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Sample records for heavily proton irradiated

  1. Charge collection and noise analysis of heavily irradiated silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Pirollo, S.; Sciortino, S.; Leroy, C.

    1998-04-01

    Measurements performed on high-resistivity silicon detectors irradiated with proton and neutron fluences, up to 3.5 {times} 10{sup 14} p/cm{sup 2}, and 4 {times} 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} respectively, are presented. The charge collection efficiency (CCE) and the output noise of the devices have been measured to carry out a detector performance study after irradiation. The CCE is found to slowly decrease for fluences increasing up to approximately 1.8 {times} 10{sup 14} p/cm{sup 2}. For higher particle fluences, the device inefficiency increases rapidly because full depletion could not be reached (up to 75% for the highest fluence: 4 {times} 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}). A complete analysis of the noise of the irradiated devices has been carried out assuming a simple model which correlates the main noise sources to the fluence and the leakage current. A linear dependence of the square of the noise amplitude on the fluence has been observed: a value of the leakage current damage constant has been found to be in good agreement with the values reported in literature, obtained with current-voltage (IV) analysis. An extension of the noise analysis is carried out considering the detectors irradiated with very high fluences, up to 4 {times} 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}.

  2. Proton irradiation and endometriosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.H.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Salmon, Y.L.; Eason, R.L.; Boster, R.A.

    1983-08-01

    It was found that female rhesus monkeys given single total-body exposures of protons of varying energies developed endometriosis at a frequency significantly higher than that of nonirradiated animals of the same age. The minimum latency period was determined to be 7 years after the proton exposure. The doses and energies of the radiation received by the experimental animals were within the range that could be received by an aircrew member in near-earth orbit during a random solar flare event. It is concluded that endometriosis should be a consideration in assessing the risk of delayed radiation effects in female crew members. 15 references.

  3. Regeneration of cilia in heavily irradiated sea urchin embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Rustad, R.C.

    1981-12-01

    Cilia were removed from blastulae, gastrulae, and plutei of the sea urchins Arbacia punctulata and Lytechinus variegatus by shaking the embryos in hypertonic media. Exposure to 50 krad (and in some experiments 100 krad) of ..gamma.. radiation either before or after deciliation had no effect on the time of appearance of regenerating cilia. There were no visually obvious differences in the rate of growth of the cilia in control and irradiated embryos. The cilia commenced beating at the same time, but the initial beating sometimes seemed less vigorous following irradiation. The data support the hypothesis that radiation has no major effect on the assembly from mature basal bodies of the microtubules of cilia.

  4. Proton irradiation and endometriosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.H.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Salmon, Y.L.; Eason, R.L.; Boster, R.A.

    1983-08-01

    Female rhesus monkeys given single total-body exposures of protons of varying energies developed endometriosis at a frequency significantly higher than that of nonirradiated animals of the same age. The minimum latency period was 7 years after exposure. The doses and energies of the radiation received were within the range that could be received by an aircrew member in near-earth orbit during a random solar flare event, leading to the conclusion that endometriosis should be a consideration in assessing the risk of delayed radiation effects in female crewmembers.

  5. Proton Irradiation Creep in Pyrocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Was, Gary S.; Campbell, Anne

    2011-10-01

    This project aims to understand irradiation creep in pyrocarbon using proton irradiation under controlled stresses and temperatures. Experiments will be conducted over a range of temperatures and stresses per the proposal submitted. The work scope will include the preparation of samples, measurement of deposition thickness, thickness uniformity, and anisotropy. The samples produced will be made in strips, which will be used for the creep experiments. Materials used will include pyrolytic carbon (PyC), Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG), or graphite strip samples in that order depending upon success. Temperatures tested under will range from 800°C to 1200°C, and stresses from 6MPa to 20.7MPa. Optional testing may occur at 900°C and 1100°C and stresses from 6MPa to 20.7MPa if funding is available.

  6. Avalanche Effect in Si Heavily Irradiated Detectors: Physical Model and Perspectives for Application

    SciTech Connect

    Eremin V.; Li Z.; Verbitskaya, E.; Zabrodskii, A.; Harkonen, J.

    2011-05-07

    The model explaining an enhanced collected charge in detectors irradiated to 10{sup 15}-10{sup 16} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} is developed. This effect was first revealed in heavily irradiated n-on-p detectors operated at high bias voltage ranging from 900 to 1700 V. The model is based on the fundamental effect of carrier avalanche multiplication in the space charge region and in our case is extended with a consideration of p-n junctions with a high concentration of the deep levels. It is shown that the efficient trapping of free carriers from the bulk generation current to the deep levels of radiation induced defects leads to the stabilization of the irradiated detector operation in avalanche multiplication mode due to the reduction of the electric field at the junction. The charge collection efficiency and the detector reverse current dependences on the applied bias have been numerically simulated in this study and they well correlate to the recent experimental results of CERN RD50 collaboration. The developed model of enhanced collected charge predicts a controllable operation of heavily irradiated detectors that is promising for the detector application in the upcoming experiments in a high luminosity collider.

  7. Study of anomalous charge collection efficiency in heavily irradiated silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikuž, M.; Cindro, V.; Kramberger, G.; Mandić, I.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2011-04-01

    Anomalous charge collection efficiency observed in heavily irradiated silicon strip detectors operated at high bias voltages has been studied in terms of a simple model and experimentally using 25 ns shaping electronics and transient current technique (TCT) with edge-on laser injection. The model confirmed qualitatively the explanation by electron impact ionization in the high electric field close to the strips, but failed in the quantitative description of the collected charge. First results on a Hamamatsu strip detector irradiated to 5×1015 neq/cm2 and operated at bias voltages in excess of 1000 V exhibit charge collection similar to what obtained on Micron devices. TCT tests with local charge injection by a laser confirm the validity of a linear extrapolation of trapping to very high fluences and reveal significant charge collection from the non-depleted volume of the detector.

  8. Mechanical response of proton beam irradiated nitinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Naveed; Ghauri, I. M.; Mubarik, F. E.; Amin, F.

    2011-01-01

    The present investigation deals with the study of mechanical behavior of proton beam irradiated nitinol at room temperature. The specimens in austenitic phase were irradiated over periods of 15, 30, 45 and 60 min at room temperature using 2 MeV proton beam obtained from Pelletron accelerator. The stress-strain curves of both unirradiated and irradiated specimens were obtained using a universal testing machine at room temperature. The results of the experiment show that an intermediate rhombohedral (R) phase has been introduced between austenite and martensite phase, which resulted in the suppression of direct transformation from austenite to martensite (A-M). Stresses required to start R-phase ( σRS) and martensitic phase ( σMS) were observed to decrease with increase in exposure time. The hardness tests of samples before and after irradiation were also carried out using Vickers hardness tester. The comparison reveals that the hardness is higher in irradiated specimens than that of the unirradiated one. The increase in hardness is quite sharp in specimens irradiated for 15 min, which then increases linearly as the exposure time is increased up to 60 min. The generation of R-phase, variations in the transformation stresses σRS and σMS and increase in hardness of irradiated nitinol may be attributed to lattice disorder and associated changes in crystal structure induced by proton beam irradiation.

  9. Shallow melting of thin heavily doped silicon layers by pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.B.; Christie, W.H.

    1989-05-01

    We show that an extremely shallow (approx. <800 A) melt depth can be easily obtained by irradiating a thin (/similar to/200 A) heavily doped silicon layer with a CO/sub 2/ laser pulse. Since the absorption of the CO/sub 2/ laser pulse is dominated by free-carrier transitions, the beam heating occurs primarily in the thin degenerately doped film at the sample surface, and there is little energy deposited in the underlying lightly doped substrate. For CO/sub 2/ pulse-energy densities exceeding a threshold value of about 5 J/cm/sup 2/, surface melting occurs and the reflectivity of the incident laser pulse increases abruptly to about 90%. This large increase in the reflectivity acts like a switch to reflect almost all of the energy in the remainder of the CO/sub 2/ laser pulse, thereby greatly reducing the amount of energy available to drive the melt front to deeper depths in the material. This is in contrast to the energy deposition of a laser pulse that has a photon energy exceeding the band gap, in which case the penetration depth of the incident radiation is only weakly affected by the free-carrier density. Transmission electron microscopy shows no extended defects in the near-surface region after CO/sub 2/ laser irradiation, and van der Pauw electrical measurements verify that 100% of the implanted arsenic dopant is electrically active. Calculated values for the melt depth versus incident pulse-energy density (E/sub L/) indicate that there exists a window where the maximum melt-front penetration increases slowly with increasing E/sub L/ and has a value of less than a few hundred angstroms.

  10. Single proton counting at the RIKEN cell irradiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mäckel, V. Puttaraksa, N.; Kobayashi, T.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2015-08-15

    We present newly developed tapered capillaries with a scintillator window, which enable us to count single protons at the RIKEN cell irradiation setup. Their potential for performing single proton irradiation experiments at our beamline setup is demonstrated with CR39 samples, showing a single proton detection fidelity of 98%.

  11. Toxicity of spleen cell suspensions from heavily irradiated mice: implications for CFU-S seeding

    SciTech Connect

    Hubner, G.E.; Cronkite, E.P.; Laisue, J.A.; Van Wangenheim, K.H.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1981-11-01

    Cell suspensions were made from spleens of mice 5 hr to 6 days after irradiation. Mice were irradiated with 800 rad. One group of mice received a transfusion of 2 x 10/sup 6/ nucleated bone marrow cells and another group no bone marrow transfusion. From 15 hr to 6 days after irradiation the toxicity of the cell suspensions varies with time and number of cells injected. As many as 20 x 10/sup 6/ spleen cells from normal mice or mice 5 hr after irradiation can be injected with no signs of toxicity. A molecular factor(s) in cooperation with cells or cell debris is responsible for the toxicity. Some characteristics of the factor(s) are described. The toxic cell suspensions caused pulmonary embolism. There was no effect of the toxic substance on pluripotent stem cells (CFU-S) in regular CFU-S assay or the ability of bone marrow to repopulate irradiated mice. Whether the emboli trap the CFU-S and influence the seeding efficiency of CFU-S in the spleen is not known.

  12. Proton irradiation energy dependence of defect formation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sanggeun; Seo, Jungmok; Hong, Juree; Park, Seul Hyun; Lee, Joo-Hee; Min, Byung-Wook; Lee, Taeyoon

    2015-07-01

    Graphene transistors on SiO2/Si were irradiated with 5, 10, and 15 MeV protons at a dose rate of 2 × 1014 cm-2. The effect of proton irradiation on the structural defects and electrical characteristics of graphene was measured using Raman spectroscopy and electrical measurements. Raman spectra exhibited high intensity peaks induced by defects after 5 and 10 MeV proton irradiation, whereas no significant defect-induced peaks were observed after 15 MeV proton irradiation. The drain current of graphene transistors decreased and the Dirac point shifted after proton irradiation; however, a flattening in the Dirac point occurred after 15 MeV proton irradiation. The variations in characteristics were attributed to different types of graphene defects, which were closely related to the irradiation energy dependency of the transferred energy. Our observation results were in good agreement with the Bethe formula as well as the stopping and range of ions in matter simulation results.

  13. Microstructure and tensile properties of heavily irradiated 5052-0 aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, K.

    1980-01-01

    During neutron irradiation of an aluminum 2.2% magnesium solid solution alloy in the High Flux Isotope Reactor to fast and thermal fluences > 10/sup 27/ neutrons (n)m/sup 2/ at 328/sup 0/K (0.35 T/sub m/) about seven percent insoluble, transmutant silicon was produced. Some of this silicon reacted with the dissolved magnesium to form a fine precipitate of Mg/sub 2/Si. A tight dislocation structure was also created. The alloy showed good resistance to cavity formation. Tension tests at 323, 373, and 423/sup 0/K (0.35, 0.40, and 0.45 T/sub m/) showed pronounced irradiation-induced strengthening and an associated marked loss in ductility. These changes were greater than in magnesium-free aluminum and in alloys containing preexisting, thermally-aged Mg/sub 2/Si precipitate. Increasing the thermal-to-fast flux ratio from 1.7 to 2.1 caused further strengthening beyond that expected from a simple increase in silicon level.

  14. Heavily irradiated N-in-p thin planar pixel sensors with and without active edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzo, S.; Andricek, L.; Macchiolo, A.; Moser, H. G.; Nisius, R.; Richter, R. H.; Weigell, P.

    2014-05-01

    We present the results of the characterization of silicon pixel modules employing n-in-p planar sensors with an active thickness of 150 μm, produced at MPP/HLL, and 100-200 μm thin active edge sensor devices, produced at VTT in Finland. These thin sensors are designed as candidates for the ATLAS pixel detector upgrade to be operated at the HL-LHC, as they ensure radiation hardness at high fluences. They are interconnected to the ATLAS FE-I3 and FE-I4 read-out chips. Moreover, the n-in-p technology only requires a single side processing and thereby it is a cost-effective alternative to the n-in-n pixel technology presently employed in the LHC experiments. High precision beam test measurements of the hit efficiency have been performed on these devices both at the CERN SpS and at DESY, Hamburg. We studied the behavior of these sensors at different bias voltages and different beam incident angles up to the maximum one expected for the new Insertable B-Layer of ATLAS and for HL-LHC detectors. Results obtained with 150 μm thin sensors, assembled with the new ATLAS FE-I4 chip and irradiated up to a fluence of 4 × 1015 neq/cm2, show that they are excellent candidates for larger radii of the silicon pixel tracker in the upgrade of the ATLAS detector at HL-LHC. In addition, the active edge technology of the VTT devices maximizes the active area of the sensor and reduces the material budget to suit the requirements for the innermost layers. The edge pixel performance of VTT modules has been investigated at beam test experiments and the analysis after irradiation up to a fluence of 5 × 1015 neq/cm2 has been performed using radioactive sources in the laboratory.

  15. Raman Microscopic Characterization of Proton-Irradiated Polycrystalline Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. L.; Davidson, J. L.; Lance, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    The microstructural effects of irradiating polycrystalline diamond films with proton dosages ranging from 10(exp 15) to 10(exp 17) H(+) per square centimeter was examined. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Raman microscopy were used to examine the changes in the diamond crystalline lattice as a function of depth. Results indicate that the diamond lattice is retained, even at maximum irradiation levels.

  16. Surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Chae, San; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated pure zirconium (99.8%). The Zr samples were irradiated by 3.5 MeV protons using MC-50 cyclotron accelerator at different doses ranging from 1 × 1013 to 1 × 1016 protons/cm2. Both un-irradiated and irradiated samples were characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Universal Testing Machine (UTM). The average surface roughness of the specimens was determined by using Nanotech WSxM 5.0 develop 7.0 software. The FESEM results revealed the formation of bubbles, cracks and black spots on the samples' surface at different doses whereas the XRD results indicated the presence of residual stresses in the irradiated specimens. Williamson-Hall analysis of the diffraction peaks was carried out to investigate changes in crystallite size and lattice strain in the irradiated specimens. The tensile properties such as the yield stress, ultimate tensile stress and percentage elongation exhibited a decreasing trend after irradiation in general, however, an inconsistent behavior was observed in their dependence on proton dose. The changes in tensile properties of Zr were associated with the production of radiation-induced defects including bubbles, cracks, precipitates and simultaneous recovery by the thermal energy generated with the increase of irradiation dose.

  17. Measurement of thermal conductivity in proton irradiated silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Marat Khafizov; Clarissa Yablinsky; Todd Allen; David Hurley

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the influence of proton irradiation on thermal conductivity in single crystal silicon. We apply laser based modulated thermoreflectance technique to extract the change in conductivity of the thin layer damaged by proton irradiation. Unlike time domain thermoreflectance techniques that require application of a metal film, we perform our measurement on uncoated samples. This provides greater sensitivity to the change in conductivity of the thin damaged layer. Using sample temperature as a parameter provides a means to deduce the primary defect structures that limit thermal transport. We find that under high temperature irradiation the degradation of thermal conductivity is caused primarily by extended defects.

  18. Proton and neutron irradiation effect of Ti: Sapphires

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Zhang, J.; Yang, J.

    1999-07-01

    Various effects of proton and neutron irradiated Ti: sapphires were studied. Proton irradiation induced F, F{sup +} and V center in Ti: sapphires and 3310 cm{sup -1} infrared absorption, and made ultraviolet absorption edge shift to short wave. Neutron irradiation produced a number of F, F{sup +} and F{sub 2} centers and larger defects in Ti: sapphires, and changed Ti{sup 4+}into Ti{sup 3+} ions. Such valence state variation enhanced characteristic luminescence of Ti: sapphires, and no singular variances of intrinsic fluorescence spectra of Ti: sapphires took place with neutron flux of 1 x 10{sup 17}n/cm{sup 2}, but the fluorescence vanished with neutron flux of 1 x 10{sup 18}n/cm{sup 2} which means the threshold for the concentration of improving Ti{sup 3+} ions by neutron irradiation.

  19. Radiation damage in proton irradiated indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    1986-01-01

    Indium phosphide solar cells exposed to 10 MeV proton irradiations were found to have significantly greater radiation resistance than either GaAs or Si. Performance predictions were obtained for two proton dominated orbits and one in which both protons and electrons were significant cell degradation factors. Array specific power was calculated using lightweight blanket technology, a SEP array structure, and projected cell efficiencies. Results indicate that arrays using fully developed InP cells should out-perform those using GaAs or Si in orbits where radiation is a significant cell degradation factor.

  20. Central nervous system effects of whole-body proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Tara Beth; Panda, Nirlipta; Hein, Amy M; Das, Shoshana L; Hurley, Sean D; Olschowka, John A; Williams, Jacqueline P; O'Banion, M Kerry

    2014-07-01

    Space missions beyond the protection of Earth's magnetosphere expose astronauts to an environment that contains ionizing proton radiation. The hazards that proton radiation pose to normal tissues, such as the central nervous system (CNS), are not fully understood, although it has been shown that proton radiation affects the neurogenic environment, killing neural precursors and altering behavior. To determine the time and dose-response characteristics of the CNS to whole-body proton irradiation, C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 1 GeV/n proton radiation at doses of 0-200 cGy and behavioral, physiological and immunohistochemical end points were analyzed over a range of time points (48 h-12 months) postirradiation. These experiments revealed that proton radiation exposure leads to: 1. an acute decrease in cell division within the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, with significant differences detected at doses as low as 10 cGy; 2. a persistent effect on proliferation in the subgranular zone, at 1 month postirradiation; 3. a decrease in neurogenesis at doses as low as 50 cGy, at 3 months postirradiation; and 4. a decrease in hippocampal ICAM-1 immunoreactivity at doses as low as 10 cGy, at 1 month postirradiation. The data presented contribute to our understanding of biological responses to whole-body proton radiation and may help reduce uncertainty in the assessment of health risks to astronauts. These findings may also be relevant to clinical proton beam therapy. PMID:24937778

  1. Mechanism of hypocoagulability in proton-irradiated ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Savage, Alexandria R.; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Wroe, Andrew J.; Gridley, Daila S.; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the mechanism of proton radiation-induced coagulopathy. Material and methods Ferrets were exposed to either solar particle event (SPE)-like proton radiation at a predetermined dose rate of 0.5 Gray (Gy) per hour (h) for a total dose of 0 or 1 Gy. Blood was collected pre- and post-irradiation for a complete blood cell count or a soluble fibrin concentration analysis, to determine whether coagulation activation had occurred. Tissue was stained with an anti-fibrinogen antibody to confirm the presence of fibrin in blood vessels. Results SPE-like proton radiation exposure resulted in coagulation cascade activation, as determined by increased soluble fibrin concentration in blood from 0.7 – 2.4 at 3 h, and 9.9 soluble fibrin units (p < 0.05) at 24 h post-irradiation and fibrin clots in blood vessels of livers, lungs and kidneys from irradiated ferrets. In combination with this increase in fibrin clots, ferrets had increased prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time values post-irradiation, which are representative of the extrinsic/intrinsic coagulation pathways. Platelet counts remained at pre-irradiation values over the course of 7 days, indicating that the observed effects were not platelet-related, but instead likely to be due to radiation-induced effects on secondary hemostasis. White blood cell (WBC) counts were reduced in a statistically significant manner from 24 h through the course of the seven-day experiment. Conclusions SPE-like proton radiation results in significant decreases in all WBC counts as well as activates secondary hemostasis; together, these data suggest severe risks to astronaut health from exposure to SPE radiation. PMID:23651328

  2. Breakdown of silicon particle detectors under proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Vaeyrynen, S.; Raeisaenen, J.; Kassamakov, I.; Tuominen, E.

    2009-11-15

    Silicon particle detectors made on Czochralski and float zone silicon materials were irradiated with 7 and 9 MeV protons at a temperature of 220 K. During the irradiations, the detectors were biased up to their operating voltage. Specific values for the fluence and flux of the irradiation were found to cause a sudden breakdown in the detectors. We studied the limits of the fluence and the flux in the breakdown as well as the behavior of the detector response function under high flux irradiations. The breakdown was shown to be an edge effect. Additionally, the buildup of an oxide charge is suggested to lead to an increased localized electric field, which in turn triggers a charge carrier multiplication. Furthermore, we studied the influences of the type of silicon material and the configuration of the detector guard rings.

  3. Production of sodium-22 from proton irradiated aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Wayne A.; Heaton, Richard C.; Jamriska, David J.

    1996-01-01

    A process for selective separation of sodium-22 from a proton irradiated minum target including dissolving a proton irradiated aluminum target in hydrochloric acid to form a first solution including aluminum ions and sodium ions, separating a portion of the aluminum ions from the first solution by crystallization of an aluminum salt, contacting the remaining first solution with an anion exchange resin whereby ions selected from the group consisting of iron and copper are selectively absorbed by the anion exchange resin while aluminum ions and sodium ions remain in solution, contacting the solution with an cation exchange resin whereby aluminum ions and sodium ions are adsorbed by the cation exchange resin, and, contacting the cation exchange resin with an acid solution capable of selectively separating the adsorbed sodium ions from the cation exchange resin while aluminum ions remain adsorbed on the cation exchange resin is disclosed.

  4. Uphill diffusion mechanism in proton-irradiated silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Morikawa, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Nagami, K.

    1980-06-15

    Uphill diffusion of boron or phosphorus in silicon due to high-temperature proton irradiation is explained by a proposed model in which a vacancy mechanism is assumed. The results calculated from the model show good agreement with the experimentally measured profiles, and some physical parameters can be estimated. A significant feature of the proposed model is that Fick's law is included as a special case.

  5. Superconductivity in MgB2 irradiated with energetic protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandu, Viorel; Craciun, Liviu; Ionescu, Alina Marinela; Aldica, Gheorghe; Miu, Lucica; Kuncser, Andrei

    2016-09-01

    A series of MgB2 samples were irradiated with protons of 11.3 and 13.2 MeV. Magnetization data shows an insignificant reduction of the critical temperatures but a continuous decrease of the Meissner fraction with increasing fluence or energy. All samples show a consistent improvement of the critical current density compared to the virgin sample and an increase of the pinning energy at high fields as resulted from relaxation data.

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Proton Beam Irradiated Human Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Jankowska, Urszula; Elas, Martyna; Sowa, Urszula; Swakon, Jan; Cierniak, Agnieszka; Olko, Pawel; Romanowska-Dixon, Bozena; Urbanska, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    Proton beam irradiation is a form of advanced radiotherapy providing superior distributions of a low LET radiation dose relative to that of photon therapy for the treatment of cancer. Even though this clinical treatment has been developing for several decades, the proton radiobiology critical to the optimization of proton radiotherapy is far from being understood. Proteomic changes were analyzed in human melanoma cells treated with a sublethal dose (3 Gy) of proton beam irradiation. The results were compared with untreated cells. Two-dimensional electrophoresis was performed with mass spectrometry to identify the proteins. At the dose of 3 Gy a minimal slowdown in proliferation rate was seen, as well as some DNA damage. After allowing time for damage repair, the proteomic analysis was performed. In total 17 protein levels were found to significantly (more than 1.5 times) change: 4 downregulated and 13 upregulated. Functionally, they represent four categories: (i) DNA repair and RNA regulation (VCP, MVP, STRAP, FAB-2, Lamine A/C, GAPDH), (ii) cell survival and stress response (STRAP, MCM7, Annexin 7, MVP, Caprin-1, PDCD6, VCP, HSP70), (iii) cell metabolism (TIM, GAPDH, VCP), and (iv) cytoskeleton and motility (Moesin, Actinin 4, FAB-2, Vimentin, Annexin 7, Lamine A/C, Lamine B). A substantial decrease (2.3 x) was seen in the level of vimentin, a marker of epithelial to mesenchymal transition and the metastatic properties of melanoma. PMID:24392146

  7. High Rate Proton Irradiation of 15mm Muon Drifttubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibell, A.; Biebel, O.; Hertenberger, R.; Ruschke, A.; Schmitt, Ch.; Kroha, H.; Bittner, B.; Schwegler, P.; Dubbert, J.; Ott, S.

    2012-08-01

    Future LHC luminosity upgrades will significantly increase the amount of background hits from photons, neutrons 11.11d protons in the detectors of the ATLAS muon spectrometer. At the proposed LHC peak luminosity of 5\\cdot 1034(1)/(cm2s), background hit rates of more than 10(kHz)/(cm2) are expected in the innermost forward region, leading to a loss of performance of the current tracking chambers. Based on the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tube chambers, a new high rate capable drift tube detecor using tubes with a reduced diameter of 15mm was developed. To test the response to highly ionizing particles, a prototype chamber of 46 15mm drift tubes was irradiated with a 20 MeV proton beam at the tandem accelerator at the Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory, Munich. Three tubes in a planar layer were irradiated while all other tubes were used for reconstruction of cosmic muon tracks through irradiated and nonirradiated parts of the chamber. To determine the rate capability of the 15mm drifttubes we investigated the effect of the proton hit rate on pulse height, efficiency and spatial resolution of the cosmic muon signals.

  8. Technique for sparing previously irradiated critical normal structures in salvage proton craniospinal irradiation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cranial reirradiation is clinically appropriate in some cases but cumulative radiation dose to critical normal structures remains a practical concern. The authors developed a simple technique in 3D conformal proton craniospinal irradiation (CSI) to block organs at risk (OAR) while minimizing underdosing of adjacent target brain tissue. Methods Two clinical cases illustrate the use of proton therapy to provide salvage CSI when a previously irradiated OAR required sparing from additional radiation dose. The prior radiation plan was coregistered to the treatment planning CT to create a planning organ at risk volume (PRV) around the OAR. Right and left lateral cranial whole brain proton apertures were created with a small block over the PRV. Then right and left lateral “inverse apertures” were generated, creating an aperture opening in the shape of the area previously blocked and blocking the area previously open. The inverse aperture opening was made one millimeter smaller than the original block to minimize the risk of dose overlap. The inverse apertures were used to irradiate the target volume lateral to the PRV, selecting a proton beam range to abut the 50% isodose line against either lateral edge of the PRV. Together, the 4 cranial proton fields created a region of complete dose avoidance around the OAR. Comparative photon treatment plans were generated with opposed lateral X-ray fields with custom blocks and coplanar intensity modulated radiation therapy optimized to avoid the PRV. Cumulative dose volume histograms were evaluated. Results Treatment plans were developed and successfully implemented to provide sparing of previously irradiated critical normal structures while treating target brain lateral to these structures. The absence of dose overlapping during irradiation through the inverse apertures was confirmed by film. Compared to the lateral X-ray and IMRT treatment plans, the proton CSI technique improved coverage of target brain tissue

  9. Magnetic properties of point defects in proton irradiated diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makgato, T. N.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Ramos, M. A.; García-Hernández, M.; Climent-Font, A.; Zucchiatti, A.; Muñoz-Martin, A.; Shrivastava, S.; Erasmus, R.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the magnetic properties of ultra-pure type-IIa diamond following irradiation with proton beams of ≈1-2 MeV energy. SQUID magnetometry indicate the formation of Curie type paramagnetism according to the Curie law. Raman and Photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements show that the primary structural features created by proton irradiation are the centers: GR1, ND1, TR12 and 3H. The Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) Monte Carlo simulations together with SQUID observations show a strong correlation between vacancy production, proton fluence and the paramagnetic factor. At an average surface vacancy spacing of ≈1-1.6 nm and bulk (peak) vacancy spacing of ≈0.3-0.5 nm Curie paramagnetism is induced by formation of ND1 centres with an effective magnetic moment μeff~(0.1-0.2)μB. No evidence of long range magnetic ordering is observed in the temperature range 4.2-300 K.

  10. Head and neck tumors after energetic proton irradiation in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, D.; Cox, A.; Hardy, K.; Salmon, Y.; Trotter, R.

    1994-10-01

    This is a two-year progress report on a life span dose-response study of brain tumor risk at moderate to high doses of energetic protons. It was initiated because a joint NASA/USAF life span study of rhesus monkeys that were irradiated with 55-MeV protons (average surface dose, 3.5 Gy) indicated that the incidence of brain tumors per unit surface absorbed dose was over 19 times that of the human tinea capitis patients whose heads were exposed to 100 kv x-rays. Examination of those rats that died in the two-year interval after irradiation of the head revealed a linear dose-response for total head and neck tumor incidence in the dose range of 0-8.5 Gy. The exposed rats had a greater incidence of pituitary chromophobe adenomas, epithelial and mesothelial cell tumors than the unexposed controls but the excessive occurrence of malignant gliomas that was observed in the monkeys was absent in the rats. The estimated dose required to double the number of all types of head and neck tumors was 5.2 Gy. The highest dose, 18 Gy, resulted in high mortality due to obstructive squamous metaplasia at less than 50 weeks, prompting a new study of the relative bological effectiveness of high energy protons in producing this lesion.

  11. Proton irradiation creep of FM steel T91

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Cheng; Was, Gary S.

    2015-04-01

    Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steel T91 was subjected to irradiation with 3 MeV protons while under load at stresses of 100-200 MPa, temperatures between 400 °C and 500 °C, and dose rates between 1.4 × 10-6 dpa/s and 5 × 10-6 dpa/s to a total dose of less than 1 dpa. Creep behavior was analyzed for parametric dependencies. The temperature dependence was found to be negligible between 400 °C and 500 °C, and the dose rate dependence was observed to be linear. Creep rate was proportional to stress at low stress values and varied with stress to the power 14 above 160 MPa. The large stress exponent of the proton irradiation creep experiments under high stress suggested that dislocation glide was driving both thermal and irradiation creep. Microstructure observations of anisotropic dislocation loops also contributed to the total creep strain. After subtracting the power law creep and anisotropic dislocation loop contributions, the remaining creep strain was accounted for by dislocation climb enabled by stress induced preferential absorption (SIPA) and preferential dislocation glide (PAG).

  12. Charge dynamics in KH2PO4 systematically modified by proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung Kweon, Jin; Won Lee, Kyu; Lee, Kwang-Sei; Oh, In-Hwan; Eui Lee, Cheol

    2011-08-01

    Our systematic study employing high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance measurements shows that the hydrogen bonds and proton transport in the KH2PO4 (KDP) system may be tuned sensitively by proton irradiation. In particular, the hydrogen-bond length in KDP increased by a properly chosen dose of proton irradiation is shown to give rise to a minimum in the activation energy of proton hopping in the hydrogen-bond direction.

  13. Charge dynamics in KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} systematically modified by proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kweon, Jin Jung; Lee, Kyu Won; Lee, Cheol Eui; Lee, Kwang-Sei; Oh, In-Hwan

    2011-08-15

    Our systematic study employing high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance measurements shows that the hydrogen bonds and proton transport in the KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KDP) system may be tuned sensitively by proton irradiation. In particular, the hydrogen-bond length in KDP increased by a properly chosen dose of proton irradiation is shown to give rise to a minimum in the activation energy of proton hopping in the hydrogen-bond direction.

  14. Ferromagnetism in proton irradiated 4H-SiC single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ren-Wei; Wang, Hua-Jie; Chen, Wei-Bin; Li, Fei; Liu, Xue-Chao Zhuo, Shi-Yi; Shi, Er-Wei

    2015-04-15

    Room-temperature ferromagnetism is observed in proton irradiated 4H-SiC single crystal. An initial increase in proton dose leads to pronounced ferromagnetism, accompanying with obvious increase in vacancy concentration. Further increase in irradiation dose lowers the saturation magnetization with the decrease in total vacancy defects due to the defects recombination. It is found that divacancies are the mainly defects in proton irradiated 4H-SiC and responsible for the observed ferromagnetism.

  15. Proton irradiation effects on the thermoelectric properties in single-crystalline Bi nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Taehoo; Kim, Jeongmin; Song, Min-Jung; Lee, Wooyoung

    2015-05-15

    The effects of proton irradiation on the thermoelectric properties of Bi nanowires (Bi-NWs) were investigated. Single crystalline Bi-NWs were grown by the on-film formation of nanowires method. The devices based on individual Bi-NWs were irradiated with protons at different energies. The total number of displaced atoms was estimated using the Kinchin-Pease displacement model. The electric conductivity and Seebeck coefficient in the Bi-NW devices were investigated before and after proton irradiation at different temperatures. Although the Seebeck coefficient remained stable at various irradiation energies, the electrical conductivity significantly declined with increasing proton energy up to 40 MeV.

  16. Hall effect measurements on proton-irradiated ROSE samples

    SciTech Connect

    Biggeri, U.; Bruzzi, M.; Borchi, E.

    1997-01-01

    Bulk samples obtained from two wafers of a silicon monocrystal material produced by Float-Zone refinement have been analyzed using the four-point probe method. One of the wafers comes from an oxygenated ingot; two sets of pure and oxygenated samples have been irradiated with 24 GeV/c protons in the fluence range from 10{sup 13} p/cm{sup 2} to 2x10{sup 14} p/cm{sup 2}. Van der Pauw resistivity and Hall coefficient have been measured before and after irradiation as a function of the temperature. A thermal treatment (30 minutes at 100C) has been performed to accelerate the reverse annealing effect in the irradiated silicon. The irradiated samples show the same exponential dependence of the resistivity and of the Hall coefficient on the temperature from 370K to 100K, corresponding to the presence of radiation-induced deep energy levels around 0.6-0.7eV in the silicon gap. The free carrier concentrations (n, p) have been evaluated in the investigated fluence range. The inversion of the conductivity type from n to p occurred respectively at 7x10{sup 13} p/cm{sup 2} and at 4x10{sup 13} p/cm{sup 2} before and after the annealing treatment, for both the two sets. Only slight differences have been detected between the pure and oxygenated samples.

