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Sample records for hebenton jon spencer

  1. Herbert Spencer: Victorian Curriculum Theorist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, P.

    1980-01-01

    Assesses the importance of the English philosopher Herbert Spencer (1820-1903) for curriculum development. His main contribution was arguing forcefully in favor of science in the controversy between classical and scientific education in Victorian England. Summarizes the main principles of Spencer's theory of knowledge, examines their application…

  2. Author! Author! Making Kids Laugh: Jon Scieszka

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a brief biography of author Jon Scieszka, best known for his first published title, "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs!" which has become a modern classic. The publication of this creative and inventive title led to the numerous fractured fairy tales published since its release in 1989. His books have received numerous…

  3. Did Herbert Spencer have reading epilepsy?

    PubMed

    Raitiere, Martin N

    2011-10-01

    Herbert Spencer, the nineteenth-century philosopher, has frequently been dismissed as a "fantastical hypochondriac" (as his most recent biographer, Mark Francis, terms him). Yet he left a record in his Autobiography of symptoms that suggest a very different diagnosis. Abruptly at age 35, he found that the activity of reading, previously indulged in without difficulty, triggered paroxysmal episodes of disturbing "head-sensations" including "giddiness" (so Spencer described them); these severely curtailed his ability to carry out his philosophical studies. Of all possible explanations for such episodes, none seems as likely as reading epilepsy. Enduring preconceptions about Spencer's presumed neurosesmay have kept modern historians from appreciating that Spencer suffered from a legitimate, if esoteric, neurological malady. PMID:22003861

  4. Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer Past ... Prostate Cancer" Articles Progress Against Prostate Cancer / Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer / Prostate ...

  5. The Spencer Foundation Annual Report 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer Foundation, Chicago, IL.

    The Spencer Foundation, which began its work in 1970, is dedicated to enhancing the applicability of theory and research findings to educational practice. The projects supported by the foundation, including seed money to attract young researchers to educational problems, direct support of disciplined studies, and a small amount of direct support…

  6. The Daily Show with Jon Stewart: Part 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trier, James

    2008-01-01

    "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart" is one of the best critical literacy programs on television, and in this Media Literacy column the author suggests ways that teachers can use video clips from the show in their classrooms. (For Part 1, see EJ784683.)

  7. "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart": Part 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trier, James

    2008-01-01

    Comedy Central's popular program "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart" is the best critical media literacy program on television, and it can be used in valuable ways in the classroom as part of a media literacy pedagogy. This Media Literacy column provides an overview of the show and its accompanying website and considers ways it might be used in the…

  8. Phytoplankton bloom in Spencer Gulf, South Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Summer in southern Australia is the dry season, and in this true-color MODIS image of South Australia and the Spencer Gulf from October 20,2001, the area's vegetation is losing much of the lushness it possessed in the winter rainy season (See image from September 19, 2001). In southern hemisphere summer, the high pressure systems that dominate the continent's weather move south, and block the rain-bearing westerly winds. The resulting changes in seasonal rainfall are extreme. Many of the rivers are impermanent, and flow into dry or impermanent salt lakes, such as Lake Torrens (long, thin lake bed, roughly in the center of the image), and Lake Eyre (pink and white lake bed to the northwest of Torrens). Between the Eyre Peninsula (lower left) and the Yorke Peninsula further east lies the Spencer Gulf, showing the blue-green swirls that indicate a phytoplankton bloom. Australia gets less rainfall than any continent except Antarctica, and the low and seasonal flows contribute to problems with salinity and algal blooms in the continent's surface waters.

  9. Phytoplankton bloom in Spencer Gulf, Southern Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    South Australia occupies the center of the Australian continent. The deserts of the interior give way to more fertile land along the coast of the Southern Ocean. This true-color MODIS image from September 17, 2001, shows the marked contrast between the country's arid interior--where seasonal salt lakes stand out in white against the deserts' vast, red expanse--and the coastal regions, including Spencer Gulf, to the lower left of the image's center. The characteristic blue-green swirls of a phytoplankton bloom can be seen in the Gulf and southeastward along the coast. To Spencer Gulf's east, the brownish-gray pixels on the eastern coast of the Gulf of St. Vincent indicate the location of the city of Adelaide, the region's capital. The large dark areas that stand out amid the green vegetation do not indicate areas where vegetation had been damaged or burned. In fact, the opposite is actually true. In many cases, those areas are land protected by national and state parks and preserves, where the natural vegetation of the semi-arid landscape is allowed to exist undisturbed. For example, due east of Adelaide are Billiat Conservation Park and the semi-rectangular Murray Sunset National Park, which is across the border from South Australia in Victoria. South of those parks are the parks of the Big Desert (top) and Little Desert (bottom).

  10. 75 FR 42 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Spencer, WV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ... October 19, 2009 (74 FR 53407), Docket No. FAA- 2009-0602; Airspace Docket No. 09-AEA-13. The FAA uses the... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Establishment of Class E Airspace; Spencer, WV AGENCY... that establishes Class E Airspace at Spencer, WV. This action enhances the safety and...

  11. 77 FR 56646 - Wayne E. Spencer: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Wayne E. Spencer: Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and Drug... the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) permanently debarring Wayne E. Spencer from... violation of sections 301(e) and 303(a)(2) of the FD&C Act (21 U.S.C. 331(e), 333(a)(2), and 18 U.S.C....

  12. Spencer Cohomology and 11-Dimensional Supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa-O'Farrill, José; Santi, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    We recover the classification of the maximally supersymmetric bosonic backgrounds of 11-dimensional supergravity by Lie algebraic means. We classify all filtered deformations of the Z-graded subalgebras h=h_{-2} oplus {h}_{-1} oplus{h}0} of the Poincaré superalgebra {{g}={g}_{-2} oplus{g}_{-1} oplus{g}0=Voplus Soplus {so}(V)} which differ only in zero degree, that is {{h}_0subset{g}_0} and {{h}_{j}={g}_{j}} for {{j}<0} . Aside from the Poincaré superalgebra itself and its {{{Z}}} -graded subalgebras, there are only three other Lie superalgebras, which are the symmetry superalgebras of the non-flat maximally supersymmetric backgrounds. In passing we identify the gravitino variation with (a component of) a Spencer cocycle.

  13. Mind Is Primarily a Verb: An Examination of Mistaken Similarities between John Dewey and Herbert Spencer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zebrowski, Robin L.

    2008-01-01

    In educational scholarship, a number of comparisons have been made between the work of John Dewey and Herbert Spencer, many claiming that Spencer's influence is unmistakable in Dewey's theories or even that Dewey is derivative of Spencer. However, one must look beyond the surface similarities of Dewey and Spencer and recognize the drastically…

  14. Straight talk with...James Ironside. [Interviewed by Jon Evans].

    PubMed

    Ironside, James

    2009-08-01

    Would you entrust your brain to a bank? Well, many people do after they die, and such brain banks-often funded by government agencies or disease charities-are essential for neuroscience research. They collect and store the healthy and diseased brain specimens that neuroscientists need to explore neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia and autism. Each brain bank typically has a limited supply of samples and tends to operate fairly independently. This means that researchers often have to trawl through numerous brain banks to find their desired specimens. Furthermore, there is a general shortage of brain samples. To help resolve these issues in the UK, James Ironside, professor of clinical neuropathology at the University of Edinburgh, was appointed in June as the director of the new UK Brain Banks Network. An expert in human prion diseases, particularly Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Ironside knows all about brain banks. He established the Brain and Tissue Bank at the UK's National CJD Surveillance Unit and is involved in the Sudden Death Brain and Tissue Bank at the University of Edinburgh. Jon Evans recently caught up with Ironside to discuss his new leadership position and how the brain network will benefit neuroscience research. PMID:19661981

  15. Explaining the universe: Herbert Spencer's attempt to synthesize political and evolutionary ideas.

    PubMed

    Gay, H

    1999-01-01

    Herbert Spencer's evolutionary ideas related not just to the biological world but to the universe and everything in it. Human societies were also viewed through his evolutionary lens so that Spencer's evolutionary and political ideas are inextricably entwined. This essay looks at some of Spencer's ideas and attempts to locate them in the social and intellectual context of his youth. It also speculates on the rise and fall of Spencer's reputation. PMID:10507908

  16. View of Astronaut Jon McBride during Zero-G training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    View of Astronaut Jon McBride during Zero-G training on the KC-135. He is preparing for the 41-G mission on the space shuttle Challenger. In this view he appears to be floating over the seats in the rear of the KC-135, while Canadian Marc Garneau sits with his eyes closed.

  17. Humor, Simplicity, and Experimentation in the Picture Books of Jon Agee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashore, Kristin

    2003-01-01

    Notes that in his 20-year tenure as a picture book artist, Jon Agee, has produced a number of books that greatly vary in appearance. Provides examples of Agee's evolution as an artist while demonstrating his metafictive experimentation with artistic conventions, his play with concepts of reality and impossibility, and his abundant talent for…

  18. The Big Cheese: Jon Scieszka, National Ambassador for Young People's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minkel, Walter

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Jon Scieszka, author of "The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales" who is tapped by the "Children's Book Council" and the Library of Congress's "Center for the Book" as the first National Ambassador for Young People's Literature. A former grade-school teacher, Scieszka is also the creator of Guys…

  19. Lost Innocent and Sacrificial Delegate: The JonBenet Ramsey Murder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Joann

    1999-01-01

    Analyzes murder case of 6-year-old JonBenet Ramsey as emblematic of American cultural fascination with images of the innocence of children and the perfect family, and of a change in cultural self-awareness as these images prove illusionary. Considers the role of mass media in marketing a cultural fascination with sexualized images of children and…

  20. Lithofacies of Spencer Formation, western Tualatin Valley, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Van Atta, R.O.

    1986-04-01

    The Spencer Formation crops out in a narrow band that trends north-northwest on the western edge of the Willamette and Tualatin Valleys, Oregon. It apparently conformably overlies mud rocks of either the Yamhill or the Nestucca Formation and is conformably overlain by the Pittsburgh Bluff Formation. The Spencer Formation consists of two members (informal): a lower highly micaceous sandstone (800-1000 ft) and an upper member that is micaceous siltstone and mudstone (1000-1300 ft). The lower member includes an upper part that is light-gray to creamy-gray, silty to muddy, pebbly lithic arkose to feldspathic litharenite, with minor arkose. Sorting is poor and beds may be laminated to ripple cross-laminated or massive and bioturbated with abundant mollusk shells, carbonized wood, and burrows. The lower part of the lower member is medium-gray to greenish-gray, silty, pumiceous lithic arkose to feldspathic litharenite. The texture tends to be more uniform and better sorted than that of the upper part of the member. Bedding is commonly massive due to bioturbation. The upper member is medium to dark-gray mudstone with thin pebble-conglomerate lenses. It intertongues with the lower member. Bioturbation, burrows, and carbonized wood are common. The trend in depositional environments appears to be from outer to mid-neritic (lower part, lower member) to shallow neritic, nearshore, and lagoonal (upper part, lower member, and upper member). The provenance of the Spencer Formation includes both proximal volcanics and distant plutonic and high-grade metamorphics.

  1. 77 FR 75223 - Spencer Pharmaceutical Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Spencer Pharmaceutical Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading December 17, 2012. It appears to the Securities and Exchange Commission that there is a lack of current and accurate information concerning the securities of Spencer...

  2. Developing the next Generation of Education Researchers: UCLA's Experience with the Spencer Foundation Research Training Grant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorr, Aimee; Arms, Emily; Hall, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    Background/Context: In the early 1990s, the Spencer Foundation instituted an Institutional Research Training Grant (RTG) program to improve the preparation of the next generation of education researchers. UCLA received an RTG in the first round of competition. Purpose/Objective/Research Question/Focus of Study: UCLA's Spencer RTG program sought to…

  3. From Rousseau to Evolutionism: Herbert Spencer on the Science of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson, Stephen

    1996-01-01

    Reviews the contributions and educational philosophy of Herbert Spencer. The 19th-century social philosopher was an advocate of Pestalozzianism, an early form of open education and a precursor to John Dewey's progressive education. Discusses a broad range of educational reform movements and how they influenced Spencer. (MJP)

  4. Jon Carlson: Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology.

    PubMed

    2011-11-01

    Presents Jon Carlson as the 2011 winner of the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology. "For his contributions in creating educational and training materials in psychology for instruction and the public. Jon Carlson has a distinguished career in higher education, maintained an active private practice, served 34 years as a school psychologist/counselor, is a prolific author and scholar, and is an innovator in the development of media-based training materials. His contribution to education and training is noteworthy for the volume of his professional production, the scope of topics addressed, and his ability to provide meaningful tools to change how psychologists are trained. His audiovisual work documents the profession of psychology in terms of research and practice for current scholars and for future generations." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:22082400

  5. Yetta Goodman, Maxine Greene, Louise Rosenblatt, and Margaret Meek Spencer: Language, Literacy, and Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Denny

    2004-01-01

    Profiles of Yetta Goodman, Maxine Greene, Louise Rosenblatt, and Margaret Meek Spencer are given. They are the members of International Scholars' Forums in Literacy Studies at Hofstra, whose focus is language, literacy, politics and education.

  6. The "History" of Victorian Scientific Naturalism: Huxley, Spencer and the "End" of natural history.

    PubMed

    Lightman, Bernard

    2016-08-01

    As part of their defence of evolutionary theory, T. H. Huxley and Herbert Spencer argued that natural history was no longer a legitimate scientific discipline. They outlined a secularized concept of life from biology to argue for the validity of naturalism. Despite their support for naturalism, they offered two different responses to the decline of natural history. Whereas Huxley emphasized the creation of a biological discipline, and all that that entailed, Spencer was more concerned with constructing an entire intellectual system based on the idea of evolution. In effect, Spencer wanted to create a new scientific worldview based on evolutionary theory. This had consequences for their understanding of human history, especially of how science had evolved through the ages. It affected their conceptions of human agency, contingency, and directionality in history. Examining Huxley's and Spencer's responses to the "end" of natural history reveals some of the deep divisions within scientific naturalism and the inherent problems of naturalism in general. Whereas Huxley chose to separate the natural and the historical, Spencer opted to fuse them into a single system. PMID:26751794

  7. Darwin and Spencer on the origin of music: is music the food of love?

    PubMed

    Kleinman, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Finding an evolutionary explanation for the origins of music serves as a rich test of broader ideas on the emergence of mind and the evolution of mental processes. Charles Darwin and Herbert Spencer both offered evolutionary explanations for the origins of music, indicating the importance of the question for these two leading nineteenth-century students of "descent with modification." Their discussion unfolded between the publication of Spencer's "The origin and function of music" in 1857 and Darwin's commentaries on music in The Descent of Man in 1871 with an addendum Spencer offered to his original article in light of Darwin's views. They had conflicting views on the lines of causation, asked differing questions, and had fundamentally different approaches. Their exchange laid the foundation for the discussion among contemporary adaptationists and nonadaptationists and contributed to the thinking of those who argue for Mixed Origins of Music or that it is a Transformative Technology of Mind. PMID:25725907

  8. Margaret Beale Spencer Delivers AERA's Fourth Annual "Brown" Lecture in Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article describes AERA's Fourth Annual "Brown" Lecture in Education Research delivered by internationally known education researcher and developmental psychologist Margaret Beale Spencer. The Lecture--"Lessons Learned and Opportunities Ignored Post-"Brown v. Board of Education": Youth Development and the Myth of a Colorblind Society"--drew…

  9. A TIME TO TRAIN, AN ACCOUNT OF EXPERIENCE GAINED BY RTB, AT ITS SPENCER WORKS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAKER, JAMES; REYNOLDS, O.W.

    EDUCATION AND TRAINING, BEGINNING 18 MONTHS BEFORE THE OPENING IN 1962 OF THE NEW SPENCER WORKS STEEL PLANT OF RICHARD THOMAS AND BALDWINS, LTD., IN MONMOUTHSHIRE, ENGLAND, INVOLVED ALL LEVELS OF PERSONNEL. (SOME PROGRAMS, FOR EXAMPLE, FOR CLERICALS, WERE DELAYED UNTIL AFTER THE OPENING.) THE UNDEVELOPED SITE, RADICALLY NEW EQUIPMENT AND…

  10. 46 CFR 7.150 - Canadian (BC) and United States (AK) Borders to Cape Spencer, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Canadian (BC) and United States (AK) Borders to Cape Spencer, AK. 7.150 Section 7.150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.150 Canadian (BC) and United States (AK) Borders to...

  11. 46 CFR 7.150 - Canadian (BC) and United States (AK) Borders to Cape Spencer, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Canadian (BC) and United States (AK) Borders to Cape Spencer, AK. 7.150 Section 7.150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.150 Canadian (BC) and United States (AK) Borders to...

  12. A theoretical re-examination of Spencer-Attix cavity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Hugo

    2012-06-01

    The aim of radiation dosimetry is to evaluate, under specific conditions, absorbed dose in a medium of interest using a detection device. In comparison to what is meant to be evaluated, the distinctive composition of the detector causes particle fluence perturbation and shifted absorbed-dose response, both effects depending on beam quality. For electron and megavoltage photon beams, Spencer-Attix cavity theory further adapted by Nahum remains the accepted standard method used to convert absorbed dose in a wall-less detector to absorbed dose in the medium of interest. For several decades, the approach has been widely used in protocols to generate data for ionization chamber dosimetry. As a considerable effort was made towards accurate Monte Carlo methods, computation techniques are nowadays available to determine absorbed dose accurately in complex geometries, including radiation detectors. In the development of nonstandard beam protocols, direct Monte Carlo dose calculations using realistic models are being suggested and used to generate data for ionization chamber dosimetry. This indicates that for a general dosimetric context, including nonstandard beams, a more general cavity theory in agreement with what is currently being done could be adopted. Not only this could be of interest in the dosimetry standards community, but also for educational purposes. This paper re-examines Spencer-Attix theory from first principles, using a new general cavity theory rigorously derived from radiation transport equations. The approach is based on the same schematization as for Spencer-Attix’s (i.e. groups of slow and fast electrons) and yields a general expression of absorbed dose for suitably implemented Monte Carlo methods. The Spencer-Attix-Nahum formulation is shown to be a special case of the presented model, outlining specific issues of the standard method. By providing an expression of absorbed dose which reflects the gold standard calculation method (i.e. Monte Carlo

  13. Flood-inundation maps for the White River at Spencer, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nystrom, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 5.3-mile reach of the White River at Spencer, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage White River at Spencer, Indiana (sta. no. 03357000). Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/. National Weather Service (NWS)-forecasted peak-stage inforamation may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relation at the White River at Spencer, Indiana, streamgage and documented high-water marks from the flood of June 8, 2008. The hydraulic model was then used to compute 20 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from the NWS action stage (9 feet) to the highest rated stage (28 feet) at the streamgage. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data) in order to delineate the area flooded at each water level. The availability of these maps along with Internet information regarding the current stage from the Spencer USGS streamgage and forecasted stream stages from the NWS will provide emergency management personnel and residents with information that is critical for flood response activities, such as evacuations and road

  14. Exploring the Investment: Four Universities' Experiences with the Spencer Foundation's Research Training Grant Program--A Retrospective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Anna; Pallas, Aaron; Peterson, Penelope

    2008-01-01

    Background: This article serves as a conclusion to a TCR special issue devoted to understanding the impact of the Spencer Foundation's Research Training Grant (RTG) initiative. We examine four case reports prepared by scholars at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of California at Los Angeles…

  15. Herbert Spencer's contributions to behavior analysis: a retrospective review of principles of psychology.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Julian C

    2006-07-01

    Herbert Spencer's Principles of Psychology (1855, first edition) was regarded by his contemporaries, including William James and John Dewey, as a major contribution to what was then a very new discipline. In this book he first expounded his ideas about both evolution of species and how behavior of the individual organism adapts through interaction with the environment. His formulation of the principle that behavior changes in adaptation to the environment is closely related to the version of the law of effect propounded some years later by Thorndike. He can thus be seen as the first proponent of selectionism, a key tenet of behavior analysis. He also explicitly attacked the then prevailing view of free will as being incompatible with the biologically grounded view of psychological processes that he was advocating, and thus put forward ideas that were precursors of B. F. Skinner's in this important area of debate. PMID:16903496

  16. Time reverse automata patterns generated by Spencer-Brown's modulator: invertibility based on autopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Gunji, Y; Nakamura, T

    1991-01-01

    In the present paper the self-consistency or operational closure of autopoiesis is described by introducing time explicitly. It is an extension of Spencer-Brown's idea of time, however. The definition of time is segregated into two parts, corresponding to the syntax and semantics of language, respectively. In this context, time reversibility is defined by the formalization of the relationship between time and self-consistency. This idea has also been discussed in the context of designation and/or naming. Here we will discuss it in the context of cellular automata and explain the structure of one-to-many type mappings. Our approach is the first attempt to extend autopoietic systems in terms of dynamics. It illustrates how to introduce an autopoietic time which looks irreversible, but without the concept of entropy. PMID:1912385

  17. Cane Creek flood-flow characteristics at State Route 30 near Spencer, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gamble, Charles R.

    1983-01-01

    The Tennessee Department of Transportation has constructed a new bridge and approaches on State Route 30 over Cane Creek near Spencer, Tennessee. The old bridge and its approaches were fairly low, permitting considerable flow over the road during high floods. The new bridge and its approaches are considerably higher, causing different flow conditions at the site. Analysis of the effects of the new bridge, as compared to the old bridge, on floods of the magnitude of the May 27, 1973, flood is presented. The May 27, 1973, flood was greater than a 100-year flood. Analysis of the 50- and 100-year floods for the new bridge are also presented. Results of the study indicate that the new construction will increase the water-surface elevation for a flood equal to the May 27, 1973, flood by approximately 1 foot upstream from bridge. (USGS)

  18. Geochemistry of Spencer-High Point Volcanic Field Lava Flows, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwahashi, G. S.; Hughes, S. S.

    2007-12-01

    Lava flows in Spencer-High Point (SHP) volcanic field, an ~1700 sq km mafic volcanic rift zone located near Yellowstone in the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), have been compared physically and chemically to other ESRP olivine tholeiites. Overall, SHP lavas are geochemically similar to other ESRP olivine tholeiites but their geomorphology is entirely different. The structural alignment of vents and fissures in an east-west direction in the Spencer-High Point region contrasts with most of the ESRP volcanic features aligned northwest-southeast. Numerous cinder cones at SHP, features that characterize Craters of the Moon volcanic field, are unusual on most of the eastern Snake River Plain. This study agrees with preliminary geochemical data by Leeman (1982) and Kuntz et al. (1992) suggesting that SHP lavas are typical ESRP basalts. However, a broad range of geochemical compositions exists in the SHP field that is similar to the entire range of ESRP olivine tholeiites. A few of the samples are actually closer in composition to lavas present at Craters of the Moon but only a limited number of samples from vents with physically higher relief, in the central and eastern portions of the field show these evolved chemical compositions. Typically Ta ranges 0.5-4.5ppm, La 20-90ppm, Ba 200-1100ppm and Cr 7-550ppm. Some lava flows in the central and eastern sections of SHP volcanic field also contain crustal xenoliths, implying a prolonged crustal history. These results although preliminary, suggest that the SHP system represents a possible petrologic transition between the dominant ESRP tholeiites and the evolved compositions found at Craters of the Moon.

  19. Erasmus Darwin, Herbert Spencer, and the origins of the evolutionary worldview in British provincial scientific culture, 1770-1850.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Paul

    2003-03-01

    The significance of Herbert Spencer's evolutionary philosophy has been generally recognized for over a century, as the familiarity of his phrase "survival of the fittest" indicates, yet accounts of the origins of his system still tend to follow too closely his own description, written many decades later. This essay argues that Spencer's own interpretation of his intellectual development gives an inadequate impression of the debt he owed to provincial scientific culture and its institutions. Most important, it shows that his evolutionism was originally stimulated by his association with the Derby philosophical community, for it was through this group--of which his father, who also appears to have espoused a deistic evolutionary theory, was a member--that he was first exposed to progressive Englightenment social and educational philosophies and to the evolutionary worldview of Erasmus Darwin, the first president of the Derby Philosophical Society. Darwin's scheme was the first to incorporate biological evolution, associationist psychology, evolutionary geology, and cosmological developmentalism. Spencer's own implicit denials of the link with Darwin are shown to be implausible in the face of Darwin's continuing influence on the Derby savants, the product of insecurity in his later years when he feared for his reputation as Lamarckism became increasingly untenable. PMID:12725102

  20. From 'circumstances' to 'environment': Herbert Spencer and the origins of the idea of organism-environment interaction.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Trevor

    2010-09-01

    The word 'environment' has a history. Before the mid-nineteenth century, the idea of a singular, abstract entity--the organism--interacting with another singular, abstract entity--the environment--was virtually unknown. In this paper I trace how the idea of a plurality of external conditions or circumstances was replaced by the idea of a singular environment. The central figure behind this shift, at least in Anglo-American intellectual life, was the philosopher Herbert Spencer. I examine Spencer's work from 1840 to 1855, demonstrating that he was exposed to a variety of discussions of the 'force of circumstances' in this period, and was decisively influenced by the ideas of Auguste Comte in the years preceding the publication of Principles of psychology (1855). It is this latter work that popularized the word 'environment' and the corresponding idea of organism--environment interaction--an idea with important metaphysical and methodological implications. Spencer introduced into the English-speaking world one of our most enduring dichotomies: organism and environment. PMID:20934645

  1. Automatic classification of unexploded ordnance applied to Spencer Range live site for 5x5 TEMTADS sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigman, John B.; Barrowes, Benjamin E.; O'Neill, Kevin; Shubitidze, Fridon

    2013-06-01

    This paper details methods for automatic classification of Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) as applied to sensor data from the Spencer Range live site. The Spencer Range is a former military weapons range in Spencer, Tennessee. Electromagnetic Induction (EMI) sensing is carried out using the 5x5 Time-domain Electromagnetic Multi-sensor Towed Array Detection System (5x5 TEMTADS), which has 25 receivers and 25 co-located transmitters. Every transmitter is activated sequentially, each followed by measuring the magnetic field in all 25 receivers, from 100 microseconds to 25 milliseconds. From these data target extrinsic and intrinsic parameters are extracted using the Differential Evolution (DE) algorithm and the Ortho-Normalized Volume Magnetic Source (ONVMS) algorithms, respectively. Namely, the inversion provides x, y, and z locations and a time series of the total ONVMS principal eigenvalues, which are intrinsic properties of the objects. The eigenvalues are fit to a power-decay empirical model, the Pasion-Oldenburg model, providing 3 coefficients (k, b, and g) for each object. The objects are grouped geometrically into variably-sized clusters, in the k-b-g space, using clustering algorithms. Clusters matching a priori characteristics are identified as Targets of Interest (TOI), and larger clusters are automatically subclustered. Ground Truths (GT) at the center of each class are requested, and probability density functions are created for clusters that have centroid TOI using a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM). The probability functions are applied to all remaining anomalies. All objects of UXO probability higher than a chosen threshold are placed in a ranked dig list. This prioritized list is scored and the results are demonstrated and analyzed.

  2. Sorption of Cd2+ Ions From Aqueous Solutions on Organic Wastes / Sorpcja Jonów Cd2+ Z Roztworów Wodnych Na Odpadach Organicznych

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bożęcka, Agnieszka; Sanak-Rydlewska, Stanisława

    2015-09-01

    This article presents the results of research on the Cd2+ ions sorption from model aqueous solutions on sunflower hulls, walnut shells and plum stones. The effect of various factors, such as mass of the natural sorbent, the pH, the time and the temperature was studied. The process of Cd2+ ions sorption on studied sorbents was described by the Langmuir model. The best sorption capacity has been achieved for sunflower hulls. The maximum sorption capacity for this material was 19.93 mg/g. W artykule przedstawiono wyniki badań, które dotyczyły usuwania jonów Cd2+ z modelowych roztworów wodnych za pomocą odpadów organicznych, takich jak: łuski słonecznika, łupiny orzecha włoskiego i pestki śliwek. Wykazano, iż badane materiały mogą być skutecznie wykorzystywane do usuwania jonów Cd2+ z modelowych roztworów wodnych w układach jednoskładnikowych. Dla badanego zakresu stężeń i przyjętych warunków procesu sorpcji w układach jednoskładnikowych, największą wydajność sorpcji jonów Cd2+, osiągnięto dla łuszczyn słonecznika. Wyniosła ona 81,75-93,02%. Dla pozostałych materiałów sorpcja jest nieco niższa, ale również zadowalająca. W pracy podano interpretację otrzymanych wyników w oparciu o jeden z najpopularniejszych modeli izoterm adsorpcji - Langmuira, który potwierdził, iż najlepszym sorbentem jonów Cd2+, spośród badanych, są łuszczyny słonecznika. Materiał ten cechuje się największą wartością parametrów qmax i b izotermy Langmuira. W tym przypadku stała qmax, wyrażająca pojemność monowarstwy, przyjęła wartość 19,93 mg/g, a parametr b, określający powinowactwo do usuwanych jonów wynosi 0,2264 dm3/mg (Rys. 5, Tab. 1). Udowodniono również, że proces sorpcji jonów Cd2+ na badanych sorbentach organicznych zależy od masy sorbentu. Dla wszystkich materiałów stopień usunięcia jonów Cd2+ z roztworów wodnych rośnie ze wzrostem masy sorbentu, aż do uzyskania maksimum przy naważce 0,5 g (Rys. 1

  3. Impacts of trawling on benthic macro-fauna and -flora of the Spencer Gulf prawn fishing grounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svane, Ib; Hammett, Zoe; Lauer, Peter

    2009-05-01

    The overall effects of trawling on benthic habitats and their assemblages are dependent on the distribution and intensity of trawl effort. The benthic habitats of the Spencer Gulf prawn trawling grounds are subjected to known variable levels of trawling disturbance recorded from fisher's logbooks. These habitats have not been quantitatively investigated. The aim of the study was firstly to characterise the macro-faunal and -floral assemblages and secondly, to comparatively assess trawl impact by testing the null hypothesis of no differences between five sites exposed to different intensity of trawl effort. The distribution and abundance of benthic macro-fauna and -flora were studied at two sampling resolutions by using beam trawl sampling (˜10,000 m 2) and underwater stereophotography (˜4.5 m 2) at five sites with different levels of trawl disturbance (effort). The results showed that the Spencer Gulf prawn trawling grounds are characterised by sandy sediments with a low content of silt and clay, with the exception of one site with very fine gravel. Biomass, abundance and cover of macro-fauna and -flora were generally low throughout, but with large differences among sites. Biomass, abundance and cover were found to be negatively correlated to both trawl hours from 1994-1998 and during the period of study. ANOSIM and SIMPER analyses using biomass, abundance and percentage cover as variables showed significant differences between sites with eight species or taxonomic groups contributing more than 10% to the observed similarity within sites. The two northern sites were dominated by sponges and the bearded mussel, Trichomya hirsutus, and the southern hammer oyster, Malleus meridianus. Other species that contributed to the similarity within sites were the ascidian, Polycarpa viridis, mobile epifauna (the blue swimmer crab, Portunus pelagicus, and the western king prawn, Penaeus (Melicertus) latisulcatus) and demersal fish species (Degens leatherjacket, Thamnaconus

  4. "Improvement, Always and Everywhere": William George Spencer (1790-1866) and Mathematical, Geographical and Scientific Education in Nineteenth-Century England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Given the prominence in Victorian society of some of William George Spencer's pupils, his development of an extended curriculum for both sexes, and the fact that his textbook on inventional geometry was considered to be the most Pestalozzian published in England, he remains a remarkably undervalued figure in the history of education. Despite a…

  5. The 'Mandarin-missionary' strategy: Robert Kennicott, Spencer Fullerton Baird and specimen collection in the Hudson's Bay Territory.

    PubMed

    Laubacher, Matthew

    2012-06-01

    In 1859, Robert Kennicott, one of the most promising specimen collectors and young naturalists in the United States, was dispatched to Hudson's Bay Territory by Spencer Fullerton Baird, the Assistant Secretary of the Smithsonian. Kennicott was chosen because of previous experience in Canada, the familiarity with biota of the American Midwest, and because he had a boundless, infectious, enthusiasm for natural history that was typical among Baird's closest protégées. Kennicott was a natural scientific envoy--or missionary--to the officers of the Hudson's Bay Company, and many officers were enthusiastically 'converted' to the cause of collecting and/or overseeing the collection of natural history specimens. Due to this collaboration between Baird, Kennicott and the officers of the Hudson's Bay Company, the Smithsonian became a leading center of Canadian natural history in the Western hemisphere. PMID:22410313

  6. Statement of Jon Baron, President, Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy. House Committee on Ways and Means, Subcommittee on Human Resources Hearing on the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In his testimony, Jon Baron, president of Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy, recommends reauthorization of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (MIECHV) Program. He outlines three reasons that support his recommendation: (1) MIECHV represents an important, bipartisan departure from the usual approach to social…

  7. Water-Temperature Data for the Colorado River and Tributaries Between Glen Canyon Dam and Spencer Canyon, Northern Arizona, 1988-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voichick, Nicholas; Wright, Scott A.

    2007-01-01

    The regulation of flow of the Colorado River by Glen Canyon Dam began in 1963. This resulted in significant changes to the downstream ecosystem of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, contributing to the initiation of the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies program in 1982, followed by establishment of the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program in 1996. This report describes a water-temperature dataset collected through these programs for the reach of the Colorado River and selected tributaries between Glen Canyon Dam and Spencer Canyon (approximately 261 river miles) in northern Arizona from 1988 to 2005. The primary purposes of the report are to summarize the methods of data collection, processing, and editing; to present summary statistics; and to make the data described in the report available.

  8. Dosimetric response of variable-size cavities in photon-irradiated media and the behaviour of the Spencer-Attix cavity integral with increasing Δ.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Deshpande, Deepak D; Nahum, Alan E

    2016-04-01

    Cavity theory is fundamental to understanding and predicting dosimeter response. Conventional cavity theories have been shown to be consistent with one another by deriving the electron (+positron) and photon fluence spectra with the FLURZnrc user-code (EGSnrc Monte-Carlo system) in large volumes under quasi-CPE for photon beams of 1 MeV and 10 MeV in three materials (water, aluminium and copper) and then using these fluence spectra to evaluate and then inter-compare the Bragg-Gray, Spencer-Attix and 'large photon' 'cavity integrals'. The behaviour of the 'Spencer-Attix dose' (aka restricted cema), D S-A(▵), in a 1-MeV photon field in water has been investigated for a wide range of values of the cavity-size parameter ▵: D S-A(▵) decreases far below the Monte-Carlo dose (D MC) for ▵ greater than  ≈  30 keV due to secondary electrons with starting energies below ▵ not being 'counted'. We show that for a quasi-scatter-free geometry (D S-A(▵)/D MC) is closely equal to the proportion of energy transferred to Compton electrons with initial (kinetic) energies above ▵, derived from the Klein-Nishina (K-N) differential cross section. (D S-A(▵)/D MC) can be used to estimate the maximum size of a detector behaving as a Bragg-Gray cavity in a photon-irradiated medium as a function of photon-beam quality (under quasi CPE) e.g. a typical air-filled ion chamber is 'Bragg-Gray' at (monoenergetic) beam energies  ⩾260 keV. Finally, by varying the density of a silicon cavity (of 2.26 mm diameter and 2.0 mm thickness) in water, the response of different cavity 'sizes' was simulated; the Monte-Carlo-derived ratio D w/D Si for 6 MV and 15 MV photons varied from very close to the Spencer-Attix value at 'gas' densities, agreed well with Burlin cavity theory as ρ increased, and approached large photon behaviour for ρ  ≈  10 g cm(-3). The estimate of ▵ for the Si cavity was improved by incorporating a Monte-Carlo-derived correction for

  9. Dosimetric response of variable-size cavities in photon-irradiated media and the behaviour of the Spencer-Attix cavity integral with increasing Δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Deshpande, Deepak D.; Nahum, Alan E.

    2016-04-01

    Cavity theory is fundamental to understanding and predicting dosimeter response. Conventional cavity theories have been shown to be consistent with one another by deriving the electron (+positron) and photon fluence spectra with the FLURZnrc user-code (EGSnrc Monte-Carlo system) in large volumes under quasi-CPE for photon beams of 1 MeV and 10 MeV in three materials (water, aluminium and copper) and then using these fluence spectra to evaluate and then inter-compare the Bragg-Gray, Spencer-Attix and ‘large photon’ ‘cavity integrals’. The behaviour of the ‘Spencer-Attix dose’ (aka restricted cema), D S-A(▵), in a 1-MeV photon field in water has been investigated for a wide range of values of the cavity-size parameter ▵: D S-A(▵) decreases far below the Monte-Carlo dose (D MC) for ▵ greater than  ≈  30 keV due to secondary electrons with starting energies below ▵ not being ‘counted’. We show that for a quasi-scatter-free geometry (D S-A(▵)/D MC) is closely equal to the proportion of energy transferred to Compton electrons with initial (kinetic) energies above ▵, derived from the Klein-Nishina (K-N) differential cross section. (D S-A(▵)/D MC) can be used to estimate the maximum size of a detector behaving as a Bragg-Gray cavity in a photon-irradiated medium as a function of photon-beam quality (under quasi CPE) e.g. a typical air-filled ion chamber is ‘Bragg-Gray’ at (monoenergetic) beam energies  ⩾260 keV. Finally, by varying the density of a silicon cavity (of 2.26 mm diameter and 2.0 mm thickness) in water, the response of different cavity ‘sizes’ was simulated; the Monte-Carlo-derived ratio D w/D Si for 6 MV and 15 MV photons varied from very close to the Spencer-Attix value at ‘gas’ densities, agreed well with Burlin cavity theory as ρ increased, and approached large photon behaviour for ρ  ≈  10 g cm-3. The estimate of ▵ for the Si cavity was improved by incorporating a Monte

  10. Identification of crude oil source facies in Railroad Valley, Nevada, using multivariate analysis of crude oil and hydrous pyrolysis data from the Meridian Spencer Federal 32-29 well

    SciTech Connect

    Conlan, L.M.; Francis, R.D. )

    1991-03-01

    Comparison of biological markers of a hydrous pyrolyzate of Mississippian-Chainman Shale from the Meridian Spencer Federal 32-29 well with two crude oils produced from the same well and crude oils produced from Trap Springs, Grant Canyon, Bacon Flats, and Eagle Springs fields indicate the possibility of three distinct crude oil source facies within Railroad Valley, Nevada. The two crude oil samples produced in the Meridian Spencer Federal 32-29 well are from the Eocene Sheep Pass Formation (MSF-SP) at 10,570 ft and the Joana Limestone (MSF-J) at 13,943 ft; the pyrolyzate is from the Chainman Shale at 10,700 ft. The Chainman Shale pyrolyzate has a similar composition to oils produced in Trap Springs and Grant Canyon fields. Applying multivariate statistical analysis to biological marker data shows that the Chainman Shale is a possible source for oil produced at Trap Springs because of the similarities between Trap Springs oils and the Chainman Shale pyrolyzate. It is also apparent that MSF-SP and oils produced in the Eagle Springs field have been generated from a different source (probably the Sheep Pass Formation) because of the presence of gammacerane (C{sub 30}). MSF-J and Bacon Flats appear to be either sourced from a pre-Mississippian unit or from a different facies within the Chainman Shale because of the apparent differences between MSF-J and Chainman Shale pyrolyzate.

  11. Spencer Jones, Sir Harold (1890-1960)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Astronomer, born in London, England. He was chief assistant to Frank Dyson at Greenwich and worked at the Royal Observatory at the Cape of Good Hope. Following in the tracks of DAVID GILL, he repeated Gill's photographic survey of the southern sky (Cape Photographic Catalogue, CPC). He then organized the international project to determine Earth-Sun distance by repeated measurements of the asteroi...

  12. An Interview with Jon Wallace, Christian College President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntire, David

    2010-01-01

    Without question, effective leadership is essential to the future of higher education. Presidential leadership is seen as the key to strategically positioning the future of colleges and universities. This may be even more critical for Christian institutions. It is imperative that boards are successful in selecting, developing, and supporting their…

  13. How Spencer Made Number: First Uses of the Number Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mix, Kelly S.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the development of number concepts between infancy and early childhood. It is based on a diary study that tracked number word use in a child from 12 to 38 months of age. Number words appeared early in the child's vocabulary, but accurate reference to specific numerosities evolved gradually over the entire 27-month period.…

  14. The Blessings of Authenticity: An Interview with Myla and Jon Kabat-Zinn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Charlie; Prystowski, Richard; Kabat-Zinn, Myla; Kabat-Zinn, Jon

    2001-01-01

    The authors of a book on parenting maintain their book is about the state of being while raising children, which they feel is a spiritual experience. Allowing children their sovereignty; learning from pain and chaos; not projecting expectations onto children; and the importance of paying attention to the present moment, a concept borrowed from…

  15. 78 FR 42064 - Before Commissioners: Jon Wellinghoff, Chairman; Philip D. Moeller, John R. Norris, Cheryl A...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    .... Norris, Cheryl A. LaFleur, and Tony Clark; Order Approving Reliability Standard: North American Electric Reliability Corporation 1. On December 31, 2012, as amended on January 4, 2013, the North American Electric... the Electric Reliability Organization (ERO), as defined in section 215 of the FPA, in July 2006.\\2\\...

  16. Critical Event Preparedness and Response: Keynote Address to the 2006 Sloan Research Workshop by Jon Links

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Janet C.

    2008-01-01

    At the intersection of online education and preparedness, Johns Hopkins University's (JHU) Center for Public Health Preparedness provides all-hazards preparedness and response training for public health and public safety professionals. This report comes from Jonathan Links' keynote address to the Sloan Summer Research Workshop in Baltimore,…

  17. Jon Stewart Comes to Class: The Learning Effects of "America (The Book)" in Introduction to American Government Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgartner, Jody C.; Morris, Jonathan S.

    2008-01-01

    This project posits that incorporating political humor into the classroom can have a positive effect on learning in higher education. Specifically, we present preliminary findings from a quasi-experiment in which a humorous, "mock" textbook titled America (The Book) (Stewart, Karlin, and Javerbaum 2004) was incorporated into Introduction to…

  18. 76 FR 72197 - Before Commissioners: Jon Wellinghoff, Chairman; Philip D. Moeller, John R. Norris, and Cheryl A...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    ...'s requirements. \\16\\ 76 FR 7557 (2011). 11. MISO and NYISO state that Reliability Standard FAC-013-2... allow planning coordinators a reasonable time, after certain related Modeling, Data, and Analysis (MOD... framework for the calculation of transfer capabilities, including data inputs and modeling...

  19. Cultural Tools and Learning Processes in a Changing World. Final Report to the Spencer Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfield, Patricia M.

    This research study centers on the interrelations among culture, social change, informal education, and cognitive development. The study explored how changing cultural and social conditions influence processes of informal education and their cognitive consequences. The overall goal was to examine the relationship between important cultural tools,…

  20. Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Affairs, both sponsor and conduct clinical trials. Numerous organizations, physicians, medical institutions, foundations, volunteer groups, and pharmaceutical companies also undertake clinical trials. How Can I Find ...

  1. Hydrologic evaluation of a hypothetical coal-mining site near Chrisney, Spencer County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zogorski, John S.; Ramey, Daniel S.; Lambert, Paul W.; Martin, Jeffrey D.; Warner, Robert E.

    1980-01-01

    was completed to improve the understanding of the kinds of information needed to make such assessments by: (a) reviewing the regulations to determine what hydrologic information is required; (b) preparing an example hydrologic assessment based on the regulations; and (c) using the experience gained in (a) and (b) to identify areas lacking or needing additional data to make the required assessment. Hydrologic data for the study area were obtained from published and unpublished reports, maps, aerial photographs, personal interviews with residents in the area of the hypothetical mine site, and discussions with experts in the field. Where data were unavailable, "synthetic" data were generated by extrapolation from proximate or similar watersheds and (or) by assumptions based on experience or theory. Some field data were collected to corroborate and augment information originating from all these sources.

  2. The Method of Anschauung: From Johann H. Pestalozzi to Herbert Spencer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takaya, Keiichi

    2003-01-01

    One of the major inventions of modern education is the instructional use of "Anschauung," an experience-based learning technique that was influential both as a method of instruction (more effective than mere book-learning and rote memorization) and as a rejection of old social arrangements that inculcated traditional values through deductive and…

  3. Cognitive Processes and Theory Development: A Reply to Spencer and Karmiloff-Smith.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellatly, Angus

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on the role of enculturation in children's cognitive development by distinguishing between, and elaborating upon, three factors: (1) cultural context; (2) cognitive contents; and (3) cognitive processes. Suggests problems inherent in positing homologies between children's cognitive development and the historical development of scientific…

  4. The complete mitogenome of the Australian tadpole shrimp Triops australiensis (Spencer & Hall, 1895) (Crustacea: Branchiopoda: Notostraca).

    PubMed

    Gan, Han Ming; Tan, Mun Hua; Lee, Yin Peng; Austin, Christopher M

    2016-05-01

    The mitochondrial genome sequence of the Australian tadpole shrimp, Triops australiensis is presented (GenBank Accession Number: NC_024439) and compared with other Triops species. Triops australiensis has a mitochondrial genome of 15,125 base pairs consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs, and a non-coding AT-rich region. The T. australiensis mitogenome is composed of 36.4% A, 16.1% C, 12.3% G and 35.1% T. The mitogenome gene order conforms to the primitive arrangement for Branchiopod crustaceans, which is also conserved within the Pancrustacean. PMID:25329290

  5. Quantitative trait loci underlying seed sugars content in MD96-5722 by spencer recombinant inbred line population of soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose, raffinose, and stachyose are important soluble sugars in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] seeds, and soybean seeds with higher sucrose and lower raffinose and stachyose are desirable. Therefore, optimizing sugars biosynthesis is a major goal for soy food industry. The objective of this stud...

  6. Getting It Wrong from the Beginning: Our Progressivist Inheritance from Herbert Spencer, John Dewey, and Jean Piaget.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Kieran

    This book sets out to prove that the progressivist tenets that have become the foundation of American education are mistaken. The author does not argue against progressivism on the basis of the usual alternatives of liberal or traditional theories of education because it is not adequately attuned to preparing students for jobs. The author sets out…

  7. Study of Verbally Gifted Youth: Second Annual Report to the Spencer Foundation. 1 September 1973-1 September 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Robert; And Others

    Reported are second year data from an on-going project concerned with identification and facilitation of verbal talent in early adolescence. Parent and teacher nominations of junior high students and verbal scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT-V) are described as primary assessment tools. Overall the enrichment sample is described as…

  8. When in Rome, Do as Jon Stewart Does: Using "America--The Book" as a Textbook for Introductory-Level Classes in American Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teten, Ryan Lee

    2010-01-01

    This article draws from different experiences in teaching Introduction to American Politics classes over a six-year period. It examines the value of using nontraditional texts in introductory political science classes that may also fulfill general education requirements, in order to engage as many students as possible in the subject matter. It…

  9. A Conversation with Blake Simmons, Vice President, Deconstruction Division, and Jon Magnuson, Director, Fungal Biotechnology Group, Joint BioEnergy Institute, Emeryville, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Blake A.; Magnuson, Jon K.

