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Sample records for heavy dense materials

  1. Dense, finely, grained composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Holt, Joseph B.; Kingman, Donald D.; Munir, Zuhair A.

    1990-01-01

    Dense, finely grained composite materials comprising one or more ceramic phase or phase and one or more metallic and/or intermetallic phase or phases are produced by combustion synthesis. Spherical ceramic grains are homogeneously dispersed within the matrix. Methods are provided, which include the step of applying mechanical pressure during or immediately after ignition, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected.

  2. A High-Energy, Ultrashort-Pulse X-Ray System for the Dynamic Study of Heavy, Dense Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D J

    2004-09-17

    Thomson-scattering based x-ray radiation sources, in which a laser beam is scattered off a relativistic electron beam resulting in a high-energy x-ray beam, are currently being developed by several groups around the world to enable studies of dynamic material properties which require temporal resolution on the order of tens of femtoseconds to tens of picoseconds. These sources offer pulses that are shorter than available from synchrotrons, more tunable than available from so-called Ka sources, and more penetrating and more directly probing than ultrafast lasers. Furthermore, Thomson-scattering sources can scale directly up to x-ray energies in the few MeV range, providing peak brightnesses far exceeding any other sources in this regime. This dissertation presents the development effort of one such source at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Picosecond Laser-Electron InterAction for the Dynamic Evaluation of Structures (PLEIADES) project, designed to target energies from 30 keV to 200 keV, with a peak brightness on the order of 10{sup 18} photons {center_dot} s{sup -1} {center_dot} mm{sup -2} {center_dot} mrad{sup -2} {center_dot} 0.01% bandwidth{sup -1}. A 10 TW Ti:Sapphire based laser system provides the photons for the interaction, and a 100 MeV accelerator with a 1.6 cell S-Band photoinjector at the front end provides the electron beam. The details of both these systems are presented, as is the initial x-ray production and characterization, validating the theory of Thomson scattering. In addition to the systems used to enable PLEIADES, two alternative systems are discussed. An 8.5 GHz X-Band photoinjector, capable of sustaining higher accelerating gradients and producing lower emittance electron beams in a smaller space than the S-Band gun, is presented, and the initial operation and commissioning of this gun is presented. Also, a hybrid chirped-pulse amplification system is presented as an alternative to the standard regenerative amplifier technology

  3. Energy levels of a heavy ion moving in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Hongwei; Chen, Wencong; Zhao, Yongtao; Li, Fuli; Dong, Chenzhong

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, the potential of a slowly moving test particle moving in collisional dense plasmas is studied. It is composed of the Debye-shielding potential, wake potential, and collision term. The Ritz variational-perturbational method is developed for calculating relativistic binding energy levels of a heavy ion moving in dense plasmas. Binding energy levels of a heavy ion moving in plasmas are calculated. The results show that both non-relativistic energy levels and relativistic energy levels become more negative as the temperature becomes high. They also become more negative as the number density decreasing. Relativistic correction is important for calculating binding energy levels. Both relativistic energy levels and non-relativistic energy levels vary minutely as the speed of heavy ion varies.

  4. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ray Johnson

    2000-01-31

    The objectives are to Provide Key Enabling Materials Technologies to Increase Energy Efficiency and Reduce Exhaust Emissions. The following goals are listed: Goal 1: By 3rd quarter 2002, complete development of materials enabling the maintenance or improvement of fuel efficiency {ge} 45% of class 7-8 truck engines while meeting the EPA/Justice Department ''Consent Decree'' for emissions reduction. Goal 2: By 4th quarter 2004, complete development of enabling materials for light-duty (class 1-2) diesel truck engines with efficiency over 40%, over a wide range of loads and speeds, while meeting EPA Tier 2 emission regulations. Goal 3: By 4th quarter 2006, complete development of materials solutions to enable heavy-duty diesel engine efficiency of 50% while meeting the emission reduction goals identified in the EPA proposed rule for heavy-duty highway engines.''

  5. Times Scales in Dense Granular Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Duan

    2005-07-01

    Forces in dense granular material are transmitted through particle contacts. The evolution of the contact stress is directly related to dynamical interaction forces between particles. Since particle contacts in a dense granular material are random, a statistical method is employed to describe and model their motions. It is found that the time scales of particle contacts determinate stress relaxation and the fluid- like or solid-like behavior of the material. Numerical simulations are performed to calculate statistical properties of particle interactions. Using results from the numerical simulations we examine the relationship between the averaged local deformation field and the macroscopic deformation field. We also examine the relationship between the averaged local interaction force and the averaged stress field in the material. Validities of the Voigt and the Reuss assumptions are examined; and extensions to these assumptions are studied. Numerical simulations show that tangential frictions between particles significantly increase the contact stress, while the direct contribution of the tangential force to the stress is small. This puzzling observation can be explained by dependency of the relaxation time on the tangential friction.

  6. Superconductivity in dense carbon-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Siyu; Liu, Hanyu; Naumov, Ivan I.; Meng, Sheng; Li, Yinwei; Tse, John S.; Yang, Bai; Hemley, Russell J.

    2016-03-01

    Guided by a simple strategy in search of new superconducting materials, we predict that high-temperature superconductivity can be realized in classes of high-density materials having strong sp3 chemical bonding and high lattice symmetry. We examine in detail sodalite carbon frameworks doped with simple metals such as Li, Na, and Al. Though such materials share some common features with doped diamond, their doping level is not limited, and the density of states at the Fermi level in them can be as high as that in the renowned Mg B2 . Together with other factors, this boosts the superconducting temperature (Tc) in the materials investigated to higher levels compared to doped diamond. For example, the Tc of sodalitelike Na C6 is predicted to be above 100 K. This phase and a series of other sodalite-based superconductors are predicted to be metastable phases but are dynamically stable. Owing to the rigid carbon framework of these and related dense carbon materials, these doped sodalite-based structures could be recoverable as potentially useful superconductors.

  7. Heavy-electron materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, Z.; Ott, H.R.; Smith, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    De Haas-van Alphen results demonstrated the existence of a Fermi surface at sufficiently low temperature and show that the entire Fermi surface involves heavy electrons. The phase transitions in their heavy-electron state are discussed. These are either magnetic or superconducting. 38 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs. (WRF)

  8. Estimation of vulnerable zones due to accidental release of toxic materials resulting in dense gas clouds.

    PubMed

    Singh, M P; Mohan, M; Panwar, T S; Chopra, H V

    1991-09-01

    Heavy gas dispersion models have been developed at IIT (hereinafter referred as IIT heavy gas models I and II) with a view to estimate vulnerable zones due to accidental (both instantaneous and continuous, respectively) release of dense toxic material in the atmosphere. The results obtained from IIT heavy gas models have been compared with those obtained from the DEGADIS model [Dense Gas Dispersion Model, developed by Havens and Spicer (1985) for the U.S. Coast Guard] as well as with the observed data collected during the Burro Series, Maplin Sands, and Thorney Island field trials. Both of these models include relevant features of dense gas dispersion, viz., gravity slumping, air entrainment, cloud heating, and transition to the passive phase, etc. The DEGADIS model has been considered for comparing the performance of IIT heavy gas models in this study because it incorporates most of the physical processes of dense gas dispersion in an elaborate manner, and has also been satisfactorily tested against field observations. The predictions from IIT heavy gas models indicate a fairly similar trend to the observed values from Thorney Island, Burro Series, and Maplin experiments with a tendency toward overprediction. There is a good agreement between the prediction of IIT Heavy Gas models I and II with those from DEGADIS, except for the simulations of IIT heavy gas model-I pertaining to very large release quantities under highly stable atmospheric conditions. In summary, the performance of IIT heavy gas models have been found to be reasonably good both with respect to the limited field data available and various simulations (selected on the basis of relevant storages in the industries and prevalent meteorological conditions performed with DEGADIS). However, there is a scope of improvement in the IIT heavy gas models (viz., better formulation for entrainment, modification of coefficients, transition criteria, etc.). Further, isotons (nomograms) have been prepared by using

  9. Properties of hot and dense matter from relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Koch, Volker; Schäfer, Thomas; Stachel, Johanna

    2016-03-01

    We review the progress achieved in extracting the properties of hot and dense matter from relativistic heavy ion collisions at the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the large hadron collider (LHC) at CERN. We focus on bulk properties of the medium, in particular the evidence for thermalization, aspects of the equation of state, transport properties, as well as fluctuations and correlations. We also discuss the in-medium properties of hadrons with light and heavy quarks, and measurements of dileptons and quarkonia. This review is dedicated to the memory of Gerald E. Brown.

  10. Survival of high p{sub T} light and heavy flavors in a dense medium

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.

    2011-04-26

    This talk presents an attempt at a critical overview of the current status of modeling for high-p{sub T} processes in nuclei. In particular, it includes discussion of the space-time development of hadronization of highly virtual light and heavy partons, and the related time scales; the role of early production and subsequent attenuation of pre-hadrons in a dense medium. We identify several challenging problems within the current interpretation of high-p{sub T} processes and propose solutions for some of them.

  11. Energy and momentum relaxation of heavy fermion in dense and warm plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Sreemoyee; Dutt-Mazumder, Abhee K.

    2010-09-01

    We determine the drag and the momentum diffusion coefficients of heavy fermion in dense plasma. It is seen that in degenerate matter the drag coefficient at the leading order mediated by the transverse photon is proportional to (E-{mu}){sup 2} while for the longitudinal exchange this goes as (E-{mu}){sup 3}. We also calculate the longitudinal diffusion coefficient to obtain the Einstein relation in a relativistic degenerate plasma. Finally, finite temperature corrections are included both for the drag and the diffusion coefficients.

  12. General trend for pressurized superconducting hydrogen-dense materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Duck Young; Scheicher, Ralph H.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Kang, T. W.; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2010-02-16

    The long-standing prediction that hydrogen can assume a metallic state under high pressure, combined with arguments put forward more recently that this state might even be superconducting up to high temperatures, continues to spur tremendous research activities toward the experimental realization of metallic hydrogen. These efforts have however so far been impeded by the enormous challenges associated with the exceedingly large required pressure. Hydrogen-dense materials, of the MH{sub 4} form (where M can be, e.g., Si, Ge, or Sn) or of the MH{sub 3} form (with M being, e.g., Al, Sc, Y, or La), allow for the rather exciting opportunity to carry out a proxy study of metallic hydrogen and associated high-temperature superconductivity at pressures within the reach of current techniques. At least one experimental report indicates that a superconducting state might have been observed already in SiH{sub 4}, and several theoretical studies have predicted superconductivity in pressurized hydrogen-rich materials; however, no systematic dependence on the applied pressure has yet been identified so far. In the present work, we have used first-principles methods in an attempt to predict the superconducting critical temperature (T{sub c}) as a function of pressure (P) for three metal-hydride systems of the MH{sub 3} form, namely ScH{sub 3}, YH{sub 3}, and LaH{sub 3}. By comparing the obtained results, we are able to point out a general trend in the T{sub c}-dependence on P. These gained insights presented here are likely to stimulate further theoretical studies of metallic phases of hydrogen-dense materials and should lead to new experimental investigations of their superconducting properties.

  13. Stress transmission and incipient yield flow in dense granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenfeld, Raphael

    2010-05-01

    Jammed granular matter transmits stresses non-uniformly like no conventional solid, especially when it is on the verge of failure. Jamming is caused by self-organization of granular matter under external loads, often giving rise to networks of force chains that support the loads non-uniformly. An ongoing debate in the literature concerns the correct way to model the static stress field in such media: good old elasticity theory or newcomer isostaticity theory. The two differ significantly and, in particular in 2D, isostaticity theory leads naturally to force chain solutions. More recently, it has been proposed that real granular materials are made of mixtures of regions, some behaving elastically and some isostatically. The theory to describe these systems has been named stato-elasticity. In this paper, I first present the rationale for stato-elasticity theory. An important step towards the construction of this theory is a good understanding of stress transmission in the regions of pure isostatic states. A brief description is given of recently derived general solutions for 2D isostatic regions with nonuniform structures, which go well beyond the over-simplistic picture of force chains. I then show how the static stress equations are related directly to incipient yield flow and derive the equations that govern yield and creep rheology of dense granular matter at the initial stages of failure. These equations are general and describe strains in granular materials of both rigid and compliant particles.

  14. Quantum critical behavior in heavy electron materials

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi-feng; Pines, David

    2014-01-01

    Quantum critical behavior in heavy electron materials is typically brought about by changes in pressure or magnetic field. In this paper, we develop a simple unified model for the combined influence of pressure and magnetic field on the effectiveness of the hybridization that plays a central role in the two-fluid description of heavy electron emergence. We show that it leads to quantum critical and delocalization lines that accord well with those measured for CeCoIn5, yields a quantitative explanation of the field and pressure-induced changes in antiferromagnetic ordering and quantum critical behavior measured for YbRh2Si2, and provides a valuable framework for describing the role of magnetic fields in bringing about quantum critical behavior in other heavy electron materials. PMID:24912172

  15. Terrestrial atmospheric effects induced by counterstreaming dense interstellar cloud material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeghikyan, A.; Fahr, H.

    The Solar System during its life has encountered more than 10 times with dense interstellar clouds with particle concentrations about 10(8)-10(9) m(-3) and more suppressing the heliopause to dimensions smaller than 1 AU and bringing the Earth in immediate contact with the interstellar matter. For cloud's concentration greater than of 10(8) m(-3), the flow material at the Earth, completely shielded from solar wind protons would be only subject to solar photoionization processes. Previously published results were limited to consideration of processes outside of the accretion radius and have not been taken into account the photoionization. We have developed a 2D-2-fluid gasdynamical numerical code to describe the behavior of the incoming neutral matter near the Earth, taken into account both the photoionization and the gravity of the Sun. Increased neutral hydrogen fluxes ranging from 10(13) to 10(16) m(-2)s(-1) would cause an alteration of the terrestrial atmosphere. During immersion in the cloud the total incident flux of neutral hydrogen onto the terrestrial atmosphere in the steady state would be balanced by the upward escape flux of hydrogen and the downward flux of water, which is the product of hydrogen-oxygen chemistry via even-odd reaction schemes. In that case hydrogen acts as a catalyst for the destruction of oxygen atoms and causes the ozone concentration to diminish pronouncedly above 50 km from a factor of 1.5 at the stratopause to about a factor of 1000 and more at the mesopause. Thus, depending on the encounter parameters the large mixing ratio of hydrogen decreases the ozon concentration in the mesosphere and triggers an ice age of relatively long duration.

  16. Experiments on the interaction of heavy-ion beams with dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckl, C.; Roth, M.; Suess, W.; Wetzler, H; Seelig, W.; Kulish, M.; Spiller, P.; Jacoby, J.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.

    1997-03-01

    Gas discharge plasma targets were used for energy loss and charge state measurements of fast heavy ions 5 MeV/u < E{sub kin} < 10 MeV/u in a regime of electron density and temperature up to 10{sup 19}cm{sup -3} and 20 eV, respectively. Progress has been achieved in the understanding of charge exchange processes in fully ionized hydrogen plasma. An improved model that has taken excitation-autoionization processes into account has removed some of the discrepancies of previous theoretical descriptions. Furthermore, the energy loss of the ion beam serves as an excellent diagnostic tool for measuring the electron density in partially ionized plasmas such as argon. The experience with these methods will be used in the future to diagnose dense laser-produced plasmas. A setup with a 5-GW neodymium-glass laser, currently under construction, will provide access to density ranges up to 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3} and temperatures > 100 eV. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Two-flavor lattice QCD with a finite density of heavy quarks: heavy-dense limit and "particle-hole" symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindlisbacher, Tobias; de Forcrand, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the properties of the half-filling point in lattice QCD (LQCD), in particular the disappearance of the sign problem and the emergence of an apparent particle-hole symmetry, and try to understand where these properties come from by studying the heavy-dense fermion determinant and the corresponding strong-coupling partition function (which can be integrated analytically). We then add in a first step an effective Polyakov loop gauge action (which reproduces the leading terms in the character expansion of the Wilson gauge action) to the heavy-dense partition function and try to analyze how some of the properties of the half-filling point change when leaving the strong coupling limit. In a second step, we take also the leading nearest-neighbor fermion hopping terms into account (including gauge interactions in the fundamental representation) and mention how the method could be improved further to incorporate the full set of nearest-neighbor fermion hoppings. Using our mean-field method, we also obtain an approximate ( μ, T) phase diagram for heavy-dense LQCD at finite inverse gauge coupling β. Finally, we propose a simple criterion to identify the chemical potential beyond which lattice artifacts become dominant.

  18. Material Removes Heavy Metal Ions From Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, Warren H., Jr.; Street, Kenneth W.; Hill, Carol; Savino, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    New high capacity ion-exchange polymer material removes toxic metal cations from contaminated water. Offers several advantages. High sensitivities for such heavy metals as lead, cadmium, and copper and capable of reducing concentrations in aqueous solutions to parts-per-billion range. Removes cations even when calcium present. Material made into variety of forms, such as thin films, coatings, pellets, and fibers. As result, adapted to many applications to purify contaminated water, usually hard wherever found, whether in wastewater-treatment systems, lakes, ponds, industrial plants, or homes. Another important feature that adsorbed metals easily reclaimed by either destructive or nondestructive process. Other tests show ion-exchange polymer made inexpensively; easy to use; strong, flexible, not easily torn; and chemically stable in storage, in aqueous solutions, and in acidic or basic solution.

  19. Lightweight Composite Materials for Heavy Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Pruez, Jacky; Shoukry, Samir; Williams, Gergis; Shoukry, Mark

    2013-08-31

    The main objective of this project is to develop, analyze and validate data, methodologies and tools that support widespread applications of automotive lightweighting technologies. Two underlying principles are guiding the research efforts towards this objective: • Seamless integration between the lightweight materials selected for certain vehicle systems, cost-effective methods for their design and manufacturing, and practical means to enhance their durability while reducing their Life-Cycle-Costs (LCC). • Smooth migration of the experience and findings accumulated so far at WVU in the areas of designing with lightweight materials, innovative joining concepts and durability predictions, from applications to the area of weight savings for heavy vehicle systems and hydrogen storage tanks, to lightweighting applications of selected systems or assemblies in light–duty vehicles.

  20. Processes for making dense, spherical active materials for lithium-ion cells

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Sun-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2011-11-22

    Processes are provided for making dense, spherical mixed-metal carbonate or phosphate precursors that are particularly well suited for the production of active materials for electrochemical devices such as lithium ion secondary batteries. Exemplified methods include precipitating dense, spherical particles of metal carbonates or metal phosphates from a combined aqueous solution using a precipitating agent such as ammonium hydrogen carbonate, sodium hydrogen carbonate, or a mixture that includes sodium hydrogen carbonate. Other exemplified methods include precipitating dense, spherical particles of metal phosphates using a precipitating agent such as ammonium hydrogen phosphate, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, sodium phosphate, sodium hydrogen phosphate, sodium dihydrogen phosphate, or a mixture of any two or more thereof. Further provided are compositions of and methods of making dense, spherical metal oxides and metal phosphates using the dense, spherical metal precursors. Still further provided are electrodes and batteries using the same.

  1. Charge state and stopping dynamics of fast heavy ions in dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Rosmej, O. N.; Blazevic, A.; Korostiy, S.; Bock, R.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Pikuz, S. A. Jr.; Efremov, V. P.; Fortov, V. E.; Fertman, A.; Mutin, T.; Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.

    2005-11-15

    K-shell radiation of fast heavy ions penetrating solid matter was used to analyze the stopping dynamics of ions over more than 80% of the stopping path. The most important advantage of this method is that the data is obtained with a high spatial resolution directly from the interaction volume. In experiments 11.4 MeV/u Ca projectile were slowed down in solid quartz and low-density SiO{sub 2} aerogel targets. Characteristic projectile and target spectra in the photon energy range of 1.5-4 keV were registered by means of spherically bent crystal spectrometers with high spectral and spatial resolution in the direction of the ion beam propagation. K-shell spectra of heavy ions induced by close collisions with target atoms provided information about the projectile charge state and velocity dynamics. The line intensity distribution of the K-shell transitions arising from ions with different ion charges represents the charge state distribution along the ion beam track. The variation of the line Doppler shift due to the ion deceleration in the target material was used to determine the ion velocity dynamics. The spectroscopic analysis of the stopping process was complemented by measurements of the energy loss and ion charge state distribution after the ion beam emerged from the target using a standard time-of-flight method and magnet spectrometer.

  2. Short intense ion pulses for materials and warm dense matter research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Peter A.; Persaud, Arun; Waldron, William L.; Barnard, John J.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Friedman, Alex; Gilson, Erik P.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Grote, David P.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Lidia, Steven M.; Stettler, Matthew; Takakuwa, Jeffrey H.; Schenkel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, by generating beam spots size with radius r<1 mm within 2 ns FWHM and approximately 1010 ions/pulse. To enable the short pulse durations and mm-scale focal spot radii, the 1.2 MeV Li+ ion beam is neutralized in a 1.6-meter drift compression section located after the last accelerator magnet. An 8-Tesla short focal length solenoid compresses the beam in the presence of the large volume plasma near the end of this section before the target. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including selected topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Here we describe the accelerator commissioning and time-resolved ionoluminescence measurements of yttrium aluminum perovskite using the fully integrated accelerator and neutralized drift compression components.

  3. Short Intense Ion Pulses for Materials and Warm Dense Matter Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Peter; Ji, Q.; Lidia, S. M.; Persaud, A.; Stettler, M.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Waldron, W. L.; Schenkel, T.; Barnard, J. J.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.

    2015-11-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, by generating beam spots size with radius r <1 mm within 2 ns FWHM and approximately 1010 ions/pulse. To enable the short pulse durations and mm-scale focal spot radii, the 1.2 MeV Li + ion beam is neutralized in a 1.6-meter drift compression section located after the last accelerator magnet. An 8-Tesla short focal length solenoid compresses the beam in the presence of the large volume plasma near the end of this section before the target. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including selected topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. We will describe the accelerator commissioning and time-resolved ionoluminescence measurements of yttrium aluminium perovskite using the fully integrated accelerator and neutralized drift compression components (arXiv:1506.05839). This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  4. Short intense ion pulses for materials and warm dense matter research

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Seidl, Peter A.; Persaud, Arun; Waldron, William L.; Barnard, John J.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Friedman, Alex; Gilson, Erik P.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Grote, David P.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; et al

    2015-11-11

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, by generating beam spots size with radius r<1 mm within 2 ns FWHM and approximately 1010 ions/pulse. To enable the short pulse durations and mm-scale focal spot radii, the 1.2 MeV Li+ ion beam is neutralized in a 1.6-meter drift compression section located after the last accelerator magnet. An 8-Tesla short focal length solenoid compresses the beam in the presence of the large volume plasma near the end of this section before the target. The scientific topics tomore » be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including selected topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Finally, we describe the accelerator commissioning and time-resolved ionoluminescence measurements of yttrium aluminum perovskite using the fully integrated accelerator and neutralized drift compression components.« less

  5. Short intense ion pulses for materials and warm dense matter research

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, Peter A.; Persaud, Arun; Waldron, William L.; Barnard, John J.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Friedman, Alex; Gilson, Erik P.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Grote, David P.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Lidia, Steven M.; Stettler, Matthew; Takakuwa, Jeffrey H.; Schenkel, Thomas

    2015-11-11

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, by generating beam spots size with radius r<1 mm within 2 ns FWHM and approximately 1010 ions/pulse. To enable the short pulse durations and mm-scale focal spot radii, the 1.2 MeV Li+ ion beam is neutralized in a 1.6-meter drift compression section located after the last accelerator magnet. An 8-Tesla short focal length solenoid compresses the beam in the presence of the large volume plasma near the end of this section before the target. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including selected topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Finally, we describe the accelerator commissioning and time-resolved ionoluminescence measurements of yttrium aluminum perovskite using the fully integrated accelerator and neutralized drift compression components.

  6. Casting fine grained, fully dense, strong inorganic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Sam W.; Spencer, Larry S.; Phillips, Michael R.

    2015-11-24

    Methods and apparatuses for casting inorganic materials are provided. The inorganic materials include metals, metal alloys, metal hydrides and other materials. Thermal control zones may be established to control the propagation of a freeze front through the casting. Agitation from a mechanical blade or ultrasonic energy may be used to reduce porosity and shrinkage in the casting. After solidification of the casting, the casting apparatus may be used to anneal the cast part.

  7. Probing properties of hot and dense QCD matter with heavy flavor in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Nouicer, Rachid

    2015-05-29

    Hadrons carrying heavy quarks, i.e. charm or bottom, are important probes of the hot and dense medium created in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Heavy quark-antiquark pairs are mainly produced in initial hard scattering processes of partons. While some of the produced pairs form bound quarkonia, the vast majority hadronize into particles carrying open heavy flavor. Heavy quark production has been studied by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC via measurements of single leptons from semi-leptonic decays in both the electron channel at mid-rapidity and in the muon channel at forward rapidity. A large suppression and azimuthal anisotropy of single electrons have been observed in Au + Au collisions at 200 GeV. These results suggest a large energy loss and flow of heavy quarks in the hot, dense matter. The PHENIX experiment has also measured J/ψ production at 200 GeV in p + p, d + Au, Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions, both at mid- and forward-rapidities, and additionally Cu + Au and U + U at forward-rapidities. In the most energetic collisions, more suppression is observed at forward rapidity than at central rapidity. This can be interpreted either as a sign of quark recombination, or as a hint of additional cold nuclear matter effects. The centrality dependence of nuclear modification factor, RAA(pT), for J/ψ in U + U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV shows a similar trend to the lighter systems, Au + Au and Cu + Cu, at similar energy 200 GeV.

  8. Probing properties of hot and dense QCD matter with heavy flavor in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nouicer, Rachid

    2015-05-29

    Hadrons carrying heavy quarks, i.e. charm or bottom, are important probes of the hot and dense medium created in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Heavy quark-antiquark pairs are mainly produced in initial hard scattering processes of partons. While some of the produced pairs form bound quarkonia, the vast majority hadronize into particles carrying open heavy flavor. Heavy quark production has been studied by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC via measurements of single leptons from semi-leptonic decays in both the electron channel at mid-rapidity and in the muon channel at forward rapidity. A large suppression and azimuthal anisotropy of single electrons havemore » been observed in Au + Au collisions at 200 GeV. These results suggest a large energy loss and flow of heavy quarks in the hot, dense matter. The PHENIX experiment has also measured J/ψ production at 200 GeV in p + p, d + Au, Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions, both at mid- and forward-rapidities, and additionally Cu + Au and U + U at forward-rapidities. In the most energetic collisions, more suppression is observed at forward rapidity than at central rapidity. This can be interpreted either as a sign of quark recombination, or as a hint of additional cold nuclear matter effects. The centrality dependence of nuclear modification factor, RAA(pT), for J/ψ in U + U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV shows a similar trend to the lighter systems, Au + Au and Cu + Cu, at similar energy 200 GeV.« less

  9. Toxic heavy metals: materials cycle optimization.

    PubMed Central

    Ayres, R U

    1992-01-01

    Long-term ecological sustainability is incompatible with an open materials cycle. The toxic heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, silver, uranium/plutonium, zinc) exemplify the problem. These metals are being mobilized and dispersed into the environment by industrial activity at a rate far higher than by natural processes. Apart from losses to the environment resulting from mine wastes and primary processing, many of these metals are utilized in products that are inherently dissipative. Examples of such uses include fuels, lubricants, solvents, fire retardants, stabilizers, flocculants, pigments, biocides, and preservatives. To close the materials cycle, it will be necessary to accomplish two things. The first is to ban or otherwise discourage (e.g., by means of high severance taxes on virgin materials) dissipative uses of the above type. The second is to increase the efficiency of recycling of those materials that are not replaceable in principle. Here, also, economic instruments (such as returnable deposits) can be effective in some cases. A systems view of the problem is essential to assess the cost and effectiveness of alternative strategies. PMID:11607259

  10. Multivariate spatial analysis of a heavy rain event in a densely populated delta city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitan, Santiago; ten Veldhuis, Marie-claire; Bruni, Guenda; van de Giesen, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Delta cities account for half of the world's population and host key infrastructure and services for the global economic growth. Due to the characteristic geography of delta areas, these cities face high vulnerability to extreme weather and pluvial flooding risks, that are expected to increase as climate change drives heavier rain events. Besides, delta cities are subjected to fast urban densification processes that progressively make them more vulnerable to pluvial flooding. Delta cities need to be adapted to better cope with this threat. The mechanism leading to damage after heavy rains is not completely understood. For instance, current research has shown that rain intensities and volumes can only partially explain the occurrence and localization of rain-related insurance claims (Spekkers et al., 2013). The goal of this paper is to provide further insights into spatial characteristics of the urban environment that can significantly be linked to pluvial-related flooding impacts. To that end, a study-case has been selected: on October 12 to 14 2013, a heavy rain event triggered pluvial floods in Rotterdam, a densely populated city which is undergoing multiple climate adaptation efforts and is located in the Meuse river Delta. While the average yearly precipitation in this city is around 800 mm, local rain gauge measurements ranged from aprox. 60 to 130 mm just during these three days. More than 600 citizens' telephonic complaints reported impacts related to rainfall. The registry of those complaints, which comprises around 300 calls made to the municipality and another 300 to the fire brigade, was made available for research. Other accessible information about this city includes a series of rainfall measurements with up to 1 min time-step at 7 different locations around the city, ground-based radar rainfall data (1 Km^2 spatial resolution and 5 min time-step), a digital elevation model (50 cm of horizontal resolution), a model of overland-flow paths, cadastral

  11. Melting of Dense Hydrogen during Heavy Ion Beam-Driven Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Grinenko, A; Gericke, D O; Vorberger, J; Glenzer, S H

    2009-03-02

    Until now the thermodynamic and structural properties of hydrogen continue to be understood unsatisfactory. A number of complex high pressure phases at relatively low temperatures has been confirmed [1]. However, conclusive answers on the existence of a plasma phase transition, the dissociation of hydrogen molecules at high densities, the metallization in the solid, and the melting line for pressures above 70GPa are still missing. A particularly interesting behavior has been predicted for the melting line at high pressures where it has a maximum and its slope changes sign [2]. In Ref. [3], we have shown that these states can be created using cylindrical compression driven by heavy ion beams. Employing ab initio simulations [4] and experimental data, a new wide range equation of state for hydrogen was constructed [3]. This new hydrogen EOS combined with hydrodynamic simulations is then used to describe the compression of hydrogen in LAPLAS targets [5] driven by heavy ion beams to be generated at the FAIR. The results shown in Fig. 1 indicate that the melting line up to its maximum as well as the transition from molecular fluids to fully ionized plasmas can be tested. By carefully tuning the number of particles in the beam, the compression can be adjusted to yield states at the solid-liquid phase transition (compare panels (a) and (b) in Fig. 1). This allows one to test the shape of the melting line beyond its maximum. It was demonstrated [3] that x-ray scattering [6] can be used to distinguish between the molecular solid and liquid phases as well as the metallic states. Hydrodynamic simulations have also highlighted the importance of temperature diagnostics, as it is more sensitive to the EOS than the density based diagnostic methods. Different materials have been considered as absorber. Although lead might seem to be the natural choice, the simulations show that aluminium is also a feasible option if slightly less compression is sufficient. Moreover, aluminium

  12. ULTRASONICALLY-ENHANCED DENSE-MEDIUM CYCLONING FOR FINE COAL AND COAL REFUSE IMPOUNDMENT MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Mark S. Klima; Dr. Barbara J. Arnold

    2001-08-01

    The Pennsylvania State University, its project team (Typlex, Inc., DAGER, Inc., and PrepTech, Inc.), and advisory committee members have demonstrated the application of ultrasonic energy during dense-medium cyclining and subsequent recovery of fine coal and coal refuse impoundment materials. The results will help to extend the range of conventional dense-medium cyclining to sizes now typically cleaned in relatively inefficient water-only cyclone and spiral concentrators circuits. This technology also provides a potential approach to produce ultra-clean material as would be used for feedstocks for premium carbon products. This report describes Phase I of the project, which involved laboratory testing of dense-medium cyclining and subsequent medium recovery, with and without ultrasonic treatment, along with fundamental dispersion testing. Dense-medium cycloning was conducted with a 76.2-mm (3-in.) diameter cyclone under various conditions including magnetite grade, medium relative density, inlet pressure, cyclone geometry, and feed coal. Dense-medium recovery testing was carried out with a 305-mm (12-in.) diameter x 152-mm (6-in.) wide wet-drum magnetic separator using the cyclone clean coal and refuse products as the feed material. Fundamental testing of dispersion/reagglomeration phenomena was conducted with coal/clay mixtures. In almost all cases, the dense-medium cyclone was capable of achieving separations down to approximately 0.037 mm. Ultrasonic treatment had a slight effect on reducing the ash content of the clean coal. It was also found that ultrasonic treatment improved the purity of the magnetic fraction during wet-drum magnetic separation. The treatment was particularly beneficial for the cyclone overflow material. The fundamental testing indicated that agitation after ultrasonic treatment is necessary to disperse fine particles and to prevent agglomeration.

