Science.gov

Sample records for heavy water detritiation

  1. Development of a Heavy Water Detritiation Plant for PIK Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, I.A.; Bondarenko, S.D.; Fedorchenko, O.A.; Konoplev, K.A.; Vasyanina, T.V.; Arkhipov, E.A.; Uborsky, V.V

    2005-07-15

    The research reactor PIK should be supplied with a Detritiation Plant (DP) to remove tritium from heavy water in order to reduce operator radiation dose and tritium emissions. The original design of the reactor PIK Detritiation Plant was completed several years ago. A number of investigations have been made to obtain data for the DP design. Nowadays the design of the DP is being revised on a basis of our investigations. The Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange (CECE) process will be used at the Detritiation Plant instead of Vapor Phase Catalytic Exchange. The experimental industrial plant for hydrogen isotope separation on the basis of the CECE process is under operation in Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute. The plant was updated to provide a means for heavy water detritiation. Very high detritiation factors have been achieved in the plant. The use of the CECE process will allow the development of a more compact and less expensive detritiation plant for heavy water reactor PIK.

  2. Improvement of PNPI experimental industrial plant based on CECE process for heavy water detritiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, S. D.; Alekseev, I. A.; Fedorchenko, O. A.; Vasyanina, T. V.; Konoplev, K. A.; Arkhipov, E. A.; Uborsky, V. V.

    2008-07-15

    An updated experimental industrial plant of PNPI for the development of CECE technology is described. Experimental results for heavy water detritiation in different operating modes are shown. The effect of pressure, temperatures and gas flow rate on the detritiation factor for the CECE process is presented. (authors)

  3. CECE alternative for upgrading/detritiation in heavy water nuclear reactors and for tritium recovery in fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Spagnolo, D.A.; Miller, A.I.

    1995-10-01

    The Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE) process, utilizing AECL`s wetproofed catalyst, is ideally suited for extracting tritium from water because of its high isotopic separation factor and near-ambient operating conditions. Several CECE options are compared with the more conventional DW-VPCE arrangements for heavy water upgrading and detritiation of CANDU nuclear reactors and for detritiation of fusion facilities such as ITER. For both applications, CECE offers a more economical alternative over conventional technology. Experimental data on catalyst activity and lifetime are also presented and past commercial applications of the AECL catalyst are reviewed. AECL has recently committed to assembly of a CECE upgrading/detritiation demonstration facility. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Light water detritiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorchenko, O.A.; Aleksee, I.A.; Bondarenko, S.D.; Vasyanina, T.V.

    2015-03-15

    Hundreds of thousands of tons of tritiated light water have been accumulating from the enterprises of nuclear fuel cycles around the world. The Dual-Temperature Water-Hydrogen (DTWH) process looks like the only practical alternative to Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange (CECE). In DTWH power-consuming lower reflux device (electrolytic cell) is replaced by a so-called 'hot tower' (LPCE column operating at conditions which ensure relatively small value of elementary separation factor α(hot)). In the upper, cold tower, the tritium transfers from hydrogen to water while in the lower, hot tower - in the opposite direction - from water to hydrogen. The DTWH process is much more complicated compared to CECE; it must be thoroughly computed and strictly controlled by an automatic control system. The use of a simulation code for DTWH is absolutely important. The simulation code EVIO-5 deals with 3 flows inside a column (hydrogen gas, water vapour and liquid water) and 2 simultaneous isotope exchange sub-processes (counter-current phase exchange and co-current catalytic exchange). EVIO-5 takes into account the strong dependence of process performance on given conditions (temperature and pressure). It calculates steady-state isotope concentration profiles considering a full set of reversible exchange reactions between different isotope modifications of water and hydrogen (12 molecular species). So the code can be used for simulation of LPCE column operation for detritiation of hydrogen and water feed, which contains H and D not only at low concentrations but above 10 at.% also. EVIO-5 code is used to model a Tritium Removal Facility with a throughput capacity of about 400 m{sup 3}/day. Simulation results show that a huge amount of wet-proofed catalyst is required (about 6000 m{sup 3}), mainly (90%) in the first stage. One reason for these large expenses (apart from a big scale of the problem itself) is the relatively high tritium separation factor in the hot tower

  5. Choice of a process design for simultaneous detritiation and upgrading of heavy water for the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.I.; Spagnolo, D.A.; DeVore, J.R.

    1995-11-01

    Tritium removal and heavy water upgrading are essential components of the heavy water-moderated reactor that is the heart of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The technologies for these two processes, which are closely related, are reviewed in the context of the ANS requirements. The evolution of the design of the Heavy Water Upgrading and Detritiation Facility (HWUDF) for ANS is outlined, and the final conceptual design is presented. The conceptual design of HWUDF has two main component systems: (a) a front-end combined electrolysis and catalytic exchange (CECE) system and (b) a back-end cryogenic distillation (CD) system. The CECE process consists of a countercurrent exchange column for hydrogen-water exchange over a wetproofed catalyst and electrolysis to convert water into hydrogen. It accepts all the tritiated heavy water streams of the reactor and performs an almost total separation into a protium (light hydrogen) stream containing tritium and deuterium at only natural abundance and a deuterium stream containing all the tritium and almost no protium. The tritium-containing deuterium stream is then processed by a CD unit, which removes over 90% of the tritium and concentrates it to >99% tritium for indefinite storage as a metal tritide. Deuterium gas with a small residue of tritium is recombined with oxygen from the electrolytic cells and returned as heavy water to the reactor.

  6. Complex software dedicated for design and simulation of LPCE process for heavy water detritiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bornea, A.; Petrutiu, C.; Zamfirache, M.

    2015-03-15

    The main purpose of this paper is to present a comprehensive software, SICA, designed to be used in water-hydrogen liquid phase catalytic exchange process (LPCE). The software calculates the water-gas catalytic isotopic exchange process, following the transfer of any H, D or T isotope from water to gas and vice versa. This software is useful for both design and laboratory-based research; the type of the catalytic filling (ordered or random) can be defined for any of these 2 cases, the isotopic calculation being specific to the package type. For the laboratory-based research, the performance of a catalytic packing can be determined by knowing the type and by using experimental results. Performance of the mixed catalytic packing is defined by mass transfer constants for each catalytic and hydrophilic package in that specific arrangement, and also for the isotope whose transfer is studied from one phase to another. Also, it has been established a link between these constants and commonly used parameters for the fillings performance defined by HETP (Height Equivalent of Theoretical Plate). To demonstrate the performance of the software, we present a comparative analysis of water-gas catalytic isotopic exchange on a column equipped with 3 types of filling: successive layers, random and structured (ordered package filled with catalyst). The program can be used for the LPCE process calculation, process used at detritiation facilities for CANDU reactors or fusion reactors. (authors)

  7. Conceptual design and optimization for JET water detritiation system cryo-distillation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, X.; Hollingsworth, A.; Parracho, A.; Dalgliesh, P.; Butler, B.; Smith, R.

    2015-03-15

    The aim of the Exhaust Detritiation System (EDS) of the JET Active Gas Handling System (AGHS) is to convert all Q-based species (Q{sub 2}, Q-hydrocarbons) into Q{sub 2}O (Q being indifferently H, D or T) which is then trapped on molecular sieve beds (MSB). Regenerating the saturated MSBs leads to the production of tritiated water which is stored in Briggs drums. An alternative disposal solution to offsite shipping, is to process the tritiated water onsite via the implementation of a Water Detritiation System (WDS) based, in part, on the combination of an electrolyser and a cryo-distillation (CD) facility. The CD system will separate a Q{sub 2} mixture into a de-tritiated hydrogen stream for safe release and a tritiated stream for further processing on existing AGHS subsystems. A sensitivity study of the Souers' model using the simulation program ProSimPlus (edited by ProSim S.A.) has then been undertaken in order to perform an optimised dimensioning of the cryo-distillation system in terms of available cooling technologies, cost of investment, cost of operations, process performance and safety. (authors)

  8. Development and Improvement of Devices for Hydrogen Generation and Oxidation in Water Detritiation Facility Based on CECE Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Rozenkevich, M.; Andreev, B.; Magomedbekov, E.; Park, Yu.; Sakharovsky, Yu.; Perevezentsev, A

    2005-07-15

    Water detritiation facility based on CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange) technology needs an electrolyser for water conversion to hydrogen. Use of a conventional alkali electrolyser requires a very deep purification of hydrogen stream from alkali prior to injection to LPCE (Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange) column. In some applications conversion of detritiated hydrogen back into water is required. This is usually performed via hydrogen catalytic oxidation in a recombiner. This paper presents results of study to improve hydrogen and oxygen purification for alkali electrolysers and develop a hydrogen recombiner based on use of hydrophobic catalyst.

  9. Water Detritiation: Better SCK-CEN Catalysts for Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Bruggeman, Aime; Braet, Johan; Vanderbiesen, Sven

    2005-07-15

    A technically and economically sound technology for water detritiation is mandatory for the future of fusion. This technology is expected to be based on water electrolysis and Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE). LPCE requires an efficient hydrophobic catalyst. SCK-CEN invented and developed such a catalyst in the past, which is prepared by depositing platinum on an activated charcoal carrier and mixing it with polytetrafluorethylene as a hydrophobic material. In combination with an appropriate wettable packing, different batches of this catalyst performed very well during years of extensive testing, allowing us to develop the ELEX process for water detritiation at inland reprocessing plants. Recently we succeeded in reproducing this catalyst and preparing a slightly different but clearly ameliorated type. By extrapolation these new results would allow us to obtain, at 40 deg. C and under typical but conservative operating conditions, a decontamination factor of 10000 with a column of less than 3 meters long. Such performances would make this catalyst an excellent candidate for application at JET or ITER. To confirm the performances of our improved catalyst for a longer period of time and in a longer column, we are now starting experiments in a newly built installation and we are collaborating with ICSI, Romania.

  10. Process calculations for a moderator detritiation plant

    SciTech Connect

    Rodman, M.; Howard, D.W.

    1985-03-01

    The Savannah River Plant is currently analyzing processes for the removal of tritium from the heavy water used as a moderator in SRP's nuclear reactors. An accompanying paper describes the background and need for this process. A computer-aided design program was used to simulate the distillation section of the detritiation process flowsheet. Simplified calculation techniques were performed to optimize the process parameters. Results obtained are being used to evaluate proposals from various vendors.

  11. Process calculations for a moderator detritiation plant

    SciTech Connect

    Rodman, M.; Howard, D.W.

    1985-09-01

    The Savannah River Plant is currently analyzing processes for the removal of tritium from the heavy water used as a moderator in SRP's nuclear reactors. An accompanying paper describes the background and need for this process. A computer-aided design program was used to simulate the distillation section of the detritiation process flowsheet. Simplified calculation techniques were performed to optimize the process parameters. Results obtained are being used to evaluate proposals from various vendors.

  12. Endurance Test for SCK-CEN Catalytic Mixed Packing, Proposed for Water Detritiation System at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Ionita, Gh.; Bornea, A.; Braet, J.; Popescu, I.; Stefanescu, I.; Bidica, N.; Varlam, C; Postolache, Cr.; Mateic, L.

    2005-07-15

    JET machine's operation lead to continuously generation of tritiated water and therefore, it is necessary to consider the development of a Water Detritiation System (WDS) for JET and also for ITER. The key point of WDS is the efficiency and stability of liquid phase catalytic exchange (LPCE) column, that has to achieve a high decontamination of tritiated streams.Two catalytic mixed packing based on hydrophobic Pt-catalyst, and having closed separation performances have been proposed for LPCE column. A complete data base concerning the influence of {beta}-radiation of tritium and the influence of impurities from feed streams on the catalytic mixed packing' s performances and parameters is absolutely necessary.The results of 3 months endurance test for one of these packing (SCK-CEN packing), are presented in this paper. No significant modifications of performances and physico-structural parameters have been observed.

  13. Experiments on water detritiation and cryogenic distillation at TLK; Impact on ITER fuel cycle subsystems interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cristescu, I.; Cristescu, I. R.; Doerr, L.; Hellriegel, G.; Michling, R.; Murdoch, D.; Schaefer, P.; Welte, S.; Wurster, W.

    2008-07-15

    The ITER Isotope Separation System (ISS) and Water Detritiation System (WDS) should be integrated in order to reduce potential chronic tritium emissions from the ISS. This is achieved by routing the top (protium) product from the ISS to a feed point near the bottom end of the WDS Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE) column. This provides an additional barrier against ISS emissions and should mitigate the memory effects due to process parameter fluctuations in the ISS. To support the research activities needed to characterize the performances of various components for WDS and ISS processes under various working conditions and configurations as needed for ITER design, an experimental facility called TRENTA representative of the ITER WDS and ISS protium separation column, has been commissioned and is in operation at TLK The experimental program on TRENTA facility is conducted to provide the necessary design data related to the relevant ITER operating modes. The operation availability and performances of ISS-WDS have impact on ITER fuel cycle subsystems with consequences on the design integration. The preliminary experimental data on TRENTA facility are presented. (authors)

  14. Moderator detritiation at the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgarten, P.K.; Howard, D.W.

    1985-09-01

    A study has been made of the technical and economic aspects of reducing tritium concentration in Savannah River Plant heavy-water moderator by 90%. A single detritiation plant would serve four operating reactors and the desired tritium reduction would be achieved in less than ten years. The process choice has narrowed to three processes. These involve a front-end extraction or preparation of molecular DT in a D/sub 2/ stream, and a back-end fractional distillation of this stream followed by catalytic conversion to make 98% tritium T/sub 2/.

  15. Concepts for detritiation of waste liquids

    SciTech Connect

    King, C.M. ); Van Brunt, V.; Garber, A.R. ); King, R.B. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-01-01

    Tritium is formed in thermal nuclear reactors both by neutron activation of elements such as deuterium and lithium and by ternary fission in the fuel. It is a weak beta-emitter with a short half-life, 12.3 years, and its radiological significance in reactor discharges is very low. In heavy-water-cooled and -moderated reactors, such as the SRS reactors, the tritium concentration in the moderator is sufficiently high to cause a potential hazard to operators, so research and development programs have been carried out on processes to remove the tritium. Detritiation of light water has also been the subject of major R D efforts world-wide, because reprocessing operations can generate significant quantities of tritium in liquid waste, and high concentrations of tritium may arise in some aqueous streams in future fusion reactors. This paper presents a review of some of the methods that have been proposed, studied, and developed for removal of tritium from light and heavy water, along with some new concepts for aqueous detritiation directly from liquid oxide (HTO) bearing feed streams.

  16. Concepts for detritiation of waste liquids

    SciTech Connect

    King, C.M.; Van Brunt, V.; Garber, A.R.; King, R.B.

    1991-12-31

    Tritium is formed in thermal nuclear reactors both by neutron activation of elements such as deuterium and lithium and by ternary fission in the fuel. It is a weak beta-emitter with a short half-life, 12.3 years, and its radiological significance in reactor discharges is very low. In heavy-water-cooled and -moderated reactors, such as the SRS reactors, the tritium concentration in the moderator is sufficiently high to cause a potential hazard to operators, so research and development programs have been carried out on processes to remove the tritium. Detritiation of light water has also been the subject of major R&D efforts world-wide, because reprocessing operations can generate significant quantities of tritium in liquid waste, and high concentrations of tritium may arise in some aqueous streams in future fusion reactors. This paper presents a review of some of the methods that have been proposed, studied, and developed for removal of tritium from light and heavy water, along with some new concepts for aqueous detritiation directly from liquid oxide (HTO) bearing feed streams.

  17. Membrane reactor for water detritiation: a parametric study on operating parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarade, J.; Liger, K.; Troulay, M.; Perrais, C.

    2015-03-15

    This paper presents the results of a parametric study done on a single stage finger-type packed-bed membrane reactor (PBMR) used for heavy water vapor de-deuteration. Parametric studies have been done on 3 operating parameters which are: the membrane temperature, the total feed flow rate and the feed composition through D{sub 2}O content variations. Thanks to mass spectrometer analysis of streams leaving the PBMR, speciation of deuterated species was achieved. Measurement of the amounts of each molecular component allowed the calculation of reaction quotient at the packed-bed outlet. While temperature variation mainly influences permeation efficiency, feed flow rate perturbation reveals dependence of conversion and permeation properties to contact time between catalyst and reacting mixture. The study shows that isotopic exchange reactions occurring on the catalyst particles surface are not thermodynamically balanced. Moreover, the variation of the heavy water content in the feed exhibits competition between permeation and conversion kinetics.

  18. Dynamic behavior of chemical exchange column in a water detritiation system for a fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanishi, T.; Iwai, Y.

    2008-07-15

    The dynamic behavior of a CECE column used for a demonstration reactor (DEMO) plant has been studied. In the case where the column was filled with natural water, the time required to achieve steady state was almost the same as that for the column operated under the total reflux mode. The manipulated variables were flow rate of the bottom stream for the control of the bottom tritium concentration, and flow rate of the hydrogen stream for the control of the top tritium concentration. For both the variables, the response curve was expressed by the first-order lag system, and a PID controller could be applied. (authors)

  19. HEAVY WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Szilard, L.

    1958-04-29

    A nuclear reactor of the type which utilizes uranium fuel elements and a liquid coolant is described. The fuel elements are in the form of elongated tubes and are disposed within outer tubes extending through a tank containing heavy water, which acts as a moderator. The ends of the fuel tubes are connected by inlet and discharge headers, and liquid bismuth is circulated between the headers and through the fuel tubes for cooling. Helium is circulated through the annular space between the outer tubes in the tank and the fuel tubes to cool the water moderator to prevent boiling. The fuel tubes are covered with a steel lining, and suitable control means, heat exchange means, and pumping means for the coolants are provided to complete the reactor assembly.

  20. Discovery of Interstellar Heavy Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butner, H. M.; Charnley, S. B.; Ceccarelli, C.; Rodgers, S. D.; Pardo, J. R.; Parise, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Davis, G. R.

    2007-04-01

    We report the discovery of doubly deuterated water (D2O, heavy water) in the interstellar medium. Using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory 10 m telescope, we detected the 110-101 transition of para-D2O at 316.7998 GHz in both absorption and emission toward the protostellar binary system IRAS 16293-2422. Assuming that the D2O exists primarily in the warm regions where water ices have been evaporated (i.e., in a ``hot corino'' environment), we determine a total column density of N(D2O) of 1.0×1013 cm-2 and a fractional abundance of D2O/H2=1.7×10-10. The derived column density ratios for IRAS 16293-2422 are D2O/HDO=1.7×10-3 and D2O/H2O=5×10-5 for the hot corino gas. Steady state models of water ice formation, either in the gas phase or on grains, predict D2O/HDO ratios that are about 4 times larger than that derived from our observations. For water formation on grain surfaces to be a viable explanation, a larger H2O abundance than that measured in IRAS 16293-2422 is required. Alternatively, the observed D2O/HDO ratio could be indicative of gas-phase water chemistry prior to a chemical steady state being attained, such as would have occurred during the formation of this source. Future observations with the Herschel Space Observatory satellite will be important for settling this issue.

  1. Development of tritiated vapor absorbent applicable to the atmospheric detritiation system in a nuclear facility.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Yasunori; Yamanishi, Toshihiko

    2010-09-01

    The combination of hydrogen oxidation reactor packed noble metal catalysts and water vapor absorber has been applied to the atmospheric detritiation system of the tritium handling facility. Commercial synthetic zeolite such as molecular sieve 5A has been used as an adsorbent of ADS absorber. In the case of application of molecular sieve 5A to the ADS absorber of a large-scale tritium handling facility such as a future fusion plant, an absorber becomes huge due mainly to the difficulty in dehydration from molecular sieve 5A. Hence, application of CaY Faujasite-type zeolite with a high framework silica-to-alumina ratio to the adsorbent for atmospheric detritiation system was investigated. It was clear that the dehydration behavior at room temperature was significantly improved using CaY zeolite. In contrast, detritiation factor for CaY zeolite with a high framework silica-to-alumina ratio depended strongly on the space velocity through the absorber. To apply CaY zeolite with a high framework SiO(2)/Al(2)O(3) ratio to the ADS absorbent, the space velocity less than 250h(-1) was recommended to maintain the detritiation factor more than 1000. The steep increase in water adsorption at the relative pressure lower than 0.05 is a feature of synthetic zeolite with calcium cation. However, such an increase was not observed in water adsorption on CaY zeolite with a framework SiO(2)/Al(2)O(3) ratio more than 7.0. Consequently, the CaY zeolite with the framework SiO(2)/Al(2)O(3) ratio of 5.0 is a promising candidate as absorbent of ADS absorber. PMID:20434352

  2. Water issues associated with heavy oil production.

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-28

    Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

  3. ``Heavy-water Lattice and Heavy-Quark''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksoed, Ssi, Wh-

    Refer to Birgitt Roettger-Roessler: ``Feelings at the Margins'', 2014 retrieved the Vienna, 2006 UNIDO Research Programme: Combating Marginalization and Poverty through Industrial Development/COMPID. Also from Vienna, on Feb 18-22, 1963 reported Technical Report Series 20 about ``Heavy Water Lattice''. Failed to relates scale-invariant properties of public-Debt growth to convergence in perturbation theory, sought JH Field: ``Convergence & Gauge Dependence Properties:..''. Furthers, in GP Lepage: ``On the Viabilities of Lattice Perturbation Theory'', 1992 stated: ``in terms of physical quantities, like the heavy-quark potential, greatly enhanced the predictive power of lattice perturbation theory''. Acknowledgements to HE. Mr. H. TUK SETYOHADI, Jl. Sriwijaya Raya 3, South-Jakarta, INDONESIA.

  4. Removal of gadolinium nitrate from heavy water

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.

    2000-03-22

    Work was conducted to develop a cost-effective process to purify 181 55-gallon drums containing spent heavy water moderator (D2O) contaminated with high concentrations of gadolinium nitrate, a chemical used as a neutron poison during former nuclear reactor operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These drums also contain low level radioactive contamination, including tritium, which complicates treatment options. Presently, the drums of degraded moderator are being stored on site. It was suggested that a process utilizing biological mechanisms could potentially lower the total cost of heavy water purification by allowing the use of smaller equipment with less product loss and a reduction in the quantity of secondary waste materials produced by the current baseline process (ion exchange).

  5. HEAVY WATER COMPONENTS TEST REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

    2011-10-13

    The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) Decommissioning Project was initiated in 2009 as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Removal Action with funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). This paper summarizes the history prior to 2009, the major D&D activities, and final end state of the facility at completion of decommissioning in June 2011. The HWCTR facility was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. In 2009 the $1.6 billion allocation from the ARRA to SRS for site footprint reduction at SRS reopened the doors to HWCTR - this time for final decommissioning. Alternative studies concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning was to remove the reactor vessel, both steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. The transfer coffin, originally above grade, was to be placed in the cavity vacated by the reactor vessel and the remaining below grade spaces would be grouted. Once all above equipment

  6. Design of Recycle Pressurized Water Reactor with Heavy Water Moderation

    SciTech Connect

    Hibi, Koki; Uchita, Masato

    2004-03-15

    This study presents the conceptual design of the recycle pressurized water reactor (RPWR), which is an innovative PWR fueled with mixed oxide, moderated by heavy water, and having breeding ratios around 1.1. Most of the systems of RPWR can employ those of PWRs. The RPWR has no boric acid systems and has a small tritium removal system. The construction and operation costs would be similar to those of current PWRs. Heavy water cost has decreased drastically with up-to-date producing methods. The reliability of the systems of the RPWR is high, and the research and development cost for RPWR is very low because the core design is fundamentally based on the current PWR technology.

  7. Material Removes Heavy Metal Ions From Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, Warren H., Jr.; Street, Kenneth W.; Hill, Carol; Savino, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    New high capacity ion-exchange polymer material removes toxic metal cations from contaminated water. Offers several advantages. High sensitivities for such heavy metals as lead, cadmium, and copper and capable of reducing concentrations in aqueous solutions to parts-per-billion range. Removes cations even when calcium present. Material made into variety of forms, such as thin films, coatings, pellets, and fibers. As result, adapted to many applications to purify contaminated water, usually hard wherever found, whether in wastewater-treatment systems, lakes, ponds, industrial plants, or homes. Another important feature that adsorbed metals easily reclaimed by either destructive or nondestructive process. Other tests show ion-exchange polymer made inexpensively; easy to use; strong, flexible, not easily torn; and chemically stable in storage, in aqueous solutions, and in acidic or basic solution.

  8. METHOD OF OPERATING A HEAVY WATER MODERATED REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, H.C.

    1962-08-14

    A method of removing fission products from the heavy water used in a slurry type nuclear reactor is described. According to the process the slurry is steam distilled with carbon tetrachloride so that at least a part of the heavy water and carbon tetrachloride are vaporized; the heavy water and carbon tetrachloride are separated; the carbon tetrachloride is returned to the steam distillation column at different points in the column to aid in depositing the slurry particles at the bottom of the column; and the heavy water portion of the condensate is purified. (AEC)

  9. Antineutrino Monitoring for Heavy Water Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Eric; Huber, Patrick; Jaffke, Patrick; Shea, Thomas E.

    2014-07-01

    In this Letter we discuss the potential application of antineutrino monitoring to the Iranian heavy water reactor at Arak, the IR-40, as a nonproliferation measure. An above ground detector positioned right outside the IR-40 reactor building could meet IAEA verification goals for reactor plutonium inventories. While detectors with the needed spectral sensitivity have been demonstrated below ground, additional research and development is needed to demonstrate an above-ground detector with this same level of sensitivity. In addition to monitoring the reactor during operation, observing antineutrino emissions from long-lived fission products could also allow monitoring the reactor when it is shut down, provided very low detector backgrounds can be achieved. Antineutrino monitoring could also be used to distinguish different levels of fuel enrichment. Most importantly, these capabilities would not require a complete reactor operational history and could provide a means to reestablish continuity of knowledge in safeguards conclusions should this become necessary.

  10. Status and practicality of detritiation and tritium production strategies for environmental remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Fulbright, H.H.; Schwirian-Spann, A.L.; Brunt, V. van; Jerome, K.M.; Looney, B.B.

    1996-02-26

    Operation of nuclear facilities throughout the world generates wastewater, groundwater and surface water contaminated with tritium. Because of a commitment to minimize radiation exposures to ''levels as low as reasonably achievable'', the US Department of Energy supports development of tritium isotope separation technologies. Also, DOE periodically documents the status and potential viability of alternative tritium treatment technologies and management strategies. The specific objectives of the current effort are to evaluate practical engineering issues, technology acceptability issues, and costs for realistic tritium treatment scenarios. A unique feature of the assessment is that the portfolio of options was expanded to include various management strategies rather than only evaluating detritiation technologies. The ultimate purpose of this effort is to assist Environmental Restoration and its support organizations in allocating future investments.

  11. An optical dosimeter for monitoring heavy metal ions in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, Anna G.; Regan, Fiona; Leamy, D.; Mencaglia, A. A.; Ciaccheri, L.

    2005-05-01

    This work presents an optochemical dosimeter for determining and discriminating nickel, copper, and cobalt ions in water that can be used as an early warning system for water pollution. An inexpensive fiber optic spectrophotometer monitors the sensor's spectral behavior under exposure to water solutions of heavy metal ions in the 1-10 mg/l concentration range. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method quantitatively determines the heavy metals and discriminates their type and combination.

  12. VIEW OF SOUTHERNMOST OF TWO HEAVY WATER STORAGE TANKS, LOCATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF SOUTHERN-MOST OF TWO HEAVY WATER STORAGE TANKS, LOCATED BEHIND SUPPORT COLUMN, WITH ADJACENT PIPING, LEVEL -27’, LOOKING WEST - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

  13. VIEW OF TWO HEAVY WATER STORAGE TANKS (BEHIND SUPPORT COLUMNS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF TWO HEAVY WATER STORAGE TANKS (BEHIND SUPPORT COLUMNS AND STEEL BEAMS), SUB-BASEMENT LEVEL -27’, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

  14. Magnetic process for removing heavy metals from water employing magnetites

    DOEpatents

    Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D.; Padilla, Dennis D.; Wingo, Robert M.; Worl, Laura A.; Johnson, Michael D.

    2003-07-22

    A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. The magnetite is mixed with the water such that at least a portion of, and preferably the majority of, the heavy metal in the water is bound to the magnetite. Once this occurs the magnetite and absorbed metal is removed from the water by application of a magnetic field. In most applications the process is achieved by flowing the water through a solid magnetized matrix, such as steel wool, such that the magnetite magnetically binds to the solid matrix. The magnetized matrix preferably has remnant magnetism, but may also be subject to an externally applied magnetic field. Once the magnetite and associated heavy metal is bound to the matrix, it can be removed and disposed of, such as by reverse water or air and water flow through the matrix. The magnetite may be formed in-situ by the addition of the necessary quantities of Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions, or pre-formed magnetite may be added, or a combination of seed and in-situ formation may be used. The invention also relates to an apparatus for performing the removal of heavy metals from water using the process outlined above.

  15. Magnetic process for removing heavy metals from water employing magnetites

    DOEpatents

    Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D.

    2006-12-26

    A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. The magnetite is mixed with the water such that at least a portion of, and preferably the majority of, the heavy metal in the water is bound to the magnetite. Once this occurs the magnetite and absorbed metal is removed from the water by application of a magnetic field. In most applications the process is achieved by flowing the water through a solid magnetized matrix, such as steel wool, such that the magnetite magnetically binds to the solid matrix. The magnetized matrix preferably has remnant magnetism, but may also be subject to an externally applied magnetic field. Once the magnetite and associated heavy metal is bound to the matrix, it can be removed and disposed of, such as by reverse water or air and water flow through the matrix. The magnetite may be formed in-situ by the addition of the necessary quantities of Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions, or pre-formed magnetite may be added, or a combination of seed and in-situ formation may be used. The invention also relates to an apparatus for performing the removal of heavy metals from water using the process outlined above.

  16. Water hyacinth as indicator of heavy metal pollution the tropics

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, H.; Otero, M. ); Lodenius, M. )

    1989-12-01

    The water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) is a common aquatic plant in many tropical countries. Its ability absorb nutrients and other elements from the water has made it possible to use it for water purification purposes. Eichhornia, especially stems and leaves, have been successfully used as indicators of heavy metal pollution in tropical countries. The uptake of heavy metals in this plant is stronger in the roots than in the floating shoots. Metallothionein-like compounds have been found from roots of this species after cadmium exposure. The purpose of this investigation was to study the possibilities of using roots of water hyacinth as a biological indicator of metal pollution in tropical aquatic ecosystems.

  17. Detritiation of type 316 stainless steel by treatment with liquids at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penzhorn, Ralf-Dieter; Torikai, Y.; Matsuyama, M.; Watanabe, K.

    2006-07-01

    The detritiation efficiency of type 316 stainless steel (SS316) using liquids reagents (distilled deionized water, concentrated aqueous ammonia or a diluted hydrochloric acid/nitric acid mixture) was investigated at ambient temperature by means of liquid scintillation counting (LSC) and β-ray-induced X-ray spectrometry (BIXS). After a fast initial removal of tritium trapped on the outermost surface of SS316 with a rate in the order water < ammonia < acid mixture a slow chronic liberation of tritium into all three liquids sets in. First results indicate that chronic release occurs with a rate of approx. 0.2% per day. The long-term release was found to be largely independent from the kind of liquid agent into which the metal is submerged and from the initial loading of the SS316 specimen. From a practical point of view, the release rate of tritium into liquids is too slow for conditioning applications. Complementary evidence for the occurrence of a chronic liberation of tritium from SS316 into air at ambient temperature was obtained from tritium depth profiling of aged specimens by acid etching.

  18. Utilizing heavy metal-laden water hyacinth biomass in vermicomposting.

    PubMed

    Tereshchenko, Natalya N; Akimova, Elena E; Pisarchuk, Anna D; Yunusova, Tatyana V; Minaeva, Oksana M

    2015-05-01

    We studied the efficiency of water treatment by water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) from heavy metals (Zn, Cd, Pb, Cu), as well as a possibility of using water hyacinth biomass obtained during treatment for vermicomposting by Eisenia fetida and the vermicompost quality in a model experiment. The results showed that the concentration of heavy metals in the trials with water hyacinth decreased within 35 days. We introduced water hyacinth biomass to the organic substrate for vermicomposting, which promoted a significant weight gain of earthworms and growth in their number, as well as a 1.5- to 3-fold increase in coprolite production. In the trial with 40 % of Eichhornia biomass in the mixture, we observed a 26-fold increase in the number and a 16-fold weight gain of big mature individuals with clitellum; an increase in the number of small individuals 40 times and in the number of cocoons 140 times, as compared to the initial substrate. The utilization of water hyacinth biomass containing heavy metals in the mixture led to a 10-fold increase in the number of adult individuals and cocoons, which was higher than in control. We found out that adding 10 % of Eichhornia biomass to the initial mixture affected slightly the number of microorganisms and their species diversity in the vermicompost. Adding Eichhornia biomass with heavy metals reduced the total number of microorganisms and sharply diminished their species diversity. In all trials, adding water hyacinth in the mixture for vermicomposting had a positive impact on wheat biometric parameters in a 14-day laboratory experiment, even in the trial with heavy metals. PMID:25501861

  19. [Effect of heavy water on the viability of bacteria].

    PubMed

    Dronova, N V; Parkhomenko, T V; Popov, V G; Sventitskiĭ, E N; Iakovleva, L Iu

    1988-01-01

    Influence of heavy water (D2O) on the membrane energization, the efflux of hydrogen ions and the respiration of bacteria E. coli M-17 was studied. As has been shown, heavy water of a low concentration (0.05-0.20% v/v) activates and of a high concentration (above 10%) inhibits the absorption of lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP+) and of oxygen by cells. The return of these characteristics to the initial levels after the removal of D2O points to a reversible action of D2O. A protective effect of D2O towards membrane energization and rate of respiration on dried cells was observed. This fact is in agreement with the data on viability of bacteria. The indicated protective action increases at the stage of rehydration in the presence of D2O. PMID:3390482

  20. DEGRADATION EVALUATION OF HEAVY WATER DRUMS AND TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Vormelker, P.

    2009-07-31

    Heavy water with varying chemistries is currently being stored in over 6700 drums in L- and K-areas and in seven tanks in L-, K-, and C-areas. A detailed evaluation of the potential degradation of the drums and tanks, specific to their design and service conditions, has been performed to support the demonstration of their integrity throughout the desired storage period. The 55-gallon drums are of several designs with Type 304 stainless steel as the material of construction. The tanks have capacities ranging from 8000 to 45600 gallons and are made of Type 304 stainless steel. The drums and tanks were designed and fabricated to national regulations, codes and standards per procurement specifications for the Savannah River Site. The drums have had approximately 25 leakage failures over their 50+ years of use with the last drum failure occurring in 2003. The tanks have experienced no leaks to date. The failures in the drums have occurred principally near the bottom weld, which attaches the bottom to the drum sidewall. Failures have occurred by pitting, crevice and stress corrosion cracking and are attributable, in part, to the presence of chloride ions in the heavy water. Probable degradation mechanisms for the continued storage of heavy water were evaluated that could lead to future failures in the drum or tanks. This evaluation will be used to support establishment of an inspection plan which will include susceptible locations, methods, and frequencies for the drums and tanks to avoid future leakage failures.