    2013-05-03

    An interview of myself and Blake Simmons conducted by Vicki Glaser, Executive Editor of Industrial Biotechnology. The subject of the interview was the relatively new PNNL led Fungal Biotechnology Group within the Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI).

  10. Effects of metals and sediment particle size on the species composition of the epifauna of Pinna bicolor near a lead smelter, Spencer Gulf, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Trevor J.; Young, Peter C.

    1984-01-01

    Pinna bicolor (Mollusca: Pelecypoda) were transplanted between four sites near a lead smelter. The species composition of their epifauna (sessile and mobile) was examined in relation to characteristics of both sediments and seston at the sites. Seventy-two taxa were distinguished in the epifaunal community. Substantial differences were found in the short-term sensitivity of some of the species to concentrations of Cd, Pb and Zn in sediments and to sediment particle size. The short-term sensitivity of many species to metals or sediment particle size explained their long-term distribution pattern. Twenty-three taxa were identified as significantly characterizing the faunal differences. Of these, eleven (four molluscs, four bryozoans, two barnacles and one ascidian) were affected by both sediment metal concentration and particle size, and eight (four molluscs, one bryozoan, one polychaete, one hydroid and one barnacle) were affected by metal contamination but not particle size. Of all fauna examined, the Bryozoa were the most metal-sensitive. Four species, Smittina raigii (Bryozoa), Galeolaria sp. 1 (Polychaeta), Epopella simplex (Cirripedia) and Monia ione (Pelecypoda) were identified by their short- and long-term sensitivity to metal contamination, and absence of sensitivity to sediment particle size, as suitable species for monitoring the effects of metal contamination on the epifauna. The implications of the results for toxicity-testing are discussed.

  11. Witnesses for the Prosecution: Policy Papers on Educational Finance, Governance, and Constitutionality in Illinois (Including the Declaration of Galesburg). MacArthur/Spencer Series Number 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickrod, G. Alan; And Others

    Advocacy for drastic change in the governance and structure of Illinois educational finance is the theme of this collection of oral presentations. Section 1 contains testimonies by G. Alan Hickrod and Lawrence E. Frank delivered to the Citizens Council on School Problems, focusing on K-12 educational funding problems and solutions. Section 2…

  12. Description of a nomen nudum species of Liriomyza Mik and the first record of Liriomyza blechi Spencer from Brazil (Insecta: Diptera: Agromyzidae).

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Filho, Fernando Da Silva; Almeida, Flávio Roberto De Albuquerque; Esposito, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The nomen nudum Liriomyza flagellae is formerly described in this paper as Liriomyza valladaresae sp. nov., based on male and female specimens collected in the Brazilian Amazon and reared from leaves of Alternanthera tenella and Amaranthus viridis (Amaranthaceae). Information on the puparium and the biology of this new species are provided. The species Liriomyza blechi, previously recorded from the U.S.A., Guadeloupe and Dominican Republic, is newly recorded from Brazil, reared from leaves of Blechum pyramidatum (Acanthaceae) and Spigelia anthelmia (Loganiaceae). PMID:27394352

  13. To designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 95 Dogwood Street in Cary, Mississippi, as the "Spencer Byrd Powers, Jr. Post Office".

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Thompson, Bennie G. [D-MS-2

    2011-03-14

    04/01/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Federal Workforce, U.S. Postal Service, and Labor Policy. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see S.655, which became Public Law 112-23 on 6/29/2011. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. The Concept of Adequacy in Illinois School Finance. MacArthur/Spencer Special Series on Illinois School Finance Series Number 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, James Gordon

    The purpose of this monograph is to explore the concept of educational adequacy, defined by Cubberley as "a generous system of free public schools," and to apply those measures in an analysis of educational adequacy in the state of Illinois. The difficulty in defining what constitutes a generous education is that there is no clear consensus in…

  15. Speech Recognition as a Support Service for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students: Adaptation and Evaluation. Final Report to Spencer Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinson, Michael; Elliot, Lisa; McKee, Barbara; Coyne, Gina

    This report discusses a project that adapted new automatic speech recognition (ASR) technology to provide real-time speech-to-text transcription as a support service for students who are deaf and hard of hearing (D/HH). In this system, as the teacher speaks, a hearing intermediary, or captionist, dictates into the speech recognition system in a…

  16. Geronimo's Kids: A Teacher's Lessons on the Apache Reservation. Elma Dill Russell Spencer Series in the West and Southwest, No. 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ove, Robert S.; Stockel, H. Henrietta

    In 1948, a young and naive Robert Ove arrived at Whitetail, on the Mescalero Apache Reservation, to teach at the Bureau of Indian Affairs day school. Living there were the Chiricahua Apaches--descendants of Geronimo and the survivors of nearly 30 years of incarceration by the U.S. government. With help from Indian historian H. Henrietta Stockel,…

  17. Two Essays on the Political and Normative Aspects of American School Finance: An Historical Perspective. The MacArthur/Spencer Special Series on Illinois School Finance, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickrod, G. Alan Karnes-Wallis; Ward, James Gordon

    Two essays are presented in this monograph, the first in a series of publications examining educational finance and using Illinois data. After an introduction, the first essay replies to a "Forbes" magazine cover story on educational finance that asks if education is economically efficient. The central theme is that the maintenance of a large,…

  18. Identification and Nurturance of Extraordinarily Precocious Young Children. Annual Report to the Spencer Foundation (Granting Period: September 1976 through August 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Halbert B.; And Others

    This study was designed to examine the predictive significance of different types and degrees of precocity in preschool children and to assess the effects of participation in a model preschool-kindergarten program operated in conjunction with the study. Extraordinary precocity is defined for this study as performance at the norm for children twice…

  19. The Impact of High Stakes Accountability on Teachers' Professional Development: Evidence from the South. A Final Report to the Spencer Foundation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Barnett; Turchi, Laura; Johnson, Dylan; Hare, Dwight; Owens, Deborah Duncan; Clements, Steve

    2003-01-01

    This report presents the case-study findings from a cross-state investigation focused on Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee, intended to deepen understanding around the influence of high stakes accountability on teacher learning and the capacity of districts and schools to support instructional practices…

  20. 76 FR 46898 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals, Who Have Chosen To Expatriate, as Required by Section 6039G

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... MAN-KAM SPENCER JULIE SPENCER SIMON SPITZNAS ELISABETH MARIE BEATRICE STACEY THOMAS EDWARD STEEL... SUSANNE A TADAHARU UCHIDA TAKEUCHI EIKO TAKEUCHI YOSHIFUMI TAKI KENTARO TAKIGAWA MASAMICHI TAM...

  1. Snoring

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... snoring -- I'm joined in studio by our medical expert, Dr. Jon Hallberg, who's a family practice ... And that's something you would go and seek medical help for? Dr. Jon Hallberg: Absolutely. Announcer: Now ...

  2. 77 FR 49778 - Pennington County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... Highway 16. Written comments should be sent to Jon M. Stansfield, 8221 South Highway 16, Rapid City, SD... building. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jon M. Stansfield, Acting District Ranger, Mystic...

  3. MedlinePlus.gov Turns 10!

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Photo courtesy of Michael Spencer, NIH NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group celebrates 10 years of success. Photo courtesy of Michael Spencer, NIH NIH's MedlinePlus.gov , the popular, consumer- ...

  4. 25 Years of GenBank

    MedlinePlus

    ... is President of the J. Craig Venter Institute. Photo courtesy of Michael Spencer, NIH Nobel Laureate Dr. ... Director of NIH's National Human Genome Research Institute. Photo courtesy of Michael Spencer, NIH Dr. Betsy Nabel, ...

  5. 76 FR 73614 - Lock 14 Hydro Partners; FFP Project 106 LLC; Notice of Competing Preliminary Permit Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... Lock and Dam No. 14, as directed by the Corps. Applicant Contact: Mr. David Brown Kinloch, Soft Energy...-2822. FERC Contact: Michael Spencer, michael.spencer@ferc.gov , (202) 502- 6093. Deadline for...

  6. 76 FR 73616 - Lock 12 Hydro Partners; FFP Project 107 LLC; Notice of Competing Preliminary Permit Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... Lock and Dam No. 12, as directed by the Corps. Applicant Contact: Mr. David Brown Kinloch, Soft Energy...-2822. FERC Contact: Michael Spencer, michael.spencer@ferc.gov , (202) 502- 6093. Deadline for...

  7. Effects of level of processing but not of task enactment on recognition memory in a case of developmental amnesia.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, John M; Brandt, Karen R; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh; Baddeley, Alan; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2006-09-01

    We report the performance in four recognition memory experiments of Jon, a young adult with early-onset developmental amnesia whose episodic memory is gravely impaired in tests of recall, but seems relatively preserved in tests of recognition, and who has developed normal levels of performance in tests of intelligence and general knowledge. Jon's recognition performance was enhanced by deeper levels of processing in comparing a more meaningful study task with a less meaningful one, but not by task enactment in comparing performance of an action with reading an action phrase. Both of these variables normally enhance episodic remembering, which Jon claimed to experience. But Jon was unable to support that claim by recollecting what it was that he remembered. Taken altogether, the findings strongly imply that Jon's recognition performance entailed little genuine episodic remembering and that the levels-of-processing effects in Jon reflected semantic, not episodic, memory. PMID:21049360

  8. 76 FR 27175 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals Who Have Chosen To Expatriate, as Required by Section 6039G

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... HIRSCH COLETTE ROSANNE HO CHAK KIE HOFFMANN HERBERT HOLT MICHAEL LAWRENCE HOLTER KARL GUNNAR HOLTERMANN... PANAGIOTA SOWELL TIMOTHY SPENCER CAITLIN SARAH SPERLING JOERG JACQUES SRINIVASAN VENKATRAMAN...

  9. 76 FR 38718 - Indiana Disaster #IN-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ..., Parke, Perry, Pike, Posey, Putnam, Ripley, Scott, Spencer, Starke, Sullivan, Switzerland, Vanderburgh... Federal Domestic Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) James E. Rivera, Associate Administrator for...

  10. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pubmed/22003063 . American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Prince JB, Wilens TE, Spencer TJ, Biederman ...

  11. Education, Training and Contexts: Studies and Essays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauglo, Jon

    This volume provides an overview of some of the outstanding features of the work of the Norwegian sociologist and comparative educationist, Jon Lauglo. After an introduction, "'It Ain't Necessarily So!': Theories and Observations in Jon Lauglo's World of Education and Training" (Se-Yung Lim and Klaus Schaack), essays and studies are presented in…

  12. Torah, Talmud, and Curriculum: Required Reading for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zisenwine, David

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about Jon A. Levisohn's article that develops a menu of orientations for the teaching of rabbinic literature. The author suggests that Jon A. Levisohn's article should be required reading for all Jewish educators who are interested in curriculum and teaching. The essay is a vehicle for introducing a way of looking…

  13. One Adolescent's Construction of Native Identity in School: "Speaking with Dance and Not in Words and Writing"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Amy Alexandra; Boatright, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    This case study describes how one eighth-grade student, Jon, asserted Native identities in texts as he attended a middle school in the western United States. Jon--a self-described Native American, Navajo, and Paiute with verified Native ancestry--sought to share what he called his Native culture with others in his school wherein he was the only…

  14. Two Sides of the Same Coin: Authentic Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Steven L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents interviews with Dr. Jon Mueller and Dr. Paula Harris. Dr. Jon Mueller is a professor of Psychology at North Central College in Naperville, Illinois. Dr. Paula Harris is a professor in the Department of Language, Literature, and Arts at Jackson Community College in Jackson, Michigan. In these interviews, they present a…

  15. 77 FR 33231 - Notice of Application for Proposed Withdrawal Extension and Opportunity for Public Meeting; Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... extend PLO No. 7393 (64 FR 29064 (1999)), which withdrew 600 acres of National Forest System land in the... the Spencer Glacier Material Site available to nearby communities for private and public works... purpose of the proposed withdrawal extension is to continue the protection of the USFS Spencer...

  16. Career Counseling of College Students: An Empirical Guide to Strategies That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luzzo, Darrell Anthony, Ed.

    This book contains 17 papers devoted to the counseling of college students. The following papers are included: "Introduction" (Darrell Anthony Luzzo); "Established Career Theories" (Paul J. Hartung, Spencer G. Niles); "Emerging Career Theories" (Spencer G. Niles, Paul J. Hartung); "Emotional-Social Issues in the Provision of Career Counseling"…

  17. Being Raced, Acting Racially: Multiracial Tribal College Students' Representations of Their Racial Identity Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Michelle Rene

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, many studies have clearly documented that mixed-race people are currently engaged in the process of self validation (DaCosta. 2007; Dalmage, 2003; McQueen, 2002; Root, 1996 & 2001; Spencer, J, M., 1997; Spencer, R., 2006a; Thorton, 1992). There is not a lot of empirical research that examines how schools influence the racial…

  18. ISS Update: SpaceX Space Act Agreement Status

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kyle Herring interviews Jon Cowart, Commercial Crew Program, Partner Manager for Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX), about the status of Space Act Agreement. Questi...

  19. A little help from the crowd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Jon

    2014-11-01

    Whether they need start-up capital to fund an innovation or some novel research, physicists the world over are turning to crowdfunding websites to support their next projects, as Jon Cartwright reports.

  20. Navigating the publication process for the Journal of Nematology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Journal of Nematology (JON) accepts manuscripts in several areas of nematology including taxomony/systematics, host parasite relations, ecology, biological and chemical control, management, entomopathogenic nematodes, resistance, and physiology. Manuscripts may be formatted as research reports, ...

  1. Better than reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Jon

    2016-04-01

    Can you learn optics better using a simulation than you can in real life? Jon Cartwright explores how scientists are forgoing reality by replacing mirrors and lenses with virtual facilities and classrooms.

  2. Using semantic memory to boost 'episodic' recall in a case of developmental amnesia.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Karen R; Gardiner, John M; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh; Baddeley, Alan D; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2006-07-17

    We report two experiments that investigated factors that might boost 'episodic' recall for Jon, a developmental amnesic whose episodic memory is gravely impaired but whose semantic memory seems relatively normal. Experiment 1 showed that Jon's recall improved following a semantic study task compared with a non-semantic study task, as well as following four repeated study trials compared with only one. Experiment 2 additionally revealed that Jon's recall improved after acting compared with reading action phrases at study, but only if the phrases were well integrated semantically. The results provide some support for the hypothesis that Jon's 'episodic' recall depends on the extent to which he is able to retrieve events using semantic memory. PMID:16791103

  3. Electronegativity from Avogadro to Pauling. Part I: Origins of the Electronegativity Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the origins of electronegativity as a qualitative concept in the period between 1809 and 1813. Outlines the contributions of Amedeo Avogadro and Jons Jakob Berzelius to the development of this concept. Contains 53 references. (JRH)

  4. Impairment of recollection but not familiarity in a case of developmental amnesia.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Karen R; Gardiner, John M; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh; Baddeley, Alan D; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2008-01-01

    In a re-examination of the recognition memory of Jon, a young adult with developmental amnesia due to perinatal hippocampal damage, we used a test procedure that provides estimates of the separate contributions to recognition of recollection and familiarity. Comparison between Jon and his controls revealed that, whereas he was unimpaired in the familiarity process, he showed abnormally low levels of recollection, supporting the view that the hippocampus mediates the latter process selectively. PMID:19090415

  5. Impairment of recollection but not familiarity in a case of developmental amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Karen R.; Gardiner, John M.; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh; Baddeley, Alan D.; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2010-01-01

    In a re-examination of the recognition memory of Jon, a young adult with developmental amnesia due to perinatal hippocampal damage, we used a test procedure that provides estimates of the separate contributions to recognition of recollection and familiarity. Comparison between Jon and his controls revealed that, whereas he was unimpaired in the familiarity process, he showed abnormally low levels of recollection, supporting the view that the hippocampus mediates the latter process selectively. PMID:19090415

  6. Nuclear fear revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2010-10-01

    In 1988 the science historian Spencer Weart published a groundbreaking book called Nuclear Fear: A History of Images, which examined visions of radiation damage and nuclear disaster in newspapers, television, film, literature, advertisements and popular culture.

  7. Impact of Migraine on School Performance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD The impact of migraine on school performance Daniel Kantor, MD e168 WHAT ... this study tackle an often overlooked problem: how migraine headache affects the school performance of children. 1 ...

  8. Infant Colic and Migraine: Is There a Connection?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD Infant colic and migraine Is there a connection? Steven Karceski, MD Neal S. ... infant colic as an early life expression of migraine,” Dr. Gelfand and colleagues 1 studied a large ...

  9. Epilepsy and Mood

    MedlinePlus

    ... Editors David C. Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD Epilepsy and mood Update Steven Karceski, MD In their ... important and worrisome topic for peo- ple with epilepsy. In short, a patient may wonder, “ Will the ...

  10. 20. DETAIL WITH FIRE HYDRANT, LOOKING NORTHEAST Kodiak Naval ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAIL WITH FIRE HYDRANT, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Kodiak Naval Operating Base, Aircraft Storehouse, U.S. Coast Guard Station, Albatross Avenue near Cape Spencer Street, Kodiak, Kodiak Island Borough, AK

  11. Childhood Absence Epilepsy: Poor Attention Is More Than Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD Childhood absence epilepsy Poor attention is more than seizures Liu Lin Thio, ... of this article is prohibited. Childhood absence epilepsy: Poor attention is more than seizures Liu Lin Thio ...

  12. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Satellite Communications Terminal, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  13. Interior view Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Satellite Communications Terminal, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  14. 77 FR 32622 - Lock 14 Hydro Partners; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ...)--825(r) . h. Applicant Contact: David Brown Kinloch, Lock 14 Hydro Partners, 414 S. Wenzel Street, Louisville, Kentucky 40204, (502) 589-0975. i. FERC Contact: Michael Spencer, (202) 502-6093,...

  15. An Uninformative Truth: The Logic of Amarin's Off-Label Promotion.

    PubMed

    Hey, Spencer Phillips; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2016-03-01

    Spencer Phillips Hey and Aaron Kesselheim propose that informativeness-asserting scientific facts-rather than truthfulness ought to be the standard for regulating commercial speech about pharmaceuticals. PMID:26978686

  16. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Electric Substation, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  17. Looking north Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking north - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Electric Substation, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  18. Exterior, looking west Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior, looking west - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Civil Engineering Storage Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  19. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Civil Engineering Storage Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  20. Interior, looking northwest Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, looking northwest - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Civil Engineering Storage Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  1. A Pre-History of Educational Philosophy in the United States: 1861 to 1914.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminsky, James S.

    1992-01-01

    Early stages of the development of educational philosophy in the United States involved the social reform movement of the 1890s, populism, progressivism, social science, literary history, muckraking, Hull House, and the work of Herbert Spencer and John Dewey. (SK)

  2. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  3. Friends of the National Library of Medicine - How You Can Help the Library Extend Medical Knowledge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Friends of the National Library of Medicine Past Issues / Spring 2008 ... of Michael Spencer, NIH How You Can Help the Library Extend Medical Knowledge You can be a ...

  4. 7. DETAIL OF WINDOW AT WEST END OF SOUTH ELEVATION, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL OF WINDOW AT WEST END OF SOUTH ELEVATION, CAMERA FACING NORTH. - U.S. Coast Guard Support Center Alameda, Warehouse, Spencer Road & Icarrus Drive, Coast Guard Island, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  5. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Microwave Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  6. Interior, looking northeast Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, looking northeast - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Microwave Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  7. Next-Generation WDM Network Design and Routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Danny H. K.; Bensaou, Brahim

    2003-08-01

    Call for Papers The Editors of JON are soliciting papers on WDM Network Design and Routing. The aim in this focus issue is to publish original research on topics including - but not limited to - the following: - WDM network architectures and protocols - GMPLS network architectures - Wavelength converter placement in WDM networks - Routing and wavelength assignment (RWA) in WDM networks - Protection and restoration strategies and algorithms in WDM networks - Traffic grooming in WDM networks - Dynamic routing strategies and algorithms - Optical Burst Switching - Support of Multicast - Protection and restoration in WDM networks - Performance analysis and optimization in WDM networks Manuscript Submission To submit to this special issue, follow the normal procedure for submission to JON, indicating "WDM Network Design" in the "Comments" field of the online submission form. For all other questions relating to this focus issue, please send an e-mail to jon@osa.org, subject line "WDM Network Design." Additional information can be found on the JON website: http://www.osa-jon.org/submission/. Schedule Paper Submission Deadline: November 1, 2003 Notification to Authors: January 15, 2004 Final Manuscripts to Publisher: February 15, 2004 Publication of Focus Issue: February/March 2004

  8. Next-Generation WDM Network Design and Routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Danny H. K.; Bensaou, Brahim

    2003-10-01

    Call for Papers The Editors of JON are soliciting papers on WDM Network Design and Routing. The aim in this focus issue is to publish original research on topics including - but not limited to - the following: - WDM network architectures and protocols - GMPLS network architectures - Wavelength converter placement in WDM networks - Routing and wavelength assignment (RWA) in WDM networks - Protection and restoration strategies and algorithms in WDM networks - Traffic grooming in WDM networks - Dynamic routing strategies and algorithms - Optical burst switching - Support of multicast - Protection and restoration in WDM networks - Performance analysis and optimization in WDM networks Manuscript Submission To submit to this special issue, follow the normal procedure for submission to JON, indicating "WDM Network Design" in the "Comments" field of the online submission form. For all other questions relating to this focus issue, please send an e-mail to jon@osa.org, subject line "WDM Network Design." Additional information can be found on the JON website: http://www.osa-jon.org/submission/. Schedule - Paper Submission Deadline: November 1, 2003 - Notification to Authors: January 15, 2004 - Final Manuscripts to Publisher: February 15, 2004 - Publication of Focus Issue: February/March 2004

  9. Next-Generation WDM Network Design and Routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Danny H. K.; Bensaou, Brahim

    2003-09-01

    Call for Papers The Editors of JON are soliciting papers on WDM Network Design and Routing. The aim in this focus issue is to publish original research on topics including - but not limited to - the following: - WDM network architectures and protocols - GMPLS network architectures - Wavelength converter placement in WDM networks - Routing and wavelength assignment (RWA) in WDM networks - Protection and restoration strategies and algorithms in WDM networks - Traffic grooming in WDM networks - Dynamic routing strategies and algorithms - Optical burst switching - Support of multicast - Protection and restoration in WDM networks - Performance analysis and optimization in WDM networks Manuscript Submission To submit to this special issue, follow the normal procedure for submission to JON, indicating "WDM Network Design" in the "Comments" field of the online submission form. For all other questions relating to this focus issue, please send an e-mail to jon@osa.org, subject line "WDM Network Design." Additional information can be found on the JON website: http://www.osa-jon.org/submission/. Schedule - Paper Submission Deadline: November 1, 2003 - Notification to Authors: January 15, 2004 - Final Manuscripts to Publisher: February 15, 2004 - Publication of Focus Issue: February/March 2004

  10. Letter of Appreciation to 2004 Journal of Optical Networking Reviewers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-02-01

    The international scientific and engineering professions rely on the work of countless reviewers to ensure the quality of the research published in technical journals. Like all such journals, JON benefits from the tireless efforts of these volunteers. Below is a list of 2004 JON reviewers who have agreed to have their names published. We sincerely thank these reviewers, as well as those not listed, for their assistance to JON and praise them for their dedication to their profession. The system simply would not work without them. Charalambos Anastassiou Ivan Andonovic Nirwan Ansari Chris Bintjas Martin Birk Zoran Bojkovic Xiren Cao Yang Cao Calvin C.K. Chan Yongmao Chang Yang Chen Kwok-Wai Cheung Nim-Kwan Cheung Su Fong Chien Wilson Chu Yun Chung Tibor Cinkler Ignacio de Miguel Jiun S. Deng Jitender Deogun H.J.S. Dorren Mark Feuer Samrat Ganguly

  11. Charting the acquisition of semantic knowledge in a case of developmental amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, John M.; Brandt, Karen R.; Baddeley, Alan D.; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2009-01-01

    We report the acquisition and recall of novel facts by Jon, a young adult with early onset developmental amnesia whose episodic memory is gravely impaired due to selective bilateral hippocampal damage. Jon succeeded in learning some novel facts but compared with a control group his intertrial retention was impaired during acquisition and, except for the most frequently repeated facts, he was also less accurate in correctly sourcing these facts to the experiment. The results further support the hypothesis that despite a severely compromised episodic memory and hippocampal system, there is nevertheless the capacity to accrue semantic knowledge available to recall. PMID:18589461

  12. Charting the acquisition of semantic knowledge in a case of developmental amnesia.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, John M; Brandt, Karen R; Baddeley, Alan D; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2008-09-01

    We report the acquisition and recall of novel facts by Jon, a young adult with early onset developmental amnesia whose episodic memory is gravely impaired due to selective bilateral hippocampal damage. Jon succeeded in learning some novel facts but compared with a control group his intertrial retention was impaired during acquisition and, except for the most frequently repeated facts, he was also less accurate in correctly sourcing these facts to the experiment. The results further support the hypothesis that despite a severely compromised episodic memory and hippocampal system, there is nevertheless the capacity to accrue semantic knowledge available to recall. PMID:18589461

  13. The 1999 Crafoord Prize lectures. Neo-Lamarckian experimentalism in America: origins and consequences.

    PubMed

    Cook, G M

    1999-12-01

    The 1890s and the first decades of the twentieth century saw a vigorous debate about the mechanisms of evolutionary change. On one side, August Weismann defended the selectionist hypothesis; on the other, Herbert Spencer defended neo-Lamarckian theory. Supporters of Spencer, notably the American paleontologist and evolutionary theorist Henry Fairfield Osborn, recognized that the questions raised by Weismann and Spencer could only be settled experimentally. They called for the application of experimental methods, and the establishment of a new institution for the purpose of confirming the inheritance of acquired characters. To a great extent, the experimental program championed by Osborn and others was implemented and, although it failed to reveal soft inheritance and was soon eclipsed by Mendelian and chromosomal genetics, it did make significant and lasting contributions to evolutionary biology. Thus the importance of methodological and institutional innovation and theoretical pluralism to the progress of science is illustrated and underscored. PMID:10672643

  14. Making History: An Indiana Teacher Uses Technology to Feel the History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Jon Carl's vision is simple: get students passionate about history by turning them into historians. To accomplish this, he created a class centered on documentary film-making. Students choose a topic, conduct research at local libraries, write a script, film video interviews, and create video segments of four to 15 minutes. District technology…

  15. Rebooting the EdD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wergin, Jon F.

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, Jon Wergin reminds readers of the philosophical and historical foundations of the doctor of education (EdD) degree. He argues that the EdD should be based, in large part, on John Dewey's progressive ideals of democratization and Paulo Freire's concepts of emancipatory education. Drawing on theories of reflective practice,…

  16. Applying the Menu of Orientations to the Jewish High School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Rabbi Elliot

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to Jon A. Levisohn's article entitled "A Menu of Orientations in the Teaching of Rabbinic Literature." As a discipline, the teaching of rabbinic literature is still in its early stages of development. Levisohn's menu of orientations and reflections about its usefulness are welcome additions to the…

  17. Levisohn's Orientations: A Response from the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehman, Marjorie

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the author's response to Jon A. Levisohn's article entitled "A Menu of Orientations in the Teaching of Rabbinic Literature." Levisohn has made a significant contribution to the scholarship of teaching in his article proposing that the teaching of rabbinic literature is most successfully accomplished when teachers think about…

  18. 76 FR 48841 - Wisconsin Public Service Corporation; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    .... Application Type: Non-project use of project lands and waters. b. Project No: 2595-134. c. Date Filed: July 28, 2011. d. Applicant: Wisconsin Public Service Corporation. e. Name of Project: High Falls Project. f... Street, P.O. Box 19001, Green Bay, WI 54301-9001. i. FERC Contact: Jon Cofrancesco, (202) 502-8951,...

  19. The Surprising Effectiveness of College Scientific Literacy Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Art

    2008-01-01

    Research by Jon Miller, professor of Interdisciplinary Studies and director of the International Center for Scientific Literacy at Michigan State University, shows that the U.S. scientific literacy course requirements for nonscience college students pull the United States into second place in international rankings of adult scientific literacy.…

  20. Exploring Nonfiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Neal

    2007-01-01

    Readers often think of nonfiction as an information experience and not as a story experience, and indeed many nonfiction titles are task oriented, teaching readers how to knit or outlining the process of building a fence. But there is a huge body of nonfiction that is both informative and story-based. New nonfiction classics like Jon Krakauer's…

  1. Smart and intelligent sensor payload project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Engineers working on the smart and intelligent sensor payload project include (l to r): Ed Conley (NASA), Mark Mitchell (Jacobs Technology), Luke Richards (NASA), Robert Drackett (Jacobs Technology), Mark Turowski (Jacobs Technology) , Richard Franzl (seated, Jacobs Technology), Greg McVay (Jacobs Technology), Brianne Guillot (Jacobs Technology), Jon Morris (Jacobs Technology), Stephen Rawls (NASA), John Schmalzel (NASA) and Andrew Bracey (NASA).

  2. Journals Online News: Dispersing Collection Management Information on the World Wide Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langley, Anne; And Others

    Journals Online News (JON) is a World Wide Web site created and maintained by the Collection Development Team at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) Libraries in order to speak with the UTK community about journals-related issues. Its primary function at present is to provide UTK faculty and other interested parties with the latest…

  3. Panel: RFID Security and Privacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Kevin

    The panel on RFID security and privacy included Ross Anderson, Jon Callas, Yvo Desmedt, and Kevin Fu. Topics for discussion included the "chip and PIN" EMV payment systems, e-Passports, "mafia" attacks, and RFID-enabled credit cards. Position papers by the panelists appear in the following pages, and the RFID-enabled credit card work appears separately in these proceedings.

  4. 75 FR 28687 - Responsibility of Applicants for Promoting Objectivity in Research for Which Public Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) in the Federal Register on May 8, 2009 (74 FR 21610-21613... Phase I awards will be required to implement these regulations in due course. \\10\\ 60 FR 35810, 35814.... Caplan, and Jon F. Merz, ``All Gifts Large and Small,'' Am. J. of Bioethics, summer 2003, vol. 3, no....

  5. The Political Boundaries of School Choice and Privatization in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beese, Jane A.; Simon, Carlee Escue; Sutton, Lenford C.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the votes taken in the Ohio State Legislature pertaining to the establishment of six school voucher programs: The Ohio Scholarship and Tutoring Program, The Autism Scholarship, The Jon Peterson Special Needs Scholarship, The Educational Choice Pilot Scholarship, The Educational Choice Scholarship, and the Income-based Scholarship…

  6. Writing Letchworth's War: Developing a Sense of the Local within Historical Fiction through Primary Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Jon; Townsend, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Local history, historical fiction, and one of the most significant events of the twentieth century come together in this article as Jon Grant and Dan Townsend suggest a way to enable students to produce better historical fiction and improve their understanding of the history of their own area. They develop the work on historical fiction…

  7. Ivan Illich's Late Critique of "Deschooling Society": "I Was Largely Barking up the Wrong Tree"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruno-Jofre, Rosa; Zaldivar, Jon Igelmo

    2012-01-01

    In this article, Rosa Bruno-Jofre and Jon Igelmo Zaldivar examine Ivan Illich's own critique of "Deschooling Society", and his subsequent revised critique of educational institutions and understanding of education, within the context of both his personal intellectual journey and the general epistemological shift that started to take shape in the…

  8. National CrossTalk. Volume 14, Number 3, Summer 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trombley, William, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    The primary purpose of "National CrossTalk" is to stimulate informed discussion and debate of higher education issues. This issue contains the following articles: (1) The M Word: "Marketing" Has Changed from a Dirty Word to a Buzzword in Higher Education (Jon Marcus); (2) A Contrarian View of the Testing Industry: FairTest Argues that Standardized…

  9. Selected Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the American Journalism Historians Association (Tulsa, Oklahoma, September 28-30, 1995). Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journalism Historians' Association.

    The 14 papers in this collection all deal with 20th century journalism and journalists in the United States. The papers and their authors are: "Educating Ike: The Evolution of Presidential PR in 1953" (David W. Guth); "Crumbs from the Publishers' Golden Tables: The Plight of the Chicago Newsboy" (Jon Bekken); "'They Work Too Hard': How Newspapers…

  10. Whose Orientations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutoff, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to Jon A. Levisohn's article entitled "A Menu of Orientations in the Teaching of Rabbinic Literature." While the "menu" Levisohn describes in his groundbreaking work on orientations to the teaching of rabbinic texts will almost certainly be refined over time, even as it stands this article should be of…

  11. A Philological Orientation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonrobert, Charlotte Elisheva

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to Jon A. Levisohn's article entitled "A Menu of Orientations in the Teaching of Rabbinic Literature." As someone who is experimenting not only with how to teach rabbinic texts but with which texts to select in virtually every course the author teaches for American undergraduate as well as graduate…

  12. 77 FR 64967 - Senior Executive Service; Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ..., KAREN C HALE, ANDREW M HALE, JOHN H HALLMAN, TIMOTHY J HANDWERKER, ALAN I HANLON, PETER H HANNIGAN... HARRIS, ROBERT J HARROD, WILLIAM J HARVEY, STEPHEN J HELD, EDWARD B HENDERSON III, CLYDE H HENNEBERGER..., LINDA S KIRCHHOFF, STEPHEN A KLARA, SCOTT M KLAUSING, KATHLEEN A KLING, JON NMN KNOELL, THOMAS C...

  13. Taming the Anxious Mind: An 8-Week Mindfulness Meditation Group at a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Michael C.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an eight-week mindfulness meditation-based group that took place at a university counseling center. The group is patterned after the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program developed by Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn at the Stress Reduction Clinic at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. Group members are taught…

  14. 76 FR 4097 - Erie Boulevard Hydropower, L.P.; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Erie Boulevard Hydropower, L.P.; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing... Hydropower, L.P. e. Name of Project: Oswegatchie River Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: The existing multi... Contact: Jon Elmer, Erie Boulevard Hydropower, L.P, 800 Starbuck Ave., Suite 802, Watertown, New...

  15. 76 FR 56784 - Safe and Healthy Homes Investment Partnerships: Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... initiatives, the National Coalition to End Childhood Lead Poisoning/Green and Healthy Homes Initiative (GHHI... Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control, HUD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice solicits public comment... . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jon L. Gant, Director, Office of Healthy Homes and Lead...

  16. Using "The Daily Show" to Promote Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, H. James; Schmeichel, Mardi

    2012-01-01

    Social studies teachers are tasked with aiding their students' abilities to engage in public debate and make politically sound decisions. One way the authors have found to help facilitate this is to draw connections between content knowledge and current political conversations through the use of clips from "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart." While…

  17. Sen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: Adaptive Preferences and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive preferences are both a central justification and continuing problem for the use of the capability approach. They are illustrated here with reference to a project examining the choices of young people who had rejected higher education. Jon Elster, Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum have all criticised utilitarianism on the grounds that a…

  18. Increasing Understanding of Public Problems and Policies, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ernstes, David P., Ed.; Hicks, Dawne M., Ed.

    This document contains 21 papers: "Land Grant University and Extension in the 21st Century" (Jon Wefald); "A Reality Check" (Bud Webb); "Land Grant Colleges and Universities of the Future" (Michael J. Phillips); "Vulnerability of the Land Grant Colleges of Agriculture: A Public Affairs Perspective" (Allen Rosenfeld); "The Future of Land Grant…

  19. 77 FR 30274 - The Commission's Role Regarding the Environmental Protection Agency's Mercury and Air Toxics...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-22

    .../pkg/FR-2012-02-16/pdf/2012-806.pdf . I. Introduction 2. On December 21, 2011, the EPA released the... Mercury and Air Toxics Standards; Policy Statement on the Commission's Role Regarding the Environmental Protection Agency's Mercury and Air Toxics Standards Before Commissioners: Jon Wellinghoff, Chairman;...

  20. Spellings Seeks to Cast Her Glow over NCLB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, David J.

    2008-01-01

    In her three years as U.S. secretary of education, Margaret Spellings has been a celebrity contestant on "Jeopardy!," a guest on "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart," and an occasional subject of Washington's best-read gossip column. Above all, though, she's been the nation's leading spokeswoman for the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). With one year…

  1. Lift the Math Curse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Cathlene

    2006-01-01

    "When am I ever going to use this?" This question is heard or thought in every middle-level math class across the land. Teachers struggle to apply math lessons to everyday life and make math meaningful and useful for their students. This author, too, struggled with this problem, until she read the book "Math Curse" by Jon Scieszka (Viking Books,…

  2. To Be or Not to Be...a Frog: The Frog Prince and Shifting Paradigms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Lisa Marie

    1997-01-01

    Discusses three modern variations of the classic "Frog Prince" folk tale: "Pondlarker" (Fred Gwynne); "The Frog Prince Continued" (Jon Scieszka); and "The Prince of the Pond" (Donna Jo Napoli). Notes that these variants create a world in which frogs can have values, wisdom, and emotion, and in which frogs can influence the ways of humanity. (RS)

  3. National CrossTalk. Volume 17, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trombley, William, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of "National CrossTalk" is to stimulate informed discussion and debate of higher education issues. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Florida's Unnatural Disaster: The State's Economic Bubble Has Burst, Leaving Higher Education in a Double Bind (Jon Marcus); (2) Saudi King's Modern University: Partnerships Are…

  4. Treasured Texas Theaters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Dallas artist Jon Flaming's deep love of Texas is evident in his paintings and sculpture. Although he has created one sculptural Texas theater, his work primarily showcases old Texas barbershops, vacant homes, and gas stations. In this article, the author describes how her students, inspired by Flaming's works, created three-dimensional historical…

  5. A subtle point about Bohr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotson, Allen

    2013-07-01

    Jon Cartwright's interesting and informative article on quantum philosophy ("The life of psi", May pp26-31) mischaracterizes Niels Bohr's stance as anti-realist by suggesting (in the illustration on p29) that Bohr believed that "quantum theory [does not] describe an objective reality, independent of the observer".

  6. Rectal prolapse repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... the anus. This is called rectal prolapse. Update Date 7/30/2014 Updated by: Jon A. Daller, MD, PhD, Department of Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare ...

  7. Rectal prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Constipation Cystic fibrosis Malabsorption Mucosa Whipworm infection Update Date 7/30/2014 Updated by: Jon A. Daller, MD, PhD, Department of Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare ...

  8. Oklahoma Association of Teacher Educators Journal 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Malinda Hendricks, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    The Oklahoma Association of Teacher Educators 2009 Journal includes the following four peer reviewed articles: (1) The Changing Role of Grandparents (Fred D. Hammond, III, Terry E. Spigner, Charolette Myles-Nixon, and Pauline Holloway); (2) Pedagogical Agent Instructional Design Challenges (Jon Martens); (3) Differences in Relatedness across…

  9. Women in History--Sarah Winnemucca: Native Educator and Human Rights Advocate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumm, Bernita L.

    2006-01-01

    This article profiles Sarah Winnemucca, a Native educator and dedicated human rights advocate who devoted her life to building communication and creating understanding between the Native and white cultures. On March 1, 2005, Congressman Jon Porter of Nevada addressed Congress on a bill to allow for the placement of a statue of Sarah Winnemucca…

  10. Literacy Update. Volume 18, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Jon, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This newsletter, published five times a year, features articles on issues of concern to adult, family, and youth literacy practitioners, as well as recommended resources, announcements, and teaching strategies. This issue contains: (1) Using a License to Drive Improvement: Professional Development in Massachusetts (Jon Steinberg); (2) Building…

  11. "Thank You for Your Words": Observations from a Disability Summer Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Ronald J.; Feucht, Jon

    2012-01-01

    This article recounts the authors' experiences at the Authentic Voices of America summer camp for severely disabled youths who are learning to become more proficient at using computerized communication devices to speak. The five-day camp was founded by Jon Feucht, who also uses a device and continues to serve as its director. In the summer of…

  12. Antimony: a flame fighter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wintzer, Niki E.; Guberman, David E.

    2015-01-01

    In the 11th century, the word antimonium was used by medieval scholar Constantinus Africanus, but antimony metal was not isolated until the 16th century by Vannoccio Biringuccio, an Italian metallurgist. In the early 18th century, chemist Jons Jakob Berzelius chose the periodic symbol for antimony (Sb) based on stibium, which is the Latin name for stibnite.

  13. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (80th, Chicago, Illinois, July 30-August 2, 1997): Newspaper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Newspaper section of the Proceedings contains the following 16 papers: "Reader-Friendly Journalism's Lasting Impact: A Study of Reporters and Editors Involved in Knight-Ridder's 25/43 Project" (Kris Kodrich); "An Analysis of Online Sites Produced by U.S. Newspapers: Are the Critics Right?" (Jon Gubman and Jennifer Greer); "Self-Promotion and…

  14. Physics Myth Busting: A Lab-Centered Course for Non-Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madsen, Martin John

    2011-01-01

    There is ongoing interest in how and what we teach in physics courses for non-science students, so-called "physics for poets" courses. Art Hobson has effectively argued that teaching science literacy should be a key ingredient in these courses. Hobson uses Jon Millers definition of science literacy, which has two components: first, "a basic…

  15. Scieszka's "The Stinky Cheese Man": A Tossed Salad of Parodic Re-Versions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantaleo, Sylvia

    2007-01-01

    "The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales" (1992) by Jon Scieszka and Lane Smith was awarded a Randolph Caldecott Honor Medal in 1993. Scieszka and Smith subvert textual authority through playing "with literary and cultural codes and conventions" (McCallum 1996, p. 400) in their metafictive text. In this article, I discuss the…

  16. Transporting Students into Thin Air: Using Science to Enhance Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bricker, Patricia; Rogowski, Nick; Hedt, Melissa; Rolfe, Nadeen

    2010-01-01

    The "Into Thin Air" unit, based on the book by Jon Krakauer, was designed as an interdisciplinary unit for a small group of academically gifted sixth-grade students. It included hands-on, minds-on activities that would immerse students in the scientific, social, and personal struggles people face while attempting to climb the world's tallest…

  17. Asking "Who Are You?" when Going "into the Wild": Moving beyond an Individualized Form of Outdoor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zink, Robyn

    2010-01-01

    The story of Chris McCandless, as told by Jon Krakauer, and more recently by Sean Penn, tells a familiar tale of going alone into the wilderness in search of the truth of oneself. Chris's story provides a parable to explore some of the motifs that inform contemporary outdoor education. In this paper I draw on the work of Michel Foucault and Judith…

  18. A Disposition for Benevolence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Shea, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the first half of an address at the 2011 Jon C. Dalton Institution on College Student Values. Drawing on personal reflections regarding his higher education experiences, the author argues that cultivating a robust disposition for benevolence requires a synthesis of intellectual engagement, critical self-reflection, and…

  19. National CrossTalk. Volume 13, Number 2, Spring 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trombley, William, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The primary purpose of "National CrossTalk" is to stimulate informed discussion and debate of higher education issues. This issue contains the following articles: (1) CUNY [City University of New York] Sheds Reputation as "Tutor U": The Nation's Largest Urban University Raises Standards, and Grapples with Remediation (Jon Marcus); (2) Scholarship…

  20. 40 CFR 52.2355 - Section 110(a)(2) infrastructure requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Section 110(a)(2) infrastructure requirements. 52.2355 Section 52.2355 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... 110(a)(2) infrastructure requirements. On December 3, 2007 Jon L. Huntsman, Jr., Governor, State...

  1. 40 CFR 52.2355 - Section 110(a)(2) infrastructure requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Section 110(a)(2) infrastructure requirements. 52.2355 Section 52.2355 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... 110(a)(2) infrastructure requirements. On December 3, 2007 Jon L. Huntsman, Jr., Governor, State...

  2. Boyz 2 Men: Responsible Empowerment for Inner-City Adolescent Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilgoff, Jon

    2007-01-01

    Jon Gilgoff is the Boys Services Manager of the Youth Justice Institute in Oakland, California, and a former Robert Bowne Foundation Fellow who researched Boyz 2 Men through his work with the Educational Alliance in New York City. Boyz 2 Men aimed to provide a positive alternative to drugs as a means of coping with the multiple challenges young…

  3. Getting Political Science in on the Joke: Using "The Daily Show" and Other Comedy to Teach Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beavers, Staci L.

    2011-01-01

    The challenges of teaching introductory-level U.S. politics to reluctant audiences are well known and widely lamented. This article investigates the pedagogical potential of political satire, specifically "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart", in engaging students in this tough-to-teach course. Based on a review of available literature and student…

  4. Developing an Effective Major Gift Program: From Managing Staff to Soliciting Gifts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Roy, Ed.; May, Jerry, Ed.

    This publication contains 15 papers concerned with the establishment at colleges and universities of new major gift programs or the improvement of existing programs. The papers, all by development professionals in higher education, are as follows: (1) "An Introduction to the Major Gift Process" (Jon Cosovich); (2) "Strategic Management of a Major…

  5. Commonsense Reasoning about the Physical World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bliss, Joan

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on a programme of research carried out over a period of twenty years by Joan Bliss, Jon Ogborn and others, and aimed at understanding how pupils and students reason about the everyday physical world. Our starting point was the science alternative conceptions literature, particularly force and motion, where the results puzzled…

  6. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (78th, Washington, DC, August 9-12, 1995). History Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The history section of the Proceedings contains the following 13 papers: "Telling the Untold Story: An Examination of the History of the Religious Press in America" (Phyllis E. Alsdurf); "Dusting with a Ballot: The Portrayal of Women in the Milwaukee Leader" (Jon Bekken); "The Struggle to Control Motion Picture Advertising, 1921 to 1968" (Sharon…

  7. Hopes, Fears, & Reality: A Balanced Look at American Charter Schools in 2009. 5th Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake, Robin J., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of critical tests ahead for the charter school sector. This volume of "Hopes, Fears, & Reality" explores these issues. In chapter 1, Jon Christensen, Jacqueline Meijer-Irons, and Robin J. Lake lay out the basic data on charter school growth in the last several years. They examine the growth and character of the charter movement…

  8. Experimental Research in TV Instruction. Proceedings of an International Conference (2nd, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada, June 21-23, 1979). [Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baggaley, Jon, Ed.; Sharpe, Joan, Ed.