  17. Deficiency in Homologous Recombination Renders Mammalian Cells More Sensitive to Proton Versus Photon Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, Nicole; Fontana, Andrea O.; Hug, Eugen B.; Lomax, Antony; Coray, Adolf; Augsburger, Marc; Paganetti, Harald; Sartori, Alessandro A.; Pruschy, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of the 2 major DNA repair machineries on cellular survival in response to irradiation with the 2 types of ionizing radiation. Methods and Materials: The DNA repair and cell survival endpoints in wild-type, homologous recombination (HR)-deficient, and nonhomologous end-joining-deficient cells were analyzed after irradiation with clinically relevant, low-linear energy transfer (LET) protons and 200-keV photons. Results: All cell lines were more sensitive to proton irradiation compared with photon irradiation, despite no differences in the induction of DNA breaks. Interestingly, HR-deficient cells and wild-type cells with small interfering RNA-down-regulated Rad51 were markedly hypersensitive to proton irradiation, resulting in an increased relative biological effectiveness in comparison with the relative biological effectiveness determined in wild-type cells. In contrast, lack of nonhomologous end-joining did not result in hypersensitivity toward proton irradiation. Repair kinetics of DNA damage in wild-type cells were equal after both types of irradiation, although proton irradiation resulted in more lethal chromosomal aberrations. Finally, repair kinetics in HR-deficient cells were significantly delayed after proton irradiation, with elevated amounts of residual γH2AX foci after irradiation. Conclusion: Our data indicate a differential quality of DNA damage by proton versus photon irradiation, with a specific requirement for homologous recombination for DNA repair and enhanced cell survival. This has potential relevance for clinical stratification of patients carrying mutations in the DNA damage response pathways.

  18. Standardized treatment planning methodology for passively scattered proton craniospinal irradiation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As the number of proton therapy centers increases, so does the need for studies which compare proton treatments between institutions and with photon therapy. However, results of such studies are highly dependent on target volume definition and treatment planning techniques. Thus, standardized methods of treatment planning are needed, particularly for proton treatment planning, in which special consideration is paid to the depth and sharp distal fall-off of the proton distribution. This study presents and evaluates a standardized method of proton treatment planning for craniospinal irradiation (CSI). Methods We applied our institution’s planning methodology for proton CSI, at the time of the study, to an anatomically diverse population of 18 pediatric patients. We evaluated our dosimetric results for the population as a whole and for the two subgroups having two different age-specific target volumes using the minimum, maximum, and mean dose values in 10 organs (i.e., the spinal cord, brain, eyes, lenses, esophagus, lungs, kidneys, thyroid, heart, and liver). We also report isodose distributions and dose-volume histograms (DVH) for 2 representative patients. Additionally we report population-averaged DVHs for various organs. Results The planning methodology here describes various techniques used to achieve normal tissue sparing. In particular, we found pronounced dose reductions in three radiosensitive organs (i.e., eyes, esophagus, and thyroid) which were identified for optimization. Mean doses to the thyroid, eyes, and esophagus were 0.2%, 69% and 0.2%, respectively, of the prescribed dose. In four organs not specifically identified for optimization (i.e., lungs, liver, kidneys, and heart) we found that organs lateral to the treatment field (lungs and kidneys) received relatively low mean doses (less than 8% of the prescribed dose), whereas the heart and liver, organs distal to the treatment field, received less than 1% of the prescribed dose

  19. Proton irradiation creep of beta-silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Vani; Was, Gary S.

    2011-11-01

    In situ irradiation creep behavior of chemically vapor-deposited (CVD) polycrystalline beta silicon carbide (β-SiC) has been studied using proton beam of energies 2.8 MeV and 3.2 MeV. Experiments were conducted at 1183 K and at stresses of 18.5 MPa and 97.9 MPa between dose rates of 1.5 and 2.45 × 10 -6 dpa/s. Strain was measured using a laser speckle extensometer (LSE) and a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT), and temperature was measured using a 2-dimensional infrared pyrometer. Results showed that the total strain rate increased with increasing stress and dose rate. Shifts of XRD peaks following proton irradiation of SiC at 1183 K indicated that swelling had occurred and that it increased with dose. A uniform expansion of the lattice with no X-ray line broadening clearly indicated that the swelling at doses up to 0.37 dpa was due to single point defects. The swelling rate was determined and subtracted from the measured total strain rate to obtain the true creep rate. The creep rate was found to exhibit a linear dependence on the applied tensile stress, and on dose rate to the third power.

  20. Delocalized Plastic Flow in Proton-Irradiated Monolithic Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jaewon; Kim, Sunghwan; Ryu, Seunghwa; Jang, Dongchan

    2016-01-01

    Creating new materials with novel properties through structural modification is the Holy Grail of materials science. The range of targetable structures for amplification of mechanical properties in metallic glasses would include types of atomic short range orders at the smallest scale through compositions or morphologies of phases in composites. Even though the usefulness of the latter approach has been successfully demonstrated in the past decades, the feasibility of the former has been incompletely proved with only marginal property improvements reported within experimentally-accessible atomic-level structural changes. Here, we report the significant enhancement of deformability in Zr-based monolithic metallic glass only through the atomic disordering by proton irradiation without altering any other structural traits. Metallic glass nanopillars that originally failed catastrophically without any notable plasticity become capable of attaining more than 30% uniaxial plastic strain accommodated by homogeneous deformation when irradiated to ~1 displacement per atom (DPA). We discuss the atomistic origin of this improved plasticity in terms of density and spatial distributions of icosahedral short range order influenced by irradiation. PMID:26988265

  1. Delocalized Plastic Flow in Proton-Irradiated Monolithic Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Jaewon; Kim, Sunghwan; Ryu, Seunghwa; Jang, Dongchan

    2016-03-01

    Creating new materials with novel properties through structural modification is the Holy Grail of materials science. The range of targetable structures for amplification of mechanical properties in metallic glasses would include types of atomic short range orders at the smallest scale through compositions or morphologies of phases in composites. Even though the usefulness of the latter approach has been successfully demonstrated in the past decades, the feasibility of the former has been incompletely proved with only marginal property improvements reported within experimentally-accessible atomic-level structural changes. Here, we report the significant enhancement of deformability in Zr-based monolithic metallic glass only through the atomic disordering by proton irradiation without altering any other structural traits. Metallic glass nanopillars that originally failed catastrophically without any notable plasticity become capable of attaining more than 30% uniaxial plastic strain accommodated by homogeneous deformation when irradiated to ~1 displacement per atom (DPA). We discuss the atomistic origin of this improved plasticity in terms of density and spatial distributions of icosahedral short range order influenced by irradiation.

  2. Delocalized Plastic Flow in Proton-Irradiated Monolithic Metallic Glasses.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jaewon; Kim, Sunghwan; Ryu, Seunghwa; Jang, Dongchan

    2016-01-01

    Creating new materials with novel properties through structural modification is the Holy Grail of materials science. The range of targetable structures for amplification of mechanical properties in metallic glasses would include types of atomic short range orders at the smallest scale through compositions or morphologies of phases in composites. Even though the usefulness of the latter approach has been successfully demonstrated in the past decades, the feasibility of the former has been incompletely proved with only marginal property improvements reported within experimentally-accessible atomic-level structural changes. Here, we report the significant enhancement of deformability in Zr-based monolithic metallic glass only through the atomic disordering by proton irradiation without altering any other structural traits. Metallic glass nanopillars that originally failed catastrophically without any notable plasticity become capable of attaining more than 30% uniaxial plastic strain accommodated by homogeneous deformation when irradiated to ~1 displacement per atom (DPA). We discuss the atomistic origin of this improved plasticity in terms of density and spatial distributions of icosahedral short range order influenced by irradiation. PMID:26988265

  3. Proton irradiation of the CIS115 for the JUICE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soman, M. R.; Allanwood, E. A. H.; Holland, A. D.; Winstone, G. P.; Gow, J. P. D.; Stefanov, K.; Leese, M.

    2015-09-01

    The CIS115 is one of the latest CMOS Imaging Sensors designed by e2v technologies, with 1504x2000 pixels on a 7 μm pitch. Each pixel in the array is a pinned photodiode with a 4T architecture, achieving an average dark current of 22 electrons pixel-1 s-1 at 21°C measured in a front-faced device. The sensor aims for high optical sensitivity by utilising e2v's back-thinning and processing capabilities, providing a sensitive silicon thickness approximately 9 μm to 12 μm thick with a tuned anti-reflective coating. The sensor operates in a rolling shutter mode incorporating reset level subtraction resulting in a mean pixel readout noise of 4.25 electrons rms. The full well has been measured to be 34000 electrons in a previous study, resulting in a dynamic range of up to 8000. These performance characteristics have led to the CIS115 being chosen for JANUS, the high-resolution and wide-angle optical camera on the JUpiter ICy moon Explorer (JUICE). The three year science phase of JUICE is in the harsh radiation environment of the Jovian magnetosphere, primarily studying Jupiter and its icy moons. Analysis of the expected radiation environment and shielding levels from the spacecraft and instrument design predict the End Of Life (EOL) displacement and ionising damage for the CIS115 to be equivalent to 1010 10 MeV protons cm-2 and 100 krad(Si) respectively. Dark current and image lag characterisation results following initial proton irradiations are presented, detailing the initial phase of space qualification of the CIS115. Results are compared to the pre-irradiation performance and the instrument specifications and further qualification plans are outlined.

  4. Hematological and TGF-beta variations after whole-body proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kajioka, E H; Andres, M L; Mao, X W; Moyers, M F; Nelson, G A; Gridley, D S

    2000-01-01

    The acute effects of proton whole-body irradiation on five bone-marrow-derived cell types and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) were examined and compared to the effects of photons (60Co). C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 3 Gy (0.4 Gy/min) protons at spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP), protons at entry (E), or 60Co and euthanized on days 0.5-17 thereafter. 60Co-irradiated animals had decreased erythrocytes, hemoglobin and hematocrit at 12 hours post-exposure; depression was not noted in proton (SOBP or E)-irradiated groups until day 4. Significantly decreased leukocyte counts were observed at this same time in all irradiated groups, with lymphocyte loss being greater than that of monocytes, and the depression was generally maintained. In contrast, the levels of neutrophils and thrombocytes fluctuated, especially during the first week; significant differences were noted among irradiated groups in neutrophil levels. Plasma TGF-beta 1 was elevated on day 7 in the 60Co, but not proton, irradiated mice. Collectively, the data show that dramatic and persistent changes occurred in all irradiated groups. However, few differences in assay results were seen between animals exposed to protons (SOBP or E) or photons, as well as between the groups irradiated with either of the two regions of the proton Bragg curve. PMID:11204485

  5. Hematological and TGF-beta variations after whole-body proton irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kajioka, E. H.; Andres, M. L.; Mao, X. W.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.; Gridley, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    The acute effects of proton whole-body irradiation on five bone-marrow-derived cell types and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) were examined and compared to the effects of photons (60Co). C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 3 Gy (0.4 Gy/min) protons at spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP), protons at entry (E), or 60Co and euthanized on days 0.5-17 thereafter. 60Co-irradiated animals had decreased erythrocytes, hemoglobin and hematocrit at 12 hours post-exposure; depression was not noted in proton (SOBP or E)-irradiated groups until day 4. Significantly decreased leukocyte counts were observed at this same time in all irradiated groups, with lymphocyte loss being greater than that of monocytes, and the depression was generally maintained. In contrast, the levels of neutrophils and thrombocytes fluctuated, especially during the first week; significant differences were noted among irradiated groups in neutrophil levels. Plasma TGF-beta 1 was elevated on day 7 in the 60Co, but not proton, irradiated mice. Collectively, the data show that dramatic and persistent changes occurred in all irradiated groups. However, few differences in assay results were seen between animals exposed to protons (SOBP or E) or photons, as well as between the groups irradiated with either of the two regions of the proton Bragg curve.

  6. Microstructure evolution in proton-irradiated austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys under LWR core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Jian

    1999-11-01

    Irradiation-induced microstructure of austenitic stainless steel was investigated using proton irradiation. High-purity alloys of Fe-20Cr-9Ni (UHP 304 SS), Fe-20Cr-24Ni and Ni-18Cr-9Fe were irradiated using 3.2 MeV protons at a dose rate of 7 × 10-6 dpa/s between 300°C and 600°C. The irradiation produced a microstructure consisting of dislocation loops and voids. The dose and temperature dependence of the number density and size of dislocation loops and voids were investigated. The changes in yield strength due to irradiation were estimated from Vickers hardness measurements and compared to calculations using a dispersed-barrier hardening model. The dose and temperature dependence of microstructure and hardness change for proton irradiation follows the same trend as that for neutron irradiation at comparable irradiation conditions. Commercial purity alloys of CP 304 SS and CP 316 SS were irradiated at 360°C to doses between 0.3 and 3.0 dpa. The irradiated microstructure consists of dislocation loops. No voids were detected at doses up to 3.0 dpa. Loop size distributions are in close agreement with that in the same alloys neutron-irradiated in a LWR core. The loop density also agrees with neutron irradiation data. The yield strength as a function of dose in proton irradiated commercial purity alloys is consistent with the neutron- data trend. A fast-reactor microstructure model was adapted for light water reactor (LWR) irradiation conditions (275°C, 7 × 10 -8 dpa/s) and then applied to proton irradiation under conditions (360°C, 7 × 10-6 dpa/s) relevant to LWRs. The original model was modified by including in-cascade interstitial clustering and the loss of interstitial clusters to sinks by cluster diffusion. It was demonstrated that loop nucleation for both LWR irradiation condition and proton irradiation are driven by in-cascade interstitial clustering. One important result from this modeling work is that the difference in displacement cascade between

  7. Control of Refractive Index of Fluorinated Polyimide by Proton Beam Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Yukitaka; Ohki, Yoshimichi; Saito, Keisuke; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    To clarify the feasibility of controlling the refractive index of a polymer by proton beam irradiation, we irradiated 1.0 MeV protons to a fluorinated polyimide film. Before and after the proton irradiation at a fluence between 1×1014 and 7×1016 cm-2, the film surface was scanned by a profilometer. It was found that the depth of a dent, which increases with fluence, was induced by the irradiation. The refractive index of the ion-irradiated region was calculated using the Lorentz-Lorenz equation, substituting the depth of the dent and the projected range of the protons. When the fluorinated polyimide was irradiated at a fluence of 7×1016 cm-2, the refractive index increased by about 3.3%, which agrees with the increment in refractive index measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The increment in refractive index (0.21%) induced by the irradiation of protons at the fluence of 1×1015 cm-2 is comparable to the value (0.35%) observed when protons were irradiated to SiO2 glass at a similar fluence. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that the ion irradiation to a polymer can be a good method for fabricating a high-performance polymer-based optical waveguide.

  8. Investigation of proton irradiation effects on InP/InGaAs double heterojunction bipolar transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Min; Zhang, Yuming; Lu, Hongliang; Zhang, Yimen; Zhang, Jincan; Ren, Xiaotang

    2015-07-01

    In this article, 3 MeV proton irradiation-induced degradation in InP/InGaAs double heterojunction bipolar transistors (DHBTs) is studied, the fluence up to 5 × 1012 protons/cm2, meanwhile 10 MeV proton irradiation is investigated in order to compare the differences induced by different proton energy irradiation. The devices exhibit good tolerance up to 5 × 1011 protons/cm2. The concentration of vacancies at different proton fluences can be calculated from SRIM. Being donor-like defects, the In and Ga vacancies act as compensation center while As vacancy acts as an acceptor-like defect. Adding the vacancies model into Sentaurus device simulator, simulation results match well with the trends of measured data.

  9. Silicon/HfO{sub 2} interface: Effects of proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Maurya, Savita; Radhakrishna, M.

    2015-06-24

    Substrate oxide interfaces are of paramount importance in deciding the quality of the semiconductor devices. In this work we have studied how 200 keV proton irradiation affects the interface of a 13 nm thick, atomic layer deposited hafnium dioxide on silicon substrate. Pre- and post-irradiation electrical measurements are used to quantify the effect of proton irradiation for varying electrode geometries. Proton irradiation introduces positive charge in the oxide and at the interface of Si/HfO{sub 2} interface. The gate current is not very much affected under positive injection since the induced positive charge is compensated by the injected electrons. Current voltage characteristics under negative bias get affected by the proton irradiation.

  10. Irradiation-induced effects of proton irradiation on zirconium carbides with different stoichiometries

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Huang; B.R. Maier; T.R. Allen

    2014-10-01

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for utilization in deep burn TRISO fuel particles for hightemperature, gas-cooled reactors. Zirconium carbide has a cubic B1 type crystal structure along with a very high melting point (3420 ?C), exceptional hardness and good thermal and electrical conductivities. Understanding the ZrC irradiation response is crucial for establishing ZrC as an alternative component in TRISO fuel. Until now, very few studies on irradiation effects on ZrC have been released and fundamental aspects of defect evolution and kinetics are not well understood although some atomistic simulations and phenomenological studies have been performed. This work was carried out to understand the damage evolution in float-zone refined ZrC with different stoichiometries. Proton irradiations at 800 ?C up to doses of 3 dpa were performed on ZrCx (where x ranges from 0.9 to 1.2) to investigate the damage evolution. The irradiation-induced defects, such as density of dislocation loops, at different stoichiometries and doses which were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is presented and discussed.

  11. Effects of fotemustine or dacarbasine on a melanoma cell line pretreated with therapeutic proton irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Ristić-Fira, Aleksandra M; Korićanac, Lela B; Žakula, Jelena J; Valastro, Lucia M; Iannolo, Gioacchin; Privitera, Giuseppe; Cuttone, Giacomo; Petrović, Ivan M

    2009-01-01

    Background Considering that HTB140 melanoma cells have shown a poor response to either protons or alkylating agents, the effects of a combined use of these agents have been analysed. Methods Cells were irradiated in the middle of the therapeutic 62 MeV proton spread out Bragg peak (SOBP). Irradiation doses were 12 or 16 Gy and are those frequently used in proton therapy. Four days after irradiation cells were treated with fotemustine (FM) or dacarbazine (DTIC). Drug concentrations were 100 and 250 μM, values close to those that produce 50% of growth inhibition. Cell viability, proliferation, survival and cell cycle distribution were assessed 7 days after irradiation that corresponds to more than six doubling times of HTB140 cells. In this way incubation periods providing the best single effects of drugs (3 days) and protons (7 days) coincided at the same time. Results Single proton irradiations have reduced the number of cells to ~50%. FM caused stronger cell inactivation due to its high toxicity, while the effectiveness of DTIC, that was important at short term, almost vanished with the incubation of 7 days. Cellular mechanisms triggered by proton irradiation differently influenced the final effects of combined treatments. Combination of protons and FM did not improve cell inactivation level achieved by single treatments. A low efficiency of the single DTIC treatment was overcome when DTIC was introduced following proton irradiation, giving better inhibitory effects with respect to the single treatments. Most of the analysed cells were in G1/S phase, viable, active and able to replicate DNA. Conclusion The obtained results are the consequence of a high resistance of HTB140 melanoma cells to protons and/or drugs. The inactivation level of the HTB140 human melanoma cells after protons, FM or DTIC treatments was not enhanced by their combined application. PMID:19358719

  12. 55Co separation from proton irradiated metallic nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdovinos, H. F.; Graves, S.; Barnhart, T.; Nickles, R. J.

    2014-11-01

    55Co with > 97% radionuclidic purity 24 hours after end of bombardment (EoB) was produced from the 58Ni ( p ,α) reaction using proton irradiations of 16 MeV on natural nickel. Two-hour irradiations with 25 μA on a 254 μm thick nickel foil generate 0.18 ± 0.01 GBq (n = 3) 24 hours after EoB. The separation of cobalt from the target material and other metallic contaminants present at trace levels is accomplished in HCl medium by two rounds of anion exchange chromatography (AG1-X8) using an automated module driven by a peristaltic pump. 80 ± 5 % (n = 3) of the activity generated at EoB is ready for labeling in 0.1 M HCl one hour after the start of separation. Using 99.999% pure Ni, the reactivity (decay corrected to EoB) with the bifunctional chelator (BFC) DOTA was 8.5 GBq/μmol; enough for radiolabeling BFC conjugated biomolecules at a nmol scale with > 90% yield. Using 99.9% pure Ni the reactivity with DOTA and NOTA was 0.19 +/- 0.09 GBq/μmol and 2.9 +/- 1.7 GBq/μmol (n = 2), respectively. Both cobalt complexes showed 100% in vitro stability in PBS and mouse serum over 41 hours at room temperature. MicroPET images of a miniature Derenzo phantom show excellent resolution where rods of 1.5 mm were separated by two times their diameter.

  13. {sup 55}Co separation from proton irradiated metallic nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Valdovinos, H. F. Graves, S. Barnhart, T. Nickles, R. J.

    2014-11-07

    {sup 55}Co with > 97% radionuclidic purity 24 hours after end of bombardment (EoB) was produced from the {sup 58}Ni(p,α) reaction using proton irradiations of 16 MeV on natural nickel. Two-hour irradiations with 25 μA on a 254 μm thick nickel foil generate 0.18 ± 0.01 GBq (n = 3) 24 hours after EoB. The separation of cobalt from the target material and other metallic contaminants present at trace levels is accomplished in HCl medium by two rounds of anion exchange chromatography (AG1-X8) using an automated module driven by a peristaltic pump. 80 ± 5 % (n = 3) of the activity generated at EoB is ready for labeling in 0.1 M HCl one hour after the start of separation. Using 99.999% pure Ni, the reactivity (decay corrected to EoB) with the bifunctional chelator (BFC) DOTA was 8.5 GBq/μmol; enough for radiolabeling BFC conjugated biomolecules at a nmol scale with > 90% yield. Using 99.9% pure Ni the reactivity with DOTA and NOTA was 0.19 +/− 0.09 GBq/μmol and 2.9 +/− 1.7 GBq/μmol (n = 2), respectively. Both cobalt complexes showed 100% in vitro stability in PBS and mouse serum over 41 hours at room temperature. MicroPET images of a miniature Derenzo phantom show excellent resolution where rods of 1.5 mm were separated by two times their diameter.

  14. Luminescence imaging of water during proton-beam irradiation for range estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Seiichi Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to the target tumor, so the dose distribution should be accurately measured by a precise and efficient method. The authors found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and conjectured that this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: To achieve more accurate dose distribution, the authors set water phantoms on a table with a spot scanning proton therapy system and measured the luminescence images of these phantoms with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device camera during proton-beam irradiation. The authors imaged the phantoms of pure water, fluorescein solution, and an acrylic block. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during proton-beam irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. Furthermore, the image of the pure-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of the fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had a 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 s. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation is promising as an effective method for range estimation in proton therapy.

  15. Electric dipole moment in KH2PO4 systematically modified by proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung Kweon, Jin; Eui Lee, Cheol; Noh, S. J.; Kim, H. S.

    2012-01-01

    We have carried out an impedance spectroscopy study on a series of proton-irradiated KH2PO4 (KDP) systems. A systematic modification was observed in the transverse dipole moment of the proton-irradiated KDP systems, associated with hydrogen-ion displacements, as obtained from dielectric constant measurements by using a mean-field approximation. Besides, intercorrelation of the charge transport with the dielectric properties was revealed, both having closely to do with the hydrogen-bond modification.

  16. A study on the microstructure and mechanical property of proton irradiated A508-3 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-hong; Lei, Jing; Shu, Guo-gang; Wan, Qiang-mao

    2015-05-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and the nanoindentation technique were employed to study the dislocation loops and hardening induced in proton irradiated A508-3 steel. The A508-3 steel specimens were irradiated to the dose of 0.054, 0.163, 0.271 dpa at room temperature (RT), 0.163 pa at 250 °C and 0.163, 0.271 dpa at 290 °C. The effect of dose and temperature on the dislocation loops and irradiation hardening was investigated. The results indicated that the dislocation loops were formed in proton irradiated A508-3 steel. The size and number density generally increased with increasing dose at RT. When the irradiation temperature changed from RT to 290 °C, the loop size increased and the loop number density decreased. The irradiation hardening increased with dose. The effect of temperature on the irradiation induced hardening was discussed.

  17. Anomalous effects in silicon solar cell irradiated by 1-MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kachare, R.; Anspaugh, B. E.

    1989-01-01

    Several silicon solar cells having thicknesses of approximately 63 microns, with and without back-surface fields (BSF), were irradiated with 1-MeV protons having fluences between 10 to the 10th and 10 to the 12th sq cm. The irradiations were performed using both normal and isotropic incidence on the rear surfaces of the cells. It was observed that after irradiation with fluences greater than 10 to the 11th protons/sq cm, all BSF cells degraded at a faster rate than cells without BSF. The irradiation results are analyzed using a model in which irradiation-induced defects in the BSF region are taken into account. Tentatively, it is concluded that an increase in defect density due to the formation of aluminum and proton complexes in BSF cells is responsible for the higher-power loss in the BSF cells compared to the non-BSF cells.

  18. Particle LET spectra from microelectronics packaging materials subjected to neutron and proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, J. S.; Holtkamp, D. B.

    1988-12-01

    Cumulative fractions for LET spectra were measured for particles ejected from microelectronics packaging materials subjected to neutron and proton irradiation. The measurements for the neutron irradiation compare well with Monte Carlo theoretical calculations. The spectra can be used to access microelectronics vulnerabilities in strategic-nuclear- weapon, space-trapped, and neutral-beam directed-energy particle environments.

  19. Quasi-monoenergetic proton beam from a proton-layer embedded metal foil irradiated by an intense laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Nam; Lee, Kitae; Kumar, Manoj; Kim, Ha-Na; Park, Seong Hee; Jeong, Young Uk; Vinokurov, Nikolay; Kim, Yong Gi

    2016-03-01

    A target structure, ion-layer embedded foil (ILEF) is proposed for producing a quasi-monoenergetic proton beam by utilizing a bulk electrostatic field, which is generated by irradiating the target with an ultra-intense laser pulse, inside the plasma. Compared with the case of a single metal foil in which the proton layer is initially present on the surface, in the ILEF target, the proton layer is initially located inside a metal foil. A two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation shows that the target generates a proton beam with a narrow energy spread. With a laser intensity of 2 × 1019 W/cm2, a 22-MeV proton beam with an energy spread of 8% at the full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) is obtained when the proton layer is located at 0.4 μm inside the rear surface of a 2.4 μm-thick copper foil. When the proton layer moves toward the front side, a proton beam with a flat-top energy distribution ranging from 15 MeV to 35 MeV is obtained. Further, with a higher laser intensity of 1021 W/cm2, a proton beam with the maximum energy of 345 MeV and FWHM energy spread of 7.2% is obtained. The analysis of the PIC simulation with an aid of a fluid analysis shows that the spectrum is affected by the initial position of the proton layer, its initial spread during the formation of the sheath field, and the space charge effect.

  20. Instrumentation for the in situ control of carrier recombination characteristics during irradiation by protons

    SciTech Connect

    Gaubas, E.; Uleckas, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Raisanen, J.; Tikkanen, P.

    2010-05-15

    Instrument and methods for the remote and in situ control of carrier recombination parameters during irradiation by protons of energy in the range of 3-8 MeV are presented. Direct techniques for measurements and separation of carrier recombination and trapping/generation characteristics based on the analysis of microwave probed photoconductivity transients during exposure on protons of different energies and irradiations at different temperatures are described. Simultaneously, a spectroscopy of activation energy of dominant traps has been performed before and just after irradiation by temperature scans of variation in the recombination parameters.

  1. Instrumentation for the in situ control of carrier recombination characteristics during irradiation by protons.

    PubMed

    Gaubas, E; Uleckas, A; Vaitkus, J; Raisanen, J; Tikkanen, P

    2010-05-01

    Instrument and methods for the remote and in situ control of carrier recombination parameters during irradiation by protons of energy in the range of 3-8 MeV are presented. Direct techniques for measurements and separation of carrier recombination and trapping/generation characteristics based on the analysis of microwave probed photoconductivity transients during exposure on protons of different energies and irradiations at different temperatures are described. Simultaneously, a spectroscopy of activation energy of dominant traps has been performed before and just after irradiation by temperature scans of variation in the recombination parameters. PMID:20515132

  2. Radiograaff, a proton irradiation facility for radiobiological studies at a 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constanzo, J.; Fallavier, M.; Alphonse, G.; Bernard, C.; Battiston-Montagne, P.; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C.; Dauvergne, D.; Beuve, M.

    2014-09-01

    A horizontal beam facility for radiobiological experiments with low-energy protons has been set up at the 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator of the Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon. A homogeneous irradiation field with a suitable proton flux is obtained by means of two collimators and two Au-scattering foils. A monitoring chamber contains a movable Faraday cup, a movable quartz beam viewer for controlling the intensity and the position of the initial incident beam and four scintillating fibers for beam monitoring during the irradiation of the cell samples. The beam line is ended by a thin aluminized Mylar window (12 μm thick) for the beam extraction in air. The set-up was simulated by the GATE v6.1 Monte-Carlo platform. The measurement of the proton energy distribution, the evaluation of the fluence-homogeneity over the sample and the calibration of the monitoring system were performed using a silicon PIPS detector, placed in air in the same position as the biological samples to be irradiated. The irradiation proton fluence was found to be homogeneous to within ±2% over a circular field of 20 mm diameter. As preliminary biological experiment, two Human Head and Neck Squamous Carcinoma Cell lines (with different radiosensitivities) were irradiated with 2.9 MeV protons. The measured survival curves are compared to those obtained after X-ray irradiation, giving a Relative Biological Efficiency between 1.3 and 1.4.

  3. High total dose proton irradiation effects on silicon NPN rf power transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Bharathi, M. N.; Praveen, K. C.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana; Pushpa, N.

    2014-04-24

    The effects of 3 MeV proton irradiation on the I-V characteristics of NPN rf power transistors were studied in the dose range of 100 Krad to 100 Mrad. The different electrical characteristics like Gummel, current gain and output characteristics were systematically studied before and after irradiation. The recovery in the I-V characteristics of irradiated NPN BJTs were studied by isochronal and isothermal annealing methods.

  4. Whole-body proton irradiation causes long-term damage to hematopoietic stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jianhui; Feng, Wei; Wang, Yingying; Luo, Yi; Allen, Antiño R; Koturbash, Igor; Turner, Jennifer; Stewart, Blair; Raber, Jacob; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian

    2015-02-01

    Space flight poses certain health risks to astronauts, including exposure to space radiation, with protons accounting for more than 80% of deep-space radiation. Proton radiation is also now being used with increasing frequency in the clinical setting to treat cancer. For these reasons, there is an urgent need to better understand the biological effects of proton radiation on the body. Such improved understanding could also lead to more accurate assessment of the potential health risks of proton radiation, as well as the development of improved strategies to prevent and mitigate its adverse effects. Previous studies have shown that exposure to low doses of protons is detrimental to mature leukocyte populations in peripheral blood, however, the underlying mechanisms are not known. Some of these detriments may be attributable to damage to hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that have the ability to self-renew, proliferate and differentiate into different lineages of blood cells through hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). The goal of this study was to investigate the long-term effects of low-dose proton irradiation on HSCs. We exposed C57BL/6J mice to 1.0 Gy whole-body proton irradiation (150 MeV) and then studied the effects of proton radiation on HSCs and HPCs in the bone marrow (BM) 22 weeks after the exposure. The results showed that mice exposed to 1.0 Gy whole-body proton irradiation had a significant and persistent reduction of BM HSCs compared to unirradiated controls. In contrast, no significant changes were observed in BM HPCs after proton irradiation. Furthermore, irradiated HSCs and their progeny exhibited a significant impairment in clonogenic function, as revealed by the cobblestone area-forming cell (CAFC) and colony-forming cell assays, respectively. These long-term effects of proton irradiation on HSCs may be attributable to the induction of chronic oxidative stress in HSCs, because HSCs from irradiated mice exhibited a significant increase in NADPH

  5. Production of proton beams with narrow-band energy spectra from laser-irradiated ultrathin foils

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, A. P. L; Gibbon, P.

    2007-01-15

    Three-dimensional gridless particle simulations of proton acceleration via irradiation of a very thin foil by a short-pulse, high-intensity laser have been performed to evaluate recently proposed microstructured target configurations. It is found that a pure proton microdot target does not by itself result in a quasimonoenergetic proton beam. Such a beam can only be produced with a very lightly doped target, in qualitative agreement with one-dimensional theory. The simulations suggest that beam quality in current experiments could be dramatically improved by choosing microdot compositions with a 5-10 times lower proton fraction.

  6. DNA double strand breaks and Hsp70 expression in proton irradiated living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Anja; Reinert, Tilo; Tanner, Judith; Butz, Tilman

    2007-07-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in living cells can be directly provoked by ionising radiation. DSBs can be visualized by immunostaining the phosphorylated histone γH2AX. Our concern was to test the feasibility of γH2AX staining for a direct visualization of single proton hits. If single protons produce detectable foci, DNA DSBs could be used as "biological track detectors" for protons. Ionising radiation can also damage proteins indirectly by inducing free radicals. Heat shock proteins (Hsp) help to refold or even degrade the damaged proteins. The level of the most famous heat shock protein Hsp70 is increased by ionising radiation. We investigated the expression of γH2AX and Hsp70 after cross and line patterned irradiation with counted numbers of 2.25 MeV protons on primary human skin fibroblasts. The proton induced DSBs appear more delocalised than it was expected by the ion hit accuracy. Cooling the cells before the irradiation reduces the delocalisation of DNA DSBs, which is probably caused by the reduced diffusion of DNA damaging agents. Proton irradiation seems to provoke protein damages mainly in the cytoplasm indicated by cytoplasmic Hsp70 aggregates. On the contrary, in control heat shocked cells the Hsp70 was predominantly localized in the cell nucleus. However, the irradiated area could not be recognized, all cells on the Si 3N 4 window showed a homogenous Hsp70 expression pattern.

