 was observed for Ca. The Fe atoms are completely disordered with 50 +/- 1% at each M-site, except for a weak deviation at 300/sup 0/C with 47.1 +/- 1% at M1. The study indicates that exchange of cations between M-sites may begin as low as 300/sup 0/C. This implies that Ni and Mn distribution in natural olivines may be a useful indicator of cooling rate in rapidly cooled rocks.

  16. Natural convection heat transfer on two horizontal cylinders in liquid sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, K.; Shiotsu, M.; Takeuchi, Y.

    1995-09-01

    Natural convection heat transfer on two horizontal 7.6 mm diameter test cylinders assembled with the ratio of the distance between each cylinder axis to the cylinder diameter, S/D, of 2 in liquid sodium was studied experimentally and theoretically. The heat transfer coefficients on the cylinder surface due to the same heat inputs ranging from 1.0 X 10{sup 7} to 1.0 x 10{sup 9} W/m{sup 3} were obtained experimentally for various setting angeles, {gamma}, between vertical direction and the plane including both of these cylinder axis over the range of zero to 90{degrees}. Theoretical equations for laminar natural convection heat transfer from the two horizontal cylinders were numerically solved for the same conditions as the experimental ones considering the temperature dependence of thermophysical properties concerned. The average Nusselt numbers, Nu, values on the Nu versus modified Rayleigh number, R{sub f}, graph. The experimental values of Nu for the upper cylinder are about 20% lower than those for the lower cylinder at {gamma} = 0{degrees} for the range of R{sub f} tested here. The value of Nu for the upper cylinder becomes higher and approaches that for the lower cylinder with the increase in {gamma} over range of 0 to 90{degrees}. The values of Nu for the lower cylinder at each {gamma} are almost in agreement with those for a single cylinder. The theoretical values of Nu on two cylinders except those for R{sub f}<4 at {gamma} = 0{degrees} are in agreement with the experimental data at each {gamma} with the deviations less than 15%. Correlations for Nu on the upper and lower cylinders were obtained as functions of S/D and {gamma} based n the theoretical solutions for the S/D ranged over 1.5 to 4.0.

  17. Influence of wick properties in a vertical LHP on remove waste heat from electronic equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Smitka, Martin E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk Nemec, Patrik E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk Malcho, Milan E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk

    2014-08-06

    The loop heat pipe is a vapour-liquid phase-change device that transfers heat from evaporator to condenser. One of the most important parts of the LHP is the porous wick structure. The wick structure provides capillary force to circulate the working fluid. To achieve good thermal performance of LHP, capillary wicks with high permeability and porosity and fine pore radius are expected. The aim of this work is to develop porous wick of sintered nickel powder with different grain sizes. These porous wicks were used in LHP and there were performed a series of measurements to remove waste heat from the insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT)

  18. Influence of wick properties in a vertical LHP on remove waste heat from electronic equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smitka, Martin; Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, Milan

    2014-08-01

    The loop heat pipe is a vapour-liquid phase-change device that transfers heat from evaporator to condenser. One of the most important parts of the LHP is the porous wick structure. The wick structure provides capillary force to circulate the working fluid. To achieve good thermal performance of LHP, capillary wicks with high permeability and porosity and fine pore radius are expected. The aim of this work is to develop porous wick of sintered nickel powder with different grain sizes. These porous wicks were used in LHP and there were performed a series of measurements to remove waste heat from the insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT).

  19. Heat transfer in porous medium embedded with vertical plate: Non-equilibrium approach - Part B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quadir, G. A.; Badruddin, Irfan Anjum

    2016-06-01

    This work is continuation of the paper Part A. Due to large number of results, the paper is divided into two section with section-A (Part A) discussing the effect of various parameters such as heat transfer coefficient parameter, thermal conductivity ratio etc. on streamlines and isothermal lines. Section-B highlights the heat transfer characteristics in terms of Nusselt number The Darcy model is employed to simulate the flow inside the medium. It is assumed that the heat transfer takes place by convection and radiation. The governing partial differential equations are converted into non-dimensional form and solved numerically using finite element method.

  20. Seismometer using a vertical long natural-period rotational pendulum with magnetic levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otake, Yuji; Araya, Akito; Hidano, Kazuo

    2005-05-01

    We have demonstrated a highly sensitive/wideband vertical-component seismometer using an astatic rotational pendulum to obtain a long natural period. This seismometer employs magnetic levitation for removing any parasitic resonances of a spring to support a weight due to gravity and the thermal dependence of the spring constant. The pendulum has a cylindrical plunger-type permanent magnet that has a weight at one side of its end edge. The plunger magnet is inserted into a uniform magnetic field generated by a window-frame-type permanent magnet, and attached to two crossed-leaf spring hinges as a rotational axis outside of the bore of the magnet. Magnetic forces applied to the plunger magnet counterbalance the gravitational force at the weight. To realize stable operation of the rotational pendulum without any unnecessary movements of the plunger magnet, a tilt of lines of the magnetic force in the bore of the window-frame magnet was compensated by a tilted magnetic-pole surface near to its opening. The field uniformity reached 10-4 owing to this compensation. The thermal dependence of a magnetic field strength of about 10-3/K was also compensated by as much as 9×10-5/K by Ni-Fe metal having a negative permeability coefficient. The metal was attached along the sidewalls of the window-frame magnet. To determine the feedback control parameters for a feedback control seismometer, the natural period of a prototype rotational pendulum was measured. It was more than 8s, and was able to be changed from 5to8s by using an additional magnetic spring, similar to the voice coil actuator of a speaker. This change was in accordance with theoretical calculations, and showed that the pendulum movement did not include a big nonlinearity caused by the tilt of the lines of the magnetic force. No parasitic resonances were found during experiments. A velocity feedback-control circuit and a capacitance position detector to measure the weight position were applied to the rotational

  1. Seismometer using a vertical long natural-period rotational pendulum with magnetic levitation

    SciTech Connect

    Otake, Yuji; Araya, Akito; Hidano, Kazuo

    2005-05-15

    We have demonstrated a highly sensitive/wideband vertical-component seismometer using an astatic rotational pendulum to obtain a long natural period. This seismometer employs magnetic levitation for removing any parasitic resonances of a spring to support a weight due to gravity and the thermal dependence of the spring constant. The pendulum has a cylindrical plunger-type permanent magnet that has a weight at one side of its end edge. The plunger magnet is inserted into a uniform magnetic field generated by a window-frame-type permanent magnet, and attached to two crossed-leaf spring hinges as a rotational axis outside of the bore of the magnet. Magnetic forces applied to the plunger magnet counterbalance the gravitational force at the weight. To realize stable operation of the rotational pendulum without any unnecessary movements of the plunger magnet, a tilt of lines of the magnetic force in the bore of the window-frame magnet was compensated by a tilted magnetic-pole surface near to its opening. The field uniformity reached 10{sup -4} owing to this compensation. The thermal dependence of a magnetic field strength of about 10{sup -3}/K was also compensated by as much as 9x10{sup -5}/K by Ni-Fe metal having a negative permeability coefficient. The metal was attached along the sidewalls of the window-frame magnet. To determine the feedback control parameters for a feedback control seismometer, the natural period of a prototype rotational pendulum was measured. It was more than 8 s, and was able to be changed from 5 to 8 s by using an additional magnetic spring, similar to the voice coil actuator of a speaker. This change was in accordance with theoretical calculations, and showed that the pendulum movement did not include a big nonlinearity caused by the tilt of the lines of the magnetic force. No parasitic resonances were found during experiments. A velocity feedback-control circuit and a capacitance position detector to measure the weight position were applied to

  2. Turbulent combined-convection boundary layer with aiding flows along a heated vertical flat plate at higher freestream velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedina, Mohammad Zoynal; Islam, Mohammed Moinul; Hanif, Md. Abu; Alam, Md. Jahangir

    2016-07-01

    A numerical investigation is performed in the turbulent combined-convection boundary layer with aiding flows in air along a heated vertical flat plate at a higher freestream velocity (Reδ0 = 600) by time-developing direct numerical simulation (DNS). At higher freestream velocity, the transition from laminar to turbulent delays for aiding flows and relatively a lower and higher heat transfer rates are observed, respectively, in the laminar and turbulent region compared to that of lower freestream velocity. The wall shear stresses are higher in the laminar region compared to that in the turbulent region, and at higher freestream velocity, the wall shear stress in the transition region shows a higher peak value. The intensity of velocity and temperature fluctuations for aiding flows with higher freestream velocity become appreciably lower than that for lower freestream velocity due to the laminarization of the boundary layer.

  3. Stability of a vertical liquid film with consideration of the marangoni effect and heat exchange with the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmistrova, O. A.

    2014-05-01

    The stability of a free vertical liquid film under the combined action of gravity and thermocapillary forces has been studied. An exact solution of the Navier-Stokes and thermal conductivity equations is obtained for the case of plane steady flow with constant film thickness. It is shown that if the free surfaces of the film are perfectly heat insulated, the liquid flow rate through the cross section of the layer is zero. It is found that to close the model with consideration of the heat exchange with the environment, it is necessary to specify the liquid flow rate and the derivative of the temperature with respect to the longitudinal coordinate or the flow rate and the film thickness. The stability of the solution with constant film thickness at small wave numbers is studied. A solution of the spectral problem for perturbations in the form of damped oscillations is obtained.

  4. Vertical Mass, Momentum, Moisture, and Heat Fluxes in Hurricanes above 10 km during CAMEX-3 and CAMEX-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Bui, Paul; Herman, Robert; Dean-Day, Jon; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The third and fourth NASA Convection and Moisture Experiments (CAMEX-3 and CAMEX-4) during the Atlantic hurricane seasons of 1998 and 2001, respectively, have yielded comprehensive multi-aircraft datasets using, both remote and in-situ instrumentation. Among these are high-frequency in-situ measurements of vertical wind, horizontal wind, temperature, and water vapor, made from NASA's DC-8 aircraft in the upper portions of the hurricane (typically above 10 km). Wind and temperature measurements were made at 20 hz by the NASA/Ames Meteorological Measurement System, while water vapor was measured at 1 hz by the NASA/JPL Laser Hygrometer. Fluxes of heat, momentum, and moisture at these levels are important, since modeling studies have shown that ice processes, which are dominant at temperatures below -40C (where the DC-8 flies) are important for hurricane intensification. Also, there are indications from satellite studies that latent heat release at DC-8 levels is significant, perhaps a third of those in the mid-troposphere. Preliminary results show that typical updrafts in the eyewall region are comparable to or higher than previous observations of tropical convection, with several instances of updraft magnitudes of 15 meters per second (the maximum observed was 21 meters per second). They also show significant supersaturations (10-20% or more) in the updrafts, which would enhance the latent heat release at the upper levels of the hurricane. This paper will examine the magnitude and distribution of small and mesoscale vertical fluxes of mass, momentum, moisture, and heat. The goal is to examine the role of these fluxes in the overall budgets of the respective quantities in the upper portions of the hurricane.

  5. Study of heat-stress levels in naturally ventilated sheep barns during heat waves: development and assessment of regression models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanastasiou, D. K.; Bartzanas, T.; Panagakis, P.; Zhang, G.; Kittas, C.

    2016-03-01

    It is well documented that heat-stress burdens sheep welfare and productivity. Peak heat-stress levels are observed when high temperatures prevail, i.e. during heat waves; however, continuous measurements inside livestock buildings are not usually available for long periods so as to study the variation of summer heat-stress levels for several years, especially during extreme hot weather. Α methodology to develop a long time series of summer temperature and relative humidity inside naturally ventilated sheep barns is proposed. The accuracy and the transferability of the developed linear regression models were verified. Temperature Humidity Index (THI) was used to assess sheep's potential heat-stress. Τhe variation of THI inside a barn during heat wave and non-heat wave days was examined, and the results were comparatively assessed. The analysis showed that sheep were exposed to moderate, severe, and extreme severe heat-stress in 10, 21 and 66 % of hours, respectively, during heat wave days, while the corresponding values during non-heat wave days were 14, 33 and 43 %, respectively. The heat load on sheep was much higher during heat wave events than during non-heat wave periods. Additionally, based on the averaged diurnal variation of THI, it was concluded that extreme severe heat-stress conditions were prevailing between 1000 and 2400 hours local time during heat wave days. Cool off night periods were never and extremely rarely detected during heat wave and non-heat wave days, respectively.

  6. MHD forced convective laminar boundary layer flow from a convectively heated moving vertical plate with radiation and transpiration effect.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Md Jashim; Khan, Waqar A; Ismail, A I Md

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional steady forced convective flow of a Newtonian fluid past a convectively heated permeable vertically moving plate in the presence of a variable magnetic field and radiation effect has been investigated numerically. The plate moves either in assisting or opposing direction to the free stream. The plate and free stream velocities are considered to be proportional to x(m) whilst the magnetic field and mass transfer velocity are taken to be proportional to x((m-1)/2) where x is the distance along the plate from the leading edge of the plate. Instead of using existing similarity transformations, we use a linear group of transformations to transform the governing equations into similarity equations with relevant boundary conditions. Numerical solutions of the similarity equations are presented to show the effects of the controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles as well as on the friction factor, rate of heat and mass transfer. It is found that the rate of heat transfer elevates with the mass transfer velocity, convective heat transfer, Prandtl number, velocity ratio and the magnetic field parameters. It is also found that the rate of mass transfer enhances with the mass transfer velocity, velocity ratio, power law index and the Schmidt number, whilst it suppresses with the magnetic field parameter. Our results are compared with the results existing in the open literature. The comparisons are satisfactory. PMID:23741295

  7. MHD Forced Convective Laminar Boundary Layer Flow from a Convectively Heated Moving Vertical Plate with Radiation and Transpiration Effect

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Md. Jashim; Khan, Waqar A.; Ismail, A. I. Md.

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional steady forced convective flow of a Newtonian fluid past a convectively heated permeable vertically moving plate in the presence of a variable magnetic field and radiation effect has been investigated numerically. The plate moves either in assisting or opposing direction to the free stream. The plate and free stream velocities are considered to be proportional to whilst the magnetic field and mass transfer velocity are taken to be proportional to where is the distance along the plate from the leading edge of the plate. Instead of using existing similarity transformations, we use a linear group of transformations to transform the governing equations into similarity equations with relevant boundary conditions. Numerical solutions of the similarity equations are presented to show the effects of the controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles as well as on the friction factor, rate of heat and mass transfer. It is found that the rate of heat transfer elevates with the mass transfer velocity, convective heat transfer, Prandtl number, velocity ratio and the magnetic field parameters. It is also found that the rate of mass transfer enhances with the mass transfer velocity, velocity ratio, power law index and the Schmidt number, whilst it suppresses with the magnetic field parameter. Our results are compared with the results existing in the open literature. The comparisons are satisfactory. PMID:23741295

  8. Study on heat transfer characteristic of ethanol-water mixture condensation on a vertical micro-tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiping; Wang, Jinshi; Qin, Junchao; Chong, Daotong; Yan, Junjie

    2013-07-01

    In present experiment, the vapor mixture with different velocities (2mṡs-1, 4mṡs-1) and different ethanol mass fraction (0.5%, 1%, 2%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 50%) flew through vertical micro-tube and condensed on the outer tube surface at pressure 31.16kPa, 47.36kPa. The condensation modes were observed by CCD camera, and the characteristics of the heat transfer coefficients versus the vapor-to-surface temperature differences for different experimental conditions were obtained. The condensation heat transfer coefficients of vapor mixture decrease with the vapor concentration increasing. The maximum peak value of heat transfer coefficients, up to 39 kWṡm-2ṡK1, which was about 3-4 times greater than that of steam, appeared when the ethanol mass fraction was 2%. A heat transfer coefficient correlation including the effects of all the tested parameters is proposed by using the multiple linear least squares method based on the experimental data. The calculated values agreed well with the experimental data and the deviations between them were from -20% to 20%.

  9. Laminar natural convection heat transfer and air flow in three-dimensional cubic enclosures with a partially heated wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellah, S.; Ben-Cheikh, N.; Ben-Beya, B.; Lili, T.

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, a finite volume computational procedure and a full multigrid technique are used to investigate laminar natural convection in partially heated cubic enclosures. Effects of heated strip disposition in the enclosure on the heat transfer rate are studied. Results are presented in the form of flow lines, isotherms plots, average Nusselt numbers, and average temperature on the heat source surface. Statistical distributions of temperature and average velocity fields and their root-mean-square values are presented and discussed.

  10. Experimental and analytical study of inverted annular flow film boiling heat transfer in a vertical tube using R-134a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Nakla, Meamer A.

    An experimental investigation of inverted annular film boiling heat transfer has been performed for vertical up-flow in a round tube. The working fluid was R-134a and the flow conditions covered a pressure range of 640 to 2390 kPa (water equivalent range: 4000 to 14000 kPa) and a mass flux range of 500 to 4000 kgm-2s-1 (water equivalent range: 700 to 5700 kgm-2s-1 ). The inlet qualities of the tests ranged from -0.75 to -0.03. The hot-patch technique is used to obtain the subcooled film boiling measurements. The parametric trends of the heat transfer coefficient with respect to mass flux, inlet quality, heat flux and pressure are examined and compared to reported parametric trends from the literature. The comparison shows agreement between observed effects of flow parameters with those reported by other researchers. The heat transfer vs. quality curve is divided into four different regions. It is shown that these regions are dependent on pressure, mass flux and local quality. A two-fluid one-dimensional model has been developed to predict the wall temperature of an internally-heated tube during IAFB. The model is derived using basic conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy. To simplify the derivation of the constitutive heat transfer relations, flow between two parallel plates is assumed. The model features shear stress and interfacial relations that make it accurately predicts the parametric effects and heat transfer characteristics of IAFB over a wide range of flow conditions. The model predicts wall temperatures of R-134a-cooled tubes with an average error of -1.21% and an RMS error of 6.37%. This corresponds to average and RMS errors in predicted heat transfer coefficients of 1.33% and 10.07%, respectively. Using water data, the model predicts wall temperatures with an average error of -1.76% and an RMS error of 7.78% which corresponds to average and RMS errors in predicted heat transfer coefficients of 4.16% and 15.06%, respectively.

  11. Impact of aerosol vertical distribution on aerosol direct radiative effect and heating rate in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, Vasileios; Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Matsoukas, Christos; Koras Carracca, Mario; Kinne, Stefan; Vardavas, Ilias

    2015-04-01

    It is now well-established that aerosols cause an overall cooling effect at the surface and a warming effect within the atmosphere. At the top of the atmosphere (TOA), both positive and negative forcing can be found, depending on a number of other factors, such as surface albedo and relative position of clouds and aerosols. Whilst aerosol surface cooling is important due to its relation with surface temperature and other bio-environmental reasons, atmospheric heating is of special interest as well having significant impacts on atmospheric dynamics, such as formation of clouds and subsequent precipitation. The actual position of aerosols and their altitude relative to clouds is of major importance as certain types of aerosol, such as black carbon (BC) above clouds can have a significant impact on planetary albedo. The vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds has recently drawn the attention of the aerosol community, because partially can account for the differences between simulated aerosol radiative forcing with various models, and therefore decrease the level of our uncertainty regarding aerosol forcing, which is one of our priorities set by IPCC. The vertical profiles of aerosol optical and physical properties have been studied by various research groups around the world, following different methodologies and using various indices in order to present the impact of aerosols on radiation on different altitudes above the surface. However, there is still variability between the published results as to the actual effect of aerosols on shortwave radiation and on heating rate within the atmosphere. This study uses vertical information on aerosols from the Max Planck Aerosol Climatology (MAC-v1) global dataset, which is a combination of model output with quality ground-based measurements, in order to provide useful insight into the vertical profile of atmospheric heating for the Mediterranean region. MAC-v1 and the science behind this aerosol dataset have already

  12. Blade-to-coolant heat-transfer results and operating data from a natural-convection water-cooled single-stage turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaguila, Anthony J; Freche, John C

    1951-01-01

    Blade-to-coolant heat-transfer data and operating data were obtained with a natural-convection water-cooled turbine over range of turbine speeds and inlet-gas temperatures. The convective coefficients were correlated by the general relation for natural-convection heat transfer. The turbine data were displaced from a theoretical equation for natural convection heat transfer in the turbulent region and from natural-convection data obtained with vertical cylinders and plates; possible disruption of natural convection circulation within the blade coolant passages was thus indicated. Comparison of non dimensional temperature-ratio parameters for the blade leading edge, midchord, and trailing edge indicated that the blade cooling effectiveness is greatest at the midchord and least at the trailing edge.

  13. Natural analogs for enhanced heat recovery from geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, Dennis L.

    1996-01-24

    well as others that develop methods for the mining of heat past the stage of primary production, will be termed Enhanced Heat Recovery (EHR). Examples of the evolution of natural systems suggest the methods by which deep geothermal systems can be exploited. The key to the exploitation of deep geothermal systems is successful injection of water into rocks above the brittle-ductile transition, producing steam, cooling the rocks and driving the brittle-ductile transition to deeper levels. Under this scenario, injection wells may be more expensive and require more thoughtful planning than production wells.

  14. Combined effects of suction/injection and wall surface curvature on natural convection flow in a vertical micro-porous annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, B. K.; Aina, B.; Muhammad, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates analytically the hydrodynamic and thermal behaviour of a fully developed natural convection flow in a vertical micro-porous-annulus (MPA) taking into account the velocity slip and temperature jump at the outer surface of inner porous cylinder and inner surface of outer porous cylinder. A closed — form solution is presented for velocity, temperature, volume flow rate, skin friction and rate of heat transfer expressed as a Nusselt number. The influence of each governing parameter on hydrodynamic and thermal behaviour is discussed with the aid of graphs. During the course of investigation, it is found that as suction/injection on the cylinder walls increases, the fluid velocity and temperature is enhanced. In addition, it is observed that wall surface curvature has a significant effect on flow and thermal characteristics.

  15. Characteristics, vertical structures, and heat/salt transports of mesoscale eddies in the southeastern tropical Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Yu, Weidong; Yuan, Yeli; Zhao, Xia; Wang, Fan; Chen, Gengxin; Liu, Lin; Duan, Yongliang

    2015-10-01

    Satellite altimetry sea surface height measurements reveal high mesoscale eddy activity in the southeastern tropical Indian Ocean (SETIO). In this study, the characteristics of mesoscale eddies in the SETIO are investigated by analyzing 564 cyclonic eddy (CE) tracks and 695 anticyclonic eddy (AE) tracks identified from a new version of satellite altimetry data with a daily temporal resolution. The mean radius, lifespan, propagation speed, and distance of CEs (AEs) are 149 (153) km, 50 (46) days, 15.3 (16.6) cm s-1, and 651 (648) km, respectively. Some significant differences exist in the eddy statistical characteristics between the new-version daily altimeter data and the former weekly data. Mean vertical structures of anomalous potential temperature, salinity, geostrophic current, as well as heat and salt transports of the composite eddies, are estimated by analyzing Argo profile data matched to altimeter-detected eddies. The composite analysis shows that eddy-induced ocean anomalies are mainly confined in the upper 300 dbar. In the eddy core, CE (AE) could induce a cooling (warming) of 2°C between 60 and 180 dbar and maximum positive (negative) salinity anomalies of 0.1 (-0.3) psu in the upper 50 (110) dbar. The meridional heat transport induced by the composite CE (AE) is southward (northward), whereas the salt transport of CE (AE) is northward (southward). Most of the meridional heat and salt transports are carried in the upper 300 dbar.

  16. Nonsimilar hydromagnetic simultaneous heat and mass transfer by mixed convection from a vertical plate embedded in a uniform porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Chamkha, A.J.; Khaled, A.R.A.

    1999-08-27

    Simultaneous heat and mass transfer from different geometries embedded in porous media has many engineering and geophysical applications, such as migration of water in geothermal reservoirs, underground spreading of chemical wastes and other pollutants, thermal insulation, enhanced oil recovery, packed-bed catalytic reactors, cooling of nuclear reactors, grain storage, and evaporative cooling and solidification. This work considers steady, laminar, hydromagnetic simultaneous heat and mass transfer by mixed convection flow over a permeable vertical plate immersed in a uniform porous medium for the cases of power law variations of both the wall temperature and concentration and the wall heat flux and mass flux. Appropriate transformations are employed to transform the governing differential equations to a nonsimilar form. The transformed equations are solved numerically by an accurate, implicit, iterative, finite difference method. The obtained results are validated by favorable comparisons with previously published work on special cases of the problem. A parametric study illustrating the influence of all involved parameters on the local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers is conducted. The results of this parametric study are shown graphically, and the physical aspects of the problem are discussed.

  17. Thermobaric deep convection, baroclinic instability, and their roles in vertical heat transport around Maud Rise in the Weddell Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akitomo, Kazunori

    2006-09-01

    Numerical experiments with two- and three-dimensional nonhydrostatic models in a rotating frame have been executed to investigate thermobaric deep convection, subsequent baroclinic instability, and their roles in vertical heat transport, using hydrographic data around Maud Rise in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. Overturning of the water column due to thermobaric convection is apt to occur on the southern and northern flanks of the rise, and induces upward heat transport. The depth of overturning is two times larger on the northern flank (˜1.5 km) than on the southern flank (˜0.7 km). To the contrary, no overturning occurs over the top of the rise in 90 days. Baroclinic instability develops at a density front formed between the overturned and unoverturned regions since a density contrast at the front is enhanced by thermobaricity. Heat transport due to baroclinic instability is similarly upward, and at peak becomes comparable to that due to the overturning. Applicability of the results to the cooling events previously reported is also discussed.

  18. Steady and oscillatory laminar opposing mixed convection in a vertical channel of finite length subjected to symmetrical isothermal discrete heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Suástegui, Lorenzo; Treviño, César; Cajas, Juan Carlos

    2015-06-01

    Transient laminar opposing mixed convection in a gravity driven downward flow confined inside a vertical rectangular channel has been investigated, with both walls suddenly subjected to symmetrical isothermal heat sources over a finite portion of the channel walls. The unsteady two-dimensional Navier-Stokes and energy equations have been solved numerically for a wide parametric set. Studies are carried out for Reynolds numbers of 100 and 200 and several values of buoyancy strength or Richardson number. The effect of Reynolds number and opposing buoyancy on the temporal evolution of the overall flow structure, temperature field, and Nusselt number from the heated surfaces is investigated using fixed geometrical parameters and considering heat losses to the channel walls. In this parameter space, for a given Reynolds number and relatively small values of the buoyancy parameter, the transient process leads to a final symmetric or asymmetric steady-state. However, as the value of buoyancy strength increases, the flow and temperature fields become more complex and an oscillatory flow with a fundamental frequency sets in when a critical value of the Richardson number is reached. Numerical predictions show that the critical value of the Richardson number between the two regimes strongly depends on the value of the Reynolds number, and the time scales, natural frequencies, and phase-space portraits of flow oscillation are presented and discussed in detail. Stability of the symmetric response has been analyzed. The results include the effects of Prandtl number and heat losses to the channel walls on the evolution of the final flow and thermal responses.

  19. Chemically Reacting Hydromagnetic Unsteady Flow of a Radiating Fluid Past a Vertical Plate with Constant Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makinde, Oluwole Daniel

    2012-05-01

    The combined effects of thermal radiation absorption and magnetic field on an unsteady chemically reacting convective flow past an impulsively started vertical plate is studied in the presence of a constant wall heat flux. Boundary layer equations are derived and the resulting approximate nonlinear partial differential equations are solved numerically using a semi-discretization finite difference technique. A parametric study of all parameters involved is conducted, and a representative set of numerical results for the velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles as well as the skin-friction parameter and Sherwood number are illustrated graphically to show typical trends of the solutions. Further validation with previous works is carried out and an excellent agreement is achieved.

  20. Assessment of the vertical distribution of natural radionuclides in a mineralized uranium area in south-west Spain.

    PubMed

    Blanco Rodríguez, P; Vera Tomé, F; Lozano, J C

    2014-01-01

    Low-level alpha spectrometry techniques using semiconductor detectors (PIPS) and liquid scintillation (LKB Quantulus 1220™) were used to determine the activity concentration of (238)U, (234)U, (230)Th, (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (210)Pb in soil samples. The soils were collected from an old disused uranium mine located in southwest Spain. The soils were sampled from areas with different levels of influence from the installation and hence had different levels of contamination. The vertical profiles of the soils (down to 40 cm depth) were studied in order to evaluate the vertical distribution of the natural radionuclides. To determine the origin of these natural radionuclides the Enrichment Factor was used. Also, study of the activity ratios between radionuclides belonging to the same radioactive series allowed us to assess the different types of behaviors of the radionuclides involved. The vertical profiles for the radionuclide members of the (238)U series were different at each sampling point, depending on the level of influence of the installation. However, the profiles of each point were similar for the long-lived radionuclides of the (238)U series ((238)U, (234)U, (230)Th, and (226)Ra). Moreover, a major imbalance was observed between (210)Pb and (226)Ra in the surface layer, due to (222)Rn exhalation and the subsequent surface deposition of (210)Pb. PMID:24182407

  1. Study of dynamic structure and heat and mass transfer of a vertical ceramic tiles dryer using CFD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriaa, Wassim; Bejaoui, Salma; Mhiri, Hatem; Le Palec, Georges; Bournot, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we developed a two-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model to simulate dynamic structure and heat and mass transfer of a vertical ceramic tiles dryer (EVA 702). The carrier's motion imposed the choice of a dynamic mesh based on two methods: "spring based smoothing" and "local remeshing". The dryer airflow is considered as turbulent ( Re = 1.09 × 105 at the dryer inlet), therefore the Re-Normalization Group model with Enhanced Wall Treatment was used as a turbulence model. The resolution of the governing equation was performed with Fluent 6.3 whose capacities do not allow the direct resolution of drying problems. Thus, a user defined scalar equation was inserted in the CFD code to model moisture content diffusion into tiles. User-defined functions were implemented to define carriers' motion, thermo-physical properties… etc. We adopted also a "two-step" simulation method: in the first step, we follow the heat transfer coefficient evolution (Hc). In the second step, we determine the mass transfer coefficient (Hm) and the features fields of drying air and ceramic tiles. The found results in mixed convection mode (Fr = 5.39 at the dryer inlet) were used to describe dynamic and thermal fields of airflow and heat and mass transfer close to the ceramic tiles. The response of ceramic tiles to heat and mass transfer was studied based on Biot numbers. The evolutions of averages temperature and moisture content of ceramic tiles were analyzed. Lastly, comparison between experimental and numerical results showed a good agreement.

  2. Effects of vertically ribbed surface roughness on the forced convective heat losses in central receiver systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, Ralf; Frantz, Cathy; Fritsch, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    External receiver configurations are directly exposed to ambient wind. Therefore, a precise determination of the convective losses is a key factor in the prediction and evaluation of the efficiency of the solar absorbers. Based on several studies, the forced convective losses of external receivers are modeled using correlations for a roughened cylinder in a cross-flow of air. However at high wind velocities, the thermal efficiency measured during the Solar Two experiment was considerably lower than the efficiency predicted by these correlations. A detailed review of the available literature on the convective losses of external receivers has been made. Three CFD models of different level of detail have been developed to analyze the influence of the actual shape of the receiver and tower configuration, of the receiver shape and of the absorber panels on the forced convective heat transfer coefficients. The heat transfer coefficients deduced from the correlations have been compared to the results of the CFD simulations. In a final step the influence of both modeling approaches on the thermal efficiency of an external tubular receiver has been studied in a thermal FE model of the Solar Two receiver.

  3. The effects of Prandtl number on flow over a vertical heated cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sameen, Abdulvahab; S, Ajithkumar; S, Anillal

    2015-11-01

    Flow over a two dimensional heated cylinder is analyzed numerically using a hybrid finite element-finite volume method. We assume the flow direction to be opposite to the direction of gravity. It is fundamental in fluid dynamics that the von Karman vortex street appears in the wake of the cylinder above the Reynolds number of approximately 47. On heating the cylinder surface, the Strouhal number (St), which is the non dimensional representation of the vortex shedding frequency, increases. The gradual increase in St is followed by a sudden drop at a particular value of Richardson number (Ri), defined as the relative dominance of the buoyancy force to the inertia force reported as a sudden breakdown of the Karman vortex. Our simulations show that upon further increase in Ri, recirculation bubble reappears. The present numerical work discusses the physical reasons behind this phenomenon and the effects of Prandtl number (defined as the ratio of viscous diffusion to the moment um diffusion) on Richardson number at which break down occurs.

  4. Adjoint optimization of natural convection problems: differentially heated cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saglietti, Clio; Schlatter, Philipp; Monokrousos, Antonios; Henningson, Dan S.

    2016-06-01

    Optimization of natural convection-driven flows may provide significant improvements to the performance of cooling devices, but a theoretical investigation of such flows has been rarely done. The present paper illustrates an efficient gradient-based optimization method for analyzing such systems. We consider numerically the natural convection-driven flow in a differentially heated cavity with three Prandtl numbers (Pr=0.15{-}7 ) at super-critical conditions. All results and implementations were done with the spectral element code Nek5000. The flow is analyzed using linear direct and adjoint computations about a nonlinear base flow, extracting in particular optimal initial conditions using power iteration and the solution of the full adjoint direct eigenproblem. The cost function for both temperature and velocity is based on the kinetic energy and the concept of entransy, which yields a quadratic functional. Results are presented as a function of Prandtl number, time horizons and weights between kinetic energy and entransy. In particular, it is shown that the maximum transient growth is achieved at time horizons on the order of 5 time units for all cases, whereas for larger time horizons the adjoint mode is recovered as optimal initial condition. For smaller time horizons, the influence of the weights leads either to a concentric temperature distribution or to an initial condition pattern that opposes the mean shear and grows according to the Orr mechanism. For specific cases, it could also been shown that the computation of optimal initial conditions leads to a degenerate problem, with a potential loss of symmetry. In these situations, it turns out that any initial condition lying in a specific span of the eigenfunctions will yield exactly the same transient amplification. As a consequence, the power iteration converges very slowly and fails to extract all possible optimal initial conditions. According to the authors' knowledge, this behavior is illustrated here

  5. Ocean Turbulence. Paper 3; Two-Point Closure Model Momentum, Heat and Salt Vertical Diffusivities in the Presence of Shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Dubovikov, M. S.; Howard, A.; Cheng, Y.

    1999-01-01

    In papers 1 and 2 we have presented the results of the most updated 1-point closure model for the turbulent vertical diffusivities of momentum, heat and salt, K(sub m,h,s). In this paper, we derive the analytic expressions for K(sub m,h,s) using a new 2-point closure model that has recently been developed and successfully tested against some approx. 80 turbulence statistics for different flows. The new model has no free parameters. The expressions for K(sub m, h. s) are analytical functions of two stability parameters: the Turner number R(sub rho) (salinity gradient/temperature gradient) and the Richardson number R(sub i) (temperature gradient/shear). The turbulent kinetic energy K and its rate of dissipation may be taken local or non-local (K-epsilon model). Contrary to all previous models that to describe turbulent mixing below the mixed layer (ML) have adopted three adjustable "background diffusivities" for momentum. heat and salt, we propose a model that avoids such adjustable diffusivities. We assume that below the ML, K(sub m,h,s) have the same functional dependence on R(sub i) and R(sub rho) derived from the turbulence model. However, in order to compute R(sub i) below the ML, we use data of vertical shear due to wave-breaking measured by Gargett et al. (1981). The procedure frees the model from adjustable background diffusivities and indeed we use the same model throughout the entire vertical extent of the ocean. Using the new K(sub m,h, s), we run an O-GCM and present a variety of results that we compare with Levitus and the KPP model. Since the traditional 1-point (used in papers 1 and 2) and the new 2-point closure models used here represent different modeling philosophies and procedures, testing them in an O-GCM is indispensable. The basic motivation is to show that the new 2-point closure model gives results that are overall superior to the 1-point closure in spite of the fact that the latter rely on several adjustable parameters while the new 2-point

  6. Estimation of lacustrine groundwater discharge using heat as a tracer and vertical hydraulic gradients - a comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnick, S.; Lewandowski, J.; Nützmann, G.

    2015-03-01

    Lacustrine groundwater discharge (LGD) can play a major role in water and nutrient balances of lakes. Unfortunately, studies often neglect this input path due to methodological difficulties in the determination. In a previous study we described a method which allows the estimation of LGD and groundwater recharge using hydraulic head data and groundwater net balances based on meteorological data. The aim of this study is to compare these results with discharge rates estimated by inverse modelling of heat transport using temperature profiles measured in lake bed sediments. We were able to show a correlation between the fluxes obtained with the different methods, although the time scales of the methods differ substantially. As a consequence, we conclude that the use of hydraulic head data and meteorologically-based groundwater net balances to estimate LGD is limited to time scales similar to the calibration period.

  7. A Study on a Performance of Water-Spray-Type Ice Thermal Energy Storage Vessel with Vertical Heat Exchanger Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Kenji; Sasaguchi, Kengo; Fukuda, Toshihito; Koyama, Shigeru

    A system with a water-embedded-trpe ice storage vessel is widely used because of its simple structure and compactness. However, the water-embedded-type ice storage vessel has a disadvantage, that is, the solidification rate is very small. The use of falling water film seems to be one of promising ways for solving this disadvantage. We have found in a previous study that the use of the falling water film is very effective, especially for high initial water temperatures. In the present study, we eexamined the performance of a faling-water-film-type ice thermal energy storage vessel with pratical size, having vertical heat exchanger plates. The ice making performance coefficient, η, increases with time, and it becomes am aximum value of 2.5, after that, it decreases gradually. In order to make ice efficiently, it is necessary to set a flow rate of refrigerant properly and to adjust a difference between the evaporating temperature of refrigerant and the freezing point of water so that the refrigerant evaporates in the heat exchanger plates overall.

  8. Particle image velocimetry measurements for opposing flow in a vertical channel with a differential and asymmetric heating condition

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Suastegui, L.; Trevino, C.

    2007-10-15

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were carried out in an experimental investigation of laminar mixed convection in a vertical duct with a square cross-section. The main downward water-flow is driven by gravity while a portion of a lateral side is heated, and buoyancy forces produce non-stationary vortex structures close to the heated region. Various ranges of the Grashof number, Gr are studied in combination with the Reynolds number, Re varying from 300 to 700. The values of the generalized buoyancy parameter or Richardson number, Ri = Gr/Re{sup 2} parallel to the Grashof number are included in the results. The influence of these nondimensional parameters and how they affect the fluid flow structure and vortex sizes and locations are reported. The flow patterns are nonsymmetric, periodic, and exhibit increasing complexity and frequency for increasing buoyancy. For the averaged values of the resulting vortex dimensions, it was found that a better and more congruent representation occurs when employing the Grashof and Reynolds numbers as independent parameters. (author)

  9. Data, exergy, and energy analysis of a vertical-bore, ground-source heat pump to for domestic water heating under simulated occupancy conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ally, Moonis Raza; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Baxter, Van D.; Gehl, Anthony C.

    2015-05-27

    Evidence is provided to support the view that greater than two-thirds of energy required to produce domestic hot water may be extracted from the ground which serves as renewable energy resource. The case refers to a 345 m2 research house located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 36.01 N 84.26 W in a mixed-humid climate with HDD of 2218 C-days (3993 F-days) and CDD of 723 C-days (1301 F-days). The house is operated under simulated occupancy conditions in which the hot water use protocol is based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition (Hendron 2008; Hendron and Engebrecht 2010) which captures themore » water consumption lifestyles of the average family in the United States. The 5.275 (1.5-ton) water-to-water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) shared the same vertical bore with a 7.56 KW water-to-air ground source heat pump for space conditioning the same house. Energy and exergy analysis of data collected continuously over a twelve month period provide performance metrics and sources of inherent systemic inefficiencies. Data and analyses are vital to better understand how WW-GSHPs may be further improved to enable the ground to be used as a renewable energy resource.« less

  10. Data, exergy, and energy analysis of a vertical-bore, ground-source heat pump to for domestic water heating under simulated occupancy conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, Moonis Raza; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Baxter, Van D.; Gehl, Anthony C.

    2015-05-27

    Evidence is provided to support the view that greater than two-thirds of energy required to produce domestic hot water may be extracted from the ground which serves as renewable energy resource. The case refers to a 345 m2 research house located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 36.01 N 84.26 W in a mixed-humid climate with HDD of 2218 C-days (3993 F-days) and CDD of 723 C-days (1301 F-days). The house is operated under simulated occupancy conditions in which the hot water use protocol is based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition (Hendron 2008; Hendron and Engebrecht 2010) which captures the water consumption lifestyles of the average family in the United States. The 5.275 (1.5-ton) water-to-water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) shared the same vertical bore with a 7.56 KW water-to-air ground source heat pump for space conditioning the same house. Energy and exergy analysis of data collected continuously over a twelve month period provide performance metrics and sources of inherent systemic inefficiencies. Data and analyses are vital to better understand how WW-GSHPs may be further improved to enable the ground to be used as a renewable energy resource.

  11. The Correlation of Coupled Heat and Mass Transfer Experimental Data for Vertical Falling Film Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Keyhani, M; Miller, W A

    1999-11-14

    Absorption chillers are gaining global acceptance as quality comfort cooling systems. These machines are the central chilling plants and the supply for cotnfort cooling for many large commercial buildings. Virtually all absorption chillers use lithium bromide (LiBr) and water as the absorption fluids. Water is the refrigerant. Research has shown LiBr to he one of the best absorption working fluids because it has a high affinity for water, releases water vapor at relatively low temperatures, and has a boiling point much higher than that of water. The heart of the chiller is the absorber, where a process of simultaneous heat and mass transfer occurs as the refrigerant water vapor is absorbed into a falling film of aqueous LiBr. The more water vapor absorbed into the falling film, the larger the chiller's capacity for supporting comfort cooling. Improving the performance of the absorber leads directly to efficiency gains for the chiller. The design of an absorber is very empirical and requires experimental data. Yet design data and correlations are sparse in the open literature. The experimental data available to date have been derived at LiBr concentrations ranging from 0.30 to 0.60 mass fraction. No literature data are readily available for the design operating conditions of 0.62 and 0.64 mass fraction of LiBr and absorber pressures of 0.7 and 1.0 kPa.

  12. Natural convection flow and heat transfer between a fluid layer and a porous layer inside a rectangular enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckermann, C.; Ramadhyani, S.; Viskanta, R.

    1987-05-01

    A numerical and experimental study is performed to analyze the steady-state natural convection fluid flow and heat transfer in a vertical rectangular enclosure that is partially filled with a vertical layer of a fluid-saturated porous medium. The flow in the porous layer is modeled utilizing the Brinkman-Forchheimer-extended Darcy equations. The numerical model is verified by conducting a number of experiments, with spherical glass beads as the porous medium and water and glycerin as the fluids, in rectangular test cells. The agreement between the flow visualization results and temperature measurements and the numerical model is, in general, good. It is found that the amount of fluid penetrating from the fluid region into the porous layer depends strongly on the Darcy (Da) and Rayleigh (Ra) numbers. For a relatively low product of Ra x Da, the flow takes place primarily in the fluid layer, and heat transfer in the porous layer is by conduction only. On other hand, fluid penetration into a relatively highly permeable porous layer has a significant impact on the natural convection flow patterns in the entire enclosure.