    A foreword by Arthur M. Sullivan and an introduction by Jon P. Baggaley introduce the 12 conference papers included in this collection. The papers are as follows: (1) "Research on 'Sesame Street': Designing the Educational Context" (Rodney Dennis); (2) "'Sesame Street' in Labrador" (Graham Skanes and Lorne Taylor); (3) "Videotapes for…

  9. Disability and Adult Life: Dependence on Social Security among Former Students with Special Educational Needs in Their Late Twenties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myklebust, Jon Olav

    2013-01-01

    This article, by Jon Olav Myklebust from Volda University, Norway, presents analyses of social security dependence among students with special educational needs in Norway who at the start of upper secondary school had various disabilities--of a somatic, psychological and/or social nature. They were all educated in ordinary schools, in special or…

  10. Setting the Record Straight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulard, Garry

    2005-01-01

    Dr. Jon Quistgaard, president of Bemidji State University (BSU), is unhappy with the way the national media has portrayed the Red Lake Indian Reservation in northern Minnesota, the nearby city of Bemidji and American Indian life in general. That such coverage is even a matter of discussion is the result of a tragedy: On March 21, Jeffrey Weise, a…

  11. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (75th, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, August 5-8, 1992). Part X: Health, Science, and the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Health, Science, and the Environment section of these proceedings contains the following seven papers: "Columbus, Mars, and the Changing Images and Ideologies of Exploration: A Critical Examination" (Lin Bin and August T. Horvath); "Prime Time TV Portrayals of Sex, 'Safe Sex' and AIDS: A Longitudinal Analysis" (Dennis T. Lowry and Jon A.…

  12. Technology in Education: Implications and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zellner, Ronald D., Ed.; And Others

    Nine of the 15 papers in this collection consider the current uses of technology in education and the implications of this use; the six remaining papers focus on applications of technology in education. The papers are: (1) "A Qualitative Synthesis of Pictorial Complexity on Learner Achievement" (Jay Angert, Jon Denton, and Francis Clark); (2)…

  13. Experimental Research in TV Instruction. Proceedings of an International Conference (4th, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada, September 28-30, 1981). Volume 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baggaley, Jon, Ed.; Janega, Patti, Ed.

    An introduction by Jon Baggaley provides background information on this international conference and its participants, and introduces 10 papers which were presented. The papers are as follows: (1) "Teaching Production Research and Design: The Interface of Theory and Practice" (James M. Linton); (2) "The Impact of Television on Adolescents in South…

  14. Learning as Calling and Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jons, Lotta

    2014-01-01

    According to Martin Buber's philosophy of dialogue, our being-in-the-world is to be conceived of as an existential dialogue. Elsewhere, I have conceptualized the teacher-student-relation accordingly (see Jons 2008), as a matter of calling and responding. The conceptualization rests on a secularised notion of vocation, paving way for…

  15. National CrossTalk. Volume 15, Number 1, Winter 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trombley, William, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    The primary purpose of "National CrossTalk" is to stimulate informed discussion and debate of higher education issues. This issue contains the following articles: (1) The Celtic Tiger: Ireland Invests Heavily in Higher Education, and Benefits Mightily (Jon Marcus); (2) Western Classic: Nevada's James Rogers Is a Non-Traditional Chancellor with a…

  16. How Comedians Learn to Use Humor to Raise Awareness and Consciousness about Social and Political Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Nancy Ann

    2011-01-01

    During these unprecedented complicated times, there is an equally unprecedented need for an informed citizenry. Many of us watch democracy get played out on the 24-hour news networks. Still others bear witness to it in the social commentaries embedded in the entertainment provided by late night comedians like Jon Stewart. Humor provides a largely…

  17. Dark matter and sterility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Peter F.

    2014-10-01

    In reply to Louise Mayor's dark-matter flow-chart "What's the matter?" (July pp30-31), which summarized the most likely candidates for galactic dark matter, and to Jon Cartwright's feature "A fourth type of neutrino" on the possibility of "sterile" neutrinos (August pp24-28).

  18. The Present in Future Tense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelman, Ari Y.

    2012-01-01

    This author states his belief that Jon Woocher's essay is the latest in a long line of jeremiads bemoaning the state of Jewish education. Kelman believes that, though a bit more sanguine than the other "withering portraits" he cites, Woocher's essay falls very much in their tradition of critique and corrective; "Here's what's wrong," argues each…

  19. 76 FR 78631 - Appalachian Power Company; Notice of Designation of Certain Commission Personnel as Non-Decisional

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Appalachian Power Company; Notice of Designation of Certain Commission Personnel as Non-Decisional Commission staff members Jon Cofrancesco (Office of Energy Projects (202)...

  20. Collaborative Caregiving: Parlerai Connects the Network of Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puglisi, Dana

    2009-01-01

    Kristin and Jon Erickson know that communication and collaboration are key to success. As the parents of Karly, a child with special needs, the Ericksons experienced first-hand the trials and tribulations that go along with managing the care of a person with disabilities. They found themselves frustrated by a lack of available tools for parents…

  1. Shaking B Mediates Synaptic Coupling between Auditory Sensory Neurons and the Giant Fiber of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, Jonathan P.; Blagburn, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    The Johnston’s Organ neurons (JONs) form chemical and electrical synapses onto the giant fiber neuron (GF), as part of the neuronal circuit that mediates the GF escape response in Drosophila melanogaster. The purpose of this study was to identify which of the 8 Drosophila innexins (invertebrate gap junction proteins) mediates the electrical connection at this synapse. The GF is known to express Shaking B (ShakB), specifically the ShakB(N+16) isoform only, at its output synapses in the thorax. The shakB2 mutation disrupts these GF outputs and also abolishes JON-GF synaptic transmission. However, the identity of the innexin that forms the presynaptic hemichannels in the JONs remains unknown. We used electrophysiology, immunocytochemistry and dye injection, along with presynaptically-driven RNA interference, to investigate this question. The amplitude of the compound action potential recorded in response to sound from the base of the antenna (sound-evoked potential, or SEP) was reduced by RNAi of the innexins Ogre, Inx3, Inx6 and, to a lesser extent Inx2, suggesting that they could be required in JONs for proper development, excitability, or synchronization of action potentials. The strength of the JON-GF connection itself was reduced to background levels only by RNAi of shakB, not of the other seven innexins. ShakB knockdown prevented Neurobiotin coupling between GF and JONs and removed the plaques of ShakB protein immunoreactivity that are present at the region of contact. Specific shakB RNAi lines that are predicted to target the ShakB(L) or ShakB(N) isoforms alone did not reduce the synaptic strength, implying that it is ShakB(N+16) that is required in the presynaptic neurons. Overexpression of ShakB(N+16) in JONs caused the formation of ectopic dye coupling, whereas ShakB(N) prevented it altogether, supporting this conclusion and also suggesting that gap junction proteins may have an instructive role in synaptic target choice. PMID:27043822

  2. Shaking B Mediates Synaptic Coupling between Auditory Sensory Neurons and the Giant Fiber of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Pézier, Adeline P; Jezzini, Sami H; Bacon, Jonathan P; Blagburn, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    The Johnston's Organ neurons (JONs) form chemical and electrical synapses onto the giant fiber neuron (GF), as part of the neuronal circuit that mediates the GF escape response in Drosophila melanogaster. The purpose of this study was to identify which of the 8 Drosophila innexins (invertebrate gap junction proteins) mediates the electrical connection at this synapse. The GF is known to express Shaking B (ShakB), specifically the ShakB(N+16) isoform only, at its output synapses in the thorax. The shakB2 mutation disrupts these GF outputs and also abolishes JON-GF synaptic transmission. However, the identity of the innexin that forms the presynaptic hemichannels in the JONs remains unknown. We used electrophysiology, immunocytochemistry and dye injection, along with presynaptically-driven RNA interference, to investigate this question. The amplitude of the compound action potential recorded in response to sound from the base of the antenna (sound-evoked potential, or SEP) was reduced by RNAi of the innexins Ogre, Inx3, Inx6 and, to a lesser extent Inx2, suggesting that they could be required in JONs for proper development, excitability, or synchronization of action potentials. The strength of the JON-GF connection itself was reduced to background levels only by RNAi of shakB, not of the other seven innexins. ShakB knockdown prevented Neurobiotin coupling between GF and JONs and removed the plaques of ShakB protein immunoreactivity that are present at the region of contact. Specific shakB RNAi lines that are predicted to target the ShakB(L) or ShakB(N) isoforms alone did not reduce the synaptic strength, implying that it is ShakB(N+16) that is required in the presynaptic neurons. Overexpression of ShakB(N+16) in JONs caused the formation of ectopic dye coupling, whereas ShakB(N) prevented it altogether, supporting this conclusion and also suggesting that gap junction proteins may have an instructive role in synaptic target choice. PMID:27043822

  3. Outdoor Education: A Product of the Times. Taft Campus Occasional Paper No. 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammerman, Donald R.

    In the years from 1930 to 1960 a number of socio-cultural forces influenced the emergence of outdoor education with the five major areas of influence including philosophical, social, economical, political and educational factors. Philosophical factors were found in the doctrines of Rousseau, Herbart, Pestalozzi and Spencer with the ideas of…

  4. Quality and Characteristics of Recent Research in Technology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Scott D.; Daugherty, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    The focus of research in technology education has evolved throughout its history as the field changed from industrial arts to technology education (Spencer & Rogers, 2006). With the move to technology education, the field has begun to broaden its focus to better understand the teaching, learning, curriculum, and policy implications of preparing…

  5. Meet the 2008 Cliff Weiss Memorial Essay Contest Winners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Techniques: Connecting Education and Careers (J3), 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the winners of the 2008 Cliff Weiss Memorial Essay Contest and their winning essays. The winners are Spencer Terry of Tulsa, Oklahoma (secondary), and Carrie Snyder-Renfro of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (postsecondary). The topic for secondary students is "How would you communicate the impact and importance of CTE related to your…

  6. Igniting GameZombie TV: A Longitudinal Autoethnography of a Student-Fueled Game Media Studio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Striker, Spencer

    2012-01-01

    "Igniting GameZombie TV" utilizes an accessible, energetic, postmodern style to recall how Spencer Striker founded GameZombie TV at Indiana University in the fall of 2006, built the project into an award-winning game media studio, and then expanded the initiative to the University of Wisconsin in the fall of 2009. Through grit and a…

  7. Students' Perception of Engagement in a Third-Grade Writing Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spinks, James D., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Educators have been challenged for many years to engage their students, but often students still seem to be disengaged (Klem & Connell, 2004). Research indicates student engagement is critical to student achievement and success in school (Appleton, 2008; Connell, Spencer, & Aber, 1994; Easton, 2008; Fredricks, Blumenfeld, & Paris,…

  8. The Skateboard Factory: Curriculum by Design--Oasis Skateboard Factory Q&A with Craig Morrison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, George

    2012-01-01

    Since its opening three years ago, Oasis Skateboard Factory (OSF), founded by teacher Craig Morrison, has attracted considerable media exposure and received a Ken Spencer Award from the CEA for its innovative program. OSF is one of three programs offered by Oasis Alternative Secondary School, one of 22 alternative secondary schools of the Toronto…

  9. Child Care Needs Assessment Louisville, Kentucky Metropolitan Area 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrisman, Kent; And Others

    This report assesses the need for and availability of child care services in the metropolitan area of Louisville, Kentucky, including Jefferson County and six surrounding counties in Kentucky (Bullitt, Henry, Oldham, Shelby, Spencer, and Trimble) and three counties (Clark, Floyd, and Harrison) in southern Indiana. This assessment focused on 1990…

  10. Site Visit Report: Seven Counties Services, Louisville, Kentucky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Racino, Julie Ann

    The report describes a site visit to the Seven Counties Services Region in Kentucky to identify and document promising practices for serving people with severe disabilities in integrated community-based services. The regional agency serves Jefferson, Oldham, Henry, Trimble, Spencer, Bullitt and Shelby Counties. Regional service priorities have…

  11. To Bond or Not to Bond? That Is the Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balzer, Wayne E.

    2015-01-01

    This case, inspired by a real school district scenario, was developed for use in a graduate-level course in school finance. James Spencer had just been selected as the new superintendent of a low-income, 400-student, rural school district in need of many capital improvements. The previous superintendent had refused to hold a bond election because…

  12. Looking into Generator Room, showing electromagnetic pulse (EMP) filter boxes ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking into Generator Room, showing electromagnetic pulse (EMP) filter boxes mounted above door - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Power Plant, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  13. Closeup view of nested transmitterreceiver modules in Array Room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Closeup view of nested transmitter-receiver modules in Array Room - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  14. Literacy for the Contemporary World. A Report of the National Conference on Liberal Learning, the Annual Meeting of the Association of American Colleges (68th, Boston, Massachusetts, January 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Colleges, Washington, DC.

    The 68th annual conference of the Association of American Colleges focused on literacy in foreign languages, international studies, values, and science and technology. The conference proceedings are summarized and two speeches are reproduced, the report of the chairman of the board of directors (Samuel R. Spencer, Jr.) and the address of the…

  15. On the Emergence of Research Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johanson, George A.; Brooks, Gordon; Papa, Michael J.

    This study examined the process followed by graduate students in the formation of research problems for their dissertations. Narratives were solicited from researchers who received Spencer Awards for their dissertation research, and researchers received 30 narratives that described the process of research problem formation. The grounded theory…

  16. 75 FR 2560 - Issuance of Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... Louisiana State 74 FR 47821; September December 3, 2009 University LSU Museum 17, 2009. of Natural Science. 217648 U.S. Fish and Wildlife 74 FR 37240, July 28, December 8, 2009 Service. 2009. 222610 Atlanta-Fulton.... Pylman....... 74 FR 58977; November December 23, 2009 16, 2009. 231522 Robert B. Spencer...... 74...

  17. The Relational Web in Teaching and Learning: Connections, Disconnections and the Central Relational Paradox in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stieha, Vicki

    2010-01-01

    Using relational and action oriented qualitative modes of inquiry (Cochran-Smith & Lytle, 2009; Gilligan, Spencer, Weinberg, & Bertsch, 2003; Raider-Roth, 2005), this research explores the trajectory of five veteran teachers' practice over two years. The participants were part of a group of teachers involved in an intensive Summer Teachers…

  18. University in the Art Museum: A Model for Museum-Faculty Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villeneuve, Pat; Martin-Harmon, Amanda; Mitchell, Kristina E.

    2006-01-01

    Professor Barb Woods observes her students working diligently in the Spencer Museum of Art galleries. As the 3-hour session progresses, the students increase their observational skills as they examine works of art that depict the relationship of healthcare and society and illustrate how views of doctors and pharmacists have changed over time. The…

  19. Traveling through Languages: Reports on Language Experiences in Tourists' Travel Blogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goethals, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to gain insight into (Spanish) tourists' multilingual experiences by analyzing spontaneously written online travel diaries. Using the conceptual framework of Rapport Management Theory (RMT; Spencer-Oatey 2008), I analyze reports on the tourists' mother tongue, local languages, and English as lingua franca in order to examine the…

  20. Creating a Culture of Student Success: The SEEK Scholars Peer Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zevallos, Ana L.; Washburn, Mara

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades, Vincent Tinto, Edmund Thile, Francis Ianni, and others all link mentoring to better academic performance, improved social adjustment, enhanced academic experiences, and greater rates of degree completion. Even more specifically, Jean E. Rhodes, Renée Spencer, Thomas E. Keller, Belle Liang, and Gil Noam describe three…

  1. Structuring Mentoring Relationships for Competence, Character, and Purpose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Jean E.; Spencer, Renee

    2010-01-01

    We close this volume with a final commentary from two leaders in the mentoring field. Rhodes and Spencer articulate how the contributions to this volume offer a richer, more complex rendering of relational styles and processes than has been laid out previously in the mentoring literature. They suggest that these efforts should provoke discussion…

  2. The Educational Appeal of Barbershop Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeGroot, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    Barbershop music has undergone some thing of a revival in recent years; some would argue that it never went away. The author discusses how music teachers can make use of this uniquely American art form. Rick Spencer, director of music and education for the Barbershop Harmony Society, the world's largest all-male singing organization, encourages…

  3. 46 CFR 42.03-35 - U.S.-flag vessels and Canadian vessels navigating on sheltered waters of Puget Sound and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false U.S.-flag vessels and Canadian vessels navigating on... FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Application § 42.03-35 U.S.-flag vessels and Canadian vessels navigating on... Island to Cape Spencer, Alaska, are sheltered waters * * *.” (b) U.S.-flag vessels and Canadian...

  4. 46 CFR 42.03-35 - U.S.-flag vessels and Canadian vessels navigating on sheltered waters of Puget Sound and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false U.S.-flag vessels and Canadian vessels navigating on... FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Application § 42.03-35 U.S.-flag vessels and Canadian vessels navigating on... Island to Cape Spencer, Alaska, are sheltered waters * * *.” (b) U.S.-flag vessels and Canadian...

  5. 46 CFR 42.03-35 - U.S.-flag vessels and Canadian vessels navigating on sheltered waters of Puget Sound and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false U.S.-flag vessels and Canadian vessels navigating on... FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Application § 42.03-35 U.S.-flag vessels and Canadian vessels navigating on... Island to Cape Spencer, Alaska, are sheltered waters * * *.” (b) U.S.-flag vessels and Canadian...

  6. An Initial Evaluation of the Iowa DE Project to Enhance Students' Authentic Intellectual Work. Fall 2007 to Fall 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Case studies of Authentic Intellectual Work (AIW) in the Iowa project included four high schools that have been practicing this professional development model for the last five years. The schools, AHST Secondary School, Cedar Falls High School, Spencer High and Middle Schools and Valley High School were visited in April, 2011. The visits included…

  7. View of Face A and Face B Arrays, looking northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Face A and Face B Arrays, looking northeast - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  8. Looking northwest, Face B Array to left, Face C (rear) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking northwest, Face B Array to left, Face C (rear) center, Power Plant (Building 5761), to right - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  9. [Intervention Programs Dealing with the Farm and Rural Crisis].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blundell, Joan; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes five creative/innovative human service programs currently dealing with the farm/rural crisis: Northwest Iowa Community Mental Health Center (Spencer), Lutheran Social Services in southwest Minnesota, Farm Counseling Service, Inc. (Memphis, Missouri), Missouri Financial Advisory and Resource Management Support (Columbia), and Missouri…

  10. Civic Education and Charter Schools: Current Knowledge and Future Research Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chudowsky, Naomi; Chudowsky, Victor

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, as schools have shifted more attention to English language arts and mathematics, several groups have made a plea for renewed attention to civic education for all students. One such group is the Spencer Foundation, which promotes research to improve students' civics knowledge and skills and their dispositions for responsible…

  11. Managing Rapport in Lingua Franca Sales Negotiations: A Comparison of Professional and Aspiring Negotiators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planken, B.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents selective findings from a study that investigated how facework is used to achieve interpersonal goals in intercultural sales negotiations. The article reports on linguistic analyses of what Spencer-Oatey has termed ''rapport management'' which, in a negotiation context, is aimed primarily, but not exclusively, at building a…

  12. School Libraries in a Diverse World: Providing the Personal Touch. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the International Association of School Librarianship (20th, Everett, Washington, July 22-27, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Association of School Librarianship, Kalamazoo, MI.

    This report of proceedings contains 28 papers that were presented at an international conference on school librarianship. The papers are: (1) "Multi-Ethnic Materials for Children and Young Adults in a Changing World" (Spencer G. Shaw); (2) "Eating Computers" (Dean Marney); (3) "Literature, Reading and the School Library Resource Centre in a…

  13. Within compound, from Guard Tower, looking southeast, Power Plant (Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Within compound, from Guard Tower, looking southeast, Power Plant (Building 5761) to left, Satellite Communications Terminal (Building 5771) center, Supply Warehouse (Building 5768) to left - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  14. View of Terminal Building and antenna, looking southeast Beale ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Terminal Building and antenna, looking southeast - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Satellite Communications Terminal, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  15. View of Terminal Building and antenna, looking north Beale ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Terminal Building and antenna, looking north - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Satellite Communications Terminal, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  16. Within compound, looking southeast, Satellite Communications Terminal Building (Building 5771) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Within compound, looking southeast, Satellite Communications Terminal Building (Building 5771) to left, Gate House (Building 5764) to right of center - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  17. Within compound, from Gate House, looking northwest, Power Plant (Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Within compound, from Gate House, looking northwest, Power Plant (Building 5761) to left, Electrical Substation (Building 5770) and Supply Warehouse (Building 5768) center, Satellite Communications Terminal (Building 5771) to far left - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  18. Within compound, looking southeast Power Plant (Building 5761) to left, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Within compound, looking southeast Power Plant (Building 5761) to left, Satellite Communications Terminal (Building 5771), center - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  19. Educational Change over Time? The Sustainability and Nonsustainability of Three Decades of Secondary School Change and Continuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargreaves, Andy; Goodson, Ivor

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This article presents the conceptual framework, methodological design, and key research findings from a Spencer Foundation-funded project of long-term educational change over time. Research Design: Based on more than 200 interviews, supplementary observations, and extensive archival data, it examines perceptions and experiences of…

  20. Caging Wild Birds: Making "Real Boys" into "Real Men" at the Interlaken School, 1907-1918.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamer, Lynne

    1998-01-01

    Interlaken School (Indiana) was an elite boys' preparatory boarding school that combined Hall's definitive theory of adolescence and Spencer's theory of social evolution into both a philosophy and a pedagogy. Interlaken was portrayed as an isolated mythologized community that combined manual with mental development and believed that adolescent…

  1. 40 CFR 795.250 - Developmental neurotoxicity screen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., presented in blocks of 10 trials as above. (E) Mean number of shuttles during the inter-trial intervals. (8.... “The effects of inter-trial interval on avoidance learning in the rat.” Journal of Comparative...: “Experimental and Clinical Neurotoxicology.” Spencer, P.S. and Schaumburg, H.H., eds., Baltimore, MD:...

  2. How Economics Can Help Colleges Be More Efficient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Michael; Schapiro, Morton Owen; Ahlburg, Dennis; Breneman, David

    2011-01-01

    For more than ten years, the Ford Policy Forum, an integral part of the Forum for the Future of Higher Education's annual Aspen Symposium, has been chaired by Michael McPherson and Morty Schapiro, presidents of the Spencer Foundation and Northwestern University, respectively. Its intent has been to explore how economics can make individual…

  3. What Works for Me.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vishwanadha, Hari; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Provides suggestions on various English instruction topics. Includes (1) "Argumentation Exercise," Hari Vishwanadha; (2) "How to Survive Developmental (or Any Other) English," Sally Russell; (3) "Reach Out to an Expert," Norma A. Register; (4) "Summary and Response Writing," Alec Valentine; (5) "The Living Journal," Blair Spencer Ray; and (6)…

  4. Handbook for Women Scholars: Strategies for Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Mary L.; And Others

    Articles on discrimination against women scholars and information on change strategies and resource groups are presented. The status and self-expressed needs of women scholars, as revealed in a recent survey of over 1,000 San Francisco Bay respondents, are considered in an article entitled "Status and Needs of Women Scholars" (Mary L. Spencer and…

  5. Computer Maintenance Operations Center (CMOC), additional computer support equipment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Computer Maintenance Operations Center (CMOC), additional computer support equipment - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  6. Computer Maintenance Operations Center (CMOC), showing duplexed cyber 170174 computers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Computer Maintenance Operations Center (CMOC), showing duplexed cyber 170-174 computers - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  7. Systematic Replication of the Effects of a Supplementary, Technology-Assisted, Storybook Intervention for Preschool Children with Weak Vocabulary and Comprehension Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Charles R.; Carta, Judith J.; Kelley, Elizabeth S.; Guerrero, Gabriela; Kong, Na Young; Atwater, Jane; Goldstein, Howard

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, Spencer, Goldstein, Sherman, et al. reported the promising effects of a supplemental, technology-assisted, storybook intervention (Tier 2) containing embedded instruction targeting the oral language learning of preschool children at risk for delays. We sought to advance knowledge of the intervention by replicating it in a new sample and…

  8. Within compound, from Guard Tower (Building 5762), looking southwest, Technical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Within compound, from Guard Tower (Building 5762), looking southwest, Technical Equipment Building (Building 5760) to left, Microwave Tower (associated with Building 5769) and Civil Engineering Storage Building (Building 5766) to left - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  9. Exterior, looking west, Equipment Building to left, Tower at center, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior, looking west, Equipment Building to left, Tower at center, Civil Engineering Storage Building (Building 5765) at left - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Microwave Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  10. 75 FR 16515 - Ram Rod Industries, LLC, Prentice, WI; Notice of Revised Determination Certification Regarding...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... decreased absolutely; and (ii)(I) imports of articles or services like or directly competitive with articles... because imports of articles or services like or directly competitive with the hydraulic cylinders produced... increased imports of goods like or directly competitive with those produced at Ramrod's Spencer location....

  11. Race, Racism, and Darwinism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeynes, William H.

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the views of Darwinist evolution on issues regarding race and how this contributed to the spread of racism in the United States. The writings of Charles Darwin and a myriad of his followers are examined, including Herbert Spencer, Francis Galton, and others. The influence of Darwinism in contributing to the growth of…

  12. A Librarian's Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiske, John

    2008-01-01

    John Fiske (1842-1901) was an American historian, philosopher, lecturer, and prolific author. Renowned as a popularizer of evolutionary theory, Fiske rubbed elbows with Charles Darwin and Herbert Spencer. From 1872-79 he served as Assistant Librarian at Harvard University, occupied mainly with what is known today as "Technical Services," i.e.,…

  13. No Child Left Behind: A Neoliberal Repackaging of Social Darwinism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyva, Rodolfo

    2009-01-01

    It is widely believed that the end of Nazism, and the postwar era brought an end to academic theories and discourses regarding inherent racial inferiority. There was little tolerance Hawkins (1997) argues, for biological justifications for racism, war, and exploitation. The infamous Social Darwinism of key intellectual Herbert Spencer, and its…

  14. What Rural Education Research is of Most Worth? A Reply to Arnold, Newman, Gaddy, and Dean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howley, Craig B.; Theobald, Paul; Howley, Aimee

    2005-01-01

    Offering a response to the question, "What rural education research is of most worth?", the authors recommend an approach very different from the one taken by Arnold, Newman, Gaddy, and Dean (2005) in their consideration of the rural education research literature. They remind readers that about 150 years ago, Herbert Spencer put a similar…

  15. Astride a Long-Dead Horse: Mainstream Outdoor Education Theory and the Central Curriculum Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookes, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    In 1859 Herbert Spencer recognised that the key curriculum issue was not what to include but what to leave out. What to leave out marked a shift in curriculum discourse from a search for universal approaches and absolute principles towards curriculum questions understood as only resolvable relative to particular social contexts. Yet outdoor…

  16. Letters in this Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-01-01

    Reforming the General Chemistry Textbook individual letters by Edward T. Samulski; Stephen J. Hawkes; Stephen J. Fisher; J. Stephen Hartman; A. R. H. Cole; Stanley Pine, Ronald Archer, and Herbert Kaesz; Jimmy Reeves; Robert Hill; and Brock Spencer, C. Bradley Moore and Nedah Rose. Re: article by R. J. Gillespie The author replies

  17. Spinning a Yarn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinzer, Tom

    1997-01-01

    Owen Valley High School in Spencer, Indiana, uses a holistic approach to integrating its academic and vocational curricula. Publication of a book of student-written stories on local history was a collaboration of classes in creative writing, civics, child development, English, art, computer applications, print communications, manufacturing,…

  18. Language at Work. Selected Papers from the Annual Meeting of the British Association for Applied Linguistics (University of Birmingham, England, September 1997). British Studies in Applied Linguistics 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunston, Susan, Ed.

    Papers on the role of language in the work environment include: "Institutions, Writing and Talk in Environmental Discourse" (Greg Myers); "Negotiating Training: Shifting Participant Frameworks in the Workplace" (Kristina Bennert); "Relational Management in Chinese-British Business Meetings" (Helen Spencer-Oatey, Jianyu Xing); "A Pragmatic Approach…

  19. Preparing Graduate Students for Virtual World Simulations: Exploring the Potential of an Emerging Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Anne M.; Spencer, Susan; Mirliss, Danielle; Twal, Riad

    2009-01-01

    Anne M. Hewitt, Susan Spencer, Danielle Mirliss, and Riad Twal report on a collaborative team initiative to create a virtual world emergency preparedness simulation that focuses on crisis and emergency risk communication (CERC). CERC is a key competency for students enrolled in Seton Hall University's (SHU) Master of Healthcare Administration…

  20. Get It? Got It. Good!: Utilizing Get It Now Article Delivery Service at a Health Sciences Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Christy; Gregory, Joan M.

    2016-01-01

    With journal price increases continuing to outpace inflation and library collection funds remaining stagnant or shrinking, libraries are seeking innovative ways to control spending while continuing to provide patrons with high-quality content. The Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library reports on the evaluation, implementation, and use of…

  1. Within compound, looking northwest, Power Plant (Building 5761) and Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Within compound, looking northwest, Power Plant (Building 5761) and Guard Tower (Building 5762) to left, Electrical Substation to right - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  2. Closeup view of subarray driver module, mounted on girder at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Closeup view of sub-array driver module, mounted on girder at back of array - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  3. Literacy Teachers Engage in Service-Learning via Community Organization Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dooley, Caitlin McMunn; Mays, Lydia Criss

    2014-01-01

    Service-learning provides community service as well as authentic, curriculum-driven learning experiences (Furco & Root, 2010) and has been an effective component of teacher education courses (García, Arias, Murri, & Surna, 2010; Mitton-Kukner, Nelson, & Descrochers, 2010; Spencer, Cox-Petersen, & Crawford, 2005). With these…

  4. Using Cooperative Learning To Improve Reading and Writing in Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesbit, Catherine R.; Rogers, Cynthia A.

    1997-01-01

    Presents several cooperative learning lessons that integrate science, reading and writing. Notes that sample lessons involve six methods of cooperative learning drawn from four prominent developers and researchers, David Johnson, Roger Johnson, Robert Slavin, and Spencer Kagan. Describes the cooperative learning method to illustrate how to use it…

  5. The Experiences and Perceptions of Selected Mentors: The Dyadic Relationship in School-Based Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frels, Rebecca Karen

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, collective case study was to explore selected mentors' perceptions and experiences of the dyadic mentoring relationship in SBM. A second purpose was to build on the qualitative body of research (Spencer, 2004, 2007) for understanding roles, purposes, approaches, and experiences of the relationship process with…

  6. Detail of array panels, Face B, with active and terminated ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of array panels, Face B, with active and terminated dipole elements - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  7. Toward a Vibrant Research Community in Education: Investing in Early-Career Scholars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Lauren Jones

    2008-01-01

    Background/Context: In 1994, the Spencer Foundation embarked on an ambitious experimental initiative to support the preparation of education researchers. Over the 13-year span of the Research Training Grant (RTG) program, the foundation made multiyear awards to more than a dozen leading institutions in the United States and South Africa. This…

  8. Isoflavonoid accumulation in soybean hairy roots upon treatment with Fusarium solani.

    PubMed

    Lozovaya, Vera V; Lygin, Anatoliy V; Zernova, Olga V; Li, Shuxian; Hartman, Glen L; Widholm, Jack M

    2004-01-01

    Hairy roots were initiated from two soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] genotypes with different susceptibility (susceptible 'Spencer' and partially resistant 'PI567.374') to the disease sudden death syndrome (SDS) caused by the soil-borne fungal pathogen Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines (FSG) to study the role of isoflavonoids in the plant response to FSG infection. Hairy root cultures obtained by transformation with Agrobacterium rhizogenes allows normal root growth that can be visually monitored. The principal isoflavones (genistin, daidzin, glycitin and their malonyl conjugates and aglycones) and also isoflavonoid phytoalexins (coumestrol and glyceollin) were measured by HPLC in extracts of the FSG-inoculated and non-inoculated hairy roots. FSG mycelia grew more slowly on inoculated PI567.374 hairy roots than on Spencer hairy roots. The glyceollin content was higher in FSG-inoculated PI567.374 hairy roots than in Spencer hairy roots even though the glyceollin precursor, the isoflavone daidzein, was higher in Spencer. The de novo synthesis of isoflavones and glyceollin was confirmed by [(14)C]Phe incorporation into glyceollin, which was higher both in the FSG-inoculated roots and surrounding medium of the cv. PI567.374 than that of Spencer. Glyceollin was the most inhibitory to FSG growth among eight isoflavonoids tested. The levels of coumestrol, a putative phytoalexin, did not change upon FSG inoculation. The defense response was also elicited by FSG culture filtrates in hairy roots grown in liquid culture. The data obtained indicate that the ability of soybean roots to rapidly produce sufficient amounts of glyceollin in response to FSG infection might be important in providing partial resistance to this fungus. PMID:15331097

  9. The Weather Guys Discussing Science via the Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. E.; Ackerman, S. A.; Meiller, L.; Packard, J.

    2006-12-01

    For over 8 years the weather guys, Prof Jon Martin and Steve Ackerman, have be regular quests on the Larry Meiller show on Wisconsin Public Radio IDEAS Network. The format of the show is a live call-in show. The show is aired the last Monday of the month and is also web-cast live (http://www.wpr.org/), enabling questions to be called in on phone or sent via email. Jon and Steve will discuss their experiences with doing this live show, presenting personal stories of successful and less-successful communication attempts. A nearly complete archive exists and we will present an analysis of the type of questions asked and the more common, and less common, topics.

  10. A LOW GAMMA_T INJECTION LATTICE FOR POLARIZED PROTONS IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.

    2007-06-25

    Polarized protons are injected into the Relativistic Heavy Jon Collider (RHIC) just above transition energy. When installation of a cold partial Siberian snake in the AGS required lowering the injection energy by {Delta}{gamma} = 0.56, the transition energy in RHIC had to be lowered accordingly to ensure proper longitudinal matching. This paper presents lattice modifications implemented to lower the transition energy by {Delta}{gamma}{sub t} = 0.8.

  11. Optical Ethernet: introduction to the feature issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Cedric F.; Tsang, Danny H. K.

    2002-08-01

    Ethernet and IP (Internet Protocol) have become the ubiquitous protocols for today's data communication networks, with Ethernet being used to provide the physical layer and data-link layer functions and IP for routing and internetworking in the network layer. Here feature editors Cedric F. Lam and Danny H. K. Tsang discuss the emerging technology of Optical Ethernet and introduce the papers in this feature issue of JON.

  12. IET. Snaptran. Flying a kite in the service of science. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET. Snaptran. Flying a kite in the service of science. Doug Wenzel and Jon Hurd obtain weather data on east side of IET as part of Snaptran experiment. tank building (TAN-627) and movable building (TAN-624) at left. Stack and ANP duct at right. Photographer: Farmer. Date: September 27, 1965. INEEL negative no. 65-4986 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. American Chemical Society. 23rd Great Lakes Regional Meeting. Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The technical program includes some 250 papers in 38 sessions, featuring 16 symposia with 99 invited speakers. Program highlights include a plenary lecture, The Origin and Consequences of Scientific Illiteracy, by Jon D. Miller. Sessions for general technical papers are scheduled in the following categories: analytical chemistry; biochemistry; inorganic chemistry; organic chemistry; and physical chemistry. Papers have been processed for inclusion on the data base.

  14. Item-location binding in working memory: is it hippocampus-dependent?

    PubMed

    Allen, Richard J; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh; Baddeley, Alan D

    2014-07-01

    A general consensus is emerging that the hippocampus has an important and active role in the creation of new long-term memory representations of associations or bindings between elements. However, it is less clear whether this contribution can be extended to the creation of temporary bound representations in working memory, involving the retention of small numbers of items over short delays. We examined this by administering a series of recognition and recall tests of working memory for colour-location binding and object-location binding to a patient with highly selective hippocampal damage (Jon), and groups of control participants. Jon achieved high levels of accuracy in all working memory tests of recognition and recall binding across retention intervals of up to 10s. In contrast, Jon performed at chance on an unexpected delayed test of the same object-location binding information. These findings indicate a clear dissociation between working memory and long-term memory, with no evidence for a critical hippocampal contribution to item-location binding in working memory. PMID:24784006

  15. Engrailed Alters the Specificity of Synaptic Connections of Drosophila Auditory Neurons with the Giant Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Pézier, Adeline; Jezzini, Sami H.; Marie, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    We show that a subset of sound-detecting Johnston's Organ neurons (JONs) in Drosophila melanogaster, which express the transcription factors Engrailed (En) and Invected (Inv), form mixed electrical and chemical synaptic inputs onto the giant fiber (GF) dendrite. These synaptic connections are detected by trans-synaptic Neurobiotin (NB) transfer and by colocalization of Bruchpilot-short puncta. We then show that misexpressing En postmitotically in a second subset of sound-responsive JONs causes them to form ectopic electrical and chemical synapses with the GF, in turn causing that postsynaptic neuron to redistribute its dendritic branches into the vicinity of these afferents. We also introduce a simple electrophysiological recording paradigm for quantifying the presynaptic and postsynaptic electrical activity at this synapse, by measuring the extracellular sound-evoked potentials (SEPs) from the antennal nerve while monitoring the likelihood of the GF firing an action potential in response to simultaneous subthreshold sound and voltage stimuli. Ectopic presynaptic expression of En strengthens the synaptic connection, consistent with there being more synaptic contacts formed. Finally, RNAi-mediated knockdown of En and Inv in postmitotic neurons reduces SEP amplitude but also reduces synaptic strength at the JON–GF synapse. Overall, these results suggest that En and Inv in JONs regulate both neuronal excitability and synaptic connectivity. PMID:25164665

  16. Brain activity evidence for recognition without recollection after early hippocampal damage

    PubMed Central

    Düzel, E.; Vargha-Khadem, F.; Heinze, H. J.; Mishkin, M.

    2001-01-01

    Amnesic patients with early and seemingly isolated hippocampal injury show relatively normal recognition memory scores. The cognitive profile of these patients raises the possibility that this recognition performance is maintained mainly by stimulus familiarity in the absence of recollection of contextual information. Here we report electrophysiological data on the status of recognition memory in one of the patients, Jon. Jon's recognition of studied words lacks the event-related potential (ERP) index of recollection, viz., an increase in the late positive component (500–700 ms), under conditions that elicit it reliably in normal subjects. On the other hand, a decrease of the ERP amplitude between 300 and 500 ms, also reliably found in normal subjects, is well preserved. This so-called N400 effect has been linked to stimulus familiarity in previous ERP studies of recognition memory. In Jon, this link is supported by the finding that his recognized and unrecognized studied words evoked topographically distinct ERP effects in the N400 time window. These data suggest that recollection is more dependent on the hippocampal formation than is familiarity, consistent with the view that the hippocampal formation plays a special role in episodic memory, for which recollection is so critical. PMID:11438748

  17. Observations of deep convection from an airborne high-frequency (92 and 183 GHz) passive microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkarinen, I. M.; Adler, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Spencer et al. (1983) have reported that very low Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) brightness temperatures at 37 GHz over land coincide with heavy thunderstorm rainfall, while Wilheit et al. (1982) used an aircraft-mounted radiometer operating at 92 and 183 GHz to observe convective precipitation associated with a tropical storm over the ocean. A scanning version of the instrument employed by Wilheit et al. is the Advanced Microwave Moisture Sounder (AMMS). The present paper has the objective to summarize the preliminary results of AMMS observations of convective raining clouds and to determine whether empirical relationships between rain rate and microwave brightness temperature, such as those developed for 37 GHz satellite data by Spencer et al., can be extended to higher microwave frequencies.

  18. Slope stability and stabilization methods

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, L.W.; Lee, T.S.; Boyce, G.M.; Sharma, S.S.

    1995-12-01

    Slope stability can be a major problem during the construction of surface facilities. Cutting into existing ground disturbs the mechanics of the surrounding area, which can result in landslides and rock falls. This practical reference gives you the comprehensive information you need for slope stability analysis, suitable methods of analysis with and without the use of computers, and examples of common stability problems and stabilization methods for cuts and fills. It includes detailed discussions of methods used in slope stability analysis, including the Ordinary Method of Slices, Simplified Janbu Method, Simplified Bishop Method, Spencer`s Method, other limit equilibrium methods, numerical methods, total stress analysis, effective stress analysis, and the use of computer programs to solve problems. Chapters include: General Slope Stability Concepts; Engineering Geology Principles; Groundwater Conditions; Geologic Site Exploration; Laboratory Testing Interpretation; Slope Stability Concepts; Slope Stabilization Methods; and Design, Construction and Maintenance.

  19. Modeling the emergent executive: implications for the structure and development of executive function.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, Sandra A

    2014-06-01

    In this Monograph, Buss and Spencer develop a novel theory of preschool executive function (EF) based on the principles of dynamic systems theory (DST). In this commentary, I discuss how this model contributes to our understanding of EF and highlight challenges that remain to be addressed. First, I discuss Buss and Spencer's model in the context of existing theories, and in terms of the processes thought to underlie developmental improvements in card-sorting. Next, I explore implications for our understanding of the structure of EF in early childhood. Finally, I suggest possible extensions of this approach to later development, including whether and how this work might shed light on relations between individual differences in early EF and later developmental outcomes. PMID:24818832

  20. Hughlings Jackson. The man and his time.

    PubMed

    Critchley, M

    1986-05-01

    This article is a brief account of the personality of Hughlings Jackson, his mode of life, and his intimate friends. He grew up when worldwide developments were taking place in biological thinking. The philosopher Herbert Spencer impressed him with his exciting concept of evolution, a principle which Jackson realized was applicable to the functions and disorders of the nervous system. Jackson and Spencer corresponded over a period of at least 37 years but they were not friends, their personal qualities being very different. Revered by his colleagues, even though they may not have fully understood what he was trying to say, Jackson became a legend in his own lifetime and an inspiration to neurologists who succeeded him. PMID:3516126

  1. Microwave sounding units and global warming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Bruce L.; Keihm, Stephen J.

    1991-01-01

    A recent work of Spencer and Christy (1990) on precise monitoring of global temperature trends from satellites is critically examined. It is tentatively concluded in the present comment that remote sensing using satellite microwave radiometers can in fact provide a means for the monitoring of troposphere-averaged air temperature. However, for this to be successful more than one decade of data will be required to overcome the apparent inherent variability of global average air temperature. It is argued that the data set reported by Spencer and Christy should be subjected to careful review before it is interpreted as evidence of the presence or absence of global warming. In a reply, Christy provides specific responses to the commenters' objections.

  2. Polygons and the Lace Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clisby, Nathan; Slade, Gordon

    The lace expansion was introduced by Brydges and Spencer in 1985 [7] to analyse weakly self-avoiding walks in dimensions d > 4. Subsequently it has been generalised and greatly extended, so that it now applies to a variety of problems of interest in probability theory, statistical physics, and combinatorics, including the strictly self-avoiding walk, lattice trees, lattice animals, percolation, oriented percolation, the contact process, random graphs, and the Ising model. A recent survey is [42].

  3. National hydrogen energy roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2002-11-01

    This report was unveiled by Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham in November 2002 and provides a blueprint for the coordinated, long-term, public and private efforts required for hydrogen energy development. Based on the results of the government-industry National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap Workshop, held in Washington, DC on April 2-3, 2002, it displays the development of a roadmap for America's clean energy future and outlines the key barriers and needs to achieve the hydrogen vision goals defined in

  4. Gill, Sir David (1843-1914)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Astronomer, born in Aberdeen, trained as a watchmaker, had a private observatory near Aberdeen, became Her Majesty's Astronomer at the Cape of Good Hope. He redetermined the solar parallax by observing the close approach to the Earth in 1889 of the minor planets Iris, Victoria and Sappho (his was the standard value for nearly a century). His measurement was repeated by HAROLD SPENCER JONES during...

  5. Effect of DEM Source and Resolution on Extracting River Network and Watershed within Multi-Lake Area in Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Li, Gang; Lin, Hui

    2014-11-01

    DEM defines drainage structures and basin through conducting overland flow simulation. Two matured DEM Sources are SRTM DEM (Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission) and ASTER GDEM (Advanced Space borne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer Global Digital Elevation Model); The accuracy of hydrological characters that derived from DEM decreased from high resolution to coarse resolution and appeared to be different in different data source (Vaze,Teng, & Spencer, 2010).

  6. Some properties of correlations of quantum lattice systems in thermal equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Fröhlich, Jürg; Ueltschi, Daniel

    2015-05-15

    Simple proofs of uniqueness of the thermodynamic limit of KMS states and of the decay of equilibrium correlations are presented for a large class of quantum lattice systems at high temperatures. New quantum correlation inequalities for general Heisenberg models are described. Finally, a simplified derivation of a general result on power-law decay of correlations in 2D quantum lattice systems with continuous symmetries is given, extending results of McBryan and Spencer for the 2D classical XY model.

  7. 12. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. WEST WING. AN OVERHEAD POWER SHAFT IS SHOWN ALONG EACH WALL, BELT-CONNECTED TO A ROW OF BILLINGS & SPENCER DROP HAMMERS USED IN FORGING PARTS FOR 1903 MODEL SPRINGFIELD RIFLE. ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED 1905. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 64, Rodman Avenue between Second & Third Streets, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  8. Call for Papers: Photonics in Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosinska, Lena; Glick, Madeleine

    2006-04-01

  9. Hybrid OBS/TDM or OBS/wavelength routing
  10. Manuscript Submission

    To submit to this special issue, follow the normal procedure for submission to JON and select ``Photonics in Switching' in the features indicator of the online submission form. For all other questions relating to this feature issue, please send an e-mail to jon@osa.org, subject line ``Photonics in Switching.' Additional information can be found on the JON website: http://www.osa-jon.org/journal/jon/author.cfm. Submission Deadline: 15 September 2006

  11. Optical Ethernet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Calvin C. K.; Lam, Cedric F.; Tsang, Danny H. K.

    2005-09-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Ethernet The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) is soliciting papers for a second feature issue on Optical Ethernet. Ethernet has evolved from a LAN technology connecting desktop computers to a universal broadband network interface. It is not only the vehicle for local data connectivity but also the standard interface for next-generation network equipment such as video servers and IP telephony. High-speed Ethernet has been increasingly assuming the volume of backbone network traffic from SONET/SDH-based circuit applications. It is clear that IP has become the universal network protocol for future converged networks, and Ethernet is becoming the ubiquitous link layer for connectivity. Network operators have been offering Ethernet services for several years. Problems and new requirements in Ethernet service offerings have been captured through previous experience. New study groups and standards bodies have been formed to address these problems. This feature issue aims at reviewing and updating the new developments and R&D efforts of high-speed Ethernet in recent years, especially those related to the field of optical networking. Scope of Submission The scope of the papers includes, but is not limited to, the following: Ethernet PHY development 10-Gbit Ethernet on multimode fiber Native Ethernet transport and Ethernet on legacy networks EPON Ethernet OAM Resilient packet ring (RPR) and Ethernet QoS definition and management on Ethernet Ethernet protection switching Circuit emulation services on Ethernet Transparent LAN service development Carrier VLAN and Ethernet Ethernet MAC frame expansion Ethernet switching High-speed Ethernet applications Economic models of high-speed Ethernet services Ethernet field deployment and standard activities To submit to this special issue, follow the normal procedure for submission to JON, indicating "Optical Ethernet feature" in the "Comments" field of the online submission form. For all other questions

  12. The practice of Spencerian science: Patrick Geddes's Biosocial Program, 1876-1889.

    PubMed

    Renwick, Chris

    2009-03-01

    From the Victorian era to our own, critics of Herbert Spencer have portrayed his science-based philosophical system as irrelevant to the concerns of practicing scientists. Yet, as a number of scholars have recently argued, an extraordinary range of reformist and experimental projects across the human and life sciences took their bearings from Spencer's work. This essay examines Spencerian science as practiced by the biologist, sociologist, and town planner Patrick Geddes (1854-1932). Through a close examination of his experimental natural history of the late 1870s and early 1880s, his wider writings on the evolutionary process in the 1880s, and his efforts later in that decade to improve the slums of Edinburgh, this essay reveals Geddes's deep, unifying, and energizing commitment to Spencer's program. Recapturing that commitment can not only help historians rethink Spencerian science as practice but also suggest ways of overcoming the dichotomy between elite ideas and practical activity that bedevils much contemporary historiography of science. PMID:19554869

  13. Southern Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    South-central Australia is home to several deserts, including the Simpson Desert, whose reddish-orange sands are seen in the upper left quadrant of this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from July 1, 2002. Several impermanent, salty, lakes stand whitely out against the arid terrain. The largest is North Lake Eyre, southwest of center. At bottom center, Spencer Gulf separates the triangular Eyre Peninsula from the Yorke Peninsula. The Gulf of St. Vincent separates Yorke Peninsula from the mainland. In Spencer Gulf, colorful blue-green swirls indicate the presence of a bloom of marine plants called phytoplankton, whose brightly colored photosynthetic pigments stain the water. Water quality in the Gulf is an ongoing problem for Australia, as irrigation projects have diverted the already small flow of freshwater that empties into the Gulf. Other problems include contamination with pesticides and agricultural and residential fertilizer. On both the Eyre Peninsula and in the Victoria Territory to the east of Spencer Gulf, dark-colored rectangles show the boundaries of parks and nature preserves where the natural, drought-tolerant vegetation thrives.