  7. Anti-angiogenic activity in metastasis of human breast cancer cells irradiated by a proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyu-Shik; Shin, Jin-Sun; Nam, Kyung-Soo; Shon, Yun-Hee

    2012-07-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential process of metastasis in human breast cancer. We investigated the effects of proton beam irradiation on angiogenic enzyme activities and their expressions in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The regulation of angiogenic regulating factors, of transforming growth factor- β (TGF- β) and of vesicular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in breast cancer cells irradiated with a proton beam was studied. Aromatase activity and mRNA expression, which is correlated with metastasis, were significantly decreased by irradiation with a proton beam in a dose-dependent manner. TGF- β and VEGF transcriptions were also diminished by proton beam irradiation. In contrast, transcription of tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs), also known as biological inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), was dose-dependently enhanced. Furthermore, an increase in the expression of TIMPs caused th MMP-9 activity to be diminished and the MMP-9 and the MMP-2 expressions to be decreased. These results suggest that inhibition of angiogenesis by proton beam irradiation in breast cancer cells is closely related to inhibitions of aromatase activity and transcription and to down-regulation of TGF- β and VEGF transcription.

  8. High-energy proton irradiation of C57Bl6 mice under hindlimb unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonca, Marc; Todd, Paul; Orschell, Christie; Chin-Sinex, Helen; Farr, Jonathan; Klein, Susan; Sokol, Paul

    2012-07-01

    Solar proton events (SPEs) pose substantial risk for crewmembers on deep space missions. It has been shown that low gravity and ionizing radiation both produce transient anemia and immunodeficiencies. We utilized the C57Bl/6 based hindlimb suspension model to investigate the consequences of hindlimb-unloading induced immune suppression on the sensitivity to whole body irradiation with modulated 208 MeV protons. Eight-week old C57Bl/6 female mice were conditioned by hindlimb-unloading. Serial CBC and hematocrit assays by HEMAVET were accumulated for the hindlimb-unloaded mice and parallel control animals subjected to identical conditions without unloading. One week of hindlimb-unloading resulted in a persistent, statistically significant 10% reduction in RBC count and a persistent, statistically significant 35% drop in lymphocyte count. This inhibition is consistent with published observations of low Earth orbit flown mice and with crewmember blood analyses. In our experiments the cell count suppression was sustained for the entire six-week period of observation and persisted for at least 7 days beyond the period of active hindlimb-unloading. C57Bl/6 mice were also irradiated with 208 MeV Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP) protons at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. We found that at 8.5 Gy hindlimb-unloaded mice were significantly more radiation sensitive with 35 lethalities out of 51 mice versus 15 out of 45 control (non-suspended) mice within 30 days of receiving 8.5 Gy of SOBP protons (p =0.001). Both control and hindlimb-unloaded stocktickerCBC analyses of 8.5 Gy proton irradiated and control mice by HEMAVET demonstrated severe reductions in WBC counts (Lymphocytes and PMNs) by day 2 post-irradiation, followed a week to ten days later by reductions in platelets, and then reductions in RBCs about 2 weeks post-irradiation. Recovery of all blood components commenced by three weeks post-irradiation. CBC analyses of 8

  9. Magnetic properties of proton irradiated BiFeO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungkyu; Jin Kim, Sam; Sung Kim, Chul

    2013-05-07

    The crystal structure and magnetic properties of BiFeO{sub 3} samples, proton-irradiated with 0, 10, and 20 pC/{mu}m{sup 2}, were investigated with x-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer, and Moessbauer spectroscopy measurements. From the Rietveld refinement analysis of the XRD patterns, the crystal structure of BiFeO{sub 3} is determined to be rhombohedral with the space group of R3c. We have observed the decrease in the lattice constant and oxygen occupancy with proton irradiation. The magnetization hysteresis (M-H) curves show the appearance of the weak ferromagnetic behavior in the proton irradiated BiFeO{sub 3} samples. The Moessbauer spectra of proton irradiated BiFeO{sub 3} samples at 295 K were analyzed with two-sextets (B{sub 1} and B{sub 2}) and doublet. From the isomer shift ({delta}) values, ionic states were determined to be Fe{sup 3+}. Compared to non-irradiated sample, having the antiferromagnetic area ratio (two-sextets) of 45.47, 54.53% the antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic area ratios (doublet) of 10 and 20 pC/{mu}m{sup 2} proton irradiated BiFeO{sub 3} samples are 41.36, 51.26, and 7.38% and 41.03, 50.90, and 8.07%, respectively. Our experimental observation suggests that the increase in the paramagnetic area ratio is due to the disappearance of superexchange interaction, resulted from the removal of the oxygen with proton irradiation. Also, the appearance of the weak ferromagnetic behavior is caused by the breaking of the antiferromagnetic coupling.

  10. Microstructural evolution of RPV steels under proton and ion irradiation studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J.; Wu, Y. C.; Liu, X. B.; Wang, R. S.; Nagai, Y.; Inoue, K.; Shimizu, Y.; Toyama, T.

    2015-03-01

    The microstructural evolution of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels induced by proton and heavy ion irradiation at low temperature (∼373 K) has been investigated using positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), atom probe tomography (APT), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nanoindentation. The PAS results indicated that both proton and heavy ion irradiation produce a large number of matrix defects, which contain small-size defects such as vacancies, vacancy-solute complexes, dislocation loops, and large-size vacancy clusters. In proton irradiated RPV steels, the size and number density of vacancy cluster defects increased rapidly with increasing dose due to the migration and agglomeration of vacancies. In contrast, for Fe ion irradiated steels, high density, larger size vacancy clusters can be easily induced at low dose, showing saturation in PAS response with increasing dose. No clear precipitates, solute-enriched clusters or other forms of solute segregation were observed by APT. Furthermore, dislocation loops were observed by TEM after 1.0 dpa, 240 keV proton irradiation, and an increase of the average nanoindentation hardness was found. It is suggested that ion irradiation produces many point defects and vacancy cluster defects, which induce the formation of dislocation loops and the increase of nanoindentation hardness.

  11. Relative degradation of near infrared avalanche photodiodes from proton irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Heidi; Johnston, Allan H.

    2004-01-01

    InGaAs and Ge avalanche photodiodes are compared for the effects of 63-MeV protons on dark current. Differences in displacement damage factors are discussed as they relate to structural differences between devices.

  12. Proton Irradiation Processing of Early Solar System Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetteland, C. J.; Sickafus, K. E.; Taylor, L. A.; McSween, H. Y.

    2015-07-01

    High-flux protons from Young Stellar Objects may result in secondary processing of early solar system solids. Chondrule precursors may be subjected to heating (possibly melting), nuclear transmutation, comminution, and carbon deposition.

  13. Single shot cell irradiations with laser-driven protons

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, N.; Schmid, T. E.; Zlobinskaya, O.; Wilkens, J. J.; Allinger, K.; Hilz, P.; Ma, W.; Reinhardt, S.; Bin, J.; Kiefer, D.; Schreiber, J.; Drexler, G. A.; Friedl, A.

    2013-07-26

    Ion beams are relevant for radiobiological studies in basic research and for application in tumor therapy. Here we present a method to generate nanosecond proton bunches with single shot doses of up to 7 Gray by a tabletop high-power laser. Although in their infancy, laser-ion accelerators allow studying fast radiobiological processes at small-scale laboratories as exemplarily demonstrated by measurements of the relative biological effectiveness of protons in human tumor cells.

  14. Single shot cell irradiations with laser-driven protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humble, N.; Allinger, K.; Bin, J.; Drexler, G. A.; Friedl, A.; Hilz, P.; Kiefer, D.; Ma, W.; Reinhardt, S.; Schmid, T. E.; Zlobinskaya, O.; Schreiber, J.; Wilkens, J. J.

    2013-07-01

    Ion beams are relevant for radiobiological studies in basic research and for application in tumor therapy. Here we present a method to generate nanosecond proton bunches with single shot doses of up to 7 Gray by a tabletop high-power laser. Although in their infancy, laser-ion accelerators allow studying fast radiobiological processes at small-scale laboratories as exemplarily demonstrated by measurements of the relative biological effectiveness of protons in human tumor cells.

  15. Proton irradiation of stem cells: Radiation damage and chemical radioprotection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, R. C.; Montour, J. L.; Gurney, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    Effects of high energy protons on erythropoietic stem cells and radioprotection by chemicals were investigated in NASA Space Radiation Effects Laboratory. The effects of a parallel beam of 600 MeV protons. The fluence, when converted to dose, were referenced to the synchrocyclotron beam monitors which were then used to administer radiation exposures. Mice were given graded doses to 300 rads to determine dose-response curve. Other mice received saline, AET, or 5-hydroxytryptamine 10 to 15 minutes before exposure.

  16. Lithium target for accelerator based BNCT neutron source: Influence by the proton irradiation on lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, R.; Imahori, Y.; Nakakmura, M.; Takada, M.; Kamada, S.; Hamano, T.; Hoshi, M.; Sato, H.; Itami, J.; Abe, Y.; Fuse, M.

    2012-12-01

    The neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is in the transition stage from nuclear reactor to accelerator based neutron source. Generation of low energy neutron can be achieved by 7Li (p, n) 7Be reaction using accelerator based neutron source. Development of small-scale and safe neutron source is within reach. The melting point of lithium that is used for the target is low, and durability is questioned for an extended use at a high current proton beam. In order to test its durability, we have irradiated lithium with proton beam at the same level as the actual current density, and found no deterioration after 3 hours of continuous irradiation. As a result, it is suggested that lithium target can withstand proton irradiation at high current, confirming suitability as accelerator based neutron source for BNCT.

  17. Effects of proton irradiation on SiGe HBTs implemented with isolation guard rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ningyue; Cho, Namki; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2010-12-01

    The effects of proton irradiation on SiGe HBTs implemented with isolation guard rings are investigated in this work. Different from what was shown in any of the previous radiation tolerance studies, a distinctive increase of the emitter current after proton irradiation was observed on a measured inverse-mode Gummel plot from the SiGe HBTs implemented with isolation guard rings. Detailed device measurements and modeling revealed a new SiGe HBT degradation mechanism under proton irradiation. It is found that the increase of the emitter current measured in the inverse-mode Gummel plot comes from the degradation of the substrate-collector (buried layer) junction diode associated with the SiGe HBTs. Furthermore, we identified that the radiation damages in the substrate-collector junction near the deep trench edges are solely responsible for the observed degradation of radiation tolerance. The potential impact of this radiation damage to device operation is discussed.

  18. Determination of proton and neutron spectra in the LANSCE spallation irradiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    James, M.R.; Maloy, S.A.; Sommer, W.F.; Fowler, M.M.; Dry, D.; Ferguson, P.D.; Mueller, G.; Corzine, R.K.

    1999-06-01

    Materials samples were recently irradiated in the Los Alamos Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to provide data for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project on the effect of irradiation on the mechanical and physical properties of materials. The targets were configured to expose samples to a variety of radiation environments including, high-energy protons, mixed protons and high-energy neutrons, and low-energy neutrons. The samples were irradiated for approximately six months during a ten month period using an 800 MeV proton beam with a circular Gaussian shape of approximately 2{sigma} = 3.0 cm. At the end of this period, the samples were extracted and tested. Activation foils were also extracted that had been placed in proximity to the materials samples. These were used to quantify the fluences in various locations.

  19. The effects of proton irradiation on the reliability of InAlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.; Lo, C. F.; Xi, Y. Y.; Wang, Y.l.; Kim, H.-Y.; Kim, J.; Pearton, S. J.; Laboutin, O.; Cao, Yu; Johnson, Wayne J.; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Ren, F.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of proton irradiation on reliability of InAlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Devices were subjected to 5-15 MeV proton irradiations with a fixed dose of 5 1015 cm-2, or to a different doses of 2 1011, 5 1013 or 2 1015 cm-2 of protons at a fixed energy of 5 MeV. During off-state electrical stressing, the typical critical voltage for un-irradiated devices was 45 to 55 V. By sharp contrast, no critical voltage was detected for proton irradiated HEMTs up to 100 V, which was instrument-limited. After electrical stressing, no degradation was observed for the drain or gate current-voltage characteristics of the proton-irradiated HEMTs. However, the drain current decreased ~12%, and the reverse bias gate leakage current increased more than two orders of magnitude for un-irradiated HEMTs as a result of electrical stressing.

  20. "Out-of-field" effects of head-localized proton irradiation on peripheral immune parameters.

    PubMed

    Pecaut, Michael J; Nelson, Gregory A; Moyers, Michael F; Rabin, Bernard; Gridley, Daila S

    2003-01-01

    The heads of Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated with protons to total doses of 1.5, 3 and 4 Gy and euthanized 9-10 days later. Significant dose-dependent decreases were noted in thymus mass. Lymphocyte and platelet numbers were significantly reduced in blood. Flow cytometric analysis of blood and spleen showed that CD3+ T, CD3+/CD4+ TH, and CD3+/CD8+ TC cell numbers were low and proportions were significantly altered by radiation. CD4:CD8 ratios and CD45R+ B lymphocytes were unaffected. Spontaneous blastogenesis of blood and spleen leukocytes was significantly increased by radiation. Plasma TGF-beta 1 level in irradiated rats was consistently, but not significantly, higher than in non-irradiated animals. T and B cell proportions in lymph nodes from irradiated animals were similar to non-irradiated controls. Bone marrow from all irradiated groups had high CD90+/Gran+ cell numbers. The data show that head-localized proton irradiation at relatively modest doses can profoundly influence systemic distribution and composition of lymphocyte populations. The data also suggest that immune modulation induced by localized proton, as well as other forms of radiation, should be taken into consideration when evaluating adjunctive immunotherapies in patients receiving radiotherapy. PMID:14758715

  1. Proton irradiation induced defects in GaN: Rutherford backscattering and thermally stimulated current studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Nishikata, N.; Kamioka, K.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.

    2016-03-01

    The proton irradiation induced defects in GaN are studied by combining elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA), thermally stimulated current (TSC), and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) measurements. The proton irradiation (peak concentration: 1.0 × 1015 cm-2) into GaN films with a thickness of 3 μm is performed using a 500 keV implanter. The proton concentration by a TRIM simulation is maximum at 3600 nm in depth, which means that the proton beam almost passes through the GaN film. The carrier concentration decreases three orders of magnitude to 1015 cm-3 by the proton irradiation, suggesting the existence of the proton irradiation-induced defects. The ERDA measurements using the 1.5 MeV helium beam can evaluate hydrogen from the surface to ∼300 nm. The hydrogen concentration at ∼220 nm is ∼8.3 × 1013 cm-2 and ∼1.0 × 1014 cm-2 for un-irradiated and as-irradiated samples, respectively, suggesting that electrical properties are almost not affected by hydrogen. TSC measurements show a broad spectrum at around 110 K which can be divided into three traps, P1 (ionization energy 173 meV), P2 (251 meV), and P3 (330 meV). The peak intensity of P1 is much larger than that of P2 and P3. These traps are related to the N vacancy and/or complex involving N vacancy (P1), neutral Ga vacancy (VGa) (P2), and complex involving VGa (P3). The Ga displacement concentration evaluated by RBS measurements is 1.75 × 1019 cm-3 corresponding to 1/1000 of the Ga concentration in GaN. The observed Ga displacement may be origins of P2 and P3 traps.

  2. Accumulation efficiency of cancer stem-like cells post γ-ray and proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Yi; Wang, Weikang; Fu, Qibin; Mei, Tao; Wu, Jingwen; Li, Jia; Yang, Gen; Wang, Yugang

    2012-09-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) has been proven to be a powerful medical treatment in cancer therapy. Rational and effective use of its killing power depends on understanding IR-mediated responses at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels. Increasing evidence supports that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) play an important role in tumor regrowth and spread post radiotherapy, for they are resistant to various therapy methods including radiation. Presently, SW620 colon carcinoma monolayer culture cells were irradiated with γ-rays and protons of 2 Gy. Then apoptosis, clonogenic survival and the expression of CD133+ protein were examined. The results showed that there was no significantly difference either on long-term clonogenic survival or on short-term apoptosis ratio. However, compared with γ-rays, irradiation with protons was less efficient to accumulate CSCs at the same dose, although both protons and γ-rays can significantly accumulate the CD133+ CSCs subpopulation. In addition, the results of sphere formation assay also confirmed that proton irradiation is less efficient in CSCs accumulation, suggesting proton irradiation might have higher efficiency in CSCs elimination for cancer radiotherapy.

  3. Impact of proton irradiation on deep level states in n-GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Arehart, A. R.; Cinkilic, E.; Ringel, S. A.; Chen, J.; Zhang, E. X.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Schrimpf, R. D.; McSkimming, B.; Speck, J. S.

    2013-07-22

    Deep levels in 1.8 MeV proton irradiated n-type GaN were systematically characterized using deep level transient spectroscopies and deep level optical spectroscopies. The impacts of proton irradiation on the introduction and evolution of those deep states were revealed as a function of proton fluences up to 1.1 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2}. The proton irradiation introduced two traps with activation energies of E{sub C} - 0.13 eV and 0.16 eV, and a monotonic increase in the concentration for most of the pre-existing traps, though the increase rates were different for each trap, suggesting different physical sources and/or configurations for these states. Through lighted capacitance voltage measurements, the deep levels at E{sub C} - 1.25 eV, 2.50 eV, and 3.25 eV were identified as being the source of systematic carrier removal in proton-damaged n-GaN as a function of proton fluence.

  4. High energy proton irradiation induced pinning centers in Bi-2212 and Bi-2223 superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, J.O.; Safar, H.; Cho, J.H.

    1995-12-01

    Bi-2212 single crystals and Bi-2223/Ag-sheathed tapes were irradiated with high energy protons. TEM images reveal the production of randomly oriented (splayed) columnar defects with an amorphous core of {approximately}10 nm diameter caused by the fissioning of Bi nuclei. The critical current density J{sub c} and irreversibility line both substantially increased with the proton dose for both crystals and tapes, especially for the magnetic field parallel to the c axis. An irradiated tape had a J{sub c} value {approximately}100 times greater than that of an unirradiated one at 1 T and 75 K.

  5. Redistribution of components in the niobium-silicon system under high-temperature proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Afonin, N. N.; Logacheva, V. A. Khoviv, A. M.

    2011-12-15

    The redistribution of components in the niobium-silicon system during magnetron-assisted sputtering of niobium, vacuum annealing, and high-temperature proton irradiation is studied. It is established that, during magnetron-assisted sputtering followed by vacuum annealing, silicon penetrates through the metal film to the outer boundary of the film. Under high-temperature proton irradiation, the suppression of the diffusion of niobium into silicon is observed. This effect is attributed to the high concentration of radiation vacancies in the region of the Nb/Si interphase boundary.

  6. Anomalous effects in silicon solar cell irradiated by 1-MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Kachare, R.; Anspaugh, B.E. )

    1989-09-15

    Several silicon solar cells having thicknesses of approximately 63 {mu}m, with and without back-surface fields (BSF), were irradiated with 1-MeV protons having fluences between 10{sup 10} and 10{sup 12} protons/cm{sup 2}. The irradiations were performed using both normal and isotropic incidence on the rear surfaces of the cells. It was observed that after irradiation with fluences greater than 10{sup 11} protons/cm{sup 2}, all BSF cells degraded at a faster rate than cells without BSF. The irradiation results are analyzed using a model in which irradiation-induced defects in the BSF region are taken into account. A number of other possibilities for BSF cell degradation are considered. Tentatively, it is concluded that an increase in defect density due to the formation of aluminum and proton complexes in BSF cells is responsible for the higher-power loss in the BSF cells compared to the non-BSF cells.

  7. Annealing results on low-energy proton-irradiated GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kachare, R.; Anspaugh, B. E.; O'Meara, L.

    1988-01-01

    AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells with an approximately 0.5-micron-thick Al(0.85)Ga(0.15)As window layer were irradiated using normal and isotropic incident protons having energies between 50 and 500 keV with fluence up to 1 x 10 to the 12th protons/sq cm. The irradiated cells were annealed at temperatures between 150 and 300 C in nitrogen ambient. The annealing results reveal that significant recovery in spectral response at longer wavelengths occurred. However, the short-wavelength spectral response showed negligible annealing, irrespective of the irradiation energy and annealing conditions. This indicates that the damage produced near the AlGaAs/GaAs interface and the space-charge region anneals differently than damage produced in the bulk. This is explained by using a model in which the as-grown dislocations interact with irradiation-induced point defects to produce thermally stable defects.

  8. Scaling Laws for Proton Acceleration from the Rear Surface of Laser-Irradiated Thin Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, J.; Antici, P.; D'Humieres, E.; Lefebvre, E.; Borghesi, M.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Brambrink, E.; Audebert, P.; Kaluza, M.; Schreiber, J.; Malka, V.; Manclossi, M.; Meyroneinc, S.; Mora, P.; Toncian, T.; Pepin, H.

    2006-04-07

    In the last few years, intense research has been conducted on the topic of laser-accelerated ion sources and their applications. Ultra-bright beams of multi-MeV protons are produced by irradiating thin metallic foils with ultra-intense short laser pulses. These sources open new opportunities for ion beam generation and control, and could stimulate development of compact ion accelerators for many applications, in particular proton therapy of deep-seated tumours. Here we show that scaling laws deduced from fluid models reproduce well the acceleration of proton beams for a large range of laser and target parameters. These scaling laws show that, in our regime, there is an optimum in the laser pulse duration of {approx}200 fs-1 ps, with a needed laser energy level of 30 to 100 J, in order to achieve e.g. 200 MeV energy protons necessary for proton therapy.

  9. Cognitive effects of proton irradiation at differing energy levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During exploratory class missions to space outside of the magnetic field of the Earth, astronauts will be exposed to various forms of radiation including solar particle events (SPE) which are predominantly composed of protons. As such it is important to characterize the cognitive effects of exposure...

  10. Evaluation of irradiation hardening of proton irradiated stainless steels by nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Kuribayashi, Yutaka; Nogami, Shuhei; Kasada, Ryuta; Hasegawa, Akira

    2014-03-01

    Ion irradiation experiments are useful for investigating irradiation damage. However, estimating the irradiation hardening of ion-irradiated materials is challenging because of the shallow damage induced region. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to prove usefulness of nanoindentation technique for estimation of irradiation hardening for ion-irradiated materials. SUS316L austenitic stainless steel was used and it was irradiated by 1 MeV H+ ions to a nominal displacement damage of 0.1, 0.3, 1, and 8 dpa at 573 K. The irradiation hardness of the irradiated specimens were measured and analyzed by Nix-Gao model. The indentation size effect was observed in both unirradiated and irradiated specimens. The hardness of the irradiated specimens changed significantly at certain indentation depths. The depth at which the hardness varied indicated that the region deformed by the indenter had reached the boundary between the irradiated and unirradiated regions. The hardness of the irradiated region was proportional to the inverse of the indentation depth in the Nix-Gao plot. The bulk hardness of the irradiated region, H0, estimated by the Nix-Gao plot and Vickers hardness were found to be related to each other, and the relationship could be described by the equation, HV = 0.76H0. Thus, the nanoindentation technique demonstrated in this study is valuable for measuring irradiation hardening in ion-irradiated materials.

  11. ASTRO-H CdTe detectors proton irradiation at PIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limousin, O.; Renaud, D.; Horeau, B.; Dubos, S.; Laurent, P.; Lebrun, F.; Chipaux, R.; Boatella Polo, C.; Marcinkowski, R.; Kawaharada, M.; Watanabe, S.; Ohta, M.; Sato, G.; Takahashi, T.

    2015-07-01

    ASTRO-H will be operated in a Low Earth Orbit with a 31° inclination at ~550 km altitude, thus passing daily through the South Atlantic Anomaly radiation belt, a specially harsh environment where the detectors are suffering the effect of the interaction with trapped high energy protons. As CdTe detector performance might be affected by the irradiation, we investigate the effect of the accumulated proton fluence on their spectral response. To do so, we have characterized and irradiated representative samples of SGD and HXI detector under different conditions. The detectors in question, from ACRORAD, are single-pixels having a size of 2 mm by 2 mm and 750 μm thick. The Schottky contact is either made of an Indium or Aluminum for SGD and HXI respectively. We ran the irradiation test campaign at the Proton Irradiation Facility (PIF) at PSI, and ESA approved equipment to evaluate the radiation hardness of flight hardware. We simulated the proton flux expected on the sensors over the entire mission, and secondary neutrons flux due to primary proton interactions into the surrounding BGO active shielding. We eventually characterized the detector response evolution, emphasizing each detector spectral response as well as its stability by studying the so-called Polarization effect. The latter is provoking a spectral response degradation against time as a charge accumulation process occurs in Schottky type CdTe sensors. In this paper, we report on the test campaigns at PIF and will show up our experimental setup. We will pursue describing the irradiation conditions associated with our GEANT 4 predictions and finally, we report the main results of our campaigns concluding that the proton effect does not severely affect the CdTe response neither the detector stability while the secondary neutrons might be more active to reduce the performance on the long run.

  12. Water corrosion measurements on tungsten irradiated with high energy protons and spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Scott Lillard, R.; Sommer, Walter F.; Butt, Darryl P.; Gac, Frank D.; Willcutt, Gordon J.; Louthan, McIntyre R.

    2012-12-01

    A detailed analysis was performed on the degradation of a tungsten target under water cooling while being exposed to a 761 MeV proton beam at an average current of 0.867 mA to a maximum fluence of 1.3 × 1021 protons/cm2. The target consisted of 3 mm diameter tungsten rods arranged in bundles and cooled with deionized water flowing over their length. Degradation of the tungsten was measured through analyzing water resistivity, tungsten concentration in water samples that were taken during irradiation and through dimensional measurements on the rods after irradiation. Chemical analysis of irradiated water samples showed W concentrations up to 35 μg/ml. Gamma analysis showed increases in concentrations of many isotopes including W-178, Lu-171, Tm-167, Tm-166, Yb-169 and Hf-175. Dimensional measurements performed after irradiation on the W rods revealed a decrease in diameter as a function of position that followed closely the Gaussian proton beam profile along the rod length and indicated a definite beam-effect. A general decrease in diameter, especially on the coolant-water entrance point where turbulent flow was likely, also suggests a chemically and mechanically-driven corrosion effect. A method to estimate the apparent corrosion rate based on proton fluence is presented and application of this method estimates the material loss rate at about 1.9 W atoms/incident proton. From this result, the corrosion rate of tungsten in a 761 MeV, 0.867 mA proton beam was calculated to be 0.073 cm/full power year. of irradiation.

  13. Studies of proton-irradiated SO2 at low temperatures Implications for Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The infrared absorption spectrum from 3.3 to 27 microns of SO2 ice films has been measured at 20 and 88 K before and after 1-MeV proton irradiation. The radiation flux was chosen to simulate the estimated flux of Jovian magnetospheric 1-MeV protons incident on Io. After irradiation, SO3 is identified as the dominant molecule synthesized in the SO2 ice. This is also the case after irradiation of composite samples of SO2 with sulfur or disulfites. Darkening was observed in irradiated SO2 ice and in irradiated S8 pellets. Photometric and spectral measurements of the thermoluminescence of irradiated SO2 have been made during warming. The spectrum appears as a broad band with a maximum at 4450 A. Analysis of the luminescence data suggests that at Ionian temperatures irradiated SO2 ice would not be a dominant contributor to posteclipse brightening phenomena. After warming to room temperature, a form of SO3 remains along with a sulfate and S8. Based on these experiments, it is reasonable to propose that small amounts of SO3 may exist on the surface of Io as a result of irradiation synthesis in SO2 frosts.

  14. Studies of proton-irradiated SO2 at low temperatures Implications for Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, M. H.

    1984-07-01

    The infrared absorption spectrum from 3.3 to 27 microns of SO2 ice films has been measured at 20 and 88 K before and after 1-MeV proton irradiation. The radiation flux was chosen to simulate the estimated flux of Jovian magnetospheric 1-MeV protons incident on Io. After irradiation, SO3 is identified as the dominant molecule synthesized in the SO2 ice. This is also the case after irradiation of composite samples of SO2 with sulfur or disulfites. Darkening was observed in irradiated SO2 ice and in irradiated S8 pellets. Photometric and spectral measurements of the thermoluminescence of irradiated SO2 have been made during warming. The spectrum appears as a broad band with a maximum at 4450 A. Analysis of the luminescence data suggests that at Ionian temperatures irradiated SO2 ice would not be a dominant contributor to posteclipse brightening phenomena. After warming to room temperature, a form of SO3 remains along with a sulfate and S8. Based on these experiments, it is reasonable to propose that small amounts of SO3 may exist on the surface of Io as a result of irradiation synthesis in SO2 frosts.

  15. Comparison of the microstructure, deformation and crack initiation behavior of austenitic stainless steel irradiated in-reactor or with protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Kale J.; Was, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the microstructures, microchemistry, hardening, susceptibility to IASCC initiation, and deformation behavior resulting from proton or reactor irradiation. Two commercial purity and six high purity austenitic stainless steels with various solute element additions were compared. Samples of each alloy were irradiated in the BOR-60 fast reactor at 320 °C to doses between approximately 4 and 12 dpa or by a 3.2 MeV proton beam at 360 °C to a dose of 5.5 dpa. Irradiated microstructures consisted mainly of dislocation loops, which were similar in size but lower in density after proton irradiation. Both irradiation types resulted in the formation of Ni-Si rich precipitates in a high purity alloy with added Si, but several other high purity neutron irradiated alloys showed precipitation that was not observed after proton irradiation, likely due to their higher irradiation dose. Low densities of small voids were observed in several high purity proton irradiated alloys, and even lower densities in neutron irradiated alloys, implying void nucleation was in process. Elemental segregation at grain boundaries was very similar after each irradiation type. Constant extension rate tensile experiments on the alloys in simulated light water reactor environments showed excellent agreement in terms of the relative amounts of intergranular cracking, and an analysis of localized deformation after straining showed a similar response of cracking to surface step height after both irradiation types. Overall, excellent agreement was observed after proton and reactor irradiation, providing additional evidence that proton irradiation is a useful tool for accelerated testing of irradiation effects in austenitic stainless steel.

  16. Effect of annealing on proton irradiated AlGaN/GaN based micro-Hall sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Abderrahmane, A.; Takahashi, H.; Tashiro, T.; Ko, P. J.; Okada, H.; Sandhu, A.; Sato, S.; Ohshima, T.

    2014-02-20

    The effect of annealing at 673 K on irradiated micro-Hall sensors irradiated with protons at 380keV and fluences of 10{sup 14}, 10{sup 15} and 10{sup 16} protons/cm{sup 2} is reported. Cathodoluminescence measurements were carried out at room temperature before and after annealing and showed improvement in the band edge band emission of the GaN layer. After annealing a sensor irradiated by 10{sup 15} protons/cm{sup 2} the device became operational with improvements in its magnetic sensitivity. All irradiated sensors showed improvement in their electrical characteristics after annealing.

  17. Proton irradiation of conventional and lithium solar cells - 11-37 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Carter, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Conventional n/p and lithium solar cells were irradiated with 11- to 37-MeV protons. The energy dependence of the solar cell degradation, calculated from electrical parameters and lifetime measurements, is shown to be very slight. Damage coefficients for the n/p cells are calculated. Annealing characteristics of both the lithium cells and the n/p cells are presented.

  18. Survival of tumor cells after proton irradiation with ultra-high dose rates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Laser acceleration of protons and heavy ions may in the future be used in radiation therapy. Laser-driven particle beams are pulsed and ultra high dose rates of >109 Gy s-1may be achieved. Here we compare the radiobiological effects of pulsed and continuous proton beams. Methods The ion microbeam SNAKE at the Munich tandem accelerator was used to directly compare a pulsed and a continuous 20 MeV proton beam, which delivered a dose of 3 Gy to a HeLa cell monolayer within < 1 ns or 100 ms, respectively. Investigated endpoints were G2 phase cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and colony formation. Results At 10 h after pulsed irradiation, the fraction of G2 cells was significantly lower than after irradiation with the continuous beam, while all other endpoints including colony formation were not significantly different. We determined the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for pulsed and continuous proton beams relative to x-irradiation as 0.91 ± 0.26 and 0.86 ± 0.33 (mean and SD), respectively. Conclusions At the dose rates investigated here, which are expected to correspond to those in radiation therapy using laser-driven particles, the RBE of the pulsed and the (conventional) continuous irradiation mode do not differ significantly. PMID:22008289

  19. Critical currents and dissipative effects in proton-irradiated ceramic YBCO and BISCO

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzetti, E.; Minetti, B. ); Andreone, D. ); Cherubini, R. ); Gherardi, L.; Metra, P. )

    1992-04-01

    Transport properties in pellets of YBCO and BISCO are studied before and after 6.5-MeV proton implantation. The average critical current was strongly enhanced but in one case also weakened, probably due to the unfavorable interaction with the pre-irradiation defect structure. Characteristic parameters are compared and discussed. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Determination of mixed proton/neutron fluences in the LANSCE irradiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    James, M.R.; Maloy, S.A; Sommer, W.F.; Ferguson, P.; Fowler, M.M.; Corzine, K.

    1998-12-31

    In support of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program, several materials were exposed to a high-energy proton and spallation neutron environments. Large differences in mechanical property changes in this environment are expected compared to the typical fusion or fission systems. To make proper dose correlations, it is important to accurately quantify the fluences. Activation foils consisting of a stack of disks of Co, Ni, Fe, Al, Nb and Cu were irradiated concurrent with mechanical testing samples in the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facility. The irradiation consisted of an 800 MeV, 1 mA proton beam and a W target in the beam provided a source of spallation neutrons. The maximum proton fluence was around 3 {times} 10{sup 21} p/cm{sup 2} and the maximum neutron fluence approximately 3 {times} 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2}. After irradiation, the foils were withdrawn and the radioactive isotopes analyzed using gamma spectroscopy. From initial estimates for the fluences and spectra derived from the Los Alamos High-Energy Transport (LAHET) Code System (LCS), comparisons to the measured levels of activation products were made. The Na-22 activation products in the Al foils were measured from different regions of the target in order to profile the spatial levels of the fluences. These tests gave empirical confirmation of the proton and neutron fluences of the irradiated samples throughout the target region.