  13. Influence of vertical and lateral heat transfer on permafrost thaw, peatland landscape transition, and groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurylyk, Barret L.; Hayashi, Masaki; Quinton, William L.; McKenzie, Jeffrey M.; Voss, Clifford I.

    2016-02-01

    Recent climate change has reduced the spatial extent and thickness of permafrost in many discontinuous permafrost regions. Rapid permafrost thaw is producing distinct landscape changes in the Taiga Plains of the Northwest Territories, Canada. As permafrost bodies underlying forested peat plateaus shrink, the landscape slowly transitions into unforested wetlands. The expansion of wetlands has enhanced the hydrologic connectivity of many watersheds via new surface and near-surface flow paths, and increased streamflow has been observed. Furthermore, the decrease in forested peat plateaus results in a net loss of boreal forest and associated ecosystems. This study investigates fundamental processes that contribute to permafrost thaw by comparing observed and simulated thaw development and landscape transition of a peat plateau-wetland complex in the Northwest Territories, Canada from 1970 to 2012. Measured climate data are first used to drive surface energy balance simulations for the wetland and peat plateau. Near-surface soil temperatures simulated in the surface energy balance model are then applied as the upper boundary condition to a three-dimensional model of subsurface water flow and coupled energy transport with freeze-thaw. Simulation results demonstrate that lateral heat transfer, which is not considered in many permafrost models, can influence permafrost thaw rates. Furthermore, the simulations indicate that landscape evolution arising from permafrost thaw acts as a positive feedback mechanism that increases the energy absorbed at the land surface and produces additional permafrost thaw. The modeling results also demonstrate that flow rates in local groundwater flow systems may be enhanced by the degradation of isolated permafrost bodies.

  14. Characterizing fractured rock aquifers using heated Distributed Fiber-Optic Temperature Sensing to determine borehole vertical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, T. O.; Bour, O.; Selker, J. S.; Le Borgne, T.; Bense, V.; Hochreutener, R.; Lavenant, N.

    2013-12-01

    In highly heterogeneous media, fracture network connectivity and hydraulic properties can be estimated using methods such as packer- or cross-borehole pumping-tests. Typically, measurements of hydraulic head or vertical flow in such tests are made either at a single location over time, or at a series of depths by installing a number of packers or raising or lowering a probe. We show how this often encountered monitoring problem, with current solutions sacrificing either one of temporal or spatial information, can be addressed using Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS). Here, we electrically heat the conductive cladding materials of cables deployed in boreholes to determine the vertical flow profile. We present results from heated fiber optic cables deployed in three boreholes in a fractured rock aquifer at the much studied experimental site near Ploemeur, France, allowing detailed comparisons with alternative methods (e.g. Le Borgne et al., 2007). When submerged in water and electrically heated, the cable very rapidly reaches a steady state temperature (less than 60 seconds). The steady state temperature of the heated cable, measured using the DTS method, is then a function of the velocity of the fluid in the borehole. We find that such cables are sensitive to a wide range of fluid velocities, and thus suitable for measuring both ambient and pumped flow profiles at the Ploemeur site. The cables are then used to monitor the flow profiles during all possible configurations of: ambient flow, cross-borehole- (pumping one borehole, and observing in another), and dipole-tests (pumping one borehole, re-injection in another). Such flow data acquired using DTS may then be used for tomographic flow inversions, for instance using the approach developed by Klepikova et al., (submitted). Using the heated fiber optic method, we are able to observe the flow response during such tests in high spatial detail, and are also able to capture temporal flow dynamics occurring at the

  15. Experimental validation benchmark data for CFD of transient convection from forced to natural with flow reversal on a vertical flat plate

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lance, Blake W.; Smith, Barton L.

    2016-06-23

    Transient convection has been investigated experimentally for the purpose of providing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) validation benchmark data. A specialized facility for validation benchmark experiments called the Rotatable Buoyancy Tunnel was used to acquire thermal and velocity measurements of flow over a smooth, vertical heated plate. The initial condition was forced convection downward with subsequent transition to mixed convection, ending with natural convection upward after a flow reversal. Data acquisition through the transient was repeated for ensemble-averaged results. With simple flow geometry, validation data were acquired at the benchmark level. All boundary conditions (BCs) were measured and their uncertainties quantified.more » Temperature profiles on all four walls and the inlet were measured, as well as as-built test section geometry. Inlet velocity profiles and turbulence levels were quantified using Particle Image Velocimetry. System Response Quantities (SRQs) were measured for comparison with CFD outputs and include velocity profiles, wall heat flux, and wall shear stress. Extra effort was invested in documenting and preserving the validation data. Details about the experimental facility, instrumentation, experimental procedure, materials, BCs, and SRQs are made available through this paper. As a result, the latter two are available for download and the other details are included in this work.« less

  16. Experimental measurements of heat transfer from an iced surface during artificial and natural cloud icing conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Mark S.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The heat transfer behavior of accreting ice surfaces in natural (flight test) and simulated (wind tunnel) cloud icing conditions were studied. Observations of wet and dry ice growth regimes as measured by ultrasonic pulse echo techniques were made. Observed wet and dry ice growth regimes at the stagnation point of a cylinder were compared with those predicted using a quasi steady state heat balance model. A series of heat transfer coefficients were employed by the model to infer the local heat transfer behavior of the actual ice surfaces. The heat transfer in the stagnation region was generally inferred to be higher in wind tunnel icing tests than in natural flight icing conditions.

  17. The importance of vertical transmission of Neospora sp. in naturally infected horses.

    PubMed

    Antonello, Ana Maria; Pivoto, Felipe Lamberti; Camillo, Giovana; Braunig, Patricia; Sangioni, Luis Antonio; Pompermayer, Endrigo; Vogel, Fernanda Silveira Flores

    2012-07-01

    Neospora spp. is a intracellular protozoan phylogenetically closely related to Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis neurona, and it can infect horses leading to the development of reproductive or neurological diseases. We determined the presence of antibodies to Neospora sp. in mares at their parturition time and determine the frequency of vertical transmission in healthy foals to verify the importance of transplacental transmission. The samples were analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence antibody test, showing that seroprevalence in mares is higher than in foals and seropositive mares are likely to transmit the neosporosis to their offspring. This shows that endogenous challenge occurs in horses, and it suggests that this protozoan can be disseminated by means of transplacental transmission in horse species. PMID:22436425

  18. Ocean Turbulence I: One-Point Closure Model Momentum and Heat Vertical Diffusivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Howard, A.; Cheng, Y.; Dubovikov, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    Since the early forties, one-point turbulence closure models have been the canonical tools used to describe turbulent flows in many fields. In geophysics, Mellor and Yamada applied such models using the 1980 state-of-the art. Since then, no improvements were introduced to alleviate two major difficulties: 1) closure of the pressure correlations, which affects the correct determination of the critical Richardson number Ri(sub cr) above which turbulent mixing is no longer possible and 2) the need to express the non-local third-order moments (TOM) in terms of lower order moments rather than via the down-gradient approximation as done thus far, since the latter seriously underestimates the TOMs. Since 1) and 2) are still being dealt with adjustable parameters which weaken the credibility of the models, alternative models, not based on turbulence modeling, have been suggested. The aim of this paper is to show that new information, partly derived from the newest 2-point closure model discussed, can be used to solve these shortcomings. The new one-point closure model, which in its simplest form is algebraic and thus simple to implement, is first shown to reproduce a variety of data. Then, it is used in a Ocean-General Circulation Model (O-GCM) where it reproduces well a large variety of ocean data. While phenomenological models are specifically tuned to ocean turbulence, the present model is not. It is first tested against laboratory data on stably stratified flows and then used in an O-GCM. It is more general, more predictive and more resilient, e.g., it can incorporate phenomena like wave-breaking at the surface, salinity diffusivity, non-locality, etc. One important feature that naturally comes out of the new model is that the predicted Richardson critical value Ri(sub cr) is Ri (sub cr approx. = 1) in agreement with both Large Eddy Simulations (LES) and empirical evidence while all previous models predicted Ri (sub cr approx. = 0.2) which led to a considerable

  19. Influences of surface hydrophilicity on frost formation on a vertical cold plate under natural convection conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhongliang; Zhang, Xinghua; Wang, Hongyan; Meng, Sheng; Cheng, Shuiyuan

    2007-07-15

    Surface hydrophilicity has a strong influence on frost nucleation according to phase transition theory. To study this effect, a close observation of frost formation and deposition processes on a vertical plate was made under free convection conditions. The formation and shape variation of frost crystals during the initial period are described and the frost thickness variation with time on both hydrophobic and plain copper cold surfaces are presented. The various influencing factors are discussed in depth. The mechanism of surface hydrophilicity influence on frost formation was analyzed theoretically. This revealed that increasing the contact angle can increase the potential barrier and restrain crystal nucleation and growth and thus frost deposition. The experimental results show that the initial water drops formed on a hydrophobic surface are smaller and remain in the liquid state for a longer time compared with ones formed on a plain copper surface. It is also observed that the frost layer deposited on a hydrophobic surface is loose and weak. Though the hydrophobic surface can retard frost formation to a certain extent and causes a looser frost layer, our experimental results show that it does not depress the growth of the frost layer. (author)

  20. The transverse instability in a differentially heated vertical cavity filled with molecular radiating gases. I. Linear stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borget, V.; Bdéoui, F.; Soufiani, A.; Le Quéré, P.

    2001-05-01

    Radiation effects on the onset of the transverse instability in a differentially heated vertical cavity containing molecular emitting and absorbing gases in the so-called conduction regime is studied theoretically. Radiative transfer is treated using the full integro-differential formulation. The neutral stability curves are determined using a combined Galerkin-collocation method based on Chebyshev polynomials. A modified correlated-k model and the absorption distribution function model are used in order to take into account the spectral structure of the absorption coefficient for radiating molecules such as H2O and CO2. For transparent media, perfect agreement is found with the available data reported in the literature and, particularly, the principle of exchange of stability is found to hold for Prandtl number values less than 12.46. The study of gray media allows us to examine the basic mechanisms that yield to the onset of transverse instability as traveling waves. For real radiating gases, a parametric study for H2O and CO2 is reported. It is shown that the radiative transfer delays the onset of the transverse instability and this delay increases with temperature and decreases with boundary emissivities, while layer depth effects depend on the level of saturation of the gas active absorption bands. Whatever the gas considered, it is found that neither radiation effect on the basic flow nor the radiative power disturbances can be neglected.

  1. Experimental study of the Marangoni flow in evaporating water droplet placed on vertical vibration and heated hydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chang Seok; Lim, Hee Chang

    2015-11-01

    In general, the heated surface generates a Marangoni flow inside a droplet yielding a coffee stain effect in the end. This study aims to visualize and control the Marangoni flow by using periodic vertical vibration. While the droplet is evaporating, the variation of contact angle and internal volume of droplet was observed by using the combination of a continuous light and a DSLR still camera. Regarding the internal velocity, the PIV(Particle Image Velocimetry) system was applied to visualize the internal Marangoni flow. In order to estimate the temperature gradient inside and surface tension on the droplet, a commercial software Comsol Multiphysics was used. In the result, the internal velocity increases with the increase of the plate temperature and both flow directions of Marangoni and gravitational flow are opposite so that there seems to be a possibility to control the coffee stain effect. In addition, the Marangoni flow was controlled at relatively lower range of frequency 30 ~ 50Hz. Work supported by Korea government Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy KETEP grant No. 20134030200290, Ministry of Education NRF grant No. NRF2013R1A1A2005347.

  2. Heat transfer analysis in a second grade fluid over and oscillating vertical plate using fractional Caputo-Fabrizio derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Nehad Ali; Khan, Ilyas

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a Caputo-Fabrizio fractional derivatives approach to the thermal analysis of a second grade fluid over an infinite oscillating vertical flat plate. Together with an oscillating boundary motion, the heat transfer is caused by the buoyancy force induced by temperature differences between the plate and the fluid. Closed form solutions of the fluid velocity and temperature are obtained by means of the Laplace transform. The solutions of ordinary second grade and Newtonian fluids corresponding to time derivatives of integer and fractional orders are obtained as particular cases of the present solutions. Numerical computations and graphical illustrations are used in order to study the effects of the Caputo-Fabrizio time-fractional parameter α, the material parameter α _2 , and the Prandtl and Grashof numbers on the velocity field. A comparison for time derivative of integer order versus fractional order is shown graphically for both Newtonian and second grade fluids. It is found that fractional fluids (second grade and Newtonian) have highest velocities. This shows that the fractional parameter enhances the fluid flow.

  3. Effect of a finite external heat transfer coefficient on the Darcy-Bénard instability in a vertical porous cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, A.; Storesletten, L.

    2013-04-01

    The onset of thermal convection in a vertical porous cylinder is studied by considering the heating from below and the cooling from above as caused by external forced convection processes. These processes are parametrised through a finite Biot number, and hence through third-kind, or Robin, temperature conditions imposed on the lower and upper boundaries of the cylinder. Both the horizontal plane boundaries and the cylindrical sidewall are assumed to be impermeable; the sidewall is modelled as a thermally insulated boundary. The linear stability analysis is carried out by studying separable normal modes, and the principle of exchange of stabilities is proved. It is shown that the Biot number does not affect the ordering of the instability modes that, when the radius-to-height aspect ratio increases, are displayed in sequence at the onset of convection. On the other hand, the Biot number plays a central role in determining the transition aspect ratios from one mode to its follower. In the limit of a vanishingly small Biot number, just the first (non-axisymmetric) mode is displayed at the onset of convection, for every value of the aspect ratio.

  4. Heat Transfer Mechanism of a Vertical Wall Inside a Two-Phase Closed Thermosiphon Evaporator and Its Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O-Uchi, Masaki; Hirose, Koichi; Saito, Futami

    The inside heat transfer coefficient, overall heat transfer coefficient, and heat flow rate at the heating section of the thermosiphon were determined for each heating method. In order to observe the heat transfer mechanism in the evaporator, a thermosiphon unit made of glass was assembled and conducted separately. The results of these experiments with these two units are summarized as follows. (1) Nucleate boiling due to the internal heat transfer mechanism improves the heat transfer characteristics of the thermosiphon unit. Under the specific heating conditions with dropwise condensation, there are two types of heat transfer mechanism occur in the evaporator accompanying nucleate boiling, i. e. latent heat transfer and sensible heat transfer. (2) In the case of latent heat transfer, the inside heat transfer coefficient has an upper limit which can be used as a criterion to determine the type of internal heat transfer mechanism.

  5. Comparison of natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.; Liu, W.

    1998-09-15

    Thermosyphon heat exchangers are used in indirect solar water heating systems to avoid using a pump to circulate water from the storage tank to the heat exchanger. In this study, the authors consider the effect of heat exchanger design on system performance. They also compare performance of a system with thermosyphon flow to the same system with a 40W pump in the water loop. In the first part of the study, the authors consider the impact of heat exchanger design on the thermal performance of both one- and two-collector solar water heaters. The comparison is based on Solar Rating and Certification Corporation (SRCC) OG300 simulations. The thermosyphon heat exchangers considered are (1) a one-pass, double wall, 0.22 m{sup 2}, four tube-in-shell heat exchanger manufactured by AAA Service and Supply, Inc., (the Quad-Rod); (2) a two-pass, double wall, 0.2 m{sup 2}, tube-in-shell made by Heliodyne, Inc., but not intended for commercial development; (3) a one-pass, single wall, 0.28 m{sup 2}, 31 tube-in-shell heat exchanger from Young Radiator Company, and (4) a one-pass single-wall, 0.61 m{sup 2}, four coil-in-shell heat exchanger made by ThermoDynamics Ltd. The authors compare performance of the systems with thermosyphon heat exchangers to a system with a 40 W pump used with the Quad-Rod heat exchanger. In the second part of the study, the effects of reducing frictional losses through the heat exchanger and/or the pipes connecting the heat exchanger to the storage tank, and increasing heat transfer area are evaluated in terms of OG300 ratings.

  6. Effect of adiabatic wall on the natural convection heat transfer from a wavy surface created by attached horizontal cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Harsini, I.; Ashjaee, M.

    2010-09-15

    The effect of a vertical adiabatic wall on the natural convection heat transfer from vertical array of attached cylinders, which can be considered as wavy surface, was investigated experimentally and numerically. The experiments were carried out using Mach-Zehnder interferometer and the commercial FLUENT code was used for numerical study. This paper focuses on the effect of wall-wavy surface spacing and Rayleigh number variation on the local and average free convection heat transfer coefficients from the each cylinder and the wavy surface. Rayleigh number ranges from 2400 to 10,000 and from 300,000 to 1,250,000 based on cylinder diameter and wavy surface height respectively. The local and average Nusselt numbers were determined for the different Rayleigh numbers, and the ratio of wall- wavy surface spacing to cylinder diameter 0.75, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, and {infinity}. Results are indicated with a single correlation which gives the average Nusselt number as a function of the ratio of the wall-wavy surface spacing to cylinder diameter and the Rayleigh numbers. There is an optimum distance between the wall and wavy surface in which the Nusselt number attain its maximum value. This optimum distance depends on the Rayleigh number. (author)

  7. Heat flux measurement from vertical temperature profile and thermal infrared imagery in low-flux fumarolic zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudin, Damien; Finizola, Anthony; Beauducel, François; Brothelande, Elodie; Allemand, Pascal; Delacourt, Christophe; Delcher, Eric; Peltier, Aline

    2014-05-01

    Hydrothermal systems are associated to most of the dormant volcanoes. Heat is transported by steam from the hot magma body in the connected porosity and the fissures of the rock to the surface. If the flux is low enough (<500 W/m²), the steam mainly condensates in the soil close to surface, and a significant proportion of the heat is transported to the surface by conduction, producing a gradient of temperature and a thermal anomaly detectable at the surface. Detecting and monitoring these fluxes is crucial for hazard management, since it reflects the state of the magma body in depth. In order to quantify this flux two methods are considered. First, a vertical profile of temperature is measured by a series of thermocouples, and the conducted flux is estimated thanks to the Fourier law. Secondly, a more recent method uses the thermal infrared imagery to monitor the surface temperature anomaly (STA) between the studied zone and an equivalent zone not affected by the geothermal flux. The heat flux from the soil to the atmosphere is computed as the sum of (1) the radiative flux, (2) the sensible flux and (3) the residual steam flux. These two methods are complementary and have an equivalent uncertainty of approximately 20%, which would allow to track the major changes in the hydrothermal system. However, the surface and sub-surface temperatures are strongly influenced by the climate. For instance, it has been widely demonstrated that the surface temperature dramatically decreases after a rainfall. In order to estimate the reliability of the measurements, a numerical model simulating the evolution of the subsurface temperature in low flux fumarolic zone has been built. In depth, the heat can be transported either by conduction, or by the rising steam, or by condensed water. In surface, both the radiative flux and the sensible flux (convection of the atmosphere) are taken into account. This model allows to estimate the changes of temperature due to a variation of solar

  8. Numerical computations of natural convection heat transfer in irregular geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glakpe, E. K.

    1987-01-01

    This report explains the determination of buoyancy driven flow characteristics and heat transfer in enclosures of complex geometrical shapes. Applications of buoyancy driven flows can be found in solar collector devices, energy conservation technologies, cooling of micro-electronic chips, and nuclear reactor spent fuel shipping configurations. The problem is further complicated when three dimensional effects, non-Boussinesq effects, turbulence, and heat transfer by radiation are accounted for in the overall balance of energy transfer. This study developed a capability to model and predict the heat transfer and flow characteristics in shipping cask configurations involving light water and fast reactor fuel assemblies. We explored the complex flow phenomena involved in these configurations to develop numerical prediction capabilities to obtain data for the design and/or thermal analysis of such shipping casks.

  9. Analysis and measurements of interzonal natural convection heat transfer in buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Burns, P.

    1986-08-01

    Natural convection heat transfer through doorways can be an important process by which thermal energy is transferred from one zone to another zone of a building. The topic of this paper is interzonal natural convection in a two zone and a three zone multilevel full scale building. Aperture velocity and temperature distributions are measured and the experimental interzonal mass flow rate and heat transfer are determined. A Bernoulli model is derived to predict the neutral heights, velocity profiles, and interzonal heat transfer. The measured and predicted interzonal flow rate and heat transfer are compared and found to be in good agreement.

  10. Parametric numerical investigaion of natural convection in a heat-generating fluid with phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Aksenova, A.E.; Chudanov, V.V.; Strizhov, V.F.; Vabishchevich, P.N.

    1995-09-01

    Unsteady natural convection of a heat-generating fluid with phase transitions in the enclosures of a square section with isothermal rigid walls is investigated numerically for a wide range of dimensionless parameters. The quasisteady state solutions of conjugate heat and mass transfer problem are compared with available experimental results. Correlation relations for heat flux distributions at the domain boundaries depending on Rayleigh and Ostrogradskii numbers are obtained. It is shown that generally heat transfer is governed both by natural circulation and crust formation phenomena. Results of this paper may be used for analysis of experiments with prototypic core materials.

  11. A new look at natural convection from isothermal vertical parallel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.H.; Chung, B.T.F.

    1996-12-31

    Natural convection between isothermal plates is solved numerically by applying the full Navier-Stokes equations. The elliptic formulation allows separating the effect of the Rayleigh number, Ra, and the aspect ratio, L/B. Calculations are made on a wide range of the Rayleigh number and the aspect ratio, and the Nusselt number is provided as a function of both Ra and B/L. The conventional correlations in the literature presenting the Nusselt number in terms of a single parameter, RaB/L, have been found inaccurate. At a small value of RaB/L, multiple values of Nusselt number are obtained for different combinations of Ra and B/L. Previous results are found to be the special cases of the present study. A minimum Rayleigh number is also obtained above which a fully-developed flow is possible. To simulate the natural convective flow, the ambient pressure is given at the exit while the pressure at the entrance is related to the ambient pressure by the Bernoulli equation. Velocities at the entrance and exit are also solved from the Navier-Stokes equations.

  12. Numerical analysis of natural convection for non-Newtonian fluid conveying nanoparticles between two vertical parallel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahebi, S. A. R.; Pourziaei, H.; Feizi, A. R.; Taheri, M. H.; Rostamiyan, Y.; Ganji, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, natural convection of non-Newtonian bio-nanofluids flow between two vertical flat plates is investigated numerically. Sodium Alginate (SA) and Sodium Carboxymethyl Cellulose (SCMC) are considered as the base non-Newtonian fluid, and nanoparticles such as Titania ( TiO2 and Alumina ( Al2O3 were added to them. The effective thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluids are calculated through Maxwell-Garnetts (MG) and Brinkman models, respectively. A fourth-order Runge-Kutta numerical method (NUM) and three Weighted Residual Methods (WRMs), Collocation (CM), Galerkin (GM) and Least-Square Method (LSM) and Finite-Element Method (FEM), are used to solve the present problem. The influence of some physical parameters such as nanofluid volume friction on non-dimensional velocity and temperature profiles are discussed. The results show that SCMC- TiO2 has higher velocity and temperature values than other nanofluid structures.

  13. Natural convection in binary gases driven by combined horizontal thermal and vertical solutal gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, J.A.; Viskanta, R. )

    1992-01-01

    An investigation of natural convection is presented to examine the influence of a horizontal temperature gradient and a concentration gradient occurring from the bottom to the cold wall in a cavity. As the solutal buoyancy force changes from augmenting to opposing the thermal buoyancy force, the fluid motion switches from unicellular to multicellular flow (fluid motion is up the cold wall and down the hot wall for the bottom counterrotating flow cell). Qualitatively, the agreement between predicted streamlines and smoke flow patterns is generally good. In contrast, agreement between measured and predicted temperature and concentration distributions ranges from fair to poor. Part of the discrepancy can be attributed to experimental error. However, there remains considerable discrepancy between data and predictions due to the idealizations of the mathematical model, which examines only first-order physical effects. An unsteady flow, variable thermophysical properties, conjugate effects, species interdiffusion, and radiation were not accounted for in the model. 31 refs.

  14. Decay Heat Removal by Natural Circulation of Vacuum Vessel Coolant for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iseli, M.; Bartels, H.-W.; Poucet, A.

    1997-06-01

    The decay heat-driven temperature transients of the in-vessel components following a postulated loss of all in-vessel cooling have been calculated. The resulting time-dependent heat load to the vacuum vessel is due to radiation from the backplate and convection of postulated steam between backplate and vacuum vessel. It is shown, that even for a failure of all in-vessel cooling and total loss of power, the ITER design can rely on passive decay heat removal by natural circulation in one of the two existing cooling loops of the vacuum vessel. A mathematical model describes the transient operating conditions and shows that the temperature established by natural circulation does not exceed 200°C at the maximum shut down heat load to the vacuum vessel. Therefore, no additional emergency cooling system is required if the existing heat exchanger is designed for natural circulation and a bypass is used during normal operation to maintain operation temperature.

  15. Fuel savings with conventional hot water space heating systems by incorporating a natural gas powered heat pump. Preliminary project: Development of heat pump technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanheyden, L.; Evertz, E.

    1980-12-01

    Compression type air/water heat pumps were developed for domestic heating systems rated at 20 to 150 kW. The heat pump is driven either by a reciprocating piston or rotary piston engine modified to operate on natural gas. Particular features of natural gas engines as prime movers, such as waste heat recovery and variable speed, are stressed. Two systems suitable for heat pump operation were selected from among five different mass produced car engines and were modified to incorporate reciprocating piston compressor pairs. The refrigerants used are R 12 and R 22. Test rig data transferred to field conditions show that the fuel consumption of conventional boilers can be reduced by 50% and more by the installation of engine driven heat pumps. Pilot heat pumps based on a 1,600 cc reciprocating piston engine were built for heating four two-family houses. Pilot pump operation confirms test rig findings. The service life of rotary piston and reciprocating piston engines was investigated. The tests reveal characteristic curves for reciprocating piston engines and include exhaust composition measurements.

  16. Intraseasonal variations in the surface layer heat balance of the central equatorial Indian Ocean: The importance of zonal advection and vertical mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, M. J.; Foltz, G. R.

    2013-06-01

    examine the ocean mixed layer response to intraseasonal atmospheric forcing using moored time series data in the central equatorial Indian Ocean for October 2004 to March 2005, a period coincident with two active phases of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). Both MJO events were accompanied by a sea surface temperature decrease that was partially the consequence of reduced net surface heat flux. In addition, during the first event in October-November 2004, advection by an enhanced Wyrtki Jet contributed substantial cooling, while during the second event in December 2004 to January 2005, vertical processes, most likely related to entrainment mixing, were pronounced. Heavy rainfall at the mooring location during the first event may have contributed to the formation of a 30-40 m thick barrier layer that limited turbulent vertical transfers between the mixed layer and the thermocline. There was no barrier layer present during the second event, which presumably allowed for much freer vertical turbulent exchanges.

  17. Effect of Temperature Shock and Inventory Surprises on Natural Gas and Heating Oil Futures Returns

    PubMed Central

    Hu, John Wei-Shan; Lin, Chien-Yu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the impact of temperature shock on both near-month and far-month natural gas and heating oil futures returns by extending the weather and storage models of the previous study. Several notable findings from the empirical studies are presented. First, the expected temperature shock significantly and positively affects both the near-month and far-month natural gas and heating oil futures returns. Next, significant temperature shock has effect on both the conditional mean and volatility of natural gas and heating oil prices. The results indicate that expected inventory surprises significantly and negatively affects the far-month natural gas futures returns. Moreover, volatility of natural gas futures returns is higher on Thursdays and that of near-month heating oil futures returns is higher on Wednesdays than other days. Finally, it is found that storage announcement for natural gas significantly affects near-month and far-month natural gas futures returns. Furthermore, both natural gas and heating oil futures returns are affected more by the weighted average temperature reported by multiple weather reporting stations than that reported by a single weather reporting station. PMID:25133233

  18. A study of the dry heat resistance of naturally occurring organisms widely dispersed on a surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garst, D. M.; Lindell, K. F.

    1971-01-01

    Although Bacillus subtilis var. niger is the standard test organism for NASA planetary quarantine sterilization studies, it was found that some naturally occurring soil organisms are more heat resistant. The separation of these organisms from soil particles is described. Experiments are discussed which were designed to show that the heat resistance is a natural characteristic of the organisms, rather than a condition induced by the clumping effect of agglomerated particles and organisms.

  19. Effects of chemical reaction on MHD mixed convection stagnation point flow toward a vertical plate in a porous medium with radiation and heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hari, Niranjan; Sivasankaran, S.; Bhuvaneswari, M.; Siri, Zailan

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to analyze the effects of chemical reaction on MHD mixed convection with the stagnation point flow towards a vertical plate embedded in a porous medium with radiation and internal heat generation. The governing boundary layer equations are transformed into a set of ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations. Then they are solved by shooting technique with Runge-Kutta fourth order iteration. The obtained numerical results are illustrated graphically and the heat and mass transfer rates are given in tabular form. The velocity and temperature profiles overshoot near the plate on increasing the chemical reaction parameter, Richardson number and magnetic field parameter.

  20. Generation of Acoustic-Gravity Waves in Ionospheric HF Heating Experiments: Simulating Large-Scale Natural Heat Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradipta, Rezy

    In this thesis, we investigate the potential role played by large-scale anomalous heat sources (e.g. prolonged heat wave events) in generating acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) that might trigger widespread plasma turbulence in the ionospheric layer. The main hypothesis is that, the thermal gradients associated with the heat wave fronts could act as a source of powerful AGW capable of triggering ionospheric plasma turbulence over extensive areas. In our investigations, first we are going to examine a case study of the summer 2006 North American heat wave event. Our examination of GPS-derived total electron content (TEC) data over the North American sector reveals a quite noticeable increase in the level of daily plasma density fluctuations during the summer 2006 heat wave period. Comparison with the summer 2005 and summer 2007 data further confirms that the observed increase of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) during the summer 2006 heat wave period was not simply a regular seasonal phenomenon. Furthermore, a series of field experiments had been carried out at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in order to physically simulate the process of AGW/TID generation by large-scale thermal gradients in the ionosphere. In these ionospheric HF heating experiments, we create some time-varying artificial thermal gradients at an altitude of 200--300 km above the Earth's surface using vertically-transmitted amplitude-modulated 0-mode HF heater waves. For our experiments, a number of radio diagnostic instruments had been utilized to detect the characteristic signatures of heater-generated AGW/TID. So far, we have been able to obtain several affirmative indications that some artificial AGW/TID are indeed being radiated out from the heated plasma volume during the HAARP-AGW experiments. Based on the experimental evidence, we may conclude that it is certainly quite plausible for large-scale thermal gradients associated with severe heat wave

  1. Natural-convection heat transfer of a spherical lighting fixture

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Takamasa; Fujii, Tetsu

    1994-09-01

    The surface temperatures of the inner lamp and the outer globe of a spherical lighting fixture, the surfaces of which are painted black, were measured. From the results, the average convective heat-transfer coefficients between the inner lamp and the outer globe and on the outer surface of the globe were obtained. These data are correlated with the aid of existing equations for two concentric spheres and the outer surface of a single sphere. The relationships between the maximum and mean temperatures on the lamp and the globe were also obtained. By the use of these equations, a method for the optimal thermal design of spherical lighting fixtures is proposed.

  2. Natural Convection Heat Transfer in a Rectangular Water Pool with Internal Heating and Top and Bottom Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong K.; Lee, Seung D.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2006-07-01

    During a severe accident, the reactor core may melt and be relocated to the lower plenum to form a hemispherical pool. If there is no effective cooling mechanism, the core debris may heat up and the molten pool run into natural convection. Natural convection heat transfer was examined in SIGMA RP (Simulant Internal Gravitated Material Apparatus Rectangular Pool). The SIGMA RP apparatus comprises a rectangular test section, heat exchanger, cartridge heaters, cooling jackets, thermocouples and a data acquisition system. The internal heater heating method was used to simulate uniform heat source which is related to the modified Rayleigh number Ra'. The test procedure started with water, the working fluid, filling in the test section. There were two boundary conditions: one dealt with both walls being cooled isothermally, while the other had to with only the upper wall being cooled isothermally. The heat exchanger was utilized to maintain the isothermal boundary condition. Four side walls were surrounded by the insulating material to minimize heat loss. Tests were carried out at 10{sup 11} < Ra' < 10{sup 13}. The SIGMA RP tests with an appropriate cartridge heater arrangement showed excellent uniform heat generation in the pool. The steady state was defined such that the temperature fluctuation stayed within {+-}0.2 K over a time period of 5,000 s. The conductive heat transfer was dominant below the critical Rayleigh number Ra'c, whereas the convective heat transfer picked up above Ra'{sub c}. In the top and bottom boundary cooling condition, the upward Nusselt number Nu{sub up} was greater than the downward Nusselt number Nu{sub dn}. In particular, the discrepancy between Nu{sub up} and Nu{sub dn} widened with Ra'. The Nu{sub up} to Nu{sub dn} ratio was varied from 7.75 to 16.77 given 1.45 x 10{sup 12} < Ra' < 9.59 x 10{sup 13}. On the other hand, Nu{sub up} was increased in absence of downward heat transfer for the case of top cooling. The current rectangular pool

  3. New configurations of a heat recovery absorption heat pump integrated with a natural gas boiler for boiler efficiency improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Ming; Abdelaziz, Omar; Yin, Hongxi

    2014-11-01

    Conventional natural gas-fired boilers exhaust flue gas direct to the atmosphere at 150 200 C, which, at such temperatures, contains large amount of energy and results in relatively low thermal efficiency ranging from 70% to 80%. Although condensing boilers for recovering the heat in the flue gas have been developed over the past 40 years, their present market share is still less than 25%. The major reason for this relatively slow acceptance is the limited improvement in the thermal efficiency of condensing boilers. In the condensing boiler, the temperature of the hot water return at the range of 50 60 C, which is used to cool the flue gas, is very close to the dew point of the water vapor in the flue gas. Therefore, the latent heat, the majority of the waste heat in the flue gas, which is contained in the water vapor, cannot be recovered. This paper presents a new approach to improve boiler thermal efficiency by integrating absorption heat pumps with natural gas boilers for waste heat recovery (HRAHP). Three configurations of HRAHPs are introduced and discussed. The three configurations are modeled in detail to illustrate the significant thermal efficiency improvement they attain. Further, for conceptual proof and validation, an existing hot water-driven absorption chiller is operated as a heat pump at operating conditions similar to one of the devised configurations. An overall system performance and economic analysis are provided for decision-making and as evidence of the potential benefits. These three configurations of HRAHP provide a pathway to achieving realistic high-efficiency natural gas boilers for applications with process fluid return temperatures higher than or close to the dew point of the water vapor in the flue gas.

  4. Direct measurements of vertical heat flux and Na flux in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere by lidar at Boulder (40°N, 105°W), Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.; Chu, X.; Gardner, C. S.; Barry, I. F.; Smith, J. A.; Fong, W.; Yu, Z.; Chen, C.

    2014-12-01

    The vertical transport of heat and constituent by gravity waves and tides plays a fundamental role in establishing the thermal and constituent structures of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT), but has not been thoroughly investigated by observations. In particular, direct measurements of vertical heat flux and metal constituent flux caused by dissipating waves are extremely rare, which demand precise measurements with high spatial and temporal resolutions over a long period. Such requirements are necessary to overcome various uncertainties to reveal the small quantities of the heat and constituent fluxes induced by dissipating waves. So far such direct observations have only been reported for vertical heat and Na fluxes using a Na Doppler lidar at Starfire Optical Range (SOR) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Furthermore, estimate of eddy heat and constituent fluxes from the turbulent mixing generated by breaking waves is even more challenging due to the even smaller temporal and spatial scales of the eddy. Consequently, the associated coefficients of thermal (kH) and constituent (kzz) diffusion have not been well characterized and remain as large uncertainties in models. We attempt to address these issues with direct measurements by a Na Doppler lidar with exceptional high-resolution measurement capabilities. Since summer 2010, we have been operating a Na Doppler lidar at Boulder, Colorado. The efficiency of the lidar has been greatly improved in summer of 2011 and achieved generally over 1000 counts of Na signal per lidar pulse in winter. In 2013, we made extensive Na lidar observations in 98 nights. These data covering each month of a full year will be used to characterize the seasonal variations of heat and Na fluxes and to be compared with the pioneering observations at SOR. In November 2013, we further upgraded the lidar with two new frequency shifters and a new data acquisition scheme, which are optimized for estimating eddy fluxes and reducing the

  5. Natural/passive solar heating and cooling for poultry sheds

    SciTech Connect

    Abd El-Salam, E.M.

    1980-12-01

    Arid climates, as in Egypt and the Middle-East regions, are characterized by large durinal and seasonal temperature variation coupled with clear skies and ample sunshine duration. Partial stabilization of indoor thermal environment in habitation is of great comfort for human and have large effects on animals or birds productivities. In case of poultry or animal sheds, can have some economical turn over in terms of increased egg or animal productivity and reduction of mortality rates if their indoor thermal environment is favorably controlled. Poultry birds are sensitive to changes of ambient temperatures, humidity and other environmental variables. This investigation describes an unconventional method of maintaining moderate thermal environment within poultry sheds by using the roof for storage of heat and coolness in appropriate seasons. During winter, underground water is circulated through specially designed pipe matrix imbeded in the roof slab and through radiant wall panels.

  6. Natural analogs for enhanced heat recovery from geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, D.L.

    1996-12-31

    High-temperature hydrothermal systems are physically and chemically zoned with depth. The energy input is from a magmatic zone, intruded by igneous bodies, that may also contribute variable amounts of magmatic fluid to the system. The heat source is directly overlain by a section of rocks, that due to their elevated temperature, respond to stress in a ductile fashion. The ductile zone is, in turn, overlain by a section of rocks that respond to stress in a brittle fashion, where water is able to circulate through fractures (the geothermal reservoir) and will be termed the hydrothermal circulation zone. Ancient and modern high-temperature geothermal systems show a predictable sequence of evolutionary events affecting these stratified zones. Metamorphic core complexes are uplifts, formed in highly extended terrains, that expose fossil brittle-ductile transition zones. Formerly ductile rocks have had brittle fractures superimposed on them, and meteoric hydrothermal systems are associated with the brittle fracturing. Porphyry copper deposits typically evolve from magmatic to meteoric hydrothermal systems. At the Larderello geothermal system, the brittle-ductile transition has been mapped using reflection seismology, and the zone has been penetrated by the San Pompeo 2 well where temperatures >420{degrees}C were encountered. Although neo-granitic dikes have been penetrated by drilling in the Larderello area, the brittle-ductile transition is largely above the inferred plutonic heat source. In the Geysers system, in contrast, the present steam system has been superimposed on young plutonic rocks and the inferred brittle-ductile transition is present at a depth of about 4.7 km within the plutonic rocks. As hydrothermal reservoirs are depleted, or surface facilities are restricted by environmental considerations, interest will turn to the deeper portions of known systems. Japan already has an aggressive program to develop Deep-Seated and Magma-Ambient resources.

  7. Numerical investigation of natural convection heat transfer in a three-dimensional annular enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, Chain-Nan; de Witt, Kenneth J.; Keith, Theo G., Jr.

    Natural convective flow and heat transfer in a three-dimensional annular enclose have been investigated numerically. The analysis uses dimensionless equations of continuity, momentum, and energy in Cartesian coordinates, which are cast into a generalized curvilinear system and solved by using a prediction-correction algorithm. For short horizontal cylinders, the local heat transfer rate is found to decrease sharply near the end walls due to convective velocity suppression; the overall heat transfer rate is less than that predicted by a two-dimensional model. Heat transfer rates are presented as a function of the Rayleigh number and compared with the available experimental data.

  8. Natural convection mass transfer at a vertical array of closely-spaced horizontal cylinders with special reference to electrochemical reactor design

    SciTech Connect

    Sedahmed, G.H.; Nirdosh, I.

    1995-06-01

    Many industrial electrochemical processes such as electrowinning of metals, electrochemical pollution control, and electroorganic and electroinorganic syntheses are diffusion-controlled processes whose rates depend on the geometry of the working electrode as well as the prevailing hydrodynamic conditions. Recently much work has been done to develop new electrochemical reactors which are more efficient than the traditional parallel plate electrochemical reactor used in conducting such processes. In line with this, the object of the present work was to study the natural convection mass transfer behavior of a new electrode geometry, namely an array of closely-spaced horizontal tubes. Natural convection mass transfer at a vertical array of closely-spaced horizontal cylinders was studied by an electrochemical technique involving the measurement of the limiting current of the cathodic deposition of copper from acidified copper sulfate solution. Various combinations of solution concentration, cylinder diameter, and number of cylinders per array were used including experiments on single cylinders. The mass transfer coefficient at the array was found to decrease with increasing number of cylinders, pass through a minimum, and then increase with further increase in the number of cylinders per array; the mass transfer coefficient increased with increasing cylinder diameter in the array. Mass transfer data for different arrays were correlated for the range 6.3 {times} 10{sup 9} < ScGr < 3.63 {times} 10{sup 10} by the equation Sh = 0.455(ScGr){sup 0.25} and for the range 6.3 {times} 10{sup 10} < ScGr < 3.63 {times} 10{sup 12} by the equation Sh = 0.0064(ScGr){sup 0.42}. The characteristic length used in the above correlations was obtained by dividing the array area by the perimeter projected onto a horizontal plane. Practical implications of the present results in designing electrochemical reactors with heat transfer facilities are highlighted.

  9. The effect of transpiration on coupled heat and mass transfer in mixed convection over a vertical plate embedded in a saturated porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Yih, K.A.

    1997-03-01

    Effect of transpiration velocity on the heat and mass transfer characteristics of mixed convection about a permeable vertical plate embedded in a saturated porous medium under the coupled effects of thermal and mass diffusion is numerically analyzed. The plate is maintained at a uniform temperature and species concentration with constant transpiration velocity. The transformed governing equations are solved by Keller box method. Numerical results for the local Nusselt number and local Sherwood number are presented. In general, it has been found for thermally assisted flow that the local surface heat and mass transfer rates increase owing to suction of fluid. This trend reversed for blowing of fluid. It is apparent that the Lewis number has a pronounced effect on the local Sherwood number than it does on the local Nusselt number. Increasing the Lewis number decreases (increases) the local heat (mass) transfer rate.

  10. Analysis of fluid motion and heat transport on magnetohydrodynamic boundary layer past a vertical power law stretching sheet with hydrodynamic and thermal slip effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkahtani, Badr; Abel, M. Subhas; Aly, Emad H.

    2015-12-01

    The present model is committed to the study of MHD boundary layer flow and heat transfer past a nonlinear vertically stretching porous stretching sheet with the effects of hydrodynamic and thermal slip. The boundary value problem, consisting of boundary layer equations of motion and heat transfer, which are nonlinear partial differential equations are transformed into nonlinear ordinary differential equations, with the aid of similarity transformation. This problem has been solved, using Runge Kutta fourth order method with shooting technique. The effects of various physical parameters, such as, stretching parameter m, magnetic parameter M, porosity parameter fw, buoyancy parameter λ, Prandtl number Pr, Eckert number Ec, hydrodynamic slip parameter γ, and thermal slip parameter δ, on flow and heat transfer characteristics, are computed and represented graphically.

  11. Mitigation of upward and downward vertical displacement event heat loads with upper or lower massive gas injection in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Hollmann, E. M.; Moyer, R. A.; Commaux, N.; Shiraki, D.; Eidietis, N. W.; Parks, P. B.; Lasnier, C. J.