  13. Solenoid transport of a heavy ion beam for warm dense matterstudies and inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Armijo, Julien

    2006-10-01

    From February to July 2006, I have been doing research as a guest at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in the Heavy Ion Fusion group. This internship, which counts as one semester in my master's program in France, I was very pleased to do it in a field that I consider has the beauty of fundamental physics, and at the same time the special appeal of a quest for a long-term and environmentally-respectful energy source. During my stay at LBNL, I have been involved in three projects, all of them related to Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). The first one, experimental and analytical, has consisted in measuring the effects of the eddy currents induced by the pulsed magnets in the conducting plates of the source and diagnostic chambers of the Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX, which is a subset of NDCX). We have modeled the effect and run finite-element simulations that have reproduced the perturbation to the field. Then, we have modified WARP, the Particle-In-Cell code used to model the whole experiment, in order to import realistic fields including the eddy current effects and some details of each magnet. The second project has been to take part in a campaign of WARP simulations of the same experiment to understand the leakage of electrons that was observed in the experiment as a consequence to some diagnostics and the failure of the electrostatic electron trap. The simulations have shown qualitative agreement with the measured phenomena, but are still in progress. The third project, rather theoretical, has been related to the upcoming target experiment of a thin aluminum foil heated by a beam to the 1-eV range. At the beginning I helped by analyzing simulations of the hydrodynamic expansion and cooling of the heated material. But, progressively, my work turned into making estimates for the nature of the liquid/vapor two-phase flow. In particular, I have been working on criteria and models to predict the formation of droplets, their size, and

  14. Heavy vector and axial-vector mesons in hot and dense asymmetric strange hadronic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Arvind; Chhabra, Rahul

    2015-09-01

    We calculate the effects of finite density and temperature of isospin asymmetric strange hadronic matter, for different strangeness fractions, on the in-medium properties of vector (D*,Ds*,B*,Bs*) and axial-vector (D1,D1 s,B1,B1 s) mesons, using the chiral hadronic SU(3) model and QCD sum rules. We focus on the evaluation of in-medium mass-shift and shift in decay constant of above vector and axial-vector mesons. In the quantum chromodynamics sum rule approach, the properties, e.g., the masses and decay constants of vector and axial-vector mesons are written in terms of quark and gluon condensates. These quark and gluon condensates are evaluated in the present work within the chiral SU(3) model, through the medium modification of scalar-isoscalar fields σ and ζ , the scalar-isovector field δ , and the scalar dilaton field χ , in the strange hadronic medium which includes both nucleons as well as hyperons. As we shall see in detail, the masses and decay constants of heavy vector and axial-vector mesons are affected significantly from isospin asymmetry and the strangeness fraction of the medium, and these modifications may influence the experimental observables produced in heavy-ion collision experiments. The results of present investigations of in-medium properties of vector and axial-vector mesons at finite density and temperature of strange hadronic medium may be helpful for understanding the experimental data from heavy-ion collision experiments in particular for the compressed baryonic matter (CBM) experiment of the FAIR facility at GSI, Germany.

  15. Anomalous energy cascades in dense granular materials yielding under simple shear deformations.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Kuniyasu; Mizuno, Hideyuki

    2016-02-01

    By using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of dense granular particles in two dimensions, we study turbulent-like structures of their non-affine velocities under simple shear deformations. We find that the spectrum of non-affine velocities, introduced as an analog of the energy spectrum for turbulent flows, exhibits the power-law decay if the system is yielding in a quasi-static regime, where large-scale collective motions and inelastic interactions of granular particles are crucial for the anomalous cascade of kinetic energy. Based on hydrodynamic equations of dense granular materials, which include both kinetic and contact contributions in constitutive relations, we derive a theoretical expression for the spectrum, where a good agreement between the result of MD simulations and theoretical prediction is established over a wide range of length scales. PMID:26701740

  16. Quadrupolar Kondo effect in uranium heavy-electron materials?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. L.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility of an electric quadrupole Kondo effect for a non-Kramers doublet on a uranium (U) ion is a cubic metallic host is demonstrated by model calculations showing a Kondo upturn in the resistivity, universal quenching of the quadrupolar moment, and a heavy-electron anomaly in the electronic specific heat. With inclusion of excited crystal-field levels, some of the unusual magnetic-response data in the heavy-electron superconductor UBe13 may be understood. Structural phase transitions at unprecedented low temperatures may occur in U-based heavy-electron materials.

  17. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program: Progress and Highlights

    SciTech Connect

    D. Ray Johnson; Sidney Diamond

    2000-06-19

    The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program was begun in 1997 to support the enabling materials needs of the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT). The technical agenda for the program grew out of the technology roadmap for the OHVT and includes efforts in materials for: fuel systems, exhaust aftertreatment, valve train, air handling, structural components, electrochemical propulsion, natural gas storage, and thermal management. A five-year program plan was written in early 2000, following a stakeholders workshop. The technical issues and planned and ongoing projects are discussed. Brief summaries of several technical highlights are given.

  18. Heavy Equipment Operator: General Equipment Operator. Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Laborn J.; Sawatzky, Joyce

    Developed through close coordination between contractors, construction workers, and vocational educators, this instructor's manual is designed to help heavy equipment instructors present materials in a systematic format. The instructional materials in the manual are written in terms of student performance, using measurable behavioral objectives.…

  19. Heavy Equipment Operator Instructional Materials. Basic Core. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Laborn J.; Sawatzky, Joyce

    Developed through close coordination between contractors, construction workers, and vocational educators, this instructor's manual is designed to help heavy equipment instructors present materials in a systematic format. The instructional materials in the manual are written in terms of student performance, using measurable behavioral objectives.…

  20. Evolution of heavy duty engine valves - materials and design

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, S.K.; Larson, J.M.; Jenkins, L.F.; Wang, Y.

    1997-12-31

    Engine poppet valves control gas flow in internal combustion engines. The combustion event and the flow of the gases formed past the valve during the intake or exhaust portion of the combustion cycle, expose heavy duty diesel valves to high temperatures, oxidizing or corroding atmospheres and high stresses from firing and seating. This paper is a review of heavy duty diesel engine valve material and design evolution over the last fifty years in North America. The primary driving forces behind the evolution have historically been the need for improved durability and more cost effective designs. However, in recent years engine emission regulatory requirements have become an equally important influence on valve material selection and design. The paper also endeavors to predict how heavy duty diesel engine valve materials and designs may change in response to these driving forces in the foreseeable future.

  1. Heavy ion beams in extended materials - Computational methods and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Schimmerling, W.; Wong, M.; Townsend, L. W.

    1987-01-01

    The transport of heavy ion beams in extended materials is a problem of interest in accelerator and space shielding, radiation therapy, and astrophysical and radiobiological studies. The beam particles change their energy and direction of motion through atomic/molecular collisions and undergo occasional radical transformation in nuclear collision. In health physics applications, a heavy ion beam of initially well defined radiation quality is transformed into a complex mixture of diverse quality components after passing through a modest amount of material. This transformation of radiation quality must be understood to adequately explain the biological response of tissue to heavy ion radiation. A theoretical/experimental program to define an ion beam and its products in extended matter is described.

  2. 30 CFR 57.16017 - Hoisting heavy equipment or material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hoisting heavy equipment or material. 57.16017 Section 57.16017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  3. 30 CFR 57.16017 - Hoisting heavy equipment or material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hoisting heavy equipment or material. 57.16017 Section 57.16017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  4. 30 CFR 57.16017 - Hoisting heavy equipment or material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hoisting heavy equipment or material. 57.16017 Section 57.16017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  5. 30 CFR 57.16017 - Hoisting heavy equipment or material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hoisting heavy equipment or material. 57.16017 Section 57.16017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  6. 30 CFR 57.16017 - Hoisting heavy equipment or material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hoisting heavy equipment or material. 57.16017 Section 57.16017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  7. Numerical modelling of dense material distribution on the core-mantle boundaries in terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Płonka, A.; Czechowski, L.

    2013-09-01

    Our main interest lies within the properties of the lower thermal boundary layer of the mantle convection. We assume whole-mantle convection for smaller planetary bodies like Westa, for the Earth our model corresponds to two-layered convection with only the strongest currents reaching the lowermost mantle. For certain densities of the accumulates on the core we calculate their distribution, stream function and temperature. The Rayleigh number is kept relatively low. We search over accumulate densities reaching from 1 to 2.5 of the mantle density - in this way we want to determine for which densities the accumulates start to form distinct domes on the core-mantle boundary. For the Earth, formation of high and sharp domes is visible for high densities after 700 million years. Another question, addressing also the problem of the accumulate genesis, is the ratio of radiogenic heat production in the dense material.

  8. Scaling in the Emergent Behavior of Heavy Electron Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curro, N.; Young, B.-L.; Pines, D.; Schmalian, Joerg

    2004-03-01

    We show that the two fluid description of the Kondo lattice developed by Nakatsuji, Pines, and Fisk provides a quantitative explanation of the Knight shift anomaly that has been measured in a number of heavy electron materials. It enables us to identify the onset of the anomaly at a temperature, T, at which the heavy electron liquid emerges from a lattice of non-interacting Kondo centers, and to determine quantitatively the temperature evolution of the heavy electron spin susceptibility by combining measurements of the temperature dependence of the Knight shift with those of the bulk electronic spin susceptibility. We find that an excellent fit to existing experimental data in Ce, Yb and U based materials is obtained with a susceptibility whose temperature dependence follows the simple form: (1-T/T*)log T^*/T; a result that suggests that quite generally in Kondo lattices the emergent behavior of the heavy electron liquid can be characterized entirely by the single energy scale, T^*, that Nakatsuji et al. have proposed is a direct measure of the strength of nearest neighbor intersite magnetic coupling.

  9. Dynamical evolution, hadronization and angular de-correlation of heavy flavor in a hot and dense QCD medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shanshan; Qin, Guang-You; Bass, Steffen A.

    2014-12-01

    We study heavy flavor evolution and hadronization in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The in-medium evolution of heavy quarks is described using our modified Langevin framework that incorporates both collisional and radiative energy loss mechanisms. The subsequent hadronization process for heavy quarks is calculated with a fragmentation plus recombination model. We find significant contribution from gluon radiation to heavy quark energy loss at high pT; the recombination mechanism can greatly enhance the D meson production at medium pT. Our calculation provides a good description of the D meson nuclear modification at the LHC. In addition, we explore the angular correlation functions of heavy flavor pairs which may provide us a potential candidate for distinguishing different energy loss mechanisms of heavy quarks inside the QGP.

  10. Activation of accelerator construction materials by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katrík, P.; Mustafin, E.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Pavlovič, M.; Strašík, I.

    2015-12-01

    Activation data for an aluminum target irradiated by 200 MeV/u 238U ion beam are presented in the paper. The target was irradiated in the stacked-foil geometry and analyzed using gamma-ray spectroscopy. The purpose of the experiment was to study the role of primary particles, projectile fragments, and target fragments in the activation process using the depth profiling of residual activity. The study brought information on which particles contribute dominantly to the target activation. The experimental data were compared with the Monte Carlo simulations by the FLUKA 2011.2c.0 code. This study is a part of a research program devoted to activation of accelerator construction materials by high-energy (⩾200 MeV/u) heavy ions at GSI Darmstadt. The experimental data are needed to validate the computer codes used for simulation of interaction of swift heavy ions with matter.

  11. System for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, D.P.; Browning, J.F.

    1998-07-21

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high (n,f) reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu. 3 figs.

  12. System for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, David P.; Browning, James F.

    1998-01-01

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  13. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, David P.; Browning, James F.

    1999-01-01

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  14. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, D.P.; Browning, J.F.

    1999-02-16

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu. 3 figs.

  15. Immobilization of EAFD heavy metals using acidic materials.

    PubMed

    Mitrakas, Manassis G; Sikalidis, Constantinos A; Karamanli, Theoktisti P

    2007-03-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the chemical and leaching characteristics of the Electric Arc Furnace Dust (EAFD) generated by a Greek plant and to investigate various acidic materials efficiency on the EAFD stabilization. In order to investigate how [OH(-)] neutralization influences EAFD heavy metals leachability, Na HCO3(-), HNO3 and H3PO4 were used as acidic materials. The concentration of Pb in leachate was found between 40 and 3.7 x 10(3) mg Pb/kg of EAFD, exceeding in all EAFD samples the maximum acceptable limit (MAL) 25 mg/kg for landfill disposal. Neutralization of [OH(-)] with HCO3(-) decreased Pb concentration in leachate at 350 mg Pb/kg of EAFD, while excess over a stoichiometry in HCO3(-) addition increased leachability of Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu as well as F. Using HNO3 as an acidic material decreased leachability of almost all the parameters concerning the EC directive 33/19-01-2003 in a pH value up to 7.2, in exception of Zn. Zinc leachability showed a U shape curve as a function of pH value. The concentration of Zn was minimized in a concentration lower than 1 mg Zn/kg EAFD in a pH range 10.5 to 9 and exceeded the MAL 90 mg/kg at a pH value 7.2. However, the major disadvantage of HNO3 was proved to be its leachability, since NO3(-) concentration in leachate was equal to HNO3 dose. H3PO4 was found the most promising acidic material for the chemical immobilization of heavy metals, since it decreased their leachability in a concentration significantly lower than MAL at a pH value up to 7.1. Finally, the concentration of Cl(-) ranged between 18 and 33 x 10(3) mg Cl(-)/kg EAFD exceeding in all EAFD samples the MAL 17 x 10(3) mg/kg. This high concentration of Cl(-) is attributed to the scrap and it could be reduced only by modification of its composition. PMID:17365324

  16. Fast six-channel pyrometer for warm-dense-matter experiments with intense heavy-ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P.A.; Kulish, M.I.; Mintsev, V.; Nikolaev, D.N.; Ternovoi, V.Ya.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Udrea, S.; Tahir, N.A.; Varentsov, D.; Hug, A.

    2008-12-01

    This paper describes a fast multi-channel radiation pyrometer that was developed for warmdense-matter experiments with intense heavy ion beams at Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI). The pyrometer is capable of measuring of brightness temperatures from 2000 K to 50000 K, at 6 wavelengths in visible and near-infrared parts of spectrum, with 5 nanosecond temporal resolution and several micrometers spatial resolution. The pyrometer's spectral discrimination technique is based on interference filters, which act as filters and mirrors to allow for simultaneous spectral discrimination of the same ray at multiple wavelengths.

  17. A high-powered siren for stable acoustic levitation of dense materials in the earth's gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammel, Paul M.; Croonquist, Arvid P.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1988-01-01

    Levitation of large dense samples (e.g., 1-cm diameter steel balls) has been performed in a 1-g environment. A siren was used to study the effects of reflector geometry and variable-frequency operation in order to attain stable acoustic positioning. The harmonic content and spatial distribution of the acoustic field have been investigated. The best stability was obtained with an open reflector system, using a flat lower reflector and a slightly concave upper reflector while operating at a frequency slightly below resonance.

  18. Stabilized Acoustic Levitation of Dense Materials Using a High-Powered Siren

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammell, P. M.; Croonquist, A.; Wang, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    Stabilized acoustic levitation and manipulation of dense (e.g., steel) objects of 1 cm diameter, using a high powered siren, was demonstrated in trials that investigated the harmonic content and spatial distribution of the acoustic field, as well as the effect of sample position and reflector geometries on the acoustic field. Although further optimization is possible, the most stable operation achieved is expected to be adequate for most containerless processing applications. Best stability was obtained with an open reflector system, using a flat lower reflector and a slightly concave upper one. Operation slightly below resonance enhances stability as this minimizes the second harmonic, which is suspected of being a particularly destabilizing influence.

  19. Minimizing the magnetic field effect in MR-linac specific QA-tests: the use of electron dense materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zijp, H. M.; van Asselen, B.; Wolthaus, J. W. H.; Kok, J. M. G.; de Vries, J. H. W.; Ishakoglu, K.; Beld, E.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2016-02-01

    To address the quality assurance (QA) of a MR-linac which is an MRI combined with a linear accelerator (linac), the traditional linac QA-tests need to be redesigned, since the presence of the static magnetic field in the MR-linac alters the electron trajectory. The latter causes the asymmetry in the dose kernel which is introduced by the magnetic field and hinders accurate geometrical QA-tests for the MR-linac. We introduced the use of electron dense materials (e.g. copper) to reduce the size of the dose kernel and thereby the magnetic field effect on the dose deposition. Two examples of QA-tests are presented in which the geometrical accuracy of the MR-linac was addressed; beam profile and star-shot measurements. The introduced setup was compared with a reference setup and both were tested on a conventional and the MR-linac. The results showed that the symmetry of the recorded beam profile was restored in presence of the copper material and that the isocenter size of the MR-linac can be determined accurately with the introduced star-shot setup. The use of electron dense materials is not limited to the presented QA-tests but has a broad application for beam-specific QA-tests in presence of a magnetic field.

  20. Non-Gaussian behavior in jamming / unjamming transition in dense granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atman, A. P. F.; Kolb, E.; Combe, G.; Paiva, H. A.; Martins, G. H. B.

    2013-06-01

    Experiments of penetration of a cylindrical intruder inside a bidimensional dense and disordered granular media were reported recently showing the jamming / unjamming transition. In the present work, we perform molecular dynamics simulations with the same geometry in order to assess both kinematic and static features of jamming / unjamming transition. We study the statistics of the particles velocities at the neighborhood of the intruder to evince that both experiments and simulations present the same qualitative behavior. We observe that the probability density functions (PDF) of velocities deviate from Gaussian depending on the packing fraction of the granular assembly. In order to quantify these deviations we consider a q-Gaussian (Tsallis) function to fit the PDF's. The q-value can be an indication of the presence of long range correlations along the system. We compare the fitted PDF's obtained with those obtained using the stretched exponential, and sketch some conclusions concerning the nature of the correlations along a granular confined flow.

  1. Study of liquid-solid transition for materials processing in space. Analysis of field effects on dense liquid materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. I.

    1973-01-01

    The behavior of dense liquids near the solidification point under the influence of magnetic fields or near-zero gravity conditions were analyzed within the framework of existing liquid state models and classical field theory. The dynamic body forces which are an effect of the magnetic field on liquids are discussed. It is concluded that both magnetic fields and low gravity conditions produce an increase in the diffusion coefficient which result in an increased growth rate of crystals, and time varying magnetic fields induce eddy currents in the liquid which produce body forces and tend to disrupt convection.

  2. Monitor of the concentration of particles of dense radioactive materials in a stream of air

    DOEpatents

    Yule, Thomas J.

    1979-01-01

    A monitor of the concentration of particles of radioactive materials such as plutonium oxide in diameters as small as 1/2 micron includes in combination a first stage comprising a plurality of virtual impactors, a second stage comprising a further plurality of virtual impactors, a collector for concentrating particulate material, a radiation detector disposed near the collector to respond to radiation from collected material and means for moving a stream of air, possibly containing particulate contaminants, through the apparatus.

  3. The Hidden Pathways in Dense Energy Materials - Oxygen at Defects in Nanocrystalline Metals.

    PubMed

    Scherrer, Barbara; Döbeli, Max; Felfer, Peter; Spolenak, Ralph; Cairney, Julie; Galinski, Henning

    2015-10-28

    Highly abundant oxygen-rich line defects (blue) can act as fast oxygen transport paths. These defects show similar chemistry and therefore similar catalytic activity to the materials surface. These results provide the opportunity to design and produce simple scalable structures as catalysts, whose functionality derives from internal defects rather than from the materials surfaces. PMID:26378629

  4. In vitro mineralization of dense collagen substrates: a biomimetic approach toward the development of bone-graft materials.

    PubMed

    Thula, Taili T; Rodriguez, Douglas E; Lee, Myong Hwa; Pendi, Laura; Podschun, Jacob; Gower, Laurie B

    2011-08-01

    Bone is an organic-inorganic composite which has hierarchical structuring that leads to high strength and toughness. The nanostructure of bone consists of nanocrystals of hydroxyapatite embedded and aligned within the interstices of collagen fibrils. This unique nanostructure leads to exceptional properties, both mechanical and biological, making it difficult to emulate bone properties without having a bone-like nanostructured material. A primary goal of our group's work is to use biomimetic processing techniques that lead to bone-like structures. In our prior studies, we demonstrated that intrafibrillar mineralization of porous collagen sponges, leading to a bone-like nanostructure, can be achieved using a polymer-induced liquid precursor (PILP) mineralization process. The objective of this study was to investigate the use of this polymer-directed crystallization process to mineralize dense collagen substrates. To examine collagen scaffolds that truly represent the dense-packed matrix of bone, manatee bone was demineralized to isolate its collagen matrix, consisting of a dense, lamellar osteonal microstructure. This biogenic collagen scaffold was then remineralized using polyaspartate to direct the mineralization process through an amorphous precursor pathway. The various conditions investigated included polymer molecular weight, substrate dimension and mineralization time. Mineral penetration depths of up to 100 μms were achieved using this PILP process, compared to no penetration with only surface precipitates observed for the conventional crystallization process. Electron microscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis were used to characterize the resulting hydroxyapatite/collagen composites. These studies demonstrate that the original interpenetrating bone nanostructure and osteonal microstructure could be recovered in a biogenic matrix using the PILP process. PMID:21550424

  5. Heavy fermion and actinide materials. Annual technical progress report, February 1, 1992--January 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    During this period, 1/N expansions have been systematically applied to the calculation of the properties of highly correlated electron systems. These studies include examinations of (a) the class of materials known as heavy fermion semi-conductors, (b) the high energy spectra of heavy fermion systems, and (c) the doped oxide superconductors.

  6. SPiRIT-TPC with GET readout electronics for the study of density dependent symmetry energy of high dense matter with Heavy RI collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Tadaaki; SPiRIT Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The nuclear Equation of State (EoS) is a fundamental property of nuclear matter that describes the relationships between the parameters for a nuclear system, such as energy, density and temperature. An international collaboration, named SPiRIT, to study the nuclear EoS has been formed recently. One of the main devices of experimental setup is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) which will be installed into the SAMURAI dipole magnet at RIKEN-RIBF. The TPC can measure charged pions, protons and light ions simultaneously in heavy RI collisions, and those will be used as probes to study the asymmetric dense nuclear matter. In addition to the status of the SPiRIT project, testing of SPiRIT-TPC with GET electronics will be presented in this talk. GET, general electronics for TPC, is a project for the development of novel electronics for TPC supported by NSF and ANR. This work is supported in part by the Japan Grant-in-Aide award and the US DOE grant DE-SC0004835 and JUSEIPEN.

  7. Conduction and Narrow Escape in Dense, Disordered, Particulate-based Heterogeneous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechman, Jeremy

    For optimal and reliable performance, many technological devices rely on complex, disordered heterogeneous or composite materials and their associated manufacturing processes. Examples include many powder and particulate-based materials found in phyrotechnic devices for car airbags, electrodes in energy storage devices, and various advanced composite materials. Due to their technological importance and complex structure, these materials have been the subject of much research in a number of fields. Moreover, the advent of new manufacturing techniques based on powder bed and particulate process routes, the potential of functional nano-structured materials, and the additional recognition of persistent shortcomings in predicting reliable performance of high consequence applications; leading to ballooning costs of fielding and maintaining advanced technologies, should motivate renewed efforts in understanding, predicting and controlling these materials' fabrication and behavior. Our particular effort seeks to understand the link between the top-down control presented in specific non-equilibrium processes routes (i.e., manufacturing processes) and the variability and uncertainty of the end product performance. Our ultimate aim is to quantify the variability inherent in these constrained dynamical or random processes and to use it to optimize and predict resulting material properties/performance and to inform component design with precise margins. In fact, this raises a set of deep and broad-ranging issues that have been recognized and as touching the core of a major research challenge at Sandia National Laboratories. In this talk, we will give an overview of recent efforts to address aspects of this vision. In particular the case of conductive properties of packed particulate materials will be highlighted. Combining a number of existing approaches we will discuss new insights and potential directions for further development toward the stated goal. Sandia National

  8. Development and testing of a pulsed helium ion source for probing materials and warm dense matter studies.

    PubMed

    Ji, Q; Seidl, P A; Waldron, W L; Takakuwa, J H; Friedman, A; Grote, D P; Persaud, A; Barnard, J J; Schenkel, T

    2016-02-01

    The neutralized drift compression experiment was designed and commissioned as a pulsed, linear induction accelerator to drive thin targets to warm dense matter (WDM) states with peak temperatures of ∼1 eV using intense, short pulses (∼1 ns) of 1.2 MeV lithium ions. At that kinetic energy, heating a thin target foil near the Bragg peak energy using He(+) ions leads to more uniform energy deposition of the target material than Li(+) ions. Experiments show that a higher current density of helium ions can be delivered from a plasma source compared to Li(+) ions from a hot plate type ion source. He(+) beam pulses as high as 200 mA at the peak and 4 μs long were measured from a multi-aperture 7-cm-diameter emission area. Within ±5% variation, the uniform beam area is approximately 6 cm across. The accelerated and compressed pulsed ion beams can be used for materials studies and isochoric heating of target materials for high energy density physics experiments and WDM studies. PMID:26932070

  9. Development and testing of a pulsed helium ion source for probing materials and warm dense matter studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Q.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Persaud, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Schenkel, T.

    2016-02-01

    The neutralized drift compression experiment was designed and commissioned as a pulsed, linear induction accelerator to drive thin targets to warm dense matter (WDM) states with peak temperatures of ˜1 eV using intense, short pulses (˜1 ns) of 1.2 MeV lithium ions. At that kinetic energy, heating a thin target foil near the Bragg peak energy using He+ ions leads to more uniform energy deposition of the target material than Li+ ions. Experiments show that a higher current density of helium ions can be delivered from a plasma source compared to Li+ ions from a hot plate type ion source. He+ beam pulses as high as 200 mA at the peak and 4 μs long were measured from a multi-aperture 7-cm-diameter emission area. Within ±5% variation, the uniform beam area is approximately 6 cm across. The accelerated and compressed pulsed ion beams can be used for materials studies and isochoric heating of target materials for high energy density physics experiments and WDM studies.

  10. Laser desorption mass spectrometry and small angle neutron scattering of heavy fossil materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.E.; Winans, R.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1997-09-01

    The determination of the structural building blocks and the molecular weight range of heavy hydrocarbon materials is of crucial importance in research on their reactivity and for their processing. The chemically and physically heterogenous nature of heavy hydrocarbon materials, such as coals, heavy petroleum fractions, and residues, dictates that their structure and reactivity patterns be complicated. The problem is further complicated by the fact that the molecular structure and molecular weight distribution of these materials is not dependent on a single molecule, but on a complex mixture of molecules which vary among coals and heavy petroleum samples. Laser Desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) is emerging as a technique for molecular weight determination having found widespread use in biological polymer research, but is still a relatively new technique in the fossil fuel area. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) provides information on the size and shape of heavy fossil materials. SANS offers the advantages of high penetration power even in thick cells at high temperatures and high contrast for hydrocarbon systems dispersed in deuterated solvents. LDMS coupled with time of flight has the advantages of high sensitivity and transmission and high mass range. We have used LDMS to examine various heavy fossil-derived materials including: long chain hydrocarbons, asphaltenes from petroleum vacuum resids, and coals. This paper describes the application of laser desorption and small angle neutron scattering techniques to the analysis of components in coals, petroleum resids and unsaturated polymers.

  11. Effect of vermicomposting on concentration and speciation of heavy metals in sewage sludge with additive materials.

    PubMed

    He, Xin; Zhang, Yaxin; Shen, Maocai; Zeng, Guangming; Zhou, Mucen; Li, Meirong

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the total content and speciation of heavy metals (As, Cr, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) during vermicomposting of sewage sludge by Eisenia fetida earthworm with different additive materials (soil, straw, fly ash and sawdust). Results showed that the pH, total organic carbon were reduced, while the electric conductivity and germination index increased after a combined composting - vermicomposting process. The addition of bulking agents accelerated the stabilization of sludge and eliminated its toxicity. The total heavy metals after vermicomposting in 10 scenarios were lowered as compared with the initial values and the control without amendment. BCR sequential extraction indicated that vermicomposting significantly decreased the mobility of all heavy metals by increasing the residual fractions. The activity of earthworms and appropriate addition of amendment materials played a positive role in sequestering heavy metals during the treatment of sewage sludge. PMID:27434304

  12. Experimental results on the irradiation of nuclear fusion relevant materials at the dense plasma focus ‘Bora’ device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Gribkov, V. A.; Niemela, J.; Tuniz, C.; Zanolli, C.; Chernyshova, M.; Demina, E. V.; Latyshev, S. V.; Pimenov, V. N.; Talab, A. A.