  1. Doubling of the Critical Current Density of 2G-YBCO Coated Conductors through proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welp, Ulrich; Jia, Ying; Kwok, Wai-Kwong; Rupich, Marty; Fleshler, Steven; Kayani, Asfghar

    2013-03-01

    We report on magnetization and transport measurements of the critical current density of commercial 2G YBCO coated conductors before and after proton irradiation. The samples were irradiated along the c-axis with 4 MeV protons to a fluence of 1.5x1016 p/cm2. We find that at temperatures below 50 K, proton irradiation increases Jc by a factor of 2 in low fields and increases up to 2.5 in fields of 7 T. At 77 K, proton irradiation is less effective in enhancing the critical current. Doubling of Jc in fields of several Tesla and at temperatures below 50 K will be highly beneficial for applications of coated conductors in rotating machinery, generators and magnet coils. - Work supported by the US DoE-BES funded Energy Frontier Research Center (YJ), and by Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (UW, WKK), under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  2. Proton irradiation creep of Inconel 718 at 300°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, R.; Matera, R.

    2000-12-01

    Torsional creep tests were conducted on Inconel 718 in the precipitation hardened condition under 17 MeV proton irradiation at 300°C upto a maximum dose of 0.35 dpa. The stress dependence of the irradiation creep rate was linear for the applied shear stresses which ranged from 150 to 450 MPa. The results are discussed in relation to the operating conditions of an ITER-like machine, where Inconel 718 bolts are used to mechanically attach the shielding blanket to the backplate. The irradiation creep induced stress relaxation amounted to about 30% after a dose of 0.35 dpa.

  3. Results of hybrid photodiode irradiation by 200 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh A. et al.

    2001-12-03

    Hybrid Photodiodes (HPD, [1]) will be used as the photodetector for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Hadron Calorimeter (HCAL) readout [2]. The HPDs are required to operate in a high radiation environment, where the HCAL detector will receive a total ionizing dose of about 330 rads and a fluence of 4 x 10{sup 11} n/cm{sup 2} over a 10 year running period [3]. Effects of HPD irradiation by low energy neutrons were studied and reported previously [1]. In these studies, high energy protons are used to study possible effects of single event burnout [4], since high energy protons are more likely to induce large energy transfer within the HPD silicon. The HPDs were irradiated by 200 MeV protons at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility [IUCF, 5]. The results of the study are presented.

  4. Proton irradiation of MWIR HgCdTe/CdZnTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahey, Stephen; Velicu, Silviu; Bommena, Ramana; Zhao, Jun; Cowan, Vincent; Morath, Christian; Sivananthan, Sivalingam

    2015-09-01

    High performance infrared sensors are vulnerable to slight changes in defect densities and locations. For example in a space application where such sensors are exposed to proton irradiation capable of generating point defects the sensors are known to suffer performance degradation. The degradation can generally be observed in terms of dark current density and responsivity degradations. Here we report results of MWIR HgCdTe/CdZnTe single element diodes dark current densities before and after exposure to 63MeV protons at room temperature to a total ionizing dose of 100 kRad(Si). We find the irradiated diodes as a group show some signs of proton-induced damage in dark current.

  5. High-temperature annealing of proton irradiated beryllium - A dilatometry-based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simos, Nikolaos; Elbakhshwan, Mohamed; Zhong, Zhong; Ghose, Sanjit; Savkliyildiz, Ilyas

    2016-08-01

    Ssbnd 200 F grade beryllium has been irradiated with 160 MeV protons up to 1.2 1020 cm-2 peak fluence and irradiation temperatures in the range of 100-200 °C. To address the effect of proton irradiation on dimensional stability, an important parameter in its consideration in fusion reactor applications, and to simulate high temperature irradiation conditions, multi-stage annealing using high precision dilatometry to temperatures up to 740 °C were conducted in air. X-ray diffraction studies were also performed to compliment the macroscopic thermal study and offer a microscopic view of the irradiation effects on the crystal lattice. The primary objective was to qualify the competing dimensional change processes occurring at elevated temperatures namely manufacturing defect annealing, lattice parameter recovery, transmutation 4He and 3H diffusion and swelling and oxidation kinetics. Further, quantification of the effect of irradiation dose and annealing temperature and duration on dimensional changes is sought. The study revealed the presence of manufacturing porosity in the beryllium grade, the oxidation acceleration effect of irradiation including the discontinuous character of oxidation advancement, the effect of annealing duration on the recovery of lattice parameters recovery and the triggering temperature for transmutation gas diffusion leading to swelling.

  6. Enhanced critical currents of commercial 2G superconducting coated conductors through proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welp, Ulrich; Leroux, M.; Kihlstrom, K. J.; Kwok, W.-K.; Koshelev, A. E.; Miller, D. J.; Rupich, M. W.; Fleshler, S.; Malozemoff, A. P.; Kayani, A.

    2015-03-01

    We report on magnetization and transport measurements of the critical current density, Jc, of commercial 2G YBCO coated conductors before and after proton irradiation. The samples were irradiated along the c-axis with 4 MeV protons. Proton irradiation produces a mixed pinning landscape composed of pre-existing rare earth particles and a uniform distribution of irradiation induced nm-sized defects. This pinning landscape strongly reduces the suppression of Jc in magnetic fields resulting in a doubling of Jc in a field of ~ 4T. The irradiation dose-dependence of Jc is characterized by a temperature and field dependent sweat spot that at 5 K and 6 T occurs around 20x1016 p/cm2. Large-scale time dependent Ginzburg-Landau simulations yield a good description of our results. This work supported by the Center for Emergent Superconductivity, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. D.O.E., Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (KK, ML, AEK) and by the D.O.E, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 (UW, WKK).

  7. Effects of proton irradiation on nanocluster precipitation in ferritic steel containing fcc alloying additions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhongwu; Liu, C T; Wang, Xun-Li; Miller, Michael K; Ma, Dong; Chen, Guang; Williams, J R; Chin, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Newly-developed precipitate-strengthened ferritic steels with and without pre-existing nanoscale precipitates were irradiated with 4 MeV protons to a dose of ~5 mdpa at 50 C and subsequently examined by nanoindentation and atom probe tomography (APT). Irradiation-enhanced precipitation and coarsening of pre-existing nanoscale precipitates were observed. Copper partitions to the precipitate core along with a segregation of Ni, Al and Mn to the precipitate/matrix interface after both thermal aging and proton irradiation. Proton irradiation induces the precipitation reaction and coarsening of pre-existing nanoscale precipitates, and these results are similar to a thermal aging process. The precipitation and coarsening of nanoscale precipitates are responsible for the changes in hardness. The observation of the radiation-induced softening is essentially due to the coarsening of the pre-existing Cu-rich nanoscale precipitates. The implication of the precipitation on the embrittlement of reactor-pressure-vessel steels after irradiation is discussed.

  8. Defocusing beam line design for an irradiation facility at the TAEA SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencer, A.; Demirköz, B.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Yiğitoğlu, M.

    2016-07-01

    Electronic components must be tested to ensure reliable performance in high radiation environments such as Hi-Limu LHC and space. We propose a defocusing beam line to perform proton irradiation tests in Turkey. The Turkish Atomic Energy Authority SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility was inaugurated in May 2012 for radioisotope production. The facility has also an R&D room for research purposes. The accelerator produces protons with 30 MeV kinetic energy and the beam current is variable between 10 μA and 1.2 mA. The beam kinetic energy is suitable for irradiation tests, however the beam current is high and therefore the flux must be lowered. We plan to build a defocusing beam line (DBL) in order to enlarge the beam size, reduce the flux to match the required specifications for the irradiation tests. Current design includes the beam transport and the final focusing magnets to blow up the beam. Scattering foils and a collimator is placed for the reduction of the beam flux. The DBL is designed to provide fluxes between 107 p /cm2 / s and 109 p /cm2 / s for performing irradiation tests in an area of 15.4 cm × 21.5 cm. The facility will be the first irradiation facility of its kind in Turkey.

  9. Comparative study of changes in electrical properties of silicon and silicon carbide upon proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Emtsev, V. V. Ivanov, A. M.; Kozlovskii, V. V.; Lebedev, A. A.; Oganesyan, G. A.; Strokan, N. B.

    2010-05-15

    Rates of carrier removal from the conduction band in n-type FZ-Si and 4H-SiC irradiated with 8- and 15-MeV protons at room temperature are discussed. Calculated rates of formation of primary radiation defects (Frenkel pairs) in these materials are presented and compared with the corresponding experimental values. Protons create defects in collision cascades involving recoil atoms formed in the crystal lattice itself. The results are compared with similar data previously obtained in irradiation of n-type FZ-Si and 4H-SiC with 900-keV electrons, in which case isolated so-called close Frenkel pairs are absolutely dominant among primary radiation defects. It has been found that the E-center model adequately describing the decrease in the electrical conductivity of n-FZ-Si upon electron irradiation is inapplicable to interpretation of experimental data for proton-irradiated materials. It is suggested that a pronounced annealing of 'simple' radiation defects of the type of close Frenkel pairs occurs during irradiation at room temperature.

  10. The influence of relative humidity on iron corrosion under proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapuerta, S.; Bérerd, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Millard-Pinard, N.; Jaffrézic, H.; Crusset, D.; Féron, D.

    2008-03-01

    With regard to the storage for high-level radioactive waste and the reversible period of a geological repository, the influence of proton irradiation on the indoor atmospheric corrosion of iron has been investigated in relation to the relative humidity (RH) in the atmosphere. Irradiation experiments were performed using a 3-MeV extracted proton beam. Relative humidity varies from 0% to 85%. Before and after each irradiation, the surfaces of the sample were characterised by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in order to determine oxygen concentrations in the metal. The maximum oxidation rate was observed for 45% RH in air under proton irradiation and was compared with literature data without irradiation where the maximum oxidation rate was observed at 95% RH. The experimental results are discussed on the basis of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) model: they are explained by the contrast between the adsorption of O 2 and H 2O species on the active cathodic sites of the iron surface and by the formation of H +(H 2O) n.

  11. Role for proton beam irradiation in treatment of pediatric CNS malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Archambeau, J.O.; Slater, J.D.; Slater, J.M.; Tangeman, R. )

    1992-01-01

    The ability to vary the proton energy (depth of beam penetration) and modulate the dose distribution at the end of range permits delivery of an increased dose to the designated cancer-containing volume with a reduced dose to overlying normal brain tissue. The evolution of childhood CNS malignancy following therapy is reviewed to identify radiation response variables indicating where the proton dose distribution will improve the therapeutic ratio. The review documents that of the 1262 children expected to develop CNS malignancy in 1989, only 43% will survive 5 years. About 75% of those with medulloblastoma and over 90% with astrocytoma die from persistent (in-field) disease. When the patient has been treated with radiation, it is accepted that disease persistence indicates the cancer dose was insufficient. Potentially 536 children could show an improved incidence of local control and improved survival from an increased cancer dose available from proton irradiation. As the total dose and volume of brain irradiated is increased about 1800 cGy, brain dysfunction increases, producing a spectrum of functional and intellectual deficits which are age and volume related. About 900 irradiated patients would have fewer in-field histologic and functional changes if the dose to normal brain, or the volume of brain irradiated, is reduced by an improved dose distribution. A proton beam treatment plan, delivering a cancer dose of 7400 cGy, is simulated for a thalamic astrocytoma. The dose distribution of this plan is compared with an x-ray plan used to treat a patient, in which a dose of 5400 cGy was delivered to the astrocytoma. Comparative isodose distributions and dose-volume histograms indicate a decreased integral dose to normal brain and a decreased volume of normal brain irradiated, even as the cancer dose is boosted 2000 cGy with protons.

  12. Response of 9Cr-ODS Steel to Proton Irradiation at 400 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Jianchao He; Farong Wan; Kumar Sridharan; Todd R. Allen; A. Certain; Y. Q. Wu

    2014-09-01

    The stability of Y–Ti–O nanoclusters, dislocation structure, and grain boundary segregation in 9Cr-ODS steels has been investigated following proton irradiation at 400 °C with damage levels up to 3.7 dpa. A slight coarsening and a decrease in number density of nanoclusters were observed as a result of irradiation. The composition of nanoclusters was also observed to change with a slight increase of Y and Cr concentration in the nanoclusters following irradiation. Size, density, and composition of the nanoclusters were investigated as a function of nanocluster size, specifically classified to three groups. In addition to the changes in nanoclusters, dislocation loops were observed after irradiation. Finally, radiation-induced enrichment of Cr and depletion of W were observed at grain boundaries after irradiation.

  13. Proton irradiation of a swept charge device at cryogenic temperature and the subsequent annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gow, J. P. D.; Smith, P. H.; Pool, P.; Hall, D. J.; Holland, A. D.; Murray, N. J.

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that a room temperature proton irradiation may not be sufficient to provide an accurate estimation of the impact of the space radiation environment on detector performance. This is a result of the relationship between defect mobility and temperature, causing the performance to vary subject to the temperature history of the device from the point at which it was irradiated. Results measured using Charge Coupled Devices (CCD) irradiated at room temperature therefore tend to differ from those taken when the device was irradiated at a cryogenic temperature, more appropriate considering the operating conditions in space, impacting the prediction of in-flight performance. This paper describes the cryogenic irradiation, and subsequent annealing of an e2v technologies Swept Charge Device (SCD) CCD236 irradiated at -35.4°C with a 10 MeV equivalent proton fluence of 5.0 × 108 protons · cm-2. The CCD236 is a large area (4.4 cm2) X-ray detector that will be flown on-board the Chandrayaan-2 and Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope spacecraft, in the Chandrayaan-2 Large Area Soft X-ray Spectrometer and the Soft X-ray Detector respectively. The SCD is readout continually in order to benefit from intrinsic dither mode clocking, leading to suppression of the surface component of the dark current and allowing the detector to be operated at warmer temperatures than a conventional CCD. The SCD is therefore an excellent choice to test and demonstrate the variation in the impact of irradiation at cryogenic temperatures in comparison to a more typical room temperature irradiation.

  14. Ionization versus displacement damage effects in proton irradiated CMOS sensors manufactured in deep submicron process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goiffon, V.; Magnan, P.; Saint-Pé, O.; Bernard, F.; Rolland, G.

    2009-10-01

    Proton irradiation effects have been studied on CMOS image sensors manufactured in a 0.18 μm technology dedicated to imaging. The ionizing dose and displacement damage effects were discriminated and localized thanks to 60Co irradiations and large photodiode reverse current measurements. The only degradation observed was a photodiode dark current increase. It was found that ionizing dose effects dominate this rise by inducing generation centers at the interface between shallow trench isolations and depleted silicon regions. Displacement damages are is responsible for a large degradation of dark current non-uniformity. This work suggests that designing a photodiode tolerant to ionizing radiation can mitigate an important part of proton irradiation effects.

  15. In situ proton irradiation-induced creep at very high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Anne A.; Was, Gary S.

    2013-02-01

    This objective of this work was to develop an experimental facility that can perform in situ high temperature proton irradiation-induced creep experiments on a range of materials. This was achieved by designing an irradiation chamber and stage that allows for load application and removal, provides a method for controlling and monitoring temperature and proton flux, and a means to make in situ measurement of dimensional change of the samples during the experiment. Initial experiments on POCO Graphite Inc. ZXF-5Q grade ultra-fine grain samples irradiated at 1000 °C at a damage rate of 1.15 × 10-6 dpa/s exhibited a linear dependence of measured creep rate on applied stress over a range of stresses from 10 MPa to 40 MPa.

  16. Persistent changes in neuronal structure and synaptic plasticity caused by proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Parihar, Vipan K; Pasha, Junaid; Tran, Katherine K; Craver, Brianna M; Acharya, Munjal M; Limoli, Charles L

    2015-03-01

    Cranial radiotherapy is used routinely to control the growth of primary and secondary brain tumors, but often results in serious and debilitating cognitive dysfunction. In part due to the beneficial dose depth distributions that may spare normal tissue damage, the use of protons to treat CNS and other tumor types is rapidly gaining popularity. Astronauts exposed to lower doses of protons in the space radiation environment are also at risk for developing adverse CNS complications. To explore the consequences of whole body proton irradiation, mice were subjected to 0.1 and 1 Gy and analyzed for morphometric changes in hippocampal neurons 10 and 30 days following exposure. Significant dose-dependent reductions (~33 %) in dendritic complexity were found, when dendritic length, branching and area were analyzed 30 days after exposure. At equivalent doses and times, significant reductions in the number (~30 %) and density (50-75 %) of dendritic spines along hippocampal neurons of the dentate gyrus were also observed. Immature spines (filopodia, long) exhibited the greatest sensitivity (1.5- to 3-fold) to irradiation, while more mature spines (mushroom) were more resistant to changes over a 1-month post-irradiation timeframe. Irradiated granule cell neurons spanning the subfields of the dentate gyrus showed significant and dose-responsive reductions in synaptophysin expression, while the expression of postsynaptic density protein (PSD-95) was increased significantly. These findings corroborate our past work using photon irradiation, and demonstrate for the first time, dose-responsive changes in dendritic complexity, spine density and morphology and synaptic protein levels following exposure to low-dose whole body proton irradiation. PMID:24446074

  17. Proton irradiation damage of an annealed Alloy 718 beam window

    SciTech Connect

    Bach, H. T.; Anderoglu, O.; Saleh, T. A.; Romero, T. J.; Kelsey, C. T.; Olivas, E. R.; Sencer, B. H.; Dickerson, P. O.; Connors, M. A.; John, K. D.; Maloy, S. A.

    2015-04-01

    Mechanical testing and microstructural analysis was performed on an Alloy 718 window that was in use at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Isotope Production Facility (IPF) for approximately 5 years. It was replaced as part of the IPF preventive maintenance program. The window was transported to the Wing 9 hot cells at the Chemical and Metallurgical Research (CMR) LANL facility, visually inspected and 3-mm diameter samples were trepanned from the window for mechanical testing and microstructural analysis. Shear punch testing and optical metallography was performed at the CMR hot cells. The 1-mm diameter shear punch disks were cut into smaller samples to further reduce radiation exposure dose rate using Focus Ion Beam (FIB) and microstructure changes were analyzed using a Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Irradiation doses were determined to be ~0.2–0.7 dpa (edge) to 11.3 dpa (peak of beam intensity) using autoradiography and MCNPX calculations. The corresponding irradiation temperatures were calculated to be ~34–120 °C with short excursion to be ~47–220 °C using ANSYS. Mechanical properties and microstructure analysis results with respect to calculated dpa and temperatures show that significant work hardening occurs but useful ductility still remains. The hardening in the lowest dose region (~0.2–0.7 dpa) was the highest and attributed to the formation of γ" precipitates and irradiation defect clusters/bubbles whereas the hardening in the highest dose region (~11.3 dpa) was lower and attributed mainly to irradiation defect clusters and some thermal annealing.

  18. Proton irradiation damage of an annealed Alloy 718 beam window

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bach, H. T.; Anderoglu, O.; Saleh, T. A.; Romero, T. J.; Kelsey, C. T.; Olivas, E. R.; Sencer, B. H.; Dickerson, P. O.; Connors, M. A.; John, K. D.; et al

    2015-04-01

    Mechanical testing and microstructural analysis was performed on an Alloy 718 window that was in use at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Isotope Production Facility (IPF) for approximately 5 years. It was replaced as part of the IPF preventive maintenance program. The window was transported to the Wing 9 hot cells at the Chemical and Metallurgical Research (CMR) LANL facility, visually inspected and 3-mm diameter samples were trepanned from the window for mechanical testing and microstructural analysis. Shear punch testing and optical metallography was performed at the CMR hot cells. The 1-mm diameter shear punch disks were cutmore » into smaller samples to further reduce radiation exposure dose rate using Focus Ion Beam (FIB) and microstructure changes were analyzed using a Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Irradiation doses were determined to be ~0.2–0.7 dpa (edge) to 11.3 dpa (peak of beam intensity) using autoradiography and MCNPX calculations. The corresponding irradiation temperatures were calculated to be ~34–120 °C with short excursion to be ~47–220 °C using ANSYS. Mechanical properties and microstructure analysis results with respect to calculated dpa and temperatures show that significant work hardening occurs but useful ductility still remains. The hardening in the lowest dose region (~0.2–0.7 dpa) was the highest and attributed to the formation of γ" precipitates and irradiation defect clusters/bubbles whereas the hardening in the highest dose region (~11.3 dpa) was lower and attributed mainly to irradiation defect clusters and some thermal annealing.« less

  19. Proton irradiation damage of an annealed Alloy 718 beam window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, H. T.; Anderoglu, O.; Saleh, T. A.; Romero, T. J.; Kelsey, C. T.; Olivas, E. R.; Sencer, B. H.; Dickerson, P. O.; Connors, M. A.; John, K. D.; Maloy, S. A.

    2015-04-01

    Mechanical testing and microstructural analysis was performed on an Alloy 718 window that was in use at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Isotope Production Facility (IPF) for approximately 5 years. It was replaced as part of the IPF preventive maintenance program. The window was transported to the Wing 9 hot cells at the Chemical and Metallurgical Research (CMR) LANL facility, visually inspected and 3-mm diameter samples were trepanned from the window for mechanical testing and microstructural analysis. Shear punch testing and optical metallography was performed at the CMR hot cells. The 1-mm diameter shear punch disks were cut into smaller samples to further reduce radiation exposure dose rate using Focus Ion Beam (FIB) and microstructure changes were analyzed using a Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Irradiation doses were determined to be ∼0.2-0.7 dpa (edge) to 11.3 dpa (peak of beam intensity) using autoradiography and MCNPX calculations. The corresponding irradiation temperatures were calculated to be ∼34-120 °C with short excursion to be ∼47-220 °C using ANSYS. Mechanical properties and microstructure analysis results with respect to calculated dpa and temperatures show that significant work hardening occurs but useful ductility still remains. The hardening in the lowest dose region (∼0.2-0.7 dpa) was the highest and attributed to the formation of γ″ precipitates and irradiation defect clusters/bubbles whereas the hardening in the highest dose region (∼11.3 dpa) was lower and attributed mainly to irradiation defect clusters and some thermal annealing.

  20. Studies of proton-irradiated cometary-type ice mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.H.; Donn, B.; Khanna, R.

    1983-06-01

    Cometary ice mixtures are studied in a laboratory experiment designed to simulate the temperature, pressure and radiation environments of the interstellar Oort cloud region, in order to test the hypothesized radiation synthesis mechanism for changing the characteristics of the outer few meters of a comet stored in the Oort cloud for 4.6 billion years. All experiments conducted confirm the synthesis of new molecular species in solid phase mixtures at 20 K. When CH4 is present in the irradiated ice mixture, long chained, voltaile hydrocarbon and CO2 are synthesized together with high molecular weight C compounds present in the room temperature residue. Due to radiation synthesis, about 1 percent of the ice was converted into a nonvolatile residue containing complicated C compounds not present in the blank samples. These results suggest that initial molecular abundances can be altered, and new species created, as a result of radiation synthesis. Irradiated mixtures exhibited thermoluminescence and pressure enhancements during warming, showing the synthesis of reactive species. Outbursts in new comets resulting from similar irradiation-induced exothermic activity would be expected to begin occurring at distances of the order of 100 AU. 40 references.

  1. Studies of proton-irradiated cometary-type ice mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, M. H.; Donn, B.; Khanna, R.; A'Hearn, M. F.

    1983-06-01

    Cometary ice mixtures are studied in a laboratory experiment designed to simulate the temperature, pressure and radiation environments of the interstellar Oort cloud region, in order to test the hypothesized radiation synthesis mechanism for changing the characteristics of the outer few meters of a comet stored in the Oort cloud for 4.6 billion years. All experiments conducted confirm the synthesis of new molecular species in solid phase mixtures at 20 K. When CH4 is present in the irradiated ice mixture, long chained, voltaile hydrocarbon and CO2 are synthesized together with high molecular weight C compounds present in the room temperature residue. Due to radiation synthesis, about 1 percent of the ice was converted into a nonvolatile residue containing complicated C compounds not present in the blank samples. These results suggest that initial molecular abundances can be altered, and new species created, as a result of radiation synthesis. Irradiated mixtures exhibited thermoluminescence and pressure enhancements during warming, showing the synthesis of reactive species. Outbursts in new comets resulting from similar irradiation-induced exothermic activity would be expected to begin occurring at distances of the order of 100 AU.

  2. Physiologic and Radiographic Evidence of the Distal Edge of the Proton Beam in Craniospinal Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Krejcarek, Stephanie C.; Grant, P. Ellen; Henson, John W.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I. . E-mail: tyock@partners.org

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Fatty replacement of bone marrow resulting from radiation therapy can be seen on T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. We evaluated the radiographic appearance of the vertebral bodies in children treated with proton craniospinal irradiation (CSI) to illustrate the distal edge effect of proton radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of 13 adolescents aged 12-18 years who received CSI with proton radiotherapy at Massachusetts General Hospital. Ten of these patients had reached maximal or near-maximal growth. Proton beam radiation for these 10 patients was delivered to the thecal sac and exiting nerve roots only, whereas the remaining 3 patients had a target volume that included the thecal sac, exiting nerve roots, and entire vertebral bodies. Median CSI dose was 27 [range, 23.4-36] cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) given in 1.8-CGE fractions. Magnetic resonance images of the spine were obtained after completion of radiotherapy. Results: Magnetic resonance images of patients who received proton radiotherapy to the thecal sac only demonstrate a sharp demarcation of hyperintense T1-weighted signal in the posterior aspects of the vertebral bodies, consistent with radiation-associated fatty marrow replacement. Magnetic resonance images of the patients prescribed proton radiotherapy to the entire vertebral column had corresponding hyperintense T1-weighted signal involving the entire vertebral bodies. Conclusion: The sharp delineation of radiation-associated fatty marrow replacement in the vertebral bodies demonstrates the rapid decrease in energy at the edge of the proton beam. This provides evidence for a sharp fall-off in radiation dose and supports the premise that proton radiotherapy spares normal tissues unnecessary irradiation.

  3. External-Beam Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Multiple Proton Beam Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaochun; Amos, Richard A.; Zhang Xiaodong; Taddei, Phillip J.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Yu, Tse Kuan; Tereffe, Welela; Oh, Julia; Perkins, George H.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Zhang, Sean X.; Sun, Tzou Liang; Gillin, Michael; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Strom, Eric A.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To explore multiple proton beam configurations for optimizing dosimetry and minimizing uncertainties for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and to compare the dosimetry of proton with that of photon radiotherapy for treatment of the same clinical volumes. Methods and Materials: Proton treatment plans were created for 11 sequential patients treated with three-dimensional radiotherapy (3DCRT) photon APBI using passive scattering proton beams (PSPB) and were compared with clinically treated 3DCRT photon plans. Monte Carlo calculations were used to verify the accuracy of the proton dose calculation from the treatment planning system. The impact of range, motion, and setup uncertainty was evaluated with tangential vs. en face beams. Results: Compared with 3DCRT photons, the absolute reduction of the mean of V100 (the volume receiving 100% of prescription dose), V90, V75, V50, and V20 for normal breast using protons are 3.4%, 8.6%, 11.8%, 17.9%, and 23.6%, respectively. For breast skin, with the similar V90 as 3DCRT photons, the proton plan significantly reduced V75, V50, V30, and V10. The proton plan also significantly reduced the dose to the lung and heart. Dose distributions from Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated minimal deviation from the treatment planning system. The tangential beam configuration showed significantly less dose fluctuation in the chest wall region but was more vulnerable to respiratory motion than that for the en face beams. Worst-case analysis demonstrated the robustness of designed proton beams with range and patient setup uncertainties. Conclusions: APBI using multiple proton beams spares significantly more normal tissue, including nontarget breast and breast skin, than 3DCRT using photons. It is robust, considering the range and patient setup uncertainties.

  4. In-situ proton irradiation and measurement of superconducting rf cavities under cryogenic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rusnak, B.; Haynes, W.B.; Chan, K.C.D.

    1997-08-01

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Project is investigating using a superconducting linac for the high-energy portion of the accelerator. As this accelerator would be used to accelerate a high-current (100-mA) CW proton beam up to 1700 MeV, it is important to determine the effects of stray-beam impingement on the superconducting properties of a 700-MHz niobium cavity. To accomplish this, two 3000-MHz elliptical niobium cavities were placed in a cryostat, cooled to nominally 2 K in sub-atmospheric liquid helium, and irradiated with 798-MeV protons at up to 490 {pi}A average current. The elliptically shaped beam passed through the equatorial regions of both cavities in order to maximize sensitivity to any changes in the superconducting-surface resistance. Over the course of the experiment, 6x10{sup 16} protons were passed through the cavities. After irradiation, the cavities were warmed to 250 K, then recooled to investigate the effects of a room-temperature annealing cycle on the superconducting properties of the irradiated cavities. A detailed description of the experiment and the results shall be presented. These results are important to employing superconducting-rf technology to future high-intensity proton accelerators for use in research and transmutation technologies.

  5. Transition of proton energy scaling using an ultrathin target irradiated by linearly polarized femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Kim, I Jong; Pae, Ki Hong; Kim, Chul Min; Kim, Hyung Taek; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Yu, Tae Jun; Choi, Il Woo; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Nam, Kee Hwan; Nickles, Peter V; Jeong, Tae Moon; Lee, Jongmin

    2013-10-18

    Particle acceleration using ultraintense, ultrashort laser pulses is one of the most attractive topics in relativistic laser-plasma research. We report proton and/or ion acceleration in the intensity range of 5×10(19) to 3.3×10(20) W/cm2 by irradiating linearly polarized, 30-fs laser pulses on 10-to 100-nm-thick polymer targets. The proton energy scaling with respect to the intensity and target thickness is examined, and a maximum proton energy of 45 MeV is obtained when a 10-nm-thick target is irradiated by a laser intensity of 3.3×10(20) W/cm2. The proton acceleration is explained by a hybrid acceleration mechanism including target normal sheath acceleration, radiation pressure acceleration, and Coulomb explosion assisted-free expansion. The transition of proton energy scaling from I(1/2) to I is observed as a consequence of the hybrid acceleration mechanism. The experimental results are supported by two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:24182274

  6. [DEMONSTRATION OF LIKELIHOOD OF THE NEGATIVE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL PROTECTION DURING TOTAL PROTON IRRADIATION OF MICE].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A A; Bulynina, T M; Molokanov, A G; Vorozhtsova, S V; Utina, D M; Severyukhin, Yu S; Ushakov, I B

    2015-01-01

    The experiments were performed with outbred CD-1 male mice (SPF category). Total irradiation at 1.0; 2.5 and 5.0 Gy by protons with the average energy of 170 MeV was conducted in a level medical beam of the phasotron at the Joint Institute of Nuclear Investigations. Targets were 2 points of in-depth dose distribution, i.e. beam entrance of the object, and modified Bragg peak. As a physical protector, the comb filter increases linear energy transfer (LET) of 170 MeV entrance protons from 0.49 keV/μm to 1.6 keV/μm and, according to the bone marrow test, doubles the biological effectiveness of protons when comparing radiation doses that cause 37% inhibition of blood cell formation in the bone marrow. Physical protection increases dose rate from 0.37 Gy/min for entrance protons to 0.8 Gy/min for moderated protons which more than in thrice reduces time of irradiation needed to reach an equal radiobiological effect. PMID:26554131

  7. Proton irradiation effects on 2Gb flash memory

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, William; Nelson, Charles; Marriner, John

    2004-08-18

    The authors report total ionizing dose and single event effects on 2Gb Samsung flash memory devices after exposure to 200 MeV protons to various doses up to 83 krad(Si). They characterize observed failures and single event upsets on 22 devices from two different lots. Devices from both lots are robust to greater than 20 krad(Si) although they see evidence for lot-to-lot variation where only one lot appears robust up to about 50 krad(Si). Single event upsets are observed at a relatively low rate and are consistent with single isolated bit flips within registers that transfer bits to and from the flash memory cells.

  8. Discrimination of photon from proton irradiation using glow curve feature extraction and vector analysis.

    PubMed

    Skopec, M; Loew, M; Price, J L; Guardala, N; Moscovitch, M

    2006-01-01

    Two types of thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs), the Harshaw LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) and CaF(2):Tm (TLD-300) were investigated for their glow curve response to separate photon and proton irradiations. The TLDs were exposed to gamma irradiation from a (137)Cs source and proton irradiation using a positive ion accelerator. The glow curve peak structure for each individual TLD exposure was deconvolved to obtain peak height, width, and position. Simulated mixed-field glow curves were obtained by superposition of the experimentally obtained single field exposures. Feature vectors were composed of two kinds of features: those from deconvolution and those taken in the neighbourhood of several glow curve peaks. The inner product of the feature vectors was used to discriminate among the pure photon, pure proton and simulated mixed-field irradiations. In the pure cases, identification of radiation types is both straightforward and effective. Mixed-field discrimination did not succeed using deconvolution features, but the peak-neighbourhood features proved to discriminate reliably. PMID:16614091

  9. RBE for late somatic effects in mice irradiated with 60 MeV protons relative to X-rays.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, E. B., Jr.; Clapp, N. K.; Bender, R. S.; Jernigan, M. C.; Upton, A. C.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation of the relative biological effectiveness of energetic protons for the induction of somatic effects in a mammal (mice) following whole body irradiation. The proton energy used approximates the mean energy for proton spectra accompanying solar events. The effects on longevity and the incidence of major neoplastic diseases are summarized. The results obtained suggest that medium energy proton irradiation is no more effective, and on the whole, probably less effective, than conventional X radiation for the induction of late radiation effects in the mouse.

