Science.gov

Sample records for heavy-ion induced fission

  1. Recent advances in heavy-ion-induced fission

    SciTech Connect

    Plasil, F.

    1984-01-01

    Three topics are discussed. The first deals with results that have been published recently on angular-momentum-dependent fission barriers. They are discussed because of the significance that we attach to them. We feel that, after a decade of study and controversy, we have arrived at a quantitative understanding of the competition between heavy-ion-induced fission and particle emission from compound nuclei at relatively low bombarding energies. The second topic concerns the extension of our heavy-ion-induced fission studies to higher energies. It is clear that in this regime the effects, both of fission following incomplete fusion and of extra-push requirements, need to be considered. Finally, discussed are our recent conclusions concerning the fissionlike decay of products from reactions between two /sup 58/Ni nuclei at an incident energy, E/A, of 15.3 MeV, as well as the impact of our findings on the conclusions drawn from previous, similar measurements. 39 references.

  2. Study of heavy-ion induced fission for heavy-element synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, K.; Ikezoe, H.; Hofmann, S.; Heßberger, F. P.; Ackermann, D.; Antalic, S.; Aritomo, Y.; Comas, V. F.; Düllman, Ch. E.; Gorshkov, A.; Graeger, R.; Heinz, S.; Heredia, J. A.; Hirose, K.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kindler, B.; Kojouharov, I.; Lommel, B.; Makii, H.; Mann, R.; Mitsuoka, S.; Nagame, Y.; Nishinaka, I.; Ohtsuki, T.; Popeko, A. G.; Saro, S.; Schädel, M.; Türler, A.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Yakushev, A.; Yeremin, A. V.

    2014-03-01

    Fission fragment mass distributions were measured in heavy-ion induced fissions using 238U target nucleus. The measured mass distributions changed drastically with incident energy. The results are explained by a change of the ratio between fusion and qasifission with nuclear orientation. A calculation based on a fluctuation dissipation model reproduced the mass distributions and their incident energy dependence. Fusion probability was determined in the analysis, and the values were consistent with those determined from the evaporation residue cross sections.

  3. Multimodal Fission in Heavy-Ion Induced Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovskiy, I. V.; Bogachev, A. A.; Iitkis, M. G.; Iitkis, J. M.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Dorvaux, O.; Rowley, N.; Schmitt, Ch.; Stuttge, L.

    2006-08-14

    Mass, energy and folding angle distributions of the fission fragments as well as multiplicities of neutron and gamma-quanta emissions accompanying the fission process were measured for fission of 226Th, 227Pa and 234Pu compound nuclei produced in reactions with 18O and 26Mg projectiles over a wide energy range. Data were analyzed with respect to the presence of fission modes. Asymmetric fission was observed even at very high initial excitation for all the measured systems. The so-called fission mode S1 (caused by the proton shell Z{approx}50 and neutron shell N{approx}82 in heavy fragment) was found to be dominant in asymmetric fission of 234Pu. Reactions with not full linear momentum transfer were observed in the folding spectra for all the measured systems.

  4. Observation of fission modes in heavy ion induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Itkis, M. G.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Pashkevich, V. V.; Pokrovsky, I. V.; Salamatin, V. S.; Rusanov, A. Ya.; Calabretta, L.; Maiolino, C.; Lukashin, K.; Agodi, C.; Bellia, G.; Chubarian, G. G.; Hurst, B. J.; O'Kelly, D.; Schmitt, R. P.; Hanappe, F.; Liatard, E.; Huck, A.

    1998-02-15

    The fission of the systems {sup 220,224,226}Th was investigated by measuring the mass-energy distributions of the fission fragments. The corresponding excitation energies at the saddle point, E{sub sp}*, ranged from 16 to 40 MeV. As E{sub sp*} decreases, an asymmetric mass component becomes visible on the predominately symmetric mass distribution. The contribution of the asymmetric mode is characterized by the total yield ratio Y{sub s}/Y{sub a}, which decreases rapidly for the heavier isotopes of thorium. This behavior of Y{sub s}/Y{sub a} is in qualitative agreement with theoretical calculations. For all isotopes studied, the subtracted asymmetric fission component, Y{sub a}=Y{sub 1}-Y{sub s}, exhibits a complex structure, actually showing two components, Y{sub a}=Y{sub a1}+Y{sub a0}, which have average masses M{sub a1}=132 and M{sub a0}=140.

  5. Observation of fission modes in heavy ion induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Itkis, M.G.; Kondratiev, N.A.; Kozulin, E.M.; Oganessian, Y.T.; Pashkevich, V.V.; Pokrovsky, I.V.; Salamatin, V.S.; Rusanov, A.Y.; Calabretta, L.; Maiolino, C.; Lukashin, K.; Agodi, C.; Bellia, G.; Chubarian, G.G.; Hurst, B.J.; OKelly, D.; Schmitt, R.P.; Hanappe, F.; Liatard, E.; Huck, A.; Stuttge, L.

    1998-02-01

    The fission of the systems {sup 220,224,226}Th was investigated by measuring the mass-energy distributions of the fission fragments. The corresponding excitation energies at the saddle point, E{sub sp}{sup {asterisk}}, ranged from 16 to 40 MeV. As E{sub sp{sup {asterisk}}} decreases, an asymmetric mass component becomes visible on the predominately symmetric mass distribution. The contribution of the asymmetric mode is characterized by the total yield ratio Y{sub s}/Y{sub a}, which decreases rapidly for the heavier isotopes of thorium. This behavior of Y{sub s}/Y{sub a} is in qualitative agreement with theoretical calculations. For all isotopes studied, the subtracted asymmetric fission component, Y{sub a}=Y{sub 1}{minus}Y{sub s}, exhibits a complex structure, actually showing two components, Y{sub a}=Y{sub a1}+Y{sub a0}, which have average masses M{sub a1}=132 and M{sub a0}=140. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Competition between fusion and quasi-fission in heavy ion induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.

    1986-09-01

    Quantitative analyses of angular distributions and angle-mass correlations have been applied to the U + Ca reaction to obtain upper limit estimates for the cross sections for complete fusion near or below the interaction barrier. Extrapolating to the systems Ca + Cm and Ca + Es using the well established scaling properties of the extra push model, an estimate of the cross sections relevant to the efforts of synthesizing super-heavy elements in the region Z = 116 and N = 184 via heavy-ion fusion reactions are obtained. A simple evaporation calculation using properties of the super heavy elements shows that the failure to observe super-heavy elements with the Ca + Cm reaction is consistent with estimates of the complete fusion process. 33 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Capture and Fusion-Fission Processes in Heavy Ion Induced Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itkis, M. G.; Beghini, S.; Behera, B. R.; Bogatchev, A. A.; Bouchat, V.; Corradi, L.; Dorvaux, O.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Hanappe, F.; Itkis, I. M.; Jandel, M.; Kliman, J.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Krupa, L.; Latina, A.; Lyapin, V. G.; Materna, T.; Montagnoli, G.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Pokrovsky, I. V.; Prokhorova, E. V.; Rowley, N.; Rubchenya, V. A.; Rusanov, A. Ya.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Scarlassara, F.; Schmitt, C.; Stefanini, A. M.; Stuttge, L.; Szilner, S.; Trotta, M.; Trzaska, W. H.; Voskresenski, V. M.

    2005-11-01

    Results of the experiments aimed at the study of fission and quasi-fission processes in the reactions 12C+204Pb, 48Ca+144,154Sm, 168Er, 208Pb, 238U, 244Pu, 248Cm; 58Fe+208Pb, 244Pu, 248Cm, and 64Ni+186W, 242Pu are presented. The choice of the above-mentioned reactions was inspired by the experiments on the production of the isotopes 283112, 289114 and 283116 at Dubna using the same reactions. The 58Fe and 64Ni projectiles were chosen since the corresponding projectile-target combinations lead to the synthesis of even heavier elements. The experiments were carried out at the U-400 accelerator of the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (JINR, Russia), the XTU Tandem accelerator of the National Laboratory of Legnaro (LNL, Italy) and the Accelerator of the Laboratory of University of Jyvaskyla (JYFL, Finland) using the time-of-flight spectrometer of fission fragments CORSET and the neutron multi-detector DEMON. The role of shell effects and the influence of the entrance channel asymmetry and the deformations of colliding nucleus on the mechanism of the fusion-fission and the competitive process of quasi-fission are discussed.

  8. Dynamical simulation of energy dissipation in asymmetric heavy-ion induced fission of {sup 200}Pb, {sup 213}Fr, and {sup 251}Es

    SciTech Connect

    Mirfathi, S. M.; Pahlavani, M. R.

    2008-12-15

    The dynamical model based on the asymmetric mass division has been applied to calculate pre-scission neutron multiplicity from heavy-ion induced fusion-fission reactions. Links between the pre-scission neutron multiplicity, excitation energy, and asymmetric mass distribution are clarified based on the Monte Carlo simulation and Langevin dynamics. The pre-scission neutron multiplicity is calculated and compared with the respective experimental data over a wide range of excitation energy and nonconstant viscosity. The analysis indicates a different effect for the application of asymmetric mass division in different energy regions of such processes.

  9. Fusion hindrance and quasi-fission in heavy-ion induced reactions: disentangling the effect of different parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Fioretto, E.; Stefanini, A. M.; Behera, B. R.; Corradi, L.; Gadea, A.; Latina, A.; Trotta, M.; Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Chizhov, A. Yu.; Itkis, I. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Kniajeva, G. N.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Pokrovsky, I. V.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Voskressensky, V. M.; Courtin, S.

    2006-04-26

    Experimental results on the fusion inhibition effect near the Coulomb barrier due to the onset of the quasi-fission mechanism are presented. The investigation was focused on reactions induced by 48Ca projectiles on different heavy targets and comparing them to reactions induced by light ions such as 12C and 16O leading to the same compound nuclei. Cross sections and angular distributions of evaporation residues and fission fragments have been measured.

  10. Dynamical fission following peripheral heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strazzeri, A.; Italiano, A.

    2016-02-01

    A closed-form theoretical approach describing in a single picture both the evaporation component and the fast nonequilibrium component of the sequential fission of projectile-like fragments in a peripheral heavy-ion collision is derived and then applied to the dynamical fission observed in the 124Sn+64Ni semiperipheral collision at 35AMeV. Information on the reaction mechanism is obtained such as the opposite polarization effects and the estimate of the “formation-to-fast fission lifetimes” of the fissioning fragment.

  11. Fission in intermediate energy heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmy, J.B.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Blaich, T.; Boissevain, J.; Fowler, M.M.; Gavron, A.; Jacak, B.V.; Lysaght, P.S.; Britt, H.C.; Fields, D.J.

    1989-04-01

    A systematic study of reaction mechanisms at intermediate energies (50--100 MeV/A) has been performed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's BeValac using medium weight projectiles on medium and heavy element targets. A gas and plastic phoswich detector system was employed which gave large geometric coverage and a wide dynamic response. The particles identified with the gas detectors could be characterized into three components--intermediate mass fragments (IMF), fission fragments (FF) and heavy residues (HR). Major observed features are: the reaction yields are similar in the 50 to 100 MeV/A range, central collisions have high multiplicity of IMF's with broad angular correlations consistent with a large participant region, effects of final state Coulomb interactions are observed and give information on the size and temporal behavior of the source, true fission yields are dependent on target fissility and correlated with relatively peripheral collisions. Analysis of fission and evaporation yields implies limiting conditions for which fission decay remains a viable deexcitation channel. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Fission and quasifission modes in heavy-ion-induced reactions leading to the formation of Hs{sup *}

    SciTech Connect

    Itkis, I. M.; Kozulin, E. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Bogachev, A. A.; Chernysheva, E. V.; Krupa, L.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Zagrebaev, V. I.; Rusanov, A. Ya.; Goennenwein, F.; Dorvaux, O.; Stuttge, L.; Hanappe, F.; Vardaci, E.; Goes Brennand, E. de

    2011-06-15

    Mass and energy distributions of binary reaction products obtained in the reactions {sup 22}Ne+{sup 249}Cf,{sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm, {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U, and {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb have been measured. All reactions lead to Hs isotopes. At energies below the Coulomb barrier the bimodal fission of Hs{sup *}, formed in the reaction {sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm, is observed. In the reaction {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U, leading to the formation of a similar compound nucleus, the main part of the symmetric fragments arises from the quasifission process. At energies above the Coulomb barrier fusion-fission is the main process leading to the formation of symmetric fragments for both reactions with Mg and S ions. In the case of the {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb reaction the quasifission process dominates at all measured energies.

  13. Local brain heavy ion irradiation induced Immunosuppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Runhong; Deng, Yulin; Huiyang Zhu, Bitlife.; Zhao, Tuo; Wang, Hailong; Yu, Yingqi; Ma, Hong; Wang, Xiao; Zhuang, Fengyuan; Qing, Hong

    Purpose: To investigate the long term effect of acute local brain heavy ion irradiation on the peripheral immune system in rat model. Methodology: Only the brain of adult male Wistar rats were radiated by heavy ions at the dose of 15 Gy. One, two and three months after irradiation, thymus and spleen were analyzed by four ways. Tunel assay was performed to evaluate the percentage of apoptotic cells in thymus and spleen, level of Inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, SSAO, and TNF-α) was detected by ELISA assay, the differentiation of thymus T lymphocyte subsets were measured by flow cytometry and the relative expression levels of genes related to thymus immune cell development were measured by using quantitative real-time PCR. Results: Thymus and spleen showed significant atrophy from one month to three months after irradiation. A high level of apoptosis in thymus and spleen were obtained and the latter was more vulnerable, also, high level of inflammatory cytokines were found. Genes (c-kit, Rag1, Rag2 and Sca1) related to thymus lymphocytes’ development were down-regulated. Conclusion: Local area radiation in the rat brain would cause the immunosuppression, especially, the losing of cell-mediated immune functions. In this model, radiation caused inflammation and then induced apoptosis of cells in the immune organs, which contributed to immunosuppression.

  14. Chromosomal instability induced by heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limoli, C. L.; Ponnaiya, B.; Corcoran, J. J.; Giedzinski, E.; Morgan, W. F.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To establish the dose-response relationship for the induction of chromosomal instability in GM10115 cells exposed to high-energy iron ions (1 GeV/nucleon, mean LET 146 keV/microm) and gold ions (11 GeV/nucleon, mean LET 1450 keV/microm). Past work has established that sparsely ionizing X-rays can induce a long-lived destabilization of chromosomes in a dose-dependent manner at an incidence of approximately 3% per gray. The present investigation assesses the capacity of High-Z and High-energy (HZE) particles to elicit this same endpoint. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Clonal populations derived from single progenitor cells surviving heavy-ion irradiation were analyzed cytogenetically to identify those clones showing a persistent destablization of chromosomes. RESULTS: Dose-response data, with a particular emphasis at low dose (< 1.0 Gy), indicate a frequency of approximately 4% per gray for the induction of chromosomal instability in clones derived from single progenitor cells surviving exposure to iron ions. The induction of chromosomal instability by gold ions was, however, less responsive to applied dose, as the observed incidence of this phenotype varied from 0 to 10% over 1-8 Gy. Both iron and gold ions gave dose-dependent increases in the yield of chromosomal aberrations (both chromosome- and chromatid-type) measured at the first mitosis following irradiation, as well as shoulderless survival curves having D0=0.87 and 1.1 Gy respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the present dose-response data, the relative biological effectiveness of iron ions is 1.3 for the induction of chromosomal instability, and this indicates that heavy ions are only slightly more efficient than X-rays at eliciting this delayed phenotype.

  15. Semiclassical approach to sequential fission in peripheral heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strazzeri, Andrea; Italiano, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    A closed-form theoretical approach describing in a single picture both the evaporation component and the fast nonequilibrium component of the sequential fission of projectilelike fragments in a semiperipheral heavy-ion collision is derived and then applied to the dynamical fission observed in the 124Sn+64Ni semiperipheral collision at 35A MeV. Information on opposite polarization effects of the fissioning projectilelike fragments and on their "formation-to-fast fission lifetimes" are obtained.

  16. Residual activity induced by heavy ions and beam-loss criteria for heavy-ion accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strašík, I.; Mustafin, E.; Pavlovič, M.

    2010-07-01

    The paper presents results of FLUKA simulations of the residual activity induced by heavy ions in two target configurations representing: (1) a beam pipe of an accelerator and (2) a bulky accelerator structure like a magnet yoke or a coil. The target materials were stainless steel and copper representing the most common construction materials used for basic accelerator components. For these two materials, the inventory of the induced isotopes depends mainly on the target material and much less on the projectile species. Time evolution of the induced activity can be described by means of a generic curve that is independent from the projectile mass. Dependence of the induced residual activity on selected ion beam parameters was studied. The main goal of the study was establishing a scaling law expanding the existing proton beam-loss tolerance to heavy-ion beams. This scaling law enables specifying beam-loss criteria for projectile species from proton up to uranium at energies from 200MeV/u up to 1GeV/u.

  17. Heavy-ion induced electronic desorption of gas from metals

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Kollmus, H; Mahner, E; Covo, M K; Bellachioma, M C; Bender, M; Bieniosek, F M; Hedlund, E; Kramer, A; Kwan, J; Malyshev, O B; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Westenskow, G; Westerberg, L

    2006-12-19

    During heavy ion operation in several particle accelerators world-wide, dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were triggered by lost beam ions that bombarded the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced molecular desorption, observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion beam lifetime and intensity of the accelerator. From dedicated test stand experiments we have discovered that heavy-ion induced gas desorption scales with the electronic energy loss (dE{sub e}/d/dx) of the ions slowing down in matter; but it varies only little with the ion impact angle, unlike electronic sputtering.

  18. (Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions)

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following research projects; decay of excited nuclei formed in La-induced reactions at E/A = 45 MeV; mass and charge distributions in Cl-induced heavy ion reactions; and mass and charge distributions in {sup 56}Fe + {sup 165}Ho at E/A = 12 MeV.

  19. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  20. Solutions to heavy ion induced avalanche burnout in power devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, Theodore F.; Beutler, David E.

    1992-12-01

    A review of normal breakdown and current induced avalanche (CIA) breakdown mechanisms in silicon power transistors is presented. The applicability of the CIA model to heavy ion induced burnout is shown, and solutions to CIA in silicon power semiconductors are given. It is noted that solving the problem of CIA burnout in npn bipolar and n-channel DMOS devices is, at best, difficult. Several techniques of hardening these devices to the effects of heavy ion, dose-rate induced failure, and any other condition producing CIA are discussed. The most effective techniques are those that minimize the emitter current injection by reducing the emitter injection efficiency or making the parasitic bipolar more difficult to turn on. However, it is believed that the simplest solution to the problem is to use pnp bipolar and p-channel DMOS devices whenever possible.

  1. Interplay between compound and fragments aspects of nuclear fission and heavy-ion reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Moller, Peter; Iwamoto, A; Ichikawa, I

    2010-09-10

    The scission point in nuclear fission plays a special role where one-body system changes to two-body system. Inverse of this situation is realized in heavy-ion fusion reaction where two-body system changes to one body system. Among several peculiar phenomena expected to occur during this change, we focus our attention to the behavior of compound and fragments shell effects. Some aspects of the interplay between compound and fragments shell effect are discussed related to the topics of the fission valleys in the potential energy surface of actinide nuclei and the fusion-like trajectory found in the cold fusion reaction leading to superheavy nuclei.

  2. System for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, D.P.; Browning, J.F.

    1998-07-21

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high (n,f) reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu. 3 figs.

  3. System for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, David P.; Browning, James F.

    1998-01-01

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  4. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, David P.; Browning, James F.

    1999-01-01

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  5. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, D.P.; Browning, J.F.

    1999-02-16

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu. 3 figs.

  6. L X-ray emission induced by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajek, M.; Banaś, D.; Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Semaniak, J.; Fijał-Kirejczyk, I.; Jaskóła, M.; Czarnacki, W.; Korman, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Mukoyama, T.; Trautmann, D.

    2015-11-01

    Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique is usually applied using typically 1 MeV to 3 MeV protons or helium ions, for which the ion-atom interaction is dominated by the single ionization process. For heavier ions the multiple ionization plays an increasingly important role and this process can influence substantially both the X-ray spectra and atomic decay rates. Additionally, the subshell coupling effects are important for the L- and M-shells ionized by heavy ions. Here we discuss the main features of the X-ray emission induced by heavy ions which are important for PIXE applications, namely, the effects of X-ray line shifts and broadening, vacancy rearrangement and change of the fluorescence and Coster-Kronig yields in multiple ionized atoms. These effects are illustrated here by the results of the measurements of L X-ray emission from heavy atoms bombarded by 6 MeV to 36 MeV Si ions, which were reported earlier. The strong L-subshell coupling effects are observed, in particular L2-subshell, which can be accounted for within the coupling subshell model (CSM) developed within the semiclassical approximation. Finally, the prospects to use heavy ions in PIXE analysis are discussed.

  7. Heavy-ion induced genetic changes and evolution processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. H.; Craise, L. M.; Durante, M.; Mei, M.

    1994-01-01

    On Moon and Mars, there will be more galactic cosmic rays and higher radiation doses than on Earth. Our experimental studies showed that heavy ion radiation can effectively cause mutation and chromosome aberrations and that high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) heavy-ion induced mutants can be irreversible. Chromosome translocations and deletions are common in cells irradiated by heavy particles, and ionizing radiations are effective in causing hyperploidy. The importance of the genetic changes in the evolution of life is an interesting question. Through evolution, there is an increase of DNA content in cells from lower forms of life to higher organisms. The DNA content, however, reached a plateau in vertebrates. By increasing DNA content, there can be an increase of information in the cell. For a given DNA content, the quality of information can be changed by rearranging the DNA. Because radiation can cause hyperploidy, an increase of DNA content in cells, and can induce DNA rearrangement, it is likely that the evolution of life on Mars will be effected by its radiation environment. A simple analysis shows that the radiation level on Mars may cause a mutation frequency comparable to that of the spontaneous mutation rate on Earth. To the extent that mutation plays a role in adaptation, radiation alone on Mars may thus provide sufficient mutation for the evolution of life.

  8. (Studies of heavy-ion induced reactions): Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1986-10-01

    An experiment was performed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac, extending previous studies using inverse reactions to 50 MeV/u /sup 139/La incident on targets of C and Al. Studies of excitation energy division in lower energy division in lower energy heavy-ion reactions were furthered using kinematic coincidences to measure the excitation energies of primary products in the Fe + Ho reaction at 12 MeV/u. These results will provide important systematics for comparisons with previous measurements at 9 MeV/u on the same system and at 15 MeV/u on the Fe + Fe and Fe + U systems. Also studied were different aspects of 15 MeV/u Fe-induced reactions, with experiments performed at the Oak Ridge HHIRF. The first three contributions of this report constitute a major portion of the results from this research. Finally, at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac a large detector array for coincident detection of fragmentation products in heavy-ion collisions below 100 MeV/u is being built. A list of publications, personnel, and activities is provided.

  9. Predictions for proton and heavy ions induced SEUs in 65 nm SRAMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shougang, Du; Suge, Yue; Hongxia, Liu; Long, Fan; Hongchao, Zheng

    2015-11-01

    We report on irradiation induced single event upset (SEU) by high-energy protons and heavy ions. The experiments were performed at the Paul Scherer Institute, and heavy ions at the SEE irradiating Facility on the HI-13 Tandem Accelerator in China's Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing and the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou in the Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The results of proton and heavy ions induced (SEU) in 65 nm bulk silicon CMOS SRAMS are discussed and the prediction on several typical orbits are presented.

  10. Heavy-ion irradiation induced diamond formation in carbonaceous materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Daulton, T. L.

    1999-01-08

    The basic mechanisms of metastable phase formation produced under highly non-equilibrium thermodynamic conditions within high-energy particle tracks are investigated. In particular, the possible formation of diamond by heavy-ion irradiation of graphite at ambient temperature is examined. This work was motivated, in part, by earlier studies which discovered nanometer-grain polycrystalline diamond aggregates of submicron-size in uranium-rich carbonaceous mineral assemblages of Precambrian age. It was proposed that the radioactive decay of uranium formed diamond in the fission particle tracks produced in the carbonaceous minerals. To test the hypothesis that nanodiamonds can form by ion irradiation, fine-grain polycrystalline graphite sheets were irradiated with 400 MeV Kr ions. The ion irradiated graphite (and unirradiated graphite control) were then subjected to acid dissolution treatments to remove the graphite and isolate any diamonds that were produced. The acid residues were then characterized by analytical and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The acid residues of the ion-irradiated graphite were found to contain ppm concentrations of nanodiamonds, suggesting that ion irradiation of bulk graphite at ambient temperature can produce diamond.

  11. Chemical modifications of PET induced by swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckenreiter, T.; Balanzat, E.; Fuess, H.; Trautmann, C.

    1997-08-01

    Ion induced chemical modifications of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were studied by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The irradiations with Kr (8.6 MeV/u) and with Mo (5.6 MeV/u) ions were performed under vacuum and in oxygen atmosphere, respectively. The overall degradation of the polymer was investigated as a function of the ion fluence in the range from 1 × 10 11to 6 × 10 12 ions/cm 2. A significant loss of crystallinity is related to scission processes of the main chains at the ethylene glycol residue. The benzene ring structures show only small changes under irradiation and do not seem to participate in the degradation process significantly. While various degradation processes known from photochemical degradation take place, the creation of alkynes near the track core is found to be a unique process induced by heavy ions. The presence of oxygen during irradiation enhances the overall degradation of PET and leads to enhanced formation of alkynes and CO 2.

  12. Heavy Ion and Proton Induced Single Event Transients in Linear Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, D. K.; Coss, J. R.; Miyahira, T.; Schwartz, H. R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a display of heavy-ion and proton-induced single event transients for selected linear devices. The transient vital signs are serious; low LET threshold, high voltage amplitude and extended pulse duration (microsecs.).

  13. Detection of DNA damage induced by heavy ion irradiation in the individual cells with comet assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, S.; Natsuhori, M.; Ito, N.; Funayama, T.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2003-05-01

    Investigating the biological effects of high-LET heavy ion irradiation at low fluence is important to evaluate the risk of charged particles. Especially it is important to detect radiation damage induced by the precise number of heavy ions in the individual cells. Thus we studied the relationship between the number of ions traversing the cell and DNA damage produced by the ion irradiation. We applied comet assay to measure the DNA damage in the individual cells. Cells attached on the ion track detector CR-39 were irradiated with ion beams at TIARA, JAERI-Takasaki. After irradiation, the cells were stained with ethidium bromide and the opposite side of the CR-39 was etched. We observed that the heavy ions with higher LET values induced the heavier DNA damage. The result indicated that the amount of DNA damage induced by one particle increased with the LET values of the heavy ions.

  14. Heavy-ion radiation induced Photosynthesis changes in Oryza sativa L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Li, Xishan; Meng, Qingmei

    The abnormal development of rice was observed frequently after the seed was exposed to heavy-ion radiation. The heavy-ion radiation could change the chloroplast structure in mesophyll cell by decreasing chloroplast grana and loosing the thylakoid lamellas. To study the mechanism of heavy-ion radiation induced photosynthesis changes, rice seed was exposed to 0-20 Gy dose of (12) C radiation. By measuring the changes of chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, the content of chlorophyll as well as the expression of CP24 in the leaves of rice at the three-leaf stage, we analyzed the influence mechanism of heavy-ion radiation on photosynthesis in rice. The results indicated that chlorophyll fluorescence parameter Fv/Fm and content of chlorophyll (including chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and total chlorophyll) changed significantly in different doses. Both the relative expression of CP24 and its encoding gene lhcb6 altered after exposed to different dose of radiation. By using Pearson correlation analysis, we found that the 1 Gy was the bound of low-dose radiation. The possible molecular mechanisms and biological consequences of the observed changes are discussed. Key Words: Heavy-ion Radiation; Rice; Photosynthesis; Fv/Fm; CP24.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of swift heavy ion induced defect recovery in SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Backman, Marie; Toulemonde, Marcel; Pakarinen, Olli H; Juslin, Niklas; Djurabekova, Flyura; Nordlund, Kai; Debelle, Aurelien; Weber, William J

    2013-01-01

    Swift heavy ions induce a high density of electronic excitations that can cause the formation of amorphous ion tracks in insulators. No ion tracks have been observed in the semiconductor SiC, but recent experimental work suggests that irradiation damaged SiC can undergo defect recovery under swift heavy ion irradiation. It is believed that local heating of the lattice due to the electronic energy deposition can anneal, and thereby recover, some of the disordered structure. We simulate the local heating due to the ions by the inelastic thermal spike model and perform molecular dynamics simulations of dierent model damage states to study the defect recovery on an atomistic level. We find significant recovery of point defects and a disordered layer, as well as recrystallization at the amorphous-to-crystalline interface of an amorphous layer. The simulation results support the swift heavy ion annealing hypothesis.Swift heavy ions induce a high density of electronic excitations that can cause the formation of amorphous ion tracks in insulators. No ion tracks have been observed in the semiconductor SiC, but recent experimental work suggests that irradiation damaged SiC can undergo defect recovery under swift heavy ion irradiation. It is believed that local heating of the lattice due to the electronic energy deposition can anneal, and thereby recover, some of the disordered structure. We simulate the local heating due to the ions by the inelastic thermal spike model and perform molecular dynamics simulations of dierent model damage states to study the defect recovery on an atomistic level. We find significant recovery of point defects and a disordered layer, as well as recrystallization at the amorphous-to-crystalline interface of an amorphous layer. The simulation results support the swift heavy ion annealing hypothesis.

  16. Comprehensive identification of mutations induced by heavy-ion beam irradiation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Tomonari; Kazama, Yusuke; Ishii, Kotaro; Ohbu, Sumie; Shirakawa, Yuki; Abe, Tomoko

    2015-04-01

    Heavy-ion beams are widely used for mutation breeding and molecular biology. Although the mutagenic effects of heavy-ion beam irradiation have been characterized by sequence analysis of some restricted chromosomal regions or loci, there have been no evaluations at the whole-genome level or of the detailed genomic rearrangements in the mutant genomes. In this study, using array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) and resequencing, we comprehensively characterized the mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana genomes irradiated with Ar or Fe ions. We subsequently used this information to investigate the mutagenic effects of the heavy-ion beams. Array-CGH demonstrated that the average number of deleted areas per genome were 1.9 and 3.7 following Ar-ion and Fe-ion irradiation, respectively, with deletion sizes ranging from 149 to 602,180 bp; 81% of the deletions were accompanied by genomic rearrangements. To provide a further detailed analysis, the genomes of the mutants induced by Ar-ion beam irradiation were resequenced, and total mutations, including base substitutions, duplications, in/dels, inversions, and translocations, were detected using three algorithms. All three resequenced mutants had genomic rearrangements. Of the 22 DNA fragments that contributed to the rearrangements, 19 fragments were responsible for the intrachromosomal rearrangements, and multiple rearrangements were formed in the localized regions of the chromosomes. The interchromosomal rearrangements were detected in the multiply rearranged regions. These results indicate that the heavy-ion beams led to clustered DNA damage in the chromosome, and that they have great potential to induce complicated intrachromosomal rearrangements. Heavy-ion beams will prove useful as unique mutagens for plant breeding and the establishment of mutant lines. PMID:25690092

  17. Epigenetic Analysis of Heavy-ion Radiation Induced Bystander Effects in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Cui, Changna; Xue, Bei

    Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect was defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic and proteomics plays significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male Balb/c and C57BL mice were exposed head-only to 40, 200, 2000mGy dose of (12) C heavy-ion radiation, while the rest of the animal body was shielded. Directly radiation organ ear and the distant organ liver were detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. Methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) was used to monitor the level of polymorphic genomic DNA methylation changed with dose and time effects. The results show that heavy-ion irradiated mouse head could induce genomic DNA methylation changes significantly in both the directly radiation organ ear and the distant organ liver. The percent of DNA methylation changes were time-dependent and tissue-specific. Demethylation polymorphism rate was highest separately at 1 h in 200 mGy and 6 h in 2000 mGy after irradiation. The global DNA methylation changes tended to occur in the CG sites. The results illustrated that genomic methylation changes of heavy ion radiation-induced bystander effect in liver could be obvious 1 h after radiation and achieved the maximum at 6 h, while the changes could recover gradually at 12 h. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in both directly radiation organ ear and distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of

  18. Heavy ion induced mutations in mammalian cells: Cross sections and molecular analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoll, U.; Schmidt, P.; Schneider, E.; Kiefer, J.

    1994-01-01

    Our investigations of heavy ion-induced mutations in mammalian cells, which had been begun a few years ago, were systematically continued. For the first time, it was possible to cover a large LET range with a few kinds of ions. To do this, both UNILAC and SIS were used to yield comparable data for a large energy range. This is a necessary condition for a comprehensive description of the influence of such ion parameters as energy and LET. In these experiments, the induced resistance against the poison 6-thioguanin (6-TG), which is linked to the HPRT locus on the genome, is being used as mutation system. In addition to the mutation-induction cross-section measurements, the molecular changes of the DNA are being investigated by means of Multiplex PCR ('Polymerase Chain Reaction') gene amplification. From these experiments we expect further elucidation of the mutation-inducing mechanisms composing the biological action of heavy-ion radiation.

  19. Heavy Ion Microbeam- and Broadbeam-Induced Transients in SiGe HBTs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Reed, Robert A.; McMorrow, Dale; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Ferlet-Cavrois, Veronique; Baggio, Jacques; Duhamel, Olivier; Moen, Kurt A.; Phillips, Stanley D.; Diestelhorst, Ryan M.; Cressler, John D.; Sutton, Akil K.; Raman, Ashok; Turowski, Marek; Dodd, Paul E.; Alles, Michael L.; Schrimpf, Ronald D.; Marshall, Paul W.; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    SiGe HBT heavy ion-induced current transients are measured using Sandia National Laboratories microbeam and high- and low-energy broadbeam sources at the Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds and the University of Jyvaskyla. The data were captured using a custom broadband IC package and real-time digital phosphor oscilloscopes with at least 16 GHz of analog bandwidth. These data provide detailed insight into the effects of ion strike location, range, and LET.

  20. Heavy ion induced DNA transfer in biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilaithong, T.; Yu, L. D.; Apavatjrut, P.; Phanchaisri, B.; Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Brown, I. G.

    2004-10-01

    Low-energy ion beam bombardment of biological materials for genetic modification purposes has experienced rapid growth in the last decade, particularly for the direct DNA transfer into living organisms including both plants and bacteria. Attempts have been made to understand the mechanisms involved in ion-bombardment-induced direct gene transfer into biological cells. Here we summarize the present status of the application of low-energy ions for genetic modification of living sample materials.

  1. Repair and misrepair of heavy-ion-induced chromosomal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, E.; Blakely, E.; Ivery, G.; Tobias, C.

    The premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to investigate chromosomal damage, repair, and misrepair in the G1 phase of a human/hamster hybrid cell line that contains a single human chromosome. Plateau-phase cell cultures were exposed to either x-rays or a 425 MeV/u beam of neon ions near the Bragg peak where the LET is 183 keV/μm. An in situ hybridization technique coupled to fluorescent staining of PCC spreads confirmed the linearity of the dose response for initial chromatin breakage in the human chromosome to high doses (1600 cGy x-ray or 1062 cGy Ne). On Giemsa-stained slides, initial chromatin breakage in the total genome and the rejoining kinetics of these breaks were determined. As a measure of chromosomal misrepair, ring PCC aberrations were also scored. Ne ions were about 1.5 x more effective per unit dose compared to x-rays at producing the initially measured chromatin breakage. 90% of the x-ray-induced breaks rejoined in cells incubated at 37°C after exposure. In contrast, only 50% of Ne-ion-induced breaks rejoined. In the irradiated G1 cells, ring PCC aberrations increased with time apparently by first order kinetics after either x-ray or Ne exposures. However, far fewer rings formed in Ne-irradiated cells after a dose giving a comparable initial number of chromatin breaks. Following x-ray exposures, the yield of rings formed after long repair times (6 to 9 hrs) fit a quadratic dose-response curve. These results indicate quantitative and qualitative differences in the chromosomal lesions induced by low- and high-LET radiations.

  2. Complex Chromosomal Rearrangements Induced in Vivo by Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Ando, K.; Furusawa, G.; Obe, G.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that the ratio complex/simple exchanges can be used as a biomarker of exposure to high-LET radiation. We tested this hypothesis in vivo, by considering data from several studies that measured complex exchanges in peripheral blood from humans exposed to mixed fields of low- and high-LET radiation. In particular, we studied data from astronauts involved in long-term missions in low-Earth-orbit, and uterus cancer patients treated with accelerated carbon ions. Data from two studies of chromosomal aberrations in astronauts used blood samples obtained before and after space flight, and a third study used blood samples from patients before and after radiotherapy course. Similar methods were used in each study, where lymphocytes were stimulated to grow in vitro, and collected after incubation in either colcemid or calyculin A. Slides were painted with whole-chromosome DNA fluorescent probes (FISH), and complex and simple chromosome exchanges in the painted genome were classified separately. Complex-type exchanges were observed at low frequencies in control subjects, and in our test subjects before the treatment. No statistically significant increase in the yield of complex-type exchanges was induced by the space flight. Radiation therapy induced a high fraction of complex exchanges, but no significant differences could be detected between patients treated with accelerated carbon ions or X-rays. Complex chromosomal rearrangements do not represent a practical biomarker of radiation quality in our test subjects. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Fission barriers for Po nuclei produced in complete fusion reactions with heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sagaidak, R. N.; Andreyev, A. N.

    2009-05-15

    Evaporation residues and fission excitation functions obtained in complete fusion reactions leading to Po compound nuclei have been analyzed in the framework of the standard statistical model. Macroscopic fission barriers deduced from the cross-section data analysis are compared with the predictions of various theoretical models and available data. A drop in the Po barriers with the decrease in a neutron number was found, which is stronger than predicted by any theory. The presence of entrance channel effects and collective excitations in the compound nucleus decay is considered as a possible reason for the barrier reduction.

  4. Comparison study of the charge density distribution induced by heavy ions and pulsed lasers in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Kai; Cao, Zhou; Xue, Yu-Xiong; Yang, Shi-Yu

    2010-01-01

    Heavy ions and pulsed lasers are important means to simulate the ionization damage effects on semiconductor materials. The analytic solution of high-energy heavy ion energy loss in silicon has been obtained using the Bethe-Bloch formula and the Kobetich-Katz theory, and some ionization damage parameters of Fe ions in silicon, such as the track structure and ionized charge density distribution, have been calculated and analyzed according to the theoretical calculation results. Using the Gaussian function and Beer's law, the parameters of the track structure and charge density distribution induced by a pulsed laser in silicon have also been calculated and compared with those of Fe ions in silicon, which provides a theoretical basis for ionization damage effect modeling.

  5. Nanolesions induced by heavy ions in human tissues: Experimental and theoretical studies

    PubMed Central

    Bleicher, Marcus; Burigo, Lucas; Herrlitz, Maren; Krämer, Michael; Mishustin, Igor; Müller, Iris; Natale, Francesco; Pshenichnov, Igor; Schramm, Stefan; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Wälzlein, Cathrin

    2012-01-01

    Summary The biological effects of energetic heavy ions are attracting increasing interest for their applications in cancer therapy and protection against space radiation. The cascade of events leading to cell death or late effects starts from stochastic energy deposition on the nanometer scale and the corresponding lesions in biological molecules, primarily DNA. We have developed experimental techniques to visualize DNA nanolesions induced by heavy ions. Nanolesions appear in cells as “streaks” which can be visualized by using different DNA repair markers. We have studied the kinetics of repair of these “streaks” also with respect to the chromatin conformation. Initial steps in the modeling of the energy deposition patterns at the micrometer and nanometer scale were made with MCHIT and TRAX models, respectively. PMID:23019551

  6. Can induced theta vacua be created in heavy-Ion collisions?

    PubMed

    Buckley; Fugleberg; Zhitnitsky

    2000-05-22

    We discuss a phenomenon important to the development of the early Universe which may be experimentally testable in heavy-ion collisions. An arbitrary induced straight theta vacuum state should be created in heavy-ion collisions, similar to the creation of the disoriented chiral condensate. It should be a large domain with a wrong straight theta(ind) not equal0 orientation which will mimic the physics of the early Universe when it is believed that the fundamental parameter straight theta(fund) not equal0. We test this idea numerically in a simple model where we study the evolution of the phases of the chiral condensates in QCD with two quark flavors with nonzero straight theta(ind) parameter. We see the formation of a nonzero straight theta(ind) vacuum on a time scale of 10(-23) s. PMID:10990805

  7. Heavy-ion induced single-event upset in integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    The cosmic ray environment in space can affect the operation of Integrated Circuit (IC) devices via the phenomenon of Single Event Upset (SEU). In particular, heavy ions passing through an IC can induce sufficient integrated current (charge) to alter the state of a bistable circuit, for example a memory cell. The SEU effect is studied in great detail in both static and dynamic memory devices, as well as microprocessors fabricated from bipolar, Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) and N channel Metal Oxide Semiconductor (NMOS) technologies. Each device/process reflects its individual characteristics (minimum scale geometry/process parameters) via a unique response to the direct ionization of electron hole pairs by heavy ion tracks. A summary of these analytical and experimental SEU investigations is presented.

  8. Identification of heavy-ion radiation-induced microRNAs in rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Liang, Shujian; Hang, Xiaoming; Xiang, Yingxia; Cheng, Zhenlong; Li, Wenjian; Shi, Jinming; Huang, Lei; Sun, Yeqing

    2011-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small non-coding RNAs, which play significant roles in regulating development and stress responses in plant. As an excellent model organism for studying the effects of environmental stress, rice has been used to assess the damage of the space radiation environment for decades. Heavy-ions radiation show higher relative biological effectiveness compared to other cosmic-rays radiation. To identify the specific miRNAs that underlie biological effects of heavy-ion radiation, the germinated seeds of rice were exposed to 1 Gy, 10 Gy and 20 Gy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation, respectively. Analysis of phenotype indicated that 20 Gy dose of heavy-ion radiation was the semi-lethal dose of rice seedling. The microarray of μparaflo™ chip was employed to monitor the expression profiles of miRNAs in rice (Oryza sativa) under 20 Gy dose of radiation stress. miR164a, miR164c, miR164d and miR156a-j were identified as heavy-ion radiation-induced miRNAs. miR164 and miR156 family were increased in all three exposed samples by using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-RCP). As targets of miR156 and miR164, SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING-LIKE (SPL) transcription factors and NAM/ATAF/CUC (NAC) transcription factors expression were down-regulated correlating with an up-regulated level of the regulated miRNAs. Since SPL transcription factors and NAC transcription factors regulated growth and development of plant, we used 2-dimension electrophoresis (2-DE) gel to analyze changes of functional proteins in 20 Gy exposed samples. It was evident that both the height and survival rates of seedlings were markedly decreased. The abundance of some developmentally regulated proteins was also changed. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report heavy-ion radiation stress responsive miRNAs in plant. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of space biology.

  9. Enhancement of impact-induced mechanoluminescence by swift heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, T. Z.; Terasawa, Y.; Xu, C. N.; Yamada, H.; Zhang, L.; Iwase, H.; Kawai, M.

    2012-01-02

    In this Letter, we report a strategy using swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation to enhance the impact-induced mechanoluminescence (ML) in ML materials. The impact-induced ML intensity of CaSrAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}:Eu{sup 2+} was enhanced by about one order of magnitude by using SHI irradiation. Furthermore, the enhancement was found to depend on electronic stopping power and irradiation fluence. The density of traps of a type suitable for impact-induced ML is considered to be increased by the SHI irradiation, resulting in the impact-induced ML enhancement.

  10. Gene expression profiling of breast cells induced by X-rays and heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Roy, D; Guida, P; Zhou, G; Echiburu-Chau, C; Calaf, G M

    2008-05-01

    Several genetic aberrations and gene expression changes have been shown to occur when cells are exposed to various types of radiation. The integrity of DNA depends upon several processes that include DNA damage recognition and repair, replication, transcription and cell cycle regulation. Ionizing radiation has many sources, including radon decay from the soil and X-rays from medical practice. Epidemiological evidence indicates a risk for cancer by inducing genetic alterations through DNA damage, and molecular alterations have been reported in epidemiological studies of the A-bomb survivors. A spontaneously immortalized human breast epithelial cell model, MCF-10F, was used to examine the gene expression profiling of breast cells induced by X-ray and heavy ion exposure, by a cDNA expression array of DNA damage and repair genes. This cell line was exposed to 10, 50, 100 and 200 cGy of either X-rays or heavy ions and gene expression profiles were studied. Results indicated that out of a total of 161 genes, 38 were differentially expressed by X-ray treatment and 24 by heavy ion (Fe(+2)) treatment. Eight genes were common to both treatments and were confirmed by Northern blot analysis: BRCA1, BIRC2/CIAP1, CENP-E, DDB1, MRE11A, RAD54/ATRX, Wip1 and XPF/ERCC4. A number of candidate genes reported here may be useful molecular biomarkers of radiation exposure in breast cells. PMID:18425356

  11. Irradiation effects of graphene and thin layer graphite induced by swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jian; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Sheng-Xia; Zhai, Peng-Fei; Yao, Hui-Jun; Duan, Jing-Lai; Guo, Hang; Hou, Ming-Dong; Sun, You-Mei

    2015-08-01

    Graphene and thin graphite films deposited on SiO2/Si are irradiated by swift heavy ions (209Bi, 9.5 MeV/u) with the fluences in a range of 1011 ions/cm2-1012 ions/cm2 at room temperature. Both pristine and irradiated samples are investigated by Raman spectroscopy. For pristine graphite films, the “blue shift” of 2D bond and the “red shift” of G bond with the decrease of thickness are found in the Raman spectra. For both irradiated graphene and thin graphite films, the disorder-induced D peak and D‧ peak are detected at the fluence above a threshold Φth. The thinner the film, the lower the Φth is. In this work, the graphite films thicker than 60 nm reveal defect free via the absence of a D bond signal under the swift heavy ion irradiation till the fluence of 2.6 × 1012 ions/cm2. For graphite films thinner than 6 nm, the area ratios between D peak and G peak increase sharply with reducing film thickness. It concludes that it is much easier to induce defects in thinner films than in thicker ones by swift heavy ions. The intensities of the D peak and D‧ peak increase with increasing ion fluence, which predicts the continuous impacting of swift heavy ions can lead to the increasing of defects in samples. Different defect types are detected in graphite films of different thickness values. The main defect types are discussed via the various intensity ratios between the D peak and D‧ peak (HD/HD‧). Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11179003, 10975164, 10805062, 11005134, and 11275237).

  12. Study of near-stability nuclei populated as fission fragments in heavy-ion fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fotiadis, Nikolaos; Nelson, Ronald O; Devlin, Matthew; Cizewski, Jolie A; Krucken, Reiner; Clark, R M; Fallon, Paul; Lee, I Yang; Macchiavelli, Agusto O; Becker, John A; Younes, Walid

    2010-01-01

    Examples are presented to illustrate the power of prompt {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of fission fragments from compound nuclei with A {approx} 200 formed in fusion-evaporation reactions in experiments using the Gammasphere Ge-detector array. Complementary methods, such as Coulomb excitation and deep-inelastic processes, are also discussed. In other cases (n, xn{gamma}) reactions on stable isotopes have been used to establish neutron excitation functions for {gamma}-rays using a pulsed 'white'-neutron source, coupled to a high-energy-resolution germanium-detector array. The excitation functions can unambiguously assign {gamma}-rays to a specific reaction product. Results from all these methods bridge the gaps in the systematics of high-spin states between the neutron-deficient and neutron-rich nuclei. Results near shell closures should motivate new shell model calculations.

  13. [Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions]. Annual progress report, [January 1992--February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1993-02-01

    Completed work is summarized on the topics of excitation energy division in deep-inelastic reactions and the onset of multifragmentation in La-induced reactions at E/A = 45 MeV. Magnetic fields are being calculated for the PHOBOS detector system, a two-arm multiparticle spectrometer for studying low-transverse-momentum particles produced at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The Maryland Forward Array is being developed for detection of the reaction products from very peripheral collisions; it consists of two individual units of detectors: the annular silicon detector in front and the plastic phoswich detector at back.

  14. Fission and cluster decay of the {sup 76}Sr nucleus in the ground state and formed in heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Raj K.; Sharma, Manoj K.; Singh, Sarbjit; Nouicer, Rachid; Beck, Christian

    1997-12-01

    Calculations for fission and cluster decay of {sup 76}Sr are presented for this nucleus to be in its ground state or formed as an excited compound system in heavy-ion reactions. The predicted mass distribution, for the dynamical collective mass transfer process assumed for fission of {sup 76}Sr, is clearly asymmetric, favoring {alpha} nuclei. Cluster decay is studied within a preformed cluster model, both for ground-state to ground-state decays and from excited compound system to the ground state(s) or excited states(s) of the fragments. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Nitric oxide-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by heavy-ion microbeam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Hideki; Funayama, Tomoo; Yokota, Yuichiro; Otsuka, Kensuke; Maeda, Munetoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-01

    In general, a radiation-induced bystander response is known to be a cellular response induced in non-irradiated cells after receiving bystander signaling factors released from directly irradiated cells within a cell population. Bystander responses induced by high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions at low fluence are an important health problem for astronauts in space. Bystander responses are mediated via physical cell-cell contact, such as gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and/or diffusive factors released into the medium in cell culture conditions. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known major initiator/mediator of intercellular signaling within culture medium during bystander responses. In this study, we investigated the NO-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by high-LET argon (Ar)-ion microbeam irradiation of normal human fibroblasts. Foci formation by DNA double-strand break repair proteins was induced in non-irradiated cells, which were co-cultured with those irradiated by high-LET Ar-ion microbeams in the same culture plate. Foci formation was suppressed significantly by pretreatment with an NO scavenger. Furthermore, NO-mediated reproductive cell death was also induced in bystander cells. Phosphorylation of NF-κB and Akt were induced during NO-mediated bystander signaling in the irradiated and bystander cells. However, the activation of these proteins depended on the incubation time after irradiation. The accumulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a downstream target of NO and NF-κB, was observed in the bystander cells 6 h after irradiation but not in the directly irradiated cells. Our findings suggest that Akt- and NF-κB-dependent signaling pathways involving COX-2 play important roles in NO-mediated high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander responses. In addition, COX-2 may be used as a molecular marker of high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander cells to distinguish them from directly irradiated cells, although this may depend on the time

  16. Nitric oxide-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by heavy-ion microbeam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Hideki; Funayama, Tomoo; Yokota, Yuichiro; Otsuka, Kensuke; Maeda, Munetoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-01

    In general, a radiation-induced bystander response is known to be a cellular response induced in non-irradiated cells after receiving bystander signaling factors released from directly irradiated cells within a cell population. Bystander responses induced by high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions at low fluence are an important health problem for astronauts in space. Bystander responses are mediated via physical cell-cell contact, such as gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and/or diffusive factors released into the medium in cell culture conditions. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known major initiator/mediator of intercellular signaling within culture medium during bystander responses. In this study, we investigated the NO-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by high-LET argon (Ar)-ion microbeam irradiation of normal human fibroblasts. Foci formation by DNA double-strand break repair proteins was induced in non-irradiated cells, which were co-cultured with those irradiated by high-LET Ar-ion microbeams in the same culture plate. Foci formation was suppressed significantly by pretreatment with an NO scavenger. Furthermore, NO-mediated reproductive cell death was also induced in bystander cells. Phosphorylation of NF-κB and Akt were induced during NO-mediated bystander signaling in the irradiated and bystander cells. However, the activation of these proteins depended on the incubation time after irradiation. The accumulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a downstream target of NO and NF-κB, was observed in the bystander cells 6 h after irradiation but not in the directly irradiated cells. Our findings suggest that Akt- and NF-κB-dependent signaling pathways involving COX-2 play important roles in NO-mediated high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander responses. In addition, COX-2 may be used as a molecular marker of high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander cells to distinguish them from directly irradiated cells, although this may depend on the time

  17. Single ion induced surface nanostructures: a comparison between slow highly charged and swift heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Aumayr, Friedrich; Facsko, Stefan; El-Said, Ayman S; Trautmann, Christina; Schleberger, Marika

    2011-10-01

    This topical review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the formation of surface nanostructures, an intriguing phenomenon in ion-surface interaction due to the impact of individual ions. In many solid targets, swift heavy ions produce narrow cylindrical tracks accompanied by the formation of a surface nanostructure. More recently, a similar nanometric surface effect has been revealed for the impact of individual, very slow but highly charged ions. While swift ions transfer their large kinetic energy to the target via ionization and electronic excitation processes (electronic stopping), slow highly charged ions produce surface structures due to potential energy deposited at the top surface layers. Despite the differences in primary excitation, the similarity between the nanostructures is striking and strongly points to a common mechanism related to the energy transfer from the electronic to the lattice system of the target. A comparison of surface structures induced by swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions provides a valuable insight to better understand the formation mechanisms. PMID:21900733

  18. Review of heavy-ion induced desorption studies for particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahner, Edgar

    2008-10-01

    During high-intensity heavy-ion operation of several particle accelerators worldwide, large dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were caused by lost beam ions that impacted under grazing angle onto the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced desorption, observed, for example, at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion intensity, luminosity, and beam lifetime of the accelerator. For the heavy-ion program at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider collisions between beams of fully stripped lead (Pb82+208) ions with a beam energy of 2.76TeV/u and a nominal luminosity of 1027cm-2s-1 are foreseen. The GSI future project FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) aims at a beam intensity of 1012 uranium (U28+238) ions per second to be extracted from the synchrotron SIS18. Over the past years an experimental effort has been made to study the observed dynamic vacuum degradations, which are important to understand and overcome for present and future particle accelerators. The paper reviews the results obtained in several laboratories using dedicated test setups, the mitigation techniques found, and their implementation in accelerators.

  19. Identification of heavy-ion radiation-induced microRNAs in rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Liang, Shujian; Hang, Xiaoming; Sun, Yeqing

    As an excellent model organism for studying the effects of environmental stress, rice was used to assess biological effect of the space radiation environment. Rice abnormal development or growth was observed frequently after seeds space flight. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small non-coding regulatory RNAs, which have significant roles in regulating development and stress responses in plant. To identify whether the miRNAs were involved in biological effects of heavy-ion radiation, the germinated seeds of rice were exposed to 20 Gy dose of 12 C heavy-ion radiation which could induce rice development retarded. The microarray was used to monitor rice (Oryza sativa) miRNAs expression profiles under radiation stress. Members of miR164 family and miR156a-j were found up-regulated significantly, and confirmed by relative quantifi-cation real-time PCR. We found that the expression of the miR156 and miR164 increased and targets genes expression decrease was closely bound up with the irradiation rice phenotypes changes.

  20. Heavy ion induced DNA-DSB in yeast and mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loebrich, M.; Ikpeme, S.; Kiefer, J.

    1994-01-01

    Molecular changes at the DNA are assumed to be the main cause for radiation effects in a number of organisms. During the course of the last decades techniques have been developed for measuring DNA double-strand breaks (dsb), generally assumed to be the most critical DNA lesions. The outcome of all those different approaches portrays a collection of data useful for a theoretical description of radiation action mechanisms. However, in the case of heavy ion induced DNA dsb the picture is not quite clear yet and further projects and strategies have to be developed. The biological systems studied in our group are yeast and mammalian cells. While in the case of yeast cells technical and methodical reasons highlight these organisms mammalian cells reach greater importance when dsb repair studies are performed. In both types of organisms the technique of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is applied, although with different modifications and evaluation procedures mainly due to the different genome sizes.

  1. Multifragmentation in intermediate energy {sup 129}Xe-induced heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tso, Kin

    1996-05-01

    The {sup 129}Xe-induced reactions on {sup nat}Cu, {sup 89}Y, {sup 165}Ho, and {sup 197}Au at bombarding energies of E/A = 40 & 60 MeV have been studied theoretically and experimentally in order to establish the underlying mechanism of multifragmentation at intermediate energy heavy-Ion collisions. Nuclear disks formed in central heavy-ion collisions, as simulated by means of Boltzmann-like kinetic equations, break up into several fragments due to a new kind of Rayleigh-like surface instability. A sheet of liquid, stable in the limit of non-interacting surfaces, is shown to become unstable due to surface-surface interactions. The onset of this instability is determined analytically. A thin bubble behaves like a sheet and is susceptible to the surface instability through the crispation mode. The Coulomb effects associated with the depletion of charges in the central cavity of nuclear bubbles are investigated. The onset of Coulomb instability is demonstrated for perturbations of the radial mode. Experimental intermediate-mass-fragment multiplicity distributions for the {sup 129}Xe-induced reactions are shown to be binomial at each transverse energy. From these distributions, independent of the specific target, an elementary binary decay probability p can be extracted that has a thermal dependence. Thus it is inferred that multifragmentation is reducible to a combination of nearly independent emission processes. If sequential decay is assumed, the increase of p with transverse energy implies a contraction of the emission time scale. The sensitivity of p to the lower Z threshold in the definition of intermediate-mass-fragments points to a physical Poisson simulations of the particle multiplicities show that the weak auto-correlation between the fragment multiplicity and the transverse energy does not distort a Poisson distribution into a binomial distribution. The effect of device efficiency on the experimental results has also been studied.

  2. Resection is a major repair pathway of heavy ion-induced DNA lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, Marco; Averbeck, Nicole; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela

    Space radiation include densely ionizing heavy ions, which can produce clustered DNA damage with high frequency in human cells. Repair of these complex lesions is generally assumed to be more difficult than for simple double-strand breaks. We show here that human cells use break resection with increasing frequency after exposure to heavy ions. Resection can lead to misrepair of the DNA lesion, via microhomology mediated end-joining. Resection can therefore be responsible for the increased effectiveness of heavy ions in the induction of mutations and genetic late effects.

  3. Carbon Heavy-ion Radiation Induced Biological effects on Oryza sativa L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Li, Xishan; Gong, Ning; Meng, Qingmei; Liu, Jiawei; Wang, Ting

    2016-07-01

    Large number of researches on rice after spaceflights indicated that rice was a favorable model organism to study biological effects induced by space radiation. The stimulative effect could often be found on rice seedlings after irradiation by low-dose energetic heavy-ion radiation. Spaceflight also could induce stimulative effect on kinds of seeds. To further understand the mechanism of low-dose radiation biological effects and the dose range, the germinated rice seeds which were irradiated by different doses of carbon heavy-ion (0, 0.02, 0.1, 0.2, 1, 2, 5, 10, 15 and 20Gy, LET=27.3keV/µm) were used as materials to study. By investigating the variation of rice phenotype under different doses, we found that 2Gy radiation dose was a dividing point of the phenotypic variation. Transmission electron microscopy was used to observe the variation of mitochondria, chloroplast, endoplasmic reticulum, ribosome and nucleus in mesophyll cell of rice apical meristem at 24 hours after radiation with different doses. The cells were not apparently physiologically damaged when the dose of radiation was less than 2Gy. The number of chloroplast did not change significantly, but the number of mitochondria was significantly increased, and gathered around in the chloroplast and endoplasmic reticulum; the obvious lesion of chloroplast and mitochondria were found at the mesophyll cells when radiation dose was higher than 2Gy. The mitochondria were swelling and appearing blurred crest. The chloroplast and mitochondrial mutation rate increased significantly (p<0.01). These phenomena showed that cell biological changes may be the reasons of the stimulation and inhibition effects with the boundary of 2Gy. Since mitochondrial was an important organelle involved in the antioxidative systems, its dysfunction could result in the increase of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation. We found that the growth stimulation induced by low-dose radiation mainly occurred at three-leaf stage along

  4. Effects of implanted solutes and heavy-ion cascades on the kinetics of radiation-induced segregation in binary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacobbe, Michael John, III

    Various electron and dual ion irradiations were conducted to investigate the effect of implanted solutes and heavy-ion cascades on the fluxes of freely-migrating defects which drive radiation-induced segregation (RIS) in Ni-9at.%Al and Cu-1at.%Au alloys. To study the effect of solute implantation on RIS, the segregation rate of Al atoms in Ni-9at.%Al following the implantation of Ne, Sc, or Zr was quantified using in-situ measurements of the growth rate of gamma '-Ni3Al precipitate zones produced during 900-keV electron irradiations between 450 and 625°C in a HVEM. It was found that the implantation of 0.06at.%Ne, 0.12at.%Sc, and 0.06at.%Zr resulted in very strong, small, and no RIS suppression in Ni-9at.%Al, respectively. The Ne effect increased with increasing implantation dose at 450°C and with increasing electron irradiation temperature between 550 and 625°C. In-situ Rutherford backscattering (RBS) was used to measure the RIS suppression effect of heavy-ion bombardment, i.e., 300-keV Al+, 800-keV Cu+, and 1.2-MeV Ag+, on 1.5-MeV He+-induced Au transport away from the near-surface region during concurrent He + and heavy-ion irradiation of Cu-1at.%Au at 400°C. Results demonstrated that the suppression of He+-induced RIS in Cu-1at.%Au caused by concurrent heavy-ion irradiation correlated well with the cascade volume produced by Al+, Cu+, or Ag+ per second and was independent of the heavy ion used. Computer simulations of dual beam experiments based on the Johnson-Lam model for RIS kinetics in binary alloys were also performed, and these simulations supported the RBS results.