  1. Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning - Major Component Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

    2010-05-05

    The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility (Figure 1) was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR facility is on high, well-drained ground, about 30 meters above the water table. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. It was not a defense-related facility like the materials production reactors at SRS. The reactor was moderated with heavy water and was rated at 50 megawatts thermal power. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In 1965, fuel assemblies were removed, systems that contained heavy water were drained, fluid piping systems were drained, deenergized and disconnected and the spent fuel basin was drained and dried. The doors of the reactor facility were shut and it wasn't until 10 years later that decommissioning plans were considered and ultimately postponed due to budget constraints. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR again. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. The $1.6 billion allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to SRS for site clean up at SRS has opened the doors to the HWCTR again - this time for final decommissioning. During the lifetime of HWCTR, 36 different fuel assemblies were tested in the facility. Ten of these

  2. Method and apparatus for separation of heavy and tritiated water

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Myung W.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is a bi-thermal membrane process for separating and recovering hydrogen isotopes from a fluid containing hydrogen isotopes, such as water and hydrogen gas. The process in accordance with the present invention provides counter-current cold and hot streams of the fluid separated with a thermally insulating and chemically transparent proton exchange membrane (PEM). The two streams exchange hydrogen isotopes through the membrane: the heavier isotopes migrate into the cold stream, while the lighter isotopes migrate into the hot stream. The heavy and light isotopes are continuously withdrawn from the cold and hot streams respectively.

  3. Leaching of heavy metals from water bottle components into the drinking water of rodents.

    PubMed

    Nunamaker, Elizabeth A; Otto, Kevin J; Artwohl, James E; Fortman, Jeffrey D

    2013-01-01

    Providing high-quality, uncontaminated drinking water is an essential component of rodent husbandry. Acidification of drinking water is a common technique to control microbial growth but is not a benign treatment. In addition to its potential biologic effects, acidified water might interact with the water-delivery system, leading to the leaching of heavy metals into the drinking water. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the effects of water acidification and autoclaving on water-bottle assemblies. The individual components of the system (stainless-steel sipper tubes, rubber stoppers, neoprene stoppers, and polysulfone water bottles) were acid-digested and analyzed for cadmium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, magnesium, manganese, selenium, and zinc to quantify the metal composition of each material. In addition the amounts of these metals that leached into tap and acidified water with and without autoclaving were quantified after 1 wk of contact time. On a weight basis, sipper tubes contained the largest quantities of all metals except magnesium and zinc, which were greatest in the neoprene stoppers. Except for cadmium and selenium, all metals had leached into the water after 1 wk, especially under the acidified condition. The quantities of copper, lead, and zinc that leached into the drinking water were the most noteworthy, because the resulting concentrations had the potential to confound animal experiments. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that water-quality monitoring programs include heavy metal analysis at the level of water delivery to animals. PMID:23562029

  4. Concentration and speciation of heavy metals during water hyacinth composting.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jiwan; Kalamdhad, Ajay S

    2012-11-01

    The Tessier sequential extraction method was employed to investigate the changes in heavy metals speciation (Zn, Cu, Mn, Fe, Pb, Ni, Cd and Cr) during water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) composting. Results showed that, the contents of total metals concentration were increased during the composting process. The largest proportion of metals was found in the residual fraction which was in more stable form and is consequently considered unavailable for plant uptake. Reducible and oxidizable fractions of Ni, Pb and Cd were not found in all trials during water hyacinth composting. The concentrations of Cu and Cd were very low comparative to the other metals, but the percentage of exchangeable and carbonate fractions were similar as other metals. From this study it can be concluded that the appropriate proportion of cattle manure addition (Trial 4) significantly reduced the mobile and easily available fractions (exchangeable and carbonate fractions) during the composting process. PMID:22989643

  5. Deployment Scenario of Heavy Water Cooled Thorium Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mardiansah, Deby; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2010-06-22

    Deployment scenario of heavy water cooled thorium breeder reactor has been studied. We have assumed to use plutonium and thorium oxide fuel in water cooled reactor to produce {sup 233}U which will be used in thorium breeder reactor. The objective is to analysis the potential of water cooled Th-Pu reactor for replacing all of current LWRs especially in Japan. In this paper, the standard Pressurize Water Reactor (PWR) has been designed to produce 3423 MWt; (i) Th-Pu PWR, (ii) Th-Pu HWR (MFR = 1.0) and (iii) Th-Pu HWR (MFR 1.2). The properties and performance of the core were investigated by using cell and core calculation code. Th-Pu PWR or HWR produces {sup 233}U to introduce thorium breeder reactor. The result showed that to replace all (60 GWe) LWR by thorium breeder reactor within a period of one century, Th-Pu oxide fueled PWR has insufficient capability to produce necessary amount of {sup 233}U and Th-Pu oxide fueled HWR has almost enough potential to produce {sup 233}U but shows positive void reactivity coefficient.

  6. Pollution status of Pakistan: a retrospective review on heavy metal contamination of water, soil, and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Waseem, Amir; Arshad, Jahanzaib; Iqbal, Farhat; Sajjad, Ashif; Mehmood, Zahid; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2014-01-01

    Trace heavy metals, such as arsenic, cadmium, lead, chromium, nickel, and mercury, are important environmental pollutants, particularly in areas with high anthropogenic pressure. In addition to these metals, copper, manganese, iron, and zinc are also important trace micronutrients. The presence of trace heavy metals in the atmosphere, soil, and water can cause serious problems to all organisms, and the ubiquitous bioavailability of these heavy metal can result in bioaccumulation in the food chain which especially can be highly dangerous to human health. This study reviews the heavy metal contamination in several areas of Pakistan over the past few years, particularly to assess the heavy metal contamination in water (ground water, surface water, and waste water), soil, sediments, particulate matter, and vegetables. The listed contaminations affect the drinking water quality, ecological environment, and food chain. Moreover, the toxicity induced by contaminated water, soil, and vegetables poses serious threat to human health. PMID:25276818

  7. Pollution Status of Pakistan: A Retrospective Review on Heavy Metal Contamination of Water, Soil, and Vegetables

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Jahanzaib; Iqbal, Farhat; Sajjad, Ashif; Mehmood, Zahid

    2014-01-01

    Trace heavy metals, such as arsenic, cadmium, lead, chromium, nickel, and mercury, are important environmental pollutants, particularly in areas with high anthropogenic pressure. In addition to these metals, copper, manganese, iron, and zinc are also important trace micronutrients. The presence of trace heavy metals in the atmosphere, soil, and water can cause serious problems to all organisms, and the ubiquitous bioavailability of these heavy metal can result in bioaccumulation in the food chain which especially can be highly dangerous to human health. This study reviews the heavy metal contamination in several areas of Pakistan over the past few years, particularly to assess the heavy metal contamination in water (ground water, surface water, and waste water), soil, sediments, particulate matter, and vegetables. The listed contaminations affect the drinking water quality, ecological environment, and food chain. Moreover, the toxicity induced by contaminated water, soil, and vegetables poses serious threat to human health. PMID:25276818

  8. Heavy metals in drinking water: Occurrences, implications, and future needs in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat; Mazumder, M A Jafar; Al-Attas, Omar; Husain, Tahir

    2016-11-01

    Heavy metals in drinking water pose a threat to human health. Populations are exposed to heavy metals primarily through water consumption, but few heavy metals can bioaccumulate in the human body (e.g., in lipids and the gastrointestinal system) and may induce cancer and other risks. To date, few thousand publications have reported various aspects of heavy metals in drinking water, including the types and quantities of metals in drinking water, their sources, factors affecting their concentrations at exposure points, human exposure, potential risks, and their removal from drinking water. Many developing countries are faced with the challenge of reducing human exposure to heavy metals, mainly due to their limited economic capacities to use advanced technologies for heavy metal removal. This paper aims to review the state of research on heavy metals in drinking water in developing countries; understand their types and variability, sources, exposure, possible health effects, and removal; and analyze the factors contributing to heavy metals in drinking water. This study identifies the current challenges in developing countries, and future research needs to reduce the levels of heavy metals in drinking water. PMID:27355520

  9. 76 FR 52994 - Application for a License To Export Heavy Water

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... FR 49139 (Aug. 28, 2007). Information about filing electronically is available on the NRC's public... COMMISSION Application for a License To Export Heavy Water Pursuant to 10 CFR 110.70 (b) ``Public Notice of... end-use for China. (D2O--heavy (liters). producing an active water). pharmaceutical ingredient...

  10. Accident analysis of heavy water cooled thorium breeder reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulianti, Yanti; Su'ud, Zaki; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2015-04-01

    Thorium has lately attracted considerable attention because it is accumulating as a by-product of large scale rare earth mining. The objective of research is to analyze transient behavior of a heavy water cooled thorium breeder that is designed by Tokai University and Tokyo Institute of Technology. That is oxide fueled, PWR type reactor with heavy water as primary coolant. An example of the optimized core has relatively small moderator to fuel volume ratio (MFR) of 0.6 and the characteristics of the core are burn-up of 67 GWd/t, breeding ratio of 1.08, burn-up reactivity loss during cycles of < 0.2% dk/k, and negative coolant reactivity coefficient. One of the nuclear reactor accidents types examined here is Unprotected Transient over Power (UTOP) due to withdrawing of the control rod that result in the positive reactivity insertion so that the reactor power will increase rapidly. Another accident type is Unprotected Loss of Flow (ULOF) that caused by failure of coolant pumps. To analyze the reactor accidents, neutron distribution calculation in the nuclear reactor is the most important factor. The best expression for the neutron distribution is the Boltzmann transport equation. However, solving this equation is very difficult so that the space-time diffusion equation is commonly used. Usually, space-time diffusion equation is solved by employing a point kinetics approach. However, this approach is less accurate for a spatially heterogeneous nuclear reactor and the nuclear reactor with quite large reactivity input. Direct method is therefore used to solve space-time diffusion equation which consider spatial factor in detail during nuclear reactor accident simulation. Set of equations that obtained from full implicit finite-difference method is solved by using iterative methods. The indication of UTOP accident is decreasing macroscopic absorption cross-section that results large external reactivity, and ULOF accident is indicated by decreasing coolant flow. The

  11. Accident analysis of heavy water cooled thorium breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yulianti, Yanti; Su’ud, Zaki; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2015-04-16

    Thorium has lately attracted considerable attention because it is accumulating as a by-product of large scale rare earth mining. The objective of research is to analyze transient behavior of a heavy water cooled thorium breeder that is designed by Tokai University and Tokyo Institute of Technology. That is oxide fueled, PWR type reactor with heavy water as primary coolant. An example of the optimized core has relatively small moderator to fuel volume ratio (MFR) of 0.6 and the characteristics of the core are burn-up of 67 GWd/t, breeding ratio of 1.08, burn-up reactivity loss during cycles of < 0.2% dk/k, and negative coolant reactivity coefficient. One of the nuclear reactor accidents types examined here is Unprotected Transient over Power (UTOP) due to withdrawing of the control rod that result in the positive reactivity insertion so that the reactor power will increase rapidly. Another accident type is Unprotected Loss of Flow (ULOF) that caused by failure of coolant pumps. To analyze the reactor accidents, neutron distribution calculation in the nuclear reactor is the most important factor. The best expression for the neutron distribution is the Boltzmann transport equation. However, solving this equation is very difficult so that the space-time diffusion equation is commonly used. Usually, space-time diffusion equation is solved by employing a point kinetics approach. However, this approach is less accurate for a spatially heterogeneous nuclear reactor and the nuclear reactor with quite large reactivity input. Direct method is therefore used to solve space-time diffusion equation which consider spatial factor in detail during nuclear reactor accident simulation. Set of equations that obtained from full implicit finite-difference method is solved by using iterative methods. The indication of UTOP accident is decreasing macroscopic absorption cross-section that results large external reactivity, and ULOF accident is indicated by decreasing coolant flow. The

  12. Selected bibliography on heavy water, tritiated water and hydrogen isotopes (1981-1992)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, V. T.; Sutawane, U. B.; Rathi, B. N.

    A selected bibliography on heavy water, tritiated water and hydrogen isotopes is presented. This bibliography covers the period 1981-1992 and is in continuation to Division's earlier report BARC-1192 (1983). The sources of information for this compilation are Chemical Abstracts, INIS Atom Index and also some scattered search through journals and reports available in our library. No claim is made towards exhaustiveness of this bibliography even though sincere attempts have been made for a wide coverage. The bibliography is arranged under the headings: (1) production, purification, recovery, reprocessing and storage; (2) isotope exchange; (3) isotope analysis; (4) properties; and (5) miscellaneous. Total number of references in the bibliography are 1762.

  13. Electromyogram as a measure of heavy metal toxicity in fresh water and salt water mussels

    SciTech Connect

    Kidder, G.W. III |; McCoy, A.A. |

    1996-02-01

    The response of bivalves to heavy metals and other toxins has usually been determined by observing valve position. Since mussels close their valves to avoid noxious stimuli, experimental delivery of chemicals ins uncertain. To obtain constant results plastic spacers can be employed to hold the valves apart. This obviates valve position as an index of response and some other method is required. Electromyography of intact mussels is one such index, giving a simple, effective, and quantitative measurement of activity. Experiments are reported in this article on the effects of added mercury on salt water and fresh water species.

  14. Stable growth mechanisms of ice disk crystals in heavy water.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Satoshi; Yoshizaki, Izumi; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Yokoyama, Etsuro; Furukawa, Yoshinori; Shimaoka, Taro

    2011-11-01

    Ice crystal growth experiments in heavy water were carried out under microgravity to investigate the morphological transition from a disk crystal to a dendrite. Surprisingly, however, no transition was observed, namely, the disk crystal or dendrite maintained its shape throughout the experiments, unlike the results obtained on the ground. Therefore, we introduce a growth model to understand disk growth. The Gibbs-Thomson effect is taken into account as a stabilization mechanism. The model is numerically solved by varying both an interfacial tension of the prism plane and supercooling so that the final sizes of the crystals can become almost the same to determine the interfacial tension. The results are compared with the typical experimental ones and thus the interfacial tension is estimated to be 20 mJ/m(2). Next, the model is solved under two supercooling conditions by using the estimated interfacial tension to understand stable growth. Comparisons between the numerical and experimental results show that our model explains well the microgravity experiments. It is also found that the experimental setup has the capability of controlling temperature on the order of 1/100 K. PMID:22181428

  15. Freezing of heavy water (D2O) nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Bhabhe, Ashutosh; Pathak, Harshad; Wyslouzil, Barbara E

    2013-07-01

    We follow the freezing of heavy water (D2O) nanodroplets formed in a supersonic nozzle apparatus using position resolved pressure trace measurements, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering. For these 3-9 nm radii droplets, freezing starts between 223 and 225 K, at volume based ice nucleation rates Jice,V on the order of 10(23) cm(-3) s(-1) or surface based ice nucleation rates Jice,S on the order of 10(16) cm(-2) s(-1). The temperatures corresponding to the onset of D2O ice nucleation are higher than those reported for H2O by Manka et al. [Manka, A.; Pathak, H.; Tanimura, S.; Wölk, J.; Strey, R.; Wyslouzil, B. E. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys.2012, 14, 4505]. Although the values of Jice,S scale somewhat better with droplet size than values of Jice,V, the data are not accurate enough to state that nucleation is surface initiated. Finally, using current estimates of the thermophysical properties of D2O and the theoretical framework presented by Murray et al. [Murray, B. J.; Broadley, S. L.; Wilson, T. W.; Bull, S. J.; Wills, R. H.; Christenson, H. K.; Murray, E. J. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys.2010, 12, 10380], we find that the theoretical ice nucleation rates are within 3 orders of magnitude of the measured rates over an ∼15 K temperature range. PMID:23763363

  16. Heavy metals in water, sediments and submerged macrophytes in ponds around the Dianchi Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhixiu; Yao, Lu; Liu, Guihua; Liu, Wenzhi

    2014-09-01

    Through retaining runoff and pollutants such as heavy metals from surrounding landscapes, ponds around a lake play an important role in mitigating the impacts of human activities on lake ecosystems. In order to determine the potential for heavy metal accumulation of submerged macrophytes, we investigated the concentrations of 10 heavy metals (i.e., As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in water, sediments, and submerged macrophytes collected from 37 ponds around the Dianchi Lake in China. Our results showed that both water and sediments of these ponds were polluted by Pb. Water and sediments heavy metal concentrations in ponds received urban and agricultural runoff were not significantly higher than those in ponds received forest runoff. This result indicates that a large portion of heavy metals in these ponds may originate from atmospheric deposition and weathering of background soils. Positive relationships were found among heavy metal concentrations in submerged macrophytes, probably due to the coaccumulation of heavy metals. For most heavy metals, no significant relationships were found between submerged macrophytes and their water and sediment environments. The maximum concentrations of Cr, Fe and Ni in Ceratophyllum demersum were 4242, 16,429 and 2662mgkg(-1), respectively. The result suggests that C. demersum is a good candidate species for removing heavy metals from polluted aquatic environments. PMID:25011115

  17. Spur decay kinetics of the solvated electron in heavy water radiolysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Bartels, D. M.; Gosztola, D.; Jonah, C. D.; Chemistry

    2001-08-30

    Spur decay kinetics of the hydrated electron following picosecond pulse radiolysis of heavy water have been measured using a time-correlated absorption spectroscopy (TCAS) technique. The TCAS data collected for the first 40 ns of the decay was matched up with single-shot transient digitizer data out to microsecond time scales. The decay shape in heavy water looks exactly like the decay in light water except in the first 10 ns. The 'time zero' solvated electron yield in heavy water radiolysis must be approximately 7% larger than in light water, to match the best available scavenger product measurements. We propose an explanation in terms of the larger distances traveled by electrons in heavy water prior to localization. The implication is that presolvated H{sub 2}O{sup +} 'holes' are very efficient scavengers for the presolvated conduction band electrons.

  18. Molecular Sieve Regeneration System for assaying HTO from detritiation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nasise, J.E.; Anderson, J.L.; Naruse, Y.

    1992-07-01

    A Molecular Sieve Regeneration System (MSRS) is being added to the existing Tritium Waste Treatment system (TWT) within the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This system is an upgrade to the TWT to provide accurate measurements of the liquid waste generated from this system. Within the TWT, hydrogen isotopes are removed from the effluent gas stream by the catalytic conversion to water and the subsequent removal of water by molecular sieve trapping prior to the release to the environment. Within the TWT and similar systems, molecular sieve regeneration is required to rejuvenate the beds. The major difference of the MSRS and other regeneration systems is the capability of direct assay of long-term storage waste containers. This is accomplished with loop-flow regeneration, water collection, and tritiated water assay by scintillation and calorimetric techniques. This paper describes the MSRS in detail and how it is interfaced with the Tritium Waste Treatment system.

  19. Molecular Sieve Regeneration System for assaying HTO from detritiation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nasise, J.E.; Anderson, J.L. ); Naruse, Y. )

    1992-01-01

    A Molecular Sieve Regeneration System (MSRS) is being added to the existing Tritium Waste Treatment system (TWT) within the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This system is an upgrade to the TWT to provide accurate measurements of the liquid waste generated from this system. Within the TWT, hydrogen isotopes are removed from the effluent gas stream by the catalytic conversion to water and the subsequent removal of water by molecular sieve trapping prior to the release to the environment. Within the TWT and similar systems, molecular sieve regeneration is required to rejuvenate the beds. The major difference of the MSRS and other regeneration systems is the capability of direct assay of long-term storage waste containers. This is accomplished with loop-flow regeneration, water collection, and tritiated water assay by scintillation and calorimetric techniques. This paper describes the MSRS in detail and how it is interfaced with the Tritium Waste Treatment system.

  20. Toxicity of irradiated advanced heavy water reactor fuels.

    PubMed

    Priest, N D; Richardson, R B; Edwards, G W R

    2013-02-01

    The good neutron economy and online refueling capability of the CANDU® heavy water moderated reactor (HWR) enable it to use many different fuels such as low enriched uranium (LEU), plutonium, or thorium, in addition to its traditional natural uranium (NU) fuel. The toxicity and radiological protection methods for these proposed fuels, unlike those for NU, are not well established. This study uses software to compare the fuel composition and toxicity of irradiated NU fuel against those of two irradiated advanced HWR fuel bundles as a function of post-irradiation time. The first bundle investigated is a CANFLEX® low void reactor fuel (LVRF), of which only the dysprosium-poisoned central element, and not the outer 42 LEU elements, is specifically analyzed. The second bundle investigated is a heterogeneous high-burnup (LEU,Th)O(2) fuelled bundle, whose two components (LEU in the outer 35 elements and thorium in the central eight elements) are analyzed separately. The LVRF central element was estimated to have a much lower toxicity than that of NU at all times after shutdown. Both the high burnup LEU and the thorium fuel had similar toxicity to NU at shutdown, but due to the creation of such inhalation hazards as (238)Pu, (240)Pu, (242)Am, (242)Cm, and (244)Cm (in high burnup LEU), and (232)U and (228)Th (in irradiated thorium), the toxicity of these fuels was almost double that of irradiated NU after 2,700 d of cooling. New urine bioassay methods for higher actinoids and the analysis of thorium in fecal samples are recommended to assess the internal dose from these two fuels. PMID:23274823

  1. On stability of water and heavy-water nanoclusters in a nitrogen cryomatrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drobyshev, A.; Aldiyarov, A.; Katpaeva, K.; Korshikov, E.; Kurnosov, V.; Shinbayeva, A.

    2014-11-01

    Earlier studies of the properties of cryocondensed films of diluted solutions of ethanol in nitrogen have shown that a slight increase in the temperature of solid nitrogen, long before its sublimation, leads to changes in the vibrational spectrum of ethanol. The present work is a continuation of these studies and is focused on exploring the properties of thin films of cryovacuum condensates of dilute solutions of water and heavy water in nitrogen. The measurements were carried out in the temperature range from 12 to 40 K; the pressure in the vacuum chamber was below 5 × 10-8 Torr. The concentration of water and heavy water in nitrogen was varied in the range from 0.5% to 3%. Based on the analysis of the vibrational spectra, it is suggested that the structure of the two-component film is a system of polyaggregates. An increase in the temperature of the matrix leads to the transformation of these polyaggregates into more stable states, as indicated by the changes in the fine structure of the bands. The presence of the absorption bands with the frequencies corresponding to the water monomers and dimers in a nitrogen matrix can be due to the fact that a fraction of the water molecules constituting polyaggregates might not be connected through hydrogen bonds with the neighboring molecules, forming broken chains. Thus, a population of quasi-free molecules with the corresponding absorption bands is formed. It is assumed that these unbound quasi-free molecules are mainly located in the subsurface layer of the clusters.

  2. Heavy metal contamination of soil and water in the vicinity of an abandoned e-waste recycling site: implications for dissemination of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qihang; Leung, Jonathan Y S; Geng, Xinhua; Chen, Shejun; Huang, Xuexia; Li, Haiyan; Huang, Zhuying; Zhu, Libin; Chen, Jiahao; Lu, Yayin

    2015-02-15

    Illegal e-waste recycling activity has caused heavy metal pollution in many developing countries, including China. In recent years, the Chinese government has strengthened enforcement to impede such activity; however, the heavy metals remaining in the abandoned e-waste recycling site can still pose ecological risk. The present study aimed to investigate the concentrations of heavy metals in soil and water in the vicinity of an abandoned e-waste recycling site in Longtang, South China. Results showed that the surface soil of the former burning and acid-leaching sites was still heavily contaminated with Cd (>0.39 mg kg(-1)) and Cu (>1981 mg kg(-1)), which exceeded their respective guideline levels. The concentration of heavy metals generally decreased with depth in both burning site and paddy field, which is related to the elevated pH and reduced TOM along the depth gradient. The pond water was seriously acidified and contaminated with heavy metals, while the well water was slightly contaminated since heavy metals were mostly retained in the surface soil. The use of pond water for irrigation resulted in considerable heavy metal contamination in the paddy soil. Compared with previous studies, the reduced heavy metal concentrations in the surface soil imply that heavy metals were transported to the other areas, such as pond. Therefore, immediate remediation of the contaminated soil and water is necessary to prevent dissemination of heavy metals and potential ecological disaster. PMID:25460954

  3. Heavy metal bioaccumulation and effects on water hyacinth weevils, Neochetina eichhorniae, feeding on water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, S.H.; Haller, W.T.

    1986-08-01

    Both aquatic and terrestrial habitats frequently are subject to contamination by toxic heavy metals, yet very little is known about the influence of heavy metals absorbed by plant tissues upon the phytophagous insect fauna feeding upon these plants. The objectives of this study were to determine the influence of plant-absorbed metals upon the feeding, mortality, and body burdens of lead, cadmium, and copper in the water hyacinth weevil, Neochetina eichhorniae, imported for the biological control of water hyacinths (Eichhornia crassipes).

  4. "Periodic-table-style" paper device for monitoring heavy metals in water.

    PubMed

    Li, Miaosi; Cao, Rong; Nilghaz, Azadeh; Guan, Liyun; Zhang, Xiwang; Shen, Wei

    2015-03-01

    If a paper-based analytical device (μ-PAD) could be made by printing indicators for detection of heavy metals in chemical symbols of the metals in a style of the periodic table of elements, it could be possible for such μ-PAD to report the presence and the safety level of heavy metal ions in water simultaneously and by text message. This device would be able to provide easy solutions to field-based monitoring of heavy metals in industrial wastewater discharges and in irrigating and drinking water. Text-reporting could promptly inform even nonprofessional users of the water quality. This work presents a proof of concept study of this idea. Cu(II), Ni(II), and Cr(VI) were chosen to demonstrate the feasibility, specificity, and reliability of paper-based text-reporting devices for monitoring heavy metals in water. PMID:25645265

  5. Comparative study of electrical breakdown properties of deionized water and heavy water under pulsed power conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veda Prakash, G.; Kumar, R.; Saurabh, K.; Nasir, Anitha, V. P.; Chowdhuri, M. B.; Shyam, A.

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study of electrical breakdown properties of deionized water (H2O) and heavy water (D2O) is presented with two different electrode materials (stainless steel (SS) and brass) and polarity (positive and negative) combinations. The pulsed (˜a few tens of nanoseconds) discharges are conducted by applying high voltage (˜a few hundred kV) pulse between two hemisphere electrodes of the same material, spaced 3 mm apart, at room temperature (˜26-28 °C) with the help of Tesla based pulse generator. It is observed that breakdown occurred in heavy water at lesser voltage and in short duration compared to deionized water irrespective of the electrode material and applied voltage polarity chosen. SS electrodes are seen to perform better in terms of the voltage withstanding capacity of the liquid dielectric as compared to brass electrodes. Further, discharges with negative polarity are found to give slightly enhanced discharge breakdown voltage when compared with those with positive polarity. The observations corroborate well with conductivity measurements carried out on original and post-treated liquid samples. An interpretation of the observations is attempted using Fourier transform infrared measurements on original and post-treated liquids as well as in situ emission spectra studies. A yet another important observation from the emission spectra has been that even short (nanosecond) duration discharges result in the formation of a considerable amount of ions injected into the liquid from the electrodes in a similar manner as reported for long (microseconds) discharges. The experimental observations show that deionised water is better suited for high voltage applications and also offer a comparison of the discharge behaviour with different electrodes and polarities.

  6. [Heavy metals distribution characteristics and risk assessment of water below an electroplating factory].

    PubMed

    Hang, Xiao-Shuai; Wang, Huo-Yan; Zhou, Jian-Min

    2008-10-01

    Surface water and shallow groundwater within the flow of an electroplating factory was analyzed in order to study the resulting impact. The analysis method of ICP-AES was used to analyze content of zinc, manganese, chromium, copper and nickel in surface water and groundwater samples. The results indicate acidic pollutants of zinc, manganese, chromium, copper and nickel were discharged from the factory with concentrations of 1.34, 3.77, 28.1, 6.40 and 9.37 mg x L(-1), respectively; and pH was 2.32. They all exceeded permissible levels according to Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard except zinc. Factory discharge is responsible for the longitudinal distribution characteristics of heavy metals in the stream water downstream from the factory. Heavy metals variations in the well water do not suggest they were affected by heavy metals in the stream, indicating that the migration rates of heavy metals in soils were relatively low. Risk assessment shows surface water quality significantly deteriorated. Nickel and manganese in the stream water exceeded the standard levels seriously, and chromium and copper in some samples were also above Grade III standard levels according to Environmental Quality Standard for Surface Water. Moreover, all studied heavy metals in 14 groundwater samples measured within drinking water standard, except manganese in 4 groundwater samples, which were Grade IV according to Quality Standard for Ground water. PMID:19143363

  7. Accumulation of heavy metals in water, sediments and wetland plants of kizilirmak delta (samsun, Turkey).

    PubMed

    Engin, M S; Uyanik, A; Kutbay, H G

    2015-01-01

    In this study, concentrations of heavy metals (Fe, Mn, Ni, Co, Zn, Cu, and Pb) were measured in water bodies including streams, bottom sediments and various wetland plants of Kızılırmak Delta. Kızılırmak Delta is one of the largest and the most important natural wetlands in Turkey and has been protected by Ramsar convention since 1993. The heavy metal concentrations in water were found lower than that of national standards for protected lakes and reserves. In bottom sediments and wetland plants, however, the accumulated amounts of different heavy metals varied in the following order: Fe>Mn>Zn>Ni>Co>Cu>Pb, and Fe>Mn>Zn>Ni>Co respectively. Heavy metal uptake of Hydrocharis morsus-ranae and Myriophyllum verticillatum plants among others were found far above the toxic levels and they might be used as bio-indicators and heavy metal accumulators in polluted natural areas. PMID:25174426

  8. Black water sludge reuse in agriculture: are heavy metals a problem?

    PubMed

    Tervahauta, Taina; Rani, Sonia; Hernández Leal, Lucía; Buisman, Cees J N; Zeeman, Grietje

    2014-06-15

    Heavy metal content of sewage sludge is currently the most significant factor limiting its reuse in agriculture within the European Union. In the Netherlands most of the produced sewage sludge is incinerated, mineralizing the organic carbon into the atmosphere rather than returning it back to the soil. Source-separation of black water (toilet water) excludes external heavy metal inputs, such as industrial effluents and surface run-offs, producing sludge with reduced heavy metal content that is a more favorable source for resource recovery. The results presented in this paper show that feces is the main contributor to the heavy metal loading of vacuum collected black water (52-84%), while in sewage the contribution of feces is less than 10%. To distinguish black water from sewage in the sludge reuse regulation, a control parameter should be implemented, such as the Hg and Pb content that is significantly higher in sewage sludge compared to black water sludge (from 50- to 200-fold). The heavy metals in feces and urine are primarily from dietary sources, and promotion of the soil application of black water sludge over livestock manure and artificial fertilizers could further reduce the heavy metal content in the soil/food cycle. PMID:24794814

  9. Pharmacological uses and perspectives of heavy water and deuterated compounds.

    PubMed

    Kushner, D J; Baker, A; Dunstall, T G

    1999-02-01

    Since the discovery of D20 (heavy water) and its use as a moderator in nuclear reactors, its biological effects have been extensively, although seldom deeply, studied. This article reviews these effects on whole animals, animal cells, and microorganisms. Both "solvent isotope effects," those due to the special properties of D20 as a solvent, and "deuterium isotope effects" (DIE), which result when D replaces H in many biological molecules, are considered. The low toxicity of D20 toward mammals is reflected in its widespread use for measuring water spaces in humans and other animals. Higher concentrations (usually >20% of body weight) can be toxic to animals and animal cells. Effects on the nervous system and the liver and on formation of different blood cells have been noted. At the cellular level, D20 may affect mitosis and membrane function. Protozoa are able to withstand up to 70% D20. Algae and bacteria can adapt to grow in 100% D2O and can serve as sources of a large number of deuterated molecules. D2O increases heat stability of macromolecules but may decrease cellular heat stability, possibly as a result of inhibition of chaperonin formation. High D2O concentrations can reduce salt- and ethanol-induced hypertension in rats and protect mice from gamma irradation. Such concentrations are also used in boron neutron capture therapy to increase neutron penetration to boron compounds bound to malignant cells. D2O is more toxic to malignant than normal animal cells, but at concentrations too high for regular therapeutic use. D2O and deuterated drugs are widely used in studies of metabolism of drugs and toxic substances in humans and other animals. The deuterated forms of drugs often have different actions than the protonated forms. Some deuterated drugs show different transport processes. Most are more resistant to metabolic changes, especially those changes mediated by cytochrome P450 systems. Deuteration may also change the pathway of drug metabolism (metabolic

  10. Using biopolymers to remove heavy metals from soil and water

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, S.; Frederick, R.M.

    1993-11-19

    Chemical remediation of soil may involve the use of harsh chemicals that generate waste streams, which may adversely affect the soil's integrity and ability to support vegetation. This article reviews the potential use of benign reagents, such as biopolymers, to extract heavy metals. The biopolymers discussed are chitin and chitosan, modified starch, cellulose, and polymer-containing algae. (Copyright (c) Remediation 1994.)

  11. USING BIOPOLYMERS TO REMOVE HEAVY METALS FROM SOIL AND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical remediation of soil may involve the use of harsh chemicals that generate waste streams, which may adversely affect the soil's integrity and ability to support vegetation. This article reviews the potential use of benign reagents, such as biopolymers, to extract heavy me...

  12. Heavy metals in vegetables and respective soils irrigated by canal, municipal waste and tube well waters.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Amir; Riaz, Muhammad; Akhtar, Saeed; Ismail, Tariq; Amir, Mamoona; Zafar-ul-Hye, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metal contamination in the food chain is of serious concern due to the potential risks involved. The results of this study revealed the presence of maximum concentration of heavy metals in the canal followed by sewerage and tube well water. Similarly, the vegetables and respective soils irrigated with canal water were found to have higher heavy metal contamination followed by sewerage- and tube-well-watered samples. However, the heavy metal content of vegetables under study was below the limits as set by FAO/WHO, except for lead in canal-water-irrigated spinach (0.59 mg kg(-1)), radish pods (0.44 mg kg(-1)) and bitter gourd (0.33 mg kg(-1)). Estimated daily intakes of heavy metals by the consumption of selected vegetables were found to be well below the maximum limits. However, a complete estimation of daily intake requires the inclusion of other dietary and non-dietary exposure sources of heavy metals. PMID:25029405

  13. Ground water quality evaluation near mining area and development of heavy metal pollution index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Bably; Kumari, Puja; Bano, Shamima; Kumari, Shweta

    2014-03-01

    Opencast as well as underground coal mining are likely to disturb the underground water table in terms of quantity as well as quality. Added to this is the problem of leachates from the large number of industrial waste and overburden dumps that are in abundance in mining areas, reaching the ground water and adversely affecting its quality. Enhancement of heavy metals contamination of the ground water is one eventuality. In the present work, concentrations of 7 heavy metals have been evaluated at 20 important ground water sampling stations at Dhanbad township situated very near to Jharia coalfields. The concentration of heavy metals in general was found to be below the permissible levels although concentration of iron and manganese was found above the permissible limits at a few stations. These data have been used for the calculation of heavy metal pollution index (HPI). The HPI of ground water in total was found to be 6.8860 which is far below the critical index limit of 100 pointing to the fact that the ground water is not polluted with respect to heavy metals in spite of the prolific growth of mining and allied industrial activities near the town.

  14. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy detection of heavy metal in water based on graphite conch method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunlong; Liu, Jianguo; Zhao, Nanjing; Shi, Huan; Liu, Lituo; Ma, Mingjun; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Dong; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Yujun; Liu, Wenqing

    2012-10-01

    The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy emission characteristics of trace heavy metal lead in water is studied based on graphite conch method, with a 1064nm wavelength Nd: YAG laser as excitation source, the echelle spectrometer and ICCD detector are used for spectral separation and high sensitive detection with high resolution and wide spectral range. The delay time 900ns and gate time 1600ns are determined in the experiment. The calibration curve of Pb is plotted based on the different concentration measurement results, and a limit of detection of 0.0138mg / L is obtained for Pb in water. Graphite conch method effectively overcomes the current problems on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy detection of heavy metal in water. The detection limits and stability are improved. The reference data is provided for further study on the fast measurement of trace heavy metals in water by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique.

  15. [Pollution Characteristics and Potential Ecological Risk of Heavy Metals in Urban Surface Water Sediments from Yongkang].

