Science.gov

Sample records for heavy odd-mass nuclides

  1. Description of electromagnetic and favored α transitions in heavy odd-mass nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrescu, A.; Delion, D. S.

    2016-02-01

    We describe electromagnetic and favored α transitions to rotational bands in odd-mass nuclei built upon a single particle state with angular momentum projection Ω ≠1/2 in the region 88 ≤Z ≤98 . We use the particle coupled to an even-even core approach described by the coherent state model and the coupled channels method to estimate partial α -decay widths. We reproduce the energy levels of the rotational band where favored α transitions occur for 26 nuclei and predict B (" close=")E 2 )">E 2 values for electromagnetic transitions to the band head using a deformation parameter and a Hamiltonian strength parameter for each nucleus, together with an effective collective charge depending linearly on the deformation parameter. Where experimental data are available, the contribution of the single particle effective charge to the total B value is calculated. The Hamiltonian describing the α -nucleus interaction contains two terms, a spherically symmetric potential given by the double-folding of the M3Y nucleon-nucleon interaction plus a repulsive core simulating the Pauli principle and a quadrupole-quadrupole (QQ) interaction. The α -decaying state is identified as a narrow outgoing resonance in this potential. The intensity of the transition to the first excited state is reproduced by the QQ coupling strength. It depends linearly both on the nuclear deformation and the square of the reduced width for the decay to the band head, respectively. Predicted intensities for transitions to higher excited states are in a reasonable agreement with experimental data. This formalism offers a unified description of energy levels, electromagnetic and favored α transitions for known heavy odd-mass α emitters.

  2. Microscopic description of ground state magnetic moment and low-lying magnetic dipole excitations in heavy odd-mass 181Ta nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabar, Emre; Yakut, Hakan; Kuliev, Ali Akbar

    2016-07-01

    The ground state magnetic moments and the low-lying magnetic dipole (Ml) transitions from the ground to excited states in heavy deformed odd-mass 181Ta have been microscopically investigated on the basis of the quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model (QPNM). The problem of the spurious state mixing in M1 excitations is overcome by a restoration method allowing a self-consistent determination of the separable effective restoration forces. Due to the self-consistency of the method, these effective forces contain no arbitrary parameters. The results of calculations are compared with the available experimental data, the agreement being reasonably satisfactory.

  3. Identification of heavy and superheavy nuclides using chemical separator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türler, Andreas

    1999-11-01

    With the recent synthesis of superheavy nuclides produced in the reactions 48Ca+238U and 48Ca+242,244Pu, much longer-lived nuclei than the previously known neutron-deficient isotopes of the heaviest elements have been identified. Half-lives of several hours and up to several years have been predicted for the longest-lived isotopes of these elements. Thus, the sensitivity of radiochemical separation techniques may present a viable alternative to physical separator systems for the discovery of some of the predicted longer-lived heavy and superheavy nuclides. The advantages of chemical separator systems in comparison to kinematic separators lie in the possibility of using thick targets, high beam intensities spread over larger target areas and in providing access to nuclides emitted under large angles and low velocities. Thus, chemical separator systems are ideally suited to study also transfer and (HI, αxn) reaction products. In the following, a study of (HI, αxn) reactions will be presented and prospects to chemically identify heavy and superheavy elements discussed.

  4. Band-head spectra of low-energy single-particle excitations in some well-deformed, odd-mass heavy nuclei within a microscopic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Meng-Hock; Duy Duc, Dao; Nhan Hao, T. V.; Thuy Long, Ha; Quentin, P.; Bonneau, L.

    2016-01-01

    In four well-deformed heavy odd nuclei, the energies of low-lying rotational band heads have been determined microscopically within a self-consistent Hartree-Fock-plus-BCS approach with blocking. A Skyrme nucleon-nucleon effective interaction has been used together with a seniority force to describe pairing correlations. Only such states which are phenomenologically deemed to be related to single-particle excitations have been considered. The polarization effects, including those associated with the genuine time-reversal symmetry breaking have been fully taken into account within our model assumptions. The calculated spectra are in reasonably good qualitative agreement with available data for the considered odd-neutron nuclei. This is not so much the case for the odd-proton nuclei. A potential explanation for such a difference in behavior is proposed.

  5. Heavy mass elements total half-lives for selected long-lived nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    In the past, many compilations and evaluations of half-lives have been made which have uncritically accepted authors' values and uncertainties. They have merely recommended weight-averaged reported results. This evaluation attempts to reanalyze each experiment in the literature including an estimate of the standard deviation utilizing, where possible, an estimate of the systematic error. This paper constitutes a preliminary step in the process of recommending values. The long-lived nuclides of heavy mass elements are of interest in determining geological ages using the Re-Os or the Lu-Hf dating methods, in supplying information on the p-process (proton capture) of nucleo-synthesis, in providing information on lepton number conservation and the rest mass for the electron neutrino from double ..beta.. decay processes and in the case of tantalum because it represents the first long-lived state which is actually an isomer. Experimental data on the half-lives of selected nuclides have been evaluated and recommended values and uncertainties are presented for the following nuclides: /sup 128/Te, /sup 130/Te, /sup 129/I, /sup 138/La, /sup 144,145/Nd, /sup 146,147,148/Sm, /sup 152/Gd, /sup 154/Dy, /sup 176/Lu, /sup 174/Hf, /sup 180/Ta, /sup 187/Re, /sup 186/Os, /sup 190/Pt, /sup 204,205/Pb and /sup 230,232/Th. It is shown that /sup 204/Pb, which was previously thought to be radioactive, is stable. For /sup 205/Pb, the L electron capture x-rays have been revised for the M and higher x-ray yields. The resulting half-life for /sup 205/Pb is 1.9 +- 0.3 x 10/sup 7/ years. /sup 146/Sm with a half-life of 1.03 +- 0.05 x 10/sup 8/ years is the longest-lived extinct natural nuclide. 21 tabs.

  6. Neutron-proton pairing correlations in odd mass systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fellah, M. Allal, N. H.; Oudih, M. R.

    2015-03-30

    An expression of the ground-state which describes odd mass systems within the BCS approach in the isovector neutron-proton pairing case is proposed using the blocked level technique. The gap equations as well as the energy expression are then derived. It is shown that they exactly generalize the expressions obtained in the pairing between like-particles case. The various gap parameters and the energy are then numerically studied as a function of the pairing-strength within the schematic one-level model.

  7. Beyond-mean-field boson-fermion model for odd-mass nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, K.; Nikšić, T.; Vretenar, D.

    2016-05-01

    A novel method for calculating spectroscopic properties of medium-mass and heavy atomic nuclei with an odd number of nucleons is introduced, based on the framework of nuclear energy density functional theory and the particle-core coupling scheme. The deformation energy surface of the even-even core, as well as the spherical single-particle energies and occupation probabilities of the odd particle(s), are obtained in a self-consistent mean-field calculation determined by the choice of the energy density functional and pairing interaction. This method uniquely determines the parameters of the Hamiltonian of the boson core, and only the strength of the particle-core coupling is specifically adjusted to selected data for a particular nucleus. The approach is illustrated in a systematic study of low-energy excitation spectra and transition rates of axially deformed odd-mass Eu isotopes.

  8. Beyond Mean-Field Calculations for Odd-Mass Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, B.; Avez, B.; Bender, M.; Heenen, P.-H.

    2014-10-01

    Beyond mean-field methods are very successful tools for the description of large-amplitude collective motion for even-even atomic nuclei. The state-of-the-art framework of these methods consists in a generator coordinate method based on angular-momentum and particle-number projected triaxially deformed Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) states. The extension of this scheme to odd-mass nuclei is a long-standing challenge. We present for the first time such an extension, where the generator coordinate space is built from self-consistently blocked one-quasiparticle HFB states. One of the key points for this success is that the same Skyrme interaction is used for the mean-field and the pairing channels, thus avoiding problems related to the violation of the Pauli principle. An application to Mg25 illustrates the power of our method, as agreement with experiment is obtained for the spectrum, electromagnetic moments, and transition strengths, for both positive and negative parity states and without the necessity for effective charges or effective moments. Although the effective interaction still requires improvement, our study opens the way to systematically describe odd-A nuclei throughout the nuclear chart.

  9. Beyond mean-field calculations for odd-mass nuclei.

    PubMed

    Bally, B; Avez, B; Bender, M; Heenen, P-H

    2014-10-17

    Beyond mean-field methods are very successful tools for the description of large-amplitude collective motion for even-even atomic nuclei. The state-of-the-art framework of these methods consists in a generator coordinate method based on angular-momentum and particle-number projected triaxially deformed Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) states. The extension of this scheme to odd-mass nuclei is a long-standing challenge. We present for the first time such an extension, where the generator coordinate space is built from self-consistently blocked one-quasiparticle HFB states. One of the key points for this success is that the same Skyrme interaction is used for the mean-field and the pairing channels, thus avoiding problems related to the violation of the Pauli principle. An application to ^{25}Mg illustrates the power of our method, as agreement with experiment is obtained for the spectrum, electromagnetic moments, and transition strengths, for both positive and negative parity states and without the necessity for effective charges or effective moments. Although the effective interaction still requires improvement, our study opens the way to systematically describe odd-A nuclei throughout the nuclear chart. PMID:25361253

  10. Shape-changing particle decays of 185 Bi and structure of the lightest odd-mass Bi isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreyev, A. N.; Ackermann, D.; Heßberger, F. P.; Heyde, K.; Hofmann, S.; Huyse, M.; Karlgren, D.; Kojouharov, I.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Münzenberg, G.; Page, R. D.; van de Vel, K.; van Duppen, P.; Walters, W. B.; Wyss, R.

    2004-05-01

    Proton and α decay of the proton-rich nuclide 185 Bi has been restudied in more detail in the complete fusion reaction 93 Nb ( 95 Mo ,3n ) 185 Bi at the velocity filter SHIP. The observed decay pattern of 185 Bi and of the heavier odd-mass isotopes 187,189,191,193 Bi are interpreted based on potential-energy surface calculations. It is shown that the experimental systematics of the particle decays and of the excited states in these nuclei (where known) can be explained by the prolate-oblate shape co-existence at low excitation energy. The observed state in 185 Bi is proposed to be of prolate nature, which is in contrast with the previously proposed oblate interpretation.

  11. Optical model methods of predicting nuclide production cross sections from heavy ion fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Ramsey, C. R.; Tripathi, R. K.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Norbury, J. W.; Wilson, J. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Quantum mechanical optical potential methods for calculating inclusive isotope and element production cross sections from the fragmenting of heavy nuclei by intermediate- and high-energy protons and heavy ions are presented based upon a modified abrasion-ablation-FSI (frictional spectator interaction) collision model. The abrasion stage is treated as a quantum mechanical knockout process that leaves the residual prefragment in an excited state. Prefragment excitation energies are estimated using a combined liquid drop and FSI method. In ablation the prefragment deexcites by particle and photon emission to produce the final fragment. Contributions from electromagnetic dissociation to single nucleon removal cross sections are incorporated using a Weiszacker-Williams theory that includes electric dipole and electric quadrupole interactions. Estimates of elemental and isotopic production cross sections are in good agreement with published cross section measurements for a variety of projectile-target-beam energy combinations.

  12. Experimental Identification of Intruder Bandheads in Odd-Mass {sup 187-193}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    A.N. Andreyev; J.F.C. Cocks; O. Dorvaux; K. Eskola; P. Greenlees; P. Jones; R. Julin; S. Juutinen; K. Helariutta; M. Huyse; H. Kettunen; P. Kuusiniemi; M. Leino; M. Muikku; W.H. Trzaska; K. Van de Vel; P. Van Duppen; R. Wyss

    1999-12-31

    Fine-structure {alpha}-decays of the odd mass {sup 191-197}Po identifying proton based intruder states in the daughter lead nuclei have been observed, leading to a systematics of intruder states in odd mass lead isotopes from {sup 197}Pb down to {sup 187}Pb. The interpretation of these states involves the coupling of the i{sub 13/2} or p{sub 3/2} odd neutron to the oblate deformed even lead core.

  13. Experimental identification of intruder bandheads in odd-mass {sup 187-193}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Andreyev, A. N.; Huyse, M.; Van de Vel, K.; Van Duppen, P.; Cocks, J. F. C.; Dorvaux, O.; Greenlees, P.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Helariutta, K.; Kettunen, H.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Leino, M.; Muikku, M.; Trzaska, W. H.; Eskola, K.; Wyss, R.

    1999-11-16

    Fine-structure {alpha}-decays of the odd mass {sup 191-197}Po identifying proton based intruder states in the daughter lead nuclei have been observed, leading to a systematics of intruder states in odd mass lead isotopes from {sup 197}Pb down to {sup 187}Pb. The interpretation of these states involves the coupling of the i{sub 13/2} or p{sub 3/2} odd neutron to the oblate deformed even lead core.

  14. Study of nuclear structure of odd mass 119-127I nuclei in a phenomenological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dhanvir; Gupta, Anuradha; Kumar, Amit; Sharma, Chetan; Singh, Suram; Bharti, Arun; Khosa, S. K.; Bhat, G. H.; Sheikh, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    By using the phenomenological approach of Projected Shell Model (PSM), the positive and negative-parity band structures of odd mass neutron-rich 119-127I nuclei have been studied with the deformed single-particle states generated by the standard Nilsson potential. For these isotopes, the band structures have been analyzed in terms of quasi-particles configurations. The phenomenon of backbending in moment of inertia is also studied in the present work. Besides this, the reduced transition probabilities, i.e. B (E 2) and B (M 1), are obtained from the PSM wavefunction for the first time for yrast bands of these isotopes.

  15. α -decay half-lives of odd-mass nuclei with differences between neutron and proton distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Dongdong; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2016-05-01

    Effects of differences between neutron and proton distributions on α decay are investigated for odd-mass nuclei within the generalized density-dependent cluster model. The neutron skin thickness is employed to gauge the differences and it is considered in numerically computing the double-folding α -nucleus potentials. In terms of the characteristic of odd-mass α emitters, special attention is paid to the α decays from ground or isomeric states which end in the ground states of daughter nuclei and furthermore belong to favored α decays. The calculations with the neutron skin thickness yield shorter half-lives, suggesting a smaller preformation factor. This is quite consistent with the conclusions for even-even α emitters. Moreover, α -decay calculations are extended for odd-mass isomers and superheavy nuclei. The calculated α -decay half-lives are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data.

  16. Programmed gradient descent biosorption of strontium ions by Saccaromyces cerevisiae and ashing analysis: A decrement solution for nuclide and heavy metal disposal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxue; Dong, Faqin; Zhang, Wei; Nie, Xiaoqin; Sun, Shiyong; Wei, Hongfu; Luo, Lang; Xiang, Sha; Zhang, Gege

    2016-08-15

    One of the waste disposal principles is decrement. The programmed gradient descent biosorption of strontium ions by Saccaromyces cerevisiae regarding bioremoval and ashing process for decrement were studied in present research. The results indicated that S. cerevisiae cells showed valid biosorption for strontium ions with greater than 90% bioremoval efficiency for high concentration strontium ions under batch culture conditions. The S. cerevisiae cells bioaccumulated approximately 10% of strontium ions in the cytoplasm besides adsorbing 90% strontium ions on cell wall. The programmed gradient descent biosorption presented good performance with a nearly 100% bioremoval ratio for low concentration strontium ions after 3 cycles. The ashing process resulted in a huge volume and weight reduction ratio as well as enrichment for strontium in the ash. XRD results showed that SrSO4 existed in ash. Simulated experiments proved that sulfate could adjust the precipitation of strontium ions. Finally, we proposed a technological flow process that combined the programmed gradient descent biosorption and ashing, which could yield great decrement and allow the supernatant to meet discharge standard. This technological flow process may be beneficial for nuclides and heavy metal disposal treatment in many fields. PMID:27136735

  17. Dipole strength distributions of the stable odd-mass N=82 isotones {sup 139}La and {sup 141}Pr

    SciTech Connect

    Scheck, M.; Brentano, P. von; Fransen, C.; Linnemann, A.; Muecher, D.; Pietralla, N.; Scholl, C.; Werner, V.; Kneissl, U.; Kohstall, C.; Pitz, H. H.; Stedile, F.; Walter, S.; Yates, S. W.

    2007-04-15

    The low-lying dipole strength distributions of the odd-mass isotopes {sup 139}La and {sup 141}Pr were studied in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments using bremsstrahlung beams. Excited states were observed at excitation energies up to 4 MeV. Spectroscopic information was obtained on excitation energies, decay widths, decay branching ratios, and transition probabilities. The states belonging to the [[2{sup +}(multiply-in-circle sign)3{sup -}](multiply-in-circle sign)particle/hole] coupling were a special focus, and the results are compared with other stable odd-mass nuclei at or near the N=82 shell closure.

  18. Workshop on Cosmogenic Nuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C. (Editor); Englert, P. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Abstracts of papers presented at the Workshop on Cosmogenic Nuclides are compiled. The major topic areas covered include: new techniques for measuring nuclides such as tandem accelerator and resonance mass spectrometry; solar modulation of cosmic rays; pre-irradiation histories of extraterrestrial materials; terrestrial studies; simulations and cross sections; nuclide production rate calculations; and meteoritic nuclides.

  19. QPNM calculation for the ground state magnetic moments of odd-mass deformed nuclei: 157-167Er isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakut, H.; Guliyev, E.; Guner, M.; Tabar, E.; Zenginerler, Z.

    2012-08-01

    A new microscopic method has been developed in the framework of the Quasiparticle-Phonon Nuclear Model (QPNM) in order to investigate spin polarization effects on the magnetic properties such as magnetic moment, intrinsic magnetic moment and effective gs factor of the ground state of odd-mass 157-167Er isotopes. The calculations were performed using both Tamm-Dancoff Approximation (TDA) and Quasiparticle Random-Phase Approximation (QRPA). Reasonably good agreement has been obtained between the QRPA results and the relevant experimental data. Furthermore the variation of the intrinsic magnetic moment gK values with the mass number A exhibits similar behavior for both theoretical and experimental results. From the compression of the calculated intrinsic magnetic moment values with the experimental data the spin-spin interaction parameter has been found as χ=(30/A) MeV for odd-mass 157-167Er isotopes. Our results clarify the possibility of using this new method to describe the magnetic properties of odd-mass deformed nuclei.

  20. 12. 3-min /sup 256/Cf and 43-min /sup 258/Md and systematics of the spontaneous fission propertiesof heavy nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Weber, J.; Daniels, W.R.; Hulet, E.K.; Lougheed, R.W.; Landrum, J.H.; Wild, J.F.; Dupzyk, R.J.

    1980-03-01

    The new isotope 12.3-min /sup 256/Cf was produced via the /sup 254/Cf(t,p) reaction, and a new 43-min isomer of /sup 258/Md was produced via the /sup 255/Es(..cap alpha..,n) reaction. The fragment mass and kinetic energy distributions from the spontaneous fission of /sup 256/Cf were found to be very similar to those from the spontaneous fission of lighter Cf isotopes. The mass division is primarily asymmetric, and the average total kinetic energy is 189.8 +- 0.9 MeV. The 43-min /sup 258/Md presumably decays by electron capture and provides an opportunity to study the mass and kinetic energy distributions from the spontaneous fission of the 380-..mu..s /sup 258/Fm daughter. The observed narrow, symmetric mass distribution and the most probable total kinetic energy of 238 +- 3 MeV are similar to those reported for the spontaneous fission of /sup 259/Fm but show a sharp increase in symmetric mass division and total kinetic energy compared to /sup 257/Fm and the lighter Fm isotopes. No such abrupt change in properties was observed for /sup 256/Cf, which, like /sup 258/Fm, has 158 neutrons. The marked difference between the spontaneous fission properties of the heavier Fm isotopes and those of other spontaneously fissioning nuclides is compared to some theoretical predictions.

  1. Depth and size effects on cosmogenic nuclide production in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, P.

    1985-01-01

    The galactic cosmic particle radiation (GCR) can cause changes in condensed extraterrestrial matter in different ways. It can lose energy via ionization processes of induced nuclear reactions which lead to a wide variety of stable and radioactive cosmogenic nuclides. Heavy particles incur radiation damage in minerals such as olivine and pyroxene. Light particles predominantly tend to induce nuclear reactions, causing the development of a secondary particle cascade of neutrons, protons, pions and gamma-rays and the production of cosmogenic nuclides. Such processes are described by various models, which predict the depth and size dependent production of cosmogenic nuclides.

  2. Nuclide Guide and International Chart of Nuclides - 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golashvili, T.

    2009-08-01

    New versions of Nuclide Guide and Chart of the Nuclides were developed as a result of Russian-Chinese collaboration. The Nuclide Guide contains the basic information on more than 3000 radioactive and stable nuclides. The characteristics of isomers with half-lives more than 1 ms are included. For each nuclide spin, parity, mass of nuclide, magnetic moment (if available), mass excess, half-life or abundance, decay modes, branching ratios, emitted particles, energies of most intense gamma-rays and their intensities, decay energies and mean values of radiation energy per decay are given. For stable and natural long-lived nuclides cross-sections of thermal neutron induced activation are indicated. The information presented in the Guide was compiled from 5 sources: 1) ENSDF-2008, 2) atomic mass evaluation-2005 by Audi and Wapstra, 3) interactive data bases at web-sites , , 4) original evaluations of authors, 5) recent publications. The International Chart ot Nuclides was developed on the basis of information presented in Nuclide Guide.

  3. Chart of the Nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Sartori, Enrico

    1999-03-23

    Nucleus is an interactive PC-based graphical viewer of NUBASE nuclear property data. NUBASE contains experimentally known nuclear properties, together with some values that have been estimated from extrapolation of experimental data for 3010 nuclides. NUBASE also contains data on those isomeric states that have half-lives greater than 1 millisecond; there are 669 such nuclides of which 58 have more than one isomeric state. The latest version of NUCLEUS-CHART has been corrected to include the names and the chemical symbols of the elements 104 to 109 that have been finally adopted by the Commission on Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry (CNIC) of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). They differ from those recommended by the same commission a few years before and that were widely used in the evaluations AME''95 and NUBASE''97. It results in some shuffling of the names and symbols, that may cause confusion in the near future. At AMDC we''ll be as careful as possible to try to avoid such confusion. In advance we apologize if any will occur in the future and recommend the user to always double check these few names.

  4. Chart of the Nuclides

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-03-23

    Nucleus is an interactive PC-based graphical viewer of NUBASE nuclear property data. NUBASE contains experimentally known nuclear properties, together with some values that have been estimated from extrapolation of experimental data for 3010 nuclides. NUBASE also contains data on those isomeric states that have half-lives greater than 1 millisecond; there are 669 such nuclides of which 58 have more than one isomeric state. The latest version of NUCLEUS-CHART has been corrected to include the namesmore » and the chemical symbols of the elements 104 to 109 that have been finally adopted by the Commission on Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry (CNIC) of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). They differ from those recommended by the same commission a few years before and that were widely used in the evaluations AME''95 and NUBASE''97. It results in some shuffling of the names and symbols, that may cause confusion in the near future. At AMDC we''ll be as careful as possible to try to avoid such confusion. In advance we apologize if any will occur in the future and recommend the user to always double check these few names.« less

  5. Unconventional Nuclides for Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Jason P.; Williamson, Matthew J.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and widespread growth in the use of nuclear medicine for both diagnosis and therapy of disease has been the driving force behind burgeoning research interests in the design of novel radiopharmaceuticals. Until recently, the majority of clinical and basic science research has focused on the development of 11C-, 13N-, 15O-, and 18F-radiopharmaceuticals for use with positron emission tomography (PET) and 99mTc-labeled agents for use with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). With the increased availability of small, low-energy cyclotrons and improvements in both cyclotron targetry and purification chemistries, the use of “nonstandard” radionuclides is becoming more prevalent. This brief review describes the physical characteristics of 60 radionuclides, including β+, β−, γ-ray, and α-particle emitters, which have the potential for use in the design and synthesis of the next generation of diagnostic and/or radiotherapeutic drugs. As the decay processes of many of the radionuclides described herein involve emission of high-energy γ-rays, relevant shielding and radiation safety issues are also considered. In particular, the properties and safety considerations associated with the increasingly prevalent PET nuclides 64Cu, 68Ga, 86Y, 89Zr, and 124I are discussed. PMID:20128994

  6. β -decay rates of odd-mass neutron-rich isotopes in the deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation with realistic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Dongdong; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2015-09-01

    The deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions is extended for the β- decay of odd-mass neutron-rich Kr, Sr, Zr, and Mo isotopes, from their longest-lived isotopes to the experimentally unknown nuclei. The particle-particle and particle-hole channels of residual interactions are handled in large single-particle model spaces, based on the Brückner G matrix with charge-dependent Bonn nucleon-nucleon forces. Both allowed Gamow-Teller and first-forbidden transitions are considered and different treatments for odd-mass systems are emphasized. The sensitivity of the calculated results to the single-particle level scheme and the particle-particle strength is discussed. The calculated Gamow-Teller strengths are analyzed, together with the contributions from first-forbidden transitions. The calculated half-lives are found to agree well with the experimental data over the orders of magnitude from 10-2 to 103 s.

  7. Phase transition studies of the odd-mass 123‑135Xe isotopes based on SU(1,1) algebra in IBFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarizadeh, M. A.; Fouladi, N.; Ghapanvari, M.; Fathi, H.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the positive-parity states in the odd-mass transitional 123‑135Xe isotopes within the framework of the interacting boson-fermion model. Two solvable extended transitional Hamiltonians which are based on SU(1,1) algebra are employed to provide an investigation of quantum phase transition (QPT) between the spherical and deformed gamma — unstable shapes along the chain of Xe isotopes. The low-states energy spectra and B(E2) values for these nuclei have been calculated and compared with the experimental data. The predicted excitation energies and B(E2) transition rates of the odd isotopes are found to agree well with the experimental data. We have also analyzed the critical behavior of even-odd Xe isotopes via Catastrophe Theory in combination with a coherent state formalism to generate energy surfaces and special isotopes which are the best candidates for the critical point are identified.

  8. Delta I = 1 staggering effect for negative parity rotational bands with K = 1/2 in W/Os/Pt odd-mass nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, M. M.

    2015-11-01

    The anomalous negative-parity bands of odd-mass nuclei W/Os/Pt for N = 103 isotones are studied within the framework of particle rotor model (PRM). The phenomenon of Δ I = 1 staggering or signature splitting in energies occurs as one plots the gamma transitional energy over spin (EGOS) versus spin for the 1/2-[521] band originating from N = 5 single particle orbital. The rotational band with K = 1/2 separates into two signature partners. The levels with I = 1/2, 5/2, 9/2,… are displaced relatively to the levels with I = 3/2,7/2,11/2,…. The deviations of the level energies from the rigid rotor values is described by Coriolis coupling.

  9. International Chart of the Nuclides - 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Zhixiang; Zhuang Youxiang; Zhou Chunmei; Huang Xiaolong; Antony, M.S.; Hasegawa, Akira; Katakura, Junichi; Golashvili, T.V.; Kupriyanov, V.M.; Lbov, A.A.; Demidov, A.P.; Chechev, V.P.

    2005-05-24

    The International Chart of Nuclides - 2003 has been developed taking into account the data obtained in 1998 - 2003. Unlike widespread nuclide charts the present Chart of Nuclides contains EVALUATED values of the main characteristics. These values are supplied with the standard deviations. The presented data are applicable in medicine, agriculture, environmental protection etc.

  10. Mean-field studies of time reversal breaking states in super-heavy nuclei with the Gogny force

    SciTech Connect

    Robledo, L. M.

    2015-10-15

    Recent progress on the description of time reversal breaking (odd mass and multi-quasiparticle excitation) states in super-heavy nuclei within a mean field framework and using several flavors of the Gogny interaction is reported. The study includes ground and excited states in selected odd mass isotopes of nobelium and mendelevium as well as high K isomeric states in {sup 254}No. These are two and four-quasiparticle excitations that are treated in the same self-consistent HFB plus blocking framework as the odd mass states.

  11. Recent MARS15 developments: nuclide inventory, DPA and gas production

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

    2010-12-01

    Recent developments in the MARS15 code are described for the critical modules related to demands of hadron and lepton colliders and Megawatt proton and heavy-ion beam facilities. Details of advanced models for particle production and nuclide distributions in nuclear interactions at low and medium energies, energy loss, atomic displacements and gas production are presented along with benchmarking against data. Recent developments in the MARS15 physics models, such as nuclide production, decay and transmutation and all-component DPA modelling for arbitrary projectiles in the 1 keV to 10 TeV energy range, add new capabilities to the code crucial in numerous applications with high-intensity high-power beams. Some discrepancies in DPA rate predictions by several codes, relation of DPA and H/He production rates to changes in material properties, as well as corresponding experimental studies at energies above a hundred of MeV are the areas requiring further efforts.

  12. Particle-hole intruder levels in 67Cu, collectivity, monopole shifts, and the hockey-stick behaviour of ell - 1/2 5/2- levels in neutron-rich odd-mass Cu nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, W. B.; Chiara, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    A new sequence of gamma rays with energies of 572, 499, 585, and 674 keV has been identified in 67Cu populating the 7/2- level at 2362 keV. Owing to the strong population of the 2362-keV level via an ell = 3 proton pickup reaction, that level is assigned to be an f7/2-1 2-particle-1-hole "intruder" proton configuration, and the new levels are found to form a sequence consistent with intruder sequences in the adjacent odd-mass Cu isotopes and in the odd-mass Sb isotopes. The changing position of the intruder sequence in the odd-mass Cu isotopes is discussed and related to the onset of collectivity associated with the presence of g9/2 neutrons beyond N = 40. The increase in collectivity is also discussed for a number of isotonic and isotopic chains as more protons or neutrons, respectively, are added beyond an oscillator shell boundary. For most of these systems, the ell -1/2 levels show a systematic "hockey-stick-like" behaviour with a sharp decrease in energy with the addition of the first protons or neutrons, owing to both the added collectivity and the tensor interaction, and then a lower slope when collectivity changes are diminished and only the tensor interaction is influencing the changes in level positions.

  13. Cosmogenic Nuclides Study of Large Iron Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutzler, A.; Smith, T.; Rochette, P.; Bourles, D. L.; Leya, I.; Gattacceca, J.

    2014-09-01

    Six large iron meteorites were selected (Saint-Aubin, Mont-Dieu, Caille, Morasko, Agoudal, and Gebel Kamil). We measured stable and radiogenic cosmogenic nuclides, to study pre-atmospheric size, cosmic-ray exposure ages and terrestrial ages.

  14. Light nuclides produced in the proton-induced spallation of {sup 238}U at 1 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ricciardi, M.V.; Armbruster, P.; Enqvist, T.; Kelic, A.; Rejmund, F.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Yordanov, O.; Benlliure, J.; Pereira, J.; Bernas, M.; Mustapha, B.; Stephan, C.; Tassan-Got, L.

    2006-01-15

    The production of light and intermediate-mass nuclides formed in the reaction {sup 1}H+{sup 238}U at 1 GeV was measured at the Fragment Separator at GSI, Darmstadt. The experiment was performed in inverse kinematics, by shooting a 1 A GeV {sup 238}U beam on a thin liquid-hydrogen target. A total of 254 isotopes of all elements in the range 7{<=}Z{<=}37 were unambiguously identified, and the velocity distributions of the produced nuclides were determined with high precision. The results show that the nuclides are produced in a very asymmetric binary decay of heavy nuclei originating from the spallation of uranium. All the features of the produced nuclides merge with the characteristics of the fission products as their mass increases.

  15. Production systematics of cosmogenic nuclides in the earth

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    The high-energy particles in the galactic cosmic rays, (GCR) can produce nuclides deep in any object exposed to them. These cosmic-ray-produced (cosmogenic) nuclides have been extensively studied during the last four decades, mainly in meteorites and lunar samples (e.g., 1,2). In extraterrestrial matter, several approaches have been used to determine the production systematics of these cosmogenic nuclides. Production rates of most cosmogenic nuclides in the Earth axe much lower, especially those nuclides made ``in situ`` in the Earth`s surface. Many of these @trial cosmogenic nuclides are only now being measured because of improved techniques, such as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). There have been very few determinations of the production rates of nuclides made in the Earth by cosmic rays. The work being done for terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides is following the approaches used for, studying the production of extraterrestrial nuclides.

  16. Cosmogenic nuclide budgeting of floodplain sediment transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, H.; von Blanckenburg, F.