  5. Creep of a crystalline metallic layer induced by high energy heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benyagoub, A.; Chamberod, A.; Dran, J. C.; Dunlop, A.; Garrido, F.; Klaumünzer, S.; Thomé, L.

    1996-02-01

    The atomic transport induced by ion electronic energy loss in amorphous systems is studied on metallic sandwiches irradiated at liquid nitrogen temperature with 500 MeV iodide ions delivered by the VICKSI accelerator of the Hahn-Meitner-Institut (Berlin). The sandwiches are composed of two amorphous Ni3B layers of 1 or 1.5 μm thickness embedding a crystalline Au or W layer of thickness varying from 20 to 900 nm. Rutherford backscattering experiments using a 3.6 MeV He2+ beam delivered by the ARAMIS accelerator of the CSNSM (Orsay) were performed in order to determine the modifications of the geometry of the sandwiches after swift heavy ion irradiation. The results show a huge creep of the crystalline part of the sandwiches. The magnitude of this creep depends on the nature of the crystalline layer (Au or W) and increases steadily with the irradiating ion fluence with a strain-rate decreasing with increasing layer thickness. This creep phenomenon is due to the plastic deformation process occurring in the surrounding amorphous layers and is induced by ion electronic energy loss. A simple rheological model is developed to reproduce the observed effects.

  6. Quantitative analysis of the epitaxial recrystallization effect induced by swift heavy ions in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benyagoub, A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper discusses recent results on the recrystallization effect induced by swift heavy ions (SHI) in pre-damaged silicon carbide. The recrystallization kinetics was followed by using increasing SHI fluences and by starting from different levels of initial damage within the SiC samples. The quantitative analysis of the data shows that the recrystallization rate depends drastically on the local amount of crystalline material: it is nil in fully amorphous regions and becomes more significant with increasing amount of crystalline material. For instance, in samples initially nearly half-disordered, the recrystallization rate per incident ion is found to be 3 orders of magnitude higher than what it is observed with the well-known IBIEC process using low energy ions. This high rate can therefore not be accounted for by the existing IBIEC models. Moreover, decreasing the electronic energy loss leads to a drastic reduction of the recrystallization rate. A comprehensive quantitative analysis of all the experimental results shows that the SHI induced high recrystallization rate can only be explained by a mechanism based on the melting of the amorphous zones through a thermal spike process followed by an epitaxial recrystallization initiated from the neighboring crystalline regions if the size of the latter exceeds a certain critical value. This quantitative analysis also reveals that recent molecular dynamics calculations supposed to reproduce this phenomenon are wrong since they overestimated the recrystallization rate by a factor ∼40.

  7. Heavy ion irradiation induced dislocation loops in AREVA's M5® alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hengstler-Eger, R. M.; Baldo, P.; Beck, L.; Dorner, J.; Ertl, K.; Hoffmann, P. B.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Kirk, M. A.; Petry, W.; Pikart, P.; Rempel, A.

    2012-04-01

    Pressurized water reactor (PWR) Zr-based alloy structural materials show creep and growth under neutron irradiation as a consequence of the irradiation induced microstructural changes in the alloy. A better scientific understanding of these microstructural processes can improve simulation programs for structural component deformation and simplify the development of advanced deformation resistant alloys. As in-pile irradiation leads to high material activation and requires long irradiation times, the objective of this work was to study whether ion irradiation is an applicable method to simulate typical PWR neutron damage in Zr-based alloys, with AREVA's M5® alloy as reference material. The irradiated specimens were studied by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), positron Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) and in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at different dose levels and temperatures. The irradiation induced microstructure consisted of - and -type dislocation loops with their characteristics corresponding to typical neutron damage in Zr-based alloys; it can thus be concluded that heavy ion irradiation under the chosen conditions is an excellent method to simulate PWR neutron damage.

  8. Changes in metal nanoparticle shape and size induced by swift heavy-ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, M. C.; Kluth, P.; Giulian, R.; Sprouster, D. J.; Araujo, L. L.; Schnohr, C. S.; Llewellyn, D. J.; Byrne, A. P.; Foran, G. J.; Cookson, D. J.

    2009-03-01

    Changes in the shape and size of Co, Pt and Au nanoparticles induced by swift heavy-ion irradiation (SHII) have been characterized using a combination of transmission electron microscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption near-edge structure. Elemental nanoparticles of diameters 2-15 nm were first formed in amorphous SiO 2 by ion implantation and thermal annealing and then irradiated at room temperature with 27-185 MeV Au ions as a function of fluence. Spherical nanoparticles below a minimum diameter (4-7 nm) remained spherical under SHII but progressively decreased in size as a result of dissolution into the SiO 2 matrix. Spherical nanoparticles above the minimum diameter threshold were transformed to elongated rods aligned with the ion beamdirection. The nanorod width saturated at an electronic energy deposition dependent value, progressively increasing from 4-6 to 7-10 nm (at 5-18 keV/nm, respectively) while the nanorod length exhibited a broad distribution consistent with that of the unirradiated spherical nanoparticles. The threshold diameter for spherical nanoparticle elongation was comparable to the saturation value of nanorod width. We correlate this saturation value with the diameter of the molten track induced in amorphous SiO 2 by SHII. In summary, changes in nanoparticle shape and size are governed to a large extent by the ion irradiation parameters.

  9. Swift heavy-ion irradiation-induced shape and structural transformation in cobalt nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprouster, D. J.; Giulian, R.; Araujo, L. L.; Kluth, P.; Johannessen, B.; Cookson, D. J.; Ridgway, M. C.

    2011-06-01

    The shape and structural evolution of Co nanoparticles embedded in SiO2 and subjected to swift heavy-ion irradiation have been investigated over a wide energy and fluence range. Modifications of the nanoparticle size and shape were characterized with transmission electron microscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering. Nanoparticles below a threshold diameter remained spherical in shape and progressively decreased in size under irradiation due to dissolution. Nanoparticles above the threshold diameter transformed into nanorods with their major dimension parallel to the incident ion direction. Modifications of the atomic-scale structure of the Co nanoparticles were identified with x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the x-ray absorption near-edge spectra showed that prior to irradiation all Co atoms were in a metallic state, while after irradiation Co atoms were in both oxidized and metallic environments, the former consistent with dissolution. The evolution of the nanoparticle short-range order was determined from extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Structural changes in the Co nanoparticles as a function of ion fluence included an increase in disorder and asymmetric deviation from a Gaussian interatomic distance distribution coupled with a decrease in bondlength. Such changes resulted from the irradiation-induced decrease in nanoparticle size and subsequent dissolution.

  10. Swift-heavy-ion-induced damage formation in III-V binary and ternary semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnohr, C. S.; Kluth, P.; Giulian, R.; Llewellyn, D. J.; Byrne, A. P.; Cookson, D. J.; Ridgway, M. C.

    2010-02-01

    Damage formation in InP, GaP, InAs, GaAs, and the related ternary alloys Ga0.50In0.50P and Ga0.47In0.53As irradiated at room temperature with 185 MeV Au ions was studied using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy in channeling configuration, transmission electron microscopy, and small-angle x-ray scattering. Despite nearly identical ion-energy loss in these materials, their behavior under swift-heavy-ion irradiation is strikingly different: InP and Ga0.50In0.50P are readily amorphized, GaP and GaAs remain almost undamaged and InAs and Ga0.47In0.53As exhibit intermediate behavior. A material-dependent combination of irradiation-induced damage formation and annealing is proposed to describe the different responses of the III-V materials to electronic energy loss.

  11. In situ study of heavy ion induced radiation damage in NF616 (P92) alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topbasi, Cem; Motta, Arthur T.; Kirk, Mark A.

    2012-06-01

    NF616 is a nominal 9Cr ferritic-martensitic steel that is amongst the primary candidates for cladding and duct applications in the Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor, one of the Generation IV nuclear energy systems. In this study, an in situ investigation of the microstructure evolution in NF616 under heavy ion irradiation has been conducted. NF616 was irradiated to 8.4 dpa at 50 K and to 7.6 dpa at 473 K with 1 MeV Kr ions. Nano-sized defects first appeared as white dots in dark-field TEM images and their areal density increased until saturation (˜6 dpa). Dynamic observations at 50 K and 473 K showed appearance and disappearance of TEM-visible defect clusters under irradiation that continued above saturation dose. Quantitative analysis showed no significant change in the average size (˜3-4 nm) and distribution of defect clusters with increasing dose at 50 K and 473 K. These results indicate a cascade-driven process of microstructure evolution under irradiation in these alloys that involves both the formation of TEM-visible defect clusters by various degrees of cascade overlap and cascade induced defect cluster elimination. According to this mechanism, saturation of defect cluster density is reached when the rate of defect cluster formation by overlap is equal to the rate of cluster elimination during irradiation.

  12. Recent results on fast electron production induced by energetic heavy ions on thin solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzanò, G.; Anzalone, A.; Arena, N.; De Filippo, E.; Geraci, M.; Giustolisi, F.; Pagano, A.; Rothard, H.; Volant, C.

    2003-08-01

    In order to study the emission of energetic electrons induced by the impact of swift heavy ions on thin solid targets, we carried out a series of experiments at the Superconducting Cyclotron of the Catania Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) in November and December 2001. We bombarded solid thin targets, ranging from carbon to bismuth, with different ion beams at fixed velocity, i.e. ˜23 MeV/nucleon 197Au 36+, 58Ni 14+ and 12C 3+. Absolute velocity spectra were measured in a wide laboratory angular range, from 1.5° to 175°. At forward angles, besides the well-known convoy and binary encounter components with the beam velocity and two times the beam velocity respectively, we observe also a high velocity tail and an intermediate velocity component. At backward laboratory angles, the spectra remain complex, still presenting an energetic tail. These electron velocity spectra strongly depend on the beam and target atomic numbers. We suggest a Fermi-Shuttle (or multiscattering) mechanism and an in-flight-emission of projectile Auger electrons to explain some of the observed features in the velocity spectra.

  13. Fission induced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of creating a plasma from fission fragments was investigated, as well as the probability of utilizing the energy of these particles to create population inversion leading to laser action. Eventually, it is hoped that the same medium could be used for both fissioning and lasing, thus avoiding inefficiences in converting one form of energy to the other. A central problem in understanding a fission induced plasma is to obtain an accurate model of the electron behavior; some calculations are presented to this end. The calculations are simple, providing a compendium of processes for reference.

  14. Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1981-07-01

    The research summarized in this report was performed during the period August 1, 1980 to June 30, 1981. The experimental emphasis in the heavy-ion-induced reaction studies continues to be discrete charge and mass resolution of all projectile-like fragments measured. In an experiment performed at the Argonne National Laboratory Superconducting LINAC, the /sup 37/Cl beam was used to bombard targets of /sup 40/Ca and /sup 209/Bi. This experiment is compared to results of our previous /sup 56/Fe-induced experiments. Attempts were made to extend the /sup 56/Fe reactions to lower energies at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory SuperHILAC. In a desire to improve the mass and charge resolution of previous experiments we tried a time-of-flight telescope employing both a channel-plate start and stop signal. This was backed by an ion chamber ..delta..E and silicon E detector. The operational difficulties encountered are being corrected and we hope to have a reliable system ready this fall. Studies of target fragmentation in /sup 4/He-induced reactions are continuing via experiments and model calculations. The program which began at the University of Maryland Cyclotron has been continued at the Indiana University Cyclotron with 120 and 200 MeV /sup 4/He incident on /sup 12/C and /sup 27/Al targets. While the Indiana data are currently being analyzed and no results are yet available, a summary of the Maryland work is given. Also presented in this section are the model calculations used to describe the data. 28 refs.

  15. Comparison of space flight and heavy ion radiation induced genomic/epigenomic mutations in rice (Oryza sativa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jinming; Lu, Weihong; Sun, Yeqing

    2014-04-01

    Rice seeds, after space flight and low dose heavy ion radiation treatment were cultured on ground. Leaves of the mature plants were obtained for examination of genomic/epigenomic mutations by using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and methylation sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) method, respectively. The mutation sites were identified by fragment recovery and sequencing. The heritability of the mutations was detected in the next generation. Results showed that both space flight and low dose heavy ion radiation can induce significant alterations on rice genome and epigenome (P < 0.05). For both genetic and epigenetic assays, while there was no significant difference in mutation rates and their ability to be inherited to the next generation, the site of mutations differed between the space flight and radiation treated groups. More than 50% of the mutation sites were shared by two radiation treated groups, radiated with different LET value and dose, while only about 20% of the mutation sites were shared by space flight group and radiation treated group. Moreover, in space flight group, we found that DNA methylation changes were more prone to occur on CNG sequence than CG sequence. Sequencing results proved that both space flight and heavy ion radiation induced mutations were widely spread on rice genome including coding region and repeated region. Our study described and compared the characters of space flight and low dose heavy ion radiation induced genomic/epigenomic mutations. Our data revealed the mechanisms of application of space environment for mutagenesis and crop breeding. Furthermore, this work implicated that the nature of mutations induced under space flight conditions may involve factors beyond ion radiation.

  16. Swift heavy ion irradiation induced electrical degradation in deca-nanometer MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yao; Yang, Zhimei; Gong, Min; Gao, Bo; Li, Yun; Lin, Wei; Li, Jinbo; Xia, Zhuohui

    2016-09-01

    In this work, degradation of the electrical characteristics of 65 nm nMOSFETs under swift heavy ion irradiation is investigated. It was found that a heavy ion can generate a localized region of physical damage (ion latent track) in the gate oxide. This is the likely cause for the increased gate leakage current and soft breakdown (SBD) then hard breakdown (HBD) of the gate oxide. Except in the case of HBD, the devices retain their functionality but with degraded transconductance. The degraded gate oxide exhibits early breakdown behavior compatible with the model of defect generation and percolation path formation in the percolation model.

  17. Heavy Ion Microbeam- and Broadbeam-Induced Current Transients in SiGe HBTs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Reed, R. A.; McMorrow, D.; Vizkelethy, G.; Ferlet-Cavrois, V.; Baggio, J.; Duhamel, O.; Moen, K. A.; Phillips, S. D.; Diestelhorst, R. M.; Cressler, J. D.; Sutton, A. K.; Raman, A.; Turowski, M.; Dodd, P. E.; Alles, M. L.; Schrimpf, R. D.; Marshall, P. W.; Labeal, K. A.

    2009-01-01

    IBM 5AM SiGe HBT is device-under-test. High-speed measurement setup. Low-impedance current transient measurements. SNL, JYFL, GANIL. Microbeam to broadbeam position inference. Improvement to state-of-the-art. Microbeam (SNL) transients reveal position dependent heavy ion response, Unique response for different device regions Unique response for different bias schemes. Similarities to TPA pulsed-laser data. Broadbeam transients (JYFL and GANIL) provide realistic heavy ion response. Feedback using microbeam data. Overcome issues of LET and ion range with microbeam. **Angled Ar-40 data in full paper. Data sets yield first-order results, suitable for TCAD calibration feedback.

  18. Exposure to Heavy Ion Radiation Induces Persistent Oxidative Stress in Mouse Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Kallakury, Bhaskar V. S.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress is attributed to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to radiolysis of water molecules and is short lived. Persistent oxidative stress has also been observed after radiation exposure and is implicated in the late effects of radiation. The goal of this study was to determine if long-term oxidative stress in freshly isolated mouse intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) is dependent on radiation quality at a dose relevant to fractionated radiotherapy. Mice (C57BL/6J; 6 to 8 weeks; female) were irradiated with 2 Gy of γ-rays, a low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, and intestinal tissues and IEC were collected 1 year after radiation exposure. Intracellular ROS, mitochondrial function, and antioxidant activity in IEC were studied by flow cytometry and biochemical assays. Oxidative DNA damage, cell death, and mitogenic activity in IEC were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Effects of γ radiation were compared to 56Fe radiation (iso-toxic dose: 1.6 Gy; energy: 1000 MeV/nucleon; LET: 148 keV/µm), we used as representative of high-LET radiation, since it's one of the important sources of high Z and high energy (HZE) radiation in cosmic rays. Radiation quality affected the level of persistent oxidative stress with higher elevation of intracellular ROS and mitochondrial superoxide in high-LET 56Fe radiation compared to unirradiated controls and γ radiation. NADPH oxidase activity, mitochondrial membrane damage, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were greater in 56Fe-irradiated mice. Compared to γ radiation oxidative DNA damage was higher, cell death ratio was unchanged, and mitotic activity was increased after 56Fe radiation. Taken together our results indicate that long-term functional dysregulation of mitochondria and increased NADPH oxidase activity are major contributing factors towards heavy ion radiation-induced persistent oxidative stress in IEC with potential for neoplastic transformation. PMID

  19. Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) Studies and Focused Heavy Ion Microprobe Facility at the University of North Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B. N.; Renfrow, S. N.; Jin, J.; Hughes, B. F.; Duggan, J. L.; McDaniel, F. D.

    1998-03-01

    As the feature sizes reduce, semiconductor devices increase their sensitivity to ionizing radiation that creates electron-hole pairs. The induced charge collection by the device p-n junctions can alter the state of the device, most commonly causing memory errors. To design robust devices immune to these effects, it is essential to create and test accurate models of this process. Such model-based testing requires energetic heavy ions whose number, arrival time, spatial location, energy, and angle can be controlled when they strike the integrated circuit. IBMAL is building a strong focusing lens system with spatial resolution 1μ m, raster-scanning capabilities for alpha particles and heavier ions. A detailed description of the focused heavy ion microprobe facility and IBICC experimental results conducted at Sandia National Laboratory will be presented.

  20. Heavy-ion-induced sucrose radicals investigated using EPR and UV spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Karakirova, Yordanka; Yordanov, Nicola D

    2015-05-01

    The potential use of a sucrose dosimeter for estimating both linear energy transfer (LET) and the absorbed dose of heavy ion and X-ray radiation was investigated. The stable free radicals were produced when sucrose was irradiated with heavy ions, such as helium, carbon, silicon and neon ions, and when the X-ray radiation was similar to the obtained electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, which were ∼7 mT wide and composed of several hyperfine structures. In addition, the total spin concentration resulting from heavy-ion irradiation increased linearly as the absorbed dose increased, and decreased logarithmically as the LET increased. These empirical relations imply that the LET at a certain dose can be determined from the spin concentration. For sucrose and alanine, both cross-sections following C-ion irradiation with a 50 Gy dose were ∼1.3 × 10(-12) [μm(2)], taking into account the molecular size of the samples. The values of these cross-sections imply that multiple ionizing particles were involved in the production of stable radicals. Furthermore, UV absorbance at 267 nm of an aqueous solution of irradiated sucrose was found to linearly increase with increasing absorbed dose. Therefore, the EPR and UV results suggest that sucrose can be a useful dosimeter for heavy-ion irradiation. PMID:25480828

  1. Heavy-ion-induced sucrose radicals investigated using EPR and UV spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Karakirova, Yordanka; Yordanov, Nicola D.

    2015-01-01

    The potential use of a sucrose dosimeter for estimating both linear energy transfer (LET) and the absorbed dose of heavy ion and X-ray radiation was investigated. The stable free radicals were produced when sucrose was irradiated with heavy ions, such as helium, carbon, silicon and neon ions, and when the X-ray radiation was similar to the obtained electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, which were ∼7 mT wide and composed of several hyperfine structures. In addition, the total spin concentration resulting from heavy-ion irradiation increased linearly as the absorbed dose increased, and decreased logarithmically as the LET increased. These empirical relations imply that the LET at a certain dose can be determined from the spin concentration. For sucrose and alanine, both cross-sections following C-ion irradiation with a 50 Gy dose were ∼1.3 × 10−12 [μm2], taking into account the molecular size of the samples. The values of these cross-sections imply that multiple ionizing particles were involved in the production of stable radicals. Furthermore, UV absorbance at 267 nm of an aqueous solution of irradiated sucrose was found to linearly increase with increasing absorbed dose. Therefore, the EPR and UV results suggest that sucrose can be a useful dosimeter for heavy-ion irradiation. PMID:25480828

  2. Swift heavy ion irradiation of ZnO nanoparticles embedded in silica: Radiation-induced deoxidation and shape elongation

    SciTech Connect

    Amekura, H.; Tsuya, D.; Mitsuishi, K.; Nakayama, Y.; Okubo, N.; Ishikawa, N.; Singh, U. B.; Khan, S. A.; Avasthi, D. K.; Mohapatra, S.

    2013-11-11

    ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in amorphous SiO{sub 2} were irradiated with 200 MeV Xe{sup 14+} swift heavy ions (SHIs) to a fluence of 5.0 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. Optical linear dichroism was induced in the samples by the irradiation, indicating shape transformation of the NPs from spheres to anisotropic ones. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed that some NPs were elongated to prolate shapes; the elongated NPs consisted not of ZnO but of Zn metal. The SHI irradiation induced deoxidation of small ZnO NPs and successive shape elongation of the deoxidized metal NPs.

  3. Swift heavy ion irradiation of ZnO nanoparticles embedded in silica: Radiation-induced deoxidation and shape elongation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amekura, H.; Okubo, N.; Ishikawa, N.; Tsuya, D.; Mitsuishi, K.; Nakayama, Y.; Singh, U. B.; Khan, S. A.; Mohapatra, S.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2013-11-01

    ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in amorphous SiO2 were irradiated with 200 MeV Xe14+ swift heavy ions (SHIs) to a fluence of 5.0 × 1013 ions/cm2. Optical linear dichroism was induced in the samples by the irradiation, indicating shape transformation of the NPs from spheres to anisotropic ones. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed that some NPs were elongated to prolate shapes; the elongated NPs consisted not of ZnO but of Zn metal. The SHI irradiation induced deoxidation of small ZnO NPs and successive shape elongation of the deoxidized metal NPs.

  4. Painting analysis of chromosome aberrations induced by energetic heavy ions in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H.; Hada, M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future exploration missions High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects including cell inactivation genetic mutations and cancer induction Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults Over the years we have studied chromosomal damage in human fibroblast epithelia and lymphocyte cells exposed in vitro to energetic charged particles generated at several accelerator facilities in the world Various fluorescence in situ hybridization painting techniques have been used to identify from only the telomere region of the chromosome to every chromosome in a human cell We will summarize the results of the investigations and discuss the unique radiation signatures and biomarkers for space radiation exposure

  5. Effects of an induced electric field on the π-/π+ ratio in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Gao-Feng; Dong, Shi-Hai; Cao, Xin-Wei; Zhang, Yun-Liang

    2016-07-01

    Using an isospin- and momentum-dependent transport model, we examine the effects of an electric field induced by a variable magnetic field on the π-/π+ ratio in central to peripheral heavy-ion collisions at beam energies of 400 and 1500 MeV/nucleon. It is shown that while the induced electric field does not affect the total multiplicities of both π- and π+ mesons at both the lower beam energy of 400 MeV/nucleon and the higher beam energy of 1500 MeV/nucleon, it reduces (enhances) the emission of π-(π+) mesons in midrapidity, but enhances (reduces) the emission of π-(π+) mesons in forward and backward rapidities especially for the more peripheral collisions at the lower beam energy because of the rapidly transient variable magnetic field at more peripheral collisions and the longer reaction duration time at the lower beam energy. These findings indicate that the total π-/π+ ratio is still a precisely reliable probe of symmetry energy at both the lower and the higher beam energies, but one should consider the induced electric field when using the differential π-/π+ ratio to probe the symmetry energy especially for the lower beam energy and more peripheral collisions. Finally, the relative suppression factor based on the ratio of π-/π+ in different rapidities is proposed to be an effective probe of the induced electric field generated in heavy-ion collisions due to its maximizing effects of induced electric fields on the differential π-/π+ ratio but minimizing effects of some uncertainty factors in heavy-ion collisions.

  6. Swift heavy ion induced changes in magnetization of cobalt thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attri, Asha; Nair, Lekha

    2016-05-01

    The effects of 45 MeV Li3+ ions and 100 MeV O7+ ions irradiation on magnetic properties of nanoparticles of 25 nm Cobalt thin films, synthesized by e-beam sputtering have been studied. Significant changes in the hysteresis loop are observed with different irradiating fluence, which may be attributed to formation of cluster of defects in the nano-crystalline samples due to swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation along with the distortion in the lattice parameter.

  7. Sub-micron resolution of localized ion beam induced charge reduction in silicon detectors damaged by heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Bielejec, Edward; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Abraham, John B. S.; Doyle, Barney L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, displacement damage reduces ion beam induced charge (IBIC) through Shockley-Read-Hall recombination. Closely spaced pulses of 200 keV Si++ ions focused in a 40 nm beam spot are used to create damage cascades within 0.25 μm2 areas. Damaged areas are detected through contrast in IBIC signals generated with focused ion beams of 200 keV Si++ ions and 60 keV Li+ ions. IBIC signal reduction can be resolved over sub-micron regions of a silicon detector damaged by as few as 1000 heavy ions.

  8. Sub-micron resolution of localized ion beam induced charge reduction in silicon detectors damaged by heavy ions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Bielejec, Edward; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Abraham, John B. S.; Doyle, Barney L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, displacement damage reduces ion beam induced charge (IBIC) through Shockley-Read-Hall recombination. Closely spaced pulses of 200 keV Si++ ions focused in a 40 nm beam spot are used to create damage cascades within 0.25 μm2 areas. Damaged areas are detected through contrast in IBIC signals generated with focused ion beams of 200 keV Si++ ions and 60 keV Li+ ions. IBIC signal reduction can be resolved over sub-micron regions of a silicon detector damaged by as few as 1000 heavy ions.

  9. [Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions]. [Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1993-02-01

    Completed work is summarized on the topics of excitation energy division in deep-inelastic reactions and the onset of multifragmentation in La-induced reactions at E/A = 45 MeV. Magnetic fields are being calculated for the PHOBOS detector system, a two-arm multiparticle spectrometer for studying low-transverse-momentum particles produced at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The Maryland Forward Array is being developed for detection of the reaction products from very peripheral collisions; it consists of two individual units of detectors: the annular silicon detector in front and the plastic phoswich detector at back.

  10. Oxygen loss induced by swift heavy ions of low and high dE/dx in PMMA thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomaz, R.; Gutierres, L. I.; Morais, J.; Louette, P.; Severin, D.; Trautmann, C.; Pireaux, J. J.; Papaléo, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Investigations on the chemical modifications induced by swift heavy ions in PMMA thin films were carried out using beams of high dE/dx (2.2 GeV Bi, 14,090 eV/nm) and low dE/dx (2 MeV H, 19 eV/nm). The induced chemical modifications were monitored by XPS for films with initial thickness of 50 and 100 nm. For both beams, the irradiation decreased the amount of carbon atoms bound to oxygen (Cdbnd O and Csbnd Osbnd C), with a larger decrease of the carboxyl moiety, as expected. However, the chemical changes induced by light and heavy ions were qualitatively different. For the same mean deposited energy density, proton irradiation induced a decrease of the relative intensity of the carbon-oxygen bonds up to ∼20% larger than the irradiation with Bi ions. This suggests a greater importance of particle ejection by unzipping of PMMA chains at high dE/dx, which tends to keep the O/C ratio closer to the pristine value.

  11. Tracks and voids in amorphous Ge induced by swift heavy-ion irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, M C; Bierschenk, T; Giulian, R; Afra, B; Rodriguez, M D; Araujo, L L; Byrne, A P; Kirby, N; Pakarinen, O H; Djurabekova, F; Nordlund, K; Schleberger, M; Osmani, O; Medvedev, N; Rethfeld, B; Kluth, P

    2013-06-14

    Ion tracks formed in amorphous Ge by swift heavy-ion irradiation have been identified with experiment and modeling to yield unambiguous evidence of tracks in an amorphous semiconductor. Their underdense core and overdense shell result from quenched-in radially outward material flow. Following a solid-to-liquid phase transformation, the volume contraction necessary to accommodate the high-density molten phase produces voids, potentially the precursors to porosity, along the ion direction. Their bow-tie shape, reproduced by simulation, results from radially inward resolidification. PMID:25165936

  12. Swift heavy ion induced nano-dimensional phase separation in liquid immiscible binary Mn-Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, S. K.; Khan, S. A.; Sudheer Babu, P.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2014-08-01

    Pulsed laser deposited 60 nm thin film of homogeneous Mn0.82Bi0.18 composite has been irradiated by 100 MeV Au ions at fluence 1 × 1013 ions/cm2, and investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, magnetic hysteresis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and nanoindentation measurements. Dispersed nanostructures of soft Bi-rich phase of about 20 nm diameter emerged in a hard Mn-rich matrix on irradiation. Such structures, as synthesized by the present novel swift heavy ion irradiation approach, are usable as self-lubricating thin films.

  13. Energetic photons from intermediate energy proton- and heavy-ion-induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, W.; Bertsch, G.F.; Cassing, W.; Mosel, U.

    1986-12-01

    The cross section for emitting high energy gamma rays in heavy-ion collisions is calculated in a model based on the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation. The elementary production cross section is assumed to be neutron-proton bremsstrahlung. Comparison is made with experimental data at bombarding energies from 20 to 84 MeV/nucleon. The calculations are found to roughly reproduce the energy spectrum, bombarding energy dependence, and angular distribution. From the numerical analysis we conclude that the production of high-energy ..gamma.. rays is limited to the very early stage of the collision.

  14. Detection of microlesions induced by heavy ions using liposomes filled with fluorescent dye

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koniarek, J. P.; Thomas, J. L.; Vazquez, M.

    2004-01-01

    In cells irradiation by heavy ions has been hypothesized to produce microlesions, regions of local damage. In cell membranes this damage is thought to manifest itself in the form of holes. The primary evidence for microlesions comes from morphological studies of cell membranes, but this evidence is still controversial, especially since holes also have been observed in membranes of normal, nonirradiated, cells. However, it is possible that damage not associated with histologically discernable disruptions may still occur. In order to resolve this issue, we developed a system for detecting microlesions based on liposomes filled with fluorescent dye. We hypothesized that if microlesions form in these liposomes as the result of irradiation, then the entrapped dye will leak out into the surrounding medium in a measurable way. Polypropylene vials containing suspensions of vesicles composed of either dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine, or a combination of egg phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol were irradiated at the Brookhaven National Laboratory using 56Fe ions at 1 GeV/amu. In several cases we obtained a significant loss of the entrapped dye above the background level. Our results suggest that holes may form in liposomes as the result of heavy ion irradiation, and that these holes are large enough to allow leakage of cell internal contents that are at least as large as a 1 nm diameter calcein molecule. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Study on the desorption yield for natural botanic sample induced by energetic heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, J. M.; Wang, Y. G.; Du, G. H.; Yan, S.; Zhao, W. J.

    2002-12-01

    The dependence of desorption yield for the natural botanic sample bombarded with heavy ion on the electronic stopping power ( Se) and dose has been measured by weighing sample mass before and after irradiation. Primary ions including 50 keV N +, 1.5 MeV F +, 3.0 MeV F 2+, 4.0 MeV F 2+ and 3.0 MeV Si 2+ were used in the experiment. Three megaelectron volts of F 2+ with doses ranging from 4×10 15 to 4×10 16 ions/cm 2 were used in order to investigate the influence of ion dose. A mass spectrum from the sample bombarded with 3 MeV Si 2+ was also taken for a better understanding of the desorption process. Results show that the natural botanic sample is very easily to be desorpted. The yield of MeV heavy ions can be as high as thousands CH 2O/ion, and significantly depends on both the Se and dose. The measured yields increase quickly with Se, but drop down with increasing ion dose. These results fit roughly with the prediction of the pressure pulse model.

  16. Cellular responses and genetic consequences by DSBs induced after heavy- ion exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, S.; Tomita, M.; Morimoto, S.; Yatagai, F.

    Molecular analyses for LOH (loss of heterozygosity) events in human cells after low-dose heavy-ion exposure could contribute to estimation of genetic influences by high background of high-LET radiation. Exposure of human lymphoblastoid TK6-20C cells to 10 cGy of accelerated C ion (22 keV/um) beam demonstrated- about 20-fold induction of TK mutants exhibiting the specific hemizygous -type LOH, which can be considered as a result of mis - endjoining of DSBs. The delays in cell-cycle progression into G2/M were observed after exposure of TK6 cells to heavy-ions. These results can be also explained by clustered DNA damage, including DSBs. Evidence of such clustered damage was provided by formation of localizedH2AX and Rad51 foci following Fe-ion (1000 keV/um). These facts implicate that DSBs produced by heavy -i o n exposure are difficult to be repaired by non-homologous endjoining repair. The rate of apoptosis did not significant ly differ between low- and high-LET irradiation, suggesting the possibility that the densely damaged cells could survive with risk to cause unique genetic-alterations.

  17. Heavy-ion-induced mutations in the gpt delta transgenic mouse: effect of p53 gene knockout.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Fumio; Kurobe, Toshihiro; Nohmi, Takehiko; Masumura, Ken-ichi; Tsukada, Teruyo; Yamaguchi, Hirotake; Kasai-Eguchi, Kiyomi; Fukunishi, Nobuhisa

    2002-01-01

    The influence of the loss of p53 gene on heavy-ion-induced mutations was examined by constructing a new line of transgenic mice, p53 knockout (p53(-/-)) gpt delta. In this mouse model, deletions in lambda DNA integrated into the mouse genome are preferentially selected as Spi(-) phages, which can then be subjected to molecular analysis. Mice were exposed to 10 Gy of whole-body carbon-ion irradiation. The carbon ions were accelerated to 135 MeV/u by the RIKEN Ring Cyclotron. The p53 defect markedly enhanced the Spi(-) mutant frequency (MF) in the kidneys of mice exposed to C-ion irradiation: the Spi(-) MF increased 4.4- and 2.8-fold over the background level after irradiation in p53(-/-) and p53(+/+) mice, respectively. There was no significant difference in the background Spi(-) MF between p53(-/-) and p53(+/+) mice. Sequence analysis of the Spi(-) mutants indicated that the enhancement of kidney Spi(-) MF in p53(-/-) mice was primarily due to an increase in complex or rearranged-type deletions. In contrast to the kidney, the p53 defect had no effect on the Spi(-) MF in liver: Spi(-) MF increased 3.0- and 2.7-fold after the irradiation in p53(-/-) and p53(+/+) mice, respectively. Our results suggest that p53 suppresses deletion mutations induced by heavy-ion irradiation in an organ-specific manner. PMID:12355556

  18. Dynamical Dipole Mode in Heavy-Ion Fusion-Evaporation and Fission Reactions in the {sup 192}Pb Mass Region

    SciTech Connect

    Silvestri, R.; Inglima, G.; La Commara, M.; Martin, B.; Sandoli, M.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Parascandolo, C.; Boiano, A.; Romoli, M.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Maiolino, C.; Santonocito, D.; Baran, V.; De Filippo, E.; Di Toro, M.; Rizzo, C.

    2011-10-28

    The prompt {gamma}-ray emission related with the dynamical dipole mode decay was investigated in the {sup 192}Pb mass region by means of the {sup 40}Ca+{sup 152}Sm and {sup 48}Ca+{sup 144}Sm fusion-evaporation and fission reactions at E{sub lab} = 11 and 10.1 MeV/nucleon, respectively. The two reactions populate, through entrance channel having different charge asymmetries, the {sup 192}Pb compound nucleus at an excitation energy of 236 MeV with identical spin distribution. Preliminary results of this experiment show that the dynamical dipole mode survives in collisions involving heavier mass reaction partners than those studied previously. As a fast cooling mechanism on the fusion path, the prompt dipole {gamma} radiation could be of interest for the synthesis of super-heavy elements through ''hot'' fusion reactions.

  19. Fission-induced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.; Shiu, Y. J.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility of creating a plasma from fission fragments, and to utilize the energy of the particles to create population inversion that would lead to laser action is investigated. An investigation was made of various laser materials which could be used for nuclear-pumped lasing. The most likely candidate for a fissioning material in the gaseous form is uranium hexafluoride - UF6, and experiments were performed to investigate materials that would be compatible with it. One of the central problems in understanding a fission-induced plasma is to obtain a model of the electron behavior, and some preliminary calculations are presented. In particular, the rates of various processes are discussed. A simple intuitive model of the electron energy distribution function is also shown. The results were useful for considering a mathematical model of a nuclear-pumped laser. Next a theoretical model of a (3)He-Ar nuclear-pumped laser is presented. The theory showed good qualitative agreement with the experimental results.

  20. Experimental research of heavy ion and proton induced single event effects for a Bi-CMOS technology DC/DC converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anlin, He; Gang, Guo; Shuting, Shi; Dongjun, Shen; Jiancheng, Liu; Li, Cai; Hui, Fan

    2015-11-01

    This paper tested and analyzed heavy ion and proton induced single event effects (SEE) of a commercial DC/DC converter based on a 600 nm Bi-CMOS technology. Heavy ion induced single event transients (SET) testing has been carried out by using the Beijing HI-13 tandem accelerator at China Institute of Atomic Energy. Proton test has been carried out by using the Canadian TRIUMF proton accelerator. Both SET cross section versus linear energy transfer (LET) and proton energy has been measured. The main study conclusions are: (1) the DC/DC is both sensitive to heavy ion and proton radiations although at a pretty large feature size (600 nm), and threshold LET is about 0.06 MeV·mg/cm2 (2) heavy ion SET saturation cross section is about 5 magnitudes order larger than proton SET saturation cross section, which is consistent with the theory calculation result deduced by the RPP model and the proton nuclear reaction model; (3) on-orbit soft error rate (SER) prediction showed, on GEO orbit, proton induced SERs calculated by the heavy ion derived model are 4-5 times larger than those calculated by proton test data.

  1. Swift heavy ion induced modifications of single walled carbon nanotube thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishalli; Raina, K. K.; Avasthi, D. K.; Srivastava, Alok; Dharamvir, Keya

    2016-04-01

    Thin films of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were prepared by Langmuir-Blodgett method and irradiated with swift heavy ions, carbon and nickel each of energy 60 MeV. The ion beams have different electronic energy loss (Se) values and the samples were exposed to various irradiation doses. The irradiated films were characterized using Raman and optical absorption spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy results indicate the competing processes of defect creation and healing (annealing) of SWCNTs at lower fluences, while at higher fluences defect creation or damage dominates. In UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy we find that there is decrease in the intensity of characteristic peaks with every increasing fluence, indicating decrease in the optically active states with irradiation.

  2. Mechanisms of heavy-ion induced gate rupture in thin oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, F.W.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Krisch, K.S.

    1998-08-01

    Single event gate rupture (SEGR) is a catastrophic failure mode that occurs in dielectric materials that are struck by energetic heavy ions while biased under a high electric field condition. SEGR can reduce the critical electric field to breakdown to less than half the value observed in normal voltage ramp reliability tests. As electric fields in gate oxides increase to greater than 5 MV/cm in advanced MOS technologies, the impact of SEGR on the reliability of space based electronics must be assessed. In this summary, the authors explore the nature of SEGR in oxides with thickness from 7 nm to less than 5 nm, where soft breakdown is often observed during traditional reliability tests. They discuss the possible connection between the present understanding of SEGR and voltage stress breakdown models.

  3. Differential effects of p53 on bystander phenotypes induced by gamma ray and high LET heavy ion radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Mingyuan; Dong, Chen; Konishi, Teruaki; Tu, Wenzhi; Liu, Weili; Shiomi, Naoko; Kobayashi, Alisa; Uchihori, Yukio; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Hei, Tom K.; Dang, Bingrong; Shao, Chunlin

    2014-04-01

    High LET particle irradiation has several potential advantages over γ-rays such as p53-independent response. The purpose of this work is to disclose the effect of p53 on the bystander effect induced by different LET irradiations and underlying mechanism. Lymphocyte cells of TK6 (wild type p53) and HMy2.CIR (mutated p53) were exposed to either low or high LET irradiation, then their mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS generation were detected. The micronuclei (MN) induction in HL-7702 hepatocytes co-cultured with irradiated lymphocytes was also measured. It was found that the mitochondrial dysfunction, p66Shc activation, and intracellular ROS were enhanced in TK6 but not in HMy2.CIR cells after γ-ray irradiation, but all of them were increased in both cell lines after carbon and iron irradiation. Consistently, the bystander effect of MN formation in HL-7702 cells was only triggered by γ-irradiated TK6 cells but not by γ-irradiated HMy2.CIR cells. But this bystander effect was induced by both lymphocyte cell lines after heavy ion irradiation. PFT-μ, an inhibitor of p53, only partly inhibited ROS generation and bystander effect induced by 30 keV/μm carbon-irradiated TK6 cells but failed to suppress the bystander effect induced by the TK6 cells irradiated with either 70 keV/μm carbon or 180 keV/μm iron. The mitochondrial inhibitors of rotenone and oligomycin eliminated heavy ion induced ROS generation in TK6 and HMy2.CIR cells and hence diminished the bystander effect on HL-7702 cells. These results clearly demonstrate that the bystander effect is p53-dependent for low LET irradiation, but it is p53-independent for high LET irradiation which may be because of p53-independent ROS generation due to mitochondrial dysfunction.

  4. On-line and post irradiation analysis of swift heavy ion induced modification of PMMA (polymethyl-methacrylate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, U. H.; Lima, V.; Baake, O.; Severin, D.; Bender, M.; Ensinger, W.

    2014-05-01

    The present work is part of a research program studying the swift heavy ion induced modification of aliphatic polymers with some comparable side groups, here polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA). This paper presents a study on Fourier-transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), residual gas analysis (RGA), and Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy of the transformations of a PMMA film under gold (Au) and uranium (U) ion irradiation in the MeV/u range in vacuum to fluences up to 3 × 1011 ions per cm2. The results show a general ion induced degradation of the polymer, with release of volatile fragments, scission of side chains and polymeric backbone, formation of conjugated double bonds, and the resulting increased absorption of the UV part in the UV-Vis spectral region. A molecular scission mechanism which explains the main degradation products is proposed.

  5. Vitamin D-metabolites from human plasma and mass spectrometric analysis by fast heavy ion induced desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fohlman, J.; Peterson, P. A.; Kamensky, I.; Håkansson, P.; Sundqvist, B.

    1982-07-01

    D-vitamin metabolites have been isolated from human serum employing chromatographic techniques. The serum carrier protein for vitamin D (DBP) was first isolated by immunosorbent chromatography. Lipid ligands associated with DBP were then extracted with hexane and separated by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Detection of vitamin D metabolites by their absorbance of ultraviolet light is not sufficiently sensitive to monitor all vitamin D derivatives from a few millilitres of serum. Therefore, further analyses are necessary to quantitate these compounds. We have begun to develop a mass spectrometric method to achieve a reliable, quantitative procedure. As a first step towards this goal a number of pure samples of vitamin D compounds have been studied in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer based on fast heavy ion induced desorption. All vitamin D compounds examined could be detected and identified by their molecular ion and fragment spectra.

  6. Nanoclay and swift heavy ions induced piezoelectric and conducting nanochannel based polymeric membrane for fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Karun Kumar; Srivastava, Anshuman; Parkash, Om; Avasthi, Devesh K.; Rana, Dipak; Shahi, Vinod K.; Maiti, Pralay

    2016-01-01

    Through nanochannels are fabricated in poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoro propylene) films by bombarding swift heavy ions (SHI) of energy 80 MeV and thereby creating latent tracks in the ion passage followed by chemical etching of the amorphous track. The dimension of the nanochannel is varied from 34 to 65 nm using different fluences and by dispersing organically modified nanoclay in polymer matrix. The nanochannels are grafted with polystyrene using the free radicals caused by SHI irradiation followed by their sulfonation. Nanoclay nucleates piezoelectric β-phase in copolymer whose extent gets enhanced after irradiation, grafting and sulfonation leading to a better material. The efficiency of functionalized nanochannel conduction is studied through dc conductivity of the bulk film in the semiconducting range against the insulating nature of the pristine copolymer. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristic of the membrane exhibits strong fluence dependency and shows superior conduction in functionalized nanohybrid. Proton conductivity of the functionalized nanohybrid is 6.2 × 10-2 S cm-1, while methanol permeability drastically reduces indicating higher values of the selective parameter of the developed membrane as compared to Nafion. Membrane electrode assembly studies of functionalized nanohybrid show 0.63 V as open circuit voltage leading to power density of 30.8 mW/cm2, considerably higher than the functionalized copolymer.

  7. fcc-hcp phase transformation in Co nanoparticles induced by swift heavy-ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprouster, D. J.; Giulian, R.; Schnohr, C. S.; Araujo, L. L.; Kluth, P.; Byrne, A. P.; Foran, G. J.; Johannessen, B.; Ridgway, M. C.

    2009-09-01

    We demonstrate a face-centered cubic (fcc) to hexagonally close-packed (hcp) phase transformation in spherical Co nanoparticles achieved via swift heavy-ion irradiation. Co nanoparticles of mean diameter 13.2 nm and fcc phase were first formed in amorphous SiO2 by ion implantation and thermal annealing and then irradiated at room temperature with 9-185 MeV Au ions. The crystallographic phase was identified with x-ray absorption spectroscopy and electron diffraction and quantified, as functions of the irradiation energy and fluence, with the former. The transformation was complete at low fluence prior to any change in nanoparticle shape or size and was governed by electronic stopping. A direct-impact mechanism was identified with the transformation interaction cross-section correlated with that of a molten ion track in amorphous SiO2 . We suggest the shear stress resulting from the rapid thermal expansion about an ion track in amorphous SiO2 was sufficient to initiate the fcc-to-hcp phase transformation in the Co nanoparticles.

  8. Dose--response of initial G2-chromatid breaks induced in normal human fibroblasts by heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Durante, M.; Furusawa, Y.; George, K.; Takai, N.; Wu, H.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Dicello, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate initial chromatid breaks in prematurely condensed G2 chromosomes following exposure to heavy ions of different LET. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exponentially growing human fibroblast cells AG1522 were irradiated with gamma-rays, energetic carbon (13 keV/ microm, 80 keV/microm), silicon (55 keV/microm) and iron (140 keV/microm, 185keV/microm, 440keV/microm) ions. Chromosomes were prematurely condensed using calyculin-A. Initial chromatid-type and isochromatid breaks in G2 cells were scored. RESULTS: The dose response curves for total chromatid breaks were linear regardless of radiation type. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) showed a LET-dependent increase, peaking around 2.7 at 55-80keV/microm and decreasing at higher LET. The dose response curves for isochromatid-type breaks were linear for high-LET radiations, but linear-quadratic for gamma-rays and 13 keV/microm carbon ions. The RBE for the induction of isochromatid breaks obtained from linear components increased rapidly between 13keV/microm (about 7) and 80keV/microm carbon (about 71), and decreased gradually until 440 keV/microm iron ions (about 66). CONCLUSIONS: High-LET radiations are more effective at inducing isochromatid breaks, while low-LET radiations are more effective at inducing chromatid-type breaks. The densely ionizing track structures of heavy ions and the proximity of sister chromatids in G2 cells result in an increase in isochromatid breaks.

  9. Swift heavy ion irradiation-induced modifications in structural, magnetic and electrical transport properties of epitaxial magnetite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ravi; Khan, M. Wasi; Srivastava, J. P.; Arora, S. K.; Sofin, R. G. S.; Choudhary, R. J.; Shvets, I. V.

    2006-08-01

    The effect of swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation (190 MeV Ag) on structural, electrical transport and magnetic properties of epitaxial magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) thin films (thickness {approx}70 nm) grown on MgO<100> oriented substrate have been investigated. The x-ray diffraction shows that at low fluence values up to 5x10{sup 11} ions/cm{sup 2}, the strain in the films is relaxed, whereas, at higher fluence range 1x10{sup 12}-1x10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}, the epitaxial relationship with the substrate is lost along with a phase transformation from magnetite to more oxidized magnetite phase (i.e., maghemite). The Verwey transition temperature measured by electrical transport is found to increase from 109 to 117 K with the low fluence SHI irradiation, which is related to the irradiation induced strain relaxation and structural modifications. At higher fluences the system did not show Verwey transition and the resistance is also increased. The similar results were obtained by magnetization studies. The observed magnetization at 1 T field is increased at low fluence suggesting the reduction of areas with frustrated exchange interactions associated with the cationic arrangement at the anti phase boundaries. At higher fluences it decreases monotonically, indicating the emergence of other phases. The observed modifications are explained on the basis of structural strain and disorder induced by swift heavy ions, which lead to modification of the interionic Coulomb potential at octahedral sublattices and bandwidth in this system.

  10. Swift heavy ion induced modification in morphological and physico-chemical properties of tin oxide nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Manoj Kumar; Kanjilal, D.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2013-11-01

    Nanocomposite thin films of tin oxide (SnO2)/titanium oxide (TiO2) were grown on silicon (1 0 0) substrates by electron beam evaporation deposition technique using sintered nanocomposite pellet of SnO2/TiO2 in the percentage ratio of 95:5. Sintering of the nanocomposite pellet was done at 1300 °C for 24 h. The thicknesses of these films were measured to be 100 nm during deposition using piezo-sensor attached to the deposition chamber. TiO2 doped SnO2 nanocomposite films were irradiated by 100 MeV Au8+ ion beam at fluence range varying from 1 × 1011 ions/cm2 to 5 × 1013 ions/cm2 at Inter University Accelerator Center (IUAC), New Delhi, India. Chemical properties of pristine and ion irradiation modified thin films were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. FTIR peak at 610 cm-1 confirms the presence of O-Sn-O bridge of tin (IV) oxide signifying the composite nature of pristine and irradiated thin films. Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) in tapping mode was used to study the surface morphology and grain growth due to swift heavy ion irradiation at different fluencies. Grain size calculations obtained from sectional analysis of AFM images were compared with results obtained from Glancing Angle X-ray Diffraction (GAXRD) measurements using Scherrer’s formulae. Phase transformation due to irradiation was observed from Glancing Angle X-ray Diffraction (GAXRD) results. The prominent 2θ peaks observed in GAXRD spectrum are at 30.67°, 32.08°, 43.91°, 44.91° and 52.35° in the irradiated films.

  11. Bystander/abscopal effects induced in intact Arabidopsis seeds by low-energy heavy-ion radiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gen; Mei, Tao; Yuan, Hang; Zhang, Weiming; Chen, Lianyun; Xue, Jianming; Wu, Lijun; Wang, Yugang

    2008-09-01

    To date, radiation-induced bystander effects have been observed largely in in vitro single-cell systems; verification of both the effects and the mechanisms in multicellular systems in vivo is important. Previously we showed that bystander/ abscopal effects can be induced by irradiating the shoot apical meristem cells in Arabidopsis embryos. In this study, we investigated the in vivo effects induced by 30 keV 40Ar ions in intact Arabidopsis seeds and traced the postembryonic development of both irradiated and nonirradiated shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem cells. Since the range of 30 keV 40Ar ions in water is about 0.07 microm, which is less than the distance from the testa to shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem in Arabidopsis seeds (about 100 microm), the incident low-energy heavy ions generally stop in the proximal surface. Our results showed that, after the 30 keV 40Ar-ion irradiation of shielded and nonshielded Arabidopsis seeds at a fluence of 1.5 x 10(17) ions/cm2, short- and long-term postembryonic development, including germination, root hair differentiation, primary root elongation, lateral root initiation and survival, was significantly inhibited. Since shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem cells were not damaged directly by radiation, the results suggested that a damage signal(s) is transferred from the irradiated cells to shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem cells and causes the ultimate developmental alterations, indicating that long-distance bystander/ abscopal effects exist in the intact seed. A further study of mechanisms showed that the effects are associated with either enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or decreased auxin-dependent transcription in postembryonic development. Treatment with the ROS scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or synthetic auxin 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) can significantly reverse both the alterations in postembryonic development and auxin

  12. Swift heavy ion irradiation induced magnetism in magnetically frustrated BiMn{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, D. K.; Mollah, S.; Kumar, Ravi; Choudhary, R. J.; Thakur, P.; Brookes, N. B.; Sharma, S. K.; Knobel, M.

    2010-11-01

    The swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation induces weak ferrimagnetism (FM) in magnetically frustrated polycrystalline BiMn{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films. This is manifested from irradiation induced higher energetic configuration that accounts for evolution of the Mn{sup 2+} state in the Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} network. Basically, this is the root of large magnetic moment in the irradiated samples. X-ray diffraction and Raman-scattering data of the samples indicate considerable modifications in the crystal structure after the SHI irradiation. FM in the irradiated samples and magnetically frustrated behavior of the pristine sample is apparent from dc magnetization measurements. Element specific characterizations such as near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at O K and Mn L{sub 3,2} edges along with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism at Mn L{sub 3,2} edge show the evolution of the Mn{sup 2+} at disbursement of the Mn{sup 4+}. The microscopic origin behind the induced weak FM is found to be the increased orbital moment in the irradiated thin films.

  13. Swift heavy ion irradiation induced phase transformation in undoped and niobium doped titanium dioxide composite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Subodh K.; Chettah, Abdelhak; Singh, R. G.; Ojha, Sunil; Singh, Fouran

    2016-07-01

    Study reports the effect of swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation induced phase transformation in undoped and Niobium doped anatase TiO2 composite thin films. Investigations were carried out at different densities of electronic excitations (EEs) using 120 MeV Ag and 130 MeV Ni ions irradiations. Films were initially annealed at 900 °C and results revealed that undoped films were highly stable in anatase phase, while the Nb doped films showed the composite nature with the weak presence of Niobium penta-oxide (Nb2O5) phase. The effect at low density of EEs in undoped film show partial anatase to rutile phase transformation; however doped film shows only further growth of Nb2O5 phase beside the anatase to rutile phase transformation. At higher density of EEs induced by Ag ions, registered continuous ion track of ∼3 nm in lattice which leads to nano-crystallization followed by decomposition/amorphization of rutile TiO2 and Nb2O5 phases in undoped and doped films, respectively. However, Ni ions are only induced discontinuous sequence of ion tracks with creation of damage and disorder and do not show amorphization in the lattice. The in-elastic thermal spike calculations were carried out for anatase TiO2 phase to understand the effect of EEs on anatase to rutile phase transformation followed by amorphization in NTO films in terms of continuous and discontinuous track formation by SHI irradiation.

  14. Chemistry of heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1988-10-01

    The use of heavy ions to induce nuclear reactions was reported as early as 1950. Since that time it has been one of the most active areas of nuclear research. Intense beams of ions as heavy as uranium with energies high enough to overcome the Coulomb barriers of even the heaviest elements are available. The wide variety of possible reactions gives rise to a multitude of products which have been studied by many ingenious chemical and physical techniques. Chemical techniques have been of special value for the separation and unequivocal identification of low yield species from the plethora of other nuclides present. Heavy ion reactions have been essential for the production of the trans-Md elements and a host of new isotopes. The systematics of compound nucleus reactions, transfer reactions, and deeply inelastic reactions have been elucidated using chemical techniques. A review of the variety of chemical procedures and techniques which have been developed for the study of heavy ion reactions and their products is given. Determination of the chemical properties of the trans-Md elements, which are very short-lived and can only be produced an ''atom-at-a-time'' via heavy ion reactions, is discussed. 53 refs., 19 figs.

  15. Effects of electronic and nuclear stopping power on disorder induced in GaN under swift heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisy, F.; Sall, M.; Grygiel, C.; Balanzat, E.; Boisserie, M.; Lacroix, B.; Simon, P.; Monnet, I.

    2016-08-01

    Wurtzite GaN epilayers, grown on the c-plane of sapphire substrate, have been irradiated with swift heavy ions at different energies and fluences, and thereafter studied by Raman scattering spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectra show strong structural modifications in the GaN layer. Indeed, in addition to the broadening of the allowed modes, a large continuum and three new modes at approximately 200 cm-1, 300 cm-1 and 670 cm-1 appear after irradiation attributed to disorder-activated Raman scattering. In this case, spectra are driven by the phonon density of states of the material due to the loss of translation symmetry of the lattice induced by defects. It was shown qualitatively that both electronic excitations and elastic collisions play an important role in the disorder induced by irradiation. UV-visible spectra reveal an absorption band at 2.8 eV which is linked to the new mode at 300 cm-1 observed in irradiated Raman spectra and comes from Ga-vacancies. These color centers are produced by elastic collisions (without any visible effect of electronic excitations).

  16. Heavy-ion dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmerling, W.

    1980-03-01

    This lecture deals with some of the more important physical characteristics of relativistic heavy ions and their measurement, with beam delivery and beam monitoring, and with conventional radiation dosimetry as used in the operation of the BEVALAC biomedical facility for high energy heavy ions (Lyman and Howard, 1977; BEVALAC, 1977). Even so, many fundamental aspects of the interaction of relativistic heavy ions with matter, including important atomic physics and radiation chemical considerations, are not discussed beyond the reminder that such additional understanding is required before an adequte perspective of the problem can be attained.

  17. Induced radioactivity in CU targets produced by high-energy heavy ions and the corresponding estimated photon dose rates.

    PubMed

    Yashima, H; Uwamino, Y; Sugita, H; Ito, S; Nakamura, T; Fukumura, A

    2004-01-01

    Irradiation experiments were performed at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) facility, National Institute of Radiological Sciences. The radioactive spallation products in a thick Cu target were obtained for Ar(230, 400 MeV per nucleon), Si(800 MeV per nucleon), Ne(100, 230, 400 MeV per nucleon), C(100, 230, 400 MeV per nucleon), He(100, 230 MeV per nucleon), p(100, 230 MeV) ions. The gamma-ray spectra from irradiated Cu samples inserted into the composite Cu target were measured with a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. From the gamma-ray spectra, we obtained the spatial distribution of radioactive yields of spallation products of 40 nuclides in the Cu sample in the Cu target. From the spatial distribution of radioactive yields, we estimated the residual activity and photon dose induced in the Cu target. The residual activity and photon dose become larger with the increase in projectile energy per nucleon and the range of the projectile beam for the same projectile energy per nucleon. PMID:15280565

  18. Angular momentum effects in fusion-fission and fusion-evaporation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Plasil, F.

    1980-01-01

    The study of heavy-ion fusion reactions is complicated by the possible contributions of several mechanisms. The various types of heavy-ion-induced fission are discussed. Then compound-nucleus fission is considered with reference to fission barriers deduced from heavy-ion-induced fission. Next, the problems associated with measured values of evaporation-residue cross sections and the angular momentum dependence of incomplete fusion are examined. Finally, the de-excitation of compound nuclei is again taken up, this time with reference to the greatly enhanced ..cap alpha.. emission predicted on the basis of the rotating liquid drop model. 24 figures. (RWR)

  19. Painting Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Energetic Heavy Ions in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu

    2006-01-01

    FISH, mFISH, mBAND, telomere and centromere probes have been used to study chromosome aberrations induced in human cells exposed to low-and high-LET radiation in vitro. High-LET induced damages are mostly a single track effect. Unrejoined chromosome breaks (incomplete exchanges) and complex type aberrations were higher for high-LET. Biosignatures may depend on the method the samples are collected. Recent mBAND analysis has revealed more information about the nature of intra-chromosome exchanges. Whether space flight/microgravity affects radiation-induced chromosome aberration frequencies is still an open question.

  20. Raman investigation of lattice defects and stress induced in InP and GaN films by swift heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, P. P.; Liu, J.; Zhang, S. X.; Maaz, K.; Zeng, J.; Guo, H.; Zhai, P. F.; Duan, J. L.; Sun, Y. M.; Hou, M. D.

    2016-04-01

    InP crystals and GaN films were irradiated by swift heavy ions 86Kr and 209Bi with kinetic energies of 25 and 9.5 MeV per nucleon and ion fluence in the range 5 × 1010 to 3.6 × 1012 ions/cm2. The characteristic optical bands were studied by Raman spectroscopy to reveal the disorder and defects induced in the samples during the irradiation process. The crystallinity of InP and GaN was found to be deteriorated after irradiation by the swift heavy ions and resulted in the amorphous nature of the samples along the ion tracks. The amorphous tracks observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images confirmed the formation of lattice defects. In typical F2(LO) mode, in case of InP, the spectra shifted towards the lower wavenumbers with a maximum shift of 7.6 cm-1 induced by 1030 MeV Bi ion irradiation. While in case of GaN, the typical E2(high) mode shifted towards the higher wavenumbers, with maximum shift of 5.4 cm-1 induced by 760 MeV Bi ion irradiation at ion fluence of 1 × 1012 ions/cm2. The observed Raman shifts reveal the presence of lattice defects and disorder induced in the samples after irradiation by the swift heavy ions. This irradiation also generated lattice stress in the samples, which has been investigated and discussed in detail in this work.