  14. The power of the projected self: a case study in self artistry.

    PubMed

    Rapport, N

    2005-12-01

    The "projected self" is an individual engaged in a life project. The power that enables an individual to formulate, to embark on, and to effect a life project is of an "existential", embodied kind: something fuelled metabolically within the body of the individual, and conceived of by way of his or her ongoing, individual acts of interpretation. In this article the life of the English artist Stanley Spencer is looked to as a case study through which to flesh out and apply the above conceptual terms and their argument. To what extent can there be said to be a relationship between the "work of art" that Spencer created in and as his life, and his influence over those forces and those others that might otherwise have claimed a hold over his life? Spencer's construction of a beautiful, involved, and extensive worldview, the article argues, does translate into him exercising a conscious control over the course of his life and enjoying a wellbeing of identity. PMID:23674663

  15. Healthcare and the slippery slope of state growth: lessons from the past.

    PubMed

    Mingardi, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    All over Europe, the provision of healthcare services is widely considered a primary duty of the government. Universal access to medical care can be considered a basic ingredient of the so-called "European social model." But if universal access to medical care is seldom questioned, European governments-faced with expanding costs caused by an increasing demand driven by an aging population and technology-driven improvements-are contemplating the possibility of "rationing" (1) treatments, or the possibility of allowing a greater role for private suppliers. If a "multi-tier" healthcare system has long been anathema to the European leadership, guaranteeing a uniform access to state-of-the-art care seems to be well beyond the means of states suffering from persisting debt crisis. Was the failure of state-controlled "adequate" healthcare totally unpredictable? Far-sighted criticisms had been offered by two eminent thinkers in the classical liberal tradition, Herbert Spencer (1820-1903) and Friedrich A. von Hayek (1899-1992). Neither author is usually recognized as a forerunner of contemporary critics of the welfare state, and both investigated the issue of the state financing and providing health services well before (Spencer) or right after (Hayek) the establishment of national health services. With the benefit of hindsight, reading Spencer and Hayek helps us to understand how the crisis of state-supplied healthcare is not rooted in the mere progress of clinical technology, but is rather the logical consequence of the theoretical basis of the model itself. Whereas modern theorists of the welfare state tend to offer theories that are impervious to a critical appraisal of their unintended consequences-insofar as they are framed in a language of "rights"-both Hayek and Spencer understood that human systems are complex, and that unwanted effects of public policy should be taken into account. Although Spencer emphasized the moral hazards accruing from the paternalism

  16. Searching for Thermal Anomalies on Icy Satellites: Step 1- Validation of the Three Dimensional Volatile-Transport (VT3D)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Gary G.; Howett, Carly J. A.; Young, Leslie A.; Spencer, John R.

    2015-11-01

    In the last few decades, thermal data from the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft have detected various anomalies on Jovian and Saturnian satellites, including the thermally anomalous “PacMan” regions on Mimas and Tethys and the Pwyll anomaly on Europa (Howett et al. 2011, Howett et al. 2012, Spencer et al. 1999). Yet, the peculiarities of some of these anomalies, like the weak detection of the “PacMan” anomalies on Rhea and Dione and the low thermal inertia values of the widespread anomalies on equatorial Europa, are subjects for on-going research (Howett et al. 2014, Rathbun et al. 2010). Further, analysis and review of all the data both Galileo and Cassini took of these worlds will provide information of the thermal inertia and albedos of their surfaces, perhaps highlighting potential targets of interest for future Jovian and Saturnian system missions. Many previous works have used a thermophysical model for airless planets developed by Spencer (1990). However, the Three Dimensional Volatile-Transport (VT3D) model proposed by Young (2012) is able to predict surface temperatures in significantly faster computation time, incorporating seasonal and diurnal insolation variations. This work is the first step in an ongoing investigation, which will use VT3D’s capabilities to reanalyze Galileo and Cassini data. VT3D, which has already been used to analyze volatile transport on Pluto, is validated by comparing its results to that of the Spencer thermal model. We will also present our initial results using VT3D to reanalyze the thermophysical properties of the PacMan anomaly previous discovered on Mimas by Howett et al. (2011), using temperature constraints of diurnal data from Cassini/CIRS. VT3D is expected to be an efficient tool in identifying new thermal anomalies in future Saturnian and Jovian missions.Bibliography:C.J.A. Howett et al. (2011), Icarus 216, 221.C.J.A. Howett et al. (2012), Icarus 221, 1084.C.J.A. Howett et al. (2014), Icarus 241, 239.J

  17. U.S. Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Program: Battery Test Manual For Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Jon P. Christophersen

    2014-09-01

    This battery test procedure manual was prepared for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office. It is based on technical targets for commercial viability established for energy storage development projects aimed at meeting system level DOE goals for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV). The specific procedures defined in this manual support the performance and life characterization of advanced battery devices under development for PHEV’s. However, it does share some methods described in the previously published battery test manual for power-assist hybrid electric vehicles. Due to the complexity of some of the procedures and supporting analysis, future revisions including some modifications and clarifications of these procedures are expected. As in previous battery and capacitor test manuals, this version of the manual defines testing methods for full-size battery systems, along with provisions for scaling these tests for modules, cells or other subscale level devices. The DOE-United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC), Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) supported the development of the manual. Technical Team points of contact responsible for its development and revision are Renata M. Arsenault of Ford Motor Company and Jon P. Christophersen of the Idaho National Laboratory. The development of this manual was funded by the Unites States Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office. Technical direction from DOE was provided by David Howell, Energy Storage R&D Manager and Hybrid Electric Systems Team Leader. Comments and questions regarding the manual should be directed to Jon P. Christophersen at the Idaho National Laboratory (jon.christophersen@inl.gov).

  18. Battery Test Manual For Electric Vehicles, Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Christophersen, Jon P.

    2015-06-01

    This battery test procedure manual was prepared for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office. It is based on technical targets for commercial viability established for energy storage development projects aimed at meeting system level DOE goals for Electric Vehicles (EV). The specific procedures defined in this manual support the performance and life characterization of advanced battery devices under development for EVs. However, it does share some methods described in the previously published battery test manual for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Due to the complexity of some of the procedures and supporting analysis, future revisions including some modifications and clarifications of these procedures are expected. As in previous battery and capacitor test manuals, this version of the manual defines testing methods for full-size battery systems, along with provisions for scaling these tests for modules, cells or other subscale level devices. The DOE-United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC), Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) supported the development of the manual. Technical Team points of contact responsible for its development and revision are Chul Bae of Ford Motor Company and Jon P. Christophersen of the Idaho National Laboratory. The development of this manual was funded by the Unites States Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office. Technical direction from DOE was provided by David Howell, Energy Storage R&D Manager and Hybrid Electric Systems Team Leader. Comments and questions regarding the manual should be directed to Jon P. Christophersen at the Idaho National Laboratory (jon.christophersen@inl.gov).

  19. SWiFT Software Quality Assurance Plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Jonathan Charles

    2016-01-01

    This document describes the software development practice areas and processes which contribute to the ability of SWiFT software developers to provide quality software. These processes are designed to satisfy the requirements set forth by the Sandia Software Quality Assurance Program (SSQAP). APPROVALS SWiFT Software Quality Assurance Plan (SAND2016-0765) approved by: Department Manager SWiFT Site Lead Dave Minster (6121) Date Jonathan White (6121) Date SWiFT Controls Engineer Jonathan Berg (6121) Date CHANGE HISTORY Issue Date Originator(s) Description A 2016/01/27 Jon Berg (06121) Initial release of the SWiFT Software Quality Assurance Plan

  20. Hypnosis and Mindfulness: The Twain Finally Meet.

    PubMed

    Otani, Akira

    2016-04-01

    Mindfulness meditation (or simply mindfulness) is an ancient method of attention training. Arguably, developed originally by the Buddha, it has been practiced by Buddhists over 2,500 years as part of their spiritual training. The popularity in mindfulness has soared recently following its adaptation as Mindfulness-Based Stress Management by Jon Kabat-Zinn (1995). Mindfulness is often compared to hypnosis but not all assertions are accurate. This article, as a primer, delineates similarities and dissimilarities between mindfulness and hypnosis in terms of 12 specific facets, including putative neuroscientific findings. It also provides a case example that illustrates clinical integration of the two methods. PMID:27003487

  21. Innovative techniques and tools for public participation in U.S. Department of Energy programs

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, A.H.; Henrich, D.L.; Kuhlman, C.A.; White, G.W.

    1995-07-01

    In early 1995, Jon Yerxa, Public Involvement Team Leader in the Office of External Affairs at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office, identified the need to ``provide Hanford`s Public Participation Program with input and advice concerning public involvement issues at Hanford.`` Yerxa identified the following committees: (1) Training, (2) Tri-Party Agreement/NEPA/ Environmental Justice, (3) Program, (4) Performance Evaluation, and (5) Communications Techniques and Technology. These committees were to be staffed by public involvement and communications staff from DOE and its contractors on the Hanford Site. This report describes the activities and recommendations of the Communications Techniques and Technology committee.

  22. Assertive or antiquated: ProMedica vows to appeal loss against FTC as questions loom over whether mergers lead to efficiencies or clout.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Joe

    2011-12-12

    ProMedica vows to fight the feds over the acquisition of St. Luke's Hospital. Here is what they have to say. "The cost of healthcare is a real problem for all Americans, and the commission seeks to address this national problem by using all the tools Congress gave to us, and by devoting significant resources so that competition will enable market participants to deliver on the promises of cost-containment and continued excellence and innovation," says the FTC's Jon Leibowitz. PMID:22299225

  1. Immunogenetics and immunology of transplantation in Leiden.

    PubMed

    Heidt, Sebastiaan; Eikmans, Michael; Roelen, Dave L; van Kooten, Cees; Claas, Frans H J

    2014-10-01

    The historical observation of Jon van Rood that pregnancy can lead to the induction of HLA antibodies (1) was the start of a long history of research on immunogenetics and immunology of transplantation in Leiden. Some of the current research topics are presented in this mini-review. These include amongst others the differential immunogenicity of HLA mismatches in clinical transplantation, a special strategy to transplant highly sensitized patients, new tools to monitor donor specific memory B cells, new parameters for risk assessment in transplant recipients and the importance of the innate immune response in transplantation. PMID:25251513

  2. Signatures of Hydrometeor Species from Airborne Passive Microwave Data for Frequencies 10-183 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; Leppert, Kenneth, II

    2014-01-01

    There are 2 basic precipitation retrieval methods using passive microwave measurements: (1) Emission-based: Based on the tendency of liquid precipitation to cause an increase in brightness temperature (BT) primarily at frequencies below 22 GHz over a radiometrically cold background, often an ocean background (e.g., Spencer et al. 1989; Adler et al. 1991; McGaughey et al. 1996); and (2) Scattering-based: Based on the tendency of precipitation-sized ice to scatter upwelling radiation, thereby reducing the measured BT over a relatively warmer (usually land) background at frequencies generally 37 GHz (e.g., Spencer et al. 1989; Smith et al. 1992; Ferraro and Marks 1995). Passive microwave measurements have also been used to detect intense convection (e.g., Spencer and Santek 1985) and for the detection of hail (e.g., Cecil 2009; Cecil and Blankenship 2012; Ferraro et al. 2014). The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission expands upon the successful Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission program to provide global rainfall and snowfall observations every 3 hours (Hou et al. 2014). One of the instruments on board the GPM Core Observatory is the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) which is a conically-scanning microwave radiometer with 13 channels ranging from 10-183 GHz. Goal of this study: Determine the signatures of various hydrometeor species in terms of BTs measured at frequencies used by GMI by using data collected on 3 case days (all having intense/severe convection) during the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment conducted over Oklahoma in 2011.

  3. National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap: A National Hydrogen Vision (CD-ROM)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2002-12-01

    ''The National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap'' was unveiled by the Secretary of Energy, Spencer Abraham, November 12, 2002. The Roadmap provides a blueprint for the coordinated, long-term, public and private efforts required for hydrogen energy development. This CD-ROM also includes''A National Vision of America's Transition to a Hydrogen Economy-to 2030 and Beyond'', which was published in February 2002 as a result of the Hydrogen Vision Meeting. This document summarizes the potential role for hydrogen systems in America's energy future, outlining the common vision of the ''hydrogen economy.''

  4. Extreme Science (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect

    Ajo-Franklin, Caroline; Klein, Spencer; Minor, Andrew; Torok, Tamas

    2012-02-27

    On Feb. 27, 2012 at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre, four Berkeley Lab scientists presented talks related to extreme science - and what it means to you. Topics include: Neutrino hunting in Antarctica. Learn why Spencer Klein goes to the ends of the Earth to search for these ghostly particles. From Chernobyl to Central Asia, Tamas Torok travels the globe to study microbial diversity in extreme environments. Andrew Minor uses the world's most advanced electron microscopes to explore materials at ultrahigh stresses and in harsh environments. And microbes that talk to computers? Caroline Ajo-Franklin is pioneering cellular-electrical connections that could help transform sunlight into fuel.

  5. The Moment Condensed History Algorithm for Monte Carlo Electron Transport Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tolar, D R; Larsen, E W

    2001-02-27

    We introduce a new Condensed History algorithm for the Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport. To obtain more accurate simulations, the new algorithm preserves the mean position and the variance in the mean position exactly for electrons that have traveled a given path length and are traveling in a given direction. This is accomplished by deriving the zeroth-, first-, and second-order spatial moments of the Spencer-Lewis equation and employing this information directly in the Condensed History process. Numerical calculations demonstrate the advantages of our method over standard Condensed History methods.

  6. Fetal genes in mother's blood: a novel mechanism for telegony?

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongsheng

    2013-07-25

    Telegony is a discredited genetic phenomenon that a previous male may influence the characteristics of offspring subsequently borne by the same female to another male. Although its reality was acknowledged by such authorities as Charles Darwin and Herbert Spencer, it has been met with skepticism because of a lack of understanding of the theoretical basis for telegony. With the discovery of fetal genes in mother's blood, the penetration of somatic cells by sperm, and the ability of RNA to program genome rearrangement, mechanisms might exist for telegony. PMID:23618818

  7. John Hughlings-Jackson: a sesquicentennial tribute.

    PubMed

    Swash, M

    1986-09-01

    One hundred and fifty years have elapsed since the birth of John Hughlings-Jackson, a pivotal figure in the development of clinical neuroscience. In this review the origin of Jackson's postulate of a hierarchical organisation of function in the nervous system is described in the context of his education and his contacts with contemporaries, both in his clinical practice at The London Hospital and at the National Hospital, Queen Square, and in relation to the evolutionary approach to the organisation and ideas on biology and society set out by the philosopher Herbert Spencer. PMID:3531410

  8. John Hughlings Jackson and the conceptual foundations of the neurosciences.

    PubMed

    Greenblatt, S H

    1999-01-01

    Cerebral localization, including hierarchical organization of the nervous system, was the critical conceptual advance that made possible the development of modern neuroscience in the nineteenth century. Some of our most basic ideas about neural organization were contributed by Hughlings Jackson. In the early twentieth century, Charles Sherrington combined localization with the neurone theory to create the paradigm of neurophysiological integration. Because Sherrington was educated in the Jacksonian tradition of British neurology, Sherringtonian integration contains ideas that are derived from Jackson and from Herbert Spencer. PMID:11640240

  9. Shirley Jackson's "The Tooth": Dentistry as Horror, the Imagination as a Shield.

    PubMed

    Haas, Robert

    2015-01-01

    On her way to a dreaded dental appointment to have an aching tooth pulled, Clara Spencer meets a solicitous stranger, Jim, and by the end of the story runs off with him, in many interpretations to perdition. But since 1) Shirley Jackson (who herself had much dental work and hated it) has suffered from typecasting as a horror writer, 2) dental gas anesthesia protocols of the time as Clara is anticipating could lead to sexual hallucinations, and 3) contemporary literature celebrated escapist fantasy (e.g., the invisible giant rabbit in Harvey), this article proposes instead that Jim is Clara's own imaginative, comforting, therapeutic creation. PMID:26095844

  10. The Roles of Lesser-Known American Telescope Makers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Trudy E.

    A history of lesser-known telescope makers. The following makers, owners, dealers and firms are discussed: Henry Fitz, William S. Van Duzee, Lewis M. Rutherford, Charles A. Spencer, A. K. Eaton, John Byrne, Robert B. Tolles, Buff and Berger of Boston, Fauth and Co., George N. Saegmuller, E. Kubel (Kübel), Chester S. Lyman, Stackpole and Brother, William Wurdemann (Würdemann), William J. Young, Gundlach of Rochester, William Kahler, Stendicke of NYC, Walther of Philadelphia, Worcester R. Warner, Ambrose Swasey, William T. Gregg, Phelps and Gurley of Troy, H. G. Sedgewick, Benjamin Pike, William Mogey, David Mogey, and James A. Queen.

  11. Saturated liquid densities of benzene, cyclohexane, and hexane from 298. 15 to 473. 15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, Shafkat; Tukur, N.M.; Al-Harbi, D.K.; Hamad, E.Z. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-07-01

    The results of measurements of saturated liquid densities using a high-pressure stainless steel pycnometer system over a wide variation of temperature from 298.15 to 473.15 K are presented for benzene, cyclohexane, and hexane. Experimental densities were compared with those predicted by the Spencer-Danner-modified Rackett equation (SDR) and the Hankinson-Brobst-Thompson correlation (HBT). The SDR showed an average deviation of 0.22% while the HBT predicted the densities of the three organic solvents with an average deviation of 0.28%. The data obtained have also been compared with the available data reported in the literature.

  12. Consensus guidelines for the use of ultrasound for diving research.

    PubMed

    Møllerløkken, Andreas; Blogg, S Lesley; Doolette, David J; Nishi, Ronald Y; Pollock, Neal W

    2016-03-01

    The International Meeting on Ultrasound for Diving Research produced expert consensus recommendations for ultrasound detection of vascular gas bubbles and the analysis, interpretation and reporting of such data. Recommendations for standardization of techniques to allow comparison between studies included bubble monitoring site selection, frequency and duration of monitoring, and use of the Spencer, Kisman-Masurel or Eftedal-Brubakk scales. Recommendations for reporting of results included description of subject posture and provocation manoeuvres during monitoring, reporting of untransformed data and the appropriate use of statistics. These guidelines are available from www.dhmjournal.com. PMID:27044459

  13. The Post-Darwinian Controversies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, James R.

    1981-11-01

    Preface; Introduction: the terrain of revision; Part I. Historians and Historiography: 1. Draper, White, and the military metaphor; 2. Politics, polemics, and the military milieu; 3. Warfare's toll in historical interpretation; 4. Towards a non-violent history; Part II. Darwinism and Evolutionary Thought: 5. Darwinism in transition; 6. The challenge of Lamarckian evolution; 7. The vogue of Herbert Spencer; 8. Darwinism and Neo-Darwinism; Part III. Theology and Evolution: 9. Christian anti-Darwinism: the realm of certainty and fixity; 10. Christian Darwinism: the role of providence and progress; 11. Christian Darwinism: the relevance of orthodox theology; 12. Darwinism and Darwinisticism in theology; Conclusion; Notes to the text; Bibliography; Index.

  14. COMMITTEES: SQM2004 Organising and International Advisory Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-06-01

    Organising Committee Jean Cleymans (Chairman) Zeblon Vilakazi Roger Fearick Peter Steinberg Rory Adams Bruce Becker Sarah Blyth Gareth de Vaux Heather Gray Mark Horner Nawahl Razak Artur Szostak Spencer Wheaton International Advisory Committee Federico Antinori Tim Hallman John Harris Tetsuo Hatsuda Ulrich Heinz Huan Z Huang Sonja Kabana Volker Koch Rob Lacey Jes Madsen Yasuo Miake Maurizio Morando Berndt Mueller Grazyna Odyniec Helmut Oeschler Apostolos Panagiotou Josef Pochodzalla Johann Rafelski Karel Safarik Jack Sandweiss Jürgen Schaffner-Bielich Georges Stephans Horst Stoecker Herbert Stroebele Thomas Ullrich Orlando Villalobos-Baillie Bill Zajc Joseph Zimanyi

  15. A study of color harmony relating with area ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Shing-Sheng

    2002-06-01

    Among thousands of color combination, how to arrange and create color harmony? What is the best ratio in arranging color area? This study is based on 'Tone' concept to arrange the experiments whereas it was developed and issued by Nippon Color Design Research Institute. This study aims to explore how area ratio relate to color harmony. As well the experimental results were used to verify Munsell's Law <> and Moon & Spencer' Model <>.

  16. An artificial bee colony algorithm for locating the critical slip surface in slope stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Fei; Li, Junjie; Ma, Zhenyue

    2013-02-01

    Determination of the critical slip surface with the minimum factor of safety of a slope is a difficult constrained global optimization problem. In this article, an artificial bee colony algorithm with a multi-slice adjustment method is proposed for locating the critical slip surfaces of soil slopes, and the Spencer method is employed to calculate the factor of safety. Six benchmark examples are presented to illustrate the reliability and efficiency of the proposed technique, and it is also compared with some well-known or recent algorithms for the problem. The results show that the new algorithm is promising in terms of accuracy and efficiency.

  17. Neural representations of courtship song in the Drosophila brain

    PubMed Central

    Tootoonian, Sina; Coen, Philip; Kawai, Risa; Murthy, Mala

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic communication in Drosophilid flies is based on the production and perception of courtship songs, which facilitate mating. Despite decades of research on courtship songs and behavior in Drosophila, central auditory responses have remained uncharacterized. In this study, we report on intracellular recordings from central neurons that innervate the Drosophila AMMC (antennal mechanosensory and motor center), the first relay for auditory information in the fly brain. These neurons produce graded-potential (non-spiking) responses to sound; we compare recordings from AMMC neurons to extracellular recordings of the receptor neuron population (Johnston’s Organ neurons or JONs). We discover that while steady-state response profiles for tonal and broadband stimuli are significantly transformed between the JON population in the antenna and AMMC neurons in the brain, transient responses to pulses present in natural stimuli (courtship song) are not. For pulse stimuli in particular, AMMC neurons simply low-pass filter the receptor population response, thus preserving low-frequency temporal features (such as the spacing of song pulses) for analysis by postsynaptic neurons. We also compare responses in two closely related Drosophila species, D. melanogaster and D. simulans, and find that pulse song responses are largely similar, despite differences in the spectral content of their songs. Our recordings inform how downstream circuits may read out behaviorally-relevant information from central neurons in the AMMC. PMID:22262877

  18. High Availability in Optical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, Wayne D.; Wosinska, Lena; Fumagalli, Andrea

    2005-09-01

    Call for Papers: High Availability in Optical Networks Submission Deadline: 1 January 2006 The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) is soliciting papers for a feature Issue pertaining to all aspects of reliable components and systems for optical networks and concepts, techniques, and experience leading to high availability of services provided by optical networks. Most nations now recognize that telecommunications in all its forms -- including voice, Internet, video, and so on -- are "critical infrastructure" for the society, commerce, government, and education. Yet all these services and applications are almost completely dependent on optical networks for their realization. "Always on" or apparently unbreakable communications connectivity is the expectation from most users and for some services is the actual requirement as well. Achieving the desired level of availability of services, and doing so with some elegance and efficiency, is a meritorious goal for current researchers. This requires development and use of high-reliability components and subsystems, but also concepts for active reconfiguration and capacity planning leading to high availability of service through unseen fast-acting survivability mechanisms. The feature issue is also intended to reflect some of the most important current directions and objectives in optical networking research, which include the aspects of integrated design and operation of multilevel survivability and realization of multiple Quality-of-Protection service classes. Dynamic survivable service provisioning, or batch re-provisioning is an important current theme, as well as methods that achieve high availability at far less investment in spare capacity than required by brute force service path duplication or 100% redundant rings, which is still the surprisingly prevalent practice. Papers of several types are envisioned in the feature issue, including outlook and forecasting types of treatments, optimization and analysis, new

  19. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-09-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  20. Transcranial power M-mode Doppler ultrasound for diagnosis of patent foramen ovale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehring, Mark; Spencer, Merrill

    2005-04-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a right-to-left shunt (RLS) which communicates blood from the right to left atrium of the heart. PFO has been associated with stroke and, more recently, with migraine headache. Diagnosis of RLS can be accomplished effectively with transcranial power M-mode Doppler ultrasound (PMD). PMD is a modality which can be performed without the sedation required by the more invasive diagnostic technique using transesophageal echocardiography. PMD for this application consists of 2 MHz pulse Doppler ultrasound with placement of sample gates at 2 mm intervals along the single-transducer beam axis, and 8 kHz pulse repetition rate (PMD100M, Spencer Technologies). Doppler power versus depth is constructed every 4ms, using 33 sample gates. Bubble microemboli injected in the venous system and moving across a PFO present as high intensity tracks on a PMD image, as emboli transit from the heart to the brain and through the observed cerebral vasculature. Use of PMD in this context has been reported in the clinical literature [M. P. Spencer, M. A. Moehring, J. Jesurum et al, J. Neuroimaging 14, 342-349 (2004)]. This talk surveys the basic technical features of PMD for sensing PFO-related showers of bubble microemboli, and how these features provide clues to the severity of PFO.

  1. Use of Exotic Coordinate Systems in the Design of RF Resonators for High-Field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, Edward

    2008-10-01

    High field human MRI (11.7 Tesla is FDC approved for human research) renders standard RF coil design inadequate because the resonant wavelength in human soft tissue (about 8 cm at 500 MHz) is significantly smaller than the physical size of the human body. I propose optimizing the design of such RF coils using coordinate systems appropriate to human body parts, as has been done with ellipticalootnotetextCrozier et al, Concepts Magn Reson 1997; 9:195-210. and Cassinian ovalootnotetextDe Zanche et al, Magn Reson Med 2005; 53:201-211. cross sections. I have computed analytically the magnetic fields produced by a device of toroidal cross section using a cascade of conformal transformations.ootnotetextButterworth & Gore, J Magn Reson 2005; 175:114-123. Building upon these efforts, I will use the eleven coordinate systems of Moon & Spencer,ootnotetextMoon & Spencer, Field Theory Handbook, Berlin: Springer-Verlag; 1971. along with other possible coordinate systems and conformal transformations, to identify a small number of configurations that have the highest probability of being useful as RF coil designs for ultrahigh-field MRI.

  2. Multimodal imaging of the human temporal bone: A comparison of CT and optical scanning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voie, Arne H.; Whiting, Bruce; Skinner, Margaret; Neely, J. Gail; Lee, Kenneth; Holden, Tim; Brunsden, Barry

    2003-10-01

    A collaborative effort between Washington University in St. Louis and Spencer Technologies in Seattle, WA has been undertaken to create a multimodal 3D reconstruction of the human cochlea and vestibular system. The goal of this project is to improve the accuracy of in vivo CT reconstructions of implanted cochleae, and to expand the knowledge of high-resolution anatomical detail provided by orthogonal-plane optical sectioning (OPFOS). At WUSL, computed tomography (CT) images of the cochlea are used to determine the position of cochlear implant electrodes relative to target auditory neurons. The cochlear implant position is determined using pre- and post-operative CT scans. The CT volumes are cross-registered to align the semicircular canals and internal auditory canal, which have a unique configuration in 3-D space. The head of a human body donor was scanned with a clinical CT device, after which the temporal bones were removed, fixed in formalin and trimmed prior to scanning with a laboratory Micro CT scanner. Following CT, the temporal bones were sent to the OPFOS Imaging Lab at Spencer Technologies for a further analysis. 3-D reconstructions of CT and OPFOS imaging modalities were compared, and results are presented. [Work supported by NIDCD Grants R44-03623-5 and R01-00581-13.

  3. Parthenocarpic apple fruit production conferred by transposon insertion mutations in a MADS-box transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jia-Long; Dong, Yi-Hu; Morris, Bret A. M.

    2001-01-01

    Fruit development in higher plants normally requires pollination and fertilization to stimulate cell division of specific floral tissues. In some cases, parthenocarpic fruit development proceeds without either pollination or fertilization. Parthenocarpic fruit without seed has higher commercial value than seeded fruit. Several apple (Malus domestica) mutants (Rae Ime, Spencer Seedless and Wellington Bloomless) are known to produce only apetalous flowers that readily go on to develop into parthenocarpic fruit. Through genetics, a single recessive gene has been identified to control this trait in apple. Flower phenotypes of these apple mutants are strikingly similar to those of the Arabidopsis mutant pistillata (pi), which produces flowers where petals are transformed to sepals and stamens to carpels. In this study, we have cloned the apple PI homolog (MdPI) that shows 64% amino acid sequence identity and closely conserved intron positions and mRNA expression patterns to the Arabidopsis PI. We have identified that in the apetalous mutants MdPI has been mutated by a retrotransposon insertion in intron 4 in the case of Rae Ime and in intron 6 in the case of Spencer Seedless and Wellington Bloomless. The insertion apparently abolishes the normal expression of the MdPI gene. We conclude that the loss of function mutation in the MdPI MADS-box transcription factor confers parthenocarpic fruit development in these apple varieties and demonstrates another function for the MADS- box gene family. The knowledge generated here could be used to produce parthenocarpic fruit cultivars through genetic engineering. PMID:11158635

  4. Four-particle decay of the Bethe-Salpeter kernel in the high-temperature Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auil, F.

    2002-12-01

    In this article we study the four-particle decay of the Bethe-Salpeter (B-S) kernel for the high-temperature Ising model. We use the hyperplane decoupling method [T. Spencer, Commun. Math. Phys. 44, 143 (1975); R. S. Schor, Nucl. Phys. B 222, 71 (1983)] to prove exponential decay in a set of variables particularly adapted to the methods of Spencer and Zirilli [Commun. Math. Phys. 49, 1 (1976)] for the analysis of scattering and bound states in QFT, transcribed to lattice theories by Auil and Barata [Ann. Henri Poincare 2, 1065 (2001)]. We study arbitrary derivatives of the general n-point correlation functions with respect to the interpolating variables, and we are able to obtain, in some cases, information about the third derivatives of the B-S kernel. As a later consequence, we have two-body asymptotic completeness for the (massive) Euclidean lattice field theory implemented by this model. This allows us to analyze the Ornstein-Zernike behavior of four-point functions, related to the specific heat of the model.

  5. Automatic detection of red lesions in digital color fundus photographs.

    PubMed

    Niemeijer, Meindert; van Ginneken, Bram; Staal, Joes; Suttorp-Schulten, Maria S A; Abràmoff, Michael D

    2005-05-01

    The robust detection of red lesions in digital color fundus photographs is a critical step in the development of automated screening systems for diabetic retinopathy. In this paper, a novel red lesion detection method is presented based on a hybrid approach, combining prior works by Spencer et al. (1996) and Frame et al. (1998) with two important new contributions. The first contribution is a new red lesion candidate detection system based on pixel classification. Using this technique, vasculature and red lesions are separated from the background of the image. After removal of the connected vasculature the remaining objects are considered possible red lesions. Second, an extensive number of new features are added to those proposed by Spencer-Frame. The detected candidate objects are classified using all features and a k-nearest neighbor classifier. An extensive evaluation was performed on a test set composed of images representative of those normally found in a screening set. When determining whether an image contains red lesions the system achieves a sensitivity of 100% at a specificity of 87%. The method is compared with several different automatic systems and is shown to outperform them all. Performance is close to that of a human expert examining the images for the presence of red lesions. PMID:15889546

  6. Temperature Trends in the TOVS Pathfinder Path A Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    TOVS (Tiros Operational Vertical Sounder) is the suite of infra-red and microwave sounding instruments, including HIRS-2 and MSU, that have flown on the NOAA Polar orbiting operational satellites TIROS-N, NOAA 6-14 from November 1978 to the present day. Data has been analyzed for the entire time period using a consistent methodology to produce twice daily per satellite global fields of surface skin temperature, atmospheric temperature-moisture profile, cloud top pressure, and fractional cloud cover, OLR and clear sky OLR, and precipitation. All parameters were found to depend on the orbit time of observation which differed as a function of time both because of differing initial satellite orbits and orbit drift. This must be accounted for before one can attempt to find trends in the data. Methodology to account for orbit drift will be shown. Trends will then be shown, over the 21 year period 1979-1999, for surface skin temperature and atmospheric temperature profile. There has been global warming near the surface which falls off rapidly with height. Trends will also be shown for values of MSU2R and MSU4 which are computed from the soundings. These will be compared to trends of MSU2R and MSU4 observed by Spencer and Christy. There is generally good agreement between Spencer and Christy MSU2R trends and those computed from the TOVS Pathfinder data set, with the largest differences over the tropics.

  7. Seasonal Variations in Physical Characteristics of the South Australian Shelf Waters -Results from the Southern Australian Integrated Marine Observing System (SAIMOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, C.; Luick, J.; Leterme, S. C.; Middleton, J.; Seuront, L.

    2009-04-01

    The Southern Australia Integrated Marine Observing System, or SAIMOS, is one of five nodes operating as part of the Australia-wide Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS). This is a collaborative program designed to observe Australia's oceans, both coastal and blue-water. Since February 2008 Physical Data has been collected for SAIMOS in both summer and winter months during 8 surveys. The data collected during summer are used to characterise the nature and dynamics of the Kangaroo Island-Eyre Peninsula upwelling system during a record upwelling event in February 2008. During this event a plume of very cool water was observed along the bottom from South of KI to the Eyre Peninsula. This plume dissipated rapidly after the end of upwelling favourable winds and by March 2008 had disappeared entirely from the observations. The data are also used to study the dense high salinity outflow from Spencer Gulf observed during the winter months. The dense plume result from surface cooling of high salinity waters at the head of Spencer Gulf. One striking result of these observations is that the outflow occurs during a series of strong pulses with a period of approximately 2 weeks and duration of 1-3 days. During these pulses bottom velocities at 100 m can exceed 1 m/s.

  8. In This Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-07-01

    , quantum theory is not accessible to even well prepared introductory students, except in a qualitative, often confusing, version. Gillespie, Spencer, and Moog (page 617) provide a new way of introducing the idea of electron configurations that is based on experimental data instead of theoretical quantum numbers. Beginning with the periodic table they develop the inference that electrons must be arranged in shells. They then use ionization potentials and photoelectron spectra to develop further the ideas of shell and subshell. This provides a radically different approach that is at the same time based more firmly on experiment and more accessible to students. Gillespie, Spencer, and Moog (page 622) describe an approach to molecular structure that is closely related to the VSEPR theory originally developed by Gillespie and Nyholm, but does not depend on the orbitals or quantum mechanics. Their electron domain model is based on electron spin and electron pairs but not orbitals and provides an interesting way for students to be introduced to the idea of structure. Birk and Abbassian (page 636) provide a way of visualizing either orbitals or electron domains that uses readily available, inexpensive plastic eggs and is a nice complement to Gillespie, Spencer, and Moog's article. Spencer, Moog, and Gillespie's third article based on the work of the Task Force on the General Chemistry Curriculum begins on page 627. It develops the idea of average valence electron energy and applies it to determining electronegativity values. In the fourth article in this Forum collection, Spencer, Moog, and Gillespie (page 631) propose that students can much more readily assimilate the ideas of reaction thermodynamics if changes in enthalpy, entropy, and free energy are all developed in terms of complete atomization of all reactants followed by putting the atoms back together in a different way to form products. Their tables of enthalpies, entropies, and free energies of atomization will be

  9. Sorption of Pb2+ Ions from Aqueous Solutions on Organic Wastes (part i) / Sorpcja JONÓW Pb2+ Z ROZTWORÓW Wodnych NA Odpadach Organicznych (CZĘŚĆ I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bożęcka, Agnieszka; Sanak-Rydlewska, Stanisława

    2013-12-01

    This article presents the results of the research on the Pb2+ ions sorption from model aqueous solutions on walnut shells, plum stones and sunflower hulls. The effect of various factors, such as the concentration of natural sorbent, the pH, and the temperature was studied. The process of Pb2+ ions sorption on studied sorbents was described by the Langmuir model. The best sorption capacity has been revealed for sunflower hulls. The maximum sorption capacity for this material was 36.9 mg/g. W artykule przedstawiono wyniki badań, które dotyczyły usuwania jonów Pb2+ z modelowych roztworów wodnych za pomocą odpadów organicznych, takich jak: łuski słonecznika, łupiny orzecha włoskiego i pestki śliwek. Dla badanego zakresu stężeń od 6,0-110 mg/dm3 i warunków procesu największą wydajność sorpcji, będącą w zakresie (89,4-96,3)% uzyskano dla łusek słonecznika. W przypadku łupin orzecha włoskiego i pestek śliwek sorpcja jonów Pb2+ jest znacznie niższa a jej wydajność wynosi odpowiednio (60,8-78,7)% i (62,3-81,3)%. Zbadano także wpływ stężenia sorbentu, pH roztworu i temperatury na badany proces sorpcji. Dla wszystkich materiałów optymalne stężenie sorbentu wyniosło 5 g/dm3. Powyżej tej wartości nie obserwowano istotnych zmian w stopniu redukcji jonów Pb2+ (rys.2). We wszystkich przypadkach maksima sorpcji osiągnięto przy pH równym 4,0±0,1 co obrazuje rysunek 3. Obniżenie sorpcji, występujące przy pH poniżej i powyżej wartości 4,0 prawdopodobnie związane jest to z ładunkiem gromadzącym się na powierzchni sorbentu (elektrostatyczne odpychanie i przyciąganie badanych jonów). Wartość pH roztworu determinuje także formę oraz stężenie badanego jonu w roztworze. W roztworach silnie kwaśnych ołów występuje głównie w postaci kationów. Stopniowy wzrost pH prowadzi do tworzenia jonów kompleksowych i strącania go w postaci wodorotlenku. Wykazano również, że ze wzrostem temperatury w zakresie (293-313)K nast

  10. LIDAR Helps Identify Source of 1872 Earthquake Near Chelan, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrod, B. L.; Blakely, R. J.; Weaver, C. S.

    2015-12-01

    One of the largest historic earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest occurred on 15 December 1872 (M6.5-7) near the south end of Lake Chelan in north-central Washington State. Lack of recognized surface deformation suggested that the earthquake occurred on a blind, perhaps deep, fault. New LiDAR data show landslides and a ~6 km long, NW-side-up scarp in Spencer Canyon, ~30 km south of Lake Chelan. Two landslides in Spencer Canyon impounded small ponds. An historical account indicated that dead trees were visible in one pond in AD1884. Wood from a snag in the pond yielded a calibrated age of AD1670-1940. Tree ring counts show that the oldest living trees on each landslide are 130 and 128 years old. The larger of the two landslides obliterated the scarp and thus, post-dates the last scarp-forming event. Two trenches across the scarp exposed a NW-dipping thrust fault. One trench exposed alluvial fan deposits, Mazama ash, and scarp colluvium cut by a single thrust fault. Three charcoal samples from a colluvium buried during the last fault displacement had calibrated ages between AD1680 and AD1940. The second trench exposed gneiss thrust over colluvium during at least two, and possibly three fault displacements. The younger of two charcoal samples collected from a colluvium below gneiss had a calibrated age of AD1665- AD1905. For an historical constraint, we assume that the lack of felt reports for large earthquakes in the period between 1872 and today indicates that no large earthquakes capable of rupturing the ground surface occurred in the region after the 1872 earthquake; thus the last displacement on the Spencer Canyon scarp cannot post-date the 1872 earthquake. Modeling of the age data suggests that the last displacement occurred between AD1840 and AD1890. These data, combined with the historical record, indicate that this fault is the source of the 1872 earthquake. Analyses of aeromagnetic data reveal lithologic contacts beneath the scarp that form an ENE

  11. The knowledge most worth having: Otis W. Caldwell (1869 1947) and the rise of the general science course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffron, John M.

    1995-07-01

    In 1860 Herbert Spencer asked the famous rhetorical question ‘What Knowledge is of Most Worth?’ The unequivocal answer was science. Giving greater attention to science and scientific knowledge would not only produce additional scientists; more important, argued Spencer, it would make better parents, better church-goers, better citizens and workers, better artists and better consumers of art. It would lead to a ‘command of fundamental processes’, ‘worthy home membership’, ‘worthy use of leisure’, ‘ethical character’ — the goals of a general education spelled out by Spencerians within the National Educational Association in 1918. Here is our puzzle, then: how are we to interpret a definition of science, one widely accepted both in Spencer's time and in our own, that comes so close descriptively to a commonsensical view of what constitutes non-science? The answer to this question lies in part in the historical relationship between science and general education, a relationship established in the opening decades of this century, when the authority of science and scientific objectivity was in the minds of most educators unimpeachable. The high school general science course, developed in its early stages by the botanist and educator, Otis W. Caldwell, was a potent symbol of this new relationship. Organized around broad, topical issues and claiming to teach the mundane truths of life, general science was more than a loose collection of facts from the various earth, biological, and physical sciences. Its many advocates viewed the new unified science course as pedagogically independent of the specialties yet central to education in general. In 1949, two years after Caldwell's death, 72 percent of the total science enrollments in the United States were in general science and biology, its closest cognate. This paper examines the rise of the general science course and its implications for the reform of secondary school science education. It concludes that

  12. Dust control at longwalls with water infusion and foam. Technical progress report through November 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Foam spray equipment and materials for dust suppression on longwall double drum shearer faces have been procured. This equipment includes metering pumps, foam generators and mounting brackets, foam solutions, flow meters, real time and gravimetric sampling equipment, hoses and valve banks. Initial tests have been conducted in the laboratory with three types of generators and five types of foam solutions. Based on these tests, Senior Conflow's cluster spray and Onyx Chemical Company's millifoam solution have been selected. For pumping foam solution to the shearer, Jon Bean's 2 hp, 120 VAC single-phase ceramic lined piston pump has been selected. For field tests, equipment has been installed underground in Dobbin mine in Upper Freeport seam on Eickhoff EDW 300 double drum shearer. Foamspray tests have been conducted. Real time and gravimetric dust samples have been collected. Real time sampling results indicate a dust level reduction of up to 37 percent with foam spray compared to the base case of water sprays.

  13. Becoming conscious: the science of mindfulness.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Steve; Davidson, Richard; Jha, Amishi; Kabat-Zinn, Jon

    2013-11-01

    Many of us go through our daily lives on autopilot, not fully aware of our conscious experiences. In a discussion moderated by Steve Paulson, executive producer and host of To the Best of Our Knowledge, neuroscientists Richard Davidson and Amishi Jha and clinical mindfulness expert Jon Kabat-Zinn explore the role of consciousness in mental and physical health, how we can train our minds to be more flexible and adaptable, and cutting-edge neuroscience findings about the transformation of consciousness through mindfulness and contemplative practice. The following is an edited transcript of the discussion that occurred February 6, 2013, 7:00-8:15 PM, at the New York Academy of Sciences in New York City. PMID:24236866

  14. Olympic torch transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    KSC Shuttle Operations Manager Loren J. Shriver (right) transfers the Olympic flame to KSC runner Joanne Maceo's torch at the top of Launch Pad 39A after he carried the Olympic torch to the top of the pad as his contribution to the July 7, 1996 KSC Olympic torch relay effort. Jon Granston of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (center) witnesses the exchange. Maceo then carried her lit torch down the concrete hard stand of the pad to pass the flame to another of the 20-member KSC runner team that participated in the KSC relay effort. The Olympic torch arrived at KSC at 1:40 p.m. and traveled a 20-mile course to the pad and then out to the KSC visitor Center. The Space Shuttle Atlantis is behind the trio, poised for the STS-79 mission, with will feature the fourth docking of the shuttle with the Russian Mir space station.

  15. Shriver and Granston display Olympic torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    KSC Shuttle Operations Manager Loren J. Shriver (right) proudly displays the Olympic torch that he carried to the top of Launch Pad 39A as his contribution to the July 7 KSC Olympic torch relay effort. To his right is Jon Granston of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games. Nineteen other KSC runners also participated in the relay effort at the center. The Olympic torch arrived at KSC at 1:40 p.m. and traveled a 20-mile course to the pad and then out to the KSC visitor Center. The Space Shuttle Atlantis is behind Shriver, poised for the STS-79 mission, which will feature the fourth docking of the Shuttle with the Russian Mir space station.

  16. Submitting MIGS, MIMS, MIENS Information to EMBL and Standards and the Sequencing Pipelines of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Vaughan, Bob [EMBL]; Kaye, Jon [Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

    2011-04-29

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Bob Vaughan of EMBL on submitting MIGS/MIMS/MIENS information to EMBL-EBI's system, followed by a brief talk from Jon Kaye of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation on standards and the foundation's sequencing pipelines at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009

  17. First Estimate of the Exoplanet Population from Kepler Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, D. G.; Batalha, N.; Caldwell, D.; Dunham, E. W.; Gautier, T. N., III; Howell, S. B.; Jenkins, J. M.; Marcy, G. W.; Rowe, J.; Charbonneau, D.; Ciardi, D.; Ford, E. B.; Christiansen, J. L.; Kolodziejczak, J.; Prsa, A.

    2011-05-01

    William J. Borucki, David G. Koch, Natalie Batalha, Derek Buzasi , Doug Caldwell, David Charbonneau, Jessie L. Christiansen, David R. Ciardi, Edward Dunham, Eric B. Ford, Steve Thomas N. Gautier III, Steve Howell, Jon M. Jenkins, Jeffery Kolodziejczak, Geoffrey W. Marcy, Jason Rowe, and Andrej Prsa A model was developed to provide a first estimate of the intrinsic frequency of planetary candidates based on the number of detected planetary candidates and the measured noise for each of the 156,000 observed stars. The estimated distributions for the exoplanet frequency are presented with respect to the semi-major axis and the stellar effective temperature and represent values appropriate only to short-period candidates. Improved estimates are expected after a Monte Carlo study of the sensitivity of the data analysis pipeline to transit signals injected at the pixel level is completed.