    2009-08-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides produced in quartz may either decay or accumulate while sediment is moved through a river basin. A change in nuclide concentration resulting from storage in a floodplain is potentially important in large drainage basins in which sediment is prone to repeated burial and remobilization as a river migrates through its floodplain. We have modeled depth- and time-dependent cosmogenic nuclide concentration changes for 10Be, 26Al, and 14C during sediment storage and mixing in various active floodplain settings ranging from confined, shallow rivers with small floodplains to foreland-basin scale floodplains traversed by deep rivers. Floodplain storage time, estimated from channel migration rates, ranges from 0.4 kyr for the Beni River basin (Bolivia) to 7 kyr for the Amazon River basin, while floodplain storage depth, estimated from channel depth, ranges from 1 to 25 m. For all modeled active floodplain settings, the long-lived nuclides 10Be and 26Al show neither significant increase in nuclide concentration from irradiation nor decrease from decay. We predict a hypothetical response time after which changes in 10Be or 26Al concentrations become analytically resolvable. This interval ranges from 0.07 to 2 Myr and exceeds in all cases the typical residence time of sediment in a floodplain. Due to the much shorter half life of 14C, nuclide concentrations modeled for the in situ-produced variety of this nuclide are, however, sensitive to floodplain storage on residence times of < 20 kyr. The cosmogenic nuclide composition of old deposits in currently inactive floodplains that have been isolated for periods of millions of years from the river that once deposited them is predicted to either increase or decrease in 10Be and 26Al concentration, depending on the depositional depth. These conditions can be evaluated using the 26Al/ 10Be ratio that readily discloses the depth and duration of storage. We illustrate these models with examples from the Amazon basin

  17. Multi-nuclide AMS system at the University of Tsukuba

    SciTech Connect

    Sasa, Kimikazu; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2010-05-12

    A multi-nuclide AMS system on the 12UD Pelletron tandem accelerator at the University of Tsukuba (Tsukuba AMS system) can measure environmental levels of long-lived radioisotopes of {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 129}I by employing a molecular pilot beam. AMS is an ultrasensitive technique for the study of long-lived radioisotopes, and stable isotopes at very low abundances. The high terminal voltage has an advantage in the detection of heavy radioisotopes. Much progress has been made in the development of new AMS techniques. For example, a standard deviation of the fluctuation for the {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratio is +- 2%, and the effective detection limit is better than 1x10{sup -15}. In recent years, the main research field of the 12UD Pelletron tandem accelerator has shifted to accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) research from nuclear physics. This report presents an overview of the Tsukuba AMS system.

  18. Corrosion Tests of LWR Fuels - Nuclide Release

    SciTech Connect

    P.A. Finn; Y. Tsai; J.C. Cunnane

    2001-12-14

    Two BWR fuels [64 and 71 (MWd)/kgU], one of which contained 2% Gd, and two PWR fuels [30 and 45 (MWd)/kgU], are tested by dripping groundwater on the fuels under oxidizing and hydrologically unsaturated conditions for times ranging from 2.4 to 8.2 yr at 90 C. The {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 97}Mo, and {sup 90}Sr releases are presented to show the effects of long reaction times and of gadolinium on nuclide release. This investigation showed that the five nuclides at long reaction times have similar fractional release rates and that the presence of 2% Gd reduced the {sup 99}Tc cumulative release fraction by about an order of magnitude over that of a fuel with a similar burnup.

  19. Cosmogenic nuclides: Observable effects of Martian volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Drake, D. M.; Feldman, W. C.

    1988-01-01

    Cosmic-ray produced (cosmogenic) nuclides in returned Martian samples could be used to study the amounts and distributions of volatiles in the recent past on Mars. In planning for the gamma-ray spectrometer experiment that is scheduled to fly on the Mars Observer, many calculations were done on the nuclear reactions that should occur in the Martian surface, studying especially the production and transport of neutrons. It is found that three aspects of Mars can very significantly affect the production of cosmogenic products in Mars: the Martian atmosphere and the presence of H2O in or CO2 on the surface of Mars. These volatile components can greatly affect the energy and spatial distributions of neutrons, expecially those with thermal or near thermal energies, in the surface of Mars. In turn, these neutrons produce many cosmogenic nuclides that can be observed in samples returned from Mars.

  20. Neutron multiplicities for the transplutonium nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.; Zucker, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    This paper continues, with respect to the transplutonium nuclides, earlier efforts to collate and evaluate data from the scientific literature on the prompt neutron multiplicity distribution from fission and its first moment = ..sigma..nuPnu. The isotopes considered here for which P/sub nu/ and or data (or both) were found in the literature are of americium (Am), curium (Cm), berkelium (Bk), californium (Cf), einsteinium (Es), fermium (Fm), and nobelium (No).

  1. Mass Evaluation for Proton Rich Nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Audi, G.; Xu, X.; Pfeiffer, B.; Kondev, F. G.

    2011-11-30

    The Atomic mass evaluation (AME) provides the reliable resource for the values related to atomic masses. Since the publication of the latest version of AME in 2003, many developments for atomic mass determination have been done and important results changed significantly our knowledge. A preliminary version of AME was released in April 2011, and an official version is foreseen to be published in early 2013. The general status of AME is presented and some specific features of AME for proton-rich nuclides are discussed.

  2. Mass measurements of exotic nuclides at SHIPTRAP

    SciTech Connect

    Block, M.; Ackermann, D.; Eliseev, S.; Herfurth, F.; Hessberger, F. P.; Hofmann, S.; Kluge, H.-J.; Maero, G.; Martin, A.; Mazzocco, M.; Mukherjee, M.; Quint, W.; Rahaman, S.; Rauth, C.; Rodriguez, D.; Scheidenberger, C.; Vorobjev, G.; Blaum, K.; Ferrer, R.; Weber, C.

    2007-05-22

    The Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP is installed behind the velocity-filter SHIP at GSI for high-precision mass measurements of fusion-evaporation residues. To facilitate an efficient stopping of the reaction products a buffer gas stopping cell is utilized. In an investigation of neutron-deficient nuclides in the terbium-to-thulium region around A {approx_equal} 146, 18 new or improved mass values have been obtained, resulting in a more accurate determination of the proton drip line for holmium and thulium. With the present performance of SHIPTRAP, a first direct mass measurement of transuranium elements in the nobelium region is within reach.

  3. Application of different nuclides in retrospective dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Konheiser, J.; Mittag, S.; Viehrig, H.W.; Gleisberg, B.

    2011-07-01

    The activities of nuclides produced via the neutron irradiation of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel are used to validate respective fluence calculations. Niobium, nickel, and technetium isotopes from RPV trepans of the decommissioned NPP Greifswald (VVER-440) have been analyzed. The activities were determined by TRAMO (Monte-Carlo) fluence calculations, newly applying 640 neutron-energy groups and ENDF/B7 data. Relative to earlier results, fluences up to 20% higher have been computed, leading to somewhat better agreement between measurement and calculation, particularly in the case of Tc-99. (authors)

  4. Chart of Nuclides from the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Chart of Nuclides is a software product that allows users to search and plot nuclear structure and nuclear decay data interactively. The Chart of Nuclides was developed by the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC). It provides an interface between web users and several databases containing nuclear structure, nuclear decay and some neutron-induced nuclear reaction information. Using the Chart of Nuclides, it is possible to search for nuclear level properties (energy, half-life, spin-parity), gamma-ray information (energy, intensity, multipolarity, coincidences),radiation information following nuclear decay (energy, intensity, dose), and neutron-induced reaction data from the BNL-325 book (thermal cross section and resonance integral). The information provided by the Chart of Nuclides can be seen in tables, level schemes and an interactive chart of nuclides. (From the Chart of Nuclides Description at http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/chart/help/index.jsp?product=chart)

  5. Cosmogenic nuclides in football-sized rocks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahlen, M.; Honda, M.; Imamura, M.; Fruchter, J. S.; Finkel, R. C.; Kohl, C. P.; Arnold, J. R.; Reedy, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    The activity of long- and short-lived isotopes in a series of samples from a vertical column through the center of rock 14321 was measured. Rock 14321 is a 9 kg fragmental rock whose orientation was photographically documented on the lunar surface. Also investigated was a sample from the lower portion of rock 14310, where, in order to study target effects, two different density fractions (mineral separates) were analyzed. A few nuclides in a sample from the comprehensive fines 14259 were measured. This material has been collected largely from the top centimeter of the lunar soil. The study of the deep samples of 14321 and 14310 provided values for the activity of isotopes at points where only effects produced by galactic cosmic rays are significant.

  6. Prompt neutron multiplicities for the transplutonium nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.; Zucker, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The direct determination of the average prompt neutron emission values is reviewed, and a method of comparing different sites of neutron emission multiplicity distribution values is described. Measured and recommended values are tabulated for these nuclides: /sup 241/Am, /sup 242/Am, /sup 242/Cm, /sup 243/Cm, /sup 244/Cm, /sup 246/Cm, /sup 247/Cm, /sup 248/Cm, /sup 250/Cm, /sup 245/Cm, /sup 249/Bk, /sup 246/Cf, /sup 249/Cf, /sup 250/Cf, /sup 252/Cf, /sup 254/Cf, /sup 251/Cf, /sup 253/Es, /sup 254/Es, /sup 244/Fm, /sup 246/Fm, /sup 255/Fm, /sup 252/No, /sup 254/Fm, /sup 256/Fm, /sup 257/Fm. 59 refs., 24 tabs. (LEW)

  7. Nuclide production in (very) small meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. R.; Nishiizumi, K.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most interesting open questions in the study of cosmic-ray effects in meteorites is the expected behavior of objects which are very small compared to the mean interaction length of primary galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles. A reasonable limit might be a pre-atmospheric radius of 5 gram/cm(2), or 1.5 cm for chondrites. These are interesting for at least three reasons: (1) this is a limiting case for large objects, and can help us make better models; (2) this size is intermediate between usual meteorites and irradiated grams (spherules); and (3) these are the most likely objects to show solar cosmic ray (SCR) effects. Reedy (1984) has recently proposed a model for production by GCR of radioactive and stable nuclides in spherical meteorites. Very small objects are expected to deviate from this model in the direction of fewer secondary particles (larger spectral shape parameter), at all depths. The net effect will be significantly lower production of such low-energy products as Mn-53 and Al-26. The SCR production of these and other nuclides will be lower, too, because meteorite orbits extend typically out into the asteroid belt, and the mean SCR flux must fall off approximately as r(-2) with distance from the Sun. Kepler's laws insure that for such orbits most of the exposure time is spent near aphelion. None the less the equivalent mean exposure distance, R(exp), is slightly less than the semimajor axis A because of the weighting by R(-2). For the three meteorite orbits we have, R(exp) has a narrow range, from about 1.6 to 2.1 a.u. This is probably true for the great majority of meteorites.

  8. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Herman

    2016-09-01

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3 / 2 , 5 / 2 , 7 / 2, and 9 / 2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  9. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cho, Herman

    2016-02-28

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3/2,5/2,7/2, and 9/2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Furthermore, applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  10. Nuclide production by primary cosmic-ray protons

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    The production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in the solar system and in interstellar space were calculated for the primary protons in the galactic and solar cosmic rays. At 1 AU, the long-term average fluxes of solar protons usually produce many more atoms of a cosmogenic nuclide than the primary protons in the galactic cosmic rays (GCR), the exceptions being nuclides made only by high-energy reactions (like /sup 10/Be). Because the particle fluxes inside meteorites and other large objects in space include many secondary neutrons, the production rates are much higher and ratios inside large objects are often very different from those by just the primary GCR protons in small objects. The production rates of cosmogenic nuclides are calculated to vary by about factors of 2.5 during at typical 11-year solar cycle, in agreement with measurements of short-lived radionuclides in recently fallen meteorites. The production of cosmogenic nuclides by the GCR particles outside the heliosphere is higher than that by the modulated GCR primaries normally in the solar system. However, there is considerable uncertainty in the fluxes of interstellar protons and, therefore, in the production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in interstellar space. Production rates and ratios for cosmogenic nuclides would be able to identify particles that were small in space or that were exposed to an unmodulated spectrum of GCR particles. 25 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Reportable Nuclide Criteria for ORNL Radioactive Waste Management Activities - 13005

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, Kip; Forrester, Tim; Saunders, Mark

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee generates numerous radioactive waste streams. Many of those streams contain a large number of radionuclides with an extremely broad range of concentrations. To feasibly manage the radionuclide information, ORNL developed reportable nuclide criteria to distinguish between those nuclides in a waste stream that require waste tracking versus those nuclides of such minimal activity that do not require tracking. The criteria include tracking thresholds drawn from ORNL onsite management requirements, transportation requirements, and relevant treatment and disposal facility acceptance criteria. As a management practice, ORNL maintains waste tracking on a nuclide in a specific waste stream if it exceeds any of the reportable nuclide criteria. Nuclides in a specific waste stream that screen out as non-reportable under all these criteria may be dropped from ORNL waste tracking. The benefit of these criteria is to ensure that nuclides in a waste stream with activities which meaningfully affect safety and compliance are tracked, while documenting the basis for removing certain isotopes from further consideration. (authors)

  12. Reportable Nuclide Criteria for ORNL Waste Management Activities - 13005

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, Kip; Forrester, Tim; Saunders, Mark Edward

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee generates numerous radioactive waste streams. Many of those streams contain a large number of radionuclides with an extremely broad range of concentrations. To feasibly manage the radionuclide information, ORNL developed a reportable nuclide criteria to distinguish between those nuclides in a waste stream that require waste tracking versus those nuclides of such minimal activity that do not require tracking. The criteria include tracking thresholds drawn from ORNL onsite management requirements, transportation requirements, and relevant treatment and disposal facility acceptance criteria. As a management practice, ORNL maintains waste tracking on a nuclide in a specific waste stream if it exceeds any of the reportable nuclide criteria. Nuclides in a specific waste stream that screen out as non-reportable under all these criteria may be dropped from ORNL waste tracking. The benefit of this criteria is to ensure that nuclides in a waste stream with activities which meaningfully affect safety and compliance are tracked, while documenting the basis for removing certain isotopes from further consideration.

  13. Alpha-emitting nuclides in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentreath, R. J.

    1984-06-01

    The occurrence of alpha-emitting nuclides and their daughter products in the marine environment continues to be a subject of study for many reasons. Those nuclides which occur naturally, in the uranium, thorium and actinium series, are of interest because of their value in determining the rates of geological and geochemical processes in the oceans. Studies of them address such problems as the determination of rates of transfer of particulate matter, deposition rates, bioturbation rates, and so on. Two of the natural alpha-series nuclides in which a different interest has been expressed are 210Po and 226Ra, because their concentrations in marine organisms are such that they contribute to a significant fraction of the background dose rates sustained both by the organisms themselves and by consumers of marine fish and shellfish. To this pool of naturally-occurring nuclides, human activities have added the transuranium nuclides, both from the atmospheric testing of nuclear devices and from the authorized discharges of radioactive wastes into coastal waters and the deep sea. Studies have therefore been made to understand the chemistry of these radionuclides in sea water, their association with sedimentary materials, and their accumulation by marine organisms, the last of these being of particular interest because the transuranics are essentially "novel" elements to the marine fauna and flora. The need to predict the long-term behaviour of these nuclides has, in turn, stimulated research on those naturally-occurring nuclides which may behave in a similar manner.

  14. Nuclide Importance and the Steady-State Burnup Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Nemoto, Atsushi

    2000-05-15

    Conventional methods for evaluating some characteristic values of nuclides relating to burnup in a given neutron spectrum are reviewed in a mathematically systematic way, and a new method based on the importance theory is proposed. In this method, these characteristic values of a nuclide are equivalent to the importances of the nuclide. By solving the equation adjoint to the steady-state burnup equation with a properly chosen source term, the importances for all nuclides are obtained simultaneously.The fission number importance, net neutron importance, fission neutron importance, and absorbed neutron importance are evaluated and discussed. The net neutron importance is a measure directly estimating neutron economy, and it can be evaluated simply by calculating the fission neutron importance minus the absorbed neutron importance, where only the absorbed neutron importance depends on the fission product. The fission neutron importance and absorbed neutron importance are analyzed separately, and detailed discussions of the fission product effects are given for the absorbed neutron importance.

  15. PRODUCTION CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE CLASSICAL PET NUCLIDES.

    SciTech Connect

    FINN,R.; SCHLYER,D.

    2001-06-25

    Nuclear Medicine is the specialty of medical imaging, which utilizes a variety of radionuclides incorporated into specific compounds for diagnostic imaging and therapeutic applications. During recent years, research efforts associated with this discipline have concentrated on the decay characteristics of particular radionuclides and the design of unique radiolabeled tracers necessary to achieve time-dependent molecular images. The specialty is expanding with specific Positron emission tomography (PET) and SPECT radiopharmaceuticals allowing for an extension from functional process imaging in tissue to pathologic processes and nuclide directed treatments. PET is an example of a technique that has been shown to yield the physiologic information necessary for clinical oncology diagnoses based upon altered tissue metabolism. Most PET drugs are currently produced using a cyclotron at locations that are in close proximity to the hospital or academic center at which the radiopharmaceutical will be administered. In November 1997, a law was enacted called the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 which directed the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to establish appropriate procedures for the approval of PET drugs in accordance with section 505 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and to establish current good manufacturing practice requirements for such drugs. At this time the FDA is considering adopting special approval procedures and cGMP requirements for PET drugs. The evolution of PET radiopharmaceuticals has introduced a new class of ''drugs'' requiring production facilities and product formulations that must be closely aligned with the scheduled clinical utilization. The production of the radionuclide in the appropriate synthetic form is but one critical component in the manufacture of the finished radiopharmaceutical.

  16. (The fate of nuclides in natural water systems)

    SciTech Connect

    Turekian, K.K. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1989-01-01

    Our research at Yale on the fate of nuclides in natural water systems has three components to it: the study of the atmospheric precipitation of radionuclides and other chemical species; the study of the behavior of natural radionuclides in groundwater and hydrothermal systems; and understanding the controls on the distribution of radionuclides and stable nuclides in the marine realm. In this section a review of our progress in each of these areas is presented.

  17. Nuclear Properties and Decay Data Chart of Nuclides.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-04-04

    Version 00 NUCHART displays nuclear decay data graphically on a PC and, includes a search routine for assigning gamma-ray energies to radionuclides. The numerical data included in NUCHART were taken from the online database "NUDAT" Version of March 1994. The following information is presented: (1) Nuclide information: for each nuclide, abundance, mass excess, (main) decay mode, half-life and uncertainty, branching ratio, decay Q; (2) decay radiation: for each nuclide, tables of radiation energy, intensity andmore » equivalent dose for the 5 most intense decay radiations of beta+, beta-, conversion electrons, gammas, alphas and x-rays, including electron Augers; (3) adopted gammas: for each nuclide, table containing energy, relative intensity, energy level of the main gamma lines and year of publication in Nuclear Data Sheets; (4) search gamma energies: for a specified interval of gamma energies all know gamma lines and their nuclides are displayed; the database contains 132,000 gamma lines; (5) a search mode by specific nuclide is also available. For the latest data and online tools for viewing the data, see NuDat 2.4 on the NNDC and IAEA NDS websites: http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/ and http://www-nds.iaea.org/.« less

  18. Solar-Cosmic-Ray-Produced Nuclides in Extraterrestrial Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, Robert C.

    2000-01-01

    There are two main types of cosmic rays that have sufficient energy to induce nuclear reactions -- the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar cosmic rays (also called solar energetic particles). Both types of particles can have production rates and production ratios in the small objects often found in cold and hot deserts that are different from those seen for most meteorites, which typically have radii of approx.10-100 centimeters. GCR production rates are often lower than those for most meteorites. GCR production ratios, such as Ne-22/Ne-21, are also often different in small objects. Smaller meteoroids also are more likely to have nuclides made by solar-cosmic-ray (SCR) particles than typically-sized meteorites. The very small meteorite Salem had large amounts of SCR-produced radionuclides. Meteorites recovered in Antarctica are more likely to contain SCR-produced nuclides than other meteorites. Martian and lunar meteorites are also likely to have SCR-produced nuclides. Production rates and profiles for SCR-produced nuclides in meteoroids have been calculated previously. However, the cross sections for the nuclear reactions making many SCR-produced nuclides, such as Be-10, were not well measured then. New rates and profiles are calculated here using good cross sections for the reactions making these nuclides.

  19. Solar-Cosmic-Ray-Produced Nuclides in Extraterrestrial Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, Robert C.

    1999-01-01

    There are two main types of cosmic rays that have sufficient energy to induce nuclear reactions -- the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar cosmic rays (also called solar energetic particles). Both types of particles can have production rates and production ratios in the small objects often found in cold and hot deserts that are different from those seen for most meteorites, which typically have radii of approx. 10-100 centimeters. GCR production rates are often lower than those for most meteorites. GCR production ratios, such as Ne-22/Ne-21, are also often different in small objects. Smaller meteoroids also are more likely to have nuclides made by solar-cosmic-ray (SCR) particles than typically-sized meteorites. The very small meteorite Salem had large amounts of SCR-produced radionuclides. Meteorites recovered in Antarctica are more likely to contain SCR-produced nuclides than other meteorites. Martian and lunar meteorites are also likely to have SCR-produced nuclides. Production rates and profiles for SCR-produced nuclides in meteoroids have been calculated previously. However, the cross sections for the nuclear reactions making many SCR-produced nuclides, such as Be-10 were not well measured then. New rates and profiles are calculated here using good cross sections for the reactions making these nuclides.

  20. Initial Test Determination of Cosmogenic Nuclides in Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, H.; Caffee, M. W.; Nagao, K.; Nishiizumi, K.

    2014-12-01

    Long-lived radionuclides, such as 10Be, 26Al, and 36Cl, are produced by cosmic rays in surficial materials on Earth, and used for determinations of cosmic-ray exposure ages and erosion rates. Quartz and limestone are routinely used as the target minerals for these geomorphological studies. Magnetite also contains target elements that produce abundant cosmogenic nuclides when exposed to the cosmic rays. Magnetite has several notable merits that enable the measurement of cosmogenic nuclides: (1) the target elements for production of cosmogenic nuclides in magnetite comprise the dominant mineral form of magnetite, Fe3O4; (2) magnetite can be easily isolated, using a magnet, after rock milling; (3) multiple cosmogenic nuclides are produced by exposure of magnetite to cosmic-ray secondaries; and (4) cosmogenic nuclides produced in the rock containing the magnetite, but not within the magnetite itself, can be separated using nitric acid and sodium hydroxide leaches. As part of this initial study, magnetite was separated from a basaltic sample collected from the Atacama Desert in Chili (2,995 m). Then Be, Al, Cl, Ca, and Mn were separated from ~2 g of the purified magnetite. We measured cosmogenic 10Be, 26Al, and 36Cl concentrations in the magnetite by accelerator mass spectrometry at PRIME Lab, Purdue University. Cosmogenic 3He and 21Ne concentrations of aliquot of the magnetite were measured by mass spectrometry at the University of Tokyo. We also measured the nuclide concentrations from magnetite collected from a mine at Ishpeming, Michigan as a blank. The 10Be and 36Cl concentrations as well as 3He concentration produce concordant cosmic ray exposure ages of ~0.4 Myr for the Atacama basalt. However, observed high 26Al and 21Ne concentrations attribute to those nuclides incorporation from silicate impurity.

  1. Variable temperature effects on release rates of readily soluble nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.-L.; Light, W.B.; Lee, W.W.-L.; Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1988-09-01

    In this paper we study the effect of temperature on the release rate of readily soluble nuclides, as affected by a time-temperature dependent diffusion coefficient. In this analysis ground water fills the voids in the waste package at t = 0 and one percent of the inventories of cesium and iodine are immediately dissolved into the void water. Mass transfer resistance of partly failed container and cladding is conservatively neglected. The nuclides move through the void space into the surrounding rock under a concentration gradient. We use an analytic solution to compute the nuclide concentration in the gap or void, and the mass flux rate into the porous rock. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Shielding and activity estimator for template-based nuclide identification methods

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Karl Einar

    2013-04-09

    According to one embodiment, a method for estimating an activity of one or more radio-nuclides includes receiving one or more templates, the one or more templates corresponding to one or more radio-nuclides which contribute to a probable solution, receiving one or more weighting factors, each weighting factor representing a contribution of one radio-nuclide to the probable solution, computing an effective areal density for each of the one more radio-nuclides, computing an effective atomic number (Z) for each of the one more radio-nuclides, computing an effective metric for each of the one or more radio-nuclides, and computing an estimated activity for each of the one or more radio-nuclides. In other embodiments, computer program products, systems, and other methods are presented for estimating an activity of one or more radio-nuclides.

  3. Regular Cosmogenic Nuclide Dosing of Sediment Moving Down Desert Piedmonts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, K. K.; Bierman, P. R.; Hooke, R. L.; Eppes, M. C.; Persico, L.; Caffee, M.; Finkel, R.

    2001-12-01

    Low-gradient alluvial piedmonts are common in desert areas throughout the world; however, long-term rates of processes that modify these landscapes are poorly understood. Using cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al, we attempt to quantify the long-term (>103 y) behavior of desert piedmonts in Southern California. We measured the activity of 10Be and 26Al in three samples of drainage basin alluvium and six amalgamated samples from transects spaced at 1-km intervals down a piedmont in Fort Irwin, Mojave Desert, California. Each transect sample consists of sediment from 21 collection sites spaced at 150 m intervals. Such sampling averages the variability of nuclide activity between sub-sample locations and thus gives a long-term dosing history of sediment as it is transported from uplands to the distal piedmont. The piedmont is heavily used during military training exercises during which hundreds of wheeled and tracked vehicles traverse the surface. The piedmont surface is planar, and fan-head incision is minimal at the rangefront decreasing to zero between the first and second transects, 1.5 km from the rangefront. 10Be activity increases steadily from 5.87 X 105 atoms g-1 at the rangefront to 1.02 X 6 atoms g-1 at the piedmont bottom. Nuclide activity and distance are well correlated (r2 = 0.95) suggesting that sediment is dosed uniformly as it is transported down piedmont. We have measured similar increases in nuclide activity in transect samples collected from two other Mojave Desert piedmonts, those fringing the Iron and Granite Mountains (Nichols et al, in press, Geomorphology). These piedmonts have nuclide activities that also correlate well with distance (r2 = 0.98 and 0.96, respectively) from their rangefronts, but nuclides increase at a lower rate down piedmont. Modeled sediment transport speeds for the Iron and Granite Mountain piedmonts are decimeters per year. The regular increase in nuclide activities down three different Mojave Desert piedmonts suggests that

  4. Radio-nuclide mixture identification using medium energy resolution detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Karl Einar

    2013-09-17

    According to one embodiment, a method for identifying radio-nuclides includes receiving spectral data, extracting a feature set from the spectral data comparable to a plurality of templates in a template library, and using a branch and bound method to determine a probable template match based on the feature set and templates in the template library. In another embodiment, a device for identifying unknown radio-nuclides includes a processor, a multi-channel analyzer, and a memory operatively coupled to the processor, the memory having computer readable code stored thereon. The computer readable code is configured, when executed by the processor, to receive spectral data, to extract a feature set from the spectral data comparable to a plurality of templates in a template library, and to use a branch and bound method to determine a probable template match based on the feature set and templates in the template library.

  5. Measurements of cosmogenic nuclides in lunar rock 64455

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. R.; Kohl, C. P.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.; Finkel, R. C.; Southon, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    Eleven samples were ground from the glass coated surface of lunar rock 64455,82 with an average depth resolution of 50 microns and were measured for Be-10, Al-26, and Cl-36 using AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry). Results show no evidence of SCR (solar cosmic ray) effects. The flat cosmogenic nuclide profiles and activity levels are consistent with a 2 My exposure history for the rock and a sample location on the bottom of the rock. These AMS measurements are some of the most precise ever obtained for these three nuclides. This precision and the demonstrated fine depth resolution will enable us to conduct a number of detailed studies of depth effects in lunar and meteoritic samples, including investigating SCR effects in the surface exposed top of the glass coating of 64455 and possibly in the underlying rock.

  6. Production rates of terrestrial in-situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.; Tuniz, C.; Fink, D.

    1993-12-31

    Production rates of cosmogenic nuclides made in situ in terrestrial samples and how they are applied to the interpretation of measured radionuclide concentrations were discussed at a one-day Workshop held 2 October 1993 in Sydney, Australia. The status of terrestrial in-situ studies using the long-lived radionuclides {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, and {sup 41}Ca and of various modeling and related studies were presented. The relative uncertainties in the various factors that go into the interpretation of these terrestrial in-situ cosmogenic nuclides were discussed. The magnitudes of the errors for these factors were estimated and none dominated the final uncertainty.

  7. Simulations of Terrestrial in-situ Cosmogenic-Nuclide Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Lal, D.; Arnold, J. R.; Englert, P. A. J.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.; Jull, A. J. T.; Donahue, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    Targets of silicon and silicon dioxide were irradiated with spallation neutrons to simulate the production of long-lived radionuclides in the surface of the Earth. Gamma-ray spectroscopy was used to measure Be-7 and Na-22, and accelerator mass spectrometry was used to measure Be-10, C-14, and Al-26. The measured ratios of these nuclides are compared with calculated ratios and with ratios from other simulations and agree well with ratios inferred from terrestrial samples.

  8. Hot demonstration of proposed commercial nuclide removal technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.

    1996-10-01

    This task covers the development and operation of an experimental test unit located in a Building 4501 hot cell within Building 4501 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This equipment is designed to test radionuclides removal technologies under continuous operatoin on actual ORNL Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) supernatant, Savannah River high-level waste supernatant, and Hanford supernatant. The latter two may be simulated by adding the appropriate chemicals and/or nuclides to the MVST supernatant.

  9. Nuclear fission of neutron-deficient protactinium nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Nishinaka, I.; Nagame, Y.; Tsukada, K.; Ikezoe, H.; Sueki, K.; Nakahara, H.; Tanikawa, M.; Ohtsuki, T.

    1997-08-01

    Fragment velocity, kinetic energy, mass yield, and element yield distributions in the fission of neutron-deficient Pa isotopes produced in the reactions of {sup 16}O and {sup 18}O on {sup 209}Bi have been measured at incident beam energies near and above the Coulomb barriers by the time-of-flight and radiochemical methods. An asymmetric mass-division component has been observed. Measured fission cross sections were compared with the results of statistical model calculations which take into account two fission barrier heights for symmetric and asymmetric yields. The fission barrier height deduced for the asymmetric fission is found slightly lower than that for the symmetric one. The difference between the two barrier heights in the fission of the present protactinium nuclides (N{approximately}135) is considerably smaller than that in the neutron-rich nuclide of {sup 233}Pa (N{approximately}142), indicating that the difference sensitively depends on the neutron number of the fissioning nuclide. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Atomic Mass Measurements of Stable and Unstable Nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyck, Gary Robert

    1990-01-01

    This work describes three experiments in which precise atomic mass differences are determined by the technique of high resolution mass spectrometry. The Manitoba II mass spectrometer has been used to measure precise differences, involving naturally occurring nuclides, in two distinct studies, both of which have implications for the current work related to the question of neutrino mass. The first is a set of 6 doublet measurements in the Gd-Tb region, which show that the decay energy of 1220.64 +/- 0.83 keV is insufficient to allow the K-capture decay of ^{158} Tb to the 1187 keV level of ^{158 }Gd, which was proposed as a possible candidate for low energy beta decay in which the effect of a nu mass would be clearly seen. The second study is one in which 4 doublet spacings were determined in order to provide precise Q_ {2beta} values for the decays of ^{130}Te and ^{128}Te, which have long been of interest because they represent similar decays where the Q-values are significantly different. In a third experiment the Chalk River on-line isotope separator (ISOL) has been used to determine the masses of unstable nuclides. The tandem Van de Graaff accelerator was used to produce ^{105 }In, ^{104}In and ^{103}In which were then studied with the ISOL. This represents only the second time that masses of nuclides far from stability, other than alkali metals, have been determined directly.

  11. Factors affecting production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in extraterrestrial matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reedy, R. C.

    2015-10-01

    Good production rates are needed for cosmic-ray-produced nuclides to interpret their measurements. Rates depend on many factors, especially the pre-atmospheric object's size, the location of the sample in that object (such as near surface or deep inside), and the object's bulk composition. The bulk composition affects rates, especially in objects with very low and very high iron contents. Extraterrestrial materials with high iron contents usually have higher rates for making nuclides made by reactions with energetic particles and lower rates for the capture of thermal neutrons. In small objects and near the surface of objects, the cascade of secondary neutrons is being developed as primary particles are being removed. Deep in large objects, that secondary cascade is fully developed and the fluxes of primary particles are low. Recent work shows that even the shape of an object in space has a small but measureable effect. Work has been done and continues to be done on better understanding those and other factors. More good sets of measurements in meteorites with known exposure geometries in space are needed. With the use of modern Monte Carlo codes for the production and transport of particles, the nature of these effects have been and is being studied. Work needs to be done to improve the results of these calculations, especially the cross sections for making spallogenic nuclides.