    PubMed

    Qi, Peng; Yu, Shu-quan; Zhang, Chao; Liang, Li-cheng; Che, Ji-lu

    2015-12-01

    In order to understand the pollution characteristics of heavy metals in surface water sediments of Yongkang, we analyzed the concentrations of 10 heavy metals including Ti, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pb and Fe in 122 sediment samples, explored the underlying source of heavy metals and then assessed the potential ecological risks of those metals by methods of the index of geo-accumulation and the potential ecological risk. The study results showed that: 10 heavy metal contents followed the order: Fe > Ti > Mn > Zn > Cr > Cu > Ph > Ni > As > Co, all heavy metals except for Ti were 1. 17 to 3.78 times higher than those of Zhejiang Jinhua- Quzhou basin natural soils background values; The concentrations of all heavy metals had a significantly correlation between each other, indicating that those heavy metals had similar sources of pollution, and it mainly came from industrial and vehicle pollutions; The pollution extent of heavy metals in sediments by geo-accumulation index (Igeo) followed the order: Cr > Zn > Ni > Cu > Fe > As > Pb >Mn > Ti, thereinto, Cr, Zn, Cu and Ni were moderately polluted or heavily polluted at some sampling sites; The potential ecological risk of 9 heavy metals in sediments were in the following order: Cu > As > Ni > Cr > Pb > Co > Zn > Mn > Ti, Cu and As contributed the most to the total potential ecological risk, accounting for 22.84% and 21. 62% , others had a total of 55.54% , through the ecological risk assessment, 89. 34% of the potential ecological risk indexes ( RI) were low and 10. 66% were higher. The contamination level of heavy metals in Yongkang was slight in total, but was heavy in local areas. PMID:27011984

  16. Reduction of bioavailability and leachability of heavy metals during vermicomposting of water hyacinth.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jiwan; Kalamdhad, Ajay S

    2013-12-01

    Vermicomposting of water hyacinth is a good alternative for the treatment of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) and subsequentially, beneficial for agriculture purposes. The bioavailability and leachability of heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Mn, Fe, Ni, Pb, Cd, and Cr) were evaluated during vermicomposting of E. crassipes employing Eisenia fetida earthworm. Five different proportions (trials 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5) of cattle manure, water hyacinth, and sawdust were prepared for the vermicomposting process. Results show that very poor biomass growth of earthworms was observed in the highest proportion of water hyacinth (trial 1). The water soluble, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) extractable, and leachable heavy metals concentration (percentage of total heavy metals) were reduced significantly in all trials except trial 1. The total concentration of some metals was low but its water soluble and DTPA extractable fractions were similar or more than other metals which were present in higher concentration. This study revealed that the toxicity of metals depends on bioavailable fraction rather than total metal concentration. Bioavailable fraction of metals may be toxic for plants and soil microorganisms. The vermicomposting of water hyacinth by E. fetida was very effective for reduction of bioavailability and leachability of selected heavy metals. Leachability test confirmed that prepared vermicompost is not hazardous for soil, plants, and human health. The feasibility of earthworms to mitigate the metal toxicity and to enhance the nutrient profile in water hyacinth vermicompost might be useful in sustainable land renovation practices at low-input basis. PMID:23757026

  17. [Effect of Recycled Water Irrieation on Heavy Metal Pollution in Irrigation Soil].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi-qi; Liu, Yun-xia; Fu, Hui-min

    2016-01-15

    With acceleration of urbanization, water shortages will become a serious problem. Usage of reclaimed water for flushing and watering of the green areas will be common in the future. To study the heavy metal contamination of soils after green area irrigation using recycled wastewater from special industries, we selected sewage and laboratory wastewater as water source for integrated oxidation ditch treatment, and the effluent was used as irrigation water of the green area. The irrigation units included broad-leaved forest, bush and lawn. Six samples sites were selected, and 0-20 cm soil of them were collected. Analysis of the heavy metals including Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Pb in the soil showed no significant differences with heavy metals concentration in soil irrigated with tap water. The heavy metals in the soil irrigated with recycled water were mainly enriched in the surface layer, among which the contents of Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb were below the soil background values of Beijing. A slight pollution of As and Cd was found in the soil irrigated by recycled water, which needs to be noticed. PMID:27078969

  18. Toenail as a biomarker of heavy metal exposure via drinking water: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ab Razak, Nurul Hafiza; Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Hashim, Zailina

    2015-01-01

    Toenail is metabolic end product of the skin, which can provide information about heavy metal accumulation in human cells. Slow growth rates of toenail can represent heavy metal exposure from 2 to 12 months before the clipping. The toenail is a non-invasive biomarker that is easy to collect and store and is stable over time. In this systematic review, the suitability of toenail as a long-term biomarker was reviewed, along with the analysis and validation of toenail and confounders to heavy metal. This systematic review has included 30 articles chosen from a total of 132 articles searched from online electronic databases like Pubmed, Proquest, Science Direct, and SCOPUS. Keywords used in the search included "toenail", "biomarker", "heavy metal", and "drinking water". Heavy metal in toenail can be accurately analyzed using an ICP-MS instrument. The validation of toenail heavy metal concentration data is very crucial; however, the Certified Reference Material (CRM) for toenail is still unavailable. Usually, CRM for hair is used in toenail studies. Confounders that have major effects on heavy metal accumulation in toenail are dietary intake of food and supplement, smoking habit, and overall health condition. This review has identified the advantages and limitations of using toenail as a biomarker for long-term exposure, which can help future researchers design a study on heavy metal exposure using toenail. PMID:25332289

  19. Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, Robert L.; Navratil, James D.

    1997-01-21

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

  20. Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

    1997-01-21

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

  1. Heavy metals stabilization in medical waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline assisted supercritical water technology.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jian; Li, Xiaodong; Chi, Yong; Yan, Jianhua

    2010-12-01

    This study investigated the process of aluminosilicate formation in medical waste incinerator fly ash containing large amounts of heavy metals and treated with alkaline compounds at 375 degrees C and examined how this process affected the mobility and availability of the metals. As a consequence of the treatments, the amount of dissolved heavy metals, and thus their mobility, was greatly reduced, and the metal leaching concentration was below the legislative regulations for metal leachability. Moreover, this process did not produce a high concentration of heavy metals in the effluent. The addition of alkaline compounds such as sodium hydroxide and sodium carbonate can prevent certain heavy metal ions dissolving in water. In comparison with the alkaline-free condition, the extracted concentrations of As, Mn, Pb, Sr and Zn were decreased by about 51.08, 97.22, 58.33, 96.77 and 86.89% by the addition of sodium hydroxide and 66.18, 86.11, 58.33, 83.87 and 81.91% by the addition of sodium carbonate. A mechanism for how the formation of aluminosilicate occurred in supercritical water and affected the mobility and availability of the heavy metals is discussed. The reported results could be useful as basic knowledge for planning new technologies for the hydrothermal stabilization of heavy metals in fly ash. PMID:20430801

  2. Water-soluble organophosphorus reagents for mineralization of heavy metals.

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K. L.

    1999-02-26

    In this report, we have described the principal stages of a two-step process for the in-situ stabilization of actinide ions in the environment. The combination of cation exchange and mineralization appears likely to provide a long-term solution to environments contaminated with heavy metals. Relying on a naturally occurring sequestering agent has obvious potential advantages from a regulatory standpoint. There are additional aspects of this technology requiring further elucidation, including the demonstration of the effect of these treatment protocols on the geohydrology of soil columns, further examination of the influence of humates and other colloidal species on cation uptake, and microbiological studies of phytate hydrolysis. We have learned during the course of this investigation that phytic acid is potentially available in large quantities. In the US alone, phytic acid is produced at an annual rate of several hundred thousand metric tons as a byproduct of fermentation processes (11). This material presently is not isolated for use. Instead, most of the insoluble phyate (as phytin) is being recycled along with the other solid fermentation residues for animal feed. This material is in fact considered undesirable in animal feed. The details of possible separation processes for phytate from these residues would have to be worked out before this untapped resource would be available for application to heavy metal sequestration. The results described emphasize the behavior of actinide and trivalent lanthanide metal ions, as these species are of primary interest to the Department of Energy for the cleanup of the former nuclear weapons production complex. While the specific demonstration includes this limited selection of metal ions, the technique should be readily applicable to any class of metal ions that form insoluble phosphate compounds under appropriate conditions. Further, though this demonstration has been conducted in the pH 5-8 range, it is conceivable that

  3. Density hysteresis of heavy water confined in a nanoporous silica matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Faraone, Antonio; Kamitakahara, William; Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Leao, Juscelino B; Chang, Sung C; Chen, Sow-hsin H

    2011-01-01

    A neutron scattering technique was developed to measure the density of heavy water confined in a nanoporous silica matrix in a temperature-pressure range, from 300 to 130 K and from 1 to 2,900 bars, where bulk water will crystalize. We observed a prominent hysteresis phenomenon in the measured density profiles between warming and cooling scans above 1,000 bars. We inter- pret this hysteresis phenomenon as support (although not a proof) of the hypothetical existence of a first-order liquid liquid phase transition of water that would exist in the macroscopic system if crystallization could be avoided in the relevant phase region. Moreover, the density data we obtained for the confined heavy water under these conditions are valuable to large communities in biology and earth and planetary sciences interested in phenomena in which nanometer-sized water layers are involved.

  4. Removal of heavy metal ions from oil shale beneficiation process water by ferrite process

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, R.K.; Zhang, L.; Lamont, W.E.; Schultz, C.W. . Mineral Resources Inst.)

    1991-01-01

    The ferrite process is an established technique for removing heavy metals from waste water. Because the process water resulting from oil shale beneficiation falls into the category of industrial waste water, it is anticipated that this process may turn out to be a potential viable treatment for oil shale beneficiation process water containing many heave metal ions. The process is chemoremedial because not only effluent water comply with quality standards, but harmful heavy metals are converted into a valuable, chemically stable by-product known as ferrite. These spinel ferrites have magnetic properties, and therefore can be use in applications such as magnetic marker, ferrofluid, microwave absorbing and scavenging material. Experimental results from this process are presented along with results of treatment technique such as sulfide precipitation.

  5. Removal of heavy metal ions from oil shale beneficiation process water by ferrite process

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, R.K.; Zhang, L.; Lamont, W.E.; Schultz, C.W.

    1991-12-31

    The ferrite process is an established technique for removing heavy metals from waste water. Because the process water resulting from oil shale beneficiation falls into the category of industrial waste water, it is anticipated that this process may turn out to be a potential viable treatment for oil shale beneficiation process water containing many heave metal ions. The process is chemoremedial because not only effluent water comply with quality standards, but harmful heavy metals are converted into a valuable, chemically stable by-product known as ferrite. These spinel ferrites have magnetic properties, and therefore can be use in applications such as magnetic marker, ferrofluid, microwave absorbing and scavenging material. Experimental results from this process are presented along with results of treatment technique such as sulfide precipitation.

  6. Heavy metals in coastal water systems. A case study from the northwestern Gulf of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Censi, P; Spoto, S E; Saiano, F; Sprovieri, M; Mazzola, S; Nardone, G; Di Geronimo, S I; Punturo, R; Ottonello, D

    2006-08-01

    A geochemical survey of the northwestern part of the Thailand Gulf (Inner Gulf) was carried out in order to define concentrations and distribution patterns of selected heavy metals (V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, and U) in the coastal system and estuarine area of the Mae Klong river. The results indicate the presence of two different sources of heavy metals in the studied environment and allowed us to identify a lithogenic component that significantly influences the composition of coastal waters and suspended particulate matter (SPM). Comparison of the normalized heavy metals concentrations both in the studied samples and in those reported for the Sn-W ores present in the surrounding areas suggests an important anthropogenic contribution to the chemistry of the seafloor sediments. Vanadium and nickel enrichment factors (EF) calculated for coastal waters indicate that contamination by hydrocarbons discharge took place in the investigated area. PMID:16403556

  7. Heavy metals in water, sediments, plants and fish of Kali Nadi U. P. (India)

    SciTech Connect

    Ajmal, M.; Uddin, R.; Khan, A.U. )

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of heavy metals viz., Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn in the water, sediments, plants and fish samples collected from the Kali Nadi (India) have been determined. The studies have shown that there was considerable variation in the concentration of heavy metals from one sampling station to the other which may be due to the variation in the quality of industrial and sewage wastes being added to the river at different places. The orders of the concentration of heavy metals in water, sediments, plants (Eicchornia crassipes) and fish (Heteropnuestes fossilis) were Fe > Zn > Cu > Mn > Cr > Ni > Pb > Co > Cd; Fe > Zn > Mn > Ni > Cr > Co > Cu > Pb > Cd; Fe > Mn > Zn > Cu > Ni > Co > Pb > Cr > Cd and Fe > Zn > Mn > Ni > Pb >Co > Cr > Cu > Cd, respectively.

  8. A new material for removing heavy metals from water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, Warren H., Jr.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center developed and is patenting a new high capacity ion exchange material (IEM) that removes toxic metals from contaminated water in laboratory tests. The IEM can be made into many forms, such as thin films, coatings, pellets, and fibers. As a result, it can be adapted to many applications to purify contaminated water wherever it is found, be it in waste water treatment systems, lakes, ponds, industrial plants, or in homes. Laboratory tests have been conducted on aqueous solutions containing only one of the following metal cations: lead, copper, mercury, cadmium, silver, chromium (III), nickel, zinc, and yttrium. Tests were also conducted with: (1) calcium present to determine its effects on the uptake of cadmium and copper, and (2) uranium and lanthanides which are stand-ins for other radioactive elements, (3) drinking water for the removal of copper and lead, and (3) others compositions. The results revealed that the IEM removes all these cations, even in the presence of the calcium. Of particular interest are the results of the tests with the drinking water: the lead concentration was reduced from 142 ppb down to 2.8 ppb (well below the accepted EPA standard).

  9. Study on the Effects of Irrigation with Reclaimed Water on the Content and Distribution of Heavy Metals in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shibao; Wang, Jianhua; Pei, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Reclaimed water is an important resource for irrigation, and exploration in making full use of it is an important way to alleviate water shortage. This paper analyzes the effects of irrigation with reclaimed water through field trials on the content and distribution of heavy metals in both tomatoes and the soil. By exploring the effects of reclaimed water after secondary treatment on the content and distribution characteristics of heavy metals in tomatoes and the heavy metal balance in the soil-crop system under different conditions, the study shows that there are no significant differences in the heavy metal content when the quantity of reclaimed water for irrigation varies. Reclaimed water for short-term irrigation does not cause pollution to either the soil environment or the crops. Nor will it cause the accumulation of heavy metals, and the index for the heavy metal content is far below the critical value of the national standard, which indicates that the vegetables irrigated with reclaimed water during their growth turn out to be free of pollutants. The heavy metals brought into the soil by reclaimed water are less than that taken away by the crops. The input and output quantities have only small effects on the heavy metal balance in the soil. This paper provides a reference for the evaluation and safety control of irrigation with reclaimed water. PMID:27005639

  10. Study on the Effects of Irrigation with Reclaimed Water on the Content and Distribution of Heavy Metals in Soil.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shibao; Wang, Jianhua; Pei, Liang

    2016-03-01

    Reclaimed water is an important resource for irrigation, and exploration in making full use of it is an important way to alleviate water shortage. This paper analyzes the effects of irrigation with reclaimed water through field trials on the content and distribution of heavy metals in both tomatoes and the soil. By exploring the effects of reclaimed water after secondary treatment on the content and distribution characteristics of heavy metals in tomatoes and the heavy metal balance in the soil-crop system under different conditions, the study shows that there are no significant differences in the heavy metal content when the quantity of reclaimed water for irrigation varies. Reclaimed water for short-term irrigation does not cause pollution to either the soil environment or the crops. Nor will it cause the accumulation of heavy metals, and the index for the heavy metal content is far below the critical value of the national standard, which indicates that the vegetables irrigated with reclaimed water during their growth turn out to be free of pollutants. The heavy metals brought into the soil by reclaimed water are less than that taken away by the crops. The input and output quantities have only small effects on the heavy metal balance in the soil. This paper provides a reference for the evaluation and safety control of irrigation with reclaimed water. PMID:27005639

  11. Influence of vegetative filter strips on heavy metal retention in runoff waters: a laboratory evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrechts, Thomas; de Braekeleer, Charlotte; Iserentant, Anne; Rentmeesters, Guido; Lutts, Stanley; Bielders, Charles

    2010-05-01

    Point-polluted industrial sites can be exposed to water erosion, leading to a dispersion of, e.g., heavy metal contaminated soil particles. Sowing vegetative buffer strips could limit this problem. We therefore investigated the influence of different vegetative filter strips on heavy metal retention, for runoff water loaded with two different polluted sediments. An experimental flume was built in order to simulate sediment retention by short vegetative buffer strips for different runoff discharges, slopes and sediment concentrations. At the lower bound of the flume, a 0.58 m wide x 1 m long x 0.1 m deep cage filled with soil could be inserted. Three treatments were considered: bare soil and soil sown with either Trifolium repens or Lolium perenne. The plants were allowed to grow for 2 months after germination. The setup allowed characterizing the water and sediment discharge at the outlet of the vegetative strips by means of a tipping bucket with splitter device. Heavy metal-polluted soils were collected at two industrial sites highly polluted with 1) arsenic and lead (Ath), and 2) cadmium and zinc (Prayon). We investigated the effects of the three different covers for these two sediment types (4 replications by treatment), with a slope of 8%, a discharge of 1.7 m3/h and a sediment concentration of 10g/l. Besides sediment mass, we determined heavy metal concentrations and particle size of the sediments collected both at the outlet of the flume and in the sediment deposits upstream of the strips. Following these experiments, size separation of the initial soils was performed, to analyze heavy metal concentrations of each size class. Finally, selective extractions (water, CaCl2 and EDTA) were performed, allowing estimation of heavy metal soluble fractions not retained by vegetative filter strips. Ath Prayon As [%] Pb [%] Cd [%] Zn [%] Lolium perenne 24.1 21.5 23.7 21.2 Trifolium repens 47.8 40.5 55 52.4 Bare soil 20.5 10.9 26.5 22.1 Concentrations [mg/kg] 800 40000

  12. Calculation of heavy-ion tracks in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, R.N.; Turner, J.E.; Ritchie, R.H.; Wright, H.A.

    1985-01-01

    Detailed Monte Carlo calculations are presented of proton and alpha-particle tracks in liquid water. The computations treat the interactions of the primary particle and all secondary electrons on a statistical, event-by-event basis to simulate the initial physical changes that accompany the passage of an ion through water. Our methods for obtaining the cross sections needed for such calculations are described. Inelastic scattering probabilities (inverse mean free paths) are derived from a complex dielectric response function constructed for liquid water, based on experimental and theoretical data. Examples of partial cross sections for ionization and excitation by protons are shown. The computation of electron transport and energy loss includes exchange, elastic scattering, and a scheme for the delocalization of energy shared collectively by a large number of electrons in the condensed medium. Several examples of calculated proton and alpha-particle tracks are presented and discussed. The meaning and significance of the concept of a ''track core'' is briefly addressed in the light of this work. The present paper treats only the initial, physical changes produced by radiation in water (in approx. 10/sup -15/ sec in local regions of a track). The work described here is used in calculations that we have reported in other publications on the later chemical development of charged-particle tracks. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  13. IMMOBILIZATION OF HEAVY METALS IN SOILS AND WATER BY A MANGANESE MINERAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A synthesized Mn mineral used in study on adsorption of heavy metals from water has shown a great adsorption capability for Pb, Cu, Cd, Co, Ni and Zn on this mineral over a pH range from 2 to 8. The retention of Pb on this mineral was as high as 10% of its weight. Application of ...

  14. Influence of silver nanoparticles on heavy metals of pore water in contaminated river sediments.

    PubMed

    Tao, Wei; Chen, Guiqiu; Zeng, Guangming; Yan, Ming; Chen, Anwei; Guo, Zhi; Huang, Zhenzhen; He, Kai; Hu, Liang; Wang, Lichao

    2016-11-01

    Despite the increasing knowledge on the discharge of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) into the environment and their potential toxicity to microorganisms, the interaction of AgNPs with heavy metals remains poorly understood. This study focused on the effect of AgNPs on heavy metal concentration and form in sediment contaminated with heavy metals from the Xiangjiang River. The results showed that the concentration of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd decreased and then increased with a change in form. The changes in form and concentrations of heavy metals in pore water suggested that Cu and Zn were more likely to be affected compared to Pb and Cd. The concentrations of Hg in sediment pore water in three AgNPs-dosed containers, increased greatly until they reached their peaks at 4.468 ± 0.133, 4.589 ± 0.235, and 5.083 ± 0.084 μg L(-1) in Bare AgNPs, Citrate AgNPs and Tween 80 AgNPs, respectively. The measurements of Hg concentrations in the sediment pore water, combined with SEM and EDX analysis, demonstrated that added AgNPs stabilized in pore water and formed an amalgam with Hg(0), which can affect Hg transportation over long distance. PMID:27494311

  15. PROCESSES, COEFFICIENTS, AND MODELS FOR SIMULATING TOXIC ORGANICS AND HEAVY METALS IN SURFACE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reference manual provides kinetics formulations for users of models that compute the fate of toxic organic chemicals and heavy metals in natural surface waters. Rates and coefficients provided in the manual were collected through literature reviews through 1986. The manual de...

  16. EFFECT OF THE GEOCHEMICAL ENVIRONMENTAL ON HEAVY-METAL TRANSPORT IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    An overview is presented of a field-based research program that is examining the significance of chemical reactions in heavy-metal transport in ground water. oth natural-gradient tracer tests and laboratory experiments with subsurface materials are being used to evaluate the rela...

  17. Heavy metal concentration in fish tissues inhabiting waters of "Busko Blato" reservoir (Bosnia and Herzegovina).

    PubMed

    Has-Schön, Elizabeta; Bogut, Ivan; Kralik, Gordana; Bogut, Stjepan; Horvatić, Janja; Cacić, Milan; Cacić, Ivan

    2008-09-01

    Heavy metals concentration (mercury, lead, cadmium, arsenic, copper, zinc and chromium) in tissues (muscles, liver, kidney and gonads) of Dalmatian barbelgudgeon, the nase, the souffie and brown trout, inhabiting waters of Busko Blato reservoir in Bosnia and Herzegovina, has been determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The meat of the tested fish sorts does not contain elevated concentration of most analyzed heavy metals with exception of lead (higher than MAC in Italy, Germany and Denmark) and mercury (in muscles of brown trout higher than MAC in most countries). The lowest level of all heavy metals is always detected in gonads, with higher values in fry compared to milt for copper, zinc, chromium and arsenic. The highest copper concentration is observed in the liver from the souffie which is suggested as a suitable biomonitor for copper intoxication. In muscles of all fish sorts, lead was always present in much higher concentration than cadmium, while in kidneys of most fish sorts, lead and cadmium concentrations were similar. We showed that bioaccumulation of some heavy metals in the fish sorts analyzed is tissue and sex dependent. Also, we concluded that the small water exchange in reversible shallow reservoir does not induce elevated concentration of heavy metals in fish tissues inhabiting Busko Blato. PMID:17342437

  18. Heavy Metals in Water and Sediment: A Case Study of Tembi River

    PubMed Central

    Shanbehzadeh, Saeed; Vahid Dastjerdi, Marzieh; Hassanzadeh, Akbar; Kiyanizadeh, Toba

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to examine heavy metals concentration in water and sediment of upstream and downstream of the entry of the sewage to the Tembi River, Iran. Samples were collected from upstream and downstream and were analyzed for Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Ni, and Zn by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results indicated that the average concentration of the metals in water and sediment on downstream was more than that of upstream. The comparison of the mean concentrations of heavy metals in water of the Tembi River with drinking water standards and those in the water used for agriculture suggests that the mean concentration of Cu and Zn lies within the standard range for drinking water and the mean concentration of Mn, Zn, and Pb lies within the standard range of agricultural water. The highest average concentration on downstream for Pb in water and for Mn in sediment was 1.95 and 820.5 ppm, respectively. Also, the lowest average concentration on upstream was identified for Cd in water and sediment 0.07 and 10 ppm, respectively. With regard to the results, it gets clear that using the water for recreational purposes, washing, and fishing is detrimental to human health and the environment. PMID:24616738

  19. Analysis of heavy metal sources in storm water from urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, U.; Fuchs, S.

    2009-04-01

    The input of heavy metals into surface waters is a serious impairment of the aquatic environment. The emissions of heavy metals via point and diffuse pathways into the German river basins were thus quantified for the period of 1985 through 2005. The total emission into the German river systems decreased for each metal during the observed period. This reduction is mainly caused by the decline of emissions via point sources. The measures taken by industry and implemented within the scope of a stringently water legislation have decisively contributed to an improvement of environmental conditions. Today's emissions of heavy metals into river basins of Germany are dominated by the input via diffuse pathways. One of the most important diffuse input is the storm water discharged from paved urban areas into the surface waters via storm sewers and combined sewer overflows especially for the metals copper, zinc and lead. The objective of this project was to identify the sources of these three heavy metals washed of from paved urban areas. The use of copper, zinc and lead on the outsides of buildings results in emissions to water and soil via rainwater due to weathering and runoff of soluble and insoluble metallic compounds. Copper and zinc are traditionally used materials in the building sector especially for roofs, gutters and facades. Lead, in contrast, plays only a subordinate role due to its more limited outdoor use. The corrosion rates vary widely. Climatic factors (temperature, humidity etc.), above all the presence of corrosive gases (sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, ozone etc.) influence the corrosion processes. Estimates of industrial associations were referred to in order to determine the corrosion relevant metal surfaces. Heavy metal emissions caused by traffic are complex and depend on many parameters which vary by locality, time and substance. In principle, substances can be emitted by vehicles, the road surface and by maintenance. Emissions of copper, lead and

  20. Removal of heavy metals from mine waters by natural zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Ulla Wingenfelder; Carsten Hansen; Gerhard Furrer; Rainer Schulin

    2005-06-15

    The study investigated the removal of Fe, Pb, Cd, and Zn from synthetic mine waters by a natural zeolite. The emphasis was given to the zeolite's behavior toward a few cations in competition with each other. Pb was removed efficiently from neutral as well as from acidic solutions, whereas the uptake of Zn and Cd decreased with low pH and high iron concentrations. With increasing Ca concentrations in solution, elimination of Zn and Cd became poorer while removal of Pb remained virtually unchanged. The zeolite was stable in acidic solutions. Disintegration was only observed below pH 2.0. Forward- and back-titration of synthetic acidic mine water were carried out in the presence and absence of zeolite to simulate the effects of a pH increase by addition of neutralizing agents and a re-acidification which can be caused by subsequent mixing with acidic water. The pH increase during neutralization causes precipitation of hydrous ferric oxides and decreased dissolved metal concentrations. Zeolite addition further diminished Pb concentrations but did not have an effect on Zn and Cd concentrations in solution. During re-acidification of the solution, remobilization of Pb was weaker in the presence than in the absence of zeolite. No substantial differences were observed for Fe, Cd, and Zn immobilization. The immobilization of the metals during pH increase and the subsequent remobilization caused by re-acidification can be well described by a geochemical equilibrium speciation model that accounts for metal complexation at hydrous ferric oxides, for ion exchange on the zeolite surfaces, as well as for dissolution and precipitation processes. 42 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Modeling Adsorption Kinetics (Bio-remediation of Heavy Metal Contaminated Water)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Chris

    My talk will focus on modeling the kinetics of the adsorption and filtering process using differential equations, stochastic methods, and recursive functions. The models have been developed in support of our interdisciplinary lab group which is conducting research into bio-remediation of heavy metal contaminated water via filtration through biomass such as spent tea leaves. The spent tea leaves are available in large quantities as a result of the industrial production of tea beverages. The heavy metals bond with the surfaces of the tea leaves (adsorption). Funding: CUNY Collaborative Incentive Research Grant.

  2. Graphene-Based Microbots for Toxic Heavy Metal Removal and Recovery from Water.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Diana; Parmar, Jemish; Zeng, Yongfei; Zhao, Yanli; Sánchez, Samuel

    2016-04-13

    Heavy metal contamination in water is a serious risk to the public health and other life forms on earth. Current research in nanotechnology is developing new nanosystems and nanomaterials for the fast and efficient removal of pollutants and heavy metals from water. Here, we report graphene oxide-based microbots (GOx-microbots) as active self-propelled systems for the capture, transfer, and removal of a heavy metal (i.e., lead) and its subsequent recovery for recycling purposes. Microbots' structure consists of nanosized multilayers of graphene oxide, nickel, and platinum, providing different functionalities. The outer layer of graphene oxide captures lead on the surface, and the inner layer of platinum functions as the engine decomposing hydrogen peroxide fuel for self-propulsion, while the middle layer of nickel enables external magnetic control of the microbots. Mobile GOx-microbots remove lead 10 times more efficiently than nonmotile GOx-microbots, cleaning water from 1000 ppb down to below 50 ppb in 60 min. Furthermore, after chemical detachment of lead from the surface of GOx-microbots, the microbots can be reused. Finally, we demonstrate the magnetic control of the GOx-microbots inside a microfluidic system as a proof-of-concept for automatic microbots-based system to remove and recover heavy metals. PMID:26998896

  3. Graphene-Based Microbots for Toxic Heavy Metal Removal and Recovery from Water

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metal contamination in water is a serious risk to the public health and other life forms on earth. Current research in nanotechnology is developing new nanosystems and nanomaterials for the fast and efficient removal of pollutants and heavy metals from water. Here, we report graphene oxide-based microbots (GOx-microbots) as active self-propelled systems for the capture, transfer, and removal of a heavy metal (i.e., lead) and its subsequent recovery for recycling purposes. Microbots’ structure consists of nanosized multilayers of graphene oxide, nickel, and platinum, providing different functionalities. The outer layer of graphene oxide captures lead on the surface, and the inner layer of platinum functions as the engine decomposing hydrogen peroxide fuel for self-propulsion, while the middle layer of nickel enables external magnetic control of the microbots. Mobile GOx-microbots remove lead 10 times more efficiently than nonmotile GOx-microbots, cleaning water from 1000 ppb down to below 50 ppb in 60 min. Furthermore, after chemical detachment of lead from the surface of GOx-microbots, the microbots can be reused. Finally, we demonstrate the magnetic control of the GOx-microbots inside a microfluidic system as a proof-of-concept for automatic microbots-based system to remove and recover heavy metals. PMID:26998896

  4. Prolong Restoration of the Water Quality of River Ganga Effect of Heavy Metals and Radioactive Elements.

    PubMed

    Tare, Vinod; Basu, Subhankar

    2014-04-01

    The genesis of the present research was the belief since ages and the observations made through some studies that the water of river Ganga has unique characteristics, which allows storage of water quality even on prolong storage. Very few systematic studies have been conducted to support the contention that the Ganga water indeed has some special composition that could be attributed to its unique storage capacity. It was postulated that prolong restoration of water quality depends on the ability to arrest microbial activity that is generally responsible for deterioration in water quality on prolong storage. Hence, attempt has been made to identify the parameters that are likely to influence the prolong storage of river water. Along with Ganga river water, other three major rivers, viz. Yamuna, Godavari and Narmada, were selected for comparison. Emphasis was made on estimation of heavy metals, radioactive elements, dissolved carbon and other physicochemical parameters such as temperature, pH, alkalinity, hardness and dissolved organic carbon. Based on the available information regarding the impact of heavy metals, radioactive elements vis-à-vis the chemical composition of water on microorganisms in the aquatic environment, an overall impact score for the waters of the four Indian rivers selected in the study has been assigned. PMID:26563059

  5. Experimental investigation on feasible bioreactor using mechanism of hydrogen oxidation of natural soil for detritiation system.

    PubMed

    Edao, Yuki; Iwai, Yasunori; Sato, Katsumi; Hayashi, Takumi

    2016-08-01

    A passive reactor for tritium oxidation at room temperature has been widely studied in nuclear engineering especially for a detritiation system (DS) of a tritium process facility taking possible extraordinary situation severely into consideration. We have focused on bacterial oxidation of tritium by hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria in natural soil to realize the passive oxidation reactor. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of a bioreactor with hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria in soil from a point of view of engineering. The efficiency of the bioreactor was evaluated by kinetics. The bioreactor packed with natural soil shows a relative high conversion rate of tritium under the saturated moisture condition at room temperature, which is obviously superior to that of a Pt/Al2O3 catalyst generally used for tritium oxidation in the existing tritium handling facilities. The order of reaction for tritium oxidation with soil was the pseudo-first order as assessed with Michaelis-Menten kinetics model. Our engineering suggestion to increase the reaction rate is the intentional addition of hydrogen at a small concentration in the feed gas on condition that the oxidation of tritium with soil is expressed by the Michaelis-Menten kinetics model. PMID:27180219

  6. Potential for detection of microorganisms and heavy metals in potable water using electronic nose technology.

    PubMed

    Canhoto, Olinda F; Magan, Naresh

    2003-05-01

    Studies have been carried out to determine the potential for the detection of different microbial species (Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa), alone and in the presence of low concentrations of different heavy metals (As, Cd, Pb and Zn) in bottled, reverse osmosis (RO) and tap water, using an electronic nose. Studies show that it is possible to discriminate control water samples from water contaminated with 0.5 ppm of a mixture of metals. The presence of heavy metals may modify the activity of microorganisms and thus the volatile production patterns. Bacterial species at 10(2)-10(4) colony forming units (CFUs) ml(-1) could be detected after 24 h of incubation. Work is in progress to identify the limits of detection for a range of other microorganisms, including, fungi and cyanobacteria, and chlorinated phenols using electronic nose technology. PMID:12706588

  7. Remote sensing applied to the detection of heavy metals in potable water sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Aimee

    2003-06-01

    High resolution satellite data were used to assess the hazardous heavy metals seeping into potable water sources from refuse resulting from the coal cleaning and refining process. Remote sensing data from different NASA Earth Observing Satellite and instruments aboard these satellites were utilized in developing a three-dimensional visualization (flythrough). These were mapped on the specialized graphics of the West Virginia region to detect metal concentrations in the water bodies around coal impoundments. An integration of EDGE Viewer, ArcView Geological Information Systems (GIS), and Bryce 5 software were used to construct the visualization. The communities surrounding the particular geographical locations will be able to use this tool for posting an alert of unusually high and potentially harmful concentrations of heavy metals in the water reservoir.

  8. Red cabbage yield, heavy metal content, water use and soil chemical characteristics under wastewater irrigation.

    PubMed

    Tunc, Talip; Sahin, Ustun

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this 2-year field study was to evaluate the effects of drip irrigation with urban wastewaters reclaimed using primary (filtration) and secondary (filtration and aeration) processes on red cabbage growth and fresh yield, heavy metal content, water use and efficiency and soil chemical properties. Filtered wastewater (WW1), filtered and aerated wastewater (WW2), freshwater and filtered wastewater mix (1:1 by volume) (WW3) and freshwater (FW) were investigated as irrigation water treatments. Crop evapotranspiration decreased significantly, while water use efficiency increased under wastewater treatments compared to FW. WW1 treatment had the lowest value (474.2 mm), while FW treatments had the highest value (556.7 mm). The highest water use efficiency was found in the WW1 treatment as 8.41 kg m(-3), and there was a twofold increase with regard to the FW. Wastewater irrigation increased soil fertility and therefore red cabbage yield. WW2 treatment produced the highest total fresh yield (40.02 Mg ha(-1)). However, wastewater irrigation increased the heavy metal content in crops and soil. Cd content in red cabbage heads was above the safe limit, and WW1 treatment had the highest value (0.168 mg kg(-1)). WW3 treatment among wastewater treatments is less risky in terms of soil and crop heavy metal pollution and faecal coliform contamination. Therefore, WW3 wastewater irrigation for red cabbage could be recommended for higher yield and water efficiency with regard to freshwater irrigation. PMID:26611631

  9. Removal and selective recovery of heavy-metal ions from industrial waste waters. Technical completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Darnall, D.W.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.