    2015-06-01

    Samples of materials counted as perspective ones for use in the first-wall and construction elements in nuclear fusion reactors (FRs) with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement (W, Ti, Al, low-activated ferritic steel ‘Eurofer’ and some alloys) were irradiated in the dense plasma focus (DPF) device ‘Bora’ having a bank energy of ⩽5 kJ. The device generates hot dense (T ˜ 1 keV, n ˜ 1019 cm-3) deuterium plasma, powerful plasma streams (v ˜ 3 × 107 cm s-1) and fast (E ˜ 0.1 … 1.0 MeV) deuterons of power flux densities q up to 1010 and 1012 W cm-2 correspondingly. ‘Damage factor’ F = q × τ0.5 ensures an opportunity to simulate radiation loads (predictable for both reactors types) by the plasma/ion streams, which have the same nature and namely those parameters as expected in the FR modules. Before and after irradiation we provided investigations of our samples by means of a number of analytical techniques. Among them we used optical and scanning electron microscopy to understand character and parameters of damageability of the surface layers of the samples. Atomic force microscopy was applied to measure roughness of the surface after irradiation. These characteristics are quite important for understanding mechanisms and values of dust production in FR that may relate to tritium retention and emergency situations in FR facilities. We also applied two new techniques. For the surface we elaborated the portable x-ray diffractometer that combines x-ray single photon detection with high spectroscopic and angular resolutions. For bulk damageability investigations we applied an x-ray microCT system where x-rays were produced by a Hamamatsu microfocus source (150 kV, 500 µA, 5 µm minimum focal spot size). The detector was a Hamamatsu CMOS flat panel coupled to a fibre optic plate under the GOS scintillator. The reconstruction of three-dimensional data was run with Cobra 7.4 and DIGIX CT software while VG Studio Max 2.1, and Amira 5.3 were used for

  13. Heavy metal and radionuclide concentrations in fly ash material

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, J.D.; Phagan, C.J.; Gray, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    A study was completed to characterize the concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides and their mobility in two fly ash covered parking lots at the US Department of Energy`s Pantex Plant. Six composite samples collected from the parking areas were analyzed by an offsite contract laboratory for arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, silver, uranium 234, and uranium 238. All metal and radionuclide concentrations except mercury and silver exceeded the applicable comparison standards for typical Pantex Plant soil; however, concentrations of mercury and silver were significantly below the Texas Risk Reduction Standards. In view of these results, it was strongly recommended that fly ash not be used for future projects at the Pantex Plant unless specialized engineering controls are used.

  14. Heavy-ion irradiation induced diamond formation in carbonaceous materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Daulton, T. L.

    1999-01-08

    The basic mechanisms of metastable phase formation produced under highly non-equilibrium thermodynamic conditions within high-energy particle tracks are investigated. In particular, the possible formation of diamond by heavy-ion irradiation of graphite at ambient temperature is examined. This work was motivated, in part, by earlier studies which discovered nanometer-grain polycrystalline diamond aggregates of submicron-size in uranium-rich carbonaceous mineral assemblages of Precambrian age. It was proposed that the radioactive decay of uranium formed diamond in the fission particle tracks produced in the carbonaceous minerals. To test the hypothesis that nanodiamonds can form by ion irradiation, fine-grain polycrystalline graphite sheets were irradiated with 400 MeV Kr ions. The ion irradiated graphite (and unirradiated graphite control) were then subjected to acid dissolution treatments to remove the graphite and isolate any diamonds that were produced. The acid residues were then characterized by analytical and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The acid residues of the ion-irradiated graphite were found to contain ppm concentrations of nanodiamonds, suggesting that ion irradiation of bulk graphite at ambient temperature can produce diamond.

  15. Comparison of filter media materials for heavy metal removal from urban stormwater runoff using biofiltration systems.

    PubMed

    Lim, H S; Lim, W; Hu, J Y; Ziegler, A; Ong, S L

    2015-01-01

    The filter media in biofiltration systems play an important role in removing potentially harmful pollutants from urban stormwater runoff. This study compares the heavy metal removal potential (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb) of five materials (potting soil, compost, coconut coir, sludge and a commercial mix) using laboratory columns. Total/dissolved organic carbon (TOC/DOC) was also analysed because some of the test materials had high carbon content which affects heavy metal uptake/release. Potting soil and the commercial mix offered the best metal uptake when dosed with low (Cu: 44.78 μg/L, Zn: 436.4 μg/L, Cd, 1.82 μg/L, Pb: 51.32 μg/L) and high concentrations of heavy metals (Cu: 241 μg/L, Zn: 1127 μg/L, Cd: 4.57 μg/L, Pb: 90.25 μg/L). Compost and sludge also had high removal efficiencies (>90%). Heavy metal leaching from these materials was negligible. A one-month dry period between dosing experiments did not affect metal removal efficiencies. TOC concentrations from all materials increased after the dry period. Heavy metal removal was not affected by filter media depth (600 mm vs. 300 mm). Heavy metals tended to accumulate at the upper 5 cm of the filter media although potting soil showed bottom-enriched concentrations. We recommend using potting soil as the principal media mixed with compost or sludge since these materials perform well and are readily available. The use of renewable materials commonly found in Singapore supports a sustainable approach to urban water management. PMID:25261749

  16. Radiation damage of heavy crystalline detector materials by 24 GeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barysevich, A.; Dormenev, V.; Fedorov, A.; Glaser, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Korjik, M.; Maas, F.; Mechinski, V.; Rusack, R.; Singovski, A.; Zoueyski, R.

    2013-02-01

    Samples of three heavy crystalline materials: PbWO4, Bi4Si3O12, and PbF2 were irradiated in a high-intensity 24 GeV proton beam at the CERN PS to fluencies of 3.8×1013 protons/cm2. The optical transmission radiation damage was measured and all crystals show a shift of the cutoff in the transmission spectrum that is not observed when the crystals are irradiated with γ radiation. This shift of the cutoff under proton irradiation seems to be a general property of the heavy crystalline materials. A mechanism for this proton-induced transmission damage is discussed.

  17. Mineral materials as feasible amendments to stabilize heavy metals in polluted urban soils.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingkui; Pu, Jincheng

    2011-01-01

    Four minerals, agricultural limestone (AL), rock phosphate (RP), palygorskite (PG), and calcium magnesium phosphate (CMP), were evaluated by means of chemical fractions of heavy metals in soils and concentrations of heavy metals in leachates from columns to determine their ability to stabilize heavy metals in polluted urban soils. Two urban soils (calcareous soil and acidic soil) polluted with cadmium, copper, zinc and lead were selected and amended in the laboratory with the mineral materials) for 12 months. Results indicated that application of the mineral materials reduced exchangeable metals in the sequence of Pb, Cd > Cu > Zn. The reduction of exchangeable fraction of heavy metals in the soils amended with different mineral materials followed the sequence of CMP, PG > AL > RP. Reductions of heavy metals leached were based on comparison with cumulative totals of heavy metals eluted through 12 pore volumes from an untreated soil. The reductions of the metals eluted from the calcareous soil amended with the RP, AL, PG and CMP were 1.98%, 38.89%, 64.81% and 75.93% for Cd, 8.51%, 40.42%, 60.64% and 55.32% for Cu, 1.76%, 52.94%, 70.00% and 74.12% for Pb, and 28.42%, 52.74%, 64.38% and 49.66% for Zn. Those from the acidic soil amended with the CMP, PG, AL, and RP were 25.65%, 68.06%, 78.01% and 79.06% for Cd, 26.56%, 49.64%, 43.40% and 34.68% for Cu, 44.44%, 33.32%, 61.11% and 69.44% for Pb, and 18.46%, 43.77%, 41.98% and 40.68% for Zn. The CMP and PG treatments were superior to the AL and RP for stabilizing heavy metals in the polluted urban soils. PMID:21793403

  18. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semiannual progress report for April 1998 thru September 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1--3 trucks to realize a 35{percent} fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7--8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy-duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies.

  19. The application of prepared porous carbon materials: Effect of different components on the heavy metal adsorption.

    PubMed

    Song, Min; Wei, Yuexing; Yu, Lei; Tang, Xinhong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, five typical municipal solid waste (MSW) components (tyres, cardboard, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), acrylic textile, toilet paper) were used as raw materials to prepare four kinds of MSW-based carbon materials (paperboard-based carbon materials (AC1); the tyres and paperboard-based carbon materials (AC2); the tyres, paperboard and PVC-based carbon materials (AC3); the tyres, paperboard, toilet paper, PVC and acrylic textile-based carbon materials (AC4)) by the KOH activation method. The characteristic results illustrate that the prepared carbon adsorbents exhibited a large pore volume, high surface area and sufficient oxygen functional groups. Furthermore, the application of AC1, AC2, AC3, AC4 on different heavy metal (Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Pb(2+), Cr(3+)) removals was explored to investigate their adsorption properties. The effects of reaction time, pH, temperature and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption capability of heavy metals were investigated. Comparisons of heavy metal adsorption on carbon of different components were carried out. Among the four samples, AC1 exhibits the highest adsorption capacity for Cu(2+); the highest adsorption capacities of Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) are obtained for AC2; that of Cr(3+) are obtained for AC4. In addition, the carbon materials exhibit better adsorption capability of Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) than the other two kind of metal ions (Zn(2+) and Cr(3+)). PMID:26951338

  20. UPTAKE OF HEAVY METALS IN BATCH SYSTEMS BY A RECYCLED IRON-BEARING MATERIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    An iron-bearing material deriving from surface finishing operations in the manufacturing of cast-iron components demonstrates potential for removal of heavy metals from aqueous waste streams. Batch isotherm and rate experiments were conducted for uptake of cadmium, zinc, and lead...

  1. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semiannual progress report for April 1999 through September 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks.

  2. A new material for removing heavy metals from water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, Warren H., Jr.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center developed and is patenting a new high capacity ion exchange material (IEM) that removes toxic metals from contaminated water in laboratory tests. The IEM can be made into many forms, such as thin films, coatings, pellets, and fibers. As a result, it can be adapted to many applications to purify contaminated water wherever it is found, be it in waste water treatment systems, lakes, ponds, industrial plants, or in homes. Laboratory tests have been conducted on aqueous solutions containing only one of the following metal cations: lead, copper, mercury, cadmium, silver, chromium (III), nickel, zinc, and yttrium. Tests were also conducted with: (1) calcium present to determine its effects on the uptake of cadmium and copper, and (2) uranium and lanthanides which are stand-ins for other radioactive elements, (3) drinking water for the removal of copper and lead, and (3) others compositions. The results revealed that the IEM removes all these cations, even in the presence of the calcium. Of particular interest are the results of the tests with the drinking water: the lead concentration was reduced from 142 ppb down to 2.8 ppb (well below the accepted EPA standard).

  3. Issues in heavy fermions and in high-T c superconductive materials raised at this conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, C. M.

    1991-05-01

    In this closing session at the conference I would like, in the light of the presentations at this conference to briefly summarize the remarkable progress achieved in the heavy-fermion and heavy-fermion superconductivity problems, and point to what seem to me the principal problems remaining. The situation in the theory of high- Tc materials, on the face of it, appears much less bright. Unlike the heavy fermions, there is no agreement on what model represents the essentials of the problem. I believe, the difficulty in achieving a consensus here is only partly scientific. It is also sociological. I will paint a rather sanguine picture of the scientific developments there as well.

  4. Heavy Liquid Metal Corrosion of Structural Materials in Advanced Nuclear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caro, M.; Woloshun, K.; Rubio, F.; Maloy, S. A.; Hosemann, P.

    2013-08-01

    Interest in advanced nuclear concepts using liquid metal coolant has increased in the past few years. Liquid metal coolants have been proposed for the next generation of small-sized nuclear reactors, which offer exceptional safety and reliability, sustainability, nonproliferation, and economic competitiveness. Heavy liquid metal coolants are investigated for advanced fast reactors that operate at high temperatures, reaching high efficiencies. Lead and lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolants are also proposed as coolants and targets of accelerator driven systems. High temperature, corrosive environment, high fast neutron flux, high fluence, and radiation damage, among other physical phenomena, challenge the integrity of materials in these advanced systems. Excellent compatibility with the liquid coolant is recognized as a key factor in the selection of structural materials for advanced concepts. In this article, we review materials requirements for heavy metal cooled systems with emphasis on lead and LBE materials corrosion properties. We describe experimental corrosion tests currently ongoing at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Development of Lead Alloy Technical Applications (DELTA) loop. DELTA is a facility designed to study the long-term corrosive effects of LBE on structural materials under relevant conditions of chemistry, flow, and temperature. The research studies will provide data of corrosion rates and corrosion mechanisms in selected steel exposed to high velocity (above 2 m/s) in flowing LBE at 500°C. Fundamental research studies will help support conceptual design efforts and further the development of heavy liquid metals technology.

  5. Dense and nanometric electronic excitations induced by swift heavy ions in an ionic CaF2 crystal: Evidence for two thresholds of damage creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toulemonde, M.; Benyagoub, A.; Trautmann, C.; Khalfaoui, N.; Boccanfuso, M.; Dufour, C.; Gourbilleau, F.; Grob, J. J.; Stoquert, J. P.; Costantini, J. M.; Haas, F.; Jacquet, E.; Voss, K.-O.; Meftah, A.

    2012-02-01

    CaF2 crystals as representatives of the class of ionic nonamorphizable insulators were irradiated with many different swift heavy ions of energy above 0.5 MeV/u providing a broad range of electronic energy losses (Se). Beam-induced modifications were characterized by Channeling Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (C-RBS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD), complemented by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results from C-RBS give evidence of significant damage appearing above a Se threshold of 5 ± 2 keV/nm. A second critical Se appears around 18 ± 3 keV/nm; below this value the damage as function of ion fluence saturates at 20%, while above this the damage saturation level increases with Se, reaching ˜60% for ions of Se = 30 keV/nm. XRD measurements also show effects indicating two threshold values. Above 5 keV/nm, the widths of the XRD reflection peaks increase due to the formation of nanograins, as seen by TEM, while a significant decrease of the peak areas only occurs above 18 keV/nm. The track radii deduced from C-RBS measurements are in agreement with those extracted from the fluence evolution of the widths of the XRD peaks. Moreover, track radii deduced from the peak area analysis are slightly smaller but in agreement with previous track observations by high resolution electron microscopy. Calculations based on the inelastic thermal spike model suggest that the lower threshold at 5 keV/nm is linked to the quenching of the molten phase, whereas the threshold at 18 keV/nm can be interpreted as quenching of the boiling phase. The results of CaF2 are compared with other nonamorphizable materials such as LiF and UO2.

  6. Adsorption of mixtures of nutrients and heavy metals in simulated urban stormwater by different filter materials.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Krishna R; Xie, Tao; Dastgheibi, Sara

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, several best management practices have been developed for the removal of different types of pollutants from stormwater runoff that lead to effective stormwater management. Filter materials that remove a wide range of contaminants have great potential for extensive use in filtration systems. In this study, four filter materials (calcite, zeolite, sand, and iron filings) were investigated for their adsorption and efficiency in the removal of nutrients and heavy metals when they exist individually versus when they co-exist. Laboratory batch experiments were conducted separately under individual and mixed contaminants conditions at different initial concentrations. Adsorption capacities varied under the individual and mixed contaminant conditions due to different removal mechanisms. Most filter materials showed lower removal efficiency under mixed contaminant conditions. In general, iron filings were found effective in the removal of nutrients and heavy metals simultaneously to the maximum levels. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were used to model the batch adsorption results and the former better fitted the experimental results. Overall, the results indicate that the filter materials used in this study have the potential to be effective media for the treatment of nutrients and heavy metals commonly found in urban stormwater runoff. PMID:24410683

  7. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program: Semiannual progress report, April 1996--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55% efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55% efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies. OTT OHVT also recognizes a significant opportunity for reduction in petroleum consumption by dieselization of pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. Application of the diesel engine to class 1, 2, and 3 trucks is expected to yield a 35% increase in fuel economy per vehicle. The foremost barrier to diesel use in this market is emission control. Once an engine is made certifiable, subsequent challenges will be in cost; noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH); and performance. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the database for contributions to this report.

  8. Geometrical Optics of Dense Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Michael J.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2013-04-24

    Assembling a free-standing, sharp-edged slab of homogeneous material that is much denser than gas, but much more rare ed than a solid, is an outstanding technological challenge. The solution may lie in focusing a dense aerosol to assume this geometry. However, whereas the geometrical optics of dilute aerosols is a well-developed fi eld, the dense aerosol limit is mostly unexplored. Yet controlling the geometrical optics of dense aerosols is necessary in preparing such a material slab. Focusing dense aerosols is shown here to be possible, but the nite particle density reduces the eff ective Stokes number of the flow, a critical result for controlled focusing. __________________________________________________

  9. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program Semiannual Progress Report for October 1998 Through March 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.D.

    1999-06-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OIT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55% efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NOX and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulate. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55% efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies. OIT OHVT also recognizes a significant opportunity for reduction in petroleum consumption by dieselization of pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. Application of the diesel engine to class 1,2, and 3 trucks is expected to yield a 35% increase in fuel economy per vehicle. The foremost barrier to diesel use in this market is emission control. Once an engine is made certifiable, subsequent challenges will be in cost; noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH); and performance. The design of advanced components for high-efficiency diesel engines has, in some cases, pushed the performance envelope for materials of construction past the point of reliable operation. Higher mechanical and

  10. Marriage of heavy main group elements with π-conjugated materials for optoelectronic applications.

    PubMed

    Parke, Sarah M; Boone, Michael P; Rivard, Eric

    2016-08-01

    This review article summarizes recent progress in the synthesis and optoelectronic properties of conjugated materials containing heavy main group elements from Group 13-16 as integral components. As will be discussed, the introduction of these elements can promote novel phosphorescent behavior and support desirable molecular and polymeric properties such as low optical band gaps and high charge mobilities for photovoltaic and thin film transistor applications. PMID:27344980

  11. Heavy wax distillate as a raw material for the production of solid hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Gundyrev, R.A.; Fokina, T.V.; Garun, Y.E.; Kazakova, L.P.; Sochevko, T.I.

    1984-07-01

    This article discusses the feasibility of recovering solid hydrocarbons from a heavy wax distillate in order to expand the raw material base for the production of high-melting waxes. The examined distillate has a melting point of 45/sup 0/C, a wax content of 34% by weight, a viscosity (at 100/sup 0/C) of 8.2 mm/sup 2//sec, a molecular weight of 345, a content of paraffinic and naphthenic hydrocarbons of 59.1% by weight, contents of aromatic hydrocarbons (light, medium and heavy) of 8.9%, 5.1%, and 20.4% by weight, respectively, and a content of hydrocarbons forming and not forming urea adducts of 21.8% and 78.2%, respectively. The heavy wax distillate was filtered in a Bogdanov laboratory unit containing a filter press consisting of a crystallizer and a slack wax chamber. The filtration residue from the crystallizer beaker and the slack wax cake from the wax chamber are collected in a preweighed container. It is concluded that the heavy wax distillate can be successfully dewaxed for wax production if it is modified by dilution with a filtrate and the incorporation of a structure modifier.

  12. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program Semiannual Progress Report for April 2000 Through September 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, DR

    2000-12-11

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advantages LE-55 diesel engines with 55% efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NOx and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55% efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies. OTT OHVT also recognizes a significant opportunity for reduction in petroleum consumption by dieselization of pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. Application of the diesel engine to class 1, 2, and 3 trucks is expected to yield a 35% increase in fuel economy per vehicle. The foremost barrier to diesel use in this market is emission control. Once an engine is made certifiable, subsequent challenges will be in cost; noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH); and performance. The design of advanced components for high-efficiency diesel engines has, in some cases, pushed the performance envelope for materials of construction past the point of reliable operation. Higher mechanical and

  13. Functional Material Features of Bombyx mori Silk Light vs. Heavy Chain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Muhammad S.; Belton, David J.; Hanby, Benjamin; Kaplan, David L.; Perry, Carole C.

    2016-01-01

    Bombyx mori (BM) silk fibroin is composed of two different subunits; heavy chain and light chain fibroin linked by a covalent disulphide bond. Current methods of separating the two silk fractions is complicated and produces inadequate quantities of the isolated components for the study of the individual light and heavy chain silks with respect to new materials. We report a simple method of separating silk fractions using formic acid. The formic acid treatment partially releases predominately the light chain fragment (soluble fraction) and then the soluble fraction and insoluble fractions can be converted into new materials. The regenerated original (total) silk fibroin and the separated fractions (soluble vs. insoluble) had different molecular weights and showed distinctive pH stabilities against aggregation/precipitation based on particle charging. All silk fractions could be electrospun to give fibre mats with viscosity of the regenerated fractions being the controlling factor for successful electrospinning. The silk fractions could be mixed to give blends with different proportions of the two fractions to modify the diameter and uniformity of the electrospun fibres formed. The soluble fraction containing the light chain was able to modify the viscosity by thinning the insoluble fraction containing heavy chain fragments, perhaps analogous to its role in natural fibre formation where the light chain provides increased mobility and the heavy chain producing shear thickening effects. The simplicity of this new separation method should enable access to these different silk protein fractions and accelerate the identification of methods, modifications and potential applications of these materials in biomedical and industrial applications. PMID:25565556

  14. [Speciation Distribution and Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Typical Material Roof Dusts].

    PubMed

    Li, Dun-zhu; Guan, Yun-tao; Liu, An; Li, Si-yuan

    2015-09-01

    With the modified BCR sequential extraction procedure, the chemical speciation and risk for 10 heavy metals (Ba, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sr and Zn) in roof dusts were investigated. The subjects of this study were collected from four typical material paved roofs (i. e., ceramic tile, concrete, metal and asphalt) in southeast China. The results indicated that the average contents of heavy metals in roof dust significantly exceeded road dust. The analysis of chemical fraction showed that the acid soluble/exchangeable fraction of Zn was much higher than other elements, the existence of Pb and Cu was mainly in oxidization fraction, while other heavy metals dominated by the residual fraction. The mobility sequence percentages for all roof dust samples decreased in the order of Pb > Zn > Cu >Mn > Co >Sr > Sb > Ni > Ba > Cr, and it should be noted that Pb, Zn, Cu, Mn and Co all have more than 50% proportion in mobility sequence. Based on environmental risk assessment, the highest values of contamination factors (Cf) and risk assessment code (RAC) consistently was observed in Zn, which indicated that Zn had relatively high ecological risk. Health risk assessment showed that the non-carcinogenic hazard indexes (HI) of heavy metals decreased in the order of Pb > Cr > Sb > Zn > Mn > Cu > Ba > Ni > Co > Sr, the HI of heavy metals for adults were lower than safe value while the HI of Pb for children was higher than safe value, suggesting that they will not harm the adult's health except Pb for children. The carcinogenic risk for Cr, Co and Ni were all below the threshold values, which indicated that there was no carcinogenic risk. PMID:26717687

  15. High temperature solid lubricant materials for heavy duty and advanced heat engines

    SciTech Connect

    DellaCorte, C.; Wood, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    Advanced engine designs incorporate higher mechanical and thermal loading to achieve efficiency improvements. This approach often leads to higher operating temperatures of critical sliding elements (e.g. piston ring/cylinder wall contacts and valve guides) which compromise the use of conventional and even advanced synthetic liquid lubricants. For these applications solid lubricants must be considered. Several novel solid lubricant composites and coatings designated PS/PM200 have been employed to dry and marginally oil lubricated contacts in advanced heat engines. These applications include cylinder kits of heavy duty diesels, and high temperature sterling engines, sidewall seals of rotary engines and various exhaust valve and exhaust component applications. The following paper describes the tribological and thermophysical properties of these tribomaterials and reviews the results of applying them to engine applications. Other potential tribological materials and applications are also discussed with particular emphasis to heavy duty and advanced heat engines.

  16. Estimates of Sputter Yields of Solar-Wind Heavy Ions of Lunar Regolith Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, Abdulmasser F.; Adams, James H., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    At energies of approximately 1 keV/amu, solar-wind protons and heavy ions interact with the lunar surface materials via a number of microscopic interactions that include sputtering. Solar-wind induced sputtering is a main mechanism by which the composition of the topmost layers of the lunar surface can change, dynamically and preferentially. This work concentrates on sputtering induced by solar-wind heavy ions. Sputtering associated with slow (speeds the electrons speed in its first Bohr orbit) and highly charged ions are known to include both kinetic and potential sputtering. Potential sputtering enjoys some unique characteristics that makes it of special interest to lunar science and exploration. Unlike the yield from kinetic sputtering where simulation and approximation schemes exist, the yield from potential sputtering is not as easy to estimate. This work will present a preliminary numerical scheme designed to estimate potential sputtering yields from reactions relevant to this aspect of solar-wind lunar-surface coupling.

  17. High Temperature Solid Lubricant Materials for Heavy Duty and Advanced Heat Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, C.; Wood, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced engine designs incorporate higher mechanical and thermal loading to achieve efficiency improvements. This approach often leads to higher operating temperatures of critical sliding elements (e.g. piston ring/cylinder wall contacts and valve guides) which compromise the use of conventional and even advanced synthetic liquid lubricants. For these applications solid lubricants must be considered. Several novel solid lubricant composites and coatings designated PS/PM200 have been employed to dry and marginally oil lubricated contacts in advanced heat engines. These applications include cylinder kits of heavy duty diesels, and high temperature Stirling engines, sidewall seals of rotary engines, and various exhaust valve and exhaust component applications. This paper describes the tribological and thermophysical properties of these tribomaterials and reviews the results of applying them to engine applications. Other potential tribological materials and applications are also discussed with particular emphasis on heavy duty and advanced heat engines.

  18. Sucrose as a dosimetric material for photon and heavy particle radiation: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakirova, Yordanka; Yordanov, Nicola D.

    2015-05-01

    The application of high-energy radiation in many areas of human activity and its harmful effects on human health makes necessary knowledge of the radiation chemistry of various materials upon exposure to high-energy radiation. Among these materials, saccharides (particularly sucrose) maintain the greatest advantage for potential radiochemistry applications. Until now, radiation chemistry studies have been conducted primarily with γ-ray irradiation; however, in the past few years there has been increased interest in the fields of radiotherapy and radiochemistry on substances irradiated with heavy particles. To this end, this review discusses the possibilities of employing sucrose as a radiation-sensitive material for the determination of absorbed doses of high-energy radiation both for emergency situations and for dosimeters used in standard applications.

  19. Solidification/stabilization of heavy metal contaminated mine tailings using polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, K.; Kim, T.; Lee, H.

    2009-12-01

    Polymeric materials in addition to Portland cement and hydrated limes were used to solidify and stabilize heavy metal contaminated tailings from five abandoned metal mines in Korea. Mine tailings were mixed separately with Portland cement and hydrated lime at a concentration of 20-30 wt% and 6-9 wt%, respectively and Ethylene Vinyl Acetate (EVA) powder was added to each specimen at a ratio of 2.5 and 5.0 wt% to binders. Polymer-added and polymer-free solidified/stabilized (s/s) forms were evaluated for their appropriateness in accordance with the suggested test methods. Regardless of addition of polymeric materials, all s/s forms satisfy the uniaxial comprehensive strength (USC) requirements (0.35MPa) for land reclamation and show remarkably reduced leaching concentrations of heavy metals such as As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn less than the toxicity criteria of Korean standard leaching test (KSLT). The addition of polymeric materials increased the USC of s/s forms to improve a long-term stability of s/s mine tailings.

  20. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program semiannual progress report for October 1996 through March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The design of advanced components for high-efficiency diesel engines has, in some cases, pushed the performance envelope for materials of construction past the point of reliable operation. Higher mechanical and tribological stresses and higher temperatures of advanced designs limit the engine designers; advanced materials allow the design of components that may operate reliably at higher stresses and temperatures, thus enabling more efficient engine designs. Advanced materials also offer the opportunity to improve the emissions, NVH, and performance of diesel engines for pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. The principal areas of research are: (1) cost effective high performance materials and processing; (2) advanced manufacturing technology; (3) testing and characterization; and (4) materials and testing standards.

  1. Dense Plasma Focus: physics and applications (radiation material science, single-shot disclosure of hidden illegal objects, radiation biology and medicine, etc.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribkov, V. A.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Zielinska, E.; Chernyshova, M.; Pisarczyk, T.; Pimenov, V. N.; Demina, E. V.; Niemela, J.; Crespo, M.-L.; Cicuttin, A.; Tomaszewski, K.; Sadowski, M. J.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Pytel, K.; Zawadka, A.; Giannini, G.; Longo, F.; Talab, A.; Ul'yanenko, S. E.

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents some outcomes obtained during the year of 2013 of the activity in the frame of the International Atomic Energy Agency Co-ordinated research project "Investigations of Materials under High Repetition and Intense Fusion-Relevant Pulses". The main results are related to the effects created at the interaction of powerful pulses of different types of radiation (soft and hard X-rays, hot plasma and fast ion streams, neutrons, etc. generated in Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) facilities) with various materials including those that are counted as perspective ones for their use in future thermonuclear reactors. Besides we discuss phenomena observed at the irradiation of biological test objects. We examine possible applications of nanosecond powerful pulses of neutrons to the aims of nuclear medicine and for disclosure of hidden illegal objects. Special attention is devoted to discussions of a possibility to create extremely large and enormously diminutive DPF devices and probabilities of their use in energetics, medicine and modern electronics.

  2. Laser-induced fusion in ultra-dense deuterium D(-1): Optimizing MeV particle emission by carrier material selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmlid, Leif

    2013-02-01

    Power generation by laser-induced nuclear fusion in ultra-dense deuterium D(-1) requires that the carrier material interacts correctly with D(-1) prior to the laser pulse and also during the laser pulse. In previous studies, the interaction between the superfluid D(-1) layer and various carrier materials prior to the laser pulse has been investigated. It was shown that organic polymer materials do not give a condensed D(-1) layer. Metal surfaces carry thicker D(-1) layers useful for fusion. Here, the interaction between the carrier and the nuclear fusion process is investigated by observing the MeV particle emission (e.g. 14 MeV protons) using twelve different carrier materials and two different methods of detection. Several factors have been analyzed for the performance of the carrier materials: the hardness and the melting point of the material, and the chemical properties of the surface layer. The best performance is found for the high-melting metals Ti and Ta, but also Cu performs well as carrier despite its low melting point. The unexpectedly meager performance of Ni and Ir may be due to their catalytic activity towards hydrogen which may give atomic association to deuterium molecules at the low D2 pressure used.