  10. Development of a Ne gas target for 22Na production by proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Bidhan Ch.; Barua, Luna; Das, Sujata Saha; Pal, Gautam

    2016-03-01

    The article presents the design and development of a neon gas target for the production of 22Na using a proton beam from the room temperature cyclotron in Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata. The target design is made to handle a beam power of 85 W (17 MeV, 5 μA). The design is based on simulation using the computer code FLUKA for the beam dump and CFD-CFX for target cooling. The target has been successfully used for the production of 22Na in a 6 day long 17 MeV, 5 μA proton irradiation run.

  11. Synchrotron X-ray Microdiffraction Analysis of Proton Irradiated Polycrystalline Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. I.; Davidson, J. L.; Ice, G. E.; Liu, W.

    2004-01-01

    X-ray microdiffraction is a non-destructive technique that allows for depth-resolved, strain measurements with sub-micron spatial resolution. These capabilities make this technique promising for understanding the mechanical properties of MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). This investigation examined the local strain induced by irradiating a polycrystalline diamond thin film with a dose of 2x10(exp 17) H(+)per square centimeter protons. Preliminary results indicate that a measurable strain, on the order of 10(exp -3), was introduced into the film near the End of Range (EOR) region of the protons.

  12. Chemical ordering in ilmenite-hematite bulk ceramics through proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.M.; Navarrete, L.; Dou, J.; Schad, R.; Padmini, P.; Kale, P.; Pandey, R.K.; Shojah-Ardalan, S.; Wilkins, R.

    2004-12-13

    We demonstrated the capability of MeV proton irradiation to promote chemical ordering processes in a solid at low temperature. We used the ilmenite-hematite solid solution system which allows estimation of the degree of ordering through measurement of its magnetization. Normally, ordering through diffusion would require high temperature annealing. At high temperatures, however, the equilibrium state would be less ordered and thus the achievable ordering incomplete. High energetic protons continuously transfer energy to the sample through electronic interaction which locally deposits large quantities of energy without a general increase of the sample temperature. This promotes diffusion processes which allow the system to relax towards the ordered equilibrium state.

  13. Development of a Ne gas target for (22)Na production by proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Bidhan Ch; Barua, Luna; Das, Sujata Saha; Pal, Gautam

    2016-03-01

    The article presents the design and development of a neon gas target for the production of (22)Na using a proton beam from the room temperature cyclotron in Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata. The target design is made to handle a beam power of 85 W (17 MeV, 5 μA). The design is based on simulation using the computer code FLUKA for the beam dump and CFD-CFX for target cooling. The target has been successfully used for the production of (22)Na in a 6 day long 17 MeV, 5 μA proton irradiation run. PMID:27036769

  14. Response of thyroid follicular cells to gamma irradiation compared to proton irradiation: II. The role of connexin 32

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, L. M.; Tran, D. T.; Murray, D. K.; Rightnar, S. S.; Todd, S.; Nelson, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether connexin 32-type gap junctions contribute to the "contact effect" in follicular thyrocytes and whether the response is influenced by radiation quality. Our previous studies demonstrated that early-passage follicular cultures of Fischer rat thyroid cells express functional connexin 32 gap junctions, with later-passage cultures expressing a truncated nonfunctional form of the protein. This model allowed us to assess the role of connexin 32 in radiation responsiveness without relying solely on chemical manipulation of gap junctions. The survival curves generated after gamma irradiation revealed that early-passage follicular cultures had significantly lower values of alpha (0.04 Gy(-1)) than later-passage cultures (0.11 Gy(-1)) (P < 0.0001, n = 12). As an additional way to determine whether connexin 32 was contributing to the difference in survival, cultures were treated with heptanol, resulting in higher alpha values, with early-passage cultures (0.10 Gy(-1)) nearly equivalent to untreated late-passage cultures (0.11 Gy(-1)) (P > 0.1, n = 9). This strongly suggests that the presence of functional connexin 32-type gap junctions was contributing to radiation resistance in gamma-irradiated thyroid follicles. Survival curves from proton-irradiated cultures had alpha values that were not significantly different whether cells expressed functional connexin 32 (0.10 Gy(-1)), did not express connexin 32 (0.09 Gy(-1)), or were down-regulated (early-passage plus heptanol, 0.09 Gy(-1); late-passage plus heptanol, 0.12 Gy(-1)) (P > 0.1, n = 19). Thus, for proton irradiation, the presence of connexin 32-type gap junctional channels did not influence their radiosensitivity. Collectively, the data support the following conclusions. (1) The lower alpha values from the gamma-ray survival curves of the early-passage cultures suggest greater repair efficiency and/or enhanced resistance to radiation-induced damage, coincident with the

  15. Compaction of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) due to proton beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szilasi, Szabolcs Zoltan; Kokavecz, Janos; Huszank, Robert; Rajta, Istvan

    2011-03-01

    This work is about the detailed investigation of the changes of the surface topography, the degree of compaction/shrinkage and its relation to the irradiation fluence and the structure spacing in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) patterned with 2 MeV proton microbeam. The irradiated periodic structures consisted of parallel lines with different widths and spacing. To achieve different degrees of compaction, each structure was irradiated with more different fluences. At the irradiated areas the surface topography, the adhesion, the wettability and the rigidity of the surface also changes due to the chemical/structural change of the basic poly(dimethylsiloxane) polymer. The surface topography, the phase modification of the surface, and the connection between them was revealed with using an atomic force microscope (AFM).

  16. Study on the mechanical properties evolution of A508-3 steel under proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jing; Ding, Hui; Shu, Guo-gang; Wan, Qiang-mao

    2014-11-01

    In an effort to study the effect of irradiation on the hardening behavior of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel, nanoindentation was employed to investigate the mechanical properties of A508-3 steel after an irradiation with 190 keV proton to the dose range of 0.054-0.271 displacement per atom (dpa) at room temperature. The results show that the relationship between the nanohardness and indent depth is in accordance with the Nix-Gao model. The nanohardness of A508-3 steel increases notably with the dose. In addition, the contribution of the irradiation-induced microstructural defects including matrix damage and nano clusters to the irradiation hardening is discussed.

  17. Study on the damage effects of electron and proton combined irradiation on T700/cyanate composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Wei; Peng, Dequn; Wu, Xiaohong

    2013-10-01

    The synergistic effects of electron and proton co-irradiation with an energy of 160 keV in ultrahigh vacuum environment on T700/cyanate composites was studied through examining the alteration of their interlayer shear strength (ILSS) and mass loss. The surface molecular structure and chemical composition of T700/cyanate composites before and after co-irradiation were studied by IR and XPS, respectively. The results indicate that under low co-irradiation fluence of less than 1.0 × 1016 e(p)/cm2, the cross-linking density of cyanate in the surface layer increased with fluence, resulting in increased ILSS of the composite. However a further increase in fluence caused the ILSS to decrease. Besides surface cross-linking, co-irradiation in high vacuum broke the surface chemical bonds. As a result, the mass loss and formation of a carbon-rich layer at thesurface of T700/cyanate composites took place.

  18. Diffusion length damage coefficient and annealing studies in proton-irradiated InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakimzadeh, Roshanak; Vargas-Aburto, Carlos; Bailey, Sheila G.; Williams, Wendell

    1993-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the diffusion length damage coefficient (K(sub L)) and the annealing characteristics of the minority carrier diffusion length (L(sub n)) in Czochralski-grown zinc-doped indium phosphide (InP), with a carrier concentration of 1 x 10(exp l8) cm(exp -3). In measuring K(sub L) irradiations were made with 0.5 MeV protons with fluences ranging from 1 x 10(exp 11) to 3 x 10(exp 13) cm(exp -2). Pre- and post-irradiation electron-beam induced current (EBIC) measurements allowed for the extraction of L(sub n) from which K(sub L) was determined. In studying the annealing characteristics of L(sub n) irradiations were made with 2 MeV protons with fluence of 5 x 10(exp 13) cm(exp -2). Post-irradiation studies of L(sub n) with time at room temperature, and with minority carrier photoinjection and forward-bias injection were carried out. The results showed that recovery under Air Mass Zero (AMO) photoinjection was complete. L(sub n) was also found to recover under forward-bias injection, where recovery was found to depend on the value of the injection current. However, no recovery of L(sub n) after proton irradiation was observed with time at room temperature, in contrast to the behavior of 1 MeV electron-irradiated InP solar cells reported previously.

  19. Effect of Proton Irradiation on 2DEG in AlGaN/GaN Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abderrahmane, A.; Koide, S.; Tahara, T.; Sato, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okada, H.; Sandhu, A.

    2013-04-01

    Low temperature Hall effect measurements were carried on AlGaN/GaN micro-Hall effect sensors before and after irradiation with 380 keV and fluence of 1014 protons/cm2 protons. The sheet electron density after irradiation did not show significant changes but there was a dramatic decrease in the electron mobility of the heterostructures. Prior to irradiation, the observation of well-defined Landau plateaus in the Hall resistance and Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations (SdH) at 4.5 T was indicative of the high quality the heterojunction confining the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the AlGaN/GaN interface of micro-Hall effect sensors. In contrast, the Landau plateaus disappeared after irradiation and the threshold magnetic field required for the observation of the SdH increased, which was accompanied by a decrease of the electron mobility. Temperature dependent magnetoresistance measurements were used to deduce the effective mass and the quantum scattering time before irradiation. A negative magnetoresistance was observed at low magnetic fields which is related to weak localization and parabolic negative magnetoresistance attributed to electron-electron interaction in both samples.

  20. Effects of 3 MeV proton irradiation on the mechanical properties of polyimide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, David J. T.; Hopewell, Jefferson L.

    1996-11-01

    The effects of 3 MeV proton irradiation on the elongation to break, fracture energy and Young's Modulus have been investigated for films of Kapton and Ultem over the dose range 0-75 MGy at ambient temperature. The results have been compared with those reported by other workers for irradiation by 60Co gamma rays and 2 MeV electron beams under similar conditions, and little difference was found between the damage to the mechanical properties of the films induced by these three beam types.

  1. Far-infrared spectral studies of phase changes in water ice induced by proton irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Marla H.; Hudson, Reggie L.

    1992-01-01

    Changes in the FIR spectrum of crystalline and amorphous water ice as a function of temperature are reported. The dramatic differences between the spectra of these ices in the FIR are used to examine the effect of proton irradiation on the stability of the crystalline and amorphous ice phases from 13 to 77 K. In particular, the spectra near 13 K show interconversion between the amorphous and crystalline ice phases beginning at doses near 2 eV/molecule and continuing cyclically with increased dose. The results are used to estimate the stability of irradiated ices in astronomical environments.

  2. Preliminary results of proton beam characterization for a facility of broad beam in vitro cell irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wéra, A.-C.; Donato, K.; Michiels, C.; Jongen, Y.; Lucas, S.

    2008-05-01

    The interaction of charged particles with living matter needs to be well understood for medical applications. Particularly, it is useful to study how ion beams interact with tissues in terms of damage, dose released and dose rate. One way to evaluate the biological effects induced by an ion beam is by the irradiation of cultured cells at a particle accelerator, where cells can be exposed to different ions at different energies and flux. In this paper, we report the first results concerning the characterization of a broad proton beam obtained with our 2 MV tandem accelerator. For broad beam in vitro cell irradiation, the beam has to be stable over time, uniform over a ∼0.5 cm2 surface, and a dose rate ranging from 0.1 to 10 Gy/min must be achievable. Results concerning the level of achievement of these requirements are presented in this paper for a 1 MeV proton beam.

  3. Proton Irradiation Response of CsI(Tl) Crystals for the GLAST Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Bergenius, S.; Carius, S.; Carlson, P.; Grove, J.E.; Johansson, G.; Klamra, W.; Nilsson, L.; Pearce, M.; Metzler, S.D.

    2012-04-10

    The electromagnetic calorimeter of the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) consists of 16 towers of CsI(Tl) crystals. Each tower contains 8 layers of crystals (each 326.0 x 26.7 x 19.9 mm{sup 3}) arranged in a hodoscopic fashion. The crystals are read out at both ends with photodiodes. Crystals produced by Amcrys-H (Ukraine) are used. A full size crystal was irradiated with a 180 MeV proton beam and the radiation induced attenuation was measured. The induced radioactivity of the crystal was also studied. In this paper we will discuss the damage due to proton irradiation and compare this with the expected in-orbit background flux.

  4. A TCT and annealing study on Magnetic Czochralski silicon detectors irradiated with neutrons and 24 GeV/ c protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacifico, Nicola; Creanza, Donato; de Palma, Mauro; Manna, Norman; Kramberger, Gregor; Moll, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Silicon diodes (pad detectors) were irradiated with 24 GeV/ c protons at the CERN PS IRRAD1 facility and with neutrons at the TRIGA reactor in Ljubljana (Slovenia). The diodes were realized on Magnetic Czochralski (MCz) grown silicon, of both n- and p-type. After irradiation, an annealing study with CV measurements was performed on 24 GeV/ c proton irradiated detectors, looking for hints of type inversion after irradiation and during annealing. Other pad detectors were studied using the TCT (transient current technique), to gather information about the field profile in the detector bulk and thus about the effective space charge distribution within it.

  5. Correlation of electron and proton irradiation-induced damage in InP solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, R.J.; Summers, G.P.; Messenger, S.R.; Burke, E.A.

    1995-10-01

    When determining the best solar cell technology for a particular space flight mission, accurate prediction of solar cell performance in a space radiation environment is essential. The current methodology used to make such predictions requires extensive experimental data measured under both electron and proton irradiation. Due to the rising cost of accelerators and irradiation facilities, such extensive data sets are expensive to obtain. Moreover, with the rapid development of novel cell designs, the necessary data are often not available. Therefore, a method for predicting cell degradation based on limited data is needed. Such a method has been developed at the Naval Research Laboratory based on damage correlation using `displacement damage dose` which is the product of the non-ionizing energy loss (NIEL) and the particle fluence. Displacement damage dose is a direct analog of the ionization dose used to correlate the effects of ionizing radiations. In this method, the performance of a solar cell in a complex radiation environment can be predicted from data on a single proton energy and two electron energies, or one proton energy, one electron energy, and Co(exp 60) gammas. This method has been used to accurately predict the extensive data set measured by Anspaugh on GaAs/Ge solar cells under a wide range of electron and proton energies. In this paper, the method is applied to InP solar cells using data measured under 1 MeV electron and 3 MeV proton irradiations, and the calculations are shown to agree well with the measured data. In addition to providing accurate damage predictions, this method also provides a basis for quantitative comparisons of the performance of different cell technologies. The performance of the present InP cells is compared to that published for GaAs/Ge cells. The results show InP to be inherently more resistant to displacement energy deposition than GaAs/Ge.

  6. Correlation of electron and proton irradiation-induced damage in InP solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Robert J.; Summers, Geoffrey P.; Messenger, Scott R.; Burke, Edward A.

    1995-10-01

    When determining the best solar cell technology for a particular space flight mission, accurate prediction of solar cell performance in a space radiation environment is essential. The current methodology used to make such predictions requires extensive experimental data measured under both electron and proton irradiation. Due to the rising cost of accelerators and irradiation facilities, such extensive data sets are expensive to obtain. Moreover, with the rapid development of novel cell designs, the necessary data are often not available. Therefore, a method for predicting cell degradation based on limited data is needed. Such a method has been developed at the Naval Research Laboratory based on damage correlation using 'displacement damage dose' which is the product of the non-ionizing energy loss (NIEL) and the particle fluence. Displacement damage dose is a direct analog of the ionization dose used to correlate the effects of ionizing radiations. In this method, the performance of a solar cell in a complex radiation environment can be predicted from data on a single proton energy and two electron energies, or one proton energy, one electron energy, and Co(exp 60) gammas. This method has been used to accurately predict the extensive data set measured by Anspaugh on GaAs/Ge solar cells under a wide range of electron and proton energies. In this paper, the method is applied to InP solar cells using data measured under 1 MeV electron and 3 MeV proton irradiations, and the calculations are shown to agree well with the measured data. In addition to providing accurate damage predictions, this method also provides a basis for quantitative comparisons of the performance of different cell technologies. The performance of the present InP cells is compared to that published for GaAs/Ge cells. The results show InP to be inherently more resistant to displacement energy deposition than GaAs/Ge.

  7. Correlation of electron and proton irradiation-induced damage in InP solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, Robert J.; Summers, Geoffrey P.; Messenger, Scott R.; Burke, Edward A.

    1995-01-01

    When determining the best solar cell technology for a particular space flight mission, accurate prediction of solar cell performance in a space radiation environment is essential. The current methodology used to make such predictions requires extensive experimental data measured under both electron and proton irradiation. Due to the rising cost of accelerators and irradiation facilities, such extensive data sets are expensive to obtain. Moreover, with the rapid development of novel cell designs, the necessary data are often not available. Therefore, a method for predicting cell degradation based on limited data is needed. Such a method has been developed at the Naval Research Laboratory based on damage correlation using 'displacement damage dose' which is the product of the non-ionizing energy loss (NIEL) and the particle fluence. Displacement damage dose is a direct analog of the ionization dose used to correlate the effects of ionizing radiations. In this method, the performance of a solar cell in a complex radiation environment can be predicted from data on a single proton energy and two electron energies, or one proton energy, one electron energy, and Co(exp 60) gammas. This method has been used to accurately predict the extensive data set measured by Anspaugh on GaAs/Ge solar cells under a wide range of electron and proton energies. In this paper, the method is applied to InP solar cells using data measured under 1 MeV electron and 3 MeV proton irradiations, and the calculations are shown to agree well with the measured data. In addition to providing accurate damage predictions, this method also provides a basis for quantitative comparisons of the performance of different cell technologies. The performance of the present InP cells is compared to that published for GaAs/Ge cells. The results show InP to be inherently more resistant to displacement energy deposition than GaAs/Ge.

  8. Optimal conditions for high current proton irradiations at the university of Wisconsin's ion beam laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wetteland, C. J.; Field, K. G.; Gerczak, T. J.; Eiden, T. J.; Maier, B. R.; Albakri, O.; Sridharan, K.; Allen, T. R.

    2013-04-19

    The National Electrostatics Corporation's (NEC) Toroidal Volume Ion Source (TORVIS) source is known for exceptionally high proton currents with minimal service downtime as compared to traditional sputter sources. It has been possible to obtain over 150{mu}A of proton current from the source, with over 70{mu}A on the target stage. However, beam fluxes above {approx}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17}/m2-s may have many undesirable effects, especially for insulators. This may include high temperature gradients at the surface, sputtering, surface discharge, cracking or even disintegration of the sample. A series of experiments were conducted to examine the role of high current fluxes in a suite of ceramics and insulating materials. Results will show the optimal proton irradiation conditions and target mounting strategies needed to minimize unwanted macro-scale damage, while developing a procedure for conducting preliminary radiation experiments.

  9. InGaAs/GaAs Quantum Dots: Effects of Ensemble Interactions, Interdiffusion, Segregation and Proton Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, R.

    2000-01-01

    A sumary or recent experimental findings on the effects of interdiffusion, segregation, strained ensemble interactions and proton irradiation on the optical properties of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) are presented.

  10. Measurement and calculation of characteristic prompt gamma ray spectra emitted during proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Polf, J C; Peterson, S; McCleskey, M; Roeder, B T; Spiridon, A; Beddar, S; Trache, L

    2009-11-21

    In this paper, we present results of initial measurements and calculations of prompt gamma ray spectra (produced by proton-nucleus interactions) emitted from tissue equivalent phantoms during irradiations with proton beams. Measurements of prompt gamma ray spectra were made using a high-purity germanium detector shielded either with lead (passive shielding), or a Compton suppression system (active shielding). Calculations of the spectra were performed using a model of both the passive and active shielding experimental setups developed using the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit. From the measured spectra it was shown that it is possible to distinguish the characteristic emission lines from the major elemental constituent atoms (C, O, Ca) in the irradiated phantoms during delivery of proton doses similar to those delivered during patient treatment. Also, the Monte Carlo spectra were found to be in very good agreement with the measured spectra providing an initial validation of our model for use in further studies of prompt gamma ray emission during proton therapy. PMID:19864704

  11. Radiosensitization by PARP inhibition to proton beam irradiation in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takahisa; Saito, Soichiro; Fujimori, Hiroaki; Matsushita, Keiichiro; Nishio, Teiji; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2016-09-01

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 regulates DNA damage responses and promotes base excision repair. PARP inhibitors have been shown to enhance the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation in various cancer cells and animal models. We have demonstrated that the PARP inhibitor (PARPi) AZD2281 is also an effective radiosensitizer for carbon-ion radiation; thus, we speculated that the PARPi could be applied to a wide therapeutic range of linear energy transfer (LET) radiation as a radiosensitizer. Institutes for biological experiments using proton beam are limited worldwide. This study was performed as a cooperative research at heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) in National Institute of Radiological Sciences. HIMAC can generate various ion beams; this enabled us to compare the radiosensitization effect of the PARPi on cells subjected to proton and carbon-ion beams from the same beam line. After physical optimization of proton beam irradiation, the radiosensitization effect of the PARPi was assessed in the human lung cancer cell line, A549, and the pancreatic cancer cell line, MIA PaCa-2. The effect of the PARPi, AZD2281, on radiosensitization to Bragg peak was more significant than that to entrance region. The PARPi increased the number of phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX) foci and enhanced G2/M arrest after proton beam irradiation. This result supports our hypothesis that a PARPi could be applied to a wide therapeutic range of LET radiation by blocking the DNA repair response. PMID:27425251

  12. Contribution of indirect effects to clustered damage in DNA irradiated with protons.

    PubMed

    Pachnerová Brabcová, K; Štěpán, V; Karamitros, M; Karabín, M; Dostálek, P; Incerti, S; Davídková, M; Sihver, L

    2015-09-01

    Protons are the dominant particles both in galactic cosmic rays and in solar particle events and, furthermore, proton irradiation becomes increasingly used in tumour treatment. It is believed that complex DNA damage is the determining factor for the consequent cellular response to radiation. DNA plasmid pBR322 was irradiated at U120-M cyclotron with 30 MeV protons and treated with two Escherichia coli base excision repair enzymes. The yields of SSBs and DSBs were analysed using agarose gel electrophoresis. DNA has been irradiated in the presence of hydroxyl radical scavenger (coumarin-3-carboxylic acid) in order to distinguish between direct and indirect damage of the biological target. Pure scavenger solution was used as a probe for measurement of induced OH· radical yields. Experimental OH· radical yield kinetics was compared with predictions computed by two theoretical models-RADAMOL and Geant4-DNA. Both approaches use Geant4-DNA for description of physical stages of radiation action, and then each of them applies a distinct model for description of the pre-chemical and chemical stage. PMID:25897140

  13. Proton or photon irradiation for hemangiomas of the choroid? A retrospective comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Hoecht, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.hoecht@charite.de; Wachtlin, Joachim; Bechrakis, Nikolaos E.; Schaefer, Christiane; Heufelder, Jens; Cordini, Dino; Kluge, Heinz; Foerster, Michael; Hinkelbein, Wolfgang

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare, on a retrospective basis, the results of therapy in patients with uveal hemangioma treated with photon or proton irradiation at a single center. Methods and Materials: From 1993 to 2002 a total of 44 patients were treated. Until 1998 radiotherapy was given with 6 MV photons in standard fractionation of 2.0 Gy 5 times per week. In 1998 proton therapy became available and was used since then. A dose of 20 to 22.5 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) 68 MeV protons was given on 4 consecutive days. Progressive symptoms or deterioration of vision were the indications for therapy. Results: Of the 44 patients treated, 36 had circumscribed choroidal hemangiomas and 8 had diffuse choroidal hemangiomas (DCH) and Sturge-Weber syndrome. Of the patients, 19 were treated with photons with a total dose in the range of 16 to 30 Gy. A total of 25 patients were irradiated with protons. All patients with DCH but 1 were treated with photons. Stabilization of visual acuity was achieved in 93.2% of all patients. Tumor thickness decreased in 95.4% and retinal detachment resolved in 92.9%. Late effects, although generally mild or moderate, were frequently detected. In all, 40.9% showed radiation-induced optic neuropathy, maximum Grade I. Retinopathy was found in 29.5% of cases, but only 1 patient experienced more than Grade II severity. Retinopathy and radiation-induced optic neuropathy were reversible in some of the patients and in some resolved completely. No differences could be detected between patients with circumscribed choroidal hemangiomas treated with protons and photons. Treatment was less effective in DCH patients (75%). Conclusions: Radiotherapy is effective in treating choroidal hemangiomas with respect to visual acuity and tumor thickness but a benefit of proton therapy could not be detected. Side effects are moderate but careful monitoring for side effects should be part of the follow-up procedures.

  14. Proton irradiation impacts age-driven modulations of cancer progression influenced by immune system transcriptome modifications from splenic tissue.

    PubMed

    Wage, Justin; Ma, Lili; Peluso, Michael; Lamont, Clare; Evens, Andrew M; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Beheshti, Afshin

    2015-09-01

    Age plays a crucial role in the interplay between tumor and host, with additional impact due to irradiation. Proton irradiation of tumors induces biological modulations including inhibition of angiogenic and immune factors critical to 'hallmark' processes impacting tumor development. Proton irradiation has also provided promising results for proton therapy in cancer due to targeting advantages. Additionally, protons may contribute to the carcinogenesis risk from space travel (due to the high proportion of high-energy protons in space radiation). Through a systems biology approach, we investigated how host tissue (i.e. splenic tissue) of tumor-bearing mice was altered with age, with or without whole-body proton exposure. Transcriptome analysis was performed on splenic tissue from adolescent (68-day) versus old (736-day) C57BL/6 male mice injected with Lewis lung carcinoma cells with or without three fractionations of 0.5 Gy (1-GeV) proton irradiation. Global transcriptome analysis indicated that proton irradiation of adolescent hosts caused significant signaling changes within splenic tissues that support carcinogenesis within the mice, as compared with older subjects. Increases in cell cycling and immunosuppression in irradiated adolescent hosts with CDK2, MCM7, CD74 and RUVBL2 indicated these were the key genes involved in the regulatory changes in the host environment response (i.e. the spleen). Collectively, these results suggest that a significant biological component of proton irradiation is modulated by host age through promotion of carcinogenesis in adolescence and resistance to immunosuppression, carcinogenesis and genetic perturbation associated with advancing age. PMID:26253138

  15. Effects of combined irradiation of 500 keV protons and atomic oxygen on polyimide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Lev; Chernik, Vladimir; Zhilyakov, Lev; Voronina, Ekaterina; Chirskaia, Natalia

    2016-07-01

    Polyimide films are widely used on the spacecraft surface as thermal control coating, films in different constuctions, etc. However, the space ionizing radiation of different types can alter the mechanical, optical and electrical properties of polyimide films. For example, it is well known that 20-100 keV proton irradiation causes breaking of chemical bonds and destruction of the surface layer in polyimide, deterioration of its optical properties, etc. In low-Earth orbits serious danger for polymeric materials is atomic oxygen of the upper atmosphere of the Earth, which is the main component in the range of heights of 200-800 km. Due to the orbital spacecraft velocity, the collision energy of oxygen atoms with the surface ( 5 eV) enhances their reactivity and opens additional pathways of their reaction with near-surface layers of materials. Hyperthermal oxygen atom flow causes erosion of the polyimide surface by breaking chemical bonds and forming of volatiles products (primarily, CO and CO _{2}), which leads to mass losses and degradation of material properties. Combined effect of protons and oxygen plasma is expected to give rise to synergistic effects enhancing the destruction of polyimide surface layers. This paper describes experimental investigation of polyimide films sequential irradiation with protons and oxygen plasma. The samples were irradiated by 500 keV protons at fluences of 10 ^{14}-10 ^{16} cm ^{-2} produced with SINP cascade generator KG-500 and 5-20 eV neutral oxygen atoms at fluence of 10 ^{20} cm ^{-2} generated by SINP magnetoplasmodynamics accelerator. The proton bombardment causes the decrease in optical transmission coefficient of samples, but their transmittance recovers partially after the exposure to oxygen plasma. The results of the comparative analysis of polyimide optical transmission spectra, Raman and XPS spectra obtained at different stages of the irradiation of samples, data on mass loss of samples due to erosion of the surface are

  16. Annealing results on low-energy proton-irradiated GaAs solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kachare, R.; Anspaugh, B.E.; O'Meara, L.

    1988-11-01

    AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells with an approximately 0.5-..mu..m-thick Al/sub 0.85/Ga/sub 0.15/As window layer were irradiated using normal and isotropic incident protons having energies between 50 and 500 keV with fluence up to 1 x 10/sup 12/ protons/cm/sup 2/. The irradiated cells were annealed at temperatures between 150 and 300 /sup 0/C in nitrogen ambient. The annealing results reveal that significant recovery in spectral response at longer wavelengths occurred. However, the short-wavelength spectral response showed negligible annealing, irrespective of the irradiation energy and annealing conditions. This indicates that the damage produced near the AlGaAs/GaAs interface and the space-charge region anneals differently than damage produced in the bulk. This is explained by using a model in which the as-grown dislocations interact with irradiation-induced point defects to produce thermally stable defects.

  17. Resistivity changes in superconducting-cavity-grade Nb following high-energy proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, C.L. Jr.; Hanson, A.; Greene, G.A.

    1997-12-01

    Niobium superconducting rf cavities are proposed for use in the proton LINAC accelerators for spallation-neutron applications. Because of accidental beam loss and continual halo losses along the accelerator path, concern for the degradation of the superconducting properties of the cavities with accumulating damage arises. Residual-resistivity-ratio (RRR) specimens of Nb, with a range of initial RRR`s were irradiated at room temperature with protons at energies from 200 to 2000 MeV. Four-probe resistance measurements were made at room temperature and at 4.2 K both prior to and after irradiation. Nonlinear increases in resistivity simulate expected behavior in cavity material after extended irradiation, followed by periodic anneals to room temperature: For RRR = 316 material, irradiations to (2 - 3) x 10{sup 15} p/cm{sup 2} produce degradations up to the 10% level, a change that is deemed operationally acceptable. Without. periodic warming to room temperature, the accumulated damage energy would be up to a factor of ten greater, resulting in unacceptable degradations. Likewise, should higher-RRR material be used, for the same damage energy imparted, relatively larger percentage changes in the RRR will result.

  18. Ciliary body and choroidal melanomas treated by proton beam irradiation. Histopathologic study of eyes

    SciTech Connect

    Seddon, J.M.; Gragoudas, E.S.; Albert, D.M.

    1983-09-01

    Proton beam irradiation resulted in clinical and/or histopathological regression of large ciliary body and choroidal melanomas in three eyes. Enucleations were performed 6 1/2 weeks, five months, and 11 months after irradiation for angle-closure glaucoma from total retinal detachment, increase in retinal detachment, and neovascular glaucoma, respectively. A direct relationship was found between the length of the interval from irradiation to enucleation and the degree of histologic changes. Vascular changes in the tumors included endothelial cell swelling and decreased lumen size, basement membrane thickening, collapse of sinusoidal vessels, and thrombosis of vessels. Although apparently unaltered tumor cells remained, degenerative changes occurred in some melanoma cells, including lipid vacuoles in cytoplasm, pyknotic nuclei, and balloon cell formation. Patchy areas of necrosis and proteinaceous exudate were present. Pigment-laden macrophages were found near tumor vessels and all had a substantial chronic inflammatory infiltrate. The effect of proton beam irradiation on tumor vessels probably plays an important role in uveal melanoma regression.

  19. Initial results from a cryogenic proton irradiation of a p-channel CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gow, J. P. D.; Wood, D.; Burt, D.; Hall, D. J.; Dryer, B.; Holland, A. D.; Murray, N. J.

    2015-08-01

    The displacement damage hardness that can be achieved using p-channel charge coupled devices (CCD) was originally demonstrated in 1997 and since then a number of other studies have demonstrated an improved tolerance to radiationinduced CTI when compared to n-channel CCDs. A number of recent studies have also shown that the temperature history of the device after the irradiation impacts the performance of the detector, linked to the mobility of defects at different temperatures. This study describes the initial results from an e2v technologies p-channel CCD204 irradiated at 153 K with a 10 MeV equivalent proton fluences of 1.24×109 and 1.24×1011 protons.cm-2. The number of defects identified using trap pumping, dark current and cosmetic quality immediately after irradiation and over a period of 150 hours after the irradiation with the device held at 153 K and then after different periods of time at room temperature are described. The device also exhibited a flatband voltage shift of around 30 mV per krad, determined by the reduction in full well capacity.