    1989-02-01

    Accumulation of toxic metal ions in water supplies is a matter of increasingly grave concern. Primarily the undesirable by-products of mining and industrial activity, these ions can cause acute and chronic illnesses in humans and other animals. In an effort to limit further contamination, development of efficient, widely applicable, low-cost methods for removal of heavy-metal ions from waters deserves high priority. One new method that has allowed both the removal and recovery of metal ions from water has been the utilization of microorganisms such as algae. This metal-ion sorption process is based upon the natural, very strong affinity of the cell walls of algae for heavy metal ions. There appear to be distinct advantages of the immobilized algal system over other technology currently used for heavy-metal-ion cleanup from waste waters. The goals of the project were (1) to examine the effects of calcium(II) and magnesium(II) on transition metal binding to the algae, (2) to test the immobilized silica-algal polymers for removal of metal ions from electroplating plant waste waters, (3) to evaluate the effects of culturing conditions on the metal binding capacity of the resulting biomass, and (4) to investigate the mechanism of metal-ion binding to different algae.

  10. Heavy metal mobility in runoff water and absorption by eggplant fruits from sludge treated soil.

    PubMed

    Antonious, George F; Turley, Eric T; Sikora, Frank; Snyder, John C

    2008-08-01

    Sewage sludge addition to agricultural lands requires judicious management to avoid environmental risks arising from heavy metal and nitrate contamination of surface water and accumulation in edible plants. A field study was conducted on a silty-loam soil of 10% slope at Kentucky State University Research Farm. Eighteen plots of 22 x 3.7 m each were separated using metal borders and the soil in six plots was mixed with sewage sludge and yard waste compost mix (SS-YW) at 15 t acre(-1), six plots were mixed with sewage sludge (SS) at 15 t acre(-1), and six unamended plots that never received sludge were used for comparison purposes. Plots were planted with eggplant, Solanum melongena L. as the test plant. The objectives of this investigation were to: 1) assess the effect of soil amendments on the transport of NO3, NH4, and heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Zn, Cu, and Mo) into surface water; 2) investigate the effect of soil amendments on heavy metal bioavailability in eggplant fruits at harvest; and 3) assess chemical and physical properties of soil following addition of soil amendments and their impact on the yield and quality of eggplant fruit. SS-YW treatments reduced runoff water by 63% while plots incorporated with sewage sludge alone reduced runoff water by 37% compared to control treatment. The SS-YW treatments transported more mineral nitrogen (NO3-N and NH4-N) in runoff water than SS treatments. Total marketable yield (lbs acre(-1)) and number of eggplant fruits were greatest in SS-YW treatments. This response may be due to improved soil porosity, water, and nutrient retention of the soil amended with SS-YW mixture. Concentrations of heavy metals in soil amended with sludge were below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) limits. Chromium, Ni, Zn, and Cu were taken up by eggplant fruits but their concentrations were below the Codex Commission allowable levels. PMID:18665990

  11. The behavior of heavy metals in tidal flat sediments during fresh water leaching.

    PubMed

    Li, QuSheng; Liu, YaNan; Du, YeFeng; Cui, ZhiHong; Shi, Lei; Wang, LiLi; Li, HongJie

    2011-02-01

    Many of the coastal tidal flats in China that were polluted with heavy metals are now being reclaimed for arable land. The safety of these soils for agriculture is of great concern. The present study investigated the sediment chemical properties, concentrations, and speciation of heavy metals at different levels of desalination during a controlled leaching experiment. After leaching with fresh water, the average reductions in the heavy metal species examined in 0-65 cm depth sediment were 32.1% for Pb, 26.2% for Cd, 14.0% for Zn, 13.8% for Cu, and 11.0% for Cr, while the Ni concentration in sediment did not change significantly. The amounts of Cd, Pb, Cr, Cu, and Zn bound to the reducible fraction, the amounts of Cd, Pb, and Zn bound to the exchangeable fraction, the amounts of Pb, Cr, Cu, and Zn associated with the carbonate fraction, and the Cu associated with the oxidizable fraction all decreased significantly. Complexation with salt anions, ion exchange between the cations and the metal ions, removal of SO4(2-), dissolution of carbonate, and the redox potential variations all contributed to the decreases in Pb, Cd, Zn, Cu, and Cr. These results suggest that leaching with fresh water can also remove a fraction of the heavy metal contamination when it diminishes sediment salinity. PMID:21131022

  12. Safety Evaluation of Osun River Water Containing Heavy Metals and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Rats.

    PubMed

    Azeez, L; Salau, A K; Adewuyi, S O; Osineye, S O; Tijani, K O; Balogun, R O

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the pH, heavy metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Osun river water. It also evaluated its safety in rats. Heavy metals were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) while VOCs were determined by gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Male and female rats were exposed to Osun river water for three weeks and then sacrificed. The abundance of heavy metals in Osun river followed the trend Pb > Cd > Zn > Fe > Cr > Cu while VOCs followed the trend benzene < ethylbenzene < toluene < xylene. The concentrations of Pb, Cd and benzene were higher than the permissible limits of Standards Organization of Nigeria (SON) and World Health Organization (WHO) respectively. Rats exposed to Osun river water for three weeks had increased WBC, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), serum proteins and serum aminotransferases. There were also significant decreases in HCT, PLT, liver aminotransferases and liver glutathione compared to the control. These results show that the pollutants in Osun river water are capable of inducing hematological imbalance and liver cell injury. The toxicity induced in blood was sex-dependent affecting female rats more than male rats. PMID:27506174

  13. Dosimetry of mixed neutron and gamma radiation with paired Fricke solutions in light and heavy water.

    PubMed

    Himit, M; Itoh, T; Endo, S; Fujikawa, K; Hoshi, M

    1996-06-01

    Paired Fricke solutions, made up from light water or heavy water and 0.8N in H2SO4 and 1 mM in Fe(NH4)2(SO4)2 and NaCl, were calibrated with 60Co gamma rays and with mixed neutron and gamma radiation from a 252Cf source. Absorbance increases, AL and AH, in light- and heavy-water Fricke dosimeters, respectively, increased with fast-neutron and gamma-ray tissue doses, Dn (GY) and D gamma (GY), of the mixed radiation as follows: AL = 0.00178Dn + 0.00371D gamma; AH = 0.00121Dn + 0.00442 D gamma. G-values of 7.2 and 5.5 were obtained for 252Cf neutrons in light- and heavy-water Fricke dosimeters, respectively. When we applied the pair of equations to AL and AH values observed after exposure to mixed radiation in a nuclear reactor, resulting Dn and D gamma values agreed within 10% to doses measured with paired ionization chambers. Doses required for Fricke dosimeters were 5 Gy or more. In contrast, we found that micronuclear yields in onion roots can measure the neutron component of mixed radiation fields at the order of 10 cGy with reasonable accuracy even if the neutron to gamma-ray dose ratio is unknown. PMID:8840720

  14. Graphene-based sensors for detection of heavy metals in water: a review.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jingbo; Zhou, Guihua; Christensen, Erik R; Heideman, Robert; Chen, Junhong

    2014-06-01

    Graphene (G) is attracting significant attention because of its unique physical and electronic properties. The production of graphene through the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) is a low-cost method. The reduction of GO can further lead to electrically conductive reduced GO. These graphene-based nanomaterials are attractive for high-performance water sensors due to their unique properties, such as high specific surface areas, high electron mobilities, and exceptionally low electronic noise. Because of potential risks to the environment and human health arising from heavy-metal pollution in water, G-/GO-based water sensors are being developed for rapid and sensitive detection of heavy-metal ions. In this review, a general introduction to graphene and GO properties, as well as their syntheses, is provided. Recent advances in optical, electrochemical, and electrical detection of heavy-metal ions using graphene or GO are then highlighted. Finally, challenges facing G/GO-based water sensor development and outlook for future research are discussed. PMID:24740529

  15. Analysis of heavy metals concentration in water and sediment in the Hara biosphere reserve, southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Nowrouzi, Mohsen; Mansouri, Borhan; Nabizadeh, Sahar; Pourkhabbaz, Alireza

    2014-02-01

    This study determined the concentration of heavy metals (Al, Cr, Cu, and Zn) in water and sediments at nine sites in the Hara biosphere reserve of southern Iran during the summer and winter 2010. Determination of Al, Cr, Cu, and Zn in water was carried out by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer (Shimadzu, AA 610s) and in sediment by flame atomic absorption spectrometer (Perkin Elmer, AA3030). Results showed that the heavy metal concentrations in the water samples decreased in the sequence of Zn > Al > Cu > Cr, while in sediment samples were Cr > Zn > Cu > Al. Data analysis indicated that with the exception of Al, there was a Pearson's correlation coefficient between pH and Cu, Zn, and Cr at α = 0.01, 0.05, and 0.001 in sediment (in winter), respectively. There were also significant differences between heavy metals of Cr, Cu, and Zn during the two seasons (p < 0.001) in the water and sediment. PMID:22740619

  16. Studies on heavy charged particle interaction, water equivalence and Monte Carlo simulation in some gel dosimeters, water, human tissues and water phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2015-09-01

    Some gel dosimeters, water, human tissues and water phantoms were investigated with respect to their radiological properties in the energy region 10 keV-10 MeV. The effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and electron densities (Ne) for some heavy charged particles such as protons, He ions, B ions and C ions have been calculated for the first time for Fricke, MAGIC, MAGAT, PAGAT, PRESAGE, water, adipose tissue, muscle skeletal (ICRP), muscle striated (ICRU), plastic water, WT1 and RW3 using mass stopping powers from SRIM Monte Carlo software. The ranges and straggling were also calculated for the given materials. Two different set of mass stopping powers were used to calculate Zeff for comparison. The water equivalence of the given materials was also determined based on the results obtained. The Monte Carlo simulation of the charged particle transport was also done using SRIM code. The heavy ion distribution along with its parameters were shown for the given materials for different heavy ions. Also the energy loss and damage events in water when irradiated with 100 keV heavy ions were studied in detail.

  17. Treatment of oil well "produced water" by waste stabilization ponds: removal of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Shpiner, R; Vathi, S; Stuckey, D C

    2009-09-01

    Oil well produced water (PW) can serve as an alternative water resource for restricted halotolerant agricultural purposes if the main pollutants, hydrocarbons and heavy metals, can be removed to below the irrigation standards. In this work, the potential removal of cadmium(II), chromium(III) and nickel(II) from PW by chemical precipitation in biological treatment was evaluated. Precipitation as a sulphide salt was found to be a very effective mechanism, which together with biosorption, biological metal uptake, precipitation as hydroxides and carbonates could remove heavy metals down to below irrigation standards. The existence and capability of these various mechanisms was demonstrated in the performance of a continuous artificial pond followed by intermittent sand filter, achieving removals of around 95% for nickel(II) and even higher removal rates for cadmium(II), chromium(III) from artificial PW after the installation of an anaerobic stage. The treated effluent quality was higher than that required by current European standards. PMID:19580985

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF RADIOACTIVITY IN THE REACTOR VESSEL OF THE HEAVY WATER COMPONENT TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Vinson, Dennis

    2010-06-01

    The Heavy Water Component Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility is a pressurized heavy water reactor that was used to test candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. The reactor operated at nominal power of 50 MW{sub th}. The reactor coolant loop operated at 1200 psig and 250 C. Two isolated test loop were designed into the reactor to provide special test conditions. Fig. 1 shows a cut-away view of the reactor. The two loops are contained in four inch diameter stainless steel piping. The HWCTR was operated for only a short duration, from March 1962 to December 1964 in order to test the viability of test fuel elements and other reactor components for use in a heavy water power reactor. The reactor achieved 13,882 MWd of total power while testing 36 different fuel assemblies. In the course of operation, HWCTR experienced the cladding failures of 10 separate test fuel assemblies. In each case, the cladding was breached with some release of fuel core material into the isolated test loop, causing fission product and actinide contamination in the main coolant loop and the liquid and boiling test loops. Despite the contribution of the contamination from the failed fuel, the primary source of radioactivity in the HWCTR vessel and internals is the activation products in the thermal shields, and to a lesser degree, activation products in the reactor vessel walls and liner. A detailed facility characterization report of the HWCTR facility was completed in 1996. Many of the inputs and assumptions in the 1996 characterization report were derived from the HWCTR decommissioning plan published in 1975. The current paper provides an updated assessment of the radioisotopic characteristics of the HWCTR vessel and internals to support decommissioning activities on the facility.

  19. Additional capabilities and benchmarking with the SPERT transients for heavy water application of the PARET code

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    The capabilities of the PARET code have been expanded to include the ability to compute steady-state and transient results for heavy water reactors. A comparison is provided between PARET and the SPERT II series of transients. Another significant improvement in the code is the addition of a restart capability. The current capabilities of the code are summarized. 7 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Effects of lime on bioavailability and leachability of heavy metals during agitated pile composting of water hyacinth.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jiwan; Kalamdhad, Ajay S

    2013-06-01

    In the present study composting of water hyacinth was done with cattle manure and saw dust (6:3:1) ratio and effects of addition of lime (1%, 2% and 3%) on heavy metal bioavailability and leachability was evaluated during 30 days of composting period. The changes in temperature, pH, electrical conductivity (EC), organic matter and extractable heavy metal contents were measured. Results showed that the total concentration of heavy metals was increased during the composting process. Due to addition of lime initial pH of the compost was raised effectively, caused a decrease in water soluble, diethylene triamine pentracetic acid (DTPA) and toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP) extractable metal contents in the final compost. Water soluble metals (Ni, Pb and Cd) and DTPA extractable metals (Pb and Cd) were not detected during water soluble fraction. Addition of lime significantly reduced the bioavailability and leachability of heavy metals during water hyacinth composting process. PMID:23612174

  1. Using total precipitable water anomaly as a forecast aid for heavy precipitation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VandenBoogart, Lance M.

    Heavy precipitation events are of interest to weather forecasters, local government officials, and the Department of Defense. These events can cause flooding which endangers lives and property. Military concerns include decreased trafficability for military vehicles, which hinders both war- and peace-time missions. Even in data-rich areas such as the United States, it is difficult to determine when and where a heavy precipitation event will occur. The challenges are compounded in data-denied regions. The hypothesis that total precipitable water anomaly (TPWA) will be positive and increasing preceding heavy precipitation events is tested in order to establish an understanding of TPWA evolution. Results are then used to create a precipitation forecast aid. The operational, 16 km-gridded, 6-hourly TPWA product developed at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) compares a blended TPW product with a TPW climatology to give a percent of normal TPWA value. TPWA evolution is examined for 84 heavy precipitation events which occurred between August 2010 and November 2011. An algorithm which uses various TPWA thresholds derived from the 84 events is then developed and tested using dichotomous contingency table verification statistics to determine the extent to which satellite-based TPWA might be used to aid in forecasting precipitation over mesoscale domains. The hypothesis of positive and increasing TPWA preceding heavy precipitation events is supported by the analysis. Event-average TPWA rises for 36 hours and peaks at 154% of normal at the event time. The average precipitation event detected by the forecast algorithm is not of sufficient magnitude to be termed a "heavy" precipitation event; however, the algorithm adds skill to a climatological precipitation forecast. Probability of detection is low and false alarm ratios are large, thus qualifying the algorithm's current use as an aid rather than a deterministic forecast tool. The algorithm

  2. Heavy metals in drinking water: Standards, sources, and effects. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning studies of heavy metal pollutants in drinking water and their effects on public health. Topics examine the toxicological effects of prolonged exposure incurred by ingestion of lead, copper, nickel, mercury, cadmium, manganese, and zinc. Quantification factors, federal and state regulations and standards, and laboratory animal studies are discussed. Goundwater contamination by landfill leachates, acid precipitation contributions to groundwater pollution, and corrosion by-products in residential plumbing and public water supply transport systems are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  3. Levels of organochlorine pesticides and heavy metals in surface waters of Konya closed basin, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Mehmet Emin; Ozcan, Senar; Beduk, Fatma; Tor, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), including α -, β -, γ -, and δ -hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, dieldrin, aldrin, endrin, endrin aldehyde, endrin ketone, endosulfan I, endosulfan II, endosulfan sulfate, p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDD, p,p'-DDT, methoxychlor, chlordane I, chlordane II, and heavy metals, such as As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Ni in surface water samples from the Konya closed basin were determined to evaluate the level of contamination. Among all HCH isomers, β -HCH is the main isomer with a concentration range of 0.015-0.065 μ g/L. DDE, DDD, and DDT were almost determined in all samples, in which DDE isomer had the highest concentration ranged from not detected to 0.037 μ g/L. In all studied OCPs, aldrin showed the highest concentration at 0.220 μ g/L. The concentrations of heavy metals in water samples were observed with order: Mnwater quality recommended by EU, US EPA, WHO, and Turkish Regulation, while Cu, Ni, and Mn concentrations are below the guideline values. The levels of both OCPs and heavy metals were also compared with other previously published data. PMID:23533363

  4. Levels of Organochlorine Pesticides and Heavy Metals in Surface Waters of Konya Closed Basin, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Mehmet Emin; Ozcan, Senar; Beduk, Fatma; Tor, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), including α-, β-, γ-, and δ-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, dieldrin, aldrin, endrin, endrin aldehyde, endrin ketone, endosulfan I, endosulfan II, endosulfan sulfate, p,p′-DDE, p,p′-DDD, p,p′-DDT, methoxychlor, chlordane I, chlordane II, and heavy metals, such as As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Ni in surface water samples from the Konya closed basin were determined to evaluate the level of contamination. Among all HCH isomers, β-HCH is the main isomer with a concentration range of 0.015–0.065 μg/L. DDE, DDD, and DDT were almost determined in all samples, in which DDE isomer had the highest concentration ranged from not detected to 0.037 μg/L. In all studied OCPs, aldrin showed the highest concentration at 0.220 μg/L. The concentrations of heavy metals in water samples were observed with order: Mn < Cu < Ni < As < Cr < Fe. In some samples, As, Fe, and Cr concentrations exceeded the drinking water quality recommended by EU, US EPA, WHO, and Turkish Regulation, while Cu, Ni, and Mn concentrations are below the guideline values. The levels of both OCPs and heavy metals were also compared with other previously published data. PMID:23533363

  5. Embedded optical fibers for PDV measurements in shock-loaded, light and heavy water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Patrick; Benier, Jacky; Frugier, Pierre-Antoine; Debruyne, Michel; Bolis, Cyril

    2011-06-01

    In order to study the shock-detonation transition, it is necessary to characterize the shock loading of a high explosive plane wave generator into a nitromethane cell. To eliminate the reactive behaviour, we replace the nitromethane by an inert liquid compound. Light water has been first employed; eventually heavy water has been chosen for its better infrared spectral properties. We present the PDV results of different submerged embedded optical fibers which sense the medium with two different approaches: a non-intrusive optical observation of phenomena coming in front of them (interface, shock wave) followed by the mechanical interaction with the shock wave.

  6. Embedded optical fibers for PDV measurements in shock-loaded, light and heavy water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Patrick; Benier, Jacky; Frugier, Pierre Antoine; Debruyne, Michel; Bolis, Cyril

    2012-03-01

    In order to study the shock-detonation transition, we propose to characterize the shock loading of a high explosive plane wave generator into a nitromethane cell. To eliminate the reactive behaviour, we replace the nitromethane by an inert liquid compound. Light water (H2O) has been first employed; eventually heavy water (D2O) has been chosen for its better infrared spectral properties. We present the PDV results of different embedded optical fibers which sense the medium with two different approaches: a non intrusive optical observation of phenomena coming in front of them (interface, shock wave, detonation wave) followed by their mechanical interaction with the fiber.

  7. Assessment of toxicity in waters due to heavy metals derived from atmospheric deposition using Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Cukurluoglu, Sibel; Muezzinoglu, Aysen

    2013-01-01

    Water toxicity originating from the atmospheric deposition of six heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) was investigated on Vibrio fischeri activity in Izmir, Turkey. A LUMIStox® test was applied to dry and wet deposition samples and metal solutions. The inhibition levels and effective toxicity concentrations of these samples and solutions were determined. Interactive toxicity effects among the metals were investigated. When the impacts of the synthetic single heavy metal solutions were compared with each other, a toxicity ranking of Cr>Cd>Pb>Cu>Zn>Ni was obtained in order of decreasing severity. The total effective concentrations of these six metals were in the ranges of 0.074-0.221 mg/L and 0.071-0.225 mg/L for receiving aqueous solutions of dry and wet atmospheric depositions, respectively. The toxicity data showed that the wet deposition samples were 15% more toxic than the dry deposition samples. The interactive toxicity effects of the heavy metals in both dry and wet deposition samples were classified as antagonistic. High levels of heavy metals deposited in dissolved form may constitute an important input in the biochemical cycle and may have significant impacts. PMID:23030388

  8. Separation of heavy metal from water samples--The study of the synthesis of complex compounds of heavy metal with dithiocarbamates.

    PubMed

    Kane, Sonila; Lazo, Pranvera; Ylli, Fatos; Stafilov, Trajce; Qarri, Flora; Marku, Elda

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity and persistence of heavy metal (HM) ions may cause several problems to marine organisms and human beings. For this reason, it is growing the interest in the chemistry of sulphur donor ligands such as dithiocarbamates (DDTC), due to their applications particularly in analytical chemistry sciences. The aim of this work has been the study of heavy metal complexes with DDTC and their application in separation techniques for the preconcentration and/or removing of heavy metals from the water solutions or the water ecosystems prior to their analysis. The HM-DDTC complexes were prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR and UV-Vis spectroscopic methods. The elemental analysis and the yield of the synthesis (97.5-99.9%) revealed a good purity of the complexes. High values of complex formation yields of HM-DDTC complexes is an important parameter for quantitatively removing/and or preconcentration of heavy metal ions from water solution even at low concentration of heavy metals. Significant differences founded between the characteristic parameters of UV/Vis (λmax and ϵmax) and FTIR absorption spectra of the parent DDTC and HM-DDTC complexes revealed the complex formation. The presence of the peaks at the visible spectral zone is important to M(nd(10-m))-L electron charge transfer of the new complexes. The (C=N) (1450-1500 cm(-1)) and the un-splitting (C-S) band (950-1002 cm(-1)) in HM-DDTC FTIR spectra are important to the identification of their bidentate mode (HM[S2CNC4H10]2). The total CHCl3 extraction of trace level heavy metals from water samples after their complex formation with DDTC is reported in this article. PMID:26761072

  9. Aquatic and terrestrial plant species with potential to remove heavy metals from storm-water.

    PubMed

    Fritioff, Asa; Greger, Maria

    2003-01-01

    Remediation of storm-water polluted with heavy metals should be possible in percolation systems, ponds, or wetlands. The aim of this work was to find plant species for such systems that are efficient in the uptake of Zn, Cu, Cd, and Pb. Plants were collected from percolation and wetland areas and analyzed for heavy metal concentrations. Results showed that submersed and free-floating plants had the capacity to take up high levels of Cu, Zn, and Pb into their shoots. With roots having a concentration factor above 1, the terrestrial plants show efficient stabilization of Cd and Zn and emergent plants show corresponding stabilisation of Zn. In addition, Potamogeton natans, Alisma plantago-aquatica, and Filipendula ulmaria were used in a controlled experiment. The shoots of P. natans and the roots of A. plantago-aquatica were found to accumulate even higher concentrations of Zn, Cu, and Pb than found in the field-harvested plants. Similar results were found for Cd in shoots and Pb in roots of F. ulmaria. Our conclusion is that submersed plant species seem to be the most efficient for removal of heavy metals from storm-water. PMID:14750429

  10. Water plasmas for the revalorisation of heavy oils and cokes from petroleum refining.

    PubMed

    Hueso, José L; Rico, Víctor J; Cotrino, José; Jiménez-Mateos, J M; González-Elipe, Agustín R

    2009-04-01

    This work investigates the possibility of using plasmas to treat high boiling point and viscous liquids (HBPVL) and cokes resulting as secondary streams from the refining of oil. For their revalorisation, the use of microwave (MW) induced plasmas of water is proposed, as an alternative to more conventional processes (i.e., catalysis, pyrolysis, combustion, etc.). As a main result, this type of energetic cold plasma facilitates the conversion at room temperature of the heavy aromatic oils and cokes into linear hydrocarbons and synthesis gas, commonly defined as syngas (CO + H2 gas mixture). The exposure of the coke to this plasma also facilitates the removal of the sulfur present in the samples and leads to the formation on their surface of a sort of carbon fibers and rods network and new porous structures. Besides, optical emission measurements have provided direct evidence of the intermediates resulting from the fragmentation of the heavy oils and cokes during their exposure to the water plasma. Furthermore, the analysis of the mass spectra patterns suggests a major easiness to break the aromatic bonds mainly contained in the heavy oils. Therefore, an innovative method for the conversion of low value residues from oil-refining processes is addressed. PMID:19452916

  11. Detection of trace heavy metal ions in water by nanostructured porous Si biosensors.

    PubMed

    Shtenberg, Giorgi; Massad-Ivanir, Naama; Segal, Ester

    2015-07-01

    A generic biosensing platform, based on nanostructured porous Si (PSi), Fabry-Pérot thin films, for label-free monitoring of heavy metal ions in aqueous solutions by enzymatic activity inhibition, is described. First, we show a general detection assay by immobilizing horseradish peroxidase (HRP) within the oxidized PSi nanostructure and monitor its catalytic activity in real time by reflective interferometric Fourier transform spectroscopy. Optical studies reveal the high specificity and sensitivity of the HRP-immobilized PSi towards three metal ions (Ag(+) > Pb(2+) > Cu(2+)), with a detection limit range of 60-120 ppb. Next, we demonstrate the concept of specific detection of Cu(2+) ions (as a model heavy metal) by immobilizing Laccase, a multi-copper oxidase, within the oxidized PSi. The resulting biosensor allows for specific detection and quantification of copper ions in real water samples by monitoring the Laccase relative activity. The optical biosensing results are found to be in excellent agreement with those obtained by the gold standard analytical technique (ICP-AES) for all water samples. The main advantage of the presented biosensing concept is the ability to detect heavy metal ions at environmentally relevant concentrations using a simple and portable experimental setup, while the specific biosensor design can be tailored by varying the enzyme type. PMID:25988196

  12. Speciation of heavy metals in environmental water by ion chromatography coupled to ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Ammann, Adrian A

    2002-02-01

    Biogenic (e.g. phytochelatins, porphyrins, DOM) as well as anthropogenic (e.g. NTA, EDTA, phosphonates) chelators affect the mobility and cycling of heavy metals in environmental waters. Since such chelators can form strongly bound anionic heavy metal complexes that are stable and highly mobile, anion-exchange chromatography coupled to ICP-MS was investigated. A narrow bore HPLC system was connected to a micro concentric nebuliser for in-line sample introduction. A new chromatographic procedure based on a synthetic hydrophilic quaternary ammonium anion exchanger in combination with nitrate as a strong eluent anion, and gradient elution, provided high separation selectivity and a large analytical window. Low detection limits (nmol L(-1)) were achieved by on-column matrix removal and sample preconcentration. This allowed the method to be successfully applied to different environmental research areas. In ecotoxicological studies of heavy metal effects on algae low concentrations of metal EDTA complexes were determined in nutrient solutions without interference from high (buffer) salt concentrations. In groundwater, infiltrated by a polluted river, mobile metal EDTA species were observed. In river water of different pollution levels beside CuEDTA other anionic Cu-complexes were found in nmol L(-1) concentrations. PMID:11939532

  13. Irrigation water quality in southern Mexico City based on bacterial and heavy metal analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solís, C.; Sandoval, J.; Pérez-Vega, H.; Mazari-Hiriart, M.

    2006-08-01

    Xochimilco is located in southern Mexico City and represents the reminiscence of the pre-Columbian farming system, the "chinampa" agriculture. "Chinampas" are island plots surrounded by a canal network. At present the area is densely urbanized and populated, with various contaminant sources contributing to the water quality degradation. The canal system is recharged by a combination of treated-untreated wastewater, and precipitation during the rainy season. Over 40 agricultural species, including vegetables, cereals and flowers, are produced in the "chinampas". In order to characterize the quality of Xochimilcos' water used for irrigation, spatial and temporal contaminant indicators such as microorganisms and heavy metals were investigated. Bacterial indicators (fecal coliforms, fecal enterococcus) were analyzed by standard analytical procedures, and heavy metals (such as Fe, Cu, Zn and Pb) were analyzed by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). The more contaminated sites coincide with the heavily populated areas. Seasonal variation of contaminants was observed, with the higher bacterial counts and heavy metal concentrations reported during the rainy season.

  14. [Sediment heavy metals quality criteria for fresh waters based on biological effect database approach].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Zhong, Wen-Jue; Zeng, Yi; Zhu, Ling-Yan

    2012-09-01

    Heavy metals are the important pollutants in sediments, which can cause serious damage to benthonic organisms and aquatic ecology, while biological effect database approach (BEDA) is a widely used method for assessing sediment quality in developed countries or regions. This paper introduced the concrete steps of this approach, and built the sediment quality criteria of five heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, and Ni) for fresh waters. The comparability, reliability, and predictability of the criteria were also tested. It was shown that the threshold effect level (TEL) of the Cd, Ni, Pb, Zn, and Cu was 3.0, 31.4, 47.3, 74.9, and 45.5 mg x kg(-1) dry mass, and the probable effect level (PEL) of the Cd, Ni, Pb, Zn, and Cu was 19, 76.9, 204.1, 403.6, and 181.1 mg x kg(-1) dry mass basis, respectively. Except for Zn, the TEL and PEL for the Cu, Cd, Pb, and Ni were consistent with the definitional biological effect of the heavy metals, being accor-dance with the demands of sediment quality criteria for protecting benthic organisms and having high reliability, and thus, could be used as the proposed sediment quality criteria for fresh waters in China. PMID:23286020

  15. Electrochemical sensors and devices for heavy metals assay in water: the French groups' contribution

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, Luca; Evrard, David; Groenen-Serrano, Karine; Freyssinier, Mathilde; Ruffien-Cizsak, Audrey; Gros, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    A great challenge in the area of heavy metal trace detection is the development of electrochemical techniques and devices which are user-friendly, robust, selective, with low detection limits and allowing fast analyses. This review presents the major contribution of the French scientific academic community in the field of electrochemical sensors and electroanalytical methods within the last 20 years. From the well-known polarography to the up-to-date generation of functionalized interfaces, the different strategies dedicated to analytical performances improvement are exposed: stripping voltammetry, solid mercury-free electrode, ion selective sensor, carbon based materials, chemically modified electrodes, nano-structured surfaces. The paper particularly emphasizes their advantages and limits face to the last Water Frame Directive devoted to the Environmental Quality Standards for heavy metals. Recent trends on trace metal speciation as well as on automatic “on line” monitoring devices are also evoked. PMID:24818124

  16. Electrochemical sensors and devices for heavy metals assay in water: the French groups' contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Luca; Evrard, David; Groenen-Serrano, Karine; Freyssinier, Mathilde; Ruffien-Ciszak, Audrey; Gros, Pierre

    2014-04-01

    A great challenge in the area of heavy metal trace detection is the development of electrochemical techniques and devices which are user-friendly, robust, selective, with low detection limits and allowing fast analyses. This review presents the major contribution of the French scientific academic community in the field of electrochemical sensors and electroanalytical methods within the last 20 years. From the well-known polarography to the up-to-date generation of functionalized interfaces, the different strategies dedicated to analytical performances improvement are exposed: stripping voltammetry, solid mercury-free electrode, ion selective sensor, carbon based materials, chemically modified electrodes, nano-structured surfaces. The paper particularly emphasizes their advantages and limits face to the last Water Frame Directive devoted to the Environmental Quality Standards for heavy metals. Recent trends on trace metal speciation as well as on automatic “on line” monitoring devices are also evoked.

  17. Electrochemical sensors and devices for heavy metals assay in water: the French groups' contribution.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Luca; Evrard, David; Groenen-Serrano, Karine; Freyssinier, Mathilde; Ruffien-Cizsak, Audrey; Gros, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    A great challenge in the area of heavy metal trace detection is the development of electrochemical techniques and devices which are user-friendly, robust, selective, with low detection limits and allowing fast analyses. This review presents the major contribution of the French scientific academic community in the field of electrochemical sensors and electroanalytical methods within the last 20 years. From the well-known polarography to the up-to-date generation of functionalized interfaces, the different strategies dedicated to analytical performances improvement are exposed: stripping voltammetry, solid mercury-free electrode, ion selective sensor, carbon based materials, chemically modified electrodes, nano-structured surfaces. The paper particularly emphasizes their advantages and limits face to the last Water Frame Directive devoted to the Environmental Quality Standards for heavy metals. Recent trends on trace metal speciation as well as on automatic "on line" monitoring devices are also evoked. PMID:24818124

  18. Heavy metals in molluscan, crustacean, and other commercially important Chilean marine coastal water species

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, A.G.; Gonzalez, M.; Santa Maria, I.

    1987-03-01

    The work reported here is part of a general program to monitor the marine chemical pollution along the Chilean coast. The present investigation was designated to provide information on the nature and levels of the heavy metals present in the marine species commonly consumed by the population, and to learn whether these levels may constitute a hazard to consumers. The authors report here the typical contents of 10 heavy metals in 12 commercially significant marine species from the Chilean coastal waters (Valparaiso, Concepcion and Puerto Montt). The analyzed species included 7 molluscs, 3 curstacea, and 2 other shellfish species of wide consumption. The metals chosen for analysis were copper, zinc, cadmium, lead, mercury, nickel, antimony, selenium, iron and chromium.

  19. [Study on measurement of trace heavy metal Ni in water by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique].

    PubMed

    Shi, Huan; Zhao, Nan-jing; Wang, Chun-long; Lu, Cui-ping; Liu, Li-tuo; Chen, Dong; Ma, Ming-jun; Zhang, Yu-jun; Liu, Jian-guo; Liu, Wen-qing

    2012-01-01

    The spectroscopy emission characteristics and the detection limit of trace heavy metal nickel in water was studied based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique, with a 1,064 nm wavelength Nd : YAG laser as excitation source, and the echelle spectrometer and ICCD detector were used for spectral separation and high sensitive detection with high resolution and wide spectral range. A round flat solid state graphite as matrix was used for element enrichment for reducing water splashing, extending the plasma lifetime and improving the detection sensitivity, and the experimental sample was prepared by titrating a fixed volume of nickel nitrate solution of different concentrations on a fixed area of the graphite matrix. The results show that the better detection delay time is about 700 ns, the spectrum intensity raises with the concentration increase, a good linear relationship is presented at low concentration with a correlation coefficient 0.996 1, and the lower limit of detection of nickel in water with 0.28 mg x L(-1) was retrieved. A measurement method for further study of trace heavy metals in water is provided with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. PMID:22497119

  20. [New methodology for heavy metals measurement in water samples by PGNAA-XRF].