  12. Recent developments in cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    A new cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling model based on analytical fits to Monte Carlo simulations of atmospheric cosmic ray flux spectra (both of which agree well with measured spectra) enables identification and quantification of the biases in previously published models (Lifton, N., Sato, T., Dunai, T., in review, Earth and Planet. Sci. Lett.). Scaling predictions derived from the new model (termed LSD) suggest two potential sources of bias in the previous models: different energy responses of the secondary neutron detectors used in developing the models, and different geomagnetic parameterizations. In addition, the particle flux spectra generated by the LSD model allow one to generate nuclide-specific scaling factors that reflect the influences of the flux energy distribution and the relevant excitation functions (probability of nuclide production in a given nuclear reaction as a function of energy). Resulting scaling factors indicate 3He shows the strongest positive deviation from the flux-based scaling, while 14C exhibits a negative deviation. These results are consistent with previous studies showing an increasing 3He/10Be ratio with altitude in the Himalayas, but with a much lower magnitude for the effect. Furthermore, the new model provides a flexible framework for exploring the implications of future advances in model inputs. For example, the effects of recently updated paleomagnetic models (e.g. Korte et al., 2011, Earth and Planet Sci. Lett. 312, 497-505) on scaling predictions will also be presented.

  13. Notre Dame Nuclear Database: A New Chart of Nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kevin; Khouw, Timothy; Fasano, Patrick; Mumpower, Matthew; Aprahamian, Ani

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear data is critical to research fields from medicine to astrophysics. We are creating a database, the Notre Dame Nuclear Database, which can store theoretical and experimental datasets. We place emphasis on storing metadata and user interaction with the database. Users are able to search in addition to the specific nuclear datum, the author(s), the facility where the measurements were made, the institution of the facility, and device or method/technique used. We also allow users to interact with the database by providing online search, an interactive nuclide chart, and a command line interface. The nuclide chart is a more descriptive version of the periodic table that can be used to visualize nuclear properties such as half-lives and mass. We achieve this by using D3 (Data Driven Documents), HTML, and CSS3 to plot the nuclides and color them accordingly. Search capabilities can be applied dynamically to the chart by using Python to communicate with MySQL, allowing for customization. Users can save the customized chart they create to any image format. These features provide a unique approach for researchers to interface with nuclear data. We report on the current progress of this project and will present a working demo that highlights each aspect of the aforementioned features. This is the first time that all available technologies are put to use to make nuclear data more accessible than ever before in a manner that is much easier and fully detailed. This is a first and we will make it available as open source ware.

  14. Band structure of odd-mass lanthanum nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Deepti; Verma, Preeti; Singh, Suram; Bharti, Arun; Khosa, S. K.

    2014-04-01

    Negative parity energy states in 121-131La have been studied using Projected Shell Model (PSM). Some nuclear structure properties like yrast spectra, back-bending in moment of inertia, reduced transition probabilities and band diagrams have been described. The experimental feature of the co-existence of prolate-oblate shapes in 125-131La isotopes has been satisfactorily explained by PSM results. Comparison of the theoretical data with their experimental counterparts has also been made. From the calculations, it is found that the yrast states arise because of multi-quasiparticle states.

  15. ICoN, the Interactive Chart of Nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kevin; Mumpower, Matthew; Aprahamian, Ani

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear data is critical to research fields from medicine to astrophysics. The chart of nuclides is a more descriptive version of the periodic table that can be used to visualize nuclear properties such as half-lives and mass. We have created ICoN (simply short for Interactive Chart of Nuclides), an API which can be used to visualize theoretical and experimental datasets. This visualization is achieved by using D3 (Data Driven Documents), HTML, and CSS3 to plot the elements and color them accordingly. ICoN features many customization options that users can access that are dynamically applied to the chart without reloading the page. Users can save the customized chart they create to various formats. We have constructed these features in order to provide a unique approach for researchers to interface with nuclear data. ICoN can also be used on all electronic devices without loss of support. We report on the current progress of this project and will present a working demo that highlights each aspect of the aforementioned features. This is the first time that all available technologies are put to use to make nuclear data more accessible than ever before. This is a first and we will make it available as open source ware.

  16. Interpolations of nuclide-specific scattering kernels generated with Serpent

    SciTech Connect

    Scopatz, A.; Schneider, E.

    2012-07-01

    The neutron group-to-group scattering cross section is an essential input parameter for any multi-energy group physics model. However, if the analyst prefers to use Monte Carlo transport to generate group constants this data is difficult to obtain for a single species of a material. Here, the Monte Carlo code Serpent was modified to return the group transfer probabilities on a per-nuclide basis. This ability is demonstrated in conjunction with an essential physics reactor model where cross section perturbations are used to dynamically generate reactor state dependent group constants via interpolation from pre-computed libraries. The modified version of Serpent was therefore verified with three interpolation cases designed to test the resilience of the interpolation scheme to changes in intra-group fluxes. For most species, interpolation resulted in errors of less than 5% of transport-computed values. For important scatterers, such as {sup 1}H, errors less than 2% were observed. For nuclides with high errors ( > 10%), the scattering channel typically only had a small probability of occurring. (authors)

  17. Forbush decreases geomagnetic and atmospheric effects cosmogenic nuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flueckiger, E. O.

    1986-01-01

    An overview and synthesis is given of recent developments that have occurred in the areas of Forbush decreases, geomagnetic and atmospheric effects, and cosmogenic nuclides. Experimental evidence has been found for substantial differences in the effects of the various types of interplanetary perturbations on cosmic rays, and for a dependence of these effects on the three-dimensional configuration of the interplanetary medium. In order to fully understand and to be able to simulate the solar cosmic ray particle access to the polar regions of the earth we need accurate models of the magnetospheric magnetic field. These models must include all major magnetospheric current systems (in particular the field aligned currents), and they should represent magnetically quiet time periods as well as different levels of geomagnetic activity. In the evolution of magnetospheric magnetic field models, cosmic ray and magnetospheric physicists should work closely together since cosmic ray measurements are a powerful additional tool in the study of the perturbed magnetosphere. In the field of cosmogenic nuclides, finally, exciting new results and developments follow in rapid succession. Thanks to new techniques and new isotopes the analysis of cosmic ray history has entered into a new dimension.

  18. Calculation of the minimum critical mass of fissile nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, R Q; Hopper, Calvin Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    The OB-1 method for the calculation of the minimum critical mass of fissile actinides in metal/water systems was described in a previous paper. A fit to the calculated minimum critical mass data using the extended criticality parameter is the basis of the revised method. The solution density (grams/liter) for the minimum critical mass is also obtained by a fit to calculated values. Input to the calculation consists of the Maxwellian averaged fission and absorption cross sections and the thermal values of nubar. The revised method gives more accurate values than the original method does for both the minimum critical mass and the solution densities. The OB-1 method has been extended to calculate the uncertainties in the minimum critical mass for 12 different fissile nuclides. The uncertainties for the fission and capture cross sections and the estimated nubar uncertainties are used to determine the uncertainties in the minimum critical mass, either in percent or grams. Results have been obtained for U-233, U-235, Pu-236, Pu-239, Pu-241, Am-242m, Cm-243, Cm-245, Cf-249, Cf-251, Cf-253, and Es-254. Eight of these 12 nuclides are included in the ANS-8.15 standard.

  19. Significance of the effect of mineral alteration of nuclide migration

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Takashi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Isobe, Hiroshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Yanase, Nobuyuki; Kimura, Hideo

    1994-12-31

    In order to clarify the effect of mineral alteration on nuclide migration, we examined the processes, mechanisms, and kinetics of chlorite weathering, and the uranium concentrations in minerals and rocks at Koongarra, Australia. The observed concentrations of uranium in rocks were compared to those calculated. The sequence of chlorite weathering may be simply expressed as a chlorite {yields} vermiculite {yields} kaolinite conversion. These minerals occur as a function of depth, which corresponds well to uranium concentrations on the meter scale. Iron minerals, closely related to the uranium redistribution, are released during the weathering. The first-order kinetic model of the weathering process suggests that the weathering rate is not constant but time-dependent. The uranium concentrations are qualitatively proportional to the extent of the weathering, the weathered part having higher uranium concentration. Uranium mainly occurs with iron minerals, and sub micron sized saleeite, a uranyl phosphate, is one of the most probable uranyl phases associated with the iron minerals. The uranium fixation mechanisms are probably saleeite microcrystal coprecipitation and sorption to the iron minerals. Our model, which describes uranium concentrations in rocks as a function of time, shows that the transition zone (a vermiculite dominant area) plays an important role in the uranium migration. We have established that weathering of chlorite has affected the redistribution of uranium for more than one million years. The present study demonstrates the significance of mineral alteration when we estimate nuclide migration for geologic time.

  20. Penning trap mass measurements of nuclides along the astrophysical rp- and νp- process paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Jason

    2009-10-01

    X-ray bursters and supernovae are examples of explosive stellar phenomena in which nuclides are quickly produced in great quantities. Observed as x-ray bursts, thermonuclear runaways on the surface of neutron stars accreting material from its binary star companion create elements by a nucleosynthetic procoess which involves a series of rapid proton-capture reactions, termed the rp process. The timescale, nuclides produced, and energy released during the rp process are very sensitive to delays encountered at waiting-point nuclides, nuclides in which their slow β decay is more probable than net proton capture. A possible mechanism to bypass the waiting-point nuclides is through the νp process, in which (n,p) and (n,γ) reactions on the waiting-point nuclides, in addition to the proton-capture reactions, are possible. Supernovae are possible sites for the νp process as the proton-rich ejecta can absorb antineutrinos to produce the required free neutrons. It is this νp process which may resolve the long-standing discrepancy between the observed and predicted abundances of ^92Mo and ^94Mo. Proton-capture Q values of nuclides along the rp- and νp- process paths are required to accurately model the nucleosynthesis, especially at the waiting-point nuclides. In recent years, Penning traps have become the preferred tool to make precise mass measurements of stable and unstable nuclides. To make the best use of these devices in measuring the masses of radioactive nuclides, systems have been developed to quickly, cleanly, and efficiently transport the short-lived, weakly produced nuclides to the Penning traps. This talk will discuss the rp and νp nucleosynthetic processes and will highlight the precise Penning trap mass measurements of nuclides along these process paths.

  1. Bridging the timescales between thermochronological and cosmogenic nuclide data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glotzbach, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructing the evolution of Earth's landscape is a key to understand its future evolution and to identify the driving forces that shape Earth's surface. Cosmogenic nuclide and thermochronological methods are routinely used to quantify Earth surface processes over 102-104 yr and 106-107 yr, respectively (e.g. Lal 1991; Reiners and Ehlers 2005; von Blanckenburg 2006). A comparison of the rates of surface processes derived from these methods is, however, hampered by the large difference in their timescales. For instance, a constant erosion rate of 0.1 mm/yr yield an apatite (U-Th)/He age of ~24 Ma and a 10Be age of ~6 ka, respectively. Analytical methods that bridge this time gap are on the way, but are not yet fully established (e.g. Herman et al. 2010). A ready to use alternative are river profiles, which record the regional uplift history over 102-107 yr (e.g. Pritchard et al. 2009). Changes in uplift are retained in knickzones that propagate with a distinct velocity upstream, and therefore the time of an uplift event can be estimated. Here I present an integrative inverse modelling approach to simultaneously reconstruct river profiles, model thermochronological and cosmogenic nuclide data and to derive robust information about landscape evolution over thousands to millions of years. An efficient inversion routine is used to solve the forward problem and find the best uplift history and erosional parameters that reproduce the observed data. I test the performance of the algorithm by inverting a synthetic dataset and a dataset from the Sila massif (Italy). Results show that even complicated uplift histories can be reliably retrieved by the combined interpretation of river profiles, thermochronological and cosmogenic nuclide data. References Gallagher, K., Brown, R. & Johnson, C. (1998): Fission track analysis and its applications to geological problems. - Annu. Rev. Earth Planet., 26: 519-572. Herman, F., Rhodes, E.J., Braun, J. & Heiniger, L. (2010): Uniform

  2. Nuclides.net: A Web-Based Environment for Nuclear Data and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Galy, J.; Magill, J.

    2005-05-24

    An interactive multimedia tool, Nuclides.net, has been developed at the Institute for Transuranium Elements. The Nuclides.net 'integrated environment' is a suite of computer programs ranging from a powerful user-friendly interface, which allows the user to navigate the nuclides chart and explore the properties of nuclides, to various computational modules. Through this powerful interface, the user can access a wide variety of nuclear data including, e.g., radioactive decay data, cross sections, fission yields, etc. from international recognized sources.

  3. From the HINDAS Project: Excitation Functions for Residual Nuclide Production by Proton-Induced Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, R.; Gloris, M.; Protoschill, J.; Uosif, M.A.M.; Weug, M.; Herpers, U.; Kuhnhenn, J.; Kubik, P.-W.; Schumann, D.; Synal, H.-A.; Weinreich, R.; Leya, I.; David, J.C.; Leray, S.; Duijvestijn, M.; Koning, A.; Kelic, A.; Schmidt, K.H.; Cugnon, J.

    2005-05-24

    A survey is given about efforts undertaken during the HINDAS project to investigate the energy dependence of residual nuclide production by proton-induced reactions from thresholds up to 2.6 GeV. For proton-induced reactions, our experiments aimed to further develop and complete the cross-section database that was established by our collaboration in recent years. It was extended to the heavy-target elements Ta, W, Pb, and Bi for energies up to 2.6 GeV. In addition, new measurements for the target element iron were performed up to 2.6 GeV and for natural uranium for energies from 21 MeV to 69 MeV. For the target element lead, a comprehensive set of excitation functions published recently was completed by AMS-measurements of cross sections for the production of the long-lived radionuclides Be-10, Al-26, Cl-36, and I-129 and by mass spectrometric measurements for stable and radioactive rare gas isotopes of He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. Comprehensive tests of the nuclear-reaction codes TALYS and INCL4+ABLA, which were developed within the HINDAS project, were performed with the new experimental results over the entire energy range.

  4. Observation of the 3n evaporation channel in the complete hot-fusion reaction 26Mg + 248Cm leading to the new superheavy nuclide 271Hs.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, J; Brüchle, W; Chelnokov, M; Düllmann, Ch E; Dvorakova, Z; Eberhardt, K; Jäger, E; Krücken, R; Kuznetsov, A; Nagame, Y; Nebel, F; Nishio, K; Perego, R; Qin, Z; Schädel, M; Schausten, B; Schimpf, E; Schuber, R; Semchenkov, A; Thörle, P; Türler, A; Wegrzecki, M; Wierczinski, B; Yakushev, A; Yeremin, A

    2008-04-01

    The analysis of a large body of heavy ion fusion reaction data with medium-heavy projectiles (6 < or = Z < or = 18) and actinide targets suggests a disappearance of the 3n exit channel with increasing atomic number of the projectile. Here, we report a measurement of the excitation function of the reaction (248)Cm ((26)Mg,xn)(274-x)Hs and the observation of the new nuclide (271)Hs produced in the 3n evaporation channel at a beam energy well below the Bass fusion barrier with a cross section comparable to the maxima of the 4n and 5n channels. This indicates the possible discovery of new neutron-rich transactinide nuclei using relatively light heavy ion beams of the most neutron-rich stable isotopes and actinide targets. PMID:18517941

  5. Chemistry of heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1988-10-01

    The use of heavy ions to induce nuclear reactions was reported as early as 1950. Since that time it has been one of the most active areas of nuclear research. Intense beams of ions as heavy as uranium with energies high enough to overcome the Coulomb barriers of even the heaviest elements are available. The wide variety of possible reactions gives rise to a multitude of products which have been studied by many ingenious chemical and physical techniques. Chemical techniques have been of special value for the separation and unequivocal identification of low yield species from the plethora of other nuclides present. Heavy ion reactions have been essential for the production of the trans-Md elements and a host of new isotopes. The systematics of compound nucleus reactions, transfer reactions, and deeply inelastic reactions have been elucidated using chemical techniques. A review of the variety of chemical procedures and techniques which have been developed for the study of heavy ion reactions and their products is given. Determination of the chemical properties of the trans-Md elements, which are very short-lived and can only be produced an ''atom-at-a-time'' via heavy ion reactions, is discussed. 53 refs., 19 figs.

  6. Excited states in the proton-unbound nuclide 158Ta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, R. J.; Page, R. D.; Joss, D. T.; O'Donnell, D.; Uusitalo, J.; Darby, I. G.; Andgren, K.; Auranen, K.; Bönig, S.; Cederwall, B.; Doncel, M.; Drummond, M. C.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Grahn, T.; Gray-Jones, C.; Greenlees, P. T.; Hadinia, B.; HerzáÅ, A.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Konki, J.; Kröll, T.; Leino, M.; Leppänen, A.-P.; McPeake, C.; Nyman, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Partanen, J.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Revill, J.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Sayǧi, B.; Scholey, C.; Seweryniak, D.; Simpson, J.; Sorri, J.; Stolze, S.; Taylor, M. J.; Thornthwaite, A.

    2016-03-01

    Excited states in the neutron-deficient odd-odd proton-unbound nuclide 158Ta have been investigated in two separate experiments. In the first experiment, 166Ir nuclei were produced in the reactions of 380 MeV 78Kr ions with an isotopically enriched 92Mo target. The α -decay chain of the 9+ state in 166Ir was analyzed. Fine structure in the α decay of the 9+ state in 162Re established a 66 keV difference in excitation energy between the lowest-lying 9+ and 10+ states in 158Ta. Higher-lying states in 158Ta were populated in the reactions of 255 MeV 58Ni ions with an isotopically enriched 102Pd target. Gamma-ray decay paths that populate, depopulate, and bypass a 19- isomeric state have been identified. The general features of the deduced level scheme are discussed and the prospects for observing proton emission branches from excited states are considered.

  7. Modified microspheres for cleaning liquid wastes from radioactive nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Danilin, Lev; Drozhzhin, Valery

    2007-07-01

    An effective solution of nuclear industry problems related to deactivation of technological and natural waters polluted with toxic and radioactive elements is the development of inorganic sorbents capable of not only withdrawing radioactive nuclides, but also of providing their subsequent conservation under conditions of long-term storage. A successful technical approach to creation of sorbents can be the use of hollow aluminosilicate microspheres. Such microspheres are formed from mineral additives during coal burning in furnaces of boiler units of electric power stations. Despite some reduction in exchange capacity per a mass unit of sorbents the latter have high kinetic characteristics that makes it possible to carry out the sorption process both in static and dynamic modes. Taking into account large industrial resources of microspheres as by-products of electric power stations, a comparative simplicity of the modification process, as well as good kinetic and capacitor characteristics, this class of sorbents can be considered promising enough for solving the problems of cleaning liquid radioactive wastes of various pollution levels. (authors)

  8. Engineering refinements to overcome default nuclide regulatory constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, R.; Capitelli, P.; Sheh, Y.; Lom, C.; Graham, M.; Germain, J. St.

    2005-12-01

    The "classical" positron emitting radionuclides include oxygen-15, nitrogen-13 and carbon-11 which possess unique properties for medical imaging. They are radionuclides of the fundamental elements of biological matter. They each possess short half-lives which allow their use in designed radiotracers for clinical investigations with minimal risk and they are readily able to be produced in sufficient activities by low energy nuclear reactions. At present several accelerator manufacturers offer production packages for these radionuclides emphasizing targetry with consideration of the cyclotron extracted energies for nuclide production and on-line chemistry systems for the continuous production of specific precursors or radiotracers. Following the installation and acceptance of the MSKCC TR 19/9 Cyclotron, our experience with the procured chemistry module for the preparation of oxygen-15 labeled water has forced us to examine the design and the operation of the synthetic unit with a view toward the state of New York's regulations addressing the environmental pollution from radioactive materials. The chemistry module was refined with subtle modifications to the chemistry procedure/unit and our experience with the unit is presented as an example of our approach to insure regulatory compliance.

  9. Production and Recoil Loss of Cosmogenic Nuclides in Presolar Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trappitsch, Reto; Leya, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Presolar grains are small particles that condensed in the vicinity of dying stars. Some of these grains survived the voyage through the interstellar medium (ISM) and were incorporated into meteorite parent bodies at the formation of the Solar System. An important question is when these stellar processes happened, i.e., how long presolar grains were drifting through the ISM. While conventional radiometric dating of such small grains is very difficult, presolar grains are irradiated with galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) in the ISM, which induce the production of cosmogenic nuclides. This opens the possibility to determine cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) ages, i.e., how long presolar grains were irradiated in the ISM. Here, we present a new model for the production and loss of cosmogenic 3He, 6,7Li, and 21,22Ne in presolar SiC grains. The cosmogenic production rates are calculated using a state-of-the-art nuclear cross-section database and a GCR spectrum in the ISM consistent with recent Voyager data. Our findings are that previously measured 3He and 21Ne CRE ages agree within the (sometimes large) 2σ uncertainties and that the CRE ages for most presolar grains are smaller than the predicted survival times. The obtained results are relatively robust since interferences from implanted low-energy GCRs into the presolar SiC grains and/or from cosmogenic production within the meteoroid can be neglected.

  10. The concentration of short-lived spontaneously fissioning nuclides from iron-manganes nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, O. D.

    2016-03-01

    The paper reports on the observation of the spontaneously fissioning nuclides as a result of hydrochemical and high-temperature processing of iron-manganese nodules. The spontaneous fission in the samples obtained was measured by the track method using electrochemical etching, and nuclides with T 1/2 = 15 d, T 1/2 = 25 d that is similar in chemical properties to Os and T 1/2 = 62 d, (similar in chemical properties to Pb and Ra) were detected. The content of the parent nuclide in iron-manganese nodules corresponds to 4 × 10-14-8 × 10-14 g/g.

  11. Phase II Nuclide Partition Laboratory Study Influence of Cellulose Degradation Products on the Transport of Nuclides from SRS Shallow Land Burial Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Serkiz, S.M.

    1999-10-04

    Degradation products of cellulosic materials (e.g., paper and wood products) can significantly influence the subsurface transport of metals and radionuclides. Codisposal of radionuclides with cellulosic materials in the E-Area slit trenches at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is, therefore, expected to influence nuclide fate and transport in the subsurface. Due to the complexities of these systems and the scarcity of site-specific data, the effects of cellulose waste loading and its subsequent influence on nuclide transport are not well established.

  12. Recommended Partition Coefficient (Kd) Values for Nuclide Partitioning in the Presence of Cellulose Degradation Products

    SciTech Connect

    Serkiz, S.M.

    2001-02-23

    This report documents the data analysis of the results of the described laboratory studies in order to recommend Kd values for use in Performance Assessment modeling of nuclide transport in the presence of CDP.

  13. (1) Selective separation and solidification of radioactive nuclides by zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimura, Hitoshi; Sato, Nobuaki; Kirishima, Akira

    Massive tsunami generated by the Great East Japan Earthquake attacked the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant and caused the nuclear accident of level 7 to overturn the safety myth of the nuclear power generation. The domestic worst accident does not yet reach the convergence, and many inhabitants around the power plant are forced to double pains of earthquake disaster and nuclear accident. Large amounts of high-activity-level water over 200,000 tons are accumulated on the basement floor of each turbine building, which is a serious obstacle to take measures for the nuclear accident. For the decontamination of high-activity-level water containing seawater, the inorganic ion-exchangers having high selectivity are effective especially for the selective removal of radioactive Cs. On the other hand, radioactive Cs and I released into the atmosphere from the power plant spread widely around Fukushima prefecture, and the decontamination of rainwater and soil become the urgent problem. At present, passing about four months after nuclear accident, the radioactive nuclides of 137Cs and 134Cs are mainly contained in the high-activity-level water and the selective adsorbents for radioactive Cs play an important part in the decontamination. Since the construction of original decontamination system is an urgent necessity, selective separation methods using inorganic ion-exchangers are greatly expected. From the viewpoint of cost efficiency and high Cs-selectivity, natural zeolites are effective for the decontamination of radioactive Cs. This special issue deals with the selective separation and solidification of radioactive Cs and Sr using zeolites.

  14. Measurements of Cosmogenic Nuclides in and their Significance for Samples Returned from Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Herzog, G. F.; Reedy, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear interactions of cosmic rays with matter produce cosmogenic nuclides (CNs). Ever since they were first measured nearly 50 years ago, cosmogenic nuclides have been used to infer the irradiation histories of terrestrial and extraterrestrial materials. Here we call for an extension of such measurements to samples returned from an asteroidal surface. The information gained in this way will be important for elucidating the evolution of the asteroidal surface. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Investigation of Naturally Occurring Radio Nuclides in Shir-kuh Granites

    SciTech Connect

    Mazarei, Mohammad Mehdi; Zarei, Mojtaba

    2011-12-26

    One of the principle natural radiation resources is Granite which can be dangerous for human because of its radiations. Based on this fact, in this research we attempt to specify the activity amount of these natural radio nuclides, existing in Shir-kuh Granite of Yazd state. To specify the activity amount of this natural radio nuclides, it has been applied the measurement method of Gamma spectroscopy using high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector.

  16. Investigation of Naturally Occurring Radio Nuclides in Shir-kuh Granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazarei, Mohammad Mehdi; Zarei, Mojtaba

    2011-12-01

    One of the principle natural radiation resources is Granite which can be dangerous for human because of its radiations. Based on this fact, in this research we attempt to specify the activity amount of these natural radio nuclides, existing in Shir-kuh Granite of Yazd state. To specify the activity amount of this natural radio nuclides, it has been applied the measurement method of Gamma spectroscopy using high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector.

  17. Cosmogenic nuclides application on French Mediterranean shore platform development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliano, Jérémy; Lebourg, Thomas; Godard, Vincent; Dewez, Thomas; Braucher, Régis; Bourlès, Didier; Marçot, Nathalie

    2014-05-01

    Rocky shorelines are among the most common elements of the world's littoral zone, and the potential effects of rising sea level on the ever increasing populations require a better understanding of their dynamics. The sinuosity and heterogeneity of the shoreline morphology at large and intermediate wavelengths (1-100 km) results from their constant evolution under the combined influence of marine and continental forcings. This macro-scale organization is the expression of the action of elementary erosion processes acting at shorter wavelengths (<1 km) which lead to the development of shore platforms by landward retreat of cliff edges. Modern analytical techniques (laser-scaning, micro-erosion meters, aerial surveys) constitute appropriate methods to identify and quantify processes of cliff retreat to 1-100 yrs time-scales. But over this time frame, shore platform development appears imperceptible. Precise knowledge of long-term erosion rates are needed to understand rocky shore evolution, and develop quantitative modeling of platform development. Rocky coasts constitute a Quaternary sea level evolution archive that is partly preserved and progressively destroyed. One major challenges is to determine the degree to which coast morphologies are (i) contemporary, (ii) or ancient features inherited, (iii) or partly inherited from Quaternary interglacial stages. In order to fill the lack of long term coast morphodynamic data, we use cosmogenic nuclides (36Cl) to study abrasion surfaces carved in carbonates lithologies along the French Mediterranean coast, in a microtidal environment (Côte Bleue, West of Marseille). 36Cl concentration heritage influences strongly our interpretations in terms of age and denudation of the surfaces. We propose to constrain heritage in sampling oldest relic marine surfaces at 10m of altitude, and along recent cliff scarp. 36Cl concentrations show that the lowest platforms near sea level are contemporary and the highest ones (8-14 m above sea

  18. Heavy flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.; Gilman, F.J.; Gottschalk, T.D.

    1986-11-01

    A range of issues pertaining to heavy flavors at the SSC is examined including heavy flavor production by gluon-gluon fusion and by shower evolution of gluon jets, flavor tagging, reconstruction of Higgs and W bosons, and the study of rare decays and CP violation in the B meson system. A specific detector for doing heavy flavor physics and tuned to this latter study at the SSC, the TASTER, is described. 36 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Optical model methods of predicting nuclide production from spallation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, C. R.; Townsend, L. W.; Tripathi, R. K.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Quantum mechanical optical model methods for calculating isotope production cross sections from the spallation of heavy nuclei by high-energy protons are developed from a modified abrasion-ablation collision formalism. The abrasion step is treated quantum-mechanically as a knockout process which leaves the residual prefragment nucleus in an excited state. In ablation the prefragment deexcites to produce the final fragment. The excitation energies of the prefragments are estimated from a combination of liquid drop and frictional-spectator interaction considerations. Estimates of elemental and isotopic production cross sections are in good agreement with recently published cross section measurements.

  20. Characterization of nuclide inventories in waste streams from nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Oppermann, U.; Mueller, W.

    1993-12-31

    Producers of radioactive waste are increasingly required to characterize the nuclide specific activity inventory of their wastes to demonstrate compliance with the acceptance criteria of interim storages or repositories for the final disposal of radioactive wastes. Nuclide specific characterization of activity inventories for nuclides that are hard to measure in nuclear power plant wastes in general is based on calculations by fixed correlations to easy measurable intense {gamma}-emitters (key nuclides). This method is establish within a CEC project for LWR waste streams from four European countries. First experiences from this project in comparison to data from the US and to earlier evaluations for German LWRs are presented. The applicability of the method is discussed with regard to the measurability of radiologically relevant nuclides comparability between different reactor systems and waste streams, and the availability of the necessary data. All topics are illustrated by examples for individual correlations. Conclusions are drawn for the degree of necessary differentiation and the main factors responsible for these differences.

  1. Fast-neutron activation of long-lived nuclides in natural Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiseppe, V. E.; Elliott, S. R.; Fields, N. E.; Hixon, D.

    2015-04-01

    We measured the production of the long-lived nuclides 207 Bi, 202 Pb, and 194 Hg in a sample of natural Pb due to high-energy neutron interactions using a neutron beam at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The activated sample was counted by a HPGe detector to measure the amount of radioactive nuclides present. These nuclides are critical in understanding potential backgrounds in low background experiments utilizing large amounts of Pb shielding due to cosmogenic neutron interactions in the Pb while residing on the Earth's surface. By scaling the LANSCE neutron flux to a cosmic neutron flux, we measure the sea level cosmic ray production rates of 8.0 ± 1.3 atoms/kg/day of 194 Hg, 120 ± 25 atoms/kg/day 202 Pb, and <0.17 ± 0.04 atoms/kg/day 207 Bi.

  2. (n, charged particle) reactions on lp-shell nuclides at 14 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, R.C.

    1981-06-01

    The reactions (n,p), (n,d), (n,t) and (n,..cap alpha..) of 14-MeV neutrons with 1p-shell nuclides are of interest in several areas: they can provide tests of charge symmetry by comparisons with proton-induced reactions (on T=O nuclides); they allow study of the complex, often many-body decay of excited nuclear states; and they yield information on final-state interactions. As part of the program in (n, charged particle) reaction studies, several 1p-shell nuclides were investigated: /sup 9/Be, /sup 12/C, /sup 14/N, and /sup 16/O at E/sub n/ = 14 MeV (Haight et. al. 1981). These measurements, with the newly developed magnetic quadrupole charged-particle spectrometer, provide data with a much higher signal-to-background than heretofore available. Experimental methods and results are briefly described. (WHK)

  3. Calculated half-lives and kinetic energies for spontaneous emission of heavy ions from nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Poenaru, D.N.; Greiner, W.; Depta, K.; Ivascu, M.; Mazilu, D.; Sandulescu, A.

    1986-05-01

    The most probable decays by spontaneous emission of heavy ions are listed for nuclides with Z = 47--106 and total half-lives>1 ..mu..sec. Partial half-lives, branching ratios relative to ..cap alpha.. decay, kinetic energies, and Q values are estimated by using the analytical superasymmetric fission model, a semiempirical formula for those ..cap alpha..-decay lifetimes which have not been measured, and the new Wapstra--Audi mass tables. Numerous ''stable'' nuclides with Z>40 are found to be metastable with respect to the new decay modes. The current experimental status is briefly reviewed.

  4. Accelerator experiments on the contribution of secondary particles to the production of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragovitsch, P.; Englert, P.

    1985-01-01

    Through the interaction of galactic cosmic particle radiation (GCR) a wide variety of cosmogenic nuclides is produced in meteorites. They provide historical information about the cosmic radiation and the bombarded meteorites. An important way to understand the production mechanisms of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites is to gather information about the depth and size dependence of the build-up of Galactic Rays Cosmic-secondary particles within meteorites of different sizes and chemical compositions. Simulation experiments with meteorite models offer an alternative to direct observation providing a data basis to describe the development and action of the secondary cascade induced by the GCR in meteorites.

  5. Applications of in situ cosmogenic nuclides in the geologic site characterization of Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Gosse, J.C.; Harrington, C.D.; Whitney, J.W.

    1995-12-31

    The gradual buildup of rare isotopes from interactions between cosmic rays and atoms in an exposed rock provides a new method of directly determining the exposure age of rock surfaces. The cosmogenic nuclide method can also provide constraints on erosion rates and the length of time surface exposure was interrupted by burial. Numerous successful applications of the technique have been imperative to the complete surface geologic characterization of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential high level nuclear waste repository. In this short paper, we summarize the cosmogenic nuclide method and describe with examples some the utility of the technique in geologic site characterization. We report preliminary results from our ongoing work at Yucca Mountain.