  1. Swift-heavy ion irradiation-induced latent tracks in few- and mono-layer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hang; Sun, Youmei; Zhai, Pengfei; Yao, Huijun; Zeng, Jian; Zhang, Shengxia; Duan, Jinglai; Hou, Mingdong; Khan, Maaz; Liu, Jie

    2016-04-01

    The latent tracks in mono- and few-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) induced by 209Bi ions with energies of 0.45-1.23 GeV were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The hillock-like latent tracks were observed on the surface of irradiated monolayer MoS2. The diameter of the hillock after deconvolution procedure is 15.8 ± 1.7 nm and the height is 1.0 ± 0.3 nm. Hillock-like tracks are induced by energy transfer from energetic 209Bi ions to electron system of MoS2, resulting in the ionization and excitation and then the displacement of target atoms. Since Raman spectroscopy is sensitive to damages induced by swift-heavy ion irradiation, the in-plane E 2 g 1 mode (~385 cm-1) and the out-of-plane A 1 g mode (~408 cm-1) of MoS2 were investigated. With increasing ion fluence, the A 1 g peak shifts to higher frequencies, and the intensity ratio between A 1 g and E 2 g 1 peak increases. Besides, the A 1 g peak narrows. The evolution of the structural and vibrational properties of MoS2 with fluence is discussed. It can be concluded that the blue shift and narrowing of A 1 g peak in irradiated MoS2 is due to the adsorption of oxygen molecules at latent tracks. With decreasing thickness of MoS2, the irradiation resistance decreases.

  2. Growth of silicon bump induced by swift heavy ion at the silicon oxide-silicon interface

    SciTech Connect

    Carlotti, J.-F.; Touboul, A.D.; Ramonda, M.; Caussanel, M.; Guasch, C.; Bonnet, J.; Gasiot, J.

    2006-01-23

    Thin silicon oxide layers on silicon substrates are investigated by scanning probe microscopy before and after irradiation with 210 MeV Au+ ions. After irradiation and complete chemical etching of the silicon oxide layer, silicon bumps grown on the silicon surface are observed. It is shown that each impinging ion induces one silicon bump at the interface. This observation is consistent with the thermal spike theory. Ion energy loss is transferred to the oxide and induces local melting. Silicon-bump formation is favored when the oxide and oxide-silicon interface are silicon rich.

  3. Deduction of compound nucleus formation probability from the fragment angular distributions in heavy-ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, C.; Thomas, R. G.; Mohanty, A. K.; Kapoor, S. S.

    2015-07-01

    The presence of various fissionlike reactions in heavy-ion induced reactions is a major hurdle in the path to laboratory synthesis of heavy and super-heavy nuclei. It is known that the cross section of forming a heavy evaporation residue in fusion reactions depends on the three factors—the capture cross section, probability of compound nucleus formation PCN, and the survival probability of the compound nucleus against fission. As the probability of compound nucleus formation, PCN is difficult to theoretically estimate because of its complex dependence on several parameters; attempts have been made in the past to deduce it from the fission fragment anisotropy data. In the present work, the fragment anisotropy data for a number of heavy-ion reactions are analyzed and it is found that deduction of PCN from the anisotropy data also requires the knowledge of the ratio of relaxation time of the K degree of freedom to pre-equilibrium fission time.

  4. Damage of M-type baryum hexaferrites induced by GeV-heavy ion irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, J. M.; Brisard, F.; Meftah, A.; Toulemonde, M.; Studer, F.

    1995-12-01

    The damage induced in single crystals of M-type baryum hexaferrites (BaFe 12O 19 and BaFe 12- x-yCo xTi yO 19 with x ˜- 1.4; y ˜- 1.5) by 3.8 GeV 129Xe and 6.0 GeV 208Pb ion irradiations has been monitored with room temperature (RT) 57Fe Mössbauer spectrometry. The damage cross sections deduced from the former data are compared with our previous results on polycrystalline samples. The effects of amorphous track formation on the RT ac magnetic permeability and Mössbauer spectra are studied. Comparison is also made with our previous results on another (ferri) magnetic insulator, namely Y 3Fe 5O 12, regarding the effects of disorder and track-induced strain field on the magnetic properties.

  5. Zn nanoparticles irradiated with swift heavy ions at low fluences: Optically-detected shape elongation induced by nonoverlapping ion tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Amekura, H.; Mitsuishi, K.; Nakayama, Y.; Kishimoto, N.; Ishikawa, N.; Okubo, N.; Ridgway, M. C.; Giulian, R.; Buchal, Ch.; Mantl, S.

    2011-05-15

    Elongation of metal nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in silica (SiO{sub 2}) induced by swift heavy-ion (SHI) irradiation, from spheres to spheroids, has been evaluated mainly by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at high fluences, where tens to thousands of ion tracks were overlapped each other. It is important to clarify whether the high fluences, i.e., track overlaps, are essential for the elongation. In this study the elongation of metal NPs was evaluated at low fluences by linearly polarized optical absorption spectroscopy. Zn NPs embedded in silica were irradiated with 200-MeV Xe{sup 14+} ions with an incident angle of 45 deg. The fluence ranged from 1.0x10{sup 11} to 5.0x10{sup 13} Xe/cm{sup 2}, which corresponds to the track coverage ratio (CR) of 0.050 to 25 by ion tracks. A small but certain dichroism was observed down to 5.0x10{sup 11} Xe/cm{sup 2} (CR = 0.25). The comparison with numerical simulation suggested that the elongation of Zn NPs was induced by nonoverlapping ion tracks. After further irradiation each NP experienced multiple SHI impacts, which resulted in further elongation. TEM observation showed the elongated NPs whose aspect ratio (AR) ranged from 1.2 to 1.7 at 5.0x10{sup 13} Xe/cm{sup 2}. Under almost the same irradiation conditions, Co NPs with the same initial mean radius showed more prominent elongation with AR of {approx}4 at the same fluence, while the melting point (m.p.) of Co is much higher than that of Zn. Less efficient elongation of Zn NPs while lower m.p. is discussed.

  6. Chemical modifications of polymer films induced by high energy heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhiyong; Sun, Youmei; Liu, Changlong; Liu, Jie; Jin, Yunfan

    2002-06-01

    Polymer films including polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polystyrene (PS) and polycarbonate (PC) were irradiated at room temperature with ions of 35 MeV/u 40Ar, 25 MeV/u 84Kr, 15.1 MeV/u 136Xe and 11.4 MeV/u 238U to fluences ranging from 9×10 9 to 5.5×10 12 ions/cm 2. The radiation-induced chemical changes of the materials were investigated by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and ultraviolet/visible spectroscopies. It is found that the absorbance in the ultraviolet and visible range induced by all irradiations follows a linear relationship with fluence. The radiation-induced absorbance normalized to one particle increases slowly with increasing of electronic energy loss below about 8 keV/nm followed by a sharp increase up to about 15 keV/nm above which saturation is reached. FTIR measurements reveal that the materials suffer serious degradation through bond breaking. The absorbance of the typical infrared bands decays exponentially with increase of ion fluence and the bond-disruption cross-section shows a sigmoid variation with electronic energy loss. In PET loss of crystallinity is attributed to the configuration transformation of the ethylene glycol residue from trans into the gauche. Alkyne end groups are induced in all the materials above certain electronic energy loss threshold, which is found to be about 0.8 keV/nm for PS and 0.4 keV/nm for PC. The production cross-section of alkyne end group increases with increasing of electronic energy loss and shows saturation at high electronic energy loss values. It is concluded that not only the physical processes but also the chemical processes of the energy deposition determine the modification of polymer.

  7. Painting Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Energetic Heavy Ions in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews some of the techniques used to analyze the damage done to chromosome from ion radiation. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), mFISH, mBAND, telomere and centromereprobes have been used to study chromosome aberrations induced in human cells exposed to low-and high-LET radiation in vitro. There is some comparison of the different results from the various techniques. The results of the study are summarized.

  8. Impact of p53 status on heavy-ion radiation-induced micronuclei in circulating erythrocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Torous, D.; Lutze-Mann, L.; Winegar, R.

    2000-01-01

    Transgenic mice that differed in their p53 genetic status were exposed to an acute dose of highly charged and energetic (HZE) iron particle radiation. Micronuclei (MN) in two distinct populations of circulating peripheral blood erythrocytes, the immature reticulocytes (RETs) and the mature normochromatic erythrocytes (NCEs), were measured using a simple and efficient flow cytometric procedure. Our results show significant elevation in the frequency of micronucleated RETs (%MN-RETs) at 2 and 3 days post-radiation. At 3 days post-irradiation, the magnitude of the radiation-induced MN-RET was 2.3-fold higher in the irradiated p53 wild-type animals compared to the unirradiated controls, 2.5-fold higher in the p53 hemizygotes and 4.3-fold higher in the p53 nullizygotes. The persistence of this radiation-induced elevation of MN-RETs is dependent on the p53 genetic background of the animal. In the p53 wild-type and p53 hemizygotes, %MN-RETs returned to control levels by 9 days post-radiation. However, elevated levels of %MN-RETs in p53 nullizygous mice persisted beyond 56 days post-radiation. We also observed elevated MN-NCEs in the peripheral circulation after radiation, but the changes in radiation-induced levels of MN-NCEs appear dampened compared to those of the MN-RETs for all three strains of animals. These results suggest that the lack of p53 gene function may play a role in the iron particle radiation-induced genomic instability in stem cell populations in the hematopoietic system.

  9. Clustered DNA damages induced by high and low LET radiation, including heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, B. M.; Bennett, P. V.; Schenk, H.; Sidorkina, O.; Laval, J.; Trunk, J.; Monteleone, D.; Sutherland, J.; Lowenstein, D. I. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Clustered DNA damages--here defined as two or more lesions (strand breaks, oxidized purines, oxidized pyrimidines or abasic sites) within a few helical turns--have been postulated as difficult to repair accurately, and thus highly significant biological lesions. Further, attempted repair of clusters may produce double strand breaks (DSBs). However, until recently, there was no way to measure ionizing radiation-induced clustered damages, except DSB. We recently described an approach for measuring classes of clustered damages (oxidized purine clusters, oxidized pyrimidine clusters, abasic clusters, along with DSB). We showed that ionizing radiation (gamma rays and Fe ions, 1 GeV/amu) does induce such clusters in genomic DNA in solution and in human cells. These studies also showed that each damage cluster results from one radiation hit (and its track), thus indicating that they can be induced by very low doses of radiation, i.e. two independent hits are not required for cluster induction. Further, among all complex damages, double strand breaks comprise--at most-- 20%, with the other clustered damages being at least 80%.

  10. Rejoining of isochromatid breaks induced by heavy ions in G2-phase normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Durante, M.; Furusawa, Y.; George, K.; Ito, H.; Wu, H.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    We reported previously that exposure of normal human fibroblasts in G2 phase of the cell cycle to high-LET radiation produces a much higher frequency of isochromatid breaks than exposure to gamma rays. We concluded that an increase in the production of isochromatid breaks is a signature of initial high-LET radiation-induced G2-phase damage. In this paper, we report the repair kinetics of isochromatid breaks induced by high-LET radiation in normal G2-phase human fibroblasts. Exponentially growing human fibroblasts (AG1522) were irradiated with gamma rays or energetic carbon (290 MeV/nucleon), silicon (490 MeV/nucleon), or iron (200 MeV/nucleon) ions. Prematurely condensed chromosomes were induced by calyculin A after different postirradiation incubation times ranging from 0 to 600 min. Chromosomes were stained with Giemsa, and aberrations were scored in cells at G2 phase. G2-phase fragments, the result of the induction of isochromatid breaks, decreased quickly with incubation time. The curve for the kinetics of the rejoining of chromatid-type breaks showed a slight upward curvature with time after exposure to 440 keV/microm iron particles, probably due to isochromatid-isochromatid break rejoining. The formation of chromatid exchanges after exposure to high-LET radiation therefore appears to be underestimated, because isochromatid-isochromatid exchanges cannot be detected. Increased induction of isochromatid breaks and rejoining of isochromatid breaks affect the overall kinetics of chromatid-type break rejoining after exposure to high-LET radiation.

  11. Shape transformation of Pt nanoparticles induced by swift heavy-ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giulian, R.; Kluth, P.; Araujo, L. L.; Sprouster, D. J.; Byrne, A. P.; Cookson, D. J.; Ridgway, M. C.

    2008-09-01

    Pt nanoparticles (NPs) formed by ion-beam synthesis in amorphous SiO2 were irradiated with Au ions in the energy range of 27 185 MeV. Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize an irradiation-induced shape transformation within the NPs. A simple yet effective way of analyzing the SAXS data to determine both NP dimensions is presented. A transformation from spherical to rodlike shape with increasing irradiation fluence was observed for NPs larger than an energy-dependent threshold diameter, which varied from 4.0 to 6.5 nm over 27 185 MeV. NPs smaller than this threshold diameter remained spherical upon irradiation but decreased in size as a result of dissolution. The latter was more pronounced for the smallest particles. The minor dimension of the transformed NPs saturated at an energy-dependent value comparable to the threshold diameter for elongation. The saturated minor dimension was less than the diameter of the irradiation-induced molten track within the matrix. We demonstrate that Pt NPs of diameter 13 nm reach saturation of the minor dimension beyond a total-energy deposition into the matrix of 20keV/nm3 .

  12. Outgassing and degradation of polyimide induced by swift heavy ion irradiation at cryogenic temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Severin, D.; Balanzat, E.; Ensinger, W.; Trautmann, C.

    2010-07-15

    Polyimide foils were irradiated with energetic Kr (740 MeV) and Pb (890 MeV) ions at cryogenic temperature (12 K). Beam-induced degradation processes were monitored by residual gas analysis and online infrared spectroscopy. The outgassing components observed at low irradiation temperatures differ in quantity but are similar in mass distribution to those identified at room temperature exposure. Besides CO as major volatile fragment, a significant contribution of short hydrocarbons like C{sub 2}H{sub x} is released. In situ infrared spectroscopy indicates accumulation of CO and CO{sub 2} molecules at 12 K in the foils. During heat-up cycles, most of these frozen gases become mobile and outgas at a temperature between 35 and 55 K. The study is motivated by the application of polyimide foils as insulating material in high radiation environment of the future accelerator facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR).

  13. Swift heavy ion irradiation induced phase transformation in calcite single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagabhushana, H.; Nagabhushana, B. M.; Lakshminarasappa, B. N.; Singh, Fouran; Chakradhar, R. P. S.

    2009-11-01

    Ion irradiation induced phase transformation in calcite single crystals have been studied by means of Raman and infrared spectroscopy using 120 MeV Au 9+ ions. The observed bands have been assigned according to group theory analysis. For higher fluence of 5×10 12 ion/cm 2, an extra peak on either side of the 713 cm -1 peak and an increase in the intensity of 1085 cm -1 peak were observed in Raman studies. FTIR spectra exhibit extra absorption bands at 674, 1589 cm -1 and enhancement in bands at 2340 and 2374 cm -1 was observed. This might be due to the phase transformation from calcite to vaterite. The damage cross section ( σ) for all the Raman and FTIR active modes was determined. The increase of FWHM, shift in peak positions and appearance of new peaks indicated that calcite phase is converted into vaterite.

  14. Swift heavy ion induced modifications of luminescence and mechanical properties of polypropylene/ZnO nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniks, J.; Grigorjeva, L.; Zabels, R.; Millers, D.; Bochkov, I.; Zicans, J.; Ivanova, T.; Grabis, J.

    2014-05-01

    The effect of irradiation with 150 MeV Kr ions at fluencies 1011 and 1012 ions/cm2 on luminescence of PP/ZnO nanocomposites and PP matrix has been studied. In unirradiated composite the luminescence is comparatively weak and is contributed mainly by the excitonic luminescence of ZnO. Irradiation of nanocomposite and PP matrix leads to a strong increase of luminescence intensity in a wide spectral range of 360-600 nm. It follows from the obtained results that the enhancement of luminescence originates mainly from the broken bonds in PP matrix. Ion-induced scission of polymer bonds and fragmentation of polymer chains is deduced also from the nanoindentation tests which show a remarkable reduction of hardness for the irradiated samples.

  15. Swift heavy ion-beam induced amorphization and recrystallization of yttrium iron garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Miro, Sandrine; Beuneu, François; Toulemonde, Marcel

    2015-12-01

    Pure and (Ca and Si)-substituted yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12 or YIG) epitaxial layers and amorphous films on gadolinium gallium garnet (Gd3Ga5O12, or GGG) single crystal substrates were irradiated by 50 MeV 32Si and 50 MeV (or 60 MeV) 63Cu ions for electronic stopping powers larger than the threshold value (~4 MeV μm-1) for amorphous track formation in YIG crystals. Conductivity data of crystalline samples in a broad ion fluence range (1011-1016 cm-2) are modeled with a set of rate equations corresponding to the amorphization and recrystallization induced in ion tracks by electronic excitations. The data for amorphous layers confirm that a recrystallization process takes place above ~1014 cm-2. Cross sections for both processes deduced from this analysis are discussed in comparison to previous determinations with reference to the inelastic thermal-spike model of track formation. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was also used to follow the related structural modifications. Raman spectra show the progressive vanishing and randomization of crystal phonon modes in relation to the ion-induced damage. For crystalline samples irradiated at high fluences (⩾1014 cm-2), only two prominent broad bands remain like for amorphous films, thereby reflecting the phonon density of states of the disordered solid, regardless of samples and irradiation conditions. The main band peaked at ~660 cm-1 is assigned to vibration modes of randomized bonds in tetrahedral (FeO4) units.

  16. A new setup for the investigation of swift heavy ion induced particle emission and surface modifications.

    PubMed

    Meinerzhagen, F; Breuer, L; Bukowska, H; Bender, M; Severin, D; Herder, M; Lebius, H; Schleberger, M; Wucher, A

    2016-01-01

    The irradiation with fast ions with kinetic energies of >10 MeV leads to the deposition of a high amount of energy along their trajectory (up to several ten keV/nm). The energy is mainly transferred to the electronic subsystem and induces different secondary processes of excitations, which result in significant material modifications. A new setup to study these ion induced effects on surfaces will be described in this paper. The setup combines a variable irradiation chamber with different techniques of surface characterizations like scanning probe microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion, and neutral mass spectrometry, as well as low energy electron diffraction under ultra high vacuum conditions, and is mounted at a beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) of the GSI facility in Darmstadt, Germany. Here, samples can be irradiated with high-energy ions with a total kinetic energy up to several GeVs under different angles of incidence. Our setup enables the preparation and in situ analysis of different types of sample systems ranging from metals to insulators. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry enables us to study the chemical composition of the surface, while scanning probe microscopy allows a detailed view into the local electrical and morphological conditions of the sample surface down to atomic scales. With the new setup, particle emission during irradiation as well as persistent modifications of the surface after irradiation can thus be studied. We present first data obtained with the new setup, including a novel measuring protocol for time-of-flight mass spectrometry with the GSI UNILAC accelerator. PMID:26827329

  17. Swift heavy ion-beam induced amorphization and recrystallization of yttrium iron garnet.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Miro, Sandrine; Beuneu, François; Toulemonde, Marcel

    2015-12-16

    Pure and (Ca and Si)-substituted yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12 or YIG) epitaxial layers and amorphous films on gadolinium gallium garnet (Gd3Ga5O12, or GGG) single crystal substrates were irradiated by 50 MeV (32)Si and 50 MeV (or 60 MeV) (63)Cu ions for electronic stopping powers larger than the threshold value (~4 MeV μm(-1)) for amorphous track formation in YIG crystals. Conductivity data of crystalline samples in a broad ion fluence range (10(11)-10(16) cm(-2)) are modeled with a set of rate equations corresponding to the amorphization and recrystallization induced in ion tracks by electronic excitations. The data for amorphous layers confirm that a recrystallization process takes place above ~10(14) cm(-2). Cross sections for both processes deduced from this analysis are discussed in comparison to previous determinations with reference to the inelastic thermal-spike model of track formation. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was also used to follow the related structural modifications. Raman spectra show the progressive vanishing and randomization of crystal phonon modes in relation to the ion-induced damage. For crystalline samples irradiated at high fluences (⩾10(14) cm(-2)), only two prominent broad bands remain like for amorphous films, thereby reflecting the phonon density of states of the disordered solid, regardless of samples and irradiation conditions. The main band peaked at ~660 cm(-1) is assigned to vibration modes of randomized bonds in tetrahedral (FeO4) units. PMID:26580459

  18. A new setup for the investigation of swift heavy ion induced particle emission and surface modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinerzhagen, F.; Breuer, L.; Bukowska, H.; Bender, M.; Severin, D.; Herder, M.; Lebius, H.; Schleberger, M.; Wucher, A.

    2016-01-01

    The irradiation with fast ions with kinetic energies of >10 MeV leads to the deposition of a high amount of energy along their trajectory (up to several ten keV/nm). The energy is mainly transferred to the electronic subsystem and induces different secondary processes of excitations, which result in significant material modifications. A new setup to study these ion induced effects on surfaces will be described in this paper. The setup combines a variable irradiation chamber with different techniques of surface characterizations like scanning probe microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion, and neutral mass spectrometry, as well as low energy electron diffraction under ultra high vacuum conditions, and is mounted at a beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) of the GSI facility in Darmstadt, Germany. Here, samples can be irradiated with high-energy ions with a total kinetic energy up to several GeVs under different angles of incidence. Our setup enables the preparation and in situ analysis of different types of sample systems ranging from metals to insulators. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry enables us to study the chemical composition of the surface, while scanning probe microscopy allows a detailed view into the local electrical and morphological conditions of the sample surface down to atomic scales. With the new setup, particle emission during irradiation as well as persistent modifications of the surface after irradiation can thus be studied. We present first data obtained with the new setup, including a novel measuring protocol for time-of-flight mass spectrometry with the GSI UNILAC accelerator.

  19. Swift heavy ion irradiation-induced amorphization of La2Ti2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sulgiye; Lang, Maik; Tracy, Cameron L.; Zhang, Jiaming; Zhang, Fuxiang; Trautmann, Christina; Kluth, Patrick; Rodriguez, Matias D.; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2014-05-01

    Polycrystalline La2Ti2O7 powders have been irradiated with 2.0 GeV 181Ta ions up to a fluence of 1 × 1013 ions/cm2. Radiation-induced structural modifications were analyzed using synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction (XRD), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). An increase in the amorphous fraction as a function of fluence was revealed by XRD and Raman analyses and is evidenced by the reduction in intensity of the sharp Bragg maxima from the crystalline regions. Concurrently, diffraction maxima and vibrational absorption bands broaden with the increasing amorphous fraction. The cross-section for the crystalline-to-amorphous transformation (ion tracks) was determined by quantitative analysis of XRD patterns yielding a track diameter of d = 7.2 ± 0.9 nm. Slightly larger track diameters were obtained directly from TEM images (d = 10.6 ± 0.8 nm) and SAXS analysis (d = 10.6 ± 0.3 nm). High-resolution TEM images revealed that single tracks are entirely amorphous without any outer crystalline, disordered shell as found in pyrochlore oxides of the same stoichiometry. The large ratio of ionic radii of the A- and B-site cations (rA/rB = 1.94) means that disordering over the A- and B-sites is energetically unfavorable.

  20. Swift heavy ion induced phase transformation and thermoluminescence properties of zirconium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokesha, H. S.; Nagabhushana, K. R.; Singh, Fouran

    2016-07-01

    Zirconium oxide (ZrO2) powder is synthesized by combustion technique. XRD pattern of ZrO2 shows monoclinic phase with average crystallite size 35 nm. Pellets of ZrO2 are irradiated with 100 MeV swift Si7+, Ni7+ and 120 MeV swift Ag9+ ions in the fluence range 3 × 1010-3 × 1013 ions cm-2. XRD pattern show the main diffraction peak correspond to monoclinic and tetragonal phase of ZrO2 in 2θ range 27-33°. Structural phase transformation is observed for Ni7+ and Ag9+ ion irradiated samples at a fluence 1 × 1013 ions cm-2 and 3 × 1012 ions cm-2 respectively, since the deposited electronic energy loss exceeds an effective threshold (>12 keV nm-1). Phase transition induced by Ag9+ ion is nearly 2.9 times faster than Ni7+ ion at 1 × 1013 ions cm-2. Ag9+ ion irradiation leads two ion impact processes. Thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves exhibit two glows, a well resolved peak at ∼424 K and unresolved peak at 550 K for all SHI irradiated samples. TL response is decreased with increase of ion fluence. Beyond 3 × 1012 ions cm-2, samples don't exhibit TL due to annihilation of defects.

  1. Heavy-ion-induced production and preseparation of short-livedisotopes for chemistry experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dullmann, Christoph E.; Folden III, Charles M.; Gregorich, Kenneth E.; Hoffman, Darleane C.; Leitner, Daniela; Pang, Gregory K.; Sudowe, Ralf; Zielinski, Peter M.; Nitsche, Heino

    2005-02-24

    Physical separation of short-lived isotopes produced inheavy-ion-induced fusion reactions is a powerful and well know method andoften applied in investigations of the heaviest elements, called thetransactinides (Z>=104). By extracting these isotopes from a recoilseparator, they can be made available for transport to setups locatedoutside the heavily shielded irradiation position such as chemistrysetups. This physical preseparation technique overcomes many limitationscurrently faced in the chemical investigation of transactinides. Here wedescribe the basic principle using relatively short-lived isotopes of thelighter group 4 elements zirconium (Zr) and hafnium (Hf) that are used asanalogs of the lightest transactinide element, rutherfordium (Rf, element104). The Zr and Hf isotopes were produced at the LBNL 88-Inch Cyclotronusing a cocktail of 18O and 50Ti beams and the appropriate targets.Subsequently, the isotopes were physically separated in the BerkeleyGas-filled Separator (BGS) and guided to a Recoil Transfer Chamber (RTC)to transfer them to chemistry setups. The magnetic rigidities of thereaction products in low-pressure helium gas were measured and theiridentities determined with gamma-pectroscopy. Using preseparated isotopeshas the advantages of low background and beam plasma free environment forchemistry experiments. The new possibilities that open up for chemicalinvestigations of transactinide elements are descr ibed. The method canreadily be applied to homologous elements within other groups in theperiodic table.

  2. Heavy ion induced damage to plasmid DNA: plateau region vs. spread out Bragg-peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, H. M.; van Goethem, M. J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Brandenburg, S.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.

    2011-08-01

    We have investigated the damage of synthetic plasmid pBR322 DNA in dilute aqueous solutions induced by fast carbon ions. The relative contribution of indirect damage and direct damage to the DNA itself is expected to vary with linear energy transfer along the ion track, with the direct damage contribution increasing towards the Bragg peak. Therefore, 12C ions at the spread-out Bragg peak (dose averaged LET∞ = 189 ± 15 keV/ μm) and in the plateau region of the Bragg curve (LET = 40 keV/ μm) were employed and the radical scavenger concentration in the plasmid solution was varied to quantify the indirect effect. In order to minimize the influence of 12C break-up fragments, a relatively low initial energy of 90 MeV/nucleon was employed for the carbon ions. DNA damage has been quantified by subsequent electrophoresis on agarose gels. We find that strand breaks due to both indirect and direct effects are systematically higher in the plateau region as compared to the Bragg peak region with the difference being smallest at high scavenging capacities. In view of the fact that the relative biological effectiveness for many biological endpoints is maximum at the Bragg peak our findings imply that DNA damage at the Bragg peak is qualitatively most severe.

  3. Analysis of Heavy Ion-Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Fibroblast Cells Using In Situ Hybridization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Durante, Marco; Furusawa, Yoshiya; George, Kerry; Kawata, Tetsuya; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    Confluent human fibroblast cells (AG1522) were irradiated with gamma rays, 490 MeV/nucleon Si, or with Fe ions at either 200 or 500 MeV/nucleon. The cells were allowed to repair at 37 0 C for 24 hours after exposure, and a chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to condense chromosomes in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Unrejoined chromosomal breaks and complex exchanges were analyzed in the irradiated samples. In order to verify that chromosomal breaks were truly unrejoined, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using a combination of whole chromosome specific probes and probes specific for the telomere region of the chromosome. Results showed that the frequency of unrejoined chromosome breaks was higher after high-LET radiation, and consequently, the ratio of incomplete to complete exchanges increased steadily with LET up to 440 keV/micron, the highest LET value in the present study. For samples exposed to 200 MeV/nucleon Fe ions, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using the multicolor FISH (mFISH) technique that allows identification of both complex and truly incomplete exchanges. Results of the mFISH study showed that 0.7 and 3 Gy dose of the Fe ions produced similar ratios of complex to simple exchanges and incomplete to complete exchanges, values for which were higher than those obtained after a 6 Gy gamma exposure. After 0.7 Gy of Fe ions, most complex aberrations were found to involve three or four chromosomes, indicating the maximum number of chromosome domains traversed by a single Fe ion track. 2

  4. Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Willen, E.H.

    1986-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a proposed research facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory to study the collision of beams of heavy ions, up to gold in mass and at beam energies up to 100 GeV/nucleon. The physics to be explored by this collider is an overlap between the traditional disciplines of nuclear physics and high energy physics and is a continuation of the planned program of light and heavy ion physics at BNL. The machine is to be constructed in the now-empty tunnel built for the former CBA project. Various other facilities to support the collider are either in place or under construction at BNL. The collider itself, including the magnets, is in an advanced state of design, and a construction start is anticipated in the next several years.

  5. (Relativistic heavy ion research)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory, participation in the E802 Experiment, which is the first major heavy-ion experiment at the BNL-AGS, was the main focus of the group during the past four years. The emphases of the E802 experiment were on (a) accurate particle identification and measurements of spectra over a wide kinematical domain (5{degree} < {theta}{sub LAB} < 55{degree}, p < 20 GeV/c); and (b) measurements of small-angle two-particle correlations, with event characterization tools: multiplicity array, forward and large-angle calorimeters. This experiment and other heavy ion collision experiments are discussed in this report.

  6. Biomarker for Space Radiation Risk: Painting Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Energetic Heavy Ions in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2007-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future Lunar and Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Over the years, we have studied chromosomal damage in human fibroblast, epithelia and lymphocyte cells exposed in vitro to energetic charged particles generated at several accelerator facilities in the world. We have also studied chromosome aberrations in astronaut s peripheral blood lymphocytes before and after space flight. Various fluorescence in situ hybridization painting techniques have been used to identify from only the telomere region of the chromosome to every chromosome in a human cell. We will summarize the results of the investigations, and discuss the unique radiation signatures and biomarkers for space radiation exposure.

  7. Investigations on heavy ion induced Single-Event Transients (SETs) in highly-scaled FinFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillardin, M.; Raine, M.; Paillet, P.; Adell, P. C.; Girard, S.; Duhamel, O.; Andrieu, F.; Barraud, S.; Faynot, O.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate Single-Event Transients (SET) in different designs of multiple-gate devices made of FinFETs with various geometries. Heavy ion experimental results are explained by using a thorough charge collection analysis of fast transients measured on dedicated test structures. Multi-level simulations are performed to get new insights into the charge collection mechanisms in multiple-gate devices. Implications for multiple-gate device design hardening are finally discussed.

  8. ATM protein is indispensable to repair complex-type DNA double strand breaks induced by high LET heavy ion irradiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Emiko; Yu, Dong; Fujimori, Akira; Anzai, Kazunori; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated) protein responsible for a rare genetic disease with hyperradiosensitivity, is the one of the earliest repair proteins sensing DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). ATM is known to phosphorylate DNA repair proteins such as MRN complex (Mre11, Rad50 and NBS1), 53BP1, Artemis, Brca1, gamma-H2AX, and MDC. We studied the interactions between ATM and DNA-PKcs, a crucial NHEJ repair protein, after cells exposure to high and low LET irradiation. Normal human (HFL III, MRC5VA) and AT homozygote (AT2KY, AT5BIVA, AT3BIVA) cells were irradiated with X-rays and high LET radiation (carbon ions: 290MeV/n initial energy at 70 keV/um, and iron ions: 500MeV/n initial energy at 200KeV/um), and several critical end points were examined. AT cells with high LET irradiation showed a significantly higher radiosensitivity when compared with normal cells. The behavior of DNA DSB repair was monitored by immuno-fluorescence techniques using DNA-PKcs (pThr2609, pSer2056) and ATM (pSer1981) antibodies. In normal cells, the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs was clearly detected after high LET irradiation, though the peak of phosphorylation was delayed when compared to X-irradiation. In contrast, almost no DNA-PKcs phosphorylation foci were detected in AT cells irradiated with high LET radiation. A similar result was also observed in normal cells treated with 10 uM ATM kinase specific inhibitor (KU55933) one hour before irradiation. These data suggest that the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs with low LET X-rays is mostly ATM-independent, and the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs with high LET radiation seems to require ATM probably due to its complex nature of DSB induced. Our study indicates that high LET heavy ion irradiation which we can observe in the space environment would provide a useful tool to study the fundamental mechanism associated with DNA DSB repair.

  9. DNA-DSB in CHO-K1 cells induced by heavy-ions: Break rejoining and residual damage (GSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taucher-Scholz, G.; Heilmann, J.; Becher, G.; Kraft, G.

    1994-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSB's) are the critical lesions involved in cellular effects of ionizing radiation. Therefore, the evaluation of DSB induction in mammalian cells after heavy ion irradiation is an essential task for the assessment of high-LET radiation risk in space. Of particular interest has been the question of how the biological efficiency for the cellular inactivation endpoint relates to the initial lesions (DSBs) at varying LETs. For cell killing, an increased Relative Biological Efficiency (RBE) has been determined for highLET radiation around 100-200 keV/mu m. At higher LET, the RBE's decrease again to values below one for the very heavy particles. At GSI, DSB-induction was measured in CHO-K1 cells following irradiation with accelerated particles covering a wide LET range. The electrophoretic elution of fragmented DNA out of agarose plugs in a constant electrical field was applied for the detection of DSB's. The fraction of DNA retained was determined considering the relative intensities of ethidium bromide fluorescence in the well and in the gel lane. Dose-effect curves were established, from which the RBE for DSB induction was calculated at a fraction of 0.7 of DNA retained In summary, these rejoining studies are in line with an enhanced severity of the DNA DSB's at higher LET's, resulting in a decreased repairability of the induced lesions. However, no information concerning the fidelity of strand breaks rejoining is provided in these studies. To assess correct rejoining of DNA fragments an experimental system involving individual DNA hybridization bands has been set up. In preliminary experiments Sal I generated DNA fragments of 0.9 Mbp were irradiated with xrays and incubated for repair However, restitution of the original signals was not observed, probably due to the high radiation dose necessary for breakage of a fragment of this size. A banding pattern with NotI hybridization signals in a higher MW range (3Mbp) has been obtained by varying

  10. Direct measurement of transient pulses induced by laser and heavy ion irradiation in deca-nanometer devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Knudson, A. R.; Torres, A.; McMorrow, D.; Ferlet-Cavrois, Veronique; Schwank, James Ralph; Paillet, Philippe; Melinger, J. S.; Tosti, L.; Jahan, C.; Barna, Gabriel; Faynot, O.; Shaneyfelt, Marty Ray; Campbell, A. B.; Gaillardin, M.; Hirose, K.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2005-07-01

    This paper investigates the transient response of 50-nm gate length fully and partially depleted SOI and bulk devices to pulsed laser and heavy ion microbeam irradiations. The measured transient signals on 50-nm fully depleted devices are very short, and the collected charge is small compared to older 0.25-{micro}m generation SOI and bulk devices. We analyze in detail the influence of the SOI architecture (fully or partially depleted) on the pulse duration and the amount of bipolar amplification. For bulk devices, the doping engineering is shown to have large effects on the duration of the transient signals and on the charge collection efficiency.

  11. Failla Memorial lecture. The future of heavy-ion science in biology and medicine.

    PubMed

    Tobias, C A

    1985-07-01

    Interplanetary space contains fluxes of fast moving atomic nuclei. The distribution of these reflects the atomic composition of the universe, and such particles may pose limitations for space flight and for life in space. Over the past 50 years, since the invention of Ernest Lawrence's cyclotron, advances in accelerator technology have permitted the acceleration of charged nuclei to very high velocities. Currently, beams of any stable isotope species up to uranium are available at kinetic energies of several hundred MeV/nucleon at the Berkeley Bevalac. Recently, new areas of particle physics research relating to the mechanisms of spallation and fission have opened up for investigation, and it is now realistic to search for nuclear super-dense states that might be produced in heavy nuclear collisions. The heavy ions hold interest for a broad spectrum of research because of their effectiveness in producing a series of major lesions in DNA along single particle tracks and because of the Bragg depth ionization properties that allow the precise deposition of highly localized doses deep in the human body. Individual heavy ions can also interrupt the continuity of membraneous regions in cells. Heavy ions, when compared to low-LET radiation, have increased effectiveness for mammalian cell lethality, chromosome mutations, and cell transformation. The molecular mechanisms are not completely understood but appear to involve fragmentation and reintegration of DNA. Cells attempt to repair these lesions, and many of the deleterious effects are due to misrepair or misrejoining of DNA. Heavy ions do not require the presence of oxygen for producing their effects, and hypoxic cells in necrotic regions have nearly the same sensitivity as cells in well-oxygenated tissues. Heavy ions are effective in delaying or blocking the cell division process. Heavy ions are also strong enhancers of viral-induced cell transformation, a process that requires integration of foreign DNA. Some cell

  12. Comparison of total dose effects on SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistors induced by different swift heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ya-Bin; Fu, Jun; Xu, Jun; Wang, Yu-Dong; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Cui, Jie; Li, Gao-Qing; Liu, Zhi-Hong

    2014-11-01

    The degradations in NPN silicon-germanium (SiGe) heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) were fully studied in this work, by means of 25-MeV Si, 10-MeV Cl, 20-MeV Br, and 10-MeV Br ion irradiation, respectively. Electrical parameters such as the base current (IB), current gain (β), neutral base recombination (NBR), and Early voltage (VA) were investigated and used to evaluate the tolerance to heavy ion irradiation. Experimental results demonstrate that device degradations are indeed radiation-source-dependent, and the larger the ion nuclear energy loss is, the more the displacement damages are, and thereby the more serious the performance degradation is. The maximum degradation was observed in the transistors irradiated by 10-MeV Br. For 20-MeV and 10-MeV Br ion irradiation, an unexpected degradation in IC was observed and Early voltage decreased with increasing ion fluence, and NBR appeared to slow down at high ion fluence. The degradations in SiGe HBTs were mainly attributed to the displacement damages created by heavy ion irradiation in the transistors. The underlying physical mechanisms are analyzed and investigated in detail.

  13. Swift heavy ion induced structural and optical properties of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} nanophosphor

    SciTech Connect

    Som, S.; Sharma, S.K.; Lochab, S.P.

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Europium doped yttrium oxide nanophosphor was synthesized via combustion method. ► Prepared nanophosphor was irradiated by 150 MeV Swift heavy ion (Ni{sup 7+}). ► Structural (XRD, FTIR, and TEM) and optical properties (DR and PL) after ion irradiation were studied. ► Band gap increases with ion fluence due to the decrease in average crystallite size. -- Abstract: This paper reports the structural and optical modifications of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} nanophosphor induced by 150 MeV Ni{sup 7+} swift heavy ions (SHI) in the fluence range 1 × 10{sup 11} to 1 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. The XRD, TEM and FTIR studies confirm the loss of crystallinity of the nanophosphors after ion irradiation. Diffuse reflectance spectrum shows a blue shift in the absorption band for SHI induced nanophosphors. An increase in the intensity of photoluminescence peaks without any shift in the peak positions was observed.

  14. Process in high energy heavy ion acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinev, D.

    2009-03-01

    A review of processes that occur in high energy heavy ion acceleration by synchrotrons and colliders and that are essential for the accelerator performance is presented. Interactions of ions with the residual gas molecules/atoms and with stripping foils that deliberately intercept the ion trajectories are described in details. These interactions limit both the beam intensity and the beam quality. The processes of electron loss and capture lie at the root of heavy ion charge exchange injection. The review pays special attention to the ion induced vacuum pressure instability which is one of the main factors limiting the beam intensity. The intrabeam scattering phenomena which restricts the average luminosity of ion colliders is discussed. Some processes in nuclear interactions of ultra-relativistic heavy ions that could be dangerous for the performance of ion colliders are represented in the last chapter.

  15. Swift Heavy Ion Irradiation of Cobalt Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprouster, D. J.; Giulian, R.; Schnohr, C. S.; Kluth, P.; Araujo, L. L.; Byrne, A. P.; Foran, G. J.; Ridgway, M. C.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that the electronic energy loss released by swift heavy ions can cause considerable atomic movement in various solids. Here, we present a study of the effects of swift heavy ion irradiation on Co nanoparticles embedded within a silica host matrix. The evolution of the Co nanoparticle crystal phase, structural properties, shape and size has been characterized using a combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. An FCC-to-HCP phase transformation is observed at low fluences, while higher fluences result in significant changes in the short range order and NP shape. After an incubation fluence the nanoparticles deform into ellipsoids, preferentially aligned parallel to the incident beam direction. The threshold diameter for elongation was comparable to the saturation value of the ellipsoid width. We correlate this saturation value with the diameter of the molten track induced in amorphous silica by swift heavy ion irradiation.

  16. Swift heavy ion induced surface modification for tailoring coercivity in Fe-Ni based amorphous thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Senoy; Thomas, Hysen; Anantharaman, M. R.; Avasthi, D. K.; Tripathi, A.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2009-02-01

    Fe-Ni based amorphous thin films were prepared by thermal evaporation. These films were irradiated by 108 MeV Ag{sup 8+} ions at room temperature with fluences ranging from 1x10{sup 12} to 3x10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} using a 15 UD Pelletron accelerator. Glancing angle x-ray diffraction studies showed that the irradiated films retain their amorphous nature. The topographical evolution of the films under swift heavy ion (SHI) bombardment was probed using atomic force microscope and it was noticed that surface roughening was taking place with ion beam irradiation. Magnetic measurements using a vibrating sample magnetometer showed that the coercivity of the films increases with an increase in the ion fluence. The observed coercivity changes are correlated with topographical evolution of the films under SHI irradiation. The ability to modify the magnetic properties via SHI irradiation could be utilized for applications in thin film magnetism.

  17. Recent Progress in Isospin Physics with Heavy-Ion Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Liewen; Ko, Che Ming; Li Baoan

    2008-11-11

    We review recent progress in the determination of the subsaturation density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy from heavy-ion collisions as well as the theoretical progress in probing the high density behavior of the symmetry energy in heavy-ion reactions induced by future high energy radioactive beams. Implications of these results for the nuclear effective interactions are also discussed.

  18. Dynamics of neutron-induced fission of 235U using four-dimensional Langevin equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlavani, M. R.; Mirfathi, S. M.

    2015-08-01

    Background: Langevin equations have been suggested as a key approach to the dynamical analysis of energy dissipation in excited nuclei, formed during heavy-ion fusion-fission reactions. Recently, a few researchers theoretically reported investigations of fission for light nuclei in a low excitation energy using the Langevin approach, without considering the contribution of pre- and post-scission particles and γ -ray emission. Purpose: We study the dynamical evolution of mass distribution of fission fragments, and neutron and γ -ray multiplicity for 236U as compound nuclei that are constructed after fusion of a neutron and 235U. Method: Energy dissipation of the compound nucleus through fission is calculated using the Langevin dynamical approach combined with a Monte Carlo method. Also the shape of the fissioning nucleus is restricted to "funny hills" parametrization. Results: Fission fragment mass distribution, neutron and γ -ray multiplicity, and the average kinetic energy of emitted neutrons and γ rays at a low excitation energy are calculated using a dynamical model, based on the four-dimensional Langevin equations. Conclusions: The theoretical results show reasonable agreement with experimental data and the proposed dynamical model can well explain the energy dissipation in low energy induced fission.

  19. HEAVY ION LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Van Atta, C.M.; Beringer, R.; Smith, L.

    1959-01-01

    A linear accelerator of heavy ions is described. The basic contributions of the invention consist of a method and apparatus for obtaining high energy particles of an element with an increased charge-to-mass ratio. The method comprises the steps of ionizing the atoms of an element, accelerating the resultant ions to an energy substantially equal to one Mev per nucleon, stripping orbital electrons from the accelerated ions by passing the ions through a curtain of elemental vapor disposed transversely of the path of the ions to provide a second charge-to-mass ratio, and finally accelerating the resultant stripped ions to a final energy of at least ten Mev per nucleon.

  20. Heavy ion beam probing

    SciTech Connect

    Hickok, R L

    1980-07-01

    This report consists of the notes distributed to the participants at the IEEE Mini-Course on Modern Plasma Diagnostics that was held in Madison, Wisconsin in May 1980. It presents an overview of Heavy Ion Beam Probing that briefly describes the principles and discuss the types of measurements that can be made. The problems associated with implementing beam probes are noted, possible variations are described, estimated costs of present day systems, and the scaling requirements for large plasma devices are presented. The final chapter illustrates typical results that have been obtained on a variety of plasma devices. No detailed calculations are included in the report, but a list of references that will provide more detailed information is included.

  1. Heavy ion measurement on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaujean, R.; Jonathal, D.; Enge, W.

    1992-01-01

    A stack of CR-39 and Kodak CN track detectors was exposed on the NASA satellite LDEF and recovered after almost six years in space. The quick look analysis yielded heavy ion tracks on a background of low energy secondaries from proton interaction. The detected heavy ions show a steep energy spectrum which indicates a radiation belt origin.

  2. Funduscopic alterations in the rhesus monkey induced by exposure to heavy ions /0+8/ 250 MeV/nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckman, F. N.; Bonney, C. H.; Hunter, D. M.

    1974-01-01

    A heavy-ion, high-energy beam has been extracted from the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory Bevatron, making controlled exposure of biological systems feasible, and a series of experiments have been undertaken to determine the possible deleterious effects of such irradiation upon the primate retina. The left eyes of 54 rhesus monkeys have been exposed to accelerated 0+8 (250 MeV/nucleon). Beam flux ranged from 1.3 x 10 to the 7th particles/ sq cm (171 rads) to 5.9 x 10 to the 8th particles/sq cm (7740 rads). Fundus photography was performed immediately prior to and immediately following exposure, at 24 to 48 hours postexposure and at 1, 2, and 5 weeks postexposure. Punctate hemorrhages of the retina were visible at 1.3 x 10 to the 7th particles/sq cm (171 rads), the lowest exposure level utilized in this study. Acute radiation retinopathy, consisting of geographic retinal hemorrhage and ischemic necrosis of the retina, was not seen until total flux reached 7.7 x 10 to the 7th particles/sq cm (1000 rads).

  3. Cataracts Heavy Ions and Individual Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, E.; Worgul, B.; Brenner, D.; Smilenov, L.

    Ocular cataracts represents one of the few legacies of space flight evident in a significant proportion of astronauts X-rays are known to induce cataracts Heavy ions are known to be much more effective per unit dose than gamma -rays The object of this present study was to identify genes that confer individual susceptibility and to estimate RBE values Wild type mice were compared with animals heterozygous for Atm Mrad9 or BRCA1 or animals that were double heterozygotes for pairs of genes Mice were irradiated with x-rays at Columbia University in New York City or with heavy ions 1GeV amu 56 Fe ions at Brookhaven National Laboratory Haploinsufficiency for either Atm or mRAD9 resulted in cataracts appearing earlier than in wild type animals whether exposed to gamma -rays or heavy ions Double heterozygotes were more radiosensitive than animals haploinsufficient for either gene alone Heavy ions were much more effective than x-rays in inducing cataracts of all grades in animals of all genotypes A detailed analysis suggest that the RBE varies to some extent with the genotype of the animal and the cataract grade

  4. Mechanism of dissipation in heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, J.R.; Sierk, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    We discuss a new surface-plus-window mechanism for the conversion of nuclear collective energy into internal degrees of freedom at intermediate excitation energies. This novel dissipation mechanism, which results from the long mean free path of nucleons inside a nucleus, involves interactions of either one or two nucleons with the moving nuclear surface and also, for dumbbell-like shapes encountered in heavy-ion reactions and fission, the transfer of nucleons through the window separating the two portions of the system. To illustrate the effect of surface-plus-window dissipation on heavy-ion-fusion reactions we present dynamical calculations for values of the dissipation strength corresponding to 27% and 100% of the Swiatecki wall-formula value, as well as for no dissipation. In addition to dynamical thresholds for compound-nucleus formation in heavy-ion reactions, our new picture describes such other phenomena as experimental mean fission-fragment kinetic energies for the fission of nuclei throughout the periodic system, enhancement in neutron emission prior to fission, short scission-to-scission times in sequential ternary fission, widths of mass and charge distributions in deep-inelastic heavy-ion reactions, and widths of isoscalar giant quadrupole and giant octupole resonances. 32 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Band gap engineering by swift heavy ions irradiation induced amorphous nano-channels in LiNbO3

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sachan, Ritesh; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Liu, Peng; Patel, Maulik; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Zhang, Yanwen; Wang, Xuelin; Weber, William J.

    2015-04-01

    The irradiation of lithium niobate with swift heavy ions results in the creation of amorphous nano-sized channels along the incident ion path. These nano-channels are on the order of a hundred microns in length and could be useful for photonic applications. However, there are two major challenges in these nano-channels characterization; (i) it is difficult to investigate the structural characteristics of these nano-channels due to their very long length, and (ii) the analytical electron microscopic analysis of individual ion track is complicated due to electron beam sensitive nature of lithium niobate. Here, we report the first high resolution microscopic characterizationmore » of these amorphous nano-channels, widely known as ion-tracks, by direct imaging them at different depths in the material, and subsequently correlating the key characteristics with Se of ions. Energetic Kr ions (84Kr22 with 1.98 GeV energy) are used to irradiate single crystal lithium niobate with a fluence of 2x1010 ions/cm2, which results in the formation of individual ion tracks with a penetration depth of ~180 μm. Along the ion path, electron energy loss of the ions, which is responsible for creating the ion tracks, increases with depth under these conditions in LiNbO3, resulting in increases in track diameter of a factor of ~2 with depth. This diameter increase with electronic stopping power is consistent with predictions of the inelastic thermal spike model. We also show a new method to measure the band gap in individual ion track by using electron energy-loss spectroscopy.« less

  6. Band gap engineering by swift heavy ions irradiation induced amorphous nano-channels in LiNbO3

    SciTech Connect

    Sachan, Ritesh; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Liu, Peng; Patel, Maulik; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Zhang, Yanwen; Wang, Xuelin; Weber, William J.

    2015-04-01

    The irradiation of lithium niobate with swift heavy ions results in the creation of amorphous nano-sized channels along the incident ion path. These nano-channels are on the order of a hundred microns in length and could be useful for photonic applications. However, there are two major challenges in these nano-channels characterization; (i) it is difficult to investigate the structural characteristics of these nano-channels due to their very long length, and (ii) the analytical electron microscopic analysis of individual ion track is complicated due to electron beam sensitive nature of lithium niobate. Here, we report the first high resolution microscopic characterization of these amorphous nano-channels, widely known as ion-tracks, by direct imaging them at different depths in the material, and subsequently correlating the key characteristics with Se of ions. Energetic Kr ions (84Kr22 with 1.98 GeV energy) are used to irradiate single crystal lithium niobate with a fluence of 2x1010 ions/cm2, which results in the formation of individual ion tracks with a penetration depth of ~180 μm. Along the ion path, electron energy loss of the ions, which is responsible for creating the ion tracks, increases with depth under these conditions in LiNbO3, resulting in increases in track diameter of a factor of ~2 with depth. This diameter increase with electronic stopping power is consistent with predictions of the inelastic thermal spike model. We also show a new method to measure the band gap in individual ion track by using electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

  7. Data consistencies of swift heavy ion induced damage creation in yttrium iron garnet analyzed by different techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, A.; Benhacine, H.; Benyagoub, A.; Grob, J. J.; Izerrouken, M.; Kadid, S.; Khalfaoui, N.; Stoquert, J. P.; Toulemonde, M.; Trautmann, C.

    2016-01-01

    Pronounced swelling is observed when single crystals of yttrium iron garnet Y3Fe5O12 (YIG) are irradiated in the electronic energy loss regime with various swift heavy ions. The out-of-plane swelling was measured by scanning across the border line between an irradiated and a virgin area of the sample surface with the tip of a profilometer. The step height varied between 20 and 600 nm depending on fluence, electronic energy loss and total range of the ions. The step height divided by the ion range as a function of the ion fluence exhibits a linear increase in the initial phase and saturates at high fluences leading to a density decrease of around 1.7%. With complementary channeling-Rutherford-backscattering experiments (c-RBS), the damage fraction and the corresponding damage cross section were extracted and compared to the cross section deduced from swelling measurements. Irradiation effects were also characterized by scanning force microscopy (SFM). A threshold for damage creation as deduced from all the present physical characterizations is 5.5 ± 1.0 keV/nm. The value is in full agreement with previous measurements confirming that swelling and SFM characterizations can provide information concerning the electronic energy loss threshold for track formation. In contrast, track radii deduced from swelling measurements are smaller and radii from SFM are larger than deduced from c-RBS analysis. The results of Y3Fe5O12 of this work are compared with data obtained for other crystalline oxides and for ionic crystals.

  8. Imaging using accelerated heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.

    1982-05-01

    Several methods for imaging using accelerated heavy ion beams are being investigated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Using the HILAC (Heavy-Ion Linear Accelerator) as an injector, the Bevalac can accelerate fully stripped atomic nuclei from carbon (Z = 6) to krypton (Z = 34), and partly stripped ions up to uranium (Z = 92). Radiographic studies to date have been conducted with helium (from 184-inch cyclotron), carbon, oxygen, and neon beams. Useful ranges in tissue of 40 cm or more are available. To investigate the potential of heavy-ion projection radiography and computed tomography (CT), several methods and instrumentation have been studied.

  9. Silicon Carbide Power Device Performance Under Heavy-Ion Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Topper, Alyson; Wilcox, Edward; Phan, Anthony; Ikpe, Stanley; LaBel, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Heavy-ion induced degradation and catastrophic failure data for SiC power MOSFETs and Schottky diodes are examined to provide insight into the challenge of single-event effect hardening of SiC power devices.

  10. Comparison of Single-Event Transients Induced in an Operational Amplifier (LM124) by Pulsed Laser Light and a Broad Beam of Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchner, Steve; McMorrow, Dale; Poivey, Christian; Howard, James, Jr.; Pease, Rom; Savage, Mark; Boulghassoul, Younis; Massengill, Lloyd

    2003-01-01

    A comparison of transients from heavy-ion and pulsed-laser testing shows good agreement for many different voltage configurations. The agreement is illustrated by comparing directly individual transients and plots of transient amplitude versus width.

  11. Relativistically induced transparency acceleration of light ions by an ultrashort laser pulse interacting with a heavy-ion-plasma density gradient.

    PubMed

    Sahai, Aakash A; Tsung, Frank S; Tableman, Adam R; Mori, Warren B; Katsouleas, Thomas C

    2013-10-01

    The relativistically induced transparency acceleration (RITA) scheme of proton and ion acceleration using laser-plasma interactions is introduced, modeled, and compared to the existing schemes. Protons are accelerated with femtosecond relativistic pulses to produce quasimonoenergetic bunches with controllable peak energy. The RITA scheme works by a relativistic laser inducing transparency [Akhiezer and Polovin, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz 30, 915 (1956); Kaw and Dawson, Phys. Fluids 13, 472 (1970); Max and Perkins, Phys. Rev. Lett. 27, 1342 (1971)] to densities higher than the cold-electron critical density, while the background heavy ions are stationary. The rising laser pulse creates a traveling acceleration structure at the relativistic critical density by ponderomotively [Lindl and Kaw, Phys. Fluids 14, 371 (1971); Silva et al., Phys. Rev. E 59, 2273 (1999)] driving a local electron density inflation, creating an electron snowplow and a co-propagating electrostatic potential. The snowplow advances with a velocity determined by the rate of the rise of the laser's intensity envelope and the heavy-ion-plasma density gradient scale length. The rising laser is incrementally rendered transparent to higher densities such that the relativistic-electron plasma frequency is resonant with the laser frequency. In the snowplow frame, trace density protons reflect off the electrostatic potential and get snowplowed, while the heavier background ions are relatively unperturbed. Quasimonoenergetic bunches of velocity equal to twice the snowplow velocity can be obtained and tuned by controlling the snowplow velocity using laser-plasma parameters. An analytical model for the proton energy as a function of laser intensity, rise time, and plasma density gradient is developed and compared to 1D and 2D PIC OSIRIS [Fonseca et al., Lect. Note Comput. Sci. 2331, 342 (2002)] simulations. We model the acceleration of protons to GeV energies with tens-of-femtoseconds laser pulses of a few

  12. Relativistically induced transparency acceleration of light ions by an ultrashort laser pulse interacting with a heavy-ion-plasma density gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Aakash A.; Tsung, Frank S.; Tableman, Adam R.; Mori, Warren B.; Katsouleas, Thomas C.

    2013-10-01

    The relativistically induced transparency acceleration (RITA) scheme of proton and ion acceleration using laser-plasma interactions is introduced, modeled, and compared to the existing schemes. Protons are accelerated with femtosecond relativistic pulses to produce quasimonoenergetic bunches with controllable peak energy. The RITA scheme works by a relativistic laser inducing transparency [Akhiezer and Polovin, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz 30, 915 (1956); Kaw and Dawson, Phys. FluidsPFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1692942 13, 472 (1970); Max and Perkins, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.27.1342 27, 1342 (1971)] to densities higher than the cold-electron critical density, while the background heavy ions are stationary. The rising laser pulse creates a traveling acceleration structure at the relativistic critical density by ponderomotively [Lindl and Kaw, Phys. FluidsPFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1693437 14, 371 (1971); Silva , Phys. Rev. E1063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.59.2273 59, 2273 (1999)] driving a local electron density inflation, creating an electron snowplow and a co-propagating electrostatic potential. The snowplow advances with a velocity determined by the rate of the rise of the laser's intensity envelope and the heavy-ion-plasma density gradient scale length. The rising laser is incrementally rendered transparent to higher densities such that the relativistic-electron plasma frequency is resonant with the laser frequency. In the snowplow frame, trace density protons reflect off the electrostatic potential and get snowplowed, while the heavier background ions are relatively unperturbed. Quasimonoenergetic bunches of velocity equal to twice the snowplow velocity can be obtained and tuned by controlling the snowplow velocity using laser-plasma parameters. An analytical model for the proton energy as a function of laser intensity, rise time, and plasma density gradient is developed and compared to 1D and 2D PIC OSIRIS [Fonseca , Lect. Note Comput. Sci.9783

  13. Irradiation effects in 6H-SiC induced by neutron and heavy ions: Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution XRD analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaofei; Zhou, Wei; Feng, Qijie; Zheng, Jian; Liu, Xiankun; Tang, Bin; Li, Jiangbo; Xue, Jianming; Peng, Shuming

    2016-09-01

    Irradiation effects of neutron and 3 MeV C+, Si+ in 6H-SiC were investigated by Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution XRD. The total disorder values of neutron irradiated SiC agree well with that of samples irradiated by ions at the same doses respectively. On the other hand, high-resolution XRD results shows that the lattice strain rate caused by neutron irradiation is 6.8%/dpa, while it is only 2.6%/dpa and 4.2%/dpa for Si+ and C+ irradiations respectively. Our results illustrate that the total disorder in neutron irradiated SiC can be accurately simulated by MeV Si+ or C+ irradiations at the same dose, but for the lattice strain and strain-related properties like surface hardness, the depth profile of irradiation damages induced by energetic ions must be considered. This research will contribute to a better understanding of the difference in irradiation effects between neutron and heavy ions.

  14. Results of heavy ion radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R.

    1994-04-01

    The potential of heavy ion therapy for clinical use in cancer therapy stems from the biological parameters of heavy charged particles, and their precise dose localization. Biologically, carbon, neon and other heavy ion beams (up to about silicon) are clinically useful in overcoming the radioresistance of hypoxic tumors, thus increasing biological effectiveness relative to low-LET x-ray or electron beams. Cells irradiated by heavy ions show less variation in cell-cycle related radiosensitivity and decreased repair of radiation injury. The physical parameters of these heavy charged particles allow precise delivery of high radiation doses to tumors while minimizing irradiation of normal tissues. Clinical use requires close interaction between radiation oncologists, medical physicists, accelerator physicists, engineers, computer scientists and radiation biologists.

  15. Swift Heavy Ions in Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothard, Hermann; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina

    2015-12-01

    The present volume contains the proceedings of the Ninth International Symposium on Swift Heavy Ions in Matter (SHIM). This conference was held in Darmstadt, from 18 to 21 May 2015. SHIM is a triennial series, which started about 25 years ago by a joint initiative of CIRIL - Caen and GSI - Darmstadt, with the aim of promoting fundamental and applied interdisciplinary research in the field of high-energy, heavy-ion interaction processes with matter. SHIM was successively organized in Caen (1989), Bensheim (1992), Caen (1995), Berlin (1998), Catania (2002), Aschaffenburg (2005), Lyon (2008), and Kyoto (2012). The conference attracts scientists from many different fields using high-energy heavy ions delivered by large accelerator facilities and characterized by strong and short electronic excitations.

  16. Ternary fission induced by polarized neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gönnenwein, Friedrich

    2013-12-01

    Ternary fission of (e,e) U- and Pu- isotopes induced by cold polarized neutrons discloses some new facets of the process. In the so-called ROT effect shifts in the angular distributions of ternary particles relative to the fission fragments show up. In the so-called TRI effect an asymmetry in the emission of ternary particles relative to a plane formed by the fragment momentum and the spin of the neutron appear. The two effects are shown to be linked to the components of angular momentum perpendicular and parallel to the fission axis at the saddle point of fission. Based on theoretical models the spectroscopic properties of the collective transitional states at the saddle point are inferred from experiment.