  18. Optical properties of fly ash. Volume 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Self, S.A.

    1994-12-01

    Research performed under this contract was divided into four tasks under the following headings: Task 1, Characterization of fly ash; Task 2, Measurements of the optical constants of slags; Task 3, Calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions; and Task 4, Measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. Tasks 1 and 4 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Sarbajit Ghosal, while Tasks 2 and 3 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Jon Ebert. Together their doctoral dissertations give a complete account of the work performed. This final report, issued in two volumes consists of an executive summary of the whole program followed by the dissertation of Ghosal and Ebert. Volume 2 contains the dissertation of Ebert which covers the measurements of the optical constants of slags, and calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. A list of publications and conference presentations resulting from the work is also included.

  19. In Brief: Volcanic vents found in deep Caribbean waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-04-01

    Scientists surveying the Cayman Trough in the Caribbean Sea have discovered the world's deepest undersea volcanic vents, or “black smokers,” the National Oceanography Center (NOC) in Southampton, UK, announced on 11 April. The vents were found at a depth of 5000 meters, about 800 meters deeper than any previously discovered. Jon Copley, a marine biologist at the University of Southampton's School of Ocean and Earth Science, said, “Seeing the world's deepest black-smoker vents looming out of the darkness was awe-inspiring.” Geochemist Doug Connelly of NOC, principal scientist of the expedition, noted, “We hope our discovery will yield new insights into biogeochemically important elements in one of the most extreme naturally occurring environments on our planet.” Researchers used an NOC-developed Autosub6000 robot submarine, which was remotely controlled from the Royal Research Ship James Cook. For more information, visit http://www.thesearethevoyages.net/.

  20. The stability of viscous liquid filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driessen, Theo; Jeurissen, Roger; Wijshoff, Herman; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-11-01

    The stability of liquid filaments is relevant both in industrial applications, such as inkjet printing and atomization, and in nature, where the stability of filaments has a large influence on the final drop size distribution of rain droplets and waterfalls. The liquid filament may either stably collapse into a single droplet, or break up into multiple droplets. Which scenario is realized depends on the viscosity and the aspect ratio of the filament. Here we study the collapse of an axisymmetric liquid filament is analytically and with a numerical model. We find that a long, high viscous filament can only break up due to the Rayleigh-Plateau instability, whereas a low viscous filament can break up due to end-pinching. The theory shows quantitative agreement with recent experimental findings by Castréjon-Pita et al., PRL 108, 074506 (2012).

  1. Geographic names information system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1987-01-01

    of the data in each of the data elements of the four data bases of GNIS. The GNIS program, which includes the automated names system and the National Gazetteer program, is a coordinated effort under the direction of Donald J. Orth, Chief of the Branch of Geographic Names. The automated system was initially developed by Sam Stulberg and Roger L. Payne. System enhancement and software development is coordinated by Judy J. Stella, head programmer for GNIS, and special projects coordinator is Louis A. Yost IV. Coordination of the research and compilation of certain gazetteers is directed by Robin D. Worcester with research assistance and support from Jon Campbell, Linda S. Davis, and Nancy Engel.

  2. HUBBLE SHOWS EXPANSION OF ETA CARINAE DEBRIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The furious expansion of a huge, billowing pair of gas and dust clouds are captured in this NASA Hubble Space Telescope comparison image of the supermassive star Eta Carinae. To create the picture, astronomers aligned and subtracted two images of Eta Carinae taken 17 months apart (April 1994, September 1995). Black represents where the material was located in the older image, and white represents the more recent location. (The light and dark streaks that make an 'X' pattern are instrumental artifacts caused by the extreme brightness of the central star. The bright white region at the center of the image results from the star and its immediate surroundings being 'saturated' in one of the images.)Photo Credit: Jon Morse (University of Colorado), Kris Davidson (University of Minnesota), and NASA Image files in GIF and JPEG format and captions may be accessed on Internet via anonymous ftp from oposite.stsci.edu in /pubinfo.

  3. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-01-01

    economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or are now underway this hot area. The purpose of this feature issue is to expose the networking community to the latest research breakthroughs and progresses in the area of optical access networks.

    Scope of Contributions

    This feature issue aims to present a collection of papers that focus on the state-of-the-art research in various networking aspects of optical access networks. Original papers are solicited from all researchers involved in area of optical access networks. Topics of interest include but not limited to:
    • Optical access network architectures and protocols
    • Passive optical networks (BPON, EPON, GPON, etc.)
    • Active optical networks
    • Multiple access control
    • Multiservices and QoS provisioning
    • Network survivability
    • Field trials and standards
    • Performance modeling and analysis

    Manuscript Submission

    To submit to this special issue, follow the normal procedure for submission to JON, indicating ``Optical Access Networks feature' in the ``Comments' field of the online submission form. For all other questions relating to this feature issue, please send an e-mail to jon@osa.org, subject line ``Optical Access Networks' Additional information can be found on the JON website: http://www.osa-jon.org/submission/. Submission Deadline: 1 June 2005

  4. List identifies threatened ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-09-01

    The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) announced on 9 September that it will develop a new Red List of Ecosystems that will identify which ecosystems are vulnerable or endangered. The list, which is modeled on the group's Red List of Threatened Species™, could help to guide conservation activities and influence policy processes such as the Convention on Biological Diversity, according to the group. “We will assess the status of marine, terrestrial, freshwater, and subterranean ecosystems at local, regional, and global levels,” stated Jon Paul Rodriguez, leader of IUCN's Ecosystems Red List Thematic Group. “The assessment can then form the basis for concerted implementation action so that we can manage them sustainably if their risk of collapse is low or restore them if they are threatened and then monitor their recovery.”

  5. Physics Myth Busting: A Lab-Centered Course for Non-Science Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Martin John

    2011-10-01

    There is ongoing interest in how and what we teach in physics courses for non-science students, so-called "physics for poets" courses. Art Hobson has effectively argued that teaching science literacy should be a key ingredient in these courses. Hobson uses Jon Millers definition of science literacy, which has two components: first, "a basic knowledge of key scientific concepts," and second, "an understanding of the process of science."2 In preparing to teach our course for non-science students, I found that the majority of textbooks and courses focus on the first component. However, I wanted a lab-centered course that would give students hands-on practice doing science. I describe in this article a course I designed and implemented at Wabash College that focused on teaching students "the process of science." The course was titled "Adventures in Physics: Mythbusters" and was based loosely on the popular Discovery Channel show "MythBusters."3

  6. Bernard J. Wood Receives 2013 Harry H. Hess Medal: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Albrecht W.

    2014-01-01

    As Harry Hess recognized over 50 years ago, mantle melting is the fundamental motor for planetary evolution and differentiation. Melting generates the major divisions of crust mantle and core. The distribution of chemical elements between solids, melts, and gaseous phases is fundamental to understanding these differentiation processes. Bernie Wood, together with Jon Blundy, has combined experimental petrology and physicochemical theory to revolutionize the understanding of the distribution of trace elements between melts and solids in the Earth. Knowledge of these distribution laws allows the reconstruction of the source compositions of the melts (deep in Earth's interior) from their abundances in volcanic rocks. Bernie's theoretical treatment relates the elastic strain of the lattice caused by the substitution of a trace element in a crystal to the ionic radius and charge of this element. This theory, and its experimental calibrations, brought order to a literature of badly scattered, rather chaotic experimental data that allowed no satisfactory quantitative modeling of melting processes in the mantle.

  7. Gigabit optical interconnects: System and component analysis, design and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boncek, Raymond K.; Krol, Mark F.; Hayduk, Michael J.; Stacy, John L.; Johns, Steven T.

    1994-07-01

    This report describes the results of experiments performed in various areas of technology required to develop gigabit optical interconnects for communication at 1.3 micrometer wavelength. First, we will summarize the analysis of optical correlation switches (i.e. optical AND gates) for use in time-division optical interconnects. Next, we describe the design and characterization of an all-optical, 30db contrast ratio GaAlInAs multiple quantum well asymmetric reflection modulator. Then, we comment on the characterization of polarization-dependent, strained-layer InGaAs/GaAs materials useful for light emitters and modulators. Finally, we report on the development of an optically transparent ATM packet switch testbed operating at 1.24416 Gbit/s. This work is a continuation of in-house efforts begun under 62702F, JON 4600P201 and summarized in RL-TR-91-398.

  8. Crowdsourcing Aquatic Resource Data Collection: Exploring Effective Methods to Collect and Rectify Citizen Contributed Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderberg, J.

    2011-12-01

    Increasing use of mobile computing and geopositioning technology has provided the environmental sciences with vast new pools of data. Prominent among the gathering methods which produce this data is "crowdsourcing", in which citizen scientists volunteer data. Environmental data collected by crowdsourcing may need to be rectified prior to use by the scientific community. Using mobile applications to educate the crowd, support for the targeted environmental data desired, coupled with thoughtful design of mobile applications can potentially aid the process of rectification. This presentation will outline the use of crowdsourced data, cohort groups and design options for mobile applications that can be used to collect aquatic resource information. If rectification challenges can be overcome, the collective power of the crowd can be harnessed to gather standards-based geographic data, information about environmental conditions, and detailed biological data about aquatic resources. Key Words: Crowdsource, Citizen Scientist, Volunteer Data, Geopositioning Aquatic Resource Geographic Data Author Jon Eric Soderberg

  9. Optical properties of fly ash. Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Self, S.A.

    1994-12-01

    Research performed under this contract was divided into four tasks under the following headings: Task 1, Characterization of fly ash; Task 2, Measurements of the optical constants of slags; Task 3, Calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions; and Task 4, Measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. Tasks 1 and 4 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Sarbajit Ghosal, while Tasks 2 and 3 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Jon Ebert. Together their doctoral dissertations give a complete account of the work performed. This final report, issued in two volumes consists of an executive summary of the whole program followed by the dissertation of Ghosal. Volume 1 contains the dissertation of Ghosal which covers the characterization of fly ash and the measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. A list of publications and conference presentations resulting from the work is also included.

  10. How Science and Hollywood Can Work Together Is Focus of Fall Meeting Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-01-01

    Jon Amiel, director of the 2003 science fiction blockbuster movie The Core, told a room packed with geophysicists at the recent AGU Fall Meeting that he had a confession to make. The confession had nothing to do with what he called the “preposterous premises” of the movie, including that humans could start or stop the spinning of Earth's core. Rather, he told the crowd at the Tuesday evening presentation “Science and the Cinema: AGU Sciences Meet Hollywood” about his recurring dream of being on stage wearing nothing but a skimpy T-shirt. “This dream now has come true. Here I am, I'm talking to a whole room of geophysicists about The Core. I've never felt like the T-shirt was this short,” he said.

  11. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2004-12-01

    trends have many consequences for consumers, vendors, and carriers. Faced with large volumes of low-margin data traffic mixed with traditional voice services, the need for capital conservation and operational efficiency drives carriers away from today's separate overlay networks for each service and towards "converged" platforms. For example, cable operators require transport of multiple services over both hybrid fiber coax (HFC) and DWDM transport technologies. Local carriers seek an economical architecture to deliver integrated services on optically enabled broadband-access networks. Services over wireless-access networks must coexist with those from wired networks. In each case, convergence of networks and services inspires an important set of questions and challenges, driven by the need for low cost, operational efficiency, service performance requirements, and optical transport technology options. This Feature Issue explores the various interpretations and implications of network convergence pertinent to optical networking. How does convergence affect the evolution of optical transport-layer and control approaches? Are the implied directions consistent with research vision for optical networks? Substantial challenges remain. Papers are solicited across the broad spectrum of interests. These include, but are not limited to:

    • Architecture, design and performance of optical wide-area-network (WAN), metro, and access networks
    • Integration strategies for multiservice transport platforms
    • Access methods that bridge traditional and emerging services
    • Network signaling and control methodologies
    • All-optical packet routing and switching techniques

    Manuscript Submission

    To submit to this special issue, follow the normal procedure for submission to JON, indicating "Convergence feature" in the "Comments" field of the online submission form. For all other questions relating to this feature issue, please send an e

  12. Submitting MIGS, MIMS, MIENS Information to EMBL and Standards and the Sequencing Pipelines of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation (GSC8 Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, Bob; Kaye, Jon

    2009-09-09

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Bob Vaughan of EMBL on submitting MIGS/MIMS/MIENS information to EMBL-EBI's system, followed by a brief talk from Jon Kaye of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation on standards and the foundation's sequencing pipelines at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009

  13. Facilitating roles of murine platelet glycoprotein Ib and αIIbβ3 in phosphatidylserine exposure during vWF–collagen-induced thrombus formation

    PubMed Central

    Kuijpers, Marijke J E; Schulte, Valerie; Oury, Cécile; Lindhout, Theo; Broers, Jos; Hoylaerts, Marc F; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Heemskerk, Johan W M

    2004-01-01

    Vessel wall damage exposes collagen fibres, to which platelets adhere directly via the collagen receptors glycoprotein (GP) VI and integrin α2β1 and indirectly by collagen-bound von Willebrand factor (vWF) via the GPIb-V-IX and integrin αIIbβ3 receptor complexes. Platelet–collagen interaction under shear stimulates thrombus formation in two ways, by integrin-dependent formation of platelet aggregates and by surface exposure of procoagulant phosphatidylserine (PS). GPVI is involved in both processes, complemented by α2β1. In mouse blood flowing over collagen, we investigated the additional role of platelet–vWF binding via GPIb and αIIbβ3. Inhibition of GPIb as well as blocking of vWF binding to collagen reduced stable platelet adhesion at high shear rate. This was accompanied by delayed platelet Ca2+ responses and reduced PS exposure, while microaggregates were still formed. Inhibition of integrin αIIbβ3 with JON/A antibody, which blocks αIIbβ3 binding to both vWF and fibrinogen, reduced PS exposure and aggregate formation. The JON/A effects were not enhanced by combined blocking of GPIb–vWF binding, suggesting a function for αIIbβ3 downstream of GPIb. Typically, with blood from FcR γ-chain +/− mutant mice, expressing 50% of normal platelet GPVI levels, GPIb blockage almost completely abolished platelet adhesion and PS exposure. Together, these data indicate that, under physiological conditions of flow, both adhesive receptors GPIb and αIIbβ3 facilitate GPVI-mediated PS exposure by stabilizing platelet binding to collagen. Hence, these glycoproteins have an assistant procoagulant role in collagen-dependent thrombus formation, which is most prominent at reduced GPVI activity and is independent of the presence of thrombin. PMID:15155790

  14. Decay of the electron number density in the nitrogen afterglow using a hairpin resonator probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siefert, Nicholas S.; Ganguly, Biswa N.; Sands, Brian L.; Hebner, Greg A.

    2006-08-01

    A hairpin resonator was used to measure the electron number density in the afterglow of a nitrogen glow discharge (p=0.25-0.75Torr). Electron number densities were measured using a time-dependent approach similar to the approach used by Spencer et al. [J. Phys. D 20, 923 (1987)]. The decay time of the electron number density was used to determine the electron temperature in the afterglow, assuming a loss of electrons via ambipolar diffusion to the walls. The electron temperature in the near afterglow remained between 0.4 and 0.6eV, depending on pressure. This confirms the work by Guerra et al. [IEEE Trans. Plasma. Sci. 31, 542 (2003)], who demonstrated experimentally and numerically that the electron temperature stays significantly above room temperature via superelastic collisions with highly vibrationally excited ground state molecules and metastables, such as AΣu+3.

  15. The State of Scientific Visualization with Regard to the NASA EOS Mission to Planet Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christy, John R.; Botts, Michael E.; Newchurch, Michael; McNider, Richard T.

    1996-01-01

    In support of the mission to better understand the dynamics of the global atmosphere, John R. Christy and Nathaniel D. Reynolds investigated a wide range of topics. Christy worked closely with NASA scientist Roy Spencer to develop a data set of precision temperature measurements using the NASA built Microwave Sounding Unit. The data from this effort has received international recognition as they provide a source of precise information for the most difficult of environmental issues in the global climate change arena. In addition, Christy coordinated modeling research with NASA scientist Franklin Robertson with research focusing on the validation of global model output using various satellite data with sophisticated statistical techniques. Reynolds worked with NASA scientist Timothy Miller on idealized flows in a rotating annulus and the application of the results to the general circulation of the atmosphere. Additional work was carried out in investigation of stratospheric ozone fluctuations due to dynamical causes.

  16. Global variability of water vapor and condensate from SSM/I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.

    1990-01-01

    In the three years since its launch, the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) provided the beginnings of a data set crucial to the study of the Earth's global hydrologic cycle. Investigations with SSM/I centered largely on two themes: (1) an analysis of the variability in atmospheric moisture as a signature of dynamic and kinematic processes, and (2) development of high quality data sets for determining moisture balance and, eventually, diabatic heating on regional and planetary scales. To date, most of the emphasis has been on the precipitable water field since algorithms for this quantity appear to be the most mature. In addition, researchers began work with liquid water, precipitating ice and ocean surface wind stress fields. The retrievals used in these studies are from algorithms developed by Wentz (RSS Tech Rpt. 1989) and Spencer (1988 JTECH).

  17. Threatened by Gender?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humpherys, Candice; Pyper, Brian

    2006-10-01

    A good deal of research has been done on the issue of stereotype threat.^1, 2 This research proposes that if a person identifies with a group of people that is negatively stereotyped for performance, then they will not perform as well as someone from the same group of people who is not made aware of the negative stereotype. The research we conducted investigates the legitimacy of stereotype threat based on gender in the area of science in the BYU-Idaho student population. Our results have significance in the current national debate about the lack of women pursuing careers in scientific disciplines. ^1 Quinn, Diane M.; Spencer, Steven J.. (2001). The Interference of Stereotype Threat With Women's Generation of Mathematical Problem-Solving Strategies. Journal of Social Issues. 57(1):55-71. ^2 Schmader, Tony, & Johns, Michael. (2003). Converging Evidence That Stereotype Threat Reduces Working Memory Capacity. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 85(3):440-452.

  18. Threatened Because of Gender?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humpherys, Candice; Pyper, Brian

    2006-05-01

    A good deal of research has been done on the issue of stereotype threat. [1, 2] This research proposes that if a person identifies with a group of people that is negatively stereotyped for performance, then they will not perform as well as someone from the same group of people who is not made aware of the negative stereotype. The research we conducted investigates the legitimacy of stereotype threat based on gender in the area of science in the BYU-Idaho student population. Our results have significance in the current national debate about the lack of women pursuing careers in scientific disciplines. [1] Quinn, Diane M.; Spencer, Steven J.. (2001). The Interference of Stereotype Threat With Women's Generation of Mathematical Problem-Solving Strategies. Journal of Social Issues. 57(1):55-71. [2] Schmader, Tony, & Johns, Michael. (2003). Converging Evidence That Stereotype Threat Reduces Working Memory Capacity. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 85(3):440-452.

  19. Gender Consideration in Experiment Design for Air Break in Prebreathe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny; Dervay, Joseph P.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    If gender is a confounder of the decompression sickness (DCS) or venous gas emboli (VGE) outcomes of a proposed air break in oxygen prebreathe (PB) project, then decisions about the final experiment design must be made. We evaluated if the incidence of DCS and VGE from tests in altitude chambers over 20 years were different between men and women after resting and exercise PB protocols. Nitrogen washout during PB is our primary risk mitigation strategy to prevent subsequent DCS and VGE in subjects. Bubbles in the pulmonary artery (venous blood) were detected from the precordial position using Doppler ultrasound bubble detectors. The subjects were monitored for VGE for four min at about 15 min intervals for the duration of the altitude exposure, with maximum bubble grade assigned a Spencer Grade of IV.

  20. Portal provides access for carbon reduction.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    How the lessons learned from a concerted Marks & Spencer sustainability drive that was established, and subsequently enthusiastically championed by, the retailer's then CEO and chairman, Sir Stuart Rose, could be translated to an NHS under fierce pressure to cut its own carbon footprint, was the subject of a morning keynote session at November's Healthcare Estates 2011 conference in Manchester. The session also saw the official launch of a new online portal, established jointly by BRE and the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, which will enable NHS Trusts to share experience, and obtain valuable advice and guidance, to assist them in their efforts to be 'greener'. HEJ editor Jonathan Baillie reports. PMID:22332312

  1. Defensive zeal and the uncertain self: what makes you so sure?

    PubMed

    McGregor, Ian; Marigold, Denise C

    2003-11-01

    In Studies 1-3, undergraduates with high self-esteem (HSEs) reacted to personal uncertainty-threats with compensatory conviction about unrelated issues and aspects of the self. In Study 1 HSEs reacted to salience of personal dilemmas with increased implicit conviction about self-definition. In Study 2 they reacted to the same uncertainty-threat with increased explicit conviction about social issues. In Study 3, HSEs (particularly defensive HSEs, i.e., with low implicit self-esteem; C. H. Jordan, S. J. Spencer, & M. P. Zanna, 2003) reacted to uncertainty about a personal relationship with compensatory conviction about social issues. For HSEs in Study 4, expressing convictions about social issues decreased subjective salience of dilemma-related uncertainties that were not related to the social issues. Compensatory conviction is viewed as a mode of repression, akin to reaction formation, that helps keep unwanted thoughts out of awareness. PMID:14599248

  2. [Sir Francis Galton: the father of eugenics].

    PubMed

    Aubert-Marson, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Not only was Sir Francis Galton a famous geographer and statistician, he also invented "eugenics" in 1883. Eugenics, defined as the science of improving racial stock, was developed from a new heredity theory, conceived by Galton himself, and from the evolution theory of Charles Darwin, transposed to human society by Herbert Spencer. Galton's eugenics was a program to artificially produce a better human race through regulating marriage and thus procreation. Galton put particular emphasis on "positive eugenics", aimed at encouraging the physically and mentally superior members of the population to choose partners with similar traits. In 1904, he presented his ideas in front of a vast audience of physicians and scientists in London. His widely-publicized lecture served as the starting point for the development of eugenics groups in Europe and the United States during the first half of the 20th century. PMID:19602363

  3. A generalized Grubbs-Beck test statistic for detecting multiple potentially influential low outliers in flood series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, T. A.; England, J. F.; Berenbrock, C. E.; Mason, R. R.; Stedinger, J. R.; Lamontagne, J. R.

    2013-08-01

    The Grubbs-Beck test is recommended by the federal guidelines for detection of low outliers in flood flow frequency computation in the United States. This paper presents a generalization of the Grubbs-Beck test for normal data (similar to the Rosner (1983) test; see also Spencer and McCuen (1996)) that can provide a consistent standard for identifying multiple potentially influential low flows. In cases where low outliers have been identified, they can be represented as "less-than" values, and a frequency distribution can be developed using censored-data statistical techniques, such as the Expected Moments Algorithm. This approach can improve the fit of the right-hand tail of a frequency distribution and provide protection from lack-of-fit due to unimportant but potentially influential low flows (PILFs) in a flood series, thus making the flood frequency analysis procedure more robust.

  4. On suffering and sympathy: "Jude the Obscure," evolution, and ethics.

    PubMed

    Sumpter, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    This article links Thomas Hardy's exploration of sympathy in "Jude the Obscure" to contemporary scientific debates over moral evolution. Tracing the relationship between pessimism, progressivism, and determinism in Hardy's understanding of sympathy, it also considers Hardy's conception of the author as enlarger of 'social sympathies' - a position, I argue, that was shaped by Leslie Stephen's advocacy of novel writing as moral art. Considering Hardy's engagement with writings by Charles Darwin, T.H. Huxley, Herbert Spencer, and others, I explore the novel's participation in a debate about the evolutionary significance of sympathy and its implications for Hardy's understanding of moral agency. Hardy, I suggest, offered a stronger defence of morality based on biological determinism than Darwin, but this determinism was linked to an unexpected evolutionary optimism. PMID:22355828

  5. [Historical meanings of Santiago Ramón y Cajal's Rétine des vertébrés. Summary of his first scientific].

    PubMed

    Baratas Díaz, L A

    1994-01-01

    The retina was one of the main objects of study in the first stage of the scientific work of Ramón y Cajal. As culmination of his previous works Cajal published in 1893 in the journal La Cellule an article titled "La rétine des Vertébrés". This article on the retina is a perfect example of Cajal's ability for the systematic study of the cellular types of the nervous centers, its morphological description and its intercellular contacts, as well as for the formulation of physiological interpretations and hypothesis on the development of the neuronal prolongations. Finally some comments are made on the influence of the evolutionary thinking of Haeckel and Herbert Spencer on the work of Ramón y Cajal. PMID:11640477

  6. Neural and mental hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Wiest, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    The history of the sciences of the human brain and mind has been characterized from the beginning by two parallel traditions. The prevailing theory that still influences the way current neuroimaging techniques interpret brain function, can be traced back to classical localizational theories, which in turn go back to early phrenological theories. The other approach has its origins in the hierarchical neurological theories of Hughlings-Jackson, which have been influenced by the philosophical conceptions of Herbert Spencer. Another hallmark of the hierarchical tradition, which is also inherent to psychoanalytic metapsychology, is its deeply evolutionary perspective by taking both ontogenetic and phylogenetic trajectories into consideration. This article provides an outline on hierarchical concepts in brain and mind sciences, which contrast with current cognitivistic and non-hierarchical theories in the neurosciences. PMID:23189066

  7. Extensor tendon and fascia sectioning of extensors at the musculotendinous unit in lateral epicondylitis.

    PubMed

    Barth, Joeri; Mahieu, Peter; Hollevoet, Nadine

    2013-06-01

    Different surgical techniques exist to treat lateral epicondylitis. In most techniques, release of the common extensor origin is performed adjacent to the humeral epicondyle. The purpose of the present study was to assess the outcome of transverse sectioning of the intermuscular septum and the aponeuroses of the extensor carpi radialis brevis and extensor digitorum communis, 3 to 5 cm distally to the radial epicondyle. Forty-nine elbows were operated on in 44 patients. Subjective results were obtained after a mean followup of 33 months. Mean age of patients was 44 years. Mean disabilities of arm, shoulder and hand score was 6, mean visual analogue scale score for pain was 1 and for satisfaction 9. The result was excellent in 26, good in 15 and poor in 8 elbows following Spencer and Herndon. Mean absence from work was 40 days. We conclude that tendon release in the musculotendinous unit can be used to treat lateral epicondylitis. PMID:23926727

  8. Minimally Conjoined Omphalopagus Twins with a Body Stalk Anomaly.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Hidehiko; Inagaki, Takeshi; Nakata, Yusei; Kanazawa, Akane; Iwasaki, Yuka; Sasaki, Kiyoshi; Nagai, Ryuhei; Kinoshita, Hiromi; Iwata, Jun; Kikkawa, Kiyoshi

    2015-10-01

    Introduction This report will discuss a case of minimally conjoined omphalopagus twins (MCOTs) with a body stalk anomaly (BSA). Case Report We experienced monochorionic diamniotic (MD) twins born at 31 weeks. One infant was suspicious of BSA before birth, and another infant was normal. But normal infant had anal atresia with small intestine which was inserted behind the umbilicus. Twins had very short common umbilicus and infant with BSA had intestinal conjunction, two appendixes at the site of the colon, and a blind-ending colon. We diagnosed MCOTs. Discussion On the basis of the Spencer hypothesis, the etiology of MCOTs was that MD twins shared a yolk sac. However, this could not explain the presence of a BSA. It is necessary to consider the possible reasons for a singleton BSA. In addition, intestinal fusion occurred unequally in this case, although two appendixes were found in the same place, which might have occurred because of the balanced fusion. PMID:26495169

  9. Minimally Conjoined Omphalopagus Twins with a Body Stalk Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Hidehiko; Inagaki, Takeshi; Nakata, Yusei; Kanazawa, Akane; Iwasaki, Yuka; Sasaki, Kiyoshi; Nagai, Ryuhei; Kinoshita, Hiromi; Iwata, Jun; Kikkawa, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This report will discuss a case of minimally conjoined omphalopagus twins (MCOTs) with a body stalk anomaly (BSA). Case Report We experienced monochorionic diamniotic (MD) twins born at 31 weeks. One infant was suspicious of BSA before birth, and another infant was normal. But normal infant had anal atresia with small intestine which was inserted behind the umbilicus. Twins had very short common umbilicus and infant with BSA had intestinal conjunction, two appendixes at the site of the colon, and a blind-ending colon. We diagnosed MCOTs. Discussion On the basis of the Spencer hypothesis, the etiology of MCOTs was that MD twins shared a yolk sac. However, this could not explain the presence of a BSA. It is necessary to consider the possible reasons for a singleton BSA. In addition, intestinal fusion occurred unequally in this case, although two appendixes were found in the same place, which might have occurred because of the balanced fusion. PMID:26495169

  10. Science at the Theatre - Extreme Science - Promo Video

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Spencer

    2012-01-01

    On Feb. 27 at 7 pm at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre, join four Berkeley Lab scientists as they discuss extreme science -- and what it means to you. Topics include: Neutrino hunting in Antarctica. Learn why Spencer Klein goes to the ends of the Earth to search for these ghostly particles. From Chernobyl to Central Asia, Tamas Torok travels the globe to study microbial diversity in extreme environments. Andrew Minor uses the world's most advanced electron microscopes to explore materials at ultrahigh stresses and in harsh environments. And microbes that talk to computers? Caroline Ajo-Franklin is pioneering cellular-electrical connections that could help transform sunlight into fuel. Go here for more information and to view videos of previous Science at the Theater events: http://www.lbl.gov/LBL-PID/fobl/

  11. Science at the Theatre - Extreme Science - Promo Video

    ScienceCinema

    Klein, Spencer

    2013-05-29

    On Feb. 27 at 7 pm at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre, join four Berkeley Lab scientists as they discuss extreme science -- and what it means to you. Topics include: Neutrino hunting in Antarctica. Learn why Spencer Klein goes to the ends of the Earth to search for these ghostly particles. From Chernobyl to Central Asia, Tamas Torok travels the globe to study microbial diversity in extreme environments. Andrew Minor uses the world's most advanced electron microscopes to explore materials at ultrahigh stresses and in harsh environments. And microbes that talk to computers? Caroline Ajo-Franklin is pioneering cellular-electrical connections that could help transform sunlight into fuel. Go here for more information and to view videos of previous Science at the Theater events: http://www.lbl.gov/LBL-PID/fobl/

  12. Théodule Ribot's ambiguous positivism: philosophical and epistemological strategies in the founding of French scientific psychology.

    PubMed

    Guillin, Vincent

    2004-01-01

    Théodule Ribot (1839-1916) is regarded by many historians of psychology as the "father" of the discipline in France. Ribot contributed to the development of a "new psychology" independent from philosophy, relying on the methods of the natural sciences. However, such an epistemological transition encountered fierce opposition from both the champions of the old-fashioned metaphysical psychology and the representatives of the "scientific spirit." This article focuses on the objections raised by the latter, and especially philosophers of science, against the possibility of a scientific psychology. For instance, according to Auguste Comte, psychology does not satisfy certain basic methodological requirements. To overcome these objections, Ribot, in his La Psychologie Anglaise Contemporaine (1870/1914), devised an epistemological strategy that amounted to invoking criticisms of Comte's views made by other representatives of the positivist school, such as John Stuart Mill and Herbert Spencer. PMID:15048667

  13. Illuminating the Decision Path: The Yucca Mountain Site Recommendation

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, E.; Slothouber, L.

    2003-02-25

    On February 14, 2002, U.S. Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham provided to the President the ''Recommendation by the Secretary of Energy Regarding the Suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site for a Repository Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982.'' This Recommendation, along with supporting materials, complied with statutory requirements for communicating a site recommendation to the President, and it did more: in 49 pages, the Recommendation also spoke directly to the Nation, illuminating the methodology and considerations that led toward the decision to recommend the site. Addressing technical suitability, national interests, and public concerns, the Recommendation helped the public understand the potential risks and benefits of repository development and placed those risks and benefits in a meaningful national context.

  14. The "Universal propeller": built by Paragon Engineers, Inc., Baltimore, Md

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, David L

    1922-01-01

    At the request of the N.A.C.A. the "Universal Propeller" was operated and explained by the inventor, Mr. Spencer Heath, for the purpose of demonstrating the following features of design: 1) Elimination of continuously running gears, collars or bearings in the pitch control mechanism; 2) The use of engine power in place of manual labor in changing blade angle; 3) The absence of any structural limitation to the range of blade angles available and the possibility of limiting the blade travel between any two predetermined extreme positions; 4) Continuous indication on the instrument board of the blade position; 5) Automatic throttling of the engine while the propeller is passing through the position of neutral pitch.

  15. A generalized Grubbs-Beck test statistic for detecting multiple potentially influential low outliers in flood series

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohn, T.A.; England, J.F.; Berenbrock, C.E.; Mason, R.R.; Stedinger, J.R.; Lamontagne, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    he Grubbs-Beck test is recommended by the federal guidelines for detection of low outliers in flood flow frequency computation in the United States. This paper presents a generalization of the Grubbs-Beck test for normal data (similar to the Rosner (1983) test; see also Spencer and McCuen (1996)) that can provide a consistent standard for identifying multiple potentially influential low flows. In cases where low outliers have been identified, they can be represented as “less-than” values, and a frequency distribution can be developed using censored-data statistical techniques, such as the Expected Moments Algorithm. This approach can improve the fit of the right-hand tail of a frequency distribution and provide protection from lack-of-fit due to unimportant but potentially influential low flows (PILFs) in a flood series, thus making the flood frequency analysis procedure more robust.

  16. A Report on the Activities, Publications, and Pending Research of DHS/DOD Sponsored Post-doctoral Research Associate at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, Floyd E.; Tandon, Lav

    2012-04-26

    Since beginning at Los Alamos National Laboratory in February of 2012, I have been working as a DHS./DNDO Postdoctoral Research Associate under the mentorship of Lav Tandon and Khalil Spencer (NA-22 and mass spectrometry). The focus of my efforts, in addition to pursuing needed training and qualifications, has been the application of various instrumental approaches (e.g. Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry; TIMS) to a range of systems of interest in materials characterization and nuclear forensics. Research to be pursued in the coming months shall include the continued use of such approaches to advance current methods for: modified total evaporation, monitoring critical minor isotope systems, and chronometry. Each of the above points will be discussed.

  17. Hamiltonian inclusive fitness: a fitter fitness concept

    PubMed Central

    Costa, James T.

    2013-01-01

    In 1963–1964 W. D. Hamilton introduced the concept of inclusive fitness, the only significant elaboration of Darwinian fitness since the nineteenth century. I discuss the origin of the modern fitness concept, providing context for Hamilton's discovery of inclusive fitness in relation to the puzzle of altruism. While fitness conceptually originates with Darwin, the term itself stems from Spencer and crystallized quantitatively in the early twentieth century. Hamiltonian inclusive fitness, with Price's reformulation, provided the solution to Darwin's ‘special difficulty’—the evolution of caste polymorphism and sterility in social insects. Hamilton further explored the roles of inclusive fitness and reciprocation to tackle Darwin's other difficulty, the evolution of human altruism. The heuristically powerful inclusive fitness concept ramified over the past 50 years: the number and diversity of ‘offspring ideas’ that it has engendered render it a fitter fitness concept, one that Darwin would have appreciated. PMID:24132089

  18. Validation of Interannual Differences of AIRS Monthly Mean Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Iredell, Lena; Keita, Fricky; Molnar, Gyula

    2005-01-01

    Monthly mean fields of select geophysical parameters derived from analysis of AIRS/AMSU data, and their interannual differences, are shown and compared with analogous fields derived from other sources. All AIRS fields are derived using the AIRS Science Team Version 4 algorithm. Monthly mean results are shown for January 2004, as are interannual differences between January 2004 and January 2003. AIRS temperature and water vapor profile fields are compared with monthly mean collocated ECMWF 3 hour forecast and monthly mean TOVS Pathfinder Path A data. AIRS Tropospheric and Stratospheric coarse climate indicators are compared with analogous MSU products derived by Spencer and christy and found in the TOVS Pathfinder Path A data set. Total ozone is compared with results produced by TOMS. OLR is compared with OLR derived using CERES data and found in the TOVS Pathfinder Path A data set. AIRS results agree well in all cases, especially in the interannual difference sense.

  19. Technical Report Series on Global Modeling and Data Assimilation. Volume 12; Comparison of Satellite Global Rainfall Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Max J. (Editor); Chang, Alfred T. C.; Chiu, Long S.

    1997-01-01

    Seventeen months of rainfall data (August 1987-December 1988) from nine satellite rainfall algorithms (Adler, Chang, Kummerow, Prabhakara, Huffman, Spencer, Susskind, and Wu) were analyzed to examine the uncertainty of satellite-derived rainfall estimates. The variability among algorithms, measured as the standard deviation computed from the ensemble of algorithms, shows regions of high algorithm variability tend to coincide with regions of high rain rates. Histograms of pattern correlation (PC) between algorithms suggest a bimodal distribution, with separation at a PC-value of about 0.85. Applying this threshold as a criteria for similarity, our analyses show that algorithms using the same sensor or satellite input tend to be similar, suggesting the dominance of sampling errors in these satellite estimates.

  20. The Sun is Condensed Matter and has a Real Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robitaille, Pierre-Marie

    2014-03-01

    The idea that the Sun was a gaseous in nature was born from 1858-65. At that time, a group of men, including Herbert Spencer, Father Angelo Secchi, Warren de la Rue, Balfour Stewart, and Benjamin Loewy, advanced that the Sun was a ball of gas. In 1865, Hervé Faye was the first to argue that the solar surface was merely an illusion. Dismissing all signs to the contrary, solar physics has promoted this idea to the present day, as manifested by the Standard Solar Model. In this work, overwhelming observational evidence will be presented that the Sun does indeed possess a distinct surface (see P.M. Robitaille, Forty Lines of Evidence for Condensed Matter -- The Sun on Trial: Liquid Metallic Hydrogen as a Solar Building Block, Progress in Physics, 2013, v. 4, 90-143). Our telescopes and satellites are sampling real structures on the surface of the Sun.

  1. Neural and Mental Hierarchies

    PubMed Central

    Wiest, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    The history of the sciences of the human brain and mind has been characterized from the beginning by two parallel traditions. The prevailing theory that still influences the way current neuroimaging techniques interpret brain function, can be traced back to classical localizational theories, which in turn go back to early phrenological theories. The other approach has its origins in the hierarchical neurological theories of Hughlings-Jackson, which have been influenced by the philosophical conceptions of Herbert Spencer. Another hallmark of the hierarchical tradition, which is also inherent to psychoanalytic metapsychology, is its deeply evolutionary perspective by taking both ontogenetic and phylogenetic trajectories into consideration. This article provides an outline on hierarchical concepts in brain and mind sciences, which contrast with current cognitivistic and non-hierarchical theories in the neurosciences. PMID:23189066

  2. Exploratory Research for New Solar Electric Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, R.; Matson, R.

    2005-01-01

    We will review highlights of exploratory research for new PV technologies funded by the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program through NREL and its Photovoltaic Exploratory Research Project. The goal for this effort is highlighted in the beginning of the Solar Program Multi-Year Technical Plan by Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham's challenge to leapfrog the status quo by pursuing research having the potential to create breakthroughs. The ultimate goal is to create solar electric technologies for achieving electricity costs below 5 cents/kWh. Exploratory research includes work on advanced photovoltaic technologies (organic and ultra-high efficiency solar cells for solar concentrators) as well as innovative approaches to emerging and mature technologies (e.g., crystalline silicon).

  3. Groups praise, criticize Bush Transition choices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    As the administration of George W. Bush takes hold in the White House, transition plans gradually are coming into focus for many federal agencies that deal with geoscience issues. Congressional confirmation hearings already have been held for cabinet secretary nominees—including Gale Norton, the controversial figure named to head the Department of the Interior. Bush transition team members have fanned out to visit a number of agencies, and interest groups have lined up to either criticize or praise various appointment decisions that affect geoscience issues.Among cabinet nominees, New Jersey Governor Christine Todd Whitman has received mixed reviews as nominee to head the Environmental Protection Agency and is widely viewed as a moderate on environmental issues. Spencer Abraham, nominated to lead the Department of Energy co-sponsored a bill to abolish the department in 1999 while he represented Michigan in the Senate. However, there has not been a groundswell of political energy expended to try to challenge his nomination.

  4. Density of Jatropha curcas Seed Oil and its Methyl Esters: Measurement and Estimations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veny, Harumi; Baroutian, Saeid; Aroua, Mohamed Kheireddine; Hasan, Masitah; Raman, Abdul Aziz; Sulaiman, Nik Meriam Nik

    2009-04-01

    Density data as a function of temperature have been measured for Jatropha curcas seed oil, as well as biodiesel jatropha methyl esters at temperatures from above their melting points to 90 ° C. The data obtained were used to validate the method proposed by Spencer and Danner using a modified Rackett equation. The experimental and estimated density values using the modified Rackett equation gave almost identical values with average absolute percent deviations less than 0.03% for the jatropha oil and 0.04% for the jatropha methyl esters. The Janarthanan empirical equation was also employed to predict jatropha biodiesel densities. This equation performed equally well with average absolute percent deviations within 0.05%. Two simple linear equations for densities of jatropha oil and its methyl esters are also proposed in this study.

  5. Processes on a glacier-dominated coast, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Molnia, Bruce F.

    1985-01-01

    The 500 km long Gulf of Alaska coastline between Cape Suckling and Cape Spencer can be characterized by constant rapid change in an environment of glaciers, stormy climate, high relief, and extreme oceanographic parameters. During a more than 200-year history of observation, bays have completely filled with sediment, new bays have appeared, glaciers have advanced and retreated as much as 40 km, streams have been captured, and spits have grown as much as 10 km in length, earthquakes have uplifted the coast as much as 15 m, and in general, few features have been static. More than 250 km of coastline have undergone erosion and retreat, with maximum retreat exceeding 4 km at Icy Bay.

  6. Methods development for electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapol, Barry D.

    1992-04-01

    This report consists of two code manuals and an article recently published in the proceedings of the American Nuclear Society Mathematics and Computation Topical Meeting held in Pittsburgh. In these presentations, deterministic calculational methods simulating electron transport in solids are detailed. The first method presented (Section 2) is for the solution of the Spencer-Lewis equation in which electron motion is characterized by continuous slowing down theory and a pathlength formulation. The FN solution to the standard monoenergetic transport equation for electron transport with isotropic scattering in finite media is given in Section 3. For both codes, complete flow charts, operational instructions and sample problems are included. Finally, in Section 4, an application of the multigroup formulation of electron transport in an infinite medium is used to verify an equivalent SN formulation. For this case, anisotropic scattering is also included.

  7. Strategies and methodologies to develop techniques for computer-assisted analysis of gas phase formation during altitude decompression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Michael R.; Hall, W. A.

    1993-01-01

    It would be of operational significance if one possessed a device that would indicate the presence of gas phase formation in the body during hypobaric decompression. Automated analysis of Doppler gas bubble signals has been attempted for 2 decades but with generally unfavorable results, except with surgically implanted transducers. Recently, efforts have intensified with the introduction of low-cost computer programs. Current NASA work is directed towards the development of a computer-assisted method specifically targeted to EVA, and we are most interested in Spencer Grade 4. We note that Spencer Doppler Grades 1 to 3 have increased in the FFT sonogram and spectrogram in the amplitude domain, and the frequency domain is sometimes increased over that created by the normal blood flow envelope. The amplitude perturbations are of very short duration, in both systole and diastole and at random temporal positions. Grade 4 is characteristic in the amplitude domain but with modest increases in the FFT sonogram and spectral frequency power from 2K to 4K over all of the cardiac cycle. Heart valve motion appears to characteristic display signals: (1) the demodulated Doppler signal amplitude is considerably above the Doppler-shifted blow flow signal (even Grade 4); and (2) demodulated Doppler frequency shifts are considerably greater (often several kHz) than the upper edge of the blood flow envelope. Knowledge of these facts will aid in the construction of a real-time, computer-assisted discriminator to eliminate cardiac motion artifacts. There could also exist perturbations in the following: (1) modifications of the pattern of blood flow in accordance with Poiseuille's Law, (2) flow changes with a change in the Reynolds number, (3) an increase in the pulsatility index, and/or (4) diminished diastolic flow or 'runoff.' Doppler ultrasound devices have been constructed with a three-transducer array and a pulsed frequency generator.

  8. Oxygen investigation in the Galileian satellites using AFOSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliorini, A.; Barbieri, M.; Piccioni, G.; Barbieri, C.; Altieri, F.

    Spectroscopy in the visible range of the Galilean satellites is a suitable way to investigate the surface properties of these objects. In recent years, several species, like O_2, O_3, and SO_2, have been detected on the surfaces of these satellites, which were thought to be completely covered only by water ice. The recent detection of the O_2 absorption bands in the Ganymede trailing face \\citep{spencer_1995} led to laboratory experiments in order to better constraint the O_2 phases trapped in the water ice surface \\citep{vidal_1997}. The same features were observed also on Europa and Callisto surfaces \\citep{spencer_2002}, although a better investigation of their properties and their variability with time is still not fully addressed. We proposed ground-based observations with the AFOSC instrument on the 1.8-m telescope in Asiago, to investigate the Galilean satellites? surface properties, focusing both on the leading and trailing faces of the satellites. We used the Volume Phase Holographic grism covering the spectral range 400-1000 nm, with a spectral resolution of about 5000. In this work, we show results of the observations acquired in November 2014, focusing on the leading faces of the satellites. Data were treated using standard methods of data reduction. Further observations with the same setup, scheduled for February 2015 to observe the trailing face of the Galileian satellites, will complement the program. These observations are in preparation to the future science we will be able to perform with the MAJIS spectrometer on the European JUICE mission.

  9. Linking near- and far-field hydrodynamic models for simulation of desalination plant brine discharges.

    PubMed

    Botelho, D A; Barry, M E; Collecutt, G C; Brook, J; Wiltshire, D

    2013-01-01

    A desalination plant is proposed to be the major water supply to the Olympic Dam Expansion Mining project. Located in the Upper Spencer Gulf, South Australia, the site was chosen due to the existence of strong currents and their likely advantages in terms of mixing and dilution of discharged return water. A high-resolution hydrodynamic model (Estuary, Lake and Coastal Ocean Model, ELCOM) was constructed and, through a rigorous review process, was shown to reproduce the intricate details of the Spencer Gulf dynamics, including those characterising the discharge site. Notwithstanding this, it was found that deploying typically adopted 'direct insertion' techniques to simulate the brine discharge within the hydrodynamic model was problematic. Specifically, it was found that in this study the direct insertion technique delivered highly conservative brine dilution predictions in and around the proposed site, and that these were grid and time-step dependent. To improve the predictive capability, a strategy to link validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions to hydrodynamic simulations was devised. In this strategy, environmental conditions from ELCOM were used to produce boundary conditions for execution of a suite of CFD simulations. In turn, the CFD simulations provided the brine dilutions and flow rates to be applied in ELCOM. In order to conserve mass in a system-wide sense, artificial salt sinks were introduced to the ELCOM model such that salt quantities were conserved. As a result of this process, ELCOM predictions were naturally very similar to CFD predictions near the diffuser, whilst at the same time they produced an area of influence (further afield) comparable to direct insertion methods. It was concluded that the linkage of the models, in comparison to direct insertion methods, constituted a more realistic and defensible alternative to predict the far-field dispersion of outfall discharges, particularly with regards to the estimation of brine

  10. No Ocean Source for the Enceladus Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Matthew H.; Schneider, N. M.; Johnson, R. E.; Kargel, J. S.; Schaller, E. L.; Brown, M. E.