  6. Reprocessing system with nuclide separation based on chromatography in hydrochloric acid solution

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Tatsuya; Tachibana, Yu; Koyama, Shi-ichi

    2013-07-01

    We have proposed the reprocessing system with nuclide separation processes based on the chromatographic technique in the hydrochloric acid solution system. Our proposed system consists of the dissolution process, the reprocessing process, the minor actinide separation process, and nuclide separation processes. In the reprocessing and separation processes, the pyridine resin is used as a main separation media. It was confirmed that the dissolution in the hydrochloric acid solution is easily achieved by the plasma voloxidation and by the addition of oxygen peroxide into the hydrochloric acid solution.

  7. Apparatus and method for quantitatively evaluating total fissile and total fertile nuclide content in samples

    DOEpatents

    Caldwell, John T.; Kunz, Walter E.; Cates, Michael R.; Franks, Larry A.

    1985-01-01

    Simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation of samples for the quantitative determination of total fissile nuclide and total fertile nuclide material present is made possible by the use of an electron accelerator. Prompt and delayed neutrons produced from resulting induced fissions are counted using a single detection system and allow the resolution of the contributions from each interrogating flux leading in turn to the quantitative determination sought. Detection limits for .sup.239 Pu are estimated to be about 3 mg using prompt fission neutrons and about 6 mg using delayed neutrons.

  8. Observation of the 3n Evaporation Channel in the Complete Hot-Fusion Reaction {sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm Leading to the New Superheavy Nuclide {sup 271}Hs

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorak, J.; Dvorakova, Z.; Kruecken, R.; Nebel, F.; Perego, R.; Schuber, R.; Tuerler, A.; Wierczinski, B.; Yakushev, A.; Bruechle, W.; Jaeger, E.; Schaedel, M.; Schausten, B.; Schimpf, E.; Chelnokov, M.; Kuznetsov, A.; Yeremin, A.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.; Nagame, Y.

    2008-04-04

    The analysis of a large body of heavy ion fusion reaction data with medium-heavy projectiles (6{<=}Z{<=}18) and actinide targets suggests a disappearance of the 3n exit channel with increasing atomic number of the projectile. Here, we report a measurement of the excitation function of the reaction {sup 248}Cm({sup 26}Mg,xn){sup 274-x}Hs and the observation of the new nuclide {sup 271}Hs produced in the 3n evaporation channel at a beam energy well below the Bass fusion barrier with a cross section comparable to the maxima of the 4n and 5n channels. This indicates the possible discovery of new neutron-rich transactinide nuclei using relatively light heavy ion beams of the most neutron-rich stable isotopes and actinide targets.

  9. Development of Advanced Nuclide Separation and Recovery Methods using Ion-Exchanhge Techniques in Nuclear Backend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Hitoshi

    The development of compact separation and recovery methods using selective ion-exchange techniques is very important for the reprocessing and high-level liquid wastes (HLLWs) treatment in the nuclear backend field. The selective nuclide separation techniques are effective for the volume reduction of wastes and the utilization of valuable nuclides, and expected for the construction of advanced nuclear fuel cycle system and the rationalization of waste treatment. In order to accomplish the selective nuclide separation, the design and synthesis of novel adsorbents are essential for the development of compact and precise separation processes. The present paper deals with the preparation of highly functional and selective hybrid microcapsules enclosing nano-adsorbents in the alginate gel polymer matrices by sol-gel methods, their characterization and the clarification of selective adsorption properties by batch and column methods. The selective separation of Cs, Pd and Re in real HLLW was further accomplished by using novel microcapsules, and an advanced nuclide separation system was proposed by the combination of selective processes using microcapsules.

  10. Large-scale erosion rates from in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides in European river sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, M.; von Blanckenburg, F.; Hovius, N.; Kubik, P. W.

    2001-06-01

    We have calculated long-term erosion rates of 20-100 mm/kyr from quartz-contained 10Be in the bedload of middle European rivers for catchments ranging from 10 2 to 10 5 km 2. These rates average over 10-40 kyr and agree broadly with rock uplift, incision and exhumation rates, historic soil erosion rates, and erosion rates calculated from the measured sediment loads of the same rivers. Moreover, our new erosion rate estimates correlate well with lithology and relief. However, in the Regen, Neckar, Loire, and Meuse catchments, cosmogenic nuclide-derived erosion rates are consistently 1.5-4 times greater than the equivalent rates derived from measured river loads. This may be due to the systematic under-representation of high-magnitude, low-frequency transport events in the gauging records which cover less than a century. Alternatively the discrepancy may derive from spatially non-uniform erosion and preferential tapping of deeper sections of the irradiation profile. A third explanation relates the high cosmogenic nuclide-derived erosion rates to inheritance of an elevated Pleistocene erosion signal. Uncertainties associated with the cosmogenic nuclide-derived erosion rate estimates are not greater than the potential errors in conventional estimates. Therefore, the cosmogenic nuclide approach is an effective tool for rapid, catchment-wide assessment of time-integrated rates of bedrock weathering and erosion, and we anticipate its fruitful application to the Quaternary sedimentary record.

  11. The intercomparison of mixed nuclide rod source sets used to calibrate waste assay systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, J.M.; Philips, S.; Croft, S.

    2007-07-01

    The relative activities of five sets of commercially available, certified mixed-nuclide rod gamma sources have been measured. The results are compared with one another and with the manufacturer's calibration certificates in order to evaluate the self consistency, accuracies and uncertainties of the activities claimed. The comparison measurements were made with Canberra's Tomographic Gamma Scanner (TGS) System in Segmented Gamma Scanner (SGS) mode, operated with a single segment and using a 120% relative efficiency HPGe detector. Each set of six rods was measured in a rotating 208-liter drum geometry typical of applications in which such rod source sets are commonly used for both initial calibration and operational verification measurements. Three of the five source sets were found to be consistent with one another within the experimental and claimed certificate uncertainties; however, two of the mixed-nuclide source sets were found to have nuclide-to-nuclide variations of activity significantly in excess of expectations based upon the claimed 99% confidence-level uncertainties. Such discrepancies could introduce substantial bias into waste measurement results made using the afflicted rod sets as the calibration standards. The findings of this work lead us to conclude that, where possible, the certified activities and associated uncertainties on newly acquired sources should be independently confirmed before relying on them as calibration standards. (authors)

  12. Measurements of long-lived cosmogenic nuclides in returned comet nucleus samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Kohl, C. P.; Arnold, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of long lived cosmic ray produced radionuclides have given much information on the histories and rates of surface evolution for meteorites, the Moon and the Earth. These nuclides can be equally useful in studying cometary histories and post nebular processing of cometary surfaces. The concentration of these nuclides depends on the orbit of the comet (cosmic ray intensity changes with distance from the sun), the depth of the sampling site in the comet surface, and the rate of continuous evolution of the surface (erosion rate of surface materials). If the orbital parameters and the sampling depth are known, production rates of cosmogenic nuclides can be fairly accurately calculated by theoretical models normalized to measurement on lunar surface materials and meteoritic samples. Due to the continuous evaporation of surface materials, it is expected that the long lived radioactivities will be undersaturated. Accurate measurements of the degree of undersaturation in nuclides of different half-lives allows for the determination of the rate of surface material loss over the last few million years.

  13. Analytical source term optimization for radioactive releases with approximate knowledge of nuclide ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofman, Radek; Seibert, Petra; Kovalets, Ivan; Andronopoulos, Spyros

    2015-04-01

    We are concerned with source term retrieval in the case of an accident in a nuclear power with off-site consequences. The goal is to optimize atmospheric dispersion model inputs using inverse modeling of gamma dose rate measurements (instantaneous or time-integrated). These are the most abundant type of measurements provided by various radiation monitoring networks across Europe and available continuously in near-real time. Usually, a source term of an accidental release comprises of a mixture of nuclides. Unfortunately, gamma dose rate measurements do not provide a direct information on the source term composition; however, physical properties of respective nuclides (deposition properties, decay half-life) can yield some insight. In the method presented, we assume that nuclide ratios are known at least approximately, e.g. from nuclide specific observations or reactor inventory and assumptions on the accident type. The source term can be in multiple phases, each being characterized by constant nuclide ratios. The method is an extension of a well-established source term inversion approach based on the optimization of an objective function (minimization of a cost function). This function has two quadratic terms: mismatch between model and measurements weighted by an observation error covariance matrix and the deviation of the solution from a first guess weighted by the first-guess error covariance matrix. For simplicity, both error covariance matrices are approximated as diagonal. Analytical minimization of the cost function leads to a liner system of equations. Possible negative parts of the solution are iteratively removed by the means of first guess error variance reduction. Nuclide ratios enter the problem in the form of additional linear equations, where the deviations from prescribed ratios are weighted by factors; the corresponding error variance allows us to control how strongly we want to impose the prescribed ratios. This introduces some freedom into the

  14. Using Cosmogenic Nuclides to Examine Erosional Steady-State in the Western Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perg, L. A.; von Blanckenburg, F.; Kubik, P.

    2002-12-01

    Geomorphologists have long been interested in the amount of time needed for landscapes to reach equilibrium after climate or tectonic perturbation. Cosmogenic nuclides provide a means to determine whether landscapes have reached equilibrium after glacial retreat. The cosmogenic nuclide budget should be mostly balanced (input through production equals output through erosion) after removal of one spallation length scale, about 60 cm of material. If a catchment has achieved steady-state erosional loss of cosmogenic nuclides, the cosmogenic nuclide concentration of the river sediment will provide the long-term basin-averaged denudation rate. If a deglaciated catchment has not reached steady-state, the apparent erosion rates will be too high. The apparent erosion rates obtained using cosmogenic nuclides can be compared with the denudation rates obtained from sediment accumulation in glacial lakes and valleys to determine whether the landscape has reached steady-state. Different sediment sources were sampled along a NS transect through the Western Alps from the highland (1 mm/yr uplift) to the foreland (no uplift, net deposition). Samples include: subglacial outwash; intraglacial sediment; moraines (surface and deeply buried material); currently glaciated, formerly glaciated and never glaciated catchments; and large river samples that integrate these sediment sources. Sediment traps indicate a long-term erosion rate of about 0.12 m / k.y. in the W. Alps during the Holocene (Hinderer, 2001). At this rate of denudation, the cosmogenic nuclide concentrations should approach steady-state in 5-6 k.y. However, the apparent cosmogenic nuclide erosion rates are much higher (0.3 m / k.y. in the foreland and 2 m / k.y. in the highland) indicating that the landscape has not reached equilibrium in two to three times that length of time. One possible explanation is intermediate sediment storage, such as alluvial fans, with higher concentration sediment not yet reaching the streams

  15. Scaling in situ cosmogenic nuclide production rates using analytical approximations to atmospheric cosmic-ray fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, Nathaniel; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Dunai, Tibor J.

    2014-01-01

    Several models have been proposed for scaling in situ cosmogenic nuclide production rates from the relatively few sites where they have been measured to other sites of interest. Two main types of models are recognized: (1) those based on data from nuclear disintegrations in photographic emulsions combined with various neutron detectors, and (2) those based largely on neutron monitor data. However, stubborn discrepancies between these model types have led to frequent confusion when calculating surface exposure ages from production rates derived from the models. To help resolve these discrepancies and identify the sources of potential biases in each model, we have developed a new scaling model based on analytical approximations to modeled fluxes of the main atmospheric cosmic-ray particles responsible for in situ cosmogenic nuclide production. Both the analytical formulations and the Monte Carlo model fluxes on which they are based agree well with measured atmospheric fluxes of neutrons, protons, and muons, indicating they can serve as a robust estimate of the atmospheric cosmic-ray flux based on first principles. We are also using updated records for quantifying temporal and spatial variability in geomagnetic and solar modulation effects on the fluxes. A key advantage of this new model (herein termed LSD) over previous Monte Carlo models of cosmogenic nuclide production is that it allows for faster estimation of scaling factors based on time-varying geomagnetic and solar inputs. Comparing scaling predictions derived from the LSD model with those of previously published models suggest potential sources of bias in the latter can be largely attributed to two factors: different energy responses of the secondary neutron detectors used in developing the models, and different geomagnetic parameterizations. Given that the LSD model generates flux spectra for each cosmic-ray particle of interest, it is also relatively straightforward to generate nuclide-specific scaling

  16. Production of neutron-rich nuclides in the heavy-element region via /sup 3/He-induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Y.Y.; Zhou, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    We have measured the production cross sections for /sup 233/Th and /sup 231/Th from the bombardment of /sup 238/U with /sup 3/He ions at 46-, 53-, and 60-MeV at the Brookhaven 60-in. isochronous cyclotron. We have also attempted to observe the decay of /sup 233/Ac produced via /sup 238/U(/sup 3/He,/sup 8/B) or equivalent reactions using 61 MeV /sup 3/He ions by first separating thorium from actinium and then performing chemical purifications on the second thorium sample into which the actinium has decayed. In the four experiments we performed, three gave results consistent with the ..beta.. half-life of /sup 233/Ac somewhat longer than 120 s and the production cross section from this target-projectile combination in the order of 1 to 2 ..mu..b.

  17. The even-odd systematics in R-process nuclide abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marti, K.; Suess, H. E.

    1988-01-01

    The paper reports and discusses solar system N(R) abundances for nuclides A greater than 70, obtained as differences between measured solar system abundances and calculated S-process contributions. The abundance peak at A of about 163 in the rare earth element region reveals properties which are similar to those of the R-process peaks corresponding to magic neutron numbers N = 82 and N = 126. Systematic differences in the N(R) abundances of even-A and odd-A nuclides are restricted to specific mass regions. It is concluded that these differences are most probably related to the properties of nuclear species during beta(-) decay to the stability valley.

  18. The production of residual nuclides in Pb irradiated by 400 MeV/u carbon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, H. L.; Ma, F.; Zhang, X. Y.; Ju, Y. Q.; Zhang, H. B.; Chen, L.; Luo, P.; Zhou, B.; Zhang, Y. B.; Li, J. Y.; Xu, J. K.; Liang, T. J.; Wang, S. L.; Yang, Y. W.; Yang, L.

    2014-10-01

    The experiment was performed by irradiating a Pb foil with 400 MeV/u carbon beam at the HIRFL-CSR in Lanzhou, China. The experimental data was acquired by the off-line γ-spectroscopy method. 32 radioactive residual nuclides had been observed and their cross sections were determined. The measured results were compared with the results simulated by Monte Carlo code MCNPX2.7.0. The comparison shows that the simulated cross sections were underestimated for the fragments from A = 20 to 41 and A = 110 to 175. By fitting the measured and simulated cross sections to Rudstams semi-empirical formula, it was found that the charge distribution of products was asymmetric for the residual nuclides with a high mass number.

  19. TOF-Bρ mass measurements of very exotic nuclides for astrophysical calculations at the NSCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoš, M.; Estrade, A.; Amthor, M.; Aprahamian, A.; Bazin, D.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Galaviz, D.; Gade, A.; Gupta, S.; Lorusso, G.; Montes, F.; Pereira, J.; Portillo, M.; Rogers, A. M.; Schatz, H.; Shapira, D.; Smith, E.; Stolz, A.; Wallace, M.

    2008-01-01

    Atomic masses play a crucial role in many nuclear astrophysics calculations. The lack of experimental values for relevant exotic nuclides triggered a rapid development of new mass measurement devices around the world. The time-of-flight (TOF) mass measurements offer a complementary technique to the most precise one, Penning trap measurements (Blaum 2006 Phys. Rep. 425 1), the latter being limited by the rate and half-lives of the ions of interest. The NSCL facility provides a well-suited infrastructure for the TOF mass measurements of very exotic nuclei. At this facility, we have recently implemented a TOF-Bρ technique and performed mass measurements of neutron-rich nuclides in the Fe region, important for r-process calculations and for calculations of processes occurring in the crust of accreting neutron stars.

  20. Determination of Concentrations of Radioactive Nuclides in Soil Samples using Gamma Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adil, Arsalan; Weaver, Joshua

    2015-10-01

    A hyper-pure Germanium detector system was used to determine the contents and concentrations of various nuclides in soil samples collected from different parts of the United States. These include areas in close proximity to nuclear power plants, areas susceptible to nuclear fallout from weapons testing from the pre Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) period, and areas vulnerable to fallout from Fukushima from the west coast. The concentrations of naturally occurring nuclides in the 238U, 232Th, and 40K decay chains as well as that of synthetic isotopes of 137Cs and 60Co were measured with the aid of Genie-2000 and Radware (gf3m). An efficiency curve was obtained by designing a simulation and compared with standard sources. The research, now in its next stage, aims to do the same in samples from Karachi (Pakistan) which is home to three nuclear power plant projects but has no available baseline radioactivity measurements. University of Richmond.

  1. The exposure history of Jilin and production rates of cosmogenic nuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heusser, G.

    1986-01-01

    Jilin, the largest known story meteorite, is a very suitable object for studying the systematics of cosmic ray produced nuclides in stony meteorites. Its well established two stage exposure history even permits to gain information about two different irradiation geometries (2pi and 4pi). All stable and long-lived cosmogenic nuclides measured in Jilin so far correlate well with each other. An example is shown where the Al-26 activities are plotted vs. the spallogenic Ne-21 concentration. These records of cosmic-ray interaction in Jilin can be used both to determine the history of the target and to study the nature of production rate profiles. This is unavoidably a bootstrap process, involving studying one with assumption about the other. Production rate equations are presented and discussed.

  2. Light mass elements total half-lives for selected long-lived nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, N. E.

    In the past, many compilations and evaluations of half lives have been made which have uncritically accepted authors' values and uncertainties. They have merely recommended weight averaged reported results. This evaluation attempts to reanalyze each experiment in the literature including an estimate of the standard deviation utilizing, where possible, an estimate of the systematic error. This paper constitutes a preliminary step in the process of recommending values. The long lived nuclides of light elements are of interest for their use in dating methods and for calculating cosmic ray exposure ages of meteorites. Experimental data on the half lives of selected nuclides have been evaluated and recommended values and uncertainties are presented for the following nuclides: (3)H, (10)Be, (14)C, (26)Al, (39)Ar, (40)K, (50)V, (53)Mn, (76)Ge, (87)Eb, (92)Nb, (107)Pd, (113)Cd, (115)In and (123)Te. The impact of the recommended (14)C half life of 5715 years on the carbon dating techniques, which uses the Libby value of 5568 years, will be discussed. Also the possible primordial occurrence of (92)Nb is now definitely ruled out by the recommended half life of 3.7 x 10(7). Finally, based on the recommended (26)Al half life value, the (21)Ne production rate for calculating cosmic ray exposure ages remains too high, compared to rates using the (53)Mn and (10)Be half life values.

  3. Fukushima-derived fission nuclides monitored around Taiwan: Free tropospheric versus boundary layer transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Chih-An; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Lin, Chuan-Yao

    2012-02-01

    The 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan was the worst nuclear disaster following the 1986 Chernobyl accident. Fission products (nuclides) released from the Fukushima plant site since March 12, 2011 had been detected around the northern hemisphere in about two weeks and also in the southern hemisphere about one month later. We report here detailed time series of radioiodine and radiocesium isotopes monitored in a regional network around Taiwan, including one high-mountain and three ground-level sites. Our results show several pulses of emission from a sequence of accidents in the Fukushima facility, with the more volatile 131I released preferentially over 134Cs and 137Cs at the beginning. In the middle of the time series, there was a pronounced peak of radiocesium observed in northern Taiwan, with activity concentrations of 134Cs and 137Cs far exceeding that of 131I during that episode. From the first arrival time of these fission nuclides and their spatial and temporal variations at our sampling sites and elsewhere, we suggest that Fukushima-derived radioactive nuclides were transported to Taiwan and its vicinity via two pathways at different altitudes. One was transported in the free troposphere by the prevailing westerly winds around the globe; the other was transported in the planetary boundary layer by the northeast monsoon wind directly toward Taiwan.

  4. Sensitivity Analysis of Nuclide Importance to One-Group Neutron Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Nemoto, Atsushi; Yoshimura, Yoshikane

    2001-07-15

    The importance of nuclides is useful when investigating nuclide characteristics in a given neutron spectrum. However, it is derived using one-group microscopic cross sections, which may contain large errors or uncertainties. The sensitivity coefficient shows the effect of these errors or uncertainties on the importance.The equations for calculating sensitivity coefficients of importance to one-group nuclear constants are derived using the perturbation method. Numerical values are also evaluated for some important cases for fast and thermal reactor systems.Many characteristics of the sensitivity coefficients are derived from the derived equations and numerical results. The matrix of sensitivity coefficients seems diagonally dominant. However, it is not always satisfied in a detailed structure. The detailed structure of the matrix and the characteristics of coefficients are given.By using the obtained sensitivity coefficients, some demonstration calculations have been performed. The effects of error and uncertainty of nuclear data and of the change of one-group cross-section input caused by fuel design changes through the neutron spectrum are investigated. These calculations show that the sensitivity coefficient is useful when evaluating error or uncertainty of nuclide importance caused by the cross-section data error or uncertainty and when checking effectiveness of fuel cell or core design change for improving neutron economy.

  5. Cosmogenic nuclides in the Martian surface: Constraints for sample recovery and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, Peter A. J.

    1988-01-01

    Stable and radioactive cosmogenic nuclides and radiation damage effects such as cosmic ray tracks can provide information on the surface history of Mars. A recent overview on developments in cosmogenic nuclide research for historical studies of predominantly extraterrestrial materials was published previously. The information content of cosmogenic nuclides and radiation damage effects produced in the Martian surface is based on the different ways of interaction of the primary galactic and solar cosmic radiation (GCR, SCR) and the secondary particle cascade. Generally the kind and extent of interactions as seen in the products depend on the following factors: (1) composition, energy and intensity of the primary SCR and GCR; (2) composition, energy and intensity of the GCR-induced cascade of secondary particles; (3) the target geometry, i.e., the spatial parameters of Martian surface features with respect to the primary radiation source; (4) the target chemistry, i.e., the chemical composition of the Martian surface at the sampling location down to the minor element level or lower; and (5) duration of the exposure. These factors are not independent of each other and have a major influence on sample taking strategies and techniques.

  6. Grain size bias in cosmogenic nuclide studies of stream sediment in steep terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukens, Claire E.; Riebe, Clifford S.; Sklar, Leonard S.; Shuster, David L.

    2016-05-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides in stream sediment are widely used to quantify catchment-average erosion rates. A key assumption is that sampled sediment is representative of erosion from the entire catchment. Here we show that the common practice of collecting a narrow range of sizes—typically sand—may not yield a representative sample when the grain size distribution of sediment produced on slopes is spatially variable. A grain size bias arises when some parts of the catchment produce sand more readily than others. To identify catchments that are prone to this bias, we used a forward model of sediment mixing and erosion to explore the effects of catchment relief and area across a range of altitudinal gradients in sediment size and erosion rate. We found that the bias increases with increasing relief, because higher-relief catchments have a larger fraction of high elevations that are underrepresented in the sampled sand when grain size increases with altitude. The bias also increases with catchment area, because sediment size reduction during transport causes an underrepresentation of more distal, higher elevations within the catchment. Our analysis indicates that grain size bias may be significant at many sites where cosmogenic nuclides have been used to quantify catchment-average erosion rates. We discuss how to quantify and account for the bias using cosmogenic nuclides and detrital thermochronometry in multiple sediment sizes.

  7. Feasibility on the spectrometric determination of the individual dose rate for detected gamma nuclides using the dose rate spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Young-Yong; Chung, Kun Ho; Lee, Wanno; Park, Doo-Won; Kang, Mun-Ja

    2014-04-01

    A spectrometric determination of the dose rate using a detector is a very useful method to identify the contribution of artificial nuclides. In addition, the individual dose rate for detected gamma nuclides from the radioactive materials as well as the environment can give further information such as the in-situ measurement because of the direct relation between the individual dose rate and the activity of a nuclide. In this study, the calculation method for the individual dose rate for detected gamma nuclides was suggested by introducing the concept of the dose rate spectroscopy and the peak-to-total ratio in the energy spectrum for the dose rate, which means just a form of multiplied counts and the value of a G-factor in the spectrum. In addition, the validity of the suggested method for the individual dose rate was experimentally verified through a comparison of the calculation results on the energy spectra for several conditions of the standard source.

  8. Long- and short-lived nuclide constraints on the recent evolution of permafrost soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagard, M.; Chabaux, F. J.; Rihs, S.; Pokrovsky, O. S.; Prokushkin, A. S.; Viers, J.

    2011-12-01

    Frozen permafrost ecosystems are particularly sensitive to climate warming, which notably induces a deepening of the active layer (the maximum thawing depth during summer time). As a consequence, geochemical and hydrological fluxes within boreal areas are expected to be significantly affected in the future. Understanding the relationship between environmental changes and permafrost modifications is then a major challenge. This work aims to evaluate in a Siberian watershed the dynamics of the permafrost active layer and their recent modifications by combining a classic study of long-lived nuclides to the study of short-lived nuclides of U and Th decay series. Two soil profiles, located on opposite slopes (north- and south-facing slopes) of the Kulingdakan watershed (Putorana Plateau, Central Siberia), were sampled at several depths within the active layer and (238U), (234U), (232Th), (230Th), (226Ra), (228Ra), (228Th) and (210Pb) were measured on bulk soil samples by TIMS or gamma spectrometry. Our results show that south-facing and north-facing soil profiles are significantly different in terms of evolution of chemical concentrations and nuclide activities; north-facing soil profile is strongly affected by atmospheric inputs whereas long-lived nuclide dynamics within south-facing soil profile are dominated by weathering and exhibit more complex patterns. The amount of above-ground biomass being the single varying parameter between the two slopes of the watershed, we suggest that the structuring of permafrost active layer is very sensitive to vegetation activity and that the functioning of boreal soils will be significantly modified by its development due to more favorable climatic conditions. Moreover, the coupling of long and short-lived nuclides highlights the superimposition of a recent mobilization of chemical elements within soils (<10 years) over a much older soil structure (>8000 years), which can be observed for both soil profiles. The shallowest layer of

  9. Recent evolution of permafrost soils: insight from U-Th series nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagard, marie-laure; Chabaux, Francois; Rihs, Sophie; Pokrovsky, Oleg; Viers, Jérome

    2015-04-01

    Permafrost ecosystems are particularly sensitive to climate warming, which notably induces a deepening of the active layer (the maximum thawing depth during summer time). As a consequence, geochemical and hydrological fluxes within boreal areas are expected to be significantly affected in the future. Understanding the relationship between environmental changes and permafrost modifications is then a major challenge. This work aims to evaluate in a Siberian watershed the dynamics of the permafrost active layer and their recent modifications by combining a classic study of long-lived nuclides to the study of short-lived nuclides of U and Th decay series in two soil profiles. These profiles, located on opposite slopes (north- and south-facing slopes) of the Kulingdakan watershed (Putorana Plateau, Central Siberia), were sampled at several depths within the active layer and (238U), (230Th), (232Th), (226Ra), (228Ra), (228Th), (210Pb) were measured on bulk soil samples by TIMS or gamma spectrometry. Our results show that south-facing and north-facing soil profiles are significantly different in terms of evolution of chemical concentrations and nuclide activities; north-facing soil profile is strongly affected by atmospheric inputs whereas long-lived nuclide dynamics within south-facing soil profile are dominated by weathering and exhibit more complex patterns. The amount of above-ground biomass being the single varying parameter between the two slopes of the watershed, we suggest that the structuring of permafrost active layer is very sensitive to vegetation activity and that the functioning of boreal soils will be significantly modified by its development due to more favorable climatic conditions. Moreover, the coupling of long and short-lived nuclides highlights the superimposition of a recent mobilization of chemical elements within soils (<10 years) over a much older soil structuring (>8000 years), which can be observed for both soil profiles. The shallowest layer of

  10. Heavy loads

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, D.

    1982-01-01

    The extreme pressures on the roof and walls of an earth-sheltered residential home are discussed and the need for careful planning is stressed. Pertinent terms are defined. Footings and wall structure (reinforced concrete walls and concrete block walls) are described. Roofing systems are discussed in detail and illustrated: (1) poured-in-place concrete roof slabs; (2) pre-cast concrete planks; and (3) heavy timber roofs. Insulation of earth-sheltered homes is reviewed in terms of using: (1) urethanes; (2) extruded polystyrene; and (3) expanded polystyrene. Advantages, disadvantages, R-factors, costs, and installation are discussed. (MJJ)

  11. Impact of vegetation change on the mobility of uranium- and thorium-series nuclides in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontier, A.; Rihs, S.; Turpault, M.-P.; Chabaux, F.

    2012-04-01

    The effect of land cover change on chemical mobility and soil response was investigated using short- and long-lived nuclides from the U- and Th series. Indeed, the matching of these nuclides half-live to the pedogenic processes rates make these nuclides especially suitable to investigate either time or mechanism of transfers within a soil-water-plant system. This study was carried out from the experimental Breuil-Chenue site (Morvan mountains, France). The native forest (150 year-old) was partially clear-felled and replaced in 1976 by mono-specific plantations distributed in different stands. Following this cover-change, some mineralogical changes in the acid brown soil were recognized (Mareschal, 2008). Three soil sections were sampled under the native forest and the replanted oak and Douglas spruce stands respectively. The (238U), (234U), (230Th), (226Ra), (232Th) and (228Ra) activities were analysed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) and gamma spectrometry. Significant differences in U, Th, and Ra activities were observed between the soils located under the native forest or the replanted-trees stands, mostly dominated by a large uranium mobilization from the replanted soils. Moreover, all the investigated U and Th-series activity ratios show a contrasted trend between the shallowest horizons (0-50cm) and the deepest one (below 50cm), demonstrating the chemical effect of the vegetation change on the shallow soil layers. Using a continuous open-system leaching model, the coupled radioactive disequilibria measured in the different soil layers permit to quantify the rate of the radionuclides mobilities. Reference: Mareschal, L., 2008. Effet des substitutions d'essences forestières sur l'évolution des sols et de leur minéralogie : bilan après 28 ans dans le site expérimental de Breuil (Morvan) Université Henri Poincaré, Nancy-I.

  12. Tantalum-178--a short-lived nuclide for nuclear medicine: development of a potential generator system.

    PubMed

    Neirinckx, R D; Jones, A G; Davis, M A; Harris, G I; Holman, B L

    1978-05-01

    We describe a chemical separation that may form the basis of a generator system for the short-lived radionuclide Ta-178 (T 1/2 = 9 min). The parent nuclide W-178 (T 1/2 = 21.7 days) is loaded on an anion-exchange column and the daughter eluted with a mixture of dilute hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The yields of tantalum and the breakthrough of the tungsten parent as a function of the eluting conditions are discussed, and preliminary animal distribution data are presented for various treatments of the eluant solution. PMID:641574

  13. rp Process and Masses of N{approx_equal}Z{approx_equal}34 Nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Savory, J.; Schury, P.; Bachelet, C.; Block, M.; Bollen, G.; Facina, M.; Folden, C. M. III; Guenaut, C.; Kwan, E.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Morrissey, D. J.; Pang, G. K.; Prinke, A.; Ringle, R.; Schatz, H.; Schwarz, S.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.

    2009-04-03

    High-precision Penning-trap mass measurements of the N{approx_equal}Z{approx_equal}34 nuclides {sup 68}Se, {sup 70}Se, {sup 70m}Br, and {sup 71}Br were performed, reaching experimental uncertainties of 0.5-15 keV. The new and improved mass data together with theoretical Coulomb displacement energies were used as input for rp process network calculations. An increase in the effective lifetime of the waiting point nucleus {sup 68}Se was found, and more precise information was obtained on the luminosity during a type I x-ray burst along with the final elemental abundances after the burst.

  14. The CAIRN method: automated, reproducible calculation of catchment-averaged denudation rates from cosmogenic nuclide concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marius Mudd, Simon; Harel, Marie-Alice; Hurst, Martin D.; Grieve, Stuart W. D.; Marrero, Shasta M.

    2016-08-01

    We report a new program for calculating catchment-averaged denudation rates from cosmogenic nuclide concentrations. The method (Catchment-Averaged denudatIon Rates from cosmogenic Nuclides: CAIRN) bundles previously reported production scaling and topographic shielding algorithms. In addition, it calculates production and shielding on a pixel-by-pixel basis. We explore the effect of sampling frequency across both azimuth (Δθ) and altitude (Δϕ) angles for topographic shielding and show that in high relief terrain a relatively high sampling frequency is required, with a good balance achieved between accuracy and computational expense at Δθ = 8° and Δϕ = 5°. CAIRN includes both internal and external uncertainty analysis, and is packaged in freely available software in order to facilitate easily reproducible denudation rate estimates. CAIRN calculates denudation rates but also automates catchment averaging of shielding and production, and thus can be used to provide reproducible input parameters for the CRONUS family of online calculators.