  17. Relativistic heavy ion fragmentation at HISS (Heavy Ion Spectrometer System)

    SciTech Connect

    Tull, C.E.

    1990-10-01

    An experiment was conducted at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to measure projectile fragmentation of relativistic heavy ions. Charge identification was obtained by the use of a Cerenkov Hodoscope operating above the threshold for total internal reflection, while velocity measurement was performed by use of a second set of Cerenkov radiators operating at the threshold for total internal reflection. Charge and mass resolution for the system was {sigma}{sub Z} = 0.2 e and {sigma}{sub A} = 0.2 u. Measurements of the elemental and isotopic production cross sections for the fragmentation of {sup 40}Ar at 1.65{center dot}A GeV have been compared with an Abrasion-Ablation Model based on the evaporation computer code GEMINI. The model proves to be an accurate predictor of the cross sections for fragments between Chlorine and Boron. The measured cross section were reproduced using simple geometry with charge dispersions induced by zero-point vibrations of the giant dipole resonance for the prompt abrasion stage, and injecting an excitation energy spectrum based on a final state interaction with scaling factor E{sub fsi} = 38.8 MeV/c. Measurement of the longitudinal momentum distribution widths for projectile fragments are consistent with previous experiment and can be interpreted as reflecting the Fermi momentum distribution in the initial projectile nucleus. Measurement of the transverse momentum indicate an additional, unexplained dependence of the reduced momentum widths on fragment mass. This dependence has the same sign and similar slope to previously measured fragments of {sup 139}La, and to predictions based on phase-space constraints on the final state of the system.

  18. Relativistic heavy ion facilities: worldwide

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1986-05-01

    A review of relativistic heavy ion facilities which exist, are in a construction phase, or are on the drawing boards as proposals is presented. These facilities span the energy range from fixed target machines in the 1 to 2 GeV/nucleon regime, up to heavy ion colliders of 100 GeV/nucleon on 100 GeV/nucleon. In addition to specifying the general features of such machines, an outline of the central physics themes to be carried out at these facilities is given, along with a sampling of the detectors which will be used to extract the physics. 22 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Gene amplification and microsatellite instability induced in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells by alpha particles and heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piao, C. Q.; Hei, T. K.; Hall, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Gene amplification and microsatellite alteration are useful markers of genomic instability in tumor and transformed cell lines. It has been suggested that genomic instability contributes to the progression of tumorigenesis by accumulating genetic changes. In this study, amplification of the carbamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbamylase, dihydro-orotase (CAD) gene in transformed and tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells induced by either alpha particles or (56)Fe ions was assessed by measuring resistance to N-(phosphonacetyl)-l-aspartate (PALA). In addition, alterations of microsatellite loci located on chromosomes 3p and 18q were analyzed in a series of primary and secondary tumor cell lines generated in nude mice. The frequency of PALA-resistant colonies was 1-3 x 10(-3) in tumor cell lines, 5-8 x 10(-5) in transformed cells prior to inoculation into nude mice, and less than 10(-7) in control BEP2D cells. Microsatellite alterations were detected in all 11 tumor cell lines examined at the following loci: D18S34, D18S363, D18S877, D3S1038 and D3S1607. No significant difference in either PALA resistance or microsatellite instability was found in tumor cell lines that were induced by alpha particles compared to those induced by (56)Fe ions.

  20. Future relativistic heavy ion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, H.G.

    1980-12-01

    Equations of state for nuclear matter and ongoing experimental studies are discussed. Relativistic heavy ion physics is the only opportunity to study in the laboratory the properties of extended multiquark systems under conditions such that quarks might run together into new arrangements previously unobserved. Several lines of further study are mentioned. (GHT)

  1. Summary of heavy ion theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S.

    1994-09-01

    Can we study hot QCD using nuclear collisions? Can we learn about metallic hydrogen from the impact of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 on Jupiter? The answer to both questions may surprise you! I summarize progress in relativistic heavy ion theory reported at DPF `94 in the parallel sessions.

  2. Dense and nanometric electronic excitations induced by swift heavy ions in an ionic CaF2 crystal: Evidence for two thresholds of damage creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toulemonde, M.; Benyagoub, A.; Trautmann, C.; Khalfaoui, N.; Boccanfuso, M.; Dufour, C.; Gourbilleau, F.; Grob, J. J.; Stoquert, J. P.; Costantini, J. M.; Haas, F.; Jacquet, E.; Voss, K.-O.; Meftah, A.

    2012-02-01

    CaF2 crystals as representatives of the class of ionic nonamorphizable insulators were irradiated with many different swift heavy ions of energy above 0.5 MeV/u providing a broad range of electronic energy losses (Se). Beam-induced modifications were characterized by Channeling Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (C-RBS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD), complemented by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results from C-RBS give evidence of significant damage appearing above a Se threshold of 5 ± 2 keV/nm. A second critical Se appears around 18 ± 3 keV/nm; below this value the damage as function of ion fluence saturates at 20%, while above this the damage saturation level increases with Se, reaching ˜60% for ions of Se = 30 keV/nm. XRD measurements also show effects indicating two threshold values. Above 5 keV/nm, the widths of the XRD reflection peaks increase due to the formation of nanograins, as seen by TEM, while a significant decrease of the peak areas only occurs above 18 keV/nm. The track radii deduced from C-RBS measurements are in agreement with those extracted from the fluence evolution of the widths of the XRD peaks. Moreover, track radii deduced from the peak area analysis are slightly smaller but in agreement with previous track observations by high resolution electron microscopy. Calculations based on the inelastic thermal spike model suggest that the lower threshold at 5 keV/nm is linked to the quenching of the molten phase, whereas the threshold at 18 keV/nm can be interpreted as quenching of the boiling phase. The results of CaF2 are compared with other nonamorphizable materials such as LiF and UO2.

  3. Swift heavy ion-induced modification of the physical properties of polymethyl methacrylate/carbon black composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N. L.; Singh, Dolly; Qureshi, Anjum

    2011-09-01

    A carbon black (CB) filler was inserted into polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) using a chemical route method. The electrical conductivity and dielectric properties of PMMA/CB composites were investigated in a wide range of frequencies: from 100 Hz to 10 MHz. These films were irradiated with 140 MeV Ag11+ ions at a fluence of 1×1012 ions/cm2. The radiation-induced modifications in the dielectric, structural and thermal properties and in the surface morphology were studied using different techniques. The dielectric dispersion and conductivity of the composite system exhibited a strong frequency dependence, particularly in the vicinity of the percolation threshold (20 wt%). It was observed that the dielectric constant, dielectric loss and electrical conductivity gradually increased with the filler concentration and also with ion fluence; these were explained in terms of the hopping conduction mechanism. The electrical conductivity of the composites obeys the universal power law (i.e. σ=Af n ), where n is the power exponent. The results also suggest that ion beam irradiation of polymer composites creates free radicals and unsaturation and causes interfacial polarization in the heterogeneous composite systems. Thermal analysis revealed that the glass transition temperature (T g) shifted toward lower temperatures upon irradiation, indicating the scissioning of polymer chains which led to the transformation of the polymers into a disordered amorphous state. The changes in the topography of the surfaces upon irradiation were also observed.

  4. Swift heavy ion induced recrystallization in cubic silicon carbide: New insights from designed experiments and MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debelle, A.; Backman, M.; Thomé, L.; Nordlund, K.; Djurabekova, F.; Weber, W. J.; Monnet, I.; Pakarinen, O. H.; Garrido, F.; Paumier, F.

    2014-05-01

    3C-SiC single crystals have been initially irradiated in the nuclear energy loss regime with 100 keV Fe ions to fluences ranging from 4 × 1013 to 4 × 1014 cm-2 (i.e. 0.07-0.7 dpa). RBS/C measurements indicate that SiC rapidly becomes amorphous (at ∼0.4 dpa). Two damaged SiC crystals exhibiting a different defective structure have been subsequently irradiated in the electronic energy loss regime with 870 MeV swift heavy (Pb) ions (SHIs) up to a fluence of 4 × 1013 cm-2. Initially fully amorphous SiC layers showed a decrease in size after SHI irradiation with a recrystallization occurring at the amorphous-crystalline interface. On the contrary, partially amorphous crystals for which onset of amorphization just initiated at the damage peak recovered over the entire damage thickness. Variation of amorphous thickness or disorder level has been monitored as a function of Pb ion fluence, which allowed deriving recrystallization kinetics. Data have been fitted with the direct-impact model and recrystallization cross-sections and threshold values for recovery have been determined for both types of initially defective structures. Differences are qualitatively discussed in terms of nature and density of irradiation defects. All experimental trends have been successfully reproduced by molecular dynamics simulations that mimicked thermal spikes induced by SHIs.

  5. Swift Heavy Ion Induced Modification in Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}TiO{sub 3} Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Bajpai, Parmendra Kumar; Kumar, Ravi

    2009-03-10

    Swift Heavy Ion (SHI) irradiated Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}TiO{sub 3} compositions (x 0.75, 0.85 and 0.90) are studied using structural, micro-structural, ferroelectric and dielectric techniques. The properties are compared with unirradiated bulk ceramics.

  6. A Comparative Study of Heavy Ion and Proton Induced Bit Error Sensitivity and Complex Burst Error Modes in Commercially Available High Speed SiGe BiCMOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Paul; Carts, Marty; Campbell, Art; Reed, Robert; Ladbury, Ray; Seidleck, Christina; Currie, Steve; Riggs, Pam; Fritz, Karl; Randall, Barb

    2004-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation that reviews recent SiGe bit error test data for different commercially available high speed SiGe BiCMOS chips that were subjected to various levels of heavy ion and proton radiation. Results for the tested chips at different operating speeds are displayed in line graphs.

  7. Transfer-induced fission of superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Zubov, A. S.; Sargsyan, V. V.; Scheid, W.

    2010-07-15

    Possibilities of transfer-induced fission of new isotopes of superheavy nuclei with charge numbers 103-108 are studied for the first time in the reactions {sup 48}Ca+{sup 244,246,248}Cm at energies near the corresponding Coulomb barriers. The predicted cross sections are found to be measurable with the detection of three-body final states.

  8. Kr implantation into heavy ion irradiated monolithic U-Mo/Al systems: SIMS and SEM investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweifel, T.; Valle, N.; Grygiel, C.; Monnet, I.; Beck, L.; Petry, W.

    2016-03-01

    Worldwide, high performance research and material test reactors are aiming to convert their fuel from high enriched uranium towards low enriched ones. High density U-Mo/Al based nuclear fuels are considered as a promising candidate for this conversion. However, during in-pile test irradiations, the formation of an interdiffusion layer (IDL) between the U-Mo and the Al matrix is observed, caused by irradiation enhanced U-Al interdiffusion processes. This IDL accumulates fission gases at the IDL/matrix interfaces. Together, these two effects strongly reduce the performance of this new fuel type. Recently, the out-of-pile technique of heavy ion irradiation (127I) on U-Mo/Al layer systems proved to be an alternative to time-consuming in-pile test irradiations for certain fuel behaviour aspects. Here we present SIMS and SEM investigations of non-conventional 82Kr implantation into previously heavy ion irradiated U-Mo/Al layer systems. It is shown that Kr accumulates inside μm large porosities at the IDL/matrix interfaces. This critical accumulation of μm-sized large gas bubbles is directly related to the presence of the irradiation induced IDL. Without IDL no critical accumulation of fission gas bubbles occurs.

  9. EDITORIAL: Focus on Heavy Ions in Biophysics and Medical Physics FOCUS ON HEAVY IONS IN BIOPHYSICS AND MEDICAL PHYSICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, Marco

    2008-07-01

    include carcinogenesis, late degenerative tissue effects (including damage to the central nervous system), and hereditary effects. For these studies, microbeams represent an essential tool, considering that in space each cell in the human body will not experience more than one heavy-ion traversal. Both NASA and ESA are investing important resources in ground-based space radiation research programs, to reduce risk uncertainty and to develop countermeasures. For both cancer therapy and space radiation protection a better understanding of the effects of energetic heavy ions is needed. Physics should be improved, especially the measurements of nuclear fragmentation cross-sections, and the transport calculations. Biological effects need to be studied in greater detail, and clearly only understanding the mechanisms of heavy-ion induced biological damage will reduce the uncertainty on late effects in humans. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics aims to provide the state-of-the-art of the biophysics of energetic heavy ions and to highlight the areas where more research is urgently needed for therapy and the space program. Focus on Heavy Ions in Biophysics and Medical Physics Contents Heavy ion microprobes: a unique tool for bystander research and other radiobiological applications K O Voss, C Fournier and G Taucher-Scholz Heavy ions light flashes and brain functions: recent observations at accelerators and in spaceflight L Narici Clinical advantages of carbon-ion radiotherapy Hirohiko Tsujii, Tadashi Kamada, Masayuki Baba, Hiroshi Tsuji, Hirotoshi Kato, Shingo Kato, Shigeru Yamada, Shigeo Yasuda, Takeshi Yanagi, Hiroyuki Kato, Ryusuke Hara, Naotaka Yamamoto and Junetsu Mizoe Heavy-ion effects: from track structure to DNA and chromosome damage F Ballarini, D Alloni, A Facoetti and A Ottolenghi Shielding experiments with high-energy heavy ions for spaceflight applications C Zeitlin, S Guetersloh, L Heilbronn, J Miller, N Elkhayari, A Empl, M LeBourgeois, B W Mayes, L Pinsky

  10. Heavy ion therapy: Bevalac epoch

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    An overview of heavy ion therapy at the Bevelac complex (SuperHILac linear accelerator + Bevatron) is given. Treatment planning, clinical results with helium ions on the skull base and uveal melanoma, clinical results with high-LET charged particles, neon radiotherapy of prostate cancer, heavy charged particle irradiation for unfavorable soft tissue sarcoma, preliminary results in heavy charged particle irradiation of bone sarcoma, and irradiation of bile duct carcinoma with charged particles and-or photons are all covered. (GHH)

  11. Central collisions of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, Sun-yiu.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. During this period, the program focused on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus-nucleus central collisions. As part of the PHENIX collaboration, contributions were made to the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (pCDR), and work on a RHIC silicon microstrip detector R D project was performed.

  12. Magnetic-field-induced squeezing effect at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Long-Gang; Endrődi, Gergely; Petersen, Hannah

    2016-04-01

    In off-central heavy-ion collisions, quark-gluon plasma (QGP) is exposed to the strongest magnetic fields ever created in the universe. Because of the paramagnetic nature of the QGP at high temperatures, the spatially inhomogeneous magnetic field configuration exerts an anisotropic force density that competes with the pressure gradients resulting from purely geometric effects. In this paper, we simulate (3+1)-dimensional ideal hydrodynamics with external magnetic fields to estimate the effect of this force density on the anisotropic expansion of the QGP in collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). While negligible for quickly decaying magnetic fields, we find that long-lived fields generate a substantial force density that suppresses the momentum anisotropy of the plasma by up to 20 % at the LHC energy and also leaves its imprint on the elliptic flow v2 of charged pions.

  13. Recent applications of the Boltzmann master equation to heavy ion precompound decay phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.; Remington, B.A.

    1988-06-01

    The Boltzmann master equation (BME) is described and used as a tool to interpret preequilibrium neutron emission from heavy ion collisions gated on evaporation residue or fission fragments. The same approach is used to interpret neutron spectra gated on deep inelastic and quasi-elastic heavy ion collisions. Less successful applications of BME to proton inclusive data with 40 MeV/u incident /sup 12/C ions are presented, and improvements required in the exciton injection term are discussed.

  14. Positron production in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dunford, R.W.

    1995-08-01

    The ATLAS Positron Experiment APEX was built to study positron emission in collisions between very heavy ions. Narrow peaks were observed in such collisions at GSI, Darmstadt in the spectra of positrons and in the sum-energy spectra of electron-positron coincidences. APEX is a second-generation experiment which was specifically designed to look for the coincidence events and measure the opening angle between electrons and positrons. The first beam-induced positrons were detected using APEX in March 1993, and since then three additional runs were carried out. The first results for the collision system {sup 238}U + {sup 181}Ta show no evidence for sharp peaks in the electron-positron sum-energy spectrum. The current emphasis in this work is to obtain a complete understanding of the APEX apparatus. The atomic group is studying events involving coincidences between heavy ions and electrons. Since APEX measures the laboratory angles and energies of both electrons and heavy ions, it is possible to make an event-by-event Doppler correction of the electron spectra. These Doppler-corrected spectra show a number of lines which are attributed to conversion electrons which are emitted when a nuclear excited state decays by ejecting an inner-shell electron. The study of these spectra provide an important confirmation of the proper functioning of APEX. We are particularly concerned with the atomic physics aspects of this process. In order to understand the electron spectra, it is necessary to account for the change in binding energy of the inner-shell electrons as a function of ionic charge. We are utilizing the GRASP relativistic atomic structure program to calculate the binding energies. This information, together with the measured gamma-ray energies, allows us to calculate the expected energies of the conversion electrons which we can then compare with the observed Doppler-corrected conversion electron energies.

  15. Study of a High-Yield Cellulase System Created by Heavy-Ion Irradiation-Induced Mutagenesis of Aspergillus niger and Mixed Fermentation with Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji-Hong; Li, Wen-Jian; Liu, Jing; Hu, Wei; Xiao, Guo-Qing; Dong, Miao-Yin; Wang, Yu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and validate the efficiency of 12C6+ irradiation of Aspergillus niger (A. niger) or mutagenesis via mixed Trichoderma viride (T. viride) culturing as well as a liquid cultivation method for cellulase production via mixed Trichoderma reesei (T. reesei) and A. niger culture fermentation. The first mutagenesis approach was employed to optimize yield from a cellulase-producing strain via heavy-ion mutagenesis and high-throughput screening, and the second was to effectively achieve enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulase from a mixed culture of mutant T. viride and A. niger. We found that 12C6+-ion irradiation induced changes in cellulase biosynthesis in A. niger but had no effect on the time course of the synthesis. It is notable that the exoglucanases (CBH) activities of A. niger strains H11-1 and H differed (6.71 U/mL vs. 6.01 U/mL) and were significantly higher than that of A. niger mutant H3-1. Compared with strain H, the filter paper assay (FPA), endoglucanase (EG) and β-glucosidase (BGL) activities of mutant strain H11-1 were increased by 250.26%, 30.26% and 34.91%, respectively. A mixed culture system was successfully optimized, and the best ratio of T. reesei to A. niger was 5:1 for 96 h with simultaneous inoculation. The BGL activity of the mixed culture increased after 72 h. At 96 h, the FPA and BGL activities of the mixed culture were 689.00 and 797.15 U/mL, respectively, significantly higher than those of monocultures, which were 408.70 and 646.98 U/mL for T. reesei and 447.29 and 658.89 U/mL for A. niger, respectively. The EG activity of the mixed culture was 2342.81 U/mL, a value that was significantly higher than that of monocultures at 2206.57 U/mL for T. reesei and 1727.62 U/mL for A. niger. In summary, cellulose production and hydrolysis yields were significantly enhanced by the proposed combination scheme. PMID:26656155

  16. Direct-driven target implosion in heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, K.; Suzuki, T.; Kurosaki, T.; Barada, D.; Kawata, S.; Ma, Y. Y.; Ogoyski, A. I.

    2016-03-01

    In inertial confinement fusion, the driver beam illumination non-uniformity leads a degradation of fusion energy output. A fuel target alignment error would happen in a fusion reactor; the target alignment error induces heavy ion beam illumination non-uniformity on a target. On the other hand, heavy ion beam accelerator provides a capability to oscillate a beam axis with a high frequency. The wobbling beams may provide a new method to reduce or smooth the beam illumination non-uniformity. First we study the effect of driver irradiation non-uniformity induced by the target alignment error (dz) on the target implosion. We found that dz should be less than about 130 μm for a sufficient fusion energy output. We also optimize the wobbling scheme. The spiral wobbling heavy ion beams would provide a promissing scheme to the uniform beam illumination.

  17. Jet Structure in Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaizot, J.-P.; Mehtar-Tani, Y.

    We review recent theoretical developments in the study of the structure of jets that are produced in ultra relativistic heavy ion collisions. The core of the review focusses on the dynamics of the parton cascade that is induced by the interactions of a fast parton crossing a quark-gluon plasma. We recall the basic mechanisms responsible for medium induced radiation, underline the rapid disappearance of coherence effects, and the ensuing probabilistic nature of the medium induced cascade. We discuss how large radiative corrections modify the classical picture of the gluon cascade, and how these can be absorbed in a renormalization of the jet quenching parameter hat q. Then, we analyze the (wave)-turbulent transport of energy along the medium induced cascade, and point out the main characteristics of the angular structure of such a cascade. Finally, color decoherence of the incone jet structure is discussed. Modest contact with phenomenology is presented towards the end of the review.

  18. Heavy ion tracks in polycarbonate. Comparison with a heavy ion irradiated model compound (diphenyl carbonate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferain, E.; Legras, R.

    1993-09-01

    The chemical modifications induced by energetic heavy ion irradiation of polycarbonate (PC) film are determined by GPC, HPLC, ESR, TGA, IR and UV spectrophotometry. The main results of the irradiation are creation of radicals, chain scission, cross-linking and appearance of new chemical groups in the main polymer chain. As far as the creation of new groups is concerned, they are determined by means of a model compound of PC: the diphenyl carbonate (DPC). The following compounds are identified after energetic heavy ion irradiation of DPC: salicylic acid, phenol, 4,4'-biphenol, 2,4'-biphenol, 2,2'-biphenol, 4-phenoxyphenol, 2-phenoxyphenol, phenyl ether, phenyl benzoate, phenyl salicylate, 2-phenylphenol and 2-phenoxyphenyl benzoate. A similarity between the heavy ion irradiation and a heat treatment has also been established with DPC. On the basis of these results, we try to give an explanation of the preferential attack along the tracks of the irradiated film. Also, an explanation of the well-known beneficial effect of an UV exposition of the irradiated film on the selectivity of this preferential chemical attack is suggested.

  19. Neoplastic transformation of hamster embyro cells by heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Han, Z; Suzuki, H; Suzuki, F; Suzuki, M; Furusawa, Y; Kato, T; Ikenaga, M

    1998-01-01

    We have studied the induction of morphological transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells by low doses of heavy ions with different linear energy transfer (LET), ranging from 13 to 400 keV/micrometer. Exponentially growing cells were irradiated with 12C or 28Si ion beams generated by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), inoculated to culture dishes, and transformed colonies were identified when the cells were densely stacked and showed a crisscross pattern. Over the LET range examined, the frequency of transformation induced by the heavy ions increased sharply at very low doses no greater than 5 cGy. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the heavy ions relative to 250 kVp X-rays showed an initial increase with LET, reaching a maximum value of about 7 at 100 keV/micrometer, and then decreased with the further increase in LET. Thus, we confirmed that high LET heavy ions are significantly more effective than X-rays for the induction of in vitro cell transformation. PMID:11542417

  20. Chromosome Aberrations by Heavy Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    It is well known that mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation can show different types of chromosome aberrations (CAs) including dicentrics, translocations, rings, deletions and complex exchanges. Chromosome aberrations are a particularly relevant endpoint in radiobiology, because they play a fundamental role in the pathways leading either to cell death, or to cell conversion to malignancy. In particular, reciprocal translocations involving pairs of specific genes are strongly correlated (and probably also causally-related) with specific tumour types; a typical example is the BCR-ABL translocation for Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia. Furthermore, aberrations can be used for applications in biodosimetry and more generally as biomarkers of exposure and risk, that is the case for cancer patients monitored during Carbon-ion therapy and astronauts exposed to space radiation. Indeed hadron therapy and astronauts' exposure to space radiation represent two of the few scenarios where human beings can be exposed to heavy ions. After a brief introduction on the main general features of chromosome aberrations, in this work we will address key aspects of the current knowledge on chromosome aberration induction, both from an experimental and from a theoretical point of view. More specifically, in vitro data will be summarized and discussed, outlining important issues such as the role of interphase death/mitotic delay and that of complex-exchange scoring. Some available in vivo data on cancer patients and astronauts will be also reported, together with possible interpretation problems. Finally, two of the few available models of chromosome aberration induction by ionizing radiation (including heavy ions) will be described and compared, focusing on the different assumptions adopted by the authors and on how these models can deal with heavy ions.

  1. Exotics from Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, Akira; Jido, Daisuke; Cho, Sungtae; Furumoto, Takenori; Yazaki, Koichi; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Nielsen, Marina; Sekihara, Takayasu; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2011-10-21

    Discriminating hadronic molecular and multi-quark states is a long standing problem in hadronic physics. We propose here to utilize relativistic heavy ion collisions to resolve this problem, as exotic hadron yields are expected to be strongly affected by their structures. Using the coalescence model, we find that the exotic hadron yield relative to the statistical model result is typically an order of magnitude smaller for a compact multi-quark state, and larger by a factor of two or more for a loosely bound hadronic molecule. We further find that some of the newly proposed heavy exotic states could be produced and realistically measured at RHIC and LHC.

  2. Heavy Ion Current Transients in SiGe HBTs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Reed, Robert A.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; McMorrow, Dale; Ferlet-Cavrois, Veronique; Baggio, Jacques; Paillet, Philipe; Duhanel, Olivier; Phillips, Stanley D.; Sutton, Akil K.; Diestelhorst, Ryan M.; Cressler, John D.; Dodd, Paul E.; Alles, Michael L.; Schrimpf, Ronald D.; Marshall, Paul W.; Label, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved ion beam induced charge reveals heavy ion response of IBM 5AM SiGe HBT: a) Position correlation[ b) Unique response for different bias schemes; c) Similarities to TPA pulsed-laser data. Heavy ion broad-beam transients provide more realistic device response: a) Feedback using microbeam data; b) Overcome issues of LET and ion range with microbeam. Both micro- and broad-beam data sets yield valuable input for TCAD simulations. Uncover detailed mechanisms for SiGe HBTs and other devices fabricated on lightly-doped substrates.

  3. Fission dynamics within time-dependent Hartree-Fock. II. Boost-induced fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Philip; Stevenson, Paul; Rios, Arnau

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nuclear fission is a complex large-amplitude collective decay mode in heavy nuclei. Microscopic density functional studies of fission have previously concentrated on adiabatic approaches based on constrained static calculations ignoring dynamical excitations of the fissioning nucleus and the daughter products. Purpose: We explore the ability of dynamic mean-field methods to describe induced fission processes, using quadrupole boosts in the nuclide 240Pu as an example. Methods: Following upon the work presented in Goddard et al. [Phys. Rev. C 92, 054610 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevC.92.054610, quadrupole-constrained Hartree-Fock calculations are used to create a potential energy surface. An isomeric state and a state beyond the second barrier peak are excited by means of instantaneous as well as temporally extended gauge boosts with quadrupole shapes. The subsequent deexcitation is studied in a time-dependent Hartree-Fock simulation, with emphasis on fissioned final states. The corresponding fission fragment mass numbers are studied. Results: In general, the energy deposited by the quadrupole boost is quickly absorbed by the nucleus. In instantaneous boosts, this leads to fast shape rearrangements and violent dynamics that can ultimately lead to fission. This is a qualitatively different process than the deformation-induced fission. Boosts induced within a finite time window excite the system in a relatively gentler way and do induce fission but with a smaller energy deposition. Conclusions: The fission products obtained using boost-induced fission in time-dependent Hartree-Fock are more asymmetric than the fragments obtained in deformation-induced fission or the corresponding adiabatic approaches.

  4. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Wolfram

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), shown in Fig. 1, was build to study the interactions of quarks and gluons at high energies [Harrison, Ludlam and Ozaki (2003)]. The theory of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) describes these interactions. One of the main goals for the RHIC experiments was the creation and study of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), which was expected to be formed after the collision of heavy ions at a temperature of approximately 2 trillion kelvin (or equivalently an energy of 150 MeV). The QGP is the substance which existed only a few microseconds after the Big Bang. The QGP was anticipated to be weakly interacting like a gas but turned out to be strongly interacting and more like a liquid. Among its unusual properties is its extremely low viscosity [Auerbach and Schlomo (2009)], which makes the QGP the substance closest to a perfect liquid known to date. The QGP is opaque to moderate energy quarks and gluons leading to a phenomenon called jet quenching, where of a jet and its recoil jet only one is observable and the other suppressed after traversing and interacting with the QGP [Jacak and Müller (2012)]...

  5. RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLISIONS: EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Friedlander, Erwin M.; Heckman, Harry H.

    1982-04-01

    Relativistic heavy ion physics began as a 'no man's land' between particle and nuclear physics, with both sides frowning upon it as 'unclean', because on one hand, hadronic interactions and particle production cloud nuclear structure effects, while on the other, the baryonic environment complicates the interpretation of production experiments. They have attempted to review here the experimental evidence on RHI collisions from the point of view that it represents a new endeavor in the understanding of strong interaction physics. Such an approach appears increasingly justified; first, by the accumulation of data and observations of new features of hadronic interactions that could not have been detected outside a baryonic environment; second, by the maturation of the field owing to the advances made over the past several years in experimental inquiries on particle production by RHI, including pions, kaons, hyperons, and searches for antiprotons; and third, by the steady and progressive increase in the energy and mass ranges of light nuclear beams that have become available to the experiment; indeed the energy range has widened from the {approx} 0.2 to 2 AGeV at the Bevalac to {approx}4 AGeV at Dubna and recently, to the quantum jump in energies to {approx} 1000 equivalent AGeV at the CERN PS-ISR. Accompanying these expansions in the energy frontier are the immediate prospects for very heavy ion beams at the Bevalac up to, and including, 1 AGeV {sup 238}U, thereby extending the 'mass frontier' to its ultimate extent.

  6. Heavy ion measurement on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaujean, R.; Jonathal, D.; Enge, W.

    1991-01-01

    The Kiel Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) experiment M0002, mounted on experiment tray E6, was designed to measure the heavy ion environment by means of CR-39 plastic solid state track detectors. The detector stack with a size of 40x34x4.5 cu cm was exposed in vacuum covered by thermal protection foils with a total thickness of approx. 14 mg/sq cm. After etching small samples of the detector foils tracks with Z greater than or = 6 could be easily detected on a background of small etch pits, which were probably produced by secondaries from proton interactions. The LDEF orientation with respect to the magnetic field lines within the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) is expected to be constant during the mission. Therefore, the azimuth angle distribution was measured on the detector foils for low energy stopping particles. All detected arrival directions are close to a plane perpendicular to the magnetic field line of -20 deg declination and -40 deg inclination at location 34 deg W and 27 deg S. Together with the steep energy spectrum, this spatial distribution close to the mirror plane in the SAA is an evidence that heavy ions were detected from a radiation belt population.

  7. Heavy ion collisions and the pre-equilibrium exciton model

    SciTech Connect

    Betak, E.

    2012-10-20

    We present a feasible way to apply the pre-equilibrium exciton model in its masterequation formulation to heavy-ion induced reactions including spin variables. Emission of nucleons, {gamma}'s and also light clusters is included in our model.

  8. Probing the nuclear structure with heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Broglia, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclei display distortions in both ordinary space and in gauge space. It is suggested that it is possible to learn about the spatial distribution of the Nilsson orbitals and about the change of the pairing gap with the rotational frequency through the analysis of one- and two-nucleon transfer reactions induced in heavy-ion collisions.

  9. Studies of heavy ion-induced high-energy density states in matter at the GSI Darmstadt SIS-18 and future FAIR facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Adonin, A.; Deutsch, C.; Fortov, V. E.; Grandjouan, N.; Geil, B.; Grayaznov, V.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Kulish, M.; Lomonosov, I. V.; Mintsev, V.; Ni, P.; Nikolaev, D.; Piriz, A. R.; Shilkin, N.; Spiller, P.; Shutov, A.; Temporal, M.; Ternovoi, V.; Udrea, S.; Varentsov, D.

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents numerical simulation results of heating and compression of matter using intense beams of energetic heavy ions. In this study we consider different beam parameters that include those which are currently available at the heavy ion synchrotron, SIS18 at the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt and those which will be available in the near future as a result of the upgraded facility. In addition to this, we carried out detailed calculations considering parameters of high-intensity beam which will be generated at the GSI future Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR facility) that has been approved by the German Government. These simulations show that by using the above ion beam parameter range, it will be possible to carry out very useful studies on the thermophysical properties of high-energy density (HED) states in matter. This scheme would make it possible to investigate those regions of the phase diagram that are either very difficult to access or even are unaccessible using the traditional methods of shock waves. Moreover, employing a hollow ion beam which has an annular (ring shaped) focal spot, it would be possible to achieve a low entropy compression of a test material like hydrogen, which is enclosed in a cylindrical shell of a high-density material such as lead or gold. These experiments will enable one to study the interiors of Giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn as well as to investigate the problem of hydrogen metallization.

  10. SPORT: A new sub-nanosecond time-resolved instrument to study swift heavy ion-beam induced luminescence - Application to luminescence degradation of a fast plastic scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardés, E.; Balanzat, E.; Ban-d'Etat, B.; Cassimi, A.; Durantel, F.; Grygiel, C.; Madi, T.; Monnet, I.; Ramillon, J.-M.; Ropars, F.; Lebius, H.

    2013-02-01

    We developed a new sub-nanosecond time-resolved instrument to study the dynamics of UV-visible luminescence under high stopping power heavy ion irradiation. We applied our instrument, called SPORT, on a fast plastic scintillator (BC-400) irradiated with 27-MeV Ar ions having high mean electronic stopping power of 2.6 MeV/μm. As a consequence of increasing permanent radiation damages with increasing ion fluence, our investigations reveal a degradation of scintillation intensity together with, thanks to the time-resolved measurement, a decrease in the decay constant of the scintillator. This combination indicates that luminescence degradation processes by both dynamic and static quenching, the latter mechanism being predominant. Under such high density excitation, the scintillation deterioration of BC-400 is significantly enhanced compared to that observed in previous investigations, mainly performed using light ions. The observed non-linear behaviour implies that the dose at which luminescence starts deteriorating is not independent on particles' stopping power, thus illustrating that the radiation hardness of plastic scintillators can be strongly weakened under high excitation density in heavy ion environments.

  11. Mutagenic effects of heavy ions in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horneck, G.; Krasavin, E. A.; Kozubek, S.

    1994-10-01

    Various mutagenic effects by heavy ions were studied in bacteria, irradiated at accelerators in Dubna, Prague, Berkeley or Darmstadt. Endpoints investigated are histidine reversion (B. subtilis, S. typhimurium), azide resistance (B. subtilis), mutation in the lactose operon (E. coli), SOS chromotest (E. coli) and λ-prophage induction (E. coli). It was found that the cross sections of the different endpoints show a similar dependence on energy. For light ions (Z <= 4) the cross section decreases with increasing energy. For ions of Z = 10, it is nearly independent of energy. For heavier ions (Z >= 26) it increases with energy up to a maximum or saturation. The increment becomes steeper with increasing Z. This dependence on energy suggests a ``mutagenic belt'' inside the track that is restricted to an area where the density of departed energy is low enough not to kill the cell, but high enough to induce mutations.

  12. Prompt processes in heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.; Remington, B.A.

    1987-12-01

    We test a relaxation model based on two body nucleon-nucleon scattering processes to interpret phenomena observed in heavy ion reactions. We use the Boltzmann Master Equation to accomplish this. By assuming that the projectile nucleons partition the total excitation with equal a-priori probability of all configurations, we are able to reproduce several sets of neutron spectra from /sup 20/Ne and /sup 12/C induced reactions on /sup 165/Ho and from reactions of /sup 40/Ar or /sup 40/Ca. We point out ambiguities in deducing angle-integrated energy spectra from double differential spectra. With no additional free parameters, our model successfully reproduces a large body of high energy ..gamma..-ray spectra by assuming an incoherent n-p-bremsstrahlung mechanism. 45 refs., 13 figs.

  13. Experiments on nuclear fission induced by radioactive beams

    SciTech Connect

    Skobelev, N.K.

    1994-07-01

    The cross sections of {sup 209}Bi nuclear fission induced by secondary beams of {sup 6}He and {sup 4}He are measured under identical conditions. The experimental data are in good agreement with earlier results on the fission cross section of the {sup 4}He + {sup 209}Bi reaction. The measured values of the cross section of {sup 209}Bi fission induced by {sup 6}He ions are much higher than the cross sections of fission induced by {alpha}-particles. It is found that the fission threshold for the {sup 6}He + {sup 209}Bi reaction is shifted as compared to that of the {sup 4}He + {sup 209}Bi reaction. Various factors that can be responsible for the observed peculiarities in the {sup 209}Bi fission induced by the {sup 6}He ions are analyzed. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Comparative SEU sensitivities to relativistic heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, R.; Crain, S.H.; Crain, W.R.; Crawford, K.B.; Hansel, S.J.

    1998-12-01

    SEU sensitivity of microcircuits to relativistic heavy ions is compared to that measured with low-energy ions of comparable LET values. Multiple junction charge collection in a complex circuit seems to mask the effect of varying charge generations due to different iron track structures. Heavy ions at sub-relativistic speeds may generate nuclear fragments, sometimes resulting in SEUs.

  15. Heavy Ion Physics in eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Jalilian-Marian, Jamal

    2005-10-06

    We review the physics of gluon saturation in heavy ions at small x and consider the applications of Color Glass Condensate formalism to Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) of leptons on nuclei and discuss the overlapping physics between high energy heavy ion collisions at RHIC and DIS in eRHIC.

  16. 100 MeV Ni{sup +7} swift heavy ion induced magnetism in cobalt doped ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sunil Singh, D. P.; Kumar, Ravi

    2014-04-24

    Zn{sub 0.90}Co{sub 0.10}O thin films were prepared using Sol-Gel spin coating method. Films were irradiated with 100 MeV Ni{sub +7} Swift Heavy Ions (SHI) with fluences 1× 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} using 15 UD tandem accelerator at IUAC New Delhi and its effect were studied on the structural, optical and magnetic properties of irradiated thin films. X-ray diffraction studies show single phase films with preferred c-axis orientation after irradiation. Ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy shows red shift in the band gap of irradiated thin films. Magnetic field dependence of magnetization reveals weak ferromagnetism in irradiated thin films. AFM studies shows significant increase in the grain size and the surface roughness of the films after irradiation.

  17. Heavy ion program at BNL: AGS, RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider)

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    With the recent commissioning of fixed target, heavy ion physics at the AGS, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has embarked on a long range program in support of relativistic heavy ion research. Acceleration of low mass heavy ions (up to sulfur) to an energy of about 14.5 GeV/nucleon is possible with the direct connection of the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff and AGS accelerators. When completed, the new booster accelerator will provide heavy ions over the full mass range for injection and subsequent acceleration in the AGS. BNL is now engaged in an active R and D program directed toward the proposed Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The results of the first operation of the low mass heavy ion program will be reviewed, and future expectations discussed. The expected performance for the heavy ion operation of the booster will be described and finally, the current status and outlook for the RHIC facility will be presented.

  18. Violence of heavy-ion reactions from neutron multiplicity: 11 to 20A-italic MeV /sup 20/Ne+ /sup 238/U

    SciTech Connect

    Jahnke, U.; Ingold, G.; Hilscher, D.; Lehmann, M.; Schwinn, E.; Zank, P.

    1986-07-14

    The suitability of the neutron multiplicity as a gauge for the violence of medium-energy heavy-ion reactions is investigated for the first time. For this purpose the number of neutrons emitted from fission reactions induced by 220-, 290-, and 400-MeV /sup 20/Ne on /sup 238/U is registered event-by-event with a large 4..pi.. scintillator tank. It is shown that the neutron multiplicity is indeed closely related to the two quantities characterizing the violence: the induced total intrinsic excitation and the linear momentum transfer.

  19. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This report discusses the following topics: emittance variations in current-amplifying ion induction lina; transverse emittance studies of an induction accelerator of heavy ions; drift compression experiments on MBE-4 and related emittance; low emittance uniform- density C{sub s}+ sources for heavy ion fusion accelerator studies; survey of alignment of MBE-4; time-of-flight dependence on the MBE-4 quadrupole voltage; high order calculation of the multiple content of three dimensional electrostatic geometries; an induction linac injector for scaled experiments; induction accelerator test module for HIF; longitudinal instability in HIF beams; and analysis of resonant longitudinal instability in a heavy ion induction linac.

  20. heavy ion acceleration at shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, V. I.; Galinsky, V.

    2009-12-01

    The theoretical study of alpha particle acceleration at a quasi-parallel shock due to interaction with Alfven waves self-consistently excited in both upstream and downstream regions was conducted using a scale-separation model [1]. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or dumped and hence particles will be pitch--angle scattered as well as the change of the wave energy due to instability or damping. It includes in consideration the total distribution function (the bulk plasma and high energy tail), so no any assumptions (e.g. seed populations, or some ad-hoc escape rate of accelerated particles) are required. In previous studies heavy ions were treated as perfect test particles, they only experienced the Alfven turbulence excited by protons and didn’t contribute to turbulence generation. In contrast to this approach, we consider the ion scattering on hydromagnetic turbulence generated by both protons and ions themselves. It is important for alpha particles with their relatively large mass-loading parameter that defines efficiency of the wave excitation by alpha particles. The energy spectra of alpha particles is found and compared with those obtained in test particle approximation. [1] Galinsky, V.L., and V.I. Shevchenko, Astrophys. J., 669, L109, 2007.

  1. Cosmic heavy ion tracks in mesoscopic biological test objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Facius, R.

    1994-01-01

    Since more than 20 years ago, when the National Academy of Sciences and the National Research Council of the U.S.A. released their report on 'HZE particle effects in manned spaced flight', it has been emphasized how difficult - if not even impossible - it is to assess their radiobiological impact on man from conventional studies where biological test organisms are stochastically exposed to 'large' fluences of heavy ions. An alternative, competing approach had been realized in the BIOSTACK experiments, where the effects of single cosmic as well as accelerator - heavy ions on individual biological test organisms could be investigated. Although presented from the beginning as the preferable approach for terrestrial investigations with accelerator heavy ions too ('The BIOSTACK as an approach to high LET radiation research'), only recently this insight is gaining more widespread recognition. In space flight experiments, additional constraints imposed by the infrastructure of the vehicle or satellite further impede such investigations. Restrictions concern the physical detector systems needed for the registration of the cosmic heavy ions' trajectories as well as the biological systems eligible as test organisms. Such optimized procedures and techniques were developed for the investigations on chromosome aberrations induced by cosmic heavy ions in cells of the stem meristem of lettuce seeds (Lactuca sativa) and for the investigation of the radiobiological response of Wolffia arriza, which is the smallest flowering (water) plant. The biological effects were studied by the coworkers of the Russian Institute of Biomedical Problems (IBMP) which in cooperation with the European Space Agency ESA organized the exposure in the Biosatellites of the Cosmos series. Since biological investigations and physical measurements of particle tracks had to be performed in laboratories widely separated, the preferred fixed contact between biological test objects and the particle detectors

  2. Cosmic heavy ion tracks in mesoscopic biological test objects

    SciTech Connect

    Facius, R.

    1994-12-31

    Since more than 20 years ago, when the National Academy of Sciences and the National Research Council of the U.S.A. released their report on `HZE particle effects in manned spaced flight`, it has been emphasized how difficult - if not even impossible - it is to assess their radiobiological impact on man from conventional studies where biological test organisms are stochastically exposed to `large` fluences of heavy ions. An alternative, competing approach had been realized in the BIOSTACK experiments, where the effects of single cosmic as well as accelerator - heavy ions on individual biological test organisms could be investigated. Although presented from the beginning as the preferable approach for terrestrial investigations with accelerator heavy ions too (`The BIOSTACK as an approach to high LET radiation research`), only recently this insight is gaining more widespread recognition. In space flight experiments, additional constraints imposed by the infrastructure of the vehicle or satellite further impede such investigations. Restrictions concern the physical detector systems needed for the registration of the cosmic heavy ions` trajectories as well as the biological systems eligible as test organisms. Such optimized procedures and techniques were developed for the investigations on chromosome aberrations induced by cosmic heavy ions in cells of the stem meristem of lettuce seeds (Lactuca sativa) and for the investigation of the radiobiological response of Wolffia arriza, which is the smallest flowering (water) plant. The biological effects were studied by the coworkers of the Russian Institute of Biomedical Problems (IBMP) which in cooperation with the European Space Agency ESA organized the exposure in the Biosatellites of the Cosmos series.

  3. Mutagenic effects of heavy ion radiation in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, M.; Deng, H.; Lu, Y.; Zhuang, C.; Liu, Z.; Qiu, Q.; Qiu, Y.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-10-01

    Genetic and developmental effects of heavy ions in maize and rice were investigated. Heavy particles with various charges and energies were accelerated at the BEVALAC. The frequency of occurence of white-yellow stripes on leaves of plants developed from irradiated maize seeds increased linearly with dose, and high-LET heavy charged particles, e.g., neon, argon, and iron, were 2-12 times as effective as gamma rays in inducing this type of mutation. The effectiveness of high-LET heavy ion in (1) inhibiting rice seedling growth, (2) reducing plant fertility, (3) inducing chromosome aberration and micronuclei in root tip cells and pollen mother cells of the first generation plants developed from exposed seeds, and (4) inducing mutation in the second generation, were greater than that of low-LET gamma rays. All effects observed were dose-dependent; however, there appeared to be an optimal range of doses for inducing certain types of mutation, for example, for argon ions (400 MeV/u) at 90-100 Gy, several valuable mutant lines with favorable characters, such as semidwarf, early maturity and high yield ability, were obtained. Experimental results suggest that the potential application of heavy ions in crop improvement is promising. RFLP analysis of two semidwarf mutants induced by argon particles revealed that large DNA alterations might be involved in these mutants.

  4. Mutagenic effects of heavy ion radiation in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, M.; Deng, H.; Lu, Y.; Zhuang, C.; Liu, Z.; Qiu, Q.; Qiu, Y.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    Genetic and developmental effects of heavy ions in maize and rice were investigated. Heavy particles with various charges and energies were accelerated at the BEVALAC. The frequency of occurrence of white-yellow stripes on leaves of plants developed from irradiated maize seeds increased linearly with dose, and high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) heavy charged particles, e.g., neon, argon, and iron, were 2-12 times as effective as gamma rays in inducing this type of mutation. The effectiveness of high-LET heavy ion in (1) inhibiting rice seedling growth, (2) reducing plant fertility, (3) inducing chromosome aberration and micronuclei in root tip cells and pollen mother cells of the first generation plants developed from exposed seeds, and (4) inducing mutation in the second generation, were greater than that of low-LET gamma rays. All effects observed were dose-dependent; however, there appeared to be an optimal range of doses for inducing certain types of mutation, for example, for argon ions (400 MeV/u) at 90-100 Gy, several valuable mutant lines with favorable characters, such as semidwarf, early maturity and high yield ability, were obtained. Experimental results suggest that the potential application of heavy ions in crop improvement is promising. Restriction-fragment-length-polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of two semidwarf mutants induced by argon particles revealed that large DNA alterations might be involved in these mutants.

  5. Mutagenic effects of heavy ion radiation in plants.

    PubMed

    Mei, M; Deng, H; Lu, Y; Zhuang, C; Liu, Z; Qiu, Q; Qiu, Y; Yang, T C

    1994-10-01

    Genetic and developmental effects of heavy ions in maize and rice were investigated. Heavy particles with various charges and energies were accelerated at the BEVALAC. The frequency of occurrence of white-yellow stripes on leaves of plants developed from irradiated maize seeds increased linearly with dose, and high-LET heavy charged particles, e.g., neon, argon, and iron, were 2-12 times as effective as gamma rays in inducing this type of mutation. The effectiveness of high-LET heavy ion in (1) inhibiting rice seedling growth, (2) reducing plant fertility, (3) inducing chromosome aberration and micronuclei in root tip cells and pollen mother cells of the first generation plants developed from exposed seeds, and (4) inducing mutation in the second generation, were greater than that of low-LET gamma rays. All effects observed were dose-dependent; however, there appeared to be an optimal range of doses for inducing certain types of mutation, for example, for argon ions (400 MeV/u) at 90-100 Gy, several valuable mutant lines with favorable characters, such as semidwarf, early maturity and high yield ability, were obtained. Experimental results suggest that the potential application of heavy ions in crop improvement is promising. RFLP analysis of two semidwarf mutants induced by argon particles revealed that large DNA alterations might be involved in these mutants. PMID:11539972

  6. Skyrme tensor force in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, P. D.; Suckling, E. B.; Fracasso, S.; Barton, M. C.; Umar, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Background: It is generally acknowledged that the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) method provides a useful foundation for a fully microscopic many-body theory of low-energy heavy ion reactions. The TDHF method is also known in nuclear physics in the small-amplitude domain, where it provides a useful description of collective states, and is based on the mean-field formalism, which has been a relatively successful approximation to the nuclear many-body problem. Currently, the TDHF theory is being widely used in the study of fusion excitation functions, fission, and deep-inelastic scattering of heavy mass systems, while providing a natural foundation for many other studies. Purpose: With the advancement of computational power it is now possible to undertake TDHF calculations without any symmetry assumptions and incorporate the major strides made by the nuclear structure community in improving the energy density functionals used in these calculations. In particular, time-odd and tensor terms in these functionals are naturally present during the dynamical evolution, while being absent or minimally important for most static calculations. The parameters of these terms are determined by the requirement of Galilean invariance or local gauge invariance but their significance for the reaction dynamics have not been fully studied. This work addresses this question with emphasis on the tensor force. Method: The full version of the Skyrme force, including terms arising only from the Skyrme tensor force, is applied to the study of collisions within a completely symmetry-unrestricted TDHF implementation. Results: We examine the effect on upper fusion thresholds with and without the tensor force terms and find an effect on the fusion threshold energy of the order several MeV. Details of the distribution of the energy within terms in the energy density functional are also discussed. Conclusions: Terms in the energy density functional linked to the tensor force can play a non

  7. Electromagnetic processes in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertulani, C. A.; Baur, G.

    1986-10-01

    Electromagnetic effects in relativistic heavy ion collisions with impact parameter larger than the sum of the nuclear radii are studied using the virtual photon method. With increasing value of the relativistic parameter γ the hardness of the virtual photon spectrum increases. This leads to interesting new effects which will also have to be considered in the design of future relativistic heavy ion machines and experiments. The excitation of high-lying giant E1 and E2 multipole resonances is calculated as well as electromagnetic pion production. Coulomb bremsstrahlung is calculated and compared to the bremsstrahlung emitted in the more violent central nuclear collisions. K-shell ionization and electron-positron pair production is studied. The latter process has a very large cross section for heavy ions and contributes significantly to the stopping power of relativistic heavy ions in a dense medium.

  8. INELASTIC DIFFRACTION AT HEAVY ION COLLIDERS.

    SciTech Connect

    WHITE, S.

    2005-01-01

    The heavy ion physics approach to global event characterization has led us to instrument the forward region in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC. In heavy ion collisions this coverage yields a measurement of the ''spectator'' energy and its distribution about the beam direction. This energy flow is the basis of event-by-event determination of the centrality and reaction plane which are key to analyzing particle production in heavy ion collisions. These same tools have also enabled a unique set of measurements on inelastic diffraction with proton, deuteron and gold ion beams in the PHENIX experiment. We present first new results on this topic and discuss briefly the opportunity for diffractive physics with Heavy Ion beams at the LHC.

  9. Mass distributions for induced fission of different Hg isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2012-10-01

    With the improved scission-point model mass distributions are calculated for induced fission of different Hg isotopes with even mass numbers A=180, 184, 188, 192, 196, and 198. The calculated mass distribution and mean total kinetic energy of fission fragments are in good agreement with the existing experimental data. The asymmetric mass distribution of fission fragments of 180Hg observed in the recent experiment is explained. The change in the shape of the mass distribution from asymmetric to more symmetric is revealed with increasing A of the fissioning AHg nucleus, and reactions are proposed to verify this prediction experimentally.

  10. Beam dynamics in heavy ion induction LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.

    1981-10-01

    Interest in the use of an induction linac to accelerate heavy ions for the purpose of providing the energy required to initiate an inertially confined fusion reaction has stimulated a theoretical effort to investigate various beam dynamical effects associated with high intensity heavy ion beams. This paper presents a summary of the work that has been done so far; transverse, longitudinal and coupled longitudinal transverse effects are discussed.

  11. Heavy ion drivers for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1983-12-01

    The advantages of heavy ion beams as a way of delivering the needed energy and power to an inertial fusion target are surveyed. The existing broad technology base of particle accelerators provides an important foundation for designing, costing, and evaluating proposed systems. The sequence of steps needed for the verification of the heavy ion approach is described; recent research results are even more encouraging than had been assumed hitherto.

  12. Jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian; Gyulassy, M.

    1990-09-01

    Several aspects of hard and semihard QCD jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed, including multiproduction of minijets and the interaction of a jet with dense nuclear matter. The reduction of jet quenching effect in deconfined phase of nuclear matter is speculated to provide a signature of the formation of quark gluon plasma. HIJING Monte Carlo program which can simulate events of jets production and quenching in heavy ion collisions is briefly described. 35 refs., 13 figs.

  13. EDITORIAL: Focus on Heavy Ions in Biophysics and Medical Physics FOCUS ON HEAVY IONS IN BIOPHYSICS AND MEDICAL PHYSICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, Marco

    2008-07-01

    include carcinogenesis, late degenerative tissue effects (including damage to the central nervous system), and hereditary effects. For these studies, microbeams represent an essential tool, considering that in space each cell in the human body will not experience more than one heavy-ion traversal. Both NASA and ESA are investing important resources in ground-based space radiation research programs, to reduce risk uncertainty and to develop countermeasures. For both cancer therapy and space radiation protection a better understanding of the effects of energetic heavy ions is needed. Physics should be improved, especially the measurements of nuclear fragmentation cross-sections, and the transport calculations. Biological effects need to be studied in greater detail, and clearly only understanding the mechanisms of heavy-ion induced biological damage will reduce the uncertainty on late effects in humans. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics aims to provide the state-of-the-art of the biophysics of energetic heavy ions and to highlight the areas where more research is urgently needed for therapy and the space program. Focus on Heavy Ions in Biophysics and Medical Physics Contents Heavy ion microprobes: a unique tool for bystander research and other radiobiological applications K O Voss, C Fournier and G Taucher-Scholz Heavy ions light flashes and brain functions: recent observations at accelerators and in spaceflight L Narici Clinical advantages of carbon-ion radiotherapy Hirohiko Tsujii, Tadashi Kamada, Masayuki Baba, Hiroshi Tsuji, Hirotoshi Kato, Shingo Kato, Shigeru Yamada, Shigeo Yasuda, Takeshi Yanagi, Hiroyuki Kato, Ryusuke Hara, Naotaka Yamamoto and Junetsu Mizoe Heavy-ion effects: from track structure to DNA and chromosome damage F Ballarini, D Alloni, A Facoetti and A Ottolenghi Shielding experiments with high-energy heavy ions for spaceflight applications C Zeitlin, S Guetersloh, L Heilbronn, J Miller, N Elkhayari, A Empl, M LeBourgeois, B W Mayes, L Pinsky

  14. Proximity potential for heavy ion reactions on deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, A. J.; Bayman, B. F.

    1982-01-01

    The usual treatment of the deformed optical model for analysis of heavy ion induced inelastic scattering data involves a deformed (target) radius, a spherical (projectile) radius and a potential strength dependent on the surface separation along the line between the two centers. Several authors using various approaches have shown that this center line potential is geometrically inadequate especially for description of higher L deformation parameters probed in heavy ion induced inelastic scattering experiments. A quantitatively adequate form of the deformed proximity potential suitable for use with a coupled channels reaction code in the analysis of inelastic scattering data above the Coulomb barrier is described. A major objective is to be able to extract reliably higher deformed multipole moments from such data. The deformed potential calculated in the folding model will serve as a geometrically exact benchmark to evaluate the accuracy of the proximity potential prescriptions. (WHK)

  15. Dispersion of heavy ion deposited energy in nanometric electronic devices: Experimental measurements and simulation possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raine, M.; Gaillardin, M.; Paillet, P.; Duhamel, O.; Martinez, M.; Bernard, H.

    2015-12-01

    The dispersion of heavy ion deposited energy is explored in nanometric electronic devices. Experimental data are reported, in a large thin SOI diode and in a SOI FinFET device, showing larger distributions of collected charge in the nanometric volume device. Geant4 simulations are then presented, using two different modeling approaches. Both of them seem suitable to evaluate the dispersion of deposited energy induced by heavy ion beams in advanced electronic devices with nanometric dimensions.

  16. Moon originating heavy ions associated with CIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yoshifumi; Yokota, Shoichiro; Nishino, Masaki; Tsunakawa, Hideo

    2014-05-01

    Existance of a tenuous alkali atmosphere around the Moon was discovered by ground-based optical observations in 1980s. Since then the generation mechanism of the alkali atmosphere has been actively investigated. Currently, photon-stimulated desorption is regarded as the major generation process of the lunar alkai atmosphere such as sodium and potassium. MAP-PACE-IMA on Kaguya found four typical ion populations on the dayside of the Moon. These includes (1) solar wind protons backscattered at the lunar surface, (2) solar wind protons reflected by magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface, (3) reflected/backscattered protons picked-up by the solar wind, and (4) ions originating from the lunar surface/lunar exosphere. One of these populations: (4) ions originating from the lunar surface/lunar exosphere usually consisted of heavy ions such as carbon, oxygen, sodium, and potassium. Some of these ions were generated on the lunar surface by photon-stimulated desorption especially for alkali ions such as sodium and potassium and some others were generated by solar wind sputtering. Photo-ionized neutral particles were also included in these ions. These heavy ions were accelerated by the solar wind convection electric field and detected by the ion energy mass spectrometer MAP-PACE-IMA on Kaguya. Since the gyro-radius of these heavy ions was much larger than the Moon, the energy of these ions detected at 100km altitude was in most cases lower than the incident solar wind ion energy. Two special examples were found where the energy of the heavy ions was higher than the incident solar wind ion energy. These high-energy heavy ions were observed on the dayside of the Moon when CIR (Corotating Interaction Region) passed the Moon. The high energy heavy ions were observed for several hours with the highest heavy ion flux observed when the solar wind pressure increased due to the passage of the CIR. The mass spectrum of the heavy ions observed associated with CIR showed H+, He++, He

  17. In-beam Fission Study at JAEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Katsuhisa

    2013-12-01

    Fission fragment mass distributions were measured in heavy-ion induced fissions using 238U target nucleus. The measured mass distributions changed drastically with incident energy. The results are explained by a change of the ratio between fusion and quasifission with nuclear orientation. A calculation based on a fluctuation dissipation model reproduced the mass distributions and their incident energy dependence. Fusion probability was determined in the analysis. Evaporation residue cross sections were calculated with a statistical model in the reactions of 30Si + 238U and 34S + 238U using the obtained fusion probability in the entrance channel. The results agree with the measured cross sections for seaborgium and hassium isotopes.

  18. Residual gas fluorescence monitor for relativistic heavy ions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, T.; Gassner, D.; Minty, M.

    2013-10-01

    A residual gas fluorescence beam profile monitor at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has successfully recorded beam images of various species of relativistic heavy ions during FY2012 operations. These fully striped ions include gold, copper, and uranium at 100, 99.9, and 96.4GeV/n, respectively. Their beam profiles give an independent measurement of the RHIC beam size and emittance. We estimated their corresponding fluorescence cross sections to be 2.1×10-16, 1.8×10-17, and 2.6×10-16cm2, and obtained their rms transverse beam sizes of 0.36, 0.37, 0.24 mm for gold, copper, and uranium ions, respectively. They are the smallest ion beam width, thus lowest beam emittance, ever produced at RHIC or any other high-energy heavy ion colliders. These extremely small beam sizes may have reached a fundamental limit to residual gas fluorescence based beam profile monitor. Nevertheless, this beam diagnostic technique, utilizing the beam-induced fluorescence from residual gas where hydrogen is still the dominant constituent in nearly all vacuum systems, represents a passive, robust, truly noninvasive, monitor for high-energy ion beams.