    PubMed

    Jia, Wen-Bao; Zhang, Yan; Hei, Da-Qian; Ling, Yong-Sheng; Shan, Qing; Cheng, Can

    2014-11-01

    In the present paper, a new combined detection method was proposed using prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) and characteristic X-ray fluorescence to improve the heavy metals measurement accuracy for in-situ environmental water rejects analysis by PGNAA technology. Especially, the characteristic X-ray fluorescence (XRF) of heavy metals is induced by prompt gamma-ray directly instead of the traditional excitation sources. Thus, a combined measurement facility with an 241 AmBe neutron source, a BGO detector and a NaI-Be detector was developed to analyze the pollutants in water. The two detectors were respectively used to record prompt gamma-ray and characteristic X-ray fluorescence of heavy metals. The prompt gamma-ray intensity (I(γ)) and characteristic X-ray fluorescence intensity (I(x)) was determined by MCNP calculations for different concentration (c(i)) of chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb), respectively. The simulation results showed that there was a good linear relationship between I(γ), I(x) and (c(i)), respectively. The empirical formula of combined detection method was given based on the above calculations. It was found that the combined detection method was more sensitive for high atomic number heavy metals like Hg and Pb measurement than low atomic number like Cr and Cd by comparing and analyzing I(γ) and I(x). The limits of detection for Hg and Pb by the combined measurement instrument were 17.4 and 24.2 mg x kg(-1), respectively. PMID:25752071

  1. Metal-fueled HWR (heavy water reactors) severe accident issues: Differences and similarities to commercial LWRs (light water reactors)

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, P.G.; Hyder, M.L.; Monson, P.R. ); Coryell, E.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Differences and similarities in severe accident progression and phenomena between commercial Light Water Reactors (LWR) and metal-fueled isotopic production Heavy Water Reactors (HWR) are described. It is very important to distinguish between accident progression in the two systems because each reactor type behaves in a unique manner to a fuel melting accident. Some of the lessons learned as a result of the extensive commercial severe accident research are not applicable to metal-fueled heavy water reactors. A direct application of severe accident phenomena developed from oxide-fueled LWRs to metal-fueled HWRs may lead to large errors or substantial uncertainties. In general, the application of severe accident LWR concepts to HWRs should be done with the intent to define the relevant issues, define differences, and determine areas of overlap. This paper describes the relevant differences between LWR and metal-fueled HWR severe accident phenomena. Also included in the paper is a description of the phenomena that govern the source term in HWRs, the areas where research is needed to resolve major uncertainties, and areas in which LWR technology can be directly applied with few modifications.

  2. Heavy metal driven co-selection of antibiotic resistance in soil and water bodies impacted by agriculture and aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Claudia; Berendonk, Thomas U.

    2012-01-01

    The use of antibiotic agents as growth promoters was banned in animal husbandry to prevent the selection and spread of antibiotic resistance. However, in addition to antibiotic agents, heavy metals used in animal farming and aquaculture might promote the spread of antibiotic resistance via co-selection. To investigate which heavy metals are likely to co-select for antibiotic resistance in soil and water, the available data on heavy metal pollution, heavy metal toxicity, heavy metal tolerance, and co-selection mechanisms was reviewed. Additionally, the risk of metal driven co-selection of antibiotic resistance in the environment was assessed based on heavy metal concentrations that potentially induce this co-selection process. Analyses of the data indicate that agricultural and aquacultural practices represent major sources of soil and water contamination with moderately to highly toxic metals such as mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn). If those metals reach the environment and accumulate to critical concentrations they can trigger co-selection of antibiotic resistance. Furthermore, co-selection mechanisms for these heavy metals and clinically as well as veterinary relevant antibiotics have been described. Therefore, studies investigating co-selection in environments impacted by agriculture and aquaculture should focus on Hg, Cd, Cu, and Zn as selecting heavy metals. Nevertheless, the respective environmental background has to be taken into account. PMID:23248620

  3. Laser-based human breath analysis: D/H isotope ratio increase following heavy water intake.

    PubMed

    Bartlome, Richard; Sigrist, Markus W

    2009-04-01

    Following the ingestion of only 5.1 mL of D2O, a mid-infrared laser spectrometer determines the D/H isotope ratio increase in exhaled water vapor for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. This increase is still detectable several weeks after the heavy water intake. Collected breath samples are directly transferred into a high-temperature multipass cell operated at 373 K. No breath sample preparation is required. Aside from the capability to hinder unwanted condensation, measurements at elevated temperatures offer other advantages such as a lower temperature dependence of the delta value or the possibility to vary the intensity of absorption lines. We lay the foundation for many laser-based clinical applications. As an example, we measure a total body water weight of 55.2%+/-1.8% with respect to the total body weight, in agreement with the normal value of the male population. PMID:19340153

  4. Fluid (Air/Water) Cushion Transportation Technology for Emplacing Heavy Canisters into Horizontal Disposal Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    Bosgiraud, J.M.; Seidler, W.K.; Londe, L.; Thurner, E.; Pettersson, S.

    2008-07-01

    The disposal of certain types of radioactive waste canisters in a deep repository involves handling and emplacement of very heavy loads. The weight of these particular canisters can be in the order of 20 to 50 metric tons. They generally have to be handled underground in openings that are not much larger than the canisters themselves as it is time consuming and expensive to excavate and backfill large openings in a repository. This therefore calls for the development of special technology that can meet the requirements for safe operation at an industrial scale in restrained operating spaces. Air/water cushion lifting systems are used world wide in the industry for moving heavy loads. However, until now the technology needed for emplacing heavy cylindrical radioactive waste packages in bored drifts (with narrow annular gaps) has not been previously developed or demonstrated. This paper describes the related R and D work carried out by ANDRA (for air cushion technology) and by SKB and Posiva (for water cushion technology) respectively, mainly within the framework of the European Commission (EC) funded Integrated Project called ESDRED (6. European Framework Programme). The background for both the air and the water cushion applications is presented. The specific characteristics of the two different emplacement concepts are also elaborated. Then the various phases of the Test Programmes (including the Prototype phases) are detailed and illustrated for the two lifting media. Conclusions are drawn for each system developed and evaluated. Finally, based on the R and D experience, improvements deemed necessary for an industrial application are listed. The tests performed so far have shown that the emplacement equipment developed is operating efficiently. However further tests are required to verify the availability and the reliability of the equipment over longer periods of time and to identify the modifications that would be needed for an industrial application in a

  5. Innovative use of activated carbon for the removal of heavy metals from ground water sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, T. III

    1996-12-31

    This report discusses the evaluation of the ENVIRO-CLEAN PROCESS, a technology developed by Lewis Environmental Services, Inc. for the recovery of metals such as chromium, mercury, copper, cadmium, lead, and zinc from surface and groundwater streams. This new heavy metal removal process (patent-pending) utilizes granular activated carbon with a proprietary conditioning pretreatment to enhance heavy metal adsorption combined with electrolytic metal recovery to produce a saleable metallic product. The process generates no sludge or hazardous waste and the effluent meets EPA limits. A 50 gpm system was installed for recovering hexavalent chromium from a ground water stream at a site located in Fresno, California. The effluent from the activated carbon system was reinjected into the ground water table with the hexavalent chromium concentration < 10 ppb. The system simultaneously removed trichloroethylene (TCE) to concentrations levels < 05 ppb. The activated carbon is regenerated off-site and the chromium electrolytically recovered. The full scale system has treated over 5 million gallons of ground water since installation. 5 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  6. Novel biopolymer-coated hydroxyapatite foams for removing heavy-metals from polluted water.

    PubMed

    Vila, M; Sánchez-Salcedo, S; Cicuéndez, M; Izquierdo-Barba, I; Vallet-Regí, María

    2011-08-15

    3D-macroporous biopolymer-coated hydroxyapatite (HA) foams have been developed as potential devices for the treatment of lead, cadmium and copper contamination of consumable waters. These foams have exhibited a fast and effective ion metal immobilization into the HA structure after an in vitro treatment mimicking a serious water contamination case. To improve HA foam stability at contaminated aqueous solutions pH, as well as its handling and shape integrity the 3D-macroporous foams have been coated with biopolymers polycaprolactone (PCL) and gelatine cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (G/Glu). Metal ion immobilization tests have shown higher and fast heavy metals captured as function of hydrophilicity rate of biopolymer used. After an in vitro treatment, foam morphology integrity is guaranteed and the uptake of heavy metal ions rises up to 405 μmol/g in the case of Pb(2+), 378 μmol/g of Cu(2+) and 316 μmol/g of Cd(2+). These novel materials promise a feasible advance in development of new, easy to handle and low cost water purifying methods. PMID:21616595

  7. Laser-induced synthesis and decay of Tritium under exposure of solid targets in heavy water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmina, E. V.; Timashev, S. F.; Shafeev, G. A.

    2016-03-01

    The processes of laser-assisted synthesis of Tritium nuclei and their laser-induced decay in cold plasma in the vicinity of solid targets (Au, Ti, Se, etc.) immersed into heavy water are experimentally realized at peak laser intensity of 1010-1013 W/cm2. Initial stages of Tritium synthesis and their laser-induced beta-decay are interpreted on the basis of non-elastic interaction of plasma electrons having kinetic energy of 5-10 eV with nuclei of Deuterium and Tritium, respectively.

  8. What is safe and clean water in rural Bolivian communities? A preliminary investigation of heavy metal contamination in rural community water systems in the Bolivian Altiplano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borella, M.; Guido, Z.; Borella, P.; Ketron, T.

    2009-12-01

    A proliferation of potable water systems utilizing groundwater is currently underway in the Lake Titicaca region of the Bolivian Altiplano. With the aid of national and international organizations, rural communities are developing groundwater sources because the region’s surface water is highly contaminated with waterborne pathogens—the primary factor contributing to high child mortality rates in developing nations. According to UNICEF, 86 percent of Bolivian families have access to “improved” water systems, which predominantly take the form of deep groundwater wells or contained natural springs. While the water systems have worked well to reduce pathogens in drinking water systems that cause illnesses such as dysentery, the water is rarely tested for heavy metal contamination, such as arsenic and lead. While bacteria analysis is essential, it is not the only component of healthy drinking water. Testing for heavy metals is especially important in the Bolivian Altiplano because abundant volcanic deposits and massive sulfide deposits suggest that in some areas it is likely that the water contains elevated concentrations of heavy metals. In this study, Terra Resource Development International, A California-based 502(c)3 nonprofit organization, partnered with Stanford University, the Technical University of Bolivia, and the Bolivian Geologic and Mining Survey to collect water samples in 36 rural community situated in four watersheds feeding into Lake Titicaca. Water was collected from shallow, hand dug wells, deep groundwater wells, springs, and small rivers in the Tiwanku, Laja, Batallas, Achacachi watersheds and were analyzed for inorganic contaminants. Samples were analyzed at Stanford’s Environmental Measurements Facility using the Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Spectrometer for major ions and heavy metals. Results will help determine which, if any, community water systems are at risk of heavy metal contamination, where more comprehensive sampling is

  9. Evaluation of surface water quality indices and ecological risk assessment for heavy metals in scrap yard neighbourhood.

    PubMed

    Ojekunle, Olusheyi Z; Ojekunle, Olurotimi V; Adeyemi, Azeem A; Taiwo, Abayomi G; Sangowusi, Opeyemi R; Taiwo, Adewale M; Adekitan, Adetoun A

    2016-01-01

    Pollution of surface water with heavy metals from industrial activities especially those from scrap yard has caused a major threat to human life exposing man to series of hazard, diseases, disability and consequently death. This study focuses on water quality indices of Owode-Onirin and Lafenwa scrap yard with respect to its physicochemical parameters and heavy metal concentrations by evaluating Heavy Metal Pollution Index (HPI), Metal Index (MI) and Potential Ecological Risk Index (PERI). Fifteen water samples were selected randomly from two locations by purposive sampling methods. Five heavy metals which includes Nickel (Ni), Zinc (Zn), Copper (Cu), Cadmium (Cd), Lead (Pb) were analyzed using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and standard analytical procedure were follow to ensure accuracy. One way analysis of variance was carried out to analyse the data. The concentrations of the heavy metals were significantly different between sampling locations. However, the mean concentrations of Cd (0.0121 mg/L) were found to be above the highest permissible value of Standard Organization of Nigeria standards for drinking water (SON 2007) and WHO (Guidelines for drinking water quality: incorporating 1st and 2nd Addlenda. World Health Organization, Geneva, 2004) for drinking water. Although Pb was present in two out of the fifteen water samples with a mean value of (0.0324 mg/L) which was also above the highest permissible value. The mean concentrations of Zn (0.2149 mg/L) and Cu (0.0341 mg/L) are found to be below the highest permissible value of the mentioned guideline while no trace of Ni was found in the water samples across the two sampling locations. The mean HPI 518.55 is far above the critical value of 100, indicates that selected water samples are critically polluted with heavy metals. MI revealed low quality water with mean value 4.83, suggests that the selected water is seriously affected with the present of heavy metal. The Hakanson PERI indicated that of the

  10. Irrigation water quality influences heavy metal uptake by willows in biosolids.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, W Scott; Baker, Alan J M; Gregory, David; Arndt, Stefan K

    2015-05-15

    Phytoextraction is an effective method to remediate heavy metal contaminated landscapes but is often applied for single metal contaminants. Plants used for phytoextraction may not always be able to grow in drier environments without irrigation. This study investigated if willows (Salix x reichardtii A. Kerner) can be used for phytoextraction of multiple metals in biosolids, an end-product of the wastewater treatment process, and if irrigation with reclaimed and freshwater influences the extraction process. A plantation of willows was established directly onto a tilled stockpile of metal-contaminated biosolids and irrigated with slightly saline reclaimed water (EC ∼2 dS/cm) at a wastewater processing plant in Victoria, Australia. Biomass was harvested annually and analysed for heavy metal content. Phytoextraction of cadmium, copper, nickel and zinc was benchmarked against freshwater irrigated willows. The minimum irrigation rate of 700 mm per growing season was sufficient for willows to grow and extract metals. Increasing irrigation rates produced no differences in total biomass and also no differences in the extraction of heavy metals. The reclaimed water reduced both the salinity and the acidity of the biosolids significantly within the first 12 months after irrigation commenced and after three seasons the salinity of the biosolids had dropped to <15% of initial values. A flushing treatment to remove excess salts was therefore not necessary. Irrigation had an impact on biosolids attributes such as salinity and pH, and that this had an influence on metal extraction. Reclaimed water irrigation reduced the biosolid pH and this was associated with reductions of the extraction of Ni and Zn, it did not influence the extraction of Cu and enhanced the phytoextraction of Cd, which was probably related to the high chloride content of the reclaimed water. Our results demonstrate that flood-irrigation with reclaimed water was a successful treatment to grow willows in a

  11. Disiloxane Synthesis Based on Silicon-Hydrogen Bond Activation using Gold and Platinum on Carbon in Water or Heavy Water.

    PubMed

    Sawama, Yoshinari; Masuda, Masahiro; Yasukawa, Naoki; Nakatani, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Shumma; Shibata, Kyoshiro; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Monguchi, Yasunari; Suzuka, Hiroyasu; Takagi, Yukio; Sajiki, Hironao

    2016-05-20

    Disiloxanes possessing a silicon-oxygen linkage are important as frameworks for functional materials and coupling partners for Hiyama-type cross coupling. We found that disiloxanes were effectively constructed of hydrosilanes catalyzed by gold on carbon in water as the solvent and oxidant in association with the emission of hydrogen gas at room temperature. The present oxidation could proceed via various reaction pathways, such as the hydration of hydrosilane into silanol, dehydrogenative coupling of hydrosilane into disilane, and the subsequent corresponding reactions to disiloxane. Additionally, the platinum on carbon catalyzed hydrogen-deuterium exchange reaction of arylhydrosilanes as substrates in heavy water proceeded on the aromatic nuclei at 80 °C with high deuterium efficiency and high regioselectivity at the only meta and para positions of the aromatic-silicon bond to give the deuterium-labeled disiloxanes. PMID:27129497

  12. Heavy metal levels and physico--chemical quality of potable water supply in Warri, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Nduka, J K C; Orisakwe, O E

    2007-09-01

    The interaction between man's activities and the environment is gaining world wide attention. Warri an oil producing community in Delta State of Nigeria is faced with environmental oil pollution. Since open and underground water bodies are regarded as final recipients of most environmental pollutants, this study sought to provide data on the levels of the physico-chemical parameters and contaminants in Warri metropolitan water supply. This study investigated the cadmium, lead and chromium using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer, physico-chemical properties such as pH, temperature, total suspended solid TSS, total dissolved solid TDS, electrical conductivity EC, biological oxygen demand BOD, dissolved oxygen DO, chemical oxygen demand COD, and total coliform count of potable water sources in Warri. Ekpan River was found to have 1.2 mg/L of cadmium, 1.0 mg/L of chromium, 1.20 mg/L of lead and 2.0 mg/L of manganese. The heavy metals levels and the pollution parameters were lowest in the borehole water samples, except pH which is more acidic in borehole water samples and conductivity which is more in well water samples in all the sampling stations. Some of the parameters were above WHO standards. PMID:17970302

  13. A high repetition rate laser-heavy water based neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hah, Jungmoo; He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alexander; CenterUltrafast Optical Science Team

    2015-11-01

    Neutrons have numerous applications in diverse areas, such as medicine, security, and material science. For example, sources of MeV neutrons may be used for active interrogation for nuclear security applications. Recently, alternative ways to generate neutron flux have been studied. Among them, ultrashort laser pulse interactions with dense plasma have attracted significant attention as compact, pulse sources of neutrons. To generate neutrons using a laser through fusion reactions, thin solid density targets have been used in a pitcher-catcher arrangement, using deuterated plastic for example. However, the use of solid targets is limited for high-repetition rate operation due to the need to refresh the target for every laser shot. Here, we use a free flowing heavy water target with a high repetition rate (500 Hz) laser without a catcher. From the interaction between a 10 micron scale diameter heavy water stream with the Lambda-cubed laser system at the Univ. of Michigan (12mJ, 800nm, 35fs), deuterons collide with each other resulting in D-D fusion reactions generating 2.45 MeV neutrons. Under best conditions a time average of ~ 105 n/s of neutrons are generated.

  14. Fusion neutron yield from a laser-irradiated heavy-water spray

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Schnuerer, M.; Hilscher, D.; Jahnke, U.; Busch, S.; Nickles, P.V.; Sandner, W.

    2005-01-01

    The fusion neutron yield from a laser-irradiated heavy-water (D{sub 2}O) spray target was studied. Heavy-water droplets of about 150 nm diameter in the spray were exposed to 35 fs laser pulses at an intensity of 1x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Due to the 10-50 times bigger size of the spray droplets compared to usual cluster sizes, deuterons are accelerated to considerably higher kinetic energies of up to 1 MeV. Neutrons are generated by the deuterons escaping from the plasma and initiating a fusion reaction within the surrounding cold plume of the spray jet. For each 0.6 J of laser pulse energy, 6x10{sup 3} neutrons are produced by about 10{sup 11} accelerated deuterons. This corresponds to a D(d,n) reaction probability of about 6x10{sup -8}. Compared to cluster targets, the reaction probability in the spray target is found to be two orders of magnitude larger. This finding apparently is due to both the considerably higher deuteron energies and the larger effective target thickness in the spray target. The measured neutron yield per accelerated deuteron [i.e., the D(d,n) reaction probability], is employed to compare and extrapolate the neutron emission characteristics from different target arrangements.

  15. Volume holographic gratings as optical sensor for heavy metal in bathing waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, G.; Ferrara, M. A.; Borbone, F.; Zuppardi, F.; Roviello, A.; Striano, V.; Coppola, G.

    2015-05-01

    Sensor holograms utilize the diffraction principle of transmitting volume holographic grating (VHG) recorded within a photopolymer appositely functionalized to detect a specific stimulus or analyte. A change in the swelling or shrinking state or cross-linking density of the polymer can be caused by the hologram interaction with an analyte. This leads to a change in the recorded hologram sensor and thus, considering an incident monochromatic light and the VHG angular selectivity, to an angle shift of the diffracted maximum intensity. In this work, two new photopolymers based on a sol-gel matrix opportunely functionalized to be sensitive to transition metals or heavy metals were used as sensitive material to record VHGs. An interferometric set up with a laser source at 532nm was used to record VHGs and gratings of 1000 lines/mm were realized. When exposed to a solution of water and lead, an angle shift of about 3° of the first order diffraction of the grating was measured, demonstrating its capability to reveal the presence of heavy metal in water.

  16. Fusion neutron yield from a laser-irradiated heavy-water spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Schnürer, M.; Hilscher, D.; Jahnke, U.; Busch, S.; Nickles, P. V.; Sandner, W.

    2005-01-01

    The fusion neutron yield from a laser-irradiated heavy-water (D2O) spray target was studied. Heavy-water droplets of about 150nm diameter in the spray were exposed to 35fs laser pulses at an intensity of 1×1019W/cm2. Due to the 10-50 times bigger size of the spray droplets compared to usual cluster sizes, deuterons are accelerated to considerably higher kinetic energies of up to 1MeV. Neutrons are generated by the deuterons escaping from the plasma and initiating a fusion reaction within the surrounding cold plume of the spray jet. For each 0.6J of laser pulse energy, 6×103 neutrons are produced by about 1011 accelerated deuterons. This corresponds to a D(d ,n) reaction probability of about 6×10-8. Compared to cluster targets, the reaction probability in the spray target is found to be two orders of magnitude larger. This finding apparently is due to both the considerably higher deuteron energies and the larger effective target thickness in the spray target. The measured neutron yield per accelerated deuteron [i.e., the D(d ,n) reaction probability], is employed to compare and extrapolate the neutron emission characteristics from different target arrangements.

  17. Measurement of 14C emission rates from a pressurised heavy water reactor.

    PubMed

    Joshi, M L; Ramamirtham, B; Soman, S D

    1987-06-01

    Carbon-14 is produced in pressurised heavy water reactors (PHWR), mainly as an activation product in the fuel. It is also produced in the heavy water used as the primary coolant and moderator, and is produced in the air in the annular space between the pressure tube and calandria tubes as well as in the free space in the calandria vault. The production rates in different systems of a PHWR are calculated on the basis of design parameters. During a period of 3 y, 14C released through the gaseous route has been measured at Rajasthan Atomic Power Station, Kota, India, a PHWR unit. These releases have been found to be mainly 14CO2. This reduced form of 14C is less than 5% of the releases. The normalised releases of 14C have a geometric mean of 5.17 TBq GWe-1 y-1 and a geometric standard deviation of 1.52. The 14C present in the form of carbonates in liquid effluents has also been measured and is 0.14% of the gaseous releases. PMID:3583743

  18. Ecological risk of heavy metals in sediments of the luan river source water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, J.; Li, Y.; Zhang, B.; Cao, J.; Cao, Z.; Domagalski, J.

    2009-01-01

    Distribution and characteristics of heavy metals enrichment in sediment were surveyed including the bio-available form analyzed for assessment of the Luan River source water quality. The approaches of sediment quality guidelines (SQG), risk assessment code and Hakanson potential ecological risk index were used for the ecological risk assessment. According to SQG, The results show that in animal bodies, Hg at the sampling site of Wuliehexia was 1.39 mg/kg, Cr at Sandaohezi was 152.37 mg/kg and Cu at Hanjiaying was 178.61 mg/kg exceeding the severe effect screening level. There were 90% of sampling sites of Cr and Pb and 50% sites of Cu exceeded the lowest effect screening level. At Boluonuo and Wuliehexia, the exchangeable and carbonate fractions for above 50% of sites were at high risk levels and that for above 30% of sites at Xiahenan and Wulieheshang were also at high risk levels. Other sites were at medium risk level. Compared to soil background values of China, Hg and Cd showed very strong ecological risk, and the seven heavy metals of Hg, Cd, Cu, As, Pb, Cr, Zn at ecological risk levels were in the descending order. The results could give insight into risk assessment of environmental pollution and decision-making for water source security. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  19. Effect of AN Additive on Thermal Output during Electrolysis of Heavy Water with a Palladium Cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Dash, J.

    A titanium additive to a heavy water-sulfuric acid electrolyte has been found to increase the thermal output during electrolysis with a palladium foil cathode. Eight runs, about 6 h each, over a period of 16 days, gave an average of 1.8 W excess thermal power output compared with a light water control cell. This is about twice the excess obtained in co-deposition experiments. The excess thermal power output ranged from 0.5 ± 0.1 to 2.6 ± 0.1 W, which was an average of about 17% more than the input power. The additive apparently catalyzes heat-producing reactions on the surface of the palladium. After electrolysis, the Pd cathode contained localized surface concentrations of Ag, Ni, Fe, Ti, S, and Pt.

  20. Chemistry and fate of heavy metals in soils. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the kinetics, mobilization, uptake, and disposition of heavy metals in soil, sediment, loam, clay, gravel, silt, and sand. Heavy metal species studied include cadmium, zinc, lead, mercury, and arsenic. Environmental studies from governmental agencies, universities, and private industry covering ground water transport, bioaccumulation, sources of contamination, analytical methods, and chemical reactions are presented. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. Toxic heavy metals in sediments, seawater, and molluscs in the eastern and western coastal waters of Guangdong Province, South China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Shi, Zhen; Zhang, Jingping; Jiang, Zhijian; Wang, Fei; Huang, Xiaoping

    2016-05-01

    Heavy metal concentrations and distribution were studied in sediments, seawater, and molluscs, and the possible heavy metal sources in the coastal waters of Guangdong Province, South China were discussed. The results showed that the concentrations of Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cr in sediments in eastern coastal waters were generally higher than those in the western coastal waters. However, concentrations of most metals in seawater and molluscs in western waters were higher than in the eastern waters, which was tightly related to the local economics and urbanization development, especially, the different industrial structure in two regions. The main heavy metal sources were attributed to the industrial and agricultural effluent, domestic sewage, and even waste gas. Furthermore, heavy metal contamination assessment indicated that high contamination levels of Cd, Zn, and Pb occurred in sediments in local areas, especially in the bays and harbors. The metal accumulation levels by molluscs ranked following the order of Cd > Cu > As > Zn > Pb > Cr, and the ecological risks introduced by heavy metals in different areas were in the order of Zhanjiang > Yangmao > Shantou > Shanhui. PMID:27126438

  2. [Preliminary health risk assessment of heavy metals in drinking waters in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Gao, Ji-jun; Zhang, Li-ping; Huang, Sheng-biao; Ma, Mei; Wang, Zi-jian

    2004-03-01

    Concentrations distribution of the Cu, Hg, Cd, As in drinking water in the 8 city districts and 10 counties in Beijing was studied based on a total of 120 random samples. Health risks associated with 4 metals in drinking water were assessed using USEPA health risk assessment model. The results showed that the concentrations of the heavy metals in drinking water in Beijing ranged from 0.81 to 6.96 micrograms.L-1 for Cu, 0.34-0.82 microgram.L-1 for Cd, 0.10-0.74 microgram.L-1 for Hg and 0.19-3.02 micrograms.L-1 for As. Among the health risks caused by the carcinogens in drinking water, the largest risk associated with As should be in Tongzhou County (2.0 x 10(-5).a-1) and that with Cd should be in Changping County (2.3 x 10(-6).a-1), while both were significantly lower than the maximum allowance levels recommended by ICRP(5 x 10(-5).a-1). Among the non-carcinogenic risks in drinking water, the largest risk was the risk associated with Hg, followed by Cu. The non-carcinogenic risks levels ranged from 10(-8) to 10(-9), much lower than the maximum allowance levels recommended by ICRP. PMID:15202233

  3. Mobility of heavy metals from tailings to stream waters in a mining activity contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Concas, A; Ardau, C; Cristini, A; Zuddas, P; Cao, G

    2006-04-01

    In this paper the results of a recent characterization of Rio Piscinas (SW of Sardinia, Italy) hydrological basin are reported. In such area (about 50 km2), previous mining activities caused a serious heavy metal contamination of surface waters, groundwater, soils and biota. Acid mine drainage phenomena were observed in the area. The main sources of contamination are the tailings stored in mine tunnels and abandoned along fluvial banks. A methodological approach was adopted in order to identify relations between tailings and water contamination. Representative samples of tailings and stream sediments samples were collected. XRD analyses were performed for mineralogical characterization, while acid digestion was carried out for determining metal contents. Batch sequential leaching tests were performed in order to assess metal mobility. Also groundwater and stream water were sampled in specific locations and suitably characterized. All information collected allowed the understanding of the effect of tailings on water contamination, thus contributing to the qualitative prediction of pollution evolution on the basis of metal mobility. Finally, a potential remediation strategy of stream water is proposed. PMID:16216301

  4. High-Performance, Superparamagnetic, Nanoparticle-Based Heavy Metal Sorbents for Removal of Contaminants from Natural Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Cynthia L.; Addleman, Shane; Cinson, Anthony D.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Nash, Michael A.; Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Marvin G.

    2010-06-01

    We describe the synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle based heavy metal sorbents with various surface chemistries that demonstrate an excellent affinity for the separation of heavy metals in contaminated water systems (i.e. spiked Columbia river water). The magnetic nanoparticle sorbents are prepared from an easy to synthesize iron oxide precursor, followed by a simple, one-step ligand exchange technique to introduce the organic surface functionality of interest chosen to target either specific or broader classes of heavy metals. Functionalized superparamagnetic nanoparticles are excellent sorbent materials for the extraction of heavy metal contaminants from environmental and clinical samples since they are easily removed from the media once bound to the contaminant by simply applying a magnetic field. These engineered magnetic nanoparticle sorbents have an inherently high active surface area (often > 100 m2/g), allowing for increased binding capacity. To demonstrate the potential sorbent performance of each of the surface modified magnetic nanoparticles, river water was spiked with Hg, Pb, Cd, Ag, Co, Cu, and Tl and exposed to low concentrations of the functionalized nanoparticles. The samples were analyzed to determine the metal content before and after exposure to the magnetic nanoparticle sorbents. In almost all cases reported here the nanoparticles were found to be superior to commercially available sorbents binding a wide range of different heavy metals with extremely high affinity. Detailed characterization of the functionalized magnetic nanoparticle sorbents including FT-IR, BET surface analysis, TGA, XPS and VSM as well as the heavy metal removal experiments are presented.

  5. Biosorption process for removing heavy metal ions using water milfoil (Myriophyllum Spicatum) in contaminated water

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.C.; Weissman, J.C.; Varadarajan, R.

    1995-12-31

    A small scale biomass metal contacting experiment was performed to screen the optimal plant species for biosorption and bioaccumulation of cadmium, zinc, nickel, lead, and copper. Experiments were also conducted to test the ability of the biomass to lower the metal concentrations below the US Environmental Protection Agency surface water discharge criteria. The minimum residual concentration was 0.1 mg/L for zinc, 0.004 mg/L for lead, and about 0.01 mg/L for cadmium, nickel, and lead. Results indicate that water milfoil can be used for bioremoval of metals.

  6. Criticality Safety of Low-Enriched Uranium and High-Enriched Uranium Fuel Elements in Heavy Water Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Pesic, Milan P

    2003-10-15

    The RB reactor was designed as a natural-uranium, heavy water, nonreflected critical assembly in the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Yugoslavia, in 1958. From 1962 until 2002, numerous critical experiments were carried out with low-enriched uranium and high-enriched uranium fuel elements of tubular shape, known as the Russian TVR-S fuel assembly type, placed in various heavy water square lattices within the RB cylindrical aluminum tank. Some of these well-documented experiments were selected, described, evaluated, and accepted for inclusion in the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments', contributing to the preservation of a rather small number of heavy water benchmark critical experiments.

  7. Variations in heavy metal contamination of stream water and groundwater affected by an abandoned lead-zinc mine in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Yong; Choi, Jung-Chan; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2005-09-01

    This study evaluated variations in heavy metal contamination of stream waters and groundwaters affected by an abandoned lead-zinc mine, where a rockfill dam for water storage will be built 11 km downstream. For these purposes, a total of 10 rounds of stream and groundwater samplings and subsequent chemical analyses were performed during 2002-2003. Results of an exploratory investigation of stream waters in 2000 indicated substantial contamination with heavy metals including zinc (Zn), iron (Fe) and arsenic (As) for at least 6 km downstream from the mine. Stream waters near the mine showed metal contamination as high as arsenic (As) 8,923 microg L(-1), copper (Cu) 616 microg L(-1), cadmium (Cd) 223 microg L(-1) and lead (Pb) 10,590 microg L(-1), which greatly exceeded the Korean stream water guidelines. Remediation focused on the mine tailing piles largely improved the stream water qualities. However, there have still been quality problems for the waters containing relatively high concentrations of As (6-174 microg L(-1)), Cd (1-46 microg L(-1)) and Pb (2-26 microg L(-1)). Rainfall infiltration into the mine tailing piles resulted in an increase of heavy metals in the stream waters due to direct discharge of waste effluent, while dilution of the contaminated stream waters improved the water quality due to mixing with metal free rain waters. Levels of As, Cu and chromium (Cr) largely decreased after heavy rain but that of Pb was rather elevated. The stream waters were characterized by high concentrations of calcium (Ca) and sulfate (SO(4)), which were derived from dissolution and leaching of carbonate and sulfide minerals. It was observed that the proportions of Ca and SO(4) increased while those of bicarbonate (HCO(3)) and sodium and potassium (Na+K) decreased after a light rainfall event. Most interestingly, the reverse was generally detected for the groundwaters. The zinc, being the metal mined, was the most dominant heavy metal in the groundwaters (1758

  8. Effect of polluted water on soil and plant contamination by heavy metals in El-Mahla El-Kobra, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasem Mahmoud, Esawy; Ghoneim, Adel Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    The discharge of untreated waste water in Zefta drain and drain no. 5 is becoming a problem for many farmers in the El-Mahla El-Kobra area, Egypt. The discharged water contains high levels of contaminants considered hazardous to the ecosystem. Some plants, soil, water, and sediment samples were collected from the El-Mahla El-Kobra area to evaluate the contamination by heavy metals. The results showed that the heavy metals, pH, sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the water of Zefta drain and drain no. 5 exceeded permissible limits for irrigation. In rice and maize shoots grown in soils irrigated by contaminated water from Zefta drain and drain no. 5, the bioaccumulation factors for Cd, Pb, Zn, Cu, and Mn were higher than 1.0. The heavy metals content of irrigated soils from Zefta drain and drain no. 5 exceeded the upper limit of background heavy metals. In this study, the mean contaminant factor values of the drain no. 5 sediments revealed that Zn, Mn, Cu, Cd, Pb, and Ni > 6, indicating very high contamination. The bioaccumulation coefficient values of Cynodon dactylon, Phragmites australis, and Typha domingensis aquatic plants growing in Zefta drain are high. These species can be considered as hyperaccumulators for the decontamination of contaminated water.

  9. Physiological and Metagenomic Analyses of Microbial Mats Involved in Self-Purification of Mine Waters Contaminated with Heavy Metals.