  15. [Determination of natural radioactive nuclides in the travertine samples from Tamagawa hot spring].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, T; Masumura, S; Takahashi, K; Sotobayashi, T

    1982-07-01

    The determination of natural radioactive nuclides was carried out for 7 travertine samples collected from Tamagawa hot spring by means of the non-distructive gamma-ray spectrometry and of the alpha-ray spectrometry. From the former measurements, the relative activity strength, due to 223Ra, 226Ra, and 228Th, and their ratios was obtained in comparison with the photopeak strength due to respective daughters, 228Ac, 214Bi, and 212Pb, and with the results from a monazite sand standard. One travertine sample was engaged to the alpha-ray spectrometric determination of Th isotopes after the chemical purification using a 234Th-yield tracer. On the basis of the resultant absolute content of 228Th, the 228Ra and 228Th contents in the remainder samples were evaluated to be the range of 3 approximately 80 Bq (81 approximately 2160 pCi)/g and 2 approximately 20 Bq (54 approximately pCi)/g respectively. These radioactive nuclides were verified to exist almost within a Hokutolite small crystals up to 90% and there are apparently the radioactive disequilibrium relations between 228Ra and 228Th among freshly deposited travertines. The presence of 227Ac in Hokutolite was also suggested from the detection of 227Th owing to 215Po-alpha peak. PMID:7178540

  16. Runoff and sediment yield model for predicting nuclide transport in watersheds using BIOTRAN

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, A.F.; Wenzel, W.J.

    1990-09-01

    The environmental risk simulation model BIOTRAN was interfaced with a series of new subroutines (RUNOFF, GEOFLX, EROSON, and AQUIFER) to predict the movement of nuclides, elements, and pertinent chemical compounds in association with sediments through lateral and channel flow of runoff water. In addition, the movement of water into and out of segmented portions of runoff channels was modeled to simulate the dynamics of moisture flow through specified aquifers within the watershed. The BIOTRAN soil water flux subroutine, WATFLX, was modified to interface the relationships found in the SPUR model for runoff and sediment transport into channels with the particle sorting relationships to predict radionuclide enrichment and movement in watersheds. The new subroutines were applied specifically to Mortandad Canyon within Los Alamos National Laboratory by simultaneous simulation of eight surface vegetational subdivisions and associated channel and aquifer segments of this watershed. This report focuses on descriptions of the construction and rationale for the new subroutines and on discussing both input characteristics and output relationships to known runoff events from Mortandad Canyon. Limitations of the simplified input on model behavior are also discussed. Uranium-238 was selected as the nuclide for demonstration of the model because it could be assumed to be homogeneously distributed over the watershed surface. 22 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs.

  17. Cosmogenic nuclide age constraints on Middle Stone Age lithics from Niassa, Mozambique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercader, Julio; Gosse, John C.; Bennett, Tim; Hidy, Alan J.; Rood, Dylan H.

    2012-07-01

    The late phases of the Middle Stone Age (MSA) in the East African Rift System (EARS) are known for their evolutionary shifts and association with bottlenecks, transcontinental expansion, and climatic fluctuations. The chronology of MSA sites contemporaneous with these eco-demographic upheavals is uncertain because of the scarcity of datable sites and the poor understanding of their depositional and erosional histories. We apply terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating in a stratigraphic section with a complex exposure history to the study of the Luchamange Beds, a widespread sedimentological unit underlying MSA sites from the shores of Lake Niassa (Mozambican EARS). We use an innovative approach, which may be applicable elsewhere, to calculate their age using a Monte Carlo-based Bayesian model that links depth profiles of 26Al and 10Be, and uses other geomorphic and cosmogenic nuclide age constraints on episodic erosion and burial. The age of the basal Luchamange Beds is 42 + 77/-15 ka, and the MSA occupation on top is 29 + 3/-11 ka. These dates suggest temporal overlap between MSA and the earliest Later Stone Age and diversity in cultural manifestations at the end of the MSA.

  18. Progress on multi-nuclide AMS of JAEA-AMS-TONO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito-Kokubu, Yoko; Matsubara, Akihiro; Miyake, Masayasu; Nishizawa, Akimitsu; Ohwaki, Yoshio; Nishio, Tomohiro; Sanada, Katsuki; Hanaki, Tatsumi

    2015-10-01

    The JAEA-AMS-TONO (Japan Atomic Energy Agency's Accelerator Mass Spectrometer established at the Tono Geoscience Center) facility has been used for the dating of geological samples. The AMS system is versatile, based on a 5 MV tandem Pelletron-type accelerator. Since its establishment in 1997, the AMS system has been used for measurement of carbon-14 (14C) mainly for 14C dating studies in neotectonics and hydrogeology, in support of JAEA's research on geosphere stability applicable to the long-term isolation of high-level radioactive waste. Results of the measurement of 14C in soils and plants has been applied to the dating of fault activity and volcanism. Development of beryllium-10 (10Be) and aluminum-26 (26Al) AMS systems are now underway to enhance the capability of the multi-nuclide AMS in studies of dating by cosmogenic nuclides. The 10Be-AMS system has already been used for routine measurements in applied studies and improvements of the measurement technique have been made. Now we plan to fine tune the system and perform test measurements to develop the 26Al-AMS system.

  19. Sand residence times of one million years in the Namib Sand Sea from cosmogenic nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, P.; Fenton, C. R.; Kober, F.; Wiggs, G. F. S.; Bristow, C. S.; Xu, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Namib Sand Sea is one of the world's oldest and largest sand deserts, yet little is known about the source of the sand in this, or other large deserts. In particular, it is unclear whether the sand is derived from local sediment or comes from remote sources. The relatively uniform appearance of dune sands and low compositional variability within dune fields make it difficult to address this question. Here we combine cosmogenic-nuclide measurements and geochronological techniques to assess the provenance and migration history of sand grains in the Namib Sand Sea. We use U-Pb geochronology of detrital zircons to show that the primary source of sand is the Orange River at the southern edge of the Namib desert. Our burial ages obtained from measurements of the cosmogenic nuclides 10Be, 26Al and 21Ne suggest that the residence time of sand within the sand sea is at least one million years. We therefore conclude that, despite large climatic changes in the Namib region associated with Quaternary glacial-interglacial cycles, the area currently occupied by the Namib Sand Sea has never been entirely devoid of sand during the past million years.

  20. Formation of super-heavy elements in astrophysical nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zagrebaev, V. I.; Karpov, A. V.; Mishustin, I. N.; Greiner, Walter

    2012-10-20

    The unexplored area of heavy neutron-rich nuclides is extremely important for the understanding of the r process of astrophysical nucleogenesis. For elements with Z>100 only neutron deficient isotopes (located to the left of the stability line) have been synthesized so far. The 'north-east' area of the nuclear map can be reached neither in fusion reactions nor in fragmentation processes. Low energy multi-nucleon transfer reactions are quite promising for the production and study of neutron-rich heavy nuclei including those located at the superheavy (SH) island of stability [1]. The neutron capture process is considered here as an alternative method for the production of SH nuclei. Requirements for the pulsed reactors of the next generation that could be used for the synthesis of long-living neutron rich SH nuclei are formulated. Formation of SH nuclei in supernova explosions is also discussed and the abundance of SH elements in nature is estimated.

  1. Detection of ultra rare α decays of super heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, Yuri S.

    2007-04-01

    Three approaches to the measurement of a rare α decaying products produced in heavy-ion induced nuclear reactions are described. One is based on a chemical extraction and following deposition of the nuclides under investigation onto the surface of the detector, whereas the second one is associated with long-lived products implanted into silicon detectors by using the electromagnetic separation technique. The third approach relates with an application of real-time mode detection of correlated energy-time-position recoil-α sequences from 48Ca induced nuclear reactions with actinide targets, like 242,244Pu, 245,248Cm, 239Am and 249Cf. Namely with this technique, it has became possible to provide a radical suppression of backgrounds in the full fusion (3-5n) reactions aimed to the synthesis of super heavy elements with Z=113-116.

  2. Octupole shapes in heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.

    1994-08-01

    Theoretical calculations and measurements show the presence of strong octupole correlations in thecyround states and low-lying states of odd-mass and odd-odd nuclei in the RaPa region. Evidence for octupole correlations is provided by the observation of parity doublets and reductions in M1 matrix elements, decoupling parameters, and Coriolis matrix elements Involving high-j states. Enhancement of E1 transition rates has also been observed for some of the octupole deformed nuclei. The most convincing argument for octupole deformation is provided by the similarities of the reduced alpha decay rates to the two members of parity doublets.

  3. Formation of Heavy and Superheavy Neutron Rich Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Zagrebaev, Valery; Greiner, Walter

    2010-04-30

    A new way is proposed to discover and examine unknown neutron-rich heavy and superheavy nuclei at the 'north-east' part of the nuclear map. The present limits of the upper part of the nuclear map is very close to stability while the unexplored area of heavy neutron-rich nuclides to the east of the stability line (also those located along the neutron closed shell N = 126) is extremely important for nuclear astrophysics investigations and for the understanding of the r-process of astrophysical nucleo-genesis. A novel idea is proposed for the production of these nuclei via low-energy multi-nucleon transfer reactions using a gain given by the shell effects. This finding may spur new studies at heavy ion facilities and should have significant impact for future experiments. The use of the multi-nucleon transfer reactions in low-energy collisions of heavy actinide nuclei gives us also the only chance to approach the 'island of stability' of superheavy elements. A possibility for a three-body decay (heavy ternary fission) is predicted for superheavy nuclei.

  4. Cosmogenic nuclide production rates as a function of latitude and altitude calculated via a physics based model and excitation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argento, D.; Reedy, R. C.; Stone, J. O.

    2012-12-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides have been used to develop a set of tools critical to the quantification of a wide range of geomorphic and climatic processes and events (Dunai 2010). Having reliable absolute measurement methods has had great impact on research constraining ice age extents as well as providing important climatic data via well constrained erosion rates, etc. Continuing to improve CN methods is critical for these sciences. While significant progress has been made in the last two decades to reduce uncertainties (Dunai 2010; Gosse & Phillips 2001), numerous aspects still need to be refined in order to achieve the analytic resolution desired by glaciologists and geomorphologists. In order to investigate the finer details of the radiation responsible for cosmogenic nuclide production, we have developed a physics based model which models the radiation cascade of primary and secondary cosmic-rays through the atmosphere. In this study, a Monte Carlo method radiation transport code, MCNPX, is used to model the galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) radiation impinging on the upper atmosphere. Beginning with a spectrum of high energy protons and alpha particles at the top of the atmosphere, the code tracks the primary and resulting secondary particles through a model of the Earth's atmosphere and into the lithosphere. Folding the neutron and proton flux results with energy dependent cross sections for nuclide production provides production rates for key cosmogenic nuclides (Argento et al. 2012, in press; Reedy 2012, in press). Our initial study for high latitude shows that nuclides scale at different rates for each nuclide (Argento 2012, in press). Furthermore, the attenuation length for each of these nuclide production rates increases with altitude, and again, they increase at different rates. This has the consequence of changing the production rate ratio as a function of altitude. The earth's geomagnetic field differentially filters low energy cosmic-rays by deflecting them away

  5. Apparatus and method for quantitatively evaluating total fissile and total fertile nuclide content in samples. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Caldwell, J.T.; Kunz, W.E.; Cates, M.R.; Franks, L.A.

    1982-07-07

    Simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation of samples for the quantitative determination of total fissile nuclide and total fertile nuclide material present is made possible by the use of an electron accelerator. Prompt and delayed neutrons produced from resulting induced fission are counted using a single detection system and allow the resolution of the contributions from each interrogating flux leading in turn to the quantitative determination sought. Detection limits for /sup 239/Pu are estimated to be about 3 mg using prompt fission neutrons and about 6 mg using delayed neutrons.

  6. Extended scaling factors for in situ cosmogenic nuclides: New measurements at low latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desilets, Darin; Zreda, Marek; Prabu, T.

    2006-06-01

    Production rates of cosmogenic nuclides at the earth's surface are controlled by the intensity of energetic cosmic-ray nucleons, which changes rapidly with elevation. An incomplete knowledge of how nucleon fluxes vary with elevation remains a major obstacle to utilizing cosmogenic nuclides as geochronometers in applications requiring highly accurate ages. One problem is that attenuation characteristics depend on nucleon energy. Measurements of high-energy (> 50 MeV) nucleon fluxes tend to give shorter attenuation lengths than low-energy (< 1 MeV) fluxes, but these differences are not well characterized due to a lack of data at lower energies. Another problem is that the atmospheric attenuation length for nucleon fluxes varies with the geomagnetic cutoff rigidity (a parameter related to geomagnetic latitude), RC, and that there has been an incomplete mapping of nucleon fluxes at high RC (low geomagnetic latitude). We report new measurements of nucleon fluxes from altitude transects in Hawaii ( RC = 12.8 GV) and Bangalore, India ( RC = 17.3 GV). Our measurements in Hawaii of low-energy neutrons (median energy 1 eV) and energetic nucleons (median energy 140 MeV) confirm that nucleon scaling functions are energy-dependent in the range of energies at which cosmogenic nuclides are produced. Our measurements in southern India extend our previously reported scaling model for spallation reactions [D. Desilets, M. Zreda, Spatial and temporal distribution of secondary cosmic-ray nucleon intensity and applications to in situ cosmogenic dating. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 206 (2003) 21-42] from RC = 13.3 GV to RC = 17.3 GV, nearly the highest cutoff rigidity on earth. The anomalously high cutoff rigidity over India provides a geomagnetic shielding condition that is effectively the same as would be observed at the geomagnetic equator in a dipole field with an intensity 1.2 times the modern value. This makes it possible to scale low-latitude production rates to paleomagnetic fields

  7. Implications of two Holocene time-dependent geomagnetic models for cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, Nathaniel

    2016-01-01

    The geomagnetic field is a major influence on in situ cosmogenic nuclide production rates at a given location (in addition to atmospheric pressure and, to a lesser extent, solar modulation effects). A better understanding of how past fluctuations in these influences affected production rates should allow more accurate application of cosmogenic nuclides. As such, this work explores the cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling implications of two recent time-dependent spherical harmonic geomagnetic models spanning the Holocene. Korte and Constable (2011, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter.188, 247-259) and Korte et al. (2011, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 312, 497-505) recently updated earlier spherical harmonic paleomagnetic models with new paleomagnetic data from sediment cores in addition to new archeomagnetic and volcanic data. These updated models offer improved resolution and accuracy over the previous versions, in part due to increased temporal and spatial data coverage. In addition, Pavón-Carrasco et al. (2014, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 388, 98-109) developed another time-dependent spherical harmonic model of the Holocene geomagnetic field, based solely on archeomagnetic and volcanic paleomagnetic data from the same underlying paleomagnetic database as the Korte et al. models, but extending to 14 ka. With the new models as input, trajectory-traced estimates of effective vertical cutoff rigidity (RC - the standard method for ordering cosmic ray data) yield significantly different time-integrated scaling predictions when compared to each other and to results using the earlier models. In addition, predictions of each new model using RC are tested empirically using recently published production rate calibration data for both 10Be and 3He, and compared to predictions using corresponding time-varying geocentric dipolar RC formulations and a static geocentric axial dipole (GAD) model. Results for the few calibration sites from geomagnetically sensitive regions suggest that the

  8. Comparing Time-Dependent Geomagnetic and Atmospheric Effects on Cosmogenic Nuclide Production Rate Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    A recently published cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling model based on analytical fits to Monte Carlo simulations of atmospheric cosmic ray flux spectra (both of which agree well with measured spectra) (Lifton et al., 2014, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 386, 149-160: termed the LSD model) provides two main advantages over previous scaling models: identification and quantification of potential sources of bias in the earlier models, and the ability to generate nuclide-specific scaling factors easily for a wide range of input parameters. The new model also provides a flexible framework for exploring the implications of advances in model inputs. In this work, the scaling implications of two recent time-dependent spherical harmonic geomagnetic models spanning the Holocene will be explored. Korte and Constable (2011, Phys. Earth Planet. Int. 188, 247-259) and Korte et al. (2011, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 312, 497-505) recently updated earlier spherical harmonic paleomagnetic models used by Lifton et al. (2014) with paleomagnetic measurements from sediment cores in addition to archeomagnetic and volcanic data. These updated models offer improved accuracy over the previous versions, in part to due to increased temporal and spatial data coverage. With the new models as input, trajectory-traced estimates of effective vertical cutoff rigidity (RC- the standard method for ordering cosmic ray data) yield significantly different time-integrated scaling predictions when compared to the earlier models. These results will be compared to scaling predictions using another recent time-dependent spherical harmonic model of the Holocene geomagnetic field by Pavón-Carrasco et al. (2014, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 388, 98-109), based solely on archeomagnetic and volcanic paleomagnetic data, but extending to 14 ka. In addition, the potential effects of time-dependent atmospheric models on LSD scaling predictions will be presented. Given the typical dominance of altitudinal over

  9. Regional Dispersal of Fukushima-derived Fission Nuclides by East Asia Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Chih-An; Lin, Chuan-Yao; Hsu, Shih-Chieh

    2013-04-01

    Since the Fukushima nuclear accident happened on 12 March 2011, there have been a plethora of publications about the dispersion of radioactive material from the damaged reactors. Most of these works dealt with global transport of Fukushima-derived radionuclides in the northern hemisphere and local transport in the vicinity of Fukushima and around Japan. In contrast, few works investigated into dispersal of radiation plumes from Japan to other areas on regional scales. This is because regional dispersal out of Japan in the springtime is most likely dominated by the northeastern monsoon, whereas there are few monitoring stations downwind in the southeastern Asia region. In this respect, we are only aware of the data in Vietnam published by Long et al (2012) in addition to our own data obtained in and around Taiwan (Huh et al., 2012; Hsu et al., 2012). By integrating the data published in the literature plus those that can be searched from relevant websites, we try to further elucidate the dispersal of Fukushima-derived radiation toward the southeastern Asia region. The WRF/Chem tracer model is employed to simulate the dispersal of radiation plumes from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. From a vis-à-vis comparison between the model simulation and the time-series of Fukushima-derived fission nuclides monitored around the southeastern Asia, we can distinguish between global transport by the Westerlies in the free troposphere and regional transport by the northeast monsoon in the planetary boundary layer. In general, regional (mainly meridional) transport carried more weight than global (mainly zonal) transport in contributing Fukushima-derived radioactivity to the area covered in this review, particularly at the ground-level sites. References 1. Hsu, S.C., Huh, C.A., Chan, C.Y., Lin, S.H., Lin, F.J. and Liu, S.C. (2012). Hemispheric dispersion of radioactive plume laced with fission nuclides from the Fukushima nuclear event. Geophys. Res. Lett. 39, L00

  10. Production of heavy isotopes in transfer reactions by collisions of {sup 238}U+{sup 238}U

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Zhaoqing; Jin Genming; Li Junqing

    2009-12-15

    The dynamics of transfer reactions in collisions of two very heavy nuclei {sup 238}U+{sup 238}U is studied within the dinuclear system (DNS) model. Collisions of two actinide nuclei form a superheavy composite system during a very short time, in which a large number of charge and mass transfers may take place. Such reactions have been investigated experimentally as an alternative way for the production of heavy and superheavy nuclei. The role of collision orientation in the production cross sections of heavy nuclides is analyzed systematically. Calculations show that the cross sections decrease drastically as the charged numbers of the heavy fragments increase. The transfer mechanism is favorable to synthesizing heavy neutron-rich isotopes, such as nuclei around the subclosure at N=162 from No (Z=102) to Db (Z=105)

  11. Plumbing Neutron Stars to New Depths with the Binding Energy of the Exotic Nuclide Zn82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, R. N.; Beck, D.; Blaum, K.; Böhm, Ch.; Borgmann, Ch.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Chamel, N.; Goriely, S.; Herfurth, F.; Kowalska, M.; Kreim, S.; Lunney, D.; Manea, V.; Minaya Ramirez, E.; Naimi, S.; Neidherr, D.; Rosenbusch, M.; Schweikhard, L.; Stanja, J.; Wienholtz, F.; Zuber, K.

    2013-01-01

    Modeling the composition of neutron-star crusts depends strongly on binding energies of neutron-rich nuclides near the N=50 and N=82 shell closures. Using a recent development of time-of-flight mass spectrometry for on-line purification of radioactive ion beams to access more exotic species, we have determined for the first time the mass of Zn82 with the ISOLTRAP setup at the ISOLDE-CERN facility. With a robust neutron-star model based on nuclear energy-density-functional theory, we solve the general relativistic Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations and calculate the neutron-star crust composition based on the new experimental mass. The composition profile is not only altered but now constrained by experimental data deeper into the crust than before.

  12. Towards a magnetic field stabilization at ISOLTRAP for high-accuracy mass measurements on exotic nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marie-Jeanne, M.; Alonso, J.; Blaum, K.; Djekic, S.; Dworschak, M.; Hager, U.; Herlert, A.; Nagy, Sz.; Savreux, R.; Schweikhard, L.; Stahl, S.; Yazidjian, C.

    2008-03-01

    The field stability of a mass spectrometer plays a crucial role in the accuracy of mass measurements. In the case of mass determination of short-lived nuclides with a Penning trap, major causes of fluctuations are temperature variations in the vicinity of the trap and pressure changes in the liquid helium cryostat of the superconducting magnet. Thus systems for the temperature and pressure stabilization of the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at the ISOLDE facility at CERN have been installed. A reduction of the temperature and pressure fluctuations by at least an order of magnitude down to ΔT≈±5 mK and Δp≈±5 Pa has been achieved, which corresponds to a relative magnetic field change of ΔB/B=2.7×10-9 and 1.1×10-10, respectively.

  13. Atomic mass measurements of short-lived nuclides around the doubly-magic 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C.; Audi, G.; Beck, D.; Blaum, K.; Bollen, G.; Herfurth, F.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kluge, H.-J.; Lunney, D.; Schwarz, S.

    2008-04-01

    Accurate atomic mass measurements of neutron-deficient and neutron-rich nuclides around the doubly-magic 208Pb and of neutron-rich cesium isotopes were performed with the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN. The masses of 145,147Cs, 181,183Tl, 186Tl m, 187Tl m, 196Tl m, 205Tl, 197Pb m, 208Pb, 190-197Bi, 209,215,216Bi, 203,205,229Fr, and 214,229,230Ra were determined. The obtained relative mass uncertainty in the range of 2×10 to 2×10 is not only required for safe identification of isomeric states but also allows mapping the detailed structure of the mass surface. A mass adjustment procedure was carried out and the results included into the Atomic Mass Evaluation. The resulting separation energies are discussed and the mass spectrometric and laser spectroscopic data are examined for possible correlations.

  14. ANDROS: A code for Assessment of Nuclide Doses and Risks with Option Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, C.L.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Ohr, S.Y.; Chester, R.O.

    1986-11-01

    ANDROS (Assessment of Nuclide Doses and Risks with Option Selection) is a computer code written to compute doses and health effects from atmospheric releases of radionuclides. ANDROS has been designed as an integral part of the CRRIS (Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System). ANDROS reads air concentrations and environmental concentrations of radionuclides to produce tables of specified doses and health effects to selected organs via selected pathways (e.g., ingestion or air immersion). The calculation may be done for an individual at a specific location or for the population of the whole assessment grid. The user may request tables of specific effects for every assessment grid location. Along with the radionuclide concentrations, the code requires radionuclide decay data, dose and risk factors, and location-specific data, all of which are available within the CRRIS. This document is a user manual for ANDROS and presents the methodology used in this code.

  15. Impact of Nuclear Data Uncertainties on Calculated Spent Fuel Nuclide Inventories and Advanced NDA Instrument Response

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jianwei; Gauld, Ian C.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Spent Fuel (NGSI-SF) project is nearing the final phase of developing several advanced nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments designed to measure spent nuclear fuel assemblies for the purpose of improving nuclear safeguards. Current efforts are focusing on calibrating several of these instruments with spent fuel assemblies at two international spent fuel facilities. Modelling and simulation is expected to play an important role in predicting nuclide compositions, neutron and gamma source terms, and instrument responses in order to inform the instrument calibration procedures. As part of NGSI-SF project, this work was carried out to assess the impacts of uncertainties in the nuclear data used in the calculations of spent fuel content, radiation emissions and instrument responses. Nuclear data is an essential part of nuclear fuel burnup and decay codes and nuclear transport codes. Such codes are routinely used for analysis of spent fuel and NDA safeguards instruments. Hence, the uncertainties existing in the nuclear data used in these codes affect the accuracies of such analysis. In addition, nuclear data uncertainties represent the limiting (smallest) uncertainties that can be expected from nuclear code predictions, and therefore define the highest attainable accuracy of the NDA instrument. This work studies the impacts of nuclear data uncertainties on calculated spent fuel nuclide inventories and the associated NDA instrument response. Recently developed methods within the SCALE code system are applied in this study. The Californium Interrogation with Prompt Neutron instrument was selected to illustrate the impact of these uncertainties on NDA instrument response.

  16. Impact of Nuclear Data Uncertainties on Calculated Spent Fuel Nuclide Inventories and Advanced NDA Instrument Response

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hu, Jianwei; Gauld, Ian C.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Spent Fuel (NGSI-SF) project is nearing the final phase of developing several advanced nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments designed to measure spent nuclear fuel assemblies for the purpose of improving nuclear safeguards. Current efforts are focusing on calibrating several of these instruments with spent fuel assemblies at two international spent fuel facilities. Modelling and simulation is expected to play an important role in predicting nuclide compositions, neutron and gamma source terms, and instrument responses in order to inform the instrument calibration procedures. As part of NGSI-SF project, this work was carried outmore » to assess the impacts of uncertainties in the nuclear data used in the calculations of spent fuel content, radiation emissions and instrument responses. Nuclear data is an essential part of nuclear fuel burnup and decay codes and nuclear transport codes. Such codes are routinely used for analysis of spent fuel and NDA safeguards instruments. Hence, the uncertainties existing in the nuclear data used in these codes affect the accuracies of such analysis. In addition, nuclear data uncertainties represent the limiting (smallest) uncertainties that can be expected from nuclear code predictions, and therefore define the highest attainable accuracy of the NDA instrument. This work studies the impacts of nuclear data uncertainties on calculated spent fuel nuclide inventories and the associated NDA instrument response. Recently developed methods within the SCALE code system are applied in this study. The Californium Interrogation with Prompt Neutron instrument was selected to illustrate the impact of these uncertainties on NDA instrument response.« less

  17. Study of interaction between radioactive nuclides and graphite surface by the first-principles and statistic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiaofeng; Fang, Chao; Li, Xin; Lai, Wensheng; Sun, Lifeng; Liang, Tongxiang

    2013-11-01

    The adsorption and desorption of four kinds of main radioactive productions (cesium, iodine, strontium and silver) on graphite surface in high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs) have been studied. Using the first-principles density-functional theory, adsorptive geometry, energy and electron structure on the perfect and defective graphite surfaces have been calculated. It turns out that the adsorption of Cs, I and Sr atoms belongs to chemisorption while the adsorption of Ag is a pure physisorption. When introducing a vacancy in graphite surface, nuclide adatoms will be trapped by the vacancy and form chemical bonds with three nearest neighbor carbon atoms, leading to significant increase of the adsorption energy. In addition, a model of grand canonical ensemble is employed to deduce the adsorption rate as a function of temperature and partial pressure of nuclides produced. The transition temperate from adsorption to desorption of nuclides on graphite surface is defined as the inflexion point of the adsorption rate and its variation with nuclide density is obtained.

  18. Probing the nuclides {sup 102}Pd, {sup 106}Cd, and {sup 144}Sm for resonant neutrinoless double-electron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, M.; Blaum, K.; Eliseev, S.; Block, M.; Herfurth, F.; Minaya Ramirez, E.; Droese, C.; Schweikhard, L.; Novikov, Yu. N.; Zuber, K.

    2011-08-15

    The Q values for double-electron capture in {sup 102}Pd, {sup 106}Cd, and {sup 144}Sm have been measured by Penning-trap mass spectrometry. The results exclude at present all three nuclides from the list of suitable candidates for a search for resonant neutrinoless double-electron capture.

  19. NEANSC international evaluation cooperation SG10 activities on inelastic scattering cross sections for weakly absorbing fission-product nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Chiba, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Tsuneo; Nakajima, Yutaka; Zukeran, Atsushi; Gruppelaar, H.; Hogenbirk, A.; Salvatores, M.; Dietze, K.

    1994-12-31

    An evaluation method of inelastic scattering cross sections of FP nuclides is investigated. The origins of the discrepancy found in the calculated and measured sample reactivity worths are also discussed emphasizing the effect of ambiguity in inelastic scattering cross sections and neutron spectra.

  20. The tendency analytical equations of stable nuclides and the superluminal velocity motion laws of matter in geospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Kun

    In this paper, by discussing the existent distribution trend of relation for the proton number and the neutron number to be included by the stable nuclides in geospace, the tendency analytical method and it's periodic distribution equation forms of the stable nuclides are expressed at first. Then the comparison result between the curve of the theoretical equation analysis and the points of the experimental distribution data of the stable nuclides in geospace are given. Further more, the stable nuclide limit and the chemical element limit for the chemical element periodic table are given, and the possible corresponding relation equation with the positron-particle annihilation is expressed, which includes the estimation of the order of the static mass to be situated nearby at the electron neutrino structural dimension. Subsequently, by forming two hypotheses about the energy state of vacuum matter, and basing on the equivalent Binet equation, the mass equations and the energy equations of the partial moving with light-velocity or superluminal-velocity motion fusing with the results of Einstein special relativity are expressed. As inference, the possible corresponding relations between the mass equations and energy equations with the dark matter and dark energy are discussed tentatively.

  1. Anisotropic alpha decay from oriented odd-mass isotopes of some light actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Berggren, T. )

    1994-11-01

    Half-lives and anisotropies in the [alpha] decay of [sup 205,207,209]Rn, [sup 219]Rn, [sup 221]Fr, [sup 227,229]Pa, and [sup 229]U have been calculated using the reaction-theoretical formalism proposed by Jackson and Rhoades-Brown and adapted for axially symmetric deformed nuclei by Berggren and Olanders. The possibility of octupole deformation has been taken into account. In addition, a variant of triaxial octupole deformation has been considered tentatively in the case of [sup 227]Pa and [sup 229]Pa.

  2. Shape trends and triaxiality in neutron-rich odd-mass Y and Nbisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.X.; Rasmussen, J.O.; Gelberg, A.; Stefanescu, I.; Hamilton, J.H.; Ramayya, A.V.; Hwang, J.K.; Zhu, S.J.; Gore, P.M.; Fong,D.; Jones, E.F.; Wu, S.C.; Lee, I.Y.; Ginter, T.N.; Ma, W.C.; Ter-Akopian, G.M.; Daniel, A.V.; Stoyer, M.A.; Donangelo, R.

    2004-09-28

    New level schemes of Y and Nb isotopes are proposed based on measurements of prompt gamma rays from 252Cf fission at Gammasphere. Shape trends regarding triaxiality and quadrupole deformations are studied.

  3. Fermionic-Bosonic Couplings in a Weakly Deformed Odd-Mass Nucleus ^{93}_{41}Nb

    SciTech Connect

    Orce, J. N.; Holt, J. D.; Linnemann, A.; McKay, C. J.; Fransen, C.; Jolie, J.; Kuo, T.T.S.; Lesher, S. R.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Pietralla, N.; Warr, N.; Werner, V.; Yates, S. W.

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive level scheme of {sup 93}Nb below 2 MeV has been constructed from information obtained with the {sup 93}Nb(n,n{prime}{gamma}) and the {sup 94}Zr(p,2n{gamma}{gamma}){sup 93}Nb reactions. Branching ratios, lifetimes, transition multipolarities, and spin assignments have been determined. From M1 and E2 strengths, fermionic-bosonic excitations of isoscalar and isovector characters have been identified from the weak couplings of the {pi}1g{sub 9/2} {circle_times} {sub 40}{sup 92}Zr and {pi}2p{sub 1/2}{sup -1} {circle_times} {sub 42}{sup 94}Mo configurations. A microscopic interpretation of such excitations is obtained from shell-model calculations, which use low-momentum effective interactions.

  4. Projected shell model study of yrast states of neutron-deficient odd-mass Pr nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez-Sandoval, A.; Ortiz, M. E.; Velázquez, V.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Hess, P. O.; Sun, Y.

    2011-03-01

    A wide variety of modern instruments allow us to study neutron-deficient nuclei in the A=130 mass region. Highly deformed nuclei have been found in this region, providing opportunities to study the deformed rotational bands. The description of the Pr125,127,129,131,133 isotopes with the projected shell model is presented in this paper. Good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained and some characteristics are discussed, including the dynamic moment of inertia J(2), kinetic moment of inertia J(1), the crossing of rotational bands, and backbending effects.

  5. Projected Shell Model Study of Yrast States of Neutron-Deficient Odd-Mass Pr Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanes, A.; Ortiz, Mark E; Velazquez, V.; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Hess, P. O.; Sun, Y.

    2011-01-01

    A wide variety of modern instruments allow us to study neutron-deficient nuclei in the A = 130 mass region. Highly deformed nuclei have been found in this region, providing opportunities to study the deformed rotational bands. The description of the 125,127,129,131,133Pr isotopes with the projected shell model is presented in this paper. Good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained and some characteristics are discussed, including the dynamic moment of inertia J (2), kinetic moment of inertia J (1), the crossing of rotational bands, and backbending effects.