  3. Dense nitrogen-rich energetic materials: a study of 5,5'-bis(1H-tetrazolyl)amine [corrected].

    PubMed

    Laniel, Dominique; Sebastiao, Elena; Cook, Cyril; Murugesu, Muralee; Hu, Anguang; Zhang, Fan; Desgreniers, Serge

    2014-05-14

    5,5'-bis(1H-tetrazolyl)amine (BTA), a nitrogen rich molecular solid has been investigated under compression at room temperature [corrected]. Powder x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation and micro-Raman spectroscopy were carried out to pressures up to 12.9 GPa. BTA conserves the crystalline structure of its room condition phase up to the highest pressure, i.e., an orthorhombic unit cell (Pbca). A fit of the isothermal compression data to the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state reveals the high compressibility of BTA. An analysis of the volume change with pressure yields a bulk modulus and its derivative similar to that of high-nitrogen content molecular crystals. Upon laser heating to approximately 1100 K, the sample decomposed while pressurized at 2.1 GPa, resulting in a graphitic compound. Finally, numerical simulations demonstrate that the minimum energy conformation is not experimentally observed since a higher energy conformation allows for a more stable dense packing of the BTA molecules. PMID:24832293

  4. Dense nitrogen-rich energetic materials: A study of 5,5{sup ′}-(1H-tetrazolyl)amine

    SciTech Connect

    Laniel, Dominique; Desgreniers, Serge; Sebastiao, Elena; Cook, Cyril; Murugesu, Muralee; Hu, Anguang; Zhang, Fan

    2014-05-14

    5,5{sup ′}-(1H-tetrazolyl)amine (BTA), a nitrogen rich molecular solid has been investigated under compression at room temperature. Powder x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation and micro-Raman spectroscopy were carried out to pressures up to 12.9 GPa. BTA conserves the crystalline structure of its room condition phase up to the highest pressure, i.e., an orthorhombic unit cell (Pbca). A fit of the isothermal compression data to the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state reveals the high compressibility of BTA. An analysis of the volume change with pressure yields a bulk modulus and its derivative similar to that of high-nitrogen content molecular crystals. Upon laser heating to approximately 1100 K, the sample decomposed while pressurized at 2.1 GPa, resulting in a graphitic compound. Finally, numerical simulations demonstrate that the minimum energy conformation is not experimentally observed since a higher energy conformation allows for a more stable dense packing of the BTA molecules.

  5. Mass accumulation rate of detrital materials in Lake Suigetsu as a potential proxy for heavy precipitation: a comparison of the observational precipitation and sedimentary record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Tada, Ryuji; Yamada, Kazuyoshi; Irino, Tomohisa; Nagashima, Kana; Nakagawa, Takeshi; Omori, Takayuki

    2016-02-01

    In the densely populated region of East Asia, it is important to know the mechanism, scale, and frequency of heavy precipitation brought about during the monsoons and typhoons. However, observational data, which cover only several decades, are insufficient to examine the long-term trend of extreme precipitation and its background mechanism. In humid areas, the transport flux of a suspended detrital material through a river system is known to have an empirical power relationship with precipitation. Thus, the sedimentation flux of a fine detrital material could potentially be used as a proxy for reconstructing past heavy precipitation events. To test the idea that the sedimentation flux of detrital materials records past heavy precipitation events (e.g., typhoons), we focused on the detrital flux estimated from the annually laminated sediment of Lake Suigetsu, central Japan, which is capable of accurately correlating the age of detrital flux with the precipitation record. We first established a precise age model (error within ±1 year in average) beginning in 1920 A.D. on the basis of varve counting fine-tuned by correlation between event layers with historical floods. The flux of the detrital material (g/cm2/year) was estimated on the basis of Al2O3 content (wt%), dry bulk density (g/cm3), and sedimentation rate (cm/year) calculated from the age model. The detrital flux of background sedimentation showed a weak positive correlation with annual and monthly (June and September) precipitation excluding heavy precipitation that exceeded 100 mm/day. Furthermore, the thickness of instantaneous event layers, which corresponds to several maxima of detrital flux and is correlated with floods that occurred mainly during typhoons, showed a positive relationship with the total amount of precipitation that caused a flood event. This result suggests that the detrital flux maxima (deposition of event layers) record past extreme precipitation events that were likely associated with

  6. Solar-Wind Protons and Heavy Ions Sputtering of Lunar Surface Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Barghouty, N.; Meyer, Fred W; Harris, Peter R

    2011-01-01

    Lunar surface materials are exposed to {approx}1 keV/amu solar-wind protons and heavy ions on almost continuous basis. As the lunar surface consists of mostly oxides, these materials suffer, in principle, both kinetic and potential sputtering due to the actions of the solar-wind ions. Sputtering is an important mechanism affecting the composition of both the lunar surface and its tenuous exosphere. While the contribution of kinetic sputtering to the changes in the composition of the surface layer of these oxides is well understood and modeled, the role and implications of potential sputtering remain unclear. As new potential-sputtering data from multi-charged ions impacting lunar regolith simulants are becoming available from Oak Ridge National Laboratory's MIRF, we examine the role and possible implications of potential sputtering of Lunar KREEP soil. Using a non-equilibrium model we demonstrate that solar-wind heavy ions induced sputtering is critical in establishing the timescale of the overall solar-wind sputtering process of the lunar surface. We also show that potential sputtering leads to a more pronounced and significant differentiation between depleted and enriched surface elements. We briefly discuss the impacts of enhanced sputtering on the composition of the regolith and the exosphere, as well as of solar-wind sputtering as a source of hydrogen and water on the moon.

  7. Setup for in situ x-ray diffraction study of swift heavy ion irradiated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kulriya, P. K.; Singh, F.; Tripathi, A.; Ahuja, R.; Kothari, A.; Dutt, R. N.; Mishra, Y. K.; Kumar, Amit; Avasthi, D. K.

    2007-11-15

    An in situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) setup is designed and installed in the materials science beam line of the Pelletron accelerator at the Inter-University Accelerator Centre for in situ studies of phase change in swift heavy ion irradiated materials. A high vacuum chamber with suitable windows for incident and diffracted X-rays is integrated with the goniometer and the beamline. Indigenously made liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) temperature sample cooling unit is installed. The snapshots of growth of particles with fluence of 90 MeV Ni ions were recorded using in situ XRD experiment, illustrating the potential of this in situ facility. A thin film of C{sub 60} was used to test the sample cooling unit. It shows that the phase of the C{sub 60} film transforms from a cubic lattice (at room temperature) to a fcc lattice at around T=255 K.

  8. Nanocrystalline materials for the dosimetry of heavy charged particles: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, Numan

    2011-01-01

    Thermally stimulated luminescence or better known as thermoluminescence (TL) is a powerful technique extensively used for dosimetry of ionizing radiations. TL dosimeter (TLD) materials presently in use are inorganic crystalline materials. They are in the form of chips, single crystals or microcrystalline size powder. The most popular are LiF:Mg,Ti, LiF:Mg,Cu,P, CaSO 4:Dy, CaF 2:Dy and Al 2O 3:C. However, these TLD materials are not capable of precisely detecting heavy charged particles (HCP) irradiations in their present forms. The saturation effect is the major problem, which occurs at relatively low fluences (doses). Moreover, there is a significant variation in the TL glow curves structure with increase in doses, which is undesirable for the use in dosimetry. However, with the use of very tiny particles such as nanoscale TLD materials, this problem is overcome to a major extent. The TL results of the recently reported nanomaterials have revealed very imperative characteristics such as high sensitivity and saturation at very high doses. Recent studies on different luminescent nanomaterials showed that they have a potential application in dosimetry of heavy charged particles using TL technique, where the conventional microcrystalline phosphors saturate. This paper is a review on the prepared TLD nanomaterials, studied for their TL response to HCP. These are CaSO 4:Dy, LiF:Mg,Cu,P, K 2Ca 2(SO 4) 3:Eu and Ba 0.97Ca 0.03SO 4:Eu nanomaterials. The important results obtained in these nanomaterials and the possibility of using them as HCP dosimeters are discussed.

  9. A Linkage Between Parent Materials of Soil and Potential Risk of Heavy Metals in Yunnan province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, X.

    2015-12-01

    A large area exceeding soil quality standards for heavy metals in South western China has been identified previously reported on a nationwide survey of soil pollution, yet the ecological risk of heavy metal in soil is unknown or uncertainty.To assess thoroughly the ecological risk in this region, seven soil profiles with a depth of 2m on the different parent materials of soil were conducted in Yunnan province, China, and the level of total concentrations and the fraction of water soluble, ion exchangeable, carbonates, humic acid, iron and manganese oxides and organic matter of As, Cd, Hg and Pb was investigated in soil profiles. The results indicate that parent materials of soil critically influenced the ecological risk of heavy metal.The fraction of water soluble and ion exchangeable of Cd and Hg in alluvial material and in terrigenous clastic rocks showed 2-6 times higher than those in carbonate rock; As and Pb has almost same fraction of water soluble and ion exchangeable in three parent materials of soil.The findings suggest that parent materials of soil play a critical role in ecological risk of heavy metal.Thus, more studies are needed to better understand a linkage between the parent materials of soil, different soil-forming processes and the potential risk of heavy metals under various geographic conditions, which is the key for the evaluating soil quality and food safety. Those soils with high concentration of Cd and Hg originated alluvial material and terrigenous clastic rocks need to be continuously monitored before determining a cost-effective remediation technology. Keywords: Heavy metals; Ecological risk;Parent materials of soil;China

  10. The role of different factors related to social impact of heavy rain events: considerations about the intensity thresholds in densely populated areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbería, L.; Amaro, J.; Aran, M.; Llasat, M. C.

    2014-07-01

    In the assessment of social impact caused by meteorological events, factors of different natures need to be considered. Not only does hazard itself determine the impact that a severe weather event has on society, but also other features related to vulnerability and exposure. The requests of data related to insurance claims received in meteorological services proved to be a good indicator of the social impact that a weather event causes, according to studies carried out by the Social Impact Research Group, created within the framework of the MEDEX project. Taking these requests as proxy data, diverse aspects connected to the impact of heavy rain events have been studied. Understanding TeV-band The rainfall intensity, in conjunction with the population density, has established itself as one of the key factors in social impact studies. One of the conclusions we obtained is that various thresholds of rainfall should be applied for areas of varying populations. In this study, the role of rainfall intensity has been analysed for a highly populated urban area like Barcelona. A period without significant population changes has been selected for the study to minimise the effects linked to vulnerability and exposure modifications. First, correlations between rainfall recorded in different time intervals and requests were carried out. Afterwards, a method to include the intensity factor in the social impact index was suggested based on return periods given by intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves.

  11. The role of different factors related to social impact of heavy rain events: considerations about the intensity thresholds in densely populated areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbería, L.; Amaro, J.; Aran, M.; Llasat, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    In the assessment of social impact caused by meteorological events, factors of different nature need to be considered. Not only does hazard itself determine the impact that a severe weather event has on society, but also other features related to vulnerability and exposure. The requests of data related to insurance claims received in Meteorological Services proved to be a good indicator of the social impact that a weather event causes, according to studies carried out by the Social Impact Research Group, created under the frame of the MEDEX project. Taking these requests as proxy data, diverse aspects connected to the impact of heavy rain events have been studied. The rainfall intensity in conjunction with the population density has demonstrated to be one of the key factors in social impact studies. One of the conclusions we obtained is that various thresholds of rainfall should be applied for differently populated areas. In this study, the role of rainfall intensity has been analysed for a highly populated urban area like Barcelona. A period without significant population changes has been selected for the study to minimise the effects linked to vulnerability and exposure. First, correlations between rainfall recorded in different time intervals and requests have been carried out. Afterwards, a method to include the intensity factor in the social impact index has been suggested, based on return periods given by Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves.

  12. Heavy ion track-structure calculations for radial dose in arbitrary materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Katz, Robert; Wilson, John W.; Dubey, Rajendra R.

    1995-01-01

    The delta-ray theory of track structure is compared with experimental data for the radial dose from heavy ion irradiation. The effects of electron transmission and the angular dependence of secondary electron ejection are included in the calculations. Several empirical formulas for electron range and energy are compared in a wide variety of materials in order to extend the application of the track-structure theory. The model of Rudd for the secondary electron-spectrum in proton collisions, which is based on a modified classical kinematics binary encounter model at high energies and a molecular promotion model at low energies, is employed. For heavier projectiles, the secondary electron spectrum is found by scaling the effective charge. Radial dose calculations for carbon, water, silicon, and gold are discussed. The theoretical data agreed well with the experimental data.

  13. STAR heavy flavor tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Hao

    2014-11-01

    Hadrons containing heavy quarks are a clean probe of the early dynamic evolution of the dense and hot medium created in high-energy nuclear collisions. To explore heavy quark production at RHIC, the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) for the STAR experiment was built and installed in time for RHIC Run 14. The HFT consists of four layers of silicon detectors. The two outermost layers are silicon strip detectors and the two innermost layers are made from state-of-the-art ultra-thin CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS). This is the first application of a CMOS MAPS detector in a collider experiment. The use of thin pixel sensors plus the use of carbon fiber supporting material limits the material budget to be only 0.4% radiation length per pixel detector layer, enabling the reconstruction of low pT heavy flavor hadrons. The status and performance of the HFT in the RHIC 200 GeV Au + Au run in 2014 are reported. Very good detector efficiency, hit residuals and track resolution (DCAs) were observed in the cosmic ray data and in the Au + Au data.

  14. Uniform heating of materials into the warm dense matter regime with laser-driven quasimonoenergetic ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Vold, E. L.; Boettger, J. C.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    In a recent experiment at the Trident laser facility, a laser-driven beam of quasimonoenergetic aluminum ions was used to heat solid gold and diamond foils isochorically to 5.5 and 1.7 eV, respectively. Here theoretical calculations are presented that suggest the gold and diamond were heated uniformly by these laser-driven ion beams. According to calculations and SESAME equation-of-state tables, laser-driven aluminum ion beams achievable at Trident, with a finite energy spread of ΔE /E ˜20 %, are expected to heat the targets more uniformly than a beam of 140-MeV aluminum ions with zero energy spread. The robustness of the expected heating uniformity relative to the changes in the incident ion energy spectra is evaluated, and expected plasma temperatures of various target materials achievable with the current experimental platform are presented.

  15. Uniform heating of materials into the warm dense matter regime with laser-driven quasimonoenergetic ion beams

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Vold, E. L.; Boettger, J. C.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    In a recent experiment at the Trident laser facility, a laser-driven beam of quasimonoenergetic aluminum ions was used to heat solid gold and diamond foils isochorically to 5.5 and 1.7 eV, respectively. Here theoretical calculations are presented that suggest the gold and diamond were heated uniformly by these laser-driven ion beams. According to calculations and SESAME equation-of-state tables, laser-driven aluminum ion beams achievable at Trident, with a finite energy spread of ΔE/E~20%, are expected to heat the targets more uniformly than a beam of 140-MeV aluminum ions with zero energy spread. As a result, the robustness of the expected heatingmore » uniformity relative to the changes in the incident ion energy spectra is evaluated, and expected plasma temperatures of various target materials achievable with the current experimental platform are presented.« less

  16. Uniform heating of materials into the warm dense matter regime with laser-driven quasimonoenergetic ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Vold, E. L.; Boettger, J. C.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    In a recent experiment at the Trident laser facility, a laser-driven beam of quasimonoenergetic aluminum ions was used to heat solid gold and diamond foils isochorically to 5.5 and 1.7 eV, respectively. Here theoretical calculations are presented that suggest the gold and diamond were heated uniformly by these laser-driven ion beams. According to calculations and SESAME equation-of-state tables, laser-driven aluminum ion beams achievable at Trident, with a finite energy spread of ΔE/E~20%, are expected to heat the targets more uniformly than a beam of 140-MeV aluminum ions with zero energy spread. As a result, the robustness of the expected heating uniformity relative to the changes in the incident ion energy spectra is evaluated, and expected plasma temperatures of various target materials achievable with the current experimental platform are presented.

  17. Phase transformations in Ln2O3 materials irradiated with swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, Cameron L.; Lang, Maik; Zhang, Fuxiang; Trautmann, Christina; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2015-11-01

    Phase transformations induced in the cubic C-type lanthanide sesquioxides, Ln2O3 (Ln = Sm, Gd, Ho, Tm, and Lu), by dense electronic excitation are investigated. The structural modifications resulting from exposure to beams of 185 MeV Xe and 2246 MeV Au ions are characterized using synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The formation of a B-type polymorph, an X-type nonequilibrium phase, and an amorphous phase are observed. The specific phase formed and the transformation rate show dependence on the material composition, as well as the ion beam mass and energy. Atomistic mechanisms for these transformations are determined, indicating that formation of the B-type phase results from the production of anti-Frenkel defects and the aggregation of anion vacancies into planar clusters, whereas formation of the X-type and amorphous phases requires extensive displacement of both anions and cations. The observed variations in phase behavior with changing lanthanide ionic radius and deposited electronic energy density are related to the energetics of these transformation mechanisms.

  18. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semi-annual progress report for October 1997 through March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1--3 trucks to realize a 35{percent} fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7--8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy-duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies.

  19. Heavy metal uptake, translocation, and bioaccumulation studies of Triticum aestivum cultivated in contaminated dredged materials.

    PubMed

    Shumaker, Ketia L; Begonia, Gregorio

    2005-08-01

    Phytoremediation is a technology that uses vegetation to remediate contaminants from water, soil, and sediments. Unlike traditional remediation techniques such as soil washing or vitrification, phytoremediation offers a technology that is solar-driven, aesthetically pleasing, and cost effective. Recent studies indicate that winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is a potential accumulator for heavy metals such as lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) in hydroponic systems. Based on these findings, a laboratory study was conducted with the primary objective of determining the phytoaccumulation capability of this plant species for heavy metals from contaminated dredged materials (DMs) originating from two confined disposal facilities (CDF). The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) manages several hundred million cubic meters of DMs each year, and 5 to 10 % of these DMs require special handling because they are contaminated with hazardous substances that can move from the substrates into food webs causing unacceptable risk outside CDFs. Phytoremediation may offer an alternative to decrease this risk. Chemical analyses by USACE personnel identified 17 metals in various DMs, but in this present study, only zinc (Zn) and Cd were investigated. Pre-germinated seeds of the test plants were planted under laboratory conditions in pots containing the various DMs and reference soil. Four weeks after planting, plants were harvested and separated into roots and shoots for biomass production and tissue metal concentrations analyses. Results showed that T. aestivum plants have the capacity to tolerate and grow in multiple-metal contaminated DMs with the potential of accumulating various amounts of Zn and Cd. Root and shoot biomass of T. aestivum were not significantly affected by the DMs on which the plants were grown suggesting that this plant species can grow just as well on DMs contaminated by various metals as in the reference soil. No significant differences in the Zn tissue

  20. Heavy Metal Uptake, Translocation, and Bioaccumulation Studies of Triticum aestivum Cultivated in Contaminated Dredged Materials

    PubMed Central

    Shumaker, Ketia L.; Begonia, Gregorio

    2005-01-01

    Phytoremediation is a technology that uses vegetation to remediate contaminants from water, soil, and sediments. Unlike traditional remediation techniques such as soil washing or vitrification, phytoremediation offers a technology that is solar-driven, aesthetically pleasing, and cost effective. Recent studies indicate that winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is a potential accumulator for heavy metals such as lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) in hydroponic systems. Based on these findings, a laboratory study was conducted with the primary objective of determining the phytoaccumulation capability of this plant species for heavy metals from contaminated dredged materials (DMs) originating from two confined disposal facilities (CDF). The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) manages several hundred million cubic meters of DMs each year, and 5 to 10 % of these DMs require special handling because they are contaminated with hazardous substances that can move from the substrates into food webs causing unacceptable risk outside CDFs. Phytoremediation may offer an alternative to decrease this risk. Chemical analyses by USACE personnel identified 17 metals in various DMs, but in this present study, only zinc (Zn) and Cd were investigated. Pre-germinated seeds of the test plants were planted under laboratory conditions in pots containing the various DMs and reference soil. Four weeks after planting, plants were harvested and separated into roots and shoots for biomass production and tissue metal concentrations analyses. Results showed that T. aestivum plants have the capacity to tolerate and grow in multiple-metal contaminated DMs with the potential of accumulating various amounts of Zn and Cd. Root and shoot biomass of T. aestivum were not significantly affected by the DMs on which the plants were grown suggesting that this plant species can grow just as well on DMs contaminated by various metals as in the reference soil. No significant differences in the Zn tissue

  1. Materials-Enabled High-Efficiency (MEHE) Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, M.; Veliz, M.

    2011-09-30

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UTBattelle, Inc. and Caterpillar, Inc. was to improve diesel engine efficiency by incorporating advanced materials to enable higher combustion pressures and temperatures necessary for improved combustion. The project scope also included novel materials for use in advanced components and designs associated with waste-heat recovery and other concepts for improved thermal efficiency. Caterpillar initially provided ORNL with a 2004 Tier 2 C15 ACERT diesel engine (designed for on-highway use) and two 600 hp motoring dynamometers. The first year of the CRADA effort was focused on establishing a heavy-duty experimental engine research cell. First year activities included procuring, installing and commissioning the cell infrastructure. Infrastructure components consisted of intake air handling system, water tower, exhaust handling system, and cell air conditioning. Other necessary infrastructure items included the fuel delivery system and bottled gas handling to support the analytical instrumentation. The second year of the CRADA focused on commissioning the dynamometer system to enable engine experimentation. In addition to the requirements associated with the dynamometer controller, the electrical system needed a power factor correction system to maintain continuity with the electrical grid. During the second year the engine was instrumented and baseline operated to confirm performance and commission the dynamometer. The engine performance was mapped and modeled according to requirements provided by Caterpillar. This activity was further supported by a Work-for-Others project from Caterpillar to evaluate a proprietary modeling system. A second Work-for-Others activity was performed to evaluate a novel turbocharger design. This project was highly successful and may lead to new turbocharger designs for Caterpillar heavy-duty diesel engines. During the third (and final) year of the CRADA, a

  2. Correlation between ground state and orbital anisotropy in heavy fermion materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Willers, Thomas; Strigari, Fabio; Hu, Zhiwei; Sessi, Violetta; Brookes, Nicholas B.; Bauer, Eric D.; Sarrao, John L.; Thompson, J. D.; Tanaka, Arata; Wirth, Steffen; et al

    2015-02-09

    The interplay of structural, orbital, charge, and spin degrees of freedom is at the heart of many emergent phenomena, including superconductivity. We find that unraveling the underlying forces of such novel phases is a great challenge because it not only requires understanding each of these degrees of freedom, it also involves accounting for the interplay between them. Cerium-based heavy fermion compounds are an ideal playground for investigating these interdependencies, and we present evidence for a correlation between orbital anisotropy and the ground states in a representative family of materials. We have measured the 4f crystal-electric field ground-state wave functions ofmore » the strongly correlated materials CeRh1₋xIrxIn5 with great accuracy using linear polarization-dependent soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These measurements show that these wave functions correlate with the ground-state properties of the substitution series, which covers long-range antiferromagnetic order, unconventional superconductivity, and coexistence of these two states.« less

  3. Correlation between ground state and orbital anisotropy in heavy fermion materials

    SciTech Connect

    Willers, Thomas; Strigari, Fabio; Hu, Zhiwei; Sessi, Violetta; Brookes, Nicholas B.; Bauer, Eric D.; Sarrao, John L.; Thompson, J. D.; Tanaka, Arata; Wirth, Steffen; Tjeng, Liu Hao; Severing, Andrea

    2015-02-09

    The interplay of structural, orbital, charge, and spin degrees of freedom is at the heart of many emergent phenomena, including superconductivity. We find that unraveling the underlying forces of such novel phases is a great challenge because it not only requires understanding each of these degrees of freedom, it also involves accounting for the interplay between them. Cerium-based heavy fermion compounds are an ideal playground for investigating these interdependencies, and we present evidence for a correlation between orbital anisotropy and the ground states in a representative family of materials. We have measured the 4f crystal-electric field ground-state wave functions of the strongly correlated materials CeRh1₋xIrxIn5 with great accuracy using linear polarization-dependent soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These measurements show that these wave functions correlate with the ground-state properties of the substitution series, which covers long-range antiferromagnetic order, unconventional superconductivity, and coexistence of these two states.

  4. Correlation between ground state and orbital anisotropy in heavy fermion materials

    PubMed Central

    Willers, Thomas; Strigari, Fabio; Hu, Zhiwei; Sessi, Violetta; Brookes, Nicholas B.; Bauer, Eric D.; Sarrao, John L.; Thompson, J. D.; Tanaka, Arata; Wirth, Steffen; Tjeng, Liu Hao; Severing, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The interplay of structural, orbital, charge, and spin degrees of freedom is at the heart of many emergent phenomena, including superconductivity. Unraveling the underlying forces of such novel phases is a great challenge because it not only requires understanding each of these degrees of freedom, it also involves accounting for the interplay between them. Cerium-based heavy fermion compounds are an ideal playground for investigating these interdependencies, and we present evidence for a correlation between orbital anisotropy and the ground states in a representative family of materials. We have measured the 4f crystal-electric field ground-state wave functions of the strongly correlated materials CeRh1−xIrxIn5 with great accuracy using linear polarization-dependent soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These measurements show that these wave functions correlate with the ground-state properties of the substitution series, which covers long-range antiferromagnetic order, unconventional superconductivity, and coexistence of these two states. PMID:25675488

  5. From the Cover: PNAS Plus: Long range order and two-fluid behavior in heavy electron materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirer, Kent R.; Shockley, Abigail C.; Dioguardi, Adam P.; Crocker, John; Lin, Ching H.; apRoberts-Warren, Nicholas; Nisson, David M.; Klavins, Peter; Cooley, Jason C.; Yang, Yi-feng; Curro, Nicholas J.

    2012-11-01

    The heavy electron Kondo liquid is an emergent state of condensed matter that displays universal behavior independent of material details. Properties of the heavy electron liquid are best probed by NMR Knight shift measurements, which provide a direct measure of the behavior of the heavy electron liquid that emerges below the Kondo lattice coherence temperature as the lattice of local moments hybridizes with the background conduction electrons. Because the transfer of spectral weight between the localized and itinerant electronic degrees of freedom is gradual, the Kondo liquid typically coexists with the local moment component until the material orders at low temperatures. The two-fluid formula captures this behavior in a broad range of materials in the paramagnetic state. In order to investigate two-fluid behavior and the onset and physical origin of different long range ordered ground states in heavy electron materials, we have extended Knight shift measurements to URu2Si2, CeIrIn5, and CeRhIn5. In CeRhIn5 we find that the antiferromagnetic order is preceded by a relocalization of the Kondo liquid, providing independent evidence for a local moment origin of antiferromagnetism. In URu2Si2 the hidden order is shown to emerge directly from the Kondo liquid and so is not associated with local moment physics. Our results imply that the nature of the ground state is strongly coupled with the hybridization in the Kondo lattice in agreement with phase diagram proposed by Yang and Pines.

  6. TiO2/bone composite materials for the separation of heavy metal impurities from waste water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dakroury, G.; Labib, Sh.; Abou El-Nour, F. H.

    2012-09-01

    Pure bone material obtained from cow meat, as apatite-rich material, and TiO2-bone composite materials are prepared and studied to be used for heavy metal ions separation from waste water solutions. Meat wastes are chemically and thermally treated to control their microstructure in order to prepare the composite materials that fulfill all the requirements to be used as selective membranes with high performance, stability and mechanical strength. The prepared materials are analyzed using Hg-porosimetry for surface characterization, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX) for elemental analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) for chemical composition investigation. Structural studies are performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Microstructural properties are studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and specific surface area studies are performed using Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) method. XRD studies show that multiphase structures are obtained as a result of 1h sintering at 700-1200 °C for both pure bone and TiO2-bone composite materials. The factors affecting the transport of different heavy metal ions through the selected membranes are determined from permeation flux measurements. It is found that membrane pore size, membrane surface roughness and membrane surface charge are the key parameters that control the transport or rejection of heavy metal ions through the selected membranes.

  7. Heavy metal removal mechanisms of sorptive filter materials for road runoff treatment and remobilization under de-icing salt applications.