    2015-10-15

    Intentionally triggered upward and downward vertical displacement events (VDEs) leading to disruptions were pre-emptively mitigated with neon massive gas injection (MGI) coming from either above or below the plasma. Global indicators of disruption mitigation effectiveness (conducted heat loads, radiated power, and vessel motion) do not show a clear improvement when mitigating with the gas jet located closer to the VDE impact area. A clear trend of improved mitigation is observed for earlier MGI timing relative to the VDE impact time. The plasma edge magnetic perturbation is seen to lock to a preferential phase during the VDE thermal quench, but this phase is not clearly matched by preliminary attempts to fit to the conducted heat load phase. Clear indications of plasma infra-red (IR) emission are observed both before and during the disruptions. This IR emission can affect calculation of disruption heat loads; here, the time decay of post-disruption IR signals is used to correct for this effect.

  12. Mitigation of upward and downward vertical displacement event heat loads with upper or lower massive gas injection in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Hollmann, E. M.; Commaux, Nicolas J. C.; Eidietis, N. W.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Parks, P. B.; Shiraki, Daisuke

    2015-10-12

    Intentionally triggered upward and downward vertical displacement events (VDEs) leading to disruptions were pre-emptively mitigated with neon massive gas injection (MGI) coming from either above or below the plasma. Global indicators of disruption mitigation effectiveness (conducted heat loads, radiated power, and vessel motion) do not show a clear improvement when mitigating with the gas jet located closer to the VDE impact area. A clear trend of improved mitigation is observed for earlier MGI timing relative to the VDE impact time. The plasma edge magnetic perturbation is seen to lock to a preferential phase during the VDE thermal quench, but this phase is not clearly matched by preliminary attempts to fit to the conducted heat load phase. Clear indications of plasma infra-red (IR) emission are observed both before and during the disruptions. Furthermore, this IR emission can affect calculation of disruption heat loads; here, the time decay of post-disruption IR signals is used to correct for this effect.

  13. Comparing vertical profiles of natural tracers in the Williston Basin to estimate the onset of deep aquifer activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, M. Jim; Harrington, Glenn A.

    2014-08-01

    Comparing high-resolution depth profiles of different naturally occurring environmental tracers in aquitards should yield consistent and perhaps complementary information about solute transport mechanisms and the timing of major hydrogeological and climatological events. This study evaluated whether deep, continuous profiles of aquitard pore water chloride concentration could provide further insight into the paleohydrology of the Williston Basin, Canada, than possible using high-resolution depth profiles of stable H/O isotopes of water (δ18O, δ2H). Pore water samples were obtained from extracts of cores taken over 392 m of the thick Cretaceous shale aquitard. Water samples were also collected from wells installed in the underlying regional sandy aquifer (Mannville Group; 93 m thick) and from seepage inflows into potash mine shafts (to 825 m below ground). Numerical modeling of the 1-D vertical Cl- profile supported diffusion dominated solute transport in the shales. The modeling also showed a similar time frame for development of the Cl- profile prior to activation of the aquifer as determined from the δ18O profile (20-25 Ma); however, it provided a significantly longer and potentially better-constrained time frame for evolution of the profile during the activation phase of the aquifer (0.5-1 Ma). The dominant paleoevent reflected in present-day profiles of both tracers is the introduction of glaciogenic meteoric water to the Mannville aquifer underlying the shale during the Pleistocene. The source area of this water remains to be determined.

  14. The effect of external heat transfer on thermal explosion in a spherical vessel with natural convection.

    PubMed

    Campbell, A N

    2015-07-14

    When any exothermic reaction proceeds in an unstirred vessel, natural convection may develop. This flow can significantly alter the heat transfer from the reacting fluid to the environment and hence alter the balance between heat generation and heat loss, which determines whether or not the system will explode. Previous studies of the effects of natural convection on thermal explosion have considered reactors where the temperature of the wall of the reactor is held constant. This implies that there is infinitely fast heat transfer between the wall of the vessel and the surrounding environment. In reality, there will be heat transfer resistances associated with conduction through the wall of the reactor and from the wall to the environment. The existence of these additional heat transfer resistances may alter the rate of heat transfer from the hot region of the reactor to the environment and hence the stability of the reaction. This work presents an initial numerical study of thermal explosion in a spherical reactor under the influence of natural convection and external heat transfer, which neglects the effects of consumption of reactant. Simulations were performed to examine the changing behaviour of the system as the intensity of convection and the importance of external heat transfer were varied. It was shown that the temporal development of the maximum temperature in the reactor was qualitatively similar as the Rayleigh and Biot numbers were varied. Importantly, the maximum temperature in a stable system was shown to vary with Biot number. This has important consequences for the definitions used for thermal explosion in systems with significant reactant consumption. Additionally, regions of parameter space where explosions occurred were identified. It was shown that reducing the Biot number increases the likelihood of explosion and reduces the stabilising effect of natural convection. Finally, the results of the simulations were shown to compare favourably with

  15. Natural convective heat and mass transfer in a porous triangular enclosure filled with nanofluid in presence of heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Raju; Parvin, Salma; Khan, Md. Abdul Hakim

    2016-07-01

    The problem of natural convective heat and mass transfer in a triangular enclosure filled with nanofluid saturated porous medium in presence of heat generation has been studied in this paper. The bottom wall of the cavity is heated uniformly, the left inclined wall is heated linearly and the right inclined wall is considered to be cold. The concentration is higher at bottom wall, lower at right inclined wall and linearly concentrated at left inclined wall of the cavity. The governing equations are transformed to the dimensionless form and solved numerically using Galerkin weighted residual technique of finite element method. The results are obtained in terms of streamline, isotherms, isoconcentrations, Nusselt number (Nu) and Sherwood number (Sh) for the parameters thermal Rayleigh number (RaT), Heat generation parameter (λ) and Lewis number (Le) while Prandtl number (Pr), Buoyancy ratio (N) and Darcy number (Da) are considered to be fixed. It is observed that flow pattern, temperature fields and concentration fields are affected by the variation of above considered parameters.

  16. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America ) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model. Review of other latent heating algorithms will be discussed in the workshop.

  17. The vertical distribution of radiogenic heat production in the Precambrian crust of Norway and Sweden: Geothermal implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinet, Christophe; Jaupart, Claude

    The present geology of southern Scandinavia offers the unique opportunity to sample deep and intermediate levels from the same crustal section for both heat flow and heat production. In the central part of southern Norway, amphibolite facies terranes appear to lie on top of the same deeper crustal formations which crop out on their western and eastern margins. An extensive data set on the geochemistry of all types of rocks in the region culled from the literature is used to derive values for radiogenic heat production for each kind of crustal facies. Using constraints from heat flow data in the same area allows a reliable model of the distribution of crustal heat production. The average heat production of granulite facies terranes is 0.4 µW/m³, similar to values in other parts of the world. For amphibolite facies rocks, the value is 1.6 µW/m³. The present shield also includes heat producing element enriched granites formed in later events and the average heat production of presently exposed crust is 2.7 µ/m³. Using heat flow and radioactivity data from ten stations, the reduced heat flow in the area is 22 ± 2 mW/m². This corresponds to the heat flow at the top of 28 km of deep crustal facies, implying that the mantle heat flow is probably as low as 10 mW/m². Over the whole crustal thickness, the average amount of radiogenic heat is 31 mW/m².

  18. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  19. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM rainfall products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2001. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DE 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs. west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in strtaiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  20. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics Using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in straitform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMXX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM- LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  1. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  2. CFD numerical simulation of air natural convection over a heated cylindrical surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flori, M.; Vîlceanu, L.

    2015-06-01

    In this study a CFD numerical simulation is used to describe the fluid flow and heat transfer in air surrounding a heated horizontal cylinder. The model is created in 2D space dimension involving a finite element solver of Navier-Stokes equations. As natural convection phenomenon is induced by a variable fluid density field with temperature rising, the Boussinesq approximation was coupled to the model.

  3. Heat Budget Calculation in the Convective Boundary Layer on a 4 × 4 Vertical versus Time Grid from Aircraft and Surface Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukas, John C.

    2000-09-01

    Aircraft, portable tower, and radiosonde measurements from 4 August 1989 (day 68) of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), over fairly flat terrain in Kansas, are used for the reconstruction of the heat conservation equation. The calculation grid consists of three grouped flight levels and the surface, and three 1-h blocks, within the midday convective boundary layer (CBL). The day chosen had a week warm front disturbance in addition to the usual summertime southern flow over the midwestern United States. Significant vertical and temporal structure, which should not be bulk averaged, was observed for all terms. The upper layer showed warming sustained at a constant rate around noon and appeared decoupled from the surface and the middle levels in the later hours. Excess warming was due to advection and possibly entrainment. Consequently, the heat flux divergence also had a nonzero vertical gradient. Advection proves to be an important term and does not average out when driven by a synoptic feature. Its east-west component improved the balance of the heat equation at all levels. Partial flight intertrack and total CBL volume standard deviations for terms and residuals are carried through explicitly.

  4. Natural convection in horizontal porous layers with localized heating from below

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, V. ); Kulacki, F.A. )

    1987-08-01

    Convective flow of fluid through saturated porous media heated from below is of considerable interest, and has been extensively studied. Most of these studies are concerned with either infinite horizontal porous layers or rectangular (or cylindrical) porous cavities with adiabatic vertical walls. A related problem of practical importance occurs when only a portion of the bottom surface is heated and the rest of it is either adiabatic or isothermally cooled. This situation is encountered in several geothermal areas which consists of troughs of volcanic debris contained by walls of nonfragmented ignimbrite. Thus, the model region considered is a locally heated long trough of isotropic porous medium confined by impermeable and insulating surroundings. Also, the recent motivation to study this problem has come from the efforts to identify a geologic repository for nuclear waste disposal. The purpose of the present work is to consider the effects of aspect ratio and Rayleigh number on free convection heat transfer from an isothermal heat source centrally located on the bottom surface of a horizontal porous cavity.

  5. Performance gains by using heated natural-gas fuel in an annular turbojet combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchionna, N. R.

    1973-01-01

    A full-scale annular turbojet combustor was tested with natural gas fuel heated from ambient temperature to 800 K (980 F). In all tests, heating the fuel improved combustion efficiency. Two sets of gaseous fuel nozzles were tested. Combustion instabilities occurred with one set of nozzles at two conditions: one where the efficiency approached 100 percent with the heated fuel; the other where the efficiency was very poor with the unheated fuel. The second set of nozzles exhibited no combustion instability. Altitude relight tests with the second set showed that relight was improved and was achievable at essentially the same condition as blowout when the fuel temperature was 800 K (980 F).

  6. Development and test of combustion chamber for Stirling engine heated by natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tie; Song, Xiange; Gui, Xiaohong; Tang, Dawei; Li, Zhigang; Cao, Wenyu

    2014-04-01

    The combustion chamber is an important component for the Stirling engine heated by natural gas. In the paper, we develop a combustion chamber for the Stirling engine which aims to generate 3˜5 kWe electric power. The combustion chamber includes three main components: combustion module, heat exchange cavity and thermal head. Its feature is that the structure can divide "combustion" process and "heat transfer" process into two apparent individual steps and make them happen one by one. Since natural gas can mix with air fully before burning, the combustion process can be easily completed without the second wind. The flame can avoid contacting the thermal head of Stirling engine, and the temperature fields can be easily controlled. The designed combustion chamber is manufactured and its performance is tested by an experiment which includes two steps. The experimental result of the first step proves that the mixture of air and natural gas can be easily ignited and the flame burns stably. In the second step of experiment, the combustion heat flux can reach 20 kW, and the energy utilization efficiency of thermal head has exceeded 0.5. These test results show that the thermal performance of combustion chamber has reached the design goal. The designed combustion chamber can be applied to a real Stirling engine heated by natural gas which is to generate 3˜5 kWe electric power.

  7. Thermal resistance of naturally occurring airborne bacterial spores. [Viking spacecraft dry heat decontamination simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puleo, J. R.; Bergstrom, S. L.; Peeler, J. T.; Oxborrow, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    Simulation of a heat process used in the terminal dry-heat decontamination of the Viking spacecraft is reported. Naturally occurring airborne bacterial spores were collected on Teflon ribbons in selected spacecraft assembly areas and subsequently subjected to dry heat. Thermal inactivation experiments were conducted at 105, 111.7, 120, 125, 130, and 135 C with a moisture level of 1.2 mg of water per liter. Heat survivors were recovered at temperatures of 135 C when a 30-h heating cycle was employed. Survivors were recovered from all cycles studied and randomly selected for identification. The naturally occurring spore population was reduced an average of 2.2 to 4.4 log cycles from 105 to 135 C. Heating cycles of 5 and 15 h at temperature were compared with the standard 30-h cycle at 111.7, 120, and 125 C. No significant differences in inactivation (alpha = 0.05) were observed between 111.7 and 120 C. The 30-h cycle differs from the 5- and 15-h cycles at 125 C. Thus, the heating cycle can be reduced if a small fraction (about 0.001 to 0.0001) of very resistant spores can be tolerated.

  8. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF NATURAL CONVECTION HEAT TRANSFER OF IONIC LIQUID IN A RECTANGULAR ENCLOSURE HEATED FROM BELOW

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, E.; Visser, A.; Bridges, N.

    2011-07-18

    This paper presents an experimental study of natural convection heat transfer for an Ionic Liquid. The experiments were performed for 1-butyl-2, 3-dimethylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, ([C{sub 4}mmim][NTf{sub 2}]) at a Raleigh number range of 1.26 x 10{sup 7} to 8.3 x 10{sup 7}. In addition to determining the convective heat transfer coefficients, this study also included experimental determination of thermophysical properties of [C{sub 4}mmim][NTf{sub 2}] such as, density, viscosity, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity. The results show that the density of [C{sub 4}mmim][NTf{sub 2}] varies from 1.437-1.396 g/cm{sup 3} within the temperature range of 10-50 C, the thermal conductivity varies from 0.105-0.116 W/m.K between a temperature of 10 to 60 C, the heat capacity varies from 1.015 J/g.K - 1.760 J/g.K within temperature range of 25-340 C and the viscosity varies from 18cp-243cp within temperature range 10-75 C. The results for density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and viscosity were in close agreement with the values in the literature. Measured dimensionless Nusselt number was observed to be higher for the ionic liquid than that of DI water. This is expected as Nusselt number is the ratio of heat transfer by convection to conduction and the ionic liquid has lower thermal conductivity (approximately 18%) than DI water.

  9. Transient testing of the FFTF for decay-heat removal by natural convection

    SciTech Connect

    Beaver, T R; Johnson, H G; Stover, R L

    1982-06-01

    This paper reports on the series of transient tests performed in the FFTF as a major part of the pre-operations testing program. The structure of the transient test program was designed to verify the capability of the FFTF to safely remove decay heat by natural convection. The series culminated in a scram from full power to complete natural convection in the plant, simulating a loss of all electrical power. Test results and acceptance criteria related to the verification of safe decay heat removal are presented.

  10. A simplified method for determining heat of combustion of natural gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Chegini, Hoshang; Mall, Gerald H.

    1987-01-01

    A simplified technique for determination of the heat of combustion of natural gas has been developed. It is a variation of the previously developed technique wherein the carrier air, in which the test sample was burnt, was oxygen enriched to adjust the mole fraction of oxygen in the combustion product gases up to that in the carrier air. The new technique eliminates the need for oxygen enrichment of the experimental mixtures and natural gas samples and has been found to predict their heats of combustion to an uncertainty of the order of 1 percent.

  11. Aerodynamic design of a midsized vertical-axis wind turbine using natural laminar-flow blade elements

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, P.C.; Berg, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    Natural laminar-flow (NLF) airfoils are those which can achieve significant extents of laminar flow (greater than or equal to 30% chord) solely through favorable pressure gradients. Studies have shown that vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs) using NLF sections as blade elements have the potential of producing energy at a significantly lower cost (approx. =20%) than turbines of current design. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is now in the process of procuring a blade set for its 17-m-diameter research turbine which will use NLF sections as blade elements. This paper describes the design of this blade set. The blade set design began with the definition of a family of three approximately 50% chord NLF sections (15, 18, and 21% t/c). These definitions involved numerically establishing airfoil contours giving section characteristics anticipated to be favorable in the VAWT context and then screening these using a VAWT performance model. Field tests of the 15 and 18% t/c sections as elements on the SNL 5-m diameter research turbine were used to validate the predicted element performance and to establish the fact that laminar flow could be sustained in the VAWT environment. A static wind tunnel test series involving the three NLF sections was conducted in order to provide accurate late- and post-stall characteristics upon which to base the midsized design. These efforts resulted in a blade set design which used both the NACA 0015 and 18% t/c NLF sections. Installation and test of this blade set on the SNL 17-m diameter research turbine has been scheduled to begine during the fall of 1983.

  12. Studies of Phase Change Materials and a Latent Heat Storage Unit Used for a Natural Circulation Cooling/Latent Heat Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakitani, Katsumi; Honda, Hiroshi

    Experimental and theoretical studies were made of the heat transfer characteristics of a latent heat storage unit used for a natural circulation cooling /latent heat storage system. Heating and cooling curves of the latent heat storage unit undergoing solid-liquid phase change of a PCM (lauric acid) was obtained by using anatural circulation loop of R22 which consisted of an electrically heated evaporater, a water cooled condenser and the latent heat storage unit. The latent heat storage unit showed a heat transfer performance which was high enough for practical use. An approximate theoretical analysis was conducted to investigate transient behavior of the latent heat storage unit. Predictions of the refrigerant and outer surface temperatures during the melting process were in fair agreement with the experimental data, whereas that of the refrigerant temperature during the solidification process was considerably lower than the measurement.

  13. Combined Effect of Buoyancy Force and Navier Slip on MHD Flow of a Nanofluid over a Convectively Heated Vertical Porous Plate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We examine the effect of magnetic field on boundary layer flow of an incompressible electrically conducting water-based nanofluids past a convectively heated vertical porous plate with Navier slip boundary condition. A suitable similarity transformation is employed to reduce the governing partial differential equations into nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which are solved numerically by employing fourth-order Runge-Kutta with a shooting technique. Three different water-based nanofluids containing copper (Cu), aluminium oxide (Al2O3), and titanium dioxide (TiO2) are taken into consideration. Graphical results are presented and discussed quantitatively with respect to the influence of pertinent parameters, such as solid volume fraction of nanoparticles (φ), magnetic field parameter (Ha), buoyancy effect (Gr), Eckert number (Ec), suction/injection parameter (fw), Biot number (Bi), and slip parameter (β), on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient, and heat transfer rate. PMID:24222749

  14. Mass transfer effects on the unsteady mhd radiative- convective flow of a micropolar fluid past a vertical porous plate with variable heat and mass fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, M. Gnaneswara

    2013-03-01

    The problem of unsteady two-dimensional laminar flow of a viscous incompressible micropolar fluid past a vertical porous plate in the presence of a transverse magnetic field and thermal radiation with variable heat and mass fluxes is considered. The free stream velocity is subjected to exponentially increasing or decreasing small perturbations. A uniform magnetic field acts perpendicularly to a porous surface where a micropolar fluid is absorbed with a suction velocity varying with time. The Rosseland approximation is used to describe radiative heat transfer in the limit of optically thick fluids. The effects of the flow parameters and thermophysical properties on the velocity and temperature fields across the boundary layer are investigated. The effects of various parameters on the velocity, microrotation velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles are given graphically, and the values of the skin friction and couple stress coefficients are presented.

  15. Combined effect of buoyancy force and Navier slip on MHD flow of a nanofluid over a convectively heated vertical porous plate.

    PubMed

    Mutuku-Njane, Winifred Nduku; Makinde, Oluwole Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We examine the effect of magnetic field on boundary layer flow of an incompressible electrically conducting water-based nanofluids past a convectively heated vertical porous plate with Navier slip boundary condition. A suitable similarity transformation is employed to reduce the governing partial differential equations into nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which are solved numerically by employing fourth-order Runge-Kutta with a shooting technique. Three different water-based nanofluids containing copper (Cu), aluminium oxide (Al2O3), and titanium dioxide (TiO2) are taken into consideration. Graphical results are presented and discussed quantitatively with respect to the influence of pertinent parameters, such as solid volume fraction of nanoparticles (φ), magnetic field parameter (Ha), buoyancy effect (Gr), Eckert number (Ec), suction/injection parameter (f w ), Biot number (Bi), and slip parameter ( β ), on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient, and heat transfer rate. PMID:24222749

  16. Experimental Investigation on the Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Vertical Upward Flow of Supercritical CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Hyungrae Kim; Yoon Yeong Bae; Hwan Yeol Kim; Jin Ho Song; Bong Hyun Cho

    2006-07-01

    The SCWR (Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor) is one of the feasible options for the 4. generation nuclear power plant, which is being pursued by an international collaborative organization, the Gen IV International Forum (GIF). The major advantages of the SCWR include a high thermal efficiency and a maximum use of the existing technologies. In the SCWR, the coolant(water) of a supercritical pressure passes the pseudo-critical temperature as it flows upward through the sub-channels of the fuel assemblies. At certain conditions a heat transfer deterioration may occur near the pseudo-critical temperature and it may cause an excessive rise of the fuel surface temperature. Therefore, an accurate estimation of the heat transfer coefficient is necessary for the thermal-hydraulic design of a fuel pin, a fuel assembly, and the reactor core. A test facility, SPHINX, dedicated to produce heat transfer data and study flow characteristics, uses supercritical pressure CO{sub 2} as a medium to take advantage of the relatively low critical temperature and pressure; and similar physical properties with water. The produced data includes the temperature of the heating surface, the heat transfer coefficient, and the pressure drop at varying mass fluxes, heat fluxes, and operating pressures. The test section is a circular tube of ID 4.4 mm. The test range of the mass flux is 400 {approx} 1200 kg/m{sup 2}s and the maximum heat flux is 150 kW/m{sup 2}. The tests were performed for three different pressures, 7.75, 8.12, and 8.85 MPa. The test results are compared with the existing correlations of the heat transfer coefficient. In addition, the deterioration conditions observed in our test are compared against the criteria for a different fluid or a different tube size. (authors)

  17. Assessing Spatial Patterns of Lake-Groundwater Exchange Using Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) and Heat as a Natural Tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleckenstein, J. H.; Neumann, C.; Hausner, M. B.; Tyler, S. W.; Angermann, L.; Lewandowski, J.

    2011-12-01

    Heat as a natural tracer is commonly used to evaluate groundwater (GW) surface water (SW) interactions in the field. Seasonal temperature differences between GW and SW can be used to qualitatively map areas of preferential exchange. Under certain assumptions analytical solutions to the heat transport equations allow a simple quantification of exchange fluxes by an inversion of advective heat flux from temperature distributions. To reliably map temperature anomalies at the GW-SW interface in snapshot measurements using conventional temperature sensors or to quantitatively separate heat transport by advection from heat conduction typically requires a sufficient magnitude of advective flow (> 10-6 m/s). Exchange fluxes in that range are commonly encountered in stream-aquifer systems, where streambed materials are coarse and vertical hydraulic gradients relatively large. In contrast exchange fluxes between lakes and GW can be much smaller (< 10-8 m/s) due to the finer lake sediments and smaller hydraulic gradients. Also roaming temperature surveys to detect spatial patterns of exchange, as frequently used in smaller streams and rivers, are more difficult to conduct in lakes, which restricts the use of heat as a tracer in these environments. Fiber-optics based distributed temperature sensing (DTS) provides a methodology that can overcome some of these restrictions. DTS can very accurately measure temperatures at high spatial and temporal resolution and the sensor (a fiber-optic cable) can be deployed in lakes with relative ease. Important information on lake-GW exchange, which would be missed in conventional snapshot surveys of temperature, can be inferred from the temporal evolution of temperature at the water-sediment interface and from statistic of the temperature time series. Results from two DTS campaigns (one in the summer of 2008 and one in the winter of 2010) in an acid mine lake in eastern Germany are used to demonstrate the utility of DTS to characterize

  18. Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Entering the 2000-2001 Heating Season

    EIA Publications

    2000-01-01

    This special report looks at the capabilities of the national natural gas pipeline network in 2000 and provides an assessment of the current levels of available capacity to transport supplies from production areas to markets throughout the United States during the upcoming heating season. It also examines how completion of currently planned expansion projects and proposed new pipelines would affect the network.

  19. Forced and mixed convection heat transfer to supercritical CO{sub 2} vertically flowing in a uniformly-heated circular tube

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Yoon-Yeong; Kim, Hwan-Yeol; Kang, Deog-Ji

    2010-11-15

    An experiment of heat transfer to CO{sub 2}, which flows upward and downward in a circular tube with an inner diameter of 6.32 mm, was carried out with mass flux of 285-1200 kg/m{sup 2} s and heat flux of 30-170 kW/m{sup 2} at pressures of 7.75 and 8.12 MPa, respectively. The corresponding Reynolds number at the tube test section inlet ranges from 1.8 x 10{sup 4} to 3.8 x 10{sup 5}. The tube inner diameter corresponds to the equivalent hydraulic diameter of the fuel assembly sub-channel, which is being studied at KAERI. Among the tested correlations, the Bishop correlation predicted the experimental data most accurately, but only 66.9% of normal heat transfer data were predicted within {+-}30% error range. The Watts and Chou correlation, which is claimed to be valid for both the normal and deteriorated heat transfer regime, showed unsatisfactory performance. A significant decrease in Nusselt number was observed in the range of 10{sup -6}heat transfer deterioration regime. The heat transfer deteriorated when the value of the buoyancy parameter Gr{sub b}/Re{sub b}{sup 2.7} exceeded 2.0 x 10{sup -5} close to the Jackson and Hall's criterion. As soon as the heat transfer deteriorated, it entered a new regime and did not return to a normal heat transfer regime, although the value of buoyancy parameter Gr{sub b}/Re{sub b}{sup 2.7} reduced below the deterioration criterion 2.0 x 10{sup -5}. It may justify the requirement of developing separate correlations for the normal and deterioration regimes, as proposed in this paper. (author)

  20. Natural convection heat transfer from a horizontal wavy surface in a porous enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, P.V.S.N.; Kumar, B.V.R.; Singh, P.

    1997-02-07

    The effect of surface undulations on the natural convection heat transfer from an isothermal surface in a Darcian fluid-saturated porous enclosure has been numerically analyzed using the finite element method on a graded nonuniform mesh system. The flow-driving Rayleigh number Ra together with the geometrical parameters of wave amplitude a, wave phase {phi}, and the number of waves N considered in the horizontal dimension of the cavity are found to influence the flow and heat transfer process in the enclosure. For Ra around 50 and above, the phenomenon of flow separation and reattachment is noticed on the walls of the enclosure. A periodic shift in the reattachment point from the bottom wall to the adjacent walls in the clockwise direction, leading to the manifestation of cycles of unicellular and bicellular clockwise and counterclockwise flows, is observed, with the phase varying between 0{degree} and 350{degree}. The counterflow in the secondary circulation zone is intensified with the increase in the value of Ra. The counterflow on the wavy wall hinders the heat transfer into the system. An increase in either wave amplitude or the number of waves considered per unit length decreases the global heat flux into the system. Only marginal changes in global heat flux are noticed with increasing Ra. On the whole, the comparison of global heat flux results in the wavy wall case with those of the horizontal flat wall case shows that, in a porous enclosure, the wavy wall reduces the heat transfer into the system.

  1. Investigations of heat transfer, entropy generation and pressure build up for upward flow in a vertical channel equipped with a fin array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemitallah, Medhat A.; Zohir, Alaa E.

    2015-11-01

    The optimal thermal systems design criteria by maximizing the amount of heat transfer per pressure losses is a very important topic. In this work, flow and convection and radiation heat transfer characteristics are studied numerically for a flow in a vertical channel equipped with transverse fin array. The influences of fin height on heat transfer characteristics and fluid flow is investigated. Large number of fins is used (40 fins) in order to reach the fully developed conditions after few fins from the entrance. Based on the calculated data of temperature and velocity, the local entropy generation is calculated through the whole channel by solving the entropy generation equation. The results are validated against the available data in the literature and both results are in a good agreement. Optimizations for flow conditions and channel geometry are performed in order to obtain maximum heat transfer per pumping power losses. The results showed that the highest values of total heat transfer per pumping power losses are obtained at fin height to the gap width values of 0.1 and 0.3. The effect of heat transfer by radiation on entropy generation is examined and, the effect of the ratio, Gr/Re2, on the pressure field is also investigated. It was found that a positive pressure gradient appears downstream in the channel when the value of Gr/Re2 exceeds a certain limit. For Gr/Re2 values between 0 and 9, the pressure gradient is negative; however, when the value Gr/Re2 exceeds 9, the pressure starts to build up through the channel axis.

  2. Convective heat transfer to CO{sub 2} at a supercritical pressure flowing vertically upward in tubes and an annular channel

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Yoon-Yeong; Kim, Hwan-Yeol

    2009-01-15

    The Super-Critical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) has been chosen by the Generation IV International Forum as one of the candidates for the next generation nuclear reactors. Heat transfer to water from a fuel assembly may deteriorate at certain supercritical pressure flow conditions and its estimation at degraded conditions as well as in normal conditions is very important to the design of a safe and reliable reactor core. Extensive experiments on a heat transfer to a vertically upward flowing CO{sub 2} at a supercritical pressure in tubes and an annular channel have been performed. The geometries of the test sections include tubes of an internal diameter (ID) of 4.4 and 9.0 mm and an annular channel (8 x 10 mm). The heat transfer coefficient (HTC) and Nusselt numbers were derived from the inner wall temperature converted by using the outer wall temperature measured by adhesive K-type thermocouples and a direct (tube) or indirect (annular channel) electric heating power. From the test results, a correlation, which covers both a deteriorated and a normal heat transfer regime, was developed. The developed correlation takes different forms in each interval divided by the value of parameter Bu. The parameter Bu (referred to as Bu hereafter), a function of the Grashof number, the Reynolds number and the Prandtl number, was introduced since it is known to be a controlling factor for the occurrence of a heat transfer deterioration due to a buoyancy effect. The developed correlation predicted the HTCs for water and HCFC-22 fairly well. (author)

  3. Unsteady hydromagnetic flow of dusty fluid and heat transfer over a vertical stretching sheet with thermal radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Isa, Sharena Mohamad; Ali, Anati

    2015-10-22

    In this paper, the hydromagnetic flow of dusty fluid over a vertical stretching sheet with thermal radiation is investigated. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations using similarity transformation. These nonlinear ordinary differential equations are solved numerically using Runge-Kutta Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method (RKF45 Method). The behavior of velocity and temperature profiles of hydromagnetic fluid flow of dusty fluid is analyzed and discussed for different parameters of interest such as unsteady parameter, fluid-particle interaction parameter, the magnetic parameter, radiation parameter and Prandtl number on the flow.

  4. Critical heat-flux experiments under low-flow conditions in a vertical annulus. [PWR; BWR; LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Mishima, K.; Ishii, M.

    1982-03-01

    An experimental study was performed on critical heat flux (CHF) at low flow conditions for low pressure steam-water upward flow in an annulus. The test section was transparent, therefore, visual observations of dryout as well as various instrumentations were made. The data indicated that a premature CHF occurred due to flow regime transition from churn-turbulent to annular flow. It is shown that the critical heat flux observed in the experiment is essentially similar to a flooding-limited burnout and the critical heat flux can be well reproduced by a nondimensional correlation derived from the previously obtained criterion for flow regime transition. The observed CHF values are much smaller than the standard high quality CHF criteria at low flow, corresponding to the annular flow film dryout. This result is very significant, because the coolability of a heater surface at low flow rates can be drastically reduced by the occurrence of this mode of CHF.

  5. Heat transfer processes during low or high enthalpy fluid injection into naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando Ascencio Cendejas; Jesus Rivera Rodriguez

    1994-01-20

    Disposal of hot separated brine by means of reinjection within the limits of the geothermal reservoir is, at present, a problem that remains to be solved. Possible thermal, as well as chemical contamination of the resources present key questions that have to be appropiately answered before a reinjection project is actually implemented in the field. This paper focusses on the basic heat-transfer process that takes place when a relatively cold brine is injected back into the naturally fractured hot geothermal reservoir after steam has been separated at the surface. The mathematical description of this process considers that rock matrix blocks behaves as uniformly distributed heat sources, meanwhile heat transfer between matrix blocks and the fluid contained in the fractures takes place under pseudo-steady state conditions with the main temperature drop occurring in the rock-matrix blocks interphase. Analytical solutions describing the thermal front speed of propagation are presented. Discussion on the effect of several variables affecting the thermal front speed of propagation is included, stressing the importance that a proper “in-situ” determination of the effective heat transfer area at the rock-fluid interphase has on the whole process. Solutions are also presented as a type-curve that can be practically used to estimate useful parameters involved in heat transfer phenomena during cold fluid reinjection in naturally fractured geothermal systems.

  6. Passive solar heating and natural cooling of an earth-integrated design

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.R.; Shapira, H.B.

    1980-01-01

    The Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research is being designed with innovative features that will greatly reduce its energy consumption for heating, cooling, and lighting. A reference design has been studied and the effects of extending the overhang during summer and fall, varying glazing area, employing RIB, and reducing internal heat by natural lighting have been considered. The use of RIB and the extendable overhang increases the optimum window glazing area and the solar heating fraction. A mass-storage wall which will likely be included in the final design has also been considered. A figure of merit for commercial buildings is the total annual energy consumption per unit area of floor space. A highly efficient office building in the Oak Ridge area typically uses 120 to 160 kWhr/m/sup 2/. The Joint Institute reference design with natural lighting, an annual average heat pump coefficient of performance (COP) equal to 1.8, RIB, and the extendable overhang uses 71 kWhr/m/sup 2/. This figure was determined from NBSLD simulations corrected for the saving from RIB. The internal heat energy from lighting and equipment used in the simulation was 1653 kWhrs/month (high natural lighting case) which is much lower than conventional office buildings. This value was adopted because only a portion of the building will be used as office space and efforts will be made to keep internal heat generation low. The mass-storage wall and ambient air cooling will reduce energy consumption still further. The combined savings of the innovative features in the Joint Institute building are expected to result in a very energy efficient design. The building will be instrumented to monitor its performance and the measured data will provide a means of evaluating the energy-saving features. The efficiency of the design will be experimentally verified over the next several years.

  7. Transitional regimes of natural convection in a differentially heated cubical cavity under the effects of wall and molecular gas radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Soucasse, L.; Rivière, Ph.; Soufiani, A.; Xin, S.

    2014-02-15

    The transition to unsteadiness and the dynamics of weakly turbulent natural convection, coupled to wall or gas radiation in a differentially heated cubical cavity with adiabatic lateral walls, are studied numerically. The working fluid is air with small contents of water vapor and carbon dioxide whose infrared spectral radiative properties are modelled by the absorption distribution function model. A pseudo spectral Chebyshev collocation method is used to solve the flow field equations and is coupled to a direct ray tracing method for radiation transport. Flow structures are identified by means of either the proper orthogonal decomposition or the dynamic mode decomposition methods. We first retrieve the classical mechanism of transition to unsteadiness without radiation, characterized by counter-rotating streamwise-oriented vortices generated at the exit of the vertical boundary layers. Wall radiation through a transparent medium leads to a homogenization of lateral wall temperatures and the resulting transition mechanism is similar to that obtained with perfectly conducting lateral walls. The transition is due to an unstable stratification upstream the vertical boundary layers and is characterized by periodically oscillating transverse rolls of axis perpendicular to the main flow. When molecular gas radiation is accounted for, no periodic solution is found and the transition to unsteadiness displays complex structures with chimneys-like rolls whose axes are again parallel to the main flow. The origin of this instability is probably due to centrifugal forces, as suggested previously for the case without radiation. Above the transition to unsteadiness, at Ra = 3 × 10{sup 8}, it is shown that both wall and gas radiation significantly intensify turbulent fluctuations, decrease the thermal stratification in the core of the cavity, and increase the global circulation.

  8. Indriect Measurement Of Nitrogen In A Mult-Component Natural Gas By Heating The Gas

    DOEpatents

    Morrow, Thomas B.; Behring, II, Kendricks A.

    2004-06-22

    Methods of indirectly measuring the nitrogen concentration in a natural gas by heating the gas. In two embodiments, the heating energy is correlated to the speed of sound in the gas, the diluent concentrations in the gas, and constant values, resulting in a model equation. Regression analysis is used to calculate the constant values, which can then be substituted into the model equation. If the diluent concentrations other than nitrogen (typically carbon dioxide) are known, the model equation can be solved for the nitrogen concentration.

  9. System Analysis for Decay Heat Removal in Lead-Bismuth-Cooled Natural-Circulation Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Takaaki; Enuma, Yasuhiro; Iwasaki, Takashi

    2004-03-15

    Decay heat removal analyses for lead-bismuth-cooled natural-circulation reactors are described in this paper. A combined multidimensional plant dynamics code (MSG-COPD) has been developed to conduct the system analysis for the natural-circulation reactors. For the preliminary study, transient analysis has been performed for a 300-MW(thermal) lead-bismuth-cooled reactor designed by Argonne National Laboratory. In addition, decay heat removal characteristics of a 400-MW(electric) lead-bismuth-cooled natural-circulation reactor designed by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has been evaluated by using MSG-COPD. The primary reactor auxiliary cooling system (PRACS) is prepared for the JNC concept to get sufficient heat removal capacity. During 2000 s after the transient, the outlet temperature shows increasing tendency up to the maximum temperature of 430 deg. C because the buoyancy force in a primary circulation path is temporarily reduced. However, the natural circulation is recovered by the PRACS system, and the outlet temperature decreases successfully.

  10. System Analysis for Decay Heat Removal in Lead-Bismuth Cooled Natural Circulated Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Takaaki Sakai; Yasuhiro Enuma; Takashi Iwasaki; Kazuhiro Ohyama

    2002-07-01

    Decay heat removal analyses for lead-bismuth cooled natural circulation reactors are described in this paper. A combined multi-dimensional plant dynamics code (MSG-COPD) has been developed to conduct the system analysis for the natural circulation reactors. For the preliminary study, transient analysis has been performed for a 100 MWe lead-bismuth-cooled reactor designed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). In addition, decay heat removal characteristics of a 400 MWe lead-bismuth-cooled natural circulation reactor designed by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has been evaluated by using MSG-COPD. PRACS (Primary Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System) is prepared for the JNC's concept to get sufficient heat removal capacity. During 2000 sec after the transient, the outlet temperature shows increasing tendency up to the maximum temperature of 430 Centigrade, because the buoyancy force in a primary circulation path is temporary reduced. However, the natural circulation is recovered by the PRACS system and the out let temperature decreases successfully. (authors)

  11. Heat Transfer Analysis of MHD Thin Film Flow of an Unsteady Second Grade Fluid Past a Vertical Oscillating Belt

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Taza; Islam, Saeed; Shah, Rehan Ali; Khan, Ilyas; Khalid, Asma; Shafie, Sharidan

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to study the thin film layer flowing on a vertical oscillating belt. The flow is considered to satisfy the constitutive equation of unsteady second grade fluid. The governing equation for velocity and temperature fields with subjected initial and boundary conditions are solved by two analytical techniques namely Adomian Decomposition Method (ADM) and Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Method (OHAM). The comparisons of ADM and OHAM solutions for velocity and temperature fields are shown numerically and graphically for both the lift and drainage problems. It is found that both these solutions are identical. In order to understand the physical behavior of the embedded parameters such as Stock number, frequency parameter, magnetic parameter, Brinkman number and Prandtl number, the analytical results are plotted graphically and discussed. PMID:25383797

  12. Experimental investigation on heat transfer coefficient during upward flow condensation of R410A in vertical smooth tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yunxiao; Jia, Li

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on condensation of R410A upward flow in vertical tubes with the same inner diameter of 8.02mm and different lengths of 300 mm, 400 mm, 500 mm and 600mm. Condensation experiments were performed at mass fluxes of 103-490 kg m-2s-1. The saturation temperatures of experimental condition were 31°C, 38°C and 48°C, alternatively. The average vapor quality in the test section is between 0.91 and 0.98. The effects of tube length, mass flux and condensation temperature on condensation were discussed. Four correlations used for the upward flow condensation were compared with the experimental data obtained from various experimental conditions. A modified correlation was proposed within a ±15% deviation range.

  13. Exergy Analysis of a Two-Stage Ground Source Heat Pump with a Vertical Bore for Residential Space Conditioning under Simulated Occupancy

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, Moonis Raza; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Baxter, Van D.; Gehl, Anthony C.

    2015-06-26

    This twelve-month field study analyzes the performance of a 7.56W (2.16- ton) water-to-air-ground source heat pump (WA-GSHP) to satisfy domestic space conditioning loads in a 253 m2 house in a mixed-humid climate in the United States. The practical feasibility of using the ground as a source of renewable energy is clearly demonstrated. Better than 75% of the energy needed for space heating was extracted from the ground. The average monthly electricity consumption for space conditioning was only 40 kWh at summer and winter thermostat set points of 24.4°C and 21.7°C, respectively. The WA-GSHP shared the same 94.5 m vertical bore ground loop with a separate water-to-water ground-source heat pump (WW-GSHP) for meeting domestic hot water needs in the same house. Sources of systemic irreversibility, the main cause of lost work are identified using Exergy and energy analysis. Quantifying the sources of Exergy and energy losses is essential for further systemic improvements. The research findings suggest that the WA-GSHPs are a practical and viable technology to reduce primary energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions under the IECC 2012 Standard, as well as the European Union (EU) 2020 targets of using renewable energy resources.

  14. Mitigation of upward and downward vertical displacement event heat loads with upper or lower massive gas injection in DIII-D

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hollmann, E. M.; Commaux, Nicolas J. C.; Eidietis, N. W.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Parks, P. B.; Shiraki, Daisuke

    2015-10-12

    Intentionally triggered upward and downward vertical displacement events (VDEs) leading to disruptions were pre-emptively mitigated with neon massive gas injection (MGI) coming from either above or below the plasma. Global indicators of disruption mitigation effectiveness (conducted heat loads, radiated power, and vessel motion) do not show a clear improvement when mitigating with the gas jet located closer to the VDE impact area. A clear trend of improved mitigation is observed for earlier MGI timing relative to the VDE impact time. The plasma edge magnetic perturbation is seen to lock to a preferential phase during the VDE thermal quench, but thismore » phase is not clearly matched by preliminary attempts to fit to the conducted heat load phase. Clear indications of plasma infra-red (IR) emission are observed both before and during the disruptions. Furthermore, this IR emission can affect calculation of disruption heat loads; here, the time decay of post-disruption IR signals is used to correct for this effect.« less

  15. Exergy Analysis of a Two-Stage Ground Source Heat Pump with a Vertical Bore for Residential Space Conditioning under Simulated Occupancy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ally, Moonis Raza; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Baxter, Van D.; Gehl, Anthony C.