  19. Electromagnetic Dissociation of Uranium in Heavy Ion Collisions at 120 Mev/a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justice, Marvin Lealon

    The heavy-ion induced electromagnetic dissociation (EMD) of a 120 MeV/A ^{238}U beam incident on five targets (^9Be, ^{27}Al, ^ {nat}Cu, ^{nat} Ag, and ^{nat}U) has been studied experimentally. Electromagnetic dissociation at this beam energy is essentially a two step process involving the excitation of a giant resonance followed by particle decay. At 120 MeV/A there is predicted to be a significant contribution (~25%) of the giant quadrupole resonance to the EMD cross sections. The specific exit channel which was looked at was projectile fission. The two fission fragments were detected in coincidence by an array of solid-state DeltaE-E detectors, allowing the charges of the fragments to be determined to within +/- .5 units. The events were sorted on the basis of the sums of the fragments' charges, acceptance corrections were applied, and total cross sections for the most peripheral events (i.e. those leading to charge sums of approximately 92) were determined. Electromagnetic fission at the beam energy of this experiment always leads to a true charge sum of 92. Due to the imperfect resolution of the detectors, charge sums of 91 and 93 were included in order to account for all of the electromagnetic fission events. The experimentally observed cross sections are due to nuclear interaction processes as well as electromagnetic processes. Under the conditions of this experiment, the cross sections for the beryllium target are almost entirely due to nuclear processes. The nuclear cross sections for the other four targets were determined by extrapolation from the beryllium data using a geometrical scaling model. After subtraction of the nuclear cross sections, the resulting electromagnetic cross sections are compared to theoretical calculations based on the equivalent photon approximation. Systematic uncertainties associated with the normalization of the data make quantitative comparisons with theory difficult, however. The systematic uncertainties are discussed and

  20. Prompt fission neutron spectra in fast-neutron-induced fission of 238U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, V. V.; Nayak, B. K.; Saxena, A.; Suryanarayana, S. V.; Capote, R.

    2015-07-01

    Prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS) measurements for the neutron-induced fission of 238U are carried out at incident neutron energies of 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 MeV, respectively. The time-of-flight technique is employed to determine the energy of fission neutrons. The prompt fission neutron energy spectra so obtained are analyzed using Watt parametrization to derive the neutron multiplicity and average prompt fission neutron energy. The present experimental PFNS data are compared with the evaluated spectra taken from the ENDF/B-VII.1 library and the predictive calculations carried out using the empire-3.2 (Malta) code with built-in Los Alamos (LA) and Kornilov PFNS models. The sensitivity of the empire-3.2 LA model-calculated PFNS to the nuclear level density parameter of the average fission fragment and to the total kinetic energy is investigated. empire-3.2 LA model PFNS calculations that use Madland 2006-recommended values [D. G. Madland, Nucl. Phys. A 772, 113 (2006), 10.1016/j.nuclphysa.2006.03.013] of the total kinetic energy and the level density parameter a =A /(10 ±0.5 ) compare very well to measured data at all incident neutron incident energies.

  1. Fission of Actinides Induced by Neutrons at nTOF

    SciTech Connect

    Tassan-Got, L.; Audouin, L.; Berthier, B.; Ferrant, L.; Isaev, S.; Le Naour, C.; Stephan, C.; Trubert, D.; Duran, I.; Paradela, C.; Moreau, C.

    2005-05-24

    The neutron-induced fission cross sections of 233U, 234U, 232Th, 237Np, 209Bi, natPb have been measured on the nTOF facility at CERN, which allows an accurate energy measurement owing to the long path. Parallel plate avalanche counters were used to detect the 2 fission fragments in coincidence. This method allows an efficient discrimination of fission reactions among other types of reactions especially at high energies, and it is well suited for the very large energy range available at nTOF. The case of 234U will be used as an example of the quality of the data obtained in these measurements.

  2. Actinide neutron-induced fission cross section measurements at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tovesson, Fredrik K; Laptev, Alexander B; Hill, Tony S

    2010-01-01

    Fission cross sections of a range of actinides have been measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in support of nuclear energy applications in a wide energy range from sub-thermal energies up to 200 MeV. A parallel-plate ionization chamber are used to measure fission cross sections ratios relative to the {sup 235}U standard while incident neutron energies are determined using the time-of-flight method. Recent measurements include the {sup 233,238}U, {sup 239-242}Pu and {sup 243}Am neutron-induced fission cross sections. Obtained data are presented in comparison with ex isting evaluations and previous data.

  3. Relative biological effectiveness of accelerated heavy ions for induction of morphological transformation in Syrian hamster embryo cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Z B; Suzuki, H; Suzuki, F; Suzuki, M; Furusawa, Y; Kato, T; Ikenaga, M

    1998-09-01

    Syrian hamster embryo cells were used to study the morphological transformation induced by accelerated heavy ions with different linear energy transfer (LET) ranging from 13 to 400 keV/micron. Exponentially growing cells were irradiated with 12C or 28Si ion beams generated by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), then inoculated to culture dishes. Morphologically altered colonies were scored as transformants. Over the LET range examined, the frequency of transformation induced by the heavy ions increased sharply at very low doses no greater than 5 cGy. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the heavy ions relative to X-rays first increased with LET, reached a maximum value of about 7 at 100 keV/micron, then decreased with the further increase of LET. Our findings confirmed that high LET heavy ions are much more effective than X-rays for the induction of in vitro cell transformation. PMID:9868868

  4. Solenoid transport for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Edward

    2004-06-15

    Solenoid transport of high current, heavy ion beams is considered for several stages of a heavy ion fusion driver. In general this option is more efficient than magnetic quadrupole transport at sufficiently low kinetic energy and/or large e/m, and for this reason it has been employed in electron induction linacs. Ideally an ion beam would be transported in a state of Brillouin flow, i.e. cold in the transverse plane and spinning at one half the cyclotron frequency. The design of appropriate solenoids and the equilibrium and stability of transported ion beams are discussed. An outline of application to a fusion driver is also presented.

  5. Neutron induced fission of 234U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambsch, F.-J.; Al-Adili, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Pomp, S.

    2012-02-01

    The fission fragment properties of 234U(n,f) were investigated as a function of incident neutron energy from 0.2 MeV up to 5 MeV. The fission fragment mass, angular distribution and kinetic energy were measured with a double Frisch-grid ionization chamber using both analogue and digital data acquisition techniques. The reaction 234U(n,f) is relevant, since it involves the same compound nucleus as formed after neutron evaporation from highly excited 236U*, the so-called second-chance fission of 235U. Experimental data on fission fragment properties like fission fragment mass and total kinetic energy (TKE) as a function of incident neutron energy are rather scarce for this reaction. For the theoretical modelling of the reaction cross sections for Uranium isotopes this information is a crucial input parameter. In addition, 234U is also an important isotope in the Thorium-based fuel cycle. The strong anisotropy of the angular distribution around the vibrational resonance at En = 0.77 MeV could be confirmed using the full angular range. Fluctuations in the fragment TKE have been observed in the threshold region around the strong vibrational resonance at En = 0.77 MeV. The present results are in contradiction with corresponding literature values. Changes in the mass yield around the vibrational resonance and at En = 5 MeV relative to En = 2 MeV show a different signature. The drop in mean TKE around 2.5 to 3 MeV points to pair breaking as also observed in 235,238U(n,f). The measured two-dimensional mass yield and TKE distribution have been described in terms of fission modes. The yield of the standard 1 (S1) mode shows fluctuations in the threshold of the fission cross section due to the influence of the resonance and levels off at about 20% yield for higher incident neutron energies. The S2 mode shows the respective opposite behaviour. The mean TKE of both modes decreases with En. The decrease in mean TKE overrules the increase in S1 yield, so the mean TKE is dropping

  6. Local formation of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond by swift heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.; Aloni, S.; Ogletree, D. F.; Tomut, M.; Bender, M.; Severin, D.; Trautmann, C.; Rangelow, I. W.; Schenkel, T.

    2014-12-07

    We exposed nitrogen-implanted diamonds to beams of swift heavy ions (∼1 GeV, ∼4 MeV/u) and find that these irradiations lead directly to the formation of nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers, without thermal annealing. We compare the photoluminescence intensities of swift heavy ion activated NV{sup −} centers to those formed by irradiation with low-energy electrons and by thermal annealing. NV{sup −} yields from irradiations with swift heavy ions are 0.1 of yields from low energy electrons and 0.02 of yields from thermal annealing. We discuss possible mechanisms of NV center formation by swift heavy ions such as electronic excitations and thermal spikes. While forming NV centers with low efficiency, swift heavy ions could enable the formation of three dimensional NV{sup −} assemblies over relatively large distances of tens of micrometers. Further, our results show that NV center formation is a local probe of (partial) lattice damage relaxation induced by electronic excitations from swift heavy ions in diamond.

  7. Green's function methods in heavy ion shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Costen, Robert C.; Shinn, Judy L.; Badavi, Francis F.

    1993-01-01

    An analytic solution to the heavy ion transport in terms of Green's function is used to generate a highly efficient computer code for space applications. The efficiency of the computer code is accomplished by a nonperturbative technique extending Green's function over the solution domain. The computer code can also be applied to accelerator boundary conditions to allow code validation in laboratory experiments.

  8. Relativistic Hydrodynamics for Heavy-Ion Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollitrault, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Relativistic hydrodynamics is essential to our current understanding of nucleus-nucleus collisions at ultrarelativistic energies (current experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, forthcoming experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider). This is an introduction to relativistic hydrodynamics for graduate students. It includes a detailed…

  9. Acceleration of heavy ions in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M.Q.

    1983-01-01

    It is possible to use the Brookhaven AGS as a heavy ion machine by adding a cyclotron to the Tandem and using this combination as injector. An intermediate step for lighter ions might consist of injecting the Tandem beam directly into the AGS. In either case, quite high intensities should be possible.

  10. Pions from and about heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, J.O.

    1982-09-01

    A review is presented of the possibilities of pion production with heavy ion reactions. Major headings include: pion thermometry; hills and valleys in pion spectra; pionic orbits of nuclear size; pion confinement in the fireball; anomalons; and Schroedinger equation solutions for pionic atoms. 47 references, 9 figures. (GHT)

  11. Suprathermal Minor Heavy Ions In Saturn's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christon, S. P.; Difabio, R. D.; Hamilton, D. C.; Krimigis, S. M.; Mitchell, D. G.

    2010-12-01

    Minor heavy ions, with MPQ > ~25 amu/e, have been measured at energies >~64 keV/e in Saturn's inner magnetosphere using the Cassini/MIMI/CHEMS Charge Energy Mass Spectrometer. CHEMS measures atomic and molecular ions in the mass-per-charge, MPQ, range 1-80 amu/e. The predominant minor heavy ions, N2+1 and O2+1, share general spatial characteristics with the dominant water group ions (taken as O+1, OH+1, H2O+1, and H3O+1). Using an extended collection interval (mid-2004 to 2010) for CHEMS, we have also found several rare heavy ion groups with MPQ > ~40 amu/e, at ~40, ~42-48, and ~52-58 amu/e. CHEMS cannot distinguish atomic from molecular species in this MPQ range, but possible candidates at these masses are Ar+1, CO2+1 or C3H8+1, and Fe+1 or C4H8+1, respectively. These rare heavy ions exhibit somewhat different spatial characteristics than the more abundant water group and N2+1 and O2+1 ions. The compositional characteristics of these suprathermal ion groups will be discussed in the context of recent results concerning liquid water on Enceladus and the composition of dark material on the moons and rings.

  12. Heavy ion pion production: spectral irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, J.O.

    1982-09-01

    Data on ..pi../sup -//..pi../sup +/ ratios and on hills and valleys in spectra from heavy ion collisions are reviewed. Theoretical studies to handle Coulomb effects on pion spectra are examined. The possible role of strongly-bound pion orbitals of nuclear size is discussed.

  13. Resonant structures in heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, S.J.; Henning, W.; Ernst, H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Jachcinski, C.; Kovar, D.G.; Paul, M.; Schiffer, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation of heavy-ion resonance structures using the /sup 24/Mg(/sup 16/O, /sup 12/C)/sup 28/Si reaction is presented. The data are analyzed in the context of Breit-Wigner resonances added to a direct-reaction background.

  14. Metastable states of highly excited heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pegg, D. J.; Griffin, P. M.; Sellin, I. A.; Smith, W. W.; Donnally, B.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the method used and results obtained in an experimental study of the metastable states of highly stripped heavy ions, aimed at determining the lifetimes of such states by the rates of autoionization and radiation. The significance and limitations of the results presented are discussed.

  15. Reaction parameters for heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcke, W.W.; Birkelund, J.R.; Wollersheim, H.J.; Hoover, A.D.; Huizenga, J.R.; Schroeder, W.U.; Tubbs, L.E.

    1980-09-01

    These tables present reaction parameters for all combinations of 27 projectile and 16 target nuclei in a laboratory bombarding energy range of 1--50 MeV/u. The reaction parameters are derived from the Fresnel model of heavy-ion scattering, the droplet model, and the rotating liquid-drop model, or from systematics of experimental data.

  16. Heavy ion beams for inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Godlove, T.F.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1980-05-01

    The United States' program in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is described in this paper, with emphasis on the studies of the use of intense high energy beams of heavy ions to provide the power and energy needed to initiate thermonuclear burn. Preliminary calculations of the transport of intense ion beams in an electrostatic quadrupole focussing structure are discussed.

  17. Initial conditions in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopalan, Raju

    2001-10-01

    At very high energies, partons in nuclei form a color glass condensate (CGC). In a nuclear collision, the color glass shatters, producing a high multiplicity of gluons. We discuss the results of numerical simulations which describe the real time evolution of the CGC in a heavy ion collision.

  18. Lanl Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Section Measurement Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptev, A. B.; Tovesson, F.; Hill, T. S.

    2014-09-01

    A well established program of neutron-induced fission cross section measurement at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is supporting the Fuel Cycle Research program (FC R&D). Combining measurements at two LANSCE facilities, the Lujan Center and the Weapons Neutron Research facility (WNR), cover neutron energies over 10 orders of magnitude: from sub-thermal up to 200 MeV. A parallel-plate fission ionization chamber was used as a fission fragment detector. The 235U(n,f) standard was used as the reference. Fission cross sections have been measured for multiple actinides. The new data presented here completes the suite of long-lived Uranium isotopes that were investigated with this experimental approach. The cross section data are presented in comparison with existing evaluations and previous measurements.

  19. Heavy ion driven LMF design concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E. P.

    1991-08-01

    The US Department of Energy has conducted a multi-year study of the requirements, designs and costs for a Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF). The primary purpose of the LMF would be testing of weapons physics and effects simulation using the output from microexplosions of inertial fusion pellets. It does not need a high repetition rate, efficient driver system as required by an electrical generating plant. However there would be so many features in common that the design, construction and operation of an LMF would considerably advance the application of inertial confinement fusion to energy production. The DOE study has concentrated particularly on the LMF driver, with design and component development undertaken at several national laboratories. Principally, these are LLNL (Solid State Laser), LANL (Gas Laser), and SNLA (Light Ions). Heavy Ions, although considered a possible LMF driver did not receive attention until the final stages of this study since its program management was through the Office of Energy Research rather than Defense Programs. During preparation of a summary report for the study it was decided that some account of heavy ions was needed for a complete survey of the driver candidates. A conceptual heavy ion LMF driver design was created for the DOE report which is titled LMC Phase II Design Concepts. The heavy ion driver did not receive the level of scrutiny of the other concepts and, unlike the others, no costs analysis by an independent contractor was performed. Since much of heavy ion driver design lore was brought together in this exercise it is worthwhile to make it available as an independent report. This is reproduced here as it appears in the DOE report.

  20. Heavy ion driven LMF design concept

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.

    1991-08-01

    The USA Department of Energy has conducted a multi-year study of the requirements, designs and costs for a Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF). The primary purpose of the LMF would be testing of weapons physics and effects simulation using the output from microexplosions of inertial fusion pellets. It does not need a high repetition rate, efficient driver system as required by an electrical generating plant. However there would be so many features in common that the design, construction and operation of an LMF would considerably advance the application of inertial confinement fusion to energy production. The DOE study has concentrated particularly on the LMF driver, with design and component development undertaken at several national laboratories. Principally, these are LLNL (Solid State Laser), LANL (Gas Laser), and SNLA (Light Ions). Heavy Ions, although considered a possible LMF driver did not receive attention until the final stages of this study since its program management was through the Office of Energy Research rather than Defense Programs. During preparation of a summary report for the study it was decided that some account of heavy ions was needed for a complete survey of the driver candidates. A conceptual heavy ion LMF driver design was created for the DOE report which is titled LMC Phase II Design Concepts. The heavy ion driver did not receive the level of scrutiny of the other concepts and, unlike the others, no costs analysis by an independent contractor was performed. Since much of heavy ion driver design lore was brought together in this exercise it is worthwhile to make it available as an independent report. This is reproduced here as it appears in the DOE report.

  1. Mutation Induction in Mammalian Cells by Accelerated Heavy Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosendahl, I. M.; Baumstark-Khan, C.; Rink, H.

    The deleterious effects of accelerated heavy ions on living cells are of increasing importance for long duration human space flight activities. An important aspect of this field is attributed to the type and quality of biological damage induced by these densely ionizing particles. To address this aspect, cell inactivation and mutation induction at the hprt locus (coding for hypoxanthine-guanine-phosphoribosyl-transferase) was investigated in cultured V79 Chinese Hamster Cells irradiated with accelerated heavy ions (8-O, 20-Ca, 79-Au, and 92-U) and X-rays. Specific energies of the ions ranged from 1.9 to 69.7 MeV/u and corresponding LET values were between 62 band 15,580 keV/μ m. 30 spontaneous and 196 heavy-ion induced 6-thioguanine resistant hprt mutant colonies were characterized by Southern technique using the restriction enzymes EcoRI, PstI and BglII and a full length hprt cDNA probe isolated from the plasmid pHpt12 (kindly provided by Dr. J. Thacker). While inactivation cross sections (σ i) rise over the whole LET range, mutation induction cross sections (σ m) increase up to approximately 300 keV/μ m (O-ions) but decline with heavier ions and more extreme LET values. A similar behaviour is seen with mutation frequency dependent on particle fluence. After irradiation with accelerated uranium ions (8.8 MeV/u, 15,580 keV/μ m) a significant decrease of mutation frequency was found with higher particle fluences (3× 106 particles cm-2). Nearly no mutants were recovered with 8× 106 particles cm-2. All restriction patterns of the spontaneous hprt mutants were indistinguishable from the wild type pattern. These mutants probably contain small deletions or point mutations in the hprt locus. In contrast, the overall spectrum of heavy ion induced mutations revealed a majority (67%) of partial or complete deletions of the hprt gene. With constant particle fluence (3× 106 particles cm-2) the quality of heavy ion induced mutations in the hprt locus depends on physical

  2. Student Experiments in Spontaneous Fission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becchetti, F. D.; Ying, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    Advanced undergraduate experiments utilizing a commercially available, thin spontaneous fission source are described, including studies of the energy and mass distribution of the fission fragments and their energy and angular correlation. The experiments provide a useful introduction to fission, nuclear mass equations, heavy-ion physics, and…

  3. Developments for neutron-induced fission at IGISOL-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelov, D.; Penttilä, H.; Al-Adili, A.; Eronen, T.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Koponen, J.; Lantz, M.; Mattera, A.; Moore, I. D.; Pohjalainen, I.; Pomp, S.; Rakopoulos, V.; Reinikainen, J.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Simutkin, V.; Solders, A.; Voss, A.; Äystö, J.

    2016-06-01

    At the IGISOL-4 facility, neutron-rich, medium mass nuclei have usually been produced via charged particle-induced fission of natural uranium and thorium. Neutron-induced fission is expected to have a higher production cross section of the most neutron-rich species. Development of a neutron source along with a new ion guide continues to be one of the major goals since the commissioning of IGISOL-4. Neutron intensities at different angles from a beryllium neutron source have been measured in an on-line experiment with a 30 MeV proton beam. Recently, the new ion guide coupled to the neutron source has been tested as well. Details of the neutron source and ion guide design together with preliminary results from the first neutron-induced fission experiment at IGISOL-4 are presented in this report.

  4. Fission induced swelling of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Jeong, G. Y.; Park, J. M.; Robinson, A. B.

    2015-10-01

    Fission-induced swelling of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel meat was measured using microscopy images obtained from post-irradiation examination. The data of reduced-size plate-type test samples and rod-type test samples were employed for this work. A model to predict the meat swelling of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel was developed. This model is composed of several submodels including a model for interaction layer (IL) growth between U-Mo and Al matrix, a model for IL thickness to IL volume conversion, a correlation for the fission-induced swelling of U-Mo alloy particles, a correlation for the fission-induced swelling of IL, and models of U-Mo and Al consumption by IL growth. The model was validated using full-size plate data that were not included in the model development.

  5. Two-photon-induced singlet fission in rubrene single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lin; Galstyan, Gegham; Zhang, Keke; Kloc, Christian; Sun, Handong; Soci, Cesare; Michel-Beyerle, Maria E.; Gurzadyan, Gagik G.

    2013-05-01

    The two-photon-induced singlet fission was observed in rubrene single crystal and studied by use of femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. The location of two-photon excited states was obtained from the nondegenerate two-photon absorption (TPA) spectrum. Time evolution of the two-photon-induced transient absorption spectra reveals the direct singlet fission from the two-photon excited states. The TPA absorption coefficient of rubrene single crystal is 52 cm/GW at 740 nm, as obtained from Z-scan measurements. Quantum chemical calculations based on time-dependent density functional theory support our experimental data.

  6. Heavy ion test results for the 68020 microprocessor and the 68882 coprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Velazco, R.; Karoui, S. 46, Av. Felix Viallet, 38031, Grenoble Cedex ); Chapuis, T. ); Benezech, D. ); Rosier, L.H. )

    1992-06-01

    This paper will present a set of techniques allowing to perform heavy ions testing on present 32-bits microprocessors. The authors study particularly how the program executed by the circuit during the irradiation can modify the calculated upset cross-section. The approach will be illustrated by experimental results obtained on both the Motorola 68020 microprocessor and its coprocessor 68882, by means of particle accelerators as well as a Cf{sup 252} fission-decay source equipment.

  7. Science and art in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, M.S.

    1982-08-09

    One of the more intriguing phenomena discovered in heavy-ion physics is the seeming appearance of high energy structure in the excitation spectra of inelastically scattered heavy ions. For reasons illustrated, these may well be a phenomena unique to heavy ions and their explanation perhaps unique to TDHF.

  8. Event-by-Event Simulation of Induced Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R; Randrup, J

    2007-12-13

    We are developing a novel code that treats induced fission by statistical (or Monte-Carlo) simulation of individual decay chains. After its initial excitation, the fissionable compound nucleus may either deexcite by evaporation or undergo binary fission into a large number of fission channels each with different energetics involving both energy dissipation and deformed scission prefragments. After separation and Coulomb acceleration, each fission fragment undergoes a succession of individual (neutron) evaporations, leading to two bound but still excited fission products (that may further decay electromagnetically and, ultimately, weakly), as well as typically several neutrons. (The inclusion of other possible ejectiles is planned.) This kind of approach makes it possible to study more detailed observables than could be addressed with previous treatments which have tended to focus on average quantities. In particular, any type of correlation observable can readily be extracted from a generated set of events. With a view towards making the code practically useful in a variety of applications, emphasis is being put on making it numerically efficient so that large event samples can be generated quickly. In its present form, the code can generate one million full events in about 12 seconds on a MacBook laptop computer. The development of this qualitatively new tool is still at an early stage and quantitative reproduction of existing data should not be expected until a number of detailed refinement have been implemented.

  9. Hard Probes in High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.

    Hard QCD processes in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisionsbecome increasingly relevant and they can be used as probes of the dense matter formed during the violent scatterings. We will discuss how one can use these hard probes to study the properties of the dense matter and the associated phenomenologies. In particular, we study the effect of jet quenching due to medium-induced energy loss on inclusive particle pT distributions and investigate how one can improve the measurement of parton energy loss in direct photon events.

  10. Study on ferromagnetic ordering of FeRh thin films induced by energetic heavy ion irradiation by means of X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikoh, Kazuma; Tohki, Atsushi; Okuda, Shuichi; Saitoh, Yuichi; Kamiya, Tomihiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Kinoshita, Toyohiko; Iwase, Akihiro; Matsui, Toshiyuki

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the ion irradiation induced ferromagnetic state of FeRh thin films with 10 MeV I ion beam by the measurements of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as well as of soft X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD). It was clearly shown in the magnetization loops by SQUID measurements that the ion irradiation induced the ferromagnetic state in the FeRh thin films even below room temperature. This was also confirmed by the Fe L2,3-edge XMCD measurements for the irradiated FeRh film samples. However, we found that the irradiation ion fluence dependence on the magnetization was totally different between two measurement techniques. We also revealed by XMCD sum rule analysis that the ferromagnetism in the ion irradiated FeRh thin films was mainly dominated by the spin moment.

  11. Prompt Emission in Fission Induced with Fast Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. N.; Lebois, M.; Halipré, P.; Oberstedt, S.; Oberstedt, A.

    Prompt gamma-ray and neutron emission data in fission integrates a large amount of information on the fission process and can shed light on the partition of energy. Measured emission spectra, average energies and multiplicities also provide important information for energy applications. While current reactors mostly use thermal neutron spectra, the future reactors of Generation IV will use fast neutron spectra for which little experimental prompt emission data exist. Initial investigations on prompt emission in fast neutron induced fission have recently been carried out at the LICORNE facility at the IPN Orsay, which exploits inverse reactions to produce naturally collimated, intense beams of neutrons. We report on first results with LICORNE to measure prompt fission gamma-ray spectra, average energies and multiplicities for 235U and 238U. Current improvements and upgrades being carried out on the LICORNE facility will also be described, including the development of a H2 gas target to reduce parasitic backgrounds and increase intensities, and the deployment of 11B beams to extend the effective LICORNE neutron energy range up to 12 MeV. Prospects for future experimental studies of prompt gamma-ray and neutron emission in fast neutron induced fission will be presented.

  12. Swift heavy ion-induced radiation damage in isotropic graphite studied by micro-indentation and in-situ electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Christian; Voss, Kay Obbe; Bender, Markus; Kupka, Katharina; Romanenko, Anton; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina; Tomut, Marilena

    2015-12-01

    Due to its excellent thermo-physical properties and radiation hardness, isotropic graphite is presently the most promising material candidate for new high-power ion accelerators which will provide highest beam intensities and energies. Under these extreme conditions, specific accelerator components including production targets and beam protection modules are facing the risk of degradation due to radiation damage. Ion-beam induced damage effects were tested by irradiating polycrystalline, isotropic graphite samples at the UNILAC (GSI, Darmstadt) with 4.8 MeV per nucleon 132Xe, 150Sm, 197Au, and 238U ions applying fluences between 1 × 1011 and 1 × 1014 ions/cm2. The overall damage accumulation and its dependence on energy loss of the ions were studied by in situ 4-point resistivity measurements. With increasing fluence, the electric resistivity increases due to disordering of the graphitic structure. Irradiated samples were also analyzed off-line by means of micro-indentation in order to characterize mesoscale effects such as beam-induced hardening and stress fields within the specimen. With increasing fluence and energy loss, hardening becomes more pronounced.

  13. Heavy Ion Fragmentation Experiments at the Bevatron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    Fragmentation processes of heavy nuclei in matter using the heavy-ion capability of the Bevatron were studied. The purpose was to obtain the single particle inclusive spectra of secondary nuclei produced at 0 deg by the fragmentation of heavy ion beam projectiles. The process being examined is B+T yields F + anything, where B is the beam nucleus, T is the target nucleus, and F is the detected fragment. The fragments F are isotopically identified by experimental procedures involving magnetic analysis, energy loss and time-of-flight measurements. Attempts were also made to: (1) measure the total and partial production cross section for all isotopes, (2) test the applicability of high-energy multi-particle interaction theory to nuclear fragmentation, (3) apply the cross-section data and fragmentation probabilities to cosmic ray transport theory, and (4) search for systematic behavior of fragment production as a means to improve existing semi-empirical theories of cross sections.

  14. Heavy ions, targets, and research at HHIRF

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, J.L.C.

    1983-01-01

    The Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) typifies a new generation of heavy ion accelerators capable of producing high resolution beams with sufficient energy to study nuclear reactions across the periodic table. Exploiting the capabilities of the machine depends on the availability of thin foils at each stage of the experimental process. Rugged carbon foils are needed in the tandem and cyclotron to strip injected ions up to high charge states. Experimental success largely depends on the availability of a suitable target for bombardment which imposes new demands on the target maker. Many experiments use large solid angle gaseous counters with very thin foils as windows. The accelerators, experimental apparatus, and beam characteristics will be described. Target requirements demanded by different types of experiments will be discussed. These requirements have lead to the construction of specialized apparatus such as the supersonic gas jet target and the single crystal goniometer for blocking measurements.

  15. Optical Faraday Cup for Heavy Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, Frank; Bieniosek, F.M.; Eylon, S.; Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.

    2007-06-25

    We have been using alumina scintillators for imaging beams in heavy-ion beam fusion experiments in 2 to 4 transverse dimensions [1]. The scintillator has a limited lifetime under bombardment by the heavy ion beams. As a possible replacement for the scintillator, we are studying the technique of imaging the beam on a gas cloud. A gas cloud for imaging the beam may be created on a solid hole plate placed in the path of the beam, or by a localized gas jet. It is possible to image the beam using certain fast-quenching optical lines that closely follow beam current density and are independent of gas density. We describe this technique and show preliminary experimental data. This approach has promise to be a new fast beam current diagnostic on a nanosecond time scale.

  16. Classical chromodynamics and heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappi, T.

    2005-05-01

    This paper is a slightly modified version of the introductory part of a doctoral dissertation also containing the articles hep-ph/0303076, hep-ph/0409328 and hep-ph/0409058. The paper focuses on the calculation of particle production in a relativistic heavy ion collision using the McLerran-Venugopalan model. The main part of the paper summarizes the background of these numerical calculations. First we relate this calculation of the initial stage af a heavy ion collision to our understanding of the whole collision process. Then we discuss the saturation physics of the small x wavefunction of a hadron or a nucleus. The classical field model of Kovner, McLerran and Weigert is then introduced before moving to discuss the numerical algorithms used to compute gluon and quark pair production in this model. Finally we shortly review the results on gluon and quark-antiquark production obtained in the three articles mentioned above.

  17. Heavy Ions In Space (HIIS) experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Beahm, Lorraine P.; Tylka, Allan J.

    1992-01-01

    The Heavy Ions In Space (HIIS) experiment has two primary objectives: (1) to measure the elemental composition of ultraheavy Galactic cosmic rays, beginning in the tin-barium region of the periodic table; and (2) to study heavy ions which arrive at LDEF below the geomagnetic cutoff, either because they are not fully stripped of electrons or because their source is within the magnetosphere. Both have practical as well as astrophysical consequences. The HIIS experiment used eight thick stacks of plastic track detectors mounted in two trays on the space facing end of LDEF. Since the last LDEF symposium, the statistics were increased of the observations and have extended the analysis to a second stack and to detector sheets near the top of a stack. New results are reported on the detector resolution and on the observations of both stopping and relativistic particles.

  18. HEAVY-ION IMAGING APPLIED TO MEDICINE

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Tobias, C.A.; Capp, M.P.; Benton, E.V.; Holley, W.R.

    1980-02-01

    Heavy particle radiography is a newly developed noninvasive low dose imaging procedure with increased resolution of minute density differences in soft tissues of the body. The method utilizes accelerated high energy ions, primarily carbon and neon, at the BEVALAC accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The research program applied to medicine utilizes heavy-ion radiography for low dose mammography, for treatment planning for cancer patients, and for imaging and accurate densitometry of skeletal structures and brain and spinal neoplasms. The presentation will be illustrated with clinical cases under study. Discussion will include the potential of heavy-ion imaging, and particularly reconstruction tomography, as an adjunct to existing diagnostic imaging procedures in medicine, both for the applications to the diagnosis, management and treatment of clinical cancer in man, but also for the early detection of small soft tissue tumors at low radiation dose.

  19. Viscous photons in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dion, Maxime; Paquet, Jean-François; Schenke, Björn; Young, Clint; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2011-12-01

    Theoretical studies of the production of real thermal photons in relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are performed. The space-time evolution of the colliding system is modelled using music, a 3+1D relativistic hydrodynamic simulation, using both its ideal and viscous versions. The inclusive spectrum and its azimuthal angular anisotropy are studied separately, and the relative contributions of the different photon sources are highlighted. It is shown that the photon v2 coefficient is especially sensitive to the details of the microscopic dynamics like the equation of state, the ratio of shear viscosity over entropy density, η/s, and to the morphology of the initial state.

  20. Dynamical processes in heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.; Remington, B.A.

    1988-07-25

    In this report I review the physical assumptions of the Boltzmann Master Equation (BME). Comparisons of the model with experimental neutron spectra gated on evaporation residues for a range of incident projectile energies and masses are presented; next, I compare n spectra gated on projectile-like fragments, followed by comparisons with ungated, inclusive proton spectra. I will then consider secondary effects from the nucleon-nucleon processes involved in the heavy ion relaxation processes, specifically the high energy ..gamma..-rays which have been observed at energies up to 140 MeV in collisions of heavy ions of 20/endash/84 MeV/..mu... Another secondary effect, subthreshold pion production, was covered in the XVII School and will not be repeated. 39 refs., 16 figs.

  1. Heavy ion irradiation-induced microstructural evolution in pyrochlore Lu2Ti2O7 at room temperature and 723 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Q. R.; Zhang, J.; Dong, X. N.; Guo, Q. X.; Li, N.

    2015-11-01

    Polycrystalline pyrochlore Lu2Ti2O7 pellets were irradiated with 600 keV Kr3+ at room temperature and 723 K to a fluence of 4×1015 ions/cm2, corresponding to an average ballistic damage dose of 10 displacements per atom in the peak damage region. Irradiation-induced microstructural evolution was examined by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. Incomplete amorphization was observed in the sample irradiated at room temperature due to the formation of nano-crystal which has the identical structure of pyrochlore, and the formation of nano-crystal is attributed to the mechanism of epitaxial recrystallization. However, an ordered pyrochlore phase to a swelling disordered fluorite phase transformation is occurred for the Lu2Ti2O7 sample irradiated at 723 K, which is due to the disordering of metal cations and anion vacancies.

  2. Scanning picosecond tunable laser system for simulating MeV heavy ion-induced charge collection events as a function of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, Jamie Stuart; Chen, Yuan; Scheick, Leif; Vo, Tuan; Johnston, Allan

    2008-08-01

    A new methodology for using scanning picosecond laser microscopy to simulate cosmic ray induced radiation effects as a function of temperature is described in detail. The built system is centered on diffraction-limited focusing of the output from a broadband (690-960 nm) ultrafast Ti:sapphire Tsunami laser pumped by a 532 nm Millennia laser. An acousto-optic modulator is used to provide pulse picking down to event rates necessary for the technologies and effects under study. The temperature dependence of the charge generation process for ions and photons is briefly reviewed and the need for wavelength tunability is discussed. An appropriate wavelength selection is critical for proper emulation of ion events over a wide temperature range. The system developed is detailed and illustrated by way of example on a deep-submicron complementary metal-oxide semiconductor test structure.

  3. Femtoscopy in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lisa, M; Pratt, S; Soltz, R A; Wiedemann, U

    2005-07-29

    Analyses of two-particle correlations have provided the chief means for determining spatio-temporal characteristics of relativistic heavy ion collisions. We discuss the theoretical formalism behind these studies and the experimental methods used in carrying them out. Recent results from RHIC are put into context in a systematic review of correlation measurements performed over the past two decades. The current understanding of these results are discussed in terms of model comparisons and overall trends.

  4. Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility: Users handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Auble, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    The primary objective of this handbook is to provide information for those who plan to carry out research programs at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The accelerator systems and experimental apparatus available are described. The mechanism for obtaining accelerator time and the responsibilities of those users who are granted accelerator time are described. The names and phone numbers of ORNL personnel to call for information about specific areas are given. (LEW)

  5. Overview of US heavy ion fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan,J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Eylon, S.; Vay,J-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.; Callahan, D.A.; Cohen,R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik,A.W.; Lund, S.M.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham,L.R.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.A.; Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Kishek, R.A.; O'Shea, P.; Haber, I.; Prost, L.R.

    2005-06-23

    Significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the U.S. heavy ion fusion program on high-current sources, injectors, transport, final focusing, chambers and targets for high energy density physics (HEDP) and inertial fusion energy (IFE) driven by induction linac accelerators. One focus of present research is the beam physics associated with quadrupole focusing of intense, space-charge dominated heavy-ion beams, including gas and electron cloud effects at high currents, and the study of long-distance-propagation effects such as emittance growth due to field errors in scaled experiments. A second area of emphasis in present research is the introduction of background plasma to neutralize the space charge of intense heavy ion beams and assist in focusing the beams to a small spot size. In the near future, research will continue in the above areas, and a new area of emphasis will be to explore the physics of neutralized beam compression and focusing to high intensities required to heat targets to high energy density conditions as well as for inertial fusion energy.

  6. Overview of US heavy ion fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan,J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Eylon, S.; Vay,J-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.; Callahan, D.A.; Cohen,R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P; Covo, Kireeff M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik,A.W.; Lund, S.M.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham,L.R.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.A.; Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Kishek, R.A.; O'Shea, P.; Haber, I.; Prost, L.R.; Prost, L.

    2004-11-01

    Significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the U.S. heavy ion fusion program on high-current sources, injectors, transport, final focusing, chambers and targets for high energy density physics (HEDP) and inertial fusion energy (IFE) driven by induction linac accelerators. One focus of present research is the beam physics associated with quadrupole focusing of intense, space-charge dominated heavy-ion beams, including gas and electron cloud effects at high currents, and the study of long-distance-propagation effects such as emittance growth due to field errors in scaled experiments. A second area of emphasis in present research is the introduction of background plasma to neutralize the space charge of intense heavy ion beams and assist in focusing the beams to a small spot size. In the near future, research will continue in the above areas, and a new area of emphasis will be to explore the physics of neutralized beam compression and focusing to high intensities required to heat targets to high energy density conditions as well as for inertial fusion energy.

  7. Multiple Electron Stripping of Heavy Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    D. Mueller; L. Grisham; I. Kaganovich; R. L. Watson; V. Horvat; K. E. Zaharakis; Y. Peng

    2002-06-25

    One approach being explored as a route to practical fusion energy uses heavy ion beams focused on an indirect drive target. Such beams will lose electrons while passing through background gas in the target chamber, and therefore it is necessary to assess the rate at which the charge state of the incident beam evolves on the way to the target. Accelerators designed primarily for nuclear physics or high energy physics experiments utilize ion sources that generate highly stripped ions in order to achieve high energies economically. As a result, accelerators capable of producing heavy ion beams of 10 to 40 Mev/amu with charge state 1 currently do not exist. Hence, the stripping cross-sections used to model the performance of heavy ion fusion driver beams have, up to now, been based upon theoretical calculations. We have investigated experimentally the stripping of 3.4 Mev/amu Kr 7+ and Xe +11 in N2; 10.2 MeV/amu Ar +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 19 MeV/amu Ar +8 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 30 MeV He 1 + in He, N2, Ar and Xe; and 38 MeV/amu N +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe. The results of these measurements are compared with the theoretical calculations to assess their applicability over a wide range of parameters.

  8. Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Braithwaite, W. J.

    1995-05-31

    This report describes an on-going research initiative for the University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR): investigating the physics of ultra-relativistic heavy ions, i.e. collisions between massive nuclei which have been accelerated to kinetic energies so large that the rest mass of the ions is a negligible fraction of their total mass-energy. This progress report is being submitted in conjunction with a 3-year grant-renewal proposal, containing additional materials. Three main categories drive the UALRGultra-relativistic heavy ion research. (1) investigations of multi-particle Hanbury-Brown-Twiss (HBT) correlations in the CERN and RHIC energy domains strongly influence the URHI experimental effort, (2) participation in the NA49 Experiment to study 33 TeV (160 GeV/nucleon) Pb on Pb collisions using the SPS facili& at CERN, and (3) participation in the STAR collaboration which is developing a major detector for use with the STAR Experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), being built at BNL.

  9. Swift heavy ion irradiation-induced microstructure modification on two delta-phase oxides: Sc4Zr3O12 and Lu4Zr3O12

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Ming; Zhang, Jian; Uberuaga, Blas P; Sickafus, Kurt E; Reichhardt, Cynthia J; Kluth, Patrick; Maulik, Patel

    2009-01-01

    Swift gold ions (185 MeV) were used to systematically investigate the radiation damage response of delta phase compounds Sc{sub 4}Zr{sub 3}O{sub 12} and Lu{sub 4}Zr{sub 3}O{sub 12} in the electronic energy loss regime. Ion irradiation-induced microstructural modifications were examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XRD investigations indicate a phase transformation from ordered rhombohedral to disordered fluorite (O-D) in both compounds, with the Sc compound transforming at a higher ion fluence compared with the Lu compound. This result is consistent with our previous study on Sc{sub 4}Zr{sub 3}O{sub 12} and Lu{sub 4}Zr{sub 3}O{sub 12} under displacive radiation environment in which the nuclear energy loss is dominant. High resolution TEM revealed that individual ion tracks maintains crystalline structure where the core region experiences an O-D phase transformation. TEM observation also suggests that the O-D phase transformation occurs through the ion range after overlapping of ion tracks.

  10. Understanding of the mechanical and structural changes induced by alpha particles and heavy ions in the French simulated nuclear waste glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakurt, G.; Abdelouas, A.; Guin, J.-P.; Nivard, M.; Sauvage, T.; Paris, M.; Bardeau, J.-F.

    2016-07-01

    Borosilicate glasses are considered for the long-term confinement of high-level nuclear wastes. External irradiations with 1 MeV He+ ions and 7 MeV Au5+ ions were performed to simulate effects produced by alpha particles and by recoil nuclei in the simulated SON68 nuclear waste glass. To better understand the structural modifications, irradiations were also carried out on a 6-oxides borosilicate glass, a simplified version of the SON68 glass (ISG glass). The mechanical and macroscopic properties of the glasses were studied as function of the deposited electronic and nuclear energies. Alpha particles and gold ions induced a volume change up to -0.7% and -2.7%, respectively, depending on the glass composition. Nano-indentations tests were used to determine the mechanical properties of the irradiated glasses. A decrease of about -22% to -38% of the hardness and a decrease of the reduced Young's modulus by -8% were measured after irradiations. The evolution of the glass structure was studied by Raman spectroscopy, and also 11B and 27Al Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS-NMR) on a 20 MeV Kr irradiated ISG glass powder. A decrease of the silica network connectivity after irradiation with alpha particles and gold ions is deduced from the structural changes observations. NMR spectra revealed a partial conversion of BO4 to BO3 units but also a formation of AlO5 and AlO6 species after irradiation with Kr ions. The relationships between the mechanical and structural changes are also discussed.

  11. Large optical nonlinearity induced by singlet fission in pentacene films.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunlong; Zhang, Chunfeng; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Bo; Tan, Zhanao; Wang, Xiaoyong; Xiao, Min

    2015-05-18

    By creating two triplet excitons from one photo-excited singlet exciton, singlet fission in organic semiconductors has drawn tremendous attention for its potential applications in boosting the efficiency of solar conversion. Here, we show that this carrier-multiplication effect can also be used to dramatically improve the nonlinear optical response in organic materials. We have observed large optical nonlinearity with a magnitude of χ((3)) up to 10(-9) esu in pentacene films, which is further shown to be a result of singlet fission by monitoring the temporal dynamics. The potential application of such efficient nonlinear optical response has been demonstrated with a singlet-fission-induced polarization rotation. PMID:25845461

  12. Cyclin C mediates stress-induced mitochondrial fission and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Yan, Ruilan; Cooper, Katrina F.; Strich, Randy

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that undergo constant fission and fusion cycles. In response to cellular damage, this balance is shifted dramatically toward fission. Cyclin C–Cdk8 kinase regulates transcription of diverse gene sets. Using knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), we demonstrate that cyclin C directs the extensive mitochondrial scission induced by the anticancer drug cisplatin or oxidative stress. This activity is independent of transcriptional regulation, as Cdk8 is not required for this activity. Furthermore, adding purified cyclin C to unstressed permeabilized MEF cultures induced complete mitochondrial fragmentation that was dependent on the fission factors Drp1 and Mff. To regulate fission, a portion of cyclin C translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it associates with Drp1 and is required for its enhanced mitochondrial activity in oxidatively stressed cells. In addition, although HeLa cells regulate cyclin C in a manner similar to MEF cells, U2OS osteosarcoma cultures display constitutively cytoplasmic cyclin C and semifragmented mitochondria. Finally, cyclin C, but not Cdk8, is required for loss of mitochondrial outer membrane permeability and apoptosis in cells treated with cisplatin. In conclusion, this study suggests that cyclin C connects stress-induced mitochondrial hyperfission and programmed cell death in mammalian cells. PMID:25609094

  13. Prompt Fission Neutron Energy Spectra Induced by Fast Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staples, Parrish Alan

    Prompt fission neutron energy spectra for ^{235}U and ^{239 }Pu have been measured for fission neutron energies greater than the energy of the incident neutrons inducing fission. The measurements were undertaken to investigate the shape dependence of the fission neutron spectra upon both the incident neutron energy and the mass of the nucleus undergoing fission. Measurements were made for both nuclides at the following incident neutron energies; 0.50 MeV, 1.50 MeV, 2.50 MeV and 3.50 MeV. The data are presented either as relative yields or as ratios of a measured spectrum to the ^{235}U spectrum at 0.50 MeV. Incident neutrons were produced by the ^7Li(p,n)^7Be reaction using a pulsed, bunched proton beam from the 5.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator at the University of Massachusetts Lowell Pinanski Energy Center. The neutrons were detected by a thin liquid scintillator with good time resolution capabilities; time-of-flight techniques were used for neutron energy determination; in addition pulse-shape-discrimination was used to reduce gamma-ray background levels. The measurements are compared to calculations based on the Los Alamos Model of Madland and Nix to test its predictive capabilities. The data are fit by the Watt equation to determine the mean energy of the spectra, and to facilitate comparison of the results to previous measurements. The data are also compared directly to previous measurements.

  14. SOFIA, a Next-Generation Facility for Fission Yields Measurements and Fission Study. First Results and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audouin, L.; Pellereau, E.; Taieb, J.; Boutoux, G.; Béliera, G.; Chatillon, A.; Ebran, A.; Gorbinet, T.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Tassan-Got, L.; Jurado, B.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Caamano, M.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Paradela, C.; Rodriguez-Sanchez, J.-L.; Vargas, J.; Casarejos, E.; Heinz, A.; Kelic-Heil, A.; Kurz, N.; Nociforo, C.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Rossi, D.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Simon, H.; Voss, B.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.

    2015-10-01

    Fission fragments play an important role in nuclear reactors evolution and safety. However, fragments yields are poorly known : data are essentially limited to mass yields from thermal neutron-induced fissions on a very few nuclei. SOFIA (Study On FIssion with Aladin) is an innovative experimental program on nuclear fission carried out at the GSI facility, which aims at providing isotopic yields on a broad range of fissioning systems. Relativistic secondary beams of actinides and pre-actinides are selected by the Fragment Separator (FRS) and their fission is triggered by electromagnetic interaction. The resulting excitation energy is comparable to the result of an interaction with a low-energy neutron, thus leading to useful data for reactor simulations. For the first time ever, both fission fragments are completely identified in charge and mass in a new recoil spectrometer, allowing for precise yields measurements. The yield of prompt neutrons can then be deduced, and the fission mechanism can be ascribed, providing new constraints for fission models. During the first experiment, all the technical challenges were matched : we have thus set new experimental standards in the measurements of relativistic heavy ions (time of flight, position, energy loss).This communication presents a first series of results obtained on the fission of 238U; many other fissioning systems have also been measured and are being analyzed presently. A second SOFIA experiment is planned in September 2014, and will be focused on the measurement of the fission of 236U, the analog of 235U+n.

  15. Angular momentum effects in multimodal fission of {sup 226}Th

    SciTech Connect

    Chubarian, G. G.; Hurst, B. J.; O'Kelly, D.; Schmitt, R. P.; Itkis, M. G.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Pashkevich, V. V.; Pokrovsky, I. V.; Salamatin, V. S.; Rusanov, A. Ya.; Calabretta, L.; Maiolino, C.; Lukashin, K.; Agodi, C.; Bellia, G.; Hanappe, F.; Liatard, E.; Huck, A.

    1998-12-21

    The {gamma}-rays from the multimodal fission of the {sup 226}Th formed in {sup 18}O+{sup 208}Pb was investigated at the near- and sub-barrier energies. The corresponding excitation energies at the saddle point, E{sub sp}*, ranged from 23 to 26 MeV. The average {gamma}-ray multiplicities and relative {gamma}-ray energies as a function of the mass of the fission fragments exhibits a complex structure and strong variations. Such strong variations have never been previously observed in heavy ion-induced fusion-fission reactions. Obtained results may be explained with the influence of shell effects on the properties of the fission fragments. Present work is the one in series of investigation of the multimodal fission phenomena in At-Th region.

  16. Angular momentum effects in multimodal fission of {sup 226}Th

    SciTech Connect

    Chubarian, G.G.; Hurst, B.J.; OKelly, D.; Schmitt, R.P.; Itkis, M.G.; Kondratiev, N.A.; Kozulin, E.M.; Oganessian, Y.T.; Pashkevich, V.V.; Pokrovsky, I.V.; Salamatin, V.S.; Rusanov, A.Y.; Calabretta, L.; Maiolino, C.; Lukashin, K.; Agodi, C.; Bellia, G.; Hanappe, F.; Liatard, E.; Huck, A.; Stuttge, L.

    1998-12-01

    The {gamma}-rays from the multimodal fission of the {sup 226}Th formed in {sup 18}O+{sup 208}Pb was investigated at the near- and sub-barrier energies. The corresponding excitation energies at the saddle point, E{sub sp}{sup {asterisk}}, ranged from 23 to 26 MeV. The average {gamma}-ray multiplicities and relative {gamma}-ray energies as a function of the mass of the fission fragments exhibits a complex structure and strong variations. Such strong variations have never been previously observed in heavy ion-induced fusion-fission reactions. Obtained results may be explained with the influence of shell effects on the properties of the fission fragments. Present work is the one in series of investigation of the multimodal fission phenomena in At-Th region. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Determination of the time evolution of fission from particle emission

    SciTech Connect

    Lestone, J.P. )

    1993-04-12

    Recently measured properties of the prescission particle emission from heavy-ion induced fission of systems with [ital A][similar to]200 were analyzed using the statistical model. Simultaneous fits to prescission neutron, proton, and [alpha]-particle multiplicities and mean kinetic energies can be obtained when the deformation dependence of both the particle transmission coefficients and particle binding energies are taken into account. The experimental data are consistent with a total fission time scale of (30[plus minus]10)[times]10[sup [minus]21] s, with more than half of this time being spent beyond the saddle point.

  18. In-beam fission study for Heavy Element Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Katsuhisa

    2013-12-01

    Fission fragment mass distributions were measured in heavy-ion induced fissions using 238U target nucleus. The measured mass distributions changed drastically with incident energy. The results are explained by a change of the ratio between fusion and qasifission with nuclear orientation. A calculation based on a fluctuation dissipation model reproduced the mass distributions and their incident energy dependence. Fusion probability was determined in the analysis. Evaporation residue cross sections were calculated with a statistical model in the reactions of 30Si + 238U and 34S + 238U using the obtained fusion probability in the entrance channel. The results agree with the measured cross sections for seaborgium and hassium isotopes.

  19. Heavy-ion effects: from track structure to DNA and chromosome damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, F.; Alloni, D.; Facoetti, A.; Ottolenghi, A.

    2008-07-01

    The use of carbon ions for the treatment of certain tumour types, especially radioresistant tumours, is becoming more frequent due to the carbon-ion dose localization and high relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in the Bragg peak region. Human beings can also be exposed to heavy ions in space, since galactic cosmic rays are a mixed field consisting of not only high-energy protons and He ions, but also heavier ions including iron. Due to their high linear energy transfer (LET), heavy ions have peculiar track structures, characterized by a high level of energy deposition clustering. Furthermore, high-energy ions produce energetic secondary electrons ('delta rays') which can give rise to energy depositions several micrometres away from the core of the primary particle track. Also in view of hadron therapy and space radiation applications, it is therefore important to characterize heavy-ion tracks from a physical and biophysical point of view. In this framework, herein we will discuss the main physical features of heavy-ion track structure, as well as heavy-ion-induced DNA double-strand breaks, which are regarded as one of the most important initial radiobiological lesions and chromosome aberrations, which are correlated both with cell death and with cell conversion to malignancy.

  20. Towards high accurate neutron-induced fission cross sections of 240,242Pu: Spontaneous fission half-lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador-Castiñeira, P.; Bryś, T.; Eykens, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Moens, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Pretel, C.; Sibbens, G.; Vanleeuw, D.; Vidali, M.

    2013-12-01

    Fast spectrum neutron-induced fission cross sections of transuranic isotopes are being of special demand in order to provide accurate data for the new GEN-IV nuclear power plants. To minimize the uncertainties on these measurements accurate data on spontaneous fission half-lives and detector efficiencies are a key point. High α-active actinides need special attention since the misinterpretation of detector signals can lead to low efficiency values or underestimation in fission fragment detection. In that context, 240,242Pu isotopes have been studied by means of a Twin Frisch-Grid Ionization Chamber (TFGIC) for measurements of their neutron-induced fission cross section. Gases with different drift velocities have been used, namely P10 and CH4. The detector efficiencies for both samples have been determined and improved spontaneous fission half-life values were obtained.

  1. Characterization of swift heavy ion irradiation damage in ceria

    SciTech Connect

    Yablinsky, Clarissa A.; Devanathan, Ram; Pakarinen, Janne; Gan, Jian; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-03-04

    Swift heavy ion induced radiation damage is investigated for ceria (CeO2), which serves as a UO2 fuel surrogate. Microstructural changes resulting from an irradiation with 940 MeV gold ions of 42 keV/nm electronic energy loss are investigated by means of electron microscopy accompanied by electron energy loss spectroscopy showing that there exists a small density reduction in the ion track core. While chemical changes in the ion track are not precluded, evidence of them was not observed. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of thermal spikes in CeO2 with an energy deposition of 12 and 36 keV/nm show damage consisting of isolated point defects at 12 keV/nm, and defect clusters at 36 keV/nm, with no amorphization at either energy. Furthermore, inferences are drawn from modeling about density changes in the ion track and the formation of interstitial loops that shed light on features observed by electron microscopy of swift heavy ion irradiated ceria.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamics and charge identified directed flow in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürsoy, Umut; Kharzeev, Dmitri; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Strong magnetic fields produced in any non-central heavy ion collision are expected to affect the dynamics of the hot QCD matter produced in this collision. The magnetic field is time-dependent and the medium is expanding, which leads to the induction of charged currents due to the combination of Faraday and Hall effects. We study the imprint the magnetic fields produced in non-central heavy ion collisions leave on the azimuthal distributions and correlations of the produced charged hadrons by employing an analytic solution to hydrodynamics combined with the electromagnetic effects in a perturbative fashion. We use the Cooper-Frye freeze-out procedure on an isothermal freeze-out surface to obtain the azimuthal hadron distributions. We find that the charged currents induced by the present of the electromagnetic fields result in a charge-dependent directed flow v1 that is odd in rapidity and odd under charge exchange. It can be detected by measuring correlations between the directed flow of charged hadrons at different rapidities, < v1±(y1)v1±(y2) > .

  3. Heavy Ion Radiation Effects Studies With Ion Photon Emission Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Branson, J. V.; Hattar, K.; Vizkelethy, G.; Powell, C. J.; Doyle, B. L.; Rossi, P.

    2011-06-01

    The development of a new radiation effects microscopy (REM) technique is crucial as emerging semiconductor technologies demonstrate smaller feature sizes and thicker back end of line (BEOL) layers. To penetrate these materials and still deposit sufficient energy into the device to induce single event effects, high energy heavy ions are required. Ion photon emission microscopy (IPEM) is a technique that utilizes coincident photons, which are emitted from the location of each ion impact to map out regions of radiation sensitivity in integrated circuits and devices, circumventing the obstacle of focusing high-energy heavy ions. Several versions of the IPEM have been developed and implemented at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). One such instrument has been utilized on the microbeam line of the 6 MV tandem accelerator at SNL. Another IPEM was designed for ex-vacu use at the 88'' cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Extensive engineering is involved in the development of these IPEM systems, including resolving issues with electronics, event timing, optics, phosphor selection, and mechanics. The various versions of the IPEM and the obstacles, as well as benefits associated with each will be presented. In addition, the current stage of IPEM development as a user instrument will be discussed in the context of recent results.

  4. Characterization of swift heavy ion irradiation damage in ceria

    SciTech Connect

    Yablinsky, Clarissa A.; Devanathan, Ram; Pakarinen, Janne; Gan, Jian; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-03-04

    Swift heavy ion induced radiation damage is investigated for ceria (CeO2), which serves as a UO2 fuel surrogate. Microstructural changes resulting from an irradiation with 940 MeV gold ions of 42 keV/nm electronic energy loss are investigated by means of electron microscopy accompanied by electron energy loss spectroscopy showing that there exists a small density reduction in the ion track core. While chemical changes in the ion track are not precluded, evidence of them was not observed. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of thermal spikes in CeO2 with an energy deposition of 12 and 36 keV/nm show damage consisting of isolated point defects at 12 keV/nm, and defect clusters at 36 keV/nm, with no amorphization at either energy. Inferences are drawn from modeling about density changes in the ion track and the formation of interstitial loops that shed light on features observed by electron microscopy of swift heavy ion irradiated ceria.

  5. Characterization of swift heavy ion irradiation damage in ceria

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yablinsky, Clarissa A.; Devanathan, Ram; Pakarinen, Janne; Gan, Jian; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-03-04

    Swift heavy ion induced radiation damage is investigated for ceria (CeO2), which serves as a UO2 fuel surrogate. Microstructural changes resulting from an irradiation with 940 MeV gold ions of 42 keV/nm electronic energy loss are investigated by means of electron microscopy accompanied by electron energy loss spectroscopy showing that there exists a small density reduction in the ion track core. While chemical changes in the ion track are not precluded, evidence of them was not observed. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of thermal spikes in CeO2 with an energy deposition of 12 and 36 keV/nm show damage consisting of isolatedmore » point defects at 12 keV/nm, and defect clusters at 36 keV/nm, with no amorphization at either energy. Furthermore, inferences are drawn from modeling about density changes in the ion track and the formation of interstitial loops that shed light on features observed by electron microscopy of swift heavy ion irradiated ceria.« less

  6. The Analysis of the Patterns of Radiation-Induced DNA Damage Foci by a Stochastic Monte Carlo Model of DNA Double Strand Breaks Induction by Heavy Ions and Image Segmentation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Cucinotta, F.

    2011-01-01

    To create a generalized mechanistic model of DNA damage in human cells that will generate analytical and image data corresponding to experimentally observed DNA damage foci and will help to improve the experimental foci yields by simulating spatial foci patterns and resolving problems with quantitative image analysis. Material and Methods: The analysis of patterns of RIFs (radiation-induced foci) produced by low- and high-LET (linear energy transfer) radiation was conducted by using a Monte Carlo model that combines the heavy ion track structure with characteristics of the human genome on the level of chromosomes. The foci patterns were also simulated in the maximum projection plane for flat nuclei. Some data analysis was done with the help of image segmentation software that identifies individual classes of RIFs and colocolized RIFs, which is of importance to some experimental assays that assign DNA damage a dual phosphorescent signal. Results: The model predicts the spatial and genomic distributions of DNA DSBs (double strand breaks) and associated RIFs in a human cell nucleus for a particular dose of either low- or high-LET radiation. We used the model to do analyses for different irradiation scenarios. In the beam-parallel-to-the-disk-of-a-flattened-nucleus scenario we found that the foci appeared to be merged due to their high density, while, in the perpendicular-beam scenario, the foci appeared as one bright spot per hit. The statistics and spatial distribution of regions of densely arranged foci, termed DNA foci chains, were predicted numerically using this model. Another analysis was done to evaluate the number of ion hits per nucleus, which were visible from streaks of closely located foci. In another analysis, our image segmentaiton software determined foci yields directly from images with single-class or colocolized foci. Conclusions: We showed that DSB clustering needs to be taken into account to determine the true DNA damage foci yield, which helps to

  7. Genetic effects on heavy ions in drosophila

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kale, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    Drosophila sex-linked recessive lethal mutation test was used to study the dose response relation and relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions. The experiments were performed using the heavy ion beams at BEVALAC of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. These experiments were undertaken according to the proposed milestones and included Ne-20, A-40 and Fe-65 ions with respective energies of 600 MeV, 840 MeV and 850 MeV. At these energies several doses of these radiations ranging from 20 to 1280 R were used. Space radiation exposure to astronauts is supposed to be quite low and therefore very low dose experiments i.e., 20 R, were also performed for the three ions. The mutation response was measured in all germ cell types i.e., spermatozoa, spermatids, spermatocytes and spermatogonia of treated Drosophila males. A linear dose frequency relation was observed for most of the range except at high doses where the saturation effect was observed. Also, a very significant difference was observed among the sensitivity of the four germ cell stages where spermatozoa and spermatids were more sensitive. At the higher doses of this range, most of the spermatogonia and spermatocytes were killed. Although comparative and identical experiments with X-rays or neutrons have not been performed, the compassion of our data with the ones available in literature suggest that the heavy ions have a high rbe and that they are several times more effective than low LET X-rays. The rbe compared to neutrons however appears to be only slightly higher.

  8. Lateral charge transport from heavy-ion tracks in integrated circuit chips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Schwartz, H. R.; Nevill, L. R.