  20. Evaluation of the relative biological effectiveness of spot-scanning proton irradiation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Kenichiro; Yasui, Hironobu; Matsuura, Taeko; Yamamori, Tohru; Suzuki, Motofumi; Nagane, Masaki; Nam, Jin-Min; Inanami, Osamu; Shirato, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Variations in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) from a fixed value of 1.1 are critical in proton beam therapy. To date, studies estimating RBE at multiple positions relative to the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) have been predominantly performed using passive scattering methods, and limited data are available for spot-scanning beams. Thus, to investigate the RBE of spot-scanning beams, Chinese hamster fibroblast V79 cells were irradiated using the beam line at the Hokkaido University Hospital Proton Therapy Center. Cells were placed at six different depths, including the entrance of the proton beam and the proximal and distal part of the SOBP. Surviving cell fractions were analyzed using colony formation assay, and cell survival curves were obtained by the curve fitted using a linear–quadratic model. RBE10 and RBE37 were 1.15 and 1.21 at the center of the SOBP, respectively. In contrast, the distal region showed higher RBE values (1.50 for RBE10 and 1.85 for RBE37). These results are in line with those of previous studies conducted using passive scattering proton beams. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that variations in RBE should be considered during treatment planning for spot-scanning beams as well as for passive scattering proton beams. PMID:26838131

  1. Evaluation of the relative biological effectiveness of spot-scanning proton irradiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kenichiro; Yasui, Hironobu; Matsuura, Taeko; Yamamori, Tohru; Suzuki, Motofumi; Nagane, Masaki; Nam, Jin-Min; Inanami, Osamu; Shirato, Hiroki

    2016-06-01

    Variations in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) from a fixed value of 1.1 are critical in proton beam therapy. To date, studies estimating RBE at multiple positions relative to the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) have been predominantly performed using passive scattering methods, and limited data are available for spot-scanning beams. Thus, to investigate the RBE of spot-scanning beams, Chinese hamster fibroblast V79 cells were irradiated using the beam line at the Hokkaido University Hospital Proton Therapy Center. Cells were placed at six different depths, including the entrance of the proton beam and the proximal and distal part of the SOBP. Surviving cell fractions were analyzed using colony formation assay, and cell survival curves were obtained by the curve fitted using a linear-quadratic model. RBE10 and RBE37 were 1.15 and 1.21 at the center of the SOBP, respectively. In contrast, the distal region showed higher RBE values (1.50 for RBE10 and 1.85 for RBE37). These results are in line with those of previous studies conducted using passive scattering proton beams. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that variations in RBE should be considered during treatment planning for spot-scanning beams as well as for passive scattering proton beams. PMID:26838131

  2. Doubling the critical current density of high temperature superconducting coated conductors through proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Y.; LeRoux, M.; Miller, D. J.; Wen, J. G.; Kwok, W. K.; Welp, U.; Rupich, M. W.; Li, X.; Sathyamurthy, S.; Fleshler, S.; Malozemoff, A. P.; Kayani, A.; Ayala-Valenzuela, O.; Civale, L.

    2013-09-16

    The in-field critical current of commercial YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} coated conductors can be substantially enhanced by post-fabrication irradiation with 4 MeV protons. Irradiation to a fluence of 8 × 10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2} induces a near doubling of the critical current in fields of 6 T || c at a temperature of 27 K, a field and temperature range of interest for applications, such as rotating machinery. A mixed pinning landscape of preexisting precipitates and twin boundaries and small, finely dispersed irradiation induced defects may account for the improved vortex pinning in high magnetic fields. Our data indicate that there is significant head-room for further enhancements.

  3. RBE-LET relationship for proton and alpha irradiations studied with a nanodosimetric approach.

    PubMed

    Villagrasa, C; Dos Santos, M; Bianco, D; Gruel, G; Barquinero, J F; Clairand, I

    2014-10-01

    Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) values are used to characterise the biological efficiency of different radiation qualities relative to photon irradiations. The RBE-high linear energy transfer (LET) relation for ion irradiations presents general features that the authors propose to look at using a nanometric description of the energy deposition of these ion irradiations (protons and alphas of different energies). In this work, the simulation of the energy transfer points in the tracks was made by Monte Carlo method using the Geant4-DNA processes and a nanometric description of the target of interest for studying biological effects, the DNA molecule. Results were obtained concerning the sensitive volume to be considered for direct DNA clustered damages that could be related to late biological effects. PMID:24759916

  4. Response of thyroid follicular cells to gamma irradiation compared to proton irradiation. I. Initial characterization of DNA damage, micronucleus formation, apoptosis, cell survival, and cell cycle phase redistribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, L. M.; Murray, D. K.; Bant, A. M.; Kazarians, G.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.; Tran, D. T.

    2001-01-01

    The RBE of protons has been assumed to be equivalent to that of photons. The objective of this study was to determine whether radiation-induced DNA and chromosome damage, apoptosis, cell killing and cell cycling in organized epithelial cells was influenced by radiation quality. Thyroid-stimulating hormone-dependent Fischer rat thyroid cells, established as follicles, were exposed to gamma rays or proton beams delivered acutely over a range of physical doses. Gamma-irradiated cells were able to repair DNA damage relatively rapidly so that by 1 h postirradiation they had approximately 20% fewer exposed 3' ends than their counterparts that had been irradiated with proton beams. The persistence of free ends of DNA in the samples irradiated with the proton beam implies that either more initial breaks or a quantitatively different type of damage had occurred. These results were further supported by an increased frequency of chromosomal damage as measured by the presence of micronuclei. Proton-beam irradiation induced micronuclei at a rate of 2.4% per gray, which at 12 Gy translated to 40% more micronuclei than in comparable gamma-irradiated cultures. The higher rate of micronucleus formation and the presence of larger micronuclei in proton-irradiated cells was further evidence that a qualitatively more severe class of damage had been induced than was induced by gamma rays. Differences in the type of damage produced were detected in the apoptosis assay, wherein a significant lag in the induction of apoptosis occurred after gamma irradiation that did not occur with protons. The more immediate expression of apoptotic cells in the cultures irradiated with the proton beam suggests that the damage inflicted was more severe. Alternatively, the cell cycle checkpoint mechanisms required for recovery from such damage might not have been invoked. Differences based on radiation quality were also evident in the alpha components of cell survival curves (0.05 Gy(-1) for gamma rays, 0

  5. Effects of a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, Neulasta, in mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Shuman, Anne L.; Diener, Antonia K.; Lin, Liyong; Mai, Wilfried; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2015-04-01

    Astronauts could be exposed to solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is comprised mostly of proton radiation. Proton radiation is also a treatment option for certain cancers. Both astronauts and clinical patients exposed to ionizing radiation are at risk for loss of white blood cells (WBCs), which are the body's main defense against infection. In this report, the effect of Neulasta treatment, a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, after proton radiation exposure is discussed. Mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation at a dose of 2 Gy received 4 treatments of either Neulasta or saline injections. Peripheral blood cell counts and thromboelastography parameters were recorded up to 30 days post-irradiation. Neulasta significantly improved WBC loss, specifically neutrophils, in irradiated animals by approximately 60% three days after the first injection, compared to the saline treated, irradiated animals. Blood cell counts quickly decreased after the last Neulasta injection, suggesting a transient effect on WBC stimulation. Statistically significant changes in hemostasis parameters were observed after proton radiation exposure in both the saline and Neulasta treated irradiated groups, as well as internal organ complications such as pulmonary changes. In conclusion, Neulasta treatment temporarily alleviates proton radiation-induced WBC loss, but has no effect on altered hemostatic responses.

  6. Effects of a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, Neulasta, in mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Shuman, Anne L.; Diener, Antonia K.; Lin, Liyong; Mai, Wilfried; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2015-01-01

    Astronauts could be exposed to solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is comprised mostly of proton radiation. Proton radiation is also a treatment option for certain cancers. Both astronauts and clinical patients exposed to ionizing radiation are at risk for white blood cell (WBC) loss, which are the body’s main defense against infection. In this report, the effect of Neulasta treatment, a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, after proton radiation exposure is discussed. Mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation at a dose of 2 Gy received 4 treatments of either Neulasta or saline injections. Peripheral blood cell counts and thromboelastography parameters were recorded up to 30 days post-irradiation. Neulasta significantly improved white blood cell (WBC), specifically neutrophil, loss in irradiated animals by approximately 60% three days after the first injection, compared to the saline treated irradiated animals. Blood cell counts quickly decreased after the last Neulasta injection, suggesting a transient effect on WBC stimulation. Statistically significant changes in hemostasis parameters were observed after proton radiation exposure in both the saline and Neulasta treated irradiated groups, as well internal organ complications such as pulmonary changes. In conclusion, Neulasta treatment temporarily alleviates proton radiation-induced WBC loss, but has no effect on altered hemostatic responses. PMID:25909052

  7. Effects of a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, Neulasta, in mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sanzari, Jenine K; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S; Shuman, Anne L; Diener, Antonia K; Lin, Liyong; Mai, Wilfried; Kennedy, Ann R

    2015-04-01

    Astronauts could be exposed to solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is comprised mostly of proton radiation. Proton radiation is also a treatment option for certain cancers. Both astronauts and clinical patients exposed to ionizing radiation are at risk for loss of white blood cells (WBCs), which are the body's main defense against infection. In this report, the effect of Neulasta treatment, a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, after proton radiation exposure is discussed. Mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation at a dose of 2 Gy received 4 treatments of either Neulasta or saline injections. Peripheral blood cell counts and thromboelastography parameters were recorded up to 30 days post-irradiation. Neulasta significantly improved WBC loss, specifically neutrophils, in irradiated animals by approximately 60% three days after the first injection, compared to the saline treated, irradiated animals. Blood cell counts quickly decreased after the last Neulasta injection, suggesting a transient effect on WBC stimulation. Statistically significant changes in hemostasis parameters were observed after proton radiation exposure in both the saline and Neulasta treated irradiated groups, as well as internal organ complications such as pulmonary changes. In conclusion, Neulasta treatment temporarily alleviates proton radiation-induced WBC loss, but has no effect on altered hemostatic responses. PMID:25909052

  8. Spatial resolution and nature of defects produced by low-energy proton irradiation of GaAs solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kachare, R.; Anspaugh, B.E.

    1986-11-24

    AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells with --0.5-..mu..m-thick Al/sub 0.85/Ga/sub 0.15/As window layers were irradiated using isotropic and normal incidence protons having energies between 50 and 500 keV with fluences up to 1 x 10/sup 12/ protons/cm/sup 2/. Although the projected range for these protons varies from 0 to more than 4.5 ..mu..m, the recombination losses due to the irradiation-induced defects were observed to be maximum in the vicinity of the AlGaAs/GaAs interface and the space-charge region irrespective of the proton energy. This was found by analyzing spectral response measurements. The results are explained by using a model in which the interaction of as-grown dislocations with irradiation-induced point defects is considered.

  9. Spatial resolution and nature of defects produced by low-energy proton irradiation of GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kachare, R.; Anspaugh, B. E.

    1986-01-01

    AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells with about 0.5-micron-thick Al(0.85)Ga(0.15)As window layers were irradiated using isotropic and normal incidence protons having energies between 50 and 500 keV with fluences up to 1 x 10 to the 12th protons/sq cm. Although the projected range for these protons varies from 0 to more than 4.5 microns, the recombination losses due to the irradiation-induced defects were observed to be maximum in the vicinity of the AlGaAs/GaAs interface and the space-charge region irrespective of the proton energy. This was found by analyzing spectral response measurements. The results are explained by using a model in which the interaction of as-grown dislocations with irradiation-induced point defects is considered.

  10. The effect of irradiation with high-energy protons on 4H-SiC detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kazukauskas, V. Jasiulionis, R.; Kalendra, V.; Vaitkus, J.-V.

    2007-03-15

    The effect of irradiation of 4H-SiC ionizing-radiation detectors with various doses (as high as 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}) of 24-GeV protons is studied. Isotopes of B, Be, Li, He, and H were produced in the nuclear spallation reactions of protons with carbon. Isotopes of Al, Mg, Na, Ne, F, O, and N were produced in the reactions of protons with silicon. The total amount of the produced stable isotopes varied in proportion with the radiation dose from 1.2 x 10{sup 11} to 5.9 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}. It is shown that, at high radiation doses, the contact characteristics of the detectors change appreciably. The potential-barrier height increased from the initial value of 0.7-0.75 eV to 0.85 eV; the rectifying characteristics of the Schottky contacts deteriorated appreciably. These effects are attributed to the formation of a disordered structure of the material as a result of irradiation.

  11. Proton irradiation energy dependence of dc and rf characteristics on InAlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, C. F.; Liu, L.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S. J.; Gila, Brent P.; Kim, H.-Y.; Kim, J.; Laboutin, O.; Cao, Yu; Johnson, Wayne J.; Kravchenko, Ivan I

    2012-01-01

    The effects of proton irradiation energy on dc and rf characteristics of InAlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were investigated. A fixed proton dose of 51015 cm2 with 5, 10, and 15 MeV irradiation energies was used in this study. For the dc characteristics, degradation was observed for sheet resistance, transfer resistance, contact resistivity, saturation drain current, maximum transconductance, reverse-bias gate leakage current, and sub-threshold drain leakage current for all the irradiated HEMTs; however, the degree of the degradation was decreased as the irradiation energy increased. Similar trends were obtained for the rf performance of the devices, with 10% degradation of the unity gain cut-off frequency (fT) and maximum oscillation frequency ( fmax) for the HEMTs irradiated with 15 MeV protons but 30% for 5 MeV proton irradiation. The carrier removal rate was in the range 0.66 1.24 cm1 over the range of proton energies investigated

  12. Characterizing the response of miniature scintillation detectors when irradiated with proton beams

    PubMed Central

    Archambault, Louis; Polf, Jerimy C.; Beaulieu, Luc; Beddar, Sam

    2014-01-01

    Designing a plastic scintillation detector for proton radiation therapy requires careful consideration. Most plastic scintillators should not perturb a proton beam if they are sufficiently small but may exhibit some energy dependence due to quenching effect. In this work, we studied the factors that would affect the performance of such scintillation detectors. We performed Monte Carlo simulations of proton beams with energies between 50 and 250 MeV to study signal amplitude, water equivalence, spatial resolution, and quenching of light output. Implementation of the quenching effect in the Monte Carlo simulations was then compared with prior experimental data for validation. The signal amplitude of a plastic scintillating fiber detector was on the order of 300 photons per MeV of energy deposited in the detector, corresponding to a power of about 30 pW at a proton dose rate of 100 cGy/min. The signal amplitude could be increased by up to a factor of 2 with reflective coating. We also found that Cerenkov light was not a significant source of noise. Dose deposited in the plastic scintillator was within 2% of the dose deposited in a similar volume of water throughout the whole depth-dose curve for protons with energies higher than 50 MeV. A scintillation detector with a radius of 0.5 mm offers a sufficient spatial resolution for use with a proton beam of 100 MeV or more. The main disadvantage of plastic scintillators when irradiated by protons was the quenching effect, which reduced the amount of scintillation and resulted in dose underestimation by close to 30% at the Bragg peak for beams of 150 MeV or more. However, the level of quenching was nearly constant throughout the proximal half of the depth-dose curve for all proton energies considered. We therefore conclude that it is possible to construct an effective detector to overcome the problems traditionally encountered in proton dosimetry. Scintillation detectors could be used for surface or shallow measurements

  13. Strong hole-doping and robust resistance-decrease in proton-irradiated graphene

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chul; Kim, Jiho; Kim, SangJin; Chang, Young Jun; Kim, Keun Soo; Hong, ByungHee; Choi, E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Great effort has been devoted in recent years to improve the electrical conductivity of graphene for use in practical applications. Here, we demonstrate the hole carrier density of CVD graphene on a SiO2/Si substrate increases by more than one order of magnitude to n = 3 × 1013 cm−2 after irradiation with a high energy 5 MeV proton beam. As a result, the dc-resistance (R) of graphene is reduced significantly by 60%. Only a negligible amount of defect is created by the irradiation. Also the hole-doped low resistance state of graphene remains robust against external perturbations. This carrier doping is achieved without requiring the bias-gate voltage as is the case for other field effect devices. We make two important observations, (i) occurrence of the doping after the irradiation is turned off (ii) indispensability of the SiO2-layer in the substrate, which leads to a purely electronic mechanism for the doping where electron-hole pair creation and interlayer Coulomb attraction play a major role. A flux-dependent study predicts that an ultrahigh doping may be obtained by longer irradiation. We expect the irradiation doping method could be applied to other atomically thin solids, facilitating the fundamental study and application of the 2d materials. PMID:26888197

  14. Chromothripsis-like chromosomal rearrangements induced by ionizing radiation using proton microbeam irradiation system.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Maki; Muramatsu, Tomoki; Suto, Yumiko; Hirai, Momoki; Konishi, Teruaki; Hayashi, Shin; Shigemizu, Daichi; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Moriyama, Keiji; Inazawa, Johji

    2016-03-01

    Chromothripsis is the massive but highly localized chromosomal rearrangement in response to a one-step catastrophic event, rather than an accumulation of a series of subsequent and random alterations. Chromothripsis occurs commonly in various human cancers and is thought to be associated with increased malignancy and carcinogenesis. However, the causes and consequences of chromothripsis remain unclear. Therefore, to identify the mechanism underlying the generation of chromothripsis, we investigated whether chromothripsis could be artificially induced by ionizing radiation. We first elicited DNA double-strand breaks in an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line HOC313-P and its highly metastatic subline HOC313-LM, using Single Particle Irradiation system to Cell (SPICE), a focused vertical microbeam system designed to irradiate a spot within the nuclei of adhesive cells, and then established irradiated monoclonal sublines from them, respectively. SNP array analysis detected a number of chromosomal copy number alterations (CNAs) in these sublines, and one HOC313-LM-derived monoclonal subline irradiated with 200 protons by the microbeam displayed multiple CNAs involved locally in chromosome 7. Multi-color FISH showed a complex translocation of chromosome 7 involving chromosomes 11 and 12. Furthermore, whole genome sequencing analysis revealed multiple de novo complex chromosomal rearrangements localized in chromosomes 2, 5, 7, and 20, resembling chromothripsis. These findings suggested that localized ionizing irradiation within the nucleus may induce chromothripsis-like complex chromosomal alterations via local DNA damage in the nucleus. PMID:26862731

  15. [Indralin--a novel effective radioprotector during irradiation by high-energy protons].

    PubMed

    Shashkov, V S; Efimov, V I; Vasin, M V; Antipov, V V; Iliukhin, A V; Vlasov, P A; Karsanova, S K; Grigor'ev, Iu G; Ushakov, I B

    2010-01-01

    Experiments with 120 mongrel dogs were aimed at the assessment of radio protective strength of indralin and local shielding of the pelvic marrow from 2.5 Gy, and also their concurrent use for the dogs irradiated by protons (240 MeV) at absolutely lethal and over-lethal 4 Gy and 5 Gy. Clinical observations, hematological investigations and ECG analysis of survived animals were conducted 4.5 years post the irradiation. Dogs that remained healthy following 3.5 to 4.5 years since the irradiation were sacrificed for pathomorphological investigations. The radioprotective effect of local shielding against 4 Gy was weak while this effect of intramuscular indralin (10, 20, 40 mg/kg of body) was significant reaching 50 to 67.7%. The concurrent use of two methods had, apparently, potentiated the 100% radioprotection of the animals irradiated by overlethal 5 Gy. Blood investigations of the survived dogs every 2-4 months evidenced that complete recovery of the total leukocyte count had taken 9 to 13 months. Also, dogs' pregnancy in 9-10 months since the beginning of irradiation pointed to maintenance of fertility and the ability to parturiate 2 or 3 times yielding 5-6 live cubs. Necropsy of the dogs did not reveal gross macroscopic structural changes of visceral organs or tissues. Seven out of 27 sacrificed dogs had benign tumors infrequent in intact dogs at this age. PMID:20803992

  16. Chromothripsis-like chromosomal rearrangements induced by ionizing radiation using proton microbeam irradiation system

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Maki; Muramatsu, Tomoki; Suto, Yumiko; Hirai, Momoki; Konishi, Teruaki; Hayashi, Shin; Shigemizu, Daichi; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Moriyama, Keiji; Inazawa, Johji

    2016-01-01

    Chromothripsis is the massive but highly localized chromosomal rearrangement in response to a one-step catastrophic event, rather than an accumulation of a series of subsequent and random alterations. Chromothripsis occurs commonly in various human cancers and is thought to be associated with increased malignancy and carcinogenesis. However, the causes and consequences of chromothripsis remain unclear. Therefore, to identify the mechanism underlying the generation of chromothripsis, we investigated whether chromothripsis could be artificially induced by ionizing radiation. We first elicited DNA double-strand breaks in an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line HOC313-P and its highly metastatic subline HOC313-LM, using Single Particle Irradiation system to Cell (SPICE), a focused vertical microbeam system designed to irradiate a spot within the nuclei of adhesive cells, and then established irradiated monoclonal sublines from them, respectively. SNP array analysis detected a number of chromosomal copy number alterations (CNAs) in these sublines, and one HOC313-LM-derived monoclonal subline irradiated with 200 protons by the microbeam displayed multiple CNAs involved locally in chromosome 7. Multi-color FISH showed a complex translocation of chromosome 7 involving chromosomes 11 and 12. Furthermore, whole genome sequencing analysis revealed multiple de novo complex chromosomal rearrangements localized in chromosomes 2, 5, 7, and 20, resembling chromothripsis. These findings suggested that localized ionizing irradiation within the nucleus may induce chromothripsis-like complex chromosomal alterations via local DNA damage in the nucleus. PMID:26862731

  17. Effect of front and rear incident proton irradiation on silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, Bruce; Kachare, Ram

    1987-01-01

    Four solar cell types of current manufacture were irradiated through the front and rear surfaces with protons in the energy range between 1 and 10 MeV. The solar cell parameters varied for this study were cell thickness and back surface field (BSF) vs. no BSF. Some cells were irradiated at normal incidence and an equal number were irradiated with simulated isotropic fluences. The solar cell electrical characteristics were measured under simulated AM0 illumination after each fluence. Using the normal incidence data, proton damage coefficients were computed for all four types of cells for both normal and omnidirectional radiation fields. These were found to compare well with the omnidirectional damage coefficients derived directly from the rear-incidence radiation data. Similarly, the rear-incidence omnidirectional radiation data were used to compute appropriate damage coefficients. A method for calculating the effect of a spectrum of energies is derived from these calculations. It is suitable for calculating the degradation of cells in space when they have minimal rear-surface shielding.

  18. The risk of enucleation after proton beam irradiation of uveal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Egan, K.M.; Gragoudas, E.S.; Seddon, J.M.; Glynn, R.J.; Munzenreider, J.E.; Goitein, M.; Verhey, L.; Urie, M.; Koehler, A. )

    1989-09-01

    Enucleation after proton beam irradiation of uveal melanomas occurred in 64 (6.4%) of 994 eyes with a median follow-up time of 2.7 years. The median time between irradiation and enucleation in the 64 enucleated eyes was 13 months. The probability of retaining the eye was 95 and 90%, 2 and 5 years postirradiation, respectively. Three percent of eyes were enucleated during posttreatment year 1, and the yearly rate was 1% by the fourth year. No patient had enucleation later than 5 1/2 years posttreatment. The complication most likely to result in enucleation was neovascular glaucoma although this was frequently managed without enucleation. Other common reasons for enucleation were documented or suspected tumor growth and complete retinal detachment with associated loss of vision. The leading risk factors for enucleation were anterior tumor margin involving the ciliary body, tumor height greater than 8 mm, and proximity of the tumor to the fovea. Based on the presence or absence of these factors, 5-year eye retention rates were 99, 92, and 76% for low-, moderate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. Thus, the probability of eye retention after proton beam irradiation is high even among those at greatest risk of enucleation.

  19. Electrical properties of as-grown and proton-irradiated high purity silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupka, Jerzy; Karcz, Waldemar; Kamiński, Paweł; Jensen, Leif

    2016-08-01

    The complex permittivity of as-grown and proton-irradiated samples of high purity silicon obtained by the floating zone method was measured as a function of temperature at a few frequencies in microwave spectrum by employing the quasi TE011 and whispering gallery modes excited in the samples under test. The resistivity of the samples was determined from the measured imaginary part of the permittivity. The resistivity was additionally measured at RF frequencies employing capacitive spectroscopy as well as in a standard direct current experiment. The sample of as-grown material had the resistivity of ∼85 kΩ cm at room temperature. The sample irradiated with 23-MeV protons had the resistivity of ∼500 kΩ cm at 295 K and its behavior was typical of the intrinsic material at room and at elevated temperatures. For the irradiated sample, the extrinsic conductivity region is missing and at temperatures below 250 K hopping conductivity occurs. Thermal cycle hysteresis of the resistivity for the sample of as-grown material is observed. After heating and subsequent cooling of the sample, its resistivity decreases and then slowly (∼50 h) returns to the initial value.

  20. Late cataractogenesis in rhesus monkeys irradiated with protons and radiogenic cataract in other species

    SciTech Connect

    Lett, J.T.; Lee, A.C.; Cox, A.B. )

    1991-05-01

    Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) which were irradiated at ca. 2 years of age with acute doses (less than or equal to 5 Gy) of protons (32-2300 MeV) are exhibiting the late progressive phase of radiation cataractogenesis 20-24 years after exposure, the period during which we have been monitoring the sequelae of irradiation of the lens. The median life span of the primate is approximately 24 years. Analogous late ocular changes also occur in a similar period of the lifetimes of New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) exposed at 8-10 weeks of age to 460-MeV {sup 56}Fe ions. In this experiment, which has been in progress for ca. 6 years, we are following the development of radiation-induced lenticular opacification (cataractogenic profiles) throughout the life span. The median life span of the lagomorph is 5-7 years. Cataractogenic profiles for NZW rabbits irradiated with {sup 20}Ne and {sup 40}Ar ions and {sup 60}Co gamma photons were obtained previously. Reference is also made to measurements of the cataractogenic profiles of a short-lived rodent, the Fischer 344 rat (Rattus norvegicus) during the first year after exposure at 8-10 weeks of age to spread-Bragg-peak protons of 55 MeV nominal energy. The median life span of the rodent is reported to be 2-3 years.

  1. Structural, optical, and electrical characteristics of AlN:Ho thin films irradiated with 700 keV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Muhammad; Naeem, M.; Hassan, Najam ul; Maqbool, Muhammad; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Ahmad, Ishaq; Hussain, Zahid

    2015-12-01

    Effects of proton irradiation on Ho doped AlN thin films are investigated. The irradiation is performed in the dose range of 1013 to 1014 ions/cm2 at room temperature. The effect of proton bombardment is studied through a systematic investigation of the structural properties using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS). The optical properties and the band gap change after irradiation process are studied using Defuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (DRS) technique. The electrical behavior of the material is also investigated after irradiation of AlN:Ho. The results show that high-energy protons cause a band gap change in the material, which can be exploited in developing various applications.

  2. Acute effects of whole-body proton irradiation on the immune system of the mouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kajioka, E. H.; Andres, M. L.; Li, J.; Mao, X. W.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.; Slater, J. M.; Gridley, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    The acute effects of proton whole-body irradiation on the distribution and function of leukocyte populations in the spleen and blood were examined and compared to the effects of photons derived from a (60)Co gamma-ray source. Adult female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to a single dose (3 Gy at 0.4 Gy/min) of protons at spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP), protons at the distal entry (E) region, or gamma rays and killed humanely at six different times thereafter. Specific differences were noted in the results, thereby suggesting that the kinetics of the response may be variable. However, the lack of significant differences in most assays at most times suggests that the RBE for both entry and peak regions of the Bragg curve was essentially 1.0 under the conditions of this study. The greatest immunodepression was observed at 4 days postexposure. Flow cytometry and mitogenic stimulation analyses of the spleen and peripheral blood demonstrated that lymphocyte populations differ in radiosensitivity, with B (CD19(+)) cells being most sensitive, T (CD3(+)) cells being moderately sensitive, and natural killer (NK1.1(+)) cells being most resistant. B lymphocytes showed the most rapid recovery. Comparison of the T-lymphocyte subsets showed that CD4(+) T helper/inducer cells were more radiosensitive than the CD8(+) T cytotoxic/suppressor cells. These findings should have an impact on future studies designed to maximize protection of normal tissue during and after proton-radiation exposure.

  3. Proton irradiation effects on advanced digital and microwave III-V components

    SciTech Connect

    Hash, G.L.; Schwank, J.R.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Sandoval, C.E.; Connors, M.P.; Sheridan, T.J.; Sexton, F.W.; Slayton, E.M.; Heise, J.A.; Foster, C.

    1994-09-01

    A wide range of advanced III-V components suitable for use in high-speed satellite communication systems were evaluated for displacement damage and single-event effects in high-energy, high-fluence proton environments. Transistors and integrated circuits (both digital and MMIC) were irradiated with protons at energies from 41 to 197 MeV and at fluences from 10{sup 10} to 2 {times} 10{sup 14} protons/cm{sup 2}. Large soft-error rates were measured for digital GaAs MESFET (3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} errors/bit-day) and heterojunction bipolar circuits (10{sup {minus}5} errors/bit-day). No transient signals were detected from MMIC circuits. The largest degradation in transistor response caused by displacement damage was observed for 1.0-{mu}m depletion- and enhancement-mode MESFET transistors. Shorter gate length MESFET transistors and HEMT transistors exhibited less displacement-induced damage. These results show that memory-intensive GaAs digital circuits may result in significant system degradation due to single-event upset in natural and man-made space environments. However, displacement damage effects should not be a limiting factor for fluence levels up to 10{sup 14} protons/cm{sup 2} [equivalent to total doses in excess of 10 Mrad(GaAs)].

  4. Proton Irradiation Facility and space radiation monitoring at the Paul Scherrer Institute.

    PubMed

    Hajdas, W; Zehnder, A; Adams, L; Buehler, P; Harboe-Sorensen, R; Daum, M; Nickson, R; Daly, E; Nieminen, P

    2001-01-01

    The Proton Irradiation Facility (PIF) has been designed and constructed, in cooperation between Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and European Space Agency (ESA), for terrestrial proton testing of components and materials for spacecraft. Emphasis has been given to generating realistic proton spectra encountered by space-flights at any potential orbit. The facility, designed in a user-friendly manner, can be readily adapted to the individual requirements of experimenters. It is available for general use serving also in testing of radiation monitors and for proton experiments in different scientific disciplines. The Radiation Environment Monitor REM has been developed for measurements of the spacecraft radiation conditions. Two instruments were launched into space, one into a Geo-stationary Transfer Orbit on board of the STRV-1b satellite and one into a Low Earth Orbit on the Russian MIR station. The next generation of monitors (SREMs--Standard REMs) is currently under development in partnership of ESA, PSI and Contraves-Space. They will operate both as minimum intrusive monitors, which provide radiation housekeeping data and alert the spacecraft when the radiation level crosses allowed limits and as small scientific devices measuring particle spectra and fluxes. Future missions as e.g. INTEGRAL, STRV-1c and PROBA will be equipped with new SREMs. PMID:11770526

  5. Effect of proton irradiation energy on AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide semiconductor high electron mobility transistors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ahn, S.; Dong, C.; Zhu, W.; Kim, B. -j.; Hwang, Ya-Hsi; Ren, F.; Pearton, S. J.; Yang, Gwangseok; Kim, J.; Patrick, Erin; et al

    2015-08-18

    The effects of proton irradiation energy on dc characteristics of AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide semiconductor high electron mobility transistors (MOSHEMTs) using Al2O3 as the gate dielectric were studied. Al2O3/AlGaN/GaN MOSHEMTs were irradiated with a fixed proton dose of 5 × 1015 cm-2 at different energies of 5, 10, or 15 MeV. More degradation of the device dc characteristics was observed for lower irradiation energy due to the larger amount of nonionizing energy loss in the active region of the MOSHEMTs under these conditions. The reductions in saturation current were 95.3%, 68.3%, and 59.8% and reductions in maximum transconductance were 88%, 54.4%, andmore » 40.7% after 5, 10, and 15 MeV proton irradiation, respectively. Both forward and reverse gate leakage current were reduced more than one order of magnitude after irradiation. The carrier removal rates for the irradiation energies employed in this study were in the range of 127–289 cm-1. These are similar to the values reported for conventional metal-gate high-electron mobility transistors under the same conditions and show that the gate dielectric does not affect the response to proton irradiation for these energies.« less

  6. Defect characterization of proton irradiated GaAs pn-junction diodes with layers of InAs quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shin-ichiro; Schmieder, Kenneth J.; Hubbard, Seth M.; Forbes, David V.; Warner, Jeffrey H.; Ohshima, Takeshi; Walters, Robert J.

    2016-05-01

    In order to expand the technology of III-V semiconductor devices with quantum structures to both terrestrial and space use, radiation induced defects as well as native defects generated in the quantum structures should be clarified. Electrically active defects in GaAs p+n diodes with embedded ten layers of InAs quantum dots (QDs) are investigated using Deep Level Transient Fourier Spectroscopy. Both majority carrier (electron) and minority carrier (hole) traps are characterized. In the devices of this study, GaP layers are embedded in between the QD layers to offset the compressive stress introduced during growth of InAs QDs. Devices are irradiated with high energy protons for three different fluences at room temperature in order to characterize radiation induced defects. Seven majority electron traps and one minority hole trap are found after proton irradiation. It is shown that four electron traps induced by proton irradiation increase in proportion to the fluence, whereas the EL2 trap, which appears before irradiation, is not affected by irradiation. These defects correspond to electron traps previously identified in GaAs. In addition, a 0.53 eV electron trap and a 0.14 eV hole trap are found in the QD layers before proton irradiation. It is shown that these native traps are also unaffected by irradiation. The nature of the 0.14 eV hole trap is thought to be Ga-vacancies in the GaP strain balancing layers.

  7. Delayed effects of proton irradiation in Macaca Mulatta (22-year summary)

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, D.H.; Hardy, K.A.; Cox, A.B.; Salmon, Y.L.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Cordts, R.E. )

    1989-05-15

    Lifetime observations on a group of rhesus monkeys indicate that life expectancy loss from exposure to protons in the energy range encountered in the Van Allen belts and solar proton events can be correlated with the dose and energy of radiation. The primary cause of life shortening is nonleukemic cancers. Radiation also increased the rise of endometriosis (an abnormal proliferation of the lining of the uterus in females). Other effects associated with radiation exposures are lowered glucose tolerance and increased incidence of cataracts. Calculations of the relative risk of fatal cancers in the irradiated subjects reveal that the total body surface dose required to double the risk of death from cancer over a 20-year post exposure period varies with the linear energy transfer (LET) of the radiation. The ability to determine the integrated dose and LET spectrum in space radiation exposures of humans is, therefore, critical to the assessment of lifetime cancer risk.

  8. Performance of GaAs and silicon concentrator cells under 37 MeV proton irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Henry B.; Swartz, Clifford K.

    1987-01-01

    Gallium arsenide concentrator cells from three sources and silicon concentrator cells from one source were exposed to 37 MeV protons at fluences up to 2.8 x 10 to the 12th protons/sq cm. Performance data were taken after several fluences, at two temperatures (25 and 80 C), and at concentration levels from 1 to about 150 x AMO. Data at one sun and 25 C were taken with an X-25 xenon lamp solar simulator. Data at concentration were taken using a pulsed solar simulator with the assumption of a linear relationship between short circuit current and irradiance. The cells are 5 x 5 mm with a 4-mm diameter illuminated area.