    PubMed

    Huber, Maximilian; Hilbig, Harald; Badenberg, Sophia C; Fassnacht, Julius; Drewes, Jörg E; Helmreich, Brigitte

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this research study was to elucidate the removal and remobilization behaviors of five heavy metals (i.e., Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) that had been fixed onto sorptive filter materials used in decentralized stormwater treatment systems receiving traffic area runoff. Six filter materials (i.e., granular activated carbon, a mixture of granular activated alumina and porous concrete, granular activated lignite, half-burnt dolomite, and two granular ferric hydroxides) were evaluated in column experiments. First, a simultaneous preloading with the heavy metals was performed for each filter material. Subsequently, the remobilization effect was tested by three de-icing salt experiments in duplicate using pure NaCl, a mixture of NaCl and CaCl2, and a mixture of NaCl and MgCl2. Three layers of each column were separated to specify the attenuation of heavy metals as a function of depth. Cu and Pb were retained best by most of the selected filter materials, and Cu was often released the least of all metals by the three de-icing salts. The mixture of NaCl and CaCl2 resulted in a stronger effect upon remobilization than the other two de-icing salts. For the material with the highest retention, the effect of the preloading level upon remobilization was measured. The removal mechanisms of all filter materials were determined by advanced laboratory methods. For example, the different intrusions of heavy metals into the particles were determined. Findings of this study can result in improved filter materials used in decentralized stormwater treatment systems. PMID:27423405

  8. Super-heavy electron material as metallic refrigerant for adiabatic demagnetization cooling.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Yoshifumi; Piening, Boy; Jeevan, Hirale S; Bud'ko, Sergey L; Canfield, Paul C; Gegenwart, Philipp

    2016-09-01

    Low-temperature refrigeration is of crucial importance in fundamental research of condensed matter physics, because the investigations of fascinating quantum phenomena, such as superconductivity, superfluidity, and quantum criticality, often require refrigeration down to very low temperatures. Currently, cryogenic refrigerators with (3)He gas are widely used for cooling below 1 K. However, usage of the gas has been increasingly difficult because of the current worldwide shortage. Therefore, it is important to consider alternative methods of refrigeration. We show that a new type of refrigerant, the super-heavy electron metal YbCo2Zn20, can be used for adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration, which does not require (3)He gas. This method has a number of advantages, including much better metallic thermal conductivity compared to the conventional insulating refrigerants. We also demonstrate that the cooling performance is optimized in Yb1-x Sc x Co2Zn20 by partial Sc substitution, with x ~ 0.19. The substitution induces chemical pressure that drives the materials to a zero-field quantum critical point. This leads to an additional enhancement of the magnetocaloric effect in low fields and low temperatures, enabling final temperatures well below 100 mK. This performance has, up to now, been restricted to insulators. For nearly a century, the same principle of using local magnetic moments has been applied for adiabatic demagnetization cooling. This study opens new possibilities of using itinerant magnetic moments for cryogen-free refrigeration. PMID:27626073

  9. Super-heavy electron material as metallic refrigerant for adiabatic demagnetization cooling

    PubMed Central

    Tokiwa, Yoshifumi; Piening, Boy; Jeevan, Hirale S.; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Gegenwart, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Low-temperature refrigeration is of crucial importance in fundamental research of condensed matter physics, because the investigations of fascinating quantum phenomena, such as superconductivity, superfluidity, and quantum criticality, often require refrigeration down to very low temperatures. Currently, cryogenic refrigerators with 3He gas are widely used for cooling below 1 K. However, usage of the gas has been increasingly difficult because of the current worldwide shortage. Therefore, it is important to consider alternative methods of refrigeration. We show that a new type of refrigerant, the super-heavy electron metal YbCo2Zn20, can be used for adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration, which does not require 3He gas. This method has a number of advantages, including much better metallic thermal conductivity compared to the conventional insulating refrigerants. We also demonstrate that the cooling performance is optimized in Yb1−xScxCo2Zn20 by partial Sc substitution, with x ~ 0.19. The substitution induces chemical pressure that drives the materials to a zero-field quantum critical point. This leads to an additional enhancement of the magnetocaloric effect in low fields and low temperatures, enabling final temperatures well below 100 mK. This performance has, up to now, been restricted to insulators. For nearly a century, the same principle of using local magnetic moments has been applied for adiabatic demagnetization cooling. This study opens new possibilities of using itinerant magnetic moments for cryogen-free refrigeration. PMID:27626073

  10. Identification of genotoxic components of the heavy ends of energy-related materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.L. . Dept. of Chemistry); Castle, R.N. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1990-02-01

    The objective of this work was to develop capillary supercritical fluid chromatographic methods for the analysis of the high-molecular-weight components in high boiling, heavy and materials that are responsible for genotoxic activity. Since these compounds were largely unknown, 62 standard reference compounds were synthesized for comparison with actual high boiling coal-derived products. These compounds were comprised of two- and three-ring aromatic moieties coupled together with carbon, oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen bridging groups. Mass spectral evidence indicated that a number of these compound types could be present in various coal products at a concentration level of 0.01--0.2 percent, although none of them could be positively identified because of the complexities of the fractions. A number of capillary supercritical fluid chromatographic instrumental developments were made as a result of this work. These include a supercritical fluid fractionation system for group-type separation of complex samples and a direct coupled supercritical fluid chromatograph/double focusing mass spectrometer system. Finally, a number of supercritical fluid chromatographic mobile phase combinations were evaluated for the analysis of large polycyclic aromatic compounds. 34 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Mechanically induced self-propagating reaction and consequent consolidation for the production of fully dense nanocrystalline Ti{sub 55}C{sub 45} bulk material

    SciTech Connect

    Sherif El-Eskandarany, M. Al-Hazza, Abdulsalam

    2014-11-15

    We employed a high-energy ball mill for the synthesis of nanograined Ti{sub 55}C{sub 45} powders starting from elemental Ti and C powders. The mechanically induced self-propagating reaction that occurred between the reactant materials was monitored via a gas atmosphere gas-temperature-monitoring system. A single phase of NaCl-type TiC was obtained after 5 h of ball milling. To decrease the powder and grain sizes, the material was subjected to further ball milling time. The powders obtained after 200 h of milling possessed spherical-like morphology with average particle and grain sizes of 45 μm and 4.2 nm, respectively. The end-products obtained after 200 h of ball milling time, were then consolidated into full dense compacts, using hot pressing and spark plasma sintering at 1500 and 34.5 MPa, with heating rates of 20 °C/min and 500 °C/min, respectively. Whereas hot pressing of the powders led to severe grain growth (∼ 436 nm in diameter), the as-spark plasma sintered powders maintained their nanograined characteristics (∼ 28 nm in diameter). The as-synthesized and as-consolidated powders were characterized, using X-ray diffraction, high-resolution electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties of the consolidated samples obtained via the hot pressing and spark plasma sintering techniques were characterized, using Vickers microhardness and non-destructive testing techniques. The Vickers hardness, Young's modulus, shear modulus and fracture toughness of as-spark plasma sintered samples were 32 GPa, 358 GPa, 151 GPa and 6.4 MPa·m{sup 1/2}, respectively. The effects of the consolidation approach on the grain size and mechanical properties were investigated and are discussed. - Highlights: • Room-temperature synthesizing of NaCl-type TiC • Dependence on the grain size on the ball milling time • Fabrication of equiaxed nanocrystalline grains with a diameter of 4.2 nm • Fabrication of nanocrystalline bulk TiC material by

  12. Heavy metal fractionation and pedogenesis in subalpine and alpine soils on ophiolitic materials, western Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, M.; Previtali, F.

    2009-04-01

    Soils on ultramafic materials are usually rich in Mg, Fe and heavy metals (particularly Ni, Cr, Mn, Co). These chemical properties could cause toxicity effects on biological communities. Metal fractionation shows the soil phases to which metals are associated (exchangeable, associated with organic matter, with amorphous or crystalline Fe or Mn oxides, in the crystal structure of primary minerals), and thus it is strictly related with metal mobilization and bioavailability. Ni, Cr, Mn, Co and Fe fractionations (6 fractions, analysed by a selective sequential extraction technique) were analysed in 6 subalpine and in 17 alpine soils (i.e., respectively under coniferous forest or above the present-day treeline) in the ophiolitic area of Mont Avic Natural Park (Valle d'Aosta, Italian Alps), on soils formed from metal-rich serpentinite or from metal-poor mafic rocks and calcschists. The results show a tight relationship between vegetation, soil forming processes, metal fractionation and bioavailability: below and above the present-day treeline soil forming processes and metal speciation change dramatically. Serpentinite soils are always extremely rich in metals, but metal speciation in analogous habitats is similar on every substrate. The results show a tight relationship between vegetation, soil forming processes, metal fractionation and bioavailability: below and above the present-day treeline soil forming processes and metal speciation change dramatically. Serpentinite soils are always extremely rich in metals, but metal speciation in analogous habitats is similar on every substrate. Under subalpine forest, the main pedogenic process is podzolization. In the extremely acidic and leached podzolic soils, all metals are mobilized and their lowest concentration is in the bleached E horizon, while there is a higher content in organic matter-rich surface horizon and in the spodic (illuvial) B. Not considering the amount associated with primary minerals (residual fraction

  13. Physical processes taking place in dense plasma focus devices at the interaction of hot plasma and fast ion streams with materials under test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribkov, V. A.

    2015-06-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF) device represents a source of powerful streams of penetrating radiations (hot plasma, fast electron and ion beams, x-rays and neutrons) of ns-scale pulse durations. Power flux densities of the radiation types may reach in certain cases the values up to 1013 W cm  -  2. They are widely used at present time in more than 30 labs in the world in the field of radiation material science. Areas of their implementations are testing of the materials perspective for use in modern fusion reactors (FR) of both types, modification of surface layers with an aim of improvements their properties, production of some nanostructures on their surface, and so on. To use a DPF correctly in these applications it is important to understand the mechanisms of generation of the above-mentioned radiations, their dynamics inside and outside of the pinch and processes of interaction of these streams with targets. In this paper, the most important issues on the above matter we discuss in relation to the cumulative hot plasma stream and the beam of fast ions with illustration of experimental results obtained at four DPF devices ranged in the limits of bank energies from 1 kJ to 1 MJ. Among them mechanisms of a jet formation, a current abruption phenomenon, a super-Alfven ion beam propagation inside and outside of DPF plasma, generation of secondary plasma and formation of shock waves in plasma and inside a solid-state target, etc. Nanosecond time-resolved techniques (electric probes, laser interferometry, frame self-luminescent imaging, x-ray/neutron probes, etc) give an opportunity to investigate the above-mentioned events and to observe the process of interaction of the radiation types with targets. After irradiation, we analyzed the specimens by contemporary instrumentation: optical and scanning electron microscopy, local x-ray spectral and structure analysis, atomic force microscopy, the portable x-ray diffractometer that combines x-ray single

  14. Comparative sound velocity measurements between porous rock and fully-dense material under crustal condition: The cases of Darley Dale sandstone and copper block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, J.; Chien, Y. V.; Wu, W.; Dong, J.; Chang, Y.; Tsai, C.; Yang, M.; Wang, K.

    2012-12-01

    within 2%. With a wide porosity range, the measured P and S wave velocities of this set specimens presented a linear function of porosity, the velocity varying from 2.40 km/s to 4.00 km/s for P wave and 1.70 km/s to 2.40 km/s for S wave, yielding a tight value of 1.6(1) for Vp/Vs ratio. High pressure velocity and porosity measurements in the selected specimen showed both P and S wave velocities markedly increasing at low pressure regime (< 40 MPa) and reaching plateau above 60 MPa while the pore closure reaching a steady minimum beyond pressure of 60 MPa. From the measurement of copper block at high pressure, we learned that the velocity at lower pressure regime is disturbed by the coupling of the interface between wave guide and sample, and the pressure range within this kind of experiments has no or little effect on the velocity (or the elasticity) of fully-dense material. Combining the results of porosity and velocity from above measurements, we conclude that the change of velocity observed in the porous rocks under crustal condition should be mainly affected by the closure of narrow microcracks at high pressure.

  15. Extended application of Kohn-Sham first-principles molecular dynamics method with plane wave approximation at high energy—From cold materials to hot dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shen; Wang, Hongwei; Kang, Wei; Zhang, Ping; He, X. T.

    2016-04-01

    An extended first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) method based on Kohn-Sham scheme is proposed to elevate the temperature limit of the FPMD method in the calculation of dense plasmas. The extended method treats the wave functions of high energy electrons as plane waves analytically and thus expands the application of the FPMD method to the region of hot dense plasmas without suffering from the formidable computational costs. In addition, the extended method inherits the high accuracy of the Kohn-Sham scheme and keeps the information of electronic structures. This gives an edge to the extended method in the calculation of mixtures of plasmas composed of heterogeneous ions, high-Z dense plasmas, lowering of ionization potentials, X-ray absorption/emission spectra, and opacities, which are of particular interest to astrophysics, inertial confinement fusion engineering, and laboratory astrophysics.

  16. Visualizing Heavy Fermion Formation and their Unconventional Superconductivity in f-Electron Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aynajian, Pegor; da Silva Neto, Eduardo H.; Zhou, Brian B.; Misra, Shashank; Baumbach, Ryan E.; Fisk, Zachary; Mydosh, John; Thompson, Joe D.; Bauer, Eric D.; Yazdani, Ali

    2014-06-01

    In solids containing elements with f-orbitals, the interaction between f-electron spins and those of itinerant electrons leads to the development of low-energy fermionic excitations with a heavy effective mass. These excitations are fundamental to the appearance of unconventional superconductivity observed in actinide- and lanthanide-based compounds. We use spectroscopic mapping with the scanning tunneling microscope to detect the emergence of heavy excitations with lowering of temperature in Ce- and U-based heavy fermion compounds. We demonstrate the sensitivity of the tunneling process to the composite nature of these heavy quasiparticles, which arises from quantum entanglement of itinerant conduction and f-electrons. Scattering and interference of the composite quasiparticles is used in the Ce-based compounds to resolve their energy-momentum structure and to extract their mass enhancement, which develops with decreasing temperature. Finally, by extending these techniques to much lower temperatures, we investigate how superconductivity, with a nodal d-wave character, develops within a strongly correlated band of composite excitations.

  17. Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, Robert L.; Navratil, James D.

    1997-01-21

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

  18. Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

    1997-01-21

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

  19. A novel stir bar sorptive extraction coating based on monolithic material for apolar, polar organic compounds and heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaojia; Qiu, Ningning; Yuan, Dongxing; Huang, Benli

    2009-04-15

    In this study, a novel stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) based on monolithic material (SBSEM) was prepared. The monolithic material was obtained by in situ copolymerization of vinylpyrrolidone and divinylbenzene in the presence of a porogen solvent containing cyclohexanol and 1-dodecanol with azobisisobutyronitrile as initiator. The influences of polymerization conditions on the extraction efficiencies were investigated, using phenol and p-nitrophenol as detected solutes. The monolithic material was characterized by various techniques, such as elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry, infrared spectroscopy. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were used to investigate the extraction efficiencies of SBSEM for apolar analytes. Hormones, aromatic amines and phenols were selected as test analytes to investigate the extraction efficiencies of SBSEM for weakly and strongly polar compounds. The results showed that the new SBSEM could enrich the above-mentioned organic compounds effectively. It is worthy to mention that the SBSEM can enrich some heavy metal ions, such as Cu(2+), Pb(2+), Cr(3+) and Cd(2+), through coordination adsorption. To our best knowledge, that is the first to use SBSE to enrich heavy metal ions. PMID:19174210

  20. Atoms in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    More, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent experiments with high-power pulsed lasers have strongly encouraged the development of improved theoretical understanding of highly charged ions in a dense plasma environment. This work examines the theory of dense plasmas with emphasis on general rules which govern matter at extreme high temperature and density. 106 refs., 23 figs.

  1. Method for dense packing discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallus, Yoav; Elser, Veit; Gravel, Simon

    2010-11-01

    The problem of packing a system of particles as densely as possible is foundational in the field of discrete geometry and is a powerful model in the material and biological sciences. As packing problems retreat from the reach of solution by analytic constructions, the importance of an efficient numerical method for conducting de novo (from-scratch) searches for dense packings becomes crucial. In this paper, we use the divide and concur framework to develop a general search method for the solution of periodic constraint problems, and we apply it to the discovery of dense periodic packings. An important feature of the method is the integration of the unit-cell parameters with the other packing variables in the definition of the configuration space. The method we present led to previously reported improvements in the densest-known tetrahedron packing. Here, we use the method to reproduce the densest-known lattice sphere packings and the best-known lattice kissing arrangements in up to 14 and 11 dimensions, respectively, providing numerical evidence for their optimality. For nonspherical particles, we report a dense packing of regular four-dimensional simplices with density ϕ=128/219≈0.5845 and with a similar structure to the densest-known tetrahedron packing.

  2. [Effects of Different Kinds of Organic Materials on Soil Heavy Metal Phytoremediation Efficiency by Sedum alfredii Hance].

    PubMed

    Yao, Gui-hua; Xu, Hai-zhou; Zhu, Lin-gang; Ma, Jia-wei; Liu, Dan; Ye, Zheng-qian

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of clean organic materials i. e., biogas residue (BR), mushroom residue (MR), and bamboo shell (BS) on phytoextraction remediation of two heavy metal contaminated soils (collected from Wenzhou and Fuyang, which referred to "Wenzhou soil" and "Fuyang soil", respectively.) using a cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance. The results indicated that the effects of organic materials on availabilities of soil heavy metals were different due to different kinds of heavy metals, organic materials, and the application rates of the organic materials. Addition with 5% BR showed the greatest activation to copper (Cu), Zn in Wenzhou soil, and in Fuyang soil 1% BS had the highest activation for Cu, Zn, lead ( Ph) and Cd. Growth of shoot biomass of Sedum alfredii Hance increased with the addition rate of organic materials, and the plant dry weights were increased by 23.7%-93.0%. In Wenzhou soil, only 1% BS treatment had the best effect on Cd uptake and accumulation in shoots of Sedum alfredii Hance, increased by 22.6%, while other treatments were inferior to the control. For Zn, MR treatments were inferior to the control, while other treafments were superior to the control, of which 5% BR, 1% BS and 5% BS exceeded the control by 39. 6%, 32.6% and 23.8%, respectively. In Fuyang soil, for Cd, the treatment effects of 5% BS, 1% BR and 5% BR were the greatest, of which Cd accumulation in shoots exceeded the control by 12.9%, 12.8% and 6.2%, respectively, while Cd accumulations in shoots in all other treatments were less than that of control. For Zn, the treatments of adding organic materials promoted Zn accumulation in shoots of Sedum alfredii Hance, and the best treatments were as follows: 5% BS. 5% BR and 5% MR, exceeded the control by 38.4%, 25.7% and 22.4%, respectively. PMID:26911018

  3. Studies on chelating adsorption properties of novel composite material polyethyleneimine/silica gel for heavy-metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Baojiao; An, Fuqiang; Liu, Kangkai

    2006-12-01

    Firstly, the coordination processes of line-type polyethyleneimine with Cu 2+, Cd 2+ and Zn 2+ were studied by using visible light absorption spectroscopy and chelation conductivity titration method, and the structures of the chelates were determined. Afterwards, polyethyleneimine (PEI) was grafted onto the surface of silica gel particles via the coupling effect of γ-chloropropyl trimethoxysilane (CP), and the novel composite adsorption material PEI/SiO 2 with strong adsorption ability towards heavy-metal ions was prepared. The chelating adsorption properties of PEI/SiO 2 for Cu 2+, Cd 2+ and Zn 2+ were researched by both static (batch) and dynamic (flow) methods. The experiment results show that water-soluble polyamine PEI with line-type structure reacts with Cu 2+, Cd 2+ and Zn 2+ easily and quantitatively, and water-soluble chelates with four ligands are formed. The composite material PEI/SiO 2 possesses very strong chelating adsorption ability for heavy-metal ions, and the saturated adsorption amount can reach 25.94 mg g -1 and 50.01 mg g -1 for Cu 2+ under static and dynamic conditions, respectively. The isothermal adsorption data fit to Langmuir equation, and the adsorption is typical chemical adsorption with monomolecular layer. The adsorbing ability of PEI/SiO 2 towards the three kinds of the ions follows the order of Cu 2+ > Cd 2+ > Zn 2+. The pH value has great influence on the sorption, and at pH 6-7, the adsorption capacity is the greatest. The fact that adsorption capacity increases with temperature rising indicates the adsorbing process of PEI/SiO 2 for metal ions is endothermic. As diluted hydrochloric acid is used as eluent, the adsorbed heavy-metal ions are eluted easily from PEI/SiO 2, and the regeneration and reuse without decreasing sorption for PEI/SiO 2 are demonstrated.

  4. Warm Dense Matter: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantar, D H; Lee, R W; Molitoris, J D

    2004-04-21

    This document provides a summary of the ''LLNL Workshop on Extreme States of Materials: Warm Dense Matter to NIF'' which was held on 20, 21, and 22 February 2002 at the Wente Conference Center in Livermore, CA. The warm dense matter regime, the transitional phase space region between cold material and hot plasma, is presently poorly understood. The drive to understand the nature of matter in this regime is sparking scientific activity worldwide. In addition to pure scientific interest, finite temperature dense matter occurs in the regimes of interest to the SSMP (Stockpile Stewardship Materials Program). So that obtaining a better understanding of WDM is important to performing effective experiments at, e.g., NIF, a primary mission of LLNL. At this workshop we examined current experimental and theoretical work performed at, and in conjunction with, LLNL to focus future activities and define our role in this rapidly emerging research area. On the experimental front LLNL plays a leading role in three of the five relevant areas and has the opportunity to become a major player in the other two. Discussion at the workshop indicated that the path forward for the experimental efforts at LLNL were two fold: First, we are doing reasonable baseline work at SPLs, HE, and High Energy Lasers with more effort encouraged. Second, we need to plan effectively for the next evolution in large scale facilities, both laser (NIF) and Light/Beam sources (LCLS/TESLA and GSI) Theoretically, LLNL has major research advantages in areas as diverse as the thermochemical approach to warm dense matter equations of state to first principles molecular dynamics simulations. However, it was clear that there is much work to be done theoretically to understand warm dense matter. Further, there is a need for a close collaboration between the generation of verifiable experimental data that can provide benchmarks of both the experimental techniques and the theoretical capabilities. The conclusion of this

  5. Spatial interferences in the electron transport of heavy-fermion materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu-feng; Liu, Yu; Song, Hai-Feng; Yang, Yi-feng

    2016-08-01

    The scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and the point contact spectroscopy represent major progress in recent heavy-fermion research. Both have revealed important information on the composite nature of the emergent heavy-electron quasiparticles. However, a detailed and thorough microscopic understanding of the similarities and differences in the underlying physical processes of these techniques is still lacking. Here we study the electron transport in the normal state of the periodic Anderson lattice by using the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function technique. In addition to the well-known Fano interference between the conduction and f -electron channels, our results further reveal the effect of spatial interference between different spatial paths at the interface on the differential conductance and their interesting interplay with the band features such as the hybridization gap and the Van Hove singularity. We find that the spatial interference leads to a weighted average in the momentum space for the electron transport and could cause suppression of the electronic band features under certain circumstances. In particular, it reduces the capability of probing the f -electron spectral weight near the edges of the hybridization gap for large interface depending on the Fermi surface of the lead. Our results indicate an intrinsic inefficiency of the point contact spectroscopy in probing the f electrons.

  6. Determination of some radionucluides and heavy elements concentrations in concrete raw materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElFaham, Mohamed M.; Khalil, Osama M.; Elhassan, Asmaa; Salama, S.

    2015-08-01

    The presence of natural radionuclides in raw materials used in cement manufacturing was determined by using analytical methods. The used Raw materials are limestone, clay, slag, and gypsum, which be used with different concentrations in cement production. Different analytical techniques such as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique, Gamma spectroscopy, Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), in addition to X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) for phase identification of a crystalline material. The obtained data show that there is no significant radiological hazards arising from using the present cement components in the different applications. XRD data shows that there is no crystalline structures in the raw materials.

  7. The effect of low-temperature transformation of mixtures of sewage sludge and plant materials on content, leachability and toxicity of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Gondek, Krzysztof; Baran, Agnieszka; Kopeć, Michał

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of the process of low-temperature transformation and the addition of plant material to sewage sludge diversifying the content of mobile forms of heavy metals and their ecotoxicity. The experimental design included: sewage sludge+rape straw, sewage sludge+wheat straw, sewage sludge+sawdust, sewage sludge+bark and sewage sludge with no addition. The mixtures were subjected to thermal transformation in a chamber furnace, under conditions without air. The procedure consisted of two stages: the first stage (130°C for 40 min) focused on drying the material, whereas in the second stage (200°C for 30 min) proper thermal transformation of materials took place. Thermal transformation of the materials, caused an increase in total contents of heavy metals in comparison to the material before transformation. From among elements, the cadmium content changed the most in materials after thermal transformation. As a result of thermal transformation, the content of water soluble form of the heavy metals decreased significantly in all the prepared mixtures. Low toxicity of the extracts from materials for Vibrio fischeri and Lepidium sativum was found in the research, regardless of transformation process. L. sativum showed higher sensitivity to heavy metals occurring in the studied extracts from materials than V. fischeri, evidence of which are the positive significant correlations between the content of metals and the inhibition of root growth of L. sativum. PMID:25433992

  8. Heavy Duty and Industrial Alternative Fuel Applications. Forklift and Material Handling. Alternative Fuels Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Doug; Casto, Lori

    This training manual is designed to lay the foundation for trainers and technicians by showing the steps to achieve and maintain good indoor air quality through use of cleaner-burning forklifts and materials handlers. The first part of the manual consists of nine units that provide informational material and diagrams on these topics: comparison of…

  9. Dense loading of catalyst improves hydrotreater performance

    SciTech Connect

    Nooy, F.M.

    1984-11-12

    This paper discusses the advantages of increased capacity and improved catalyst/oil contact in existing hydrotreating units. The similarities between catalyst loading and other material processes are reviewed. Catalyst bed activity is examined. Dense loading systems are reviewed in detail. Over the last years, many refiners have gained experience with the benefits of dense loading techniques, and these techniques are gaining more and more acceptance.

  10. Realizing high figure of merit in heavy-band p-type half-Heusler thermoelectric materials.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chenguang; Bai, Shengqiang; Liu, Yintu; Tang, Yunshan; Chen, Lidong; Zhao, Xinbing; Zhu, Tiejun

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state thermoelectric technology offers a promising solution for converting waste heat to useful electrical power. Both high operating temperature and high figure of merit zT are desirable for high-efficiency thermoelectric power generation. Here we report a high zT of ∼1.5 at 1,200 K for the p-type FeNbSb heavy-band half-Heusler alloys. High content of heavier Hf dopant simultaneously optimizes the electrical power factor and suppresses thermal conductivity. Both the enhanced point-defect and electron-phonon scatterings contribute to a significant reduction in the lattice thermal conductivity. An eight couple prototype thermoelectric module exhibits a high conversion efficiency of 6.2% and a high power density of 2.2 W cm(-2) at a temperature difference of 655 K. These findings highlight the optimization strategy for heavy-band thermoelectric materials and demonstrate a realistic prospect of high-temperature thermoelectric modules based on half-Heusler alloys with low cost, excellent mechanical robustness and stability. PMID:26330371

  11. Realizing high figure of merit in heavy-band p-type half-Heusler thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chenguang; Bai, Shengqiang; Liu, Yintu; Tang, Yunshan; Chen, Lidong; Zhao, Xinbing; Zhu, Tiejun

    2015-09-01

    Solid-state thermoelectric technology offers a promising solution for converting waste heat to useful electrical power. Both high operating temperature and high figure of merit zT are desirable for high-efficiency thermoelectric power generation. Here we report a high zT of ~1.5 at 1,200 K for the p-type FeNbSb heavy-band half-Heusler alloys. High content of heavier Hf dopant simultaneously optimizes the electrical power factor and suppresses thermal conductivity. Both the enhanced point-defect and electron-phonon scatterings contribute to a significant reduction in the lattice thermal conductivity. An eight couple prototype thermoelectric module exhibits a high conversion efficiency of 6.2% and a high power density of 2.2 W cm-2 at a temperature difference of 655 K. These findings highlight the optimization strategy for heavy-band thermoelectric materials and demonstrate a realistic prospect of high-temperature thermoelectric modules based on half-Heusler alloys with low cost, excellent mechanical robustness and stability.

  12. Realizing high figure of merit in heavy-band p-type half-Heusler thermoelectric materials

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chenguang; Bai, Shengqiang; Liu, Yintu; Tang, Yunshan; Chen, Lidong; Zhao, Xinbing; Zhu, Tiejun

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state thermoelectric technology offers a promising solution for converting waste heat to useful electrical power. Both high operating temperature and high figure of merit zT are desirable for high-efficiency thermoelectric power generation. Here we report a high zT of ∼1.5 at 1,200 K for the p-type FeNbSb heavy-band half-Heusler alloys. High content of heavier Hf dopant simultaneously optimizes the electrical power factor and suppresses thermal conductivity. Both the enhanced point-defect and electron–phonon scatterings contribute to a significant reduction in the lattice thermal conductivity. An eight couple prototype thermoelectric module exhibits a high conversion efficiency of 6.2% and a high power density of 2.2 W cm−2 at a temperature difference of 655 K. These findings highlight the optimization strategy for heavy-band thermoelectric materials and demonstrate a realistic prospect of high-temperature thermoelectric modules based on half-Heusler alloys with low cost, excellent mechanical robustness and stability. PMID:26330371

  13. Electrokinetic stabilization as a reclamation tool for waste materials polluted by both salts and heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Traina, G; Ferro, S; De Battisti, A

    2009-05-01

    A method for detoxifying industrial wastes is presented, aiming at a safer management and reuse. Focusing, in particular, on bottom ashes from a municipal solid waste incinerator, the proposed "ElectroKinetic Stabilization" (EKS) technique requires a relatively short treatment time and improves the remediation of ashes by combining a fast extraction of chlorides by electromigration, together with a stabilization of metals through their reaction with phosphate anions, which migrate through the ash under the influence of the electric field. Heavy metals react with the phosphate anions, leading to the precipitation of metal hydroxy-apatite or chloro-apatite (for Pb and Ba), or to their trapping in a calcium-apatite mineral, that formed during the process. Along with precipitation, metal immobilization is allowed by the decrease of ash pH to 9-11 by means of H(+) produced at the anode from the electrolysis of water. The migration of salts through the wet ashes is very fast and the treatment time could be decreased to 24h. After EKS, Ba, Pb and F(-) leaching was reduced by 97%, 92% and 92%, respectively, below the allowed limits. In contrast, the final leaching of Cu and chlorides was reduced by 90% and 80%, respectively, still above the allowed limits. PMID:19201011

  14. Heavy fermions, quantum criticality, and unconventional superconductivity in filled skutterudites and related materials

    SciTech Connect

    Andraka, Bohdan

    2015-05-14

    The main goal of this program was to explore the possibility of novel states and behaviors in Pr-based system exhibiting quantum critical behavior, PrOs₄Sb₁₂. Upon small changes of external parameter, such as magnetic field, physical properties of PrOs₄Sb₁₂ are drastically altered from those corresponding to a superconductor, to heavy fermion, to field-induced ordered phase with primary quadrupolar order parameter. All these states are highly unconventional and not understood in terms of current theories thus offer an opportunity to expand our knowledge and understanding of condensed matter. At the same time, these novel states and behaviors are subjects to intense international controversies. In particular, two superconducting phases with different transition temperatures were observed in some samples and not observed in others leading to speculations that sample defects might be partially responsible for these exotic behaviors. This work clearly established that crystal disorder is important consideration, but contrary to current consensus this disorder suppresses exotic behavior. Superconducting properties imply unconventional inhomogeneous state that emerges from unconventional homogeneous normal state. Comprehensive structural investigations demonstrated that upper superconducting transition is intrinsic, bulk, and unconventional. The high quality of in-house synthesized single crystals was indirectly confirmed by de Haas-van Alphen quantum oscillation measurements. These measurements, for the first time ever reported, spanned several different phases, offering unprecedented possibility of studying quantum oscillations across phase boundaries.

  15. Simple model for coupled magnetic and quadrupolar instabilities in uranium heavy-fermion materials

    SciTech Connect

    Libero, V.L. ); Cox, D.L. )

    1993-08-01

    We present a mean-field calculation of the phase diagram of a simple model of localized moments, in the hexagonal uranium heavy-fermion compounds. The model considers a non-Kramers quadrupolar doublet ground state magnetically coupled with a singlet excited state, favoring in-plane van Vleck magnetism, as has been conjectured for UPt[sub 3]. The Hamiltonian that defines the model is Heisenberg-like in both magnetic and quadrupolar moments. No Kondo-effect physics is included in the calculations. Among our main results are (i) for zero intersite quadrupolar coupling, the magnetic order is achieved by a first-order transition above a critical intersite magnetic coupling value, which becomes second order at higher coupling strengths (ii) for finite intersite quadrupolar coupling, at temperatures below a second-order quadrupolar ordering transition, the minimal magnetic coupling value is increased, but (a) the magnetic ordering temperature is enhanced above this value, and (b) the ordering of first- and second-order transitions in the phase diagram is reversed. By considering the general structure of the Ginsburg-Landau free energy, we argue that the Kondo effect will not modify the shape of the phase diagram, but will modify the quantitative values at which transitions occur.

  16. Effect of valence holes kinetics on material excitation in tracks of swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymzhanov, R. A.; Medvedev, N. A.; Volkov, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    A considerable part of the excess energy of the electronic subsystem of a solid penetrated by a swift heavy ion (SHI) is accumulated in valence holes. Spatial redistribution of these holes can affect subsequent relaxation, resulting in ionizations of new electrons by hole impacts as well as energy transfer to the target lattice. A new version of the Monte Carlo code TREKIS is applied to study this effect in Al2O3 for SHI tracks. The complex dielectric function (CDF) formalism is used to calculate the cross sections of interaction of involved charged particles (an ion, electrons, holes) with the target giving us ability to take into account collective response of a target to excitations. We compare the radial distributions of the densities and energies of excited electrons and valence holes at different times to those obtained under the assumption of immobile holes used in earlier works. The comparison shows a significant difference between these distributions within the track core, where the majority of slow electrons and valence holes are located at femtosecond timescales after the ion impact. The study demonstrates that the energy deposited by valence holes into the lattice in nanometric tracks is comparable to the energy transferred by excited electrons. Radii of structure transformations in tracks produced by these energy exchange channels are in a good agreement with experiments.