  6. Projected shell model study of yrast states of neutron-deficient odd-mass Pr nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanez-Sandoval, A.; Ortiz, M. E.; Velazquez, V.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Hess, P. O.; Sun, Y.

    2011-03-15

    A wide variety of modern instruments allow us to study neutron-deficient nuclei in the A=130 mass region. Highly deformed nuclei have been found in this region, providing opportunities to study the deformed rotational bands. The description of the {sup 125,127,129,131,133}Pr isotopes with the projected shell model is presented in this paper. Good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained and some characteristics are discussed, including the dynamic moment of inertia J{sup (2)}, kinetic moment of inertia J{sup (1)}, the crossing of rotational bands, and backbending effects.

  7. Identification of Mixed-Symmetry States in an Odd-Mass Nearly Spherical Nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Orce, J. N.; McKay, C. J.; Lesher, S. R.; Kumar, A.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Holt, J. D.; Holt, J. W.; Kuo, T. T. S.; Linnemann, A.; Fransen, C.; Warr, N.; Werner, V.; Jolie, J.; Pietralla, N.; Yates, S. W.

    2006-08-11

    The low-spin structure of {sup 93}Nb has been studied using the (n,n{sup '}{gamma}) reaction at neutron energies ranging from 1.5 to 3 MeV and the {sup 94}Zr(p,2n{gamma}){sup 93}Nb reaction at bombarding energies from 11.5 to 19 MeV. States at 1779.7 and 1840.6 keV, respectively, are proposed as mixed-symmetry states associated with the {pi}2p{sub 1/2}{sup -1}x(2{sub 1,MS}{sup +},{sup 94}Mo) coupling. These assignments are derived from the observed M1 and E2 transition strengths to the 2p{sub 1/2}{sup -1}x(2{sub 1}{sup +},{sup 94}Mo) symmetric one-phonon states, energy systematics, spins and parities, and comparison with shell model calculations.

  8. Cluster interpretation of parity doublet rotational bands in odd-mass nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Adamian, G.G.; Antonenko, N.V.; Jolos, R.V.; Shneidman, T.M.

    2004-12-01

    The structure of parity doublet rotational bands in odd actinides and medium mass nuclei is described in a cluster model. The model is based on the assumption that cluster-type shapes are produced by the motion of the nuclear system in the mass-asymmetry coordinate. The calculated rotational bands and the electric dipole transitions between the members of the parity doublet are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  9. Erosion of mountain plateaus along Sognefjord, Norway, constrained by cosmogenic nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Jane Lund; Egholm, David L.; Knudsen, Mads F.; Linge, Henriette; Jansen, John D.

    2016-04-01

    Norway is famous for its deeply incised, steep-sided fjords, carved out by glacial erosion. The high relief of the fjords stands in contrast to the extensive areas of relatively low relief found between the fjords. The origin and development of these low-relief areas remain debated. The classical interpretation relates them to a Mesozoic peneplanation surface, uplifted to the current high elevation in the early Cenozoic (e.g. Nesje, 1994). The validity of this interpretation has, however, been repeatedly questioned in recent times (e.g. Nielsen et al. 2009, Steer et al. 2012). Recent studies point instead to a significant impact of glacial and periglacial erosion processes on the long-term development of the low-relief surfaces (Egholm et al. 2015). Here, we present a large new dataset of in-situ produced cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al in bedrock and boulders from the high, flat summit surfaces along a transect from the coast to the inner parts of Sognefjorden in Norway. Our results indicate substantial glacial modification of the sampled low-relief surfaces within the last 50 ka. Close to the coast, at an elevation of around 700 meters, the cosmogenic nuclide signal was reset around the Younger Dryas due to extensive glacial erosion. Regarding the higher surfaces further inland, our results indicate a maximum cosmogenic nuclide inheritance of 20-30 ka prior to the last deglaciation. We do not find any signs of exceptional longevity of the low-relief landscape. In contrast, our results indicate that the low-relief areas were continuously eroded by glacial and periglacial processes in the Quaternary. Nesje & Whillans. Erosion of Sognefjord, Norway. Geomorphology 9(1), 33-45, 1994. Nielsen et al. The evolution of western Scandinavian topography: a review of Neogene uplift versus the ICE (isostasy-climate-erosion) hypothesis. Journal of Geodynamics 47(2), 72-95, 2009. Steer et al. Bimodal Plio-Quaternary glacial erosion of fjords and low-relief surfaces in Scandinavia

  10. Incision of the Yangtze River at the First Bend Determined by Three-Nuclide Burial Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhillips, D. F.; Hoke, G. D.; Rood, D. H.; Bierman, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    On the southeast margin of the Tibetan Plateau, the evolution of the Yangtze River and its major tributaries has become an important source of data for investigating geodynamics. In particular, the timing of river incision is frequently interpreted as a proxy for the timing of surface uplift in the absence of structural evidence. We investigate the timing of the incision of the gorge at the First Bend using cosmogenic nuclide burial dating of coarse, quartz sediments from caves. Sediments were deposited when the caves were near river level and subsequently abandoned as the river incised. To resolve burial ages >5 Ma, we measured the radionuclides 10Be and 26Al, and the stable nuclide 21Ne. Results from 4 caves show that 26Al and 10Be concentrations are an order of magnitude lower in abandoned cave samples than in a river-level cave sample where deposition is active (10Be: 1.3x104 and 3.4x105 at/g). In contrast, 26Al/10Be ratios in all caves are ≥6.2 and indistinguishable within error. 21Ne concentrations range from 2.1x106 to 7.8x106 at/g. The results are consistent with an old age for the abandoned cave deposits, such that most of the radionuclides initially present have decayed and the concentrations that we measure today are the result of millions of years of exposure to muons. We solve for burial ages, taking into account in situ muogenic production, and find that the majority of the gorge (1 km) was likely incised between ~12 and 9 Ma. The results also require that the rate of river incision declined after the gorge was cut below the lowest elevation cave at 9 Ma. Inverse modeling of published low-temperature thermochronology (Ouimet et al., 2010) supports our burial age results. River capture near the First Bend, which likely integrated the modern Yangtze, likely occurred prior to the mid-Miocene incision of the gorge. In view of the geographic position of the First Bend—just downslope from the southeast margin of the Plateau—it is difficult to explain

  11. Super-Heavy Element and Other Exotic Nuclei Research at LLNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyer, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    The experimental nuclear physics group at LLNL is actively investigating exotic nuclei in a variety of regions of the chart of nuclides - from light nuclei to super-heavy elements. The experimental nuclear physics effort at LLNL is centered on investigating nuclei at the extremes--in particular, extremes of spin, isospin, neutron richness, excitation energy, decay and detectability, mass, and stability. This talk will focus on recent heavy and super-heavy element experiments including nuclear structure investigations of the heaviest nuclei. Other areas of research, including radioactive ion beam experiments, trapping experiments, nuclear decay spectroscopy experiments, and rare decay searches, will be discussed as time permits. Recent experimental results on studies of exotic nuclei by scientists at LLNL will be presented.

  12. CosmoCalc: An Excel add-in for cosmogenic nuclide calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, Pieter

    2007-08-01

    As dating methods using Terrestrial Cosmogenic Nuclides (TCN) become more popular, the need arises for a general-purpose and easy-to-use data reduction software. The CosmoCalc Excel add-in calculates TCN production rate scaling factors (using Lal, Stone, Dunai, and Desilets methods); topographic, snow, and self-shielding factors; and exposure ages, erosion rates, and burial ages and visualizes the results on banana-style plots. It uses an internally consistent TCN production equation that is based on the quadruple exponential approach of Granger and Smith (2000). CosmoCalc was designed to be as user-friendly as possible. Although the user interface is extremely simple, the program is also very flexible, and nearly all default parameter values can be changed. To facilitate the comparison of different scaling factors, a set of converter tools is provided, allowing the user to easily convert cut-off rigidities to magnetic inclinations, elevations to atmospheric depths, and so forth. Because it is important to use a consistent set of scaling factors for the sample measurements and the production rate calibration sites, CosmoCalc defines the production rates implicitly, as a function of the original TCN concentrations of the calibration site. The program is best suited for 10Be, 26Al, 3He, and 21Ne calculations, although basic functionality for 36Cl and 14C is also provided. CosmoCalc can be downloaded along with a set of test data from http://cosmocalc.googlepages.com.

  13. Development of the sampling and nuclide analysis methods for spent HEPA filter wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Young-Yong Ji; Dae Seok Hong; Il-Sik Kang; Bum-Kyoung Seo; Jong-Sik Shon

    2007-07-01

    Spent filter wastes of about 2,160 units have been stored in the waste storage facility of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute since its operation. These spent filters have generally consisted of a HEPA filter after its filtering of all the contaminants in the gas stream generated during the operation of the HANARO research reactor and the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. At the moment, to secure enough storage space, it is necessary to make a volume reduction of the stored radioactive wastes through a compression treatment or a regulatory clearance. There have been many studies on a treatment and a clearance of the low level radioactive wastes generated from nuclear facilities. These methods are used in view of a reduction of a management cost and disposal cost and the security of free space for a waste storage facility approaching saturation. In order to dispose of the spent filters, it is first necessary to conduct a radionuclide assessment of them. To do that, a sampling procedure should be prepared to obtain a representative sample from a spent filter. As for conducting a nuclide analysis for this representative sample, a corresponding spent filter can be determined as either a regulatory clearance waste or a radioactive waste. (authors)

  14. Applications of in situ cosmogenic nuclides in the geologic site characterization of Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Gosse, J.C.; Harrington, C.D.; Whitney, J.W.

    1996-08-01

    The gradual buildup of rare isotopes from interactions between cosmic rays and atoms in an exposed rock provides a new method of directly determining the exposure age of rock surfaces. The cosmogenic nuclide method can also provide constraints on erosion rates and the length of time surface exposure was interrupted by burial. Numerous successful applications of the technique have been imperative to the complete surface geologic characterization of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential high level nuclear waste repository. The {sup 10}Be exposure age of Black Cone lava, within a ten mile radius of the proposed repository site, is 840 {+-} 210 kyr (in agreement with previous K/Ar dates of 1.0 {+-} 0.1 Ma). Rates of erosion of the tuff bedrock (< 0.4 cm/kyr from 7 {sup 10}Be measurements) and of hillslope colluvium ({approximately} 0.5 cm/kyr from {sup 10}Be dates on boulder deposits) preclude denudation of the mountain as a concern. Neotectonic concerns (rate of slip and timing of last significant movement along faults) are also being addressed with in situ {sup 14}C and {sup 10}Be measurements on scarp surfaces and on fault-dissected landforms where no surficial expression of the fault is preserved.

  15. Cosmogenic nuclide dating of Sahelanthropus tchadensis and Australopithecus bahrelghazali: Mio-Pliocene hominids from Chad

    PubMed Central

    Lebatard, Anne-Elisabeth; Bourlès, Didier L.; Duringer, Philippe; Jolivet, Marc; Braucher, Régis; Carcaillet, Julien; Schuster, Mathieu; Arnaud, Nicolas; Monié, Patrick; Lihoreau, Fabrice; Likius, Andossa; Mackaye, Hassan Taisso; Vignaud, Patrick; Brunet, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Ages were determined at two hominid localities from the Chad Basin in the Djurab Desert (Northern Chad). In the Koro Toro fossiliferous area, KT 12 locality (16°00′N, 18°53′E) was the site of discovery of Australopithecus bahrelghazali (Abel) and in the Toros-Menalla fossiliferous area, TM 266 locality (16°15′N, 17°29′E) was the site of discovery of Sahelanthropus tchadensis (Toumaï). At both localities, the evolutive degree of the associated fossil mammal assemblages allowed a biochronological estimation of the hominid remains: early Pliocene (3–3.5 Ma) at KT 12 and late Miocene (≈7 Ma) at TM 266. Atmospheric 10Be, a cosmogenic nuclide, was used to quasicontinuously date these sedimentary units. The authigenic 10Be/9Be dating of a pelite relic within the sedimentary level containing Abel yields an age of 3.58 ± 0.27 Ma that points to the contemporaneity of Australopithecus bahrelghazali (Abel) with Australopithecus afarensis (Lucy). The 28 10Be/9Be ages obtained within the anthracotheriid unit containing Toumaï bracket, by absolute dating, the age of Sahelanthropus tchadensis to lie between 6.8 and 7.2 Ma. This chronological constraint is an important cornerstone both for establishing the earliest stages of hominid evolution and for new calibrations of the molecular clock. PMID:18305174

  16. Cosmogenic nuclide dating of Sahelanthropus tchadensis and Australopithecus bahrelghazali: Mio-Pliocene hominids from Chad.

    PubMed

    Lebatard, Anne-Elisabeth; Bourlès, Didier L; Duringer, Philippe; Jolivet, Marc; Braucher, Régis; Carcaillet, Julien; Schuster, Mathieu; Arnaud, Nicolas; Monié, Patrick; Lihoreau, Fabrice; Likius, Andossa; Mackaye, Hassan Taisso; Vignaud, Patrick; Brunet, Michel

    2008-03-01

    Ages were determined at two hominid localities from the Chad Basin in the Djurab Desert (Northern Chad). In the Koro Toro fossiliferous area, KT 12 locality (16 degrees 00'N, 18 degrees 53'E) was the site of discovery of Australopithecus bahrelghazali (Abel) and in the Toros-Menalla fossiliferous area, TM 266 locality (16 degrees 15'N, 17 degrees 29'E) was the site of discovery of Sahelanthropus tchadensis (Toumaï). At both localities, the evolutive degree of the associated fossil mammal assemblages allowed a biochronological estimation of the hominid remains: early Pliocene (3-3.5 Ma) at KT 12 and late Miocene ( approximately 7 Ma) at TM 266. Atmospheric (10)Be, a cosmogenic nuclide, was used to quasicontinuously date these sedimentary units. The authigenic (10)Be/(9)Be dating of a pelite relic within the sedimentary level containing Abel yields an age of 3.58 +/- 0.27 Ma that points to the contemporaneity of Australopithecus bahrelghazali (Abel) with Australopithecus afarensis (Lucy). The 28 (10)Be/(9)Be ages obtained within the anthracotheriid unit containing Toumaï bracket, by absolute dating, the age of Sahelanthropus tchadensis to lie between 6.8 and 7.2 Ma. This chronological constraint is an important cornerstone both for establishing the earliest stages of hominid evolution and for new calibrations of the molecular clock. PMID:18305174

  17. Cosmogenic nuclides in cometary materials: Implications for rate of mass loss and exposure history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzog, G. F.; Englert, P. A. J.; Reedy, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    As planned, the Rosetta mission will return to earth with a 10-kg core and a 1-kg surface sample from a comet. The selection of a comet with low current activity will maximize the chance of obtaining material altered as little as possible. Current temperature and level of activity, however, may not reliably indicate previous values. Fortunately, from measurements of the cosmogenic nuclide contents of cometary material, one may estimate a rate of mass loss in the past and perhaps learn something about the exposure history of the comet. Perhaps the simplest way to estimate the rate of mass loss is to compare the total inventories of several long-lived cosmogenic radionuclides with the values expected on the basis of model calculations. Although model calculations have become steadily more reliable, application to bodies with the composition of comets will require some extension beyond the normal range of use. In particular, the influence of light elements on the secondary particle cascade will need study, in part through laboratory irradiations of volatile-rich materials. In the analysis of cometary data, it would be valuable to test calculations against measurements of short-lived isotopes.

  18. Studies of Itokawa's Surface Exposure by Measurements of Cosmic-ray Produced Nuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffee, M. W.; Nishiizumi, K.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Uesugi, M.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    We plan to investigate the evolutionary history of surface materials from 25143 Itokawa, the Hayabusa samples. Our studies are based on the measurement of nuclides produced in asteroidal surface materials by cosmic rays. Cosmogenic radionuclides are used to determine the duration and nature of the exposure of materials to energetic particles. Our goals are to understand both the fundamental processes on the asteroidal surface and the evolutionary history of its surface materials. They are also key to understanding the history of Itokawa's surface and asteroid-meteoroid evolutionary dynamics. To achieve our key goals, in particular reconstructing the evolutionary histories of the asteroidal surface, we proposed: (1) characterizing Itokawa particles using SXCT, SXRD, and FE-SEM without modification of the sample; (2) embedding each particle in acrylic resin, then slicing a small corner with an ultra-microtome and examining it using super-STEM and SIMS for characterizing surface morphology, space weathering, and oxygen three-isotope analysis; and finally (3) measuring small amounts of cosmogenic radionuclides (104-105 atoms) in Hayabusa samples by AMS. However, we have to modify our plan due to unexpected situation.

  19. Activity concentration of natural radioactive nuclides in nonmetallic industrial raw materials in Japan.

    PubMed

    Iwaoka, Kazuki; Tabe, Hiroyuki; Yonehara, Hidenori

    2014-11-01

    Natural materials such as rock, ore, and clay, containing natural radioactive nuclides are widely used as industrial raw materials in Japan. If these are high concentrations, the workers who handle the material can be unknowingly exposed to radiation at a high level. In this study, about 80 nonmetallic natural materials frequently used as industrial raw materials in Japan were comprehensively collected from several industrial companies, and the activity concentrations of (238)U series, (232)Th series and (40)K in the materials was determined by ICP-MS (inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometer) and gamma ray spectrum analyses. Effective doses to workers handling them were estimated by using methods for dose estimation given in the RP 122. We found the activity concentrations to be lower than the critical values defined by regulatory requirements as described in the IAEA Safety Guide. The maximum estimated effective dose to workers handling these materials was 0.16 mSv y(-1), which was lower than the reference level (1-20 mSv y(-1)) for existing situation given in the ICRP Publ.103. PMID:25046866

  20. Chemical isolation of quartz for measurement of in-situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, C.P.; Nishiizumi, K. )

    1992-09-01

    Measurement of cosmogenic nuclides produced in situ in terrestrial samples shows great potential as a tool for quantifying continental erosion rates, determining exposure ages of rocks, dating various geologic events, and elucidating past climates. An isolation method relying totally on chemical steps was developed to separate large quantities (10-200 g) of clean mono-minerallic quartz samples from a variety of terrestrial rocks and soils for the purpose of measuring [sup 10]Be (t[sub 1/2] = 1.5 Myr) and [sup 26]Al (t[sub 1/2] = 0.705 Myr) produced by cosmic rays in situ in the quartz phase. The procedure consists of grinding the sample, heating it in HCl, and treating it with a series of leaches using a dilute HF/HNO[sub 3] mixture in a heated ultrasonic tank. The purified quartz was also used for the measurements of in-situ-cosmic-ray-produced [sup 21]Ne and [sup 14]C (t[sub 1/2] = 5,730 yr). The method is applicable to any problem requiring purified quartz on a large scale.

  1. Measurement of the complete nuclide production and kinetic energies of the system {sup 136}Xe+hydrogen at 1 GeV per nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Napolitani, P.; Tassan-Got, L.; Audouin, L.; Bernas, M.; Lafriaskh, A.; Stephan, C.; Rejmund, F.

    2007-12-15

    We present an extensive overview of production cross sections and kinetic energies for the complete set of nuclides formed in the spallation of {sup 136}Xe by protons at the incident energy of 1 GeV per nucleon. The measurement was performed in inverse kinematics at the GSI fragment separator. Slightly below the Businaro-Gallone point, {sup 136}Xe is the stable nuclide with the largest neutron excess. The kinematic data and cross sections collected in this work for the full nuclide production are a general benchmark for modeling the spallation process in a neutron-rich nuclear system, where fission is characterized by predominantly mass-asymmetric splits.

  2. First Use of High Charge States for Mass Measurements of Short-Lived Nuclides in a Penning Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Ettenauer, S.; Gallant, A. T.; Dilling, J.; Simon, M. C.; Chaudhuri, A.; Mane, E.; Delheij, P.; Pearson, M. R.; Brunner, T.; Chowdhury, U.; Simon, V. V.; Brodeur, M.; Andreoiu, C.; Audi, G.; Lopez-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo; Ullrich, J.; Gwinner, G.; Lapierre, A.; Lunney, D.; Ringle, R.

    2011-12-30

    Penning trap mass measurements of short-lived nuclides have been performed for the first time with highly charged ions, using the TITAN facility at TRIUMF. Compared to singly charged ions, this provides an improvement in experimental precision that scales with the charge state q. Neutron-deficient Rb isotopes have been charge bred in an electron beam ion trap to q=8-12+ prior to injection into the Penning trap. In combination with the Ramsey excitation scheme, this unique setup creating low energy, highly charged ions at a radioactive beam facility opens the door to unrivaled precision with gains of 1-2 orders of magnitude. The method is particularly suited for short-lived nuclides such as the superallowed {beta} emitter {sup 74}Rb (T{sub 1/2}=65 ms). The determination of its atomic mass and an improved Q{sub EC} value are presented.

  3. First use of high charge states for mass measurements of short-lived nuclides in a Penning trap.

    PubMed

    Ettenauer, S; Simon, M C; Gallant, A T; Brunner, T; Chowdhury, U; Simon, V V; Brodeur, M; Chaudhuri, A; Mané, E; Andreoiu, C; Audi, G; López-Urrutia, J R Crespo; Delheij, P; Gwinner, G; Lapierre, A; Lunney, D; Pearson, M R; Ringle, R; Ullrich, J; Dilling, J

    2011-12-30

    Penning trap mass measurements of short-lived nuclides have been performed for the first time with highly charged ions, using the TITAN facility at TRIUMF. Compared to singly charged ions, this provides an improvement in experimental precision that scales with the charge state q. Neutron-deficient Rb isotopes have been charge bred in an electron beam ion trap to q=8-12+ prior to injection into the Penning trap. In combination with the Ramsey excitation scheme, this unique setup creating low energy, highly charged ions at a radioactive beam facility opens the door to unrivaled precision with gains of 1-2 orders of magnitude. The method is particularly suited for short-lived nuclides such as the superallowed β emitter 74Rb (T(1/2)=65  ms). The determination of its atomic mass and an improved Q(EC) value are presented. PMID:22243307

  4. Light-ion-induced reactions in mass measurements of neutron-deficient nuclides close to A = 100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elomaa, V.-V.; Eronen, T.; Hager, U.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Moore, I. D.; Rahaman, S.; Rissanen, J.; Rubchenya, V.; Weber, C.; Äystö, J.

    2009-04-01

    A survey of neutron-deficient nuclides which can be produced via proton- and 3He -induced fusion-evaporation reactions in the A = 100 region was made using a Penning trap as a high-resolution mass filter. A comparison of the measured isotopic rates with a statistical model calculation for the proton-induced reactions shows the importance of using the precise binding energy values for the final reaction products. In particular, proton separation energies were found to play an important role in the evaporation process. In addition, accurate masses of 12 nuclides, 97-99, 101Pd , 100Ag , 101-105Cd and 102, 104In , were determined with uncertainties of less than 10keV.

  5. Dating the incision of the Yangtze River gorge at the First Bend using three-nuclide burial ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhillips, Devin; Hoke, Gregory D.; Liu-Zeng, Jing; Bierman, Paul R.; Rood, Dylan H.; Niedermann, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Incision of the Yangtze River gorge is widely interpreted as evidence for lower crustal flow beneath the southeast margin of the Tibetan Plateau. Previous work focused on the onset of incision, but the duration of incision remains unknown. Here we present cosmogenic nuclide burial ages of sediments collected from caves on the walls of the gorge that show the gorge was incised ~1 km sometime between 18 and 9 Ma. Thereafter, incision slowed substantially. We resolve middle Miocene burial ages by using three nuclides and accounting for in situ muogenic production. This approach explains the absolute concentrations of 10Be, 26Al, and 21Ne, as well as 26Al/10Be and 21Ne/10Be ratios. A declining incision rate challenges existing geodynamic interpretations by suggesting that either (1) surface uplift has ceased immediately south of the plateau margin or (2) gorge incision is not a useful proxy for the timing of surface uplift.

  6. Instrumental activation analysis of coal and fly ash with thermal and epithermal neutrons and short-lived nuclides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinnes, E.; Rowe, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis is applied to the determination of about 25 elements in coals and fly ash by means of nuclides with half-lives of less than 48 h ; thermal and epithermal irradiations are used. The results indicate that epithermal activation is preferable for twelve of the elements (Ga, As, Br, Sr, In, Cs, Ba, La, Sm, Ho, W and U). Data for SRM 1632 (coal) and SRM 1633 (fly ash) compare favorably with the results obtained by other investigators. ?? 1976.

  7. Measurements of cross sections for production of light nuclides by 120 GeV proton bombardment of Ni and Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Shintaro; Sekimoto, Shun; Yashima, Hiroshi; Matsushi, Yuki; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Shibata, Seiichi; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu

    2014-09-01

    Production cross sections for long-lived cosmogenic nuclides, such as Be-10 and Al-26 have a very practical benefit for health and safety in radiation protection; they serve as a comprehensive nuclear database that can be used to estimate residual radioactivities in accelerator facilities. Cross sections are also indispensable for studying the specific formation mechanisms of these nuclides, where spallation, fission, or fragmentation is a dominant process. The fragmentation process is usually studied by production cross sections of light nuclides which are best measured by AMS. For energies above 100 MeV few measurements have been made and published. We have measured and report the first Be-10 and Al-26 production cross sections from Ni and Au produced by 120 GeV protons. The proton irradiation at 120 GeV was performed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The AMS measurements were performed at MALT, University of Tokyo. We will discuss the production mechanism of Be-10 and Al-26 by spallation and fragmentation.

  8. Heavy quark masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Testa, Massimo

    1990-01-01

    In the large quark mass limit, an argument which identifies the mass of the heavy-light pseudoscalar or scalar bound state with the renormalized mass of the heavy quark is given. The following equation is discussed: m(sub Q) = m(sub B), where m(sub Q) and m(sub B) are respectively the mass of the heavy quark and the mass of the pseudoscalar bound state.

  9. On a solar origin for the cosmogenic nuclide event of 775 A.D

    SciTech Connect

    Cliver, E. W.; Tylka, A. J.; Dietrich, W. F.; Ling, A. G.

    2014-01-20

    We explore requirements for a solar particle event (SPE) and flare capable of producing the cosmogenic nuclide event of 775 A.D., and review solar circumstances at that time. A solar source for 775 would require a >1 GV spectrum ∼45 times stronger than that of the intense high-energy SPE of 1956 February 23. This implies a >30 MeV proton fluence (F {sub 30}) of ∼8 × 10{sup 10} proton cm{sup –2}, ∼10 times larger than that of the strongest 3 month interval of SPE activity in the modern era. This inferred F {sub 30} value for the 775 SPE is inconsistent with the occurrence probability distribution for >30 MeV solar proton events. The best guess value for the soft X-ray classification (total energy) of an associated flare is ∼X230 (∼9 × 10{sup 33} erg). For comparison, the flares on 2003 November 4 and 1859 September 1 had observed/inferred values of ∼X35 (∼10{sup 33} erg) and ∼X45 (∼2 × 10{sup 33} erg), respectively. The estimated size of the source active region for a ∼10{sup 34} erg flare is ∼2.5 times that of the largest region yet recorded. The 775 event occurred during a period of relatively low solar activity, with a peak smoothed amplitude about half that of the second half of the 20th century. The ∼1945-1995 interval, the most active of the last ∼2000 yr, failed to witness a SPE comparable to that required for the proposed solar event in 775. These considerations challenge a recent suggestion that the 775 event is likely of solar origin.

  10. Fission barriers at the end of the chart of the nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Möller, Peter; Sierk, Arnold J.; Ichikawa, Takatoshi; Iwamoto, Akira; Mumpower, Matthew

    2015-02-12

    We present calculated fission-barrier heights for 5239 nuclides for all nuclei between the proton and neutron drip lines with 171 ≤ A ≤ 330. The barriers are calculated in the macroscopic-microscopic finite-range liquid-drop (FRLDM) with a 2002 set of macroscopic-model parameters. The saddle-point energies are determined from potential-energy surfaces based on more than five million different shapes, defined by five deformation parameters in the three-quadratic-surface shape parametrization: elongation, neck diameter, left-fragment spheroidal deformation, right-fragment spheroidal deformation, and nascent-fragment mass asymmetry. The energy of the ground state is determined by calculating the lowest-energy configuration in both the Nilsson perturbed-spheroid (ϵ) and the spherical-harmonic (β) parametrizations, including axially asymmetric deformations. The lower of the two results (correcting for zero-point motion) is defined as the ground-state energy. The effect of axial asymmetry on the inner barrier peak is calculated in the (ϵ,γ) parametrization. We have earlier benchmarked our calculated barrier heights to experimentally extracted barrier parameters and found average agreement to about one MeV for known data across the nuclear chart. Here we do additional benchmarks and investigate the qualitative and, when possible, quantitative agreement and/or consistency with data on β-delayed fission, isotope generation along prompt-neutron-capture chains in nuclear-weapons tests, and superheavy-element stability. In addition these studies all indicate that the model is realistic at considerable distances in Z and N from the region of nuclei where its parameters were determined.

  11. Fission barriers at the end of the chart of the nuclides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Möller, Peter; Sierk, Arnold J.; Ichikawa, Takatoshi; Iwamoto, Akira; Mumpower, Matthew

    2015-02-12

    We present calculated fission-barrier heights for 5239 nuclides for all nuclei between the proton and neutron drip lines with 171 ≤ A ≤ 330. The barriers are calculated in the macroscopic-microscopic finite-range liquid-drop (FRLDM) with a 2002 set of macroscopic-model parameters. The saddle-point energies are determined from potential-energy surfaces based on more than five million different shapes, defined by five deformation parameters in the three-quadratic-surface shape parametrization: elongation, neck diameter, left-fragment spheroidal deformation, right-fragment spheroidal deformation, and nascent-fragment mass asymmetry. The energy of the ground state is determined by calculating the lowest-energy configuration in both the Nilsson perturbed-spheroid (ϵ) andmore » the spherical-harmonic (β) parametrizations, including axially asymmetric deformations. The lower of the two results (correcting for zero-point motion) is defined as the ground-state energy. The effect of axial asymmetry on the inner barrier peak is calculated in the (ϵ,γ) parametrization. We have earlier benchmarked our calculated barrier heights to experimentally extracted barrier parameters and found average agreement to about one MeV for known data across the nuclear chart. Here we do additional benchmarks and investigate the qualitative and, when possible, quantitative agreement and/or consistency with data on β-delayed fission, isotope generation along prompt-neutron-capture chains in nuclear-weapons tests, and superheavy-element stability. In addition these studies all indicate that the model is realistic at considerable distances in Z and N from the region of nuclei where its parameters were determined.« less

  12. Constraining Landscape History and Glacial Erosivity Using Paired Cosmogenic Nuclides in Upernavik, Northwest Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbett, Lee B.; Bierman, Paul R.; Graly, Joseph A.; Neumann, Thomas A.; Rood, Dylan H.

    2013-01-01

    High-latitude landscape evolution processes have the potential to preserve old, relict surfaces through burial by cold-based, nonerosive glacial ice. To investigate landscape history and age in the high Arctic, we analyzed in situ cosmogenic Be(sup 10) and Al (sup 26) in 33 rocks from Upernavik, northwest Greenland. We sampled adjacent bedrock-boulder pairs along a 100 km transect at elevations up to 1000 m above sea level. Bedrock samples gave significantly older apparent exposure ages than corresponding boulder samples, and minimum limiting ages increased with elevation. Two-isotope calculations Al(sup26)/B(sup 10) on 20 of the 33 samples yielded minimum limiting exposure durations up to 112 k.y., minimum limiting burial durations up to 900 k.y., and minimum limiting total histories up to 990 k.y. The prevalence of BE(sup 10) and Al(sup 26) inherited from previous periods of exposure, especially in bedrock samples at high elevation, indicates that these areas record long and complex surface exposure histories, including significant periods of burial with little subglacial erosion. The long total histories suggest that these high elevation surfaces were largely preserved beneath cold-based, nonerosive ice or snowfields for at least the latter half of the Quaternary. Because of high concentrations of inherited nuclides, only the six youngest boulder samples appear to record the timing of ice retreat. These six samples suggest deglaciation of the Upernavik coast at 11.3 +/- 0.5 ka (average +/- 1 standard deviation). There is no difference in deglaciation age along the 100 km sample transect, indicating that the ice-marginal position retreated rapidly at rates of approx.120 m yr(sup-1).