  9. Delayed effects of proton irradiation in Macaca Mulatta (22-year summary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, D. H.; Hardy, K. A.; Cox, A. B.; Salmon, Y. L.; Yochmowitz, M. G.; Cordts, R. E.

    1989-05-01

    Lifetime observations on a group of rhesus monkeys indicate that life expectancy loss from exposure to protons in the energy range encountered in the Van Allen belts and solar proton events can be correlated with the dose and energy of radiation. The primary cause of life shortening is nonleukemic cancers. Radiation also increased the rise of endometriosis (an abnormal proliferation of the lining of the uterus in females). Other effects associated with radiation exposures are lowered glucose tolerance and increased incidence of cataracts. Calculations of the relative risk of fatal cancers in the irradiated subjects reveal that the total body surface dose required to double the risk of death from cancer over a 20-year post exposure period varies with the linear energy transfer (LET) of the radiation. The ability to determine the integrated dose and LET spectrum in space radiation exposures of humans is, therefore, critical to the assessment of lifetime cancer risk.

  10. Energetic proton beams from plastic targets irradiated by an ultra-intense laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kitae; Lee, Ji-Young; Park, Seong Hee; Cha, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kyung-Nam; Jeong, Young Uk

    2011-05-01

    It has been found that more intense proton beams are generated from plastic foils than metal foils irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse. The acceleration model, ARIE (Acceleration by a Resistively Induced Electric field) accounts for the experimental observations from plastic foils compared with metal foils. Proton beams on foil thickness and laser prepulse have been observed, which is also well described by the ARIE model. An experiment with an aluminum-coated plastic target strongly suggests that front side acceleration is a dominant acceleration process in plastic targets. We also suggest that a vacuum-sandwiched double layer target could effectively enhance the laser contrast ratio, which was investigated in the combination of a two-dimensional hydro code and a two-dimensional PIC (Particle-In-Cell) code.

  11. Nuclear excitation functions from 40 to 200 MeV proton irradiation of terbium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Jonathan W.; Mashnik, Stepan G.; Parker, Lauren A.; Jackman, Kevin R.; Bitteker, Leo J.; Ullmann, John L.; Gulley, Mark S.; Pillai, Chandra; John, Kevin D.; Birnbaum, Eva R.; Nortier, Francois M.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear formation cross sections are reported for 26 radionuclides, measured with 40-200 MeV proton irradiations of terbium foils. These data provide the basis for the production of medically relevant radionuclides (e.g., 152Tb, 155Tb, 155Eu, and 156Eu) and 153Gd, a potential source used in ongoing efforts to characterize stellar nucleosynthesis routes. Computational predictions from the ALICE2011, CEM03.03, Bertini, and INCL + ABLA codes are compared with newly measured data to contribute to the ongoing process of code development, and yields are calculated for selected radionuclides using measured data.

  12. Gene Expression Changes in Mouse Intestinal Tissue Following Whole-Body Proton or Gamma-Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purgason, Ashley; Zhang, Ye; Mangala, Lingegowda; Nie, Ying; Gridley, Daila; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Seidel, Derek V.; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Crew members face potential consequences following exposure to the space radiation environment including acute radiation syndrome and cancer. The space radiation environment is ample with protons, and numerous studies have been devoted to the understanding of the health consequences of proton exposures. In this project, C57BL/6 mice underwent whole-body exposure to 250 MeV of protons at doses of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 2 and 6 Gy and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of each animal was dissected four hours post-irradiation. Standard H&E staining methods to screen for morphologic changes in the tissue showed an increase in apoptotic lesions for even the lowest dose of 0.1 Gy, and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased with increasing dose. Results of gene expression changes showed consistent up- or down- regulation, up to 10 fold, of a number of genes across exposure doses that may play a role in proton-induced oxidative stress including Gpx2. A separate study in C57BL/6 mice using the same four hour time point but whole-body gamma-irradiation showed damage to the small intestine with lesions appearing at the smallest dose of 0.05 Gy and increasing with increasing absorbed dose. Expressions of genes associated with oxidative stress processes were analyzed at four hours and twenty-four hours after exposure to gamma rays. We saw a much greater number of genes with significant up- or down-regulation twenty-four hours post-exposure as compared to the four hour time point. At both four hours and twenty-four hours post-exposure, Duox1 and Mpo underwent up-regulation for the highest dose of 6 Gy. Both protons and gamma rays lead to significant variation in gene expressions and these changes may provide insight into the mechanism of injury seen in the GI tract following radiation exposure. We have also completed experiments using a BALB/c mouse model undergoing whole-body exposure to protons. Doses of 0, 0.1, 1 and 2 Gy were used and results will be compared to the work mentioned

  13. Measurement of characteristic prompt gamma rays emitted from oxygen and carbon in tissue-equivalent samples during proton beam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Polf, Jerimy C; Panthi, Rajesh; Mackin, Dennis S; McCleskey, Matt; Saastamoinen, Antti; Roeder, Brian T; Beddar, Sam

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize how prompt gamma (PG) emission from tissue changes as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration, and to assess the feasibility of determining elemental concentration in tissues irradiated with proton beams. For this study, four tissue-equivalent water-sucrose samples with differing densities and concentrations of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen were irradiated with a 48 MeV proton pencil beam. The PG spectrum emitted from each sample was measured using a high-purity germanium detector, and the absolute detection efficiency of the detector, average beam current, and delivered dose distribution were also measured. Changes to the total PG emission from 12C (4.44 MeV) and 16O (6.13 MeV) per incident proton and per Gray of absorbed dose were characterized as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration in the sample. The intensity of the 4.44 MeV PG emission per incident proton was found to be nearly constant for all samples regardless of their carbon concentration. However, we found that the 6.13 MeV PG emission increased linearly with the total amount (in grams) of oxygen irradiated in the sample. From the measured PG data, we determined that 1.64 × 107 oxygen PGs were emitted per gram of oxygen irradiated per Gray of absorbed dose delivered with a 48 MeV proton beam. These results indicate that the 6.13 MeV PG emission from 16O is proportional to the concentration of oxygen in tissue irradiated with proton beams, showing that it is possible to determine the concentration of oxygen within tissues irradiated with proton beams by measuring 16O PG emission. PMID:23920051

  14. Measurement of characteristic prompt gamma rays emitted from oxygen and carbon in tissue-equivalent samples during proton beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polf, Jerimy C.; Panthi, Rajesh; Mackin, Dennis S.; McCleskey, Matt; Saastamoinen, Antti; Roeder, Brian T.; Beddar, Sam

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize how prompt gamma (PG) emission from tissue changes as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration, and to assess the feasibility of determining elemental concentration in tissues irradiated with proton beams. For this study, four tissue-equivalent water-sucrose samples with differing densities and concentrations of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen were irradiated with a 48 MeV proton pencil beam. The PG spectrum emitted from each sample was measured using a high-purity germanium detector, and the absolute detection efficiency of the detector, average beam current, and delivered dose distribution were also measured. Changes to the total PG emission from 12C (4.44 MeV) and 16O (6.13 MeV) per incident proton and per Gray of absorbed dose were characterized as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration in the sample. The intensity of the 4.44 MeV PG emission per incident proton was found to be nearly constant for all samples regardless of their carbon concentration. However, we found that the 6.13 MeV PG emission increased linearly with the total amount (in grams) of oxygen irradiated in the sample. From the measured PG data, we determined that 1.64 × 107 oxygen PGs were emitted per gram of oxygen irradiated per Gray of absorbed dose delivered with a 48 MeV proton beam. These results indicate that the 6.13 MeV PG emission from 16O is proportional to the concentration of oxygen in tissue irradiated with proton beams, showing that it is possible to determine the concentration of oxygen within tissues irradiated with proton beams by measuring 16O PG emission.

  15. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body proton-irradiation on lymphocyte blastogenesis and hematological variables: part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pecaut, Michael J.; Gridley, Daila S.; Smith, Anna L.; Nelson, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of part II of this study was to evaluate functional characteristics of leukocytes and circulating blood cell parameters after whole-body proton irradiation at varying doses and at low- and high-dose-rates (LDR and HDR, respectively). C57BL/6 mice (n=51) were irradiated and euthanized at 4 days post-exposure for assay. Significant radiation dose- (but not dose-rate-) dependent decreases were observed in splenocyte responses to T and B cell mitogens when compared to sham-irradiated controls (P<0.001). Spontaneous blastogenesis, also significantly dose-dependent, was increased in both blood and spleen (P<0.001). Red blood cell counts, hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit were decreased in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05), whereas thrombocyte numbers were only slightly affected. Comparison of proton- and gamma-irradiated groups (both receiving 3 Gy at HDR) showed a higher level of spontaneous blastogenesis in blood leukocytes and a lower splenocyte response to concanavalin A following proton irradiation (P<0.05). There were no dose rate effects. Collectively, the data demonstrate that the measurements in blood and spleen were largely dependent upon the total dose of proton radiation and that an 80-fold difference in the dose rate was not a significant factor. A difference, however, was found between protons and gamma-rays in the degree of change induced in some of the measurements.

  16. Critical current density and vortex dynamics in pristine and proton-irradiated (Ba, K)Fe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taen, Toshihiro; Ohori, Takahiro; Ohtake, Fumiaki; Tamegai, Tsuyoshi; Kihou, Kunihiro; Ishida, Shigeyuki; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Kitamura, Hisashi

    2013-11-01

    Magnetization and flux creep in pristine and 3 MeV proton-irradiated BaKFeAs single crystals with a dose of 5.3×1016 cm are measured. Both the pristine and irradiated samples show sharp superconducting transitions, demonstrating the homogeneity of the sample. The sharp central peak in the pristine sample becomes broader after the irradiation. Commonly observed fish-tail effects in iron-based superconductors disappear in the highly disordered sample after the irradiation. The normalized relaxation rate shows a large field dependence in the pristine sample, while it is weakly field dependent in the proton irradiated sample. The dip structure around zero-field is attributed to either the self-field effect or individual pinning.

  17. Proton irradiation effect on microstructure, strain localization and iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking in Zircaloy-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, L.; Serres, A.; Auzoux, Q.; Leboulch, D.; Was, G. S.

    2009-01-01

    The radiation-induced microstructure, strain localization, and iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC) behaviour of recrystallized Zircaloy-4 proton-irradiated to 2 dpa at 305 °C was examined. type dislocation loops having 1/3<1 1 2¯ 0> Burgers vector and a mean diameter and density of, respectively, 10 nm and 17 × 10 21 m -3 were observed while no Zr(Fe,Cr) 2 precipitates amorphization or Fe redistribution were detected after irradiation. After transverse tensile testing to 0.5% macroscopic plastic strain at room temperature, almost exclusively basal channels were imaged. Statistical Schmid factor analysis shows that irradiation leads to a change in slip system activation from prismatic to basal due to a higher increase of critical resolved shear stresses for prismatic slip systems than for basal slip system. Finite element calculations suggest that dislocation channeling occurs in the irradiated proton layer at an equivalent stress close to 70% of the yield stress of the irradiated material, i.e. while the irradiated layer is still in the elastic regime for a 0.5% applied macroscopic plastic strain. Comparative constant elongation rate tensile tests performed at a strain rate of 10 -5 s -1 in iodized methanol solutions at room temperature on specimens both unirradiated and proton-irradiated to 2 dpa demonstrated a detrimental effect of irradiation on I-SCC.

  18. WE-D-17A-04: Magnetically Focused Proton Irradiation of Small Volume Targets

    SciTech Connect

    McAuley, G; Slater, J; Wroe, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the advantages of magnetic focusing for small volume proton irradiations and the potential clinical benefits for radiosurgery targets. The primary goal is to create narrow elongated proton beams of elliptical cross section with superior dose delivery characteristics compared to current delivery modalities (eg, collimated beams). In addition, more general beam shapes are also under investigation. Methods: Two prototype magnets consisting of 24 segments of samarium-cobalt (Sm2Co17) permanent magnetic material adhered into hollow cylinders were manufactured for testing. A single focusing magnet was placed on a positioning track on our Gantry 1 treatment table and 15 mm diameter proton beams with energies and modulation relevant to clinical radiosurgery applications (127 to 186 MeV, and 0 to 30 mm modulation) were delivered to a terminal water tank. Beam dose distributions were measured using a PTW diode detector and Gafchromic EBT2 film. Longitudinal and transverse dose profiles were analyzed and compared to data from Monte Carlo simulations analogous to the experimental setup. Results: The narrow elongated focused beam spots showed high elliptical symmetry indicating high magnet quality. In addition, when compared to unfocused beams, peak-to-entrance depth dose ratios were 11 to 14% larger (depending on presence or extent of modulation), and minor axis penumbras were 11 to 20% smaller (again depending on modulation) for focused beams. These results suggest that the use of rare earth magnet assemblies is practical and could improve dose-sparing of normal tissue and organs at risk while delivering enhanced dose to small proton radiosurgery targets. Conclusion: Quadrapole rare earth magnetic assemblies are a promising and inexpensive method to counteract particle out scatter that tends to degrade the peak to entrance performance of small field proton beams. Knowledge gained from current experiments will inform the design of a prototype treatment

  19. In situ proton irradiation creep of ferritic-martensitic steel T91

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Cheng; Was, Gary S.

    2013-10-01

    An irradiation creep apparatus was developed for in situ straining of T91 strip samples while exposed to 2-3 MeV proton irradiation at 300-600 °C. Thermal creep experiments were conducted at 600 °C, 47 MPa, and 500 °C, 160 MPa. The thermal creep strains were in reasonable agreement with literature data on bulk samples of T91. An irradiation creep experiment was conducted at 500 °C and 160 MPa with a damage rate range from 3.1 × 10-6 dpa/s to 4.9 × 10-6 dpa/s. The creep rate of T91 was found to increase linearly with dose rate. A TEM investigation of the irradiated microstructure showed signs of dislocation pileup, subgrain formation, and small dislocation loops. The results illustrate the utility of accelerator-creep experiments to obtain creep rates at low dose and the capability to observe transient changes in real time, thus providing the tools for isolating the effects of individual variables on creep rate of T91.

  20. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND MICROSTRUCTURE IN LOW ACTIVATION MARTENSITIC STEELS F82H AND OPTIMAX AFTER 800 MEV PROTON IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Y. DAI; ET AL

    1999-10-01

    Low-activation martensitic steels, F82H (mod.) and Optimax-A, have been irradiated with 800-MeV protons up to 5.9 dpa. The tensile properties and microstructure have been studied. The results show that radiation hardening increases continuously with irradiation dose. F82H has lesser irradiation hardening as compared to Optimax-A in the present work and DIN1.4926 from a previous study. The irradiation embrittlement effects are evident in the materials since the uniform elongation is reduced sharply to less than 2%. However, all the irradiated samples ruptured in a ductile-fracture mode. Defect clusters have been observed. The size and the density of defect clusters increase with the irradiation dose. Precipitates are amorphous after irradiation.

  1. Comparative study by IBIC of Si and SiC diodes irradiated with high energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Lopez, J.; Jimenez-Ramos, M. C.; Rodriguez-Ramos, M.; Ceballos, J.; Linez, F.; Raisanen, J.

    2016-04-01

    The transport properties of a series of Si and SiC diodes have been studied using the Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) technique. Structural defects were induced into the samples during the irradiation with 17 MeV protons. The experimental values of the charge collection efficiency (CCE) vs bias voltages have been analyzed using a modified drift-diffusion model, which takes into account the recombination of carriers in the neutral and depletion regions. From these simulations, we have obtained the values of the carrier's lifetime for pristine and irradiated diodes, which are found to degrade faster in the case of the SiC samples. However, the decrease of the CCE at high bias voltages is more important for the Si detectors, indicative of the lower radiation hardness of this material compared to SiC. The nature of the proton-induced defects on Si wafers has been studied by Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) and Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy (DBS). The results suggest that the main defect detected by the positrons in p-type samples is the divacancy while for n-type at least a fraction of the positron annihilate in another defect. The concentration of defects is much lower than the number of vacancies predicted by SRIM.

  2. Engineering of silicon/HfO2 interface by variable energy proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, Savita; Tribedi, L. C.; Maringanti, Radhakrishna

    2014-08-01

    Surfaces and interfaces between materials are of paramount importance for various phenomena, such as painting a house, catalyst driven chemical reactions, intricate life processes, corrosion of materials, and fabrication of various semiconductor devices. Interface of silicon or other such substrates with any of the oxides has profound effect on the performance of metal oxide field effect transistors and other similar devices. Since a surface is an abrupt termination of a periodic crystal, surface atoms will have some unsaturated valence electrons and these unsaturated bonds at the semiconductor surface make it chemically highly reactive. Other than annealing, there is not much that can be done to manage these unsaturated bonds. This study was initiated to explore the possibility of repairing these unsaturated dangling bonds that are formed at the silicon and oxide interface during the deposition of oxide layer above silicon, by the use of proton irradiation. In order to improve the interface characteristics, we present a method to modify the interface of silicon and hafnium dioxide after its fabrication, through proton irradiation. Results of the study are promising and probably this method might be used along with other methods such as annealing to modify the interface, after its fabrication.

  3. Production of radionuclides in artificial meteorites irradiated isotropically with 600 MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, R.; Dragovitsch, P.; Englert, P.; Herpers, U.

    1986-01-01

    The understanding of the production of cosmogenic nuclides in small meteorites (R is less than 40 cm) still is not satisfactory. The existing models for the calculation of depth dependent production rates do not distinguish between the different types of nucleons reacting in a meteorite. They rather use general depth dependent particle fluxes to which cross sections have to be adjusted to fit the measured radionuclide concentrations. Some of these models can not even be extended to zero meteorite sizes without logical contradictions. Therefore, a series of three thick target irradiations was started at the 600 MeV proton beam of the CERN isochronuous cyclotron in order to study the interactions of small stony meteorites with galactic protons. The homogeneous 4 pi irradiation technique used provides a realistic meteorite model which allows a direct comparison of the measured depth profiles with those in real meteorites. Moreover, by the simultaneous measurement of thin target production cross sections one can differentiate between the contributions of primary and secondary nucleons over the entire volume of the artificial meteorite.

  4. Engineering of silicon/HfO{sub 2} interface by variable energy proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Maurya, Savita Maringanti, Radhakrishna; Tribedi, L. C.

    2014-08-18

    Surfaces and interfaces between materials are of paramount importance for various phenomena, such as painting a house, catalyst driven chemical reactions, intricate life processes, corrosion of materials, and fabrication of various semiconductor devices. Interface of silicon or other such substrates with any of the oxides has profound effect on the performance of metal oxide field effect transistors and other similar devices. Since a surface is an abrupt termination of a periodic crystal, surface atoms will have some unsaturated valence electrons and these unsaturated bonds at the semiconductor surface make it chemically highly reactive. Other than annealing, there is not much that can be done to manage these unsaturated bonds. This study was initiated to explore the possibility of repairing these unsaturated dangling bonds that are formed at the silicon and oxide interface during the deposition of oxide layer above silicon, by the use of proton irradiation. In order to improve the interface characteristics, we present a method to modify the interface of silicon and hafnium dioxide after its fabrication, through proton irradiation. Results of the study are promising and probably this method might be used along with other methods such as annealing to modify the interface, after its fabrication.

  5. Spherically shaped active transducer based on proton-irradiated vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene 70/30 mol % copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, S.T.; Chan, H.L.W.; Choy, C.L.; Cheung, W.Y.; Wong, S.P.

    2006-05-15

    Spherically shaped active transducers using proton-irradiated vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene 70/30 mol % copolymer films as the active elements are described. The copolymer films prepared by hot compression molding were irradiated with a high energy proton over a broad dose range (20-250 Mrad). The electrostrictive and piezoelectric responses of the copolymer have been characterized before subsequent transducer fabrication. The performances of the focused transducers constructed with a 4 mm aperture size and epoxy backing were evaluated under dc bias voltages. The transducers with focal lengths of 17.4-19.0 mm and a center frequency of 19 MHz display a broad bandwidth up to 94%. Besides, the transmitting output of the transducers increases with the dc bias voltage. For the copolymer active element irradiated at a proton dose of 107 Mrad, the transducer shows the highest transmitting voltage response of 1.34 kPa/V.

  6. Characterization of MeV proton acceleration from double pulse irradiation of foil targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, S.; Mo, M. Z.; Masud, R.; Tiedje, H. F.; Tsui, Y.; Fedosejevs, R.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; McLean, H. S.; Hazi, A.; Chen, H.; Ceurvorst, L.; Norreys, P.

    2014-10-01

    We report on the experimental characterization of proton acceleration from double-pulse irradiation of um-scale foil targets. Temporally separated sub-picosecond pulses have been shown to increase the conversion efficiency of laser energy to MeV protons. Here, two 700 fs, 1 ω pulses were separated by 1 to 5 ps; total beam energy was 100 J, with 5-20% of the total energy contained within the first pulse. In contrast to the ultraclean beams used in previous experiments, prepulse energies on the order of 10 mJ were present in the current experiments which appear to have a moderating effect on the enhancement. Proton beam measurements were made with radiochromic film stacks, as well as magnetic spectrometers. The effect on electron generation was measured using Kα emission from buried Cu tracer layers, while specular light diagnostics (FROG, reflection spectralon) indicated the laser coupling efficiency into the target. The results obtained will be presented and compared to PIC simulations. Work by LLNL was performed under the auspices of U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Generation of a quasi-monoergetic proton beam from laser-irradiated sub-micron droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Ramakrishna, B.; Prasad, R.; Borghesi, M.; Nickles, P. V.; Steinke, S.; Schnuerer, M.; Popov, K. I.; Ramunno, L.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2012-07-15

    Proton bursts with a narrow spectrum at an energy of (2.8 {+-} 0.3 MeV) are accelerated from sub-micron water spray droplets irradiated by high-intensity ({approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}), high-contrast ({approx}10{sup 10}), ultra-short (40 fs) laser pulses. The acceleration is preferentially in the laser propagation direction. The explosion dynamics is governed by a residual ps-scale laser pulse pedestal which 'mildly' preheats the droplet and changes its density profile before the arrival of the high intensity laser pulse peak. As a result, the energetic electrons extracted from the modified target by the high-intensity part of the laser pulse establish an anisotropic electrostatic field which results in anisotropic Coulomb explosion and proton acceleration predominantly in the forward direction. Hydrodynamic simulations of the target pre-expansion and 3D particle-in-cell simulations of the measured energy and anisotropy of the proton emission have confirmed the proposed acceleration scenario.

  8. SPICE-NIRS microbeam: a focused vertical system for proton irradiation of a single cell for radiobiological research.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Teruaki; Oikawa, Masakazu; Suya, Noriyoshi; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Maeda, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Alisa; Shiomi, Naoko; Kodama, Kumiko; Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Homma-Takeda, Shino; Isono, Mayu; Hieda, Kotaro; Uchihori, Yukio; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki

    2013-07-01

    The Single Particle Irradiation system to Cell (SPICE) facility at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) is a focused vertical microbeam system designed to irradiate the nuclei of adhesive mammalian cells with a defined number of 3.4 MeV protons. The approximately 2-μm diameter proton beam is focused with a magnetic quadrupole triplet lens and traverses the cells contained in dishes from bottom to top. All procedures for irradiation, such as cell image capturing, cell recognition and position calculation, are automated. The most distinctive characteristic of the system is its stability and high throughput; i.e. 3000 cells in a 5 mm × 5 mm area in a single dish can be routinely irradiated by the 2-μm beam within 15 min (the maximum irradiation speed is 400 cells/min). The number of protons can be set as low as one, at a precision measured by CR-39 detectors to be 99.0%. A variety of targeting modes such as fractional population targeting mode, multi-position targeting mode for nucleus irradiation and cytoplasm targeting mode are available. As an example of multi-position targeting irradiation of mammalian cells, five fluorescent spots in a cell nucleus were demonstrated using the γ-H2AX immune-staining technique. The SPICE performance modes described in this paper are in routine use. SPICE is a joint-use research facility of NIRS and its beam times are distributed for collaborative research. PMID:23287773

  9. SPICE-NIRS Microbeam: a focused vertical system for proton irradiation of a single cell for radiobiological research

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Teruaki; Oikawa, Masakazu; Suya, Noriyoshi; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Maeda, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Alisa; Shiomi, Naoko; Kodama, Kumiko; Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Homma-Takeda, Shino; Isono, Mayu; Hieda, Kotaro; Uchihori, Yukio; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    The Single Particle Irradiation system to Cell (SPICE) facility at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) is a focused vertical microbeam system designed to irradiate the nuclei of adhesive mammalian cells with a defined number of 3.4 MeV protons. The approximately 2-μm diameter proton beam is focused with a magnetic quadrupole triplet lens and traverses the cells contained in dishes from bottom to top. All procedures for irradiation, such as cell image capturing, cell recognition and position calculation, are automated. The most distinctive characteristic of the system is its stability and high throughput; i.e. 3000 cells in a 5 mm × 5 mm area in a single dish can be routinely irradiated by the 2-μm beam within 15 min (the maximum irradiation speed is 400 cells/min). The number of protons can be set as low as one, at a precision measured by CR-39 detectors to be 99.0%. A variety of targeting modes such as fractional population targeting mode, multi-position targeting mode for nucleus irradiation and cytoplasm targeting mode are available. As an example of multi-position targeting irradiation of mammalian cells, five fluorescent spots in a cell nucleus were demonstrated using the γ-H2AX immune-staining technique. The SPICE performance modes described in this paper are in routine use. SPICE is a joint-use research facility of NIRS and its beam times are distributed for collaborative research. PMID:23287773

  10. Electronic properties of deep-level defects in proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, S. S.

    1981-01-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy and capacitance voltage techniques as well as analysis of the forward current voltage (I-V) characteristics and SEM-EIC data were carried out for proton irradiated GaAs solar cells over a wide range of proton energies and proton fluences. Defect and recombination parameters such as defect energy levels and density, carrier capture cross sections and lifetimes as well as diffusion lengths in the undoped n-GaAs LPE layers were determined. Good correlation between these defect parameters and solar cell performance parameters was obtained for GaAs solar cells irradiated by 200 and 290 KeV protons. It was found that 200 to 290 KeV protons will produce the most defects and damages to the GaAs solar cell structure used. The influence of the low temperature (200 to 400 C) periodic thermal annealing on the deep level defects and the performance of the 200 KeV proton irradiated cells is discussed.

  11. Planetary quarantine in the solar system. Survival rates of some terrestrial organisms under simulated space conditions by proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, J.; Oshima, T.

    We have been studying the survival rates of some species of terrestrial unicellular and multicellular organism (viruses, bacteria, yeasts, fungi, algae, etc.) under simulated interstellar conditions, in connection with planetary quarantine. The interstellar environment in the solar system has been simulated by low temperature, high vacuum (77 K, 4 × 10 -8 torr), and proton irradiation from a Van de Graaff generator. After exposure to a barrage of protons corresponding to about 250 years of irradiation in solar space, tobacco mosaic virus, Bacillus subtilis spores, Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus flavus, Aspergillus niger spores, and Clostridium mangenoti spores showed survival rates of 82, 45, 74, 13, 28, and 25%, respectively.

  12. Planetary quarantine in the solar system. Survival rates of some terrestrial organisms under simulated space conditions by proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Koike, J; Oshima, T

    1993-08-01

    We have been studying the survival rates of some species of terrestrial unicellular and multicellular organism (viruses, bacteria, yeasts, fungi, algae, etc.) under simulated interstellar conditions, in connection with planetary quarantine. The interstellar environment in the solar system has been simulated by low temperature, high vacuum (77 K, 4 x 10(-8) torr), and proton irradiation from a Van de Graaff generator. After exposure to a barrage of protons corresponding to about 250 years of irradiation in solar space, tobacco mosaic virus, Bacillus subtilis spores, Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus flavus, Aspergillus niger spores, and Clostridium mangenoti spores showed survival rates of 82, 45, 74, 13, 28, and 25%, respectively. PMID:11541644

  13. Recovery of damage in rad-hard MOS devices during and after irradiation by electrons, protons, alphas, and gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brucker, G. J.; Van Gunten, O.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Shapiro, P.; August, L. S.; Jordan, T. M.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports on the recovery properties of rad-hard MOS devices during and after irradiation by electrons, protons, alphas, and gamma rays. The results indicated that complex recovery properties controlled the damage sensitivities of the tested parts. The results also indicated that damage sensitivities depended on dose rate, total dose, supply bias, gate bias, transistor type, radiation source, and particle energy. The complex nature of these dependencies make interpretation of LSI device performance in space (exposure to entire electron and proton spectra) difficult, if not impossible, without respective ground tests and analyses. Complete recovery of n-channel shifts was observed, in some cases within hours after irradiation, with equilibrium values of threshold voltages greater than their pre-irradiation values. This effect depended on total dose, radiation source, and gate bias during exposure. In contrast, the p-channel shifts recovered only 20 percent within 30 days after irradiation.

  14. Diffusion length variation in 0.5- and 3-MeV-proton-irradiated, heteroepitaxial indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Weinberg, Irving; Flood, Dennis J.

    1993-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cells are more radiation resistant than gallium arsenide (GaAs) and silicon (Si) solar cells, and their growth by heteroepitaxy offers additional advantages leading to the development of light weight, mechanically strong, and cost-effective cells. Changes in heteroepitaxial InP cell efficiency under 0.5- and 3-MeV proton irradiations have been explained by the variation in the minority-carrier diffusion length. The base diffusion length versus proton fluence was calculated by simulating the cell performance. The diffusion length damage coefficient, K(sub L), was also plotted as a function of proton fluence.

  15. MeV single-ion beam irradiation of mammalian cells using the Surrey vertical nanobeam, compared with broad proton beam and X-ray irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakrajang, K.; Jeynes, J. C. G.; Merchant, M. J.; Kirkby, K.; Kirkby, N.; Thopan, P.; Yu, L. D.

    2013-07-01

    As a part of a systematic study on mechanisms involved in physical cancer therapies, this work investigated response of mammalian cells to ultra-low-dose ion beam irradiation. The ion beam irradiation was performed using the recently completed nanobeam facility at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. A scanning focused vertical ion nano-beam was applied to irradiate Chinese hamster V79 cells. The V79 cells were irradiated in two different beam modes, namely, focused single ion beam and defocused scanning broad ion beam of 3.8-MeV protons. The single ion beam was capable of irradiating a single cell with a precisely controlled number of the ions to extremely low doses. After irradiation and cell incubation, the number of surviving colonies as a function of the number of the irradiating ions was measured for the cell survival fraction curve. A lower survival for the single ion beam irradiation than that of the broad beam case implied the hypersensitivity and bystander effect. The ion-beam-induced cell survival curves were compared with that from 300-kV X-ray irradiation. Theoretical studies indicated that the cell death in single ion irradiation mainly occurred in the cell cycle phases of cell division and intervals between the cell division and the DNA replication. The success in the experiment demonstrated the Surrey vertical nanobeam successfully completed.

  16. The comparison of microstructure and nanocluster evolution in proton and neutron irradiated Fe-9%Cr ODS steel to 3 dpa at 500 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, M. J.; Wharry, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    A model Fe-9%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel was irradiated with protons or neutrons to a dose of 3 displacements per atom (dpa) at a temperature of 500 °C, enabling a direct comparison of ion to neutron irradiation effects at otherwise fixed irradiation conditions. The irradiated microstructures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography including cluster analysis. Both proton and neutron irradiations produced a comparable void and dislocation loop microstructure. However, the irradiation response of the Ti-Y-O oxide nanoclusters varied. Oxides remained stable under proton irradiation, but exhibited dissolution and an increase in Y:Ti composition ratio under neutron irradiation. Both proton and neutron irradiation also induced varying extents of Si, Ni, and Mn clustering at existing oxide nanoclusters. Protons are able to reproduce the void and loop microstructure of neutron irradiation carried out to the same dose and temperature. However, since nanocluster evolution is controlled by both diffusion and ballistic impacts, protons are rendered unable to reproduce the nanocluster evolution of neutron irradiation at the same dose and temperature.

  17. Small-Scale Mechanical Testing on Proton Beam-Irradiated 304 SS from Room Temperature to Reactor Operation Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, H.; Reichardt, A.; Howard, C.; Abad, M. D.; Kaoumi, D.; Chou, P.; Hosemann, P.

    2015-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are common structural components in light water reactors. Because reactor components are subjected to harsh conditions such as high operating temperatures and neutron radiation, they can undergo irradiation-induced embrittlement and related failure, which compromises reliable operation. Small-scale mechanical testing has seen widespread use as a testing method for both ion- and reactor-irradiated materials because it allows access to the mechanical properties of the ion beam-irradiated region, and for safe handling of a small amount of activated material. In this study, nanoindentation and microcompression testing were performed on unirradiated and 10 dpa proton-irradiated 304 SS, from 25°C to 300°C. Increases in yield stress (YS), critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) and hardness ( H) were seen in the irradiated region relative to the unirradiated region. Relationships between H, YS, and CRSS of irradiated and unirradiated materials are discussed over this temperature range.

  18. Phase transformation studies in unirradiated and proton beam irradiated Ni-Ti alloy between 25 and 100°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayub, Rana; Afzal, Naveed; Ahmad, R.

    2012-06-01

    The stress-induced phase transformation characteristics of unirradiated and proton beam irradiated NiTi alloy were investigated at different tests temperatures. The wire-shaped NiTi specimens were irradiated by 2 MeV proton beam for 30 min at room temperature to a flux of 1019 protons/m2 s. Engineering stress-strain (S-S) curves of both unirradiated and irradiated specimens were obtained using a materials testing machine at 25, 50, 75 and 100°C. The results indicate a single-stage phase transformation from austenite to martensite (B2-B19‧) in unirraidated specimens at all the test temperatures. In contrast, in the case of the irradiated specimens, a two-stage austenite-rhombohedral-martensite (B2-R-B19‧) phase transformation is observed at 25 and 50°C. The B2-R-B19‧ phase transformation, however, is found to change into B2-B19‧ transformation at 75 and 100°C. The stress required to initiate the B19‧ phase transformation (σMS) and the plateau range are found to be lower in irradiated specimens compared with those of the unirradiated specimens. The results obtained are discussed on the basis of the formation of Ni4Ti3 precipitates in irradiated specimens and their consequences on the phase transformations.