    2007-12-01

    One surprising discovery of the Cassini mission to Saturn has been the presence of geyser-like plumes at the south pole of the icy moon Enceladus ejecting >300; kg/s of water into Saturn's magnetosphere. In situ and remote observations (Waite et al. 2006; Hansen et al. 2006) have shown that the primary plume constituent is H2O, and thermal measurements indicate intense heating in cracks believed to be plume vents on the surface (Spencer et al. 2006). These observations have led to speculation that the plumes are fed from a liquid water reservoir beneath Enceladus' surface. We present results from an extremely sensitive, high-resolution spectroscopic search using the Keck and Anglo-Australian Telescopes which place a stringent upper limit on sodium emission in the Enceladus plumes. Large amounts of sodium would be expected if Enceladus' plume material were derived directly from a subsurface liquid reservoir in contact with rocky material. Chemical models predict that sodium would dissolve into such an ocean at mixing ratios relative to water of 10-4 to 10-1 (Zolotov et al., 2007). Our numerical plume models show that such high sodium concentrations would form a detectable torus encircling Saturn. Our detection upper limits fall orders of magnitude below these models, leading us to conclude that the Enceladus plumes do not originate in an ocean or sea. These observations support the alternative theories that the plumes are generated by shear heating of the icy crust resulting in sublimation or melting, or the decomposition of clathrates. This work has been supported by the NASA Postdoctoral Program and the NSF's Planetary Astronomy Program. References: Hansen et al., Science, 311, 1422, 2006. Spencer et al., Science, 311, 1401, 2006. Waite et al., Science, 311, 1419, 2006. Zolotov et al., Presented to the "Enceladus Focus Group Workshop," Boulder, CO, 2007.

  11. Examining impacts of current-use pesticides in Southern Ontario using in situ exposures of the amphipod Hyalella azteca.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Adrienne J; Struger, John; Grapentine, Lee C; Palace, Vince P

    2016-05-01

    In situ exposures with Hyalella azteca were used to assess impacts of current-use pesticides in Southern Ontario, Canada. Exposures were conducted over 2 growing seasons within areas of high pesticide use: 1 site on Prudhomme Creek and 3 sites on Twenty Mile Creek. Three sites on Spencer Creek, an area of low pesticide use, were added in the second season. Surface water samples were collected every 2 wk to 3 wk and analyzed for a suite of pesticides. Hyalella were exposed in situ for 1 wk every 4 wk to 6 wk, and survival and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity were measured. Pesticides in surface waters reflected seasonal use patterns: lower concentrations in spring and fall and higher concentrations during summer months. Organophosphate insecticides (chlorpyrifos, azinphos methyl, diazinon) and acid herbicides (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid [2,4-D], mecoprop) were routinely detected in Prudhomme Creek, whereas neutral herbicides (atrazine, metolachlor) dominated the pesticide signature of Twenty Mile Creek. Spencer Creek contained fewer pesticides, which were measured at lower concentrations. In situ effects also followed seasonal patterns: higher survival and AChE activity in spring and fall, and lower survival and AChE activity during summer months. The highest toxicity was observed at Prudhomme Creek and was primarily associated with organophosphates. The present study demonstrated that current-use pesticides in Southern Ontario were linked to in situ effects and identified sites of concern requiring further investigation. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1224-1238. © 2015 Crown in the Right of Canada. PMID:26436714

  12. Io's Sodium Clouds and Plasma Torus: Three Quiet Apparitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jody; Mendillo, M.; Baumgardner, J.

    2007-10-01

    Ground-based observations of Io's sodium clouds from February 2005 to June 2007 indicate that Io was in an unusually quiet state of atmospheric escape. Simultaneous observations of the sulfur-ion plasma torus in that same period indicate that the torus has been gradually dimming, which is also consistent with below-average atmospheric escape rates from Io. The S+ torus was essentially undetectable in May 2007. Our goal in this 3-year project was to compare variability in the clouds and torus with observations of Io's volcanic infrared ``hot spots'' (e.g., Marchis et al. 2005) in order to track the flow of mass from Io's volcanoes into Jupiter's magnetosphere. Of particular interest was the 18-month cycle of Io's large volcano Loki (Rathbun et al. 2002, Mendillo et al. 2004), however it seems that Loki has settled into an unusually long-term quiescent state (Rathbun and Spencer, 2006). Thus, although we have been unable to monitor the month-to-month effects of the Loki cycle, we nonetheless have indirect evidence for Loki's long-term effects on Io's atmosphere and Jupiter's magnetosphere by observing their weak states when Loki is not actively contributing. This research is funded in part by NASA's Planetary Astronomy Program. Marchis et al., Keck AO survey of Io global volcanic activity between 2 and 5 microns, Icarus, 176, 96-122, 2005. Mendillo et al., Io's volcanic control of Jupiter's extended neutral clouds, Icarus, 170, 430-442, 2004. Rathbun, J.A. et al., Loki, Io: A periodic volcano, Geophysical Research Letters, 29, Issue 10, pp. 84-1, 2002. Rathbun, J.A. and J.R. Spencer, Loki, Io: New ground-based observations and a model describing the change from periodic overturn, Geophysical Research Letters, 33, Issue 17, 2006.

  13. Self-Consistent Generation of Single-Plume State for Enceladus Using Non-Newtonian Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besserer, Jonathan; Rozel, A.; Golabek, G. J.; Kaplan, M.; Becker, T. W.; Tackley, P. J.

    2013-10-01

    The thermal dichotomy of Enceladus suggests an asymmetrical structure in its global heat transfer [1]. So far, most of the models proposed that obtained such a distribution have prescribed an a priori asymmetry, i.e. a mechanical anomaly in the south polar ice shell surface [2], at its base [3], or in core topography [4]. We present here the first set of numerical simulations of convection that yield a stable single-plume state for Enceladus without prescribed mechanical asymmetry. Using the convection code StagYY [5,6] in a 2D-spherical annulus geometry [7], we show that a non-Newtonian rheology is sufficient to create a localized, single hot plume surrounded by a conductive ice mantle. Using a grain size-dependent rheology [8,9], we obtain a self-sustained state in which a region of small angular extent has a sufficiently low viscosity to allow convection to occur due to the stress-dependent part of the rheological law. We find that the single-plume state is very unlikely to remain stable if the rheology is Newtonian. For simplicity, we neglect tidal heating effects. Despite this, our preferred model yields a south polar heat flux which is about half the recently revised observational value [10]. References: [1] Spencer and Nimmo, 2013, An. Rev. Earth Plan. Sci., 41, 693-717 [2] Han et al., 2012, Icarus, 218, 320-330 [3] Běhounková et al. 2012, Icarus, 219, 655-664 [4] Han and Showman, 2012, LPSC, 2028 [5] Tackley, 1993, GRL, 20, 2187-2190 [6] Tackley, 2008, PEPI, 171, 7-18 [7] Hernlund and Tackley, 2008, PEPI, 171, 48-54 [8] Rozel, 2012, GGG, 13, Q10020 [9] Barr and McKinnon, 2007, JGR, 112, E02012 [10] Spencer et al., 2013, EPSC Abstract, 8, EPSC2013-840-1

  14. Field Evaluation in Four NEEMO Divers of a Prototype In-suit Doppler Ultrasound Bubble Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acock, K. E.; Gernhardt, M. L.; Conkin, J.; Powell, M. R.

    2004-01-01

    It is desirable to know if astronauts produce venous gas emboli (VGE) as a result of their exposure to 4.3 psia during space walks. The current prototype in-suit Doppler (ISD) ultrasound bubble detector provides an objective assessment of decompression stress by monitoring for VGE. The NOAA Aquarius habitat and NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) series of dives provided an opportunity to assess the ability of the prototype ISDs to record venous blood flow and possibly detect VGE in the pulmonary artery. From July 16 to 29,2003, four aquanauts (two males and two females) donned the ISD for a 4 hr automated recording session, following excursion dives (up to 6hrs and 29 MSW below storage depth) from air saturation at 17 MSW. Doppler recordings for 32 excursion dives were collected. The recordings consisted of approximately 150 digital wave files. Each wave file contained 24 sec of recording for each min. A 1 - 4 Doppler Quality Score (DQS) was assigned to each wave file in 17 of the 32 records evaluated to date. A DQS of 1 indicates a poor flow signal and a score of 4 indicates an optimum signal. Only 23% of all wave files had DQSs considered adequate to detect low grade VGE (Spencer I-II). The distribution of DQS in 2,356 wave files is as follows: DQS 1-56%, DQS 2-21%, DQS 3-18% and DQS 4-5%. Six of the 17 records had false positive VGE (Spencer I-IV) detected in one or more wave files per dive record. The false positive VGE recordings are attributable to air entrainment associated with drinking (verified by control tests), and this observation is important as astronauts drink water during space walks. The current ISD design provides quality recordings only over a narrow range of chest anatomy.

  15. Volcanic resurfacing of Io between Galileo and New Horizons Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coman, E.; Phillips, C. B.

    2011-12-01

    Io is the most geologically active object in our solar system. Due to its tumultuous volcanism, determining Io's resurfacing rate will allow better characterization of the subsurface structure, thermal state, and history of tidal heating of this small moon. Numerous active volcanic centers were documented during the Galileo mission in the late 1990's and early 2000's, and the opportunity to discover more of these centers was presented with the flyby of New Horizons in 2007. Previous authors (i.e. Spencer et al. 2007) have compared Galileo SSI and New Horizons LORRI images with similar viewing geometry, and have found multiple new potential features such as dark lava flows and bright plume deposits emplaced between the two flybys. The purpose of this study was to measure the extent of these changes on Io. Because an ISIS camera model does not yet exist for LORRI, a direct ratio image for comparison with the Galileo SSI images could not be created. By changing the stretch of the Galileo SSI images to match those of New Horizons as closely as possible, we were able to create a rough ratio image for the active center locations. We used these ratio images to measure the areal extent of the new deposits, taking careful precautions to measure more changes in shape than brightness, as brightness variations can be caused by certain surface materials being viewed at different phase angles between the Galileo and New Horizons flybys. This presentation will report our measurement findings. We then are able to use our measurements of the total area covered by new volcanic features to make estimates of the resurfacing rate of Io. Spencer, J.R. et al. (2007), Io Volcanism Seen by New Horizons: A Major Eruption of the Tvashtar Volcano, Science, 318, 240, DOI:10.1126/science.1147621.

  16. Neurogenetic approaches to habituation and dishabituation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Engel, Jeff E; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2009-09-01

    We review work in the major model systems for habituation in Drosophila melanogaster, encompassing several sensory modalities and behavioral contexts: visual (giant fiber escape response, landing response); chemical (proboscis extension reflex, olfactory jump response, locomotory startle response, odor-induced leg response, experience-dependent courtship modification); electric (shock avoidance); and mechanical (leg resistance reflex, cleaning reflex). Each model system shows several of Thompson and Spencer's [Thompson, R. F., & Spencer, W. A. (1966). Habituation: A model phenomenon for the study of neuronal substrates of behavior. Psychological Review, 73, 16-43] parametric criteria for habituation: spontaneous recovery and dishabituation have been described in almost all of them and dependence of habituation upon stimulus frequency and stimulus intensity in the majority. Stimulus generalization (and conversely, the delineation of stimulus specificity) has given insights into the localization of habituation or the neural architecture underlying sensory processing. The strength of Drosophila for studying habituation is the range of genetic approaches available. Mutations have been used to modify specific neuroanatomical structures, ion channels, elements of synaptic transmission, and second-messenger pathways. rutabaga and dunce, genes of the cAMP signal pathway that have been studied most often in the reviewed experiments, have also been implicated in synaptic plasticity and associative conditioning in Drosophila and other species including mammals. The use of the Gal4/UAS system for targeting gene expression has enabled genetic perturbation of defined sets of neurons. One clear lesson is that a gene may affect habituation differently in different behaviors, depending on the expression, processing, and localization of the gene product in specific circuits. Mutations of specific genes not only provide links between physiology and behavior in the same circuit, but

  17. Spatially resolved HST/STIS observations of Io's dayside equatorial atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessup, Kandis Lea; Spencer, John R.

    2015-03-01

    We report on an investigation of the spatial distribution of Io's atmosphere, and its diurnal variability, using Hubble's Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS). From December 2010 to January 2012, we obtained spatially resolved limb-to-limb 2100-3100 Å spectra at low latitudes (<30°), with the STIS 0.1″ slit. Spectra taken at two central meridian longitudes (CMLs), 200 and 250W, over regions that are both bright and dark at near-UV (3000-4000 Å) wavelengths, allowed investigation of the variation in atmospheric density with terrain type and local time. The combined longitudinal coverage of these observations extends from 120 to 320W longitude, and observations of the 200-250W longitude region are obtained at 2 distinct times of day, differing by 50° of rotation of Io. Using primarily SO2 gas absorptions from 2100 to 2300 Å, we detect SO2 gas densities ranging from 0.3 to 2.2 × 1017 cm-2, and 100-200 K gas temperatures. Because we avoided known persistent plume sites, and see little enhancement of SO2 density near known active volcanic centers, we conclude that SO2 gas densities ∼2 × 1017 cm-2 can be obtained via sublimation alone. We correct column densities at each location to equatorial values by assuming vapor-pressure equilibrium with frost at temperatures that vary as cosine1/4(latitude), as inferred from earlier low latitude HST/STIS observations (Jessup, K.L., Spencer, J.R., Ballester, G.E., Howell, R.R., Roesler, F., Vigil, M., Yelle, R. [2004]. Icarus 169, 197-215). Inferred equatorial SO2 gas densities in the 120-320W longitude range show the following behavior: (i) rapid decrease from longitude 170W to 310W, consistent with previous disk-integrated 19 μm and 2100 Å spectroscopy (Spencer, J.R., Lellouch, E., Richter, M.J., López-Valverde, M.A., Jessup, K.L., Greathouse, T.K., Flaud, J.M. [2005]. Icarus 176, 283-304; Tsang, C.C.C., Spencer, J.R., Jessup, K.L. [2013]. Icarus 226, 604-616) and Ly-α imaging (Feaga, L.M., McGrath, M

  18. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-01-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence

    Guest Editors: Thomas E. Darcie, University of Victoria Robert Doverspike, AT&T Martin Zirngibl, Lucent Technologies

    Coordinating Associate Editor: Steven K. Korotky, Lucent Technologies

    The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly

  19. Transmission in Optically Transparent Core Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilper, Dan; Jensen, Rich; Petermann, Klaus; Karasek, Miroslav

    2007-03-01

    related to the interworking between core and edge networks. The core network topics suitable for inclusion in this feature issue are:

    • Optically transparent system design issues, transmission experiments, and field trials
    • Optically transparent network architectures and topologies
    • Dispersion management in reconfigurable and mesh systems
    • Optically transparent network device and sub-system performance, design, characterization and control, including: amplifiers, transmitters, receivers, switches, add/drop multiplexers
    • Transient and fault management
    • Physical layer system control
    • Monitoring and compensation to support transparency
    • Wavelength routing and planning as they relate to physical layer transmission
    • Hardware cost and configuration optimization for optically transparent networks
    To submit to this special issue, follow the normal procedure for submission to JON and select "TTCN" in the features indicator of the online submission form. For all other questions relating to this feature issue, please send an e-mail to jon@osa.org, subject line "TTCN." Additional information can be found on the JON website: . Submission Deadline: 15 June 2007

  20. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-09-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  1. Study of Chemical Surface Structure of Natural Sorbents Used for Removing of Pb2+ Ions from Model Aqueous Solutions (part Ii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bożęcka, Agnieszka; Bożęcki, Piotr; Sanak-Rydlewska, Stanisława

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the results of the chemical structure research of organic sorbent surface such as walnut shells, plums stones and sunflower hulls with using such methods as infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and elemental analysis. Based on the IR spectra identification of functional groups present on the surface of studied materials has been done as well as determination of their effect on the sorption mechanism of Pb2+ ions from aqueous model solutions W artykule przedstawiono wyniki badań chemicznej struktury powierzchni sorbentów organicznych takich jak: łupiny orzecha włoskiego, pestki śliwek oraz łuski słonecznika z wykorzystaniem metody spektrometrii w podczerwieni (FTIR) oraz analizy elementarnej. W oparciu o uzyskane widma IR dokonano identyfikacji grup funkcyjnych obecnych na powierzchni tych materiałów i określono ich wpływ na mechanizm sorpcji jonów Pb2+ z modelowych roztworów wodnych. Analiza elementarna wykazała, że spośród badanych sorbentów, największą zawartość węgla (49,91%) i wodoru (5,93%) mają pestki śliwek. Najwięcej azotu (1,59%) zawierają łuszczyny słonecznika (tabela 1). Zawartość siarki we wszystkich badanych materiałach jest znikoma, dlatego nie udało się jej oznaczyć tą metodą. Obecność pozostałych pierwiastków może świadczyć o istnieniu zarówno alifatycznych jak i aromatycznych połączeń organicznych. Potwierdzeniem tego są również zarejestrowane widma IR (rysunki 1-3). W oparciu o uzyskane wyniki można przypuszczać także, iż udział procesu wymiany jonowej w sorpcji ołowiu z roztworów wodnych jest znaczący. Świadczą o tym m.in. intensywności pasm na widmach IR dla próbek badanych materiałów po ich kontakcie z roztworami jonów Pb2+ (rysunki 4-6).

  2. Selections from 2015: Earth-Sized Planet Found in Star's Habitable Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-03-01

    Editors Note:In these last two weeks of 2015, well be looking at a few selections from among the most-downloaded paperspublished in AAS journals this year. The usual posting schedule will resume after the AAS winter meeting.Discovery and Validation of Kepler-452b: a 1.6 R Super Earth Exoplanet in the Habitable Zone of a G2 StarPublished July2015Main takeaway:A phase-folded light curve showing the transit of Kepler-452b. Its transit lasts 10.5 hours, and its period is 385 days. [Jenkins et al. 2015]A team led by Jon Jenkins (NASA Ames Research Center) announced the discovery and confirmation of Kepler-452b, an exoplanet only 60% larger than Earth and located in the habitable zone of its G2 star. This planet orbits its star at a distance of just over 1 AU, taking 385 days to complete an orbit. Kepler-452b also stands a good chance of being rocky, according to estimates.Why its interesting:Kepler-452b is the first near-Earth-sized planet to be found in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star making this the closest analog to the Earth-Sun system found in the Kepler dataset so far.About the history of the system (and the future of ours?):The authors estimate that the system is ~6 billion years old, and that Kepler-452b has been in the habitable zone of its star throughout its lifetime a substantially longer time than Earth has been around and habitable! Kepler-452bs host star, in addition to being 1.5 billion years older than the Sun, is roughly 10% larger. This system might therefore provide a glimpse of what Earths environment may be like in the future, as the Sun slowly expands on its way to becoming a red giant.CitationJon M. Jenkins et al 2015 AJ 150 56. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/150/2/56

  3. Optimal humanization of 1B4, an anti-CD18 murine monoclonal antibody, is achieved by correct choice of human V-region framework sequences.

    PubMed

    Singer, I I; Kawka, D W; DeMartino, J A; Daugherty, B L; Elliston, K O; Alves, K; Bush, B L; Cameron, P M; Cuca, G C; Davies, P

    1993-04-01

    The murine anti-CD18 mAb 1B4 has been humanized using CDR grafting. Three VH (Gal, Jon, and New) and two VL (Rei and Len) human frameworks, whose selection was based exclusively on their sequence identity with m1B4, were used to construct five human gamma 4/kappa recombinant antibodies: Gal/Rei, Gal/Len, Jon/Rei, and New/Rei, and a "hemichimeric" antibody pairing the VH of m1B4 with grafted Rei. Each of these h1B4 constructs completely inhibited the binding of m1B4 to activated human leukocytes with avidities (IC50) ranging from 1.5 to 8.0 nM, compared to 0.5 nM for m1B4. Replacement of three VH residues in the best VH framework, Gal, with the corresponding m1B4 "packing" (nonsolvent exposed) residues gave an h1B4 (mutant Gal/Rei) with the same avidity as m1B4. Avidity correlated with overall percent identity between the human and murine VH frameworks and, in particular, with conservation of "packing" residues. Rei and Len VL frameworks proved to be interchangeable. Further characterization showed that the Gal/Rei prototype was equipotent to m1B4 in blocking adhesion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes to human vascular endothelium in vitro, and polymorphonuclear leukocyte extravasation into C5a-injected rabbit or monkey skin sites. Dual-label immunofluorescence microscopy of bone marrow cells with Gal/Rei h1B4 and m1B4 demonstrated that the fine specificity of the combining sites had not been altered by humanization. Reduced immunogenicity was demonstrated in rhesus monkeys that tolerated weekly treatment with h1B4 for 6 wk, whereas m1B4 induced profound anaphylaxis at 3 wk. Anti-1B4 titers in h1B4-treated rhesus were 50 to 66% lower and developed 1 wk later than in m1B4-treated monkeys. Crucially, the anti-h1B4 antibodies were anti-idiotypic while the anti-m1B4 antibodies were directed against constant and framework regions. We conclude that sequence identity searches are sufficient to identify suitable human frameworks for CDR-grafting of m1B4

  4. Geology of the Anlauf and Drain Quadrangles, Douglas and Lane Counties, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoover, Linn

    1963-01-01

    currents. About 500 feet of sandstone and siltstone assigned to the Spencer formation of late Eocene age unconformably overlies the Tyee formation. The Spencer formation, better exposed in the east-central part of the Coast Ranges, contains marine fossils but also has thin impure coal beds, indicative of strand-line accumulation. The sandstone in the Spencer formation is very similar to that in the Tyee formation, from which it was probably derived. The Fisher formation contains about 5,500 feet of nonmarine pyroclastic and volcanic rocks that are related to the volcanic rock sequences of the western Cascade Range. The formation is characterized by a wide variety of rock types, including conglomerate, tuffaceous sandstone and siltstone, vitric and crystal tuff, waterlaid and mudflow breccia, and andesitic lava flows. These rocks gen- erally occur in lenticular beds that have little stratigraphic significance. The rocks apparently accumulated on a plain slightly above sea level that was subjected alternately to fiooding by running water and to desiccation. Fossil leaves from the lowermost part of the Fisher formation are of late Eocene age; the upper part of the formation is of early, and possibly niiddle, Oligocene age. A few exposures of olivine basalt were mapped in the extreme northern part of the Anlauf quadrangle. The flows, more extensively exposed to the north, overlie the Fisher formation, and, therefore, are tentatively considered to be post-Oligocene in age. All these stratigraphic units, but principally the Fisher formation, are cut by dikes, sills, and stocklike bodies of 'porphyritic basalt, diabase, and norite. Contemporaneously with the emplacement of most of these rocks, in late Miocene (?) time, hydrothermal solutions locailly altered the sedimentary and extrusive igneous racks and deposited cinnabar and other sulfide minerals, carbonates, and silica. Three parallel nartheastward-trending

  5. The effect of low-energy electrons on the response of ion chambers to ionizing photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Russa, Daniel J.

    Cavity ionization chambers are one of the most popular and widely used devices for quantifying ionizing photon beams. This popularity originates from the precision of these devices and the relative ease with which ionization measurements are converted to quantities of interest in therapeutic radiology or radiation protection, collectively referred to as radiation dosimetry. The formalisms used for these conversions, known as cavity theory, make several assumptions about the electron spectrum in the low-energy range resulting from the incident photon beam. These electrons often account for a significant fraction of the ion chamber response. An inadequate treatment of low-energy electrons can therefore significantly effect calculated quantities of interest. This thesis sets out to investigate the effect of low-energy electrons on (1) the use of Spencer-Attix cavity theory with 60Co beams; and (2) the standard temperature-pressure correction factor, P TP, used to relate the measured ionization to a set of reference temperature and pressure conditions for vented ion chambers. Problems with the PTP correction are shown to arise when used with kilovoltage x rays, where ionization measurements are due primarily to electrons that do not have enough energy to cross the cavity. A combination of measurements and Monte Carlo calculations using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code demonstrate the breakdown of PTP in these situations when used with non-air-equivalent chambers. The extent of the breakdown is shown to depend on cavity size, energy of the incident photons, and the composition of the chamber. In the worst case, the standard P TP factor overcorrects the response of an aluminum chamber by ≈12% at an air density typical of Mexico City. The response of a more common graphite-walled chamber with similar dimensions at the same air density is undercorrected by ≈ 2%. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo code is also used to investigate Spencer-Attix cavity theory as it is used in the

  6. Possible continuous-type (unconventional) gas accumulation in the Lower Silurian "Clinton" sands, Medina Group and Tuscarora Sandstone in the Appalachian Basin; a progress report of the 1995 project activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, Robert T.; Aggen, Kerry L.; Hettinger, Robert D.; Law, Ben E.; Miller, John J.; Nuccio, Vito F.; Perry, William J., Jr.; Prensky, Stephen E.; Filipo, John J.; Wandrey, Craig J.

    1996-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) 1995 National Assessment of United States oil and gas resources (Gautier and others, 1995), the Appalachian basin was estimated to have, at a mean value, about 61 trillion cubic feet (TCF) of recoverable gas in sandstone and shale reservoirs of Paleozoic age. Approximately one-half of this gas resource is estimated to reside in a regionally extensive, continuous-type gas accumulation whose reservoirs consist of low-permeability sandstone of the Lower Silurian 'Clinton' sands and Medina Group (Gautier and others, 1995; Ryder, 1995). Recognizing the importance of this large regional gas accumulation for future energy considerations, the USGS initiated in January 1995 a multi-year study to evaluate the nature, distribution, and origin of natural gas in the 'Clinton' sands, Medina Group sandstones, and equivalent Tuscarora Sandstone. The project is part of a larger natural gas project, Continuous Gas Accumulations in Sandstones and Carbonates, coordinated in FY1995 by Ben E. Law and Jennie L. Ridgley, USGS, Denver. Approximately 2.6 man years were devoted to the Clinton/Medina project in FY1995. A continuous-type gas accumulation, referred to in the project, is a new term introduced by Schmoker (1995a) to identify those natural gas accumulations whose reservoirs are charged throughout with gas over a large area and whose entrapment does not involve a downdip gas-water contact. Gas in these accumulations is located downdip of the water column and, thus, is the reverse of conventional-type hydrocarbon accumulations. Commonly used industry terms that are more or less synonymous with continuous-type gas accumulations include basin- centered gas accumulation (Rose and others, 1984; Law and Spencer, 1993), tight (low-permeability) gas reservoir (Spencer, 1989; Law and others, 1989; Perry, 1994), and deep basin gas (Masters, 1979, 1984). The realization that undiscovered gas in Lower Silurian sandstone reservoirs of the

  7. PREFACE: Proceedings of the 7th Edoardo Amaldi Conference on Gravitational Waves (Amaldi7), Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, Darling Harbour, Sydney, Australia, 8 14 July 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Susan M.; McClelland, David E.

    2008-07-01

    Calman (right) Exhibition booth Springer Exhibition booth Springer Exhibition booth GR19 Mexico City Exhibition booth GR19 Mexico City Amaldi7 posters Amaldi7 posters Participants gather before Kip Thorne's public lecture Participants gather before Kip Thorne's public lecture Participants gather before Kip Thorne's public lecture Participants gather before Kip Thorne's public lecture Entering auditorium for Kip Thorne's public lecture Entering auditorium for Kip Thorne's public lecture Public lecture by Kip Thorne Public lecture by Kip Thorne Public lecture by Kip Thorne Public lecture by Kip Thorne Kip Thorne public lecture Kip Thorne public lecture Kip Thorne public lecture Kip Thorne public lecture Roger Penrose (left), Adam Spencer (right) Roger Penrose (left), Adam Spencer (right) From left to right: John Steele, Susan Scott, Roger Penrose, David McClelland, John Webb, Adam Spencer From left to right: John Steele, Susan Scott, Roger Penrose, David McClelland, John Webb, Adam Spencer Opening of Roger Penrose's public lecture from left to right: John Webb, Adam Spencer, Roger Penrose Opening of Roger Penrose's public lecture from left to right: John Webb, Adam Spencer, Roger Penrose Roger Penrose at opening of his public lecture Roger Penrose at opening of his public lecture Public lecture by Roger Penrose Public lecture by Roger Penrose Public lecture by Roger Penrose Public lecture by Roger Penrose

  8. Fault strength and the formation of rider blocks and domes in continental and oceanic core complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, W. Roger; Choi, Eunseo

    2014-05-01

    Core complexes are places where slip of normal sense 'detachment' faults exhumes rocks from more than 10 km depth. We first present 2D cross-sectional model results showing that core complex detachment faults are strong and that their strength has to be in a narrow range to allow kilometer scale "rider blocks" to develop. Previous numerical simulations of lithospheric extension produced the large offset, core complex-forming, normal faults only when the faults were weaker than a given threshold. High-resolution simulations are needed to resolve rider blocks and they only form when the faults are stronger than a given level. A narrow range of fault weakening, relative to intact surrounding rock, allows for a consecutive series of rider blocks to emerge in a core complex-like geometry. Rider blocks develop when the dominant form of weakening is by reduction of fault cohesion while faults that weaken primarily by friction reduction do not form distinct rider blocks. The term 'core' refers to the oval region of rocks exhumed from depth and surrounded by rocks formed at shallower depths. Cores are typically 10-15 km wide and longer in the extension direction. 2 and 3D numerical and analog models are used to show that the cores could form as a result of 'continuous casting' of warm, ductile lower plate rocks pulled up against a cold upper plate (Spencer, 1999). Spencer (1999) considered undulations in the surface of a brittle plate while here we consider how a both the surface and base of the plate can be "cast" with a nearly parallel shape. Ridges can locally migrate in time and may do so in response to along-axis variations in the magmatic accommodation of plate separation. We suggest that the core geometry is formed by along strike variations in the horizontal position of the detachment boundary. Long wavelength (compared to the brittle layer thickness) horizontal undulations in the position of the detachment can produce parallel undulations in both the surface and

  9. The Diagnosis of Complex Rotation in the Lightcurve of 4179 Toutatis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, B. E. A.; Belton, M. J. S.; Samarasinha, N. H.

    2000-10-01

    We revisit the visible lightcurve data on 4179 Toutatis (Spencer et al. 1995) to recover the signature of its excited spin state with an application of our Fourier transform and WindowCLEAN algorithms (Roberts et al. 1987, Belton 1991). WindowCLEAN yields clear and precise signatures of periodicities associated with the precession of the long axis about the total angular momentum vector (0.135 +/- 0.008 dy-1, 0.271 +/- 0.008 dy-1) and the combination of precession and rotation (LAM state), or oscillation (SAM state), about the long axis (0.643 +/- 0.008 dy-1). These periodicities are effectively the same as those found in the model calculations of Kryszczyńska et al. (1999). For an assumed LAM state, our periodicities yield a mean long axis precession period Pφ = 7.41 +/- 0.4 dy and a period of rotation around the long axis of Pψ = 5.38 +/- 0.5 dy which compares well with the values of 7.35 dy and 5.41 dy found in the analysis of radar data (Hudson and Ostro 1995). We explain why the dramatic change in the Earth-Toutatis-sun geometry during the time that the lightcurve was obtained, and which we had originally thought would undermine the derivation of 4179 Toutatis periods by Fourier analysis, has little effect on the results obtained. Using the 4179 Toutatis example as a guide we discuss limitations on deriving information about complex spin states from asteroidal light curves. This work is supported by a Planetary Astronomy Grant from NASA. References: Belton, M.J.S., 1991. In Comets in the Post-Halley Era 2, Eds. R.L. Newburn Jr. and J. Rahe. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 691-721. Hudson, R.S. and S.J. Ostro 1995. Science 270, 84-86. Kryszczyńska, A., T. Kwiatkowski, S. Breiter, and T. Micha\\l owski 1999. Astron. Astrophys. 345, 643-645. Spencer, J.R. et al. 1995. Icarus 117, 71-89. Roberts, D.H., J. Lehar, and J.W. Dreher 1987. Astron. J. 93, 968-989.

  10. Breakdown of Bragg-Gray behaviour for low-density detectors under electronic disequilibrium conditions in small megavoltage photon fields.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Fenwick, John D; Underwood, Tracy S A; Deshpande, Deepak D; Scott, Alison J D; Nahum, Alan E

    2015-10-21

    In small photon fields ionisation chambers can exhibit large deviations from Bragg-Gray behaviour; the EGSnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code system has been employed to investigate this 'Bragg-Gray breakdown'. The total electron (+positron) fluence in small water and air cavities in a water phantom has been computed for a full linac beam model as well as for a point source spectrum for 6 MV and 15 MV qualities for field sizes from 0.25  ×  0.25 cm(2) to 10  ×  10 cm(2). A water-to-air perturbation factor has been derived as the ratio of total electron (+positron) fluence, integrated over all energies, in a tiny water volume to that in a 'PinPoint 3D-chamber-like' air cavity; for the 0.25  ×  0.25 cm(2) field size the perturbation factors are 1.323 and 2.139 for 6 MV and 15 MV full linac geometries respectively. For the 15 MV full linac geometry for field sizes of 1  ×  1 cm(2) and smaller not only the absolute magnitude but also the 'shape' of the total electron fluence spectrum in the air cavity is significantly different to that in the water 'cavity'. The physics of this 'Bragg-Gray breakdown' is fully explained, making reference to the Fano theorem. For the 15 MV full linac geometry in the 0.25  ×  0.25 cm(2) field the directly computed MC dose ratio, water-to-air, differs by 5% from the product of the Spencer-Attix stopping-power ratio (SPR) and the perturbation factor; this 'difference' is explained by the difference in the shapes of the fluence spectra and is also formulated theoretically. We show that the dimensions of an air-cavity with a perturbation factor within 5% of unity would have to be impractically small in these highly non-equilibrium photon fields. In contrast the dose to water in a 0.25  ×  0.25 cm(2) field derived by multiplying the dose in the single-crystal diamond dosimeter (SCDDo) by the Spencer-Attix ratio is within 2.9% of the dose computed directly in the water voxel for full linac

  11. W, F, and I : Three quantities basic to radiation physics.

    SciTech Connect

    Inokuti, M.

    1998-11-11

    The W value is an index of the mean number of ions produced in a gas subjected to ionizing radiation. Formally, it is defined as the radiation energy absorbed (usually expressed in units of eV) ''per ion pair of either sign produced'', or, in a simpler language, ''per electron liberated''. The basic knowledge up to 1961 is eloquently articulated in a classic essay by Platzman [1], which Professor Doke loves to cite. The theme of Platzman was to explain from the point of view of basic physics the magnitude and characteristics of the ratio W/I, where I is the (first) ionization threshold energy. In summary, major characteristics are as follows. (1) The W value for a given gas depends weakly on the properties of the radiation such as the mass and charge of particles or initial energies (provided they are sufficiently high). This makes the ionization measurement useful as a method of dosimetry, viz., the determination of the absorbed energy. (2) The ratio W/I is always greater than unity because a part of the absorbed energy must be used in nonionizing events such as discrete excitation or molecular dissociation into neutral fragments and also in producing subexcitation electrons, viz., electrons with kinetic energies too low to cause electronic excitation or ionization [2]. (3) The ratio W/I is 1.7-1.8 for rare gases, and 2.1-2.6 for gases of common molecules (depending on the electronic structure, going from ''hard'' to ''soft''). Calculation of the W value is possible from three approaches: (i) the energy balance of Platzman, heuristic for general understanding and appropriate for an estimate; (ii) the Fowler equation [3] for the direct evaluation of the mean number of ions produced; and (iii) the method of Spencer and Fano [4] through the degradation spectra (or the track length distributions) of charged particles, most importantly of electrons, present in the medium. The Fowler method is good for obtaining the mean number of ions or excited states resulting from

  12. Dynamics of ultrathin metal films on amorphous substrates under fast thermal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Favazza, Christopher; Kalyanaraman, Ramki; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2007-11-15

    A mathematical model is developed to analyze the growth/decay rate of surface perturbations of an ultrathin metal film on an amorphous substrate (SiO{sub 2}). The formulation combines the approach of Mullins [W. W. Mullins, J. Appl. Phys. 30, 77 (1959)] for bulk surfaces, in which curvature-driven mass transport and surface deformation can occur by surface/volume diffusion and evaporation-condensation processes, with that of Spencer et al. [B. J. Spencer, P. W. Voorhees, and S. H. Davis, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 26 (1991)] to describe solid-state transport in thin films under epitaxial strain. Modifications of the Mullins model to account for thin-film boundary conditions result in qualitatively different dispersion relationships especially in the limit as kh{sub o}<<1, where k is the wavenumber of the perturbation and h{sub o} is the unperturbed film height. The model is applied to study the relative rate of solid-state mass transport as compared to that of liquid phase dewetting in a thin film subjected to a fast thermal pulse. Specifically, we have recently shown that multiple cycles of nanosecond (ns) pulsed laser melting and resolidification of ultrathin metal films on amorphous substrates can lead to the formation of various types of spatially ordered nanostructures [J. Trice, D. Thomas, C. Favazza, R. Sureshkumar, and R. Kalyanaraman, Phys. Rev. B 75, 235439 (2007)]. The pattern formation has been attributed to the dewetting of the thin film by a hydrodynamic instability. In such experiments the film is in the solid state during a substantial fraction of each thermal cycle. However, results of a linear stability analysis based on the aforementioned model suggest that solid-state mass transport has a negligible effect on morphological changes of the surface. Further, a qualitative analysis of the effect of thermoelastic stress, induced by the rapid temperature changes in the film-substrate bilayer, suggests that stress relaxation does not appreciably contribute

  13. Seasonal gene expression kinetics between diapause phases in Drosophila virilis group species and overwintering differences between diapausing and non-diapausing females.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Tiina S; Vesala, Laura; Laiho, Asta; Merisalo, Mikko; Hoikkala, Anneli; Kankare, Maaria

    2015-01-01

    Most northern insect species experience a period of developmental arrest, diapause, which enables them to survive over the winter and postpone reproduction until favorable conditions. We studied the timing of reproductive diapause and its long-term effects on the cold tolerance of Drosophila montana, D. littoralis and D. ezoana females in seasonally varying environmental conditions. At the same time we traced expression levels of 219 genes in D. montana using a custom-made microarray. We show that the seasonal switch to reproductive diapause occurs over a short time period, and that overwintering in reproductive diapause has long-lasting effects on cold tolerance. Some genes, such as Hsc70, Jon25Bi and period, were upregulated throughout the diapause, while others, including regucalcin, couch potato and Thor, were upregulated only at its specific phases. Some of the expression patterns induced during the sensitive stage, when the females either enter diapause or not, remained induced regardless of the later conditions. qPCR analyses confirmed the findings of the microarray analysis in D. montana and revealed similar gene expression changes in D. littoralis and D. ezoana. The present study helps to achieve a better understanding of the genetic regulation of diapause and of the plasticity of seasonal responses in general. PMID:26063442

  14. Seasonal gene expression kinetics between diapause phases in Drosophila virilis group species and overwintering differences between diapausing and non-diapausing females

    PubMed Central

    Salminen, Tiina S.; Vesala, Laura; Laiho, Asta; Merisalo, Mikko; Hoikkala, Anneli; Kankare, Maaria

    2015-01-01

    Most northern insect species experience a period of developmental arrest, diapause, which enables them to survive over the winter and postpone reproduction until favorable conditions. We studied the timing of reproductive diapause and its long-term effects on the cold tolerance of Drosophila montana, D. littoralis and D. ezoana females in seasonally varying environmental conditions. At the same time we traced expression levels of 219 genes in D. montana using a custom-made microarray. We show that the seasonal switch to reproductive diapause occurs over a short time period, and that overwintering in reproductive diapause has long-lasting effects on cold tolerance. Some genes, such as Hsc70, Jon25Bi and period, were upregulated throughout the diapause, while others, including regucalcin, couch potato and Thor, were upregulated only at its specific phases. Some of the expression patterns induced during the sensitive stage, when the females either enter diapause or not, remained induced regardless of the later conditions. qPCR analyses confirmed the findings of the microarray analysis in D. montana and revealed similar gene expression changes in D. littoralis and D. ezoana. The present study helps to achieve a better understanding of the genetic regulation of diapause and of the plasticity of seasonal responses in general. PMID:26063442

  15. Commentary on muscle dysmorphia as an addiction: A response to Grant (2015) and Nieuwoudt (2015)

    PubMed Central

    FOSTER, ANDREW C.; SHORTER, GILLIAN W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Following the publication of our paper ‘Muscle Dysmorphia: Could it be classified as an addiction to body image?’ in the Journal of Behavioral Addictions, two commentaries by Jon Grant and Johanna Nieuwoudt were published in response to our paper. Method Using the ‘addiction components model’, our main contention is that muscle dysmorphia (MD) actually comprises a number of different actions and behaviors and that the actual addictive activity is the maintaining of body image via a number of different activities such as bodybuilding, exercise, eating certain foods, taking specific drugs (e.g., anabolic steroids), shopping for certain foods, food supplements, and purchase or use of physical exercise accessories. This paper briefly responds to these two commentaries. Results While our hypothesized specifics relating to each addiction component sometimes lack empirical support (as noted explicitly by both Nieuwoudt and Grant), we still believe that our main thesis (that almost all the thoughts and behaviors of those with MD revolve around the maintenance of body image) is something that could be empirically tested in future research by those who already work in the area. Conclusions We hope that the ‘Addiction to Body Image’ model we proposed provides a new framework for carrying out work in both empirical and clinical settings. The idea that MD could potentially be classed as an addiction cannot be negated on theoretical grounds as many people in the addiction field are turning their attention to research in new areas of behavioral addiction. PMID:25786494

  16. Theoretically Investigating the Nature of Spacetime- A grand definition of what clocks measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egie, Meru

    Einstein's special theory of relativity established time as a dimension of reality, explaining physically the mathematical stipulations of Lorentz transformation equations that are required to keep the validity of Maxwell's equations of light and explain the null result of Michelson-Morley experiment. Our current understanding of time is relativistic, that is time is not absolute but runs differently depending on the frame of reference, yet this description uncovers so little about the fundamental reality of time. Using mathematical arguments derived from a simple thought experiment, both Lorentz transformation equations and Einstein's far reaching conclusions of his 1905 paper on the electrodynamics of moving bodies are obtained with arguments that suggest no prior knowledge of both Einstein and Lorentz works. This work attempts uncovering the fundamental nature of what clocks measure and a major implication of this is that the fourth dimension could just be a persistent illusion caused by the existence of space. Gratitude to Mr. Jon Egie for his support and Aghogo Rita for her listening ears.

  17. The 2014 IODC lens design problem: the Cinderella lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juergens, Richard C.

    2014-12-01

    The lens design problem for the 2014 IODC is to design a 100 mm focal length lens in which all the components of the lens can be manufactured from ten Schott N-BK7 lens blanks 100 mm in diameter x 30 mm thick. The lens is used monochromatically at 587.56 nm. The goal of the problem is to maximize the product of the entrance pupil diameter and the semi-field of view while holding the RMS wavefront error to <= 0.070 wave within the field of view. There were 45 entries from 13 different countries. Four different commercial lens design programs were used, along with six custom, in-house programs. The number of lens elements in the entries ranged from 10 to 52. The winning entry from Jon Ehrmann had 25 lens elements, and had an entrance pupil diameter of 33.9 mm and a semi-field of view of 62.5° for a merit function product of 2,119.

  18. Implementing reproducible research using the Madagascar open-source software package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomel, S.

    2015-12-01

    Reproducible research is a concept pioneered by Jon Claerbout. It refers to the discipline of attaching software code and data to scientific publications, which enables the reader to reproduce, verify, and extend published computational experiments. The Madagascar open-source software package provides an example of implementing the reproducible research discipline in geophysical publications. The package contains not only software tools for making geophysical computations but also research papers complete with links to data and reproducible data-analysis workflows. When researchers discover a research paper published on the Madagascar website and install Madagascar, they are able to follow the links and replicate all computations to verify the published computational results. Of course, reproducibility is not the goal in itself. The goal is to be able to extend previously published research by, for example, trying new computations on previously used data or previously used computations on new data. The Madagscar collection currently contains about 150 research papers and book chapters and about 900 reproducible scripts. More than 80 people from different organizations around the world have contributed to the development. This experience shows that, instead of being the responsibility of an individual author, computational reproducibility can become the responsibility of open-source scientific-software communities. Our experience shows how a dedicated community effort can keep a body of computational research alive by actively maintaining its reproducibility.

  19. Schrödinger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilmister, C. W.

    1989-03-01

    1. Introduction C. W. Kilmister; 2. Boltzmann's influence on Schrödinger Dieter Flamm; 3. Schrödinger's original interpretation of the Schrödinger equation: a rescue attempt Jon Dorling; 4. Are there quantum jumps? J. S. Bell; 5. Square root of minus one, complex phases and Erwin Schrödinger Chen Ning Yung; 6. Consequences of the Schrödinger equation for atomic and molecular physics W. E. Thirring; 7. Molecular dynamics: from H + H, to biomolecules Martin Karplus; 8. Orbital presentation of chemical reactions Kenichi Fukui; 9. Quantum chemistry A. D. Buckingham; 10. Eamon de Valera, Erwin Schrödinger and the Dublin Institute Sir William McCrea; 11. Do bosons condense? J. T. Lewis; 12. Schrödinger's nonlinear optics James McConnell; 13. Schrödinger's unified field theory seen 40 years later O. Hittmair; 14. The Schrödinger equation of the Universe S. W. Hawking; 15. Overview of particle physics A. Salam; 16. Gauge fields, topological defects and cosmology T. W. B. Kibble; 17. Quantum theory and astronomy M. J. Seaton; 18. Schrödinger's contributions to chemistry and biology Linus Pawling; 19. Erwin Schrödinger's What is Life? and molecular biology M. F. Perutz.