  17. Predictive equation of state method for heavy materials based on the Dirac equation and density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, John M.; Mattsson, Ann E.

    2012-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) provides a formally predictive base for equation of state properties. Available approximations to the exchange/correlation functional provide accurate predictions for many materials in the periodic table. For heavy materials however, DFT calculations, using available functionals, fail to provide quantitative predictions, and often fail to be even qualitative. This deficiency is due both to the lack of the appropriate confinement physics in the exchange/correlation functional and to approximations used to evaluate the underlying equations. In order to assess and develop accurate functionals, it is essential to eliminate all other sources of error. In this talk we describe an efficient first-principles electronic structure method based on the Dirac equation and compare the results obtained with this method with other methods generally used. Implications for high-pressure equation of state of relativistic materials are demonstrated in application to Ce and the light actinides. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed andoperated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Studies on Materials for Heavy-Liquid-Metal-Cooled Reactors in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Minoru Takahashi; Masayuki Igashira; Toru Obara; Hiroshi Sekimoto; Kenji Kikuchi; Kazumi Aoto; Teruaki Kitano

    2002-07-01

    Recent studies on materials for the development of lead-bismuth (Pb-Bi)-cooled fast reactors (FR) and accelerator-driven sub-critical systems (ADS) in Japan are reported. The measurement of the neutron cross section of Bi to produce {sup 210}Po, the removal experiment of Po contamination and steel corrosion test in Pb-Bi flow were performed in Tokyo Institute of Technology. A target material corrosion test was performed in the project of Transmutation Experimental Facility for ADS in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Steel corrosion test was started in Mitsui Engineering and Shipbuilding Co., LTD (MES). The feasibility study for FR cycle performed in Japan Nuclear Cycle Institute (JNC) are described. (authors)

  19. Requirements for Predictive Density Functional Theory Methods for Heavy Materials Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Ann E.; Wills, John M.

    2012-02-01

    The difficulties in experimentally determining the Equation of State of actinide and lanthanide materials has driven the development of many computational approaches with varying degree of empiricism and predictive power. While Density Functional Theory (DFT) based on the Schr"odinger Equation (possibly with relativistic corrections including the scalar relativistic approach) combined with local and semi-local functionals has proven to be a successful and predictive approach for many materials, it is not giving enough accuracy, or even is a complete failure, for the actinides. To remedy this failure both an improved fundamental description based on the Dirac Equation (DE) and improved functionals are needed. Based on results obtained using the appropriate fundamental approach of DFT based on the DE we discuss the performance of available semi-local functionals, the requirements for improved functionals for actinide/lanthanide materials, and the similarities in how functionals behave in transition metal oxides. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Feathers of the magpie (Pica pica) as a bioindicator material for heavy metal pollution assessment.

    PubMed

    Dmowski, K; Golimowski, J

    1993-11-01

    This study examined the lead and cadmium content of external tail feathers of magpies from 15 localities in Poland, differing in degree of industralization and urbanization. Extremely high levels (up to 1500 micrograms/g dry wt. Pb and about 40 micrograms/g dry wt. Cd) were found in samples from areas surrounding two zinc smelting works. The correlation between metal content in feathers and size of immission (mg/m2/y) at the sites of capture was 0.96 for Pb and 0.97 for Cd. Magpie tail feathers are recommended as a material for environmental biomonitoring. PMID:8272833

  1. Optical Spectroscopy of Strongly Correlated (MOTT-HUBBARD, Heavy-Fermion, Unconventional Superconductor) Materials Tuned Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A; Struzhkin, V V

    2003-11-12

    During the past years, the Co-PI's have been responsible for the development and operation of optical techniques (Raman, IR, fluorescence, absorption and reflectance spectroscopy at ultrahigh pressures and high and low temperatures) which have proven to be extremely powerful for studying low-Z, molecular solids including hydrogen, ice, etc. (see results below). Meanwhile, it has become increasingly clear that optical spectroscopy has an equally extraordinary potential for studying metals and superconductors at ultrahigh pressures, thus the result will have a major impact on material research. However, because of the extreme difference in optical properties of opaque metals and transparent insulating molecular solids, successful accomplishment of the present project will require substantial effort in improving the present equipment and developing new techniques, and funds for this are requested here. Below we provide a short description of the work done and techniques developed during the last years. We also propose to explore new frontiers in compressed materials close to the insulator-metal boundaries, spin-crossover, and other quantum critical points.

  2. Comparison of the time behavior in the separation of light and heavy materials in X-ray backscattered method as a diagnostic tool in inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faezeh, Rahmani; Sepideh Sadat, Azimi; Esmaiel, Bayat; Vahid, Dost Mohammadi

    2016-03-01

    X-ray backscattered method based on Compton backscattering is used in the inspection field. In contrast to transmission method, source and detectors are positioned on one side of the target, so in the situation that transmission inspection is difficult, X-ray backscattered method can be provided suitable data in the inspection field. Also, detection of hidden explosives and narcotic materials are very difficult or impossible in transmission methods. High intensity backscattered beam from light materials (low-Z), such as explosives and narcotics, in comparison to the heavy materials (high-Z), made this method as the strong technique in inspection. X-ray and gamma photons scattered by the light material (such as PE and PTFE) as well as heavy material (such as Fe and Cu) were studied using MCNPX2.6 Monte Carlo code. The results showed that rise time of pulse from light materials are slower than that of from heavy materials due to multi scattering of low energy photons in the light ones, so time expansion would occur in signals from light elements. If measurement is possible, the difference in time behavior can be used as a novel method in complementary diagnostic tool beside the use of pulse height in X-ray backscattered method.

  3. Fabrication of densely packed LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material with excellent long-term cycleability for high-voltage lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jun-Chuan; Xu, Yue-Feng; Xu, Gui-Liang; Shen, Shou-Yu; Li, Jun-Tao; Huang, Ling; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2016-02-01

    Densely packed submicron polyhedral LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 material with disordered Fd 3 barm structure was synthesized via a modified sol-gel method. The as-synthesized material has a high tap density of 2.15 g cm-3, guaranteeing a high volumetric energy density for high power batteries. Electrochemical properties were investigated in both a LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/Li half-cell and a LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/graphite full-cell. The LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/Li half-cell exhibits a superior cycle stability and rate capability. Here the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 material can deliver capacity retentions of 86% at 25 °C and 75% at 55 °C within 1000 cycles for a charge-discharge rate of 1 C. At a much higher rate of 10 C, a discharge capacity of 95 mAh g-1 can be still obtained. The LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/graphite full-cell delivers a stable discharge capacity of 130.2 mAh g-1 at 0.2 C, corresponding to a discharge energy density as high as 576.2 Wh kg-1. After 100 cycles, the full cell can maintain a working voltage of 4.55 V and capacity retention of 84.6%. The excellent cycle stability is attributed to the dense structure, large particle size, low specific surface area and less exposed (110) facets, which dramatically reduce irreversible surface chemical reactions and manganese dissolution.

  4. Electrospun and oxidized cellulose materials for environmental remediation of heavy metals in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Dong; Halada, Gary P.; Spalding, Brian Patrick; Brooks, Scott C

    2009-12-01

    This chapter focuses on the use of modified cellulosic materials in the field of environmental remediation. Two different chemical methods were involved in fabricating oxidized cellulose (OC), which has shown promise as a metal ion chelator in environmental applications. Electrospinning was utilized to introduce a more porous structure into an oxidized cellulose matrix. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy were used to study both the formation of OC and its surface complexation with metal ions. IR and Raman spectroscopic data demonstrate the formation of characteristic carboxylic groups in the structure of the final products and the successful formation of OC-metal complexes. Subsequent field tests at the Field Research Site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory confirmed the value of OC for sorption of both U and Th ions.

  5. METHOD OF PRODUCING DENSE CONSOLIDATED METALLIC REGULUS

    DOEpatents

    Magel, T.T.

    1959-08-11

    A methcd is presented for reducing dense metal compositions while simultaneously separating impurities from the reduced dense metal and casting the reduced parified dense metal, such as uranium, into well consolidated metal ingots. The reduction is accomplished by heating the dense metallic salt in the presence of a reducing agent, such as an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal in a bomb type reacting chamber, while applying centrifugal force on the reacting materials. Separation of the metal from the impurities is accomplished essentially by the incorporation of a constricted passageway at the vertex of a conical reacting chamber which is in direct communication with a collecting chamber. When a centrifugal force is applled to the molten metal and slag from the reduction in a direction collinear with the axis of the constricted passage, the dense molten metal is forced therethrough while the less dense slag is retained within the reaction chamber, resulting in a simultaneous separation of the reduced molten metal from the slag and a compacting of the reduced metal in a homogeneous mass.

  6. Uniformly dense polymeric foam body

    DOEpatents

    Whinnery, Jr., Leroy

    2003-07-15

    A method for providing a uniformly dense polymer foam body having a density between about 0.013 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.5 g/cm.sup.3 is disclosed. The method utilizes a thermally expandable polymer microsphere material wherein some of the microspheres are unexpanded and some are only partially expanded. It is shown that by mixing the two types of materials in appropriate ratios to achieve the desired bulk final density, filling a mold with this mixture so as to displace all or essentially all of the internal volume of the mold, heating the mold for a predetermined interval at a temperature above about 130.degree. C., and then cooling the mold to a temperature below 80.degree. C. the molded part achieves a bulk density which varies by less then about .+-.6% everywhere throughout the part volume.

  7. Changes in speciation and leaching behaviors of heavy metals in dredged sediment solidified/stabilized with various materials.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jianping; Wang, Liang; Xiao, Man

    2016-05-01

    Solidification/stabilization (S/S) of sediments is frequently used to treat contaminants in dredged sediments. In this study, sediment collected from the Pearl River Delta (China) was solidified/stabilized with three different kinds of functional materials: cement, lime and bentonite. Lime primarily acted via induced increases in pH, while cements stabilization occurred through their silicate-based systems and the main function of bentonite was adsorption. The speciation and leaching behaviors of specific heavy metals before and after S/S were analyzed and the results showed that the residual speciation of Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb and Zn increased in all treatments except for Cu, as the exchangeable speciation, carbonate-bound speciation and Fe-Mn-oxide-bound speciation of Cu (all of which could be stabilized) were less than 2 % of the total amount. Pb leaching only decreased when pH increased, while the mobility of Cr and Ni only decreased in response to the silicate-based systems. The leached portion of the Fe-Mn-oxide-bound speciation followed the order Zn > Cu > Ni/Cd > Pb > Cr. The leached portion of organic-matter-bound species was less than 4 % for Cd, Cr, Ni and Pb, but 35.1 % and 20.6 % for Cu and Zn, respectively. PMID:26846241

  8. In-situ high temperature irradiation setup for temperature dependent structural studies of materials under swift heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulriya, P. K.; Kumari, Renu; Kumar, Rajesh; Grover, V.; Shukla, R.; Tyagi, A. K.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    An in-situ high temperature (1000 K) setup is designed and installed in the materials science beam line of superconducting linear accelerator at the Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC) for temperature dependent ion irradiation studies on the materials exposed with swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. The Gd2Ti2O7 pyrochlore is irradiated using 120 MeV Au ion at 1000 K using the high temperature irradiation facility and characterized by ex-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). Another set of Gd2Ti2O7 samples are irradiated with the same ion beam parameter at 300 K and simultaneously characterized using in-situ XRD available in same beam line. The XRD studies along with the Raman spectroscopic investigations reveal that the structural modification induced by the ion irradiation is strongly dependent on the temperature of the sample. The Gd2Ti2O7 is readily amorphized at an ion fluence 6 × 1012 ions/cm2 on irradiation at 300 K, whereas it is transformed to a radiation-resistant anion-deficient fluorite structure on high temperature irradiation, that amorphized at ion fluence higher than 1 × 1013 ions/cm2. The temperature dependent ion irradiation studies showed that the ion fluence required to cause amorphization at 1000 K irradiation is significantly higher than that required at room temperature irradiation. In addition to testing the efficiency of the in-situ high temperature irradiation facility, the present study establishes that the radiation stability of the pyrochlore is enhanced at higher temperatures.

  9. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.

    1993-10-12

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  10. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  11. Dense suspension splash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodge, Kevin M.; Peters, Ivo R.; Ellowitz, Jake; Schaarsberg, Martin H. Klein; Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Zhang, Wendy W.

    2014-11-01

    Impact of a dense suspension drop onto a solid surface at speeds of several meters-per-second splashes by ejecting individual liquid-coated particles. Suppression or reduction of this splash is important for thermal spray coating and additive manufacturing. Accomplishing this aim requires distinguishing whether the splash is generated by individual scattering events or by collective motion reminiscent of liquid flow. Since particle inertia dominates over surface tension and viscous drag in a strong splash, we model suspension splash using a discrete-particle simulation in which the densely packed macroscopic particles experience inelastic collisions but zero friction or cohesion. Numerical results based on this highly simplified model are qualitatively consistent with observations. They also show that approximately 70% of the splash is generated by collective motion. Here an initially downward-moving particle is ejected into the splash because it experiences a succession of low-momentum-change collisions whose effects do not cancel but instead accumulate. The remainder of the splash is generated by scattering events in which a small number of high-momentum-change collisions cause a particle to be ejected upwards. Current Address: Physics of Fluids Group, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands.

  12. Warm dense crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenza, Ryan A.; Seidler, Gerald T.

    2016-03-01

    The intense femtosecond-scale pulses from x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are able to create and interrogate interesting states of matter characterized by long-lived nonequilibrium semicore or core electron occupancies or by the heating of dense phases via the relaxation cascade initiated by the photoelectric effect. We address here the latter case of "warm dense matter" (WDM) and investigate the observable consequences of x-ray heating of the electronic degrees of freedom in crystalline systems. We report temperature-dependent density functional theory calculations for the x-ray diffraction from crystalline LiF, graphite, diamond, and Be. We find testable, strong signatures of condensed-phase effects that emphasize the importance of wide-angle scattering to study nonequilibrium states. These results also suggest that the reorganization of the valence electron density at eV-scale temperatures presents a confounding factor to achieving atomic resolution in macromolecular serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) studies at XFELs, as performed under the "diffract before destroy" paradigm.

  13. DENSE MEDIUM CYCLONE OPTIMIZATON

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald H. Luttrell; Chris J. Barbee; Peter J. Bethell; Chris J. Wood

    2005-06-30

    Dense medium cyclones (DMCs) are known to be efficient, high-tonnage devices suitable for upgrading particles in the 50 to 0.5 mm size range. This versatile separator, which uses centrifugal forces to enhance the separation of fine particles that cannot be upgraded in static dense medium separators, can be found in most modern coal plants and in a variety of mineral plants treating iron ore, dolomite, diamonds, potash and lead-zinc ores. Due to the high tonnage, a small increase in DMC efficiency can have a large impact on plant profitability. Unfortunately, the knowledge base required to properly design and operate DMCs has been seriously eroded during the past several decades. In an attempt to correct this problem, a set of engineering tools have been developed to allow producers to improve the efficiency of their DMC circuits. These tools include (1) low-cost density tracers that can be used by plant operators to rapidly assess DMC performance, (2) mathematical process models that can be used to predict the influence of changes in operating and design variables on DMC performance, and (3) an expert advisor system that provides plant operators with a user-friendly interface for evaluating, optimizing and trouble-shooting DMC circuits. The field data required to develop these tools was collected by conducting detailed sampling and evaluation programs at several industrial plant sites. These data were used to demonstrate the technical, economic and environmental benefits that can be realized through the application of these engineering tools.

  14. Cooling of dense stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuruta, S.

    1972-01-01

    Cooling rates were calculated for neutron stars of about one solar mass and 10 km radius, with magnetic fields from zero to about 10 to the 14th power gauss, for extreme cases of maximum and zero superfluidity. The results show that most pulsars are so cold that thermal ionization of surface atoms would be negligible. Nucleon superfluidity and crystallization of heavy nuclei were treated quantitatively, and more realistic hadron star models were chosen. Cooling rates were calculated for a stable hyperon star near the maximum mass limit, a medium weight neutron star, and a light neutron star with neutron-rich heavy nuclei near the minimum mass limit. Results show that cooling rates are a sensitive function of density. The Crab and Vela pulsars are considered, as well as cooling of a massive white dwarf star.

  15. Geophagic clay materials from Nigeria: a potential source of heavy metals and human health implications in mostly women and children who practice it.

    PubMed

    Lar, U A; Agene, J I; Umar, A I

    2015-04-01

    Geophagy is a common practice among certain cultural groups especially women in some rural communities in Nigeria. The safety of eating such clays in terms of their heavy metal composition has not been ascertained, neither is the link between them and disease conditions established in geophagists. The analysis of field survey data reveals that the majority (about 90 %) of the women did not go beyond secondary school education. The geology of an area has a direct influence on the chemical composition of the soils. Therefore, this research was carried out to determine the mineralogical and the heavy metal content of some geophagic clay materials from Nigeria. All the geophagic clay materials are hydrated silicates of either Al, (Na and Ca), (Al and Mg), or/and (Mg and Fe). The concentration levels of Na, Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Cu, and Zn are tolerable and apparently could serve as a veritable source of mineral nutrients deficient in the human body. An assessment of the level of contamination of heavy metals on the basis of the index of geo-accumulation (I(geo)) shows that Cr, Cu, Zn, Co, and Ni (all with I(geo) < 1) did not contaminate the clay materials. On the contrary, they are extremely contaminated by As, Cd and Se (I(geo) = >5), and are moderately to strongly contaminated by Pb and Sb (I (geo) = 2-3). In terms of health risk assessment, the presence of heavy metals such as As, Cd, Pb, Se, and Sb with a health risk index (HRI) >1, renders the geophagic clays unsafe for human consumption. Similarly, Al, Fe, and Na are in excess in the clay (HRI ⋙ 1) posing serious human health risks. Thus, the ingestion of geophagic clay materials by pregnant women and children when it contains heavy metals like Pb, As, Cd, Se, and Sb poses the risk of some medical disorders and should therefore be considered a public health problem. Since geophagic practice will persist despite civilization, we advocate finding ways of reducing heavy metal pollutants in geophagic clays through

  16. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Case, Andrew; Phillips, Michael W.

    2006-10-01

    High velocity dense plasma jets are under continued experimental development for a variety of fusion applications including refueling, disruption mitigation, rotation drive, and magnetized target fusion. The technical goal is to accelerate plasma slugs of density >10^17 cm-3 and total mass >100 micrograms to velocities >200 km/s. The approach utilizes symmetrical injection of very high density plasma into a coaxial EM accelerator having a tailored cross-section geometry to prevent formation of the blow-by instability. Injected plasma is generated by electrothermal capillary discharges using either cylindrical capillaries or a newer toroidal spark gap arrangement that has worked at pressures as low as 3.5 x10-6 Torr in bench tests. Experimental plasma data will be presented for a complete 32 injector accelerator system recently built for driving rotation in the Maryland MCX experiment which utilizes the cylindrical capillaries, and also for a 50 spark gap test unit currently under construction.

  17. A comprehensive review on biosorption of heavy metals by algal biomass: materials, performances, chemistry, and modeling simulation tools.

    PubMed

    He, Jinsong; Chen, J Paul

    2014-05-01

    Heavy metals contamination has become a global issue of concern due to their higher toxicities, nature of non-biodegradability, high capabilities in bioaccumulation in human body and food chain, and carcinogenicities to humans. A series of researches demonstrate that biosorption is a promising technology for removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions. Algae serve as good biosorbents due to their abundance in seawater and fresh water, cost-effectiveness, reusability and high metal sorption capacities. This article provides a comprehensive review of recent findings on performances, applications and chemistry of algae (e.g., brown, green and red algae, modified algae and the derivatives) for sequestration of heavy metals. Biosorption kinetics and equilibrium models are reviewed. The mechanisms for biosorption are presented. Biosorption is a complicated process involving ion-exchange, complexation and coordination. Finally the theoretical simulation tools for biosorption equilibrium and kinetics are presented so that the readers can use them for further studies. PMID:24630371

  18. Dense neutron star matter

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J. R.

    2014-05-02

    The microscopic composition and properties of matter at super-saturation densities have been a subject of intense investigation for decades. The scarcity of experimental and observational data has lead to the necessary reliance on theoretical models. However, there remains great uncertainty in these models, which, of necessity, have to go beyond the over-simple assumption that high-density matter consists only of nucleons and leptons. Heavy strange baryons, mesons and quark matter in different forms and phases have to be included to fulfill basic requirements of fundamental laws of physics.

  19. Dense neutron star matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, J. R.

    2014-05-01

    The microscopic composition and properties of matter at super-saturation densities have been a subject of intense investigation for decades. The scarcity of experimental and observational data has lead to the necessary reliance on theoretical models. However, there remains great uncertainty in these models, which, of necessity, have to go beyond the over-simple assumption that high-density matter consists only of nucleons and leptons. Heavy strange baryons, mesons and quark matter in different forms and phases have to be included to fulfill basic requirements of fundamental laws of physics.

  20. DENSE MEDIA CYCLONE OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald H. Luttrell

    2002-09-14

    All project activities are now winding down. Follow-up tracer tests were conducted at several of the industrial test sites and analysis of the experimental data is currently underway. All required field work was completed during this quarter. In addition, the heavy medium cyclone simulation and expert system programs are nearly completed and user manuals are being prepared. Administrative activities (e.g., project documents, cost-sharing accounts, etc.) are being reviewed and prepared for final submission to DOE. All project reporting requirements are up to date. All financial expenditures are within approved limits.

  1. Crystal Growth and Intergrowth Structure of the New Heavy Fermion Materials CeIrIn 5 and CeRhIn 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshopoulou, E. G.; Fisk, Z.; Sarrao, J. L.; Thompson, J. D.

    2001-04-01

    The structures of the new heavy fermion materials CeIrIn5 and CeRhIn5 have been determined by single-crystal neutron (R(F)=0.051) and X-ray (R(F)=0.056) diffraction, respectively. Both compounds adopt tetragonal structure, space group P4/mmm (No. 123), Z=1, a=b=4.674(1) Å, and c=7.501(5) Å for CeIrIn5, and a=b=4.656(2) Å, and c=7.542(1) Å for CeRhIn5. The possible presence of antisite disorder, a long-standing question on this type of structure, was excluded by both electron and-neutron or X-ray diffraction. The compounds are built by monolayers of face-sharing distorted cuboctahedra [CeIn3] and monolayers of edge-sharing rectangular parallelepipeds [RhIn2] or [IrIn2], stacked alternatively in the [001] direction. Therefore, they are new members of the inhomogeneous linear homologous series MmTnT‧3m+2n. Because of their ordered intergrowth structure, the physical properties of the quasi-two-dimensional heavy electron systems CeIrIn5 and CeRhIn5 can be directly compared with the corresponding ones of their parent compound, the three-dimensional heavy fermion material CeIn3.

  2. New functional materials for heavy metal sorption: “Supramolecular” attachment of thiols to mesoporous silica substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Timothy G.; Yantasee, Wassana; Sangvanich, Thanapon; Fryxell, Glen E.; Johnson, Darren W.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2008-10-01

    This manuscript describes the functionalization of MCM-41 with phenyl monolayers at various densities to provide a scaffolding for noncovalently bound benzylmercaptan (BM), 1,3- and 1,4-bis(mercaptomethyl)benzenes (1,3- and 1,4-BMMB, respectively) for use in heavy metal uptake from native waters.

  3. Br-rich tips of calcified crab claws are less hard but more fracture resistant: a comparison of mineralized and heavy-element biological materials.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Robert M S; Niedbala, Jack C; Nesson, Michael H; Tao, Ye; Shokes, Jacob E; Scott, Robert A; Latimer, Matthew J

    2009-06-01

    We find that the spoon-like tips of the chelipeds (large claws) of the crab Pachygrapsus crassipes differ from the rest of the claw in that they are not calcified, but instead contain about 1% bromine--thus they represent a new example of a class of structural biological materials that contain heavy elements such as Zn, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Br bound in an organic matrix. X-ray absorption spectroscopy data suggest that the bromine is bound to phenyl rings, possibly in tyrosine. We measure a broad array of mechanical properties of a heavy-element biological material for the first time (abrasion resistance, coefficient of kinetic friction, energy of fracture, hardness, modulus of elasticity and dynamic mechanical properties), and we make a direct comparison with a mineralized tissue. Our results suggest that the greatest advantage of bromine-rich cuticle over calcified cuticle is resistance to fracture (the energy of fracture is about an order of magnitude greater than for calcified cuticle). The greatest advantage relative to unenriched cuticle, represented by ant mandible cuticle, is a factor of about 1.5 greater hardness and modulus of elasticity.The spoon-like tips gain additional fracture resistance from the orientation of the constituent laminae and from the viscoelasticity of the material. We suggest that fracture resistance is of greater importance in smaller organisms, and we speculate that one function of heavy elements in structural biological materials is to reduce molecular resonant frequencies and thereby increase absorption of energy from impacts. PMID:19422071

  4. Ariel's Densely Pitted Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This mosaic of the four highest-resolution images of Ariel represents the most detailed Voyager 2 picture of this satellite of Uranus. The images were taken through the clear filter of Voyager's narrow-angle camera on Jan. 24, 1986, at a distance of about 130,000 kilometers (80,000 miles). Ariel is about 1,200 km (750 mi) in diameter; the resolution here is 2.4 km (1.5 mi). Much of Ariel's surface is densely pitted with craters 5 to 10 km (3 to 6 mi) across. These craters are close to the threshold of detection in this picture. Numerous valleys and fault scarps crisscross the highly pitted terrain. Voyager scientists believe the valleys have formed over down-dropped fault blocks (graben); apparently, extensive faulting has occurred as a result of expansion and stretching of Ariel's crust. The largest fault valleys, near the terminator at right, as well as a smooth region near the center of this image, have been partly filled with deposits that are younger and less heavily cratered than the pitted terrain. Narrow, somewhat sinuous scarps and valleys have been formed, in turn, in these young deposits. It is not yet clear whether these sinuous features have been formed by faulting or by the flow of fluids.

    JPL manages the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  5. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Andrew; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael; van Doren, David; Elton, Raymond; Uzun-Kaymak, Ilker

    2007-11-01

    We are developing high velocity dense plasma jets for fusion and HEDP applications. Traditional coaxial plasma accelerators suffer from the blow-by instability which limits the mass accelerated to high velocity. In the current design blow-by is delayed by a combination of electrode shaping and use of a tailored plasma armature created by injection of a high density plasma at a few eV generated by arrays of capillary discharges or sparkgaps. Experimental data will be presented for a complete 32 injector gun system built for driving rotation in the Maryland MCX experiment, including data on penetration of the plasma jet through a magnetic field. We present spectroscopic measurements of plasma velocity, temperature, and density, as well as total momentum measured using a ballistic pendulum. Measurements are in agreement with each other and with time of flight data from photodiodes and a multichannel PMT. Plasma density is above 10^15 cm-3, velocities range up to about 100 km/s. Preliminary results from a quadrature heterodyne HeNe interferometer are consistent with these results.

  6. Shear dispersion in dense granular flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Christov, Ivan C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-04-18

    We formulate and solve a model problem of dispersion of dense granular materials in rapid shear flow down an incline. The effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder is shown to vary as the Péclet number squared, as in classical Taylor–Aris dispersion of molecular solutes. An extension to generic shear profiles is presented, and possible applications to industrial and geological granular flows are noted.

  7. Structures for dense, crack free thin films

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2011-03-08

    The process described herein provides a simple and cost effective method for making crack free, high density thin ceramic film. The steps involve depositing a layer of a ceramic material on a porous or dense substrate. The deposited layer is compacted and then the resultant laminate is sintered to achieve a higher density than would have been possible without the pre-firing compaction step.

  8. Heavy Flavor Dynamics in Relativistic Heavy-ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shanshan

    Heavy flavor hadrons serve as valuable probes of the transport properties of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. In this dissertation, we introduce a comprehensive framework that describes the full-time evolution of heavy flavor in heavy-ion collisions, including its initial production, in-medium evolution inside the QGP matter, hadronization process from heavy quarks to their respective mesonic bound states and the subsequent interactions between heavy mesons and the hadron gas. The in-medium energy loss of heavy quarks is studied within the framework of a Langevin equation coupled to hydrodynamic models that simulate the space-time evolution of the hot and dense QGP matter. We improve the classical Langevin approach such that, apart from quasi-elastic scatterings between heavy quarks and the medium background, radiative energy loss is incorporated as well by treating gluon radiation as a recoil force term. The subsequent hadronization of emitted heavy quarks is simulated via a hybrid fragmentation plus recombination model. The propagation of produced heavy mesons in the hadronic phase is described using the ultra-relativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD) model. Our calculation shows that while collisional energy loss dominates the heavy quark motion inside the QGP in the low transverse momentum (p T) regime, contributions from gluon radiation are found to be significant at high pT. The recombination mechanism is important for the heavy flavor meson production at intermediate energies. The hadronic final state interactions further enhance the suppression and the collective flow of heavy mesons we observe. Within our newly developed framework, we present numerical results for the nuclear modification and the elliptic flow of D mesons, which are consistent with measurements at both the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC); predictions for B mesons are also provided. In

  9. Ion beam driven warm dense matter experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Ni, P. A.; Leitner, M.; Roy, P. K.; More, R.; Barnard, J. J.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Molvik, A. W.; Yoneda, H.

    2007-11-01

    We report plans and experimental results in ion beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) experiments. Initial experiments at LBNL are at 0.3-1 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak), increasing toward the Bragg peak in future versions of the accelerator. The WDM conditions are envisioned to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. Initial experiments include an experiment to study transient darkening at LBNL; and a porous target experiment at GSI heated by intense heavy-ion beams from the SIS 18 storage ring. Further experiments will explore target temperature and other properties such as electrical conductivity to investigate phase transitions and the critical point.

  10. Kaon condensation in dense stellar matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chang-Hwan; Rho, M. |

    1995-03-01

    This article combines two talks given by the authors and is based on Works done in collaboration with G.E. Brown and D.P. Min on kaon condensation in dense baryonic medium treated in chiral perturbation theory using heavy-baryon formalism. It contains, in addition to what was recently published, astrophysical backgrounds for kaon condensation discussed by Brown and Bethe, a discussion on a renormalization-group analysis to meson condensation worked out together with H.K. Lee and S.J. Sin, and the recent results of K.M. Westerberg in the bound-state approach to the Skyrme model. Negatively charged kaons are predicted to condense at a critical density 2 {approx_lt} {rho}/{rho}o {approx_lt} 4, in the range to allow the intriguing new phenomena predicted by Brown and Bethe to take place in compact star matter.