  19. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body proton irradiation on leukocyte populations and lymphoid organs: part I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gridley, Daila S.; Pecaut, Michael J.; Dutta-Roy, Radha; Nelson, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of part I of this study was to evaluate the effects of whole-body proton irradiation on lymphoid organs and specific leukocyte populations. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to the entry region of the proton Bragg curve to total doses of 0.5 gray (Gy), 1.5 Gy, and 3.0 Gy, each delivered at a low dose rate (LDR) of 1 cGy/min and high dose rate (HDR) of 80 cGy/min. Non-irradiated and 3 Gy HDR gamma-irradiated groups were included as controls. At 4 days post-irradiation, highly significant radiation dose-dependent reductions were observed in the mass of both lymphoid organs and the numbers of leukocytes and T (CD3(+)), T helper (CD3(+)/CD4(+)), T cytotoxic (CD3(+)/CD8(+)), and B (CD19(+)) cells in both blood and spleen. A less pronounced dose effect was noted for natural killer (NK1.1(+) NK) cells in spleen. Monocyte, but not granulocyte, counts in blood were highly dose-dependent. The numbers for each population generally tended to be lower with HDR than with LDR radiation; a significant dose rate effect was found in the percentages of T and B cells, monocytes, and granulocytes and in CD4(+):CD8(+) ratios. These data indicate that mononuclear cell response to the entry region of the proton Bragg curve is highly dependent upon the total dose and that dose rate effects are evident with some cell types. Results from gamma- and proton-irradiated groups (both at 3 Gy HDR) were similar, although proton-irradiation gave consistently lower values in some measurements.

  20. Dosimetric Characteristics of a Two-Dimensional Diode Array Detector Irradiated with Passively Scattered Proton Beams

    PubMed Central

    Liengsawangwong, Praimakorn; Sahoo, Nanayan; Ding, Xiaoning; Lii, MingFwu; Gillin, Michale T.; Zhu, Xiaorong Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric characteristics of a two-dimensional (2D) diode array detector irradiated with passively scattered proton beams. Materials and Methods: A diode array detector, MapCHECK (Model 1175, Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL, USA) was characterized in passive-scattered proton beams. The relative sensitivity of the diodes and absolute dose calibration were determined using a 250 MeV beam. The pristine Bragg curves (PBCs) measured by MapCHECK diodes were compared with those of an ion chamber using a range shift method. The water-equivalent thickness (WET) of the diode array detector’s intrinsic buildup also was determined. The inverse square dependence, linearity, and other proton dosimetric quantities measured by MapCHECK were also compared with those of the ion chambers. The change in the absolute dose response of the MapCHECK as a function of accumulated radiation dose was used as an indicator of radiation damage to the diodes. 2D dose distribution with and without the compensator were measured and compared with the treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. Results: The WET of the MapCHECK diode’s buildup was determined to be 1.7 cm. The MapCHECK-measured PBC were virtually identical to those measured by a parallel-plate ion chamber for 160, 180, and 250 MeV proton beams. The inverse square results of the MapCHECK were within ±0.4% of the ion chamber results. The linearity of MapCHECK results was within 1% of those from the ion chamber as measured in the range between 10 and 300 MU. All other dosimetric quantities were within 1.3% of the ion chamber results. The 2D dose distributions for non-clinical fields without compensator and the patient treatment fields with the compensator were consistent with the TPS results. The absolute dose response of the MapCHECK was changed by 7.4% after an accumulated dose increased by 170 Gy. Conclusions: The MapCHECK is a convenient and useful tool for 2D dose distribution measurements using passively

  1. A proton irradiation test facility for space research in Ankara, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencer, Ayşenur; Yiǧitoǧlu, Merve; Bilge Demirköz, Melahat; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation often affects the electronic components' performance during the mission duration. In order to ensure reliable performance, the components must be tested to at least the expected dose that will be received in space, before the mission. Accelerator facilities are widely used for such irradiation tests around the world. Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEA) has a 15MeV to 30MeV variable proton cyclotron in Ankara and the facility's main purpose is to produce radioisotopes in three different rooms for different target systems. There is also an R&D room which can be used for research purposes. This paper will detail the design and current state of the construction of a beamline to perform Single Event Effect (SEE) tests in Ankara for the first time. ESA ESCC No.25100 Standard Single Event Effect Test Method and Guidelines is being considered for these SEE tests. The proton beam kinetic energy must be between 20MeV and 200MeV according to the standard. While the proton energy is suitable for SEE tests, the beam size must be 15.40cm x 21.55cm and the flux must be between 10 ^{5} p/cm ^{2}/s to at least 10 ^{8} p/cm ^{2}/s according to the standard. The beam size at the entrance of the R&D room is mm-sized and the current is variable between 10μA and 1.2mA. Therefore, a defocusing beam line has been designed to enlarge the beam size and reduce the flux value. The beam line has quadrupole magnets to enlarge the beam size and the collimators and scattering foils are used for flux reduction. This facility will provide proton fluxes between 10 ^{7} p/cm ^{2}/s and 10 ^{10} p/cm ^{2}/s for the area defined in the standard when completed. Also for testing solar cells developed for space, the proton beam energy will be lowered below 10MeV. This project has been funded by Ministry of Development in Turkey and the beam line construction will finish in two years and SEE tests will be performed for the first time in Turkey.

  2. Measurement of temperature-dependent defect diffusion in proton-irradiated GaN(Mg, H).

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Samuel Maxwell, Jr.; Fleming, Robert M.

    2005-06-01

    Deuterated p-type GaN(Mg,{sup 2}H) films were irradiated at room temperature with 1 MeV protons to create native point defects with a concentration approximately equal to the Mg doping (5 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}). The samples were then annealed isothermally at a succession of temperatures while monitoring the infrared absorption due to the H local mode of the MgH defect. As the samples were annealed, the MgH absorption signal decreased and a new mode at slightly higher frequency appeared, which has been associated with the approach of a mobile nitrogen interstitial. We used the time dependence of the MgH absorption to obtain a diffusion barrier of the nitrogen interstitial in p-type GaN of 1.99 eV. This is in good agreement with theoretical calculations of nitrogen interstitial motion in GaN.

  3. Interaction of defects and H in proton-irradiated GaN(Mg, H)

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S.M.; Seager, C.H.

    2005-05-01

    Magnesium-doped, p-type GaN containing H was irradiated with MeV protons at room temperature and then annealed at a succession of increasing temperatures, with the behavior of defects and H in the material being followed through infrared absorption spectroscopy, nuclear-reaction analysis of the H, and photoluminescence. The results support the annihilation of Ga Frenkel pairs near room temperature, leaving the N interstitial and N vacancy to influence the elevated-temperature behavior. Multiple changes are observed with increasing temperature, ending with thermal release of the H above 700 deg. C. These effects are interpreted in terms of a succession of complexes involving Mg, the point defects, and H.

  4. Pyrolysis of complex organics following high-energy proton irradiation of a simple inorganic gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Yoshinori; Marumo, Katsumi; Yabashi, Suguru; Kaneko, Takeo; Kobayashi, Kensei

    2004-08-01

    Complex organics formed by 3MeV proton irradiation of a simple inorganic gas mixture with a composition representative of the primitive earth atmosphere (carbon monoxide, nitrogen, and water) were characterized by application of Curie-point pyrolysis. Pyrolysis products consisted of a wide variety of organic compounds including amide compounds, heterocyclic, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The present data showed that primary and primitive organic matter serving as "precursors" to fundamental building blocks associated with life might have been formed in a gaseous mixture of a similar composition to that of the primitive earth atmosphere. Large numbers of endogenous organic compounds and protocatalysis components produced by cosmic rays may have contributed significantly to the early stages of chemical evolution on the primitive earth.

  5. Measurement of temperature-dependent defect diffusion in proton-irradiated GaN(Mg, H)

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, R. M.; Myers, S. M.

    2006-08-15

    Deuterated p-type GaN(Mg,{sup 2}H) films were irradiated at room temperature with 1 MeV protons to create native point defects with a concentration approximately equal to the Mg doping (5x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}). The samples were then annealed isothermally at a succession of temperatures while monitoring the infrared absorption due to the H local mode of the MgH defect. As the samples were annealed, the MgH absorption signal decreased and a new mode at slightly higher frequency appeared, which has been associated with the approach of a mobile nitrogen interstitial. We used the time dependence of the MgH absorption to obtain a diffusion barrier of the nitrogen interstitial in p-type GaN of 1.99 eV. This is in good agreement with theoretical calculations of nitrogen interstitial motion in GaN.

  6. Real-Time Time-Dependent DFT Study of Electronic Stopping in Semiconductors under Proton Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, Dillon C.; Reeves, Kyle G.; Kanai, Yosuke

    Understanding the detailed mechanisms of how highly energetic charged particles transfer their kinetic energy to electronic excitations in materials has become an important topic in various technologies ranging from nuclear energy applications to integrated circuits for space missions. In this work, we use our new large-scale real-time time-dependent density functional theory simulation to investigate details of the ion-velocity-dependent dynamics of electronic excitations in the electronic stopping process. In particular, we will discuss how point defects in semiconductor materials influence the electronic stopping process under proton irradiation, using silicon carbide (3C-SiC) as a representative material due to its great technological importance. Additionally, we will provide atomistic insights into existing analytical models that are based on the plane-wave Born approximation by examining velocity-dependence of the projectile charge from first-principles simulations.

  7. In-growth of an electrically active defect in high-purity silicon after proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nylandsted Larsen, A.; Juul Pedersen, H.; Christian Petersen, M.; Privitera, V.; Gurimskaya, Y.; Mesli, A.

    2013-12-14

    Defect-related energy levels in the lower half of the band gap of silicon have been studied with transient-capacitance techniques in high-purity, carbon and oxygen lean, plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition grown, n-and p-type silicon layers after 2-MeV proton irradiations at temperatures at or just below room temperature. The in-growth of a distinct line in deep-level transient spectroscopy spectra, corresponding to a level in the band gap at E{sub V} + 0.357 eV where E{sub V} is the energy of the valence band edge, takes place for anneal temperatures at around room temperature with an activation energy of 0.95 ± 0.08 eV. The line disappears at an anneal temperature of around 450 K. The corresponding defect is demonstrated not to contain boron, carbon, oxygen, or phosphorus. Possible defect candidates are discussed.

  8. Hot cell purification of strontium-82, 85 and other isotopes from proton irradiated molybdenum

    DOEpatents

    Bentley, Glenn E.; Barnes, John W.

    1981-01-01

    A process suitable for producing curie quantities of quite pure Sr-82,85 is given. After a Mo target is irradiated with energetic protons having energies greater than about 200 MeV, thus producing a large number of radioactive species, the particular species of Sr-82,85 are substantially separated from the other products by a 6-step process. The process comprises dissolution of the target in H.sub.2 O.sub.2, followed by use of several ion exchange resins, extraction with an organophosphorus compound, and several adjustments of pH values. Other embodiments include processes for producing relatively pure long-lived Rb isotopes, Y-88, and Zr-88.

  9. Hot cell purification of strontium-82, 85 and other isotopes from proton irradiated molybdenum

    DOEpatents

    Bentley, G.E.; Barnes, J.W.

    1979-10-17

    A process suitable for producing curie quantities of quite pure Sr-82,85 is given. After a Mo target is irradiated with energetic protons having energies greater than about 200 MeV, thus producing a large number of radioactive species, the particular species of Sr-82,85 are substantially separated from the other products by a 6-step process. The process comprises dissolution of the target in H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, followed by use of several ion exchange resins, extraction with an organophosphorus compound, and several adjustments of pH values. Other embodiments include processes for producing relatively pure long-lived Rb isotopes, Y-88, and Zr-88.

  10. Meteorite-catalyzed syntheses of nucleosides and of other prebiotic compounds from formamide under proton irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Saladino, Raffaele; Carota, Eleonora; Botta, Giorgia; Kapralov, Mikhail; Timoshenko, Gennady N.; Rozanov, Alexei Y.; Krasavin, Eugene; Di Mauro, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Liquid formamide has been irradiated by high-energy proton beams in the presence of powdered meteorites, and the products of the catalyzed resulting syntheses were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Relative to the controls (no radiation, or no formamide, or no catalyst), an extremely rich, variegate, and prebiotically relevant panel of compounds was observed. The meteorites tested were representative of the four major classes: iron, stony iron, chondrites, and achondrites. The products obtained were amino acids, carboxylic acids, nucleobases, sugars, and, most notably, four nucleosides: cytidine, uridine, adenosine, and thymidine. In accordance with theoretical studies, the detection of HCN oligomers suggests the occurrence of mechanisms based on the generation of radical cyanide species (CN·) for the synthesis of nucleobases. Given that many of the compounds obtained are key components of extant organisms, these observations contribute to outline plausible exogenous high-energy–based prebiotic scenarios and their possible boundary conditions, as discussed. PMID:25870268

  11. Mouse retinal adaptive response to proton irradiation: Correlation with DNA repair and photoreceptor cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronov, V. A.; Vinogradova, Yu. V.; Poplinskaya, V. A.; Nekrasova, E. I.; Ostrovsky, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging body of data indicate protecting effect of low level of stress (preconditioning) on retina. Our previous study revealed non-linear dose-response relationship for cytotoxicity of both ionizing radiation and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) on mouse retina. Moreover, non cytotoxic dose of MNU increased tolerance of retina to following challenge dose of MNU. This result displays protection of retina through mechanism of recovery. In present study we used the mouse model for MNU-induced retinal degeneration to evaluate adaptive response of retina to proton irradiation and implication in it of glial Muller cells. The data showed that the recovery of retina after genotoxic agents has been associated with increased efficacy of DNA damage repair and lowered death of retinal photoreceptor cells.

  12. Meteorite-catalyzed syntheses of nucleosides and of other prebiotic compounds from formamide under proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Saladino, Raffaele; Carota, Eleonora; Botta, Giorgia; Kapralov, Mikhail; Timoshenko, Gennady N; Rozanov, Alexei Y; Krasavin, Eugene; Di Mauro, Ernesto

    2015-05-26

    Liquid formamide has been irradiated by high-energy proton beams in the presence of powdered meteorites, and the products of the catalyzed resulting syntheses were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Relative to the controls (no radiation, or no formamide, or no catalyst), an extremely rich, variegate, and prebiotically relevant panel of compounds was observed. The meteorites tested were representative of the four major classes: iron, stony iron, chondrites, and achondrites. The products obtained were amino acids, carboxylic acids, nucleobases, sugars, and, most notably, four nucleosides: cytidine, uridine, adenosine, and thymidine. In accordance with theoretical studies, the detection of HCN oligomers suggests the occurrence of mechanisms based on the generation of radical cyanide species (CN·) for the synthesis of nucleobases. Given that many of the compounds obtained are key components of extant organisms, these observations contribute to outline plausible exogenous high-energy-based prebiotic scenarios and their possible boundary conditions, as discussed. PMID:25870268

  13. Ion beam induced luminescence analysis of defect evolution in lithium fluoride under proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaranta, A.; Valotto, G.; Piccinini, M.; Montereali, R. M.

    2015-11-01

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) spectra of pure LiF under irradiation by a 2 MeV proton beam were analyzed as a function of the dose in order to deepen the kinetic mechanisms underlying the formation of luminescent point defects. The intensity evolution with dose at several emission wavelengths has been studied within a wide spectral interval, from ultraviolet (UV) to near infrared (NIR), and their different change rates have been correlated to the electronic defect formation processes. The intensity at few selected wavelengths was analyzed with a multiple linear regression (MLR) method in order to demonstrate that a linear calibration curve can be obtained and that an on-line optical dose monitor for ion beams can be realized.

  14. Biological cell irradiation at ultrahigh dose rate employing laser driven protons

    SciTech Connect

    Doria, D.; Kakolee, K. F.; Kar, S.; and others

    2012-07-09

    The ultrashort duration of laser-driven multi-MeV ion bursts offers the possibility of radiobiological studies at extremely high dose rates. Employing the TARANIS Terawatt laser at Queen's University, the effect of proton irradiation at MeV-range energies on live cells has been investigated at dose rates exceeding 10{sup 9}Gy/s as a single exposure. A clonogenic assay showed consistent lethal effects on V-79 live cells, which, even at these dose rates, appear to be in line with previously published results employing conventional sources. A Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) of 1.4{+-}0.2 at 10% survival is estimated from a comparison with a 225 kVp X-ray source.

  15. Measurement of Spin Coherence Times in Proton Irradiated 4H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embley, Jacob; Colton, John; Carter, Sam; Miller, Kyle; Morris, Margaret

    Silicon vacancy defects in silicon carbide (SiC) have potential for use in spintronic devices. We used optically detected magnetic resonance and a spin echo technique to measure T2 spin coherence times for electrons in 4H-SiC. These experiments were performed at a magnetic field strength of 0.371 T and a resonant microwave frequency of 10.5 GHz. Each sample contained silicon vacancy defects that were formed through irradiation with 2 MeV protons at unique fluences (1013 and 1014 cm-2) . Measurements for each sample were made across a range of temperatures, from 8 K to room temperature. While we generally observed a decrease in spin coherence time with temperature, we also observed a range of temperatures (from 60 K to 160 K) for which the overall trend was reversed.

  16. Use of the point defect model to interpret the iron oxidation kinetics under proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lapuerta, S.; Moncoffre, N.; Jaffrezic, H.; Millard-Pinard, N.; Bererd, N.; Esnouf, C.; Crusset, D.

    2007-03-15

    This article concerns the study of iron corrosion in wet air under mega-electron-volt proton irradiation for different fluxes at room temperature and with a relative humidity fixed to 45%. Oxidized iron sample surfaces are characterized by ion beam analysis (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and elastic recoil detection analysis), for the elemental analysis. The structural and physicochemical characterization is performed using the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. We have also measured the iron oxidation kinetics. Radiation enhanced diffusion and transport processes have been evidenced. The modeling of the experimental data shows that the apparent oxygen diffusion coefficient increases whereas the oxygen transport velocity decreases as function of flux. Finally, the point defect model has been used to determine the electric field value in the samples. Results have shown that the transport process can be attributed to the presence of an electrical potential gradient.

  17. Correlation of proton irradiation induced threshold voltage shifts to deep level traps in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Cardwell, D.; Sasikumar, A.; Kyle, E. C. H.; Chen, J.; Zhang, E. X.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Schrimpf, R. D.; Speck, J. S.; Arehart, A. R.; Ringel, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    The impact of proton irradiation on the threshold voltage (VT) of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures is systematically investigated to enhance the understanding of a primary component of the degradation of irradiated high electron mobility transistors. The value of VT was found to increase monotonically as a function of 1.8 MeV proton fluence in a sub-linear manner reaching 0.63 V at a fluence of 1 × 1014 cm-2. Silvaco Atlas simulations of VT shifts caused by GaN buffer traps using experimentally measured introduction rates, and energy levels closely match the experimental results. Different buffer designs lead to different VT dependences on proton irradiation, confirming that deep, acceptor-like defects in the GaN buffer are primarily responsible for the observed VT shifts. The proton irradiation induced VT shifts are found to depend on the barrier thickness in a linear fashion; thus, scaling the barrier thickness could be an effective way to reduce such degradation.

  18. Changes in luminescence emission induced by proton irradiation: InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells and quantum dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, R.; Swift, G. M.; Magness, B.; Taylor, W. A.; Tang, Y. S.; Wang, K. L.; Dowd, P.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2000-01-01

    The photoluminescence emission from InGaAs/GaAs quantum-well and quantum-dot (QD) structures are compared after controlled irradiation with 1.5 MeV proton fluxes. Results presented here show a significant enhancement in radiation tolerance with three-dimensional quantum confinement.

  19. Effects of a low-energy proton irradiation on n +/p-AlInGaP solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. S.; Yamaguchi, M.; Ekins-Daukes, N. J.; Khan, A.; Takamoto, T.; Imaizumi, M.; Ohshima, T.; Itoh, H.

    2006-04-01

    For the first time, by deep-level transient spectroscopy, 30 keV proton irradiation-induced defects in n +/p-AlInGaP solar cells have been observed. After the 30 keV proton irradiation, new deep-level defects such as two majority-carrier (hole) traps HP1 ( E+0.98 eV, N=3.8×10 cm) and HP2, and two minority-carrier (electron) traps EP1 ( E-0.71 eV, N=2.0×10 cm) and EP2 have been observed in p-AlInGaP. The introduction rate of majority-carrier trap center (HP1) is 380 cm -1, which is lower than that (1500 cm -1) in 100 keV proton-irradiated p-InGaP. From the minority-carrier injection annealing for HP1 defect and carrier concentration in 30 keV proton-irradiated p-AlInGaP, HP1 defect is likely to act as a recombination center as well as a compensator center.

  20. Hydrogen release from 800 MeV proton-irradiated tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, B. M.; Venhaus, T. J.; Causey, R. A.; Garner, F. A.; Maloy, S. A.

    2002-12-01

    Tungsten irradiated in spallation neutron sources, such as those proposed for the accelerator production of tritium (APT) project, will contain large quantities of generated helium and hydrogen gas. Tungsten used in proposed fusion reactors will also be exposed to neutrons, and the generated protium will be accompanied by deuterium and tritium diffusing in from the plasma-facing surface. The release kinetics of these gases during various off-normal scenarios involving loss of coolant and after heat-induced rises in temperature are of particular interest for both applications. To determine the release kinetics of hydrogen from tungsten, tungsten rods irradiated with 800 MeV protons in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to high exposures as part of the APT project have been examined. Hydrogen evolution from the tungsten has been measured using a dedicated mass-spectrometer system by subjecting the specimens to an essentially linear temperature ramp from ˜300 to ˜1500 K. Release profiles are compared with predictions obtained using the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP4). The measurements show that for high proton doses, the majority of the hydrogen is released gradually, starting at about 900 K and reaching a maximum at about 1400 K, where it drops fairly rapidly. Comparisons with TMAP show quite reasonable agreement using a trap energy of 1.4 eV and a trap density of ˜7%. There is a small additional release fraction occurring at ˜550 K, which is believed to be associated with low-energy trapping at or near the surface, and, therefore, was not included in the bulk TMAP model.

  1. A Comparison of Model Calculation and Measurement of Absorbed Dose for Proton Irradiation. Chapter 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapp, N.; Semones, E.; Saganti, P.; Cucinotta, F.

    2003-01-01

    With the increase in the amount of time spent EVA that is necessary to complete the construction and subsequent maintenance of ISS, it will become increasingly important for ground support personnel to accurately characterize the radiation exposures incurred by EVA crewmembers. Since exposure measurements cannot be taken within the organs of interest, it is necessary to estimate these exposures by calculation. To validate the methods and tools used to develop these estimates, it is necessary to model experiments performed in a controlled environment. This work is such an effort. A human phantom was outfitted with detector equipment and then placed in American EMU and Orlan-M EVA space suits. The suited phantom was irradiated at the LLUPTF with proton beams of known energies. Absorbed dose measurements were made by the spaceflight operational dosimetrist from JSC at multiple sites in the skin, eye, brain, stomach, and small intestine locations in the phantom. These exposures are then modeled using the BRYNTRN radiation transport code developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, and the CAM (computerized anatomical male) human geometry model of Billings and Yucker. Comparisons of absorbed dose calculations with measurements show excellent agreement. This suggests that there is reason to be confident in the ability of both the transport code and the human body model to estimate proton exposure in ground-based laboratory experiments.

  2. The effects of proton radiation on the prothrombin and partial thromboplastin times of irradiated ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether proton radiation affects coagulation. Material and methods Ferrets were exposed to solar particle event-like proton radiation at doses of 0, 25, 100, or 200 centigray (cGy), and dose rates of 50 cGy/minute (high dose rate or HDR) or 50 cGy/hour (low dose rate or LDR). Plasma was isolated from blood collected prior to radiation exposure and at 3–7 h post-radiation. Prothrombin time (PT) assays and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) assays were performed as were mixing studies to determine the coagulation factors involved. Results HDR and LDR exposure led to statistically significant increases in PT values. It was determined that the HDR-induced increase in PT was due to Factor VII, while Factors II, V, and VII contributed to the LDR-induced increase in PT values. Only acute LDR exposure caused an increase in aPTT values, which remained elevated for 48 h post-irradiation (which was the latest time assayed in these studies). Mixing studies revealed that Factor IX contributed to the increased aPTT values. A majority of the animals exposed at the LDR had an International Normalized Ratio approaching or surpassing 2.0. Conclusions PT/aPTT assays resulted in increased clotting times due to different coagulation factors, indicating potential radiation-induced coagulopathy. PMID:22221163

  3. The formation of shallow-donor distribution profiles in proton irradiation of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grekhov, I. V.; Kostina, L. S.; Lomasov, V. N.; Yusupova, Sh. A.; Belyakova, E. I.

    2014-12-01

    A study of the formation of shallow hydrogen-containing donors (hydrogen-related shallow thermal donors, STD(H)) in silicon under proton irradiation followed by annealing in a temperature range of 300-500°C is reported. The effect of postimplantation annealing regimes on the concentration distribution of shallow donors at various proton energies and fluences is examined. It is shown that the shape of the concentration profiles strongly varies with temperature and annealing duration when a fixed concentration of radiation defects is introduced and equally with energy and dose at a given annealing temperature. It is also shown that the process in which hydrogen-containing shallow donors are formed is accompanied by the appearance in n-type silicon of H-induced buried n'-layers, the formation of which near the pn junction in the high-resistivity n-base of diode structures allows the breakdown voltage of high-voltage pn junctions to be controlled. In the general case, this makes it possible to improve the characteristics of power silicon devices of various purposes.

  4. SU-D-304-02: Magnetically Focused Proton Irradiation of Small Field Targets

    SciTech Connect

    McAuley, GA; Slater, JM; Slater, JD; Wroe, AJ

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of magnetic focusing for small field proton irradiations. It is hypothesized that magnetic focusing will provide significant dose distribution benefits over standard collimated beams for fields less than 10 mm diameter. Methods: Magnets consisting of 24 segments of radiation hard samarium-cobalt adhered into hollow cylinders were designed and manufactured. Two focusing magnets were placed on a positioning track on our Gantry 1 treatment table. Proton beams with energies of 127 and 157 MeV, 15 and 30 mm modulation, and 8 mm initial diameters were delivered to a water tank using single-stage scattering. Depth dose distributions were measured using a PTW PR60020 diode detector and transverse profiles were measured with Gafchromic EBT3 film. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed - both for comparison with experimental data and to further explore the potential of magnetic focusing in silica. For example, beam spot areas (based on the 90% dose contour) were matched at Bragg depth between simulated 100 MeV collimated beams and simulated beams focused by two 400 T/m gradient magnets. Results: Preliminary experimental results show 23% higher peak to entrance dose ratios and flatter spread out Bragg peak plateaus for 8 mm focused beams compared with uncollimated beams. Monte Carlo simulations showed 21% larger peak to entrance ratios and a ∼9 fold more efficient dose to target delivery compared to spot-sized matched collimated beams. Our latest results will be presented. Conclusion: Our results suggest that rare earth focusing magnet assemblies could reduce skin dose and beam number while delivering dose to nominally spherical radiosurgery targets over a much shorter time compared to unfocused beams. Immediate clinical applications include those associated with proton radiosurgery and functional radiosurgery of the brain and spine, however expanded treatment sites can be also envisaged.

  5. Near monochromatic 20 Me V proton acceleration using fs laser irradiating Au foils in target normal sheath acceleration regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Ceccio, G.; Cannavò, A.; Batani, D.; Boutoux, G.; Jakubowska, K.; Ducret, J. E.

    2016-04-01

    A 200 mJ laser pulse energy, 39 fs-pulse duration, 10 μm focal spot, p-polarized radiation has been employed to irradiate thin Au foils to produce proton acceleration in the forward direction. Gold foils were employed to produce high density relativistic electrons emission in the forward direction to generate a high electric field driving the ion acceleration. Measurements were performed by changing the focal position in respect of the target surface. Proton acceleration was monitored using fast SiC detectors in time-of-flight configuration. A high proton energy, up to about 20 Me V, with a narrow energy distribution, was obtained in particular conditions depending on the laser parameters, the irradiation conditions, and a target optimization.

  6. Space microbiology--lethality, mutagenicity and cytological effects of terrestrial microorganisms by irradiation of cosmic proton under simulated space condition.

    PubMed

    Koike, J; Taguchi, H

    1993-04-01

    We have been discussing in connection with a space quarantine. The subject is not merely an academic problem, but it contains a fundamental problem which avoid the contamination of other planets by terrestrial microflora. The space environments in the solar system were simulated by using an apparatus of cryostat (low temperature of 110-310K, high vacuum of 1 x 10(-8) torr) and proton irradiation from the Van de Graaff generator. After exposure to a barrage of protons corresponding to about 250 years in solar space, Tobacco mosaic virus, Bacillus subtilis spore, Staphylococcus aureus. Micrococcusflavus, Clostridium mangenoti spore and Aspergillus niger spore showed considerably high survival rates. Furthermore, it was found firstly that an irradiation of proton induced considerable mutation frequency compared to that of spontaneous and caused also the cytological effects based on a damage of chromosome. PMID:7967372

  7. The high temperature three point bend testing of proton irradiated 316L stainless steel and Mod 9Cr 1Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Zubelewicz, A.; Romero, T.; James, M. R.; Sommer, W. F.; Dai, Y.

    2005-08-01

    The predicted operating conditions for a lead-bismuth eutectic target to be used in an accelerator driven system for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative span a temperature range of 300-600 °C while being irradiated by a high energy (˜600 MeV) proton beam. Such spallation conditions lead to high displacement rates coupled with high accumulation rates of helium and hydrogen up to 150 appm/dpa. Some candidate materials for these applications include Mod9Cr-1Mo and 316L stainless steel. To investigate the effect of irradiation on these materials, the mechanical properties are being measured through three point bend testing on Mod 9Cr-1Mo and 316L at 25, 250, 350 and 500 °C after irradiation in a high energy proton beam (500-800 MeV) to a dose of 9.8 dpa at temperatures from 200 to 320 °C. By comparing measurements made in bending to tensile measurements measured on identically irradiated materials, a measurement of 0.2% offset yield stress was obtained from 0.05% offset yield stress measured in three point bend testing. Yield stress increased by more than a factor of two after irradiation to 9.8 dpa. Observation of the outer fiber surface of 316L showed very localized deformation when tested after irradiation at 70 °C and deformation on multiple slip systems when tested after irradiation at 250-320 °C.

  8. Results of 1 MeV proton irradiation of front and back surfaces of silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Kachare, R.; Weizer, V. G.

    1987-01-01

    Several silicon solar cells with and without back surface fields (BSF), having thicknesses of 200 microns and 63 microns were irradiated with 1 MeV protons having fluences between 1 times 10 to the 10th power and 1 times 10 to the 12th power p/square cm. The irradiation was performed using both normal and isotropic incidence on the front as well as back surfaces of the solar cells. The results of the back surface irradiations are analyzed using a model in which irradiation induced defects across the high-low (BSF) junction are considered. It is concluded that degradation of the high-low junction is responsible for the severe performance loss in thinner cells when irradiated from the rear.

  9. Axillary irradiation omitting axillary dissection in breast cancer: is there a role for shoulder-sparing proton therapy?

    PubMed

    Farace, P; Deidda, M A; Amichetti, M

    2015-10-01

    The recent EORTC 10981-22023 AMAROS trial showed that axillary radiotherapy and axillary lymph node dissection provide comparable local control and reduced lymphoedema in the irradiated group. However, no significant differences between the two groups in range of motion and quality of life were reported. It has been acknowledged that axillary irradiation could have induced some toxicity, particularly shoulder function impairment. In fact, conventional breast irradiation by tangential beams has to be modified to achieve full-dose coverage of the axillary nodes, including in the treatment field a larger portion of the shoulder structures. In this scenario, alternative irradiation techniques were discussed. Compared with modern photon techniques, axillary irradiation by proton therapy has the potential for sparing the shoulder without detrimental increase of the medium-to-low doses to the other normal tissues. PMID:26153903

  10. Study of crosslinking onset and hydrogen annealing of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene irradiated with high-energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John Ford

    1997-09-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) is used extensively in hip and knee endoprostheses. Radiation damage from the sterilization of these endoprostheses prior to surgical insertion results in polymer crosslinking and decreased oxidative stability. The motivation for this study was to determine if UHMW-PE could be crosslinked by low dose proton irradiation with minimal radiation damage and its subsequent deleterious effects. I found that low dose proton irradiation and post irradiation hydrogen annealing did crosslink UHMW-PE and limit post irradiation oxidation. Crosslinking onset was investigated for UHMW-PE irradiated with 2.6 and 30 MeV H+ ions at low doses from 5.7 × 1011-2.3 × 1014 ions/cm2. Crosslinking was determined from gel permeation chromatography (GPC) of 1,2,4 trichlorobenzene sol fractions and increased with dose. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed irradiation resulted in increased free radicals confirmed from increased carbonyl groups. Radiation damage, especially at the highest doses observed, also showed up in carbon double bonds and increased methyl end groups. Hydrogen annealing after ion irradiation resulted in 40- 50% decrease in FTIR absorption associated with carbonyl. The hydrogen annealing prevented further oxidation after aging for 1024 hours at 80oC. Hydrogen annealing was successful in healing radiation damage through reacting with the free radicals generated during proton irradiation. Polyethylenes, polyesters, and polyamides are used in diverse applications by the medical profession in the treatment of orthopedic impairments and cardiovascular disease and for neural implants. These artificial implants are sterilized with gamma irradiation prior to surgery and the resulting radiation damage can lead to accelerated deterioration of the implant properties. The findings in this study will greatly impact the continued use of these materials through the elimination of many problems associated with radiation