  20. Call of the wild: the negative tendency in the nature religions of American youth.

    PubMed

    Kramp, Joseph M

    2015-02-01

    The author argues that the paucity of options for sanctioned rebellion in contemporary American society drive an ever-increasing number of idealistic youth in search of isolation in nature, where they construct what the author here calls "nature religions." These worldviews focus on purification of falsehood, ritualized through enduring extreme physical pain, social isolation, and extreme weather conditions in hopes of experiencing reality more authentically. The author argues that unemployment, limited vocational options, and the homogenization of American society are among the major catalysts for this ever-expanding breed of seekers, each of whom struggles with a negative tendency (a theoretical term created by Erik Erikson). Furthermore, the author argues that the emphasis in the nature religions on connection to nature is constructed to compensate for the lack of community and sense of human connectedness in contemporary American society. A representative case study from Jon Krakauer's (Into the wild; Doubleday, New York, 1996) Into the Wild is presented to illuminate and justify the argument made by the author for more institutionally housed options for sanctioned, licit rebellion to manage the negative tendency. PMID:23700246

  1. Study of Aerosol Chemical Composition Based on Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Austin; Aryal, Rudra

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the variation of aerosol absorption optical properties obtained from the CIMEL Sun-Photometer measurements over three years (2012-2014) at three AERONET sites GSFC; MD Science_Center and Tudor Hill, Bermuda. These sites were chosen based on the availability of data and locations that can receive different types of aerosols from land and ocean. These absorption properties, mainly the aerosol absorption angstrom exponent, were analyzed to examine the corresponding aerosol chemical composition. We observed that the retrieved absorption angstrom exponents over the two sites, GSFC and MD Science Center, are near 1 (the theoretical value for black carbon) and with low single scattering albedo values during summer seasons indicating presence of black carbon. Strong variability of aerosol absorption properties were observed over Tudor Hill and will be analyzed based on the air mass embedded from ocean side and land side. We will also present the seasonal variability of these properties based on long-range air mass sources at these three sites. Brent Holben, NASA GSFC, AERONET, Jon Rodriguez.

  2. The Physics Force- Physics for ages 6 to 106.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2006-03-01

    The Physics Force is a very successful and entertaining outreach program of the Institute of Technology in the University of Minnesota developed to make science exciting and fun for students of all ages, from 6 to 106. Although all attendees, including high school and college students and guests from retirement homes, praise our performances, the primary focus is on K-6 students. The original Force consists of six k-12 teachers, Hank Ryan, Jon Barber, Jack Netland, Fred Orsted, Aaron Pinski, and Jay Dornfeld and Dan Dahlberg of the University of Minnesota Physics Department. The Force performed variations of The Physics Circus, our most popular show, at Disney's Epcot Center, parts of it were shown on Newton's Apple and several of us have performed demonstrations on the Knoff-Hoff Show, a very successful German T.V. science program. The goal of The Physics Force is to show students and the public Science is Fun, Science is Interesting, and Science is Understandable. By all measures we have available, we are extremely successful in reaching our goals. In the last three year cycle of our University support almost 100,000 residents of Minnesota (or about 2% of the total population) saw a Physics Force performance; it appears we will surpass those numbers in the present cycle.

  3. Mindfulness meditation: do-it-yourself medicalization of every moment.

    PubMed

    Barker, Kristin K

    2014-04-01

    This paper examines mindfulness as a popular and paradigmatic alternative healing practice within the context of contemporary medicalization trends. In recognition of the increasingly influential role popular media play in shaping ideas about illness and healing, what follows is a discursive analysis of bestselling mindfulness meditation self-help books and audio recordings by Jon Kabat-Zinn. The central and contradictory elements of this do-it-yourself healing practice as presented in these materials are best understood as aligned with medicalization trends for three principal reasons. First, mindfulness represents a significant expansion in the definition of disease beyond that advanced by mainstream medicine. Second, its etiological model intensifies the need for therapeutic surveillance and intervention. Third, by defining healing as a never-ending process, it permanently locates individuals within a disease-therapy cycle. In sum, the definition, cause, and treatment of disease as articulated by popular mindfulness resources expands the terrain of experiences and problems that are mediated by medical concepts. The case of mindfulness is a potent illustration of the changing character of medicalization itself. PMID:24565760

  4. Data from theodolite measurements of creep rates on San Francisco Bay region faults, California, 1979-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McFarland, Forrest S.; Lienkaemper, James J.; Caskey, S. John

    2009-01-01

    From 1979 until his retirement from the project in 2001, Jon Galehouse of San Francisco State University (SFSU) and many student research assistants measured creep (aseismic slip) rates on these faults. The creep measurement project, which was initiated by Galehouse, continued through the Geosciences Department at SFSU from 2001-2006 under the direction of Karen Grove and John Caskey (Grove and Caskey, 2005) and since 2006 under Caskey (2007). Forrest McFarland has managed most of the technical and logistical project operations, as well as data processing and compilation since 2001. Data from 2001-2007 are found in McFarland and others (2007). From 2009 onward, we have released the raw data annually using this report (OF2009-1119) as a permanent publication link, while publishing more detailed analyses of these data in the scientific literature, such as Lienkaemper and others (2014a). We maintain a project Web site (http://funnel.sfsu.edu/creep/) that includes the following information: project description, project personnel, creep characteristics and measurement, map of creep-measurement sites, creep-measurement site information, and links to data plots for each measurement site. Our most current, annually updated results are, therefore, accessible to the scientific community and to the general public. Information about the project can currently be requested by the public by an email link (fltcreep@sfsu.edu) found on our project Web site.

  5. Coming of Age With Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    1. Letters to David Baker; 2. Letters to Howard Baker; 3. Letters to Howard Barnum; 4. Letters to Paul Benioff; 5. Letters to Charlie Bennett; 6. Letters to Herb Bernstein; 7. Letters to Doug Bilodeau; 8. Letters to Gilles Brassard; 9. Letters to Jeffrey Bub; 10. Letters to Carlton Caves; 11. Letters to Greg Comer; 12. Letters to Charles Enz; 13. Letters to Henry Folse; 14. Letters to Bob Griffiths; 15. Letters to Adrian Kent; 16. Letters to Rolf Landauer; 17. Letters to Hideo Mabuchi; 18. Letters to David Mermin; 19. Letters to David Meyer; 20. Letters to Jeff Nicholson; 21. Letters to Michael Nielsen; 22. Letters to Asher Peres; 23. Diary of a carefully worded paper: more letters to Asher Peres; 24. Letters to John Preskill; 25. Letters to Joseph Renes; 26. Letters to Mary Beth Ruskai; 27. Letters to Rüdiger Schack; 28. Letters to Robert Schumann; 29. Letters to Abner Shimony; 30. Letters to Jon Waskan; 31. Letters to Bill Wootters; 32. Letters to Anton Zeilinger; 33. Other letters; Index.

  6. [Fraudulent publication in medical journals].

    PubMed

    Becerril-Ángeles, Martín; García-Gómez, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Fraud can be present in some scientific medical publications; however, the magnitude of this situation is unknown. One of the associated factors for this transgression of the good practice of investigation is the need to publish and obtain recognition and benefits, regardless of the means. The deliberate fabrication and falsification of data, plagiarism and duplication of publications are some of the scientific misconducts. Many cases of fraud in publications are known, and they have reached public opinion and have been a matter of legal sanctions (the names of Woo Suk Hwang, Jon Sudbo, Joachim Blodt, Robert Slutsky, and William Summerlin reminds us a few known cases). In the last decades, national and international regulatory organisms have been created in order to intervene against this scientific misconduct. Currently, we can rely on several effective software programs, whose function is to detect plagiarism and falsification of data. The prevention of scientific misconduct through information and education of the investigators could lead to the decrease of the presence of this problem, which damages scientific credibility and put at risk the patient's safety. PMID:24758857

  7. Observations and analysis activities of the International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. Michael

    1996-01-01

    The funds from this grant were used to support observations and analysis with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite telescope. The main area of scientific research concerned the variability analyses of ultraviolet spectra of Active Galactic Nuclei, primarily quasars, Seyfert galaxies, and BL Lacertae objects. The Colorado group included, at various times, the P.I. (J.M. Shull), Research Associate Dr. Rick Edelson, and graduate students Jon Saken, Elise Sachs, and Steve Penton. A portion of the work was also performed by CU undergraduate student Cheong-ming Fu. A major product of the effort was a database of all IUE spectra of active galactic nuclei. This database is being analyzed to obtain spectral indices, line fluxes, and continuum fluxes for over 500 AGN. As a by-product of this project, we implemented a new, improved technique of spectral extraction of IUE spectra, which has been used in several AGN-WATCH campaigns (on the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151 and on the BL Lac object PKS 2155-304).

  8. Water resource systems group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stedinger, Jery R.; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

    The 11th meeting of the Water Resource Systems Group was held at the University of Washington (Seattle), August 7-8, 1987. These systems group meetings, which are informal gatherings of professionals who have an interest in the educational and research aspects of water resources systems analysis, have usually been held on university campuses. The 30 attendees of the 1987 meeting represented a cross section of university faculty and graduate students, government managers and researchers, and engineering consultants.The meeting opened with short discussions by Steve Burges (University of Washington), Chuck Howard (CDD Howard and Associates, Victoria, Canada), David Dawdy (consultant, San Francisco, Calif.), and Jon Liebman (University of Illinois, Urbana) outlining their views of current issues in the water resources area. Burges emphasized the limitations and inadequacies of many of the models currently used in hydrology: rainfall runoff models may not adequately capture the physical characteristics of the movement of water into channels, vadose and saturated zone pollutant transport models are incapable of reproducing many of the features observed in the field, and many streamflow forecasting models used for reservoir operations have been constructed to reproduce average conditions but break down under the extreme conditions (floods and droughts) where they are most needed.

  9. Applied behavior analysis at West Virginia University: A brief history.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, R P; Chase, P N; Scotti, J R

    1993-01-01

    The development of an emphasis on applied behavior analysis in the Department of Psychology at West Virginia University is traced. The emphasis began primarily in the early 1970s, under the leadership of Roger Maley and Jon Krapfl, and has continued to expand and evolve with the participation of numerous behavior analysts and behavior therapists, both inside and outside the department. The development has been facilitated by several factors: establishment of a strong behavioral emphasis in the three Clinical graduate programs; change of the graduate program in Experimental Psychology to a program in basic Behavior Analysis; development of nonclinical applied behavior analysis within the Behavior Analysis program; establishment of a joint graduate program with Educational Psychology; establishment of a Community/Systems graduate program; and organization of numerous conferences. Several factors are described that seem to assure a stable role for behavior analysis in the department: a stable and supportive "culture" within the department; American Psychological Association accreditation of the clinical training; a good reputation both within the university and in psychology; and a broader community of behavior analysts and behavior therapists. PMID:16795816

  10. Optical Ethernet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Calvin C. K.; Lam, Cedric F.; Tsang, Danny H. K.

    2005-03-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Ethernet The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) is soliciting papers for a second feature issue on Optical Ethernet. Ethernet has evolved from a LAN technology connecting desktop computers to a universal broadband network interface. It is not only the vehicle for local data connectivity but also the standard interface for next-generation network equipment such as video servers and IP telephony. High-speed Ethernet has been increasingly assuming the volume of backbone network traffic from SONET/SDH-based circuit applications. It is clear that IP has become the universal network protocol for future converged networks, and Ethernet is becoming the ubiquitous link layer for connectivity. Network operators have been offering Ethernet services for several years. Problems and new requirements in Ethernet service offerings have been captured through previous experience. New study groups and standards bodies have been formed to address these problems. This feature issue aims at reviewing and updating the new developments and R&D efforts of high-speed Ethernet in recent years, especially those related to the field of optical networking.

  11. Optical Ethernet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Calvin C. K.; Lam, Cedric F.; Tsang, Danny H. K.

    2005-02-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Ethernet The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) is soliciting papers for a second feature issue on Optical Ethernet. Ethernet has evolved from a LAN technology connecting desktop computers to a universal broadband network interface. It is not only the vehicle for local data connectivity but also the standard interface for next-generation network equipment such as video servers and IP telephony. High-speed Ethernet has been increasingly assuming the volume of backbone network traffic from SONET/SDH-based circuit applications. It is clear that IP has become the universal network protocol for future converged networks, and Ethernet is becoming the ubiquitous link layer for connectivity. Network operators have been offering Ethernet services for several years. Problems and new requirements in Ethernet service offerings have been captured through previous experience. New study groups and standards bodies have been formed to address these problems. This feature issue aims at reviewing and updating the new developments and R&D efforts of high-speed Ethernet in recent years, especially those related to the field of optical networking.

  12. Computational discovery of pathway-level genetic vulnerabilities in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jonathan H.; Peyton, Michael; Seok Kim, Hyun; McMillan, Elizabeth; Minna, John D.; White, Michael A.; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Novel approaches are needed for discovery of targeted therapies for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that are specific to certain patients. Whole genome RNAi screening of lung cancer cell lines provides an ideal source for determining candidate drug targets. Results: Unsupervised learning algorithms uncovered patterns of differential vulnerability across lung cancer cell lines to loss of functionally related genes. Such genetic vulnerabilities represent candidate targets for therapy and are found to be involved in splicing, translation and protein folding. In particular, many NSCLC cell lines were especially sensitive to the loss of components of the LSm2-8 protein complex or the CCT/TRiC chaperonin. Different vulnerabilities were also found for different cell line subgroups. Furthermore, the predicted vulnerability of a single adenocarcinoma cell line to loss of the Wnt pathway was experimentally validated with screening of small-molecule Wnt inhibitors against an extensive cell line panel. Availability and implementation: The clustering algorithm is implemented in Python and is freely available at https://bitbucket.org/youngjh/nsclc_paper. Contact: marcotte@icmb.utexas.edu or jon.young@utexas.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26755624

  13. The attitudes of science policy, environmental, and utility leaders on US energy issues and fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. D.

    1986-11-01

    One example of basic and applied research at LLNL that has produced major, highly visible scientific and engineering advances has been the research related to controlled fusion energy. Continuing experimentation at LLNL and elsewhere is likely to demonstrate that fusion is a viable, inexhaustible alternative source of energy. Having conducted major fusion energy experiments for over 30 years at LLNL, it scientists and engineers recognized the enormous challenges that lay ahead in this important endeavor. To be successful, it was clear that collaborative efforts with universities, private industry, and other national laboratories would need to be greatly expanded. Along with invention and scientific discovery would come the challenge of transferring the myriad of new technologies from the laboratories to the private sector for commercialization of the fusion energy process and the application of related technologies to yet unimagined new industries and products. Therefore, using fusion energy research as the focus, the Laboratory's Technology Transfer Initiatives Program contracted with the Public Opinion Laboratory to conduct a survey designed to promote a better understanding of effective technology transfer. As one of the recognized authorities on scientific surveys, Dr. Jon Miller of the POL worked with Laboratory scientists to understand the objectives of the survey. He then formulated the questions, designed the survey, and derived his survey sample from a qualified list developed at the POL, which has formed the basis for other survey panels. This report, prepared by Dr. Miller, describes the basis and methodology of this survey process and then presents the survey findings and some conclusions.

  14. Acid Mine Drainage Treatment by Perlite Nanomineral, Batch and Continuous Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, Kumars Seifpanahi; Ardejani, Faramarz Doulati; Badii, Khshayar; Olya, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2014-03-01

    In this paper the adsorption activity of perlite nanoparticles for removal of Cu2+, Fe2+ and Mn2+ ions at Iran Sarcheshmeh copper acid mine drainage was discussed. Thus, raw perlite that provided from internal resource was modified and prepared via particles size reduction to nano scale and characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transforms infrared and BET specific surface area analysis. The results of acid mine drainage show that pH of acid mine drainage is 5.1 and Cu2+, Fe2+ and Mn2+ ions are 10.5, 4.1 and 8.3 ppm, respectively. Firstly in the batch system the influence of adsorbent dose and temperature parameters were considered and then isothermal and kinetic models were investigated. According to the results the Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second order kinetic model showed better correlation with the experimental data than other isotherm and kinetic models. Obtained thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° show that the Cu2+, Fe2+ and Mn2+ ions adsorption from acid mine drainage is spontaneous and endothermic. Finally, perlite nanoparticles adsorbent was packed inside a glass column and used for the removal of heavy metals in 1, 3, 5 ml/min acid mine drainage flow rates, the breakthrough curves show that the column was saturated at 180, 240 and 315 min for different flow rates, respectively. According to the obtained results, this abundant, locally available and cheap silicate mineral showed a great efficiency for the removal of heavy metal pollutants from acid mine drainage and can be utilized for much volume of acid mine drainage or industrial scale. W pracy omówiono zdolności adsorpcyjne nano-cząsteczek perlitu wykorzystywanych o usuwania jonów Cu2+, Fe2+ i Mn2+ z kwaśnych wód kopalniach w kopalni miedzi w Sarcheshmeh w Iranie. Surowy perlit pozyskiwany ze źródeł własnych został zmodyfikowany i odpowiednio spreparowany poprzez zre-dukowanie cz

  15. Day After Trinity: Oppenheimer and the Atomic Bomb

    SciTech Connect

    Documentary

    2005-10-31

    On October 31st at 4:00 pm in Panofsky Auditorium SLAC’s Colloquium Series will present the exceptional Oscar-nominated documentary The Day After Trinity. The film offers invaluable insight into historic events which have forever changed the face of our world – this screening should not to be missed. After witnessing the tremendous destructive power of the atomic bomb, J. Robert Oppenheimer declared “I have become death”. Still topically relevant a quarter of a century since its release, Director Jon Else’s documentary uses interviews, archival footage, and narration to reveal the internal landscape of the man whose leadership at Los Alamos, New Mexico, defined the rise of the Manhattan Project and the beginning of the Atomic Age. The Day After Trinity traces the unexpected path of Oppenheimer’s career - from his formation of the Los Alamos colony and the first successful atomic bomb detonation at the Trinity test site in 1945, to his final years spent branded as a security risk and excluded from the atomic energy research he pioneered due to his opposition to the development of the Hydrogen bomb.

  16. Towards the determination of the equation of state of hydrogen and helium at extreme densities: Laser induced shocks on pre-compressed samples.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loubeyre, Paul

    2005-03-01

    The determination of the equation of state of helium and hydrogen at very high density is an important problem at the frontier between condensed matter physics and plasma physics. It is also an important issue in planetary physics for understanding the formation of giant and extrasolar planets. However, the extreme densities relevant to most of the interior of Jupiter are unreachable by either static or single-shock compression techniques alone. Recently, a laser-driven shock-wave in a hydrogen sample, pre-compressed in a diamond anvil cell, has been demonstrated [1]. Consequently, the compression factors of the dynamic and static techniques can now be multiplied. We will present our current effort with the Omega laser at LLE to measure accurately the Hugoniot curves of hydrogen and helium pre-compressed up to 1.5 GPa. The metrology and error bars of the measurements will be discussed. The Hugoniot data points will be compared to published calculations, and an interesting difference in the insulator-metal transition of hydrogen and helium will be discussed. Co-authors are Stephanie Brygoo, CEA, France; Jon Eggert, Peter Celliers, Guilbert Collins, LLNL, Livermore CA 94551 USA; Ryan McWilliam, Raymond Jeanloz, University of California, CA 94720 USA; and Tom Boehly, LLE, New-York 14623 USA. [1] P. Loubeyre et al., High Pressure Research 24, 25- 31 (2004).

  17. AGU Committee Update: Recent activities of NG Technical Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, John B.

    Beginning this year, the AGU has adopted a series of new policies designed to highlight the interdisciplinary aspects of the Union. As part of these new policies, members will soon be able to affiliate with the AGU Technical Committees, including the Nonlinear Geophysics (NG) Committee. In addition, the Technical Committees are now able to sponsor or co-sponsor technical sessions at both the Spring and Fall annual meetings, as well as make awards for best research and papers, and sponsor nominations for AGU Fellows and Union-wide awards.A website for the NG committee, with descriptions of the committee's activities and other functions, can be found via a link from the main AGU website, which is maintained by Jon Pelletier (University of Arizona). An AGU/NG listserver is maintained by the AGU staff liaison to NG, Dan Moore (DMoore@agu.org). AGU members wishing to be apprised of NG committee activities by inclusion in the listserv should either sign up through the NG web site, or send email to Dan Moore. As described, the NG committee can nominate an AGU member for election to AGU Fellow status. Don Turcotte (Cornell University) chairs the NG subcommittee on Fellow nominations.

  18. Citations Prize 2012 Citations Prize 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-01-01

    Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat who was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The authors of the winning paper. The authors of the winning paper. The winner of the 2012 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous 5 years (2007-2011) is Image reconstruction in circular cone-beam computed tomography by constrained, total-variation minimization Authors: Emil Y Sidky and Xiaochuan Pan Reference: Emil Y Sidky and Xiaochuan Pan 2008 Phys. Med. Biol. 53 4777-807 Discussion of the significance of the winning paper can be found on medicalphysicsweb (medicalphysicsweb.org/cws/article/research/51868). Our congratulations go to the winning authors. Simon Cherry Editor-in-Chief Jon Ruffle Publisher

  19. Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion: The Laser Elevator Solar System Survey for Propellants Abstract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pryor, Wayne

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wayne Pryor worked on three projects this summer. These were: 1) Inertial Electrostatic Confinement; 2) The Laser Elevator; and 3) Solar System Survey for Propellants Abstract. We Assisted Jon Nadler from Richland Community College in assembling and operating a table-top nuclear fusion reactor. We successfully demonstrated neutron production in a deuterium plasma. Pryor also obtained basic spectroscopic information on the atomic and molecular emissions in the plasma. The second project consisted of the completion of a paper on a novel propulsion concept (due to Tom Meyer of Colorado, the first author): a laser sail that bounces light back to the laser source. Recycling the photons from source to sail perhaps 100-1000 times dramatically improves the energy efficiency of this system, which may become very important for high-velocity missions in the future. Lastly, we compiled a very basic inventory of solar system propellant resources, their locations, and their accessibility. This initial inventory concentrates on sunlight availability, water availability, and the difficulty (delta-velocity requirement and radiation environment) in getting there.

  20. Theoretical nuclear physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    As the three-year period FY93-FY96 ended, there were six senior investigators on the grant full-time: Bulgac, Henley, Miller, Savage, van Kolck and Wilets. This represents an increase of two members from the previous three-year period, achieved with only a two percent increase over the budget for FY90-FY93. In addition, the permanent staff of the Institute for Nuclear Theory (George Bertsch, Wick Haxton, and David Kaplan) continued to be intimately associated with our physics research efforts. Aurel Bulgac joined the Group in September, 1993 as an assistant professor, with promotion requested by the Department and College of Arts and Sciences by September, 1997. Martin Savage, who was at Carnegie-Mellon University, jointed the Physics Department in September, 1996. U. van Kolck continued as research assistant professor, and we were supporting one postdoctoral research associate, Vesteinn Thorssen, who joined us in September, 1995. Seven graduate students were being supported by the Grant (Chuan-Tsung Chan, Michael Fosmire, William Hazelton, Jon Karakowski, Jeffrey Thompson, James Walden and Mitchell Watrous).

  1. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Ten-Year Program Plan Fiscal Year 2005, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    2005-03-01

    As reflected in the U.S. ''National Energy Policy'', nuclear energy has a strong role to play in satisfying our nation's future energy security and environmental quality needs. The desirable environmental, economic, and sustainability attributes of nuclear energy give it a cornerstone position, not only in the U.S. energy portfolio, but also in the world's future energy portfolio. Accordingly, on September 20, 2002, U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham announced that, ''The United States and nine other countries have agreed to develop six Generation IV nuclear energy concepts''. The Secretary also noted that the systems are expected to ''represent significant advances in economics, safety, reliability, proliferation resistance, and waste minimization''. The six systems and their broad, worldwide research and development (R&D) needs are described in ''A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems'' (hereafter referred to as the Generation IV Roadmap). The first 10 years of required U.S. R&D contributions to achieve the goals described in the Generation IV Roadmap are outlined in this Program Plan.

  2. Correlation between decompression sickness and circulating bubbles in 232 divers.

    PubMed

    Gardette, B

    1979-03-01

    Doppler monitoring examinations were carried out during 67 simulated helium-oxygen dives in the pressure chambers of the Centre d'Etudes Hyperbares (CEH) COMEX Marseille, and involved a total of 232 COMEX professional divers. Three to five detections were done in each 24-h period, each consisting of an observation at rest and an observation after deep knee bends. Recordings of the Doppler signals were subsequently analyzed by experienced listeners and graded according to the system described by Spencer and Johanson (1974). The two vestibular decompression accidents in this series were associated with bubble scores of grade 3 at rest; one occurred during the rapid initial phase of a bounce dive decompression and the other after return to the storage depth after an excursion dive. Twenty-five cases of muscular or joint pains were observed. A higher incidence of this type of problem was found with higher bubble grades in general, although it was not possible to predict pain. PMID:462655

  3. The dynamic mechanical response of fiber-reinforced beams to large transverse loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, J. M.; Kolsky, H.

    THE PAPER describes the results of experiments on fiber-reinforced metal beams which have been subjected to dynamic transverse loading. The beams were fabricated by embedding sets of parallel steel wires in a matrix of lead-tin alloy, and were clamped at one end. The transverse dynamic loading was applied to the tip of the beam so that the problem was one of the transverse deformation of a composite cantilever. Two separate techniques were employed to load the specimens, one being to hit the end with a fast moving hammer in a "Hyge" Shock Testing Machine; the other was to detonate an explosive charge in contact with a small projectile close to the tip. The deformations were monitored by a number of different experimental techniques and the final plastic transverse deflection of the tip as well as the final position of the plastic wave front were compared with the theoretical predictions of Spencer, Jones and their co-workers. The agreement was found to be very satisfactory. In making these comparisons strain rate effects in the lead-tin matrix metal had to be allowed for and this was done with the help of a separate set of tests.

  4. Computer Applications in Geotechnical Engineering (CAGE) and Geotechnical aspects of the Computer-Aided Structural Engineering (G-CASE) projects. User's guide. UTEXAS2 slope-stability package. Volume 1: User's manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edria, Earl V., Jr.

    1987-08-01

    This report is the user's guide volume of the UTEXAS2 (University of Texas Analysis of Slopes - version 2) slope-stability package. This package describes a slope-stability program which can calculate the factor of safety by Spencer's method, simplified Bishop's procedure, force equilibrium procedure with Corps of Engineers Modified Swedish side-force assumption of parallel side forces at a user-specified inclination and force equilibrium procedure with Lowe and Karafiath's side force assumptions. The program will calculate the safety factor for either a prescribed shear surface or for a search of the critical shear surface. Both circular and noncircular shear surfaces can be evaluated. There are five options for the type of shear strength data and six options for specifying pore pressures. All analysis procedures and major features can be run in a single data file which is free-field format and utilizes command words. Graphics capability for displaying the input data and the final shear surface is available. Special capabilities include pseudo-static seismic analysis, slope reinforcement, curved (multi-linear) shear strength envelope, anisotropic shear strength, and the ability to have multiple piezometric lines.

  5. Parkinson’s Is Time on Your Side? Evidence for Difficulties with Sensorimotor Synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Bieńkiewicz, Marta M. N.; Craig, Cathy M.

    2015-01-01

    There is lack of consistent evidence as to how well PD patients are able to accurately time their movements across space with an external acoustic signal. For years, research based on the finger-tapping paradigm, the most popular paradigm for exploring the brain’s ability to time movement, has provided strong evidence that patients are not able to accurately reproduce an isochronous interval [i.e., Ref. (1)]. This was undermined by Spencer and Ivry (2) who suggested a specific deficit in temporal control linked to emergent, rhythmical movement not event-based actions, which primarily involve the cerebellum. In this study, we investigated motor timing of seven idiopathic PD participants in event-based sensorimotor synchronization task. Participants were asked to move their finger horizontally between two predefined target zones to synchronize with the occurrence of two sound events at two time intervals (1.5 and 2.5 s). The width of the targets and the distance between them were manipulated to investigate impact of accuracy demands and movement amplitude on timing performance. The results showed that participants with PD demonstrated specific difficulties when trying to accurately synchronize their movements to a beat. The extent to which their ability to synchronize movement was compromised was found to be related to the severity of PD, but independent of the spatial constraints of the task. PMID:26640458

  6. Safety subcultures in health-care organizations and managing medical error.

    PubMed

    Sirriyeh, Reema; Lawton, Rebecca; Armitage, Gerry; Gardner, Peter; Ferguson, Sally

    2012-02-01

    Leadership has been proposed as a key latent factor influencing the safety culture of an organization, the likelihood of errors occurring and the way in which these are managed. Therefore, when an error occurs, managers have an integral role to ensure that the most desirable outcomes are achieved for patients, health-care staff and their organization. Semistructured interviews were conducted in a large UK teaching hospital to explore the perspectives of staff who are tasked in some way with managing patient safety. Data from 26 transcripts were analysed using an adapted version of Spencer's (2003) qualitative framework, which revealed five primary themes. This paper reports findings from two overarching primary themes, described as being management and safety subcultures. These themes describe experiences of managing medical errors and the subgroup variations between professions, ranks and specialties in attitudes and behaviours towards error, and its management in a large National Health Service Trust. We discuss implications for health-care managers and health professionals in developing a stronger and more unified safety culture in their organizations, along with considerations for academic researchers when undertaking health services research. PMID:22323667

  7. Mendel and the Path to Genetics: Portraying Science as a Social Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampourakis, Kostas

    2013-02-01

    Textbook descriptions of the foundations of Genetics give the impression that besides Mendel's no other research on heredity took place during the nineteenth century. However, the publication of the Origin of Species in 1859, and the criticism that it received, placed the study of heredity at the centre of biological thought. Consequently, Herbert Spencer, Charles Darwin himself, Francis Galton, William Keith Brooks, Carl von Nägeli, August Weismann, and Hugo de Vries attempted to develop theories of heredity under an evolutionary perspective, and they were all influenced by each other in various ways. Nonetheless, only Nägeli became aware of Mendel's experimental work; it has also been questioned whether Mendel even had the intention to develop a theory of heredity. In this article, a short presentation of these theories is made, based on the original writings. The major aim of this article is to suggest that Mendel was definitely not the only one studying heredity before 1900, if he even did this, as may be inferred by textbooks. Although his work had a major impact after 1900, it had no impact during the latter half of the nineteenth century when an active community of students of heredity emerged. Thus, textbooks should not only present the work of Mendel, but also provide a wider view of the actual history and a depiction of science as a social process.

  8. Doctor Jean-Paul Marat (1743-93) and his time as a physician in Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Silver, J R; Weiner, M-F

    2013-01-01

    Jean-Paul Marat was a French revolutionary, famously murdered in his bath by Charlotte Corday in 1793. A lesser known fact is that for over ten years he lived in Britain where he practised as a doctor. During this time he visited London, Edinburgh, Dublin and Holland. Although he had no formal medical training, he published two medical papers on gleets (gonorrhoea) and diseases of the eyes and, on the recommendation of two eminent Scottish physicians, William Buchan and Hugh James, he was granted a medical degree from the University of St Andrews. Marat left no medical legacy and his related writings were forgotten for 100 years until the rediscovery of the two medical papers, which were eventually re-published in 1892 at the instigation of James Bailey, the librarian of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. Biographies by F Chevremont (1880), Ashbee Spencer (1890) and A Cabanès (1891) had rekindled interest in this intriguing revolutionary. A study of his time in Britain and his medical works and training provide an interesting insight into the mind of a revolutionary and how his sojourn may have shaped his future political career upon his return to France in 1777. PMID:23516696

  9. The impact of low pH, low aragonite saturation state on calcifying corals: an in-situ study of ocean acidification from the "ojos" of Puerto Morelos, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crook, E. D.; Paytan, A.; Potts, D. C.; Hernandez Terrones, L.; Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.

    2010-12-01

    Recent increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide have resulted in rising aqueous CO2 concentrations that lower the pH of the oceans (Caldeira and Wickett 2003, 2005, Doney et al., 2009). It is estimated that over the next 100 years, the pH of the surface oceans will decrease by ~0.4 pH units (Orr et al., 2005), which is expected to hinder the calcifying capabilities of numerous marine organisms. Previous field work (Hall-Spencer et al., 2008) indicates that ocean acidification will negatively impact calcifying species; however, to date, very little is known about the long-term impacts of ocean acidification from the in-situ study of coral reef ecosystems. The Yucatán Peninsula of Quintana Roo, Mexico, represents an ecosystem where naturally low pH groundwater (7.14-8.07) has been discharging offshore at highly localized points (called ojos) for millennia. We present preliminary chemical and biological data on a selection of ojos from lagoon sites in Puerto Morelos, Mexico. Our findings indicate a decrease in species richness and size with proximity to the low pH waters. We address the potential long-term implications of low pH, low aragonite saturation state on coral reef ecosystems.

  10. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound and the etiology of neurologic decompression sickness during altitude decompression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norfleet, W. T.; Powell, M. R.; Kumar, K. Vasantha; Waligora, J.

    1993-01-01

    The presence of gas bubbles in the arterial circulation can occur from iatrogenic mishaps, cardiopulmonary bypass devices, or following decompression, e.g., in deep-sea or SCUBA diving or in astronauts during extravehicular activities (EVA). We have examined the pathophysiology of neurological decompression sickness in human subjects who developed a large number of small gas bubbles in the right side of the heart as a result of hypobaric exposures. In one case, gas bubbles were detected in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and the subject developed neurological symptoms; a 'resting' patent foramen ovalae (PFO) was found upon saline contrast echocardiography. A PFO was also detected in another individual who developed Spencer Grade 4 precordial Doppler ultrasound bubbles, but no evidence was seen of arterialization of bubbles upon insonation of either the MCA or common carotid artery. The reason for this difference in the behavior of intracardiac bubbles in these two individuals is not known. To date, we have not found evidence of right-to-left shunting of bubbles through pulmonary vasculature. The volume of gas bubbles present following decompression is examined and compared with the number arising from saline contrast injection. The estimates are comparable.

  11. Mendel in Genetics Teaching: Some Contributions from History of Science and Articles for Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hani, Charbel N.

    2015-01-01

    School science descriptions about Mendel and his story are problematic because several statements that are controversial among historians of science are repeated over and over again as if they were established facts. Another problem is the neglect of other scientists working on inheritance in the second half of the nineteenth century, including Darwin, Spencer, Galton, Nägeli, Brooks, Weismann and de Vries, who paved the way for the reinterpretation of Mendel's work in 1900. These problems are often found in textbooks and are likely to be present in school science throughout the world. Here, we discuss the contributions that history of science and papers published in journals that target teachers may bring to improve how school science deals with Mendel and his contributions. Evidently the idea is not that school teachers could solve problems still under discussion in the historical literature. The point is, rather, that it is important to avoid treating Mendel's contributions as uncontroversial, mentioning, for instance, that there are ongoing debates on whether he proposed the laws named after him by appealing to invisible factors underlying phenotypic traits that are seen as the heritable potentials for those traits, and would in due time be known as genes. History of science can contribute to put the mythic Mendel into question in the science classroom, bringing school science closer to the controversies around the interpretation of his work.

  12. Mitigation alternatives for L Lake

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.B.

    1988-11-03

    The current condition of L Lake/Steel Creek was summarized in a report to SCDHEC in June 1988 which reported that the L Lake and Steel Creek ecosystems were adequately developing towards balanced biological communities. If mitigation for L Lake inputs, specifically temperature and nutrients, are required, several viable alternatives are available. A report prepared by Spencer in 1986 discusses the various options available for cooling L-Reactor discharges. In effect, a small cooling tower is the only realistic solution to reducing effluent temperatures. Nutrient mitigation can take several approaches including upstream sewage treatment, hypolimnetic withdrawal, dilution of input water by Par Pond water, precipitation of nutrients, and sediment oxidation. None of these systems would influence the thermal regime, but would significantly reduce nutrient input into the system. One beneficial use of L-Lake thermal effluents is algaculture, the production of useful algae. A document prepared in 1988 concludes that algaculture is a technically and economically feasible mitigation alternative for L Lake and could allow L Lake to be handled under Section 318 of the Clean Water Act.

  13. Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagenal, Fran; Dowling, Timothy E.; McKinnon, William B.

    2007-03-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction F. Bagenal, T. E. Dowling and W. B. McKinnon; 2. The origin of Jupiter J. I. Lunine, A. Corandini, D. Gautier, T. C. Owen and G. Wuchterl; 3. The interior of Jupiter T. Guillot, D. J. Stevenson, W. B. Hubbard and D. Saumon; 4. The composition of the atmosphere of Jupiter F. W. Taylor, S. K. Atreya, Th. Encrenaz, D. M. Hunten, P. G. J. Irwin and T. C. Owen; 5. Jovian clouds and haze R. A. West, K. H. Baines, A. J. Friedson, D. Banfield, B. Ragent and F. W. Taylor; 6. Dynamics of Jupiter's atmosphere A. P. Ingersoll, T. E. Dowling, P. J. Gierasch, G. S. Orton, P. L. Read, A. Sánchez-Lavega, A. P. Showman, A. A. Simon-Miller and A. R. Vasavada; 7. The stratosphere of Jupiter J. I. Moses, T. Fouchet, R. V. Yelle, A. J. Friedson, G. S. Orton, B. Bézard, P. Drossart, G. R. Gladstone, T. Kostiuk and T. A. Livengood; 8. Lessons from Shoemaker-Levy 9 about Jupiter and planetary impacts J. Harrington, I. de Pater, S. H. Brecht, D. Deming, V. Meadows, K. Zahnle and P. D. Nicholson; 9. Jupiter's thermosphere and ionosphere R. V. Yelle and S. Miller; 10. Jovian dust: streams, clouds and rings H. Krüger, M. Horányi, A. V. Krivov and A. L. Graps; 11. Jupiter's ring-moon system J. A. Burns, D. P. Simonelli, M. R. Showalter, D. P. Hamilton, C. C. Porco, H. Throop and L. W. Esposito; 12. Jupiter's outer satellites and trojans D. C. Jewitt, S. Sheppard and C. Porco; 13. Interior composition, structure and dynamics of the Galilean satellites G. Schubert, J. D. Anderson, T. Spohn and W. B. McKinnon; 14. The lithosphere and surface of Io A. S. McEwen, L. P. Keszthelyi, R. Lopes, P. M. Schenk and J. R. Spencer; 15. Geology of Europa R. Greeley, C. F. Chyba, J. W. Head III, T. B. McCord, W. B. McKinnon, R. T. Pappalardo and P. Figueredo; 16. Geology of Ganymede R. T. Pappalardo, G. C. Collins, J. W. Head III, P. Helfenstein, T. B. McCord, J. M. Moore, L. M. Procktor, P. M. Shenk and J. R. Spencer; 17. Callisto J. M. Moore, C. R. Chapman. E. B. Bierhaus, R

  14. The Optical Spectrum of Thiozone S_3 and Other Sulfur Rich Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkin, Damian L.; McCarthy, Michael C.; Thaddeus, Patrick

    2009-06-01

    The recent discovery and mapping of S_2 and SO_2 in the plume of Pele, one of the largest and most active volcanoes on Io, the innermost moon of Jupiter, suggests that other sulfur rich molecules may be abundant in this unusual planetary source. Optical images of Io in the range 3900 Å - 5000 Å conclude as much: the observed flux intensity cannot be attributed to transitions of these molecules alone. By means of 2-colour resonant-2-photon ionisation time of flight mass spectroscopy the optical spectrum of thiozone S_3 and other sulfur rich systems have now been detected. For thiozone a progression in the excited state bending mode is seen with a frequency of 350 cm^{-1} built onto the origin band at 433.82 nm. In this talk our results are compared to prior experimental matrix and low-resolution gas-phase work. The prospects for finding these atomic clusters in the atmosphere of Io will be discussed. J. R. Spencer, K. L. Jessup, M. A. McGrath, G. E. Ballester and R. Yelle, Science, 288, 1208-1210, 2008 A. Mollet, E. Lellouch, R. Moreno, M. A. Gurwell and C. Moore, A&A, 482, 279-292, 2008 P. Geissler, A. McEwen, C. Porco, D. Strobel, J. Saur, J. Ajello and R. West, Icarus, 172, 127-140, 2004

  15. Inference of Global Mean Temperature Trend and Climate Change from MSU and AMSU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, Cuddapah; Iacovazzi, R. A., Jr.; Yoo, J.-M.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) and Advanced MSU (AMSU) radiometers flown on the NOAA operational satellite series are potentially valuable as global temperature monitoring devices. Spencer and Christy pioneered the analysis of mid-tropospheric temperature, given by MSU Channel 2 (Ch 2) at 53.74 GHz, to derive the global temperature trend. Also, in addition to monitoring global temperature, these microwave radiometers have the potential to reveal interannual climate signals in tropics. We have analyzed the data of MSU Ch 2 and AMSU Ch 5 (53.6 GHz) from the NOAA operational satellites for the period 1980 to 2000, utilizing the NOAA calibration procedure. The data are corrected for the satellite orbital drift based on the temporal changes of the on-board warm blackbody temperature. From our analysis, we find that the global temperature increased at a rate of 0.13 +/- 0.05 Kdecade(sup -1) during 1980 to 2000. From an Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis of the MSU global data, we find that the mid-tropospheric temperature in middle and high latitudes responds to the ENSO forcing during the Northern Hemisphere Winter in a distinct manner. This mid-latitude response is opposite in phase to that in the tropics. This result is in accord with simulations performed with an ECMWF global spectral model. This study shows a potential use of the satellite observations for climatic change.

  16. Perception of risk for older people living with a mental illness: Balancing uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Leonie; Happell, Brenda; Moxham, Lorna

    2015-12-01

    Risk is commonly defined as a negative threat which needs to be controlled and mitigated; as a concept, it takes high priority in contemporary mental health services. Health-care organizations and clinicians are now required to use levels of risk as a benchmark for clinical decision-making. However, perceptions of risk change according to the lens through which it is viewed. A qualitative, exploratory research study was undertaken in an aged persons' mental health programme in Victoria, Australia, to explore the notion of risk from the multiple perspectives of service providers and consumers. Data were obtained through in-depth interviews, and analysis was based on the framework of Ritchie and Spencer. Balancing uncertainty emerged as a major theme, and comprised two subthemes: (i) complexity of risk from the perspective of providers of services; and (ii) complexity of safety from the perspectives of recipients of services. These differences emphasize a significant disjuncture between perceptions of risk and the potential for the individual needs and concerns of consumers to be subsumed under broader organizational issues. The uncertainty this tension highlights suggests the need to reconceptualize risk, incorporating the views and experiences of all stakeholders, particularly consumers and carers, to enhance recovery-oriented services and facilitate consumer participation within mental health services. PMID:26514097

  17. Humphry Davy and the Royal Institution of Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Unwin, Patrick R; Unwin, Robert W

    2009-03-20

    The abortive attempts of Sir Humphry Davy to introduce modest reforms at the Royal Society of London during his Presidency (1820-27) contrast with his (largely unstudied) earlier experience of administration at the Royal Institution of Great Britain (RI). Davy's attempts to combat the systemic weaknesses in governance and funding, and his role in effecting changes at the RI, in association with a core group of reformers, merit consideration. This paper analyses important aspects of the early management and social structure of the RI and examines the inner workings of the institution. It shows how and why the Library, its most valuable financial asset, and its celebrated Laboratory, developed along distinctive lines, each with its own support structures and intra-institutional interests. While acknowledging the roles traditionally ascribed to Count Rumford and Sir Joseph Banks, the paper highlights the contributions of other early patrons such as Thomas Bernard, son of a colonial governor of Massachusetts, and Earl Spencer, a leading European bibliophile and RI President from 1813 to 1825. The promotion of a Bill in Parliament in 1810, designed to transform the RI from a proprietary body politic into a corporation of members, and the subsequent framing of the bye-laws, provided opportunities to establish a more democratic structure of elected committees for the conduct of science. PMID:19579357

  18. An EGS4 Monte Carlo examination of the response of a PTW-diamond radiation detector in megavoltage electron beams.

    PubMed

    Mobit, P N; Sandison, G A

    1999-05-01

    The EGS4 Monte Carlo code has been used to investigate the response of a PTW/diamond detector irradiated in both clinical and monoenergetic megavoltage electron beams ranging in energy from 5 to 20 MeV. The sensitive volume of the PTW/diamond detector simulated has a thickness of 0.4 mm and a diameter of 4.4 mm. Irradiation was simulated at various depths in a water phantom. The results show that the PTW/diamond detector has a constant response (within 1.0%) in electron beams if irradiated at depths closed to dmax, and its response is almost independent of irradiation depth or incident electron energy (within 3%). A detailed examination of the average detector dose shows that the sensitive volume of the PTW/diamond detector acts as a Spencer-Attix cavity within 1%. The encapsulation of the bare diamond detector with low-Z epoxy and polystyrene wall material does not affect its response in electron beams. The difference in response between the unencapsulated (TLD) and the encapsulated form of the detector is less than 0.5% for all depths over electron energy range investigated. PMID:10360550

  19. InfoFair: an annual computer and information event.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Joan M Marcotte; Le Ber, Jeanne Marie

    2002-01-01

    Since 1983, the Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library has presented InfoFair, an annual event featuring presentations, exhibits, demonstrations, and workshops on computer and information topics of interest to health professionals and health information providers at the University of Utah Health Sciences Center and throughout Utah. The first InfoFair was held in response to an increasing number of inquiries from library users on how to search MEDLINE from their home or office computers. The focus of InfoFair has expanded and changed over the past nineteen years to reflect changes in library users' computer and information needs, concerns, and interests. While themes and programs have changed, a definite set of trends, guidelines, and procedures have developed based on the experience gained each year. The purpose of this paper is to review and evaluate the changes in InfoFair from 1983 to 2001 and to present information for use by other libraries for planning and presenting similar events. PMID:11989276

  20. Clouds not important for control of short-term surface temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-01-01

    In two recent papers, R. W. Spencer and W. D. Braswell (Remote Sens., 3(8), 1603- 1613, doi:10.3390/rs3081603, 2011) (SB) and R. S. Lindzen and Y.-S. Choi (Asia Pac. J. Atmos. Sci., 47(4), 377-390, doi:10.1007/s13143-011-0023-x, 2011) (LC) argue that clouds act as a primary initiator of surface temperature changes in Earth's climate system. The two sets of authors reached this conclusion by developing a method that tries to determine the Earth's surface temperature by calculating how much energy is stored in the ocean's upper layers, how much of this heat is transferred to the rest of the climate system, how clouds affect the rate at which energy escapes Earth's atmosphere, and how the surface's energy flux changes with temperature. Both studies spurred substantial debate within the media and the public, with the research by SB causing the editor of the journal in which it was published to resign, claiming it should not have been accepted by the journal. Assessing the two studies, Dessler found what he suggests are a number of methodological errors.

  1. Ethology and the origins of behavioral endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Marler, Peter

    2005-04-01

    The neurosciences embrace many disciplines, some long established, others of more recent origin. Behavioral endocrinology has only recently been fully acknowledged as a branch of neuroscience, distinctive for the determination of some of its exponents to remain integrative in the face of the many pressures towards reductionism that so dominate modern biology. One of its most characteristic features is a commitment to research at the whole-animal level on the physiological basis of complex behaviors, with a particular but by no means exclusive focus on reproductive behavior in all its aspects. The search for rigorously defined principles of behavioral organization that apply across species and the hormonal and neural mechanisms that sustain them underlies much of the research. Their aims are much like those put forth in the classical ethology of Lorenz and Tinbergen, one of the roots from which behavioral endocrinology has sprung. But there are others that can be traced back a century or more. Antecedents can be found in the work of such pioneers as Jakob von Uexküll, Jacques Loeb, Herbert Spencer Jennings, and particularly Charles Otis Whitman who launched a tradition that culminated in the classical contributions of Robert Hinde and Daniel Lehrman. William C. Young was another pioneer. His studies revolutionized thinking about the physiological mechanisms by which hormones influence behavior. An earlier potent influence was Karl Lashley who helped to shape the career of Frank Ambrose Beach who, more than anyone, has played a leading role in launching this new field. PMID:15777816

  2. Mode and tempo in the evolution of socio-political organization: reconciling 'Darwinian' and 'Spencerian' evolutionary approaches in anthropology.