  11. Symmetry energy in cold dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Kie Sang; Lee, Su Houng

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the symmetry energy in cold dense matter both in the normal quark phase and in the 2-color superconductor (2SC) phase. For the normal phase, the thermodynamic potential is calculated by using hard dense loop (HDL) resummation to leading order, where the dominant contribution comes from the longitudinal gluon rest mass. The effect of gluonic interaction on the symmetry energy, obtained from the thermodynamic potential, was found to be small. In the 2SC phase, the non-perturbative BCS paring gives enhanced symmetry energy as the gapped states are forced to be in the common Fermi sea reducing the number of available quarks that can contribute to the asymmetry. We used high density effective field theory to estimate the contribution of gluon interaction to the symmetry energy. Among the gluon rest masses in 2SC phase, only the Meissner mass has iso-spin dependence although the magnitude is much smaller than the Debye mass. As the iso-spin dependence of gluon rest masses is even smaller than the case in the normal phase, we expect that the contribution of gluonic interaction to the symmetry energy in the 2SC phase will be minimal. The different value of symmetry energy in each phase will lead to different prediction for the particle yields in heavy ion collision experiment.

  12. The use of synchrotron micro-XRF for characterization of the micro-heterogeneity of heavy metals in low-Z reference materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempenaers, L.; Vincze, L.; Janssens, K.

    2000-06-01

    Synchrotron μ-XRF (X-ray fluorescence analysis) is a trace-level micro-analytical method that allows one to quantitatively measure the degree of heterogeneity of inorganic trace constituents in a number of reference materials. In the present study, low atomic number materials containing trace levels of heavy metals are concerned. The measurements involve an extensive series of local analyses, performed in identical conditions at different locations on the material. In order to be able to detect low levels of sample heterogeneity, the experimental set-up must permit the collection of spectral data in a highly repeatable manner. In this paper, a procedure for determining the homogeneity of materials on the basis of a series of individual analysis results will be outlined. This includes a discussion on the manner in which a number of the sources of instability that occur during synchrotron μ-XRF experiments can be eliminated. The procedure is employed to measure the degree of micro-heterogeneity of several existing reference materials and to evaluate their suitability for calibration of trace-level micro-analytical methods. After analyzing the micro-heterogeneity of elements in these different reference materials, a minimum sampling mass for homogeneous measurements is calculated.

  13. Assessment of radioactive materials and heavy metals in the surface soil around uranium mining area of Tongliao, China.

    PubMed

    Haribala; Hu, Bitao; Wang, Chengguo; Gerilemandahu; Xu, Xiao; Zhang, Shuai; Bao, Shanhu; Li, Yuhong

    2016-08-01

    Natural and artificial radionuclides and heavy metals in the surface soil of the uranium mining area of Tongliao, China, were measured using gamma spectrometry, flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry and microwave dissolution atomic fluorescence spectrometry respectively. The estimated average activity concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th, (226)Ra, (40)K and (137)Cs are 27.53±16.01, 15.89±5.20, 12.64±4.27, 746.84±38.24 and 4.23±4.76Bq/kg respectively. The estimated average absorbed dose rate in the air and annual effective dose rate are 46.58±5.26nGy/h and 57.13±6.45μSv, respectively. The radium equivalent activity, external and internal hazard indices were also calculated and their mean values are within the acceptable limits. The heavy metal concentrations of Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, Hg and As from the surface soil were measured and their health risks were then determined. Although the content of Cd is much higher than the average background in China, its non-cancer and cancer risk indices are all within the acceptable ranges. These calculated hazard indices to estimate the potential radiological health risk in soil and the dose rate are well below their permissible limit. In addition the correlations between the radioactivity concentrations of the radionuclides and the heavy metals in soil were determined by the Pearson linear coefficient. PMID:27107776

  14. Collaborative Research: Neutrinos & Nucleosynthesis in Hot Dense Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, Sanjay

    2013-09-06

    It is now firmly established that neutrinos, which are copiously produced in the hot and dense core of the supernova, play a role in the supernova explosion mechanism and in the synthesis of heavy elements through a phenomena known as r-process nucleosynthesis. They are also detectable in terrestrial neutrino experiments, and serve as a probe of the extreme environment and complex dynamics encountered in the supernova. The major goal of the UW research activity relevant to this project was to calculate the neutrino interaction rates in hot and dense matter of relevance to core collapse supernova. These serve as key input physics in large scale computer simulations of the supernova dynamics and nucleosynthesis being pursued at national laboratories here in the United States and by other groups in Europe and Japan. Our calculations show that neutrino production and scattering rate are altered by the nuclear interactions and that these modifications have important implications for nucleosynthesis and terrestrial neutrino detection. The calculation of neutrino rates in dense matter are difficult because nucleons in the dense matter are strongly coupled. A neutrino interacts with several nucleons and the quantum interference between scattering off different nucleons depends on the nature of correlations between them in dense matter. To describe these correlations we used analytic methods based on mean field theory and hydrodynamics, and computational methods such as Quantum Monte Carlo. We found that due to nuclear effects neutrino production rates at relevant temperatures are enhanced, and that electron neutrinos are more easily absorbed than anti-electron neutrinos in dense matter. The latter, was shown to favor synthesis of heavy neutron-rich elements in the supernova.

  15. Changes in dissolved organic material determine exposure of stream benthic communities to UV-B radiation and heavy metals: Implications for climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clements, W.H.; Brooks, M.L.; Kashian, D.R.; Zuellig, R.E.

    2008-01-01

    Changes in regional climate in the Rocky Mountains over the next 100 years are expected to have significant effects on biogeochemical cycles and hydrological processes. In particular, decreased discharge and lower stream depth during summer when ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the highest combined with greater photo-oxidation of dissolved organic materials (DOM) will significantly increase exposure of benthic communities to UVR. Communities in many Rocky Mountain streams are simultaneously exposed to elevated metals from abandoned mines, the toxicity and bioavailability of which are also determined by DOM. We integrated field surveys of 19 streams (21 sites) along a gradient of metal contamination with microcosm and field experiments conducted in Colorado, USA, and New Zealand to investigate the influence of DOM on bioavailability of heavy metals and exposure of benthic communities to UVR. Spatial and seasonal variation in DOM were closely related to stream discharge and significantly influenced heavy metal uptake in benthic organisms. Qualitative and quantitative changes in DOM resulting from exposure to sunlight increased UV-B (290-320nm) penetration and toxicity of heavy metals. Results of microcosm experiments showed that benthic communities from a metal-polluted stream were tolerant of metals, but were more sensitive to UV-B than communities from a reference stream. We speculate that the greater sensitivity of these communities to UV-B resulted from costs associated with metal tolerance. Exclusion of UVR from 12 separate Colorado streams and from outdoor stream microcosms in New Zealand increased the abundance of benthic organisms (mayflies, stoneflies, and caddisflies) by 18% and 54%, respectively. Our findings demonstrate the importance of considering changes in regional climate and UV-B exposure when assessing the effects of local anthropogenic stressors. ?? Journal compilation ?? 2008 Blackwell Publishing.

  16. Materials management in an internationally safeguarded fuels reprocessing plant. [1500 and 210 metric tons heavy metal per year

    SciTech Connect

    Hakkila, E.A.; Cobb, D.D.; Dayem, H.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Kern, E.A.; Markin, J.T.; Shipley, J.P.; Barnes, J.W.; Scheinman, L.

    1980-04-01

    The second volume describes the requirements and functions of materials measurement and accounting systems (MMAS) and conceptual designs for an MMAS incorporating both conventional and near-real-time (dynamic) measurement and accounting techniques. Effectiveness evaluations, based on recently developed modeling, simulation, and analysis procedures, show that conventional accountability can meet IAEA goal quantities and detection times in these reference facilities only for low-enriched uranium. Dynamic materials accounting may meet IAEA goals for detecting the abrupt (1-3 weeks) diversion of 8 kg of plutonium. Current materials accounting techniques probably cannot meet the 1-y protracted-diversion goal of 8 kg for plutonium.

  17. Population kinetics in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schlanges, M.; Bornath, T.; Prenzel, R.; Kremp, D.

    1996-07-01

    Starting from quantum kinetic equations, rate equations for the number densities of the different atomic states and equations for the energy density are derived which are valid for dense nonideal plasmas. Statistical expressions are presented for the rate coefficients taking into account many-body effects as dynamical screening, lowering of the ionization energy and Pauli-blocking. Based on these generalized expressions, the coefficients of impact ionization, three-body recombination, excitation and deexcitation are calculated for nonideal hydrogen and carbon plasmas. As a result, higher ionization and recombination rates are obtained in the dense plasma region. The influence of the many-body effects on the population kinetics, including density and temperature relaxation, is shown then for a dense hydrogen plasma. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, N. M.; Heinonen, R. A.; Starrett, C. E.; Saumon, D.

    2015-06-25

    In this study, the ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense matter is determined using the recently developed pseudoatom molecular dynamics method [Starrett et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 013104 (2015)]. The method uses density functional theory to determine ion-ion pair interaction potentials that have no free parameters. These potentials are used in classical molecular dynamics simulations. This constitutes a computationally efficient and realistic model of dense plasmas. Comparison with recently published simulations of the ion-ion dynamic structure factor and sound speed of warm dense aluminum finds good to reasonable agreement. Using this method, we make predictions of the ion-ion dynamical structure factor and sound speed of a warm dense mixture—equimolar carbon-hydrogen. This material is commonly used as an ablator in inertial confinement fusion capsules, and our results are amenable to direct experimental measurement.

  19. Ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gill, N M; Heinonen, R A; Starrett, C E; Saumon, D

    2015-06-01

    The ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense matter is determined using the recently developed pseudoatom molecular dynamics method [Starrett et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 013104 (2015)]. The method uses density functional theory to determine ion-ion pair interaction potentials that have no free parameters. These potentials are used in classical molecular dynamics simulations. This constitutes a computationally efficient and realistic model of dense plasmas. Comparison with recently published simulations of the ion-ion dynamic structure factor and sound speed of warm dense aluminum finds good to reasonable agreement. Using this method, we make predictions of the ion-ion dynamical structure factor and sound speed of a warm dense mixture-equimolar carbon-hydrogen. This material is commonly used as an ablator in inertial confinement fusion capsules, and our results are amenable to direct experimental measurement. PMID:26172810

  20. Ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense mixtures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gill, N. M.; Heinonen, R. A.; Starrett, C. E.; Saumon, D.

    2015-06-25

    In this study, the ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense matter is determined using the recently developed pseudoatom molecular dynamics method [Starrett et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 013104 (2015)]. The method uses density functional theory to determine ion-ion pair interaction potentials that have no free parameters. These potentials are used in classical molecular dynamics simulations. This constitutes a computationally efficient and realistic model of dense plasmas. Comparison with recently published simulations of the ion-ion dynamic structure factor and sound speed of warm dense aluminum finds good to reasonable agreement. Using this method, we make predictions of the ion-ionmore » dynamical structure factor and sound speed of a warm dense mixture—equimolar carbon-hydrogen. This material is commonly used as an ablator in inertial confinement fusion capsules, and our results are amenable to direct experimental measurement.« less

  1. Assessment of heavy metal pollution in surface soils and plant material in the post-industrial city of Katowice, Poland.

    PubMed

    Steindor, Karolina A; Franiel, Izabella J; Bierza, Wojciech M; Pawlak, Beata; Palowski, Bernard F

    2016-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to assess the level of environment pollution by biological monitoring. The leaves and bark of popular ornamental trees Acer pseudoplatanus L. and Acer platanoides L. and soil from the sampling sites were used to perform heavy metals pollution monitoring in urban areas with different pollution sources, as well to investigate the suitability of the leaves and bark as bioindicators of Pb, Zn, Cd and Cu pollution. Plant samples were collected at nine locations classified into three pollution groups based on metal content in the soils. The chosen pollution indices were used to assess the level of contamination according to background values. Soils in the Katowice area are found to be relatively heavily contaminated with Pb, Zn and Cd. Both of the maple tree species did not statistically differ in terms of the investigated elements' concentration in leaves or bark. Only bark samples reflected the pollution level, showing differences between the sampling points, and therefore are recommended for biomonitoring purposes. PMID:26809744

  2. Safety Analysis of 'Older/Aged' Handling and Transportation Equipment for Heavy Loads, Radioactive Waste and Materials in Accordance with German Nuclear Standards KTA 3902, 3903 and 3905

    SciTech Connect

    Macias, P.; Prucker, E.; Stang, W.

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a general safety analysis of important handling and transportation processes and their related equipment ('load chains' consisting of cranes, load-bearing equipment and load-attaching points). This project was arranged by the responsible Bavarian ministry for environment, health and consumer protection (StMUGV) in agreement with the power plant operators of all Bavarian nuclear power plants to work out potential safety improvements. The range of the equipment (e.g. reactor building, crane, refuelling machine, load-bearing equipment and load-attaching points) covers the handling and transportation of fuel elements (e. g. with fuel flasks), heavy loads (e.g. reactor pressure vessel closure head, shielding slabs) and radioactive materials and waste (e.g. waste flasks, control elements, fuel channels, structure elements). The handling equipment was subjected to a general safety analysis taking into account the ageing of the equipment and the progress of standards. Compliance with the current valid requirements of the state of science and technology as required by German Atomic Act and particularly of the nuclear safety KTA-standards (3902, 3903 and 3905) was examined. The higher protection aims 'safe handling and transportation of heavy loads and safe handling of radioactive materials and waste' of the whole analysis are to avoid a criticality accident, the release of radioactivity and inadmissible effects on important technical equipment and buildings. The scope of the analysis was to check whether these protection aims were fulfilled for all important technical handling and transportation processes. In particularly the design and manufacturing of the components and the regulations of the handling itself were examined. (authors)

  3. Synergistic adsorption of heavy metal ions and organic pollutants by supramolecular polysaccharide composite materials from cellulose, chitosan and crown ether

    PubMed Central

    Mututuvari, Tamutsiwa M.; Tran, Chieu D.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a simple one-step method to synthesize novel supramolecular polysaccharide composites from cellulose (CEL), chitosan (CS) and benzo-15-crown 5 (B15C5). Butylmethylimidazolium chloride [BMIm+Cl−], an ionic liquid (IL), was used as a sole solvent for dissolution and preparation of the composites. Since majority of [BMIm+Cl−] used was recovered for reuse, the method is recyclable. The [CEL/CS + B15C5] composites obtained retain properties of their components, namely superior mechanical strength (from CEL), excellent adsorption capability for heavy metal ions and organic pollutants (from B15C5 and CS). More importantly, the [CEL/CS + B15C5] composites exhibit truly supramolecular properties. By itself CS, CEL and B15C5 can effectively adsorb Cd2+, Zn2+ and 2,4,5-trichlorophenol. However, adsorption capability of the composite was substantially and synergistically enhanced by adding B15C5 to either CEL and/or CS. That is, the adsorption capacity (qe values) for Cd2+ and Zn2+ by [CS + B15C5], [CEL + B15C5] and [CEL + CS + B15C5] composites are much higher than combined qe values of individual CS, CEL and B15C5 composites. It seems that B15C5 synergistically interact with CS (or CEL) to form more stable complexes with Cd2+ (or Zn2+), and as a consequence, the [CS + B15C5] (or the [CEL + B15C5]) composite can adsorb relatively larger amount Cd2+ (or Zn2+). Moreover, the pollutants adsorbed on the composites can be quantitatively desorbed to enable the [CS + CEL + B15C5] composites to be reused with similar adsorption efficiency. PMID:24333678

  4. Prediction of Heavy Metal Removal by Different Liner Materials from Landfill Leachate: Modeling of Experimental Results Using Artificial Intelligence Technique

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Nurdan Gamze; Gümüşel, Emine Beril; Ozgonenel, Okan

    2013-01-01

    An intensive study has been made to see the performance of the different liner materials with bentonite on the removal efficiency of Cu(II) and Zn(II) from industrial leachate. An artificial neural network (ANN) was used to display the significant levels of the analyzed liner materials on the removal efficiency. The statistical analysis proves that the effect of natural zeolite was significant by a cubic spline model with a 99.93% removal efficiency. Optimization of liner materials was achieved by minimizing bentonite mixtures, which were costly, and maximizing Cu(II) and Zn(II) removal efficiency. The removal efficiencies were calculated as 45.07% and 48.19% for Cu(II) and Zn(II), respectively, when only bentonite was used as liner material. However, 60% of natural zeolite with 40% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Cu(II) removal (95%), and 80% of vermiculite and pumice with 20% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Zn(II) removal (61.24% and 65.09%). Similarly, 60% of natural zeolite with 40% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Zn(II) removal (89.19%), and 80% of vermiculite and pumice with 20% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Zn(II) removal (82.76% and 74.89%). PMID:23844384

  5. Prediction of heavy metal removal by different liner materials from landfill leachate: modeling of experimental results using artificial intelligence technique.

    PubMed

    Turan, Nurdan Gamze; Gümüşel, Emine Beril; Ozgonenel, Okan

    2013-01-01

    An intensive study has been made to see the performance of the different liner materials with bentonite on the removal efficiency of Cu(II) and Zn(II) from industrial leachate. An artificial neural network (ANN) was used to display the significant levels of the analyzed liner materials on the removal efficiency. The statistical analysis proves that the effect of natural zeolite was significant by a cubic spline model with a 99.93% removal efficiency. Optimization of liner materials was achieved by minimizing bentonite mixtures, which were costly, and maximizing Cu(II) and Zn(II) removal efficiency. The removal efficiencies were calculated as 45.07% and 48.19% for Cu(II) and Zn(II), respectively, when only bentonite was used as liner material. However, 60% of natural zeolite with 40% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Cu(II) removal (95%), and 80% of vermiculite and pumice with 20% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Zn(II) removal (61.24% and 65.09%). Similarly, 60% of natural zeolite with 40% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Zn(II) removal (89.19%), and 80% of vermiculite and pumice with 20% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Zn(II) removal (82.76% and 74.89%). PMID:23844384

  6. Immobilization of heavy metals in polluted soils by the addition of zeolitic material synthesized from coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés; Moreno, Natàlia; Alvarez-Ayuso, Esther; García-Sánchez, Antonio; Cama, Jordi; Ayora, Carles; Simón, Mariano

    2006-01-01

    The use of zeolitic material synthesized from coal fly ash for the immobilization of pollutants in contaminated soils was investigated in experimental plots in the Guadiamar Valley (SW Spain). This area was affected by a pyrite slurry spill in April 1998. Although reclamation activities were completed in a few months, residual pyrite slurry mixed with soil accounted for relatively high leachable levels of trace elements such as Zn, Pb, As, Cu, Sb, Co, Tl and Cd. Phytoremediation strategies were adopted for the final recovery of the polluted soils. The immobilization of metals had previously been undertaken to avoid leaching processes and the consequent groundwater pollution. To this end, 1100 kg of high NaP1 (Na6[(AlO2)6(SiO2)10] .15H2O) zeolitic material was synthesized using fly ash from the Teruel power plant (NE Spain), in a 10 m3 reactor. This zeolitic material was manually applied using different doses (10000-25000 kg per hectare), into the 25 cm topsoil. Another plot (control) was maintained without zeolite. Sampling was carried out 1 and 2 years after the zeolite addition. The results show that the zeolitic material considerably decreases the leaching of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, and Zn. The sorption of metals in soil clay minerals (illite) proved to be the main cause contributing to the immobilization of these pollutants. This sorption could be a consequence of the rise in pH from 3.3 to 7.6 owing to the alkalinity of the zeolitic material added (caused by traces of free lime in the fly ash, or residual NaOH from synthesis). PMID:16039695

  7. Measurements of neutron effective doses and attenuation lengths for shielding materials at the heavy-ion medical accelerator in Chiba.

    PubMed

    Kumamoto, Yoshikazu; Noda, Yutaka; Sato, Yukio; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Murakami, Takeshi

    2005-05-01

    The effective doses and attenuation lengths for concrete and iron were measured for the design of heavy ion facilities. Neutrons were produced through the reaction of copper, carbon, and lead bombarded by carbon ions at 230 and 400 MeV.A, neon ions at 400 and 600 MeV.A, and silicon ions at 600 and 800 MeV.A. The detectors used were a Linus and a Andersson-Braun-type rem counter and a detector based on the activation of a plastic scintillator. Representative effective dose rates (in units of 10(-8) microSv h(-1) pps(-1) at 1 m from the incident target surface, where pps means particles per second) and the attenuation lengths (in units of m) were 9.4 x 10(4), 0.46 for carbon ions at 230 MeV.A; 8.9 x 10(5), 0.48 for carbon ions at 400 MeV.A; 9.3 x 10(5), 0.48 for neon ions at 400 MeV.A; 3.8 x 10(6), 0.50 for neon ions at 600 MeV.A; 3.9 x 10(6), 0.50 for silicon ions at 600 MeV.A; and 1.1 x 10(7), 0.51 for silicon ions at 800 MeV.A. The attenuation provided by an iron plate approximately 20 cm thick (nearly equal to the attenuation length) corresponded to that of a 50-cm block of concrete in the present energy range. Miscellaneous results, such as the angular distributions of the neutron effective dose, narrow beam attenuation experiments, decay of gamma-ray doses after the bombardment of targets, doses around an irradiation room, order effects in the multi-layer (concrete and iron) shielding, the doses from different targets, the doses measured with a scintillator activation detector, the gamma-ray doses out of walls and the ratio of the response between the Andersson-Braun-type and the Linus rem counters are also reported. PMID:15824595

  8. Jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian; Gyulassy, M.

    1990-09-01

    Several aspects of hard and semihard QCD jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed, including multiproduction of minijets and the interaction of a jet with dense nuclear matter. The reduction of jet quenching effect in deconfined phase of nuclear matter is speculated to provide a signature of the formation of quark gluon plasma. HIJING Monte Carlo program which can simulate events of jets production and quenching in heavy ion collisions is briefly described. 35 refs., 13 figs.

  9. Wettability alteration: A comprehensive review of materials/methods and testing the selected ones on heavy-oil containing oil-wet systems.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Mohammedalmojtaba; Babadagli, Tayfun

    2015-06-01

    Changing the wetting state of materials is a growing field of research in many areas of engineering and science. In the oil industry, the term wettability alteration usually refers to the process of making the reservoir rock more water-wet. This is of particular importance in naturally hydrophobic carbonates, fractured formations, and heavy-oil systems. This shift in wettability enhances oil recovery in oil-wet and weakly water-wet reservoirs and eventually increases the ultimate oil recovery. For wettability alteration, two methods have been traditionally used: Thermal and chemical. Although many attempts have been made on reviewing the advancement of research in certain aspects of wettability, a comprehensive review of these techniques, especially in terms of the classification of the chemicals used, has been ignored. In this paper, we begin with this review and provide the past experience of wettability alteration in sandstone and carbonate reservoirs. More than 100 papers were reviewed extensively with an in-depth analysis of different methods suggested in literature. The areas of controversy and contradicted observations are discussed. The limitations and the applicability of each method were analyzed. Concerns on up-scaling laboratory findings to field scale are also addressed. The most promising potential methods are identified and their critical conditions highlighted. At the end, a selection of reviewed methods is validated experimentally for one of the most challenging cases: Extra heavy-oil and bitumen recovery from fractured-strongly-oil-wet carbonates. Berea sandstone (aged to be oil-wet) and Indiana limestone samples were saturated with heavy oil (3600cp). Next, the process was initiated by soaking the cores into solvent (heptane or diluent oil) and the oil recovery was estimated using refractive index measurements. Note that solvent was selected to dilute the oil and recover a considerable amount of oil as any chemical or thermal methods yielded

  10. Construction and characterization of kilobasepair densely labeled peptide-DNA.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Suzana; Samii, Laleh; Lamour, Guillaume; Li, Hongbin; Linke, Heiner; Bromley, Elizabeth H C; Woolfson, Derek N; Curmi, Paul M G; Forde, Nancy R

    2014-11-10

    Directed assembly of biocompatible materials benefits from modular building blocks in which structural organization is independent of introduced functional modifications. For soft materials, such modifications have been limited. Here, long DNA is successfully functionalized with dense decoration by peptides. Following introduction of alkyne-modified nucleotides into kilobasepair DNA, measurements of persistence length show that DNA mechanics are unaltered by the dense incorporation of alkynes (∼1 alkyne/2 bp) and after click-chemistry attachment of a tunable density of peptides. Proteolytic cleavage of densely tethered peptides (∼1 peptide/3 bp) demonstrates addressability of the functional groups, showing that this accessible approach to creating hybrid structures can maintain orthogonality between backbone mechanics and overlaid function. The synthesis and characterization of these hybrid constructs establishes the groundwork for their implementation in future applications, such as building blocks in modular approaches to a range of problems in synthetic biology. PMID:25233124

  11. Laboratory measurements of the resistivity of warm dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Nicola; Robinson, Alex; Hakel, Peter; Gregori, Ginaluca; Rajeev, Pattathil; Woolsey, Nigel

    2015-11-01

    In this talk we will present a method for studying material resistivity in warm dense plasmas in the laboratory in which we interrogate the microphysics of the low energy electron distributions associated with an anisotropic return current. Through experimental measurements of the polarization of the Ly- α doublet emission (2s1 / 2-2p1 / 2,3/2 transitions) of sulphur, we determine the resistivity of a sulphur-doped plastic target heated to warm dense conditions by an ultra-intense laser at relativistic intensities, I ~ 5 ×1020 Wcm-2. We describe a method of exploiting classical x-ray scattering to separately measure both the π- and σ- polarizations of Ly-α1 spectral emission in a single shot. These measurements make it possible to explore fundamental material properties such as resistivity in warm and hot dense plasmas through matching plasma physics modelling to atomic physics calculations of the experimentally measured large, positive, polarisation.

  12. Enstrophy cascades in two-dimensional dense granular flows.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Kuniyasu; Mizuno, Hideyuki

    2016-08-01

    Employing two-dimensional molecular dynamics simulations of dense granular materials under simple shear deformations, we investigate vortex structures of particle rearrangements. Introducing vorticity fields as a measure of local spinning motions of the particles, we observe their heterogeneous distributions, where statistics of vorticity fields exhibit the highly non-Gaussian behavior and typical domain sizes of vorticity fields significantly increase if the system is yielding under quasistatic deformations. In such dense granular flows, a power-law decay of vorticity spectra can be observed at mesoscopic scale, implying anomalous local structures of kinetic energy dissipation. We explain the power-law decay, or enstrophy cascades in dense granular materials, by a dimensional analysis, where the dependence of vorticity spectra not only on the wave number, but also on the shear rate, is well explained. From our dimensional analyses, the scaling of granular temperature and rotational kinetic energy is also predicted. PMID:27627381

  13. Heavy flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.; Gilman, F.J.; Gottschalk, T.D.

    1986-11-01

    A range of issues pertaining to heavy flavors at the SSC is examined including heavy flavor production by gluon-gluon fusion and by shower evolution of gluon jets, flavor tagging, reconstruction of Higgs and W bosons, and the study of rare decays and CP violation in the B meson system. A specific detector for doing heavy flavor physics and tuned to this latter study at the SSC, the TASTER, is described. 36 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Impact-activated solidification of dense suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waitukaitis, Scott

    2013-03-01

    Shear-thickening, non-Newtonian fluids have typically been investigated under steady-state conditions. This approach has produced two pictures for suspension response to imposed forcing. In the weak shear-thickening picture, the response is typically attributed to the hydrodynamic interactions giving rise to hydroclusters, small groups of particles interacting through lubrication forces. At the other end of the spectrum, in the discontinuous shear-thickening regime, the response can be seen as a system-wide jamming that is ultimately limited in strength by the system boundaries. While these steady-state pictures have proven extremely useful, some of the most interesting phenomena associated with dense suspensions is transient and local in character. A prototypical example is the extraordinarily large impact resistance of dense suspensions such as cornstarch and water. When poked lightly these materials respond like a fluid, but when punched or kicked they seem to temporarily ``solidify'' and provide enormous resistance to the motion of the impacting object. Using an array of experimental techniques, including high-speed video, embedded force and acceleration sensing, and x-ray imaging, we are able to investigate the dynamic details this process as it unfolds. We find that an impacting object drives the rapid growth of a jammed, solid-like region directly below the impact site. Being coupled to the surrounding fluid by grain-mediated lubrication forces, this creates substantial peripheral flow and ultimately leads to the sudden extraction of the impactor's momentum. With a simple jamming picture to describe the solidification and an added mass model to explain the force on the rod, we are able to predict the forces on the impactor quantitatively. These findings highlight the importance of the non-equilibrium character of dense suspensions near jamming and might serve as a bridge between the weak and discontinuous shear-thickening pictures.

  15. Boundary Preserving Dense Local Regions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaechul; Grauman, Kristen

    2015-05-01

    We propose a dense local region detector to extract features suitable for image matching and object recognition tasks. Whereas traditional local interest operators rely on repeatable structures that often cross object boundaries (e.g., corners, scale-space blobs), our sampling strategy is driven by segmentation, and thus preserves object boundaries and shape. At the same time, whereas existing region-based representations are sensitive to segmentation parameters and object deformations, our novel approach to robustly sample dense sites and determine their connectivity offers better repeatability. In extensive experiments, we find that the proposed region detector provides significantly better repeatability and localization accuracy for object matching compared to an array of existing feature detectors. In addition, we show our regions lead to excellent results on two benchmark tasks that require good feature matching: weakly supervised foreground discovery and nearest neighbor-based object recognition. PMID:26353319

  16. Dense periodic packings of tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbrielli, Ruggero; Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2014-02-01

    Dense packings of nonoverlapping bodies in three-dimensional Euclidean space R3 are useful models of the structure of a variety of many-particle systems that arise in the physical and biological sciences. Here we investigate the packing behavior of congruent ring tori in R3, which are multiply connected nonconvex bodies of genus 1, as well as horn and spindle tori. Specifically, we analytically construct a family of dense periodic packings of unlinked tori guided by the organizing principles originally devised for simply connected solid bodies [22 Torquato and Jiao, Phys. Rev. E 86, 011102 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.011102]. We find that the horn tori as well as certain spindle and ring tori can achieve a packing density not only higher than that of spheres (i.e., π /√18 =0.7404...) but also higher than the densest known ellipsoid packings (i.e., 0.7707...). In addition, we study dense packings of clusters of pair-linked ring tori (i.e., Hopf links), which can possess much higher densities than corresponding packings consisting of unlinked tori.