    1988-01-01

    A 256K DRAM has been used to study the lateral transport of charge (electron-hole pairs) induced by direct ionization from heavy-ion tracks in an IC. The qualitative charge transport has been simulated using a two-dimensional numerical code in cylindrical coordinates. The experimental bit-map data clearly show the manifestation of lateral charge transport in the creation of adjacent multiple-bit errors from a single heavy-ion track. The heavy-ion data further demonstrate the occurrence of multiple-bit errors from single ion tracks with sufficient stopping power. The qualitative numerical simulation results suggest that electric-field-funnel-aided (drift) collection accounts for single error generated by an ion passing through a charge-collecting junction, while multiple errors from a single ion track are due to lateral diffusion of ion-generated charge.

  9. Towards a heavy-ion transport capability in the MARS15 Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N. V.; Gudima, K. K.; Mashnik, S. G.; Rakhno, I. L.; Striganov, S.

    2004-04-01

    In order to meet the challenges of new accelerator and space projects and further improve modelling of radiation effects in microscopic objects, heavy-ion interaction and transport physics have been recently incorporated into the MARS15 Monte Carlo code. A brief description of new modules is given in comparison with experimental data. The MARS Monte Carlo code is widely used in numerous accelerator, detector, shielding and cosmic ray applications. The needs of the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, Large Hadron Collider, Rare Isotope Accelerator and NASA projects have recently induced adding heavy-ion interaction and transport physics to the MARS15 code. The key modules of the new implementation are described below along with their comparisons to experimental data.

  10. Light particle emissions in heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Petitt, G.A.; Liu, Xin-Tao; Smathers, J.; Zhang, Ziang.

    1991-03-01

    We are completing another successful year of experimental work at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF), the Los Alamos white neutron source facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Georgia State University (GSU). A paper on energy division between the two heavy fragments in deep inelastic reactions between {sup 58}Ni + {sup 165}Ho was published in Physical Review C during the year. We have partially completed analysis of the data on the {sup 32}S + {sup 93}Nb system taken with the HILI detector system at the HHIRF. This paper discusses work on these topics and discusses the setup of a neutron detector for a neutron reaction experiment.

  11. Pair creation in heavy ion channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, N. A.; Harman, Z.

    2016-04-01

    Heavy ions channeled through crystals with multi-GeV kinetic energies can create electron-positron pairs. In the framework of the ion, the energy of virtual photons arising from the periodic crystal potential may exceed the threshold 2mec2. The repeated periodic collisions with the crystal ions yield high pair production rates. When the virtual photon frequency matches a nuclear transition in the ion, the production rate can be resonantly increased. In this two-step excitation-pair conversion scheme, the excitation rates are coherently enhanced, and scale approximately quadratically with the number of crystal sites along the channel.

  12. Economic aspects of heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1984-01-01

    The usual parameter space for examining scenarios for heavy ion fusion power plants has generally been based on large, slow cycling, reactor chambers which are only marginally different from chambers proposed for laser drivers. This paper will examine the economic implications of assuming that an inexpensive, low gain pellet is available and that a suitable high-repetition rate reactor has been devised. Interesting scenarios are found that generate economically feasible power from a system with a minimum net capacity of approx. 1 GWe compared to the larger approx. 4 GWe required in previous studies.

  13. Vorticity in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wei-Tian; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-06-01

    We study the event-by-event generation of flow vorticity in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Au +Au collisions and CERN Large Hadron Collider Pb +Pb collisions by using the hijing model. Different definitions of the vorticity field and velocity field are considered. A variety of properties of the vorticity are explored, including the impact parameter dependence, the collision energy dependence, the spatial distribution, the event-by-event fluctuation of the magnitude and azimuthal direction, and the time evolution. In addition, the spatial distribution of the flow helicity is also studied.

  14. Faster Heavy Ion Transport for HZETRN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.

    2013-01-01

    The deterministic particle transport code HZETRN was developed to enable fast and accurate space radiation transport through materials. As more complex transport solutions are implemented for neutrons, light ions (Z < 2), mesons, and leptons, it is important to maintain overall computational efficiency. In this work, the heavy ion (Z > 2) transport algorithm in HZETRN is reviewed, and a simple modification is shown to provide an approximate 5x decrease in execution time for galactic cosmic ray transport. Convergence tests and other comparisons are carried out to verify that numerical accuracy is maintained in the new algorithm.

  15. Nonrelativistic theory of heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsch, G.

    1984-07-17

    A wide range of phenomena is observed in heavy-ion collisions, calling for a comprehensive theory based on fundamental principles of many-particle quantum mechanics. At low energies, the nuclear dynamics is controlled by the mean field, as we know from spectroscopic nuclear physics. We therefore expect the comprehensive theory of collisions to contain mean-field theory at low energies. The mean-field theory is the subject of the first lectures in this chapter. This theory can be studied quantum mechanically, in which form it is called TDHF (time-dependent Hartree-Fock), or classically, where the equation is called the Vlasov equation. 25 references, 14 figures.

  16. Non abelian hydrodynamics and heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Calzetta, E.

    2014-01-14

    The goal of the relativistic heavy ion collisions (RHIC) program is to create a state of matter where color degrees of freedom are deconfined. The dynamics of matter in this state, in spite of the complexities of quantum chromodynamics, is largely determined by the conservation laws of energy momentum and color currents. Therefore it is possible to describe its main features in hydrodynamic terms, the very short color neutralization time notwithstanding. In this lecture we shall give a simple derivation of the hydrodynamics of a color charged fluid, by generalizing the usual derivation of hydrodynamics from kinetic theory to the non abelian case.

  17. High-energy accelerator for beams of heavy ions

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald L.; Arnold, Richard C.

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for accelerating heavy ions to high energies and directing the accelerated ions at a target comprises a source of singly ionized heavy ions of an element or compound of greater than 100 atomic mass units, means for accelerating the heavy ions, a storage ring for accumulating the accelerated heavy ions and switching means for switching the heavy ions from the storage ring to strike a target substantially simultaneously from a plurality of directions. In a particular embodiment the heavy ion that is accelerated is singly ionized hydrogen iodide. After acceleration, if the beam is of molecular ions, the ions are dissociated to leave an accelerated singly ionized atomic ion in a beam. Extraction of the beam may be accomplished by stripping all the electrons from the atomic ion to switch the beam from the storage ring by bending it in magnetic field of the storage ring.

  18. DNA damage and repair in oncogenic transformation by heavy ion radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T. C.; Mei, M.; George, K. A.; Craise, L. M.

    Energetic heavy ions are present in galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events. One of the most important late effects in risk assessment is carcinogenesis. We have studied the carcinogenic effects of heavy ions at the cellular and molecular levels and have obtained quantitative data on dose-response curves and on the repair of oncogenic lesions for heavy particles with various charges and energies. Studies with repair inhibitors and restriction endonucleases indicated that for oncogenic transformation DNA is the primary target. Results from heavy ion experiments showed that the cross section increased with LET and reached a maximum value of about 0.02 mum^2 at about 500 keV/mum. This limited size of cross section suggests that only a fraction of cellular genomic DNA is important in radiogenic transformation. Free radical scavengers, such as DMSO, do not give any effect on induction of oncogenic transformation by 600 MeV/u iron particles, suggesting most oncogenic damage induced by high-LET heavy ions is through direct action. Repair studies with stationary phase cells showed that the amount of reparable oncogenic lesions decreased with an increase of LET and that heavy ions with LET greater than 200 keV/mum produced only irreparable oncogenic damage. An enhancement effect for oncogenic transformation was observed in cells irradiated by low-dose-rate argon ions (400 MeV/u; 120 keV/mum). Chromosomal aberrations, such as translocation and deletion, but not sister chromatid exchange, are essential for heavy-ion-induced oncogenic transformation. The basic mechanism(s) of misrepair of DNA damage, which form oncogenic lesions, is unknown.

  19. DNA damage and repair in oncogenic transformation by heavy ion radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Mei, M.; George, K. A.; Craise, L. M.

    1996-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions are present in galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events. One of the most important late effects in risk assessment is carcinogenesis. We have studied the carcinogenic effects of heavy ions at the cellular and molecular levels and have obtained quantitative data on dose-response curves and on the repair of oncogenic lesions for heavy particles with various charges and energies. Studies with repair inhibitors and restriction endonucleases indicated that for oncogenic transformation DNA is the primary target. Results from heavy ion experiments showed that the cross section increased with LET and reached a maximum value of about 0.02 micrometer2 at about 500 keV/micrometer. This limited size of cross section suggests that only a fraction of cellular genomic DNA is important in radiogenic transformation. Free radical scavengers, such as DMSO, do not give any effect on induction of oncogenic transformation by 600 MeV/u iron particles, suggesting most oncogenic damage induced by high-LET heavy ions is through direct action. Repair studies with stationary phase cells showed that the amount of reparable oncogenic lesions decreased with an increase of LET and that heavy ions with LET greater than 200 keV/micrometer produced only irreparable oncogenic damage. An enhancement effect for oncogenic transformation was observed in cells irradiated by low-dose-rate argon ions (400 MeV/u; 120 keV/micrometer). Chromosomal aberrations, such as translocation and deletion, but not sister chromatid exchange, are essential for heavy-ion-induced oncogenic transformation. The basic mechanism(s) of misrepair of DNA damage, which form oncogenic lesions, is unknown.

  20. A heavy ion spectrometer system for the measurement of projectile fragmentation of relativistic heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelage, J.; Crawford, H. J.; Albergo, S.; Kuo, C.; Caccia, Z.; Chen, C.-X.; Costa, S.; Cronqvist, M.; Flores, L.; Fonte, R.; Greiner, L.; Guzik, T. G.; Insolia, A.; Mitchell, J. W.

    1996-06-01

    The Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) at the LBL Bevalac provided a unique facility for measuring projectile fragmentation cross sections important in deconvolving the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) source composition. The general characteristics of the apparatus specific to this application are described and the main features of the event reconstruction and analysis used in the TRANSPORT experiment are discussed.

  1. Dynamical Aspects of Nuclear Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliman, J.; Itkis, M. G.; Gmuca, Š.

    2008-11-01

    Fission dynamics. Dependence of scission-neutron yield on light-fragment mass for [symbol]=1/2 [et al.]. Dynamics of capture quasifission and fusion-fission competition / L. Stuttgé ... [et al.] -- Fission-fission. The processes of fusion-fission and quasi-fission of superheavy nuclei / M. G. Itkis ... [et al.]. Fission and quasifission in the reactions [symbol]Ca+[symbol]Pb and [symbol]Ni+[symbol]W / G. N. Knyazheva ... [et al.]. Mass-energy characteristics of reactions [symbol]Fe+[symbol][symbol][symbol]266Hs and [symbol]Mg+[symbol]Cm[symbol][symbol]Hs at Coulomb barrier / L. Krupa ... [et al.]. Fusion of heavy ions at extreme sub-barrier energies / Ş. Mişicu and H. Esbensen. Fusion and fission dynamics of heavy nuclear system / V. Zagrebaev and W. Greiner. Time-dependent potential energy for fusion and fission processes / A. V. Karpov ... [et al.] -- Superheavy elements. Advances in the understanding of structure and production mechanisms for superheavy elements / W. Greiner and V. Zagrebaev. Fission barriers of heaviest nuclei / A. Sobiczewski ... [et al.]. Possibility of synthesizing doubly magic superheavy nuclei / Y Aritomo ... [et al.]. Synthesis of superheavy nuclei in [symbol]Ca-induced reactions / V. K. Utyonkov ... [et al.] -- Fragmentation. Production of neutron-rich nuclei in the nucleus-nucleus collisions around the Fermi energy / M. Veselský. Signals of enlarged core in [symbol]Al / Y. G. Ma ... [et al.] -- Exotic modes. New insight into the fission process from experiments with relativistic heavy-ion beams / K.-H. Schmidt ... [et al.]. New results for the intensity of bimodal fission in binary and ternary spontaneous fission of [symbol]Cf / C. Goodin ... [et al.]. Rare fission modes: study of multi-cluster decays of actinide nuclei / D. V. Kamanin ... [et al.]. Energy distribution of ternary [symbol]-particles in [symbol]Cf(sf) / M. Mutterer ... [et al.]. Preliminary results of experiment aimed at searching for collinear cluster tripartition of

  2. Time dependent measurements of induced fission for SNM interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A.; Israelashvili, I.; Wengrowicz, U.; Caspi, E. N.; Yaar, I.; Osovizki, A.; Ocherashvili, A.; Rennhofer, H.; Pedersen, B.; Crochemore, J.-M.; Roesgen, E.

    2013-08-01

    Gammas from induced fissions were measured and separated into prompt and delayed particles. To this end, a dedicated detector was realized, based on a plastic scintillator, a wavelength shifter fiber and a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). Results are presented from the interrogation of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM), employing a pulsed neutron generator in the PUNITA graphite moderator incorporating the above detector assembly. The detector response is presented, as well as the sensitivities for prompt and delayed processes within the same experimental setup.

  3. Heavy ion fragmentation experiments at the bevatron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, H. H.

    1976-01-01

    Collaborative research efforts to study the fragmentation processes of heavy nuclei in matter using heavy ion beams of the Bevatron/Bevalac are described. The goal of the program is to obtain the single particle inclusive spectra of secondary nuclei produced at 0 deg by the fragmentation of heavy ion beam projectiles. The process being examined is B+T yields F + anything, where B is the beam nucleus, T is the target nucleus, and F is the detected fragment. The fragments F are isotopically identified by experimental procedures involving magnetic analysis, energy loss and time-of-flight measurements. Effects were also made to: (a) study processes of heavy nuclei in matter, (b) measure the total and partial production cross section for all isotopes, (c) test the applicability of high energy multiparticle interaction theory to nuclear fragmentation, (d) apply the cross section data and fragmentation probabilities to cosmic ray transport theory, and (e) search for systematic behavior of fragment production as a means to improve existing semi-empirical theories of cross-sections.

  4. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.

    1988-01-01

    The conceptual design of a Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RACK) to be constructed in the existing 3.8 km tunnel at Brookhaven has been developed. The collider has been designed to provide collisions of gold ions at six intersection points with a luminosity of about 5 /times/ 10/sup 26/cm/sup /minus/2/sec/sup /minus/1/ at an energy of 100 GeV/u in each beam. Collisions with different ion species, including protons, will be possible. The collider consists of two interlaced, but otherwise separate, superconducting magnet rings. The 9.7 m long dipoles will operate at 3.5 T. Their 8 cm aperture was determined by the dimensions of gold ion beams taking into account diffusion due to intrabeam scattering. Heavy ion beams will be available from the Tandem Van de Graaff/Booster/AGS complex. The salient design features and the reasons for major design choices of the proposed machine are discussed in this paper. 24 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Mutagenic effects of heavy ions in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasavin, E. A.; Kozubek, S.; Amirtayev, K. G.; Tokarova, B.; Bonev, M.

    The peculiarities and mechanisms of the mutagenic action of γ-rays and heavy ions on bacterial cells have been investigated. Direct mutations in the lac-operon of E. coli in wild type cells and repair deficient strains have been detected. Furthermore, the induction of revertants in Salmonella tester strains was measured. It was found that the mutation rate was a linear-quadratic function of dose in the case of both γ-rays and heavy ions with LET up to 200 keV/μm. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) increased with LET up to 20 keV/μm. Low mutation rates were observed in repair deficient mutants with a block of SOS-induction. The induction of SOS-repair by ionizing radiation has been investigated by means of the ``SOS-chromotest'' and λ-prophage induction. It was shown that the intensity of the SOS-induction in E. coli increased with increasing LET up to 40-60 keV/μm.

  6. Induction accelerator development for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, L.L.

    1993-05-01

    For approximately a decade, the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at LBL has been exploring the use of induction accelerators with multiple beams as the driver for inertial fusion targets. Scaled experiments have investigated the transport of space charge dominated beams (SBTE), and the current amplification and transverse emittance control in induction linacs (MBE-4) with very encouraging results. In order to study many of the beam manipulations required by a driver and to further develop economically competitive technology, a proposal has been made in partnership with LLNL to build a 10 MeV accelerator and to conduct a series of experiments collectively called the Induction Linac System Experiments (ILSE). The major components critical to the ILSE accelerator are currently under development. We have constructed a full scale induction module and we have tested a number of amorphous magnetic materials developed by Allied Signal to establish an overall optimal design. The electric and magnetic quadrupoles critical to the transport and focusing of heavy ion beams are also under development The hardware is intended to be economically competitive for a driver without sacrificing any of the physics or performance requirements. This paper will concentrate on the recent developments and tests of the major components required by the ILSE accelerator.

  7. Rare Suprathermal Heavy Ions in Saturn's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christon, S. P.; Hamilton, D. C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; DiFabio, R. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Cassini/MIMI/CHEMS ion spectrometer has measured suprathermal (~83-167 keV/e) ions in Saturn's magnetosphere since mid-2004. We report on three rare, heavy ion groups measured in Saturn's ~4-20 Rs magnetosphere at ~40, ~46, and ~56 amu/e, with the separation from other species best at higher mass. These masses suggest possible singly-charged ion identifications as Ar+, CO2+, and Fe+, respectively. The presence of these species or compounds containing them has been suggested in composition studies of Saturn's particle populations using data from other instruments on Cassini. The observed rare ion intensities are highly variable in time and space. Broad temporal and spatial averaging is needed to examine these rare ion groups because their detection levels are much lower than the dominant water ion group, W+ (which includes O+, OH+, H2O+, and H3O+). W+ itself can be quite variable. We show that these rare ions display unique spatial and temporal variations, with similarities and differences from the dominant ion group W+ as well as O2+ and M28+, all local origin ions. We compare and contrast these rare, heavy ion species to W+ and the recently characterized [Christon et al., 2013, 10.1002/jgra.50383] minor ions M28+ (C2H5+, HCNH+, N2+, and/or CO+) and O2+ (M32+).

  8. Hydrodynamic approaches in relativistic heavy ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derradi de Souza, R.; Koide, T.; Kodama, T.

    2016-01-01

    We review several facets of the hydrodynamic description of the relativistic heavy ion collisions, starting from the historical motivation to the present understandings of the observed collective aspects of experimental data, especially those of the most recent RHIC and LHC results. In this report, we particularly focus on the conceptual questions and the physical foundations of the validity of the hydrodynamic approach itself. We also discuss recent efforts to clarify some of the points in this direction, such as the various forms of derivations of relativistic hydrodynamics together with the limitations intrinsic to the traditional approaches, variational approaches, known analytic solutions for special cases, and several new theoretical developments. Throughout this review, we stress the role of course-graining procedure in the hydrodynamic description and discuss its relation to the physical observables through the analysis of a hydrodynamic mapping of a microscopic transport model. Several questions to be answered to clarify the physics of collective phenomena in the relativistic heavy ion collisions are pointed out.

  9. Constraining relativistic models through heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Menezes, D. P.; Providencia, C.; Chiapparini, M.; Bracco, M. E.; Delfino, A.; Malheiro, M.

    2007-12-15

    Relativistic models can be successfully applied to the description of compact star properties in nuclear astrophysics as well as to nuclear matter and finite nuclei properties, these studies taking place at low and moderate temperatures. Nevertheless, all results are model dependent, and so far it is unclear whether some of them should be discarded. Moreover, in the regime of hot hadronic matter, very few calculations exist using these relativistic models, in particular when applied to particle yields in heavy ion collisions. A very important investigation is the simulation of a supernova explosion that is based on the construction of an adequate equation of state that needs to be valid within very large ranges of temperatures (0 to 100 MeV at least) and densities (very low to ten times the nuclear saturation density at least). In the present work, we comment on the known constraints that can help the selection of adequate models in this wide regime and investigate the main differences that arise when the particle production during a Au+Au collision at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider is calculated with different relativistic models. We conclude that most of the models investigated in the present work give a very good overall description of the data and make predictions for not yet measured particle ratios.

  10. The Compact Muon Solenoid Heavy Ion program

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Pablo Yepes

    2005-12-15

    The Pb-Pb center of mass energy at the LHC will exceed that of Au-Au collisions at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) by nearly a factor of 30, providing exciting opportunities for addressing unique physics issues in a completely new energy domain. The interest of the Heavy Ion (HI) Physics at LHC is discussed in more detail in the LHC-USA white paper and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Heavy Ion proposal. A few highlights are presented in this document. Heavy ion collisions at LHC energies will explore regions of energy and particle density significantly beyond those reachable at RHIC. The energy density of the thermalized matter created at the LHC is estimated to be 20 times higher than at RHIC, implying an initial temperature, which is greater than at RHIC by more than a factor of two. The higher density of produced partons also allows a faster thermalization. As a consequence, the ratio of the quark-gluon plasma lifetime to the thermalization time increases by a factor of 10 over RHIC. Thus the hot, dense systems created in HI collisions at the LHC spend most of the time in a purely partonic state. The longer lifetime of the quark-gluon plasma state widens significantly the time window available to probe it experimentally. RHIC experiments have reported evidence for jet production in HI collisions and for suppression of high p{sub T} particle production. Those results open a new field of exploration of hot and dense nuclear matter. Even though RHIC has already broken ground, the production rates for jets with p{sub T} > 30 GeV are several orders of magnitude larger at the LHC than at RHIC, allowing for systematic studies with high statistics in a clean kinematic region. High p{sub T} quark and gluon jets can be used to study the hot hadronic medium produced in HI interactions. The larger Q{sup 2} causes jets to materialize very soon after the collision. They are thus embedded in and propagate through the dense environment as it forms and evolves. Through

  11. Mutagenic effect of accelerated heavy ions on bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreyko, A. V.; Krasavin, E. A.

    2011-11-01

    The heavy ion accelerators of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research were used to study the regularities and mechanisms of formation of different types of mutations in prokaryote cells. The induction of direct (lac-, ton B-, col B) mutations for Esherichia coli cells and reverse his- → His+ mutations of Salmonella typhimurium, Bacillus subtilis cells under the action of radiation in a wide range of linear energy transfer (LET) was studied. The regularities of formation of gene and structural (tonB trp-) mutations for Esherichia coli bacteria under the action of accelerated heavy ions were studied. It was demonstrated that the rate of gene mutations as a function of the dose under the action of Γ rays and accelerated heavy ions is described by linear-quadratic functions. For structural mutations, linear "dose-effect" dependences are typical. The quadratic character of mutagenesis dose curves is determined by the "interaction" of two independent "hitting" events in the course of SOS repair of genetic structures. The conclusion made was that gene mutations under the action of accelerated heavy ions are induced by δ electron regions of charged particle tracks. The methods of SOS chromotest, SOS lux test, and λ prophage induction were used to study the regularities of SOS response of cells under the action of radiations in a wide LET range. The following proposition was substantiated: the molecular basis for formation of gene mutations are cluster single-strand DNA breaks, and that for structural mutations, double-strand DNA breaks. It was found out that the LET dependence of the relative biological efficiency of accelerated ions is described by curves with a local maximum. It was demonstrated that the biological efficiency of ionizing radiations with different physical characteristics on cells with different genotype, estimated by the lethal action, induction of gene and deletion mutations, precision excision of transposons, is determined by the specific

  12. Electromagnetic dissociation of {sup 238}U in heavy-ion collisions at 120 MeV/A

    SciTech Connect

    Justice, M.L.

    1991-04-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the heavy-ion induced electromagnetic dissociation of a 120 MeV/A {sup 238}U beam incident on five targets: {sup 9}Be, {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Cu, {sup nat}Ag, and {sup nat}U. Electromagnetic dissociation at this beam energy is essentially a two step process involving the excitation of a giant resonance followed by particle decay. At 120 MeV/A there is predicted to be a significant contribution of the giant quadrupole resonance to the EMD cross sections. The specific exit channel which was looked at was projectile fission. The two fission fragments were detected in coincidence by an array of solid-state {Delta}E-E detectors, allowing the changes of the fragments to be determined to within {plus_minus} .5 units. The events were sorted on the basis of the sums of the fragments` charges, acceptance corrections were applied, and total cross sections for the most peripheral events were determined. Electromagnetic fission at the beam energy of this experiment always leads to a true charge sum of 92. Due to the imperfect resolution of the detectors, charge sums of 91 and 93 were included in order to account for all of the electromagnetic fission events. The experimentally observed cross sections are due to nuclear interaction processes as well as electromagnetic processes. Under the conditions of this experiment, the cross sections for the beryllium target are almost entirely due to nuclear processes. The nuclear cross sections for the other four targets were determined by extrapolation from the beryllium data using a geometrical scaling model. After subtraction of the nuclear cross sections, the resulting electromagnetic cross sections are compared to theoretical calculations based on the equivalent photon approximation. Systematic uncertainties are discussed and suggestions for improving the experiment are given.

  13. Electromagnetic dissociation of sup 238 U in heavy-ion collisions at 120 MeV/A

    SciTech Connect

    Justice, M.L.

    1991-04-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the heavy-ion induced electromagnetic dissociation of a 120 MeV/A {sup 238}U beam incident on five targets: {sup 9}Be, {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Cu, {sup nat}Ag, and {sup nat}U. Electromagnetic dissociation at this beam energy is essentially a two step process involving the excitation of a giant resonance followed by particle decay. At 120 MeV/A there is predicted to be a significant contribution of the giant quadrupole resonance to the EMD cross sections. The specific exit channel which was looked at was projectile fission. The two fission fragments were detected in coincidence by an array of solid-state {Delta}E-E detectors, allowing the changes of the fragments to be determined to within {plus minus} .5 units. The events were sorted on the basis of the sums of the fragments' charges, acceptance corrections were applied, and total cross sections for the most peripheral events were determined. Electromagnetic fission at the beam energy of this experiment always leads to a true charge sum of 92. Due to the imperfect resolution of the detectors, charge sums of 91 and 93 were included in order to account for all of the electromagnetic fission events. The experimentally observed cross sections are due to nuclear interaction processes as well as electromagnetic processes. Under the conditions of this experiment, the cross sections for the beryllium target are almost entirely due to nuclear processes. The nuclear cross sections for the other four targets were determined by extrapolation from the beryllium data using a geometrical scaling model. After subtraction of the nuclear cross sections, the resulting electromagnetic cross sections are compared to theoretical calculations based on the equivalent photon approximation. Systematic uncertainties are discussed and suggestions for improving the experiment are given.

  14. Analysis of prompt fission neutrons in 235U(nth,f) and fission fragment distributions for the thermal neutron induced fission of 234U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Adili, A.; Tarrío, D.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Göök, A.; Jansson, K.; Solders, A.; Rakopoulos, V.; Gustafsson, C.; Lantz, M.; Mattera, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Vidali, M.; Österlund, M.; Pomp, S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the ongoing analysis of two fission experiments. Both projects are part of the collaboration between the nuclear reactions group at Uppsala and the JRC-IRMM. The first experiment deals with the prompt fission neutron multiplicity in the thermal neutron induced fission of 235U(n,f). The second, on the fission fragment properties in the thermal fission of 234U(n,f). The prompt fission neutron multiplicity has been measured at the JRC-IRMM using two liquid scintillators in coincidence with an ionization chamber. The first experimental campaign focused on 235U(nth,f) whereas a second experimental campaign is foreseen later for the same reaction at 5.5 MeV. The goal is to investigate how the so-called sawtooth shape changes as a function of fragment mass and excitation energy. Some harsh experimental conditions were experienced due to the large radiation background. The solution to this will be discussed along with preliminary results. In addition, the analysis of thermal neutron induced fission of 234U(n,f) will be discussed. Currently analysis of data is ongoing, originally taken at the ILL reactor. The experiment is of particular interest since no measurement exist of the mass and energy distributions for this system at thermal energies. One main problem encountered during analysis was the huge background of 235U(nth,f). Despite the negligible isotopic traces in the sample, the cross section difference is enormous. Solution to this parasitic background will be highlighted.

  15. Basic Physics Data: Measurement of Neutron Multiplicity from Induced Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, Sara; Haight, Robert

    2015-05-04

    From October 1 to October 17 a team of researchers from UM visited the LANSCE facility for an experiment during beam-time allotted from October 4 to October 17. A total of 24 detectors were used at LANSCE including liquid organic scintillation detectors (EJ-309), NaI scintillation detectors, and Li-6 enriched glass detectors. It is a double time-offlight (TOF) measurement using spallation neutrons generated by a target bombarded with pulsed high-energy protons. The neutrons travel to an LLNL-manufactured parallel plate avalanche chamber (PPAC) loaded with thin U-235 foils in which fission events are induced. The generated fission neutrons and photons are then detected in a detector array designed and built at UM and shipped to LANSCE. Preparations were made at UM, where setup and proposed detectors were tested. The UM equipment was then shipped to LANSCE for use at the 15L beam of the weapons neutron research (WNR) facility.

  16. Effect of entrance channel on dynamics of heavy ions collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, D.

    2016-01-01

    A combined dynamical model using concept of dinuclear systems (DNS) and one-dimensional (1D) Langevin equations was applied to investigate the effect of entrance channel on dynamics of heavy ions collision. The 30Si+170Er, 16O+184W and 19F+181Ta reactions which formed the compound nucleus 200Pb have been considered to study this effect. We studied these reactions dynamically and calculated the ratio of evaporation residue cross-section to fusion cross-section (σER/σFus) as a tool for investigation of entrance channel effect. Results of combined model are compared with available experimental data and results of 1D Langevin equations. Obtained results based on combined model are in better agreement with experimental data in comparison with results of Langevin equations. We concluded for 30Si+170Er and 19F+181Ta reactions the results of combined model that support the quasi-fission process are different relative to Langevin dynamical approach, whereas for 16O+184W system the two models give similar results.

  17. Ion sources for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.S.; Eylon, S.; Chupp, W.

    1995-09-01

    The development of ion sources for heavy ion fusion will be reported with particular emphasis on a recently built 2 MV injector. The new injector is based on an electrostatic quadrupole configuration, and has produced pulsed K{sup +} ions of 950 mA peak from a 6.7 inch curved alumino silicate source. The ion beam has reached 2.3 MV with an energy flatness of {+-}0.2% over 1 {micro}s. The measured normalized edge emittance of less than 1 {pi} mm-mr is close to the source temperature limit. The design, construction, performance, and comparisons with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations will be described.

  18. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.

    1989-01-01

    The conceptual design of a collider capable of accelerating and colliding heavy ions and to be constructed in the existing 3.8 km tunnel at Brookhaven has been developed. The collider has been designed to provide collisions of gold ions at six intersection points with a luminosity of about 2 /times/ 10/sup 26/ cm/sup /minus/2/sec/sup /minus/1/ at an energy per nucleon of 100 GeV in each beam. Collisions with different ion species, including protons, will be possible. The salient design features and the reasons for major design choices of the proposed machine are discussed in this paper. 28 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Heavy ion physics at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R.

    2004-08-15

    The ion-ion center of mass energies at the LHC will exceed that at RHIC by nearly a factor of 30, providing exciting opportunities for addressing unique physics issues in a completely new energy domain. Some highlights of this new physics domain are presented here. We briefly describe how these collisions will provide new insights into the high density, low momentum gluon content of the nucleus expected to dominate the dynamics of the early state of the system. We then discuss how the dense initial state of the nucleus affects the lifetime and temperature of the produced system. Finally, we explain how the high energy domain of the LHC allows abundant production of ''rare'' processes, hard probes calculable in perturbative quantum chromodynamics, QCD. At the LHC, high momentum jets and b{bar b} bound states, the {Upsilon} family, will be produced with high statistics for the first time in heavy ion collisions.

  20. Focal-surface detector for heavy ions

    DOEpatents

    Erskine, John R.; Braid, Thomas H.; Stoltzfus, Joseph C.

    1979-01-01

    A detector of the properties of individual charged particles in a beam includes a gridded ionization chamber, a cathode, a plurality of resistive-wire proportional counters, a plurality of anode sections, and means for controlling the composition and pressure of gas in the chamber. Signals generated in response to the passage of charged particles can be processed to identify the energy of the particles, their loss of energy per unit distance in an absorber, and their angle of incidence. In conjunction with a magnetic spectrograph, the signals can be used to identify particles and their state of charge. The detector is especially useful for analyzing beams of heavy ions, defined as ions of atomic mass greater than 10 atomic mass units.

  1. Production of charge in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Scott; McCormack, William Patrick; Ratti, Claudia

    2015-12-01

    By analyzing preliminary experimental measurements of charge-balance functions from the STAR Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), it is found that scenarios in which balancing charges are produced in a single surge, and therefore separated by a single length scale, are inconsistent with data. In contrast, a model that assumes two surges, one associated with the formation of a thermalized quark-gluon plasma and a second associated with hadronization, provides a far superior reproduction of the data. A statistical analysis of the model comparison finds that the two-surge model best reproduces the data if the charge production from the first surge is similar to expectations for equilibrated matter taken from lattice gauge theory. The charges created in the first surge appear to separate by approximately one unit of spatial rapidity before emission, while charges from the second wave appear to have separated by approximately a half unit or less.

  2. Identifying Multiquark Hadrons from Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Sungtae; Furumoto, Takenori; Yazaki, Koichi; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Jido, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Akira; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Nielsen, Marina; Sekihara, Takayasu; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2011-05-27

    Identifying hadronic molecular states and/or hadrons with multiquark components either with or without exotic quantum numbers is a long-standing challenge in hadronic physics. We suggest that studying the production of these hadrons in relativistic heavy ion collisions offers a promising resolution to this problem as yields of exotic hadrons are expected to be strongly affected by their structures. Using the coalescence model for hadron production, we find that, compared to the case of a nonexotic hadron with normal quark numbers, the yield of an exotic hadron is typically an order of magnitude smaller when it is a compact multiquark state and a factor of 2 or more larger when it is a loosely bound hadronic molecule. We further find that some of the newly proposed heavy exotic states could be produced and realistically measured in these experiments.

  3. Rapidity dependence in holographic heavy ion collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wilke van der Schee; Schenke, Bjorn

    2015-12-11

    We present an attempt to closely mimic the initial stage of heavy ion collisions within holography, assuming a decoupling of longitudinal and transverse dynamics in the very early stage. We subsequently evolve the obtained initial state using state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations and compare results with experimental data. We present results for charged hadron pseudorapidity spectra and directed and elliptic flow as functions of pseudorapidity for √sNN = 200GeV Au-Au and 2.76TeV Pb-Pb collisions. As a result, the directed flow interestingly turns out to be quite sensitive to the viscosity. The results can explain qualitative features of the collisions, but the rapiditymore » spectra in our current model is narrower than the experimental data.« less

  4. Rapidity dependence in holographic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke van der Schee; Schenke, Bjorn

    2015-12-11

    We present an attempt to closely mimic the initial stage of heavy ion collisions within holography, assuming a decoupling of longitudinal and transverse dynamics in the very early stage. We subsequently evolve the obtained initial state using state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations and compare results with experimental data. We present results for charged hadron pseudorapidity spectra and directed and elliptic flow as functions of pseudorapidity for √sNN = 200GeV Au-Au and 2.76TeV Pb-Pb collisions. As a result, the directed flow interestingly turns out to be quite sensitive to the viscosity. The results can explain qualitative features of the collisions, but the rapidity spectra in our current model is narrower than the experimental data.

  5. Heavy Ion Reaction Modeling for Hadrontherapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Enghardt, W.; Gadioli, E.; Mairani, A.; Parodi, K.; Sommerer, F.

    2007-10-26

    A comprehensive and reliable description of nucleus-nucleus interactions represents a crucial need in different interdisciplinary fields. In particular, hadrontherapy monitoring by means of in-beam positron emission tomography (PET) requires, in addition to measuring, the capability of calculating the activity of {beta}{sup +}-decaying nuclei produced in the irradiated tissue. For this purpose, in view of treatment monitoring at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy (HIT) facility, the transport and interaction Monte Carlo code FLUKA is a promising candidate. It is provided with the description of heavy ion reactions at intermediate and low energies by two specific event generators. In-beam PET experiments performed at GSI for a few beam-target combinations have been simulated and first comparisons between the measured and calculated {beta}{sup +}-activity are available.

  6. Nuclei at HERA and heavy ion physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S.; Strikman, M.

    1995-12-31

    Copies of 16 viewgraph sets from a workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, 17-18 November, 1995. Titles of talks: HERA: The Present; HERA: Potential with Nuclei; Review of Hadron-Lepton Nucleus Data; Fermilab E665: results in muon scattering; Interactions of Quarks and Gluons with Nuclear Matter; Rescattering in Nuclear Targets for Photoproduction and DIS; Structure Functions and Nuclear Effect at PHENIX; Probing Spin-Averaged and Spin-Dependent Parton Distributions Using the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR); Jet Quenching in eA, pA, AA; Nuclear Gluon Shadowing via Continuum Lepton Pairs; What can we learn from HERA with a colliding heavy ion beam? The limiting curve of leading particles at infinite A; Coherent Production of Vector Mesons off Light Nuclei in DIS; A Model of High Parton Densities in PQCD; Gluon Production for Weizaecker-Williams Field in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions; Summary Talk.

  7. Latchup in CMOS devices from heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soliman, K.; Nichols, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    It is noted that complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) microcircuits are inherently latchup prone. The four-layer n-p-n-p structures formed from the parasitic pnp and npn transistors make up a silicon controlled rectifier. If properly biased, this rectifier may be triggered 'ON' by electrical transients, ionizing radiation, or a single heavy ion. This latchup phenomenon might lead to a loss of functionality or device burnout. Results are presented from tests on 19 different device types from six manufacturers which investigate their latchup sensitivity with argon and krypton beams. The parasitic npnp paths are identified in general, and a qualitative rationale is given for latchup susceptibility, along with a latchup cross section for each type of device. Also presented is the correlation between bit-flip sensitivity and latchup susceptibility.

  8. Beam dynamics in heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P.

    1995-04-01

    A standard design for heavy ion fusion drivers under study in the US is an induction linac with electrostatic focusing at low energy and magnetic focusing at higher energy. The need to focus the intense beam to a few-millimeter size spot at the deuterium-tritium target establishes the emittance budget for the accelerator. Economic and technological considerations favor a larger number of beams in the low-energy, electrostatic-focusing section than in the high-energy, magnetic-focusing section. Combining four beams into a single focusing channel is a viable option, depending on the growth in emittance due to the combining process. Several significant beam dynamics issues that are, or have been, under active study are discussed: large space charge and image forces, beam wall clearances, halos, alignment, longitudinal instability, and bunch length control.

  9. Bremsstrahlung from relativistic heavy ions in matter

    SciTech Connect

    Soerensen, Allan H.

    2010-02-15

    The emission of electromagnetic radiation by relativistic bare heavy ions penetrating ordinary matter is investigated. Our main aim is to determine the bremsstrahlung which we define as the radiation emitted when the projectile does not break up. It pertains to collisions without nuclear contact ('ultraperipheral collisions'). Requirement of coherent action of the nucleons in order to keep the penetrating projectile intact limits bremsstrahlung to relatively soft photons. The spectrum shows a resonance structure with peak position near 2{gamma} times the position of the giant dipole resonance, that is, near 25{gamma} MeV for a lead ion ({gamma}{identical_to}E/Mc{sup 2} is the Lorentz factor of the projectile of energy E and mass M). The maximum exceeds the bremsstrahlung from a hypothetical structureless, pointlike particle of the same charge and mass as the incoming nucleus, but rapid depletion follows on the high-energy side of the peak. As a result of its relative softness, bremsstrahlung never dominates the energy-loss process for heavy ions. As to the emission of electromagnetic radiation in collisions with nuclear break-up, it appears modest when pertaining to incoherent action of the projectile nucleons in noncontact collisions. In collisions with nuclear contact, though, substantial radiation is emitted. It overshoots the bremsstrahlung. However, despite the violence of contact events, the associated photon emission only exceeds the radiation from a hypothetical structureless pointlike nucleus [emitted energy per unit photon-energy interval essentially constant up to ({gamma}-1)Mc{sup 2}] at relatively low photon energies (for lead roughly below 0.2{gamma} GeV, a limit which is about an order of magnitude above the position of the bremsstrahlung peak). Results are presented for bare lead ions penetrating a solid lead target at energies of 158 GeV/n ({gamma}=170) and beyond.

  10. Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The National Energy Strategy calls for a demonstration IFE power plant by the year 2025. The cornerstone of the plan to meet this ambitious goal is research and development for heavy-ion driver technology. A series of successes indicates that the technology being studied by the HIFAR Group -- the induction accelerator -- is a prime candidate for further technology development toward this long-range goal. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high-power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions; the understanding of the scaling laws that apply in this hitherto little-explored physics regime; and the validation of new, potentially more economical accelerator strategies. Key specific elements to be addressed include: fundamental physical limits of transverse and longitudinal beam quality; development of induction modules for accelerators, along with multiple-beam hardware, at reasonable cost; acceleration of multiple beams, merging of the beams, and amplification of current without significant dilution of beam quality; final bunching, transport, and focusing onto a small target. In 1992, the HIFAR Program was concerned principally with the next step toward a driver: the design of ILSE, the Induction Linac Systems Experiments. ILSE will address most of the remaining beam-control and beam-manipulation issues at partial driver scale. A few parameters -- most importantly, the line charge density and consequently the size of the ILSE beams -- will be at full driver scale. A theory group closely integrated with the experimental groups continues supporting present-day work and looking ahead toward larger experiments and the eventual driver. Highlights of this long-range, driver-oriented research included continued investigations of longitudinal instability and some new insights into scaled experiments with which the authors might examine hard-to-calculate beam-dynamics phenomena.

  11. Bose condensation of nuclei in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, Ram K.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1994-01-01

    Using a fully self-consistent quantum statistical model, we demonstrate the possibility of Bose condensation of nuclei in heavy ion collisions. The most favorable conditions of high densities and low temperatures are usually associated with astrophysical processes and may be difficult to achieve in heavy ion collisions. Nonetheless, some suggestions for the possible experimental verification of the existence of this phenomenon are made.

  12. Theoretical Concepts for Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran,L.

    2009-07-27

    Various forms of matter may be produced in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. These are the Quark GluonPlasma, the Color Glass Condensate , the Glasma and Quarkyoninc Matter. A novel effect that may beassociated with topological charge fluctuations is the Chiral Magnetic Effect. I explain these concepts andexplain how they may be seen in ultra-relatvistic heavy ion collisions

  13. Laser ion source for low charge heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura,M.; Pikin, A.; Zajic, V.; Kanesue, T.; Tamura, J.

    2008-08-03

    For heavy ion inertial fusion application, a combination of a laser ion source and direct plasma injection scheme into an RFQ is proposed. The combination might provide more than 100 mA of singly charged heavy ion beam from a single laser shot. A planned feasibility test with moderate current is also discussed.

  14. Mutation induction in bacteria after heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horneck, G.; Kozubek, S.

    1994-01-01

    From a compilation of experimental data on the mutagenic effects of heavy ions in bacteria, main conclusions have been drawn as follows: (1) The mutagenic efficacy of heavy ions in bacteria depends on physical and biological variables. Physical variables are the radiation dose, energy and charge of the ion; the biological variables are the bacterial strain, the repair genotype of bacteria, and the endpoint investigated (type of mutation, induction of enzymes related to mutagenesis); (2) The responses on dose or fluence are mainly linear or linear quadratic. The quadratic component, if found for low LET radiation, is gradually reduced with increasing LET; (3) At low values of Z and LET the cross section of mutation induction sigma m (as well as SOS response, sigma sos. and lambda phage induction, sigma lambda versus LET curves can be quite consistently described by a common function which increases up to approximately 100 keV/mu m. For higher LET values, the sigma(m) versus LET curves show the so-called 'hooks' observed also for other endpoints; (4) For light ions (Z is less than or equal to 4), the cross sections mostly decrease with increasing ion energy, which is probably related to the decrease of the specific energy departed by the ion inside the sensitive volume (cell). For ions in the range of Z = 10, sigma(m) is nearly independent on the ion energy. For heavier ions (Z is greater than or equal to 16), sigma(m) increases with the energy up to a maximum or saturation around 10 MeV/u. The increment becomes steeper with increasing atomic number of the ion. It correlates with the increasing track radius of the heavy ion; (5) The mutagenic efficiency per lethal event changes slightly with ion energy, if Z is small indicating a rough correlation between cellular lethality and mutation induction, only. For ions of higher Z this relation increases with energy, indicating a change in the 'mode' of radiation action from 'killing-prone' to 'mutation-prone'; and (6

  15. Dynamical simulation of neutron-induced fission of uranium isotopes using four-dimensional Langevin equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlavani, M. R.; Mirfathi, S. M.

    2016-04-01

    Four-dimensional Langevin equations have been suggested for the dynamical simulation of neutron-induced fission at low and medium excitation energies. The mass distribution of the fission fragments, the neutron multiplicity, and the fission cross section for the thermal and fast neutron-induced fission of 233U, 235U, and 238U is studied by considering energy dissipation of the compound nucleus through the fission using four-dimensional Langevin equations combined with a Monte Carlo simulation approach. The calculated results using this approach indicate reasonable agreement with available experimental data.

  16. Fission dynamics within time-dependent Hartree-Fock: Deformation-induced fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Philip; Stevenson, Paul; Rios, Arnau

    2015-11-01

    Background: Nuclear fission is a complex large-amplitude collective decay mode in heavy nuclei. Microscopic density functional studies of fission have previously concentrated on adiabatic approaches based on constrained static calculations ignoring dynamical excitations of the fissioning nucleus and the daughter products. Purpose: We explore the ability of dynamic mean-field methods to describe fast fission processes beyond the fission barrier, using the nuclide Pu240 as an example. Methods: Time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations based on the Skyrme interaction are used to calculate nonadiabatic fission paths, beginning from static constrained Hartree-Fock calculations. The properties of the dynamic states are interpreted in terms of the nature of their collective motion. Fission product properties are compared to data. Results: Parent nuclei constrained to begin dynamic evolution with a deformation less than the fission barrier exhibit giant-resonance-type behavior. Those beginning just beyond the barrier explore large-amplitude motion but do not fission, whereas those beginning beyond the two-fragment pathway crossing fission to final states which differ according to the exact initial deformation. Conclusions: Time-dependent Hartree-Fock is able to give a good qualitative and quantitative description of fast fission, provided one begins from a sufficiently deformed state.

  17. Calculated half-lives and kinetic energies for spontaneous emission of heavy ions from nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Poenaru, D.N.; Greiner, W.; Depta, K.; Ivascu, M.; Mazilu, D.; Sandulescu, A.

    1986-05-01

    The most probable decays by spontaneous emission of heavy ions are listed for nuclides with Z = 47--106 and total half-lives>1 ..mu..sec. Partial half-lives, branching ratios relative to ..cap alpha.. decay, kinetic energies, and Q values are estimated by using the analytical superasymmetric fission model, a semiempirical formula for those ..cap alpha..-decay lifetimes which have not been measured, and the new Wapstra--Audi mass tables. Numerous ''stable'' nuclides with Z>40 are found to be metastable with respect to the new decay modes. The current experimental status is briefly reviewed.

  18. Combined High Pressure and Heavy-Ion Irradiation: a Novel Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, M.; Zhang, F; Lian, J; Trautmann, C; Neumann, R; Ewing, R

    2009-01-01

    Swift heavy-ion irradiations of a wide variety of materials have been used to modify and manipulate the properties of solids at the nanoscale. Recently, these high-energy irradiations have been successfully combined with high-pressure experiments. Based on results obtained for zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}), this paper introduces this new experimental approach involving diamond anvil cells and large ion-accelerator facilities. This technique provides a wide spectrum of geoscience applications from nanoscale simulations of fission-track formation under crustal conditions to phase transitions of radiation-damaged minerals resulting from meteorite impact.

  19. Studies of complex fragment emission in heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Charity, R.J.; Sobotka, L.G.

    1991-09-04

    This report discusses the following topics: High energy photon production in a HI collision; the mechanism for the disassembly of excited {sup 16}O projectiles into four alpha particles; the disassembly of excited {sup 28}Si projectiles; large pre-fission multiplicities from temperature; dependent friction and fission barriers; multiplicity correlations; molecular beam induced fusion; dwarf ball and wall; mini wall; and computer and local data acquisition systems.

  20. The absence of an early calcium response to heavy-ion radiation in Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Guanghua; Fischer, Bernd E; Voss, Kay-O; Becker, Gudrun; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Kraft, Gerhard; Thiel, Gerhard

    2008-09-01

    Intracellular calcium is an important second messenger that regulates many cell functions. Recent studies have shown that calcium ions can also regulate the cellular responses to ionizing radiation. However, previous data are restricted to cells treated with low-LET radiations (X rays, gamma rays and beta particles). In this work, we investigated the calcium levels in cells exposed to heavy-ion radiation of high LET. The experiments were performed at the single ion hit facility of the GSI heavy-ion microprobe. Using a built-in online calcium imaging system, the intracellular calcium concentrations were examined in HeLa cells and human foreskin fibroblast AG1522-D cells before and after irradiation with 4.8 MeV/nucleon carbon or argon ions. Although the experiment was sensitive enough to detect the calcium response to other known stimuli, no response to heavy-ion radiation was found in these two cell types. We also found that heavy-ion radiation has no impact on calcium oscillation induced by hypoxia stress in fibroblast cells. PMID:18763861

  1. Thermalization of Heavy Ions in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, Patrick J.; Kasper, Justin C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Raines, Jim M.; Shearer, Paul; Gilbert, Jason

    2015-10-01

    Observations of velocity distribution functions from the Advanced Composition Explorer/Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer heavy ion composition instrument are used to calculate ratios of kinetic temperature and Coulomb collisional interactions of an unprecedented 50 ion species in the solar wind. These ions cover a mass per charge range of 1-5.5 amu/e and were collected in the time range of 1998-2011. We report the first calculation of the Coulomb thermalization rate between each of the heavy ion (A > 4 amu) species present in the solar wind along with protons (H+) and alpha particles (He2+). From these rates, we find that protons are the dominant source of Coulomb collisional thermalization for heavy ions in the solar wind and use this fact to calculate a collisional age for those heavy ion populations. The heavy ion thermal properties are well organized by this collisional age, but we find that the temperature of all heavy ions does not simply approach that of protons as Coulomb collisions become more important. We show that He2+ and C6+ follow a monotonic decay toward equal temperatures with protons with increasing collisional age, but O6+ shows a noted deviation from this monotonic decay. Furthermore, we show that the deviation from monotonic decay for O6+ occurs in solar wind of all origins, as determined by its Fe/O ratio. The observed differences in heavy ion temperature behavior point toward a local heating mechanism that favors ions depending on their charge and mass.

  2. Heavy Ion Temperatures As Observed By ACE/Swics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, P.; Zurbuchen, T.; Raines, J. M.; Shearer, P.; Kasper, J. C.; Gilbert, J. A.; Alterman, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    Heavy ions observed near 1 AU, especially in fast solar wind, tend to have thermal speeds that are approximately equal, indicative of a mass proportional temperature. Additionally, observations near 1 AU have shown a streaming of heavy ions (Z>4) along the magnetic field direction at speeds faster than protons. The differential velocities observed are of the same order but typically less than the Alfven speed. Previous analysis of the behavior of ion thermal velocities with Ulysses-SWICS, focusing on daily average properties of 35 ion species at 5 AU, found only a small systematic trend with respect to q2/m. Utilizing improved data processing techniques, results from the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) shed new light on the thermal properties of the heavy ion population at 1 AU. A clear dependence of heavy ion thermal behavior on q2/m has now been found in the recent ACE-SWICS two hour cadence data set at 1 AU. Examining the thermal velocities of about 70 heavy ion species relative to alpha particles (He2+) shows a distinct trend from equal thermal speed toward equal temperature with increasing q2/m. When examined for solar winds of different collisional ages, the observations indicate the extent of thermal relaxation present in different solar wind types. We explore this collisional dependence with a model for the collisional thermal relaxation of the heavy ions as the solar wind propagates out to 1 AU. This model is used to subtract out the collisional effects seen in the ACE-SWICS data, providing an estimate for the temperature distribution among heavy ions at the corona to be compared to remote sensing observations that have shown that heavy ions are preferentially heated at the corona. We will discuss how this new analysis elucidates the thermal behavior and evolution of heavy ions in the solar wind, along with implications for the upcoming Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter missions.

  3. Complete and Incomplete Fusion Competition in 11B-INDUCED Fission Reactions on 197Au at the Intermediate Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demekhina, N. A.; Karapetyan, G. S.; Balabekyan, A. R.

    2015-06-01

    Above Coulomb barrier cross sections of fission fragment production were measured in reactions of 11B with 197Au target. Induced-activity method was used for measurement the fission decay channel of the composite nuclei. Systematic of the fission fragment charge and mass distributions was used for fission cross section calculation. Fission fraction of the composite nuclei decay was compared with PACE-4 mode calculations. Estimated suppression for fission fraction followed the complete fusion have been obtained 35%.

  4. Fission probabilities of 242Am,243Cm , and 244Cm induced by transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessedjian, G.; Jurado, B.; Barreau, G.; Marini, P.; Mathieu, L.; Tsekhanovich, I.; Aiche, M.; Boutoux, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Ducasse, Q.

    2015-04-01

    We have measured the fission probabilities of 242Am,243Cm , and 244Cm induced by the transfer reactions 243Am(3He,4He) ,243Am(3He,t ) , and 243Am(3He,d ) , respectively. The details of the experimental procedure and a rigorous uncertainty analysis, including a correlation matrix, are presented. For 243Cm our data show clear structures well below the fission threshold. To our knowledge, it is the first time that these structures have been observed for this nucleus. We have compared the measured fission probabilities to calculations based on the statistical model to obtain information on the fission barriers of the produced fissioning nuclei.

  5. Trap-induced photoconductivity in singlet fission pentacene diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Xianfeng; Zhao, Chen; Chen, Bingbing; Luan, Lin

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports a trap-induced photoconductivity in ITO/pentacene/Al diodes by using current-voltage and magneto-conductance measurements. The comparison of photoconductivity between pentacene diodes with and without trap clearly shows that the traps play a critical role in generating photoconductivity. It shows that no observable photoconductivity is detected for trap-free pentacene diodes, while significant photoconductivity is observed in diodes with trap. This is because the initial photogenerated singlet excitons in pentacene can rapidly split into triplet excitons with higher binding energy prior to dissociating into free charge carriers. The generated triplet excitons react with trapped charges to release charge-carriers from traps, leading to a trap-induced photoconductivity in the single-layer pentacene diodes. Our studies elucidated the formation mechanisms of photoconductivity in pentacene diodes with extremely fast singlet fission rate.

  6. Trap-induced photoconductivity in singlet fission pentacene diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Xianfeng Zhao, Chen; Chen, Bingbing; Luan, Lin

    2014-07-21

    This paper reports a trap-induced photoconductivity in ITO/pentacene/Al diodes by using current-voltage and magneto-conductance measurements. The comparison of photoconductivity between pentacene diodes with and without trap clearly shows that the traps play a critical role in generating photoconductivity. It shows that no observable photoconductivity is detected for trap-free pentacene diodes, while significant photoconductivity is observed in diodes with trap. This is because the initial photogenerated singlet excitons in pentacene can rapidly split into triplet excitons with higher binding energy prior to dissociating into free charge carriers. The generated triplet excitons react with trapped charges to release charge-carriers from traps, leading to a trap-induced photoconductivity in the single-layer pentacene diodes. Our studies elucidated the formation mechanisms of photoconductivity in pentacene diodes with extremely fast singlet fission rate.

  7. Benchmarking of Neutron Production of Heavy-Ion Transport Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Remec, Igor; Ronningen, Reginald M.; Heilbronn, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Accurate prediction of radiation fields generated by heavy ion interactions is important in medical applications, space missions, and in design and operation of rare isotope research facilities. In recent years, several well-established computer codes in widespread use for particle and radiation transport calculations have been equipped with the capability to simulate heavy ion transport and interactions. To assess and validate these capabilities, we performed simulations of a series of benchmark-quality heavy ion experiments with the computer codes FLUKA, MARS15, MCNPX, and PHITS. We focus on the comparisons of secondary neutron production. Results are encouraging; however, further improvements in models and codes and additional benchmarking are required.

  8. Model for Cumulative Solar Heavy Ion Energy and LET Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, Mike; Barth, Janet; Stauffer, Craig; Jordan, Tom; Mewaldt, Richard

    2007-01-01

    A probabilistic model of cumulative solar heavy ion energy and lineary energy transfer (LET) spectra is developed for spacecraft design applications. Spectra are given as a function of confidence level, mission time period during solar maximum and shielding thickness. It is shown that long-term solar heavy ion fluxes exceed galactic cosmic ray fluxes during solar maximum for shielding levels of interest. Cumulative solar heavy ion fluences should therefore be accounted for in single event effects rate calculations and in the planning of space missions.

  9. Heavy ion fusion experiments at LBNL and LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, L

    1998-08-19

    The long-range goal of the US Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program is to develop heavy ion accelerators capable of igniting inertial fusion targets to generate fusion energy for electrical power production. Accelerators for heavy ion fusion consist of several subsystems: ion sources, injectors, matching sections, combiners, induction acceleration sections with electric and magnetic focusing, beam compression and bending sections, and a final-focus system to focus the beams onto the target. We are currently assembling or performing experiments to address the physics of all these subsystems. This paper will discuss some of these experiments.

  10. Pre-equilibrium decay processes in energetic heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.

    1986-04-15

    The Boltzmann master equation (BME) is defined for application to precompound decay in heavy ion reactions in the 10 100 MeV/nucleon regime. Predicted neutron spectra are compared with measured results for central collisions of /sup 20/Ne and /sup 12/C with /sup 165/Ho target nuclei. Comparisons are made with subthreshold ..pi../sup 0/ yields in heavy ion reactions between 35 and 84 MeV/nucleon, and with the ..pi../sup 0/ spectra. The BME is found to be an excellent tool for investigating these experimentally observed aspects of non-equilibrium heavy ion reactions. 18 refs., 8 figs.

  11. High Intensity heavy ion Accelerator Facility (HIAF) in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. C.; Xia, J. W.; Xiao, G. Q.; Xu, H. S.; Zhao, H. W.; Zhou, X. H.; Ma, X. W.; He, Y.; Ma, L. Z.; Gao, D. Q.; Meng, J.; Xu, Z.; Mao, R. S.; Zhang, W.; Wang, Y. Y.; Sun, L. T.; Yuan, Y. J.; Yuan, P.; Zhan, W. L.; Shi, J.; Chai, W. P.; Yin, D. Y.; Li, P.; Li, J.; Mao, L. J.; Zhang, J. Q.; Sheng, L. N.

    2013-12-01

    HIAF (High Intensity heavy ion Accelerator Facility), a new facility planned in China for heavy ion related researches, consists of two ion sources, a high intensity Heavy Ion Superconducting Linac (HISCL), a 45 Tm Accumulation and Booster Ring (ABR-45) and a multifunction storage ring system. The key features of HIAF are unprecedented high pulse beam intensity and versatile operation mode. The HIAF project aims to expand nuclear and related researches into presently unreachable region and give scientists possibilities to conduct cutting-edge researches in these fields. The general description of the facility is given in this article with a focus on the accelerator design.

  12. Heavy ion event generator HYDJET++ (HYDrodynamics plus JETs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokhtin, I. P.; Malinina, L. V.; Petrushanko, S. V.; Snigirev, A. M.; Arsene, I.; Tywoniuk, K.

    2009-05-01

    ) Operating system: Linux (Scientific Linux, Red Hat Enterprise, FEDORA, etc.) RAM: 50 MBytes (determined by ROOT requirements) Classification: 11.2 External routines: ROOT [1] ( http://root.cern.ch/) Nature of problem: The experimental and phenomenological study of multi-particle production in relativistic heavy ion collisions is expected to provide valuable information on the dynamical behavior of strongly-interacting matter in the form of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) [2-4], as predicted by lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) calculations. Ongoing and future experimental studies in a wide range of heavy ion beam energies require the development of new Monte Carlo (MC) event generators and improvement of existing ones. Especially for experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), implying very high parton and hadron multiplicities, one needs fast (but realistic) MC tools for heavy ion event simulations [5-7]. The main advantage of MC technique for the simulation of high-multiplicity hadroproduction is that it allows a visual comparison of theory and data, including if necessary the detailed detector acceptances, responses and resolutions. The realistic MC event generator has to include maximum possible number of observable physical effects, which are important to determine the event topology: from the bulk properties of soft hadroproduction (domain of low transverse momenta p≲1 GeV/c) such as collective flows, to hard multi-parton production in hot and dense QCD-matter, which reveals itself in the spectra of high- p particles and hadronic jets. Moreover, the role of hard and semi-hard particle production at LHC can be significant even for the bulk properties of created matter, and hard probes of QGP became clearly observable in various new channels [8-11]. In the majority of the available MC heavy ion event generators, the simultaneous treatment of collective flow effects for soft hadroproduction and hard multi-parton in-medium production (medium-induced partonic

  13. Observables in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, J.R.; Schlei, B.R.; Strottman, D.D.; Sullivan, J.P.; Hecke, H.W. van

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors used several complimentary models of high-energy nuclear collisions to systematically study the large body of available data from high energy (p{sub beam}/A > 10 GeV/c) heavy ion experiments at BNL and CERN and to prepare for the data that will come from RHIC. One major goal of this project was to better understand the space-time history of the excited hadronic matter formed in these collisions and to use this understanding to improve models of this process. The space-time structure of the system can be extracted from measurements of single-particle p{sub T} distributions and multiparticle correlations. They looked for experimental effects of the formation of the quark-gluon plasma. Understanding the hadronic phase of the interaction determines the sensitivity of experimental measurements to the presence of this exotic state of matter.