    2015-06-26

    This twelve-month field study analyzes the performance of a 7.56W (2.16- ton) water-to-air-ground source heat pump (WA-GSHP) to satisfy domestic space conditioning loads in a 253 m2 house in a mixed-humid climate in the United States. The practical feasibility of using the ground as a source of renewable energy is clearly demonstrated. Better than 75% of the energy needed for space heating was extracted from the ground. The average monthly electricity consumption for space conditioning was only 40 kWh at summer and winter thermostat set points of 24.4°C and 21.7°C, respectively. The WA-GSHP shared the same 94.5 m vertical boremore » ground loop with a separate water-to-water ground-source heat pump (WW-GSHP) for meeting domestic hot water needs in the same house. Sources of systemic irreversibility, the main cause of lost work are identified using Exergy and energy analysis. Quantifying the sources of Exergy and energy losses is essential for further systemic improvements. The research findings suggest that the WA-GSHPs are a practical and viable technology to reduce primary energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions under the IECC 2012 Standard, as well as the European Union (EU) 2020 targets of using renewable energy resources.« less

  16. Mixed convective boundary layer flow over a vertical wedge embedded in a porous medium saturated with a nanofluid: Natural Convection Dominated Regime

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A boundary layer analysis is presented for the mixed convection past a vertical wedge in a porous medium saturated with a nano fluid. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a set of non-similar equations and solved numerically by an efficient, implicit, iterative, finite-difference method. A parametric study illustrating the influence of various physical parameters is performed. Numerical results for the velocity, temperature, and nanoparticles volume fraction profiles, as well as the friction factor, surface heat and mass transfer rates have been presented for parametric variations of the buoyancy ratio parameter Nr, Brownian motion parameter Nb, thermophoresis parameter Nt, and Lewis number Le. The dependency of the friction factor, surface heat transfer rate (Nusselt number), and mass transfer rate (Sherwood number) on these parameters has been discussed. PMID:21711715

  17. Effect of thermal-hydrogeological and borehole heat exchanger properties on performance and impact of vertical closed-loop geothermal heat pump systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehkordi, S. Emad; Schincariol, Robert A.

    2013-10-01

    Ground-source geothermal systems are drawing increasing attention and popularity due to their efficiency, sustainability and being implementable worldwide. Consequently, design software and regulatory guidelines have been developed. Interaction with the subsurface significantly affects the thermal performance, sustainability, and impacts of such systems. Reviewing the related guidelines and the design software, room for improvement is evident, especially in regards to interaction with groundwater movement. In order to accurately evaluate the thermal effect of system and hydrogeological properties on a borehole heat exchanger, a fully discretized finite-element model is used. Sensitivity of the loop outlet temperatures and heat exchange rates to hydrogeological, system and meteorological factors (i.e. groundwater flux, thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of solids, porosity, thermal dispersivity, grout thermal conductivity, background and inlet temperatures) are analyzed over 6-month and 25-year operation periods. Furthermore, thermal recovery during 25 years after system decommissioning has been modeled. The thermal plume development, transport and dissipation are also assessed. This study shows the importance of subsurface thermal conductivity, groundwater flow (flux > 10-7 m/s), and background and inlet temperature on system performance and impact. It also shows the importance of groundwater flow (flux > 10-8 m/s) on thermal recovery of the ground over other factors.

  18. Natural element method for radiative heat transfer in a semitransparent medium with irregular geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2013-05-15

    This paper develops a numerical solution to the radiative heat transfer problem coupled with conduction in an absorbing, emitting and isotropically scattering medium with the irregular geometries using the natural element method (NEM). The walls of the enclosures, having temperature and mixed boundary conditions, are considered to be opaque, diffuse as well as gray. The NEM as a meshless method is a new numerical scheme in the field of computational mechanics. Different from most of other meshless methods such as element-free Galerkin method or those based on radial basis functions, the shape functions used in NEM are constructed by the natural neighbor interpolations, which are strictly interpolant and the essential boundary conditions can be imposed directly. The natural element solutions in dealing with the coupled heat transfer problem for the mixed boundary conditions have been validated by comparison with those from Monte Carlo method (MCM) generated by the authors. For the validation of the NEM solution to radiative heat transfer in the semicircular medium with an inner circle, the results by NEM have been compared with those reported in the literatures. For pure radiative transfer, the upwind scheme is employed to overcome the oscillatory behavior of the solutions in some conditions. The steady state and transient heat transfer problem combined with radiation and conduction in the semicircular enclosure with an inner circle are studied. Effects of various parameters such as the extinction coefficient, the scattering albedo, the conduction–radiation parameter and the boundary emissivity are analyzed on the radiative and conductive heat fluxes and transient temperature distributions.

  19. Natural element method for radiative heat transfer in a semitransparent medium with irregular geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2013-05-01

    This paper develops a numerical solution to the radiative heat transfer problem coupled with conduction in an absorbing, emitting and isotropically scattering medium with the irregular geometries using the natural element method (NEM). The walls of the enclosures, having temperature and mixed boundary conditions, are considered to be opaque, diffuse as well as gray. The NEM as a meshless method is a new numerical scheme in the field of computational mechanics. Different from most of other meshless methods such as element-free Galerkin method or those based on radial basis functions, the shape functions used in NEM are constructed by the natural neighbor interpolations, which are strictly interpolant and the essential boundary conditions can be imposed directly. The natural element solutions in dealing with the coupled heat transfer problem for the mixed boundary conditions have been validated by comparison with those from Monte Carlo method (MCM) generated by the authors. For the validation of the NEM solution to radiative heat transfer in the semicircular medium with an inner circle, the results by NEM have been compared with those reported in the literatures. For pure radiative transfer, the upwind scheme is employed to overcome the oscillatory behavior of the solutions in some conditions. The steady state and transient heat transfer problem combined with radiation and conduction in the semicircular enclosure with an inner circle are studied. Effects of various parameters such as the extinction coefficient, the scattering albedo, the conduction-radiation parameter and the boundary emissivity are analyzed on the radiative and conductive heat fluxes and transient temperature distributions.

  20. Comparative analysis of using natural and radiogenic lead as heat-transfer agent in fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laas, R. A.; Gizbrekht, R. V.; Komarov, P. A.; Nesterov, V. N.

    2016-06-01

    Fast reactors with lead coolant have several advantages over analogues. Performance can be further improved by replacement of natural composition lead with radiogenic one. Thus, two main issues need to be addressed: induced radioactivity in coolant and efficient neutron multiplication factor in the core will be changed and need to be estimated. To address these issues analysis of the scheme of the nuclear transformations in the lead heat-transfer agent in the process of radiation was carried out. Induced radioactivity of radiogenic and natural lead has been studied. It is shown that replacement of lead affects multiplication factor in a certain way. Application of radiogenic lead can significantly affect reactor operation.

  1. Transient natural ventilation of a room with a distributed heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Shaun D.; Woods, Andrew W.

    We report on an experimental and theoretical study of the transient flows which develop as a naturally ventilated room adjusts from one temperature to another. We focus on a room heated from below by a uniform heat source, with both high- and low-level ventilation openings. Depending on the initial temperature of the room relative to (i) the final equilibrium temperature and (ii) the exterior temperature, three different modes of ventilation may develop. First, if the room temperature lies between the exterior and the equilibrium temperature, the interior remains well-mixed and gradually heats up to the equilibrium temperature. Secondly, if the room is initially warmer than the equilibrium temperature, then a thermal stratification develops in which the upper layer of originally hot air is displaced upwards by a lower layer of relatively cool inflowing air. At the interface, some mixing occurs owing to the effects of penetrative convection. Thirdly, if the room is initially cooler than the exterior, then on opening the vents, the original air is displaced downwards and a layer of ambient air deepens from above. As this lower layer drains, it is eventually heated to the ambient temperature, and is then able to mix into the overlying layer of external air, and the room becomes well-mixed. For each case, we present new laboratory experiments and compare these with some new quantitative models of the transient flows. We conclude by considering the implications of our work for natural ventilation of large auditoria.

  2. Heat Transfer Measurements on Surfaces with Natural Ice Castings and Modeled Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breuer, Kenneth S.; Torres, Benjamin E.; Orr, D. J.; Hansman, R. John

    1997-01-01

    An experimental method is described to measure and compare the convective heat transfer coefficient of natural and simulated ice accretion roughness and to provide a rational means for determining accretion-related enhanced heat transfer coefficients. The natural ice accretion roughness was a sample casting made from accretions at the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). One of these castings was modeled using a Spectral Estimation Technique (SET) to produce three roughness elements patterns that simulate the actual accretion. All four samples were tested in a flat-plate boundary layer at angle of attack in a "dry" wind tunnel test. The convective heat transfer coefficient was measured using infrared thermography. It is shown that, dispite some problems in the current data set, the method does show considerable promise in determining roughness-induced heat transfer coefficients, and that, in addition to the roughness height and spacing in the flow direction, the concentration and spacing of elements in the spanwise direction are important parameters.

  3. Calculation of Post-Closure Natural Convection Heat and Mass Transfer in Yucca Mountain Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    S. Webb; M. Itamura

    2004-03-16

    Natural convection heat and mass transfer under post-closure conditions has been calculated for Yucca Mountain drifts using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. Calculations have been performed for 300, 1000, 3000, and 10,000 years after repository closure. Effective dispersion coefficients that can be used to calculate mass transfer in the drift have been evaluated as a function of time and boundary temperature tilt.

  4. Investigation of combined heat and mass transfer between vertical parallel plates in a two-layer flow of couple stress nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Najeeb Alam; Sultan, Faqiha; Riaz, Fatima; Jamil, Muhammad

    2016-02-01

    This study is an investigation of fully-developed laminar flow in a two-layer vertical channel; one part filled with couple stress nanofluid and the other part with clear couple stress fluid. The flow is examined for combined heat and mass transfer using uniform wall temperature and concentration boundary conditions. Optimal homotopy analysis method (OHAM) is used to solve the nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) governing the flow in each region. This method is based on the homotopy analysis method (HAM)which is an effective method to analytically approximate the solution of highly nonlinear problems. The influence of pertinent parameters is observed on velocity, temperature, and concentration distributions, specifically, the effect of Brownian parameter on couple stress fluid is mentioned.

  5. On the Influence of Soret and Dufour Effects on MHD Free Convective Heat and Mass Transfer Flow over a Vertical Channel with Constant Suction and Viscous Dissipation

    PubMed Central

    Uwanta, Ime Jimmy; Usman, Halima

    2014-01-01

    The present paper investigates the combined effects of Soret and Dufour on free convective heat and mass transfer on the unsteady one-dimensional boundary layer flow over a vertical channel in the presence of viscous dissipation and constant suction. The governing partial differential equations are solved numerically using the implicit Crank-Nicolson method. The velocity, temperature, and concentration distributions are discussed numerically and presented through graphs. Numerical values of the skin-friction coefficient, Nusselt number, and Sherwood number at the plate are discussed numerically for various values of physical parameters and are presented through tables. It has been observed that the velocity and temperature increase with the increase in the viscous dissipation parameter and Dufour number, while an increase in Soret number causes a reduction in temperature and a rise in the velocity and concentration. PMID:27419208

  6. Study of instabilities and quasi-two-dimensional turbulence in volumetrically heated magnetohydrodynamic flows in a vertical rectangular duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetcha, N.; Smolentsev, S.; Abdou, M.; Moreau, R.

    2013-02-01

    We consider magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) rectangular duct flows with volumetric heating. The flows are upward, subject to a strong transverse magnetic field perpendicular to the temperature gradient, such that the flow dynamics is quasi-two-dimensional. The internal volumetric heating imitates conditions of a blanket of a fusion power reactor, where a buoyancy-driven flow is imposed on the forced flow. Studies of this mixed-convection flow include analysis for the basic flow, linear stability analysis and Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS)-type computations. The parameter range covers the Hartmann number (Ha) up to 500, the Reynolds number (Re) from 1000 to 10 000, and the Grashof number (Gr) from 105 to 5 × 108. The linear stability analysis predicts two primary instability modes: (i) bulk instability associated with the inflection point in the velocity profile near the "hot" wall and (ii) side-wall boundary layer instability. A mixed instability mode is also possible. An equation for the critical Hartmann number has been obtained as a function of Re and Gr. Effects of Ha, Re, and Gr on turbulent flows are addressed via nonlinear computations that demonstrate two characteristic turbulence regimes. In the "weak" turbulence regime, the induced vortices are localized near the inflection point of the basic velocity profile, while the boundary layer at the wall parallel to the magnetic field is slightly disturbed. In the "strong" turbulence regime, the bulk vortices interact with the boundary layer causing its destabilization and formation of secondary vortices that may travel across the flow, even reaching the opposite wall. In this regime, the key phenomena are vortex-wall and various vortex-vortex interactions. Flow and magnetic field effects on heat transfer are also analyzed.

  7. Lack of Evidence for Laboratory and Natural Vertical Transmission of Bluetongue Virus in Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, C. E.; Mullens, B. A.; McDermott, E. G.; Gerry, A. C.; Reisen, W. K.; MacLachlan, N. J.

    2015-01-01

    Culicoides sonorensis (Wirth & Jones) is the principal North American vector of bluetongue virus (BTV). BTV infection of livestock is distinctly seasonal (late summer and fall) in temperate regions of the world such as California, which has led to speculation regarding vertical transmission of the virus within the midge vector as a potential mechanism for interseasonal maintenance (“overwintering”) of the virus. To evaluate potential vertical transmission of BTV in its midge vector, we fed adult midges BTV-spiked blood and used a BTV-specific quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay to evaluate parent, egg, and progeny stages of laboratory-reared C. sonorensis for the presence of viral nucleic acid. Whereas BTV nucleic acid was weakly detected in egg batches of virus-fed female midges, virus was never detected in subsequent progeny stages (larvae, pupae, and F1 generation adults). Similarly, BTV was not detected in pools of larvae collected from the waste-water lagoon of a BTV-endemic dairy farm in northern California during the seasonal period of virus transmission. Collectively, these results indicate that BTV is not readily transmitted vertically in C. sonorensis, and that persistence of the virus in long-lived parous female midges is a more likely mechanism for overwintering of BTV in temperate regions. PMID:26336312

  8. Lack of Evidence for Laboratory and Natural Vertical Transmission of Bluetongue Virus in Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Osborne, C J; Mayo, C E; Mullens, B A; McDermott, E G; Gerry, A C; Reisen, W K; MacLachlan, N J

    2015-03-01

    Culicoides sonorensis (Wirth & Jones) is the principal North American vector of bluetongue virus (BTV). BTV infection of livestock is distinctly seasonal (late summer and fall) in temperate regions of the world such as California, which has led to speculation regarding vertical transmission of the virus within the midge vector as a potential mechanism for interseasonal maintenance ("overwintering") of the virus. To evaluate potential vertical transmission of BTV in its midge vector, we fed adult midges BTV-spiked blood and used a BTV-specific quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay to evaluate parent, egg, and progeny stages of laboratory-reared C. sonorensis for the presence of viral nucleic acid. Whereas BTV nucleic acid was weakly detected in egg batches of virus-fed female midges, virus was never detected in subsequent progeny stages (larvae, pupae, and F1 generation adults). Similarly, BTV was not detected in pools of larvae collected from the waste-water lagoon of a BTV-endemic dairy farm in northern California during the seasonal period of virus transmission. Collectively, these results indicate that BTV is not readily transmitted vertically in C. sonorensis, and that persistence of the virus in long-lived parous female midges is a more likely mechanism for overwintering of BTV in temperate regions. PMID:26336312

  9. Studies of Phase Change Materials and a Latent Heat Storage Unit Used for a Natural Circulation Cooling/Latent Heat Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakitani, Katsumi; Honda, Hiroshi

    Experiments were performed to investigate feasibility of using organic materials as a PCM for a latent heat storage unit of a natural circulation cooling/latent heat storage system. This system was designed to cool a shelter accommodating telecommunication equipment located in subtropical deserts or similar regions without using a power source. Taking into account practical considerations and the results of various experiments regarding the thermodynamic properties, thermal degradation, and corrosiveness to metals, lauric acid and iron was selected for the PCM and the latent heat storage unit material, respectively. Cyclic heating and cooling of the latent heat storage unit undergoing solid-liquid phase change was repeated for more than 430 days. The results showed that the heating-cooling curve was almost unchanged between the early stage and the 1,870th cycle. It was concluded that the latent heat storage unit could be used safely for more than ten years as a component of the cooling system.

  10. The relationship between latent heating, vertical velocity, and precipitation processes: The impact of aerosols on precipitation in organized deep convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, Xiaowen

    2016-06-01

    A high-resolution, two-dimensional cloud-resolving model with spectral-bin microphysics is used to study the impact of aerosols on precipitation processes in both a tropical oceanic and a midlatitude continental squall line with regard to three processes: latent heating (LH), cold pool dynamics, and ice microphysics. Evaporative cooling in the lower troposphere is found to enhance rainfall in low cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration scenarios in the developing stages of a midlatitude convective precipitation system. In contrast, the tropical case produced more rainfall under high CCN concentrations. Both cold pools and low-level convergence are stronger for those configurations having enhanced rainfall. Nevertheless, latent heat release is stronger (especially after initial precipitation) in the scenarios having more rainfall in both the tropical and midlatitude environment. Sensitivity tests are performed to examine the impact of ice and evaporative cooling on the relationship between aerosols, LH, and precipitation processes. The results show that evaporative cooling is important for cold pool strength and rain enhancement in both cases. However, ice microphysics play a larger role in the midlatitude case compared to the tropics. Detailed analysis of the vertical velocity-governing equation shows that temperature buoyancy can enhance updrafts/downdrafts in the middle/lower troposphere in the convective core region; however, the vertical pressure gradient force (PGF) is of the same order and acts in the opposite direction. Water loading is small but of the same order as the net PGF-temperature buoyancy forcing. The balance among these terms determines the intensity of convection.

  11. Natural convection in a differentially heated square enclosure with a solid polygon.

    PubMed

    Roslan, R; Saleh, H; Hashim, I

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present numerical study is to analyze the conjugate natural convection heat transfer in a differentially heated square enclosure containing a conductive polygon object. The left wall is heated and the right wall is cooled, while the horizontal walls are kept adiabatic. The COMSOL Multiphysics software is applied to solve the dimensionless governing equations. The governing parameters considered are the polygon type, 3 ≤ N ≤ ∞, the horizontal position, 0.25 ≤ X 0 ≤ 0.75, the polygon size, 0 ≤ A ≤ π/16, the thermal conductivity ratio, 0.1 ≤ K r ≤ 10.0, and the Rayleigh number, 10(3) ≤ Ra ≤ 10(6). The critical size of the solid polygon was found exists at low conductivities. The heat transfer rate increases with the increase of the size of the solid polygon, until it reaches its maximum value. Here, the size of the solid polygon is reaches its critical value. Further, beyond this critical size of the solid polygon, will decrease the heat transfer rate. PMID:24991643

  12. Natural Convection in a Differentially Heated Square Enclosure with a Solid Polygon

    PubMed Central

    Roslan, R.; Saleh, H.; Hashim, I.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present numerical study is to analyze the conjugate natural convection heat transfer in a differentially heated square enclosure containing a conductive polygon object. The left wall is heated and the right wall is cooled, while the horizontal walls are kept adiabatic. The COMSOL Multiphysics software is applied to solve the dimensionless governing equations. The governing parameters considered are the polygon type, 3 ≤ N ≤ ∞, the horizontal position, 0.25 ≤ X 0 ≤ 0.75, the polygon size, 0 ≤ A ≤ π/16, the thermal conductivity ratio, 0.1 ≤ K r ≤ 10.0, and the Rayleigh number, 103 ≤ Ra ≤ 106. The critical size of the solid polygon was found exists at low conductivities. The heat transfer rate increases with the increase of the size of the solid polygon, until it reaches its maximum value. Here, the size of the solid polygon is reaches its critical value. Further, beyond this critical size of the solid polygon, will decrease the heat transfer rate. PMID:24991643

  13. An investigation of natural circulation decay heat removal from an SP-100 reactor system for a lunar outpost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Xue, Huimin

    1992-01-01

    A transient thermal-hydraulic model of the decay heat removal from a 550 kWe SP-100 power system for a lunar outpost has been developed and used to assess the coolability of the system by natural circulation after reactor shutdown. Results show that natural circulation of lithium coolant is sufficient to ensure coolability of the reactor core after shutdown. Further improvement of the decay heat removal capability of the system could be achieved by increasing the dimensions of the decay heat exchanger duct. A radiator area of 10-15 m2 would be sufficient to maintain the reactor core safely coolable by natural circulation after shutdown. Increasing the area of the decay heat rejection radiator or the diameter of the heat pipes in the guard vessel wall insignificantly affects the decay heat removal capability of the system.

  14. Natural convection flows and associated heat transfer processes in room fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, William Stapf

    This report presents the results of experimental investigations of natural convection flows and associated heat transfer processes produced by small fires in rooms with a single door or window opening. Calculation procedures have been developed to model the major aspects of these flows.Two distinct sets of experiments were undertaken.First, in a roughly 1/4 scale facility, a slightly dense solution of brine was allowed to flow into a tank of fresh water. The resulting density difference produced a flow which simulated a very small fire in a room with adiabatic walls. Second, in an approximately 1/2 scale test room, a nearly stoichioinetric mixture of air and natural gas was burned at floor level to model moderate strength fires. In this latter facility, we directly measured the heat conducted through the walls, in addition to determining the gas temperature and composition throughout the room.These two facilities complemented each other. The former offered good flow visualization and allowed us to observe the basic flow phenomena in the absence of heat transfer effects. On the other hand, the latter, which involved relatively larger fires, was a more realistic simulation of an actual room fire, and allowed us to calculate the convective heat transfer to the ceiling and walls. In addition, the stronger sources present in these 1/2 scale tests produced significant secondary flows. These secondary flows along with heat transfer effects act to modify the gas temperature or density profiles within the room from those observed in the 1/4 scale experiments.Several calculation procedures have been developed, based on the far field properties of plumes when the density differences are small (the Boussinesq approximation). The simple point source plume solution is used along with hydraulic analysis of flow through an orifice to estimate the temperatures of the hot ceiling layer gas and of the cooler floor zone fluid, as well as the height of the interface between them. A

  15. Heat exchanger with auxiliary cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, John H.

    1980-01-01

    A heat exchanger with an auxiliary cooling system capable of cooling a nuclear reactor should the normal cooling mechanism become inoperable. A cooling coil is disposed around vertical heat transfer tubes that carry secondary coolant therethrough and is located in a downward flow of primary coolant that passes in heat transfer relationship with both the cooling coil and the vertical heat transfer tubes. A third coolant is pumped through the cooling coil which absorbs heat from the primary coolant which increases the downward flow of the primary coolant thereby increasing the natural circulation of the primary coolant through the nuclear reactor.

  16. Transient natural convection inside rigid drops in a liquid-liquid direct-contact heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    Natural convection was simulated inside spherical container and drops. The transient Navier-Stokes and energy equations were solved by employing finite-difference techniques. Pseudosteady-state natural convection inside spheres was simulated. Pseudosteady state was maintained by keeping the driving force for natural convection constant. To obtain pseudosteady state conditions, the temperature at the inside surface of the sphere was steadily increased so that the temperature difference between the surface and the center remained constant. The results were compared to experimental data found in the literature. It was found that the Nusselt number (Pr > 0.7) for pseudosteady state correlated to the Raleigh number by the following relation: Nu = 1.19Ra{sup .2215}, 10{sup 5} < Ra < 10{sup 8}. The simulation results were compared to experimental data of two other researchers who measured drop-temperature profiles in direct-contact heat-exchange columns. The simulation results demonstrate good correlation to the experimental data.

  17. On the importance of cavity-length and heat dissipation in GaN-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, W. J.; Hu, X. L.; Ying, L. Y.; Chen, S. Q.; Zhang, J. Y.; Akiyama, H.; Cai, Z. P.; Zhang, B. P.

    2015-01-01

    Cavity-length dependence of the property of optically pumped GaN-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with two dielectric distributed Bragg reflectors was investigated. The cavity lengths were well controlled by employing etching with inductively coupled plasma and chemical mechanical polishing. It was found that the lasing characteristics including threshold, slope efficiency and spontaneous emission coupling factor were substantially improved with reducing the cavity length. In comparison with the device pumped by a 400 nm pulsed laser, the lasing spectrum was featured by a red shift and simultaneous broadening with increasing the pumping energy of a 355 nm pulsed laser. Moreover, the lasing threshold was much higher when pumped by a 355 nm pulsed laser. These were explained by taking into account of the significant heating effect under 355 nm pumping. Our results demonstrate that a short cavity length and good heat-dissipation are essential to GaN-based VCSELs. PMID:25873327

  18. On the importance of cavity-length and heat dissipation in GaN-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers.

    PubMed

    Liu, W J; Hu, X L; Ying, L Y; Chen, S Q; Zhang, J Y; Akiyama, H; Cai, Z P; Zhang, B P

    2015-01-01

    Cavity-length dependence of the property of optically pumped GaN-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with two dielectric distributed Bragg reflectors was investigated. The cavity lengths were well controlled by employing etching with inductively coupled plasma and chemical mechanical polishing. It was found that the lasing characteristics including threshold, slope efficiency and spontaneous emission coupling factor were substantially improved with reducing the cavity length. In comparison with the device pumped by a 400 nm pulsed laser, the lasing spectrum was featured by a red shift and simultaneous broadening with increasing the pumping energy of a 355 nm pulsed laser. Moreover, the lasing threshold was much higher when pumped by a 355 nm pulsed laser. These were explained by taking into account of the significant heating effect under 355 nm pumping. Our results demonstrate that a short cavity length and good heat-dissipation are essential to GaN-based VCSELs. PMID:25873327

  19. Study on natural convection capability of liquid gallium for passive decay heat removal system (PDHRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.; Ha, K. S.; Lee, S. W.; Park, S. D.; Kim, S. M.; Seo, H.; Kim, J. H.; Bang, I. C.

    2012-07-01

    The safety issues of the SFRs are important due to the fact that it uses sodium as a nuclear coolant, reacting vigorously with water and air. For that reason, there are efforts to seek for alternative candidates of liquid metal coolants having excellent heat transfer property and to adopt improved safety features to the SFR concepts. This study considers gallium as alternative liquid metal coolant applicable to safety features in terms of chemical activity issue of the sodium and aims to experimentally investigate the natural convection capability of gallium as a feasibility study for the development of gallium-based passive safety features in SFRs. In this paper, the design and construction of the liquid gallium natural convection loop were carried out. The experimental results of heat transfer coefficient of liquid gallium resulting in heat removal {approx}2.53 kW were compared with existing correlations and they were much lower than the correlations. To comparison of the experimental data with computer code analysis, gallium property code was developed for employing MARS-LMR (Korea version of RELAP) based on liquid gallium as working fluid. (authors)

  20. Numerical simulation heat transfer by natural convection in liquid metal with a sinusoidal temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missoum, Abdelkrim; Elmir, Mohamed; Bouanini, Mohamed; Belkacem, Abdellah; Draoui, Belkacem

    2016-03-01

    This study focuses on the numerical simulation of heat transfer by natural convection in a rectangular enclosure, filled with a liquid metal (low Prandtl number) partially heated from below with a sinusoidal temperature. The value of the study lies in its involvement in the crystal growth for the manufacture of semiconductors and electronics cooling. Indeed, the occurrence of convection during crystal growth can lead to in homogeneities that lead to striations and defects that affect the quality of the crystals obtained by the Bridgman techniques or Chochrawlski. Temperature of the oscillations, due to the instabilities of the convective flow in the liquid metal, also induces non-uniform cooling in the solidification front. Convection is then studied in order to reduce it. A modelling of the problem in two dimensions was conducted using Comsol computer code that is based on the finite element method, by varying the configuration of the control parameters, namely, the Rayleigh number, the nature of fluid (Prandtl number) and amplitude of temperature on heat transfer rate (Nusselt number) on convective structures that appear.

  1. Unraveling the heat island effect observed in urban groundwater bodies - Definition of a potential natural state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epting, Jannis; Huggenberger, Peter

    2013-09-01

    A superposition of several thermal processes leads to an elevation of groundwater temperatures of up to 9 °C above the natural state in the city of Basel, Switzerland. The urban thermal groundwater regime is influenced by: (1) urbanization and annual heating periods; (2) thermal groundwater use; (3) seasonal trends; (4) river-groundwater interaction; and (5) climate change and consequences thereof. The combination of short- and long-term data analysis, including conventional and high-resolution multilevel groundwater temperature monitoring, as well as 3D numerical groundwater flow and heat-transport modeling allowed quantifying the thermal influences on the investigated urban groundwater body. Results facilitate to describe the “present state” of the urban thermal groundwater regime and to derive a “potential natural state” of the investigated groundwater body. The study originated from a request of the executive council to provide a basis for cost estimates of infrastructure adaptation measures necessary to mitigate the impact of climate change. It is shown that the principal trigger for the observed thermal development is not climate change but that local and regional anthropogenic factors are dominating. Although in urban areas, groundwater is increasingly used for cooling purposes; the geothermal potential, resulting from elevated groundwater temperatures, is generally not exploited. The presented approach provides a basis for the setup of combined and thermally balanced heating and cooling systems.

  2. Design and Scaling of the Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, Darius D.; Gerardi, Craig D.; Bremer, Nathan C.; Farmer, Mitchell T.

    2014-01-01

    The Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) reflects a 1/2 scale model of one conceptual design for passive safety in advanced reactors. The project was initiated in 2010 primarily to conduct ex-vessel, passive decay heat removal experiments in support of the Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC), Small Modular Reactor (SMR), and Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) programs while also generating data for code validation purposes. The facility successfully demonstrated scoping objectives in late 2013, and is expected to begin testing by early 2014. The following paper summarizes some of the key design and scaling considerations used in construction of the experimental facility, along with an overview of the current instrumentation and data acquisition methods. Details of the distributed fiber optic temperature system will be presented, which introduces a level of data density suitable for CFD validation and is a first-of-its-kind for largescale thermal hydraulics facilities.

  3. Low-Temperature Heat Capacity and Localized Vibrational Modes in Natural and Synthetic Tetrahedrites

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar; May, Andrew F; Delaire, Olivier A; McGuire, Michael A; Lu, Xu; Li, Cheng-Yun; Case, Eldon D; Morelli, Donold

    2014-01-01

    The heat capacity of natural (Cu12-x (Fe, Zn, Ag)x(Sb, As)4S13) and synthetic (Cu12-xZnxSb4S13 with x=0, 1, 2) tetrahedrite compounds was measured between 2K and 380K. It was found that the temperature dependence of the heat capacity can be described using a Debye term and three Einstein oscillators with characteristic temperatures that correspond to energies of ~1.0 meV, ~2.8 meV and ~8.4 meV. The existence of localized vibration modes, which are assigned to the displacements of the trigonally coordinated Cu atoms in the structure, is discussed in the context of anharmonicity and its effect on the low lattice thermal conductivity exhibited by these compounds.

  4. Validation of PARET for the modeling of heat transfer under natural convection core cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, J.K.; Kassim, M.S.; Mohammed, F.

    1995-12-31

    The PARET code is a one-dimensional, coupled thermal-hydraulic and point-kinetics code, which was originally developed for the analysis of SPERT-I transients and later adapted for the analysis of transient behavior in research reactors. Due to its ease of transportability and relative simplicity of input preparation, it is widely used internationally and is particularly attractive for research reactors with limited computational facilities. The thermal-hydraulic modeling of the current version of PARET accounts for buoyancy forces in the core and external pressure gradients that may arise from density differences between the core inlet and outlet. This feature of PARET makes it a useful tool for the analysis of research reactors cooled by natural convection as well as those cooled by forced convection. Since PARET has been applied to the analysis of the International Atomic Energy Agency 10-MW benchmark cores for protected and unprotected transients and also for the analysis of SPERT-I transients, its forced convection heat-removal model is reliable. However, there has been little experience with the capability of PARET to model heat removal in cores cooled by natural convection. This paper reports the results of some experiments performed at the Malaysian PUSPATI reactor to compare PARET predictions for power increases under natural convection core cooling to measured data.

  5. The vertical fluxes of heat and constituent induced by the semidiurnal tide in the region of 80-105 km at Boulder (40.1°N, 105.2°W), Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.

    2015-12-01

    Vertical fluxes of heat and Na induced by dissipating semidiurnal tides in the mesopause region (80-105 km) are calculated using the direct measurements of vertical winds, temperatures and Na densities by the Na Doppler lidar at Boulder (40.1°N, 105.2°W), CO. The amplitudes and phases of the semidiurnal tides are derived first and a analytical method is developed to compute the vertical fluxes of heat and Na induced by dissipation semidiurnal tides. The derived heat/Na fluxes are highly sensitive to the phase differences of the semidiurnal tides in vertical winds with those in temperatures/Na densities. The uncertainties of the fluxes are estimated. The data collected from March 2013 to February 2014 are used for such study, thus the seasonal variations of the vertical fluxes are examined. The results are also compared with the previous flux measurements at Starfire Optical Range (SOR, 35.0°N, 106.5°W), New Mexico and Maui (20.7°N, 156.3°W), Hawaii.

  6. Uncertainties in vertical groundwater fluxes from 1-D steady state heat transport analyses caused by heterogeneity, multidimensional flow, and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, Dylan J.; Cartwright, Ian; Post, Vincent E. A.; Simmons, Craig T.; Banks, Eddie W.

    2016-02-01

    Steady state 1-D analytical solutions to estimate groundwater fluxes from temperature profiles are an attractive option because they are simple to apply, with no complex boundary or initial conditions. Steady state solutions have been applied to estimate both aquifer scale fluxes as well as to estimate groundwater discharge to streams. This study explores the sources of uncertainty in flux estimates from regional scale aquifers caused by sensor precision, aquifer heterogeneity, multidimensional flow and variations in surface temperature due to climate change. Synthetic temperature profiles were generated using 2-D groundwater flow and heat transport models with homogeneous and heterogeneous hydraulic and thermal properties. Temperature profiles were analyzed assuming temperature can be determined with a precision between 0.1°C and 0.001°C. Analysis of synthetic temperature profiles show that the Bredehoeft and Papadopulos (1965) method can provide good estimates of the mean vertical Darcy flux over the length of the temperature profile. Reliable flux estimates were obtained when the ratio of vertical to horizontal flux was as low as 0.1, and in heterogeneous media, providing that temperature at the upper boundary was constant in time. However, temporal increases in surface temperature led to over-estimation of fluxes. Overestimates increased with time since the onset of, and with the rate of surface warming. Overall, the Bredehoeft and Papadopulos (1965) method may be more robust for the conditions with constant temperature distributions than previously thought, but that transient methods that account for surface warming should be used to determine fluxes in shallow aquifers.

  7. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, October 1, 1995--November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    The goals of this project are: (1) to develop guidelines for the design and use of thermosypohon side-arm heat exchangers in solar domestic water heating systems, and (2) to establish appropriate modeling and testing criteria for evaluating the performance of systems using this type of heat exchanger.

  8. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, April 1, 1995--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    The goals of this project are: (1) to develop guidelines for the design and use of thermosypohon side-arm heat exchangers in solar domestic water heating systems, and (2) to establish appropriate modeling and testing criteria for evaluating the performance of systems using this type of heat exchanger.

  9. Passive decay heat removal by natural air convection after severe accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Erbacher, F.J.; Neitzel, H.J.; Cheng, X.

    1995-09-01

    The composite containment proposed by the Research Center Karlsruhe and the Technical University Karlsruhe is to cope with severe accidents. It pursues the goal to restrict the consequences of core meltdown accidents to the reactor plant. One essential of this new containment concept is its potential to remove the decay heat by natural air convection and thermal radiation in a passive way. To investigate the coolability of such a passive cooling system and the physical phenomena involved, experimental investigations are carried out at the PASCO test facility. Additionally, numerical calculations are performed by using different codes. A satisfying agreement between experimental data and numerical results is obtained.

  10. Unsteady magnetohydrodynamic micropolar fluid flow and heat transfer over a vertical porous plate through a porous medium in the presence of thermal and mass diffusion with a constant heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, F. S.; Hassanien, I. A.; Bakr, A. A.

    2004-10-01

    In this work, the effects of a temperature-dependent heat source on the hydromagnetic free-convective flow (set up due to temperature as well as species concentration) of an electrically conducting micropolar fluid past a steady vertical porous plate through a highly porous medium has been analyzed when the free stream oscillates in magnitude. A uniform magnetic field acts perpendicularly to the porous surface, which absorbs the micropolar fluid with constant suction velocity. The method of solution can be applied for a small perturbation approximation. The numerical results of velocity and temperature distributions of micropolar fluids are compared with the corresponding flow problems for a Newtonian fluid. The effects of the material parameters on velocity, angular momentum, concentration, and temperature fields across the boundary layer are investigated. In addition, the skin-friction coefficient and Nusselt number are shown in tabular form.

  11. Bionics: prcise color tuning by interference in nature and technology-applications in surface-micromachined 1.55μm vertical air-cavity filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillmer, Hartmut; Daleiden, Juergen; Prott, Cornelia; Irmer, Soeren; Roemer, Friedhard; Ataro, Edwin; Tarraf, Amer; Ruehling, H.; Maniak, Markus; Strassner, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Bionics transfers the principles of success of nature into natural science, engineering disciplines and applications. Often generation and detection of different spectral colors play key roles in communication in both, nature and technology. The latter one refers e.g. to dense wavelength division multiplex optical communication systems. This paper shows interesting parallels in tunable spectral light filtering by butterfly wings and by tunable optical filters used in optical communication systems. In both cases light interferes constructively and destructively with nano- and microstructures of appropriate shape, dimensions and materials. In this paper methodology is strongly emphasized. We demonstrate that tailored scaling allows the effectiveness of physical effects to be enhanced in nature and technology. These principles are rigorously applied in micromachined 1.55μm vertical-resonator-based filters, capable of wide, continuous, monotonic and kink-free tuning by a single control parameter. Tuning is achieved by mechanically actuating one or several membranes embedded by air-gaps in a vertical resonator including two ultra-highly reflective DBR mirrors. The layers of mirrors reveal a very strong refractive index contrast. Filters including InP/air-gap DBR's (3.5 periods) using GaInAs sacrificial layers reveal a continuous tuning of >9% of the absolute wavelength. Varying a reverse voltage (U=0 .. -3.2V) between the membranes, a tuning range up to 142nm was obtained due to electrostatic actuation. Appropriate miniaturization is shown to increase the mechanical stability and the effectiveness of spectral tuning by electrostatic actuation since the relative significance of the fundamental physical forces can be shifted considerably by appropriate scaling.

  12. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, May 15, 1996--July 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    This progress report very briefly summarizes study results and includes an experimental plan developed for the fundamental study of heat transfer in thermosyphon side-arm heat exchangers. The study will investigate the influence of the Reynolds and Grashof numbers on the thermosyphon flow side of the heat exchanger, and the influence of the flow rate on the forced flow side of the heat exchanger. Detailed temperature, flow rate, and pressure data will be obtained for four, seven, and nine tube-in-shell heat exchanger designs. Correlations will be developed for the heat transfer and friction coefficients, and a semi-empirical model will be developed to predict the performance of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar water heaters.

  13. Heat transfer in horizontal tubes during two phase natural circulation with presence of noncondensing gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alt, S.; Lischke, W.

    The condensation process of steam inside horizontal tubes during natural circulation gains in importance regarding the reactor safety research for existing and future nuclear power plants. Experimental investigations due to the condensation process were realized with the rig HORUS to study the behaviour of water-steam-gas mixtures in horizontal tubes. The paper includes statements regarding the flow and heat transfer conditions inside the tube and the temperature distribution inside the small tube wall. The experiments showed a blockade of the heat transfer area with Nitrogen which is connected with an increasing primary pressure followed by a compression of the Nitrogen and a reentry of steam into the tube. The experiments serve for the creation of an experimental data base. A model development for calculation of the heat transfer is described. The model was implemented in the German thermal-hydraulic code ATHLET. The comparison of calculated data and the measured parameters of HORUS rig show the code improvement for the simulation of noncondensing gases.

  14. Species production and heat release rates in two-layered natural gas fires

    SciTech Connect

    Zukoski, E.E.; Morehart, J.H.; Kubota, T.; Toner, S.J. )

    1991-02-01

    A fire burning in an enclosure with restricted ventilation will result in the accumulation of a layer of warm products of combustion mixed with entrained air adjacent to the ceiling. For many conditions, the depth of this layer will extend to occupy a significant fraction of the volume of the room. Eventually, the interface between this vitiated ceiling layer and the uncontaminated environment below will position itself so that a large portion of the combustion processes occur in this vitiated layer. A description is given of experimental work concerning the rates of formation of product species and heat release in a turbulent, buoyant natural gas diffusion flame burning in this two-layered configuration. The enclosure was modeled by placing a hood above a burner so that it accumulated the plume gases, and the unsteady development of the ceiling layer was modeled by the direct addition of air into the upper portion of the hood. Measurements of the composition of these gases allowed the computation of stoichiometries and heat release rates. These investigations showed that the species produced in the flame depend primarily on the stoichiometry of the gases present in the ceiling layer and weakly on the temperature of the layer, but are independent of the fuel pair ratio of the mass transported into the layer by the plume. Heat release rates in the fires were compared to a theoretical limit based on a stoichiometric reaction of fuel and air with excess components left unchanged by the combustion.

  15. Critical heat flux in natural convection cooled TRIGA reactors with hexagonal bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.; Avery, M.; De Angelis, M.; Anderson, M.; Corradini, M.; Feldman, E. E.; Dunn, F. E.; Matos, J. E.

    2012-07-01

    A three-rod bundle Critical Heat Flux (CHF) study at low flow, low pressure, and natural convection condition has been conducted, simulating TRIGA reactors with the hexagonally configured core. The test section is a custom-made trefoil shape tube with three identical fuel pin heater rods located symmetrically inside. The full scale fuel rod is electrically heated with a chopped-cosine axial power profile. CHF experiments were carried out with the following conditions: inlet water subcooling from 30 K to 95 K; pressure from 110 kPa to 230 kPa; mass flux up to 150 kg/m{sup 2}s. About 50 CHF data points were collected and compared with a few existing CHF correlations whose application ranges are close to the testing conditions. Some tests were performed with the forced convection to identify the potential difference between the CHF under the natural convection and forced convection. The relevance of the CHF to test parameters is investigated. (authors)

  16. What heat is telling us about microbial conversions in nature and technology: from chip- to megacalorimetry.

    PubMed

    Maskow, Thomas; Kemp, Richard; Buchholz, Friederike; Schubert, Torsten; Kiesel, Baerbel; Harms, Hauke

    2010-05-01

    The exploitation of microorganisms in natural or technological systems calls for monitoring tools that reflect their metabolic activity in real time and, if necessary, are flexible enough for field application. The Gibbs energy dissipation of assimilated substrates or photons often in the form of heat is a general feature of life processes and thus, in principle, available to monitor and control microbial dynamics. Furthermore, the combination of measured heat fluxes with material fluxes allows the application of Hess' law to either prove expected growth stoichiometries and kinetics or identify and estimate unexpected side reactions. The combination of calorimetry with respirometry is theoretically suited for the quantification of the degree of coupling between catabolic and anabolic reactions. New calorimeter developments overcome the weaknesses of conventional devices, which hitherto limited the full exploitation of this powerful analytical tool. Calorimetric systems can be integrated easily into natural and technological systems of interest. They are potentially suited for high-throughput measurements and are robust enough for field deployment. This review explains what information calorimetric analyses provide; it introduces newly emerging calorimetric techniques and it exemplifies the application of calorimetry in different fields of microbial research. PMID:21255327

  17. What heat is telling us about microbial conversions in nature and technology: from chip‐ to megacalorimetry

    PubMed Central

    Maskow, Thomas; Kemp, Richard; Buchholz, Friederike; Schubert, Torsten; Kiesel, Baerbel; Harms, Hauke

    2010-01-01

    Summary The exploitation of microorganisms in natural or technological systems calls for monitoring tools that reflect their metabolic activity in real time and, if necessary, are flexible enough for field application. The Gibbs energy dissipation of assimilated substrates or photons often in the form of heat is a general feature of life processes and thus, in principle, available to monitor and control microbial dynamics. Furthermore, the combination of measured heat fluxes with material fluxes allows the application of Hess' law to either prove expected growth stoichiometries and kinetics or identify and estimate unexpected side reactions. The combination of calorimetry with respirometry is theoretically suited for the quantification of the degree of coupling between catabolic and anabolic reactions. New calorimeter developments overcome the weaknesses of conventional devices, which hitherto limited the full exploitation of this powerful analytical tool. Calorimetric systems can be integrated easily into natural and technological systems of interest. They are potentially suited for high‐throughput measurements and are robust enough for field deployment. This review explains what information calorimetric analyses provide; it introduces newly emerging calorimetric techniques and it exemplifies the application of calorimetry in different fields of microbial research. PMID:21255327

  18. Oscillatory MHD Convective Flow of Second Order Fluid Through Porous Medium in a Vertical Rotating Channel in Slip-Flow Regime with Heat Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, B. P.; Singh, K. D.; Bansal, A. K.