  13. Fission barriers at the end of the chart of the nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Peter; Sierk, Arnold J.; Ichikawa, Takatoshi; Iwamoto, Akira; Mumpower, Matthew

    2015-02-01

    We present calculated fission-barrier heights for 5239 nuclides for all nuclei between the proton and neutron drip lines with 171 ≤A ≤330 . The barriers are calculated in the macroscopic-microscopic finite-range liquid-drop model with a 2002 set of macroscopic-model parameters. The saddle-point energies are determined from potential-energy surfaces based on more than 5 000 000 different shapes, defined by five deformation parameters in the three-quadratic-surface shape parametrization: elongation, neck diameter, left-fragment spheroidal deformation, right-fragment spheroidal deformation, and nascent-fragment mass asymmetry. The energy of the ground state is determined by calculating the lowest-energy configuration in both the Nilsson perturbed-spheroid (ɛ ) and the spherical-harmonic (β ) parametrizations, including axially asymmetric deformations. The lower of the two results (correcting for zero-point motion) is defined as the ground-state energy. The effect of axial asymmetry on the inner barrier peak is calculated in the (ɛ ,γ ) parametrization. We have earlier benchmarked our calculated barrier heights to experimentally extracted barrier parameters and found average agreement to about 1 MeV for known data across the nuclear chart. Here we do additional benchmarks and investigate the qualitative and, when possible, quantitative agreement and/or consistency with data on β -delayed fission, isotope generation along prompt-neutron-capture chains in nuclear-weapons tests, and superheavy-element stability. These studies all indicate that the model is realistic at considerable distances in Z and N from the region of nuclei where its parameters were determined.

  14. Removal of Radioactive Nuclides from Mo-99 Acidic Liquid Waste - 13027

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Hsien-Ming; Pen, Ben-Li

    2013-07-01

    About 200 liters highly radioactive acidic liquid waste originating from Mo-99 production was stored at INER (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research). A study regarding the treatment of the radioactive acidic liquid waste was conducted to solve storage-related issues and allow discharge of the waste while avoiding environmental pollution. Before discharging the liquid waste, the acidity, NO{sub 3}{sup -} and Hg ions in high concentrations, and radionuclides must comply with environmental regulations. Therefore, the treatment plan was to neutralize the acidic liquid waste, remove key radionuclides to reduce the dose rate, and then remove the nitrate and mercury ions. Bench tests revealed that NaOH is the preferred solution to neutralize the high acidic waste solution and the pH of solution must be adjusted to 9∼11 prior to the removal of nuclides. Significant precipitation was produced when the pH of solution reached 9. NaNO{sub 3} was the major content in the precipitate and part of NaNO{sub 3} was too fine to be completely collected by filter paper with a pore size of approximately 3 μm. The residual fine particles remaining in solution therefore blocked the adsorption column during operation. Two kinds of adsorbents were employed for Cs-137 and a third for Sr-90 removal to minimize cost. For personnel radiation protection, significant lead shielding was required at a number of points in the process. The final process design and treatment facilities successfully treated the waste solutions and allowed for environmentally compliant discharge. (authors)

  15. On a Solar Origin for the Cosmogenic Nuclide Event of 775 A.D.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Tylka, A. J.; Dietrich, W. F.; Ling, A. G.

    2014-01-01

    We explore requirements for a solar particle event (SPE) and flare capable of producing the cosmogenic nuclide event of 775 A.D., and review solar circumstances at that time. A solar source for 775 would require a greater than 1 GV spectrum approximately 45 times stronger than that of the intense high-energy SPE of 1956 February 23. This implies a greater than 30 MeV proton fluence (F(sub 30)) of approximately 8 × 10(exp 10) proton cm(exp -2), approximately 10 times larger than that of the strongest 3 month interval of SPE activity in the modern era. This inferred F(sub 30) value for the 775 SPE is inconsistent with the occurrence probability distribution for greater than 30 MeV solar proton events. The best guess value for the soft X-ray classification (total energy) of an associated flare is approximately X230 (approximately 9 × 10(exp 33) erg). For comparison, the flares on 2003 November 4 and 1859 September 1 had observed/inferred values of approximately X35 (approximately 10(exp 33) erg) and approximately X45 (approximately 2 × 10(exp 33) erg), respectively. The estimated size of the source active region for a approximately 10(exp 34) erg flare is approximately 2.5 times that of the largest region yet recorded. The 775 event occurred during a period of relatively low solar activity, with a peak smoothed amplitude about half that of the second half of the 20th century. The approximately 1945-1995 interval, the most active of the last approximately 2000 yr, failed to witness a SPE comparable to that required for the proposed solar event in 775. These considerations challenge a recent suggestion that the 775 event is likely of solar origin.

  16. Extensive MIS 3 glaciation in southernmost Patagonia revealed by cosmogenic nuclide dating of outwash sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvill, Christopher M.; Bentley, Michael J.; Stokes, Chris R.; Hein, Andrew S.; Rodés, Ángel

    2015-11-01

    The timing and extent of former glacial advances can demonstrate leads and lags during periods of climatic change and their forcing, but this requires robust glacial chronologies. In parts of southernmost Patagonia, dating pre-global Last Glacial Maximum (gLGM) ice limits has proven difficult due to post-deposition processes affecting the build-up of cosmogenic nuclides in moraine boulders. Here we provide ages for the Río Cullen and San Sebastián glacial limits of the former Bahía Inútil-San Sebastián (BI-SSb) ice lobe on Tierra del Fuego (53-54°S), previously hypothesised to represent advances during Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 12 and 10, respectively. Our approach uses cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al exposure dating, but targets glacial outwash associated with these limits and uses depth-profiles and surface cobble samples, thereby accounting for surface deflation and inheritance. The data reveal that the limits formed more recently than previously thought, giving ages of 45.6 ka (+139.9/-14.3) for the Río Cullen, and 30.1 ka (+45.6/-23.1) for the San Sebastián limits. These dates indicate extensive glaciation in southern Patagonia during MIS 3, prior to the well-constrained, but much less extensive MIS 2 (gLGM) limit. This suggests the pattern of ice advances in the region was different to northern Patagonia, with the terrestrial limits relating to the last glacial cycle, rather than progressively less extensive glaciations over hundreds of thousands of years. However, the dates are consistent with MIS 3 glaciation elsewhere in the southern mid-latitudes, and the combination of cooler summers and warmer winters with increased precipitation, may have caused extensive glaciation prior to the gLGM.

  17. Mutagenicity of heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, P.K.

    1988-04-01

    Certain heavy metals are required, as trace elements for normal cellular functions. However, heavy metals are toxic to cells once their levels exceed their low physiological values. The toxicity of heavy metals on microorganisms, and on animals has been well-documented. These interactions may induce the alteration of the primary as well as secondary structures of the DNA and result in mutation(s). The present communication reports the results in determining the mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of ten heavy metals commonly found in polluted areas by using the Salmonella/mammalian-microsome mutagenicity test.

  18. Heavy-electron materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, Z.; Ott, H.R.; Smith, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    De Haas-van Alphen results demonstrated the existence of a Fermi surface at sufficiently low temperature and show that the entire Fermi surface involves heavy electrons. The phase transitions in their heavy-electron state are discussed. These are either magnetic or superconducting. 38 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs. (WRF)

  19. Mutagenicity of heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, P.K. )

    1988-05-01

    Certain heavy metals are required, as trace elements for normal cellular functions. However, heavy metals are toxic to cells once their levels exceed their low physiological values. The toxicity of heavy metals on microorganisms, on plants and on animals has been well-documented. These interactions may induce the alteration of the primary as well as secondary structures of the DNA and result in mutation(s). Though the rec assay with Bacillus subtilis and the reversion assay with Escherichia coli were used to assess the mutagenicity of some heavy metals, the present communication reports the results in determining the mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of ten heavy metals commonly found in polluted areas by using the Salmonella/mammalian-microsome mutagenicity test.

  20. Nuclide analysis in high burnup fuel samples irradiated in Vandellós 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwicky, H. U.; Low, J.; Granfors, M.; Alejano, C.; Conde, J. M.; Casado, C.; Sabater, J.; Lloret, M.; Quecedo, M.; Gago, J. A.

    2010-07-01

    In the framework of a high burnup fuel demonstration programme, rods with an enrichment of 4.5% 235U were operated to a rod average burnup of about 70 MWd/kgU in the Spanish Vandellós 2 pressurised water reactor. The rods were sent to hot cells and used for different research projects. This paper describes the isotopic composition measurements performed on samples of those rods, and the analysis of the measurement results based on comparison against calculated values. The fraction and composition of fission gases released to the rod free volume was determined for two of the rods. About 8% of Kr and Xe produced by fission were released. From the isotopic composition of the gases, it could be concluded that the gases were not preferentially released from the peripheral part of the fuel column. Local burnup and isotopic content of gamma emitting nuclides were determined by quantitatively evaluating axial gamma scans of the full rods. Nine samples were cut at different axial levels from three of the rods and analysed in two campaigns. More than 50 isotopes of 16 different elements were assessed, most of them by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry after separation with High Performance Liquid Chromatography. In general, these over 400 data points gave a consistent picture of the isotopic content of irradiated fuel as a function of burnup. Only in a few cases, the analysis provided unexpected results that seem to be wrong, in most cases due to unidentified reasons. Sample burnup analysis was performed by comparing experimental isotopic abundances of uranium and plutonium composition as well as neodymium isotopic concentrations with corresponding CASMO based data. The results were in agreement with values derived independently from gamma scanning and from core design data and plant operating records. Measured isotope abundances were finally assessed using the industry standard SAS2H sequence of the SCALE code system. This exercise showed good agreement between

  1. The light curve of SN 1987A revisited: constraining production masses of radioactive nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Timmes, F. X.; Magkotsios, Georgios

    2014-09-01

    We revisit the evidence for the contribution of the long-lived radioactive nuclides {sup 44}Ti, {sup 55}Fe, {sup 56}Co, {sup 57}Co, and {sup 60}Co to the UVOIR light curve of SN 1987A. We show that the V-band luminosity constitutes a roughly constant fraction of the bolometric luminosity between 900 and 1900 days, and we obtain an approximate bolometric light curve out to 4334 days by scaling the late time V-band data by a constant factor where no bolometric light curve data is available. Considering the five most relevant decay chains starting at {sup 44}Ti, {sup 55}Co, {sup 56}Ni, {sup 57}Ni, and {sup 60}Co, we perform a least squares fit to the constructed composite bolometric light curve. For the nickel isotopes, we obtain best fit values of M({sup 56}Ni) = (7.1 ± 0.3) × 10{sup –2} M {sub ☉} and M({sup 57}Ni) = (4.1 ± 1.8) × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉}. Our best fit {sup 44}Ti mass is M({sup 44}Ti) = (0.55 ± 0.17) × 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉}, which is in disagreement with the much higher (3.1 ± 0.8) × 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉} recently derived from INTEGRAL observations. The associated uncertainties far exceed the best fit values for {sup 55}Co and {sup 60}Co and, as a result, we only give upper limits on the production masses of M({sup 55}Co) < 7.2 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} and M({sup 60}Co) < 1.7 × 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉}. Furthermore, we find that the leptonic channels in the decay of {sup 57}Co (internal conversion and Auger electrons) are a significant contribution and constitute up to 15.5% of the total luminosity. Consideration of the kinetic energy of these electrons is essential in lowering our best fit nickel isotope production ratio to [{sup 57}Ni/{sup 56}Ni] = 2.5 ± 1.1, which is still somewhat high but is in agreement with gamma-ray observations and model predictions.

  2. Flux of transuranium nuclides and chlorinated hydrocarbons in the northwestern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, S. W.; Ballestra, S.; Villeneuve, J.-P.

    1990-09-01

    The transuranium nuclides, plutonium and americium, and selected chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds have been measured in sediment trap samples, bottom sediments and waters. These measurements have been used to quantify vertical fluxes and elucidate particulate biogeochemical cycles, of these man-made contaminants in the northwestern Mediterranean. Sediment trap experiments in the Gulf of Lions (Lacaze-Duthiers Canyon) have shown that transuranic fluxes are considerably higher in the Gulf of Lions, than those which have been reported for the northeast Pacific; principally this is due to the relatively high mass fluxes in this region of the Mediterranean. Water, surface sediment and sediment trap data indicate that 241Am is being transported downward (via particle settling) more rapidly than 239+240Pu. From direct flux measurement, residence times for 239+240Pu and 241Am in the upper 300 m were computed to be 2.5 and 0.14 years, respectively. Comparison of 239+240Pu concentrations in the water column, in 1986, with similar measurements made 5-11 years earlier suggests that fallout input to the Mediterranean has decreased by nearly a factor of 2 during the period 1975-1986. Fluxes of PCB, HCB, γ-HCH and DDT residues varied by as much as an order of magnitude, or more, both temporally and with depth. The average fluxes of most of the compounds in the Lacaze-Duthiers Canyon, during 1985-1986, were quite similar to those measured off the coast of Monaco several years earlier. Generally, the increased chlorinated hydrocarbon fluxes observed with depth were a direct result of the much higher mass fluxes which occurred at depth. Demonstrated differences in PCB concentrations in the settling particles, deposited surface sediments and overlying sediment floc indicate that simple bottom sediment resuspension is not a major contributor to the enhanced PCB flux noted at depth. The PCB concentration in sedimenting particulate material collected from deeper waters, is similar to

  3. Temporal and latitudinal cosmogenic nuclide-derived denudation rates from European river terraces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, Mirjam; Ehlers, Todd A.

    2014-05-01

    Denudation of the Earth surface is sensitive to changes in tectonics, climate, and biotic activity. The determination of these denudation rates over space and time has proven difficult. Cosmogenic nuclide concentrations in active river sediment and river terrace deposits contain information about catchment-wide denudation rates and paleo-denudation rates, respectively. In this study, temporal and spatial variations in denudation across Europe are investigated as a function of Quaternary climate change. We test the hypothesis that Quaternary climate change impacted catchment denudation rates between glacial and interglacial cycles and during late Cenozoic global cooling. Furthermore, the latitudinal dependence and perhaps the spatially and temporally asynchronous behavior of catchments due to the effect of climate change on denudation are considered. Methods used include quantification of paleo-denudation rates from in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al measured in river terraces determined from catchments in southern and northern Spain (Guadalquivir and Esla, respectively), central France (Allier and Loire), and the Czech Republic (Vltava). These five catchments span 12 degrees latitude and provide a rich temporal record of denudation rates. Results from work in progress indicate that modern denudation rates (over timescales of ~20 kyr) in the Guadalquivir range between 34 to 42 mm/kyr. In the upper course of the Esla denudation rates are 50 mm/kyr and 30 mm/kyr in the lower course of the river system. For the Allier, denudation rates recalculated from measurements by Schaller et al., (2001) are around 40 mm/kyr, The denudation rates of the Vltava and the Elbe are around 30 mm/kyr with the Elbe at 38 mm/kyr. All denudation rates of the four catchments studied are very similar despite the different latitudinal and present day climatic settings. Given these similarities in denudation rates so far suggest that modern catchment denudation is relatively insensitive

  4. Thick-Target Simulation Experiments as a Basis for Consistent Modeling of Cosmogenic Nuclide Production in Extraterrestrial Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, R.; Lange, H.-J.; Leya, I.; Herpers, U.; Meltzow, B.; Dittrich-Hannen, B.; Suter, M.; Kubik, P. W.

    1995-09-01

    Cosmogenic nuclide production rates in meteoroids depend on size and bulk chemical composition of the meteoroid, on the shielding depth and the chemical composition of a sample in it, on spectral distribution, composition and intensity of solar and galactic cosmic radiation, and on the possibly complex exposure history. Except for bulk and sample chemical compositions, all parameters are unknown and must be reconstructed. In order to interpret cosmogenic nuclide abundances in meteorites with respect to their exposure histories, to reconstruct the preatmospheric shapes of the meteoroids and to draw conclusions about long-term spectral distributions and intensities of the cosmic radiation, reliable model calculations of producton rates must be available. The lack of knowledge about the parameters which influence the production rates causes ambiguity of empirical and physical model calculations, if exclusively meteorite data are taken into account. Physical models of cosmogenic nuclide production in meteoroids without free parameters can be established on the basis of thick-target experiments by which the cosmic ray exposure of meteoroids in space is simulated as close as possible under completely controlled conditions. During recent years, we have performed five such experiments to simulate the exposure of meteoroids to galactic protons [1-6]. Here, we report new results on the latest one of these experiments, in which an artificial iron meteoroid made of steel with a radius of 10 cm was isotropically irradiated by 1.6 GeV protons [4,5]. Measurements and evaluation are now completed for shortand mediumlived radionuclides. Results for long-lived nuclides by AMS and of stable rare gas isotopes are partially available with additional measurements still going on. The results obtained up to now for radionuclide production are presented and discussed with respect to some aspects of the production of cosmogenic nuclides in iron meteoroids and of the influence of bulk

  5. Mass Measurements of Proton-rich Nuclides at the Cooler Storage Ring at IMP

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. H.; Xu, H. S.; Wang, M.; Zhou, X. H.; Yuan, Y. J.; Xia, J. W.; Hu, Z. G.; Huang, W. X.; Liu, Y.; Ma, X.; Mao, R. S.; Mei, B.; Sun, Z. Y.; Wang, J. S.; Xiao, G. Q.; Yan, X. L.; Yang, J. C.; Zhao, H. W.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhang, X. Y.; and others

    2011-11-30

    Recent results and progress of mass measurements of proton-rich nuclei using isochronous mass spectrometry (IMS) are reported. The nuclei under investigation were produced via fragmentation of relativistic energy heavy ions of {sup 78}Kr and {sup 58}Ni. After in-flight separation by the fragment separator RIBLL-2, the nuclei were injected and stored in the experimental storage ring CSRe, and their masses were determined from measurements of the revolution times. The impact of these measurements on the stellar nucleosynthesis in the rp-process is discussed.

  6. [Bibliographic consideration of proper management of radioactive waste on short-lived period nuclides that are used in nuclear medicine].

    PubMed

    Kida, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Ichirou; Nagaoka, Hiroaki; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Tanaka, Shinji; Hayakawa, Toshio

    2009-05-20

    A rational clearance system for medical radioactive waste has not yet been established in Japan. As Europe and USA's ways, the establishment of DIS that medical radioactive waste what are kept in storage room for more than decided period each nuclide except from regulation of radiation's control. The purpose of this report is to clarify the problems with the establishment of DIS in Japan through a literature review of the experience in Europe and the USA and previous research that has been reported in Japan. To establish the DIS system, the radiation control system in nuclear medicine should be rebuilt and put into effect. PMID:19498253

  7. Heavy-ion dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmerling, W.

    1980-03-01

    This lecture deals with some of the more important physical characteristics of relativistic heavy ions and their measurement, with beam delivery and beam monitoring, and with conventional radiation dosimetry as used in the operation of the BEVALAC biomedical facility for high energy heavy ions (Lyman and Howard, 1977; BEVALAC, 1977). Even so, many fundamental aspects of the interaction of relativistic heavy ions with matter, including important atomic physics and radiation chemical considerations, are not discussed beyond the reminder that such additional understanding is required before an adequte perspective of the problem can be attained.

  8. Terrestrial Cosmogenic-Nuclide Dating of Alluvial Fans in Death Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Machette, Michael N.; Slate, Janet L.; Phillips, Fred M.

    2008-01-01

    We have used terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides (TCN) to establish the age of some of the most extensive Quaternary alluvial fans in Death Valley, California. These intermediate-age alluvial fans are most extensive on the western side of the valley, where tectonic deformation is considerably less pronounced than on the eastern side of the valley. These fans are characterized by a relatively smooth, densely packed desert pavement formed by well-varnished (blackened) clasts. These surfaces have been mapped as the Q2 gravel by previous workers and as unit Qai (intermediate age) by us. However, the intermediate-age gravels probably contain multiple subunits, as evidenced by slight differences in morphologic expression, soil formation, and inset geomorphic relations. The TCN technique used herein sums the cosmogenic 36Cl in approximately 2.5-meter-deep profiles through soil and host alluvium, thus avoiding some of the problems associated with the more typical surface-exposure dating of boulders or smaller clasts. Our TCN 36Cl dating of 12 depth profiles indicates that these intermediate-age (Qai) alluvial fans range from about 100 to 40 kilo-annum (ka), with a mean age of about 70 ka. An alternative interpretation is that alluvial unit Qai was deposited in two discrete episodes from 90 to 80 ka and from 60 to 50 ka, before and after MIS (marine oxygen-isotope stage) 4 (respectively). Without an intermediate-age unit, such as MIS 4 lake deposits, we can neither disprove nor prove that Qai was deposited in two discrete intervals or over a longer range of time. Thus, in Death Valley, alluvial unit Qai largely brackets MIS 4, which is not associated with a deep phase of Lake Manly. These Qai fans extend to elevations of about -46 meters (150 feet below sea level) and have not been transgressed by Lake Manly, suggesting that MIS 4 or MIS 2 lakes were rather shallow in Death Valley, perhaps because they lacked inflow from surface runoff of the Sierra Nevada drainages through

  9. Natural Paleoseismometers: Cosmogenic Nuclide Dating of Precariously Balanced Rocks (PBRs) - Integral Constraints on Maximum Ground Accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perg, L. A.; Ludwig, L. G.; Kendrick, K.; Brune, J.; Purvance, M.; Anooshehpoor, R.; Akciz, S.

    2007-12-01

    Precariously balanced rocks (PBRs) act as natural seismometers constraining maximum ground acceleration over the surface exposure history of the PBR. These key paleoseismic indicators have the potential to validate ground motions on the timescale necessary to test earthquake rupture forecasts and Seismic Hazard Assessment estimates, and are an active topic of research to validate CyberShake results and constrain National Seismic Hazard Maps. This research focuses on examining the post-exhumation history of PBRs using in-situ terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides (TCNs). TCNs provide a record of near-surface exposure history. The measured concentrations are a function of the residence time in the upper ~20 m of the subsurface (inherited concentration), the timing and rate of exhumation, and post-exhumation surface spalling and chemical erosion. Our goal in the project is to provide reasonable constraints on the post-exhumation history, specifically the age of the PBRs and evolution of precariousness: we should be able to constrain whether the rocks were of similar precariousness 2.5 ka, 5 ka, and 10 ka ago. These specific targets will provide important constraints on time since exceedance for the CyberShake models. We developed our sampling strategy to address subsurface inheritance, exhumation rate and timing, and post- exhumation spalling and chemical erosion. PBRs were selected to meet a variety of considerations. These rocks constrain ground motions from large earthquakes on the San Jacinto and Elsinore faults, in Southern California. Inherited concentrations lead to an age estimate that is too old; we are investigating inherited concentrations though sampling a rock quarry near Perris CA, with shielded samples at greater than 15 m depth. We also have partially shielded samples from the interior of rocks toppled to measure their stability, and through vandalism. To determine exhumation age and rate, our sampling strategy is to collect 5-6 samples per PBR: 1 on top, 3

  10. Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Haecheon; Lee, Jungil; Park, Hyungmin

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of the aerodynamics of heavy vehicles, such as tractor-trailers, high-speed trains, and buses. We introduce three-dimensional flow structures around simplified model vehicles and heavy vehicles and discuss the flow-control devices used for drag reduction. Finally, we suggest important unsteady flow structures to investigate for the enhancement of aerodynamic performance and future directions for experimental and numerical approaches.

  11. Actinide Production in the Reaction of Heavy Ions withCurium-248

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, K.J.

    1983-07-01

    Chemical experiments were performed to examine the usefulness of heavy ion transfer reactions in producing new, neutron-rich actinide nuclides. A general quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic mechanism is proposed, and the utility of this method as opposed to other methods (e.g. complete fusion) is discussed. The relative merits of various techniques of actinide target synthesis are discussed. A description is given of a target system designed to remove the large amounts of heat generated by the passage of a heavy ion beam through matter, thereby maximizing the beam intensity which can be safely used in an experiment. Also described is a general separation scheme for the actinide elements from protactinium (Z = 91) to mendelevium (Z = 101), and fast specific procedures for plutonium, americium and berkelium. The cross sections for the production of several nuclides from the bombardment of {sup 248}Cm with {sup 18}O, {sup 86}Kr and {sup 136}Xe projectiles at several energies near and below the Coulomb barrier were determined. The results are compared with yields from {sup 48}Ca and {sup 238}U bombardments of {sup 248}Cm. Simple extrapolation of the product yields into unknown regions of charge and mass indicates that the use of heavy ion transfer reactions to produce new, neutron-rich above-target species is limited. The substantial production of neutron-rich below-target species, however, indicates that with very heavy ions like {sup 136}Xe and {sup 238}U the new species {sup 248}Am, {sup 249}Am and {sup 247}Pu should be produced with large cross sections from a {sup 248}Cm target. A preliminary, unsuccessful attempt to isolate {sup 247}Pu is outlined. The failure is probably due to the half life of the decay, which is calculated to be less than 3 minutes. The absolute gamma ray intensities from {sup 251}Bk decay, necessary for calculating the {sup 251}Bk cross section, are also determined.

  12. Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.; Boysen, John E.; Branthaver, Jan F.

    1991-01-01

    A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

  13. Comparative study of beta-decay data for eight nuclides measured at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Fischbach, E.; Javorsek, D.; Jenkins, J. H.; Lee, R. H.; Nistor, J.; Scargle, J. D.

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of time-series analyses of data, kindly provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, concerning the beta-decays of Ag108, Ba133, Cs137, Eu152, Eu154, Kr85, Ra226, and Sr90. From measurements of the detector currents, we find evidence of annual oscillations (especially for Ra226), and for several solar r-mode oscillations. It is notable that the frequencies of these r-mode oscillations correspond to exactly the same sidereal rotation rate (12.08 year-1) that we have previously identified in r-mode oscillations detected in both Mt Wilson solar diameter data and Lomonosov Moscow State University Sr90 beta-decay data. Ba133 is found to be anomalous in that current measurements for this nuclide have a much larger variation (by 4 σ) than those of the other nuclides. It is interesting that analysis of variability measurements in the PTB files yields strong evidence for an oscillation for Ba133 but only weak evidence for Ra226.

  14. 10Be concentrations and the long-term fate of particle-reactive nuclides in five soil profiles from California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaghan, M. C.; Krishnaswami, S.; Thomas, J. H.

    1983-10-01

    Concentration-depth profiles of cosmic-ray-produced 10Be ( t1/2 = 1.5m.y.) have been measured by accelerator-mass spectrometry in five soil profiles. These measurements were made in an effort (1) to understand the retentivity of soil surfaces for particle-reactive tracers depositing from the atmosphere on time scales of 10 4-10 6 years, and (2) to explore the application of 10Be as a chronometer of geomorphic surface age. The profiles sampled are from two wave-cut terraces located near Mendocino, California, a table mountain top and an alluvial fan, both located near Friant, California. The ages of the Mendocino terraces are inferred to be (1-5) × 10 5 years based on amino-stratigraphic correlations and models of terrace evolution; those of the table mountain top and alluvial fan are 9.5 × 10 6 years and 6.0 × 10 5 years, respectively, based on K-Ar analyses. All the surfaces sampled are nearly flat and exhibit few erosional features. In addition to 10Be we measured 210Pb, 239,240Pu and 7Be to ascertain the retentivity of the soils for particle-reactive nuclides and to assess the present-day delivery rate of nuclides from the atmosphere. The 7Be inventory is 4.0 dpm/cm 2 similar to those observed at nearby locations. The inventories of 210Pb and Pu isotopes conform to those predicted from model calculations and suggest that the soil surfaces sampled retain the entire burden of particle-reactive nuclides delivered to them over short time scales, ˜ 100 years. The 10Be concentrations in the sample range between (0.2 and 7) × 10 8 atoms/g soil and show strong correlations with leachable Fe and/or Al. The inventory of 10Be in the soil domain sampled is 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than that expected from the geological age of the surface and an average delivery rate of 10Be from the atmosphere, 5.2 × 10 5 atoms/cm 2 yr. The low inventory of 10Be is attributed to its loss from the soil domain sampled by solution transport. Based on a simple ☐-model type

  15. Comparison of Muon Capture in Light and in Heavy Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Measday, David F.; Stocki, Trevor J.

    2007-10-26

    We have recently completed an experimental study at TRIUMF of muon capture in the following elements, N, Al, Si, Ca, Fe, Ni, I, Au, and Bi. We detected the nuclear gamma rays emitted by the product nuclei after muon capture. The energy of the gamma ray identifies the source nuclide, and thus the reaction which has occurred. Our data are of better quality, and more comprehensive than any other data set in the literature. The ({mu}{sup -},{nu}n) reaction is always dominant. In light nuclei, reactions such as ({mu}{sup -},{nu}p) and ({mu}{sup -},{nu}pn) can occur, but not for heavy nuclei. However the reverse is true for reactions such as ({mu}{sup -},{nu}3n) and ({mu}{sup -},{nu}4n), which are very rare in light nuclei, but easily detected in heavy elements. We shall discuss how such information can be useful in calculations of neutrino-nucleus interactions, and of electron-capture in supernovae.

  16. Analysis of quasifission competition in fusion reactions forming heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerton, Kalee; Kohley, Zachary; Morrissey, Dave; Wakhle, Aditya; Stiefel, Krystin; Hinde, David; Dasgupta, Mahananda; Williams, Elizabeth; Simenel, Cedric; Carter, Ian; Cook, Kaitlin; Jeung, Dongyun; Luong, Duc Huy; McNeil, Steven; Palshetkar, Chandani; Rafferty, Dominic

    2015-10-01

    Heavy-ion fusion reactions have provided a mechanism for the production of superheavy elements allowing for the extension of both the periodic table and chart of the nuclides. However, fusion of the projectile and target, forming a compound nucleus, is hindered by orders of magnitude by the quasifission process in heavy systems. In order to fully understand this mechanism, and make accurate predictions for superheavy element production cross sections, a clear description of the interplay between the fusion-fission and quasifission reaction channels is necessary. The mass-angle distributions of fragments formed in 8 different Cr + W reactions were measured at the Australia National University in order to explore the N/Z dependence of the quasifission process. Two sets of data were measured: one at a constant energy relative to the fusion barrier and one at a constant compound nucleus excitation energy. The results of this analysis will provide insight into the effect of using more neutron-rich beams in superheavy element production reactions.

  17. [Uranium, thorium and potassium contents and radioactive equilibrium states of the uranium and thorium series nuclides in phosphate rocks and phosphate fertilizers].

    PubMed

    Komura, K; Yanagisawa, M; Sakurai, J; Sakanoue, M

    1985-10-01

    Uranium, thorium and potassium contents and radioactive equilibrium states of the uranium and thorium series nuclides have been studied for 2 phosphate rocks and 7 phosphate fertilizers. Uranium contents were found to be rather high (39-117 ppm) except for phosphate rock from Kola. The uranium series nuclides were found to be in various equilibration states, which can be grouped into following three categories. Almost in the equilibrium state, 238U approximately 230Th greater than 210Pb greater than 226Ra and 238U greater than 230Th greater than 210Pb greater than 226Ra. Thorium contents were found to be, in general, low and appreciable disequilibrium of the thorium series nuclides was not observed except one sample. Potassium contents were also very low (less than 0.3% K2O) except for complex fertilizers. Based on the present data, discussions were made for the radiation exposure due to phosphate fertilizers. PMID:3006158

  18. Mid-Pleistocene cosmogenic minimum-age limits for pre-Wisconsinan glacial surfaces in southwestern Minnesota and southern Baffin Island: A multiple nuclide approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bierman, P.R.; Marsella, K.A.; Patterson, Chris; Davis, P.T.; Caffee, M.

    1999-01-01

    Paired 10Be and 26Al analyses (n = 14) indicate that pre-Wisconsinan, glaciated bedrock surfaces near the northern (Baffin Island) and southern (Minnesota) paleo-margins of the Laurentide Ice Sheet have long and complex histories of cosmic-ray exposure, including significant periods of partial or complete shielding from cosmic rays. Using the ratio, 26Al/10Be, we calculate that striated outcrops of Sioux Quartzite in southwestern Minnesota (southern margin) were last overrun by ice at least 500,000 years ago. Weathered bedrock tors on the once-glaciated uplands of Baffin Island (northern margin) are eroding no faster than 1.1 m Myr-1, the equivalent of at least 450,000 years of surface and near-surface exposure. Our data demonstrate that exposure ages and erosion rates calculated from single nuclides can underestimate surface stability dramatically because any intermittent burial, and the resultant lowering of nuclide production rates and nuclide abundances, will remain undetected.

  19. In-situ measurements of U-series nuclides by electron microprobe on zircons and monazites from Gandak river sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosia, C.; Deloule, E.; France-Lanord, C.; Chabaux, F.