    PubMed

    Drewniak, Lukasz; Krawczyk, Pawel S; Mielnicki, Sebastian; Adamska, Dorota; Sobczak, Adam; Lipinski, Leszek; Burec-Drewniak, Weronika; Sklodowska, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Two microbial mats found inside two old (gold and uranium) mines in Zloty Stok and Kowary located in SW Poland seem to form a natural barrier that traps heavy metals leaking from dewatering systems. We performed complex physiological and metagenomic analyses to determine which microorganisms are the main driving agents responsible for self-purification of the mine waters and identify metabolic processes responsible for the observed features. SEM and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis showed accumulation of heavy metals on the mat surface, whereas, sorption experiments showed that neither microbial mats were completely saturated with heavy metals present in the mine waters, indicating that they have a large potential to absorb significant quantities of metal. The metagenomic analysis revealed that Methylococcaceae and Methylophilaceae families were the most abundant in both communities, moreover, it strongly suggest that backbones of both mats were formed by filamentous bacteria, such as Leptothrix, Thiothrix, and Beggiatoa. The Kowary bacterial community was enriched with the Helicobacteraceae family, whereas the Zloty Stok community consist mainly of Sphingomonadaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, and Caulobacteraceae families. Functional (culture-based) and metagenome (sequence-based) analyses showed that bacteria involved in immobilization of heavy metals, rather than those engaged in mobilization, were the main driving force within the analyzed communities. In turn, a comparison of functional genes revealed that the biofilm formation and heavy metal resistance (HMR) functions are more desirable in microorganisms engaged in water purification than the ability to utilize heavy metals in the respiratory process (oxidation-reduction). These findings provide insight on the activity of bacteria leading, from biofilm formation to self-purification, of mine waters contaminated with heavy metals. PMID:27559332

  10. Physiological and Metagenomic Analyses of Microbial Mats Involved in Self-Purification of Mine Waters Contaminated with Heavy Metals

    PubMed Central

    Drewniak, Lukasz; Krawczyk, Pawel S.; Mielnicki, Sebastian; Adamska, Dorota; Sobczak, Adam; Lipinski, Leszek; Burec-Drewniak, Weronika; Sklodowska, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Two microbial mats found inside two old (gold and uranium) mines in Zloty Stok and Kowary located in SW Poland seem to form a natural barrier that traps heavy metals leaking from dewatering systems. We performed complex physiological and metagenomic analyses to determine which microorganisms are the main driving agents responsible for self-purification of the mine waters and identify metabolic processes responsible for the observed features. SEM and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis showed accumulation of heavy metals on the mat surface, whereas, sorption experiments showed that neither microbial mats were completely saturated with heavy metals present in the mine waters, indicating that they have a large potential to absorb significant quantities of metal. The metagenomic analysis revealed that Methylococcaceae and Methylophilaceae families were the most abundant in both communities, moreover, it strongly suggest that backbones of both mats were formed by filamentous bacteria, such as Leptothrix, Thiothrix, and Beggiatoa. The Kowary bacterial community was enriched with the Helicobacteraceae family, whereas the Zloty Stok community consist mainly of Sphingomonadaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, and Caulobacteraceae families. Functional (culture-based) and metagenome (sequence-based) analyses showed that bacteria involved in immobilization of heavy metals, rather than those engaged in mobilization, were the main driving force within the analyzed communities. In turn, a comparison of functional genes revealed that the biofilm formation and heavy metal resistance (HMR) functions are more desirable in microorganisms engaged in water purification than the ability to utilize heavy metals in the respiratory process (oxidation-reduction). These findings provide insight on the activity of bacteria leading, from biofilm formation to self-purification, of mine waters contaminated with heavy metals. PMID:27559332

  11. Combine the soil water assessment tool (SWAT) with sediment geochemistry to evaluate diffuse heavy metal loadings at watershed scale.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Wei; Ouyang, Wei; Hao, Fanghua; Huang, Haobo; Shan, Yushu; Geng, Xiaojun

    2014-09-15

    Assessing the diffuse pollutant loadings at watershed scale has become increasingly important when formulating effective watershed water management strategies, but the process was seldom achieved for heavy metals. In this study, the overall temporal-spatial variability of particulate Pb, Cu, Cr and Ni losses within an agricultural watershed was quantitatively evaluated by combining SWAT with sediment geochemistry. Results showed that the watershed particulate heavy metal loadings displayed strong variability in the simulation period 1981-2010, with an obvious increasing trend in recent years. The simulated annual average loadings were 20.21 g/ha, 21.75 g/ha, 47.35 g/ha and 21.27 g/ha for Pb, Cu, Cr and Ni, respectively. By comparison, these annual average values generally matched the estimated particulate heavy metal loadings at field scale. With spatial interpolation of field loadings, it was found that the diffuse heavy metal pollution mainly came from the sub-basins dominated with cultivated lands, accounting for over 70% of total watershed loadings. The watershed distribution of particulate heavy metal losses was very similar to that of soil loss but contrary to that of heavy metal concentrations in soil, highlighting the important role of sediment yield in controlling the diffuse heavy metal loadings. PMID:25169808

  12. Characteristics of a heavy water photoneutron source in boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danial, Salehi; Dariush, Sardari; M. Salehi, Jozani

    2013-07-01

    Bremsstrahlung photon beams produced by medical linear accelerators are currently the most commonly used method of radiation therapy for cancerous tumors. Photons with energies greater than 8-10 MeV potentially generate neutrons through photonuclear interactions in the accelerator's treatment head, patient's body, and treatment room ambient. Electrons impinging on a heavy target generate a cascade shower of bremsstrahlung photons, the energy spectrum of which shows an end point equal to the electron beam energy. By varying the target thickness, an optimum thickness exists for which, at the given electron energy, maximum photon flux is achievable. If a source of high-energy photons i.e. bremsstrahlung, is conveniently directed to a suitable D2O target, a novel approach for production of an acceptable flux of filterable photoneturons for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) application is possible. This study consists of two parts. 1. Comparison and assessment of deuterium photonuclear cross section data. 2. Evaluation of the heavy water photonuclear source.

  13. Metallothionein-cross-linked hydrogels for the selective removal of heavy metals from water.

    PubMed

    Esser-Kahn, Aaron P; Iavarone, Anthony T; Francis, Matthew B

    2008-11-26

    The diverse functional repertoire of proteins promises to yield new materials with unprecedented capabilities, so long as versatile chemical methods are available to integrate biomolecules with synthetic components. As a demonstration of this potential, we have used site-selective strategies to cross-link polymer chains using the N- and C-termini of a metallothionein derived from a pea plant. This arrangement directly relates the swelling volume of the polymer to the folded state of the protein. The material retains the protein's ability to remove heavy metal ions from contaminated water samples, and can be regenerated through the subsequent addition of inexpensive chelators. The change in hydrogel volume that occurs as metal ions are bound allows the detection of contaminants through simple visual inspection. The utility of this bulk property change is demonstrated in the construction of a low-cost device that can report heavy metal contamination with no external power requirements. Most importantly, the generality of the protein modification chemistry allows the immediate generation of new hybrid materials from a wide range of protein sequences. PMID:18980305

  14. Fabrication of FeOOH hollow microboxes for purification of heavy metal-contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sida; Lan, Huachun; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-04-14

    FeOOH, a frequently used adsorbent, has been widely applied in purifying aqueous heavy metals, and its performance can be greatly improved by enlarging the number of surface active sites. To this end, we fabricated FeOOH hollow microboxes constructed from numerous 2D nanosheets via a template-engaged reaction between Prussian blue (PB) and NaOH solution. With combined observations from X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we confirmed that the hollow microboxes corroded from PB were composed of ample frizzy FeOOH nanosheets, which ensured extensive exposure of the surface active sites. Moreover, the FeOOH microboxes were utilized as an adsorbent in the removal of heavy metals (As(iii), As(v) and Se(iv)) from water and the maximum adsorption capacities were reached up to 192.19 mg g(-1), 250.0 mg g(-1) and 169.9 mg g(-1) at pH = 7.0, 4.0 and 5.0, respectively. The superior adsorptive performance of the FeOOH microboxes was derived from their large content of reactive exposed hydroxyl groups, which was unambiguously confirmed by X-ray adsorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), as well as by surface site density analysis. PMID:26980402

  15. Distribution of heavy metals in water, particulate matter and sediments of Gediz River (Eastern Aegean).

    PubMed

    Kucuksezgin, F; Uluturhan, E; Batki, H

    2008-06-01

    The present paper is the first document of heavy metal levels in surficial sediment, water and particulate matter of the Gediz River collected from five different sites in August, October 1998, February, June 1999. The present work attempts to establish the status of distribution and environmental implications of metals in the sediment, water and particulate matter and their possible sources of derivation. The concentrations of mercury ranged 0.037-0.81, 120-430; lead 0.59-1.5, 190-8,100; copper 0.24-1.6, 30-180; zinc 0.19-2.9, 10-80; manganese 30-170, 20-490; nickel 0.39-9.0, 100-510; iron 1.3-687, 100-6,200 microg/l in water and particulate matter, respectively. The maximum values in water were generally obtained in summer periods due to industrial and agricultural activities at Muradiye. The particulate metal concentrations also generally showed increased levels from the upper Gediz to the mouth of the river. Calculation of metal partition coefficients shows that the relative importance of the particulate and the water phases varies in response to water hydrochemistry and suspended solid content, but that most elements achieve a conditional equilibrium in the Gediz River. The metals ranged between Hg: 0.25-0.49, Cr: 59-814, Pb: 38-198, Cu: 15-148, Zn: 34-196, Mn: 235-1,371, Ni: 35-175, and Fe: 10,629-72,387 mg/kg in sediment. The significant increase of metals found in Muradiye suggested a pollution effect, related to anthropogenic wastes. Also, relatively high concentrations of Ni and Mn occurred in sampling site upstream, due to geochemical composition of the sediments. Maximum values of contamination factor for metals were noticed for sediment of Muradiye. The sampling stations have very high degree of contamination indicating serious anthropogenic pollution. PMID:17846908

  16. Pulse radiolysis in water with heavy-ion beams. A short review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldacchino, G.

    2008-10-01

    This article presents a short review of the studies in radiation chemistry of liquid water with heavy ions, which have used pulse radiolysis methods during the last 20 years. The interests and the difficulties of developing this kind of experiment are depicted. The linear energy transfer (LET) effect is the main topic of these studies. The earliest effects close to the structure of the deposited energy can be observed directly by transient absorption spectroscopy by following the hydrated electron, the superoxide radical produced in the absence of molecular oxygen and the hydroxyl radical, which still requires the use of scavenger. Finally, the results can be compared to the heterogeneous chemical processes in the time range of 1 ns to 1 μs described by Monte Carlo simulations. The absolute values of the radiolytic yields are still uncertain because of the dosimetry accuracy. The future aspects of the method are discussed in terms of new types of particle accelerators giving better time resolutions.

  17. Biomarkers and heavy metal bioaccumulation in mussels transplanted to coastal waters of the Beagle Channel.

    PubMed

    Giarratano, Erica; Duarte, Claudia A; Amin, Oscar A

    2010-03-01

    Mussels coming from a mussel farm at Brown Bay (Beagle Channel) were transplanted to four sites inside Ushuaia Bay for 2 and 4 weeks. The objective of this study was to assess the quality of coastal waters of Ushuaia Bay by measuring catalase activity, lipid peroxidation, total lipid content, bioaccumulation of heavy metals and condition index in transplanted mussel Mytilus edulis chilensis. Biomarkers except condition index showed significant differences among exposure times as well as among tissues. Digestive gland presented the highest catalase activity, malondialdehyde level and total lipid content. Digestive gland also was the main target tissue of accumulation of iron and copper, while gill accumulated the highest levels of zinc. A principal component analyzes with the whole set of data allowed to separate stations based on physicochemical conditions and biochemical responses of each studied area. PMID:19913913

  18. Study on hydrodynamically induced dryout and post dryout important to heavy water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; Revankar, S.T.; Nair, S.; Lele, S.; Eberle, C.S.; Babelli, I.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, the safety of low pressure liquid cooled nuclear reactors has become a very important issue with reference to the operation of the heavy water reactors at Savannah River Plant. Under accident conditions such as loss-of-flow or loss-of-coolant, these reactors typically encounter unstable two-phase flow which may lead to the occurrence of dryout and subsequent fuel failure. An analytical study using the one-dimensional drift flux model was carried out to investigate the two-phase flow instability for Westinghouse Savannah River Site reactor. The analysis indicates that the first and higher order instabilities exist in the possible transient operational conditions. The instabilities are encountered at higher heat fluxes or lower flow rates. The subcooling has a stabilizing effect except at very low subcooling. An experimental loop has been designed and constructed. A study was conducted on the CHF induced by various flow instabilities. Details of this test loop are presented.

  19. Core loading pattern optimization of thorium fueled heavy water breeder reactor using genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Soewono, C. N.; Takaki, N.

    2012-07-01

    In this work genetic algorithm was proposed to solve fuel loading pattern optimization problem in thorium fueled heavy water reactor. The objective function of optimization was to maximize the conversion ratio and minimize power peaking factor. Those objectives were simultaneously optimized using non-dominated Pareto-based population ranking optimal method. Members of non-dominated population were assigned selection probabilities based on their rankings in a manner similar to Baker's single criterion ranking selection procedure. A selected non-dominated member was bred through simple mutation or one-point crossover process to produce a new member. The genetic algorithm program was developed in FORTRAN 90 while neutronic calculation and analysis was done by COREBN code, a module of core burn-up calculation for SRAC. (authors)

  20. Effect of processing on properties of thin walled calandria tubes for pressurised heavy water reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, K.; Padmaprabu, C.; Ramana Rao, S. V.; Sanyal, T.; Kashyap, B. P.

    2003-02-01

    Thin walled calandria tubes for pressurised heavy water reactors are manufactured either by seam welding of Zircaloy-4 sheets or by seamless route. In the present study, the effect of processing on the critical properties such as texture, microstructure, hydriding behaviour and residual stress for both the routes as well as the mechanical anisotropy developed due to seam welding are investigated. The properties of the seam welded tube in the fusion and adjoining region are markedly different from the base material and from the seamless tube. Residual stress measurements indicate that heat affected zone (HAZ) of seam welded tubes have longitudinal tensile residual stress and the seamless tubes have uniform compressive stress along the circumference. The phase transition in the presence of residual stresses due to thermal gradient is found to modify the texture in the HAZ. The hydride orientation and mechanical anisotropy in these regions are found to be dependent on the texture of the material.

  1. Vibrational spectra of light and heavy water with application to neutron cross section calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Damian, J. I. Marquez; Granada, J. R.; Malaspina, D. C.

    2013-07-14

    The design of nuclear reactors and neutron moderators require a good representation of the interaction of low energy (E < 1 eV) neutrons with hydrogen and deuterium containing materials. These models are based on the dynamics of the material, represented by its vibrational spectrum. In this paper, we show calculations of the frequency spectrum for light and heavy water at room temperature using two flexible point charge potentials: SPC-MPG and TIP4P/2005f. The results are compared with experimental measurements, with emphasis on inelastic neutron scattering data. Finally, the resulting spectra are applied to calculation of neutron scattering cross sections for these materials, which were found to be a significant improvement over library data.

  2. Radio-toxicity of spent fuel of the advanced heavy water reactor.

    PubMed

    Anand, S; Singh, K D S; Sharma, V K

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a new power reactor concept being developed at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai. The reactor retains many desirable features of the existing Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR), while incorporating new, advanced safety features. The reactor aims to utilise the vast thorium resources available in India. The reactor core will use plutonium as the make-up fuel, while breeding (233)U in situ. On account of this unique combination of fuel materials, the operational characteristics of the fuel as determined by its radioactivity, decay heat and radio-toxicity are being viewed with great interest. Radio-toxicity of the spent fuel is a measure of potential radiological hazard to the members of the public and also important from the ecological point of view. The radio-toxicity of the AHWR fuel is extremely high to start with, being approximately 10(4) times that of the fresh natural U fuel used in a PHWR, and continues to remain relatively high during operation and subsequent cooling. A unique feature of this fuel is the peak observed in its radio-toxicity at approximately 10(5) y of decay cooling. The delayed increase in fuel toxicity has been traced primarily to a build-up of (229)Th, (230)Th and (226)Ra. This phenomenon has been observed earlier for thorium-based fuels and is confirmed for the AHWR fuel. This paper presents radio-toxicity data for AHWR spent fuel up to a period of 10(6) y and the results are compared with the radio-toxicity of PHWR. PMID:19776247

  3. Analysis of some heavy metals in the riverine water, sediments and fish from river Ganges at Allahabad.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aradhna; Rai, Devendra K; Pandey, Ravi S; Sharma, Bechan

    2009-10-01

    The river Ganges has been one of the major recipients of industrial effluents in India. The present paper deals with the study related to occurrence and bioaccumulation of heavy metals (Cu, Cr, Cd, Pb, Zn) in the riverine water, sediment, and the muscles of two cat fish species, Channa punctatus (C. punctatus) and Aorichthys aor (A. aor) procured from the river Ganges at Allahabad. The data obtained after water analysis reflected the order of occurrence of heavy metals to be Zn > Pb > Cu > Cr > Cd, respectively. The analysis of heavy metals in sediment indicated that among the five heavy metals tested; Zn was maximally accumulated followed by Pb, Cr, Cu and Cd. The trend of heavy metals accumulation in fish muscles was found to be similar to that observed in sediment and water such as Zn > Pb > Cu > Cr > Cd. Data indicated that Zn accumulated maximally in the sediment as well as muscles of both of the fish species in comparison to other metals. PMID:18850290

  4. Bio-clarification of water from heavy metals and microbial effluence using fungal chitosan.

    PubMed

    Tayel, Ahmed A; Gharieb, Mohamed M; Zaki, Hanaa R; Elguindy, Nihal M

    2016-02-01

    Water pollution is among the most hazardous problems that threaten human health worldwide. Chitosan is a marvelous bioactive polymer that could be produced from fungal mycelia. This study was conducted to produce chitosan from Cunninghamella elegans and to use it for water pollutants elimination, e.g. heavy metals and waterborne microorganisms, and to investigate its antibacterial mode of action against Escherichia coli. The produced fungal chitosan had a deacetylation degree of 81%, a molecular weight of 92.73 kDa and a matched FT-IR spectrum with standard shrimp chitosan. Fungal chitosan exhibited remarkable antimicrobial activity against E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Chitosan was proved as an effective metal adsorbent, toward the examined metal ions, Cu2+, Zn2+ and Pb2+, and its adsorption capacity greatly increased with the increasing of metal concentration, especially for Cu and Zn. The scanning electron micrographs, of treated E. coli cells with fungal chitosan, indicated that the cells began to lyse and combine after 3h of exposure and chitosan particles attached to the combined cells and, after 12 h from exposure, the entire bacterial cell walls were fully disrupted and lysed. Therefore, fungal chitosan could be recommended, as a bioactive, renewable, ecofriendly and cost effective material, for overcoming water pollution problems, from chemical and microbial origins. PMID:26645148

  5. A Diagnostic Hierarchy Approach to Root Cause Analysis for Heavy Water Reactor Malfunction Management

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.W.; Hajek, B.K.; Hines, J.W.

    1993-10-30

    The Nuclear Engineering and Chemical Engineering Artificial Intelligence Groups at The Ohio State University have developed a diagnostic system for the heavy water production reactors at the Savannah River Site. The diagnostic module of the system uses hybrid hierarchical decomposition methodology to decompose the search space. The knowledge is arranged so that the search space is traversed similarly to how an expert would solve the problem. The system was tested on the SRS development simulator and the results show that the system can properly diagnose all the process water and cooling water malfunctions that are programmed into the simulator. The system was not validated by operators due to hardware unavailability. Since the New Production Reactor development efforts have been halted, the probability for future work on this project is unlikely. The development used a standardized Verification and Validation program to assist in the design and construction of the system. The use of this standardized procedure is referred to as a text book example of designing an expert system in the expectation that its use would provide guidance in future projects. Of the eight phases of the software development lifecycle, five of the phases were completed and documented.

  6. Performance of mesoporous organosilicates on the adsorption of heavy oil from produced water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twaiq, Farouq A.; Nasser, Mustafa S.; Al-Ryiami, Samyia; Al-Ryiami, Hanan

    2012-09-01

    The performance of mesoporous organosilicate materials in removal of soluble oil from wastewater is investigated. The aim of the study is to evaluate the oil adsorption over organosilicate prepared using pre-synthesis methods and compare the results with adsorption over pure siliceous mesoporous material. The materials were prepared using sol-gel technique using Dodecylamine (D) and Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as surfactant templates, and Tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as silica precursor. The as-synthesized mesoporous materials were treated using three different methods to remove the surfactant from the mesoporous silica including calcinations method for total removal of the surfactant, the water vapor stripping and ethanol vapor stripping were used for partial removal of the surfactants. The synthesized materials were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and nitrogen adsorption. The materials were tested for heavy oils removal from oil-water solution. The results showed that neutral surfactant organosilicates have less adsorption compare to cationic surfactant organosilicates. The results also showed that among organosilicates prepared using neutral surfactant, treated organosilicate by ethanol vapor have the highest activity in removing the oil from the oil-water solution.

  7. Health risk assessment of heavy metals and bacterial contamination in drinking water sources: a case study of Malakand Agency, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Nawab, Javed; Khan, Sardar; Ali, Sharafat; Sher, Hassan; Rahman, Ziaur; Khan, Kifayatullah; Tang, Jianfeng; Ahmad, Aziz

    2016-05-01

    Human beings are frequently exposed to pathogens and heavy metals through ingestion of contaminated drinking water throughout the world particularly in developing countries. The present study aimed to assess the quality of water used for drinking purposes in Malakand Agency, Pakistan. Water samples were collected from different sources (dug wells, bore wells, tube wells, springs, and hand pumps) and analyzed for different physico-chemical parameters and bacterial pathogens (fecal coliform bacteria) using standard methods, while heavy metals were analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS-PEA-700). In the study area, 70 % of water sources were contaminated with F. coliform representing high bacterial contamination. The heavy metals, such as Cd (29 and 8 %), Ni (16 and 78 %), and Cr (7 %), exceeded their respective safe limits of WHO (2006) and Pak-EPA (2008), respectively, in water sources, while Pb (9 %) only exceeded from WHO safe limit. The risk assessment tools such as daily intake of metals (DIMs) and health risk indexes (HRIs) were used for health risk estimation and were observed in the order of Ni > Cr > Mn > Pb > Cd and Cd > Ni > Pb > Mn > Cr, respectively. The HRI values of heavy metals for both children and adults were <1, showing lack of potential health risk to the local inhabitants of the study area. PMID:27075311

  8. Microencapsulated Aliivibrio fischeri in Alginate Microspheres for Monitoring Heavy Metal Toxicity in Environmental Waters

    PubMed Central

    Futra, Dedi; Heng, Lee Yook; Surif, Salmijah; Ahmad, Asmat; Ling, Tan Ling

    2014-01-01

    In this article a luminescence fiber optic biosensor for the microdetection of heavy metal toxicity in waters based on the marine bacterium Aliivibrio fischeri (A. fischeri) encapsulated in alginate microspheres is described. Cu(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Cr(VI), Co(II), Ni(II), Ag(I) and Fe(II) were selected as sample toxic heavy metal ions for evaluation of the performance of this toxicity microbiosensor. The loss of bioluminescence response from immobilized A. fischeri bacterial cells corresponds to changes in the toxicity levels. The inhibition of the luminescent biosensor response collected at excitation and emission wavelengths of 287 ± 2 nm and 487 ± 2 nm, respectively, was found to be reproducible and repeatable within the relative standard deviation (RSD) range of 2.4–5.7% (n = 8). The toxicity biosensor based on alginate micropsheres exhibited a lower limit of detection (LOD) for Cu(II) (6.40 μg/L), Cd(II) (1.56 μg/L), Pb(II) (47 μg/L), Ag(I) (18 μg/L) than Zn(II) (320 μg/L), Cr(VI) (1,000 μg/L), Co(II) (1700 μg/L), Ni(II) (2800 μg/L), and Fe(III) (3100 μg/L). Such LOD values are lower when compared with other previous reported whole cell toxicity biosensors using agar gel, agarose gel and cellulose membrane biomatrices used for the immobilization of bacterial cells. The A. fischeri bacteria microencapsulated in alginate biopolymer could maintain their metabolic activity for a prolonged period of up to six weeks without any noticeable changes in the bioluminescence response. The bioluminescent biosensor could also be used for the determination of antagonistic toxicity levels for toxicant mixtures. A comparison of the results obtained by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and using the proposed luminescent A. fischeri-based biosensor suggests that the optical toxicity biosensor can be used for quantitative microdetermination of heavy metal toxicity in environmental water samples. PMID:25490588

  9. Microencapsulated Aliivibrio fischeri in alginate microspheres for monitoring heavy metal toxicity in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Futra, Dedi; Heng, Lee Yook; Surif, Salmijah; Ahmad, Asmat; Ling, Tan Ling

    2014-01-01

    In this article a luminescence fiber optic biosensor for the microdetection of heavy metal toxicity in waters based on the marine bacterium Aliivibrio fischeri (A. fischeri) encapsulated in alginate microspheres is described. Cu(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Cr(VI), Co(II), Ni(II), Ag(I) and Fe(II) were selected as sample toxic heavy metal ions for evaluation of the performance of this toxicity microbiosensor. The loss of bioluminescence response from immobilized A. fischeri bacterial cells corresponds to changes in the toxicity levels. The inhibition of the luminescent biosensor response collected at excitation and emission wavelengths of 287 ± 2 nm and 487 ± 2 nm, respectively, was found to be reproducible and repeatable within the relative standard deviation (RSD) range of 2.4-5.7% (n = 8). The toxicity biosensor based on alginate micropsheres exhibited a lower limit of detection (LOD) for Cu(II) (6.40 μg/L), Cd(II) (1.56 μg/L), Pb(II) (47 μg/L), Ag(I) (18 μg/L) than Zn(II) (320 μg/L), Cr(VI) (1,000 μg/L), Co(II) (1700 μg/L), Ni(II) (2800 μg/L), and Fe(III) (3100 μg/L). Such LOD values are lower when compared with other previous reported whole cell toxicity biosensors using agar gel, agarose gel and cellulose membrane biomatrices used for the immobilization of bacterial cells. The A. fischeri bacteria microencapsulated in alginate biopolymer could maintain their metabolic activity for a prolonged period of up to six weeks without any noticeable changes in the bioluminescence response. The bioluminescent biosensor could also be used for the determination of antagonistic toxicity levels for toxicant mixtures. A comparison of the results obtained by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and using the proposed luminescent A. fischeri-based biosensor suggests that the optical toxicity biosensor can be used for quantitative microdetermination of heavy metal toxicity in environmental water samples. PMID:25490588

  10. Heavy metals in water, sediment and tissues of Liza saliens from Esmoriz-Paramos lagoon, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, C; Fontaínhas-Fernandes, A; Cabral, D; Salgado, M A

    2008-01-01

    Esmoriz-Paramos lagoon is an ecosystem of great ecological importance that is located on the northwest coast of Portugal and has been degraded as a result of industrial and anthropogenic activities. Concentrations of heavy metals (Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn) were measured in water, sediment and in tissues (liver and muscle) of Liza saliens, which is the dominant fish from the lagoon. Comparisons between metal concentrations in water and sediments were made with those in tissues of fish caught at the lagoon. Metals in water were quantified predominantly bound to particulate and equalled or exceeded the limit of chronic reference values. Metal concentrations in sediments varied among sampled sites. The relative order of concentrations was "Zn > Cu approximately Pb > Cr" the same pattern observed for metals in water. Metals in fish tissues showed higher concentrations in liver (262 mg CuxKg(-1) and 89 mg ZnxKg(-1)) than in muscle (<3 mg CuxKg(-1) and 26 mg ZnxKg(-1)), while Pb and Cr were not detected. These results suggest that Cu and Zn are the metals of major concern in the lagoon. Mullet detritivorous feeding habits, bioaccumulation pattern and the high sediment metals concentrations relative to the water suggest that sediments can be the most important source of contamination in this ecosystem. The positive relationship found between Cu in liver and fish length demonstrates that time of exposure is a crucial factor in bioaccumulation. Condition indices (K and HSI) in mullets from the lagoon were higher compared to mullets from sea, suggesting abnormal condition in the lagoon population. We conclude that metals chronic exposure in the lagoon can impose considerable fish stress. The results also show that the lagoon is an area of environmental concern. PMID:17447151

  11. On-site solid-phase extraction and application to in situ preconcentration of heavy metals in surface water.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Fang; Gao, Hong-Wen

    2013-01-01

    An on-site solid-phase extraction, consisting of the sorption, the separation and the elution function units, was designed for in situ preconcentration of heavy metals ions. The D401 resin powder was employed as sorbent to capture Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+), and then they desorbed with 2 mol/L nitric acid as eluent. Under the optimized conditions, these heavy metals ions in West Lake, Taihu Lake, and Yangtze River of China were captured and then determined by ICP-OES with the recovery of 92.5% to 111.5%. The on-site solid-phase extraction achieved a quick preconcentration of heavy metals to avoid the transport and storage of a large volume water sample. It is suitable for in situ monitoring of water quality in mountains, tablelands or other remote areas. PMID:22286838

  12. Bioaccumulation and toxicity of heavy metals and trace elements. [Water pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.B. Jr.; Spiegel, S.J.

    1982-06-01

    A review of the literature dealing with the biological accumulation and toxicity of heavy metals in aquatic ecosystems is presented. The review first examines the sources of heavy metals and the process of ecological concentration of these pollutants. The biological effects of cadmium, copper, and zinc on fish and invertebrates are considered in detail. Methods of detoxification of heavy metals are presented. (KRM)

  13. Meta-Analysis of the Copper, Zinc, and Cadmium Absorption Capacities of Aquatic Plants in Heavy Metal-Polluted Water.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Yu, Haixin; Luan, Yaning

    2015-12-01

    The use of aquatic plants for phytoremediation is an important method for restoring polluted ecosystems. We sought to analyze the capacity of different aquatic plant species to absorb heavy metals and to summarize available relevant scientific data on this topic. We present a meta-analysis of Cu, Zn, and Cd absorption capacities of aquatic plants to provide a scientific basis for the selection of aquatic plants suitable for remediation of heavy-metal pollution. Plants from the Gramineae, Pontederiaceae, Ceratophyllaceae, Typhaceae and Haloragaceae showed relatively strong abilities to absorb these metals. The ability of a particular plant species to absorb a given metal was strongly correlated with its ability to absorb the other metals. However, the absorption abilities varied with the plant organ, with the following trend: roots > stems > leaves. The pH of the water and the life habits of aquatic plants (submerged and emerged) also affect the plant's ability to absorb elements. Acidic water aids the uptake of heavy metals by plants. The correlation observed between element concentrations in plants with different aquatic life habits suggested that the enrichment mechanism is related to the surface area of the plant exposed to water. We argue that this meta-analysis would aid the selection of aquatic plants suitable for heavy-metal absorption from polluted waters. PMID:26703632

  14. Meta-Analysis of the Copper, Zinc, and Cadmium Absorption Capacities of Aquatic Plants in Heavy Metal-Polluted Water

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Yu, Haixin; Luan, Yaning

    2015-01-01

    The use of aquatic plants for phytoremediation is an important method for restoring polluted ecosystems. We sought to analyze the capacity of different aquatic plant species to absorb heavy metals and to summarize available relevant scientific data on this topic. We present a meta-analysis of Cu, Zn, and Cd absorption capacities of aquatic plants to provide a scientific basis for the selection of aquatic plants suitable for remediation of heavy-metal pollution. Plants from the Gramineae, Pontederiaceae, Ceratophyllaceae, Typhaceae and Haloragaceae showed relatively strong abilities to absorb these metals. The ability of a particular plant species to absorb a given metal was strongly correlated with its ability to absorb the other metals. However, the absorption abilities varied with the plant organ, with the following trend: roots > stems > leaves. The pH of the water and the life habits of aquatic plants (submerged and emerged) also affect the plant’s ability to absorb elements. Acidic water aids the uptake of heavy metals by plants. The correlation observed between element concentrations in plants with different aquatic life habits suggested that the enrichment mechanism is related to the surface area of the plant exposed to water. We argue that this meta-analysis would aid the selection of aquatic plants suitable for heavy-metal absorption from polluted waters. PMID:26703632

  15. The evaluation of heavy metal content in water and sediments of small reservoirs in light of various environmental quality regulations.

    PubMed

    Michalec, Bogusław K; Lenart-Boroń, Anna M; Cupak, Agnieszka K; Wałęga, Andrzej S

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the heavy metal concentrations assessed both in bottom sediments and water flowing into two small reservoirs at Krempna and Zesławice, southern Poland. The experiments were carried out in spring, summer, autumn and winter 2010-2011. The resulting concentrations of lead, cadmium, nickel, chromium and copper were compared with the Environmental Quality Standards, guidelines of the Regulation of the Minister of Environmental Protection, regulations of the Polish Geological Institute and State Institute of Environment Protection, Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation, and with the regulations adopted in Germany, Denmark, the United States and Canada. Regarding the total heavy metal concentrations, water flowing into the examined reservoirs was not polluted. The highest concentrations of heavy metals were found in water flowing into the reservoirs in spring and summer. The heavy metal concentrations in sediments of the reservoirs at Krempna and Zesławice were much higher than the concentrations of the elements discussed present in waters flowing into these reservoirs. PMID:24679090

  16. An Experimental Investigation of the Process of Isotope Exchange that Takes Place when Heavy Water Is Exposed to the Atmosphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeney, F. A.; O'Leary, J. P.

    2009-01-01

    We have used the recently developed method for rapid measurement of maximum density temperature to determine the rate at which hydrogen and deuterium isotope exchange takes place when a sample of heavy water is exposed to the atmosphere. We also provide a simple explanation for the observed linear rate of transition. (Contains 2 figures.)

  17. Flawed Nuclear Physics and Atomic Intelligence in the Campaign to deny Norwegian Heavy Water to Germany, 1942-1944

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Børresen, Hans Christofer

    2012-12-01

    The military campaign to deny Norwegian heavy water to Germany in World War II did not diminish as the threat posed by heavy water in German hands dwindled, mainly because of excessive security among the Allies. Signs that Albert Speer (1905-1981) had decided in 1942 to stop the German atomic-bomb project were kept secret and ignored. Prominent Allied advisers like Leif Tronstad (1903-1945) and even Niels Bohr (1885-1962) were not told about the plutonium path to a German atomic bomb. Physicists did not brief advisers, decision makers, and Allied officers on how many years Werner Heisenberg (1901-1976) would need to accumulate enough heavy water (deuterium oxide, D2O) for an Uranmachine and then to extract and process plutonium for an atomic bomb. Had the flow of information been better, the military raids on the Norwegian heavy-water plant at Vemork could have been timed better, and the more costly of them could have been averted altogether.

  18. Heavy metal concentrations in marine green, brown, and red seaweeds from coastal waters of Yemen, the Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shwafi, Nabil A.; Rushdi, Ahmed I.

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the concentration levels of heavy metals in different species of the main three marine algal divisions from the Gulf of Aden coastal waters, Yemen. The divisions included Chlorophyta—green plants ( Halimeda tuna, Rhizoclonium kochiamum, Caldophora koiei, Enteromorpha compressa, and Caulerpa racemosa species), Phaeophyta—brown seaweeds ( Padina boryana, Turbinaria elatensis, Sargassum binderi, Cystoseira myrica, and Sargassum boveanum species), and Rhodophyta—red seaweeds ( Hypnea cornuta, Champia parvula, Galaxaura marginate, Laurencia paniculata, Gracilaria foliifere, and species). The heavy metals, which included cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), Iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), and vanadium (V) were measured by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAs). The concentrations of heavy metals in all algal species are in the order of Fe >> Cu > Mn > Cr > Zn > Ni > Pb > Cd > V > Co. The results also showed that the uptake of heavy metals by different marine algal divisions was in the order of Chlorophyta > Phaeophyta > Rhodophyta. These heavy metals were several order of magnitude higher than the concentrations of the same metals in seawater. This indicates that marine alga progressively uptake heavy metals from seawater.