    2015-02-01

    An analysis of an oscillatory magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) convective flow of a second order (viscoelastic), incompressible, and electrically conducting fluid through a porous medium bounded by two infinite vertical parallel porous plates is presented. The two porous plates with slip-flow condition and the no-slip condition are subjected respectively to a constant injection and suction velocity. The pressure gradient in the channel varies periodically with time. A magnetic field of uniform strength is applied in the direction perpendicular to the planes of the plates. The induced magnetic field is neglected due to the assumption of a small magnetic Reynolds number. The temperature of the plate with no-slip condition is non-uniform and oscillates periodically with time and the temperature difference of the two plates is assumed high enough to induce heat radiation. The entire system rotates in unison about the axis perpendicular to the planes of the plates. Adopting complex variable notations, a closed form solution of the problem is obtained. The analytical results are evaluated numerically and then presented graphically to discuss in detail the effects of different parameters of the problem. The velocity, temperature and the skin-friction in terms of its amplitude and phase angle have been shown graphically to observe the effects of the viscoelastic parameter γ, rotation parameter Ω, suction parameter λ , Grashof number Gr, Hartmann number M, the pressure A, Prandtl number Pr, radiation parameter N and the frequency of oscillation ω .

  19. F-15B in flight showing Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow (SS-NLF) experiment attached vertically to t

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In-flight photo of the F-15B equipped with the Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow (SS-NLF) experiment. During four research flights, laminar flow was achieved over 80 percent of the test wing at speeds approaching Mach 2. This was accomplished as the sole result of the shape of the wing, without the use of suction gloves, such as on the F-16XL. Laminar flow is a condition in which air passes over a wing in smooth layers, rather than being turbulent The greater the area of laminar flow, the lower the amount of friction drag on the wing, thus increasing an aircraft's range and fuel economy. Increasing the area of laminar flow on a wing has been the subject of research by engineers since the late 1940s, but substantial success has proven elusive. The SS-NLF experiment was intended to provide engineers with the data by which to design natural laminar flow wings.

  20. Estimating the health benefits from natural gas use in transport and heating in Santiago, Chile.

    PubMed

    Mena-Carrasco, Marcelo; Oliva, Estefania; Saide, Pablo; Spak, Scott N; de la Maza, Cristóbal; Osses, Mauricio; Tolvett, Sebastián; Campbell, J Elliott; Tsao, Tsao Es Chi-Chung; Molina, Luisa T

    2012-07-01

    Chilean law requires the assessment of air pollution control strategies for their costs and benefits. Here we employ an online weather and chemical transport model, WRF-Chem, and a gridded population density map, LANDSCAN, to estimate changes in fine particle pollution exposure, health benefits, and economic valuation for two emission reduction strategies based on increasing the use of compressed natural gas (CNG) in Santiago, Chile. The first scenario, switching to a CNG public transportation system, would reduce urban PM2.5 emissions by 229 t/year. The second scenario would reduce wood burning emissions by 671 t/year, with unique hourly emission reductions distributed from daily heating demand. The CNG bus scenario reduces annual PM2.5 by 0.33 μg/m³ and up to 2 μg/m³ during winter months, while the residential heating scenario reduces annual PM2.5 by 2.07 μg/m³, with peaks exceeding 8 μg/m³ during strong air pollution episodes in winter months. These ambient pollution reductions lead to 36 avoided premature mortalities for the CNG bus scenario, and 229 for the CNG heating scenario. Both policies are shown to be cost-effective ways of reducing air pollution, as they target high-emitting area pollution sources and reduce concentrations over densely populated urban areas as well as less dense areas outside the city limits. Unlike the concentration rollback methods commonly used in public policy analyses, which assume homogeneous reductions across a whole city (including homogeneous population densities), and without accounting for the seasonality of certain emissions, this approach accounts for both seasonality and diurnal emission profiles for both the transportation and residential heating sectors. PMID:22595553

  1. Numerical analysis of two dimensional natural convection heat transfer following a contained explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manson, Steven James

    The Pantex facility near Amarillo, Texas, is the only U.S. site charged with the disassembly of nuclear weapons. Concerns over the safety of weapons handling procedures are now being revisited, due to the enhanced safety requirements of the peace time disassembly effort. This research is a detailed examination of one possible nuclear weapons-related accident. In this hypothetical accident, a chemical explosion equivalent to over 50 kilos of TNT destroys unassembled nuclear weapons components, and may potentially result in some amount of plutonium reaching the environment. Previous attempts to simulate this accident have centered around the one-dimensional node and branch approach of the MELCOR code. This approach may be adequate in calculating pressure driven flow through narrow rampways and leak sites, however, its one-dimensionality does not allow it to accurately calculate the multi-dimensional aspects of heat transfer. This research effort uses an axi-symmetric stream function---vorticity formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations to model a Pantex cell building following a successfully contained chemical explosion. This allows direct calculation of the heat transfer within the cell room during the transient. The tool that was developed to perform this analysis is called PET (Post-Explosion Transient), and it simulates natural convection thermal hydraulics taking into account temperature-related fluid density differences, variable fluid transport properties, and a non-linear equation of state. Results obtained using the PET code indicate that previous analyses by other researchers using the MELCOR code have been overly conservative in estimating the effects of cell room heat transfer. An increase in the calculated heat transfer coefficient of approximately 20% is indicated. This has been demonstrated to significantly decrease the projected consequences of the hypothetical accident.

  2. An experimental study on the performance of a stainless steel-water loop heat pipe under natural cooling condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiwei; Cen, Jiwen; Jiang, Fangming; Zhu, Xiong

    2014-02-01

    Aiming to improve the thermal characteristics of modern electronics, we experimentally study the performance of a stainless steel/water loop heat pipe (LHP) under natural cooling condition. The LHP heat transfer performance, including start-up performance, temperature oscillation and total thermal resistance at different heat loads and with different incline angles have been investigated systematically. Experimental results show that at an optimal heat load (i.e. 60 W) and with the LHP being inclined 60° to the horizontal plane, the total thermal resistance is lowered to be ˜0.24 K/W, and the temperature of evaporator could be controlled steadily at around 90°C.

  3. Longitudinal Water Temperature and Heat Flux Patterns within a Semi-Natural Forested Stream Reach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, G.; Malcolm, I.; Hannah, D. M.; Sadler, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    It is hypothesised that riparian vegetation offers potential to mitigate water temperature thermal extremes and provide refugia for temperature sensitive organisms in a warming climate. Daytime cooling gradients have been observed for stream reaches shaded by coniferous trees downstream of clear cuts; however many of these studies are confounded by cool groundwater inflows and there is a lack of research for semi-natural forest cover. This study addresses this research gap, it aims to quantify and subsequently model observed longitudinal water temperature and heat flux patterns in a semi-natural forested reach of the Girnock Burn (a tributary of the Aberdeenshire Dee, Scotland) throughout which heat exchange across the bed-water column interface accounted for < 1% of the net energy budget. Observations were made along a 1500 m reach using a spatially-distributed network of ten water temperature micro-loggers and three automatic weather stations. The reach is located below open moorland and bounded by deciduous semi-natural riparian woodland with varying canopy density and tree species composition. For periods when daytime net radiation gains were high (i.e. clear skies), downstream cooling of up to 2.5 °C was observed. Longitudinal thermal gradients were not distinct at night or on days when net radiation gains were low (i.e. over-cast sky conditions). A Lagrangian stream temperature model driven by a reach-averaged deterministic net radiation model using hemispherical photographs provided good predictions of longitudinal water temperature change. The modelling exercise demonstrates the processes which produce longitudinal cooling patterns in a reach without significant groundwater inputs. Consequently, this research provides process based evidence for the potential of riparian vegetation to mitigate thermal extremes and thus improves the scientific basis for management decisions regarding stream temperature under a changing climate.

  4. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, August 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    The goals of this project are: (1) to develop guidelines for the design and use of thermosyphon side-arm heat exchangers in solar domestic water heating systems, and (2) to establish appropriate modeling and testing criteria for evaluating the performance of systems using this type of heat exchanger. The tasks for the project are as follows: (1) Develop a model of the thermal performance of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar water heating applications. A test protocol will be developed which minimizes the number of tests required to adequately account for mixed convection effects. The TRNSYS component model will be fully integrated in a system component model and will use data acquired with the specified test protocol. (2) Conduct a fundamental study to establish friction and heat transfer correlations for conditions and geometries typical of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar systems. Data will be obtained as a function of a buoyancy parameter based on Grashof and Reynolds numbers. The experimental domain will encompass the ranges expected in solar water heating systems.

  5. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Techniacl progress report, June 1, 1995--July 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    The goals of this project are: (1) to develop guidelines for the design and use of thermosyphon side-arm heat exchangers in solar domestic water heating systems, and (2) to establish appropriate modeling and testing criteria for evaluating the performance of systems using this type of heat exchanger. The tasks for the project are as follows: (1) Develop a model of the thermal performance of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar water heating applications. A test protocol will be developed which minimizes the number of tests required to adequately account for mixed convection effects. The TRNSYS component model will be fully integrated in a system component model and will use data acquired with the specified test protocol. (2) Conduct a fundamental study to establish friction and heat transfer correlations for conditions and geometries typical of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar systems. Data will be obtained as a function of a buoyancy parameter based on Grashof and Reynolds numbers. The experimental domain will encompass the ranges expected in solar water heating systems.

  6. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, December 31, 1995--January 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    The goals of this project are: (1) to develop guidelines for the design and use of thermosyphon side-arm heat exchangers in solar domestic water heating systems, and (2) to establish appropriate modeling and testing criteria for evaluating the performance of systems using this type of heat exchanger. The tasks for the project are as follows: (1) Develop a model of the thermal performance of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar water heating applications. A test protocol will be developed which minimizes the number of tests required to adequately account for mixed convection effects. The TRNSYS component model will be fully integrated in a system component model and will use data acquired with the specified test protocol. (2) Conduct a fundamental study to establish friction and heat transfer correlations for conditions and geometries typical of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar systems. Data will be obtained as a function of a buoyancy parameter based on Grashof and Reynolds numbers. The experimental domain will encompass the ranges expected in solar water heating systems.

  7. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, September 15, 1996--November 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    The goals of this project are: (1) to develop guidelines for the design and use of thermosyphon side-arm heat exchangers in solar domestic water heating systems, and (2) to establish appropriate modeling and testing criteria for evaluating the performance of systems using this type of heat exchanger. The tasks for the project are as follows: (1) Develop a model of the thermal performance of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar water heating applications. A test protocol will be developed which minimizes the number of tests required to adequately account for mixed convection effects. The TRNSYS component model will be fully integrated in a system component model and will use data acquired with the specified test protocol. (2) Conduct a fundamental study to establish friction and heat transfer correlations for conditions and geometries typical of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar systems. Data will be obtained as a function of a buoyancy parameter based on Grashof and Reynolds numbers. The experimental domain will encompass the ranges expected in solar water heating systems.

  8. Natural circulation decay heat removal from an SP-100, 550 kWe power system for a lunar outpost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Xue, Huimin

    1992-01-01

    This research investigated the decay heat removal from the SP-100 reactor core of a 550-kWe power system for a lunar outpost by natural circulation of lithium coolant. A transient model that simulates the decay heat removal loop (DHRL) of the power system was developed and used to assess the system's decay heat removal capability. The effects of the surface area of the decay heat rejection radiator, the dimensions of the decay heat exchanger (DHE) flow duct, the elevation of the DHE, and the diameter of the rise and down pipes in the DHRL on the decay heat removal capability were examined. Also, to determine the applicability of test results at earth gravity to actual system performance on the lunar surface, the effect of the gravity constant (1 g and 1/6 g) on the thermal behavior of the system after shutdown was investigated.

  9. Effects of repetition within trials and frequency of trial sessions on quantitative parameters of vertical force peak in horses with naturally occurring lameness.

    PubMed

    Kaido, Mari; Kilborne, Allison H; Sizemore, Joy L; Reisbig, Nathalie A; Aarnes, Turi K; Bertone, Alicia L

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the effects of vertical force peak (VFP) of repition within trials and between trial sessions in horses with naturally occurring appendicular lameness. ANIMALS 20 lame horses acclimated to trotting over a force plate. PROCEDURES Kinetic gait data were collected by use of a force plate regarding affected and contralateral limbs of lame horses that completed 5 valid repetitions in each of 5 sessions performed at 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours, constituting 1 trial/horse. Data were compared within and among repetitions and sessions, and factors influencing VFP values were identified. RESULTS VFP values differed for lame limbs after 3 valid repetitions were performed within a session and when the interval between sessions was 3 hours. Direction of change reflected less lameness (greater VFP). Lamer horses (≥ grade 4/5) had this finding to a greater degree than did less lame horses. Results were similar for contralateral limbs regarding valid repetitions within a session; however, VFP decreased when the interval between sessions exceeded 6 hours. The coefficient of variation for VFP was ≤ 8% within sessions and ≤ 6% between sessions. The asymmetry index for VFP did not change throughout the study. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Lameness profiles obtained through kinetic gait analysis of horses with naturally occurring lameness were most accurate when valid repetitions were limited to 3 and the interval between sessions within a trial was > 3 hours. Findings suggested that natural lameness may be as suitable as experimentally induced lameness for lameness research involving horses. PMID:27347829

  10. The Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio in natural and heat-treated iron-rich eudialytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K.; Aksenov, S. M.; Rozenberg, K. A.; Verin, I. A.

    2011-03-01

    The structures of natural iron-rich eudialyte (specimen 3458 from the Khibiny massif, the Kola Peninsula) and two heat-treated samples of this mineral calcined at 700 and 800°C were determined by X-ray diffraction. The trigonal unit-cell parameters (sp. gr. R3 m) are as follows: a = 14.2645(1) Å, c = 29.9635(5) Å; a = 14.1307(1) Å, c = 30.1229(3) Å; a = 14.1921(2) Å, c = 30.2417(5) Å, respectively. It was found that Fe3+ ions in the calcined eudialytes, as well as impurities in the starting specimen, occupy the square-pyramidal Fe3+(V) sites, whereas Fe2+ ions are in the planar-tetragonal Fe2+(IV) sites.

  11. Development of heat transfer method for non-intrusive pressure measurement in natural gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.T.; Holderbaum, G.S.; Philips, D.B.; Stulen, F.B.; Eberle, A.C.

    1994-12-31

    A method for non-intrusive measurement of internal pressures in flowing and non-flowing natural gas distribution pipelines has been developed. The method is based on temperature changes observed at various locations on the outside wall of the pipe in response to a circumferential band of heat applied to it. Because of the complex flow patterns in the pipe, the pressure-related phenomena induce second-order effects on the heat transfer to the gas or liquid in the pipeline. Experimental results from both laboratory and field measurements have been compared with predictions from TEMPEST, a computation fluid dynamics (CFD) model, to aid in understanding the flow characteristics. In this method, a 2.5-in. band or ring heater device placed around the outer circumference of the pipe is used to apply that to the outer wall of the pipe. The effect of heat input ranging from 250 to 1,000 watts has been evaluated for pipe diameters ranging from 4 in. to 12 in. The expected range of Reynolds numbers spans the laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow regimes, thus adding significant complexity to the problem. Results have shown that a heater power of about 1,000 watts for flowing gas and 250 watts for non-flowing gas enables an acceptable estimate of pressures for most cases. The method can be used to effectively determine whether a pipe is filled with gas or liquid. It can also indicate whether the gas is flowing or static. For flowing gas, upstream-to-downstream and top-to-bottom temperature differences at the surface of the pipe are jointly used to determine gas flow rate and pressure. For no-flow conditions, the upstream-to-downstream temperature difference is zero, and pressures ranging from 0 to 150 psig can be differentiated solely by the temperatures along the outside wall of the pipe.

  12. Numerical investigation of natural convection of nanoparticle enhanced ionic liquids (NEILs) in enclosure heated from below

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Titan C.; Morshed, A. K. M. M.; Khan, Jamil A.

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents the numerical simulation of natural convection heat transfer of Al2O3 nanoparticle enhanced N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis{trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl} imide ([C4mpyrr][NTf2]) ionic liquid. The simulation was performed in three different enclosures (aspect ratio: 0.5, 1, and 1.5) with heated from below. The temperature dependent thermophysical properties of base ionic liquids (ILs) and nanoparticle enhanced ionic liquids (NEILs) were applied in the numerical simulation. The numerical results were compared with the experimental result. The numerical results show that at a certain Rayleigh number NEILs has a lower Nusselt number compared to the base IL which are consistent with the experimental results. But the percentage of degradation is much less on the numerical results compared to the experimental. However the numerical results match well with the predicted model of using thermophysical properties of NEILs. From these observations it can be concluded that the extra degradation in the experimental results may occur due the particle-fluid interaction, clustering and sedimentation of nanoparticles.

  13. Developing natural convection in a fluid layer with localized heating and large viscosity variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickox, C. E.; Chu, Tze Yao

    Numerical simulations and laboratory experiments are used to elucidate aspects of transient natural convection in a magma chamber. The magma chamber is modeled as a horizontal fluid layer confined within an enclosure of square planform and heated from below by a strip heater centered on the lower boundary of the enclosure. The width of the strip heater and the depth of the fluid layer are one-fourth of the layer width. Corn syrup is used as the working fluid in order to approximate the large viscosity variation with temperature and the large Prandtl number typical of magma. The quiescent, uniform, fluid layer is subjected to instantaneous heating from the strip heater producing a transient flow which is dominated by two counter-rotating convective cells. Experimentally determined characteristics of the developing flow are compared with numerical simulations carried out with a finite element computer program. The results of numerical simulations are in essential agreement with experimental data. Differences between the numerical simulations and experimental measurements are conjectured to result from non-ideal effects present in the experiment which are difficult to represent accurately in a numerical simulation.

  14. Underground natural gas storage in the United States 1979 - 1980 heating year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-09-01

    Total gas in storage in the nation's active underground natural gas storage reservoirs as of March 31, 1980, the end of the 1979-1980 heating year, was reported at 5,129 billion cubic feet. Of this total, approximately 69.1 percent was base, or cushion, gas and 30.9 percent was working gas. Working gas totaled 1,586 billion cubic feet, approximately 28.2 percent above that available at the beginning of the heating year. The nation's 383 active storage reservoirs were operated by 77 companies. Total reservoir capacity was reported at 7,287 billion cubic feet, approximately 51.4 percent, or 3,744 billion cubic feet of which was working gas capacity. Approximately 67.9 percent of this working gas capacity was in 228 reservoirs operated by 30 interstate pipeline companies, 29.1 percent was in 142 reservoirs operated by 42 intrastate companies, and 3.1 percent was in 13 reservoirs operated by 5 independent producers.

  15. Plants adapted to warmer climate do not outperform regional plants during a natural heat wave.

    PubMed

    Bucharova, Anna; Durka, Walter; Hermann, Julia-Maria; Hölzel, Norbert; Michalski, Stefan; Kollmann, Johannes; Bossdorf, Oliver

    2016-06-01

    With ongoing climate change, many plant species may not be able to adapt rapidly enough, and some conservation experts are therefore considering to translocate warm-adapted ecotypes to mitigate effects of climate warming. Although this strategy, called assisted migration, is intuitively plausible, most of the support comes from models, whereas experimental evidence is so far scarce. Here we present data on multiple ecotypes of six grassland species, which we grew in four common gardens in Germany during a natural heat wave, with temperatures 1.4-2.0°C higher than the long-term means. In each garden we compared the performance of regional ecotypes with plants from a locality with long-term summer temperatures similar to what the plants experienced during the summer heat wave. We found no difference in performance between regional and warm-adapted plants in four of the six species. In two species, regional ecotypes even outperformed warm-adapted plants, despite elevated temperatures, which suggests that translocating warm-adapted ecotypes may not only lack the desired effect of increased performance but may even have negative consequences. Even if adaptation to climate plays a role, other factors involved in local adaptation, such as biotic interactions, may override it. Based on our results, we cannot advocate assisted migration as a universal tool to enhance the performance of local plant populations and communities during climate change. PMID:27516871

  16. Heat-tolerant methanotropic bacteria from the hot water effluent of a natural gas field

    SciTech Connect

    Bodrossy, L.; Kovacs, K.L.; Murrell, C.

    1995-10-01

    Methanotrophic bacteria were isolated from a natural environment potentially favorable to heat-tolerant methanotrophs. An improved colony plate assay was developed and used to identify putative methanotrophic colonies with high confidence. Fourteen new isolates were purified and partially characterized. These new isolates exhibit a DNA sequence homology of up to 97% with the conserved regions in the mmoX and mmoC genes of the soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO)-coding gene cluster of Methylococcus capsulatus Bath. The copper regulations of soluble MMO expression in the same isolates, however, differs from that of M. capsulatus Bath, as the new isolates can tolerate up to 0.8 {mu}M copper without loss of MMO activity while a drastic reduction of MMO activity occurs already at 0.1 {mu}M copper in M. capsulatus Bath. The isolates can be cultivated and utilized at elevated temperatures, and their copper- and heat-tolerant MMO activity makes these bacterial ideal candidates for future biotechnological use. 35 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Low-temperature heat capacity and localized vibrational modes in natural and synthetic tetrahedrites

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Curzio, E. May, A. F.; Delaire, O.; McGuire, M. A.; Lu, X.; Liu, Cheng-Yun; Case, E. D.; Morelli, D. T.

    2014-05-21

    The heat capacity of natural (Cu{sub 12−x} (Fe, Zn, Ag){sub x}(Sb, As){sub 4}S{sub 13}) and synthetic (Cu{sub 12−x}Zn{sub x}Sb{sub 4}S{sub 13} with x = 0, 1, 2) tetrahedrite compounds was measured between 2 K and 380 K. It was found that the temperature dependence of the heat capacity can be described using a Debye term and three Einstein oscillators with characteristic temperatures that correspond to energies of ∼1.0 meV, ∼2.8 meV, and ∼8.4 meV. The existence of localized vibrational modes, which are assigned to the displacements of the trigonally coordinated Cu atoms in the structure, is discussed in the context of anharmonicity and its effect on the low lattice thermal conductivity exhibited by these compounds.

  18. Developing natural convection in a fluid layer with localized heating and large viscosity variation

    SciTech Connect

    Hickox, C.E.; Chu, Tze Yao.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical simulations and laboratory experiments are used to elucidate aspects of transient natural convection in a magma chamber. The magma chamber is modeled as a horizontal fluid layer confined within an enclosure of square planform and heated from below by a strip heater centered on the lower boundary of the enclosure. The width of the strip heater and the depth of the fluid layer are one-fourth of the layer width. Corn syrup is used as the working fluid in order to approximate the large viscosity variation with temperature and the large Prandtl number typical of magma. The quiescent, uniform, fluid layer is subjected to instantaneous heating from the strip heater producing a transient flow which is dominated by two counter-rotating convective cells. Experimentally determined characteristics of the developing flow are compared with numerical simulations carried out with a finite element computer program. The results of numerical simulations are in essential agreement with experimental data. Differences between the numerical simulations and experimental measurements are conjectured to result from non-ideal effects present in the experiment which are difficult to represent accurately in a numerical simulation.

  19. Natural convection from a heat source in a top-vented enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Myrum, T.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Natural convection from a heated disk situated at the bottom of a top-vented enclosure was studied experimentally. The experiments were performed in water (Pr {congruent} 5) for parametric variations of the vent opening size, inner enclosure height, and disk-to-enclosure-wall temperature difference (Rayleigh number). For comparison purposes, baseline data were obtained for an unvented enclosure and for the infinite case (no enclosure). The heat transfer data were supplemented by cross-vent temperature measurements and by flow visualization using the thymol-blue electrochemical technique. The experiments demonstrated that, for the range of parameters considered, the average Nusselt numbers could be correlate using a single correlation to within 8%. It was also found that the presence of the enclosure (vented or unvented) acted to reduce the Nusselt number, especially at the lower Rayleigh numbers. Flow visualization experiments revealed an unstable flow pattern in the vicinity of the vent that fluctuated in a nonperiodic manner between four basic modes. Temperature measurements revealed asymmetric mean cross-vent temperature profiles, with the mean temperature level increasing with decreasing vent size. The intensity of the temperature fluctuations in the vent opening also increased with decreasing vent size.

  20. Petrophysical evidence for the nature of vertical permeability barriers: Temple Ave. Fault, Wilmington Oil Field, Long Beach, California

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho, H.; Sample, J.C. )

    1996-01-01

    The Temple Avenue fault is a north-trending east-dipping normal fault that dissects the north flank of the Wilmington anticline in the Wilmington Oil field. The fault involves sediments of the Repetto Formation (lower Pliocene) and the Puente Formation (upper Miocene). Oil/water contact structural maps indicate that the fault acts as a permeability barrier. Well B-756-I was drilled across the Temple Ave. fault in the Repetto Formation. The throw of the fault in this well ranges from 15 to 17 meters (50 to 56 feet). The Repetto Formation is composed of interbeded sands and shales. Sixty five samples were collected from and around the fault zone. Preliminary XRD analysis of bulk and clay fractions show that authigenic clay minerals (<2 [mu]m) represent between 1 to 2% of the sediments. Clay minerals are mostly smectite (5-7%) and a Fe-illite (15-30%); chlorite and kaolinite are also present. The authigenic illite content appears to increase around the fault zone. Diagenetic conversion of Ca-rich feldspars to smectite is suggested by an inverse correlation of their abundances. Calcite is present in the majority of the samples (4-8%), but a significant increase in the carbonate content (14-16%) occurs along the fault. Ongoing SEM and isotope analysis will aid in the determination of the origin and nature of the changes in the mineralogy that contribute to form a permeability barrier.

  1. Numerical investigation of coupled turbulent flow, heat transfer, and macroscopic solidification in a vertical twin-roll thin-strip caster

    SciTech Connect

    Seyedein, S.H.; Hasan, M.

    1997-08-29

    A vertical twin-roll continuous thin-strip casting process for stainless steel has been mathematically modeled. The model takes into account the coupled turbulent flow, heat transfer, and macroscopic solidification aspects of the process. A low-Reynolds-number {kappa}-{var_epsilon} turbulence model was used to account for the turbulent effects. The transport equations for the wedge-shaped caster`s cavity were solved using a boundary-fitted nonorthogonal coordinate system. A control-volume-based, iterative finite difference scheme on a staggered grid was used to solve the discretized transformed equations. The SIMPLE algorithm was employed to resolve the velocity-pressure coupling in the momentum equations. The parameters examined in this study include the Darcy coefficient and turbulent damping factor for the mushy region, the roll gap, and the inlet nozzle width. The effects of these process parameters on the turbulent flow and temperature fields, the turbulent eddy viscosity distributions, and the extents of the mushy and solidified regions were ascertained. A change of the Darcy coefficient above 800 did not show any significant effect on the results. The three types of liquid-fraction-dependent turbulent damping factor used for modeling the mushy region did not show a measurable effect on the solidified shell thickness but showed a noticeable influence on the velocity and temperature distributions in both liquid and mushy regions. For a fixed width of the nozzle, an increase in the roll gap increased the penetration depth of the plunging inlet jet but decreased the extent of the mushy region. The solidified shell profile was insensitive to the change of the roll gap. For a fixed roll gap, an increase in the width of the nozzle decreased the penetration depth of the nozzle but increased the extent of the mushy region, while the solidified shell thickness remained practically unaffected.

  2. Natural convection in an enclosure under time periodic heating: An experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Antohe, B.V.; Lage, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    The effect of the heating period on the heat transfer across a water filled rectangular enclosure is examined experimentally. The enclosure is designed such that periodic heat by Joule effect is delivered at one wall while the opposite wall is maintained at an approximately constant temperature. All other surfaces are insulated. Several heating power levels are chosen with equivalent time averaged heat-flux based Rayleigh number varying from 2.5 {times} 10{sup 8} to 1.0 {times} 10{sup 9}. The heating period varies from 32 seconds to 1600 seconds. For the highest Rayleigh number, Ra = 1.0 {times} 10{sup 9}, the oscillatory heating process leads to a cycle averaged heat transfer coefficient 20 percent higher than obtained with steady averaged-heat flux heating. Results, presented in terms of temperature time series, phase-plane portrait, and time evolution of cooling and heating wall temperatures, indicate that for low heating frequencies the heat transfer across the enclosure is hindered, with the time averaged heat transfer coefficient decreasing by as much as 13 percent of the equivalent steady heating value. A plausible explanation for the phenomenon is offered and discussed. The instantaneous and cycle averaged heat transfer coefficients, and the corresponding Nusselt numbers, are also presented for various heating frequencies.

  3. Heat treatment of serum samples from stray dogs naturally exposed to Dirofilaria immitis and Dirofilaria repens in Romania.

    PubMed

    Ciucă, L; Genchi, M; Kramer, L; Mangia, C; Miron, L D; Prete, L Del; Maurelli, M P; Cringoli, G; Rinaldi, L

    2016-07-30

    Pre-heating of serum samples has been shown to reverse false negative antigen tests for Dirofilaria immitis infection in dogs. Here the authors report the results of serum sampling in a population of dogs naturally exposed to D. immitis and Dirofilaria repens infection by testing in ELISA before and after heat treatment. Of 194 dogs sampled from four cities in Romania, D. immitis circulating antigens were found in 16 (8.2%) non heated samples and in 52 (26.8%) heated samples. Of the 108 dogs examined by Knott test, 24 dogs (22.2%) were positive for circulating mf. Subsequent PCR identification showed six dogs had D. immitis mf only, 12 dogs, had only D. repens mf, and 5 were positive for both. Fifty% of dogs with circulating D. immitis mf had positive antigen tests before and after heating, while the other 50% reverted to positive only after heat treatment. Sixty% of dogs with mixed D. immitis/D. repens infection were antigen positive before and after heating, while the other 40% converted to positive after heating. Antigen testing for D. immitis in the 12 dogs with only D. repens mf gave conflicting results. Only two dogs (16%) were antigen negative both before and after heat treatment. Six dogs (50%) became antigen positive after heating and four dogs (30%) were antigen positive both before and after heat treatment. Results would suggest that: false negative result for antigen testing can be reverted by heating of the serum sample; dogs infected with D. repens may have also an occult infection with D. immitis; heat treatment of serum from D. repens-infected dogs can reveal an occult infection with D. immitis. PMID:27369579

  4. THE VERTICAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, Stephen L.; Spencer, Jeffrey B.

    1994-01-01

    'THE VERTICAL' computer keyboard is designed to address critical factors which contribute to Repetitive Motion Injuries (RMI) (including Carpal Tunnel Syndrome) in association with computer keyboard usage. This keyboard splits the standard QWERTY design into two halves and positions each half 90 degrees from the desk. In order to access a computer correctly. 'THE VERTICAL' requires users to position their bodies in optimal alignment with the keyboard. The orthopaedically neutral forearm position (with hands palms-in and thumbs-up) reduces nerve compression in the forearm. The vertically arranged keypad halves ameliorate onset occurrence of keyboard-associated RMI. By utilizing visually-reference mirrored mylar surfaces adjustable to the user's eye, the user is able to readily reference any key indicia (reversed) just as they would on a conventional keyboard. Transverse adjustability substantially reduces cumulative musculoskeletal discomfort in the shoulders. 'THE VERTICAL' eliminates the need for an exterior mouse by offering a convenient finger-accessible curser control while the hands remain in the vertically neutral position. The potential commercial application for 'THE VERTICAL' is enormous since the product can effect every person who uses a computer anywhere in the world. Employers and their insurance carriers are spending hundreds of millions of dollars per year as a result of RMI. This keyboard will reduce the risk.

  5. A novel pyroelectric generator utilising naturally driven temperature fluctuations from oscillating heat pipes for waste heat recovery and thermal energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabek, D.; Taylor, J.; Ayel, V.; Bertin, Y.; Romestant, C.; Bowen, C. R.

    2016-07-01

    Low temperature thermal to electrical energy converters have the potential to provide a route for recovering waste energy. In this paper, we propose a new configuration of a thermal harvester that uses a naturally driven thermal oscillator free of mechanical motion and operates between a hot heat source and a cold heat sink. The system exploits a heat induced liquid-vapour transition of a working fluid as a primary driver for a pyroelectric generator. The two-phase instability of a fluid in a closed looped capillary channel of an oscillating heat pipe (OHP) creates pressure differences which lead to local high frequency temperature oscillations in the range of 0.1-5 K. Such temperature changes are suitable for pyroelectric thermal to electrical energy conversion, where the pyroelectric generator is attached to the adiabatic wall of the OHP, thereby absorbing thermal energy from the passing fluid. This new pyroelectric-oscillating heat pipe (POHP) assembly of a low temperature generator continuously operates across a spatial heat source temperature of 55 °C and a heat sink temperature of 25 °C, and enables waste heat recovery and thermal energy harvesting from small temperature gradients at low temperatures. Our electrical measurements with lead zirconate titanate (PZT) show an open circuit voltage of 0.4 V (AC) and with lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) an open circuit voltage of 0.8 V (AC) at a frequency of 0.45 Hz, with an energy density of 95 pJ cm-3 for PMN-PT. Our novel POHP device therefore has the capability to convert small quantities of thermal energy into more desirable electricity in the nW to mW range and provides an alternative to currently used batteries or centralised energy generation.

  6. Measured water heating performance of a vertical-bore water-to-water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) for domestic water heating over twelve months under simulated occupancy loads

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, Moonis Raza; Munk, Jeffrey D; Baxter, Van D; Gehl, Anthony C

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents monthly performance metrics of a 5.275 kW (1.5 ton) WW-GSHP providing 227 L day-1 domestic hot water at 49 C. Daily water use is simulated as stipulated in the Building America Research Benchmark Definition capturing the living habits of the average U.S household. The 94.5m vertical-bore ground loop is shared with a separate GSHP for space conditioning the 251m2 residential home. Data on entering water temperatures, energy extracted from the ground, delivered energy, compressor electricity use, COP, WW-GSHP run times, and the impact of fan and pump energy consumption on efficiency are presented for each month. Factors influencing performance metrics are highlighted.

  7. Sulphoraphane, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells by targeting heat shock proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Ruma; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Biswas, Jaydip; Roy, Madhumita

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HSPs (27, 70 and 90) and HSF1 are overexpressed in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate inhibited HSPs and HSF1 expressions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of HSPs and HSF1 lead to regulation of apoptotic proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins activate of caspases particularly caspase 3 and 9 leading to induction of apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins induce caspases leading to induction of apoptosis. -- Abstract: Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are involved in protein folding, aggregation, transport and/or stabilization by acting as a molecular chaperone, leading to inhibition of apoptosis by both caspase dependent and/or independent pathways. HSPs are overexpressed in a wide range of human cancers and are implicated in tumor cell proliferation, differentiation, invasion and metastasis. HSPs particularly 27, 70, 90 and the transcription factor heat shock factor1 (HSF1) play key roles in the etiology of breast cancer and can be considered as potential therapeutic target. The present study was designed to investigate the role of sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate on HSPs (27, 70, 90) and HSF1 in two different breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells expressing wild type and mutated p53 respectively, vis-a-vis in normal breast epithelial cell line MCF-12F. It was furthermore investigated whether modulation of HSPs and HSF1 could induce apoptosis in these cells by altering the expressions of p53, p21 and some apoptotic proteins like Bcl-2, Bax, Bid, Bad, Apaf-1 and AIF. Sulphoraphane was found to down-regulate the expressions of HSP70, 90 and HSF1, though the effect on HSP27 was not pronounced. Consequences of HSP inhibition was upregulation of p21 irrespective of p53 status. Bax, Bad, Apaf-1, AIF were upregulated followed by down-regulation of Bcl-2 and this effect was prominent

  8. Parenteral Adjuvant Effects of an Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Natural Heat-Labile Toxin Variant

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Catarina J. M.; Rodrigues, Juliana F.; Medina-Armenteros, Yordanka; Farinha-Arcieri, Luís E.; Ventura, Armando M.; Boscardin, Silvia B.; Sbrogio-Almeida, Maria E.; Ferreira, Luís C. S.

    2014-01-01

    Native type I heat-labile toxins (LTs) produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains exert strong adjuvant effects on both antibody and T cell responses to soluble and particulate antigens following co-administration via mucosal routes. However, inherent enterotoxicity and neurotoxicity (following intra-nasal delivery) had reduced the interest in the use of these toxins as mucosal adjuvants. LTs can also behave as powerful and safe adjuvants following delivery via parenteral routes, particularly for activation of cytotoxic lymphocytes. In the present study, we evaluated the adjuvant effects of a new natural LT polymorphic form (LT2), after delivery via intradermal (i.d.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) routes, with regard to both antibody and T cell responses. A recombinant HIV-1 p24 protein was employed as a model antigen for determination of antigen-specific immune responses while the reference LT (LT1), produced by the ETEC H10407 strain, and a non-toxigenic LT form (LTK63) were employed as previously characterized LT types. LT-treated mice submitted to a four dose-base immunization regimen elicited similar p24-specific serum IgG responses and CD4+ T cell activation. Nonetheless, mice immunized with LT1 or LT2 induced higher numbers of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and in vivo cytotoxic responses compared to mice immunized with the non-toxic LT derivative. These effects were correlated with stronger activation of local dendritic cell populations. In addition, mice immunized with LT1 and LT2, but not with LTK63, via s.c. or i.d. routes developed local inflammatory reactions. Altogether, the present results confirmed that the two most prevalent natural polymorphic LT variants (LT1 or LT2) display similar and strong adjuvant effects for subunit vaccines administered via i.d. or s.c. routes. PMID:24432018

  9. Comparison of CFD Natural Convection and Conduction-only Models for Heat Transfer in the Yucca Mountain Project Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    T. Hadgu; S. Webb; M. Itamura

    2004-02-12

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada has been designated as the nation's high-level radioactive waste repository and the U.S. Department of Energy has been approved to apply to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a license to construct a repository. Heat transfer in the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) drift enclosures is an important aspect of repository waste emplacement. Canisters containing radioactive waste are to be emplaced in tunnels drilled 500 m below the ground surface. After repository closure, decaying heat is transferred from waste packages to the host rock by a combination of thermal radiation, natural convection and conduction heat transfer mechanism?. Current YMP mountain-scale and drift-scale numerical models often use a simplified porous medium code to model fluid and heat flow in the drift openings. To account for natural convection heat transfer, the thermal conductivity of the air was increased in the porous medium model. The equivalent thermal conductivity, defined as the ratio of total heat flow to conductive heat flow, used in the porous media models was based on horizontal concentric cylinders. Such modeling does not effectively capture turbulent natural convection in the open spaces as discussed by Webb et al. (2003) yet the approach is still widely used on the YMP project. In order to mechanistically model natural convection conditions in YMP drifts, the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT (Fluent, Incorporated, 2001) has been used to model natural convection heat transfer in the YMP emplacement drifts. A two-dimensional (2D) model representative of YMP geometry (e.g., includes waste package, drip shield, invert and drift wall) has been developed and numerical simulations made (Francis et al., 2003). Using CFD simulation results for both natural convection and conduction-only heat transfer in a single phase, single component fluid, equivalent thermal conductivities have been calculated for different Rayleigh numbers. Correlation

  10. Characterization of Fuego for laminar and turbulent natural convection heat transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, Nicholas Donald, Jr.

    2005-08-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is conducted for internal natural convection heat transfer using the low Mach number code Fuego. The flow conditions under investigation are primarily laminar, transitional, or low-intensity level turbulent flows. In the case of turbulent boundary layers at low-level turbulence or transitional Reynolds numbers, the use of standard wall functions no longer applies, in general, for wall-bounded flows. One must integrate all the way to the wall in order to account for gradients in the dependent variables in the viscous sublayer. Fuego provides two turbulence models in which resolution of the near-wall region is appropriate. These models are the v2-f turbulence model and a Launder-Sharma, low-Reynolds number turbulence model. Two standard geometries are considered: the annulus formed between horizontal concentric cylinders and a square enclosure. Each geometry emphasizes wall shear flow and complexities associated with turbulent or near turbulent boundary layers in contact with a motionless core fluid. Overall, the Fuego simulations for both laminar and turbulent flows compared well to measured data, for both geometries under investigation, and to a widely accepted commercial CFD code (FLUENT).

  11. Apple peel waste as a natural antioxidant for heat-stressed broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Heidarisafar, Zahra; Sadeghi, Ghorbanali; Karimi, Ahmad; Azizi, Osman

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of processed apple peel waste (APW), alone or in combination with an enzyme, as a natural antioxidant on broiler chickens under heat stress. A total of 360 unsexed, 28-day-old broilers were assigned to 6 dietary treatments with four replicates (15 broilers per pen). The experiment consisted of a 3 × 2 factorial arrangement with three levels of apple peel waste (0, 50 or 100 g/kg of diet) and two levels of enzyme (0 or 500 mg/kg, ZY Multi(®)). Inclusion of 100-g APW/kg of diet decreased broiler weight gain at 42 days of age. Inclusion of 50 and 100-g APW/kg of diet increased gizzard and small intestine weights. Feeding 50 and 100-g APW/kg increased high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and decreased low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and malondialdehyde in blood serum at 49 days of age. At 49 days of age, apparent ileal protein digestibility was reduced when 50 and 100-g APW/kg were used in the diet. This study showed that feeding APW up to 50 g/kg from 28 to 49 days of age increased HDL cholesterol and decreased LDL cholesterol in serum and had no adverse effect on broiler performance. PMID:26970974

  12. Analysis of Influence of Heat Insulation on the Thermal Regime of Storage Tanks with Liquefied Natural Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, Vyacheslav I.; Nagornova, Tatiana A.; Glazyrin, Viktor P.; Shestakov, Igor A.