    2015-12-01

    Determination of sediment transfer time during transport in the alluvial plains is a critical issue to correctly understand the relationship between climate, tectonics and Earth surface evolution. The residence time of river sediments may be constrained by analyzing the U series nuclides fractionations (e.g. [1] and [2]), which are created during water rock interactions by the ejection of the daughter nuclides of the grain (α-recoil) and the preferential mobilization of nuclides in decay damaged crystal structure. However, recent studies on sediments from the Gandak river, one of the main Ganga tributary, highlighted the difficulties to obtain reproducible data on bulk sediments, due to the nuggets distribution of U-Th enriched minor minerals in the samples (Bosia et al., unpublished data). We therefore decided to analyze the U and Th isotopic systematic at a grain-scale for Himalayan sediments from the Gandak river. This has been tested by performing in situ depth profiles of 238U-234U-230Th and 232Th on zircons and monazites (50-250 μm) by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) at the CRPG, Nancy, France. The first results point the occurrence of 238U-234U-230Th disequilibria in the outermost parts of both monazite and zircon minerals with a return to the equilibrium state in the core of the grains. The relative U and Th enrichment is however slightly different depending on considered minerals, suggesting possible adsorption processes of 230-Th. Coupled to a simple model of U and Th mobility during water-mineral interactions, these data should help to constrain the origin of 238U-234U-230Th disequilibria in these minerals. Moreover, the results of the study should be relevant to discuss the potential of this approach to constrain the residence time of zircons and monazites in the Gandak alluvial plain. [1] Chabaux et al., 2012, C. R. Geoscience, 344 (11-12): 688-703; [2] Granet et al., 2007, Earth and Planet. Sci. Lett., 261 (3-4): 389-406.

  20. Cosmogenic nuclide concentrations in Neogene rivers of the Great Plains reveal the evolution of fluvial storage and recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Hugh; Stuart, Fin; McCann, Louise; Tao, Zui

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of the duration of near surface residence of sediment grains from the stratigraphic record has the potential to quantitatively reconstruct processes such as stratal condensation, sediment recycling and the exposure histories of unconformities. Geomorphological measurements of dates and rates of surfaces and erosion respectively has enabled significant advances in understanding, however, the radiogenic half life of typical cosmogenic nuclides such as 10Be and 26Al means they are not suitable for the stratigraphic record. Instead, we have applied the stable cosmogenic nuclide of 21Ne to quartz-rich sediment to quantify the routing history of the river systems that have drained the southern Rockies of Wyoming and Colorado during Neogene times. The Neogene sediments of Nebraska record fluvial systems of the Great Plains that flow from the Rockies towards the east and into the Mississippi catchment. This succession is <300 m thick, and records successive episodes of fluvial incision and aggradation associated with regional tilting from 6 to 4 Ma and periods of climate change. As part of an evaluation of the application of 21Ne to the stratigraphic record, we sampled quartzite pebbles from an Upper Miocene, Pliocene and modern river channel of the North Platte approximately 400 km from their mountainous source. The quartzite is derived from a single exposure of the Medicine Bow quartzites in Wyoming, therefore all three intervals recorded the same travel distance from source. Additionally, we know the erosion rate of the Medicine Bow quartzites from detrital 10Be analyses, and we also sampled shielded bedrock samples from the quartzite to evaluate for any non-cosmogenic 21Ne. This means that the concentrations of 21Ne in detrital pebbles >400 km from their source could be corrected for both inherited non-cosmogenic and erosion induced accumulation at source. Therefore, any additional amounts of 21Ne must record storage and exposure during transport down

  1. Studies of heavy hadron physics

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Xinheng

    2011-12-14

    In the diquark picture, we establish Bethe-Salpeter equations for ground states of heavy baryons containing one heavy quark and two heavy quarks in the heavy quark limit, respectively. The Bethe-Salpeter equations for both heavy and light diquarks are also established. Assuming kernels to consist of a scalar confinement term and a one-gluon-exchange term we solve Bethe-Salpeter wave functions numerically in the covariant instantaneous approximation and give some applications including semileptonic and nonleptonic decay widths of heavy baryons, the average kinetic energy of the heavy quark in {Lambda}{sub Q}, {Sigma}{sub Q}{sup (*)}{yields}{Lambda}{sub Q}+{pi} decay widths, and heavy quark distribution functions. We also study possible molecular heavy bound states in the Bethe-Salpeter approach. Proof of QCD factorization for {Lambda}{sub b}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}{pi} is presented in the framework of QCD factorization.

  2. Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Willen, E.H.

    1986-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a proposed research facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory to study the collision of beams of heavy ions, up to gold in mass and at beam energies up to 100 GeV/nucleon. The physics to be explored by this collider is an overlap between the traditional disciplines of nuclear physics and high energy physics and is a continuation of the planned program of light and heavy ion physics at BNL. The machine is to be constructed in the now-empty tunnel built for the former CBA project. Various other facilities to support the collider are either in place or under construction at BNL. The collider itself, including the magnets, is in an advanced state of design, and a construction start is anticipated in the next several years.

  3. (Relativistic heavy ion research)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory, participation in the E802 Experiment, which is the first major heavy-ion experiment at the BNL-AGS, was the main focus of the group during the past four years. The emphases of the E802 experiment were on (a) accurate particle identification and measurements of spectra over a wide kinematical domain (5{degree} < {theta}{sub LAB} < 55{degree}, p < 20 GeV/c); and (b) measurements of small-angle two-particle correlations, with event characterization tools: multiplicity array, forward and large-angle calorimeters. This experiment and other heavy ion collision experiments are discussed in this report.

  4. Chlorine-36 in fossil rat urine: An archive of cosmogenic nuclide deposition during the past 40,000 years

    SciTech Connect

    Plummer, M.A.; Phillips, F.M.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

    1997-07-25

    Knowledge of the production history of cosmogenic nuclides, which is needed for geological and archaeological dating, has been uncertain. Measurements of chlorine-36/chlorine ({sup 36}Cl/Cl) ratios in fossil packrat middens from Nevada that are radiocarbon-dated between about 38 thousand years ago (ka) and the present showed that {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios were higher by a factor of about 2 before {approx} 11 ka. This raises the possibility that cosmogenic production rates just before the close of the Pleistocene were up to 50% higher than is suggested by carbon-14 calibration data. The discrepancy could be explained by addition of low-carbon-14 carbon dioxide to the atmosphere during that period, which would have depressed atmospheric radiocarbon activity. Alternatively, climatic effects on {sup 36}Cl deposition may have enhanced the {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios. 49 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Modeling of nuclide release from low-level radioactive paraffin waste: a comparison of simulated and real waste.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju Youl; Kim, Chang Lak; Chung, Chang Hyun

    2002-10-01

    Nuclide leaching models based on mass transfer theory are reviewed and evaluated to analyze the leaching test results of simulated and real paraffin waste from Korean nuclear power plants (NPPs). An empirical model (EM), bulk diffusion model (BDM), coupled diffusion/dissolution model (CDDM), shrinking core model (SCM), modified SCM (MSCM), and uniform reaction model (URM) are selected for comparison. In case of simulated paraffin waste form, the experimental results are satisfactorily explained by the SCM which is based on a diffusion-controlled dissolution reaction. Leaching behavior of real paraffin waste form is well predicted by URM that considers inter-aggregated porous medium and intra-aggregated porous medium separately. If real paraffin waste forms are manufactured with relatively uniform composition, their leaching behaviors are expected to be similar to those of simulated paraffin waste forms. PMID:12169419

  6. Depth Distribution of Cosmogenic Nuclides in Boring Core Samples of Jilin Meteorite and its Cosmic Ray Irradiation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Z.; Fan, C.; Yi, W.; Wang, X.; Begemann, F.; Kersten, T.; Heusser, G.; Pernicka, E.

    Two boring cores were sampled from the Jilin No. 1 meteorite in such a way that they were kept parallel or perpendicular to the surface of the 1st stage parent body, but across the center of the 2nd stage parent body. Cosmogenic nuclides (3He, 20,21,22Ne, 22Na, 26Al, 53Mn, 60Co), radiogenic gases and trapped noble gases in the two cores have been studied in detail, which has confirmed the two-staged cosmic ray irradiation history proposed by the authors as being typical of the Jilin meteorite, and also justified their previous models regarding the ages, shapes and sizes of the two parent bodies related to the two stages as well as the emplacement of various samples.

  7. 26Al - 10Be cosmogenic nuclide isochron burial dating in combination with luminescence dating of two Danube terraces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhuber, Stephanie; Braumann, Sandra; Lüthgens, Christopher; Fiebig, Markus; Häuselmann, Philipp; Schäfer, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    The Quaternary sediment record in the Vienna Basin is influenced by two main factors: (1) the tectonic development of a pull apart basin along a sinistral strike slip fault system between the Eastern Alps and the West Carpathians and by (2) strongly varying sediment supply during the Plio- and Pleistocene. From the Late Pannonian (8.8 Ma) onward a large-scale regional uplift (Decker et al., 2005) controls terrace formation in the Vienna Basin. The main sediment supply into the Vienna Basin originates from the Danube, and subordinately from tributaries to the south such as Piesting, Fischa, Leitha and from the north by the river March. Today the Danube forms a large floodplain that is bordered to the north by one large Pleistocene terrace, the Gänserndorf Terrace that is situated 17 m above todays water level. Farther to the east a smaller terrace, the Schlosshof Terrace, reaches 25 m above todays water level. These terrace levels are tilted by movement of underlying blocks (Peresson, 2006). Both, the Schlosshof and Gänserndorf terraces consist of successions of up to 2 m thick gravel beds with intercalated sand layers or -lenses that may locally reach thicknesses up to 0.8 m. At each terrace one gavel pit was selected to calculate the time of terrace deposition by luminescence dating in combination with 26Al/10Be cosmogenic nuclide isochrone dating (Balco and Rovery, 2008). Five quartz stones from the base of each terrace were physically and chemically processed to obtain Al and Be oxides for Acceleration Mass Spectrometry. Sand samples for luminescence dating were taken above the cosmogenic nuclide samples from the closest suitable sand body. Decker et al., 2005. QSR 24, 307-322 Peresson, 2006 Geologie der österreichischen Bundesländer Niederösterreich 255-258 Balco and Rovey, 2008. AJS 908, 1083-1114 Thanks to FWF P 23138-N19, OMAA 90öu17

  8. PRODUCTION OF ALL THE r-PROCESS NUCLIDES IN THE DYNAMICAL EJECTA OF NEUTRON STAR MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Wanajo, Shinya; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Kiuchi, Kenta; Shibata, Masaru; Nishimura, Nobuya; Kyutoku, Koutarou

    2014-07-10

    Recent studies suggest that binary neutron star (NS-NS) mergers robustly produce heavy r-process nuclei above the atomic mass number A ∼ 130 because their ejecta consist of almost pure neutrons (electron fraction of Y {sub e} < 0.1). However, the production of a small amount of the lighter r-process nuclei (A ≈ 90-120) conflicts with the spectroscopic results of r-process-enhanced Galactic halo stars. We present, for the first time, the result of nucleosynthesis calculations based on the fully general relativistic simulation of a NS-NS merger with approximate neutrino transport. It is found that the bulk of the dynamical ejecta are appreciably shock-heated and neutrino processed, resulting in a wide range of Y {sub e} (≈0.09-0.45). The mass-averaged abundance distribution of calculated nucleosynthesis yields is in reasonable agreement with the full-mass range (A ≈ 90-240) of the solar r-process curve. This implies, if our model is representative of such events, that the dynamical ejecta of NS-NS mergers could be the origin of the Galactic r-process nuclei. Our result also shows that radioactive heating after ∼1 day from the merging, which gives rise to r-process-powered transient emission, is dominated by the β-decays of several species close to stability with precisely measured half-lives. This implies that the total radioactive heating rate for such an event can be well constrained within about a factor of two if the ejected material has a solar-like r-process pattern.

  9. STAR heavy flavor tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Hao

    2014-11-01

    Hadrons containing heavy quarks are a clean probe of the early dynamic evolution of the dense and hot medium created in high-energy nuclear collisions. To explore heavy quark production at RHIC, the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) for the STAR experiment was built and installed in time for RHIC Run 14. The HFT consists of four layers of silicon detectors. The two outermost layers are silicon strip detectors and the two innermost layers are made from state-of-the-art ultra-thin CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS). This is the first application of a CMOS MAPS detector in a collider experiment. The use of thin pixel sensors plus the use of carbon fiber supporting material limits the material budget to be only 0.4% radiation length per pixel detector layer, enabling the reconstruction of low pT heavy flavor hadrons. The status and performance of the HFT in the RHIC 200 GeV Au + Au run in 2014 are reported. Very good detector efficiency, hit residuals and track resolution (DCAs) were observed in the cosmic ray data and in the Au + Au data.

  10. Resonances in heavy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Betts, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental situation for the study of resonances in heavy-ion collisions is reviewed, with emphasis on the heaviest systems. New data are presented which show some of the systematics of this phenomenon. The narrow resonance structures are established as a feature of the nuclear structure of the composite system rather than a purely entrance channel effect.

  11. Heavy Chain Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells often prevents proper absorption of nutrients from food (malabsorption), resulting in severe diarrhea and weight loss. A rare form that affects the respiratory tract also exists. Blood tests are done when alpha heavy chain disease is suspected. Serum protein electrophoresis, measurement of ...

  12. Detection of heavy Higgs

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, H.A.

    1984-01-01

    The prospects for detecting heavy Higgs are discussed. In particular a general procedure is developed which includes studying first the characteristics of producing the signal, estimating the most important background, simulating both types of events via Monte Carlo techniques in an appropriate detector and concluding with the prospects for detection. 20 references.

  13. Heavy Vehicle Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sid Diamond; Richard Wares; Jules Routbort

    2000-04-11

    Heavy Vehicle (HV) systems are a necessary component of achieving OHVT goals. Elements are in place for a far-ranging program: short, intermediate, and long-term. Solicitation will bring industrial input and support. Future funding trend is positive, outlook for HV systems is good.

  14. Heavy Flavor Dynamics in Relativistic Heavy-ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shanshan

    Heavy flavor hadrons serve as valuable probes of the transport properties of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. In this dissertation, we introduce a comprehensive framework that describes the full-time evolution of heavy flavor in heavy-ion collisions, including its initial production, in-medium evolution inside the QGP matter, hadronization process from heavy quarks to their respective mesonic bound states and the subsequent interactions between heavy mesons and the hadron gas. The in-medium energy loss of heavy quarks is studied within the framework of a Langevin equation coupled to hydrodynamic models that simulate the space-time evolution of the hot and dense QGP matter. We improve the classical Langevin approach such that, apart from quasi-elastic scatterings between heavy quarks and the medium background, radiative energy loss is incorporated as well by treating gluon radiation as a recoil force term. The subsequent hadronization of emitted heavy quarks is simulated via a hybrid fragmentation plus recombination model. The propagation of produced heavy mesons in the hadronic phase is described using the ultra-relativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD) model. Our calculation shows that while collisional energy loss dominates the heavy quark motion inside the QGP in the low transverse momentum (p T) regime, contributions from gluon radiation are found to be significant at high pT. The recombination mechanism is important for the heavy flavor meson production at intermediate energies. The hadronic final state interactions further enhance the suppression and the collective flow of heavy mesons we observe. Within our newly developed framework, we present numerical results for the nuclear modification and the elliptic flow of D mesons, which are consistent with measurements at both the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC); predictions for B mesons are also provided. In

  15. Removal of radio nuclides of the U- and Th- series from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto Polyacryamide-expanded perlite: Effects of pH, concentration and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkaya, Recep

    2012-10-01

    Poly (Acryamide-expanded perlite) [P(AAm-EP)], was synthesized. The influence of process parameters: initial pH and five radio nuclides of the U- and Th- series (TI+, Ra2+, Bi3+, Ac3+ and Pb2+ in a leaching solution) concentration, on sorption thermodynamic was studied and discussed. The five natural radio nuclides were counted by gamma spectrometer using a type NAI (Tl) detector. The amounts of five radio nuclides sorbed at equlibrium were well represented by Langmuir and Freundlich type isotherms. The Langmuir adsorption capacities (XL) were in the order of 208Tl (0.4 MBq kg-1)>212Pb and 212Bi (0.3 MBq kg-1)>228Ac and (0.1 MBq kg-1)>226Ra (0.04 MBq kg-1). These results demonstrated that P(AAm-EP) had high affinity to the five natural radio nuclides. In order to specify the type of adsorption reaction, thermodynamic parameters such as the standard enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs free energy were also determined. It was also demonstrated that the adsorption mechanism was spontaneous (ΔG<0), the process was exothermic (ΔH<0) thus increasing entropy (ΔS>0). The composite was reused for four more times after regeneration without any detectable changes either in its structure or adsorptive capability.

  16. Ultrasensitive search for long-lived superheavy nuclides in the mass range A=288 to A=300 in natural Pt, Pb, and Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Dellinger, F.; Forstner, O.; Golser, R.; Priller, A.; Steier, P.; Wallner, A.; Winkler, G.; Kutschera, W.

    2011-06-15

    Theoretical models of superheavy elements (SHEs) predict a region of increased stability around the proton and neutron shell closures of Z = 114 and N = 184. Therefore a sensitive search for nuclides in the mass range from A = 288 to A = 300 was performed in natural platinum, lead, and bismuth, covering long-lived isotopes of Eka-Pt (Ds, Z = 110), Eka-Pb (Z = 114), and Eka-Bi (Z = 115). Measurements with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) established upper limits for these SHE isotopes in Pt, Pb, and Bi with abundances of <2x10{sup -15}, <5x10{sup -14}, and <5x10{sup -13}, respectively. These results complement earlier searches for SHEs with AMS at VERA in natural thorium and gold, which now amounts to a total number of 37 SHE nuclides having been explored with AMS. In none of our measurements was evidence found for the existence of SHEs in nature at the reported sensitivity level. Even though a few events were observed in the window for {sup 293}Eka-Bi, a particularly strong pileup background did not allow a definite SHE isotope identification. The present result sets limits on nuclides around the center of the island of stability, essentially ruling out the existence of SHE nuclides with half-lives longer than {approx}150 million years.

  17. Detailed deposition density maps constructed by large-scale soil sampling for gamma-ray emitting radioactive nuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kimiaki; Tanihata, Isao; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Saito, Takashi; Shimoura, Susumu; Otsuka, Takaharu; Onda, Yuichi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Ikeuchi, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Kinouchi, Nobuyuki; Saegusa, Jun; Seki, Akiyuki; Takemiya, Hiroshi; Shibata, Tokushi

    2015-01-01

    Soil deposition density maps of gamma-ray emitting radioactive nuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident were constructed on the basis of results from large-scale soil sampling. In total 10,915 soil samples were collected at 2168 locations. Gamma rays emitted from the samples were measured by Ge detectors and analyzed using a reliable unified method. The determined radioactivity was corrected to that of June 14, 2011 by considering the intrinsic decay constant of each nuclide. Finally the deposition maps were created for (134)Cs, (137)Cs, (131)I, (129m)Te and (110m)Ag. The radioactivity ratio of (134)Cs-(137)Cs was almost constant at 0.91 regardless of the locations of soil sampling. The radioactivity ratios of (131)I and (129m)Te-(137)Cs were relatively high in the regions south of the Fukushima NPP site. Effective doses for 50 y after the accident were evaluated for external and inhalation exposures due to the observed radioactive nuclides. The radiation doses from radioactive cesium were found to be much higher than those from the other radioactive nuclides. PMID:24703526

  18. Heavy quarks and lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2003-11-05

    This paper is a review of heavy quarks in lattice gauge theory, focusing on methodology. It includes a status report on some of the calculations that are relevant to heavy-quark spectroscopy and to flavor physics.

  19. Heavy quark physics in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedi, G.; CMS Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The most recent results which concern the heavy quark hadrons done in the CMS experiment are reported. The searching area spans over the heavy quark spectroscopy, production cross sections, beauty meson decay properties, rare decays, and CP violation.

  20. Heavy Stars Thrive among Heavy Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-08-01

    VLT Observes Wolf-Rayet Stars in Virgo Cluster Galaxies [1] Summary Do very massive stars form in metal-rich regions of the Universe and in the nuclei of galaxies ? Or does "heavy element poisoning" stop stellar growth at an early stage, before young stars reach the "heavyweight class"? What may at the first glance appear as a question for specialists actually has profound implications for our understanding of the evolution of galaxies, those systems of billions of stars - the main building blocks of the Universe. With an enormous output of electromagnetic radiation and energetic elementary particles, massive stars exert a decisive influence on the surrounding (interstellar) gas and dust clouds . They also eject large amounts of processed elements, thereby participating in the gradual build-up of the many elements we see today. Thus the presence or absence of such stars at the centres of galaxies can significantly change the overall development of those regions and hence, presumably, that of the entire galaxy. A team of European astronomers [2] has now directly observed the presence of so-called Wolf-Rayet stars (born with masses of 60 - 90 times that of the Sun or more) within metal-rich regions in some galaxies in the Virgo cluster, some 50 million light-years away. This is the first unambiguous detection of such massive stellar objects in metal-rich regions . PR Photo 20a/02 : H II regions in the Virgo cluster galaxy NGC 4254 . PR Photo 20b/02 : Multi-object-slit observation of galaxy NGC 4303 . PR Photo 20c/02 : Spectrum of H II region in NGC 4254 with Wolf-Rayet signatures. Production of heavy elements in the Universe Most scientists agree that the Universe in which we live underwent a dramatic event, known as the Big Bang , approximately 15,000 million years ago. During the early moments, elementary particles were formed which after some time united into more complex nuclei and in turn resulted in the production of hydrogen and helium atoms and their isotopes

  1. Detecting heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Benenson, G.; Chau, L.L.; Ludlam, T.; Paige, F.E.; Platner, E.D.; Protopopescu, S.D.; Rehak, P.

    1983-01-01

    In this exercise we examine the performance of a detector specifically configured to tag heavy quark (HQ) jets through direct observations of D-meson decays with a high resolution vertex detector. To optimize the performance of such a detector, we assume the small diamond beam crossing configuration as described in the 1978 ISABELLE proposal, giving a luminosity of 10/sup 32/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/. Because of the very large backgrounds from light quark (LQ) jets, most triggering schemes at this luminosity require high P/sub perpendicular to/ leptons and inevitably give missing neutrinos. If alternative triggering schemes could be found, then one can hope to find and calculate the mass of objects decaying to heavy quarks. A scheme using the high resolution detector will also be discussed in detail. The study was carried out with events generated by the ISAJET Monte Carlo and a computer simulation of the described detector system. (WHK)

  2. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ray Johnson

    2000-01-31

    The objectives are to Provide Key Enabling Materials Technologies to Increase Energy Efficiency and Reduce Exhaust Emissions. The following goals are listed: Goal 1: By 3rd quarter 2002, complete development of materials enabling the maintenance or improvement of fuel efficiency {ge} 45% of class 7-8 truck engines while meeting the EPA/Justice Department ''Consent Decree'' for emissions reduction. Goal 2: By 4th quarter 2004, complete development of enabling materials for light-duty (class 1-2) diesel truck engines with efficiency over 40%, over a wide range of loads and speeds, while meeting EPA Tier 2 emission regulations. Goal 3: By 4th quarter 2006, complete development of materials solutions to enable heavy-duty diesel engine efficiency of 50% while meeting the emission reduction goals identified in the EPA proposed rule for heavy-duty highway engines.''

  3. Setup with Laser Ionization in Gas Cell for Production and Study of Neutron-Rich Heavy Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagrebaev, V. I.; Zemlyanoy, S. G.; Kozulin, E. M.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Fedosseev, V.; Bark, R.; Janas, Z.; Othman, H. A.

    2015-11-01

    The present limits of the upper part of the nuclear map are very close to stability while the unexplored area of heavy neutron-rich nuclides along the neutron closed shell N=126 is extremely important for nuclear astrophysics investigations and, in particular, for the understanding of the r-process of astrophysical nucleosynthesis. This area of the nuclear map can be reached neither in fusion-fission reactions nor in fragmentation processes widely used nowadays for the production of exotic nuclei. A new way was recently proposed for the production of these nuclei via low-energy multi-nucleon transfer reactions. The estimated yields of neutron-rich nuclei are found to be significantly high in such reactions and several tens of new nuclides can be produced, for example, in the near-barrier collision of 136Xe with 208Pb. A new setup is proposed to produce and study heavy neutron-rich nuclei located along the neutron closed shell N=126.

  4. Utah Heavy Oil Program

    SciTech Connect

    J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

    2009-10-20

    The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

  5. Heavy rain field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melson, ED

    1991-01-01

    A weight-measuring rain gauge was developed to collect rain data and configured to operate at a high sample rate (one sample pre second). Instead of averaging the rain rate in minutes, hours, and sometime days as normally performed, the rain data collected are examined in seconds. The results of six field sites are compiled. Rain rate levels, duration of downpours, and frequency of heavy rainfall events are presented.

  6. Data and software tools for gamma radiation spectral threat detection and nuclide identification algorithm development and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnoy, David; Fisher, Brian; Phifer, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    spectral data at 1 s time intervals, which represents data collected by a mobile system operating in a dynamic radiation background environment; and one that represents static measurements with a foreground spectrum (background plus source) and a background spectrum. These data include controlled variations in both Source Related Factors (nuclide, nuclide combinations, activities, distances, collection times, shielding configurations, and background spectra) and Detector Related Factors (currently only gain shifts, but resolution changes and non-linear energy calibration errors will be added soon). The software tools will allow the developer to evaluate the performance impact of each of these factors. Although this first implementation is somewhat limited in scope, considering only NaI-based detection systems and two application domains, it is hoped that (with community feedback) a wider range of detector types and applications will be included in the future. This article describes the methods used for dataset creation, the software validation/performance measurement tools, the performance metrics used, and examples of baseline performance.

  7. Decays of New Nuclides and Isomers Beyond the Proton Drip Line--The Influence of Neutron Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R. D.; Bianco, L.; Darby, I. G.; Joss, D. T.; Cooper, R. J.; Grahn, T.; Judson, D. S.; Sapple, P. J.; Thomson, J.; Simpson, J.; Labiche, M.; O'Donnell, D.; Al-Khalili, J. S.; Cannon, A. J.; Stevenson, P. D.; Suckling, E. B.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.

    2008-11-11

    The energy of the vh{sub 9/2} orbital in nuclei above N = 82 drops rapidly in energy relative to the vf{sub 7/2} orbital as the occupancy of the {pi}h{sub 11/2} orbital increases. These two neutron orbitals become nearly degenerate as the proton drip line is approached. In this work, we have discovered the new nuclides {sup 161}Os and {sup 157}W, and studied the decays of the proton emitter {sup 160}Re in detail. The {sup 161}Os and {sup 160}Re nuclei were produced in reactions of 290, 300 and 310 MeV {sup 58}Ni ions with an isotopically enriched {sup 106}Cd target, separated in-flight using the RITU separator and implanted into the GREAT spectrometer. The {sup 161}Os{alpha} a decays populated the new nuclide {sup 157}W, which decayed by {beta}-particle emission. The {beta} decay fed the known {alpha}-decaying 1/2{sup +} and 11/2{sup -} states in {sup 157}Ta, which is consistent with a vf{sub 7/2} ground state in {sup 157}W. The measured {alpha}-decay energy and half-life for {sup 161}Os correspond to a reduced {alpha}-decay width that is compatible with s-wave {alpha}-particle emission, implying that its ground state is also a vf{sub 7/2} state. Over 7000 {sup 160}Re nuclei were produced and the {gamma} decays of a new isomeric state feeding the {pi}d{sub 3/2} level in {sup 160}Re were discovered, but no evidence for the proton or a decay of the expected {pi}h{sub 11/2} state could be found. The isomer decays offer a natural explanation for this non-observation and provides a striking example of the influence of the near degeneracy of the vh{sub 9/2} and vf{sub 7/2} orbitals on the properties of nuclei in this region.

  8. Removal of Radioactive Nuclides by Multi-Functional Microcapsules Enclosing Inorganic Ion-Exchangers and Organic Extractants

    SciTech Connect

    Mimura, H.; Akiba, K.; Onodera, Y.

    2002-02-26

    The microcapsules enclosing two kinds of functional materials, inorganic ion-exchangers and organic extractants, were prepared by taking advantage of the high immobilization ability of alginate gel polymer. The fine powders of inorganic ion-exchanger and oil drops of extractant were kneaded with sodium alginate (NaALG) solution and the kneaded sol readily gelled in a salt solution of CaCl2, BaCl2 or HCl to form spherical gel particles. The uptake properties of various nuclides, 137Cs, 85Sr, 60Co, 88Y, 152Eu and 241Am, for thirty-four specimens of microcapsules in the presence of 10-1-10-4 M HNO3 were evaluated by the batch method. The distribution coefficient (Kd) of Cs+ above 103 cm3/g was obtained for the microcapsules enclosing CuFC or AMP. The Kd of Sr2+ around 102 cm3/g was obtained for the microcapsules containing clinoptilolite, antimonic acid, zeolite A, zeolite X or titanic acid. The microcapsules enclosing DEHPA exhibited relatively large Kd values of trivalent metal ions above 103 cm3/g; for example, the Kd values of Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, Y3+, Eu3+ and Am3+ for a favorable microcapsule (CuFC/clinoptilolite/DEHPA/CaALG) were 1.1x104, 7.5x10, 1.1x10, 1.0x104, 1.4x104, 3.4x103 cm3/g, respectively. The uptake rates of Cs+, Y3+, Eu3+ and Am3+ for this microcapsule were rather fast; the uptake percentage above 90% was obtained after 19 h-shaking and the uptake equilibrium was attained within 1 d. The AMP/CaALG exhibited high uptake ability for Cs+ even after irradiation of 188 kGy, and DEHPA/CaALG microcapsule had similar Kd values of Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, Y3+, Eu3+ and Am3+ ions before and after irradiation. The microcapsules with various shapes such as spherical, columnar, fibrous and filmy forms were easily prepared by changing the way of dipping kneaded sol into gelling salt solution. The microcapsules enclosing inorganic ion-exchangers and extractants have a potential possibility for the simultaneous removal of various radioactive nuclides from waste solutions.

  9. Glacial Erosion Rates from Bayesian Inversion of Cosmogenic Nuclide Concentrations in a Bedrock Core, Streaked Mtn., ME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploskey, Z. T.; Stone, J. O.

    2014-12-01

    Glacial erosion is an important source of sediment and could be an important coupling to glacier and ice sheet models that track sediment. However, glacial erosion is difficult to quantify, and models of glacial erosion can benefit from independent erosion rate estimates. Here we present the results of a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) inversion of a cosmogenic nuclide (CN) geomorphic model for glacial erosion rates on a bedrock landform formerly eroded beneath the Laurentide ice sheet. The CN 10Be was measured in quartz to 8 m depth in a bedrock core from the summit of Streaked Mountain, ME. The accumulation of 10Be was modeled over multiple glacial cycles of alternating exposure and glacial erosion. This model was invertedfor glacial erosion rates and burial history using MCMC algorithms implemented in PyMC (Patil et al., 2010). This Bayesian approach allows us to incorporate prior constraints on ice cover history, including oxygen isotope records and radiometric dates, which is otherwise difficult to differentiate from erosion in rapidly eroding areas. We compare these results to depth profile and surface CN measurements elsewhere in Maine (Ploskey and Stone, 2013).The forward model of CN production used in the inversion is part of Cosmogenic (github.com/cosmolab/cosmogenic), an open-source Python-based software library we developed for modeling the growth and decay of in-situ CN inventories in rock during geomorphic evolution. It includes calibrated production rates for 10Be and 26Al in quartz and 36Cl in K-feldspar by both neutrons and muons, with more isotopic production pathways and material targets to be added in the future. Production rates are scaled to the site altitude and latitude using modular scaling schemes. Cosmogenic includes a variety of functions representing common geomorphic histories, and can be used to model any arbitrary exposure, erosion and burial history that can be defined as Python function.ReferencesPatil, A., D. Huard and C

  10. Heavy Stars Thrive among Heavy Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-08-01

    VLT Observes Wolf-Rayet Stars in Virgo Cluster Galaxies [1] Summary Do very massive stars form in metal-rich regions of the Universe and in the nuclei of galaxies ? Or does "heavy element poisoning" stop stellar growth at an early stage, before young stars reach the "heavyweight class"? What may at the first glance appear as a question for specialists actually has profound implications for our understanding of the evolution of galaxies, those systems of billions of stars - the main building blocks of the Universe. With an enormous output of electromagnetic radiation and energetic elementary particles, massive stars exert a decisive influence on the surrounding (interstellar) gas and dust clouds . They also eject large amounts of processed elements, thereby participating in the gradual build-up of the many elements we see today. Thus the presence or absence of such stars at the centres of galaxies can significantly change the overall development of those regions and hence, presumably, that of the entire galaxy. A team of European astronomers [2] has now directly observed the presence of so-called Wolf-Rayet stars (born with masses of 60 - 90 times that of the Sun or more) within metal-rich regions in some galaxies in the Virgo cluster, some 50 million light-years away. This is the first unambiguous detection of such massive stellar objects in metal-rich regions . PR Photo 20a/02 : H II regions in the Virgo cluster galaxy NGC 4254 . PR Photo 20b/02 : Multi-object-slit observation of galaxy NGC 4303 . PR Photo 20c/02 : Spectrum of H II region in NGC 4254 with Wolf-Rayet signatures. Production of heavy elements in the Universe Most scientists agree that the Universe in which we live underwent a dramatic event, known as the Big Bang , approximately 15,000 million years ago. During the early moments, elementary particles were formed which after some time united into more complex nuclei and in turn resulted in the production of hydrogen and helium atoms and their isotopes