  19. Water retention and runoff retardation in a drained wetland after heavy rainfall events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Ottfried; Fahle, Marcus; Steidl, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    Wetlands are often described as a sponge; they are believed to buffer surplus water coming from precipitation or inflow from the catchment and to emit it slowly to the downstream part of the river basin. However, in Middle or Western Europe anthropogenically influenced wetlands outnumber natural ones. In the last 200 years many wetlands have been drained to use the land for agriculture or forestry. Their water balance is nowadays regulated by water management systems consisting of ditches, weirs and sometimes pumping stations. Still, typical wetland characteristics are maintained: Groundwater levels only a few decimeters below the land surface, small surface slopes, high evapotranspiration, the domination of peat soils and extensive grasslands as the prevailing form of land use. Two main issues arise and are discussed in different contexts: (i) the extent to which the behavior of anthropogenically influenced wetlands differs from that of natural wetlands and (ii) their buffering capacities. The objective of our study was to investigate how a drained, agricultural wetland reacted to heavy rainfall events and to determine the influencing factors. In total 29 rainfall events with amounts greater than 10 mm were selected in the period between April 2010 and October 2012. The reactions of groundwater and ditch water levels were analysed, as well as the water balance of the rainfall events. The latter was determined using a weighable groundwater lysimeter installed in the Spreewald wetland in northeast Germany, whose groundwater level was adjusted to the surrounding grassland site. Our measurements showed that on average 70% of the rainfall was stored in the wetland, while only 10% was discharged. In dry periods, when sub-irrigation was present at the beginning of the rainfall event, more water was stored (83%) than in wet periods (51%) while the share of runoff was nearly halved. Evapotranspiration played an important role during the runoff process. The wetland had a

  20. Spatio-temporal impacts of dairy lagoon water reuse on soil: heavy metals and salinity.

    PubMed

    Corwin, Dennis L; Ahmad, Hamaad Raza

    2015-10-01

    Diminishing freshwater resources have brought attention to the reuse of degraded water as a water resource rather than a disposal problem. The spatial impact and sustainability of dairy lagoon water reuse from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) has not been evaluated at field scale. The objective of this study is to monitor the impact of dairy lagoon water blended with recycled water on a 32 ha field near San Jacinto, CA from 2007 to 2011. Spatial monitoring was based on soil samples collected at locations identified from apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa) directed sampling. Soil samples were taken at depth increments of 0-0.15, 0.15-0.3, 0.3-0.6, 0.6-0.9, 0.9-1.2, 1.2-1.5, and 1.5-1.8 m at 28 sample sites on 7-11 May 2007 and again on 31 May - 2 June 2011 after 4 years of irrigation with the blended waters. Chemical analyses included salinity (electrical conductivity of the saturation extract, ECe), pHe (pH of the saturation extract), SAR (sodium adsorption ratio), trace elements (As, B, Mo, Se), and heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Mn, Ni, Zn). Results indicate a decrease in mean values of pHe at all depth increments; a decrease in ECe and SAR above a depth of 0.15 m, but an increase below 0.15 m; a decrease in all trace elements except B, which increased throughout the 1.8 m profile; and the accumulation of Cd, Mn, and Ni at all depth increments, while Cu was readily leached from the 1.8 m profile. Zinc showed little change. The results focused concern on the potential long-term agronomic effect of salinity, SAR, and B, and the long-term environmental threat of salinity and Cu to detrimentally impact groundwater. The accumulation of Cd, Mn, and Ni in the soil profile raised concern since it provided a potential future source of metals for leaching. The long-term sustainability of dairy lagoon water reuse hinges on regular monitoring to provide spatial feedback for site-specific management. PMID:26294000

  1. Further evaluations of the toxicity of irradiated advanced heavy water reactor fuels.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Geoffrey W R; Priest, Nicholas D

    2014-11-01

    The neutron economy and online refueling capability of heavy water moderated reactors enable them to use many different fuel types, such as low enriched uranium, plutonium mixed with uranium, or plutonium and/or U mixed with thorium, in addition to their traditional natural uranium fuel. However, the toxicity and radiological protection methods for fuels other than natural uranium are not well established. A previous paper by the current authors compared the composition and toxicity of irradiated natural uranium to that of three potential advanced heavy water fuels not containing plutonium, and this work uses the same method to compare irradiated natural uranium to three other fuels that do contain plutonium in their initial composition. All three of the new fuels are assumed to incorporate plutonium isotopes characteristic of those that would be recovered from light water reactor fuel via reprocessing. The first fuel investigated is a homogeneous thorium-plutonium fuel designed for a once-through fuel cycle without reprocessing. The second fuel is a heterogeneous thorium-plutonium-U bundle, with graded enrichments of U in different parts of a single fuel assembly. This fuel is assumed to be part of a recycling scenario in which U from previously irradiated fuel is recovered. The third fuel is one in which plutonium and Am are mixed with natural uranium. Each of these fuels, because of the presence of plutonium in the initial composition, is determined to be considerably more radiotoxic than is standard natural uranium. Canadian nuclear safety regulations require that techniques be available for the measurement of 1 mSv of committed effective dose after exposure to irradiated fuel. For natural uranium fuel, the isotope Pu is a significant contributor to the committed effective dose after exposure, and thermal ionization mass spectrometry is sensitive enough that the amount of Pu excreted in urine is sufficient to estimate internal doses, from all isotopes, as low

  2. Preliminary assessment of heavy metal contamination in surface water and sediments from Honghu Lake, East Central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ying; Qi, Shihua; Wu, Chenxi; Ke, Yanping; Chen, Jing; Chen, Wei; Gong, Xiangyi

    2012-03-01

    Heavy metal concentrations in surface water and sediments collected from Honghu Lake in Hubei Province, China were analyzed, and ecological risks were evaluated according to the sediment quality guidelines. The results showed that the average concentrations of heavy metals in surface water were ranked as: As>Zn> Cu>Cr>Pb>Ni>Cd>Hg. In comparison with results reported in other rivers and the background values, The Honghu Lake was polluted by As, Cr, Pb, Cu and Ni. Most of metals might be mainly from fertilizers, industrial effluent and domestic wastewater around the lake. Heavy metals concentrations were relatively higher in the inlet area than in other areas. Negative correlations were observed between most heavy metals and pH, while a significant positive correlation was present between Zn, Cd and Pb. In the sediment core, Cu, Zn, Cr and Ni showed a decreasing trend while Cd present an increasing trend. The decrease of As, Cu, Zn, Cr and Ni in the 1990s might due to the flood event in 1998. The analysis of ecological risk assessment based on sediment quality guidelines suggested that heavy metals in most sediments from the Honghu Lake had moderate toxicity, with Cr being the highest priority pollutant.

  3. Health risk assessment of heavy metals in the water environment of Zhalong Wetland, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nannan; Zang, Shuying; Sun, Qingzhan

    2014-05-01

    Concentrations of the Cu, Cd, Cr, As, Zn and Ni in water samples from 272 sampling stations in the water environment of Zhalong Wetland, China were studied. Health risk assessment associated with six heavy metals and metalloid was conducted using health risk assessment model from United States Environmental Protection Agency. It can be concluded that the mean concentrations of Cu, Ni, Zn, As, Cd and Cu were 0.19, 0.45, 0.52, 4.9, 0.12 and 0.24 μg L(-1), respectively. The carcinogenic risk of Cr, As and Cd in the discharged area, experimental area, buffer area and core area were lower than the maximum allowance risk level recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 5.0 × 10(-5) a(-1)). The non-carcinogenic risks (Cu, Zn, Ni) was also lower than the maximum allowance levels recommended by ICRP. Though it was lower than the level, it was very approaching to maximum acceptable risk level, need to draw attention to the relevant departments. PMID:24414855

  4. Heavy metal contamination in water, soil, and vegetables of the industrial areas in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Jasim Uddin; Goni, Md Abdul

    2010-07-01

    Concentrations of Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr, Cd, Fe, and Ni have been estimated in soils and vegetables grown in and around an industrial area of Bangladesh. The order of metal contents was found to be Fe > Cu > Zn > Cr > Pb > Ni > Cd in contaminated irrigation water, and a similar pattern Fe > Zn > Ni > Cr > Pb > Cu > Cd was also observed in arable soils. Metal levels observed in different sources were compared with WHO, SEPA, and established permissible levels reported by different authors. Mean concentration of Cu, Fe, and Cd in irrigation water and Cd content in soil were much above the recommended level. Accumulation of the heavy metals in vegetables studied was lower than the recommended maximum tolerable levels proposed by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (1999), with the exception of Cd which exhibited elevated content. Uptake and translocation pattern of metal from soil to edible parts of vegetables were quite distinguished for almost all the elements examined. PMID:19521788

  5. The Use of Water Vapor for Detecting Environments that Lead to Convectively Produced Heavy Precipitation and Flash Floods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scofield, Rod; Vicente, Gilberto; Hodges, Mike

    2000-01-01

    This Tech Report summarizes years of study and experiences on using GOES Water vapor (6.7 micron and precipitable water) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/1) from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) derived Precipitable Water (PNAI) for detecting environments favorable for convectively produced flash floods. An emphasis is on the moisture. upper air flow, and equivalent potential temperature (Theta(sub e)) patterns that lead to devastating flood events. The 15 minute 6.7 micron water vapor imagery is essential for tracking middle to upper tropospheric disturbances that produce upward vertical motion and initiate flash flood producing systems. Water vapor imagery at 6.7 micron is also used to detect surges of upper level moisture (called tropical water vapor plumes) that have been associated with extremely heavy rainfall. Since the water vapor readily depicts lifting mechanisms and upper level moisture, water vapor imagery is often an excellent source of data for recognizing patterns of heavy precipitation and flash floods. In order to analyze the depth of the moisture, the PW aspects of the troposphere must be measured. The collocation (or nearby location) of high values ofP\\V and instability are antecedent conditions prior to the flash flood or heavy rainfall events. Knowledge of PW magnitudes have been used as thresholds for impending flash flood events, PW trends are essential in flash flood prediction. Conceptual models and water vapor products are used to study some of the characteristics of convective systems that occurred over the United States of America (USA) during the summer of 1997 and the 1997-1998 El Nino. P\\V plumes were associated with most of the \\vest coast heavy precipitation events examined during the winter season of 1997 - 1998, In another study, conducted during the summer season of 1997. results showed that the collocation of water vapor (6.7 micron) and P\\N' plumes possessed higher correlations with predicted

  6. Simultaneous removal of oil and grease, and heavy metals from artificial bilge water using electro-coagulation/flotation.

    PubMed

    Rincón, Guillermo J; La Motta, Enrique J

    2014-11-01

    US and international regulations pertaining to the control of bilge water discharges from ships have concentrated their attention to the levels of oil and grease rather than to the heavy metal concentrations. The consensus is that any discharge of bilge water (and oily water emulsion within 12 nautical miles from the nearest land cannot exceed 15 parts per million (ppm). Since there is no specific regulation for metal pollutants under the bilge water section, reference standards regulating heavy metal concentrations are taken from the ambient water quality criteria to protect aquatic life. The research herein presented discusses electro-coagulation (EC) as a method to treat bilge water, with a focus on oily emulsions and heavy metals (copper, nickel and zinc) removal efficiency. Experiments were run using a continuous flow reactor, manufactured by Ecolotron, Inc., and a synthetic emulsion as artificial bilge water. The synthetic emulsion contained 5000 mg/L of oil and grease, 5 mg/L of copper, 1.5 mg/L of nickel, and 2.5 mg/l of zinc. The experimental results demonstrate that EC is very efficient in removing oil and grease. For oil and grease removal, the best treatment and cost efficiency was obtained when using a combination of carbon steel and aluminum electrodes, at a detention time less than one minute, a flow rate of 1 L/min and 0.6 A/cm(2) of current density. The final effluent oil and grease concentration, before filtration, was always less than 10 mg/L. For heavy metal removal, the combination of aluminum and carbon steel electrodes, flow rate of 1 L/min, effluent recycling, and 7.5 amps produced 99% zinc removal efficiency. Copper and nickel are harder to remove, and a removal efficiency of 70% was achieved. PMID:24908614

  7. Residual radioactivity guidelines for the heavy water components test reactor at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, M.B. Smith, R.; McNeil, J.

    1997-04-01

    Guidelines were developed for acceptable levels of residual radioactivity in the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility at the conclusion of its decommissioning. Using source terms developed from data generated in a detailed characterization study, the RESRAD and RASRAD-BUILD computer codes were used to calculate derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs) for the radionuclides that will remain in the facility. The calculated DCGLs, when compared to existing concentrations of radionuclides measured during a 1996 characterization program, indicate that no decontamination of concrete surfaces will be necessary. Also, based on the results of the calculations, activated concrete in the reactor biological shield does not have to be removed, and imbedded radioactive piping in the facility can remain in place. Viewed in another way, the results of the calculations showed that the present inventory of residual radioactivity in the facility (not including that associated with the reactor vessel and steam generators) would produce less than one millirem per year above background to a hypothetical individual on the property. The residual radioactivity is estimated to be approximately 0.04 percent of the total inventory in the facility as of March, 1997. According to the results, the only radionuclides that would produce greater than 0.0.1-millirem per year are Am-241 (0.013 mrem/yr at 300 years), C-14 (0.022 mrem/yr at 1000 years) and U-238 (0.034 mrem/yr at 6000 years). Human exposure would occur only through the groundwater pathways, that is, from water drawn from, a well on the property. The maximum exposure would be approximately one percent of the 4 millirem per year ground water exposure limit established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 11 refs., 13 figs., 15 tabs.

  8. Heavy ion irradiation of crystalline water ice. Cosmic ray amorphisation cross-section and sputtering yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartois, E.; Augé, B.; Boduch, P.; Brunetto, R.; Chabot, M.; Domaracka, A.; Ding, J. J.; Kamalou, O.; Lv, X. Y.; Rothard, H.; da Silveira, E. F.; Thomas, J. C.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Under cosmic irradiation, the interstellar water ice mantles evolve towards a compact amorphous state. Crystalline ice amorphisation was previously monitored mainly in the keV to hundreds of keV ion energies. Aims: We experimentally investigate heavy ion irradiation amorphisation of crystalline ice, at high energies closer to true cosmic rays, and explore the water-ice sputtering yield. Methods: We irradiated thin crystalline ice films with MeV to GeV swift ion beams, produced at the GANIL accelerator. The ice infrared spectral evolution as a function of fluence is monitored with in-situ infrared spectroscopy (induced amorphisation of the initial crystalline state into a compact amorphous phase). Results: The crystalline ice amorphisation cross-section is measured in the high electronic stopping-power range for different temperatures. At large fluence, the ice sputtering is measured on the infrared spectra, and the fitted sputtering-yield dependence, combined with previous measurements, is quadratic over three decades of electronic stopping power. Conclusions: The final state of cosmic ray irradiation for porous amorphous and crystalline ice, as monitored by infrared spectroscopy, is the same, but with a large difference in cross-section, hence in time scale in an astrophysical context. The cosmic ray water-ice sputtering rates compete with the UV photodesorption yields reported in the literature. The prevalence of direct cosmic ray sputtering over cosmic-ray induced photons photodesorption may be particularly true for ices strongly bonded to the ice mantles surfaces, such as hydrogen-bonded ice structures or more generally the so-called polar ices. Experiments performed at the Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL) Caen, France. Part of this work has been financed by the French INSU-CNRS programme "Physique et Chimie du Milieu Interstellaire" (PCMI) and the ANR IGLIAS.

  9. Heavy metal concentrations in water, suspended matter, and sediment from Gökova Bay, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Balkis, Nuray; Aksu, Abdullah; Okuş, Erdoğan; Apak, Reşat

    2010-08-01

    The contents of heavy metals (Fe, Mn, Pb, Cu, Cd, and Hg) dissolved in water and suspended solids of Gökova Bay--partly and fully sampled in 2005 and 2006, respectively--are quite higher than the average values encountered in uncontaminated sea water. The high concentrations are associated with terrestrial inputs from the mining zones and anthropogenic (domestic+industrial) sources. Moreover, the distribution of Fe and Cu is affected by primary production because these elements function as nutrients in biological activities. The Cr, Ni, and Fe concentrations of surface sediments are above the shale average. The Cr and Ni contents of surface sediments representative of river mouths strongly correlate with total phosphorus contents. In a sulfide-poor environment, Pb and Cu were concentrated at a higher ratio in surface sediments than Cd, probably due to higher stabilities of their surface complexes with amorphous iron oxides and clay minerals existing as major components in the sediments. The exceptional enrichment of Zn may be attributed to double oxide formation with amorphous iron oxides in sediments. The high metal values are most probably caused by terrestrial inputs from anthropogenic sources and the mining zones at the southeast part of the bay. The Al, Mn, Pb, Cu, Zn, and Hg contents are below the shale average. The low values have possibly originated from the coarse-grained sandy sediments having a low affinity for metals. There are no distinct differences in the metal distributions in water and suspended matter between the years 2005 and 2006 in the bay, probably due to low sedimentation rates. PMID:19565345

  10. Minor actinide transmutation in thorium and uranium matrices in heavy water moderated reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatti, Zaki; Hyland, B.; Edwards, G.W.R.

    2013-07-01

    The irradiation of Th{sup 232} breeds fewer of the problematic minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) than the irradiation of U{sup 238}. This characteristic makes thorium an attractive potential matrix for the transmutation of these minor actinides, as these species can be transmuted without the creation of new actinides as is the case with a uranium fuel matrix. Minor actinides are the main contributors to long term decay heat and radiotoxicity of spent fuel, so reducing their concentration can greatly increase the capacity of a long term deep geological repository. Mixing minor actinides with thorium, three times more common in the Earth's crust than natural uranium, has the additional advantage of improving the sustainability of the fuel cycle. In this work, lattice cell calculations have been performed to determine the results of transmuting minor actinides from light water reactor spent fuel in a thorium matrix. 15-year-cooled group-extracted transuranic elements (Np, Pu, Am, Cm) from light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel were used as the fissile component in a thorium-based fuel in a heavy water moderated reactor (HWR). The minor actinide (MA) transmutation rates, spent fuel activity, decay heat and radiotoxicity, are compared with those obtained when the MA were mixed instead with natural uranium and taken to the same burnup. Each bundle contained a central pin containing a burnable neutron absorber whose initial concentration was adjusted to have the same reactivity response (in units of the delayed neutron fraction β) for coolant voiding as standard NU fuel. (authors)

  11. Health risk assessment of heavy metals and metalloid in drinking water from communities near gold mines in Tarkwa, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Bortey-Sam, Nesta; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Akoto, Osei; Baidoo, Elvis; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2015-07-01

    Concentrations of heavy metals and metalloid in borehole drinking water from 18 communities in Tarkwa, Ghana, were measured to assess the health risk associated with its consumption. Mean concentrations of heavy metals (μg/L) exceeded recommended values in some communities. If we take into consideration the additive effect of heavy metals and metalloid, then oral hazard index (HI) results raise concerns about the noncarcinogenic adverse health effects of drinking groundwater in Huniso. According to the US Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) guidelines, HI values indicating noncarcinogenic health risk for adults and children in Huniso were 0.781 (low risk) and 1.08 (medium risk), respectively. The cancer risk due to cadmium (Cd) exposure in adults and children in the sampled communities was very low. However, the average risk values of arsenic (As) for adults and children through drinking borehole water in the communities indicated medium cancer risk, but high cancer risk in some communities such as Samahu and Mile 7. Based on the USEPA assessment, the average cancer risk values of As for adults (3.65E-05) and children (5.08E-05) indicated three (adults) and five (children) cases of neoplasm in a hundred thousand inhabitants. The results of this study showed that residents in Tarkwa who use and drink water from boreholes could be at serious risk from exposure to these heavy metals and metalloid. PMID:26038318

  12. Heavy metal contents in the sediments of astatic ponds: Influence of geomorphology, hydroperiod, water chemistry and vegetation.

    PubMed

    Gołdyn, Bartłomiej; Chudzińska, Maria; Barałkiewicz, Danuta; Celewicz-Gołdyn, Sofia

    2015-08-01

    The contents of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) were analysed in the bottom sediments of 30 small, astatic ponds located in the agricultural landscape of Western Poland. The samples were collected from 118 stations located in patches of four vegetation types. Relationships between the contents of particular elements and four groups of factors (geomorphology, hydroperiod, water quality and vegetation) were tested using Redundancy Analysis (RDA). The most important factors influencing the heavy metal contents were the maximum depth and area of the pond, its hydroperiod, water pH and conductivity values. In general, low quantities of heavy metals were recorded in the sediments of kettle-like ponds (small but located in deep depressions) and high in water bodies of the shore-bursting type (large but shallow). Moreover, quantities of particular elements were influenced by the structure of the vegetation covering the pond. Based on the results, we show which types of astatic ponds are most exposed to contamination and suggest some conservation practices that may reduce the influx of heavy metals. PMID:25919341

  13. Water mutagenic potential assessment on a semiarid aquatic ecosystem under influence of heavy metals and natural radioactivity using micronuclei test.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Luiz Cláudio Cardozo; Navoni, Julio Alejandro; de Morais Ferreira, Douglisnilson; Batistuzzo de Medeiros, Silvia; Ferreira da Costa, Thomas; Petta, Reinaldo Antônio; Souza do Amaral, Viviane

    2016-04-01

    The contamination of water bodies by heavy metals and ionizing radiation is a critical environmental issue, which can affect water quality and, thus, human health. This study aimed to evaluate the water quality of the Boqueirão de Parelhas Dam in the Brazilian semiarid region. A 1-year study (2013-2014) was performed through the assessment of physicochemical parameters, heavy metal content, and radioactivity along with the mutagenicity potential of water using micronuclei test in Orechromis niloticus (in vivo) and the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay in human lymphocytes (in vitro). A deterioration of water organoleptics characteristics by the presence of high levels of sulfate and total solids was observed. High concentrations of aluminum, nickel, silver, and lead along with the alpha particle content were higher than the limits suggested by the World Health Organization and Brazilian legislation for drinking water. An increase in the frequency of micronuclei and nuclear abnormalities was observed in both experimental models. The results obtained confirmed the mutagenic potential present in water samples. This study highlights that geogenic agents affect water quality becoming a human health concern to be taken into account due to the relevance that this water reservoir has in the region. PMID:26732704

  14. Effect of long-term application of treated sewage water on heavy metal accumulation in vegetables grown in northern India.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amlan Kr; Bhatt, M A; Agrawal, H P

    2012-01-01

    Use of industrial and wastewater for irrigation is on the rise in India and other developing countries because of scarcity of good-quality irrigation water. Wastewaters contain plant nutrients that favour crop growth but leave a burden of heavy metals which can enter the food chain and is a cause of great concern. The present study was undertaken on the long-term impact of irrigation with treated sewage water for growing vegetables and the potential health risk associated with consumption of such vegetable. Treated sewage water (TSW), groundwater (GW), soil and plant samples were collected from peri urban vegetable growing areas of Northern India (Varanasi) and analysed to assess the long-term effect of irrigation with TSW on Cd, Cr, Ni and Pb build-up in soils and its subsequent transfer into commonly grown vegetable crops. Results indicate that TSW was richer in essential plant nutrients but contained Cd, Cr and Ni in amounts well above the permissible limits for its use as irrigation water. Long-term application of TSW resulted in significant build-up of total and DTPA extractable Cd, Cr, Ni and Pb over GW irrigated sites. TSW also resulted in slight lowering in pH, increase in organic carbon (1.6 g kg(-1)) and cation exchange capacity (5.2 cmol kg(-1)). The tissue metal concentration and relative efficiency of transfer of heavy metals from soil to plant (transfer factor) for various groups of vegetables were worked out. Radish, turnip and spinach were grouped as hyper accumulator of heavy metals whereas brinjal and cauliflower accumulated less heavy metals. Health risk assessment by consumption of vegetables grown with TSW indicated that all the vegetables were safe for human consumption. However, significant accumulation of these heavy metals in soil and plant needs to be monitored. PMID:21494830

  15. Spatial and seasonal characteristics of dissolved heavy metals in the east and west Guangdong coastal waters, South China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Shi, Zhen; Zhang, JingPing; Jiang, Zhijian; Wang, Fei; Huang, Xiaoping

    2015-06-15

    Heavy metal concentrations and physicochemical parameters in seawater were measured in Guangdong coastal waters, South China. Results showed that the concentrations and distribution of heavy metals varied spatially and seasonally. Generally, heavy metal concentrations in the east regions were higher than in the west. Concentrations of Pb, Zn, Cd and Cr in wet seasons were generally higher than in dry seasons owing to the seasonal differences of the river discharge, rainfall and seawater intrusion. Principal component (PC) analysis showed that PC1, PC2 and PC3 in the east were correlated to Pb+Cr+Zn+Cd, As+Cd and Cu, respectively, and they were correlated to Pb+Cr, Zn+Cu+Cd and As+Cu, respectively, in the west. That was maybe due to the differences of local heavy metal sources. The anthropogenic activities contributed more to the main sources of heavy metals, and contamination factors indicated that Zn and Pb pollution was serious in study area. PMID:25840866

  16. Small angle neutron scattering study of the gemini nonionic surfactant in heavy water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajewska, A.

    2012-03-01

    The nonionic gemini surfactant α α'-[2,4,7,9-tetramethyl-5-decyne-4,7diyl]bis[ω hydroxyl-polyoxyethylene] (S-10) was investigated in heavy water solutions only for concentrations: 2.3%, 2.5%,3%, 3.4%, 4% and 5% at temperature 25°C with small angle neutron scattering (SANS) method. All of surfactants solutions were prepared using D2O (99.9% deuterated, Prikladnaia Chimia, St. Petersburg, Russia) as a solvent. The nonionic gemini surfactant S-10 was obtained from Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., and used without further purification. All SANS measurements were performed on V-4 SANS spectrometer at BENSC, Berlin (Germany). Neutrons were used in wavelength range of 0.02 - 4 nm-1. For the measurements quartz cells of were used during experiment. Up to 14 such cells were placed in a holder. Results from experiment was calculated and evaluated with PCG 2.0 program from Graz University (Austria). In the investigated solutions two axis ellipsoidal micelles was observed.

  17. Impact of ultrasonic time on hot water elution of severely biodegraded heavy oil from weathered soils.

    PubMed

    Ji, Guodong; Sui, Xin

    2010-07-15

    An ultrasound-enhanced elution system employing water at a temperature of 70 degrees C was used to remedy weathered soils contaminated with severely biodegraded heavy oil (SBHO). The effect of varying the ultrasonic irradiation time from 0 to 1800 s on the elution of SBHO and three characteristic biomarkers (C(26-34) 17alpha 25-norhopanes, C(26-28) TAS, and C(27-29) MTAS) was analyzed using GC/MS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Elution of the three biomarkers was closely related to the carbon number of the marker. C(26-34) 17alpha 25-norhopanes and C(26-28) TAS species with higher carbon numbers and C(27-29) MTAS species with lower carbon numbers were more readily eluted using sonication times of 1080-1800 s, while smaller TAS homologs were more readily eluted after sonication times of 0-360 s. SEM images of samples treated for longer periods revealed larger "bare patches" on the soil surface. The results of XRD and energy spectroscopy experiments indicated that ultrasound irradiation for 1080 s negatively affected the deposition of CaCO(3), but overall improved the mineral and chemical compositions of treated soils and removal of SBHO. PMID:20347521

  18. Trace incorporation of heavy water reveals slow and heterogeneous pathogen growth rates in cystic fibrosis sputum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, Sebastian H.; Sessions, Alex L.; Cowley, Elise S.; Reyes, Carmen; Van Sambeek, Lindsey; Hu, Yang; Orphan, Victoria J.; Kato, Roberta; Newman, Dianne K.

    2016-01-01

    Effective treatment for chronic infections is undermined by a significant gap in understanding of the physiological state of pathogens at the site of infection. Chronic pulmonary infections are responsible for the morbidity and mortality of millions of immunocompromised individuals worldwide, yet drugs that are successful in laboratory culture are far less effective against pathogen populations persisting in vivo. Laboratory models, upon which preclinical development of new drugs is based, can only replicate host conditions when we understand the metabolic state of the pathogens and the degree of heterogeneity within the population. In this study, we measured the anabolic activity of the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus directly in the sputum of pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), by combining the high sensitivity of isotope ratio mass spectrometry with a heavy water labeling approach to capture the full range of in situ growth rates. Our results reveal S. aureus generation times with a median of 2.1 d, with extensive growth rate heterogeneity at the single-cell level. These growth rates are far below the detection limit of previous estimates of CF pathogen growth rates, and the rates are slowest in acutely sick patients undergoing pulmonary exacerbations; nevertheless, they are accessible to experimental replication within laboratory models. Treatment regimens that include specific antibiotics (vancomycin, piperacillin/tazobactam, tobramycin) further appear to correlate with slow growth of S. aureus on average, but follow-up longitudinal studies must be performed to determine whether this effect holds for individual patients.

  19. Application of lactic acid bacteria in removing heavy metals and aflatoxin B1 from contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Elsanhoty, Rafaat M; Al-Turki, I A; Ramadan, Mohamed Fawzy

    2016-01-01

    In this study selected lactic acid bacteria (LAB, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus plantrium and Streptococcus thermophiles) and probiotic bacteria (Bifidobacterium angulatum) were tested for their ability in removing heavy metals (HM) including cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and arsenic (As) as well as aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) from contaminated water. The biosorption parameters (pH, bacterial concentration, contact time and temperature) of removal using individual as well as mixed LAB and probiotic bacteria were studied. Removal of HM and AFB1 depended on the strain, wherein the process was strongly pH-dependent with high removal ability at a pH close to neutral. The increase in bacterial concentration enhanced the removal of Cd, Pb and As. Also, increasing of contact time and temperature increased the ability of LAB to remove HM. The effect of contact time on Cd removal was slightly different when freshly cultured cells were used. The removal of Cd, Pb and As decreased with the increase in the initial metal concentration. The most effective HM removers were Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium angulatum. The system was found to be adequate for concentrations of HM under investigation. At the end of the operation, the concentration of HM reached the level allowed by the World Health Organization regulations. PMID:27508367

  20. Inhalation radiotoxicity of irradiated thorium as a heavy water reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, G.W.R.; Priest, N.D.; Richardson, R.B.

    2013-07-01

    The online refueling capability of Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs), and their good neutron economy, allows a relatively high amount of neutron absorption in breeding materials to occur during normal fuel irradiation. This characteristic makes HWRs uniquely suited to the extraction of energy from thorium. In Canada, the toxicity and radiological protection methods dealing with personnel exposure to natural uranium (NU) spent fuel (SF) are well-established, but the corresponding methods for irradiated thorium fuel are not well known. This study uses software to compare the activity and toxicity of irradiated thorium fuel ('thorium SF') against those of NU. Thorium elements, contained in the inner eight elements of a heterogeneous high-burnup bundle having LEU (Low-enriched uranium) in the outer 35 elements, achieve a similar burnup to NU SF during its residence in a reactor, and the radiotoxicity due to fission products was found to be similar. However, due to the creation of such inhalation hazards as U-232 and Th-228, the radiotoxicity of thorium SF was almost double that of NU SF after sufficient time has passed for the decay of shorter-lived fission products. Current radio-protection methods for NU SF exposure are likely inadequate to estimate the internal dose to personnel to thorium SF, and an analysis of thorium in fecal samples is recommended to assess the internal dose from exposure to this fuel. (authors)

  1. Low-cost adsorbents for heavy metals uptake from contaminated water: a review.

    PubMed

    Babel, Sandhya; Kurniawan, Tonni Agustiono

    2003-02-28

    In this article, the technical feasibility of various low-cost adsorbents for heavy metal removal from contaminated water has been reviewed. Instead of using commercial activated carbon, researchers have worked on inexpensive materials, such as chitosan, zeolites, and other adsorbents, which have high adsorption capacity and are locally available. The results of their removal performance are compared to that of activated carbon and are presented in this study. It is evident from our literature survey of about 100 papers that low-cost adsorbents have demonstrated outstanding removal capabilities for certain metal ions as compared to activated carbon. Adsorbents that stand out for high adsorption capacities are chitosan (815, 273, 250 mg/g of Hg(2+), Cr(6+), and Cd(2+), respectively), zeolites (175 and 137 mg/g of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+), respectively), waste slurry (1030, 560, 540 mg/g of Pb(2+), Hg(2+), and Cr(6+), respectively), and lignin (1865 mg/g of Pb(2+)). These adsorbents are suitable for inorganic effluent treatment containing the metal ions mentioned previously. It is important to note that the adsorption capacities of the adsorbents presented in this paper vary, depending on the characteristics of the individual adsorbent, the extent of chemical modifications, and the concentration of adsorbate. PMID:12573840

  2. A new landfill liner to reduce ground-water contamination from heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, T.D.; Vesilind, P.A.

    1998-11-01

    A series of permeameters (columns) was used to evaluate the effects of the percolation of water and 1,000 {micro}g/mL of zinc chloride solution through a mixture of montmorillonite clay, sand, and lime. The column test results show that the addition of lime changes the chemical and physical properties of the clay. The hydraulic conductivities for the mixture of clay with different percentages of lime at first increases with increasing lime and then decreases with increasing lime. The breakthrough curves indicate that the Zn(II) capture is increased and Zn(II) breakthrough is delayed with increasing lime addition. Lime also enhances the clay/lime mixture`s ability to resist puncture by sharp objects. Based on the effects of lime on Zn(II) captured by the clay, an explanation for the interacting effects of lime and Zn(II) capture on changing hydraulic conductivity is suggested. The results of this research demonstrate the potential of using lime-treated clay liners for landfills. Such liners would have lower hydraulic conductivity, better resistance to puncture, and enhanced ability to capture heavy metals.

  3. Developing an Accelerator Driven System (ADS) based on electron accelerators and heavy water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feizi, H.; Ranjbar, A. H.

    2016-02-01

    An ADS based on electron accelerators has been developed specifically for energy generation and medical applications. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed using FLUKA code to design a hybrid electron target and the core components. The composition, geometry of conversion targets and the coolant system have been optimized for electron beam energies of 20 to 100 MeV . Furthermore, the photon and photoneutron energy spectra, distribution and energy deposition for various incoming electron beam powers have been studied. Light-heavy water of various mixtures have been used as heat removal for the targets, as γ-n converters and as neutron moderators. We have shown that an electron LINAC, as a neutron production driver for ADSs, is capable of producing a neutron output of > 3.5 × 1014 (n/s/mA). Accordingly, the feasibility of an electron-based ADS employing the designed features is promising for energy generation and high intense neutron production which have various applications such as medical therapies.

  4. Fracture analysis of axially cracked pressure tube of pressurized heavy water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, S.; Bhasin, V.; Mahajan, S.C.

    1997-04-01

    Three Dimensional (313) finite element elastic plastic fracture analysis was done for through wall axially cracked thin pressure tubes of 220 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor. The analysis was done for Zr-2 and Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes operating at 300{degrees}C and subjected to 9.5 Mpa internal pressure. Critical crack length was determined based on tearing instability concept. The analysis included the effect of crack face pressure due to the leaking fluid from tube. This effect was found to be significant for pressure tubes. The available formulae for calculating J (for axially cracked tubes) do not take into account the effect of crack face pressure. 3D finite element analysis also gives insight into variation of J across the thickness of pressure tube. It was observed that J is highest at the mid-surface of tube. The results have been presented in the form of across the thickness average J value and a peak factor on J. Peak factor on J is ratio of J at mid surface to average J value. Crack opening area for different cracked lengths was calculated from finite element results. The fracture assessment of pressure tubes was also done using Central Electricity Generating Board R-6 method. Ductile tearing was considered.

  5. Trace incorporation of heavy water reveals slow and heterogeneous pathogen growth rates in cystic fibrosis sputum

    PubMed Central

    Kopf, Sebastian H.; Sessions, Alex L.; Cowley, Elise S.; Reyes, Carmen; Van Sambeek, Lindsey; Hu, Yang; Orphan, Victoria J.; Kato, Roberta; Newman, Dianne K.