    2016-02-01

    Is numerically investigated the process of convective heat transfer in the reservoirs of liquefied natural gas (LNG). The regimes of natural convection in a closed rectangular region with different intensity of heat exchange at the external borders are investigated. Is solved the time-dependent system of energy and Navier-Stokes equations in the dimensionless variables "vorticity - the stream function". Are obtained distributions of the hydrodynamic parameters and temperatures, that characterize basic regularities of the processes. The special features of the formation of circulation flows are isolated and the analysis of the temperature distribution in the solution region is carried out. Is shown the influence of geometric characteristics and intensity of heat exchange on the outer boundaries of reservoir on the temperature field in the LNG storage.

  13. Separating methane emissions from biogenic sources and natural gas by vertical column enhancements of ammonia, ethane, and methane in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, R.; Volkamer, R. M.; Blumenstock, T.; Hase, F.; Hannigan, J. W.; Kille, N.; Frey, M.; Kumar Sha, M.; Orphal, J.

    2015-12-01

    Methane sources in the Colorado Front Range include biogenic sources from cattle feedlots and natural gas operations. Although numerous studies have measured methane emissions, there remains significant uncertainty regarding the relative contributions of these various methane emission sources. Here we present data from a March 2015 field campaign that deployed two Bruker EM27 Sun Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS) and the University of Colorado Solar Occultation Flux (CU-SOF) FTS in Eaton, Colorado; the former were used to measure enhancements in the methane vertical column densities (VCD), while the latter was used to measure ethane and ammonia VCDs. A third EM27 FTS was deployed to a background site in Westminster, Colorado which was far removed from cattle and petroleum operations. Northerly winds make possible the determination of methane VCD column enhancement from Westminster to Eaton. All instruments were compared during several background days at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado. This presentation explores the potential of methane source attribution using ammonia as a tracer for feedlot emissions and ethane as a tracer for petroleum emissions.

  14. Studies of heat source driven natural convection. Ph.D. Thesis. Technical Report, Jul. 1974 - Aug. 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulacki, F. A.; Emara, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    Natural convection energy transport in a horizontal layer of internally heated fluid was measured for Rayleigh numbers from 1890 to 2.17 x 10 to the 12th power. The fluid layer is bounded below by a rigid zero-heat-flux surface and above by a rigid constant-temperature surface. Joule heating by an alternating current passing horizontally through the layer provides the uniform volumetric energy source. The overall steady-state heat transfer coefficient at the upper surface was determined by measuring the temperature difference across the layer and power input to the fluid. The correlation between the Nusselt and Rayleigh numbers for the data of the present study and the data of the Kulacki study is given.

  15. Effect of adiabatic square ribs on natural convection in an asymmetrically heated channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidi-Saad, Aissa; Kadja, Mahfoud; Popa, Catalin; Polidori, Guillaume

    2016-06-01

    A 2-D numerical simulation is carried out to investigate the effect of two adiabatic square ribs on laminar flow and heat transfer in an asymmetrically heated channel. The two ribs are symmetrically located on each wall, exactly above the heating zone. The computational procedure is made by solving the unsteady bi-dimensional continuity, momentum and energy equations with the finite volume method. The investigations focused more specifically on the influence of ribs sizes on the flow structure and heat transfer enhancement. The results showed that the variation of ribs sizes significantly alters the heat transfer and fluid flow distribution along the channel, especially in the vicinity of protrusions. Also, the results show that streamlines, isotherms, and the number, sizes and formation of vortex structures inside the channel strongly depend on the size of protrusions. The changes in heat transfer parameters have also been presented.

  16. Thermocapillary convection around gas bubbles: an important natural effect for the enhancement of heat transfer in liquids under microgravity.

    PubMed

    Betz, J; Straub, J

    2002-10-01

    In the presence of a temperature gradient at a liquid-gas or liquid-liquid interface, thermocapillary or Marangoni convection develops. This convection is a special type of natural convection that was not paid much attention in heat transfer for a long time, although it is strong enough to drive liquids against the direction of buoyancy on Earth. In a microgravity environment, however, it is the remaining mode of natural convection and supports heat and mass transfer. During boiling in microgravity it was observed at subcooled liquid conditions. Therefore, the question arises about its contribution to heat transfer without phase change. Thermocapillary convection was quantitatively studied at single gas bubbles in various liquids, both experimentally and numerically. A two-dimensional mathematical model described in this article was developed. The coupled mechanism of heat transfer and fluid flow in pure liquids around a single gas bubble was simulated with a control-volume FE-method. The simulation was accompanied and compared with experiments on Earth. The numerical results are in good accordance with the experiments performed on Earth at various Marangoni numbers using various alcohols of varying chain length and Prandtl numbers. As well as calculations on Earth, the numerical method also allows simulations at stationary spherical gas bubbles in a microgravity environment. The results demonstrate that thermocapillary convection is a natural heat transfer mechanism that can partially replace the buoyancy in a microgravity environment, if extreme precautions are taken concerning the purity of the liquids, because impurities accumulate predominantly at the interface. Under Earth conditions, an enhancement of the heat transfer in a liquid volume is even found in the case where thermocapillary flow is counteracted by buoyancy. In particular, the obstructing influence of surface active substances could be observed during the experiments on Earth in water and also in

  17. Heat capacity of natural fruit juices and of their concentrates at temperatures from 10 to 120°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magerramov, M. A.

    2007-09-01

    The heat capacity of natural apple, cherry, and raspberry juices and of their concentrates has been studied at temperatures from 10 to 120°C and pressures of 0.1 and 2 MPa. A setup based on the method of adiabatic calorimeter was assembled to carry out investigations. An estimate of the error of setup operation as well as control measurements on water prove the accuracy of experimental data to be within ±0.8% at the indicated parameters of state. For the heat capacity of juices 175 values have been obtained. Equations that describe experimental data as functions of temperature and content of dry matter have been constructed.

  18. Comparison of Heat Transfer from Airfoil in Natural and Simulated Icing Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelder, Thomas F.; Lewis, James P.

    1951-01-01

    An investigation of the heat transfer from an airfoil in clear air and in simulated icing conditions was conducted in the NACA Lewis 6- by 9-foot icing-research tunnel in order to determine the validity of heat-transfer data as obtained in the tunnel. This investiation was made on the same model NACA 65,2-016 airfoil section used in a previous flight study, under similar heating, icing, and operating conditions. The effect of tunnel turbulence, in clear air and in icingwas indicated by the forward movement of transition from laminar to turbulent heat transfer. An analysis of the flight results showed the convective heat transfer in icing to be considerably different from that measured in clear air and. only slightly different from that obtained in the icing-research tunnel during simulated icing.

  19. Heat transfer in hydrocarbon fuel boiling under conditions of natural convection

    SciTech Connect

    Shigabiev, T.N.; Galimov, F.M.

    1995-12-01

    Data on the heat-transfer coefficient in boiling of five jet fuels, two automotive gasolines, and a diesel fuel are presented over a wide range of regime parameters. The obtained results are described by a unified similarity equation.

  20. Reduce Natural Gas Use in Your Industrial Process Heating Systems Trifold

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-25

    This DOE Industrial Technologies Program fact sheet describes ten effective ways to save energy and money in industrial process heating systems by making some changes in equipment, operations, and maintenance.

  1. Heat transfer and flow visualization in natural convection in rapidly spinning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobel, L.; El-Masri, M.; Smith, J. L.

    1986-08-01

    Steady and transient free convection in liquid contained in a rotating annular reservoir having two radial baffles and a small heat source mounted on the outer cylinder wall is investigated experimentally, using electrolysis of thymol-blue/HC1 solution by a Pt wire to visualize the flow. The heater is turned on either after solid-body rotation is established or just as the reservoir is impulsively accelerated to a higher rotational velocity. The results are presented in photographs and graphs and discussed in detail. It is found that weak buoyant plumes with radial trajectories relative to the spinning container generate axially invariant two-dimensional motions even when the heat source is much shorter than the cylinder. Spin-up simultaneous with the application of heat is shown to enhance the heat-transfer coefficient over a short time period. The applicability of these findings to the design of airborne superconducting generators with rotating liquid-He baths is indicated.

  2. Waste Heat Approximation for Understanding Dynamic Compression in Nature and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanloz, R.

    2015-12-01

    Energy dissipated during dynamic compression quantifies the residual heat left in a planet due to impact and accretion, as well as the deviation of a loading path from an ideal isentrope. Waste heat ignores the difference between the pressure-volume isentrope and Hugoniot in approximating the dissipated energy as the area between the Rayleigh line and Hugoniot (assumed given by a linear dependence of shock velocity on particle velocity). Strength and phase transformations are ignored: justifiably, when considering sufficiently high dynamic pressures and reversible transformations. Waste heat mis-estimates the dissipated energy by less than 10-20 percent for volume compressions under 30-60 percent. Specific waste heat (energy per mass) reaches 0.2-0.3 c02 at impact velocities 2-4 times the zero-pressure bulk sound velocity (c0), its maximum possible value being 0.5 c02. As larger impact velocities are implied for typical orbital velocities of Earth-like planets, and c02 ≈ 2-30 MJ/kg for rock, the specific waste heat due to accretion corresponds to temperature rises of about 3-15 x 103 K for rock: melting accompanies accretion even with only 20-30 percent waste heat retained. Impact sterilization is similarly quantified in terms of waste heat relative to the energy required to vaporize H2O (impact velocity of 7-8 km/s, or 4.5-5 c0, is sufficient). Waste heat also clarifies the relationship between shock, multi-shock and ramp loading experiments, as well as the effect of (static) pre-compression. Breaking a shock into 2 steps significantly reduces the dissipated energy, with minimum waste heat achieved for two equal volume compressions in succession. Breaking a shock into as few as 4 steps reduces the waste heat to within a few percent of zero, documenting how multi-shock loading approaches an isentrope. Pre-compression, being less dissipative than an initial shock to the same strain, further reduces waste heat. Multi-shock (i.e., high strain-rate) loading of pre

  3. A Multi-City Analysis of the Natural and Human Drivers of the Urban Heat Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, William Frederick

    The world's population is increasingly moving to cities, with a present day urban population of over 3.6 billion that is expected to nearly double by 2050. One of the key features of the urban environment is an increase in temperature relative to the surrounding rural areas, called the urban heat island, which can have negative impacts on the health and wellbeing of urban dwellers. This study uses a novel approach of analyzing a large number of cities from around the world to investigate the similarities and differences in urban environments among cities to explore the behavior and drivers of the urban heat island. This methodology reveals two new conditions that increase the magnitude of the heat island---low dewpoint temperature and high air temperature. Many of the cities show increases in the magnitude of the heat island during hot or dry periods of 1.0°C or more during the daytime and 2.0°C at night relative to cool or humid periods. The heat wave results are of particular note due to the added stress on urban residents during periods when the population is already at risk. For cities in temperate climate regimes, differences among cities in vegetative cover or impervious surface area leads to increases in urban temperatures of up to 1.0°C during the summer, while cities with high pollution can see reductions in the heat island by 1.5°C. Cities in tropical or Mediterranean climates have the strongest heat islands during the dry season indicating that urban infrastructure is the key driver in these cities. These results indicate that mitigation of the urban heat island is possible by altering the urban landscape through changes in the urban vegetation and the structure of the built environment.

  4. Comparative Performance Analysis of IADR Operating in Natural Gas-Fired and Waste-Heat CHP Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, Andrei Y; Sand, James R; Zaltash, Abdolreza

    2006-01-01

    Fuel utilization can be dramatically improved through effective recycle of 'waste' heat produced as a by-product of on-site or near-site power generation technologies. Development of modular compact cooling, heating, and power (CHP) systems for end-use applications in commercial and institutional buildings is a key part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) energy policy. To effectively use the thermal energy from a wide variety of sources which is normally discarded to the ambient, many components such as heat exchangers, boilers, absorption chillers, and desiccant dehumidification systems must be further developed. Recently a compact, cost-effective, and energy-efficient integrated active-desiccant vapor-compression hybrid rooftop (IADR) unit has been introduced in the market. It combines the advantages of an advanced direct-expansion cooling system with the dehumidification capability of an active desiccant wheel. The aim of this study is to compare the efficiency of the IADR operation in baseline mode, when desiccant wheel regeneration is driven by a natural gas burner, and in CHP mode, when the waste heat recovered from microturbine exhaust gas is used for desiccant regeneration. Comparative analysis shows an excellent potential for more efficient use of the desiccant dehumidification as part of a CHP system and the importance of proper sizing of the CHP components. The most crucial factor in exploiting the efficiency of this application is the maximum use of thermal energy recovered for heating of regeneration air.

  5. Global analysis of cis-natural antisense transcripts and their heat-responsive nat-siRNAs in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brassica rapa includes several important leaf vegetable crops whose production is often damaged by high temperature. Cis-natural antisense transcripts (cis-NATs) and cis-NATs-derived small interfering RNAs (nat-siRNAs) play important roles in plant development and stress responses. However, genome-wide cis-NATs in B. rapa are not known. The NATs and nat-siRNAs that respond to heat stress have never been well studied in B. rapa. Here, we took advantage of RNA-seq and small RNA (sRNA) deep sequencing technology to identify cis-NATs and heat responsive nat-siRNAs in B. rapa. Results Analyses of four RNA sequencing datasets revealed 1031 cis-NATs B. rapa ssp. chinensis cv Wut and B. rapa ssp. pekinensis cv. Bre. Based on sequence homology between Arabidopsis thaliana and B. rapa, 303 conserved cis-NATs in B. rapa were found to correspond to 280 cis-NATs in Arabidopsis; the remaining 728 novel cis-NATs were identified as Brassica-specific ones. Using six sRNA libraries, 4846 nat-siRNAs derived from 150 cis-NATs were detected. Differential expression analysis revealed that nat-siRNAs derived from 12 cis-NATs were responsive to heat stress, and most of them showed strand bias. Real-time PCR indicated that most of the transcripts generating heat-responsive nat-siRNAs were upregulated under heat stress, while the transcripts from the opposite strands of the same loci were downregulated. Conclusions Our results provide the first subsets of genome-wide cis-NATs and heat-responsive nat-siRNAs in B. rapa; these sRNAs are potentially useful for the genetic improvement of heat tolerance in B. rapa and other crops. PMID:24320882

  6. Feasibility study for use of the natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) for VHTR water-cooled RCCS shutdown.

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C.P.; Farmer, M.T.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-08-31

    In summary, a scaling analysis of a water-cooled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) system was performed based on generic information on the RCCS design of PBMR. The analysis demonstrates that the water-cooled RCCS can be simulated at the ANL NSTF facility at a prototypic scale in the lateral direction and about half scale in the vertical direction. Because, by necessity, the scaling is based on a number of approximations, and because no analytical information is available on the performance of a reference water-cooled RCCS, the scaling analysis presented here needs to be 'validated' by analysis of the steady state and transient performance of a reference water-cooled RCCS design. The analysis of the RCCS performance by CFD and system codes presents a number of challenges including: strong 3-D effects in the cavity and the RCCS tubes; simulation of turbulence in flows characterized by natural circulation, high Rayleigh numbers and low Reynolds numbers; validity of heat transfer correlations for system codes for heat transfer in the cavity and the annulus of the RCCS tubes; the potential of nucleate boiling in the tubes; water flashing in the upper section of the RCCS return line (during limiting transient); and two-phase flow phenomena in the water tanks. The limited simulation of heat transfer in cavities presented in Section 4.0, strongly underscores the need of experimental work to validate CFD codes, and heat transfer correlations for system codes, and to support the analysis and design of the RCCS. Based on the conclusions of the scaling analysis, a schematic that illustrates key attributes of the experiment system is shown in Fig. 4. This system contains the same physical elements as the PBMR RCCS, plus additional equipment to facilitate data gathering to support code validation. In particular, the prototype consists of a series of oval standpipes surrounding the reactor vessel to provide cooling of the reactor cavity during both normal and off

  7. Application of microwave technology to the heat treatment of natural Youssoufia (Morocco) phosphates.

    PubMed

    Bilali, Latifa; Benchanaa, M; Outzourhit, A; Mokhlisse, A

    2009-01-01

    Microwave heating and conventional heating were used in the drying process of white phosphates and the pyrolysis of black phosphate. Microwave drying has been found to present faster kinetics, and the reaction mechanism is controlled by interfacial progression with a cylindrical symmetry for low powers and by diffusion for high microwave powers. Infrared thermography analysis shows that the heating mode is a function of the incident microwave power, the diameter of the reactor and the initial mass of the sample. The results of this study allowed us to understand the phenomena occurring during the microwave pyrolysis of black phosphate. Three temperature domains were revealed. Heating is attributed to the relaxation of polar molecules (water, polar organic molecules...) and to conduction losses of the different components of the phosphates and the products resulting from the decomposition of the mineral matrix as well as the carbon in the residues. Dielectric measurements at microwave frequencies showed that the dielectric constants (epsilon' and epsilon") decrease with time and reach values that are independent of the humidity of the phosphates, which correspond to the complete desorption of water. Cracks were observed in the microwave pyrolysis residues which also showed better cristallinity as revealed by SEM observation and XRD analysis. XPS analysis revealed for the fist time that the microwave pyrolysis residues contain less carbon than the residues of conventional heating, i.e. more oil is produced by microwave pyrolysis. PMID:21384713

  8. Velocity and temperature field characteristics of water and air during natural convection heating in cans.

    PubMed

    Erdogdu, Ferruh; Tutar, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Presence of headspace during canning is required since an adequate amount allows forming vacuum during the process. Sealing technology may not totally eliminate all entrapped gases, and headspace might affect heat transfer. Not much attention has been given to solve this problem in computational studies, and cans, for example, were mostly assumed to be fully filled with product. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine velocity and temperature evolution of water and air in cans during heating to evaluate the relevance of headspace in the transport mechanism. For this purpose, canned water samples with a certain headspace were used, and required governing continuity, energy, and momentum equations were solved using a finite volume approach coupled with a volume of fluid element model. Simulation results correlated well with experimental results validating faster heating effects of headspace rather than insulation effects as reported in the literature. The organized velocity motions along the air-water interface were also shown. Practical Application: Canning is a universal and economic method for processing of food products, and presence of adequate headspace is required to form vacuum during sealing of the cans. Since sealing technology may not totally eliminate the entrapped gases, mainly air, headspace might affect heating rates in cans. This study demonstrated the increased heating rates in the presence of headspace in contrast with some studies in the literature. By applying the effect of headspace, required processing time for thermally processed foods can be reduced leading to more rapid processes and lower energy consumptions. PMID:21535663

  9. Experimental Technique and Assessment for Measuring the Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient from Natural Ice Accretions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masiulaniec, K. Cyril; Vanfossen, G. James, Jr.; Dewitt, Kenneth J.; Dukhan, Nihad

    1995-01-01

    A technique was developed to cast frozen ice shapes that had been grown on a metal surface. This technique was applied to a series of ice shapes that were grown in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel on flat plates. Nine flat plates, 18 inches square, were obtained from which aluminum castings were made that gave good ice shape characterizations. Test strips taken from these plates were outfitted with heat flux gages, such that when placed in a dry wind tunnel, can be used to experimentally map out the convective heat transfer coefficient in the direction of flow from the roughened surfaces. The effects on the heat transfer coefficient for both parallel and accelerating flow will be studied. The smooth plate model verification baseline data as well as one ice roughened test case are presented.

  10. Forced- and natural-convection studies on solar collectors for heating and cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, J. T.

    1983-03-01

    Convection in air heating solar collectors for heating and cooling applications was studied. It was determined that improvement in the overall conductance between the absorber and the flowing air was an area that needed much improvement. Studies were performed to obtain several absorber convector configurations which have superior heat transfer performance, modest drop penalties, and a high potential for economical manufacturing. Four surfaces which may be fabricated from aluminum or steel are recommended. Three utilize corrugated sheets bonded to the backplate and/or the back side of the absorber. These three surfaces are recommended for applications where airflow behind the absorber is appropriate. For those applications where airflow above the absorber is appropriate, a louvered surface which can be fabricated from metal or plastic is recommended.

  11. Numerical computations of natural convection heat transfer in irregular geometries: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Glakpe, E.K.

    1987-01-23

    The goal of the research program at Howard University is to develop ad document a general purpose computer code that can be used to obtain flow and heat transfer data for the transport or storage of spent fuel configurations. We believe that this work is relevant to DOE/OCRWM storage and transportation programs for the protection of public health and quality of the environment. The computer code is expected to be used to support primarily the following activities: (a) to obtain heat transfer and flow data for the design of sealed storage casks for transport to, and storage at the proposed MRS facility; (b) to obtain heat transfer and flow data for storage of spent fuel assemblies in pools or transportable metal casks at reactor sites. It is therefore proposed that the research work be continued to modify and add to the BODYFIT-1FE code physical models and applicable equations that will simulate realistic configurations of shipping/storage casks.

  12. Numerical Bifurcation Study of Natural Convection in a Layer of Fluid Subject to Spatially Distributed Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgarian, A.; Hossain, M. Z.; Floryan, J. M.

    2011-11-01

    We present the numerical investigation of Rayleigh-Benard convection (RBC) in a slot whose bottom wall is subject to a long-wavelength heating and the upper wall is isothermal. It is shown that multiple flow structures associated with the same conditions can be produced by changing the history of the heating; this history can be controlled by using different initialization conditions, different continuation strategies in the parameters space as well as by using different numerical solvers. The observed flow structures can be categorized into two generic groups, i.e. symmetric and asymmetric flow structures.

  13. Development of ITER Divertor Vertical Target with Annular Flow Concept - II: Development of Brazing Technique for CFC/CuCrZr Joint and Heating Test of Large-Scale Mock-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Ezato, K.; Dairaku, M.; Taniguchi, M.; Sato, K.; Suzuki, S.; Akiba, M.; Ibbott, C.; Tivey, R.

    2004-12-15

    The first fabrication and heating test of a large-scale carbon-fiber-composite (CFC) monoblock divertor mock-up using an annular flow concept has been performed to demonstrate its manufacturability and thermomechanical performance. This mock-up is based on the design of the lower part of the vertical target of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) divertor adapted for the annular flow concept. The annular cooling tube consists of two concentric tubes: an outer tube made of CuCrZr and an inner stainless steel tube with a twisted external fin. Prior to the fabrication of the mock-up, brazed joint tests between the CFC monoblock and the CuCrZr tube have been carried out to find the suitable heat treatment mitigating loss of the high mechanical strength of the CuCrZr material. A basic mechanical examination of CuCrZr undergoing the brazing heat treatment and finite element method analyses are also performed to support the design of the mock-up. High heat flux tests on the large-scale divertor mock-up have been performed in an ion beam facility. The mock-up has successfully withstood more than 1000 thermal cycles of 20 MW/m{sup 2} for 15 s and 3000 cycles of >10 MW/m{sup 2} for 15 s, which simulates the heat load condition of the ITER divertor. No degradation of the thermal performance of the mock-up has been observed throughout the thermal cycle test although in the tile with exposure to the heat flux of 20 MW/m{sup 2}, the erosion depth has been measured as 5.8 and 8.8 mm at the 300th and 500th cycles.

  14. Film boiling heat transfer from a sphere in natural and forced convection of freon-113

    SciTech Connect

    Dix, D.; Orozco, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Boiling heat transfer fluxes were measured on a 3.84-cm hollow copper sphere, in both forced convection and pool boiling, as a function of angular position in Freon 113. This paper reports on forced-convection tests run at speeds of 0.5 to 1.9 m/s. These tests were conducted in the stable film boiling region of the boiling curve. Significant heat transfer rates were measured in the vapor wake region of the sphere for flow film boiling. Video observations of the boiling process revealed that the flow film boiling vapor removal mechanism consisted of periodic formation and detachment of a vapor wake in the rear of the sphere. For pool boiling it was found that the heated surface had a uniform rate of energy dissipation in the stable film boiling regime, whereas in forced convection the film boiling rate was dependent on angular position. Pool film boiling tests also showed multiple humps (more than one maximum heat flux) in the boiling curve when the liquid was subcooled.

  15. Heat stability of strawberry anthocyanins in model solutions containing natural copigments extracted from rose (Rosa damascena Mill.) petals.

    PubMed

    Shikov, Vasil; Kammerer, Dietmar R; Mihalev, Kiril; Mollov, Plamen; Carle, Reinhold

    2008-09-24

    Thermal degradation and color changes of purified strawberry anthocyanins in model solutions were studied upon heating at 85 degrees C by HPLC-DAD analyses and CIELCh measurements, respectively. The anthocyanin half-life values increased significantly due to the addition of rose (Rosa damascena Mill.) petal extracts enriched in natural copigments. Correspondingly, the color stability increased as the total color difference values were smaller for anthocyanins upon copigment addition, especially after extended heating. Furthermore, the stabilizing effect of rose petal polyphenols was compared with that of well-known copigments such as isolated kaempferol, quercetin, and sinapic acid. The purified rose petal extract was found to be a most effective anthocyanin-stabilizing agent at a molar pigment/copigment ratio of 1:2. The results obtained demonstrate that the addition of rose petal polyphenols slows the thermal degradation of strawberry anthocyanins, thus resulting in improved color retention without affecting the gustatory quality of the product. PMID:18729376

  16. Investigations on natural circulation in reactor models and shutdown heat removal systems for LMFBRs (liquid metal fast breeder reactors)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, H.; Weinberg, D.; Marten, K. ); Ieda, Yoshiaki )

    1989-11-01

    For sodium-cooled pool-type reactors, studies have been undertaken to remove the decay heat by natural convection alone, as in the case of failure of all power supplies. For this purpose, four immersion coolers (ICs), two each installed at a 180-deg circumferential position with respect to the others, are arranged within the reactor tank. They are connected with natural-drift air coolers through independent intermediate circuits. The primary sodium in the tank as well as the secondary sodium in the intermediate loop circulate by natural convection. The general functioning of this passive shutdown decay heat removal (DHR) system is demonstrated in 1:20 and 1:5 scale test models using water as a simulant fluid for sodium. The model design is based on the thermohydraulics similarity criteria. In the RAMONA three-dimensional 1:20 scale model, experiments were carried out to clarify the steady-state in-vessel thermohydraulics for different parameter combinations (core power, radial power distribution across the core, DHR by 2 or 4 ICs in operation, above-core structure geometry and position, different IC designs). For all mentioned parameters, temperatures and their fluctuations were measured and used to indicate isotherms and lines of identical temperature fluctuations. The flow patterns were observed visually. The experiments were recalculated by an updated version of the single-phase three-dimensional thermohydraulics code COMMIX.

  17. Case Study for the ARRA-funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration at Denver Museum of Nature & Science

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Piljae; Liu, Xiaobing

    2015-11-30

    High initial costs and lack of public awareness of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy-saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects were competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This report highlights the findings of a case study of one such GSHP demonstration projects that uses a recycled water heat pump (RWHP) system installed at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science in Denver, Colorado. The RWHP system uses recycled water from the city’s water system as the heat sink and source for a modular water-to-water heat pump (WWHP). This case study was conducted based on the available measured performance data from December 2014 through August 2015, utility bills of the building in 2014 and 2015, construction drawings, maintenance records, personal communications, and construction costs. The annual energy consumption of the RWHP system was calculated based on the available measured data and other related information. It was compared with the performance of a baseline scenario— a conventional VAV system using a water-cooled chiller and a natural gas fired boiler, both of which have the minimum energy efficiencies allowed by ASHRAE 90.1-2010. The comparison was made to determine energy savings, operating cost savings, and CO2 emission reductions achieved by the RWHP system. A cost analysis was performed to evaluate the simple payback of the RWHP system. Summarized below are the results of the performance analysis, the learned lessons, and recommended improvement in the operation of the RWHP system.

  18. Experimental study of a constrained vapor bubble fin heat exchanger in the absence of external natural convection.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sumita; Plawsky, Joel L; Wayner, Peter C

    2004-11-01

    In preparation for a microgravity flight experiment on the International Space Station, a constrained vapor bubble fin heat exchanger (CVB) was operated both in a vacuum chamber and in air on Earth to evaluate the effect of the absence of external natural convection. The long-term objective is a general study of a high heat flux, low capillary pressure system with small viscous effects due to the relatively large 3 x 3 x 40 mm dimensions. The current CVB can be viewed as a large-scale version of a micro heat pipe with a large Bond number in the Earth environment but a small Bond number in microgravity. The walls of the CVB are quartz, to allow for image analysis of naturally occurring interference fringes that give the pressure field for liquid flow. The research is synergistic in that the study requires a microgravity environment to obtain a low Bond number and the space program needs thermal control systems, like the CVB, with a large characteristic dimension. In the absence of natural convection, operation of the CVB may be dominated by external radiative losses from its quartz surface. Therefore, an understanding of radiation from the quartz cell is required. All radiative exchange with the surroundings occurs from the outer surface of the CVB when the temperature range renders the quartz walls of the CVB optically thick (lambda > 4 microns). However, for electromagnetic radiation where lambda < 2 microns, the walls are transparent. Experimental results obtained for a cell charged with pentane are compared with those obtained for a dry cell. A numerical model was developed that successfully simulated the behavior and performance of the device observed experimentally. PMID:15644365

  19. Scalability of the natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) data to VHTR/NGNP RCCS designs.

    SciTech Connect

    Vilim, R .B.; Feldman, E. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-08-07

    Passive safety in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is strongly dependent on the thermal performance of the Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). Scaled experiments performed in the Natural Shutdown Test Facility (NSTF) are to provide data for assessing and/or improving computer code models for RCCS phenomena. Design studies and safety analyses that are to support licensing of the VHTR will rely on these models to achieve a high degree of certainty in predicted design heat removal rate. To guide in the selection and development of an appropriate set of experiments a scaling analysis has been performed for the air-cooled RCCS option. The goals were to (1) determine the phenomena that dominate the behavior of the RCCS, (2) determine the general conditions that must be met so that these phenomena and their relative importance are preserved in the experiments, (3) identify constraints specific to the NSTF that potentially might prevent exact similitude, and (4) then to indicate how the experiments can be scaled to prevent distortions in the phenomena of interest. The phenomena identified as important to RCCS operation were also the subject of a recent PIRT study. That work and the present work collectively indicate that the main phenomena influencing RCCS heat removal capability are (1) radiation heat transport from the vessel to the air ducts, (2) the integral effects of momentum and heat transfer in the air duct, (3) buoyancy at the wall inside the air duct giving rise to mixed convection, and (4) multidimensional effects inside the air duct caused by non-uniform circumferential heat flux and non-circular geometry.

  20. Influence of thermophoresis on heat and mass transfer under non-Darcy MHD mixed convection along a vertical flat plate embedded in a porous medium in the presence of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishan, N.; Jagadha, S.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents an investigation of the influence of thermophoresis on MHD mixed convective heat and mass transfer of a viscous, incompressible and electrically conducting fluid along a vertical flat plate with radiation effects. The plate is permeable and embedded in a porous medium. To describe the deviation from the Darcy model the Forchheimer flow model is used. The Rosseland approximation is used to describe the radiative heat flux in the energy equation. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations using similarity transformation. The nonlinear ordinary differential equations are linearized by using quasilinearization technique and then solved numerically by using implicit finite difference scheme. The numerical results are analyzed for the effects of various physical parameters such as magnetic parameter Ha, mixed convection parameter Ra d /Pe d , Reynolds number Red, radiation parameter R, thermophoretic parameter τ, Prandtl number Pr, and Schmidt number Sc. The heat transfer coefficient is also tabulated for different values of physical parameters.

  1. A novel high-heat transfer low-NO{sub x} natural gas combustion system. Phase 1 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rue, D.M.; Fridman, A.; Viskanta, R.; Neff, D.

    1997-11-01

    Phase I of the project focused on acquiring the market needs, modeling, design, and test plan information for a novel high-heat transfer low-NO{sub x} natural gas combustion system. All goals and objectives were achieved. The key component of the system is an innovative burner technology which combines high temperature natural gas preheating with soot formation and subsequent soot burnout in the flame, increases the system`s energy efficiency and furnace throughput, while minimizing the furnace air emissions, all without external parasitic systems. Work has included identifying industry`s needs and constraints, modeling the high luminosity burner system, designing the prototype burner for initial laboratory-scale testing, defining the test plan, adapting the burner technology to meet the industry`s needs and constraints, and outlining the Industrial Adoption Plan.

  2. Organic Rankine Cycle for Residual Heat to Power Conversion in Natural Gas Compressor Station. Part I: Modelling and Optimisation Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaczykowski, Maciej

    2016-06-01

    Basic organic Rankine cycle (ORC), and two variants of regenerative ORC have been considered for the recovery of exhaust heat from natural gas compressor station. The modelling framework for ORC systems has been presented and the optimisation of the systems was carried out with turbine power output as the variable to be maximized. The determination of ORC system design parameters was accomplished by means of the genetic algorithm. The study was aimed at estimating the thermodynamic potential of different ORC configurations with several working fluids employed. The first part of this paper describes the ORC equipment models which are employed to build a NLP formulation to tackle design problems representative for waste energy recovery on gas turbines driving natural gas pipeline compressors.

  3. Determination of vertical and horizontal pathways of injected fresh wastewater into a deep saline aquifer (Florida, USA) using natural chemical tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Virginia; Price, René M.

    2010-06-01

    Two deep-well injection sites in south Florida, USA, inject an average of 430 million liters per day (MLD) of treated domestic fresh wastewater into a deep saline aquifer 900 m below land surface. Elevated levels of NH3 (highest concentration 939 µmol) in the overlying aquifer above ambient concentrations (concentration less than 30 µmol) were evidence of the upward migration of injected fluids. Three pathways were distinguished based on ammonium, chloride and bromide ratios, and temperature. At the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, the tracer ratios showed that the injectate remained chemically distinct as it migrated upwards through rapid vertical pathways via density-driven buoyancy. The warmer injectate (mean 28°C) retained the temperature signal as it vertically migrated upwards; however, the temperature signal did not persist as the injectate moved horizontally into the overlying aquifers. Once introduced, the injectate moved slowly horizontally through the aquifer and mixed with ambient water. At the North District Wastewater Treatment Plant, data provide strong evidence of a one-time pulse of injectate into the overlying aquifers due to improper well construction. No evidence of rapid vertical pathways was observed at the North District Wastewater Treatment Plant.

  4. Revealing the Nature of Molecule-Electrode Contact in Tunneling Junctions Using Raw Data Heat Maps.

    PubMed

    Sporrer, Jacob; Chen, Jiahao; Wang, Zhengjia; Thuo, Martin M

    2015-12-17

    Mechanistic understanding of charge transport through molecular tunnel junctions requires reproducible and statistically relevant data sets. This challenge has been overcome by development of large area junctions, especially those based on liquid-metal physi-sorbed top-electrodes, such as eutectic gallium-indium. A challenge with these junctions, however, is an inability to diagnose the quality of contact between the top-electrode and the SAMs. Since tunneling currents are dependent on the distance between the two electrodes, we demonstrate that by analyzing all raw unfitted data derived from a measurement using heat-maps, one can deduce the quality of contact and other minor bias-dependent fluctuations in the charge transport behavior. We demonstrate that the use of 3D plots would be challenging to interpret, but adoption of heat maps clearly captures details on junction quality irrespective of the total size of the data set or molecules used. We propose representation of raw data, rather than reliance on statistics, as proof of quality junctions. PMID:26618717

  5. Special considerations on operating a fuel cell power plant using natural gas with marginal heating value

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, L. Ng; Chien-Liang Lin; Ya-Tang Cheng

    1996-12-31

    In realizing new power generation technologies in Taiwan, a phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant (model PC2513, ONSI Corporation) has been installed in the premises of the Power Research Institute of the Taiwan Power Company in Taipei County of Taiwan. The pipeline gas supplying to the site of this power plant has a high percentage of carbon dioxide and thus a slightly lower heating value than that specified by the manufacturer. Because of the lowering of heating value of input gas, the highest Output power from the power plant is understandably less than the rated power of 200 kW designed. Further, the transient response of the power plant as interrupted from the Grid is also affected. Since this gas is also the pipeline gas supplying to the heavily populated Taipei Municipal area, it is conceivable that the success of the operations of fuel cells using this fuel is of vital importance to the promotion of the use of this power generation technology in Taiwan. Hence, experiments were set up to assess the feasibility of this fuel cell power plant using the existing pipeline gas in this part of Taiwan where fuel cells would most likely find useful.

  6. Changes of multi-scale structure during mimicked DSC heating reveal the nature of starch gelatinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shujun; Zhang, Xiu; Wang, Shuo; Copeland, Les

    2016-06-01

    A thorough understanding of starch gelatinization is extremely important for precise control of starch functional properties for food processing and human nutrition. Here we reveal the molecular mechanism of starch gelatinization by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in conjunction with a protocol using the rapid viscosity analyzer (RVA) to generate material for analysis under conditions that simulated the DSC heating profiles. The results from DSC, FTIR, Raman, X-ray diffraction and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analyses all showed that residual structural order remained in starch that was heated to the DSC endotherm end temperature in starch:water mixtures of 0.5 to 4:1 (v/w). We conclude from this study that the DSC endotherm of starch at a water:starch ratio of 2 to 4 (v/w) does not represent complete starch gelatinization. The DSC endotherm of starch involves not only the water uptake and swelling of amorphous regions, but also the melting of starch crystallites.

  7. Changes of multi-scale structure during mimicked DSC heating reveal the nature of starch gelatinization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shujun; Zhang, Xiu; Wang, Shuo; Copeland, Les

    2016-01-01

    A thorough understanding of starch gelatinization is extremely important for precise control of starch functional properties for food processing and human nutrition. Here we reveal the molecular mechanism of starch gelatinization by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in conjunction with a protocol using the rapid viscosity analyzer (RVA) to generate material for analysis under conditions that simulated the DSC heating profiles. The results from DSC, FTIR, Raman, X-ray diffraction and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analyses all showed that residual structural order remained in starch that was heated to the DSC endotherm end temperature in starch:water mixtures of 0.5 to 4:1 (v/w). We conclude from this study that the DSC endotherm of starch at a water:starch ratio of 2 to 4 (v/w) does not represent complete starch gelatinization. The DSC endotherm of starch involves not only the water uptake and swelling of amorphous regions, but also the melting of starch crystallites. PMID:27319782

  8. MODELING HEAT TRANSFER IN SPENT FUEL TRANSFER CASK NEUTRON SHIELDS – A CHALLENGING PROBLEM IN NATURAL CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, James A.; Cuta, Judith M.; Bajwa, C.; Baglietto, E.

    2010-07-18

    In the United States, commercial spent nuclear fuel is typically moved from spent fuel pools to outdoor dry storage pads within a transfer cask system that provides radiation shielding to protect personnel and the surrounding environment. The transfer casks are cylindrical steel enclosures with integral gamma and neutron radiation shields. Since the transfer cask system must be passively cooled, decay heat removal from spent nuclear fuel canister is limited by the rate of heat transfer through the cask components, and natural convection from the transfer cask surface. The primary mode of heat transfer within the transfer cask system is conduction, but some cask designs incorporate a liquid neutron shield tank surrounding the transfer cask structural shell. In these systems, accurate prediction of natural convection within the neutron shield tank is an important part of assessing the overall thermal performance of the transfer cask system. The large-scale geometry of the neutron shield tank, which is typically an annulus approximately 2 meters in diameter but only 10-15 cm in thickness, and the relatively small scale velocities (typically less than 5 cm/s) represent a wide range of spatial and temporal scales that contribute to making this a challenging problem for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Relevant experimental data at these scales are not available in the literature, but some recent modeling studies offer insights into numerical issues and solutions; however, the geometries in these studies, and for the experimental data in the literature at smaller scales, all have large annular gaps that are not prototypic of the transfer cask neutron shield. This paper proposes that there may be reliable CFD approaches to the transfer cask problem, specifically coupled steady-state solvers or unsteady simulations; however, both of these solutions take significant computational effort. Segregated (uncoupled) steady state solvers that were tested did not

  9. Downflow dryout in a heated ribbed vertical annulus with a cosine power profile (Results from test series ECS-2, WSR, and ECS-2cE)

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, T.K.; Anderson, J.L.; Condie, K.G.

    1990-12-01

    Experiments designed to investigate surface dryout in a heated, ribbed annulus test section simulating one of the annular coolant channels of a Savannah River Plant production reactor Mark 22 fuel assembly have been conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The inner surface of the annulus was constructed of aluminum and was electrically heated to provide an axial cosine power profile and a flat azimuthal power shape. Data presented in this report are from the ECS-2, WSR, and ECS-2cE series of tests. These experiments were conducted to examine the onset of wall thermal excursion for a range of flow, inlet fluid temperature, and annulus outlet pressure. Hydraulic boundary conditions on the test section represent flowrates (0.1--1.4 1/s), inlet fluid temperatures (293--345 K), and outlet pressures (-18--139.7 cm of water relative to the bottom of the heated length (61--200 cm of water relative to the bottom of the lower plenum)) expected to occur during the Emergency Coolant System (ECS) phase of postulated Loss-of-Coolant Accident in a production reactor. The onset of thermal excursion based on the present data is consistent with data gathered in test rigs with flat axial power profiles. The data indicate that wall dryout is primarily a function of liquid superficial velocity. Air entrainment rate was observed to be a strong function of the boundary conditions (primarily flowrate and liquid temperature), but had a minor effect on the power at the onset of thermal excursion for the range of conditions examined. 14 refs., 33 figs., 13 tabs.

  10. Natural heat storage in a brine-filled solar pond in the Tully Valley of central New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayhurst, Brett; Kappel, William M.

    2014-01-01

    The Tully Valley, located in southern Onondaga County, New York, has a long history of unusual natural hydrogeologic phenomena including mudboils (Kappel, 2009), landslides (Tamulonis and others, 2009; Pair and others, 2000), landsurface subsidence (Hackett and others, 2009; Kappel, 2009), and a brine-filled sinkhole or “Solar pond” (fig. 1), which is documented in this report. A solar pond is a pool of salty water (brine) which stores the sun’s energy in the form of heat. The saltwater naturally forms distinct layers with increasing density between transitional zones (haloclines) of rapidly changing specific conductance with depth. In a typical solar pond, the top layer has a low salt content and is often times referred to as the upper convective zone (Lu and others, 2002). The bottom layer is a concentrated brine that is either convective or temperature stratified dependent on the surrounding environment. Solar insolation is absorbed and stored in the lower, denser brine while the overlying halocline acts as an insulating layer and prevents heat from moving upwards from the lower zone (Lu and others, 2002). In the case of the Tully Valley solar pond, water within the pond can be over 90 degrees Fahrenheit (°F) in late summer and early fall. The purpose of this report is to summarize observations at the Tully Valley brine-filled sinkhole and provide supplemental climate data which might affect the pond salinity gradients insolation (solar energy).

  11. A Novel High-Heat Transfer Low-NO{sub x} Natural Gas Combustion System. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, H.