    PubMed

    Currie, Thomas E; Mace, Ruth

    2011-04-12

    Traditional investigations of the evolution of human social and political institutions trace their ancestry back to nineteenth century social scientists such as Herbert Spencer, and have concentrated on the increase in socio-political complexity over time. More recent studies of cultural evolution have been explicitly informed by Darwinian evolutionary theory and focus on the transmission of cultural traits between individuals. These two approaches to investigating cultural change are often seen as incompatible. However, we argue that many of the defining features and assumptions of 'Spencerian' cultural evolutionary theory represent testable hypotheses that can and should be tackled within a broader 'Darwinian' framework. In this paper we apply phylogenetic comparative techniques to data from Austronesian-speaking societies of Island South-East Asia and the Pacific to test hypotheses about the mode and tempo of human socio-political evolution. We find support for three ideas often associated with Spencerian cultural evolutionary theory: (i) political organization has evolved through a regular sequence of forms, (ii) increases in hierarchical political complexity have been more common than decreases, and (iii) political organization has co-evolved with the wider presence of hereditary social stratification. PMID:21357233

  3. "Synergistic selection": a Darwinian frame for the evolution of complexity.

    PubMed

    Corning, Peter A; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-04-21

    Non-Darwinian theories about the emergence and evolution of complexity date back at least to Lamarck, and include those of Herbert Spencer and the "emergent evolution" theorists of the later nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In recent decades, this approach has mostly been espoused by various practitioners in biophysics and complexity theory. However, there is a Darwinian alternative - in essence, an economic theory of complexity - proposing that synergistic effects of various kinds have played an important causal role in the evolution of complexity, especially in the "major transitions". This theory is called the "synergism hypothesis". We posit that otherwise unattainable functional advantages arising from various cooperative phenomena have been favored over time in a dynamic that the late John Maynard Smith characterized and modeled as "synergistic selection". The term highlights the fact that synergistic "wholes" may become interdependent "units" of selection. We provide some historical perspective on this issue, as well as a brief explication of the underlying theory and the concept of synergistic selection, and we describe two relevant models. PMID:25681798

  4. General physiology, experimental psychology, and evolutionism. Unicellular organisms as objects of psychophysiological research, 1877-1918.

    PubMed

    Schloegel, Judy Johns; Schmidgen, Henning

    2002-12-01

    This essay aims to shed new light on the relations between physiology and psychology in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by focusing on the use of unicellular organisms as research objects during that period. Within the frameworks of evolutionism and monism advocated by Ernst Haeckel, protozoa were perceived as objects situated at the borders between organism and cell and individual and society. Scholars such as Max Verworn, Alfred Binet, and Herbert Spencer Jennings were provoked by these organisms to undertake experimental investigations situated between general physiology and psychology that differed from the physiological psychology advocated by Wilhelm Wundt. Some of these investigations sought to locate psychological properties in the molecular structure of protoplasm; others stressed the existence of organic and psychological individuality in protozoa. In the following decades, leading philosophers such as Friedrich Nietzsche, Charles Sanders Peirce, and Henri Bergson, as well as psychological researchers like Sigmund Freud, integrated the results of these investigations into their reflections on such problems as the nature of the will, the structure of the ego, and the holistic nature of the reactions of organisms to their environment. PMID:12664793

  5. Some early cases of aphasia and the capacity to sing.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Julene K; Graziano, Amy B

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines early cases of aphasia that include observations of the capacity to sing. Although the majority of these cases were published in the late nineteenth century, earlier reports exist and provide insights into the early thinking about the capacity to sing in aphasia, a topic that continues to the present day. The observation that some patients with aphasia and limited speech output were able to sing the texts of songs inspired scholars to examine the relationship between music and language. Early ideas about the capacity to sing were provided by well-known neurologists, such as John Hughlings Jackson and Adolf Kussmaul. The work of Herbert Spencer about the origins and function of music heavily influenced Jackson and others in their thinking about aphasia. This work also led to an increased interest in understanding music abilities in persons with aphasia and, later, in the brain mechanisms of music. The chapter provides a background as to why there was an interest in the capacity to sing in persons with aphasia and what influenced early thinking on this topic. PMID:25684286

  6. [A functional explanation of normative prescriptive-evaluative judgments and the concept of "evolutionary ethics"].

    PubMed

    Dorschel, A

    1992-01-01

    Neodarwinian ethology, today above all represented by sociobiology, is conceived of by responsible exponents as a descriptive and explanatory theory that cannot include any normative declarations. Still other, indeed notable, authors belonging to the discipline in question, either underhand or frankly employ prescriptive or evaluative judgments, or they claim (what is not an insight of natural science) that it is impossible to provide a rational foundation for prescriptive or evaluative judgments. (Michael Ruse and Edward O. Wilson even assert the latter without relinquishing the former.) Several functional explanations of normative validity claims advanced by Michael Ruse, Edward O. Wilson, Donald T. Campbell, Florian von Schilcher and Neil Tennant are designed to show that prescriptive or evaluative judgments cannot be justified. The reasonableness of this move is, however, dubious, because it implies strategies of raising oneself into a privileged status or of rendering the position of oneself immune from criticism by shifting it among the objects of the theory. Then Wilson's concept of 'evolutionary ethics' is thoroughly--and critically--analyzed. The suspicion that Wilson's fallacies in the transition from biological facts to moral norms are of exemplary nature is finally examined on the basis of tenets advanced by Herbert Spencer, Wolfgang Wickler, and Hans Mohr. PMID:1342729

  7. Students, Scientists, and Family Commemorate the Life and Diverse Works of Jack Eddy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, Philip

    2011-02-01

    Eddy Cross-Disciplinary Symposium on Sun-Climate Research; Aspen, Colorado, 22-24 October 2010; In 1976, John Allen Eddy published a seminal article (see Science, 192(4245), 1189-1202) revealing a link between the Little Ice Age, which occurred during the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries, and a period of low sunspot activity, which Eddy called the “Maunder Minimum.” This work placed Sun-climate research on a firm scientific footing. Eddy passed away on 10 June 2009. Following Eddy's passions for education and cross-disciplinary research, a symposium was held to expose talented college students to the science and politics of Sun-climate research. Funding from NASA's Living With a Star Targeted Research and Technology program and from the High Altitude Observatory, Advanced Study Program, and Integrated Science Program of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) supported keynote speakers and provided scholarships for 30 students (junior year to Ph.D.) from diverse disciplines. Eddy's wife, Barbara, led a session devoted to personal recollections. Spencer Weart (American Institute of Physics) gave an after-dinner tribute using recordings of Eddy from a 1999 interview.

  8. Bald eagles of the Hanford National Environmental Research Park

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzner, R.E.; Watson, D.G.; Rickard, W.H.

    1980-06-01

    Since 1961, near-yearly aerial surveys of bald eagles along the Hanford reach of the Columbia River have been conducted. Prey resources available to the eagles have also been monitored and we have thus been able to examine predator-prey relationships in a statistical fashion. We report on a unique set of data which provides insight into one of the factors (prey availability) controlling bald eagle wintering populations. The winter distribution of the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) has been reported to closely follow the availability of prey (Servheen 1975, Southern 1963, Shea 1973, Spencer 1976). Fitzner and Hanson (1979) compared twelve years of eagle winter survey data on the Hanford DOE Site with waterfowl numbers and salmon redd densities over the same period and provided some statistical evidence that eagle wintering numbers varied somewhat dependently with changing salmon redd numbers but not with changing waterfowl numbers. This report re-examines Fitzner and Hanson's (1979) twelve year data set and supplies two additional years of data for the Hanford DOE Site in order to gain additional insight into predator-prey interactions.

  9. Killing superalgebras for Lorentzian four-manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Medeiros, Paul; Figueroa-O'Farrill, José; Santi, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    We determine the Killing superalgebras underpinning field theories with rigid unextended supersymmetry on Lorentzian four-manifolds by re-interpreting them as filtered deformations of mathbb{Z} -graded subalgebras with maximum odd dimension of the N = 1 Poincaré superalgebra in four dimensions. Part of this calculation involves computing a Spencer cohomology group which, by analogy with a similar result in eleven dimensions, prescribes a notion of Killing spinor, which we identify with the defining condition for bosonic supersymmetric backgrounds of minimal off-shell supergravity in four dimensions. We prove that such Killing spinors always generate a Lie superalgebra, and that this Lie superalgebra is a filtered deformation of a subalgebra of the N = 1 Poincaré superalgebra in four dimensions. Demanding the flatness of the connection defining the Killing spinors, we obtain equations satisfied by the maximally supersymmetric backgrounds. We solve these equations, arriving at the classification of maximally supersymmetric backgrounds whose associated Killing superalgebras are precisely the filtered deformations we classify in this paper.

  10. The State of Higher Education for STEM LGBTQQ Faculty/Staff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, Susan

    2012-02-01

    It has long been understood---an understanding that has been well supported by research-based evidence---that institutional ``climate'' has a profound effect on any academic community's ability to carry out its tripartite mission of teaching, research, and service (Bauer, 1996; Boyer, 1990; Peterson & Spencer, 1990; Rankin, 1998; 2003; 2010; Rankin & Reason, 2008; Tierney & Dilley, 1996). With the acknowledgment that institutions differ in the level of attention and emphasis on issues campus climate, it is safe to say that a campus climate offering equitable learning opportunities for all students, academic freedom for all faculty, and fairness in employment for all staff and administrators is one of the primary responsibilities of institutions of higher education. The research also suggests that a challenging campus climate exists for LGBTQQ students, faculty and staff. Based on the literature, a challenging climate leads to decreased productivity, decreased sense of value to the community, decreased retention, and negatively influences educational outcomes (Settles, et al. 2006; Trower & Chait (2002); Pascrell & Terenzini, 2005; Whitt, Edison, Pascarella, Terenzini, & Nora, 2001). Little is available in the literature on LGBTQQ faculty in the STEM fields. This program will engage participants in a review of the results of the 2010 project with regard to the experiences of LGBTQQ faculty and staff in the STEM fields.

  11. Seasonal Variations in Biological Characteristics of the South Australian Shelf Waters - Results from the Southern Australian Integrated Marine Observing System (SAIMOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leterme, S. C.; James, C.; Luick, J.; Middleton, J.; van Dongen Vogels, V.; Paterson, J.; Seuront, L.

    2009-04-01

    The Southern Australia Integrated Marine Observing System, or SAIMOS, is one of five nodes operating as part of the Australia-wide Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS). This is a collaborative program designed to observe Australia's oceans, both coastal and blue-water. Since February 2008, and the occurrence of a record upwelling event on the South Australian continental shelf, the abundance and composition of viral, bacterial and pico- and nanoplankton communities have been investigating during 8 cross-shelf surveys and related to the physical and chemical properties of the water column. In summer, the space-time dynamic of viral, bacterial and pico- and nanoplankton communities is generally driven by the plume of upwelled, cool and nutrient rich water that flows across the continental shelf, and is locally heavily influenced by the level of vertical stability of the water column. In winter, the qualitative and quantitative nature of the plankton community is related to the local physical properties of the water column, which include the presence of a dense plume of bottom waters outflowing from the Spencer Gulf, the vertical stability of the water column and the presence of a deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM).

  12. Inhibition of lactate transport in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells and human erythrocytes by a synthetic anhydride of lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J H; Belt, J A; Dubinsky, W P; Zimniak, A; Racker, E

    1980-08-01

    The synthesis and some of the physical and biological characteristics of a new inhibitor of lactate transport are described. The inhibitor is isobutylcarbonyl lactayl anhydride (iBCLA). It is formed by the condensation of lactic acid and isobutylchloroformate. It inhibits lactate transport 50% at 0.5 microgram/mg of protein in both Ehrlich ascites tumor cells and human erythrocytes. In contrast, 15 microgram of iBCLA/mg of protein is required for 50% inhibition of phosphate transport in erythrocytes, and phosphate transport in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells is unaffected at levels as high as 50 microgram of iBCLA/mg of protein. A time-dependent and concentration-dependent reversal of lactate transport inhibition took place on exposure of iBCLA-treated Ehrlich ascites cells to hydroxylamine or dithiothreitol. These data, along with the observed sensitivity of the lactate transporter to sulfhydryl reagents [Spencer, T. L., & Lehninger, A. L. (1976) Biochem. J. 154, 405-414], suggest that iBCLA acylates an essential sulfhydryl group on the transporter. When glycolyzing Ehrlich ascites tumor cells were treated with concentrations of iBCLA sufficient for complete inhibition of lactate transport, intracellular lactate levels increased, intracellular pH and extra-cellular lactate levels decreased, and overall lactate production was inhibited. PMID:7407072

  13. Influence of apnoeic oxygenation in respiratory and circulatory system under general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kolettas, Alexander; Grosomanidis, Vasilis; Kolettas, Vasilis; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsiouda, Theodora; Kiougioumtzi, Ioanna; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Drylis, Georgios; Kesisis, Georgios; Beleveslis, Thomas; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-03-01

    Apnoeic oxygenation is an alternative technique of oxygenation which is recommended in the consecutive oxygen administration with varying flows (2-10 lt/min) through a catheter which is positioned over the keel of the trachea. Apnoeic oxygenation maintains for a significant period of time the oxygenation of blood in breathless conditions. This technique was first applied in 1947 by Draper, Whitehead, and Spencer and it was studied sporadically by other inventors too. However, the international literature shows few studies that have examined closely apnoeic oxygenation and its effects on Hemodynamic image and the respiratory system of the human body. Recently they have begun to arise some studies which deal with the application of this technique in several conditions such as difficult tracheal intubation, ventilation of guinea pigs in campaign conditions where the oxygen supply is limited and calculable, the application of this technique in combination with the use of extracorporeal removal of carbon dioxide (CO2). All the above indicate, the clinical use of this technique. PMID:24672687

  14. Global Near-IR Maps of Io from Gemini-N and Keck Observations in 2010, with a Specific Emphasis on Kanehekili Fluctus, Janus Patera, and Loki Patera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pater, I.; Davies, A. G.; Adamkovics, M.; McGregor, A.; Observing Team, G.

    2013-12-01

    We have constructed global maps of Io from observations obtained at 1-5 μm in 2010 using the adaptive optics systems on the Keck and Gemini telescopes. We compare these maps with those obtained in 2001 [1]. Although the total emission from all hot spots combined at each wavelength is similar for the two years, the spatial brightness distribution is very different, a reflection of evolving style and magnitude of volcanic activity. In 2010 thermal emission in the near-infrared was dominated by Loki Patera and Kanehekili Fluctus. We also present new timelines of thermal emission from Kanehekili Fluctus and Loki and Janus Paterae, updating timelines in recent publications [2, 3] with additional Keck adaptive optics data obtained between 2003 and 2010. These new timelines are the most comprehensive plots ever produced of the volcanic thermal emission variability for these or any other locations on Io, utilizing data from multiple ground- and space-based assets. The timeline plot shows that in 2010 Kanehekili Fluctus (as seen by Gemini) was briefly exceptionally brighter than ever seen before, evidence of a short-lived but highly-energetic eruption episode. Acknowledgements: AGD is supported by a grant from the NASA OPR Program. References: [1] Marchis et al. (2005) Icarus, 176, 96-122. [2] Davies et al. (2012) Icarus, 221, 466-470. [3] Rathbun and Spencer (2010) Icarus, 209, 625-630.

  15. A new approach to the determination of air kerma using primary-standard cavity ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, D. T.

    2006-02-01

    A consistent formalism is presented using Monte Carlo calculations to determine the reference air kerma from the measured energy deposition in a primary-standard cavity ionization chamber. A global approach avoiding the use of cavity ionization theory is discussed and its limitations shown in relation to the use of the recommended value for W. The role of charged-particle equilibrium is outlined and the consequent requirements placed on the calculations are detailed. Values for correction factors are presented for the BIPM air-kerma standard for 60Co, making use of the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE, a detailed geometrical model of the BIPM 60Co source and event-by-event electron transport. While the wall correction factor kwall = 1.0012(2) is somewhat lower than the existing value, the axial non-uniformity correction kan = 1.0027(3) is significantly higher. The use of a point source in the evaluation of kan is discussed. A comparison is made of the calculated dose ratio with the Bragg-Gray and Spencer-Attix stopping-power ratios, the results indicating a preference for the Bragg-Gray approach in this particular case. A change to the recommended value for W of up to 2 parts in 103 is discussed. The uncertainties arising from the geometrical models, the use of phase-space files, the radiation transport algorithms and the underlying radiation interaction coefficients are estimated.

  16. Utilizing chromophoric dissolved organic matter measurements to derive export and reactivity of dissolved organic carbon exported to the Arctic Ocean: A case study of the Yukon River, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, R.G.M.; Aiken, G.R.; Butler, K.D.; Dornblaser, M.M.; Striegl, R.G.; Hernes, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    The quality and quantity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) exported by Arctic rivers is known to vary with hydrology and this exported material plays a fundamental role in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon at high latitudes. We highlight the potential of optical measurements to examine DOM quality across the hydrograph in Arctic rivers. Furthermore, we establish chromophoric DOM (CDOM) relationships to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and lignin phenols in the Yukon River and model DOC and lignin loads from CDOM measurements, the former in excellent agreement with long-term DOC monitoring data. Intensive sampling across the historically under-sampled spring flush period highlights the importance of this time for total export of DOC and particularly lignin. Calculated riverine DOC loads to the Arctic Ocean show an increase from previous estimates, especially when new higher discharge data are incorporated. Increased DOC loads indicate decreased residence times for terrigenous DOM in the Arctic Ocean with important implications for the reactivity and export of this material to the Atlantic Ocean. Citation: Spencer, R. G. M., G. R. Aiken, K. D. Butler, M. M. Dornblaser, R. G. Striegl, and P. J. Hernes (2009), Utilizing chromophoric dissolved organic matter measurements to derive export and reactivity of dissolved organic carbon exported to the Arctic Ocean: A case study of the Yukon River, Alaska, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L06401, doi:10.1029/ 2008GL036831. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Analysis of radiation exposure for naval personnel at Operation Ivy. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C.; Goetz, J.; Stuart, J.; Klemm, J.

    1983-03-15

    The radiological environments are reconstructed for eighteen ships and the residence islands of Enewetak, Kwajalein, and Bikini Atolls that received fallout following Shots MIKE and KING during Operation IVY (November 1952). Secondary (late-time) fallout from Shot MIKE was the primary contributor to the low-level radiation encountered on the majority of the ships and atolls; only the M/V HORIZON received primary (early-time) fallout from this event. Fallout from Shot KING was minimal. From the reconstructed operations and radiological environments, equivalent personnel film badge doses are calculated and compared with available dosimetry data for fourteen of the ships. Calculated doses for the majority of the ships are in good agreement with the film badge data; however, for three of the participating destroyers (DDEs), calculated doses are significantly lower than the dosimetry data indicates. Calculated mean doses for typical shipboard personnel range from a high of 0.062 rem on the HORIZON to a low of 0.001 rem on the SPENCER F. BAIRD; for island-based personnel, calculated mean doses are less than 0.06 rem.

  18. From matrix models' topological expansion to topological string theories: counting surfaces with algebraic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orantin, N.

    2007-09-01

    The 2-matrix model has been introduced to study Ising model on random surfaces. Since then, the link between matrix models and combinatorics of discrete surfaces has strongly tightened. This manuscript aims to investigate these deep links and extend them beyond the matrix models, following my work's evolution. First, I take care to define properly the hermitian 2 matrix model which gives rise to generating functions of discrete surfaces equipped with a spin structure. Then, I show how to compute all the terms in the topological expansion of any observable by using algebraic geometry tools. They are obtained as differential forms on an algebraic curve associated to the model: the spectral curve. In a second part, I show how to define such differentials on any algebraic curve even if it does not come from a matrix model. I then study their numerous symmetry properties under deformations of the algebraic curve. In particular, I show that these objects coincide with the topological expansion of the observable of a matrix model if the algebraic curve is the spectral curve of this model. Finally, I show that fine tuning the parameters ensure that these objects can be promoted to modular invariants and satisfy the holomorphic anomaly equation of the Kodaira-Spencer theory. This gives a new hint that the Dijkgraaf-Vafa conjecture is correct.

  19. Some Correlations for Saturated-Liquid Density of Refrigerant Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maezawa, Yukishige; Sato, Haruki; Watanabe, Koichi

    Three methods to correlate and estimate the saturated-1iquid density of refrigerant mixtures are compared and evaluated on the basis of the measurements for five bibary and one ternary mixtures performed by the present authors. The first of them is a method using Peng-Robinson equation (PR-method) proposed originally by Peneloux et al. Since this method dose not require any measurements of the saturated-liquid density of mixture, it is useful for the estimation. However, the applicability of this method to various substances may be restricted. The second is the modified Rackett equation proposed by Spencer and Dannar (mR-method). The temperature functional form of this equation is quite simple, so it is useful to use it as a functional form of the fitting. Unfortunately this method can not be used for strongly non-ideal mixtures. The last one is the Hankinson-Brobst-Thomson equation (HBT-method). This method can provide the most accurate density values among the three methods with two kinds of binary parameters where these binary parameters are introduced by the present authors. In the case that many experimental saturated liquid densities of mixtures are available in the wide range of temperatures, the HBT-method is recommended for the practical use.

  20. Holocene climate at Siple Dome, West Antarctica, using bubble number-density.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, M. K.; Dennison, A.; Alley, R. B.; Fitzpatrick, J. J.; Fegyveresi, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Past allowable accumulation rate/temperature combinations from Holocene ice core samples at Siple Dome, West Antarctica, are estimated from the measured number-density of bubbles. Mass density increase and grain growth in polar firn both are controlled by temperature and accumulation rate, and their integrated effects are recorded in the number-density of bubbles as the firn changes to ice1, 2. Siple Dome bubble number-densities show an early-Holocene high in accumulation rate followed by an approximately 10% reduction in accumulation rate between 11.33 ka and 1.863 ka. 1. Spencer, M.K., R.B. Alley and J.J. Fitzpatrick. Developing a bubble number-density paleoclimatic indicator for glacier ice, J. Glaciol. 52(178), 358-364 (2006). 2. J.M. Fegyveresi, et al., Late-Holocene climate evolution at the WAIS Divide site, West Antarctica: bubble number-density estimates, J. Glaciol., 57(204) , 629 - 638 (2011).

  1. Influence of apnoeic oxygenation in respiratory and circulatory system under general anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kolettas, Alexander; Grosomanidis, Vasilis; Kolettas, Vasilis; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsiouda, Theodora; Kiougioumtzi, Ioanna; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Drylis, Georgios; Kesisis, Georgios; Beleveslis, Thomas; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Apnoeic oxygenation is an alternative technique of oxygenation which is recommended in the consecutive oxygen administration with varying flows (2-10 lt/min) through a catheter which is positioned over the keel of the trachea. Apnoeic oxygenation maintains for a significant period of time the oxygenation of blood in breathless conditions. This technique was first applied in 1947 by Draper, Whitehead, and Spencer and it was studied sporadically by other inventors too. However, the international literature shows few studies that have examined closely apnoeic oxygenation and its effects on Hemodynamic image and the respiratory system of the human body. Recently they have begun to arise some studies which deal with the application of this technique in several conditions such as difficult tracheal intubation, ventilation of guinea pigs in campaign conditions where the oxygen supply is limited and calculable, the application of this technique in combination with the use of extracorporeal removal of carbon dioxide (CO2). All the above indicate, the clinical use of this technique. PMID:24672687

  2. Cradoscrupocellaria, a new bryozoan genus for Scrupocellaria bertholletii (Audouin) and related species (Cheilostomata, Candidae): taxonomy, biodiversity and distribution.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Leandro; Spencer Jones, Mary E; Winston, Judith E

    2013-01-01

    A new genus, Cradoscrupocellaria n. gen., is erected for Scrupocellaria bertholletii (Audouin, 1826), reported as widespread in tropical and subtropical waters. Here we select a neotype of this species in order to establish its identity and distinguish it from morphologically similar species. We include redescriptions and figures of additional species now assigned to this new genus: Cradoscrupocellaria curacaoensis (Fransen, 1986) n. comb., Cradoscrupocellaria hirsuta (Jullien & Calvet, 1903) n. comb., and Cradoscrupocellaria macrorhyncha (Gautier, 1962) n. comb. Five additional species are as-signed to the genus: Cradoscrupocellaria ellisi (Vieira & Spencer Jones, 2012) n. comb., Cradoscrupocellaria nanshaensis (Liu, 1991) n. comb., Cradoscrupocellaria reptans (Linnaeus, 1758) n. comb., Cradoscrupocellaria serrata (Waters, 1909) n. comb., and Cradoscrupocellaria tenuirostris (Osburn, 1950) n. comb. Eighteen new species are described: Cra-doscrupocellaria aegyptiana n. sp., Cradoscrupocellaria arisaigensis n. sp., Cradoscrupocellaria atlantica n. sp., Cradoscrupocellaria calypso n. sp., Cradoscrupocellaria floridana n. sp., Cradoscrupocellaria galapagensis n. sp., Cradoscrupocellaria gautieri n. sp., Cradoscrupocellaria gorgonensis n. sp., Cradoscrupocellaria hastingsae n. sp., Cradoscrupocellaria insularis n. sp., Cradoscrupocellaria jamaicensis n. sp., Cradoscrupocellaria lagaaiji n. sp., Cradoscrupocellaria macrorhynchoides n. sp., Cradoscrupocellaria makua n. sp., Cradoscrupocellaria marcusorum n. sp., Cradoscrupocellaria normani n. sp., Cradoscrupocellaria odonoghuei n. sp., and Cradoscrupocellaria osburni n. sp. PMID:26146678

  3. A narrative study of novice elementary teachers' perceptions of science instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrell, Roberta

    It is hoped that, once implemented, the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) will engage students more deeply in science learning and build science knowledge sequentially beginning in Kindergarten (NRC, 2013). Early instruction is encouraged but must be delivered by qualified elementary teachers who have both the science content knowledge and the necessary instructional skills to teach science effectively to young children (Ejiwale, 2012, Spencer, Vogel, 2009, Walker, 2011). The purpose of this research study is to gain insight into novice elementary teachers' perceptions of science instruction. This research suggests that infusion of constructivist teaching in the elementary classroom is beneficial to the teacher's instruction of science concepts to elementary students. Constructivism is theory that learning is centered on the learner constructing new ideas or concepts built upon their current/past knowledge (Bruner, 1966). Based on this theory, it is recommended that the instructor should try to encourage students to discover principles independently; essentially the instructor presents the problem and lets students go (Good & Brophy, 2004). Discovery learning, hands-on, experimental, collaborative, and project-based learning are all approaches that use constructivist principles. The NGSS are based on constructivist principles. This narrative study provides insight into novice elementary teachers' perceptions of science instruction considered through the lens of Constructivist Theory (Bruner, 1960).

  4. Aloneness: the lived experience of women with cancer of the vulva.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, H; Clifford, C

    2011-11-01

    Cancer of the vulva is a rare condition that has been subject to limited research with a paucity of studies into the impact of this disease. Although the physical effects may readily be described, little is known about the psychological, emotional and social impact of this condition. To increase insights, a qualitative research study was undertaken to explore the experiences of women with vulval cancer living in the UK. An interpretive phenomenological approach based on the work of Heidegger and Van Manen was used to frame the study in which 13 women under 50 years of age were interviewed between 6 months and 5 years after their surgery. Data were analysed using framework analysis described by Ritchie and Spencer. This article describes the concept of aloneness which emerged from the data. This includes consideration of the women's sense of isolation due to the geographical distance between the woman's home and the hospital, and a sense of separation as they described their loss of sexual function and ability to enjoy the sexual relationship they had previously, following the onset of their symptoms of vulval cancer and subsequent treatment. The women's sense of aloneness was also manifest in their perception that there was a lack of knowledge and understanding about this condition both in their social world and the healthcare system in which they received treatment. PMID:21481049

  5. Cosmic Evolution: The History of an Idea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, S. J.

    2004-12-01

    Cosmic evolution has become the conceptual framework within which modern astronomy is undertaken, and is the guiding principle of major NASA programs such as Origins and Astrobiology. While there are 19th- and early 20th century antecedents, as in the work of Robert Chambers, Herbert Spencer and Lawrence Henderson, it was only at mid-20th century that full-blown cosmic evolution began to be articulated and accepted as a research paradigm extending from the Big Bang to life, intelligence and the evolution of culture. Harlow Shapley was particularly important in spreading the idea to the public in the 1950s, and NASA embraced the idea in the 1970s as part of its SETI program and later its exobiology and astrobiology programs. Eric Chaisson, Carl Sagan and others were early proponents of cosmic evolution, and it continues to be elaborated in ever more subtle form as a research program and a philosophy. It has even been termed "Genesis for the 21st century." This paper documents the origin and development of the idea and offers a glimpse of where it could lead if cultural evolution is taken seriously, possibly leading to the concept of a postbiological universe.

  6. 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay nuclear matrix elements with self-consistent short-range correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Simkovic, Fedor; Faessler, Amand; Muether, Herbert; Rodin, Vadim; Stauf, Markus

    2009-05-15

    A self-consistent calculation of nuclear matrix elements of the neutrinoless double-beta decays (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) of {sup 76}Ge, {sup 82}Se, {sup 96}Zr, {sup 100}Mo, {sup 116}Cd, {sup 128}Te, {sup 130}Te, and {sup 136}Xe is presented in the framework of the renormalized quasiparticle random phase approximation (RQRPA) and the standard QRPA. The pairing and residual interactions as well as the two-nucleon short-range correlations are for the first time derived from the same modern realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, namely, from the charge-dependent Bonn potential (CD-Bonn) and the Argonne V18 potential. In a comparison with the traditional approach of using the Miller-Spencer Jastrow correlations, matrix elements for the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay are obtained that are larger in magnitude. We analyze the differences among various two-nucleon correlations including those of the unitary correlation operator method (UCOM) and quantify the uncertainties in the calculated 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay matrix elements.

  7. Adaptation and Coevolution on an Emergent Global Competitive Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellman, Philip Vos; Post, Jonathan Vos; Wright, Roxana; Dasari, Usha

    Notions of Darwinian selection have been implicit in economic theory for at least sixty years. Richard Nelson and Sidney Winter have argued that while evolutionary thinking was prevalent in prewar economics, the postwar Neoclassical school became almost entirely preoccupied with equilibrium conditions and their mathematical conditions. One of the problems with the economic interpretation of firm selection through competition has been a weak grasp on an incomplete scientific paradigm. As I.F. Price notes: "The biological metaphor has long lurked in the background of management theory largely because the message of 'survival of the fittest' (usually wrongly attributed to Charles Darwin rather than Herbert Spencer) provides a seemingly natural model for market competition (e.g. Alchian 1950, Merrell 1984, Henderson 1989, Moore 1993), without seriously challenging the underlying paradigms of what an organisation is." [1] In this paper we examine the application of dynamic fitness landscape models to economic theory, particularly the theory of technology substitution, drawing on recent work by Kauffman, Arthur, McKelvey, Nelson and Winter, and Windrum and Birchenhall. In particular we use Professor Post's early work with John Holland on the genetic algorithm to explain some of the key differences between static and dynamic approaches to economic modeling.

  8. Explaining History. Hippolyte Taine's Philosophy of Historical Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Philipp

    Historians of European historiography have often characterized Hippolyte Taine (1828-1893) as an adherent of the positivist school of thought, typical for the development of a scientific culture in Western Europe that differed from its German counterpart.1 In accordance with that view, Wilhelm Dilthey grouped him together with other scholars like John Stuart Mill and Herbert Spencer against who Dilthey tried to develop his conception of the human sciences based on the notion of "verstehen" (see Dilthey [1924] 1957, 139ff.). Dilthey understood Taine as proposing to analyze the human mind by identifying its individual components and then explaining their meaning by laws of their relation. He argued that such an approach might be adequate for the natural sciences, but neglected the fact that an analysis of the mind had to start from a given psychological connection that was prior to any definition of particular phenomena. From Dilthey's point of view, applying Taine's theory to historical studies only made them look more objective while actually Taine was unaware of just following the prevailing convictions of his time (idem, 191f.).

  9. Mode and tempo in the evolution of socio-political organization: reconciling ‘Darwinian’ and ‘Spencerian’ evolutionary approaches in anthropology

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Thomas E.; Mace, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Traditional investigations of the evolution of human social and political institutions trace their ancestry back to nineteenth century social scientists such as Herbert Spencer, and have concentrated on the increase in socio-political complexity over time. More recent studies of cultural evolution have been explicitly informed by Darwinian evolutionary theory and focus on the transmission of cultural traits between individuals. These two approaches to investigating cultural change are often seen as incompatible. However, we argue that many of the defining features and assumptions of ‘Spencerian’ cultural evolutionary theory represent testable hypotheses that can and should be tackled within a broader ‘Darwinian’ framework. In this paper we apply phylogenetic comparative techniques to data from Austronesian-speaking societies of Island South-East Asia and the Pacific to test hypotheses about the mode and tempo of human socio-political evolution. We find support for three ideas often associated with Spencerian cultural evolutionary theory: (i) political organization has evolved through a regular sequence of forms, (ii) increases in hierarchical political complexity have been more common than decreases, and (iii) political organization has co-evolved with the wider presence of hereditary social stratification. PMID:21357233

  10. Some observations on early military anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Houghton, I T

    2006-06-01

    Although anaesthesia was discovered in 1846, pain relief had been used for many years previously. Opium, mandragora, and Indian hemp amongst others have been used since the earliest times as alluded to by many of the classical writers. The use of refrigeration anaesthesia is known to have been recommended a millennium ago although it never had much usage. Very soon after the introduction of ether anaesthesia, it was recommended for military use and the first use by the American forces was in Buena Vista early in 1847 and then again at Vera Cruz. Pirogoff taught and used ether anaesthesia on active service with the Russian forces in the Caucasus in the summer of 1847. Meanwhile Spencer Wells, who was serving with the Royal Navy in Malta, was the first British service medical officer recorded to have used anaesthesia. He went on to write up a series of 106 anaesthetics. The Danes were probably next to use anaesthesia in battle using chloroform in 1848. However, it was not until the Crimean War that anaesthesia began to play an important part in battle surgery with many anaesthetics being given with varying results. The War of the Rebellion was the next war in which anaesthesia was important and the first one in which proper statistics were kept allowing useful analysis. Anaesthesia had irrevocably found its place in battlefield surgery. PMID:16800222

  11. Facies and stratigraphy of the Pennsylvanian Warren Point Sandstone, central Cumberland Plateau, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, S.A.; Stapor, F.W. Jr. . Earth Sciences Dept.)

    1994-03-01

    The Warren Point Sandstone is a fine-grained, quartz arenite composed primarily of the following three facies: planar bedded 2-D cross beds, low angle cross beds, and broad, shallow channel-fills. Ripple cross lamination, horizontal lamination, and laminated shale facies are also observed. These facies units are grouped into four of Miall's major architectural elements: sandy bedforms, channels, laminated sand sheets, and overbank fines. Paleocurrent measurements made on the 2-D cross beds indicate southwest transport. Throughout this region the Warren Point occurs as a nearly continuous and essentially homogeneous, 7--12 m-thick, sandstone sheet. The authors interpret a sandy braid plain depositional environment for the Warren Point. Initial sand composition data suggest a foreland uplift provenance that along with the southwest transport indicate the Alleghenian orogen as the probable source. The Warren Point disconformably overlies each of it's two stratigraphically subjacent units: the Pennsylvanian Raccoon Mountain (0--5 m-thick) and the upper limestone member of the Mississippian Pennington formations. The Sewanee Conglomerate disconformably overlies the Warren Point and, near Spencer, TN, rests directly on the Pennington limestone member that was a topographic high during Warren Point deposition. The absence of underlying shelfal and marginal marine Pennsylvanian siliciclastics in conjunction with the Warren Point's basal disconformity suggests a sea-level fall that resulted in a basinward facies shift.

  12. A reconsideration of the concept of regression.

    PubMed

    Dowling, A Scott

    2004-01-01

    Regression has been a useful psychoanalytic concept, linking present mental functioning with past experiences and levels of functioning. The concept originated as an extension of the evolutionary zeitgeist of the day as enunciated by H. Spencer and H. Jackson and applied by Freud to psychological phenomena. The value system implicit in the contrast of evolution/progression vs dissolution/regression has given rise to unfortunate and powerful assumptions of social, cultural, developmental and individual value as embodied in notions of "higher," "lower;" "primitive," "mature," "archaic," and "advanced." The unhelpful results of these assumptions are evident, for example, in attitudes concerning cultural, sexual, and social "correctness, " same-sex object choice, and goals of treatment. An alternative, a continuously constructed, continuously emerging mental life, in analogy to the ever changing, continuous physical body, is suggested. This view retains the fundamentals of psychoanalysis, for example, unconscious mental life, drive, defense, and psychic structure, but stresses a functional, ever changing, present oriented understanding of mental life as contrasted with a static, onion-layered view. PMID:16240612

  13. Environmental-stratigraphic cross sections of the Cretaceous Fox Hills Sandstone and Hell Creek Formation and Paleocene Fort Union Formation, Richland and Roosevelt Counties, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, R.M.; Lepp, C.L.

    1983-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the stratigraphic, lithofacies, and deopsitional relationships of the Cretaceous Fox Hills Sandstone and Hell Creek Formation and The Paleocene Fort Union Formation. These relationships, shown in sections A-A', B-B', C-C', and D-D', we established form nearly continuous exposures in the Missouri River valley in Richland and Roosevelt Counties, Mont. The river valley topography is characterized by badlands, which permitted detailed description and construction of the stratigraphic framework of the formations within a 30-mi-long belt of exposures paralleling the Missouri River. This area of study is on the western flank of the Williston Basin and east of the Poplar Dome. The latter structure imparted a northeasterly regional dip to the rocks, which averages 25 ft per mi and is as much as 100 ft per mi according to Spencer (1980). The regional dip resulted in exposure of older rocks (Cretaceous) in the west to younger rocks (Tertiary) in the east. 

  14. Doppler indices of gas phase formation in hypobaric environments: Time-intensity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Michael R.

    1991-01-01

    A semi-quantitative method to analyze decompression data is described. It possesses the advantage that it allows a graded response to decompression rather than the dichotomous response generally employed. A generalized critical volume (C-V), or stoichiometric time-dependent equilibrium model is examined that relates the constant of the equation P sub i equals m P sub f plus b to variable tissue supersaturation and gas washout terms. The effects of the tissue ratio on gas phase formation indicate that a decreased ratio yields fewer individuals with Doppler detectable gas bubbles, but those individuals still present with Spencer Grade 3 or 4. This might indicate a local collapse of tissue saturation. The individuals with Grade 3 or 4 could be at risk for type 2 decompression sickness by transpulmonic arterialization. The primary regulator of the problems of decompression sickness is the reduction of local supersaturation, presumably governed by the presence and number of gas micronuclei. It is postulated that a reduction in these nuclei will favor a low incidence of decompression sickness in microgravity secondary to hypokinesia and adynamia.

  15. Raman study of opal at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfan, G.; Wang, S.; Mao, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    More commonly known for their beauty and lore as gemstones, opals are also intriguing geological materials which may have potential for materials science applications. Opal lacks a definite crystalline structure, and is composed of an amorphous packing of hydrated silica (SiO2) spheroids, which provides us with a unique nano-scaled mineraloid with properties unlike those of other amorphous materials like glass. Opals from different localities were studied at high pressure using a diamond anvil cell to apply pressure and Raman spectroscopy to look at changes in bonding as pressure was increased. We first tested different samples from Virgin Valley, NV, Spencer, ID, Juniper Ridge, OR, and Australia, which contain varying amounts of water at ambient conditions, using Raman spectroscopy to determine if they were opal-CT (semicrystalline cristobalite-trydimite volcanic origin) or opal-A (amorphous sedimentary origin). We then used x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a diamond anvil cell to see how their bonding and structure changed under compression and to determine what effect water content had on their high pressure behavior. Comparison of our results on opal to other high pressure studies of amorphous materials like glass has implications from a geological and materials science standpoint.

  16. Soil suppressiveness against the disease complex of the soybean cyst nematode and sudden death syndrome of soybean.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Andreas; Xing, Lijuan

    2011-07-01

    The ecology of the complex of soybean cyst nematode (SCN) and sudden death syndrome (SDS) of soybean was investigated under soybean monoculture in two field experiments from 2003 to 2007. Initially, susceptible soybean 'Spencer' was planted while inoculating Fusarium virguliforme into nonfumigated or preseason-fumigated plots (methyl bromide, MB, at 450 kg/ha), and SCN and SDS were monitored. In one field, SCN population densities declined in nonfumigated but increased in fumigated plots. After years of limited SDS in 2003 and 2004, SDS developed later in nonfumigated than fumigated plots. In 2006 in the greenhouse, nondisturbed or disturbed soil cores (10-cm diameter, 30-cm depth) from field plots received two two-level factors: (i) nonfumigated or fumigated (1,070 kg/ha MB); and (ii) noninoculated or inoculated with 9,000 second-stage juveniles of SCN. At harvest, nonfumigated cores from nonfumigated plots had fewer nematodes and less SDS regardless of disturbance or inoculation than the corresponding fumigated cores and any cores from fumigated plots. In the second field, SCN became detectable after 2003 during the monoculture in nonfumigated plots and lagged in fumigated plots; both treatments had low levels of SDS. Exploiting the suppressiveness of the first field could allow for biological control of SDS and SCN in soybean production. PMID:21675924

  17. A combined joint diagonalization-MUSIC algorithm for subsurface targets localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yinlin; Sigman, John B.; Barrowes, Benjamin E.; O'Neill, Kevin; Shubitidze, Fridon

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a combined joint diagonalization (JD) and multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm for estimating subsurface objects locations from electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensor data, without solving ill-posed inverse-scattering problems. JD is a numerical technique that finds the common eigenvectors that diagonalize a set of multistatic response (MSR) matrices measured by a time-domain EMI sensor. Eigenvalues from targets of interest (TOI) can be then distinguished automatically from noise-related eigenvalues. Filtering is also carried out in JD to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the data. The MUSIC algorithm utilizes the orthogonality between the signal and noise subspaces in the MSR matrix, which can be separated with information provided by JD. An array of theoreticallycalculated Green's functions are then projected onto the noise subspace, and the location of the target is estimated by the minimum of the projection owing to the orthogonality. This combined method is applied to data from the Time-Domain Electromagnetic Multisensor Towed Array Detection System (TEMTADS). Examples of TEMTADS test stand data and field data collected at Spencer Range, Tennessee are analyzed and presented. Results indicate that due to its noniterative mechanism, the method can be executed fast enough to provide real-time estimation of objects' locations in the field.

  18. Nurses' motivations for studying third level post-registration nursing programmes and the effects of studying on their personal and work lives.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Mary Clodagh

    2008-07-01

    Internationally nurses' motivations for post-registration education and the effects of studying are important concerns for the profession. This paper describes Irish nurses' motivations for studying post-registration nursing programmes and the effects of studying on their personal and work lives. Eighteen nurses participated in this qualitative study. Data were collected using three focus groups and a one-to-one interview. Data were analysed using the qualitative data analysis method Framework [Ritchie, J., Spencer, L., 1994. Qualitative data analysis for applied policy research. In: Bryman, A., Burgess, R. (Eds.), Analyzing Qualitative Data. Routledge, London, pp. 173-194]. Three themes were identified: "I want to keep up and I want to keep in there," "It's about juggling and getting the balance" and "I'm looking at things differently." Findings revealed that nurses studied to aid their professional development. Contextual factors influenced their motivations including a free fees initiative and Irish nursing developing into an all graduate profession. The impact of studying on their personal and work lives was broader in scope than their motivations. PMID:18313177

  19. Psychiatric effects of protracted conflict and political life events exposure among adolescents in Israel: 1998-2011.

    PubMed

    Slone, Michelle; Shoshani, Anat

    2014-06-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated relations between conflict exposure and psychiatric symptoms among 8,727 Jewish Israeli adolescents aged 12-17 years from 1998-2011. This 14-year span included periods of terrorism, missile attacks, wars, relocations, military operations, and relative quiet, reflecting a dynamically changing, primarily violent climate. Annual samples from the same cities, geographical regions, and schools throughout the country were assessed for personal political life events (PLE) exposure and for psychiatric symptoms using the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI; Derogatis & Spencer, ). Data were divided into 8 exposure periods: (a) pre-Intifada 1998-2000, (b) Intifada peak 2001-2003, (c) Intifada recession 2004, (d) evacuation 2005, (e) missiles and the 2006 Lebanon war, (f) peak missiles 2006-2007, (g) Operation Cast Lead 2008-2009, and (h) global terrorism 2010-2011. Results confirmed a relation between type of exposure period, PLE exposure, and psychiatric symptoms. In addition, PLE exposure was positively correlated with psychiatric symptoms (β = .49). A moderating effect of gender on the relationship between PLE exposure and the psychiatric index was found, with elevated symptoms among females (β = .30). PMID:24948538

  20. Relating Venous Gas Emboli (VGE) Scores to Altitude Decompression Sickness (DCS) Symptoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilmanis, A. A.; Kannan, N.; Krause, K. M.; Webb, J. T.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose. It is generally accepted that DCS symptoms are caused by gas bubbles in tissues. However, current technology of bubble detection only permits monitoring of circulating bubbles, primarily intracardiac. Since the majority of DCS symptoms appear to be caused by extravascular bubbles, it has been suggested that current bubble detection techniques target bubbles that are of importance in only a minority of DCS cases. The purpose of this study is to determine the relationships between measured VGE and DCS symptoms in human subjects exposed to altitude. Methods. The AFRL DCS Research Database contains records on 2044 subject-exposures to simulated altitudes in a hypobaric chamber. VGE monitoring was accomplished using Doppler/Echo Imaging techniques. The Spencer Scale was used to score the VGE. Reporting of DCS symptoms by the subject was the primary end-point of the exposures. Results: The Mantel- Haenzel test indicated a strong correlation between DCS and bubble grade (p-value =0.001). Conclusions. A positive correlation between increasing VGE scores and DCS symptoms, does not imply causatinn. If all non-zero VGE grades are considered, 45.9% of the cases had VGE, but no DCS symptoms. Conversely, almost 1 in 5 subject-exposures resulted in DCS with NO VGE detected. VGE scores are not . good predictors of altitude DCS symptoms and field use of bubble detection for DCS prevention is not supported by this study.