    2016-01-01

    Effective treatment for chronic infections is undermined by a significant gap in understanding of the physiological state of pathogens at the site of infection. Chronic pulmonary infections are responsible for the morbidity and mortality of millions of immunocompromised individuals worldwide, yet drugs that are successful in laboratory culture are far less effective against pathogen populations persisting in vivo. Laboratory models, upon which preclinical development of new drugs is based, can only replicate host conditions when we understand the metabolic state of the pathogens and the degree of heterogeneity within the population. In this study, we measured the anabolic activity of the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus directly in the sputum of pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), by combining the high sensitivity of isotope ratio mass spectrometry with a heavy water labeling approach to capture the full range of in situ growth rates. Our results reveal S. aureus generation times with a median of 2.1 d, with extensive growth rate heterogeneity at the single-cell level. These growth rates are far below the detection limit of previous estimates of CF pathogen growth rates, and the rates are slowest in acutely sick patients undergoing pulmonary exacerbations; nevertheless, they are accessible to experimental replication within laboratory models. Treatment regimens that include specific antibiotics (vancomycin, piperacillin/tazobactam, tobramycin) further appear to correlate with slow growth of S. aureus on average, but follow-up longitudinal studies must be performed to determine whether this effect holds for individual patients. PMID:26715741

  6. [Transportation and risk assessment of heavy metal pollution in water-soil from the Riparian Zone of Daye Lake, China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-quan; Li, Xiu; Zhang, Quan-fa; Li, Qiong; Xiao, Wen-sheng; Wang, Yong-kui; Zhang, Jian-chun; Gai, Xi-guang

    2015-01-01

    Each 20 water samples and soil samples (0-10 cm, 10-20 cm) were collected from the riparian zone of Daye Lake in dry season during March 2013. Heavy metals (Cu, Ph, Cd, Zn) have been detected by flame atomic absorption spectrometric (FAAS). The results showed that the average concentrations of Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn in the water were 7.14, 25.94, 15.72 and 37.58 microg x L(-1), respectively. The concentration of Cu was higher than the five degree of the surface water environment quality standard. The average concentrations of Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn in soil(0-10 cm) were 108.38, 53.92, 3.55, 139.26 mg x kg(-1) in soil (10-20 cm) were 93.00, 51.72, 2.08, 171.00 mg x kg(-1), respectively. The Cd concentrations were higher than the three grade value of the national soil environment quality standard. The transportation of Pb from soil to water was relatively stable, and Zn was greatly influenced by soil property and the surrounding environment from soil to water. The transformation of heavy metal in west riparian zone was higher than that of east riparian zone. The potential environmental risk was relatively high. Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn were dominated by residue fraction of the modified BCR sequential extraction method. The overall migration order of heavy metal element was: Pb > Cu > Cd > Zn. There were stronger transformation and higher environmental pollution risk of Cu, Pb. The index of assessment and potential ecological risk coefficient indicated that heavy metal pollution in soil (0-10 cm) was higher than the soil (10-20 cm), Cd was particularly serious. PMID:25898664

  7. Comparative Assessment of Heavy Metals in Drinking Water Sources in Two Small-Scale Mining Communities in Northern Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Cobbina, Samuel J.; Duwiejuah, Abudu B.; Quansah, Reginald; Obiri, Samuel; Bakobie, Noel

    2015-01-01

    The study assessed levels of heavy metals in drinking water sources in two small-scale mining communities (Nangodi and Tinga) in northern Ghana. Seventy-two (72) water samples were collected from boreholes, hand dug wells, dug-out, and a stream in the two mining communities. The levels of mercury (Hg), arsenic (As), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), and cadmium (Cd) were determined using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). Mean levels (mg/l) of heavy metals in water samples from Nangodi and Tinga communities were 0.038 and 0.064 (Hg), 0.031 and 0.002 (As), 0.250 and 0.031 (Pb), 0.034 and 0.002 (Zn), and 0.534 and 0.023 (Cd), respectively, for each community. Generally, levels of Hg, As, Pb, Zn, and Cd in water from Nangodi exceeded the World Health Organisation (WHO) stipulated limits of 0.010 for Hg, As, and Pb, 3.0 for Zn and 0.003 for Cd for drinking water, and levels of Hg, Pb, and Cd recorded in Tinga, exceeded the stipulated WHO limits. Ingestion of water, containing elevated levels of Hg, As, and Cd by residents in these mining communities may pose significant health risks. Continuous monitoring of the quality of drinking water sources in these two communities is recommended. PMID:26343702

  8. Comparative Assessment of Heavy Metals in Drinking Water Sources in Two Small-Scale Mining Communities in Northern Ghana.

    PubMed

    Cobbina, Samuel J; Duwiejuah, Abudu B; Quansah, Reginald; Obiri, Samuel; Bakobie, Noel

    2015-09-01

    The study assessed levels of heavy metals in drinking water sources in two small-scale mining communities (Nangodi and Tinga) in northern Ghana. Seventy-two (72) water samples were collected from boreholes, hand dug wells, dug-out, and a stream in the two mining communities. The levels of mercury (Hg), arsenic (As), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), and cadmium (Cd) were determined using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). Mean levels (mg/l) of heavy metals in water samples from Nangodi and Tinga communities were 0.038 and 0.064 (Hg), 0.031 and 0.002 (As), 0.250 and 0.031 (Pb), 0.034 and 0.002 (Zn), and 0.534 and 0.023 (Cd), respectively, for each community. Generally, levels of Hg, As, Pb, Zn, and Cd in water from Nangodi exceeded the World Health Organisation (WHO) stipulated limits of 0.010 for Hg, As, and Pb, 3.0 for Zn and 0.003 for Cd for drinking water, and levels of Hg, Pb, and Cd recorded in Tinga, exceeded the stipulated WHO limits. Ingestion of water, containing elevated levels of Hg, As, and Cd by residents in these mining communities may pose significant health risks. Continuous monitoring of the quality of drinking water sources in these two communities is recommended. PMID:26343702

  9. Heavy metal pollution in farmland irrigated with river water near a steel plant - detection by magnetic and geochemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C. X.

    2012-04-01

    The presence of heavy metals in the environment has become an increasing problem during the last several decades. It is a key scientific issue to disclose the source, degree and extent of pollution in farmland near to heavy industries. In this study the efficiency of magnetic methods for such a purpose is tested at a Chinese city (Loudi, Hunan Province) with fast developing steel industry. Lianshui River flows through the city and passes a large steel plant at the entrance of the urban area. Previous results revealed higher heavy metal contents in the vicinity of the Fe-smelting plant and in the city region[1]. Nearby farmland usually is irrigated with water from this river. We collected vertical soil profiles to about 60 cm depth within farmland nearby Lianshui River with sampling sites distributed from the upstream (before entering the city) to the downstream region (after leaving the city area). These samples were comprehensively investigated by integrating both magnetic and chemical analyses. Heavy metals (Pb, Zn, Cd etc) pollution in farmland soils in the downstream region is clearly higher than in the upstream region. Magnetic susceptibility and SIRM is correlating with heavy metals contents. The SIRM background in the upstream section of unpolluted farmland soils and river sediments is low (< 7-10-3Am2kg-1), whereas the polluted soils at the surrounding of the steel plant reveal higher SIRM intensities (30 to 40-10-3Am2kg-1) within the topmost 20 cm. SIRM in river sediments also correlates with heavy metals contents; it is strongly enhanced (80 to 200-10-3Am2kg-1) at the same sites, from surface to 40 cm deep depth. Magnetic enhancement is found to be related to the presence of spherical magnetite particles with a diameter of 10~30 μm. These findings demonstrate that magnetic methods have a convenient practical application for detecting and mapping heavy metal pollution in farmland soils irrigated by river water from nearby industrial areas. Reference 1

  10. Change of water sources reduces health risks from heavy metals via ingestion of water, soil, and rice in a riverine area, South China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li'e; Mo, Zhaoyu; Qin, Jian; Li, Qin; Wei, Yanhong; Ma, Shuyan; Xiong, Yuxia; Liang, Guiqiang; Qing, Li; Chen, Zhiming; Yang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zou, Yunfeng

    2015-10-15

    This study evaluates the effect of water source change on heavy metal concentrations in water, paddy soil, and rice, as well as the health risks to residents of three riverine communities in South China. The results show that after substituting the sources of drinking water, heavy metal levels (except for Pb at Tangjun) in drinking water were below WHO guideline values and the potential risk from drinking water may be negligible. The As (46.2-66.8%), Pb (65.7-82.6%), Cd (50.8-55.0%), and Hg (28.3-32.6%) concentrations in paddy soils in Sanhe and Lasha significantly (p<0.05) decreased with a change of irrigation water sources compared to Tangjun, without change of irrigation water source. Similarly, the Cd (39.1-81.3%) and Hg (60.0-75.0%) concentrations in rice grown at Sanhe and Lasha significantly (p<0.05) decreased compared to those at Tangjun. Consequently, replacing irrigation water source significantly (p<0.05) reduced the hazard quotient (HQ) and cancer risk for the corresponding single metal via soil ingestion and rice consumption. Despite that total non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic risks at Sanhe and Lasha were significantly decreased, they still exceeded the maximum acceptable limits recommended by US EPA, indicating that residents of these two communities remain at high risks of both non-cancer and cancer effects. PMID:26026418

  11. [Correlation between multiple antibiotic resistance and heavy-metal tolerance among some E.coli strains isolated from polluted waters].

    PubMed

    Lazăr, Veronica; Cernat, Ramona; Balotescu, Carmen; Cotar, Ani; Coipan, Elena; Cojocaru, Cristina

    2002-01-01

    Self-transmissible plasmids conferring multiple antibiotic resistance are wide-spread in coliforms populations. In soil and water, multiple antibiotic resistance is clearly associated with resistance/tolerance to heavy-metals (Hg2+, Cu2+, Pb2+, Zn2+, Ca2+). For different genera the genes for heavy-metals resistance are often plasmid encoded. Since these genes are clustered on the same plasmids, heavy-metals and drugs are environmental factors which exert a selective pressure for the populations of these plasmid-harboring bacteria. The aim of this preliminary study was to find possible correlation between resistance genotype determined by genetic analysis and antibiotic and heavy-metal resistance patterns of 12 E. coli strains isolated from chronically polluted waters. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed for ampicillin, tetracycline, gentamycin, kanamycin, chloramphenicol, ceftazidime and cefotaxime by standard disk diffusion Kirby-Bauer method following NCCLS recommendations. These antibiotics were chosen because of their wide-spread use and importance in the treatment of Gram-negative bacterial infections. MICs values of antibiotics and heavy-metals were determined by dilution method in Mueller-Hinton broth using an inoculum of about 1-2 x 10(8) CFU/ml. The concentration range for antimicrobials and heavy-metals salts (CuSO4, CdCl2, Co(NO3)2, Cr(NO3)3, HgCl2, NiCl2 and ZnSO4) was 0.06-64 [symbol: see text] g/ml, 0.5-256 [symbol: see text] g/ml respectively. Plasmid DNA was isolated from E. coli strains by an alkaline lysis. Genetic characterization was performed by agarose gel electrophoresis and spectrophotometric analysis. All strains are multiple antibiotic resistant, 16% of them being resistant to 3, 4 and 6 antibiotics, 32% to 5 and 8% to all 7 antibiotics, respectively. Multiple tolerance to high levels of Cd2+, Cu2+, Cr3+ and Ni2+ was common among multiple antibioresistant strains. Screening for plasmids relieved the presence of several

  12. Amperometric detection of heavy metal ions in ion pair chromatography at an array of water/nitrobenzene micro interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wilke, S; Wang, H; Muraczewska, M; Müller, H

    1996-09-01

    A novel amperometric detector for heavy metal ions has been developed and successfully applied for ion pair chromatography. The detector is based on the electrochemical transfer of the metal ions across an array of water/nitrobenzene micro interfaces. The ion transfer is facilitated by the neutral ionophores methylenebis(diphenylphosphineoxide) and methylenebis(di- phenylphosphinesulfide). More than eight metals are separated in less than 15 min on an RP18 column using octyl sulfonate as ion pair reagent. For the heavy metals, the limits of decision are 19(Pb(2+)), 9(Zn(2+)), 9l (Co(2+)), 8(Cd(2+)) and 1.6(Mn(2+)) microg/L. The applicability of the new method for water samples is demonstrated. PMID:15048359

  13. Accumulation of heavy metals in water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) cultivated in the Bangkok region, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Göthberg, Agneta; Greger, Maria; Bengtsson, Bengt-Erik

    2002-09-01

    The aquatic plant water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica), either wild or cultivated, is found throughout Southeast Asia and is a widely consumed vegetable in the region. Many of the waters where I. aquatica grows serve as recipients for domestic and other types of wastewater. Because these waters contain not only nutrients, but often also a wide variety of pollutants such as heavy metals from various human activities, many people risk intoxication. To estimate the accumulation of lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), total mercury (total Hg), and methylmercury in I. aquatica and the potential hazard to human health via consumption, nine sites for cultivation of I. aquatica in the greater Bangkok region of Thailand were sampled. At seven of the sites, I. aquatica was cultivated for the local food market. The concentrations of methylmercury, total Hg, Pb, and Cd in I. aquatica were 0.8 to 221, 12 to 2,590, 40 to 530, and < or = 10 to 123 microg/kg dry weight, respectively. At all sites at least one element showed relatively high concentrations and no reference site could be established. From threshold values for highest tolerable intake of these metals by humans and information about consumption of I. aquatica among local people, Pb and Cd concentrations in I. aquatica do not seem to be a direct threat to human health. However, concentrations of Hg were very high at some sites, and were higher in leaves (highest mean value: 1,440 microg/kg dry wt) than in stems (highest mean value: 422 microg/kg dry wt). This might be a threat, especially to children and fetuses, because Hg in I. aquatica was composed of methylmercury, partly or totally, at most sites to 11% or less and at one site from 50 to 100%. At the latter site, I. aquatica was not cultivated for the food market. Because other food sources, such as fish, may have high concentrations of methylmercury, these results indicate a need for monitoring of Hg, especially methylmercury, in different foodstuffs in the region. PMID:12206434

  14. Modifications to MELCOR for the analysis of heavy-water moderated, U-A1 fuel reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Church, J.P. ); Leonard, M.T.; Williams, K.A. )

    1990-01-01

    The MELCOR computer code is being used as the point of departure to develop an integrated severe accident analysis computer code for the heavy-water moderated U-Al fuel reactors. The resulting computer code (MELCOR/SR) provides a practical and comprehensive analytical tool for evaluating severe accident behavior in the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactors. The technical scope of this development effort is summarized in this paper. Other companion papers are cited that provide additional details regarding particular models.

  15. Evaluate the radioactivity along the central thimble hole of a decommissioned heavy water research reactor using TLD approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lun-Hui; Sher, Hai-Feng; Lu, I-Hsin; Pan, Lung-Kwang

    2012-04-01

    The radioactivity along the central thimble hole of a decommissioned heavy water research reactor, TRR, was evaluated using TLD approach. The decay radionuclide was verified to be Co-60. The dose along the TRR central thimble hole was detected and revised by performing an unfolding analysis. The revised data reduced to 70-90% of the original data (for example, the maximum dose rate was reduced from 6447 to 4831 mSv/h,) and were more reliable. PMID:22197461

  16. Analysis of heavy metals from water, sediment, and tissues of Labeo angra (Hamilton, 1822), from an Ox-box lake- an wetland site from Assam, India.

    PubMed

    Das, Suchismita; Choudhury, Shamim Sultana

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the regional impacts of heavy metals (Mn, Fe, Mg, Ca, Cu, Zn, Cd, Cr, Pb and Ni) on water, sediment and a native, teleost fish species, Labeo angra, inhabiting a flood plain wetland of Barak River in Assam, India. Heavy metal concentrations in the water, sediments and fish were measured; bioaccumulation factor, metal pollution index as well as condition indices were calculated, to assess the pollution load and health status of the fish. Multivariate statistical analysis was used on wetland water and sediment heavy metals to ascertain the possible sources and seasonal variations of the pollutants. Results showed that most heavy metals in the wetland water and sediments exceeded the water (drinking and irrigation) and sediment quality guidelines, respectively. Seasonal variations were observed for geogenic heavy metals, Mn, Fe, Mg and Ca while no seasonal variations were observed for anthropogenic heavy metals, Cu, Cd, Cr, Pb and Ni. Multivariate statistical analysis showed that there was strong correlation between geogenic and anthropogenic heavy metals in water and sediment, both originating from the common anthropogenic sources. Accumulation of most of the metals in all the tissues was above the safe limits as recommended by the Food and Agriculture Organization. High bioaccumulation factors and metal pollution index for these metals in the different tissues revealed that metals were extensively bio-accumulated and bioconcentrated. Condition indices in fish from the wetland suggested metabolic abnormalities. PMID:26422176

  17. An outbreak of waterborne giardiasis associated with heavy water runoff due to warm weather and volcanic ashfall.

    PubMed Central

    Weniger, B G; Blaser, M J; Gedrose, J; Lippy, E C; Juranek, D D

    1983-01-01

    From mid-June through early August 1980, an outbreak of gastrointestinal illness in Red Lodge, Montana affected approximately 780 persons, as estimated from attack rates of 33 per cent and 15 per cent in urban and rural residents, respectively. Giardia lamblia was identified in stool specimens from 51 per cent of 47 persons with a history of untreated gastrointestinal illness and in 13 per cent of 24 specimens from asymptomatic persons (p = .00045, Fisher's Exact Test). The epidemic curve was bimodal with peaks in mid-June and mid-July. Each peak occurred about three weeks after an episode of very heavy water runoff resulting from warm sunny weather and snow darkened by ashfall from the Mt. St. Helens volcanic eruption of May 18, 1980. Unfiltered and inadequately chlorinated surface water was supplied by the city water system, which was implicated as the vehicle of transmission in the outbreak. Water systems providing unfiltered surface water are more likely to become contaminated during periods of heavy water runoff. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:6869640

  18. Reactivity Impact of 2H and 16O Elastic Scattering Nuclear Data on Critical Systems with Heavy Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roubtsov, D.; Kozier, K. S.; Chow, J. C.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Kopecky, S.; Svenne, J. P.; Canton, L.

    2014-04-01

    The accuracy of deuterium nuclear data is important for reactor physics simulations of heavy water (D2O) reactors. The elastic neutron scattering cross section data at thermal energies, σs,th, have been observed to have noticeable impact on the reactivity values in simulations of critical systems involving D2O. We discuss how the uncertainties in the thermal scattering cross sections of 2H(n,n)2H and 16O(n,n)16O propagate to the uncertainty of the calculated neutron multiplication factor, keff, in thermal critical assemblies with heavy water neutron moderator/reflector. The method of trial evaluated nuclear data files, in which specific cross sections are individually perturbed, is used to calculate the sensitivity coefficients of keff to the microscopic nuclear data, such as σs(E) characterized by σs,th. Large reactivity differences of up to ≃ 5-10 mk (500-1000 pcm) were observed using 2H and 16O data files with different elastic scattering data in MCNP5 simulations of the LANL HEU heavy-water solution thermal critical experiments included in the ICSBEP handbook.

  19. Heavy water and (15) N labelling with NanoSIMS analysis reveals growth rate-dependent metabolic heterogeneity in chemostats.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Sebastian H; McGlynn, Shawn E; Green-Saxena, Abigail; Guan, Yunbin; Newman, Dianne K; Orphan, Victoria J

    2015-07-01

    To measure single-cell microbial activity and substrate utilization patterns in environmental systems, we employ a new technique using stable isotope labelling of microbial populations with heavy water (a passive tracer) and (15) N ammonium in combination with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry. We demonstrate simultaneous NanoSIMS analysis of hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen at high spatial and mass resolution, and report calibration data linking single-cell isotopic compositions to the corresponding bulk isotopic equivalents for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Our results show that heavy water is capable of quantifying in situ single-cell microbial activities ranging from generational time scales of minutes to years, with only light isotopic incorporation (∼0.1 atom % (2) H). Applying this approach to study the rates of fatty acid biosynthesis by single cells of S. aureus growing at different rates in chemostat culture (∼6 h, 1 day and 2 week generation times), we observe the greatest anabolic activity diversity in the slowest growing populations. By using heavy water to constrain cellular growth activity, we can further infer the relative contributions of ammonium versus amino acid assimilation to the cellular nitrogen pool. The approach described here can be applied to disentangle individual cell activities even in nutritionally complex environments. PMID:25655651

  20. The major species of heavy metal aerosol resulting from water cooling systems and spray dryer systems during incineration processes

    PubMed

    Wey; Yang; Wei

    1998-11-01

    Trace toxic metals in municipal solid waste may escape from the incineration process in flue gas, in dry collected ash, in wet scrubbed ash, or as a suspended aerosol. Therefore, understanding the behavior of heavy metals in the flue gas and the best controls in the air pollution control equipment are important and necessary. The control conditions of water cooling and spray dryer systems during incineration processes significantly influence the formation of heavy metal compounds. The formation of chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), and cadmium (Cd) species under various control conditions (water cooling tower and spray dryer reactor) was investigated in this study. The object of the experiment is to understand the effects of water cooling and spray dryer systems individually on the formation of heavy metal species. The operating parameters that are evaluated include different control systems, control temperatures, and chlorine content. A thermodynamic equilibrium model was also used to evaluate experimental data. In order to match real incineration conditions, a two-stage simulation was performed in this experiment. The results showed that the relationship of speciation between the simulation prediction and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis is consistent for Cr compounds; both indicated that Cr2O3 is the major species. The relationship is almost the same for Cd compounds, but not for Pb compounds. PMID:9846130

  1. Heavy water and 15N labeling with NanoSIMS analysis reveals growth-rate dependent metabolic heterogeneity in chemostats

    PubMed Central

    McGlynn, Shawn E.; Green-Saxena, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    To measure single cell microbial activity and substrate utilization patterns in environmental systems, we employ a new technique using stable isotope labeling of microbial populations with heavy water (a passive tracer) and 15N ammonium in combination with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry. We demonstrate simultaneous NanoSIMS analysis of hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen at high spatial and mass resolution, and report calibration data linking single cell isotopic compositions to the corresponding bulk isotopic equivalents for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Our results show that heavy water is capable of quantifying in situ single cell microbial activities ranging from generational time scales of minutes to years, with only light isotopic incorporation (∼0.1 atom % 2H). Applying this approach to study the rates of fatty acid biosynthesis by single cells of S. aureus growing at different rates in chemostat culture (∼6 hours, 1 day and 2 week generation times), we observe the greatest anabolic activity diversity in the slowest growing populations. By using heavy water to constrain cellular growth activity, we can further infer the relative contributions of ammonium vs. amino acid assimilation to the cellular nitrogen pool. The approach described here can be applied to disentangle individual cell activities even in nutritionally complex environments. PMID:25655651

  2. Tracking heavy water (D2O) incorporation for identifying and sorting active microbial cells.

    PubMed

    Berry, David; Mader, Esther; Lee, Tae Kwon; Woebken, Dagmar; Wang, Yun; Zhu, Di; Palatinszky, Marton; Schintlmeister, Arno; Schmid, Markus C; Hanson, Buck T; Shterzer, Naama; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Rauch, Isabella; Decker, Thomas; Bocklitz, Thomas; Popp, Jürgen; Gibson, Christopher M; Fowler, Patrick W; Huang, Wei E; Wagner, Michael

    2015-01-13

    Microbial communities are essential to the function of virtually all ecosystems and eukaryotes, including humans. However, it is still a major challenge to identify microbial cells active under natural conditions in complex systems. In this study, we developed a new method to identify and sort active microbes on the single-cell level in complex samples using stable isotope probing with heavy water (D2O) combined with Raman microspectroscopy. Incorporation of D2O-derived D into the biomass of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria and archaea could be unambiguously detected via C-D signature peaks in single-cell Raman spectra, and the obtained labeling pattern was confirmed by nanoscale-resolution secondary ion MS. In fast-growing Escherichia coli cells, label detection was already possible after 20 min. For functional analyses of microbial communities, the detection of D incorporation from D2O in individual microbial cells via Raman microspectroscopy can be directly combined with FISH for the identification of active microbes. Applying this approach to mouse cecal microbiota revealed that the host-compound foragers Akkermansia muciniphila and Bacteroides acidifaciens exhibited distinctive response patterns to amendments of mucin and sugars. By Raman-based cell sorting of active (deuterated) cells with optical tweezers and subsequent multiple displacement amplification and DNA sequencing, novel cecal microbes stimulated by mucin and/or glucosamine were identified, demonstrating the potential of the nondestructive D2O-Raman approach for targeted sorting of microbial cells with defined functional properties for single-cell genomics. PMID:25550518

  3. [High resolution measurement of concentrations and fluxes of heavy metals in pore waters by DGT].

    PubMed

    Fan, Ying-hong; Lin, Chun-ye; He, Meng-chang; Zhou, Yu-xiang; Yang, Zhi-feng

    2007-12-01

    Three sediment cores were collected from the Daliao River system in May 2006. The physico-chemical characteristics and heavy metal contents of sediment cores were analyzed. The vertical profiles of metals in pore water were measured by diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) and centrifugal methods separately. The sequence of the concentrations of Cd, Co, Cr and Cu in sediment is Cr > Cu > Co > Cd. The concentrations measured by DGT were lower than that measured by centrifugal method. The average ratios of DGT measured concentrations (cDGT) to the concentrations measured by centrifugal method of Cd, Co, Cr and Cu were 0.389, 0.328, 0.863 and 0.403, respectively. This suggested that the release rates of these metals from solid phase to solution followed the sequence of Cr > Cu > Cd > Co. The fluxes of Cd, Co Cr and Cu were 1.12 x 10(-7) - 3.28 x 10(-7) nmol/(cm2 x s), 2.48 x 10(-7) - 10.40 x 10(-7) nmol/(cm2 x s), 8.80 x 10(-6) - 12.65 x 10(-6) nmol/(cm2 x s) and 6.14 x 10(-6) - 13.93 x 10(-6) nmol/(cm2 x s), respectively. The result showed that the release of Cd and Cu was mainly influenced by organic matter (OM), while Fe oxides, Mn oxides and OM were major factors controlling the transfer of Cr. The redox potential may be the major factor influencing the release of Co element. PMID:18290432

  4. Checkerboard seed-blanket thorium fuel core concepts for heavy water moderated reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, B.P.; Hyland, B.

    2013-07-01

    New reactor concepts to implement thorium-based fuel cycles have been explored to achieve maximum resource utilization. Pressure tube heavy water reactors (PT-HWR) are highly advantageous for implementing the use of thorium-based fuels because of their high neutron economy and on-line re-fuelling capability. The use of heterogeneous seed-blanket core concepts in a PT-HWR where higher-fissile-content seed fuel bundles are physically separate from lower-fissile-content blanket bundles allows more flexibility and control in fuel management to maximize the fissile utilization and conversion of fertile fuel. The lattice concept chosen was a 35-element bundle made with a homogeneous mixture of reactor grade Pu (about 67 wt% fissile) and Th, and with a central zirconia rod to help reduce coolant void reactivity. Several checkerboard heterogeneous seed-blanket core concepts with plutonium-thorium-based fuels in a 700-MWe-class PT-HWR were analyzed, using a once-through thorium (OTT) cycle. Different combinations of seed and blanket fuel were tested to determine the impact on core-average burnup, fissile utilization, power distributions, and other performance parameters. It was found that various checkerboard core concepts can achieve a fissile utilization that is up to 26% higher than that achieved in a PT-HWR using more conventional natural uranium fuel bundles. Up to 60% of the Pu is consumed; up to 43% of the energy is produced from thorium, and up to 303 kg/year of Pa-233/U-233/U-235 are produced. Checkerboard cores with about 50% of low-power blanket bundles may require power de-rating (65% to 74%) to avoid exceeding maximum limits for channel and bundle powers and linear element ratings. (authors)

  5. Lattice cell and full core physics of internally cooled annular fuel in heavy water moderated reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, J.; Hamilton, H.; Hyland, B.

    2013-07-01

    A program is underway at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to develop a new fuel bundle concept to enable greater burnups for PT-HWR (pressure tube heavy water reactor) cores. One option that AECL is investigating is an internally cooled annular fuel (ICAF) element concept. ICAF contains annular cylindrical pellets with cladding on the inner and outer diameters. Coolant flows along the outside of the element and through the centre. With such a concept, the maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating is significantly reduced compared to conventional, solid-rod type fuel. The preliminary ICAF bundle concept considered in this study contains 24 half-metre long internally cooled annular fuel elements and one non-fuelled centre pin. The introduction of the non-fuelled centre pin reduces the coolant void reactivity (CVR), which is the increase in reactivity that occurs on voiding the coolant in accident scenarios. Lattice cell and full core physics calculations of the preliminary ICAF fuel bundle concept have been performed for medium burnups of approximately 18 GWd/tU using WIMS-AECL and reactor fuel simulation program (RFSP). The results will be used to assist in concept configuration optimization. The effects of radial and axial core power distributions, linear element power ratings, refuelling rates and operational power ramps have been analyzed. The results suggest that burnups of greater than 18 GWd/tU can be achieved in current reactor designs. At approximately 18 GWd/tU, expected maximum linear element ratings in a PT-HWR with online-refuelling are approximately 90 kW/m. These conditions would be prohibitive for solid-rod fuel, but may be possible in ICAF fuel given the reduced maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating. (authors)

  6. Annular seed-blanket thorium fuel core concepts for heavy water moderated reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, B.P.; Hyland, B.

    2013-07-01

    New reactor concepts to implement thorium-based fuel cycles have been explored to achieve maximum resource utilization. Pressure tube heavy water reactors (PT-HWR) are highly advantageous for implementing the use of thorium-based fuels because of their high neutron economy and on-line re-fuelling capability. The use of heterogeneous seed-blanket core concepts in a PT-HWR where higher-fissile-content seed fuel bundles are physically separate from lower-fissile-content blanket bundles allows more flexibility and control in fuel management to maximize the fissile utilization and conversion of fertile fuel. The lattice concept chosen is a 35-element bundle made with a homogeneous mixture of reactor grade Pu and Th, and with a central zirconia rod to help reduce coolant void reactivity. Several annular heterogeneous seed-blanket core concepts with plutonium-thorium-based fuels in a 700-MWe-class PT-HWR were analyzed, using a once-through thorium (OTT) cycle. Different combinations of seed and blanket fuel were tested to determine the impact on core-average burnup, fissile utilization, power distributions, and other performance parameters. It was found that the various core concepts can achieve a fissile utilization that is up to 30% higher than is currently achieved in a PT-HWR using conventional natural uranium fuel bundles. Up to 67% of the Pu is consumed; up to 43% of the energy is produced from thorium, and up to 363 kg/year of U-233 is produced. Seed-blanket cores with ∼50% content of low-power blanket bundles may require power de-rating (∼58% to 65%) to avoid exceeding maximum limits for peak channel power, bundle power and linear element ratings. (authors)

  7. Tracking heavy water (D2O) incorporation for identifying and sorting active microbial cells

    PubMed Central

    Berry, David; Mader, Esther; Lee, Tae Kwon; Woebken, Dagmar; Wang, Yun; Zhu, Di; Palatinszky, Marton; Schintlmeister, Arno; Schmid, Markus C.; Hanson, Buck T.; Shterzer, Naama; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Rauch, Isabella; Decker, Thomas; Bocklitz, Thomas; Popp, Jürgen; Gibson, Christopher M.; Fowler, Patrick W.; Huang, Wei E.; Wagner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities are essential to the function of virtually all ecosystems and eukaryotes, including humans. However, it is still a major challenge to identify microbial cells active under natural conditions in complex systems. In this study, we developed a new method to identify and sort active microbes on the single-cell level in complex samples using stable isotope probing with heavy water (D2O) combined with Raman microspectroscopy. Incorporation of D2O-derived D into the biomass of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria and archaea could be unambiguously detected via C-D signature peaks in single-cell Raman spectra, and the obtained labeling pattern was confirmed by nanoscale-resolution secondary ion MS. In fast-growing Escherichia coli cells, label detection was already possible after 20 min. For functional analyses of microbial communities, the detection of D incorporation from D2O in individual microbial cells via Raman microspectroscopy can be directly combined with FISH for the identification of active microbes. Applying this approach to mouse cecal microbiota revealed that the host-compound foragers Akkermansia muciniphila and Bacteroides acidifaciens exhibited distinctive response patterns to amendments of mucin and sugars. By Raman-based cell sorting of active (deuterated) cells with optical tweezers and subsequent multiple displacement amplification and DNA sequencing, novel cecal microbes stimulated by mucin and/or glucosamine were identified, demonstrating the potential of the nondestructive D2O-Raman approach for targeted sorting of microbial cells with defined functional properties for single-cell genomics. PMID:25550518

  8. Hydrodynamically induced dryout and post dryout important to heavy water reactors: A yearly progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; Revankar, S.T.; Babelli, I.; Lele, S.

    1992-06-01

    Recently, the safety of low pressure liquid cooled nuclear reactors has become a very important issue with reference to the operation of the heavy water reactors at Savannah River Plant. Under accident conditions such as loss-of-flow or loss-of-coolant, these reactors typically encounter unstable two-phase flow which may lead to the occurrence of dryout and subsequent fuel failure. An analytical study using the one-dimensional drift flux model was carried out to investigate the two-phase flow instability for Westinghouse Savannah River Site reactor. The analysis indicates that the first and higher order instabilities exist in the possible transient operational conditions. The instabilities are encountered at higher heat fluxes or lower flow rates. The subcooling has a stabilizing effect except at very low subcooling. An experimental loop has been designed and constructed to study the CBF induced by various flow instabilities. Details of this test loop are presented. Initial test results have been presented. The two-phase flow regimes and hydrodynamic behaviors in the post dryout region have been studied under propagating rewetting conditions. The effect of subcooling and inlet velocity on flow transition as well as on the quench front propagation was investigated. The test liquid was Freon 113 which was introduced into the bottom of the quartz test section whose walls were maintained well above the film boiling temperature of the test liquid, via a transparent heat transfer fluid. The flow regimes observed down stream of the upward moving quench front were the rough wavy, the agitated, and the dispersed droplet/ligaments. A correlation for the flow regime transition between the inverted annular and the dispersed droplet/ligament flow patterns was developed. The correlation showed a marked dependence on the void fraction at the CBF location and hence on the flow regime encountered in the pre-CBF region.

  9. Concentrations, diffusive fluxes and toxicity of heavy metals in pore water of the Fuyang River, Haihe Basin.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wenzhong; Duan, Shenghui; Shan, Baoqing; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Wenqiang; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Chao

    2016-05-01

    While the concentrations of heavy metals in pore water provide important information about their bioavailability, to date few studies have focused on this topic. In this study, pore water in river sediments collected from nine sampling sites (S1-S9) was examined to determine the concentrations, fluxes, and toxicity of heavy metals in the Fuyang River. The results showed that the average concentrations of Cr, Ni, Cu, As, Zn, and Pb in pore water were 17.06, 15.97, 20.93, 19.08, 43.72, and 0.56μgL(-1), respectively; these concentrations varied as the pore water depth increased. The diffusive fluxes of Cr, Ni, Cu, As, Zn, and Pb were in the following range: (-0.37) to 3.17, (-1.37) to 2.63, (-4.61) to 3.44, 0.17-6.02, (-180.26) to 7.51, and (-0.92) to (-0.29)μg(m(2)day)(-1), respectively. There was a potential risk of toxicity from Cu to aquatic organisms, as indicated by a value of the Interstitial Water Criteria Toxic Units that exceeded 1.0. Values of the Nemeraw Index were 2.06, 0.48, 0.11, 0.20, 1.11, 1.03, 0.99, 0.88, and 0.89 from S1 to S9, respectively. Only S1 was moderately polluted by heavy metals in pore water. PMID:26802565

  10. Validity of manganese as a surrogate of heavy metals removal in constructed wetlands treating acidic mine water

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, E.; Unz, R.F.; Hellier, W.W.

    1998-12-31

    The evaluation of manganese as a surrogate for heavy metal behavior in two wetland treatment systems receiving acidic coal mine drainage in central Pennsylvania was investigated. The use of manganese as an indicator is based on physical/chemical treatment processes quite different from wetland treatment. The treatment systems represented one anoxic, subsurface flow system and one oxic surface flow system. Water quality parameters measured included pH, alkalinity, acidity, and a suite of metals. Correlation and linear regression analysis were used to evaluate the ability of a candidate predictor variable (indicator) to predict heavy metal concentrations and removal. The use of manganese as a predictor of effluent quality proved to be poor in both wetland treatment systems, as evidenced by low linear R{sup 2} values and negative correlations. Zinc emerged as the best predictor of the detectable heavy metals at the anoxic wetland. Zinc exhibited positive strong linear correlations with copper, cobalt, and nickel (R{sup 2} values of 0.843, 0.881, and 0.970, respectively). Effluent pH was a slightly better predictor of effluent copper levels in the anoxic wetland. Iron and cobalt effluent concentrations showed the only strong relationship (R{sup 2} value = 0.778) in the oxic system. The lack of good correlations with manganese strongly challenges its appropriateness as a surrogate for heavy metals in these systems.