    2004-01-01

    A novel high-heat transfer low NO(sub x) natural gas combustion system. The objectives of this program are to research, develop, test, and commercialize a novel high-heat transfer low-NO{sub x} natural gas combustion system for oxygen-, oxygen-enriched air, and air-fired furnaces. This technology will improve the process efficiency (productivity and product quality) and the energy efficiency of high-temperature industrial furnaces by at least 20%. GTI's high-heat transfer burner has applications in high-temperature air, oxygen-enriched air, and oxygen furnaces used in the glass, metals, cement, and other industries. Development work in this program is focused on using this burner to improve the energy efficiency and productivity of glass melting furnaces that are major industrial energy consumers. The following specific project objectives are defined to provide a means of achieving the overall project objectives. (1) Identify topics to be covered, problems requiring attention, equipment to be used in the program, and test plans to be followed in Phase II and Phase III. (2) Use existing codes to develop models of gas combustion and soot nucleation and growth as well as a thermodynamic and parametric description of furnace heat transfer issues. (3) Conduct a parametric study to confirm the increase in process and energy efficiency. (4) Design and fabricate a high-heat transfer low-NOx natural gas burners for laboratory, pilot- and demonstration-scale tests. (5) Test the high-heat transfer burner in one of GTI's laboratory-scale high-temperature furnaces. (6) Design and demonstrate the high-heat transfer burner on GTI's unique pilot-scale glass tank simulator. (7) Complete one long term demonstration test of this burner technology on an Owens Corning full-scale industrial glass melting furnace. (8) Prepare an Industrial Adoption Plan. This Plan will be updated in each program Phase as additional information becomes available. The Plan will include technical and

  12. Hall Effects And Rotation Effects On MHD Flow Past An Exponentially Accelerated Vertical Plate With Combined Heat And Mass Transfer Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamizhsudar, M.; Pandurangan, J.; Muthucumaraswamy, R.

    2015-08-01

    A theoretical solution of flow past an exponentially accelerated vertical plate in the presence of Hall current and MHD relative to a rotating fluid with uniform temperature and mass diffusion is presented. The dimensionless equations are solved using the Laplace method. The axial and transverse velocity, temperature and concentration fields are studied for different parameters such as the Hall parameter (m), Hartmann number (M), Rotation parameter (Ω), Schmidt number, Prandtl number, thermal Grashof number (Gr) and mass Grashof number (Gc). It has been observed that the temperature of the plate decreases with increasing values of the Prandtl number and the concentration near the plate increases with decreasing values of Schmidt number. It is also observed that both axial and transverse velocities increase with decreasing values of the magnetic field parameter or rotation parameter, but the trend gets reversed with respect to the Hall parameter. The effects of parameters m, M, Ω, Gr and Gc on the axial and transverse velocity profiles are shown graphically.

  13. Studies of heat-source driven natural convection: A numerical investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emara, A. A.; Kulacki, F. A.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal convection driven by uniform volumetric energy sources was studied in a horizontal fluid layer bounded from above by a rigid, isothermal surface and from below by a rigid, zero heat-flux surface. The side walls of the fluid domain were assumed to be rigid and perfectly insulating. The computations were formally restricted to two-dimensional laminar convection but were carried out for a range of Rayleigh numbers which spans the regimes of laminar and turbulent flow. The results of the computations consists of streamline and isotherm patterns, horizontally averaged temperature distributions, and horizontally averaged Nusselt numbers at the upper surface. Flow and temperature fields do not exhibit a steady state, but horizontally averaged Nusselt numbers reach limiting, quasi-steady values for all Rayleigh numbers considered. Correlations of the Nusselt number in terms of the Rayleigh and Prandtl numbers were determined.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Natural Convection of a Nanofluid in an Inclined Heated Enclosure Using Two-Phase Lattice Boltzmann Method: Accurate Effects of Thermophoresis and Brownian Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mahmoud; Eslamian, Morteza

    2015-07-01

    Laminar natural convection in differentially heated ( β = 0°, where β is the inclination angle), inclined ( β = 30° and 60°), and bottom-heated ( β = 90°) square enclosures filled with a nanofluid is investigated, using a two-phase lattice Boltzmann simulation approach. The effects of the inclination angle on Nu number and convection heat transfer coefficient are studied. The effects of thermophoresis and Brownian forces which create a relative drift or slip velocity between the particles and the base fluid are included in the simulation. The effect of thermophoresis is considered using an accurate and quantitative formula proposed by the authors. Some of the existing results on natural convection are erroneous due to using wrong thermophoresis models or simply ignoring the effect. Here we show that thermophoresis has a considerable effect on heat transfer augmentation in laminar natural convection. Our non-homogenous modeling approach shows that heat transfer in nanofluids is a function of the inclination angle and Ra number. It also reveals some details of flow behavior which cannot be captured by single-phase models. The minimum heat transfer rate is associated with β = 90° (bottom-heated) and the maximum heat transfer rate occurs in an inclination angle which varies with the Ra number.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Natural Convection of a Nanofluid in an Inclined Heated Enclosure Using Two-Phase Lattice Boltzmann Method: Accurate Effects of Thermophoresis and Brownian Forces.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mahmoud; Eslamian, Morteza

    2015-12-01

    Laminar natural convection in differentially heated (β = 0°, where β is the inclination angle), inclined (β = 30° and 60°), and bottom-heated (β = 90°) square enclosures filled with a nanofluid is investigated, using a two-phase lattice Boltzmann simulation approach. The effects of the inclination angle on Nu number and convection heat transfer coefficient are studied. The effects of thermophoresis and Brownian forces which create a relative drift or slip velocity between the particles and the base fluid are included in the simulation. The effect of thermophoresis is considered using an accurate and quantitative formula proposed by the authors. Some of the existing results on natural convection are erroneous due to using wrong thermophoresis models or simply ignoring the effect. Here we show that thermophoresis has a considerable effect on heat transfer augmentation in laminar natural convection. Our non-homogenous modeling approach shows that heat transfer in nanofluids is a function of the inclination angle and Ra number. It also reveals some details of flow behavior which cannot be captured by single-phase models. The minimum heat transfer rate is associated with β = 90° (bottom-heated) and the maximum heat transfer rate occurs in an inclination angle which varies with the Ra number. PMID:26183389

  16. Heat Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stress Learn some tips to protect workers including: acclimatization, rest breaks, and fluid recommendations. NIOSH Workplace Solution: ... Blog: Adjusting to Work in the Heat: Why Acclimatization Matters The natural adaptation to the heat takes ...

  17. Quasi One-Dimensional Model of Natural Draft Wet-Cooling Tower Flow, Heat and Mass Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyhlík, Tomáš

    2015-05-01

    The article deals with the development of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow, heat and mass transfer. The moist air flow is described by the system of conservation laws along with additional equations. Moist air is assumed to be homogeneous mixture of dry air and water vapour. Liquid phase in the fill zone is described by the system of ordinary differential equations. Boundary value problem for the system of conservation laws is discretized in space using Kurganov-Tadmor central scheme and in time using strong stability preserving Runge-Kutta scheme. Initial value problems in the fill zone is solved by using standard fourth order Runge-Kutta scheme. The interaction between liquid water and moist air is done by source terms in governing equations.

  18. The Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} ratio in natural and heat-treated iron-rich eudialytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K. Aksenov, S. M.; Rozenberg, K. A.; Verin, I. A.

    2011-03-15

    The structures of natural iron-rich eudialyte (specimen 3458 from the Khibiny massif, the Kola Peninsula) and two heat-treated samples of this mineral calcined at 700 and 800 Degree-Sign C were determined by X-ray diffraction. The trigonal unit-cell parameters (sp. gr. R3m) are as follows: a = 14.2645(1) Angstrom-Sign , c = 29.9635(5) Angstrom-Sign ; a = 14.1307(1) Angstrom-Sign , c = 30.1229(3) Angstrom-Sign ; a = 14.1921(2) Angstrom-Sign , c = 30.2417(5) Angstrom-Sign , respectively. It was found that Fe{sup 3+} ions in the calcined eudialytes, as well as impurities in the starting specimen, occupy the square-pyramidal Fe{sup 3+}(V) sites, whereas Fe{sup 2+} ions are in the planar-tetragonal Fe{sup 2+}(IV) sites.

  19. Bona Fide Evidence for Natural Vertical Transmission of Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus in Freshwater Brood Stocks of Farmed Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) in Southern Chile

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Ramón; Labra, Alvaro; Carmona, Marisela; Muñoz, Cristián

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infectious salmon anemia (ISA) is a severe disease that affects farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), causing outbreaks in seawater in most salmon-producing countries worldwide, with particular aggressiveness in southern Chile. The etiological agent of this disease is a virus belonging to the Orthomyxoviridae family, named infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV). Although it has been suggested that this virus can be vertically transmitted, even in freshwater, there is a lack of compelling experimental evidence to confirm this. Here we demonstrate significant putative viral loads in the ovarian fluid as well as in the eggs of two brood stock female adult specimens that harbored the virus systemically but without clinical signs. The target virus corresponded to a highly polymorphic region 3 (HPR-3) variant, which is known to be virulent in seawater and responsible for recent and past outbreaks of this disease in Chile. Additionally, the virus recovered from the fluid as well as from the interior of the eggs was fully infective to a susceptible fish cell line. To our knowledge, this is the first robust evidence demonstrating mother-to-offspring vertical transmission of the infective virus on the one hand and the asymptomatic transmission of a virulent form of the virus in freshwater fish on the other hand. IMPORTANCE The robustness of the data presented here will contribute to a better understanding of the biology of the virus but most importantly will constitute a key management tool in the control of an aggressive agent constantly threatening the sustainability of the global salmon industry. PMID:24623436

  20. Evidence for natural vertical transmission of chikungunya viruses in field populations of Aedes aegypti in Delhi and Haryana states in India-a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Jain, Jaspreet; Kushwah, Raja Babu S; Singh, Shashi S; Sharma, Anil; Adak, Tridibes; Singh, Om P; Bhatnagar, Raj Kamal; Subbarao, Sarala K; Sunil, Sujatha

    2016-10-01

    Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus are principal vectors for the transmission of chikungunya virus (CHIKV). India is a hub for both dengue and chikungunya infections and there are several reports of co-infection of dengue and chikungunya virus in the clinical scenario. The present pilot entomological survey was conducted to evaluate vertical transmission of CHIKV in Aedes field populations. Aedes immature (larvae and pupae) collection was done in 2012, over a period of six months from selected sites in Delhi and Haryana, India. The immatures collected were reared for adult emergence and species identification was done. A. aegypti male and female mosquitoes were separated and pooled collection spot-wise, RNA extracted and RT PCR performed to test for the presence of CHIKV in the pools. Container index (CI) and minimum infection rate (MIR) were estimated. From study areas that tested positive for CHIKV, adult collections were made and females upon feeding on uninfected blood in laboratory were allowed to lay eggs. The progeny that emerged from these field-collected mothers were tested for CHIKV presence. Our pilot survey showed the existence of A. aegypti population even during peak summer season in a few foci which eventually helped the mosquitoes to tide over adverse environmental conditions and with the start of rainfall, the population exploded within a short period of time. Immatures collected from field and progeny of adults collected from the field were CHIKV positive demonstrating the presence of vertical transmission of chikungunya virus in field population of A. aegypti. The present study further demonstrates the importance of identifying permanent breeding sites for proper Aedes species control. PMID:27282096

  1. Vertical stability and the Brunt-Väisäla frequency of deep natural waters by the example of Lake Baikal, Lake Tanganyika, and the World Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherstyankin, P. P.; Kuimova, L. N.

    2009-12-01

    Theoretical analysis, calculations, and comparison with the results of observations in Lake Baikal, Lake Tanganyika, and the World Ocean are performed for the vertical stability E and the Brunt-Väisäla frequency N in the form of N 2 with regard to all components (at the constant temperature T and the salinity S, the common adiabatic form at T, S Const). The adiabatic stability E ad and the Väisäla frequency N in the form of N {/ad 2} are always positive; at a change from the inverse to the direct temperature stratification, they have deep minimums reaching 10-16 m-1 and 10-15 s-2 and less; the minimums have the form of a special point, a reversal point of the first kind called a “cusp.” The reality of these reversal points is confirmed by the analysis of the investigation procedure, comparison with the results of previous theoretical (Sherstyankin, et al., 2007), and experimental (observations in Baikal, Shimaraev et al., 1994) works. The features of vertical profiles of E ad , E and N {/ad 2}, N 2, as well as the layers where the Brunt-Väisäla frequency is less than the inertial frequency, are studied. The analysis with regard to all components of the stability E ad and the Brunt-Väisäla frequency N makes a great contribution to understanding of mixing processes in theoretical and experimental investigations; it is valid in all reservoirs of the Earth with inverse and direct temperature stratification, including Lake Baikal, Lake Tanganyika, and the World Ocean.

  2. Hospitalized dogs recovery from naturally occurring heatstroke; does serum heat shock protein 72 can provide prognostic biomarker?

    PubMed

    Bruchim, Yaron; Segev, Gilad; Kelmer, Efrat; Codner, Carolina; Marisat, Ahmad; Horowitz, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Heatstroke is a serious illness in dogs characterized by core temperatures above 41°C with central nervous system dysfunction. Experimental heatstroke models have tried to correlate biomarker levels with the severity of the syndrome. Serum heat shock protein (eHSP70) levels were recently evaluated as a biomarker of heat tolerance and acclimation, their role as a marker of heatstroke is inconclusive. Here, we monitored eHSP70 levels in correlation with systemic biomarkers in 30 naturally occurring canine heatstroke cases. Thirty dogs diagnosed with environmental (33%) or exertional (66%) heatstroke admitted to hospital (0-14 h post-injury) were tested for biomarkers of organ damage and coagulation parameters. eHSP70 levels were measured upon admission and 4, 12, and 24 h later (T1, T2, and T3, respectively). No differences were found between exertional and environmental heatstroke cases. The eHSP profile demonstrated an inverted bell shape, with the lowest levels at the 12 h time point. A positive correlation between eHSP70, lactate, and aPPT was also noted at T2 in all the dogs in the study. Twenty-four h after presentation, eHSP70 levels returned to those measured upon admission, this change was only significant in the survivors. The obtained results suggest that eHSP72 level profile may be predictive of survival. PMID:26441274

  3. Nature of fluid flows in differentially heated cylindrical container filled with a stratified solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jai-Ching

    1992-01-01

    Semiconductor crystals such as Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te grown by unidirectional solidification Bridgmann method have shown compositional segregations in both the axial and radial directions. Due to the wide separation between the liquidus and the solidus of its pseudobinary phase diagram, there is a diffusion layer of higher HgTe content built up in the melt near the melt-solid interface which gives a solute concentration gradient in the axial direction. Because of the higher thermal conductivity in the melt than that in the crystal there is a thermal leakage through the fused silica crucible wall near the melt-solid interface. This gives a thermal gradient in the radial direction. Hart (1971), Thorpe, Hutt and Soulsby (1969) have shown that under such condition a fluid will become convectively unstable as a result of different diffusivities of temperature and solute. It is quite important to understand the effects of this thermosolute convection on the compositional segregation in the unidirectionally solidified crystals. To reach this goal, we start with a simplified problem. We study the nature of fluid flows of a stratified solution in a cylindrical container with a radial temperature gradient. The cylindrical container wall is considered to be maintained at a higher temperature than that at the center of the solution and the solution in the lower gravitational direction has higher solute concentration which decrease linearly to a lower concentration and then remain constant to the top of the solution. The sample solution is taken to be salt water.

  4. Natural Circulation in the Blanket Heat Removal System During a Loss-of-Pumping Accident (LOFA) Based on Initial Conceptual Design

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07

    A transient natural convection model of the APT blanket primary heat removal (HR) system was developed to demonstrate that the blanket could be cooled for a sufficient period of time for long term cooling to be established following a loss-of-flow accident (LOFA). The particular case of interest in this report is a complete loss-of-pumping accident. For the accident scenario in which pumps are lost in both the target and blanket HR systems, natural convection provides effective cooling of the blanket for approximately 68 hours, and, if only the blanket HR systems are involved, natural convection is effective for approximately 210 hours. The heat sink for both of these accident scenarios is the assumed stagnant fluid and metal on the secondary sides of the heat exchangers.

  5. The impact of the weather conditions on the cooling performance of the heat pump driven by an internal natural gas combustion engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janovcová, Martina; Jandačka, Jozef; Malcho, Milan

    2015-05-01

    Market with sources of heat and cold offers unlimited choice of different power these devices, design technology, efficiency and price categories. New progressive technologies are constantly discovering, about which is still little information, which include heat pumps powered by a combustion engine running on natural gas. A few pieces of these installations are in Slovakia, but no studies about their work and effectiveness under real conditions. This article deals with experimental measurements of gas heat pump efficiency in cooling mode. Since the gas heat pump works only in system air - water, air is the primary low - energy source, it is necessary to monitor the impact of the climate conditions for the gas heat pump performance.

  6. Finite element analysis of natural convective heat transfer in a porous square cavity filled with nanofluids in the presence of thermal radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekar, Balla Chandra; Kishan, Naikoti

    2015-12-01

    Free convection heat transfer in a square cavity filled with nanofluid-saturated porous medium with the effects of different nanoparticles in the presence of thermal radiation is investigated in this paper. The top and bottom horizontal walls of cavity are considered adiabatic, while the vertical walls are kept at constant temperatures. The governing partial differential equations are solved by finite element method of Galerkin weighted residual scheme. Numerical results are obtained for different values of the Rayleigh number, radiation parameter and nanofluid volume fraction. The overall investigation of variation of streamlines, isotherms and Nusselt numbers is presented graphically. To examine the accuracy, the present results are compared with the available results.

  7. Numerical investigation of heat transfer enhancement of natural convection in a square cavity filled with a Water-CuO nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez Gonzalez, Jose; Beltran, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    We presents a numerical study of natural convection heat transfer in a square cavity filled a water-CuO nanofluid. The governing equations for natural convection are solved numerically with a Chebyshev pseudo spectral method using and projection method as a decoupling strategy. The Nusselt number is determined as a function of Rayleigh number and the solid volume fraction. The high conductivity of the CuO nanoparticles modifies the overall thermal conductivity of the fluid, even with a decrement of the Nusselt number the effective thermal conductivity increase therefore higher heat transfer rate is obtained with the numerical model.

  8. Spatial and vertical distribution and risk assessment of natural radionuclides in soils surrounding the lignite-fired power plants in Megalopolis basin, Greece.

    PubMed

    Papaefthymiou, H V; Manousakas, M; Fouskas, A; Siavalas, G

    2013-01-01

    Twenty soil profile samples and fourteen surface soil samples collected from the vicinity of the lignite-fired power plants in the Megalopolis basin (Greece) were analysed for their natural radionuclide concentration and (137)Cs, since fossil fuels are associated with naturally occurring radioactive materials and hence with radiological impact. No significant enhancement of surface soil radioactivity levels in the vicinity of lignite-fired plants was observed. A downcore decreasing trend of (137)Cs was observed in a number of cores reflecting its atmospheric origin, whereas the uniform distribution observed in a number of other cores gave information on the mechanical alteration of the soil. The average dose rate value was found to be 63 ± 22 nGy h(-1), while the annual average effective dose from the terrestrial gamma radiation was found to be 0.08 ± 0.03 mSv. PMID:23511709

  9. Fluidized bed heat exchanger with water cooled air distributor and dust hopper

    DOEpatents

    Jukkola, Walfred W.; Leon, Albert M.; Van Dyk, Jr., Garritt C.; McCoy, Daniel E.; Fisher, Barry L.; Saiers, Timothy L.; Karstetter, Marlin E.

    1981-11-24

    A fluidized bed heat exchanger is provided in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel. A steam-water natural circulation system is provided for heat exchange and the housing of the heat exchanger has a water-wall type construction. Vertical in-bed heat exchange tubes are provided and the air distributor is water-cooled. A water-cooled dust hopper is provided in the housing to collect particulates from the combustion gases and separate the combustion zone from a volume within said housing in which convection heat exchange tubes are provided to extract heat from the exiting combustion gases.

  10. Vertical motion simulator familiarization guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danek, George L.

    1993-01-01

    The Vertical Motion Simulator Familiarization Guide provides a synoptic description of the Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) and descriptions of the various simulation components and systems. The intended audience is the community of scientists and engineers who employ the VMS for research and development. The concept of a research simulator system is introduced and the building block nature of the VMS is emphasized. Individual sections describe all the hardware elements in terms of general properties and capabilities. Also included are an example of a typical VMS simulation which graphically illustrates the composition of the system and shows the signal flow among the elements and a glossary of specialized terms, abbreviations, and acronyms.

  11. Solar-heated swimming school--Wilmington, Delaware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Report describes operation, installation, and performance of solar-energy system which provides alternative to natural gas pool heating. System is comprised of 2,500 square feet of liquid flat-plate collectors connected to 3,600 galloon; gallongalloon storage tank, with microcomputer-based controls. Extension of building incorporates vertical-wall, passive collection system which provides quarter of heated fresh air for office.

  12. State space approach to unsteady magnetohydrodynamics natural convection heat and mass transfer through a porous medium saturated with a viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzat, M. A.; El-Bary, A. A.; Hatem, A. S.

    2014-07-01

    A technique of the state space approach and the inversion of the Laplace transform method are applied to dimensionless equations of an unsteady one-dimensional boundary-layer flow due to heat and mass transfer through a porous medium saturated with a viscoelastic fluid bounded by an infinite vertical plate in the presence of a uniform magnetic field is described. Complete analytical solutions for the temperature, concentration, velocity, and induced magnetic and electric fields are presented. The inversion of the Laplace transforms is carried out by using a numerical approach. The proposed method is used to solve two problems: boundary-layer flow in a viscoelastic fluid near a vertical wall subjected to the initial conditions of a stepwise temperature and concentration and viscoelastic fluid flow between two vertical walls. The solutions are found to be dependent on the governing parameters including the Prandtl number, the Schmidt number, the Grashof number, reaction rate coefficient, viscoelastic parameter, and permeability of the porous medium. Effects of these major parameters on the transport behavior are investigated methodically, and typical results are illustrated to reveal the tendency of the solutions. Representative results are presented for the velocity, temperature, concentration, and induced magnetic and electric field distributions, as well as the local skin-friction coefficient and the local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers.

  13. Laminar flow heat transfer downstream from U-bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie Nassif

    1987-05-01

    The laminar flow heat transfer downstream from the unheated, vertical bends in horizontal U-tubes with electrically heated straight tube sections was investigated. For each test section, local axial and peripheral wall temperatures were measured and the local peripheral heat transfer coefficients at the various locations were calculated. The investigation permitted a better understanding of the interaction of the primary, secondary and tertiary flow patterns, i.e., the combination of forced and natural convection with the centrifugal effects. Also, a correlation was developed, which predicts the heat transfer coefficient downstream from an unheated U-bend, and which can be extended to straight tubes.

  14. Short-term heat shock affects the course of immune response in Galleria mellonella naturally infected with the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Vertyporokh, Lidiia; Taszłow, Paulina; Samorek-Pieróg, Małgorzata; Wojda, Iwona

    2015-09-01

    We aimed to investigate how exposition of infected insects to short-term heat shock affects the biochemical and molecular aspects of their immune response. Galleria mellonella larvae were exposed to 43°C for 15min, at the seventy second hour after natural infection with entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana. As a result, both qualitative and quantitative changes in hemolymph protein profiles, and among them infection-induced changes in the amount of apolipophorin III (apoLp-III), were observed. Heat shock differently affects the expression of the tested immune-related genes. It transiently inhibits expression of antifungal peptides gallerimycin and galiomicin in both the fat body and hemocytes of infected larvae. The same, although to a lesser extent, concerned apoLp-III gene expression and was observed directly after heat shock. Nevertheless, in larvae that had recovered from heat shock, apoLp-III expression was higher in comparison to unshocked larvae in the fat body but not in hemocytes, which was consistent with the higher amount of this protein detected in the hemolymph of the infected, shocked larvae. Furthermore, lysozyme-type activity was higher directly after heat shock, while antifungal activity was significantly higher also in larvae that had recovered from heat shock, in comparison to the respective values in their non-shocked, infected counterparts. These results show how changes in the external temperature modulate the immune response of G. mellonella suffering from infection with its natural pathogen B. bassiana. PMID:26149823

  15. Dissociated Vertical Deviation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Terms Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Dissociated Vertical Deviation En Español Read in Chinese What is Dissociated Vertical Deviation (DVD)? DVD is ...

  16. Vertical Map Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Joanne M.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the superiority of vertical filing of maps in compressor-style vertical units over horizontal filing in drawers, emphasizing such factors as physical protection of the collection, ease of filing and retrieval, and efficient use of space. Disadvantages of vertical filing are also reviewed. (Author/JL)

  17. Nature of flow and turbulence structure around an in-stream vertical plate in a shallow channel and the implications for sediment erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkil, Gokhan; Constantinescu, George

    2009-06-01

    Detailed knowledge of the dynamics of large-scale turbulence structures is needed to understand the geomorphodynamic processes around in-stream obstacles present in rivers. Detached Eddy Simulation is used to study the flow past a high-aspect-ratio rectangular cylinder (plate) mounted on a flat-bed relatively shallow channel at a channel Reynolds number of 2.4 × 105. Similar to other flows past surface-mounted bluff bodies, the large amplification of the turbulence inside the horseshoe vortex system is because the core of the main necklace vortex is subject to large-scale bimodal oscillations. The presence of a sharp edge at the flanks of the obstruction fixes the position of the flow separation at all depths and induces the formation and shedding of very strong wake rollers over the whole channel depth. Compared with the case of a circular cylinder where the intensity of the rollers decays significantly in the near-bed region because the incoming flow velocity is not sufficient to force the wake to transition from subcritical to supercritical regime, in the case of a high-aspect-ratio rectangular cylinder the passage of the rollers was found to induce high bed-shear stresses at large distances (6-8 D) behind the obstruction. Also, the nondimensional values of the pressure root-mean-square fluctuations at the bed were found to be about 1 order of magnitude higher than the ones predicted for circular cylinders. Overall, this shows that the shape of the in-stream obstruction can greatly modify the dynamics of the large-scale coherent structures, the nature of their interactions, and ultimately, their capability to entrain and transport sediment particles and the speed at which the scour process evolves during its initial stages.

  18. Vertical bounce of two vertically aligned balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2007-11-01

    When a tennis ball rests on top of a basketball and both drop to the floor together, the tennis ball is projected vertically at high speed. A mass-spring model of the impact, as well as air track data, suggest that the tennis ball should be projected at relatively low speed. Measurements of the forces on each ball and the bounce of vertically aligned superballs are used to resolve the discrepancy.

  19. Comparing the Effect of Naturally Restored Forest and Grassland on Carbon Sequestration and Its Vertical Distribution in the Chinese Loess Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jie; Cheng, Jimin; Li, Weijun; Liu, Weiguo

    2012-01-01

    Vegetation restoration has been conducted in the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) since the 1950s, and large areas of farmland have been converted to forest and grassland, which largely results in SOC change. However, there has been little comparative research on SOC sequestration and distribution between secondary forest and restored grassland. Therefore, we selected typical secondary forest (SF-1 and SF-2) and restored grassland (RG-1 and RG-2) sites and determined the SOC storage. Moreover, to illustrate the factors resulting in possible variance in SOC sequestration, we measured the soil δ13C value. The average SOC content was 6.8, 9.9, 17.9 and 20.4 g kg−1 at sites SF-1, SF-2, RG-1 and RG-2, respectively. Compared with 0–100 cm depth, the percentage of SOC content in the top 20 cm was 55.1%, 55.3%, 23.1%, and 30.6% at sites SF-1, SF-2, RG-1 and RG-2, suggesting a higher SOC content in shallow layers in secondary forest and in deeper layers in restored grassland. The variation of soil δ13C values with depth in this study might be attributed to the mixing of new and old carbon and kinetic fractionation during the decomposition of SOM by microbes, whereas the impact of the Suess effect (the decline of 13C atmospheric CO2 values with the burning of fossil fuel since the Industrial Revolution) was minimal. The soil δ13C value increased sharply in the top 20 cm, which then increased slightly in deeper layers in secondary forest, indicating a main carbon source of surface litter. However the soil δ13C values exhibited slow increases in the whole profile in the restored grasslands, suggesting that the contribution of roots to soil carbon in deeper layers played an important role. We suggest that naturally restored grassland would be a more effective vegetation type for SOC sequestration due to higher carbon input from roots in the CLP. PMID:22768335

  20. Experimental and theoretical analysis on the effect of inclination on metal powder sintered heat pipe radiator with natural convection cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Li; Qifei, Jian; Wu, Shifeng

    2016-06-01

    An experimental study and theoretical analysis of heat transfer performance of a sintered heat pipe radiator that implemented in a 50 L domestic semiconductor refrigerator have been conducted to examine the effect of inclination angle, combined with a minimum entropy generation analysis. The experiment results suggest that inclination angle has influences on both the evaporator and condenser section, and the performance of the heat pipe radiator is more sensitive to the inclination change in negative inclined than in positive inclined position. When the heat pipe radiator is in negative inclination angle position, large amplitude of variation on the thermal resistance of this heat pipe radiator is observed. As the thermal load is below 58.89 W, the influence of inclination angle on the overall thermal resistance is not that apparent as compared to the other three thermal loads. Thermal resistance of heat pipe radiator decreases by 82.86 % in inclination of 60° at the set of 138.46 W, compared to horizontal position. Based on the analysis results in this paper, in order to achieve a better heat transfer performance of the heat pipe radiator, it is recommended that the heat pipe radiator be mounted in positive inclination angle positions (30°-90°), where the condenser is above the evaporator.

  1. Vertical axis wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij

    2011-03-08

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  2. Vertical and Interfacial Transport in Wetlands (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variano, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the fluxes connecting the water column, substrate, and atmosphere in wetland environments. To do this, analytical, numerical, and laboratory models have been used to quantify the hydrodynamic contributions to vertical fluxes. A key question is whether the hydrodynamic transport can be modeled as a diffusivity, and, if so, what the vertical structure of this diffusivity is. This question will be addressed in a number of flow types and for a number of fluxes. The fluxes of interest are heat, sediment, dissolved gases (such as methane and oxygen) and other dissolved solutes (such as nutrients and pollutants). The flows of interest include: unidirectional current, reversing flow (under waves, seiches, and tides), wind-sheared surface flows, and thermal convection. Rain and bioturbation can be important, but are not considered in the modeling work discussed herein. Specifically, we will present results on gas transport at wind-sheared free surface, sediment transport in unidirectional flow, and heat transfer in an oscillating flow cause by a seiche. All three of these will be used to consider the question of appropriate analytical models for vertical transport. The analytic models considered here are all 1D models that assume homogeneity in the horizontal plane. The numerical models use finite element methods and resolve the flow around individual vegetation stems in an idealized geometry. Laboratory models discussed herein also use an idealized geometry. Vegetation is represented by an array of cylinders, whose geometry is modeled after Scirpus spp. wetlands in Northern California. The laboratory model is constructed in a way that allows optical access to the flow, even in dense vegetation and far from boundaries. This is accomplished by using fluoropolymer plastics to construct vegetation models. The optical access allows us to employ particle image velocimetry (PIV) and planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to measure

  3. Development of a naturally aspired thermosyphon for power amplifier cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siedel, S.; Robinson, A. J.; Kempers, R.; Kerslake, S.

    2014-07-01

    This paper details the early development steps of a two-phase thermosyphon thermal management solution for power amplifiers (PA) in the telecommunication industry. These components, attached to a vertical PCB within an enclosure between the RF filter and a natural or forced convection heat sink, dissipate a large amount of heat with a high heat flux density. Currently cooled by direct contact to a shared heat sink, they tend to spread heat towards other components of their board, affecting their reliability. A thermosyphon thus appear as an ideal thermal management solution to transport the heat from the power amplifiers in order to dissipate it to a remote and dedicated natural convection heat sink. In the present study, the performance and the heat spreading of a forced convection unit is measured. A thermosyphon solution is then designed with a flat vertical evaporator and a radial natural convection heat sink and condenser. The performance of the thermosyphon thermal management solution is measured and compared to the initial solution. The limits and improvement needs of the thermosyphon solution are then discussed.

  4. Effect of the buoyancy force on natural convection in a cubical cavity with a heat source of triangular cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibanov, N. S.; Sheremet, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Numerical analysis of laminar natural convection inside a cubical cavity with a local heat source of triangular cross-section has been conducted. The mathematical model formulated in dimensionless variables such as "vector potential functions - vorticity vector" has been solved by the finite difference method of the second order accuracy. The three-dimensional temperature fields, 2D streamlines and isotherms in a wide range of the Rayleigh number from 104 to 106 have been presented illustrating variations of the fluid flow and heat transfer.

  5. POWER GENERATION USING MEGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC GENERATOR WITH A CIRCULATION FLOW DRIVEN BY SOLAR-HEAT-INDUCED NATURAL CONVECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project team has theoretically studied the mechanism of magnetohydrodynamic generator, the coupling of heat transfer and buoyancy-driven free convection, and radiation heat transfer. A number of ideas for the projects have been brainstormed in the team. The underline physi...

  6. Novel, cyclic heat dissipation method for the correction of natural temperature gradients in sap flow measurements. Part 2. Laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Acosta, J Leonardo; Vandegehuchte, Maurits W; Steppe, Kathy; Lubczynski, Maciek W

    2012-07-01

    Sap flow measurements conducted with thermal dissipation probes (TDPs) are vulnerable to natural temperature gradient (NTG) bias. Few studies, however, attempted to explain the dynamics underlying the NTG formation and its influence on the sensors' signal. This study focused on understanding how the TDP signals are affected by negative and positive temperature influences from NTG and tested the novel cyclic heat dissipation (CHD) method to filter out the NTG bias. A series of three experiments were performed in which gravity-driven water flow was enforced on freshly cut stem segments of Fagus sylvatica L., while an artificial temperature gradient (ATG) was induced. The first experiment sought to confirm the incidence of the ATG on sensors. The second experiment established the mis-estimations caused by the biasing effect of the ATG on standard TDP measurements. The third experiment tested the accuracy of the CHD method to account for the ATG biasing effect, as compared with other cyclic correction methods. During experiments, sap flow measured by TDP was assessed against gravimetric measurements. The results show that negative and positive ATGs were comparable in pattern but substantially larger than field NTGs. Second, the ATG bias caused an overestimation of the standard TDP sap flux density of ∼17 cm(3) cm(-2) h(-1) by 76%, and the sap flux density of ∼2 cm(3) cm(-2) h(-1) by over 800%. Finally, the proposed CHD method successfully reduced the max. ATG bias to 25% at ∼11 cm(3) cm(-2) h(-1) and to 40% at ∼1 cm(3) cm(-2) h(-1). We concluded that: (i) the TDP method is susceptible to NTG especially at low flows; (ii) the CHD method successfully corrected the TDP signal and resulted in generally more accurate sap flux density estimates (mean absolute percentage error ranging between 11 and 21%) than standard constant power TDP method and other cyclic power methods; and (iii) the ATG enforcing system is a suitable way of re-creating NTG for future tests. PMID

  7. Design Report for the ½ Scale Air-Cooled RCCS Tests in the Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, D. D.; Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Bremer, N.; Aeschlimann, R. W.

    2014-06-01

    The Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF) is a large scale thermal hydraulics test facility that has been built at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The facility was constructed in order to carry out highly instrumented experiments that can be used to validate the performance of passive safety systems for advanced reactor designs. The facility has principally been designed for testing of Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) concepts that rely on natural convection cooling for either air or water-based systems. Standing 25-m in height, the facility is able to supply up to 220 kW at 21 kW/m2 to accurately simulate the heat fluxes at the walls of a reactor pressure vessel. A suite of nearly 400 data acquisition channels, including a sophisticated fiber optic system for high density temperature measurements, guides test operations and provides data to support scaling analysis and modeling efforts. Measurements of system mass flow rate, air and surface temperatures, heat flux, humidity, and pressure differentials, among others; are part of this total generated data set. The following report provides an introduction to the top level-objectives of the program related to passively safe decay heat removal, a detailed description of the engineering specifications, design features, and dimensions of the test facility at Argonne. Specifications of the sensors and their placement on the test facility will be provided, along with a complete channel listing of the data acquisition system.

  8. Effect of heat-processing on the antioxidant and prooxidant activities of β-carotene from natural and synthetic origins on red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Phan-Thi, Hanh; Durand, Philippe; Prost, Michel; Prost, Emmanuelle; Waché, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Extraction of bioactives is a cause of structural changes in these molecules. In this work, the bioactivity of commercial natural β-carotenes, one softly extracted without heat-assistance from Momordica cochinchinensis (BCG), one conventionally extracted from another natural source (BCC), and a synthetic one (BCS), was assessed during an additional heat-treatment mimicking formulation. Their antioxidant activities were evaluated after heat-treatment at different concentrations through hemolysis of horse red blood cells. The thermal 15-cis-isomerization of β-carotene, characterized by DAD-HPLC, resulted in a 2.5- to 4.8-fold increase in the anti-hemolytic effect but this was undetected in chemical assay, at 4 μM. At 100 μM, BCC lost its antioxidant properties and became pro-oxidant. This effect might be caused by long-chain-oxidized-products of BCC. Results demonstrated that a short heat-treatment improves the bioactivity of β-carotene but longer treatments made BCC prooxidant, showing that samples that underwent drastic extraction processes could not tolerate additional steps for functional food production. PMID:26213087

  9. Simulation of decay heat removal by natural convection in a pool type fast reactor model-ramona-with coupled 1D/2D thermal hydraulic code system

    SciTech Connect

    Kasinathan, N.; Rajakumar, A.; Vaidyanathan, G.; Chetal, S.C.

    1995-09-01

    Post shutdown decay heat removal is an important safety requirement in any nuclear system. In order to improve the reliability of this function, Liquid metal (sodium) cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) are equipped with redundant hot pool dipped immersion coolers connected to natural draught air cooled heat exchangers through intermediate sodium circuits. During decay heat removal, flow through the core, immersion cooler primary side and in the intermediate sodium circuits are also through natural convection. In order to establish the viability and validate computer codes used in making predictions, a 1:20 scale experimental model called RAMONA with water as coolant has been built and experimental simulation of decay heat removal situation has been performed at KfK Karlsruhe. Results of two such experiments have been compiled and published as benchmarks. This paper brings out the results of the numerical simulation of one of the benchmark case through a 1D/2D coupled code system, DHDYN-1D/THYC-2D and the salient features of the comparisons. Brief description of the formulations of the codes are also included.

  10. Offset vertical radar profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witten, A.; Lane, J.

    2003-01-01

    Diffraction tomography imaging was applied to VRP data acquired by vertically moving a receiving antenna in a number of wells. This procedure simulated a vertical downhole receiver array. Similarly, a transmitting antenna was sequentially moved along a series of radial lines extending outward from the receiver wells. This provided a sequence of multistatic data sets and, from each data set, a two-dimensional vertical cross-sectional image of spatial variations in wave speed was reconstructed.

  11. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-04-01

    Blade fatigue life is an important element in determining the economic viability of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). VAWT-SAL Vertical Axis Wind Turbine- Stochastic Aerodynamic Loads Ver 3.2 numerically simulates the stochastic (random0 aerodynamic loads of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) created by the atomspheric turbulence. The program takes into account the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and assumed turbulence properties.

  12. MHD Natural Convective Flow in an Isosceles Triangular Cavity Filled with Porous Medium due to Uniform/Non-Uniform Heated Side Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, Tariq; Siddiqui, Muhammad Arshad; Mehmood, Ziafat; Pop, Ioan

    2015-10-01

    In this article, numerical simulations are carried out for fluid flow and heat transfer through natural convection in an isosceles triangular cavity under the effects of uniform magnetic field. The cavity is of cold bottom wall and uniformly/non-uniformly heated side walls and is filled with isotropic porous medium. The governing Navier Stoke's equations are subjected to Penalty finite element method to eliminate pressure term and Galerkin weighted residual method is applied to obtain the solution of the reduced equations for different ranges of the physical parameters. The results are verified as grid independent and comparison is made as a limiting case with the results available in literature, and it is shown that the developed code is highly accurate. Computations are presented in terms of streamlines, isotherms, local Nusselt number and average Nusselt number through graphs and tables. It is observed that, for the case of uniform heating side walls, strength of circulation of streamlines gets increased when Rayleigh number is increased above critical value, but increase in Hartmann number decreases strength of streamlines circulations. For non-uniform heating case, it is noticed that heat transfer rate is maximum at corners of bottom wall.

  13. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is disclosed. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  14. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  15. Analytic solution for modeling of the ground heat exchanger and groundwater system:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodbury, A. D.; Olfman, M.

    2009-12-01

    An analytical solution has been developed for the simulation of the effect on the subsurface of operating a geothermal U-Loop type vertical ground heat exchanger. The model results in a solution which allows one to determine a vertical profile of the various thermal properties, including the thermal conductivity. Based on all of the experimental evidence and various assumptions, a hypothesis regarding the cause of the vertical variation in temperature rise is formed: (1) The vertical variation of temperature rise is wholly caused by the vertical variation in thermal conductivity. Thus thermal conductivity is highest where temperature rise is highest, thermal conductivity is lowest where temperature rise is lowest. It follows that the radial heat flux function also has the same pattern as the thermal conductivity so that the most heat transfer occurs where the temperature rise is the highest and the least heat transfer occurs where the temperature rise is the lowestThus a further hypothesis, regarding the nature of the radial heat flux function, is formed: (2) The radial heat flux function takes on the same characteristic shape as the thermal conductivity function. This mathematical model is considered adequate as it predicts the subsurface behaviour observed experimentally and appears to be useful for predictive modelling.

  16. Combined Natural Gas and Solar Technologies for Heating and Cooling in the City of NIS in Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanović, Velimir P.; Bojić, Milorad Lj.

    2010-06-01

    The use of conventional systems for heat and electricity production in Niš and Serbia means a constant waste of energy, and money. This problem is present in both industrial and public sector. Using conventional systems, means not only low-energy efficient systems, and technologies, but also using very "dirty" technologies, which cause heavy environment pollution. The lack of electricity in our country, and region is also present. The gas pipeline in Niš was finished not long ago, and second gas pipeline is about to be made in the next couple of years. This opens a door for implementing new technologies and the use of new methods for production of heat and electricity, while preserving our environment. This paper reports discussion of this technology with management of public institutions, which use both heat and electricity.

  17. Learning from Nature to Improve the Heat Generation of Iron-Oxide Nanoparticles for Magnetic Hyperthermia Applications

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Boubeta, Carlos; Simeonidis, Konstantinos; Makridis, Antonios; Angelakeris, Makis; Iglesias, Oscar; Guardia, Pablo; Cabot, Andreu; Yedra, Lluis; Estradé, Sonia; Peiró, Francesca; Saghi, Zineb; Midgley, Paul A.; Conde-Leborán, Iván; Serantes, David; Baldomir, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The performance of magnetic nanoparticles is intimately entwined with their structure, mean size and magnetic anisotropy. Besides, ensembles offer a unique way of engineering the magnetic response by modifying the strength of the dipolar interactions between particles. Here we report on an experimental and theoretical analysis of magnetic hyperthermia, a rapidly developing technique in medical research and oncology. Experimentally, we demonstrate that single-domain cubic iron oxide particles resembling bacterial magnetosomes have superior magnetic heating efficiency compared to spherical particles of similar sizes. Monte Carlo simulations at the atomic level corroborate the larger anisotropy of the cubic particles in comparison with the spherical ones, thus evidencing the beneficial role of surface anisotropy in the improved heating power. Moreover we establish a quantitative link between the particle assembling, the interactions and the heating properties. This knowledge opens new perspectives for improved hyperthermia, an alternative to conventional cancer therapies. PMID:23576006

  18. Learning from Nature to Improve the Heat Generation of Iron-Oxide Nanoparticles for Magnetic Hyperthermia Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Boubeta, Carlos; Simeonidis, Konstantinos; Makridis, Antonios; Angelakeris, Makis; Iglesias, Oscar; Guardia, Pablo; Cabot, Andreu; Yedra, Lluis; Estradé, Sonia; Peiró, Francesca; Saghi, Zineb; Midgley, Paul A.; Conde-Leborán, Iván; Serantes, David; Baldomir, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    The performance of magnetic nanoparticles is intimately entwined with their structure, mean size and magnetic anisotropy. Besides, ensembles offer a unique way of engineering the magnetic response by modifying the strength of the dipolar interactions between particles. Here we report on an experimental and theoretical analysis of magnetic hyperthermia, a rapidly developing technique in medical research and oncology. Experimentally, we demonstrate that single-domain cubic iron oxide particles resembling bacterial magnetosomes have superior magnetic heating efficiency compared to spherical particles of similar sizes. Monte Carlo simulations at the atomic level corroborate the larger anisotropy of the cubic particles in comparison with the spherical ones, thus evidencing the beneficial role of surface anisotropy in the improved heating power. Moreover we establish a quantitative link between the particle assembling, the interactions and the heating properties. This knowledge opens new perspectives for improved hyperthermia, an alternative to conventional cancer therapies.