  17. The Compact Muon Solenoid Heavy Ion program

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Pablo Yepes

    2005-12-15

    The Pb-Pb center of mass energy at the LHC will exceed that of Au-Au collisions at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) by nearly a factor of 30, providing exciting opportunities for addressing unique physics issues in a completely new energy domain. The interest of the Heavy Ion (HI) Physics at LHC is discussed in more detail in the LHC-USA white paper and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Heavy Ion proposal. A few highlights are presented in this document. Heavy ion collisions at LHC energies will explore regions of energy and particle density significantly beyond those reachable at RHIC. The energy density of the thermalized matter created at the LHC is estimated to be 20 times higher than at RHIC, implying an initial temperature, which is greater than at RHIC by more than a factor of two. The higher density of produced partons also allows a faster thermalization. As a consequence, the ratio of the quark-gluon plasma lifetime to the thermalization time increases by a factor of 10 over RHIC. Thus the hot, dense systems created in HI collisions at the LHC spend most of the time in a purely partonic state. The longer lifetime of the quark-gluon plasma state widens significantly the time window available to probe it experimentally. RHIC experiments have reported evidence for jet production in HI collisions and for suppression of high p{sub T} particle production. Those results open a new field of exploration of hot and dense nuclear matter. Even though RHIC has already broken ground, the production rates for jets with p{sub T} > 30 GeV are several orders of magnitude larger at the LHC than at RHIC, allowing for systematic studies with high statistics in a clean kinematic region. High p{sub T} quark and gluon jets can be used to study the hot hadronic medium produced in HI interactions. The larger Q{sup 2} causes jets to materialize very soon after the collision. They are thus embedded in and propagate through the dense environment as it forms and evolves. Through

  18. Multi-scaling of the dense plasma focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saw, S. H.; Lee, S.

    2015-03-01

    The dense plasma focus is a copious source of multi-radiations with many potential new applications of special interest such as in advanced SXR lithography, materials synthesizing and testing, medical isotopes and imaging. This paper reviews the series of numerical experiments conducted using the Lee model code to obtain the scaling laws of the multi-radiations.

  19. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs…

  20. Constitutive relations for steady, dense granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vescovi, D.; Berzi, D.; di Prisco, C. G.

    2011-12-01

    In the recent past, the flow of dense granular materials has been the subject of many scientific works; this is due to the large number of natural phenomena involving solid particles flowing at high concentration (e.g., debris flows and landslides). In contrast with the flow of dilute granular media, where the energy is essentially dissipated in binary collisions, the flow of dense granular materials is characterized by multiple, long-lasting and frictional contacts among the particles. The work focuses on the mechanical response of dry granular materials under steady, simple shear conditions. In particular, the goal is to obtain a complete rheology able to describe the material behavior within the entire range of concentrations for which the flow can be considered dense. The total stress is assumed to be the linear sum of a frictional and a kinetic component. The frictional and the kinetic contribution are modeled in the context of the critical state theory [8, 10] and the kinetic theory of dense granular gases [1, 3, 7], respectively. In the critical state theory, the granular material approaches a certain attractor state, independent on the initial arrangement, characterized by the capability of developing unlimited shear strains without any change in the concentration. Given that a disordered granular packing exists only for a range of concentration between the random loose and close packing [11], a form for the concentration dependence of the frictional normal stress that makes the latter vanish at the random loose packing is defined. In the kinetic theory, the particles are assumed to interact through instantaneous, binary and uncorrelated collisions. A new state variable of the problem is introduced, the granular temperature, which accounts for the velocity fluctuations. The model has been extended to account for the decrease in the energy dissipation due to the existence of correlated motion among the particles [5, 6] and to deal with non

  1. Dynamics of hot and dense nuclear and partonic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Cassing, W.; Linnyk, O.; Konchakovski, V. P.; Voronyuk, V.; Ozvenchuk, V.

    2012-06-15

    The dynamics of hot and dense nuclear matter is discussed from the microscopic transport point of view. The basic concepts of the Hadron-String-Dynamical transport model (HSD)-derived from Kadanoff-Baym equations in phase phase-are presented as well as 'highlights' of HSD results for different observables in heavy-ion collisions from 100 A MeV (SIS) to 21 A TeV(RHIC) energies. Furthermore, a novel extension of the HSD model for the description of the partonic phase-the Parton-Hadron-String-Dynamics (PHSD) approach-is introduced. PHSD includes a nontrivial partonic equation of state-in line with lattice QCD-as well as covariant transition rates from partonic to hadronic degrees of freedom. The sensitivity of hadronic observables to the partonic phase is demonstrated for relativistic heavy-ion collisions from the FAIR/NICA up to the RHIC energy regime.

  2. The physics of hot and dense quark-gluon matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E

    2012-05-10

    This technical report describes the work done under the DOE grant DE-FG-88ER41723 (final award number DE-SC0005645), "The physics of hot and dense quark-gluon matter", during the year of 12/01/2010 through 11/30/2011. As planned in the proposal, the performed research focused along two main thrusts: 1) topological effects in hot quark-gluon matter and 2) phenomenology of relativistic heavy ion collisions. The results of research are presented in 12 papers published in reputable refereed journals (Physical Review Letters, Physical Review, Physics Letters and Nuclear Physics). All of the performed research is directly related to the experimental programs of DOE, especially at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Much of it also has broader interdisciplinary implications - for example, the work on the non-dissipative chiral magnetic current is directly relevant for quantum computing. The attached report describes the performed work in detail.

  3. The L3A facility at the Vinča Institute: Surface modification of materials, by heavy ion beams from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrosavljević, A.; Milosavljević, M.; Bibić, N.; Efremov, A.

    2000-02-01

    This article describes the L3A experimental facility for surface modification of materials at the Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, in Belgrade. This facility was completed and put into operation in May 1998. It is connected to the mVINIS ion source, an electron cyclotron resonance ion source capable of producing a wide range of multiply charged ions from gaseous and solid substances. The heavy ion beams obtained from mVINIS are separated by charge to mass ratio (q/m) and transported to the target chamber for sample irradiation and modification. The target chamber is equipped with a multipurpose target holder, an electron-beam evaporation source for thin layer deposition, a residual gas analyzer, and other auxiliary equipment. There is also an additional low energy argon ion source for target preparation/sputtering and for ion beam assisted deposition. In this article we describe the layout and performances of the L3A facility, the experience gained during 1 yr of operation, and the requirements imposed by the current and future experimental programs. Currently, there are 24 experimental programs competing for the ion beam time at the L3A facility.

  4. Explosive desorption of icy grain mantles in dense clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, W. A.; Greenberg, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The cycling of the condensible material in dense clouds between the gas phase and the icy grain mantles is investigated. In the model studied, desorption of the ice occurs due to grain mantle explosions when photochemically stored energy is released after transient heating by a cosmic ray particle. It is shown that, depending on the grain size distribution in dense clouds, explosive desorption can maintain up to about eight percent of the carbon in the form of CO in the gas phase at typical cloud densities.

  5. Metal chalcogenide nanoparticle gel networks: Their formation mechanism and application for novel material generation and heavy metal water remediation via cation exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palhares, Leticia F.

    overall reaction is kinetically controlled, since systems with similar solubility, and thus similar thermodynamic driving force (e.g. PbS and CdS) exchange at very different rates. A correlation exists between the speed of the reaction and the difference between the reduction potential of the incoming cation and that of Zn2+; the larger the difference, the faster the exchange. At the same time, the porosity of the aerogels and the surfactant-free surfaces hold great importance for the exchange reactions, allowing for exchange between cations of similar size and charge (i.e. Pb2+ for Zn2+), a phenomenon that was previously reported as impossible in ligand-capped metal chalcogenide nanoparticles. These observations allowed for a better understanding of the factors governing the cation exchange reaction in nanoscale metal chalcogenides. Quaternary ZnS-CuInS2 gels were obtained by cation exchange with Cu+ and In3+, but the pure CuInS2 phase was not obtained under the mild reaction conditions used, probably due to the very different mobility of the two exchanging cations. The kinetically fast cation exchange process and the propensity of the soft chalcogenide gel networks to bind heavy metal ions selectively, suggest that these materials could also be suitable for the removal of heavy metal ions from the environment. The dissertation research studied the capacity of ZnS aerogels to sequester heavy metal ions such as Pb2+ and Hg2+ from water. The materials are efficient in removing the heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions with a wide range of initial concentrations. For initial concentrations that mimic an environmental spill (i.e. 100 ppb Pb2+), the treatment with the aerogel affords a final concentration lower than the 15 ppm action level recommended by the EPA. Under thermodynamically forcing conditions, the water remediation capacity of the ZnS nanoparticle aerogels was determined to be 14.2 mmol Pb2+ / g ZnS aerogel, which is the highest value reported to date.

  6. Probing cold dense nuclear matter.

    PubMed

    Subedi, R; Shneor, R; Monaghan, P; Anderson, B D; Aniol, K; Annand, J; Arrington, J; Benaoum, H; Benmokhtar, F; Boeglin, W; Chen, J-P; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, E; Craver, B; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, O; Hansen, J-O; Higinbotham, D W; Holmstrom, T; Ibrahim, H; Igarashi, R; de Jager, C W; Jans, E; Jiang, X; Kaufman, L J; Kelleher, A; Kolarkar, A; Kumbartzki, G; Lerose, J J; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; Mazouz, M; Meekins, D; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Perdrisat, C F; Piasetzky, E; Potokar, M; Punjabi, V; Qiang, Y; Reinhold, J; Ron, G; Rosner, G; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Shahinyan, A; Sirca, S; Slifer, K; Solvignon, P; Sulkosky, V; Urciuoli, G M; Voutier, E; Watson, J W; Weinstein, L B; Wojtsekhowski, B; Wood, S; Zheng, X-C; Zhu, L

    2008-06-13

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus with high-momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in carbon-12 the neutron-proton pairs are nearly 20 times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars. PMID:18511658

  7. Probing Cold Dense Nuclear Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Subedi, Ramesh; Shneor, R.; Monaghan, Peter; Anderson, Bryon; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Arrington, John; Benaoum, Hachemi; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Boeglin, Werner; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, Evaristo; Craver, Brandon; Frullani, Salvatore; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Ibrahim, Hassan; Igarashi, Ryuichi; De Jager, Cornelis; Jans, Eddy; Jiang, Xiaodong; Kaufman, Lisa; Kelleher, Aidan; Kolarkar, Ameya; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; Mazouz, Malek; Meekins, David; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Perdrisat, Charles; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Potokar, Milan; Punjabi, Vina; Qiang, Yi; Reinhold, Joerg; Ron, Guy; Rosner, Guenther; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Shahinyan, Albert; Sirca, Simon; Slifer, Karl; Solvignon, Patricia; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Urciuoli, Guido; Voutier, Eric; Watson, John; Weinstein, Lawrence; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Wood, Stephen; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Lingyan

    2008-06-01

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus with high-momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in carbon-12 the neutron-proton pairs are nearly 20 times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars.

  8. Granular flow model for dense planetary rings

    SciTech Connect

    Borderies, N.; Goldreich, P.; Tremaine, S.

    1985-09-01

    In the present study of the viscosity of a differentially rotating particle disk, in the limiting case where the particles are densely packed and their collective behavior resembles that of a liquid, the pressure tensor is derived from both the equations of hydrodynamics and a simple kinetic model of collisions due to Haff (1983). Density waves and narrow circular rings are unstable if the liquid approximation applies, and the consequent nonlinear perturbations may generate splashing of the ring material in the vertical direction. These results are pertinent to the origin of the ellipticities of ringlets, the nonaxisymmetric features near the outer edge of the Saturn B ring, and unexplained residuals in kinematic models of the Saturn and Uranus rings. 24 references.

  9. Experimental Studies of the Transport Parameters of Warm Dense Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Chouffani, Khalid

    2014-12-01

    There is a need to establish fundamental properties of matter and energy under extreme physical conditions. Although high energy density physics (HEDP) research spans a wide range of plasma conditions, there is one unifying regime that is of particular importance and complexity: that of warm dense matter, the transitional state between solid state condensed matter and energetic plasmas. Most laboratory experimental conditions, including inertial confinement implosion, fall into this regime. Because all aspects of laboratory-created high-energy-density plasmas transition through the warm dense matter regime, understanding the fundamental properties to determine how matter and energy interact in this regime is an important aspect of major research efforts in HEDP. Improved understanding of warm dense matter would have significant and wide-ranging impact on HEDP science, from helping to explain wire initiation studies on the Sandia Z machine to increasing the predictive power of inertial confinement fusion modeling. The central goal or objective of our proposed research is to experimentally determine the electrical resistivity, temperature, density, and average ionization state of a variety of materials in the warm dense matter regime, without the use of theoretical calculations. Since the lack of an accurate energy of state (EOS) model is primarily due to the lack of experimental data, we propose an experimental study of the transport coefficients of warm dense matter.

  10. Magnetism in Dense Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Efrain J.; de la Incera, Vivian

    We review the mechanisms via which an external magnetic field can affect the ground state of cold and dense quark matter. In the absence of a magnetic field, at asymptotically high densities, cold quark matter is in the Color-Flavor-Locked (CFL) phase of color superconductivity characterized by three scales: the superconducting gap, the gluon Meissner mass, and the baryonic chemical potential. When an applied magnetic field becomes comparable with each of these scales, new phases and/or condensates may emerge. They include the magnetic CFL (MCFL) phase that becomes relevant for fields of the order of the gap scale; the paramagnetic CFL, important when the field is of the order of the Meissner mass, and a spin-one condensate associated to the magnetic moment of the Cooper pairs, significant at fields of the order of the chemical potential. We discuss the equation of state (EoS) of MCFL matter for a large range of field values and consider possible applications of the magnetic effects on dense quark matter to the astrophysics of compact stars.

  11. Managing Inventories of Heavy Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Wham, Robert M; Patton, Bradley D

    2011-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has stored a limited inventory of heavy actinides contained in irradiated targets, some partially processed, at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The 'heavy actinides' of interest include plutonium, americium, and curium isotopes; specifically 242Pu and 244Pu, 243Am, and 244/246/248Cm. No alternate supplies of these heavy actinides and no other capabilities for producing them are currently available. Some of these heavy actinide materials are important for use as feedstock for producing heavy isotopes and elements needed for research and commercial application. The rare isotope 244Pu is valuable for research, environmental safeguards, and nuclear forensics. Because the production of these heavy actinides was made possible only by the enormous investment of time and money associated with defense production efforts, the remaining inventories of these rare nuclear materials are an important part of the legacy of the Nuclear Weapons Program. Significant unique heavy actinide inventories reside in irradiated Mark-18A and Mark-42 targets at SRS and ORNL, with no plans to separate and store the isotopes for future use. Although the costs of preserving these heavy actinide materials would be considerable, for all practical purposes they are irreplaceable. The effort required to reproduce these heavy actinides today would likely cost billions of dollars and encompass a series of irradiation and chemical separation cycles for at least 50 years; thus, reproduction is virtually impossible. DOE has a limited window of opportunity to recover and preserve these heavy actinides before they are disposed of as waste. A path forward is presented to recover and manage these irreplaceable National Asset materials for future use in research, nuclear forensics, and other potential applications.

  12. Boron neutron capture enhancement (BNCE) of fast neutron irradiation for glioblastoma: increase of thermal neutron flux with heavy material collimation, a theoretical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Paquis, P; Pignol, J P; Lonjon, M; Brassart, N; Courdi, A; Chauvel, P; Grellier, P; Chatel, M

    1999-01-01

    Despite the fact that fast neutron irradiation of glioblastoma has shown on autopsies an ability to sterilize tumors, no therapeutic windows have been found for these particles due to their toxicity toward normal brain. Therefore, the Boron Neutron Capture Enhancement (BNCE) of fast neutron beam has been suggested. This paper addresses the problem of fast neutron beam collimation, which induces a dramatic decrease of the thermal neutron flux in the depth of the tissues when smaller irradiation fields are used. Thermoluminescent dosimeter TLD-600 and TLD-700 were used to determine the thermal neutron flux within a Plexiglas phantom irradiated under the Nice Biomedical Cyclotron p(60)+Be(32) fast neutron beam. A BNCE of 4.6% in physical dose was determined for a 10 x 10 cm2 field, and of 10.4% for a 20 x 20 cm2 one. A Dose Modification Factor of 1.19 was calculated for CAL 58 glioblastoma cells irradiated thanks to the larger field. In order to increase the thermal flux in depth while shaping the beam, heavy material collimation was studied with Monte Carlo simulations using coupled FLUKA and MCNP-4A codes. The use of 20 cm width lead blocks allowed a 2 fold thermal neutron flux increase in the depth of the phantom, while shielding the fast neutron beam with a fast neutron dose transmission of 23%. Using the DMF of 1.19, a BNCE of 40% was calculated in the beam axis. This enhancement might be sufficient to open, at least theoretically, a therapeutic window. PMID:10222419

  13. Rheology of Dense Granular Mixtures and Slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewoldebrhan, Bereket Yohannes

    Dense granular flows, characterized by multiple contacts between grains, are common in many industrial processes and natural events, such as debris flows. Understanding the characteristics of these flows is crucial to predict quantities such as bedrock erosion and distance traveled by debris flows. However, the rheological properties of these flows are complicated due to wide particle size distribution and presence of interstitial fluids. Models for dense sheared granular materials indicate that their rheological properties depend on particle size, but the representative particle size for mixtures is not obvious. Using the discrete element method (DEM) we study sheared granular binary mixtures in a Couette cell to determine the relationship and rheological parameters such as stress and effective coefficient of friction and particle size distribution. The results indicate that the stress does not depend monotonically on the average particle size as it does in models derived from simple dimensional consideration. The stress has an additional dependence on a measure of the effective free volume per particle that is adapted from an expression for packing of monosized particles near the jammed state. The effective friction also has a complicated dependence on particle size distribution. For these systems of relatively hard particles, these relationships are governed largely by the ratio between average collision times and mean-free-path times. The characteristics of shallow free surface flows, important for applications such as debris flows, are different from confined systems. To address this, we also study shallow granular flows in a rotating drum. The stress at the boundary, height profiles and segregation patterns from DEM simulations are quantitatively similar to the results obtained from physical experiments of shallow granular flows in rotating drums. Individual particle-bed impacts rather than enduring contacts dominate the largest forces on the drum bed, which

  14. DPIS for warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, K.; Kanesue, T.; Horioka, K.; Okamura, M.

    2010-05-23

    Warm Dense Matter (WDM) offers an challenging problem because WDM, which is beyond ideal plasma, is in a low temperature and high density state with partially degenerate electrons and coupled ions. WDM is a common state of matter in astrophysical objects such as cores of giant planets and white dwarfs. The WDM studies require large energy deposition into a small target volume in a shorter time than the hydrodynamical time and need uniformity across the full thickness of the target. Since moderate energy ion beams ({approx} 0.3 MeV/u) can be useful tool for WDM physics, we propose WDM generation using Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS). In the DPIS, laser ion source is connected to the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator directly without the beam transport line. DPIS with a realistic final focus and a linear accelerator can produce WDM.

  15. Dense inhibitory connectivity in neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Fino, Elodie; Yuste, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Summary The connectivity diagram of neocortical circuits is still unknown, and there are conflicting data as to whether cortical neurons are wired specifically or not. To investigate the basic structure of cortical microcircuits, we use a novel two-photon photostimulation technique that enables the systematic mapping of synaptic connections with single-cell resolution. We map the inhibitory connectivity between upper layers somatostatin-positive GABAergic interneurons and pyramidal cells in mouse frontal cortex. Most, and sometimes all, inhibitory neurons are locally connected to every sampled pyramidal cell. This dense inhibitory connectivity is found at both young and mature developmental ages. Inhibitory innervation of neighboring pyramidal cells is similar, regardless of whether they are connected among themselves or not. We conclude that local inhibitory connectivity is promiscuous, does not form subnetworks and can approach the theoretical limit of a completely connected synaptic matrix. PMID:21435562

  16. Viscoelastic behavior of dense microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cametti, C.; Codastefano, P.; D'arrigo, G.; Tartaglia, P.; Rouch, J.; Chen, S. H.

    1990-09-01

    We have performed extensive measurements of shear viscosity, ultrasonic absorption, and sound velocity in a ternary system consisting of water-decane-sodium di(2-ethylhexyl)sulfo- succinate(AOT), in the one-phase region where it forms a water-in-oil microemulsion. We observe a rapid increase of the static shear viscosity in the dense microemulsion region. Correspondingly the sound absorption shows unambiguous evidence of a viscoelastic behavior. The absorption data for various volume fractions and temperatures can be reduced to a universal curve by scaling both the absorption and the frequency by the measured static shear viscosity. The sound absorption can be interpreted as coming from the high-frequency tail of the viscoelastic relaxation, describable by a Cole-Cole relaxation formula with unusually small elastic moduli.

  17. Supernovae in dense and dusty environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankare, Erkki

    2013-02-01

    In this doctoral thesis supernovae in dense and dusty environments are studied, with an emphasis on core-collapse supernovae. The articles included in the thesis aim to increase our understanding of supernovae interacting with the circumstellar material and their place in stellar evolution. The results obtained have also importance in deriving core-collapse supernova rates with reliable extinction corrections, which are directly related to star formation rates and galaxy evolution. In other words, supernovae are used as a tool in the research of both stellar and galaxy evolution, both of which can be considered as fundamental basics for our understanding of the whole Universe. A detailed follow-up study of the narrow-line supernova 2009kn is presented in paper I, and its similarity to another controversial transient, supernova 1994W, is shown. These objects are clearly strongly interacting with relatively dense circumstellar matter, however their physical origin is quite uncertain. In paper I different explosion models are discussed. Discoveries from a search programme for highly obscured supernovae in dusty luminous infrared galaxies are presented in papers II and III. The search was carried out using laser guide star adaptive optics monitoring at near-infrared wavelengths. By comparing multi-band photometric follow-up observations to template light curves, the likely types and the host galaxy extinctions for the four supernovae discovered were derived. The optical depth of normal spiral galaxy disks were studied statistically and reported in paper IV. This is complementary work to studies such as the one presented in paper V, where the missing fractions of core-collapse supernovae were derived for both normal spiral galaxies and luminous infrared galaxies, to be used for correcting supernova rates both locally and as a function of redshift.

  18. Crystallization of dense neutron matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Chitre, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    The equation of state for cold neutron matter at high density is studied in the t-matrix formulation, and it is shown that energetically it is convenient to have neutrons in a crystalline configuration rather than in a liquid state for values of the density exceeding 1600 Tg/cu cm. The study of the mechanical properties indicates that the system is stable against shearing stresses. A solid core in the deep interior of heavy neutron stars appears to offer the most plausible explanation of speed-ups observed in the Vela pulsar.

  19. The performance of dense medium processes

    SciTech Connect

    Horsfall, D.W.

    1993-12-31

    Dense medium washing in baths and cyclones is widely carried out in South Africa. The paper shows the reason for the preferred use of dense medium processes rather than gravity concentrators such as jigs. The factors leading to efficient separation in baths are listed and an indication given of the extent to which these factors may be controlled and embodied in the deployment of baths and dense medium cyclones in the planning stages of a plant.

  20. Screening of Quarkonia in hot and dense media: historical overview and latest lattice results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsch, Frithjof

    2016-03-01

    Already the first lattice QCD calculations at non-zero temperature, performed around 1980, showed that the interaction among heavy (static) quarks that are emerged into a hot and dense medium of quarks and gluons is strongly modified. The heavy quark potential is screened and will not allow for the formation of bound states when the Debye screening radius becomes smaller than the typical size of heavy quark bound states. This observation has been utilized in the seminal 1986 paper by Matsui and Satz on J / Ψ suppression by quark-gluon plasma formation to predict the dissolution of bound states of heavy quarks at sufficiently high temperature. They established the reduction of quarkonium yields in heavy ion collisions as a sensitive tool for probing thermal properties of hot and dense matter. We discuss progress made in understanding the thermal modification of heavy quark bound states and the sequential suppression pattern, predicted for higher excited states, through refined lattice QCD calculations of temperature dependent potentials as well as through direct calculations of spectral functions.

  1. Dense medium cyclones on fine coal-The Australian experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kempnich, R.J.; Barneveld, S. Van; Lusan, A.

    1995-08-01

    Dense medium cyclones have been widely used to clean coarse coal (plus 30 mesh). Efficiency of separation, tolerance of near gravity material and separation density control being the primary advantage of the systems. Historically there has been a lack of accurate flexible density based processes available to treat fine material, in the size ranges less than 30 mesh. Spirals have found acceptance in cleaning fines in the size range minus 16 mesh plus 100 mesh, but are limited in their application due to process efficiency and separation density control. Conventional froth flotation also suffers from efficiency and product quality control, especially in the size ranges above 40 mesh. The fine coal dense medium has been the Holy Grail of coal preparation since the earliest dense medium developments by Dutch State Mines in the early 1950`s. The application of the technology has been significantly advanced by the 135 tph fine coal dense medium circuit commissioned at the CURRAGH Queensland Mining Pty Ltd, Blackwater, Queensland, Australia. The Curragh plant is not an R&D project and was built under a hard money turnkey contract. The data reported has been gathered during normal commissioning and production tuning of the circuits. This paper describes the circuit design and process control system implemented, discusses the commissioning experience and the optimisation of process parameters. There are a number of fundamental process parameters critical to achieving acceptable, stable separation efficiency. Effects of cyclone feed pressure and medium rheology on efficiency are discussed. The ability to recover and retain fine magnetite and control the level of non-magnetics in recirculation, were fundamental to achieving extremely low magnetite consumption. The experience at Curragh is a significant step forward and provides a foundation for future applications of fine coal dense medium technology.

  2. Intense ion beams as a tool for opacity measurements in warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Abdallah, Joseph; Tauschwiz, An; Jacoby, J; Maruhn, J A; Novikov, V G; Tauschwitz, A; Onkels, E; Wittle, K; Rosmej, F B; Schott, R

    2009-01-01

    Opacity measurements in warm dense matter (WDM) provide a valuable benchmark for the diverging theoretical models in this regime. Heating of thin foils with intense heavy-ion beams allows one to create isolated samples of warm dense matter suitable for experimental determination of frequency-dependent opacities. A prerequisite for the measurements is the isothermal expansion of the heated foil. Hydrodynamic simulations predict that this condition is fulfilled. The analysis shows that existing ion-beam accelerators are capable to contribute to this field of research.

  3. Percolation in dense storage arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, Scott; Wilcke, Winfried W.; Garner, Robert B.; Huels, Harald

    2002-11-01

    As computers and their accessories become smaller, cheaper, and faster the providers of news, retail sales, and other services we now take for granted on the Internet have met their increasing computing needs by putting more and more computers, hard disks, power supplies, and the data communications linking them to each other and to the rest of the wired world into ever smaller spaces. This has created a new and quite interesting percolation problem. It is no longer desirable to fix computers, storage or switchgear which fail in such a dense array. Attempts to repair things are all too likely to make problems worse. The alternative approach, letting units “fail in place”, be removed from service and routed around, means that a data communications environment will evolve with an underlying regular structure but a very high density of missing pieces. Some of the properties of this kind of network can be described within the existing paradigm of site or bond percolation on lattices, but other important questions have not been explored. I will discuss 3D arrays of hundreds to thousands of storage servers (something which it is quite feasible to build in the next few years), and show that bandwidth, but not percolation fraction or shortest path lengths, is the critical factor affected by the “fail in place” disorder. Redundancy strategies traditionally employed in storage systems may have to be revised. Novel approaches to routing information among the servers have been developed to minimize the impact.

  4. A quest for super dense aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiquet, G.; Narayana, C.; Bellin, C.; Shukla, A.; Esteve, I.; Mezouar, N.

    2013-12-01

    The extreme pressure phase diagram of materials is important not only for understanding the interiors of planets or stars, but also for the fundamental understanding of the relation between crystal structure and electronic structure. Structural transitions induced by extreme pressure are governed by the deformation of valence electron charge density which bears the brunt of increasing compression while the relative volume occupied by the nearly incompressible ionic core electrons increases. At extreme pressures common materials are expected to transform into new dense phases with extremely compact atomic arrangements that may also have unusual physical properties. In this report, we present new experiments carried out on aluminium. A simple system like Al is not only important as a benchmark for theory, but can also be used as a standard for pressures in the TPa range and beyond which are targeted at new dynamic compression facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the US or Laser Mégajoule (LMJ) in Bordeaux in France. For aluminium, first principle calculations have consistently predicted a phase transition sequence from fcc to hcp and hcp to bcc in a pressure range below 0.5 TPa [Tambe et al., Phys. Rev. B 77, 172102, 2008]. The hcp phase was identified at 217 GPa in a recent experiment [Akahama et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 45505, 2006] but the detection of the predicted bcc phase has been hampered by the difficulty of routine static high pressure experiments beyond 350 GPa. Here, we report on the overcoming of this obstacle and the detection of all the structural phase transitions predicted in Al by achieving a pressure in excess of 500 GPa in the static regime in a diamond-anvil cell. In particular, using X-ray diffraction at the high-pressure beamline ID27 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), we find a bcc super-dense phase of aluminium at a pressure of 380 GPa. In this report

  5. An experimental study of dense aerosol aggregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaubhadel, Rajan

    We demonstrated that an aerosol can gel. This gelation was then used for a one-step method to produce an ultralow density porous carbon or silica material. This material was named an aerosol gel because it was made via gelation of particles in the aerosol phase. The carbon and silica aerosol gels had high specific surface area (200--350 sq m2/g for carbon and 300--500 sq m2/g for silica) and an extremely low density (2.5--6.0 mg/cm3), properties similar to conventional aerogels. Key aspects to form a gel from an aerosol are large volume fraction, ca. 10-4 or greater, and small primary particle size, 50 nm or smaller, so that the gel time is fast compared to other characteristic times. Next we report the results of a study of the cluster morphology and kinetics of a dense aggregating aerosol system using the small angle light scattering technique. The soot particles started as individual monomers, ca. 38 nm radius, grew to bigger clusters with time and finally stopped evolving after spanning a network across the whole system volume. This spanning is aerosol gelation. The gelled system showed a hybrid morphology with a lower fractal dimension at length scales of a micron or smaller and a higher fractal dimension at length scales greater than a micron. The study of the kinetics of the aggregating system showed that when the system gelled, the aggregation kernel homogeneity lambda attained a value 0.4 or higher. The magnitude of the aggregation kernel showed an increase with increasing volume fraction. We also used image analysis technique to study the cluster morphology. From the digitized pictures of soot clusters the cluster morphology was determined by two different methods: structure factor and perimeter analysis. We find a hybrid, superaggregate morphology characterized by a fractal dimension of Df ≈ to 1.8 between the monomer size, ca. 50 nm, and 1 mum micron and Df ≈ to 2.6 at larger length scales up to ˜ 10 mum. The superaggregate morphology is a

  6. Compacting Plastic-Bonded Explosive Molding Powders to Dense Solids

    SciTech Connect

    B. Olinger

    2005-04-15

    Dense solid high explosives are made by compacting plastic-bonded explosive molding powders with high pressures and temperatures for extended periods of time. The density is influenced by manufacturing processes of the powders, compaction temperature, the magnitude of compaction pressure, pressure duration, and number of repeated applications of pressure. The internal density variation of compacted explosives depends on method of compaction and the material being compacted.

  7. Method for making dense crack free thin films

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2007-01-16

    The process described herein provides a simple and cost effective method for making crack free, high density thin ceramic film. The steps involve depositing a layer of a ceramic material on a porous or dense substrate. The deposited layer is compacted and then the resultant laminate is sintered to achieve a higher density than would have been possible without the pre-firing compaction step.

  8. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-06-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed.

  9. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-01-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed. PMID:27353447

  10. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-01-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed. PMID:27353447