  14. A synchronous beam sweeper for heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaty, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) facility at Argonne National Laboratory provides a wide range of accelerated heavy ions from the periodic table. Frequently, the beam delivery rate of 12 MHz is too fast for the type of experiment on line. Reaction by-products from a target bombardment may have a decay interval much longer than the dead time between beam bunches. To prevent data from being corrupted by incoming ions a beam sweeper was developed which synchronously eliminates selected beam bunches to suit experimental needs. As the SWEEPER is broad band (DC to 6 MHz) beam delivery rates can be instantaneously changed. Ion beam bunches are selectively kicked out by an electrostatic dipole electrode pulsed to 2 kVDC. The system has been used for almost three years with several hundred hours of operating time logged to date. Beam bunch delivery rates of 6 MHz down to 25 kHz have been provided. Since this is a non-resonant system any beam delivery rate from 6 MHz down to zero can be set. In addition, burst modes have been used where beam is supplied in 12 MHz bursts and then shut down for a period of time set by the user. 3 figs.

  15. Modeling the heavy ion upset cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, L. W.; McDaniel, P. J.; Prinja, A. K.; Sexton, F. W.

    1995-04-01

    The standard Rectangular Parallelepiped (RPP) construct is used to derive a closed form expression for, sigma-bar (theta, phi, L) the directional-spectral heavy ion upset cross section. This is an expected value model obtained by integrating the point-value cross section model, sigma (theta, phi, L, E), also developed here, with the Weibull density function, f(E), assumed to govern the stochastic behavior of the upset threshold energy, E. A comparison of sigma-bar (theta, phi, L) with experimental data show good agreement, lending strong credibility to the hypothesis that E-randomness is responsible for the shape of the upset cross section curve. The expected value model is used as the basis for a new, rigorous mathematical formulation of the effective cross section concept. The generalized formulation unifies previous corrections to the inverse cosine scaling, collapsing to Petersen's correction, (cos theta - (h/l) sin theta)(sup -1), near threshold and Sexton's, (cos theta + (h/l) sin theta)(sup -1), near saturation. The expected value cross section model therefore has useful applications in both upset rate prediction and test data analysis.

  16. Inertially confined fusion using heavy ion drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Bangerter, R.O.; Bock, R.; Hogan, W.J.; Lindl, J.D.

    1991-10-01

    The various technical issues of HIF will be briefly reviewed in this paper. It will be seen that there are numerous areas in common in all the approaches to HIF. In the recent International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, the attendees met in specialized workshop sessions to consider the needs for research in each area. Each of the workshop groups considered the key questions of this report: (1) Is this an appropriate time for international collaboration in HIF? (2) Which problems are most appropriate for such collaboration? (3) Can the sharing of target design information be set aside until other driver and systems issues are better resolved, by which time it might be supposed that there could be a relaxation of classification of target issues? (4) What form(s) of collaboration are most appropriate, e.g., bilateral or multilateral? (5) Can international collaboration be sensibly attempted without significant increases in funding for HIF? The authors of this report share the conviction that collaboration on a broad scale is mandatory for HIF to have the resources, both financial and personnel, to progress to a demonstration experiment. Ultimately it may be possible for a single driver with the energy, power, focusibility, and pulse shape to satisfy the needs of the international community for target physics research. Such a facility could service multiple experimental chambers with a variety of beam geometries and target concepts.

  17. Inertially confined fusion using heavy ion drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B. ); Bangerter, R.O. ); Bock, R. ); Hogan, W.J.; Lindl, J.D. )

    1991-10-01

    The various technical issues of HIF will be briefly reviewed in this paper. It will be seen that there are numerous areas in common in all the approaches to HIF. In the recent International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, the attendees met in specialized workshop sessions to consider the needs for research in each area. Each of the workshop groups considered the key questions of this report: (1) Is this an appropriate time for international collaboration in HIF (2) Which problems are most appropriate for such collaboration (3) Can the sharing of target design information be set aside until other driver and systems issues are better resolved, by which time it might be supposed that there could be a relaxation of classification of target issues (4) What form(s) of collaboration are most appropriate, e.g., bilateral or multilateral (5) Can international collaboration be sensibly attempted without significant increases in funding for HIF The authors of this report share the conviction that collaboration on a broad scale is mandatory for HIF to have the resources, both financial and personnel, to progress to a demonstration experiment. Ultimately it may be possible for a single driver with the energy, power, focusibility, and pulse shape to satisfy the needs of the international community for target physics research. Such a facility could service multiple experimental chambers with a variety of beam geometries and target concepts.

  18. Heavy ion acceleration at parallel shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinsky, V. L.; Shevchenko, V. I.

    2010-11-01

    A study of alpha particle acceleration at parallel shock due to an interaction with Alfvén waves self-consistently excited in both upstream and downstream regions was conducted using a scale-separation model (Galinsky and Shevchenko, 2000, 2007). The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or damped and hence where particles will be pitch-angle scattered. It considers the total distribution function (for the bulk plasma and high energy tail), so no standard assumptions (e.g. seed populations, or some ad-hoc escape rate of accelerated particles) are required. The heavy ion scattering on hydromagnetic turbulence generated by both protons and ions themselves is considered. The contribution of alpha particles to turbulence generation is important because of their relatively large mass-loading parameter Pα=nαmα/npmp (mp, np and mα, nα are proton and alpha particle mass and density) that defines efficiency of wave excitation. The energy spectra of alpha particles are found and compared with those obtained in test particle approximation.

  19. Heavy ions in space (M0001)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Slberberg, R.; Tsao, C. H.

    1984-01-01

    The ojectives are to investigate three components of heavy nuclei in space: (1) a recently observed anomalous component of low-energy nuclei of N, O, and Ne; (2) the heavy nuclei in the Van Allen radiation belts; and (3) the UH nuclei (Z 30) of the galactic radiation. The study of the anomalous flux of N, O, and Ne nuclei in the unexplored energy region above 100 MeV/u is expected to provide new insights into the source of this component. Its observation in this experiment will confirm that these ions are singly charged. Knowledge of the energy spectra of the heavy nuclei observed in the Van Allen belts is expected to enhance the understanding of the origin of the belts (e.g., injection and local acceleration pocesses). The observation of these heavy ions could show, for the first time, that low-energy particles of extraterrestrial origin can diffuse to the innermost parts of the magnetosphere. Measurements of the UH component are expected to contribute information concerning its source, interstellar propagation, and the galactic storage time.

  20. Heavy ion fusion systems assessment study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudziak, Donald J.; Herrmannsfeldt, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Systems Assessment (HIFSA) study was conducted with the specific objective of evaluating the prospects of using induction linac drivers to generate economical electrical power from inertial confinement fusion. The study used algorithmic models of representative components of fusion system to identify favored areas in the multidimensional parameter space. The results show that cost-of-electricity (COE) projections are comparable to those from other (magnetic) fusion scenarios, at a plant size of 1000 MWe. These results hold over a large area of parameter space, but depend especially on effecting savings in the cost of the accelerator by using ions with a charge-to-mass ratio about three times higher than has been usually assumed. The feasibility of actually realizing such savings has been shown: (1) by experiments showing better-than-previously-assumed transport stability for space charge dominated beams, and (2) by theoretical predictions that the final transport and compression of the pulse to the target pellet, in the expected environment of a reactor chamber, may be sufficiently resistant to instabilities, in particular to streaming instabilities, to enable neutralized beams to successfully propagate to the target. Neutralization is assumed to be required for the higher current pulses that result from the use of the higher charge-to-mass ratio beams jointly by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and also by the McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company with funding from the Electric Power Research Institute.

  1. Neoplastic cell transformation by heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M; Watanabe, M; Suzuki, K; Nakano, K; Kaneko, I

    1989-12-01

    We have studied the induction of morphological transformation by heavy ions. Golden hamster embryo cells were irradiated with 95 MeV 14N ions (530 keV/microns), 22 MeV 4He ions (36 keV/microns), and 22 MeV 4He ions with a 100-microns Al absorber (77 keV/microns) which were generated by a cyclotron at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research in Japan. Colonies were considered to contain neoplastically transformed cells when the cells were densely stacked and made a crisscross pattern. It was shown that the induction of transformation was much more effective with 14N and 4He ions than with gamma or X rays. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) relative to 60Co gamma rays was 3.3 for 14N ions, 2.4 for 4He ions, and 3.3 for 4He ions with a 100-microns Al absorber. The relationship between RBE and linear energy transfer was qualitatively similar for both cell death and transformation. PMID:2594968

  2. Progress in heavy ion fusion research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celata, C. M.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Logan, G.; Prost, L.; Seidl, P. A.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Yu, S. S.; Barnard, J. J.; Callahan, D. A.; Cohen, R. H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Lund, S. M.; Molvik, A.; Sharp, W. M.; Westenskow, G.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Efthimion, Philip; Gilson, Erik; Grisham, L. R.; Kaganovich, Igor; Qin, Hong; Startsev, Edward A.; Bernal, S.; Cui, Y.; Feldman, D.; Godlove, T. F.; Haber, I.; Harris, J.; Kishek, R. A.; Li, H.; O'Shea, P. G.; Quinn, B.; Reiser, M.; Valfells, A.; Walter, M.; Zou, Y.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.

    2003-05-01

    The U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion program has recently commissioned several new experiments. In the High Current Experiment [P. A. Seidl et al., Laser Part. Beams 20, 435 (2003)], a single low-energy beam with driver-scale charge-per-unit-length and space-charge potential is being used to study the limits to transportable current posed by nonlinear fields and secondary atoms, ions, and electrons. The Neutralized Transport Experiment similarly employs a low-energy beam with driver-scale perveance to study final focus of high perveance beams and neutralization for transport in the target chamber. Other scaled experiments—the University of Maryland Electron Ring [P. G. O'Shea et al., accepted for publication in Laser Part. Beams] and the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment [R. C. Davidson, H. Qin, and G. Shvets, Phys. Plasmas 7, 1020 (2000)]—will provide fundamental physics results on processes with longer scale lengths. An experiment to test a new injector concept is also in the design stage. This paper will describe the goals and status of these experiments, as well as progress in theory and simulation. A proposed future proof-of-principle experiment, the Integrated Beam Experiment, will also be described.

  3. Report of the heavy-ion fusion task group

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, G.A.; Booth, L.A.; Henderson, D.B.; Jameson, R.A.; Kindel, J.M.; Knapp, E.A.; Pollock, R.; Talbert, W.L.; Thode, L.E.; Williams, J.M.

    1980-02-01

    An assessment of heavy-ion fusion has been completed. Energetic heavy ions, for example 10-GeV uranium, provided by an rf linac or an induction linac, are used as alternatives to laser light to drive inertial confinement fusion pellets. The assessment has covered accelerator technology, transport of heavy-ion beams, target interaction physics, civilian power issues, and military applications. It is concluded that particle accelerators promise to be efficient pellet drivers, but that there are formidable technical problems to be solved. It is recommended that a moderate level research program on heavy-ion fusion be pursued and that LASL should continue to work on critical issues in accelerator development, beam transport, reactor systems studies, and target physics over the next few years.

  4. Recent trends in parts SEU susceptibility from heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, D.K.; Smith, L.S.; Price, W.E.; Koga, R.; Kolasinski, W.A.

    1987-12-01

    JPL and Aerospace have collected an extensive set of heavy ion single event upset (SEU) test data since their last joint publication in December, 1985. Trends in SEU susceptibility for state-of-the-art parts are presented.

  5. HISTRAP proposal: heavy ion storage ring for atomic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.K.; Alton, G.D.; Datz, S.; Dittner, P.F.; Dowling, D.T.; Haynes, D.L.; Hudson, E.D.; Johnson, J.W.; Lee, I.Y.; Lord, R.S.

    1986-11-01

    HISTRAP, Heavy Ion Storage Ring for Atomic Physics, is a proposed 46.8-m-circumference synchrotron-cooling-storage ring optimized to accelerate, decelerate, and store beams of highly charged very-heavy ions at energies appropriate for advanced atomic physics research. The ring is designed to allow studies of electron-ion, photon-ion, ion-atom, and ion-ion interactions. An electron cooling system will provide ion beams with small angular divergence and energy spread for precision spectroscopic studies and also is necessary to allow the deceleration of heavy ions to low energies. HISTRAP will have a maximum bending power of 2.0 Tm and will be injected with ions from either the existing Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility 25-MV tandem accelerator or from a dedicated ECR source and 250 keV/nucleon RFQ linac.

  6. Heavy ion physics at CERN: present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Alessandro, Bruno; Chiesa, Alberta Marzari

    1998-10-05

    After a general introduction on the very high energy heavy ion interactions, the CERN heavy ion program is presented. Three CERN experiments are described in details: NA38/50 (J/{psi} suppression), NA45/CERES (e{sup +}e{sup -} production) and WA85/97 (multi-strange particle production). The ALICE experiment, to be built in the next years and foreseen at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is also extensively described.

  7. HIGH-INTENSITY, HIGH CHARGE-STATE HEAVY ION SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    ALESSI,J.G.

    2004-08-16

    There are many accelerator applications for high intensity heavy ion sources, with recent needs including dc beams for RIA, and pulsed beams for injection into synchrotrons such as RHIC and LHC. The present status of sources producing high currents of high charge state heavy ions is reviewed. These sources include ECR, EBIS, and Laser ion sources. Benefits and limitations for these type sources are described. Possible future improvements in these sources are also mentioned.

  8. Bose condensation of nuclei in heavy ion collisions.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, R K; Townsend, L W

    1994-07-01

    Using a fully self-consistent quantum statistical model, we demonstrate the possibility of Bose condensation of nuclei in heavy ion collisions. The most favorable conditions of high densities and low temperatures are usually associated with astrophysical processes and may be difficult to achieve in heavy ion collisions. Nonetheless, some suggestions for the possible experimental verification of the existence of this phenomenon are made. PMID:9969695

  9. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider control system

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, T.S.; Barton, D.S.; Oerter, B.R.

    1997-12-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider control system has been used in the commissioning of the AGS to RHIC transfer line and in the first RHIC sextant test. Much of the controls infrastructure for networks and links has been installed throughout the collider. All of the controls hardware modules needed to be built for early RHIC operations have been designed and tested. Many of these VME modules are already being used in normal AGS operations. Over 150 VME based front end computers and device controllers will be installed by the Summer of 1998 in order to be ready for Fall of 1998. A few features are being added to the front end computer core software. The bulk of the Accelerator Device Objects (ADOs) which are instantiated in the FECs, have been written and tested in the early commissioning. A configuration database has been designed. Generic control and display of ADO parameters via a spreadsheet like program on the console level computers was provided early on in the control system development. User interface tools that were developed for the AGS control system have been used in RHIC applications. Some of the basic operations programs, like alarm display and save/restore, that are used in the AGS operations have been or will be expanded to support RHIC operations. A model for application programs which involves a console level manager servicing ADOs have been verified with a few RHIC applications. More applications need to be written for the Fall of 1998 commissioning effort. A sequencer for automatic control of the fill is being written with the expectation that it will be useful in early commissioning.

  10. Thermoacoustic imaging using heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Claytor, T.N.; Tesmer, J.R.; Deemer, B.C.; Murphy, J.C.

    1995-10-01

    Ion beams have been used for surface modification, semiconductor device fabrication and for material analysis, which makes ion-material interactions of significant importance. Ion implantation will produce new compositions near the surface by ion mixing or directly by implanting desired ions. Ions exchange their energy to the host material as they travel into the material by several different processes. High energy ions ionize the host atoms before atomic collisions transfer the remaining momentum and stop the incident ion. As they penetrate the surface, the low energy ions ionize the host atoms, but also have a significantly large momentum transfer mechanism near the surface of the material. This leads to atoms, groups of atoms and electrons being ejected from the surface, which is the momentum transfer process of sputtering. This talk addresses the acoustic waves generated during ion implantation using modulated heavy ion beams. The mechanisms for elastic wave generation during ion implantation, in the regimes where sputtering is significant and where implantation is dominant and sputtering is negligible, has been studied. The role of momentum transfer and thermal energy production during ion implantation was compared to laser generated elastic waves in an opaque solid as a reference, since laser generated ultrasound has been extensively studied and is fairly well understood. The thermoelastic response dominated in both high and low ion energy regimes since, apparently, more energy is lost to thermal heat producing mechanisms than momentum transfer processes. The signal magnitude was found to vary almost linearly with incident energy as in the laser thermoelastic regime. The time delays for longitudinal and shear waves-were characteristic of those expected for a purely thermal heating source. The ion beams are intrinsically less sensitive to the albedo of the surface.

  11. Intense Pulsed Heavy Ion Beam Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masugata, Katsumi; Ito, Hiroaki

    Development of intense pulsed heavy ion beam accelerator technology is described for the application of materials processing. Gas puff plasma gun and vacuum arc discharge plasma gun were developed as an active ion source for magnetically insulated pulsed ion diode. Source plasma of nitrogen and aluminum were successfully produced with the gas puff plasma gun and the vacuum arc plasma gun, respectively. The ion diode was successfully operated with gas puff plasma gun at diode voltage 190 kV, diode current 2.2 kA and nitrogen ion beam of ion current density 27 A/cm2 was obtained. The ion composition was evaluated by a Thomson parabola spectrometer and the purity of the nitrogen ion beam was estimated to be 86%. The diode also operated with aluminum ion source of vacuum arc plasma gun. The ion diode was operated at 200 kV, 12 kA, and aluminum ion beam of current density 230 A/cm2 was obtained. The beam consists of aluminum ions (Al(1-3)+) of energy 60-400 keV, and protons (90-130 keV), and the purity was estimated to be 89 %. The development of the bipolar pulse accelerator (BPA) was reported. A double coaxial type bipolar pulse generator was developed as the power supply of the BPA. The generator was tested with dummy load of 7.5 ohm, bipolar pulses of -138 kV, 72 ns (1st pulse) and +130 kV, 70 ns (2nd pulse) were succesively generated. By applying the bipolar pulse to the drift tube of the BPA, nitrogen ion beam of 2 A/cm2 was observed in the cathode, which suggests the bipolar pulse acceleration.

  12. Estimates of Sputter Yields of Solar-Wind Heavy Ions of Lunar Regolith Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, Abdulmasser F.; Adams, James H., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    At energies of approximately 1 keV/amu, solar-wind protons and heavy ions interact with the lunar surface materials via a number of microscopic interactions that include sputtering. Solar-wind induced sputtering is a main mechanism by which the composition of the topmost layers of the lunar surface can change, dynamically and preferentially. This work concentrates on sputtering induced by solar-wind heavy ions. Sputtering associated with slow (speeds the electrons speed in its first Bohr orbit) and highly charged ions are known to include both kinetic and potential sputtering. Potential sputtering enjoys some unique characteristics that makes it of special interest to lunar science and exploration. Unlike the yield from kinetic sputtering where simulation and approximation schemes exist, the yield from potential sputtering is not as easy to estimate. This work will present a preliminary numerical scheme designed to estimate potential sputtering yields from reactions relevant to this aspect of solar-wind lunar-surface coupling.

  13. Pion correlations in relativistic heavy ion collisions at Heavy Ion Spectrometer Systems (HISS)

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, W.B. Jr.

    1990-05-01

    This thesis contains the setup, analysis and results of experiment E684H Multi-Pion Correlations in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions''. The goals of the original proposal were: (1) To initiate the use of the HISS facility in the study of central Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions (RHIC). (2) To perform a second generation experiment for the detailed study of the pion source in RHIC. The first generation experiments, implied by the second goal above, refer to pion correlation studies which the Riverside group had performed at the LBL streamer chamber. The major advantage offered by moving the pion correlation studies to HISS is that, being an electronic detector system, as opposed to the Streamer Chamber which is a visual detector, one can greatly increase the statistics for a study of this sort. An additional advantage is that once one has written the necessary detector and physics analysis code to do a particular type of study, the study may be extended to investigate the systematics, with much less effort and in a relatively short time. This paper discusses the Physics motivation for this experiment, the experimental setup and detectors used, the pion correlation analysis, the results, and the conclusions possible future directions for pion studies at HISS. If one is not interested in all the details of the experiment, I believe that by reading the sections on intensity interferometry, the section the fitting of the correlation function and the systematic corrections applied, and the results section, one will get a fairly complete synopsis of the experiment.

  14. Neutron Induced Capture and Fission Processes on 238U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oprea, Cristiana; Oprea, Alexandru

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear data on Uranium isotopes are of crucial interest for new generation of nuclear reactors. Processes of interest are the nuclear reactions induced by neutrons and in this work mainly the capture and the fission process on 238U will be analyzed in a wide energy interval. For slow and resonant neutrons the many levels Breit - Wigner formalism is necessary. In the case of fast and very fast neutrons up to 200 MeV the nuclear reaction mechanism implemented in Talys will be used. The present evaluations are necessary in order to obtain the field of neutrons in the design of nuclear reactors and they are compared with experimental data from literature obtained from capture and (n,xn) processes.

  15. 231Pa and 233Pa Neutron-Induced Fission Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, V.M.; Tetereva, N.A.; Baba, M.; Hasegawa, A.; Kornilov, N.V.; Kagalenko, A.B.

    2005-05-24

    The 231Pa and 233Pa neutron-induced fission cross-section database is analyzed within the Hauser-Feshbach approach. The consistency of neutron-induced fission cross-section data and data extracted from transfer reactions is investigated. The fission probabilities of Pa, fissioning in 231,233Pa(n,nf) reactions, are defined by fitting (3He,d) or (3He,t) transfer-reaction data. The present estimate of the 233Pa(n,f) fission cross section above the emissive fission threshold is supported by smooth level-density parameter systematics, validated in the case of the 231Pa(n,f) data description up to En =20 MeV.

  16. Most probable charge of fission products in 24 MeV proton induced fission of {sup 238}U

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, H.; Maruyama, M.; Tanikawa, M.; Shinozuka, T.; Fujioka, M.

    1998-01-01

    The charge distributions of fission products in 24 MeV proton-induced fission of {sup 238}U were measured by the use of an ion-guide isotope separator on line. The most probable charge (Z{sub p}) of the charge distribution was discussed in view of the charge polarization in the fission process. It was found that Z{sub p} mainly lies on the proton-rich side in the light mass region and on the proton-deficient side in the heavy mass region compared with the postulate of the unchanged charge distribution. The charge polarization was examined with respect to production Q values. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Measurement of Neutron Induced and Spontaneous Fission in Pu-242 at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyzh, Andrii; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R.; Couture, A.; Lee, H. Y.; Ullmann, J.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Jandel, M.; Haight, R. C.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Dance Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Neutron capture and fission reactions are important in nuclear engineering and physics. DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Measurement, LANL) combined with PPAC (avalanche technique based fission tagging detector, LLNL) were used to study neutron induced and spontaneous fission in 242Pu. 2 measurements were performed in 2013. The first experiment was done without the incident neutron beam with the fission tagging ability to study γ-rays emitted in the spontaneous fission of 242Pu. The second one - with the neutron beam to measure both the neutron capture and fission reactions. This is the first direct measurement of prompt fission γ-rays in 242Pu. The γ-ray multiplicity, γ-ray energy, and total energy of γ-rays per fission in 242Pu will be presented. These distributions of the 242Pu spontaneous fission will be compared to those in the 241Pu neutron induced fission. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396 and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Reducing Uncertainties in Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Sections Using a Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Brett; Niffte Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections for actinides have long been of great interest for nuclear energy and stockpile stewardship. Traditionally, measurements were performed using fission chambers which provided limited information about the detected fission events. For the case of 239Pu(n,f), sensitivity studies have shown a need for more precise measurements. Recently the Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) has developed the fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) to measure fission cross sections to better than 1% uncertainty by providing 3D tracking of fission fragments. The fissionTPC collected data to calculate the 239Pu(n,f) cross section at the Weapons Neutron Research facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center during the 2014 run cycle. Preliminary analysis has been focused on studying particle identification and target and beam non-uniformities to reduce the uncertainty on the cross section. Additionally, the collaboration is investigating other systematic errors that could not be well studied with a traditional fission chamber. LA-UR-15-24906.

  19. Neutron-induced fission measurements at the time-of-flight facility nELBE

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kögler, T.; Beyer, R.; Junghans, A. R.; Massarczyk, R.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2015-05-18

    Neutron-induced fission of ²⁴²Pu is studied at the photoneutron source nELBE. The relative fast neutron fission cross section was determined using actinide fission chambers in a time-of-flight experiment. A good agreement of present nuclear data with evalua- tions has been achieved in the range of 100 keV to 10 MeV.

  20. Cross section systematics for the lightest Bi and Po nuclei produced in complete fusion reactions with heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Andreyev, A.N.; Ackermann, D.; Muenzenberg, G.; Antalic, S.; Saro, S.; Streicher, B.; Darby, I.G.; Page, R.D.; Wiseman, D.R.; Franchoo, S.; Hessberger, F.P.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Lommel, B.; Kindler, B.; Mann, R.; Sulignano, B.; Hofmann, S.; Huyse, M.; Vel, K. van de; Duppen, P. van

    2005-07-01

    The production of the very neutron-deficient nuclides {sup 184-192}Bi and {sup 186-192}Po in the vicinity of the neutron midshell at N = 104 has been studied by using heavy-ion-induced complete fusion reactions in a series of experiments at the velocity filter SHIP. The cross sections for the xn and pxn evaporation channels of the {sup 46}Ti+{sup 144}Sm{yields}{sup 190}Po*,{sup 98}Mo+{sup 92}Mo{yields}{sup 190}Po*,{sup 50,52}Cr+{sup 142}Nd{yields}{sup 192,194}Po*, and {sup 94,95}Mo+{sup 93}Nb{yields}{sup 187,188}Bi* reactions were measured. The results obtained, together with the previously known cross section data for the heavier Bi and Po nuclides, are compared with the results of statistical model calculations carried out with the HIVAP code. It is shown that a satisfactory description of the experimental data requires a significant (up to 35%) reduction of the theoretical fission barriers. The optimal reactions for production of the lightest Bi and Po isotopes are discussed.

  1. Fission Fragment Distributions and Delayed Neutron Yields from Photon-Induced-Fission

    SciTech Connect

    David, J.-C.; Dore, D.; Giacri-Mauborgne, M.-L.; Ridikas, D.; Lauwe, A. van

    2005-05-24

    Fission fragment distributions and delayed neutron yields for 235U and 238U are provided by a complete modelization of the photofission process below 25 MeV. The absorption cross-section parameterization and the fission fragment distributions are given and compared to experimental data. The delayed neutron yields and the half-lives in terms of six groups are presented and compared to data obtained with a bremsstrahlung spectrum of 15 MeV.

  2. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Equivalent properties of single event burnout induced by different sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shi-Yu; Cao, Zhou; Da, Dao-An; Xue, Yu-Xiong

    2009-05-01

    The experimental results of single event burnout induced by heavy ions and 252Cf fission fragments in power MOSFET devices have been investigated. It is concluded that the characteristics of single event burnout induced by 252Cf fission fragments is consistent to that in heavy ions. The power MOSFET in the “turn-off" state is more susceptible to single event burnout than it is in the “turn-on" state. The thresholds of the drain-source voltage for single event burnout induced by 173 MeV bromine ions and 252Cf fission fragments are close to each other, and the burnout cross section is sensitive to variation of the drain-source voltage above the threshold of single event burnout. In addition, the current waveforms of single event burnouts induced by different sources are similar. Different power MOSFET devices may have different probabilities for the occurrence of single event burnout.

  3. Dynamical Aspects of Heavy-Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier

    1995-01-01

    Two independent studies on heavy-ion collisions are presented. In the first part, the charge and mass of the projectile-like fragments produced in the 15-MeV per nucleon ^{40}Ca+^{209 } Bi reaction were determined for products detected near the grazing angle. Neutron number-charge (N-Z) distributions were generated as a function of the total kinetic energy loss and parameterized by their centroids, variances and correlation coefficients. After the interaction, a drift of the charge and mass centroids towards asymmetry is observed. The production of projectile -like fragments is consistent with a tendency of the projectile -like fragments to retain the projectile neutron-to-proton ratio < N > / < Z > = 1. The correlation coefficient remains well below 1.0 for the entire range of total kinetic energy lost. Predictions of two nucleon exchange models, Randrup's and Tassan-Got's, are compared to the experimental results. The models are not able to reproduce the evolution of the experimental distributions, especially the fact that the variances reach a maximum and then decrease as function of the energy loss. This behavior supports the hypothesis that some form of projectile -like fragmentation or cluster emission is perturbing the product distribution from that expected from a damped mechanism. In the second part of the thesis a clustering model that allows the recognition of mass fragments from dynamical simulations has been developed. Studying the evolution of a microscopic computation based on the nuclear -Boltzman transport equation, a suitable time is chosen to identify the bound clusters. At this time the number of binding surfaces for each test nucleon is found. Based on the number of nucleon bindings the interior nucleons are identified, and the cluster kernels are formed. An iterative routine is then applied to determine the coalescence of the surrounding free nucleons. Once the fragment formation has been established, a statistical decay code is used to

  4. Comparative measurement of prompt fission γ -ray emission from fast-neutron-induced fission of 235U and 238U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebois, M.; Wilson, J. N.; Halipré, P.; Oberstedt, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Marini, P.; Schmitt, C.; Rose, S. J.; Siem, S.; Fallot, M.; Porta, A.; Zakari, A.-A.

    2015-09-01

    Prompt fission γ -ray (PFG) spectra have been measured in a recent experiment with the novel directional fast-neutron source LICORNE at the ALTO facility of the IPN Orsay. These first results from the facility involve the comparative measurement of prompt γ emission in fast-neutron-induced fission of 235U and 238U . Characteristics such as γ multiplicity and total and average radiation energy are determined in terms of ratios between the two systems. Additionally, the average photon energies were determined and compared with recent data on thermal-neutron-induced fission of 235U . PFG spectra are shown to be similar within the precision of the present measurement, suggesting that the extra incident energy does not significantly impact the energy released by prompt γ rays. The origins of some small differences, depending on either the incident energy or the target mass, are discussed. This study demonstrates the potential of the present approach, combining an innovative neutron source and new-generation detectors, for fundamental and applied research on fission in the near future.

  5. Breakdown of QED vacuum and luminosity lifetime of a heavy ion collider

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoades-Brown, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    During beam crossing at a Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider the peripheral electromagnetic field between the fully stripped ions in colliding bunches is sufficiently intense to induce copious particle production. In this manuscript the production of free pair e{sup +},e{sup {minus}} leptons and bound-electron plus free e{sup +} particles are addressed in detail. In particular, both perturbative and non-perturbative approaches to these reactions are addressed. Capturing a produced electron into a bound state of an atom is a charge changing reaction that may effect the useful machine luminosity lifetime. The analogies between strong field effects in heavy ion colliders and the next generation of linear colliders are also discussed. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Studies of heavy ion reactions and transuranic nuclei. Progress report, September 1, 1985-August 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Huizenga, J.R.; Schroeder, W.U.

    1986-08-01

    Progress is reported of research directed to explore nuclear relaxation and transport phenomena induced in heavy-ion collisions, in the range from near-barrier energies to more than 20 MeV per nucleon above the interaction barrier. Transport processes studied include the redistribution of kinetic energy of relative motion and of linear momentum as well as the gradual relaxation of various conditions of a colliding heavy-ion system, initially far from thermodynamic equilibrium, towards a uniform population of phase space. And, finally, they include the stochastic, equilibrium, and nonequilibrium patterns of nuclear disintegration. The group activities range from design of hardware to theoretical modeling. 112 refs., 56 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Spatial distributions of photons in plastic scintillator detected by multi-anode photomultiplier for heavy-ion position determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omika, S.; Yamaguchi, T.; Fukuda, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Matsunaga, S.; Nagae, D.; Nishimura, D.; Nishimura, T.; Ozawa, A.; Sato, S.; Sawahata, K.; Suzuki, T.; Takeuchi, Y.

    2015-10-01

    The spatial distributions of scintillation photons in a plastic scintillation detector were measured using a multi-anode photomultiplier H7546A coupled with 1-mm-diameter optical fibers. A row of several tens of fibers connected to the scintillator generates one-dimensional spatial distributions of photons induced by the swift passage of heavy ions. The pulse heights from each channel change depending on the beam position. This can be utilized to determine the positions of the heavy ions. To test the performance of the proposed detection method, an experiment using a 84Kr beam with intermediate energies ranging from 40 to 85 MeV/nucleon was performed at the heavy-ion medical accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). The photon spatial distributions were successfully observed. By optimizing the photomultiplier bias voltage and threshold in the pulse height analyses, a detection efficiency of 98% and a position resolution of 1.1 mm in σ were achieved simultaneously.

  8. Chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells exposed to heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, T.; Cucinotta, F.; George, K.; Wu, H.; Shigematsu, N.; Furusawa, Y.; Uno, T.; Isobe, K.; Ito, H.

    Understanding of biological effects of heavy ions is important to assess healt h risk in space. One of the most important issues may be to take into account individual susceptibility. Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) cells are known to exhibit abnormal responses to radiations but the mechanism of hyper radiosensitivity of A-T still remains unknown. We report chromosome aberrations in normal human fibroblasts and AT fibroblasts exposed to low- and high-LET radiations. A chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique combined with chromosome- painting technique was applied to score chromosome aberrations in G2/M-phase cells. Following gamma irradiation, GM02052 cells were approximately 5 times more sensitive to g-rays than AG1522 cells. GM02052 cells had a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. When the frequency of complex type aberrations was compared, GM02052 cells showed more than 10 times higher frequency than AG1522 cells. The results will be compared with those obtained from high-LET irradiations.

  9. Radiographic Technique for Densitometric Studies Using Heavy Ion Microbeams

    SciTech Connect

    Muscio, J.; Somacal, H.; Burlon, A. A.; Debray, M. E.; Valda, A. A.; Kreiner, A. J.; Kesque, J. M.; Minsky, D. M.; Davidson, M.; Davidson, J.

    2007-10-26

    Different analytical techniques are typically used to perform multi-elemental and densitometric analysis by means of particle beams with micrometric space resolution. Usually, those analyses are respectively performed by PIXE and STIM. Traditionally, to characterize the trace element concentrations in a specimen two different experiments are required with differences in setups and types of detectors employed, as well as in the necessary ion current intensities. In this work, we discuss the latest results in the development of a new technique that synthesizes both analyses in just a single one, by means of heavy ion induced x-ray emission. This technique, implemented for the first time at the Tandar Laboratory, employs a second target in addition to the sample under study. The multi-elemental information of the specimen is provided by its PIXE signal and its densitometric information is supplied by the PIXE signal of the secondary target, which is placed immediately behind the sample under analysis. These PIXE signals are produced and acquired during the same experiment, allowing the analysis of both features (composition and density) at the same time. The X-rays originated in the secondary target are attenuated when traversing the specimen in the direction of the detector and consequently a radiographic image of the specimen is obtained. In this case, the characteristic X-rays of the secondary target act like a monochromatic secondary source. In the present work, a method to estimate the thickness of specimens is introduced and compared with estimations performed by the STIM method.

  10. Heavy ion mutagenesis: linear energy transfer effects and genetic linkage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.; Gauny, S.; Criddle, K.; Vannais, D.; Ueno, A.; Kraemer, S.; Waldren, C. A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized a series of 69 independent mutants at the endogenous hprt locus of human TK6 lymphoblasts and over 200 independent S1-deficient mutants of the human x hamster hybrid cell line AL arising spontaneously or following low-fluence exposures to densely ionizing Fe ions (600 MeV/amu, linear energy transfer = 190 keV/microns). We find that large deletions are common. The entire hprt gene (> 44 kb) was missing in 19/39 Fe-induced mutants, while only 2/30 spontaneous mutants lost the entire hprt coding sequence. When the gene of interest (S1 locus = M1C1 gene) is located on a nonessential human chromosome 11, multilocus deletions of several million base pairs are observed frequently. The S1 mutation frequency is more than 50-fold greater than the frequency of hprt mutants in the same cells. Taken together, these results suggest that low-fluence exposures to Fe ions are often cytotoxic due to their ability to create multilocus deletions that may often include the loss of essential genes. In addition, the tumorigenic potential of these HZE heavy ions may be due to the high potential for loss of tumor suppressor genes. The relative insensitivity of the hprt locus to mutation is likely due to tight linkage to a gene that is required for viability.

  11. Kaon and pion production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M.; Larionov, A.B.; Mosel, U.

    2005-03-01

    The Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) transport model is applied to study strangeness and pion production in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Starting from proton induced reactions, we further investigate Si+Au, Au+Au, and Pb+Pb collisions in the energy range between 2 and 40A GeV and compare the results with data and other transport calculations. The qq-annihilation, or resonance, channel simulated by the string model in meson-nucleon collisions at {radical}(s)>2 GeV is introduced. The importance of this channel for a good description of the proton-nucleus data on K{sup +} production is demonstrated. We further show that meson-meson collisions contribute significantly to the KK{sup lowbar} production in heavy-ion collisions above 5A GeV and improve the agreement with data on the K{sup +}/{pi}{sup +} ratio. Finally, we study the influence of in-medium modifications of the FRITIOF model on pion and kaon production.

  12. Pion-Induced Fission of 209Bi and 119Sn:. Measurements, Calculations, Analyses and Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Mukhtar Ahmed; Sher, Gul; Manzoor, Shahid; Shehzad, M. I.

    Cross-sections for the π--induced fission of 209Bi and 119Sn have been measured using the most sensitive CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detector. In experiments, target-detector stacks were exposed to negative pions of energy 500, 672, 1068, and 1665 MeV at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA. An important aspect of the present paper is the comparison of pion-induced fission fragment spectra of above mentioned nuclei with the spontaneous fission fragment spectra of 252Cf. This comparison is made in terms of fission fragment track lengths in the CR-39 detectors. Measurement results are compared with calculations of Monte Carlo and statistical weight functions methods using the computer code CEM95. Agreement between measurements and calculations is fairly good for 209Bi target nuclei whereas it is indigent for the case of 119Sn. The possibilities of the trustworthy calculations, using the computer code CEM95, comparable with measurements of pion-induced fission in intermediate and heavy nuclei are explored by employing various systematics available in the code. Energy dependence of pion-induced fission in 119Sn and 209Bi is analyzed employing a newly defined parameter geometric-size-normalized fission cross-section (χfg). It is found that the collective nuclear excitations, which may lead to fission, become more probable for both 209Bi and 119Sn nuclei with increasing energy of negative pions from 500 to 1665 MeV.

  13. Pairing-induced speedup of nuclear spontaneous fission

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Baran, A.

    2014-12-22

    Collective inertia is strongly influenced at the level crossing at which the quantum system changes its microscopic configuration diabatically. Pairing correlations tend to make the large-amplitude nuclear collective motion more adiabatic by reducing the effect of these configuration changes. Competition between pairing and level crossing is thus expected to have a profound impact on spontaneous fission lifetimes. To elucidate the role of nucleonic pairing on spontaneous fission, we study the dynamic fission trajectories of 264Fm and 240Pu using the state-of-the-art self-consistent framework. We employ the superfluid nuclear density functional theory with the Skyrme energy density functional SkM* and a density-dependentmore » pairing interaction. Along with shape variables, proton and neutron pairing correlations are taken as collective coordinates. The collective inertia tensor is calculated within the nonperturbative cranking approximation. The fission paths are obtained by using the least action principle in a four-dimensional collective space of shape and pairing coordinates. Pairing correlations are enhanced along the minimum-action fission path. For the symmetric fission of 264Fm, where the effect of triaxiality on the fission barrier is large, the geometry of the fission pathway in the space of the shape degrees of freedom is weakly impacted by pairing. This is not the case for 240Pu, where pairing fluctuations restore the axial symmetry of the dynamic fission trajectory. The minimum-action fission path is strongly impacted by nucleonic pairing. In some cases, the dynamical coupling between shape and pairing degrees of freedom can lead to a dramatic departure from the static picture. As a result, in the dynamical description of nuclear fission, particle-particle correlations should be considered on the same footing as those associated with shape degrees of freedom.« less

  14. Pairing-induced speedup of nuclear spontaneous fission

    SciTech Connect

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Baran, A.

    2014-12-22

    Collective inertia is strongly influenced at the level crossing at which the quantum system changes its microscopic configuration diabatically. Pairing correlations tend to make the large-amplitude nuclear collective motion more adiabatic by reducing the effect of these configuration changes. Competition between pairing and level crossing is thus expected to have a profound impact on spontaneous fission lifetimes. To elucidate the role of nucleonic pairing on spontaneous fission, we study the dynamic fission trajectories of 264Fm and 240Pu using the state-of-the-art self-consistent framework. We employ the superfluid nuclear density functional theory with the Skyrme energy density functional SkM* and a density-dependent pairing interaction. Along with shape variables, proton and neutron pairing correlations are taken as collective coordinates. The collective inertia tensor is calculated within the nonperturbative cranking approximation. The fission paths are obtained by using the least action principle in a four-dimensional collective space of shape and pairing coordinates. Pairing correlations are enhanced along the minimum-action fission path. For the symmetric fission of 264Fm, where the effect of triaxiality on the fission barrier is large, the geometry of the fission pathway in the space of the shape degrees of freedom is weakly impacted by pairing. This is not the case for 240Pu, where pairing fluctuations restore the axial symmetry of the dynamic fission trajectory. The minimum-action fission path is strongly impacted by nucleonic pairing. In some cases, the dynamical coupling between shape and pairing degrees of freedom can lead to a dramatic departure from the static picture. As a result, in the dynamical description of nuclear fission, particle-particle correlations should be considered on the same footing as those associated with shape degrees of freedom.

  15. Pairing-induced speedup of nuclear spontaneous fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Baran, A.

    2014-12-01

    Background: Collective inertia is strongly influenced at the level crossing at which the quantum system changes its microscopic configuration diabatically. Pairing correlations tend to make the large-amplitude nuclear collective motion more adiabatic by reducing the effect of these configuration changes. Competition between pairing and level crossing is thus expected to have a profound impact on spontaneous fission lifetimes. Purpose: To elucidate the role of nucleonic pairing on spontaneous fission, we study the dynamic fission trajectories of 264Fm and 240Pu using the state-of-the-art self-consistent framework. Methods: We employ the superfluid nuclear density functional theory with the Skyrme energy density functional SkM* and a density-dependent pairing interaction. Along with shape variables, proton and neutron pairing correlations are taken as collective coordinates. The collective inertia tensor is calculated within the nonperturbative cranking approximation. The fission paths are obtained by using the least action principle in a four-dimensional collective space of shape and pairing coordinates. Results: Pairing correlations are enhanced along the minimum-action fission path. For the symmetric fission of 264Fm, where the effect of triaxiality on the fission barrier is large, the geometry of the fission pathway in the space of the shape degrees of freedom is weakly impacted by pairing. This is not the case for 240Pu, where pairing fluctuations restore the axial symmetry of the dynamic fission trajectory. Conclusions: The minimum-action fission path is strongly impacted by nucleonic pairing. In some cases, the dynamical coupling between shape and pairing degrees of freedom can lead to a dramatic departure from the static picture. Consequently, in the dynamical description of nuclear fission, particle-particle correlations should be considered on the same footing as those associated with shape degrees of freedom.

  16. Microscopic dynamical description of proton-induced fission with the constrained molecular dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonta, N.; Souliotis, G. A.; Veselsky, M.; Bonasera, A.

    2015-08-01

    The microscopic description of nuclear fission still remains a topic of intense basic research. Understanding nuclear fission, apart from a theoretical point of view, is of practical importance for energy production and the transmutation of nuclear waste. In nuclear astrophysics, fission sets the upper limit to the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements via the r process. In this work we initiated a systematic study of intermediate-energy proton-induced fission using the constrained molecular dynamics (CoMD) code. The CoMD code implements an effective interaction with a nuclear matter compressibility of K =200 (soft equation of state) with several forms of the density dependence of the nucleon-nucleon symmetry potential. Moreover, a constraint is imposed in the phase-space occupation for each nucleon restoring the Pauli principle at each time step of the collision. A proper choice of the surface parameter of the effective interaction has been made to describe fission. In this work, we present results of fission calculations for proton-induced reactions on: (a) 232Th at 27 and 63 MeV; (b) 235U at 10, 30, 60, and 100 MeV; and (c) 238U at 100 and 660 MeV. The calculated observables include fission-fragment mass distributions, total fission energies, neutron multiplicities, and fission times. These observables are compared to available experimental data. We show that the microscopic CoMD code is able to describe the complicated many-body dynamics of the fission process at intermediate and high energy and give a reasonable estimate of the fission time scale. Sensitivity of the results to the density dependence of the nucleon symmetry potential (and, thus, the nuclear symmetry energy) is found. Further improvements of the code are necessary to achieve a satisfactory description of low-energy fission in which shell effects play a dominant role.

  17. Possibilities for relativistic heavy ion collisions at Brookhaven

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M.O.; Hahn, H.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1980 there has been considerable interest at Brookhaven in exploiting the existence of the Colliding Beam Accelerator, CBA, earlier referred to as Isabelle, for the generation of heavy ion collisions at very high energies. The only requirement for a heavy ion collider would have been for an energy booster for the Tandem accelerator and a tunnel and magnet transport system to the AGS. For a few million dollars heavy ions up to nearly 200 GeV/amu could be collided with luminosities of 10/sup 27/ to 10/sup 28//cm/sup 2/ sec in experimental halls with ideal facilities for heavy ion physics studies. Although the CBA project has been stopped, it is still true that Brookhaven has in place enormous advantages for constructing a heavy ion collider. This paper describes a design that exploits those advantages. It uses the tunnel and other civil construction, the refrigerator, vacuum equipment, injection line components, and the magnet design for which there is expertise and a production facility in place. The result is a machine that appears quite different than would a machine designed from first principles without access to these resources but one which is of high performance and of very attractive cost.

  18. Depth-dose relations for heavy ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation transport of heavy ions in matter is of interest to radiological protection in space and high-altitude aircraft. In addition, heavy ion beams are expected to be of advantage in radiotherapy since their characteristic Bragg curve allows a relative reduction of the dose in reaching a tumor site and the near elimination of exposure beyond the tumor region as the beam exits the body. Furthermore, the radioresistance of tumorous cells due to their hypoxic state may be reduced or eliminated by the high specific ionization of heavy ion beams. The depth-dose distribution of heavy ion beams consists of energy deposited by the attenuated primary beam with its characteristic Bragg curve and a relatively unstructured background due to secondary radiations produced in nuclear reactions. As the ion mass increases, the secondary contribution becomes more structured and may add significantly to the Bragg peak of the primary ions. The result for heavy ions (z greater than 20) is a greatly broadened Bragg peak region, especially in comparison to straggling effects, which may prove to be of importance in radiotherapy and biomedical research.

  19. Heavy Ion Effects on Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability: Hybrid Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, D.; Lin, D.

    2015-12-01

    Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) is a candidate mechanism for solar wind tansportation into the magnetosphere. The statistical study of Bouhram et al. 2005 has shown that heavy ions could dominate the magnetopause for as much as 30% of the time on the dusk side. Thus the influence of heavy ions in solar wind-magnetosphere coupling should not be neglected. However, the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) linear theory for KHI does not include any ion effects, and people working on the heavy ion effects have not come to an agreement either. Whether the heavy ions promote or inhibit the KHI still remains not well addressed. With a two-dimensional hybrid model, we investigated the effects of ion mass number on the KHI growth rate, starting from the simplest case of uniform density and uniform magnetic field perpendicular to the shear flow. It is shown that the growth rate of the KHI is lower with a heavier mass number. We try to to derive the linear theory for the kinetic KHI and compare it with the hybrid simulation results. The linear theory with ion effects considered is going to be further verified with varying heavy ion fractions and finite magnetic shear. More implications for the dawn-dusk asymmetry of KHI on planetary magnetopause are desirable when comparing the results of opposite magnetic field directions relative to the flow vorticity.

  20. Geometrical methods in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taliotis, Anastasios

    Currently there exists no known way to construct the Stress-Energy tensor (Tmunu) of the medium produced in heavy ion collisions at strong coupling from purely theoretical grounds. In this work, some steps are taken in that direction. In particular, the evolution of Tmunu at strong coupling and at high energies is being studied for early proper times (tau). This is achieved in the context of the AdS/CFT duality by constructing the evolution of the dual geometry in an AdS5 background. We consider high energy collisions of two shock waves in AdS5 as a model of ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in the boundary theory. We first calculate the graviton field produced in the collisions in the LO, NLO and NNLO approximations, corresponding to two, three and four-graviton exchanges with the shock waves. We use this model to study Tmunu and in particular the energy density of the strongly-coupled matter created immediately after the collision because as we argue, the expansion of the energy density (epsilon) in the powers of proper time tau squared corresponds on the gravity side to a perturbative expansion of the metric in graviton exchanges. We point out that shock waves corresponding to physical energy-momentum tensors of the nuclei is likely to completely stop after the collision; on the field theory side, this corresponds to complete nuclear stopping due to strong coupling effects, likely leading to Landau hydrodynamics. This motivates a more detailed investigation. For this reason we consider the asymmetric limit where the energy density in one shock wave is much higher than in the other one. In the boundary theory this setup corresponds to proton-nucleus collisions. Employing the eikonal approximation we find the exact high energy analytic solution for the metric in AdS5 for the asymmetric collision of two delta-function shock waves. The solution resums all-order graviton exchanges with the nucleus-shock wave and a single-graviton exchange with the proton

  1. Fission fragment angular distributions for 11B and 19F+238U systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnik, A.; Kailas, S.; Chatterjee, A.; Navin, A.; Shrivastava, A.; Singh, P.; Samant, M. S.

    1995-12-01

    The fission fragment angular distributions were measured at energies above the fusion barrier, for the systems 11B and 19F + 238U. An analysis of the present data along with those already available for the systems 6,7Li, 12C, and 16O + 238U was made in terms of the saddle-point statistical model. While the anisotropies were ``normal'' for 6,7Li, 11B, 12C+238U systems, the ones for 16O and 19F+238U systems were found to be ``anomalous.'' The entrance channel mass asymmetry dependence of the anisotropies as observed here is consistent with the expectations of preequilibrium fission dynamics. This result emphasizes the importance of preequilibrium fission in heavy-ion induced fusion-fission reactions.

  2. Cross sections and barriers for nuclear fission induced by high-energy nucleons

    SciTech Connect

    Grudzevich, O. T.; Yavshits, S. G.

    2013-03-15

    The cross sections for the fission of {sup 232}Th, {sup 235,238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu target nuclei that was induced by 20- to 1000-MeV neutrons and protons were calculated. The respective calculations were based on the multiconfiguration-fission (MCFx) model, which was used to describe three basic stages of the interaction of high-energy nucleons with nuclei: direct processes (intranuclear cascade), equilibration of the emerging compound system, and the decay of the compound nucleus (statistical model). Fission barriers were calculated within the microscopic approach for isotopic chains formed by 15 to 20 nuclei of the required elements. The calculated fission cross sections were compared with available experimental data. It was shown that the input data set and the theoretical model used made it possible to predict satisfactorily cross section for nuclear fission induced by 20- to 1000-MeV nucleons.

  3. Development of Gas Proportional Scintillation Counter for Light Heavy-Ion Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hohara, Sin-ya; Imamura, Minoru; Kin, Tadahiro; Yamashita, Yusuke; Maki, Daiske; Saiho, Fuminobu; Ikeda, Katsuhiko; Uozumi, Yusuke; Matoba, Masaru

    2005-05-24

    In recent years, nuclear data have been needed in the medical field. Nuclear data induced by light heavy ions are especially needed at high precision for cancer treatment, although there are not enough usable data at present.We have a plan to measure light heavy-ion nuclear data with a dE-E detector. Low density is needed for the dE detector. We have two options for the dE detector: a semiconductor detector (SSD) and a Gas Counter. On one hand, SSD has good energy resolution, but on the other hand, it is expensive and its decay time is on the 100-microsecond order. A Gas Counter is inexpensive, and a Gas Proportional Scintillation Counter (GPSC) has fast decay time. Then, we developed a GPSC for the dE detector, and its evaluation experiment was carried out at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC).We will report the results of the experiment with the performance of the GPSC.

  4. NOTE: The relevance of very low energy ions for heavy-ion therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsässer, T.; Gemmel, A.; Scholz, M.; Schardt, D.; Krämer, M.

    2009-04-01

    Heavy-ion radiotherapy exploits the high biological effectiveness of localized energy deposition delivered by so-called Bragg-peak particles. Recent publications have challenged the established procedures to calculate biological effective dose distributions in treatment planning. They emphasize the importance of very low energy (<500 keV amu-1) ions, either as primary particles or originating from molecular and nuclear fragmentations. We show, however, that slow heavy ions with energies below 500 keV amu-1 only play a negligible role in cancer treatments for several reasons. Their residual range is very small compared to the relevant length scale of treatment planning. Moreover, their relative frequency and also their relative dose distribution are insignificant, since energy loss and range straggling in ion slowing down processes as well as the necessary superposition of Bragg peaks wash out small-scale special effects. Additionally, we show that even a 1000 times larger biological damage of such slow ions would not result in a clinically relevant increase of the photon-equivalent dose. Therefore, neither a more precise physical description of ions in the very distal part of the Bragg peak nor the consideration of radiation damage induced by hyperthermal ions would result in a meaningful improvement of current models for heavy-ion treatment planning.

  5. Characterizing the Energetic Heavy Ion Environment Inside 4 Jovian Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, C. M.; Stone, E. C.

    2004-05-01

    On 21 September 2003 Galileo impacted Jupiter to end its 8-year tour of the Jovian magentosphere. During this last phase data was collected in the very inner part of the magnetosphere at distances < 4 Rj. The region from 2 to 4 Rj was previously explored by Galileo during its 34th orbit around Jupiter. We present the combined data from these two passes obtained by the Heavy Ion Counter (HIC) for heavy ions at energies above 2 MeV/nucleon. In particular we discuss the significant ion absorption near the moons Thebe and Amalthea, the anisotropic pitch angle distribution and the dramatic increase in heavy ion intensity with decreasing radius seen in this region

  6. Energy levels of a heavy ion moving in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Hongwei; Chen, Wencong; Zhao, Yongtao; Li, Fuli; Dong, Chenzhong

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, the potential of a slowly moving test particle moving in collisional dense plasmas is studied. It is composed of the Debye-shielding potential, wake potential, and collision term. The Ritz variational-perturbational method is developed for calculating relativistic binding energy levels of a heavy ion moving in dense plasmas. Binding energy levels of a heavy ion moving in plasmas are calculated. The results show that both non-relativistic energy levels and relativistic energy levels become more negative as the temperature becomes high. They also become more negative as the number density decreasing. Relativistic correction is important for calculating binding energy levels. Both relativistic energy levels and non-relativistic energy levels vary minutely as the speed of heavy ion varies.

  7. The Path to Heavy Ions at LHC and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutbrod, Hans H.

    My appreciation of Rolf Hagedorn motivates me to look back at my more than 40 years of trial and error in relativistic heavy ion physics. More than once, wise colleagues helped me move forward to new and better understandings. Rolf Hagedorn was one of these important people. At first, I met him anonymously in the mid 1970s when reading his 1971 Cargèse Lectures in Physics, and later in person for many years in and around CERN. I wonder what this modest person would say about his impact on physics in this millennium. As he is not here to answer, I and others give our answers in this book. I focus my report on the beginning of the research program with relativistic heavy ions, the move to CERN-SPS and the development of the heavy ion collaboration at the CERN-LHC.

  8. RHIC UPGRADES FOR HEAVY IONS AND POLARIZED PROTONS.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER, W.; ALESSI, J.; BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.; ROSER, T.

    2005-10-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), in operation since 2000, has exceeded its design parameters. The Enhanced Design parameters, expected to be reached in 2009, call for a 4-fold increase over the heavy ion design luminosity, and a 15-fold increase over the proton design luminosity, the latter with an average polarization of 70%. Also in 2009, it is planned to commission a new Electron Beam Ion Source, offering increased reliability and ion species that cannot be supplied currently. The upgrade to RHIC 11, based on electron cooling of the beams, aims to increase the average heavy ion luminosity by an order of magnitude, and the polarized proton luminosity by a factor 2-5. Plans for an electron-ion collider eRHIC is covered in another article in these proceedings.

  9. Heavy Ion Heating at Shocks in the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korreck, K. E.; Stevens, M. L.; Lepri, S. T.; Kasper, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Ions heavier than protons can be used as tracers for heating mechamisms in solar wind plasma. Measurments by the ACE and WIND satellites provide information on the relative heating of the heavy ions versus the protons. Greater than mass proportional heating has been seen at coronal mass ejections (CME) shock fronts. Using ACE SWICS heavy ions data from CME associated shocks, heavy ion heating and the non-thermal nature of helium and oxygen distributions at 1AU is examined. The WIND SWE data set is used to examine the helium distributions at the shock fronts observed at the spacecraft. Understanding the heating and source of energetic particles and their evolution through the heliosphere is relevant to predicting space weather events and the evolution of the solar wind.

  10. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorf, M. A.; Lund, S. M.; Perkins, L. J.; Terry, M. R.; Logan, B. G.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.; Reginato, L. L.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Koniges, A. E.

    2011-03-31

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  11. Thermal, chemical and spectral equilibration in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almási, Gábor András; Wolf, György

    2015-11-01

    We have considered the equilibration in relativistic heavy ion collisions at energies 1-7 A GeV using our transport model. We applied periodic boundary conditions to close the system in a box. We found that the thermal equilibration takes place in the first 20-40 fm/c whose time is comparable to the duration of a heavy ion collision. The chemical equilibration is a much slower process and the system does not equilibrate in a heavy ion collision. We have shown that in the testparticle simulation of the Boltzmann equation the mass spectra of broad resonances follow instantaneously their in-medium spectral functions as expected from the Markovian approximation to the Kadanoff-Baym equations employed via the (local) gradient expansion.

  12. HISTRAP proposal: heavy ion storage ring for atomic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.K.; Alton, G.D.; Datz, S.; Dittner, P.F.; Dowling, D.T.; Haynes, D.L.; Hudson, E.D.; Johnson, J.W.; Lee, I.Y.; Lord, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    HISTRAP is a proposed synchrotron-cooling-storage ring optimized to accelerate, decelerate, and store beams of highly charged very-heavy ions at energies appropriate for advanced atomic physics research. The ring is designed to allow studies of electron-ion, photon-ion, ion-atom, and ion-ion interactions. An electron cooling system will provide ion beams with small angular divergence and energy spread for precision spectroscopic studies and also is necessary to allow the deceleration of heavy ions to low energies. HISTRAP will be injected with ions from either the existing Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility 25-MV tandem accelerator or from a dedicated ECR source and 250 keV/nucleon RFQ linac. The ring will have a maximum bending power of 2.0 T.m and have a circumference of 46.8 m.

  13. Heavy ion beams in extended materials - Computational methods and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Schimmerling, W.; Wong, M.; Townsend, L. W.

    1987-01-01

    The transport of heavy ion beams in extended materials is a problem of interest in accelerator and space shielding, radiation therapy, and astrophysical and radiobiological studies. The beam particles change their energy and direction of motion through atomic/molecular collisions and undergo occasional radical transformation in nuclear collision. In health physics applications, a heavy ion beam of initially well defined radiation quality is transformed into a complex mixture of diverse quality components after passing through a modest amount of material. This transformation of radiation quality must be understood to adequately explain the biological response of tissue to heavy ion radiation. A theoretical/experimental program to define an ion beam and its products in extended matter is described.