  19. Application of Karhunen-Loève Expansions for the Dynamic Analysis of a Natural Convection Loop for Known Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Tobias; Pacheco-Vega, Arturo

    2012-11-01

    In the present study we use Karhunen-Loève (KL) expansions to model the dynamic behavior of a single-phase natural convection loop. The loop is filled with an incompressible fluid that exchanges heat through the walls of its toroidal shape. Influx and efflux of energy take place at different parts of the loop. The focus here is a sinusoidal variation of the heat flux exchanged with the environment for three different scenarios; i.e., stable, limit cycles and chaos. For the analysis, one-dimensional models, in which the tilt angle and the amplitude of the heat flux are used as parameters, were first developed under suitable assumptions and then solved numerically to generate the data from which the KL-based models could be constructed. The method of snapshots, along with a Galerkin projection, was then used to find the basis functions and corresponding constants of each expansion, thus producing the optimal representation of the system. Results from this study indicate that the dimension of the KL-based dynamical system depends on the linear stability of the steady states; the number of basis functions necessary to describe the system increases with increased complexity of the system operation. When compared to typical dynamical systems based on Fourier expansions the KL-based models are, in general, more compact and equally accurate in the dynamic description of the natural convection loop.

  20. CFD analysis for the applicability of the natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) for the simulation of the VHTR RCCS. Topical report.

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C. P.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-05-16

    The Very High Temperature gas cooled reactor (VHTR) is one of the GEN IV reactor concepts that have been proposed for thermochemical hydrogen production and other process-heat applications like coal gasification. The USDOE has selected the VHTR for further research and development, aiming to demonstrate emissions-free electricity and hydrogen production at a future time. One of the major safety advantages of the VHTR is the potential for passive decay heat removal by natural circulation of air in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). The air-side of the RCCS is very similar to the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) that has been proposed for the PRISM reactor design. The design and safety analysis of the RVACS have been based on extensive analytical and experimental work performed at ANL. The Natural Convective Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) at ANL that simulates at full scale the air-side of the RVACS was built to provide experimental support for the design and analysis of the PRISM RVACS system. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that the NSTF facility can be used to generate RCCS experimental data: to validate CFD and systems codes for the analysis of the RCCS; and to support the design and safety analysis of the RCCS.

  1. SOLAR HEATING OF TANK BOTTOMS Application of Solar Heating to Asphaltic and Parrafinic Oils Reducing Fuel Costs and Greenhouse Gases Due to Use of Natural Gas and Propane

    SciTech Connect

    Eugene A. Fritzler

    2005-09-01

    The sale of crude oil requires that the crude meet product specifications for BS&W, temperature, pour point and API gravity. The physical characteristics of the crude such as pour point and viscosity effect the efficient loading, transport, and unloading of the crude oil. In many cases, the crude oil has either a very high paraffin content or asphalt content which will require either hot oiling or the addition of diluents to the crude oil to reduce the viscosity and the pour point of the oil allowing the crude oil to be readily loaded on to the transport. Marginal wells are significantly impacted by the cost of preheating the oil to an appropriate temperature to allow for ease of transport. Highly paraffinic and asphaltic oils exist throughout the D-J basin and generally require pretreatment during cold months prior to sales. The current study addresses the use of solar energy to heat tank bottoms and improves the overall efficiency and operational reliability of stripper wells.

  2. Methods of testing parameterizations: Vertical ocean mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tziperman, Eli

    1992-01-01

    The ocean's velocity field is characterized by an exceptional variety of scales. While the small-scale oceanic turbulence responsible for the vertical mixing in the ocean is of scales a few centimeters and smaller, the oceanic general circulation is characterized by horizontal scales of thousands of kilometers. In oceanic general circulation models that are typically run today, the vertical structure of the ocean is represented by a few tens of discrete grid points. Such models cannot explicitly model the small-scale mixing processes, and must, therefore, find ways to parameterize them in terms of the larger-scale fields. Finding a parameterization that is both reliable and plausible to use in ocean models is not a simple task. Vertical mixing in the ocean is the combined result of many complex processes, and, in fact, mixing is one of the less known and less understood aspects of the oceanic circulation. In present models of the oceanic circulation, the many complex processes responsible for vertical mixing are often parameterized in an oversimplified manner. Yet, finding an adequate parameterization of vertical ocean mixing is crucial to the successful application of ocean models to climate studies. The results of general circulation models for quantities that are of particular interest to climate studies, such as the meridional heat flux carried by the ocean, are quite sensitive to the strength of the vertical mixing. We try to examine the difficulties in choosing an appropriate vertical mixing parameterization, and the methods that are available for validating different parameterizations by comparing model results to oceanographic data. First, some of the physical processes responsible for vertically mixing the ocean are briefly mentioned, and some possible approaches to the parameterization of these processes in oceanographic general circulation models are described in the following section. We then discuss the role of the vertical mixing in the physics of the

  3. Heat transfer system

    DOEpatents

    McGuire, Joseph C.

    1982-01-01

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  4. Heat transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-03-07

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  5. Derivation of vertical air velocity from conventional Radiosonde ascents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manguttathil Gopalakrishnan, Manoj; Mohanakumar, Kesavapillai; Samson, Titu; Kottayil, Ajil; Varadarajan, Rakesh; Rebello, Rejoy

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we devise a method to estimate air vertical velocity from ascending radiosondes similar to that described in published results, but with certain differences in deriving the balloon parameters and the drag coefficient, while not considering explicitly the heat exchange between the balloon and the environment. We basically decompose the observed balloon ascent rate into vertical velocity in still air due to buoyancy force and that due to vertical air motion. The first part is computed from basic hydrodynamical principles and the vertical velocity is derived as the difference between observed ascent rate and the estimated still air vertical velocity. The derived values agree reasonably well (r=0.66) with vertical velocities observed with a collocated wind profiler radar, and the sources of uncertainties are discussed. Since vertical velocity is a difficult quantity to measure directly without expensive methods, derivation of the same from the conventional radiosonde ascents could be of great importance to the meteorological communities.

  6. Natural convection flows due to the combined buoyancy of heat and mass diffusion in a thermally stratified medium

    SciTech Connect

    Angirasa, D.; Srinivasan, J. )

    1989-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of laminar doubly diffusive free convection flows adjacent to a vertical surface in a stable thermally stratified medium. The two buoyant mechanisms are thermal diffusion and species diffusion. The species concentration is assumed to be small. Boussinesq approximations are incorporated and the governing conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy, and species are nondimensionalized. These equations are solved using a finite-difference method. The results are explained in terms of the basic physical mechanisms that govern these flows. It is observed that the ambient thermal stratification has a profound influence on the transport characteristics. The results show many interesting aspects of the complex interaction of the two buoyant mechanisms.

  7. Comparative Analysis of Natural Convection Flows Simulated by both the Conservation and Incompressible Forms of the Navier-Stokes Equations in a Differentially-Heated Square Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Richard C. Martineau; Ray A. Berry; Aurélia Esteve; Kurt D. Hamman; Dana A. Knoll; Ryosuke Park; William Taitano

    2009-01-01

    This report illustrates a comparative study to analyze the physical differences between numerical simulations obtained with both the conservation and incompressible forms of the Navier-Stokes equations for natural convection flows in simple geometries. The purpose of this study is to quantify how the incompressible flow assumption (which is based upon constant density advection, divergence-free flow, and the Boussinesq gravitational body force approximation) differs from the conservation form (which only assumes that the fluid is a continuum) when solving flows driven by gravity acting upon density variations resulting from local temperature gradients. Driving this study is the common use of the incompressible flow assumption in fluid flow simulations for nuclear power applications in natural convection flows subjected to a high heat flux (large temperature differences). A series of simulations were conducted on two-dimensional, differentially-heated rectangular geometries and modeled with both hydrodynamic formulations. From these simulations, the selected characterization parameters of maximum Nusselt number, average Nusselt number, and normalized pressure reduction were calculated. Comparisons of these parameters were made with available benchmark solutions for air with the ideal gas assumption at both low and high heat fluxes. Additionally, we generated body force, velocity, and divergence of velocity distributions to provide a basis for further analysis. The simulations and analysis were then extended to include helium at the Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR) normal operating conditions. Our results show that the consequences of incorporating the incompressible flow assumption in high heat flux situations may lead to unrepresentative results. The results question the use of the incompressible flow assumption for simulating fluid flow in an operating nuclear reactor, where large temperature variations are present. The results show that the use of

  8. Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Project status report, August--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Computer codes have been developed to predict the velocity and temperature profiles in the natural convection boundary layer on the inside of the vertical walls of the wrap-around heat exchanger tank. A brief description of several of the methods considered is given. Heat and mass transfer results for these various methods are compared for one sample case with the results of an accurate finite difference solution obtained with Keller`s box method.

  9. Vertical sleeve gastrectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... smaller stomach is about the size of a banana. It limits the amount of food you can ... staples. This creates a long vertical tube or banana-shaped stomach. The surgery does not involve cutting ...

  10. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  11. Response to droughts and heat waves of the productivity of natural and agricultural ecosystems in Europe within ISI-MIP2 historical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, Louis; Henrot, Alexandra-Jane; Dury, Marie; Jacquemin, Ingrid; Munhoven, Guy; Friend, Andrew; Rademacher, Tim T.; Hacket Pain, Andrew J.; Hickler, Thomas; Tian, Hanqin; Morfopoulos, Catherine; Ostberg, Sebastian; Chang, Jinfeng; Rafique, Rashid; Nishina, Kazuya

    2016-04-01

    According to the projections of climate models, extreme events such as droughts and heat waves are expected to become more frequent and more severe in the future. Such events are known to severely impact the productivity of both natural and agricultural ecosystems, and hence to affect ecosystem services such as crop yield and ecosystem carbon sequestration potential. Dynamic vegetation models are conventional tools to evaluate the productivity and carbon sequestration of ecosystems and their response to climate change. However, how far are these models able to correctly represent the sensitivity of ecosystems to droughts and heat waves? How do the responses of natural and agricultural ecosystems compare to each other, in terms of drought-induced changes in productivity and carbon sequestration? In this contribution, we use ISI-MIP2 model historical simulations from the biome sector to tentatively answer these questions. Nine dynamic vegetation models have participated in the biome sector intercomparison of ISI-MIP2: CARAIB, DLEM, HYBRID, JULES, LPJ-GUESS, LPJml, ORCHIDEE, VEGAS and VISIT. We focus the analysis on well-marked droughts or heat waves that occured in Europe after 1970, such as the 1976, 2003 and 2010 events. For most recent studied events, the model results are compared to the response observed at several eddy covariance sites in Europe, and, at a larger scale, to the changes in crop productivities reported in national statistics or to the drought impacts on gross primary productivity derived from satellite data (Terra MODIS instrument). The sensitivity of the models to the climatological dataset used in the simulations, as well as to the inclusion or not of anthropogenic land use, is also analysed within the studied events. Indeed, the ISI-MIP simulations have been run with four different historical climatic forcings, as well as for several land use/land cover configurations (natural vegetation, fixed land use and variable land use).

  12. CFD Extraction of Heat Transfer Coefficient in Cryogenic Propellant Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Current reduced-order thermal model for cryogenic propellant tanks is based on correlations built for flat plates collected in the 1950's. The use of these correlations suffers from inaccurate geometry representation; inaccurate gravity orientation; ambiguous length scale; and lack of detailed validation. This study uses first-principles based CFD methodology to compute heat transfer from the tank wall to the cryogenic fluids and extracts and correlates the equivalent heat transfer coefficient to support reduced-order thermal model. The CFD tool was first validated against available experimental data and commonly used correlations for natural convection along a vertically heated wall. Good agreements between the present prediction and experimental data have been found for flows in laminar as well turbulent regimes. The convective heat transfer between the tank wall and cryogenic propellant, and that between the tank wall and ullage gas were then simulated. The results showed that the commonly used heat transfer correlations for either vertical or horizontal plate over-predict heat transfer rate for the cryogenic tank, in some cases by as much as one order of magnitude. A characteristic length scale has been defined that can correlate all heat transfer coefficients for different fill levels into a single curve. This curve can be used for the reduced-order heat transfer model analysis.

  13. Heat-pump-centered Integrated Community Energy Systems: systems development, Consolidated Natural Gas Service Company. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, N.R.; Donakowski, T.D.; Foster, R.B.; Sala, D.L.; Tison, R.R.; Whaley, T.P.; Yudow, B.D.; Swenson, P.F.

    1980-01-01

    The Heat-Actuated Heat Pump Centered Integrated Community Energy System (HAHP-ICES) utilizes a gas-fired, engine-driven, heat pump and commercial buildings, and offers several advantages over the more conventional equipment it is intended to supplant. The general non-site-specific application assumes a hypothetical community of one 59,000 ft/sup 2/ office building and five 24-unit, low-rise apartment buildings located in a region with a climate similar to Chicago. This community serves as a starting point - the base case - upon which various sensitivity analyses are performed and through which the performance characteristics of the HAHP are explored. The results of these analyses provided the selection criteria for the site-specific application of the HAHP-ICES concept to a real-world community. The site-specific community consists of 42 townhouses; five 120-unit, low-rise apartment buildings; five 104-unit high-rise apartment buildings; one 124,000 ft/sup 2/ office building; and a single 135,000 ft/sup 2/ retail building located in Monroeville, Pa. The base-case analyses confirmed that the HAHP-ICES has significant potentials for reducing the primary energy consumption and pollutant emissions associated with space conditioning when compared with a conventional system. Primary energy consumption was reduced by 30%, while emission reductions ranged from 39 to 77%. The results of the site-specific analysis indicate that reductions in energy consumption of between 15 and 22% are possible when a HAHP-ICES is selected as opposed to conventional HVAC equipment.

  14. Carbon and Water Fluxes of Crops Exposed to the Sequence of Naturally Occurring Heat Stress, Drought and Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, E.; Miller, J. N.; Bernacchi, C.

    2015-12-01

    As a consequence of global climate change the occurrence of extreme weather events (heat waves, cold spells, drought, etc) are predicted to become more frequent and/or intense, which will likely have a large impact on crop production. In the winter of 2013/2014 several polar vortexes were experienced in Illinois, US, resulting in periods of extreme low temperatures between -20°C and -35°C. Prior to the extreme cold winter of 2013/2014 the region experienced drought over a hot summer in 2012. Four established fields of three perennial biofuel crops (Miscanthus x giganteus, Panicum virgatum L., and a mixture of native prairie species) and Zea mays/Glycine max agroecosystem have been studied since 2009 in order to investigate the effect of climate change and land-use change on carbon and water fluxes using the eddy covariance technique, as well as biomass production of these species. The combined effect of the heat and drought stress in 2012 resulted in severe water deficit of all species (up to -360 mm for miscanthus), which resulted in reduced net ecosystem exchange (NEE) during the drought for all species other than miscanthus. In the following year, during the recovery of these species from drought, miscanthus showed decreased NEE but the other species did not appear to be negatively influenced. As a consequence of the environmental stresses (heat and drought stress followed by extreme freezing), the water and carbon exchanges (such as ET, NEE, GPP, Reco) as well as growth parameters (LAI, biomass production) are shown to vary based on the stress tolerance of these species.

  15. Numerical analysis of heat transfer by conduction and natural convection in loose-fill fiberglass insulation--effects of convection on thermal performance

    SciTech Connect

    Delmas, A.A.; Wilkes, K.E.

    1992-04-01

    A two-dimensional code for solving equations of convective heat transfer in porous media is used to analyze heat transfer by conduction and convection in the attic insulation configuration. The particular cases treated correspond to loose-fill fiberglass insulation, which is characterized by high porosity and air permeability. The effects of natural convection on the thermal performance of the insulation are analyzed for various densities, permeabilities, and thicknesses of insulation. With convection increasing the total heat transfer through the insulation, the thermal resistance was found to decrease as the temperature difference across the insulating material increases. The predicted results for the thermal resistance are compared with data obtained in the large-scale climate simulator at the Roof Research Center using the attic test module, where the same phenomenon has already been observed. The way the wood joists within the insulation influence the start of convection is studied for differing thermophysical and dynamic properties of the insulating material. The presence of wood joists induces convection at a lower temperature difference.

  16. Finite element analysis of double-diffusive natural convection in a porous triangular enclosure filled with Al2O3 -water nanofluid in presence of heat generation.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Raju; Parvin, Salma; Khan, Md Abdul Hakim

    2016-08-01

    The problem of double-diffusive natural convection of Al2O3 -water nanofluid in a porous triangular enclosure in presence of heat generation has been studied numerically in this paper. The bottom wall of the cavity is heated isothermally, the left inclined wall is non-isothermal and the right inclined wall is considered to be cold. The concentration is higher at bottom wall, lower at right inclined wall and non-isoconcentration at left inclined wall of the cavity. The governing equations are transformed to the dimensionless form and solved numerically using Galerkin weighted residual technique of finite element method. The results are obtained in terms of streamlines, isotherms, isoconcentrations, average Nueeslt number (Nu) and average Sherwood number (Sh) for the parameters thermal Rayleigh number (RaT ), dimensionless heat generation parameter (λ), solid volume fraction (ϕ) and Lewis number (Le) while Prandtl number (Pr), Buoyancy ratio (N) and Darcy number (Da) are considered to be fixed. It is observed that flow pattern, temperature fields and concentration fields are affected by the variation of above considered parameters. PMID:27579447

  17. The role of interruptible natural gas customers in New England heating oil markets: A preliminary examination of events in January-February 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2000-11-01

    This report provides an analysis of data collected from gas service providers and end-use customers in the six New England States and offers a preliminary assessment of the impact of interruptible gas customers on the distillate fuel oil market this past winter. Based on information collected and analyzed as of October 2000, the main findings areas follows: (1) For interruptible gas customers with distillate fuel oil as a backup fuel, their volume of interruptions was equivalent to about 1 to 2 percent of the total sales of distillate fuel oil in New England during January-February 2000. For the two peak weeks of gas supply interruptions, however, the equivalent volume of distillate fuel oil amounted to an estimated 3 to 6 percent of total sales in New England. There were no interruptions of the natural gas service during the 2-month period. (2) Purchases of distillate fuel oil by interruptible gas customers may have contributed somewhat to the spike in the price of distillate fuel oil in January-February 2000, especially during the peak weeks of gas interruptions. Nevertheless, other factors--a sudden drop in temperatures, low regional stocks of distillate fuels, and weather-related supply problems during a period of high customer demand--appear to have played a significant role in this price spike, as they have in previous spikes. (3) While this preliminary analysis suggests that interruptible natural gas service does not threaten the stability of the home heating oil market, several steps might be taken-without undermining the benefits of interruptible service--to reduce the potential adverse impacts of gas supply interruptions in times of market stress. Regardless of the magnitude of the impact of distillate fuel oil purchases by interruptible gas customers on Northeast heating oil markets, the threat of future heating oil price spikes and supply problems still remains. To help counter the threat, President Clinton in July 2000 directed Secretary Richardson to

  18. A Non-Heating Experimental Study on the Two-Phase Natural Circulation through the Annular Gap between Reactor Vessel and Insulation under External Vessel Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, K.S.; Park, R.J.; Cho, Y.R.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, H.D.; Kim, H.M.; Kim, K.Y.

    2004-07-01

    To improve the margin for IVR in high-power reactors, some design improvements of the vessel/insulation configuration to increase the heat removal rate by two-phase natural circulation have been proposed. To observe and evaluate the two-phase natural circulation phenomena through the gap between the reactor vessel and the insulation in the APR1400 under external reactor vessel cooling, the T-HERMES program has been performed, that is, the THERMES- SCALE, T-HERMES-SMALL, HERMES-HALF, and T-HERMES-CFD studies. In this paper, the HERMES-HALF study, which is one of the T-HERMES programs, is introduced. The HERMES-HALF is a non-heating experimental study on the two-phase natural circulation through the annular gap between the reactor vessel and the insulation. The objectives of this HERMES-HALF study are to observe and evaluate the two-phase natural circulation phenomena through the gap between the reactor vessel and the insulation in the APR1400. For these purposes, a half-scaled experimental facility is prepared utilizing the results of a scaling analysis to simulate the APR1400 reactor and insulation system. The behaviors of the boiling-induced two-phase natural circulation flow in the insulation gap are observed, and the liquid mass flow rates driven by the natural circulation loop and void fraction distribution are measured. And numerical analyses of the HERMES-HALF experiments using CFX-5.6 code have also been performed by solving unsteady, three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for multiphase flows with the zero equation turbulence model. By the experimental flow observation and numerical predictions, weak recirculation flows in the near region of the shear key are observed. The void fraction monotonically increases from the water inlet to the shear key region. There exists a short decrease of the void fraction after passing through the shear key due to geometrical expansion and the recirculation flow caused by the shear key. The variation of

  19. Vertical Seismoelectric Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araji, A.

    2011-12-01

    The seismoelectric method corresponds to the measurement of electromagnetic disturbances associated with the passage of seismic waves in a porous medium. The coupling is due to the existence of the electric double layer at the solid/water interfaces. We consider the case of vertical seismoelectric profiling in which we trigger a seismic source in a vertical borehole and measure the seismoelectric response on the surface. We aim to image hetrogeneities in that section of the subsurface by utilizing the seismoelectric sources created at interfaces. An iterative source localization inversion algorithm is used to achieve the imaging of interfaces.

  20. Heat collector

    DOEpatents

    Merrigan, M.A.

    1981-06-29

    A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

  1. Heat collector

    DOEpatents

    Merrigan, Michael A.

    1984-01-01

    A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

  2. Topical report : CFD analysis for the applicability of the natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) for the simulation of the VHTR RCCS.

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C. P.

    2007-05-16

    The Very High Temperature gas cooled reactor (VHTR) is one of the GEN IV reactor concepts that have been proposed for thermochemical hydrogen production and other process-heat applications like coal gasification. The United States Department of Energy has selected the VHTR for further research and development, aiming to demonstrate emissions-free electricity and hydrogen production at a future time. One of the major safety advantages of the VHTR is the potential for passive decay heat removal by natural circulation of air in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). The air-side of the RCCS is very similar to the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) that has been proposed for the PRISM reactor design. The design and safety analysis of the RVACS have been based on extensive analytical and experimental work performed at ANL. The Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) at ANL that simulates at full scale the air-side of the RVACS was built to provide experimental support for the design and analysis of the PRISM RVACS system. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that the NSTF facility can be used to generate RCCS experimental data: to validate CFD and systems codes for the analysis of the RCCS; and to support the design and safety analysis of the RCCS. At this time no reference design is available for the NGNP. The General Atomics (GA) gas turbine - modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) has been used in many analyses as a starting reference design. In the GT-MHR the reactor outlet temperature is 850 C, while the target outlet reactor temperature in VHTR is 1000 C. VHTR scoping studies with a reactor outlet temperature of 1000 C have been performed at GA and INEL. Although the reactor outlet temperature in the VHTR is significantly higher than in the GT-MHR, the peak temperature in the reactor vessel (which is the heat source for the RCCS) is not drastically different. In this work, analyses have been performed using reactor vessel

  3. Flow boiling in vertical down-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Fighetti, C.; Reddy, G.; Yang, B.; Jafri, T. ); McAssey, E. ); Qureshi, Z. )

    1989-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to investigate the onset of Ledinegg instability in vertical down-flow. For three size uniformly heated test sections with L/D ratios from 100 to 150, the pressure drop under subcooled boiling conditions has been obtained for a wide range of operating parameters. The results are presented in non-dimensional forms which correlate the important variables and provide techniques for predicting the onset of flow instability. 3 refs.

  4. Flow boiling in vertical down-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Fighetti, C.; Reddy, G.; Yang, B.; Jafri, T.; McAssey, E.; Qureshi, Z.

    1989-12-31

    An experimental program has been conducted to investigate the onset of Ledinegg instability in vertical down-flow. For three size uniformly heated test sections with L/D ratios from 100 to 150, the pressure drop under subcooled boiling conditions has been obtained for a wide range of operating parameters. The results are presented in non-dimensional forms which correlate the important variables and provide techniques for predicting the onset of flow instability. 3 refs.

  5. Horizontal wires replace the vertical files.

    PubMed

    Colburn, J L

    1997-01-01

    Traditionally, clippings of newspaper articles, pictures from magazines, pamphlets, charts, graphs, posters, proceedings, or copies thereof, and other miscellaneous information sources have been stored in vertical files in libraries. The practice of creating and maintaining vertical files is extremely time consuming. In a medical library, in particular, old information about diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis can quickly become incorrect, misleading, and possibly harmful. Adequately tending to the vertical files can require a librarian to create a balancing act between properly maintaining vertical files and meeting the needs of the users in other areas of the library. The maintenance of vertical files is, by nature, highly consumptive of paper and space consuming. A reasonable alternative to the traditional vertical files is the World-Wide Web. Search engines exist for locating specific information, and bookmarks and/or links which point users to particularly useful sites can be set in search software. Some methods for searching are discussed, and a variety of World-Wide Web information sources are offered. PMID:10173596

  6. Three-dimensional natural convection of a fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity in an enclosure with localized heating

    SciTech Connect

    Torczynski, J.R.; Henderson, J.A.; O`Hern, T.J.; Chu, T.Y.; Blanchat, T.K.

    1994-01-01

    Three-dimensional natural convection of a fluid in an enclosure is examined. The geometry is motivated by a possible magmaenergy extraction system, and the fluid is a magma simulant and has a highly temperature-dependent viscosity. Flow simulations are performed for enclosures with and without a cylinder, which represents the extractor, using the finite-element code FIDAP (Fluid Dynamics International). The presence of the cylinder completely alters the flow pattern. Flow-visualization and PIV experiments are in qualitative agreement wit the simulations.

  7. Systematic analysis of K-feldspar 40Ar/ 39Ar step heating results II: relevance of laboratory argon diffusion properties to nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovera, Oscar M.; Grove, Marty; Harrison, T. Mark

    2002-04-01

    We examine a database containing the results of 40Ar/ 39Ar step-heating experiments performed on 194 basement K-feldspars to recover thermal history information. Qualitative examination of 40Ar/ 39Ar systematics reveals that about half of the K-feldspars examined are sufficiently well behaved to be suitable for thermal history analysis. Correlation algorithms are developed to quantitatively assess the degree to which age and 39Ar release spectra are compatible with the same volume diffusion process. Upon applying these methods, we find that 65% of all samples yield correlation coefficients in excess of 0.8, whereas roughly 40% give values above 0.9. We further compare the observed correlation behavior with that predicted from the multidiffusion domain model and find good agreement for samples with correlation coefficients above 0.9. In contrast, hydrous phases unstable under in vacuo heating and K-feldspars with highly disturbed age spectra yield poorly correlated age and diffusion properties. The high degree of correlation exhibited by the majority of K-feldspars we have analyzed validates extrapolation of experimentally determined diffusion properties to conditions attending natural Ar loss within the crust. Despite this, a significant number of basement K-feldspars analyzed by the step-heating method yield 40Ar/ 39Ar systematics that are clearly problematic for thermal history analysis. We numerically explore the effects of low-temperature alteration of K-feldspar on thermochronological analysis and identify a range of conditions under which information is progressively lost. Finally, we demonstrate the insensitivity of thermal history calculations to detailed knowledge of the diffusion mechanism by introducing the heterogeneous diffusion model. We find that the multidiffusion domain approach can successfully recover imposed thermal histories from heterogeneous diffusion-type crystals and conclude that most details of the interpretive model employed are of

  8. Galaxy Disks in the Balance: Vertical Settling as a Result of Inside-Out Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Jonathan C.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Brooks, Alyson; Governato, Fabio; Weinberg, David H.; Loebman, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    Over the last decade or more, both observations and simple physical models have established that disk galaxies grow first in their central regions and then form stars at larger radii from higher angular momentum gas. These galaxies grow "inside-out"; their half-mass and scale radii increase with time. Meanwhile, recent high-resolution, hydrodynamic simulations find that the vertical kinematics of the ISM are set by hydrostatic balance between the density and scale heights of both gas and stars. We combine these ideas of inside-out growth and hydrostatic equilibrium to show that as galaxies grow in radial extent, their mass-weighted vertical extent and vertical velocity dispersion must decrease. This has dramatic observational consequences. We use state of the art galaxy formation simulations to first establish that newly-formed stars have vertically isothermal kinematics that vary with the local midplane density as predicted from hydrostatic balance. The midplane density of the exponential disk decreases with radius, thus stars born at larger radii form with smaller vertical energies. We then show that the disk forms both inside-out and upside-down, i.e., the vertical velocity dispersion of the disk decreases with time as more stellar mass is added at larger radii. This kinematic evolution is at odds with the traditional ``disk heating'' paradigm in which the disk is continuously heated due to various scattering mechanisms. Upside-down formation, however, matches the ``era of disk settling'' observational results reported by recent IFU surveys of high-redshift disk galaxies. In addition, we find that the shape of the present-day stellar age-velocity relationship (AVR), long thought to be strong evidence of continuous disk heating, naturally arises from Upside-Down formation, providing a viable solution to the classic Milky Way ``heating problem''. We conclude that simple physical arguments demand disk galaxies form Upside-Down, resolving the tension between

  9. Mammalian heat shock p70 and histone H4 transcripts, which derive from naturally intronless genes, are immune to nonsense-mediated decay.

    PubMed Central

    Maquat, L E; Li, X

    2001-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), also called mRNA surveillance, is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that degrades mRNAs that prematurely terminate translation. To date, the pathway in mammalian cells has been shown to depend on the presence of a cis-acting destabilizing element that usually consists of an exon-exon junction generated by the process of pre-mRNA splicing. Whether or not mRNAs that derive from naturally intronless genes, that is, mRNAs not formed by the process of splicing, are also subject to NMD has yet to be investigated. The possibility of NMD is certainly reasonable considering that mRNAs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are subject to NMD even though most derive from naturally intronless genes. In fact, mRNAs of S. cerevisiae generally harbor a loosely defined splicing-independent destabilizing element that has been proposed to function in NMD analogously to the spliced exon-exon junction of mammalian mRNAs. Here, we demonstrate that nonsense codons introduced into naturally intronless genes encoding mouse heat shock protein 70 or human histone H4 fail to elicit NMD. Failure is most likely because each mRNA lacks a cis-acting destabilizing element, because insertion of a spliceable intron a sufficient distance downstream of a nonsense codon within either gene is sufficient to elicit NMD. PMID:11333024

  10. Aiding Vertical Guidance Understanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feary, Michael; McCrobie, Daniel; Alkin, Martin; Sherry, Lance; Polson, Peter; Palmer, Everett; McQuinn, Noreen

    1998-01-01

    A two-part study was conducted to evaluate modern flight deck automation and interfaces. In the first part, a survey was performed to validate the existence of automation surprises with current pilots. Results indicated that pilots were often surprised by the behavior of the automation. There were several surprises that were reported more frequently than others. An experimental study was then performed to evaluate (1) the reduction of automation surprises through training specifically for the vertical guidance logic, and (2) a new display that describes the flight guidance in terms of aircraft behaviors instead of control modes. The study was performed in a simulator that was used to run a complete flight with actual airline pilots. Three groups were used to evaluate the guidance display and training. In the training, condition, participants went through a training program for vertical guidance before flying the simulation. In the display condition, participants ran through the same training program and then flew the experimental scenario with the new Guidance-Flight Mode Annunciator (G-FMA). Results showed improved pilot performance when given training specifically for the vertical guidance logic and greater improvements when given the training and the new G-FMA. Using actual behavior of the avionics to design pilot training and FMA is feasible, and when the automated vertical guidance mode of the Flight Management System is engaged, the display of the guidance mode and targets yields improved pilot performance.

  11. Vertical Alignment and Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Donna; Calzada, Lucio; LaPointe, Nancy; Lee, Audra; Sullivan, Lynn

    This study investigated whether vertical (grade level sequence) alignment of the curriculum in conjunction with teacher collaboration would enhance student performance on the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) test in south Texas school districts of various sizes. Surveys were mailed to the office of the superintendent of 47 school…

  12. Vertical shaft windmill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grana, D. C.; Inge, S. V., Jr. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A vertical shaft has several equally spaced blades mounted. Each blade consists of an inboard section and an outboard section skew hinged to the inboard section. The inboard sections automatically adjust their positions with respect to the fixed inboard sections with changes in velocity of the wind. This windmill design automatically governs the maximum rotational speed of shaft.

  13. The effects of soil vertical discretization, soil thermal properties, and soil heat convection by liquid water transfer on the water and energy cycles in a coupled land-atmosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fuxing; Dufresne, Jean-Louis; Chéruy, Frédérique; Ducharne, Agnès

    2015-04-01

    The soil heat transfer is an important component in general circulation model (GCM), and accurate representation of subsurface thermodynamics is essential for earth system modeling. The accuracy of the soil thermodynamics simulation is affected by many factors: (1) the bottom boundary layer position used in numerical scheme; (2) the soil thermal property (heat capacity and thermal conductivity) parameterization; as well as (3) the physical processes considered in the model. However, the impact of their correct representation on the quality of the simulated climate is poorly documented, and the way state-of-the art land surface model (LSM) used for climate simulations account for them is highly variable. For instance bottom boundary layer position varies from 2 m to 10 m or even more (100 m), the parameterizations of the soil thermal properties not always account for the soil texture effects, and the soil heat convection process is neglected in most soil thermodynamics models. In this work, we revisited the soil thermodynamics model included in the ORCHIDEE LSM in order (1) to determine the soil bottom layer depth which allows for simulating the annual cycle of temperature; (2) to improve the parameterization of the soil thermal properties (thermal conductivity and heat capacity) by accounting for both soil moisture and soil texture effects on the soil thermal properties; (3) to take into account the heat generated by liquid water movement in soil thermodynamics. The developpement of the parameterizations has been done in a 1-D framework where the results of the Finite Difference Method have been compared to the analytical solution. Sensitivity experiments with the LMDZ-ORCHIDEE coupled model (atmosphere-land component of IPSL-CM model) have been then designed to evaluate the impact of the soil thermal properties and soil heat convection on the water and energy cycles of the land-atmosphere. Main results are: (1) the 8 meter soil depth is proposed as a minimum

  14. Post-scram Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) heat transport system dynamics and steam generator control: Figures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brukx, J. F. L. M.

    1982-06-01

    Dynamic modeling of LMFBR heat transport system is discussed. Uncontrolled transient behavior of individual components and of the integrated heat transport system are considered. For each component, results showing specific dynamic features of the component and/or model capability were generated. Controlled dynamic behavior for alternative steam generator control systems during forced and natural sodium coolant circulation was analyzed. Combined free and forced convection of laminar and turbulent vertical pipe flow of liquid metals was investigated.

  15. Heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Leon, Lisa R; Bouchama, Abderrezak

    2015-04-01

    Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition clinically diagnosed as a severe elevation in body temperature with central nervous system dysfunction that often includes combativeness, delirium, seizures, and coma. Classic heat stroke primarily occurs in immunocompromised individuals during annual heat waves. Exertional heat stroke is observed in young fit individuals performing strenuous physical activity in hot or temperature environments. Long-term consequences of heat stroke are thought to be due to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. This article provides a comprehensive review of recent advances in the identification of risk factors that predispose to heat stroke, the role of endotoxin and cytokines in mediation of multi-organ damage, the incidence of hypothermia and fever during heat stroke recovery, clinical biomarkers of organ damage severity, and protective cooling strategies. Risk factors include environmental factors, medications, drug use, compromised health status, and genetic conditions. The role of endotoxin and cytokines is discussed in the framework of research conducted over 30 years ago that requires reassessment to more clearly identify the role of these factors in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. We challenge the notion that hypothalamic damage is responsible for thermoregulatory disturbances during heat stroke recovery and highlight recent advances in our understanding of the regulated nature of these responses. The need for more sensitive clinical biomarkers of organ damage is examined. Conventional and emerging cooling methods are discussed with reference to protection against peripheral organ damage and selective brain cooling. PMID:25880507

  16. A heat exchanger between forced flow helium gas at 14 to 18 K andliquid hydrogen at 20 K circulated by natural convection

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.

    2003-09-15

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) has three 350-mm long liquid hydrogen absorbers to reduce the momentum of 200 MeV muons in all directions. The muons are then re-accelerated in the longitudinal direction by 200 MHz RF cavities. The result is cooled muons with a reduced emittance. The energy from the muons is taken up by the liquid hydrogen in the absorber. The hydrogen in the MICE absorbers is cooled by natural convection to the walls of the absorber that are in turn cooled by helium gas that enters at 14 K. This report describes the MICE liquid hydrogen absorber and the heat exchanger between the liquid hydrogen and the helium gas that flows through passages in the absorber wall.

  17. Study of turbulent natural convection in a tall differentially heated cavity filled with either non-participating, participating grey and participating semigrey media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capdevila, R.; Lehmkuhl, O.; Colomer, G.; Perez-Segarra, C. D.

    2012-11-01

    Turbulent natural convection in a tall differentially heated cavity of aspect ratio 5:1, filled with air under a Rayleigh number based on the height of 4.5·1010 is studied numerically. Three different situations have been analysed. In the first one, the cavity is filled with a transparent medium. In the second one, the cavity is filled with a semigrey participating mixture of air and water vapour. In the last one the cavity contains a grey participating gas. The turbulent flow is described by means of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) using symmetry-preserving discretizations. Simulations are compared with experimental data available in the literature and with Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). Surface and gas radiation have been simulated using the Discrete Ordinates Method (DOM). The influence of radiation on fluid flow behaviour has been analysed.

  18. Thermal-hydraulic simulation of natural convection decay heat removal in the High Flux Isotope Reactor using RELAP5 and TEMPEST: Part 1, Models and simulation results

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.G.; Wendel, M.W.; Chen, N.C.J.; Ruggles, A.E.; Cook, D.H.

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine decay heat removal requirements in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) following shutdown from 85 MW. The objective of the study was to determine when forced flow through the core could be terminated without causing the fuel to melt. This question is particularly relevant when a station blackout caused by an external event is considered. Analysis of natural circulation in the core, vessel upper plenum, and reactor pool indicates that 12 h of forced flow will permit a safe shutdown with some margin. However, uncertainties in the analysis preclude conclusive proof that 12 h is sufficient. As a result of the study, two seismically qualified diesel generators were installed in HFIR. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Effects of grape seed extract as a natural antioxidant on growth performance, carcass characteristics and antioxidant status of rabbits during heat stress.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Fawzia A; Mahrose, Khalid M; Basyony, Mohammed M

    2016-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of different levels of dietary supplementation of grape seed extract (GSE) on growth performance, carcass traits and antioxidant status of rabbits under heat stress conditions (temperature humidity index 87.5-93.5). Weaned male New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits about 6 weeks old (n = 144, mean body weight 705 g) were randomly allotted to four dietary groups. The Control group was fed a basal diet without GSE; the experimental groups received the basal diet with 100, 200 and 300 mg GSE/kg (Groups 100 GSE, 200 GSE and 300 GSE, respectively). The experimental period lasted for 8 weeks. Compared with other groups, rabbits of Group 300 GSE had the best body weight gain and feed conversion ratio and the lowest mortality. Dietary GSE improved carcass weight, percentage of hot carcass, intestine and edible giblets, while total non-edible parts were reduced (p ≤ 0.05) in comparison with the Control group. In Groups 200 GSE and 300 GSE, plasma total protein, albumin and globulin were increased (p ≤ 0.05). In contrast, all supplementation levels of GSE reduced (p ≤ 0.05) the plasma concentrations of total lipids, total cholesterol, triglycerides and low-density lipoproteins. Antioxidant enzymes of rabbits (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione transferase) and total antioxidant capacity in blood were increased (p ≤ 0.05) by adding dietary GSE. However, malondialdehyde was reduced (p ≤ 0.001) with increasing GSE levels. Generally, grape seeds can be considered as rich source of phenolic and flavonoid compounds. The results of the study revealed that all tested levels of GSE were useful as a natural protection against heat stress to maintain performance, carcass traits and antioxidant status and could reduce the negative effects of heat stress in rabbits. PMID:26829476

  20. Potentiating the Heat Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Ground Beef Patties by Natural Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Surendran Nair, Meera; Lau, Patrick; Belskie, Kaylin; Fancher, Samantha; Chen, Chi-Hung; Karumathil, Deepti Prasad; Yin, Hsin-Bai; Liu, Yanyan; Ma, Fulin; Upadhyaya, Indu; Upadhyay, Abhinav; Mancini, Richard; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157: H7 (EHEC) is a major foodborne pathogen largely transmitted to humans through the consumption of undercooked ground beef. This study investigated the efficacy of two food-grade, plant-derived antimicrobials, namely rutin (RT), and resveratrol (RV) with or without chitosan (CH) in enhancing EHEC inactivation in undercooked hamburger patties. Further, the effect of aforementioned treatments on beef color and lipid oxidation was analyzed. Additionally, the deleterious effects of these antimicrobial treatments on EHEC was determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Ground beef was inoculated with a five-strain mixture of EHEC (7.0 log CFU/g), followed by the addition of RT (0.05%, 0.1% w/w) or RV (0.1, 0.2% w/w) with or without CH (0.01% w/w). The meat was formed into patties (25 g) and stored at 4°C for 5 days. On days 1, 3, and 5, the patties were cooked (65°C, medium rare) and surviving EHEC was enumerated. The effect of these treatments on meat color and lipid oxidation during storage was also determined as per American Meat Science Association guidelines. The study was repeated three times with duplicate samples of each treatment. Both RT and RV enhanced the thermal destruction of EHEC, and reduced the pathogen load by at least 3 log CFU/g compared to control (P < 0.05). The combination of RT or RV with CH was found to be more effective, and reduced EHEC by 5 log CFU/g (P < 0.05). EHEC counts in uncooked patties did not decline during storage for 5 days (P > 0.05). Moreover, patties treated with RV plus CH were more color stable with higher a∗ values (P < 0.05). SEM results revealed that heat treatment with antimicrobials (CH + RV 0.2%) resulted in complete destruction of EHEC cells and extrusion of intracellular contents. Results suggest that the aforementioned antimicrobials could be used for enhancing the thermal inactivation of EHEC in undercooked patties; however, detailed sensory studies are warranted. PMID:26870000