  14. Protactinium neutron-induced fission up to 200 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, V.

    2010-03-01

    The theoretical evaluation of 230-233Pa(n,F) cross sections is based on direct data, 230-234Pa fission probabilities and ratios of fission probabilities in first-chance and emissive fission domains, surrogate for neutroninduced fission. First chance fission cross sections trends of Pa are based on consistent description of 232Th(n,F), 232Th(n,2n) and 238U(n,F), 238U(n,xn) data, supported by the ratio surrogate data by Burke et al., 2006, for the 237U(n,F) reaction. Ratio surrogate data on fission probabilities of 232Th(6 Li,4 He)234Pa and 232 Th(6 Li,d)236U by Nayak et al., 2008, support the predicted 233Pa(n, F) cross section at En=11.5-16.5 MeV. The predicted trends of 230-232Pa(n, F) cross section up to En=20 MeV, are consistent with fissilities of Pa nuclides, extracted by 232Th(p,F) (Isaev et al., 2008) and 232Th(p,3n) (Morgenstern et al., 2008) data analysis. The excitation energy and nucleon composition dependence of the transition from asymmetric to symmetric scission for fission observables of Pa nuclei is defined by analysis of p-induced fission of 232Th at Ep=1-200 MeV. Predominantly symmetric fission in 232Th(p,F) at En( p)=200 MeV as revealed by experimental branching ratios (Dujvestijn et al., 1999) is reproduced. Steep transition from asymmetric to symmetric fission with increase of nucleon incident energy is due to fission of neutron-deficient Pa (A≤229) nuclei. A structure of the potential energy surface (a drop of f f symmetric and asymmetric fission barriers difierence (EfSYM - EfASYM) from ~3.5 MeV to ~1 MeV) of N-deficient Pa nuclides (A≤226) and available phase space at outer fission saddles, are shown to be responsible for the sharp increase with En( p) of the symmetric fission component contribution for 232Th(p,F) and 230-233 Pa(n, F) reactions. That is a strong evidence of emissive fission nature of moderately excited Pa nuclides, reliably quantified only up to En( p)~20(30) MeV. Predicted fission cross section of 232Pa(n,F) coincides

  15. Clinical trial of cancer therapy with heavy ions at heavy ion research facility in lanzhou

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong

    With collaborative efforts of scientists from the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences and hospitals in Gansu, initial clinical trial on cancer therapy with heavy ions has been successfully carried out in China. From November 2006 to December 2007, 51 patients with superficially-placed tumors were treated with carbon ions at Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) within four beam time blocks of 6-11 days, collaborating with the General Hospital of Lanzhou Command and the Tumor Hospital of Gansu Province. Patients and Methods: There were 51 patients (31 males and 20 females) with superficially-placed tumors (squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, basal cell carcinoma of the skin, malignant skin melanoma, sarcoma, lymphoma, breast cancer, metastatic lymph nodes of carcinomas and other skin lesions). The tumors were less than 2.1 cm deep to the skin surface. All patients had histological confirmation of their tumors. Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) of all patients was more than 70. The majority of patients were with failures or recurrences of conventional therapies. Median age at the time of radiotherapy (RT) was 55.5 years (range 5-85 years). Patients were immobilized with a vacuum cushion or a head mask and irradiated by carbon ion beams with energy 80-100 MeV/u at spread-out Bragg peak field generated from HIRFL, with two and three-dimensional conformal irradiation methods. Target volume was defined by physical palpation [ultrasonography and Computerized tomography (CT), for some cases]. The clinical target volume (CTV) was defined as the gross total volume GTV with a 0.5-1.0cm margin axially. Field placement for radiation treatment planning was done based on the surface markings. RBE of 2.5-3 within the target volume, and 40-75 GyE with a weekly fractionation of 7 × 3-15 GyE/fraction were used in the trial. Patients had follow-up examinations performed 1 month after treatment, in 1 or 2 months for the first 6 months, and 3

  16. Antiradiation vaccine: Technology and development of prophylaxis, prevention and treatment of biological consequences from Heavy Ion irradiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Vecheslav

    . Results: Group A -100% mortality within two hours after heavy ion irradiation with clinical symptoms of the acute cerebrovascular and cardiovascular syndromes. Group B -100% mortal-ity within 15 hours following irradiation. Group C -100% mortality within 14-15 hours after irradiation. Group D -100% mortality within 15-16 hours after irradiation. In groups A-D, development of the acute radiation cerebrovascular and cardiovascular syndromes as well as ex-tensive burns of skin caused rapid death. Group E -100% mortality in 280-290 hours (12 days) following heavy ion irradiation while animals were exhibiting a combination or individual forms of the acute cerebrovascular, cardiovascular, and gastrointestinal forms and focal skin burns. Discussion: The Antiradiation Vaccine (ARV) and specific immune-prophylaxis are an effective method of neutralization of Radiation Toxins. Vaccination with the ARV significantly extended the survival time after irradiation with heavy ions from two hours up to 300 hours. Clinical signs, clinical features, symptoms were somewhat attenuated. Degree of clinical forms of the Acute Radiation Syndromes were diminished in their severity. Groups A-D demonstrated an extremely severe degree (Degree 4) of Cerebrovascular and Cardiovascular forms of the Acute Radiation Syndromes and lethality 100% was registered in a short time after irradiation. Radi-ation induced burns in this groups (with Cutaneous sub-syndrome of ARS -Degree 4) that were deep with extensive and total dysfunction and possible muscle involvement developed. Animals from group E -Radioprotectant -anti-radiation vaccine had demonstrated later development of the severe Degree 3 or even Degree 2-3 forms of Cerebrovascular and Cardiovascular forms of the ARS and a survival time of irradiated animals was significantly prolonged. Cutaneous sub-syndrome developed in Degree 3 or Degree 2-3. Our results have demonstrated the potential radioprotection efficacy of specific immune-prophylaxis with the

  17. Heavy ions at steamboat: summary of parallel sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlam, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    The interest in heavy ions at the intersection between particle and nuclear physics is motivated by the opportunity for an entirely new approach to the understanding of fundamental interactions by studying extreme states of nuclear matter. At this conference we have seen important new results on some of the central issues including: (1) how well can we predict the landscape of the extremes - that is, the phase structure of QCD and nuclear matter; (2) can we explore it with heavy ion collisions; and (3) can we recognize the appearance of new terrain. Our present understanding of the behavior of nuclear matter under extreme conditions is briefly discussed. 16 references. (WHK)

  18. Heavy ion beam transport and interaction with ICF targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, G.; Aragonés, J. M.; Gago, J. A.; Gámez, L.; González, M. C.; Honrubia, J. J.; Martínez-Val, J. M.; Mínguez, E.; Ocaña, J. L.; Otero, R.; Perlado, J. M.; Santolaya, J. M.; Serrano, J. F.; Velarde, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    Numerical simulation codes provide an essential tool for analyzing the very broad range of concepts and variables considered in ICF targets. In this paper, the relevant processes embodied in the NORCLA code, needed to simulate ICF targets driven by heavy ion beams will be presented. Atomic physic models developed at DENIM to improve the atomic data needed for ion beam plasma interaction will be explained. Concerning the stopping power, the average ionization potential following a Thomas-Fermi model has been calculated, and results are compared with full quantum calculations. Finally, a parametric study of multilayered single shell targets driven by heavy ion beams will be shown.

  19. Laser ion source for isobaric heavy ion collider experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanesue, T.; Kumaki, M.; Ikeda, S.; Okamura, M.

    2016-02-01

    Heavy-ion collider experiment in isobaric system is under investigation at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. For this experiment, ion source is required to maximize the abundance of the intended isotope. The candidate of the experiment is 96Ru + 96Zr. Since the natural abundance of particular isotope is low and composition of isotope from ion source depends on the composites of the target, an isotope enriched material may be needed as a target. We studied the performance of the laser ion source required for the experiment for Zr ions.

  20. Laser ion source for isobaric heavy ion collider experiment.

    PubMed

    Kanesue, T; Kumaki, M; Ikeda, S; Okamura, M

    2016-02-01

    Heavy-ion collider experiment in isobaric system is under investigation at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. For this experiment, ion source is required to maximize the abundance of the intended isotope. The candidate of the experiment is (96)Ru + (96)Zr. Since the natural abundance of particular isotope is low and composition of isotope from ion source depends on the composites of the target, an isotope enriched material may be needed as a target. We studied the performance of the laser ion source required for the experiment for Zr ions. PMID:26931981

  1. Charge Strippers of Heavy Ions for High Intensity Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolen, Jerry A.; Marti, Felix

    2014-02-01

    Charge strippers play a critical role in many high intensity heavy ion accelerators. Here we present some history of recent stripper technology development and indicate the capabilities and limitations of the various approaches. The properties of solid, gaseous, and liquid strippers are covered. In particular, the limitations of solid strippers for high intensity, high atomic number heavy ions and the unique features of helium gas and liquid lithium for high intensity applications are covered. The need for high quality simulation of stripper performance as important input for system optimization is explained and examples of the current simulation codes are given.

  2. Development of Superconducting Focusing Quadrupoles for Heavy Ion Drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N; Manahan, R; Lietzke, A F

    2001-09-10

    Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) is exploring a promising path to a practical inertial-confinement fusion reactor. The associated heavy ion driver will require a large number of focusing quadrupole magnets. A concept for a superconducting quadrupole array, using many simple racetrack coils, was developed at LLNL. Two, single-bore quadrupole prototypes of the same design, with distinctly different conductor, were designed, built, and tested. Both prototypes reached their short sample currents with little or no training. Magnet design, and test results, are presented and discussed.

  3. Complexified boost invariance and holographic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubser, Steven S.; van der Schee, Wilke

    2015-01-01

    At strong coupling holographic studies have shown that heavy ion collisions do not obey normal boost invariance. Here we study a modified boost invariance through a complex shift in time, and show that this leads to surprisingly good agreement with numerical holographic computations. When including perturbations the agreement becomes even better, both in the hydrodynamic and the far-from-equilibrium regime. One of the main advantages is an analytic formulation of the stress-energy tensor of the longitudinal dynamics of holographic heavy ion collisions.

  4. Heavy ion action on single cells: Cellular inactivation capability of single accelerated heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kost, M.; Pross, H.-D.; Russmann, C.; Schneider, E.; Kiefer, J.; Kraft, G.; Lenz, G.; Becher, W.

    1994-01-01

    Heavy ions (HZE-particles) constitute an important part of radiation in space. Although their number is small the high amount of energy transferred by individual particles may cause severe biological effects. Their investigation requires special techniques which were tested by experiments performed at the UNILAC at the GSI (Darmstadt). Diploid yeast was used which is a suitable eucaryotic test system because of its resistance to extreme conditions like dryness and vacuum. Cells were placed on nuclear track detector foils and exposed to ions of different atomic number and energy. To assess the action of one single ion on an individual cell, track parameters and the respective colony forming abilities (CFA) were determined with the help of computer aided image analysis. There is mounting evidence that not only the amount of energy deposited along the particle path, commonly given by the LET, is of importance but also the spatial problem of energy deposition at a submicroscopical scale. It is virtually impossible to investigate track structure effects in detail with whole cell populations and (globally applied) high particle fluences. It is, therefore, necessary to detect the action of simple ions in individual cells. The results show that the biological action depends on atomic number and specific energy of the impinging ions, which can be compared with model calculations of recent track structure models.

  5. Angular distribution of products of ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunakov, V. E.; Kadmensky, S. G.; Kadmensky, S. S.

    2008-11-01

    Within quantum fission theory, angular distributions of products originating from the ternary fission of nuclei that is induced by polarized cold and thermal neutrons are investigated on the basis of a nonevaporative mechanism of third-particle emission and a consistent description of fission-channel coupling. It is shown that the inclusion of Coriolis interaction both in the region of the discrete and in the region of the continuous spectrum of states of the system undergoing fission leads to T-odd correlations in the aforementioned angular distributions. The properties of the TRI and ROT effects discovered recently, which are due to the interference between the fission amplitudes of neutron resonances, are explored. The results obtained here are compared with their counterparts from classic calculations based on the trajectory method.

  6. Angular distribution of products of ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bunakov, V. E. Kadmensky, S. G. Kadmensky, S. S.

    2008-11-15

    Within quantum fission theory, angular distributions of products originating from the ternary fission of nuclei that is induced by polarized cold and thermal neutrons are investigated on the basis of a non-evaporative mechanism of third-particle emission and a consistent description of fission-channel coupling. It is shown that the inclusion of Coriolis interaction both in the region of the discrete and in the region of the continuous spectrum of states of the system undergoing fission leads to T-odd correlations in the aforementioned angular distributions. The properties of the TRI and ROT effects discovered recently, which are due to the interference between the fission amplitudes of neutron resonances, are explored. The results obtained here are compared with their counterparts from classic calculations based on the trajectory method.

  7. Role of giant resonances in heavy-ion radiative capture

    SciTech Connect

    Sandorfi, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    The main features and physics of the radiative capture of heavy ions are reviewed. Data are discussed from three reactions: /sup 12/C(/sup 12/C,..gamma..)/sup 24/Mg, /sup 14/C(/sup 12/C,..gamma..)/sup 26/Mg, /sup 12/C(/sup 16/O,..gamma..)/sup 28/Si. Excitation functions are given and discussed. 17 references.

  8. Vacuum arc ion source for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F.; Qi, N.; Gensler, S.; Prasad, R.R.; Krishnan, M.; Brown, I.G.

    1998-02-01

    Heavy ion fusion is one approach to the problem of controlled thermonuclear power production, in which a small DT target is bombarded by an intense flux of heavy ions and compressed to fusion temperatures. There is a need in present HIF research and development for a reliable ion source for the production of heavy ion beams with low emittance, low beam noise, ion charge states Q=1+ to 3+, beam current {approximately}0.5A, pulse width {approximately}5{endash}20 {mu}s, and repetition rate {approximately}10 pulses per second. We have explored the suitability of a vacuum arc ion source for this application. Energetic, high current, gadolinium ion beams were produced with parameters as required or close to those required. The performance parameters can all be improved yet further in an optimized ion source design. Here we describe the ion source configuration used, the experiments conducted, and the results obtained. We conclude that a vacuum arc based metal ion source of this kind could be an excellent candidate for heavy ion fusion research application. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Experimental atomic physics in heavy-ion storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, S.; Andersen, L.H.; Briand, J.P.; Liesen, D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper outlines the discussion which took place at the ''round table'' on experimental atomic physics in heavy-ion storage rings. Areas of discussion are: electron-ion interactions, ion-ion collisions, precision spectroscopy of highly charged ions, beta decay into bound final states, and atomic binding energies from spectroscopy of conversion elections. 18 refs., 1 tab. (LSP)

  10. Photon and dilepton production in high energy heavy ion collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sakaguchi, Takao

    2015-05-07

    The recent results on direct photons and dileptons in high energy heavy ion collisions, obtained particularly at RHIC and LHC are reviewed. The results are new not only in terms of the probes, but also in terms of the precision. We shall discuss the physics learned from the results.

  11. The chromatic correction in RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Dell, G.F.; Hahn, H.; Parzen, G.

    1987-01-01

    The scheme for the correction of chromatic effects in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL is discussed. This scheme uses six families of sextupoles excited by four independent power supplies, and provides adequate control of linear and quadratic terms in the tune vs momentum dependence and reduces the variation of the betatron amplitude, vs momentum.

  12. Overview of Device SEE Susceptibility from Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, D. K.; Coss, J. R.; McCarthy, K. P.; Schwartz, H. R.; Smith, L. S.

    1998-01-01

    A fifth set of heavy ion single event effects (SEE) test data have been collected since the last IEEE publications (1,2,3,4) in December issues for 1985, 1987, 1989, and 1991. Trends in SEE susceptibility (including soft errors and latchup) for state-of-the-art parts are evaluated.

  13. Single event upsets caused by solar energetic heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Tylka, A.J.; Adams, J.H. Jr.; Boberg, P.R.; Dietrich, W.F.; Smith, E.C.

    1996-12-01

    The authors calculate single event upset (SEU) rates due to protons, alphas, and heavier ions in two satellite systems for the major solar particle events of 1989--92, using a new and complete analysis of GOES proton data and high-energy heavy-ion fluences from the University of Chicago Cosmic Ray Telescope on IMP-8. These measurements cover the entire range of energies relevant to SEU studies and therefore overcome shortcomings of previous studies, which relied upon theoretical or semi-empirical estimates of high-energy heavy-ion spectra. They compare the results to the observed SEU rates in these events. The SEU rates in one device were overwhelmingly dominated by protons. However, even after taking into account uncertainties in the ground-test cross-section data, the authors find that at least {approximately}45% of the SEUs in the other device must have been caused by heavy ions. The results demonstrate that both protons and heavy ions must be considered in order to make a reliable assessment of SEU vulnerabilities. Furthermore, the GOES/Chicago database of solar particle events provides a basis for making accurate solar particle SEU calculations and credible worst-case estimates. In particular, measurements of the historic solar particle events of October 1989 are used in worst week and worst day environment models in CREME96, a revision of NRL`s Cosmic Ray Effects on MicroElectronics code.

  14. Electromagnetic dissociation effects in galactic heavy-ion fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Methods for calculating cross sections for the breakup of galactic heavy ions by the Coulomb fields of the interacting nuclei are presented. By using the Weizsacker-Williams method of virtual quanta, estimates of electromagnetic dissociation cross sections for a variety of reactions applicable to galactic cosmic ray shielding studies are presented and compared with other predictions and with available experimental data.

  15. NSAC Recommends a Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Today, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Describes the plan submitted by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee to the Department of Energy and National Science Foundation urging construction of an ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collider designed to accelerate nucleon beams of ions as heavy as uranium. Discusses the process of selecting the type of facility as well as siting. (JM)

  16. Heavy-ion reaction mechanisms studied with the spin spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Halbert, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental data and statistical-model calculations for xn and ..cap alpha..xn products of the reaction /sup 20/Ne + /sup 146/Nd at 136 MeV are shown to be in generally good agreement, indicating that equilibrium processes are dominant. Preliminary results on the heavy-ion ejectiles from /sup 19/F + /sup 159/Tb are presented.

  17. Three-dimensional Model of Tissue and Heavy Ions Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem L.; Sundaresan, Alamelu; Huff, Janice L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional tissue model was incorporated into a new Monte Carlo algorithm that simulates passage of heavy ions in a tissue box . The tissue box was given as a realistic model of tissue based on confocal microscopy images. The action of heavy ions on the cellular matrix for 2- or 3-dimensional cases was simulated. Cells were modeled as a cell culture monolayer in one example, where the data were taken directly from microscopy (2-d cell matrix), and as a multi-layer obtained from confocal microscopy (3-d case). Image segmentation was used to identify cells with precise areas/volumes in an irradiated cell culture monolayer, and slices of tissue with many cell layers. The cells were then inserted into the model box of the simulated physical space pixel by pixel. In the case of modeled tissues (3-d), the tissue box had periodic boundary conditions imposed, which extrapolates the technique to macroscopic volumes of tissue. For the real tissue (3-d), specific spatial patterns for cell apoptosis and necrosis are expected. The cell patterns were modeled based on action cross sections for apoptosis and necrosis estimated from current experimental data. A spatial correlation function indicating a higher spatial concentration of damaged cells from heavy ions relative to the low-LET radiation cell damage pattern is presented. The spatial correlation effects among necrotic cells can help studying microlesions in organs, and probable effects of directionality of heavy ion radiation on epithelium and endothelium.

  18. Trends in Device SEE Susceptibility from Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, D. K.; Coss, J. R.; McCarty, K. P.; Schwartz, H. R.; Swift, G. M.; Watson, R. K.; Koga, R.; Crain, W. R.; Crawford, K. B.; Hansel, S. J.

    1995-01-01

    The sixth set of heavy ion single event effects (SEE) test data have been collected since the last IEEE publications in December issues of IEEE - Nuclear Science Transactions for 1985, 1987, 1989, 1991, and the IEEE Workshop Record, 1993. Trends in SEE susceptibility (including soft errors and latchup) for state-of- are evaluated.

  19. Inferring Magnetospheric Heavy Ion Density using EMIC Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.; Kim, Hyomin; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2014-05-01

    We present a method to infer heavy ion concentration ratios from EMIC wave observations that result from ionion hybrid (IIH) resonance. A key feature of the ion-ion hybrid resonance is the concentration of wave energy in a field-aligned resonant mode that exhibits linear polarization. This mode converted wave is localized at the location where the frequency of a compressional wave driver matches the IIH resonance condition, which depends sensitively on the heavy ion concentration. This dependence makes it possible to estimate the heavy ion concentration ratio. In this letter, we evaluate the absorption coefficients at the IIH resonance at Earth's geosynchronous orbit for variable concentrations of He+ and field-aligned wave numbers using a dipole magnetic field. Although wave absorption occurs for a wide range of heavy ion concentrations, it only occurs for a limited range of field-aligned wave numbers such that the IIH resonance frequency is close to, but not exactly the same as the crossover frequency. Using the wave absorption and observed EMIC waves from GOES-12 satellite, we demonstrate how this technique can be used to estimate that the He+ concentration is around 4% near L = 6.6.

  20. Heavy ion acceleration at the AGS: Present and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.

    1989-01-01

    The Brookhaven AGS is alternating gradient synchrotron, 807 meters in circumference, which was originally designed for only protons. Using the 15 MV Brookhaven Tandem Van de Graaff as an injector, the AGS started to accelerate heavy ions of mass lighter than sulfur. Because of the relatively poor vacuum (/approximately/10/sup /minus/8/ Torr), the AGS is not able to accelerate heavier ions which could not be fully stripped of electrons at the Tandem energy. When the AGS Booster, which is under construction, is completed the operation will be extended to all species of heavy ions including gold and uranium. Because ultra-high vacuum (/approximately/10/sup /minus/11/ Torr) is planned, the Booster can accelerate partially stripped elements. The operational experience, the parameters, and scheme of heavy ion acceleration will be presented in detail from injection to extraction, as well as future injection into the new Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). A future plan to improve intensity of the accelerator will also be presented. 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Overview of US heavy-ion fusion progress and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.

    2004-06-01

    Significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the U.S. heavy ion fusion program on high-current sources, transport, final focusing, chambers and targets for inertial fusion energy (IFE) driven by induction linac accelerators seek to provide the scientific and technical basis for the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX), an integrated source-to-target physics experiment recently included in the list of future facilities planned by the U.S. Department of Energy. To optimize the design of IBX and future inertial fusion energy drivers, current HIF-VNL research is addressing several key issues (representative, not inclusive): gas and electron cloud effects which can exacerbate beam loss at high beam perveance and magnet aperture fill factors; ballistic neutralized and assisted-pinch focusing of neutralized heavy ion beams; limits on longitudinal compression of both neutralized and un-neutralized heavy ion bunches; and tailoring heavy ion beams for uniform target energy deposition for high energy density physics (HEDP) studies.

  2. Transfer-induced fission in inverse kinematics: Impact on experimental and evaluated nuclear data bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farget, F.; Caamaño, M.; Ramos, D.; Rodrıguez-Tajes, C.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Audouin, L.; Benlliure, J.; Casarejos, E.; Clément, E.; Cortina, D.; Delaune, O.; Derkx, X.; Dijon, A.; Doré, D.; Fernández-Domınguez, B.; Gaudefroy, L.; Golabek, C.; Heinz, A.; Jurado, B.; Lemasson, A.; Paradela, C.; Roger, T.; Salsac, M. D.; Schmitt, C.

    2015-12-01

    Inverse kinematics is a new tool to study nuclear fission. Its main advantage is the possibility to measure with an unmatched resolution the atomic number of fission fragments, leading to new observables in the properties of fission-fragment distributions. In addition to the resolution improvement, the study of fission based on nuclear collisions in inverse kinematics beneficiates from a larger view with respect to the neutron-induced fission, as in a single experiment the number of fissioning systems and the excitation energy range are widden. With the use of spectrometers, mass and kinetic-energy distributions may now be investigated as a function of the proton and neutron number sharing. The production of fissioning nuclei in transfer reactions allows studying the isotopic yields of fission fragments as a function of the excitation energy. The higher excitation energy resulting in the fusion reaction leading to the compound nucleus 250Cf at an excitation energy of 45MeV is also presented. With the use of inverse kinematics, the charge polarisation of fragments at scission is now revealed with high precision, and it is shown that it cannot be neglected, even at higher excitation energies. In addition, the kinematical properties of the fragments inform on the deformation configuration at scission.

  3. Effect of the energy spectrum and angular momentum of pre-scission neutrons on the prediction of fission fragment angular anisotropy by the models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soheyli, Saeed; Khanlari, Marzieh Varasteh

    2016-04-01

    Effects of the various neutron emission energy spectra, as well as the influence of the angular momentum of pre-scission neutrons on theoretical predictions of fission fragment angular anisotropies for several heavy-ion induced fission systems are considered. Although theoretical calculations of angular anisotropy are very sensitive to neutron emission correction, the effects of the different values of kinetic energy of emitted neutrons derived from the various neutron emission energy spectra before reaching to the saddle point on the prediction of fission fragment angular distribution by the model are not significant and can be neglected, since these effects on angular anisotropies of fission fragments for a wide range of fissility parameters and excitation energies of compound nuclei are not more than 10%. Furthermore, the theoretical prediction of fission fragment angular anisotropy is not sensitive to the angular momentum of emitted neutrons.

  4. Using Ultracold Neutrons to Characterize Fission Fragment Induced Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broussard, Leah; Makela, Mark; Morris, Chris

    2015-10-01

    One of the modern challenges in nuclear science and technology is the understanding of the nature of fission fragment damage to material and the resulting ejection of matter as the fragments pass through the surface, with implications to stockpile stewardship and nuclear energy. We have demonstrated a new technique that can be used to characterize the sputtered material with knowledge of the location of the originating fission event. Due to their very high fission cross sections, ultracold neutrons (~100 neV energy) can be used to control the depth at which fission takes place using their energy or the material enrichment. This effort represents one of the first practical applications of ultracold neutrons, which to date have been primarily used to explore questions in fundamental particle physics. We will present results of demonstration measurements including first limits on the total and fission cross sections for 100 neV scale neutrons and the status of the development of this new capability. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program, the G. T. Seaborg Institute, and LANL Science Campaign C1 for this work.

  5. Angular correlations in emission of prescission neutrons from {sup 235}U fission induced by slow polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Danilyan, G. V.; Wilpert, T.; Granz, P.; Krakhotin, V. A.; Mezei, F.; Novitsky, V. V.; Pavlov, V. S.; Russina, M. V.; Shatalov, P. B.

    2008-12-15

    A new approach to searching for and studying scission neutrons, which is based on the analysis of specific angular correlations in nuclear fission induced by polarized neutrons, is described and used to evaluate the fraction of scission neutrons in the total number of prompt neutrons of {sup 235}U fission emitted perpendicularly to the fission axis.

  6. Future Heavy-Ion Program at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sako, Hiroyuki

    Recently, a heavy ion program as a future J-PARC project has been discussed among nuclear physicists and accelerator scientists. The overview of the heavy-ion program with physics goals, the design and physics feasibility of the spectrometer, and preliminary accelerator schemes are presented. The main goal of the program is to explore the QCD phase diagram in baryon densities 8-10 times as high as the normal nucleus density with heavy ion beams up to uranium at 1-10 AGeV, as well as research of unstable nuclei up to 10 AMeV. In this work, we focus on the former. One of the most important measurements which could signal the phase transition in high baryon densities is a dilepton. We study in-medium modifications of ρ , ω , and φ mesons decaying into dileptons, measure rare particles such as multi-strangeness hadrons, exotic hadrons, and hypernuclei utilizing high rate beams at J-PARC. We have been designing a spectrometer with a solenoid and a dipole magnets, which covers almost 4π acceptance, and has capability of identifying charged hadrons as well as electrons and muons. In one-month running of the experiment at the beam rate of 1011 Hz, we expect to measure ρ , ω , and φ dielectron decays of the order of 107. Heavy-ion acceleration schemes have been studied with a new heavy-ion linac and a new booster ring as an injector to RCS. The beams will be accelerated in RCS and MR. The goal beam rate is around 1010-1011/MR cycle.

  7. Heavy-ion tumor therapy: Physical and radiobiological benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schardt, Dieter; Elsässer, Thilo; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    High-energy beams of charged nuclear particles (protons and heavier ions) offer significant advantages for the treatment of deep-seated local tumors in comparison to conventional megavolt photon therapy. Their physical depth-dose distribution in tissue is characterized by a small entrance dose and a distinct maximum (Bragg peak) near the end of range with a sharp fall-off at the distal edge. Taking full advantage of the well-defined range and the small lateral beam spread, modern scanning beam systems allow delivery of the dose with millimeter precision. In addition, projectiles heavier than protons such as carbon ions exhibit an enhanced biological effectiveness in the Bragg peak region caused by the dense ionization of individual particle tracks resulting in reduced cellular repair. This makes them particularly attractive for the treatment of radio-resistant tumors localized near organs at risk. While tumor therapy with protons is a well-established treatment modality with more than 60 000 patients treated worldwide, the application of heavy ions is so far restricted to a few facilities only. Nevertheless, results of clinical phase I-II trials provide evidence that carbon-ion radiotherapy might be beneficial in several tumor entities. This article reviews the progress in heavy-ion therapy, including physical and technical developments, radiobiological studies and models, as well as radiooncological studies. As a result of the promising clinical results obtained with carbon-ion beams in the past ten years at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator facility (Japan) and in a pilot project at GSI Darmstadt (Germany), the plans for new clinical centers for heavy-ion or combined proton and heavy-ion therapy have recently received a substantial boost.

  8. Heavy-ion tumor therapy: Physical and radiobiological benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Schardt, Dieter; Elsaesser, Thilo; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2010-01-15

    High-energy beams of charged nuclear particles (protons and heavier ions) offer significant advantages for the treatment of deep-seated local tumors in comparison to conventional megavolt photon therapy. Their physical depth-dose distribution in tissue is characterized by a small entrance dose and a distinct maximum (Bragg peak) near the end of range with a sharp fall-off at the distal edge. Taking full advantage of the well-defined range and the small lateral beam spread, modern scanning beam systems allow delivery of the dose with millimeter precision. In addition, projectiles heavier than protons such as carbon ions exhibit an enhanced biological effectiveness in the Bragg peak region caused by the dense ionization of individual particle tracks resulting in reduced cellular repair. This makes them particularly attractive for the treatment of radio-resistant tumors localized near organs at risk. While tumor therapy with protons is a well-established treatment modality with more than 60 000 patients treated worldwide, the application of heavy ions is so far restricted to a few facilities only. Nevertheless, results of clinical phase I-II trials provide evidence that carbon-ion radiotherapy might be beneficial in several tumor entities. This article reviews the progress in heavy-ion therapy, including physical and technical developments, radiobiological studies and models, as well as radiooncological studies. As a result of the promising clinical results obtained with carbon-ion beams in the past ten years at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator facility (Japan) and in a pilot project at GSI Darmstadt (Germany), the plans for new clinical centers for heavy-ion or combined proton and heavy-ion therapy have recently received a substantial boost.

  9. Advanced Monte Carlo modeling of prompt fission neutrons for thermal and fast neutron-induced fission reactions on Pu239

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talou, P.; Becker, B.; Kawano, T.; Chadwick, M. B.; Danon, Y.

    2011-06-01

    Prompt fission neutrons following the thermal and 0.5 MeV neutron-induced fission reaction of Pu239 are calculated using a Monte Carlo approach to the evaporation of the excited fission fragments. Exclusive data such as the multiplicity distribution P(ν), the average multiplicity as a function of fragment mass ν¯(A), and many others are inferred in addition to the most used average prompt fission neutron spectrum χ(Ein,Eout), as well as average neutron multiplicity ν¯. Experimental information on these more exclusive data help constrain the Monte Carlo model parameters. The calculated average total neutron multiplicity is ν¯c=2.871 in very close agreement with the evaluated value ν¯e=2.8725 present in the ENDF/B-VII.0 library. The neutron multiplicity distribution P(ν) is in very good agreement with the evaluation by Holden and Zucker. The calculated average spectrum differs in shape from the ENDF/B-VII.0 spectrum, evaluated with the Madland-Nix model. In particular, we predict more neutrons in the low-energy tail of the spectrum (below about 300 keV) than the Madland-Nix calculations, casting some doubts on how much scission neutrons contribute to the shape of the low-energy tail of the spectrum. The spectrum high-energy tail is very sensitive to the total kinetic energy distribution of the fragments as well as to the total excitation energy sharing at scission. Present experimental uncertainties on measured spectra above 6 MeV are too large to distinguish between various theoretical hypotheses. Finally, comparisons of the Monte Carlo results with experimental data on ν¯(A) indicate that more neutrons are emitted from the light fragments than the heavy ones, in agreement with previous works.

  10. Transmission measurement based on STM observation to detect the penetration depth of low-energy heavy ions in botanic samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Feng; Wang, Yugang; Xue, Jianming; Wang, Sixue; Du, Guanhua; Zhao, Weijiang

    2003-01-01

    The penetration depth of low-energy heavy ions in botanic samples was detected with a new transmission measurement. In the measurement, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) pieces were placed behind the botanic samples with certain thickness. During the irradiation of heavy ions with energy of tens of keV, the energetic particles transmitted from those samples were received by the HOPG pieces. After irradiation, scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was applied to observe protrusion-like damage induced by these transmitted ions on the surface of the HOPG. The statistical average number density of protrusions and the minimum transmission rate of the low-energy heavy ions can be obtained. The detection efficiency of the new method for low-energy heavy ions was about 0.1-1 and the background in the measurement can be reduced to as low as 1.0 x 10(8) protrusions/cm2. With this method, the penetration depth of the energetic particles was detected to be no less than 60 micrometers in kidney bean slices when the slices were irradiated by 100 keVAr+ ion at the fluence of 5 x 10(16) ions/cm2. c2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Description of induced nuclear fission with Skyrme energy functionals. II. Finite temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, N.; Duke, D.; Carr, H.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of induced nuclear fission for a broad range of neutron energies could help resolve fundamental science issues, such as the formation of elements in the universe, but could have also a large impact on societal applications in energy production or nuclear waste management. The goal of this paper is to set up the foundations of a microscopic theory to study the static aspects of induced fission as a function of the excitation energy of the incident neutron, from thermal to fast neutrons. To account for the high excitation energy of the compound nucleus, we employ a statistical approach based on finite temperature nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme energy densities, which we benchmark on the 239Pu(n ,f ) reaction. We compute the evolution of the least-energy fission pathway across multidimensional potential energy surfaces with up to five collective variables as a function of the nuclear temperature and predict the evolution of both the inner and the outer fission barriers as a function of the excitation energy of the compound nucleus. We show that the coupling to the continuum induced by the finite temperature is negligible in the range of neutron energies relevant for many applications of neutron-induced fission. We prove that the concept of quantum localization introduced recently can be extended to T >0 , and we apply the method to study the interaction energy and total kinetic energy of fission fragments as a function of the temperature for the most probable fission. While large uncertainties in theoretical modeling remain, we conclude that a finite temperature nuclear density functional may provide a useful framework to obtain accurate predictions of fission fragment properties.

  12. Simulations of an accelerator-based shielding experiment using the particle and heavy-ion transport code system PHITS.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Sihver, L; Iwase, H; Nakashima, H; Niita, K

    2005-01-01

    In order to estimate the biological effects of HZE particles, an accurate knowledge of the physics of interaction of HZE particles is necessary. Since the heavy ion transport problem is a complex one, there is a need for both experimental and theoretical studies to develop accurate transport models. RIST and JAERI (Japan), GSI (Germany) and Chalmers (Sweden) are therefore currently developing and bench marking the General-Purpose Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System (PHITS), which is based on the NMTC and MCNP for nucleon/meson and neutron transport respectively, and the JAM hadron cascade model. PHITS uses JAERI Quantum Molecular Dynamics (JQMD) and the Generalized Evaporation Model (GEM) for calculations of fission and evaporation processes, a model developed at NASA Langley for calculation of total reaction cross sections, and the SPAR model for stopping power calculations. The future development of PHITS includes better parameterization in the JQMD model used for the nucleus-nucleus reactions, and improvement of the models used for calculating total reaction cross sections, and addition of routines for calculating elastic scattering of heavy ions, and inclusion of radioactivity and burn up processes. As a part of an extensive bench marking of PHITS, we have compared energy spectra of secondary neutrons created by reactions of HZE particles with different targets, with thicknesses ranging from <1 to 200 cm. We have also compared simulated and measured spatial, fluence and depth-dose distributions from different high energy heavy ion reactions. In this paper, we report simulations of an accelerator-based shielding experiment, in which a beam of 1 GeV/n Fe-ions has passed through thin slabs of polyethylene, Al, and Pb at an acceptance angle up to 4 degrees. PMID:15934196

  13. Simulations of an accelerator-based shielding experiment using the particle and heavy-ion transport code system PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Sihver, L.; Iwase, H.; Nakashima, H.; Niita, K.

    In order to estimate the biological effects of HZE particles, an accurate knowledge of the physics of interaction of HZE particles is necessary. Since the heavy ion transport problem is a complex one, there is a need for both experimental and theoretical studies to develop accurate transport models. RIST and JAERI (Japan), GSI (Germany) and Chalmers (Sweden) are therefore currently developing and bench marking the General-Purpose Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System (PHITS), which is based on the NMTC and MCNP for nucleon/meson and neutron transport respectively, and the JAM hadron cascade model. PHITS uses JAERI Quantum Molecular Dynamics (JQMD) and the Generalized Evaporation Model (GEM) for calculations of fission and evaporation processes, a model developed at NASA Langley for calculation of total reaction cross sections, and the SPAR model for stopping power calculations. The future development of PHITS includes better parameterization in the JQMD model used for the nucleus-nucleus reactions, and improvement of the models used for calculating total reaction cross sections, and addition of routines for calculating elastic scattering of heavy ions, and inclusion of radioactivity and burn up processes. As a part of an extensive bench marking of PHITS, we have compared energy spectra of secondary neutrons created by reactions of HZE particles with different targets, with thicknesses ranging from <1 to 200 cm. We have also compared simulated and measured spatial, fluence and depth-dose distributions from different high energy heavy ion reactions. In this paper, we report simulations of an accelerator-based shielding experiment, in which a beam of 1 GeV/n Fe-ions has passed through thin slabs of polyethylene, Al, and Pb at an acceptance angle up to 4°.

  14. Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Armesto, N; Borghini, N; Jeon, S; Wiedemann, U A; Abreu, S; Akkelin, V; Alam, J; Albacete, J L; Andronic, A; Antonuv, D; Arleo, F; Armesto, N; Arsene, I C; Barnafoldi, G G; Barrette, J; Bauchle, B; Becattini, F; Betz, B; Bleicher, M; Bluhm, M; Boer, D; Bopp, F W; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bravina, L; Busza, W; Cacciari, M; Capella, A; Casalderrey-Solana, J; Chatterjee, R; Chen, L; Cleymans, J; Cole, B A; delValle, Z C; Csernai, L P; Cunqueiro, L; Dainese, A; de Deus, J D; Ding, H; Djordjevic, M; Drescher, H; Dremin, I M; Dumitru, A; El, A; Engel, R; d'Enterria, D; Eskola, K J; Fai, G; Ferreiro, E G; Fries, R J; Frodermann, E; Fujii, H; Gale, C; Gelis, F; Goncalves, V P; Greco, V; Gyulassy, M; van Hees, H; Heinz, U; Honkanen, H; Horowitz, W A; Iancu, E; Ingelman, G; Jalilian-Marian, J; Jeon, S; Kaidalov, A B; Kampfer, B; Kang, Z; Karpenko, I A; Kestin, G; Kharzeev, D; Ko, C M; Koch, B; Kopeliovich, B; Kozlov, M; Kraus, I; Kuznetsova, I; Lee, S H; Lednicky, R; Letessier, J; Levin, E; Li, B; Lin, Z; Liu, H; Liu, W; Loizides, C; Lokhtin, I P; Machado, M T; Malinina, L V; Managadze, A M; Mangano, M L; Mannarelli, M; Manuel, C; Martinez, G; Milhano, J G; Mocsy, A; Molnar, D; Nardi, M; Nayak, J K; Niemi, H; Oeschler, H; Ollitrault, J; Paic, G; Pajares, C; Pantuev, V S; Papp, G; Peressounko, D; Petreczky, P; Petrushanko, S V; Piccinini, F; Pierog, T; Pirner, H J; Porteboeuf, S; Potashnikova, I; Qin, G Y; Qiu, J; Rafelski, J; Rajagopal, K; Ranft, J; Rapp, R; Rasanen, S S; Rathsman, J; Rau, P; Redlich, K; Renk, T; Rezaeian, A H; Rischke, D; Roesler, S; Ruppert, J; Ruuskanen, P V; Salgado, C A; Sapeta, S; Sarcevic, I; Sarkar, S; Sarycheva, L I; Schmidt, I; Shoski, A I; Sinha, B; Sinyukov, Y M; Snigirev, A M; Srivastava, D K; Stachel, J; Stasto, A; Stocker, H; Teplov, C Y; Thews, R L; Torrieri, G; Pop, V T; Triantafyllopoulos, D N; Tuchin, K L; Turbide, S; Tywoniuk, K; Utermann, A; Venugopalan, R; Vitev, I; Vogt, R; Wang, E; Wang, X N; Werner, K; Wessels, E; Wheaton, S; Wicks, S; Wiedemann, U A; Wolschin, G; Xiao, B; Xu, Z; Yasui, S; Zabrodin, E; Zapp, K; Zhang, B

    2008-02-25

    In August 2006, the CERN Theory Unit announced to restructure its visitor program and to create a 'CERN Theory Institute', where 1-3 month long specific programs can take place. The first such Institute was held from 14 May to 10 June 2007, focusing on 'Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions'. It brought together close to 100 scientists working on the theory of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. The aim of this workshop was to review and document the status of expectations and predictions for the heavy ion program at the Large Hadron Collider LHC before its start. LHC will explore heavy ion collisions at {approx} 30 times higher center of mass energy than explored previously at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC. So, on the one hand, the charge of this workshop provided a natural forum for the exchange of the most recent ideas, and allowed to monitor how the understanding of heavy ion collisions has evolved in recent years with the data from RHIC, and with the preparation of the LHC experimental program. On the other hand, the workshop aimed at a documentation which helps to distinguish pre- from post-dictions. An analogous documentation of the 'Last Call for Predictions' [1] was prepared prior to the start of the heavy-ion program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC, and it proved useful in the subsequent discussion and interpretation of RHIC data. The present write-up is the documentation of predictions for the LHC heavy ion program, received or presented during the CERN TH Institute. The set-up of the CERN TH Institute allowed us to aim for the wide-most coverage of predictions. There were more than 100 presentations and discussions during the workshop. Moreover, those unable to attend could still participate by submitting predictions in written form during the workshop. This followed the spirit that everybody interested in making a prediction had the right to be heard. To arrive at a concise document, we required that

  15. Altered brain energetics induces mitochondrial fission arrest in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Trushin, Sergey; Christensen, Trace A; Bachmeier, Benjamin V; Gateno, Benjamin; Schroeder, Andreas; Yao, Jia; Itoh, Kie; Sesaki, Hiromi; Poon, Wayne W; Gylys, Karen H; Patterson, Emily R; Parisi, Joseph E; Diaz Brinton, Roberta; Salisbury, Jeffrey L; Trushina, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Altered brain metabolism is associated with progression of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Mitochondria respond to bioenergetic changes by continuous fission and fusion. To account for three dimensional architecture of the brain tissue and organelles, we applied 3-dimensional electron microscopy (3D EM) reconstruction to visualize mitochondrial structure in the brain tissue from patients and mouse models of AD. We identified a previously unknown mitochondrial fission arrest phenotype that results in elongated interconnected organelles, "mitochondria-on-a-string" (MOAS). Our data suggest that MOAS formation may occur at the final stages of fission process and was not associated with altered translocation of activated dynamin related protein 1 (Drp1) to mitochondria but with reduced GTPase activity. Since MOAS formation was also observed in the brain tissue of wild-type mice in response to hypoxia or during chronological aging, fission arrest may represent fundamental compensatory adaptation to bioenergetic stress providing protection against mitophagy that may preserve residual mitochondrial function. The discovery of novel mitochondrial phenotype that occurs in the brain tissue in response to energetic stress accurately detected only using 3D EM reconstruction argues for a major role of mitochondrial dynamics in regulating neuronal survival. PMID:26729583

  16. Scaling laws in {sup 3}He induced nuclear fission

    SciTech Connect

    Rubehn, T.; Jing, K.X.; Moretto, L.G.; Phair, L.; Tso, K.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1996-12-01

    Fission excitation functions of compound nuclei in a mass region where shell effects are expected to be very strong are shown to scale exactly according to the transition state prediction once these shell effects are accounted for. Furthermore, the method applied in this paper allows for the model-independent determination of the nuclear shell effects. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  17. Meson interferometry in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: Recent HBT results form CERN experiment NA44; interferometry results from E802/E859/E866; recent results on two particle correlations from E814; source sizes from CERN data; intermittency and interferometry; Bose-Einstein correlations in 200A GeV S+Au collisions; HBT correlations at STAR; HBT interferometry with PHENIX; HBT calculations from ARC; three pion correlations; and pion correlations in proton-induced reactions.

  18. Systematics of heavy-ion fusion hindrance at extreme sub-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, C.L.; Back, B.B.; Esbensen, H.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Rehm, K.E.

    2006-01-15

    The recent discovery of hindrance in heavy-ion induced fusion reactions at extreme sub-barrier energies represents a challenge for theoretical models. Previously, it has been shown that in medium-heavy systems, the onset of fusion hindrance depends strongly on the ''stiffness'' of the nuclei in the entrance channel. In this work, we explore its dependence on the total mass and the Q-value of the fusing systems and find that the fusion hindrance depends in a systematic way on the entrance channel properties over a wide range of systems.

  19. Heavy ion precompound phenomena: A glance at hard gamma and subthreshold pion production

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.; Remington, B.A.

    1987-08-01

    We test a relaxation model based on two body nucleon-nucleon scattering processes to interpret phenomena observed in heavy ion reactions. We use the Boltzmann master equation to accomplish this. By assuming that the projectile nucleons share the total excitation with equal a-priori probability of all configurations, we are able to reproduce several sets of neutron spectra from /sup 20/Ne and /sup 12/C induced reactions on /sup 165/Ho. With no additional free parameters our model successfully reproduces subthreshold pion production cross sections, high energy ..gamma..-ray spectra, and angular distributions of high energy ..gamma..-rays. 40 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Neutron-induced fission cross sections of short-lived actinides with the surrogate reaction method.

    SciTech Connect

    Kessedijian, G.; Jurado, B.; Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Bidaud, A.; Czajkowski, S.; Dassie, D.; Haas, B.; Mathieu, L.; Audouin, L.; Capellan, N.; Tassan-Got, L.; Wilson, J. N.; Berthoumieux, E.; Gunsing, F.; Theisen, Ch.; Serot, O.; Bauge, E.; Ahmad, I.; Greene, J. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.

    2010-09-13

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections for {sup 242,243}Cm and {sup 241}Am have been obtained with the surrogate reaction method. Recent results for the neutron-induced cross section of {sup 243}Cm are questioned by the present data. For the first time, the {sup 242}Cm cross section has been determined up to the onset of second-chance fission. The good agreement at the lowest excitation energies between the present results and the existing neutron-induced data indicates that the distributions in spin and parity of states populated with both techniques are similar.

  1. Electrostatic septum for kilowatt heavy ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfredson, S.; Marti, F.; Miller, P.; Poe, D.; Stork, G.

    2001-12-01

    A septum of improved design has replaced the standard tungsten septum with uniform thickness used in the deflector for the K1200 cyclotron at Michigan State University [1]. A V-notch in the leading edge enhanced radiation cooling, and an increased septum thickness away from the median plane enhanced conduction of heat to the water cooled housing. Previously observed degradation of beam transmission attributed to thermally induced deformation of the septum was greatly improved with the new septum. The demonstrated power dissipation with an Ar beam was 900 W.

  2. Interpretation of the low energy fission process in the framework of dinuclear system conception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V. V.; Kalandarov, Sh. A.

    2016-03-01

    The possibility of the interpretation of fission of heavy nuclei as the process of formation, evolution and decay of dinuclear system is discussed. The interpretation is based on the nuclear interaction data obtained in heavy-ion nuclear physics investigations.

  3. Probing nuclear symmetry energy at high densities using pion, kaon, eta and photon productions in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Zhi-Gang; Yong, Gao-Chan; Chen, Lie-Wen; Li, Bao-An; Zhang, Ming; Xiao, Guo-Qing; Xu, Nu

    2014-02-01

    The high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy is among the most uncertain properties of dense neutron-rich matter. Its accurate determination has significant ramifications in understanding not only the reaction dynamics of heavy-ion reactions, especially those induced by radioactive beams, but also many interesting phenomena in astrophysics, such as the explosion mechanism of supernova and the properties of neutron stars. The heavy-ion physics community has devoted much effort during the last few years to constrain the high-density symmetry using various probes. In particular, the / ratio has been most extensively studied both theoretically and experimentally. All models have consistently predicted qualitatively that the / ratio is a sensitive probe of the high-density symmetry energy especially with beam energies near the pion production threshold. However, the predicted values of the / ratio are still quite model dependent mostly because of the complexity of modeling pion production and reabsorption dynamics in heavy-ion collisions, leading to currently still controversial conclusions regarding the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy from comparing various model calculations with available experimental data. As more / data become available and a deeper understanding about the pion dynamics in heavy-ion reactions is obtained, more penetrating probes, such as the K +/ K 0 ratio, meson and high-energy photons are also being investigated or planned at several facilities. Here, we review some of our recent contributions to the community effort of constraining the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy in heavy-ion collisions. In addition, the status of some worldwide experiments for studying the high-density symmetry energy, including the HIRFL-CSR external target experiment (CEE) are briefly introduced.

  4. Excitation functions for the helium-ion-induced fission of holmium and erbium

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, R.H.; Pandey, A.K.; Kalsi, P.C.; Sharma, R.C. )

    1991-12-01

    Excitation functions for the helium-ion-induced fission of holmium ({ital Z}=67) and erbium ({ital Z}=68) in the energy range 34--70 MeV were measured using lexan polycarbonate plastic as the fission fragment track detector. By analyzing the data in terms of the statistical model expression for {Gamma}{sub {ital f}}/{Gamma}{sub {ital n}}, the ratio of the fission width to neutron emission width, the fission barriers of the compound nuclei {sup 1}{sub 69}{sup 69}Tm and {sup 17}{sub 70}{sup 1.3}Yb were determined to be 29.8{plus minus}3 and 27.8{plus minus}3 MeV, respectively. The corresponding values for the fission level density parameter were found to be {ital a}{sub {ital f}}={ital A}/12 and {ital A}/13, respectively. The uncertainties shown in the fission barriers allow for inclusion of other values derived from reasonable upper and lower limits of {ital a}{sub {ital f}} values of {ital A}/8 to {ital A}/20. The measured fission barriers compare very well with the shell-corrected liquid-drop barriers of Myers and Swiatecki. The present measurements extend the range of low-{ital Z} elements which are away from the closed-shell region and which are studied at these medium energies. The results are compared with similar data available in the literature which bring out some interesting correlations and trends in the fission properties, viz., fission barriers and level density parameters of low-{ital Z} elements.

  5. Determination of the 243,246,248Cm thermal neutron induced fission cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serot, O.; Wagemans, C.; Vermote, S.; Heyse, J.; Soldner, T.; Geltenbort, P.

    2005-11-01

    The minor actinide waste produced in nuclear power plants contains various Cm-isotopes, and transmutation scenarios require improved fission cross section data. The available thermal neutron induced fission cross section data for 243Cm, 246Cm and 248Cm are not very accurate, so new cross section measurements have been performed at the high flux reactor of the ILL in Grenoble (France) under better experimental conditions (highly enriched samples, very intense and clean neutron beam). The measurements were performed at a neutron energy of 5.38 meV, yielding fission cross section values of (1240±28)b for 243Cm, (25±47)mb for 246Cm and (685±84)mb for 248Cm. From these results, thermal fission cross section values of (572±14)b; (12±25)mb and (316±43)mb have been deduced for 243Cm, 246Cm and 248Cm, respectively.

  6. Studies of Neutron-Induced Fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Dana; TKE Team

    2014-09-01

    A Frisch-gridded ionization chamber and the double energy (2E) analysis method were used to study mass yield distributions and average total kinetic energy (TKE) release from neutron-induced fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu. Despite decades of fission research, little or no TKE data exist for high incident neutron energies. Additional average TKE information at incident neutron energies relevant to defense- and energy-related applications will provide a valuable observable for benchmarking simulations. The data can also be used as inputs in theoretical fission models. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center-Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE - WNR) provides a neutron beam from thermal to hundreds of MeV, well-suited for filling in the gaps in existing data and exploring fission behavior in the fast neutron region. The results of the studies on 238U, 235U, and 239Pu will be presented. LA-UR-14-24921.

  7. Uniform fuel target implosion in heavy ion inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Karino, T.; Kondo, S.; Iinuma, T.; Barada, D.; Ma, Y. Y.; Ogoyski, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    For a steady operation of a fusion power plant the target implosion should be robust against the implosion non-uniformities. In this paper the non-uniformity mitigation mechanisms in the heavy ion beam (HIB) illumination are discussed in heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF). A density valley appears in the energy absorber, and the large-scale density valley also works as a radiation energy confinement layer, which contributes to the radiation energy smoothing for the HIB illumination non-uniformity. The large density-gradient scale, which is typically ∼500μm in HIF targets, also contributes to a reduction of the Rayleigh- Taylor instability growth rate. In HIF a wobbling HIBs illumination would also reduce the Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth and to realize a uniform implosion.

  8. How to Deal with Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, Rolf

    A qualitative review is given of the theoretical problems and possibilities arising when one tries to understand what happens in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The striking similarity between these and pp collisions suggests the use of techniques similar to those used 5-12 years ago in pp collisions to disentangle collective motions from thermodynamics. A very heuristic and qualitative sketch of statistical bootstrap thermodynamics concludes an idealized picture in which a relativistic heavy ion collision appears as a superposition of moving `fireballs' with equilibrium thermodynamics in the rest frames of these fireballs. The interesting problems arise where this theoretician's picture deviates from reality: non-equilibrium, more complicated motion (shock waves, turbulence, spin) and the collision history. Only if these problems have been solved or shown to be irrelevant can we safely identify signatures of unusual states of hadronic matter as, for example, a quark-gluon plasma or density isomers.

  9. Multiple beam induction accelerators for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Peter A.; Barnard, John J.; Faltens, Andris; Friedman, Alex; Waldron, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Induction accelerators are appealing for heavy-ion driven inertial fusion energy (HIF) because of their high efficiency and their demonstrated capability to accelerate high beam current (≥10 kA in some applications). For the HIF application, accomplishments and challenges are summarized. HIF research and development has demonstrated the production of single ion beams with the required emittance, current, and energy suitable for injection into an induction linear accelerator. Driver scale beams have been transported in quadrupole channels of the order of 10% of the number of quadrupoles of a driver. We review the design and operation of induction accelerators and the relevant aspects of their use as drivers for HIF. We describe intermediate research steps that would provide the basis for a heavy-ion research facility capable of heating matter to fusion relevant temperatures and densities, and also to test and demonstrate an accelerator architecture that scales well to a fusion power plant.

  10. Dosimetry of heavy ions by use of CCD detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schott, J. U.

    1994-01-01

    The design and the atomic composition of Charge Coupled Devices (CCD's) make them unique for investigations of single energetic particle events. As detector system for ionizing particles they detect single particles with local resolution and near real time particle tracking. In combination with its properties as optical sensor, particle transversals of single particles are to be correlated to any objects attached to the light sensitive surface of the sensor by simple imaging of their shadow and subsequent image analysis of both, optical image and particle effects, observed in affected pixels. With biological objects it is possible for the first time to investigate effects of single heavy ions in tissue or extinguished organs of metabolizing (i.e. moving) systems with a local resolution better than 15 microns. Calibration data for particle detection in CCD's are presented for low energetic protons and heavy ions.

  11. Factorization, the Glasma and the Ridge in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Venugopalan, Raju

    2008-10-13

    High energy heavy ion collisions can be efficiently described as the collision of two sheets of Color Glass Condensate. The dynamics of the collision can be studied ab initio in a systematic effective field theory approach. This requires factorization theorems that separate the initial state evolution of the wave functions with energy from the final state interactions that produce matter with high energy densities called the Glasma. We discuss how this matter is formed, its remarkable properties and its relevance for understanding thermalization of the Quark Gluon Plasma in heavy ion collisions. Long range rapidity correlations in the collision that have a remarkable ridge like structure may allow us to probe early times in the collision and infer directly the properties of the Glasma.

  12. Selected experimental results from heavy-ion collisions at LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Singh, Ranbir; Kumar, Lokesh; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2013-01-01

    We reviewmore » a subset of experimental results from the heavy-ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) facility at CERN. Excellent consistency is observed across all the experiments at the LHC (at center of mass energysNN=2.76 TeV) for the measurements such as charged particle multiplicity density, azimuthal anisotropy coefficients, and nuclear modification factor of charged hadrons. Comparison to similar measurements from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at lower energy (sNN=200 GeV) suggests that the system formed at LHC has a higher energy density and larger system size and lives for a longer time. These measurements are compared to model calculations to obtain physical insights on the properties of matter created at the RHIC and LHC.« less

  13. Nonresonant interaction of heavy ions with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berchem, J.; Gendrin, R.

    1985-01-01

    The motion of a heavy ion in the presence of an intense ultralow-frequency electromagnetic wave propagating along the dc magnetic field is analyzed. Starting from the basic equations of motion and from their associated two invariants, the heavy ion velocity-space trajectories are drawn. It is shown that after a certain time, particles whose initial phase angles are randomly distributed tend to bunch together, provided that the wave intensity b-sub-1 is sufficiently large. The importance of these results for the interpretation of the recently observed acceleration of singly charged He ions in conjunction with the occurrence of large-amplitude ion cyclotron waves in the equatorial magnetosphere is discussed.

  14. Longitudinal beam dynamics for heavy ion fusion using WARPrz

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, D.A.; Langdon, A.B.; Friedman, A.; Haber, I.

    1993-02-22

    WARPrz is a 2.5 dimensional, cylindrically symmetric, electrostatic, particle-in-cell code. It is part of the WARP family of codes which has been developed to study heavy ion fusion driver issues. WARPrz is being used to study the longitudinal dynamics of heavy ion beams including a longitudinal instability that is driven by the impedance of the LINAC accelerating modules. This instability is of concern because it can enhance longitudinal momentum spread; chromatic abhoration in the lens system restricts the amount of momentum spread allowed in the beam in the final focusing system. The impedance of the modules is modeled by a continuum of resistors and capacitors in parallel in WARPrz. We discuss simulations of this instability including the effect of finite temperature and reflection of perturbations off the beam ends. We also discuss intermittency of axial confining fields (``ears`` fields) as a seed for this instability.

  15. Pseudorapidity correlations in heavy ion collisions from viscous fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnai, Akihiko; Schenke, Björn

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate by explicit calculations in 3+1 dimensional viscous relativistic fluid dynamics how two-particle pseudorapidity correlation functions in heavy ion collisions at the LHC and RHIC depend on the number of particle producing sources and the transport properties of the produced medium. In particular, we present results for the Legendre coefficients of the two-particle pseudorapidity correlation function, an,m, in Pb+Pb collisions at 2760 GeV and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV from viscous hydrodynamics with three dimensionally fluctuating initial conditions. Our results suggest that the an,m provide important constraints on initial state fluctuations in heavy ion collisions.

  16. UNIVERSAL BEHAVIOR OF CHARGED PARTICLE PRODUCTION IN HEAVY ION COLLISIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.A.FOR THE PHOBOS COLLABORATION

    2002-07-24

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two observations indicate universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/{bar p}p and e{sup +}e{sup -} data. / in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with {radical}s in a similar way as N{sub ch} in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. These features may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  17. Compact High-Current Heavy-Ion Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G.A.; Grote, D.P.; Kwan, J.W.; Bieniosek, F.

    2005-10-05

    To provide a compact high-brightness heavy-ion beam source for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF), we have been experimenting with merging multi-beamlets in an injector which uses an RF plasma source. An array of converging beamlets was used to produce a beam with the envelope radius, convergence, and ellipticity matched to an electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) channel. Experimental results were in good quantitative agreement with simulation and have demonstrated the feasibility of this concept. The size of a driver-scale injector system using this approach will be several times smaller than one designed using traditional single large-aperture beams. The success of this experiment has possible significant economical and technical impacts on the architecture of HIF drivers.

  18. On compositional variations of heavy ions during solar particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klecker, B.; Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Fan, C. Y.; Fisk, L. A.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Ogallagher, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    Intensity-time profiles of protons, alpha particles, and heavy ions (C, O, Fe) in the MeV/nucleon energy range have been analyzed for one solar particle event following the solar flare on September 23, 1978. The data have been obtained with the wide angle double dE/dx-E sensor of the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland experiment onboard ISEE-3. Time variations in the iron to helium ratio of up to 2 orders of magnitude and a significant variation of the O/He ratio during this event have been found, whereas the C/O-ratio at the same energy/nucleon appears to be time independent. The influence of a rigidity dependent mean free path in interplanetary space and of rigidity dependent coronal propagation on heavy ion ratios during solar particle events was investigated.

  19. Compact High-Current Heavy-Ion Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G A; Grote, D P; Kwan, J W; Bieniosek, F

    2006-04-13

    To provide a compact high-brightness heavy-ion beam source for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF), we have been experimenting with merging multi-beamlets in an injector which uses an RF plasma source. An array of converging beamlets was use to produce a beam with the envelope radius, convergence, and ellipticity matched to an electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) channel. Experimental results were in good quantitative agreement with simulation and have demonstrated the feasibility of this concept. The size of a driver-scale injector system using this approach will be several times smaller than one designed using traditional single large-aperture beams. The success of this experiment has possible significant economical and technical impacts on the architecture of HIF drivers.

  20. Universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phobos Collaboration; Steinberg, Peter A.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two kinds of universal behavior are observed in charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/pbar-p and e+e- data. N_tot/(N_part/2) in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with sqrt(s) in a similar way as N_tot in e+e- collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. This feature may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.